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Sample records for crassostrea rhizophorae collected

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Crassostrea rhizophorae and Cathorops spixii from the Caroni Swamp, Trinidad, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Kanhai, La Daana K; Gobin, Judith F; Beckles, Denise M; Lauckner, Bruce; Mohammed, Azad

    2015-01-01

    Dietary exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may pose serious threats to human health. However, within the Caribbean, quantitative assessments regarding the risks associated with dietary PAH exposure remain sparse. This study investigated PAH presence in edible biota from the Caroni Swamp and quantitatively assessed the potential health threat to human consumers. Mangrove oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) and Madamango sea catfish (Cathorops spixii) collected from seven sites in the Caroni Swamp were analysed for 16 priority PAHs. Total PAH levels ranged from 109 ± 18.4 to 362 ± 63.0 ng/g dry wt. in Crassostrea rhizophorae and 7.5 ± 0.9 to 43.5 ± 25.5 ng/g dry wt. in Cathorops spixii (average ± standard deviation). Benzo[a]pyrene levels in Crassostrea rhizophorae at all sites exceeded international guidelines from British Colombia (Canada) and the European Union (EU). Incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) values based on the ingestion of Crassostrea rhizophorae ranged from 8.4 × 10(-6) to 1.6 × 10(-5) and slightly exceeded the commonly used 1 × 10(-6) acceptable level of risk. Information from this study is important in understanding the potential health risks posed by PAHs, it is critical towards the protection of public health, and it serves as a useful baseline for comparison with future work.

  2. Perkinsus sp. infecting the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae from estuaries of the septentrional Northeast, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dantas-Neto, M P; Sabry, R C; Ferreira, L P; Romão, L S; Maggioni, R

    2015-11-01

    The mangrove oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae is an estuarine resource exploited by riverside communities in Northeast Brazil. Despite its socioeconomic importance, studies on the health status of this bivalve are scanty in this region. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the presence of the protozoan Perkinsus sp. in C. rhizophorae collected in August and September 2011 in three estuaries of the septentrional Northeast, Brazil: Jaguaribe (Ceará), Camurupim (Piauí) and Carnaubeiras (Maranhão) (n= 150 specimens/site). The samples were submitted to Ray's fluid thioglycollate medium (RFTM), PCR and histology assays. The RFTM assay revealed spherical, blue or bluish-black hypnospores of the genus Perkinsus in 50 specimens (Jaguaribe= 17.3%, Camurupim= 5.3%, Carnaubeiras= 10.6%). The intensity of the infection ranged from very light (1-10 cells per slide) to severe (more than 40 cells in each of 10 fields of the slide) for Jaguaribe; very light for Camurupim and very light to moderate (at least 40 cells observed in each of 10 fields of the slide) for Carnaubeiras. When submitted to confirmatory PCR analysis, 6 cases were confirmed (Jaguaribe=3, Camurupim=1, Carnaubeiras=2). The histology confirmed 21 cases of infection in specimens from the three estuaries. Although local collectors have reported no mortality in oyster populations that might be attributed to infection by Perkinsus, health surveillance of oyster populations in the septentrional region of Northeast Brazil is advisable.

  3. Metals in sediments and mangrove oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) from the Caroni Swamp, Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Kanhai, La Daana K; Gobin, Judith F; Beckles, Denise M; Lauckner, Bruce; Mohammed, Azad

    2014-03-01

    Metals can have significant impacts on inhabitants of mangrove swamps as well as consumers of mangrove-associated fauna. Yet, for several Caribbean islands, assessments regarding the impact of metals on such ecosystems are particularly sparse. The present study investigated the distribution and potential impact of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in the Caroni Swamp, Trinidad and Tobago's largest mangrove ecosystem. Surface sediments and mangrove oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) from 10 sites in the swamp were analysed for the 6 identified metals. The concentration ranges (in μg/g dry wt.) of metals in sediments from Caroni Swamp were: Zn (113.4-264.6), Cr (27-69.7), Ni (10.7-41.1) and Cu (11-40.7). Based on Canadian Sediment Quality Guidelines (CSQGs), metals in sediments posed a low to medium risk to aquatic life. The concentration ranges (in μg/g wet wt.) for metals in Crassostrea rhizophorae tissues were: Zn (123.2-660), Cu (4.2-12.3), Ni (0.1-5.5), Pb (0.1-0.9), Cr (0.2-0.3) and Cd (0.1-0.2). Multiple evaluations indicated that zinc posed a potential threat to the health of oyster consumers. Information from this study is vital for managing the Caroni Swamp, safeguarding the health of consumers of shellfish on this Caribbean island and serving as a useful baseline for future local and regional risk assessments.

  4. Evaluation of impacted Brazilian estuaries using the native oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae: Branchial carbonic anhydrase as a biomarker.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Linhares, Maristela; Freire, Carolina A

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the use of branchial carbonic anhydrase activity in a sessile filter feeding species, the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae, as a biomarker. The oysters were collected in three human impacted Brazilian estuaries, following a crescent latitudinal gradient: in Pernambuco state (Itamaracá), in Espírito Santo state (Piraquê), and in Paraná state (Paranaguá), in August/2003 (Winter in the southern hemisphere) and February/2004 (Summer). Three sites were chosen in each estuary for oyster sampling: Reference (R), Contaminated 1 (C1, close to industrial/harbor contamination), and Contaminated 2 (C2, near to sewage discharges). Comparing to values in oysters sampled in reference sites, there was apparent inhibition in carbonic anhydrase activity (CAA) in gills of oysters from C1 of Itamaracá and from C2 of Piraquê, both cases in Summer. On the other hand, increased CAA was noted in C2 oysters of Itamaracá in winter, and of Paranaguá, in both seasons. Branchial CAA in C. rhizophorae was thus very responsive to coastal contamination. Data are consistent with its usefulness as a supporting biomarker for inexpensive and rapid analysis in the assessment of estuaries using a sessile osmoconformer species, but preferably allied to other biomarkers and with knowledge on the suite of contaminants present. PMID:26410193

  5. Evaluation of impacted Brazilian estuaries using the native oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae: Branchial carbonic anhydrase as a biomarker.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Linhares, Maristela; Freire, Carolina A

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the use of branchial carbonic anhydrase activity in a sessile filter feeding species, the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae, as a biomarker. The oysters were collected in three human impacted Brazilian estuaries, following a crescent latitudinal gradient: in Pernambuco state (Itamaracá), in Espírito Santo state (Piraquê), and in Paraná state (Paranaguá), in August/2003 (Winter in the southern hemisphere) and February/2004 (Summer). Three sites were chosen in each estuary for oyster sampling: Reference (R), Contaminated 1 (C1, close to industrial/harbor contamination), and Contaminated 2 (C2, near to sewage discharges). Comparing to values in oysters sampled in reference sites, there was apparent inhibition in carbonic anhydrase activity (CAA) in gills of oysters from C1 of Itamaracá and from C2 of Piraquê, both cases in Summer. On the other hand, increased CAA was noted in C2 oysters of Itamaracá in winter, and of Paranaguá, in both seasons. Branchial CAA in C. rhizophorae was thus very responsive to coastal contamination. Data are consistent with its usefulness as a supporting biomarker for inexpensive and rapid analysis in the assessment of estuaries using a sessile osmoconformer species, but preferably allied to other biomarkers and with knowledge on the suite of contaminants present.

  6. Microbiological quality and bacterial diversity of the tropical oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae in a monitored farming system and from natural stocks.

    PubMed

    Silva Neta, M T; Maciel, B M; Lopes, A T S; Marques, E L S; Rezende, R P; Boehs, G

    2015-12-02

    Microbiological evaluation is one of the most important parameters for analyzing the viability of an oyster farming system, which addresses public health and ecological concerns. Here, the microbiological quality of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae cultivated in a monitored environment and from natural beds in Bahia, northeastern Brazil, was determined. Bacterial diversity in oysters was measured by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Sequence analysis revealed that most bacterial species showed similarity with uncultured or unidentified bacteria from environmental samples, and were clustered into the phylum Proteobacteria. Diverse bacteria from cultivated (monitored) oyster samples were grouped in the same cluster with a high similarity index (above 79%). Microbiological analyses revealed that these oysters did not contain pathogens. These results reflect the natural balance of the microbial communities essential to the maintenance of health and in inhibiting pathogen colonization in the oyster. On the other hand, bacterial diversity of samples from native stocks in extractive areas displayed a similarity index varying between 55 and 77%, and all samples were clustered separately from each other and from the cluster of samples derived from the cultivation area. Microbiological analyses showed that oysters from the extractive area were not fit for human consumption. This reflected a different composition of the microbial community in this area, probably resulting from anthropic impact. Our study also demonstrated that low temperatures and high rainfall limits the bacterial concentration in tropical oysters. This is the first study analyzing the total bacterial community profiles of the oyster C. rhizophorae.

  7. Estimating the gasoline components and formulations toxicity to microalgae (Tetraselmis chuii) and oyster (Crassostrea rhizophorae) embryos: An approach to minimize environmental pollution risk

    SciTech Connect

    Paixao, J.F.; Nascimento, I.A. . E-mail: iracema@ftc.br; Pereira, S.A.; Leite, M.B.L.; Carvalho, G.C.; Silveira, J.S.C.; Reboucas, M.; Matias, G.R.A.; Rodrigues, I.L.P.

    2007-03-15

    Even though petrochemical contamination frequently occurs in the form of oil spills, it is thought that a greater danger to coastal habitats is posed by chronic petrochemical toxicity associated with urban run-off, in which gasoline water-soluble-fraction (WSF) plays an important role. The hypothesis of the entrepreneurs, who were associated to the scientists uncharged of this research, was that recycled petrochemical waste may provide different gasoline formulations, having different toxic properties; the correlation between the gasoline formulations and their components' toxicological effects might contribute to the reformulation of the products, in such a way that the gasoline generated could be less toxic and less harmful to the environment. The aim of this research was to determine the toxic effects of 14 different types of gasoline (formulated, in accordance with National Petroleum Agency standards, from petrochemical waste), on Tetraselmis chuii (microalgae culture) and Crassostrea rhizophorae (embryos). Microalgae and oyster embryos were exposed to different gasoline formulations water-soluble fractions (WSF) at a range of concentrations (0%, 4.6%, 10.0%, 22.0%, 46.0%, and 100%), for 96 and 24 h, respectively. The tests were carried out under controlled conditions. End-points have been CI50-96h (concentration causing 50% growth inhibition in microalgae cultures) and EC50-24h (concentration causing abnormalities on 50% of the exposed embryos). Through these procedures, gasoline formulations, which represent the lowest environmental risk, were selected. Bioassays carried out on the 8 different gasoline components aimed to correlate gasoline toxicity with the toxic potential of its components. The analysis of principal components showed that the C9DI, a mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons of 9 carbon atoms, had the highest level of toxic potential, followed by C9S (a mixture of aromatics with 9-11 carbon atoms) and heavy naphtha. The results showed gasoline

  8. Estimating the gasoline components and formulations toxicity to microalgae (Tetraselmis chuii) and oyster (Crassostrea rhizophorae) embryos: an approach to minimize environmental pollution risk.

    PubMed

    Paixão, J F; Nascimento, I A; Pereira, S A; Leite, M B L; Carvalho, G C; Silveira, J S C; Rebouças, M; Matias, G R A; Rodrigues, I L P

    2007-03-01

    Even though petrochemical contamination frequently occurs in the form of oil spills, it is thought that a greater danger to coastal habitats is posed by chronic petrochemical toxicity associated with urban run-off, in which gasoline water-soluble-fraction (WSF) plays an important role. The hypothesis of the entrepreneurs, who were associated to the scientists uncharged of this research, was that recycled petrochemical waste may provide different gasoline formulations, having different toxic properties; the correlation between the gasoline formulations and their components' toxicological effects might contribute to the reformulation of the products, in such a way that the gasoline generated could be less toxic and less harmful to the environment. The aim of this research was to determine the toxic effects of 14 different types of gasoline (formulated, in accordance with National Petroleum Agency standards, from petrochemical waste), on Tetraselmis chuii (microalgae culture) and Crassostrea rhizophorae (embryos). Microalgae and oyster embryos were exposed to different gasoline formulations water-soluble fractions (WSF) at a range of concentrations (0%, 4.6%, 10.0%, 22.0%, 46.0%, and 100%), for 96 and 24h, respectively. The tests were carried out under controlled conditions. End-points have been CI50-96h (concentration causing 50% growth inhibition in microalgae cultures) and EC50-24h (concentration causing abnormalities on 50% of the exposed embryos). Through these procedures, gasoline formulations, which represent the lowest environmental risk, were selected. Bioassays carried out on the 8 different gasoline components aimed to correlate gasoline toxicity with the toxic potential of its components. The analysis of principal components showed that the C9DI, a mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons of 9 carbon atoms, had the highest level of toxic potential, followed by C9S (a mixture of aromatics with 9-11 carbon atoms) and heavy naphtha. The results showed gasoline

  9. PARASITIC AND SYMBIONIC FAUNA IN OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) COLLECTED FROM THE CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER AND ESTUARY, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory



    Studies of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, collected from ten sites in the Caloosahatchee River and Estuary, Florida, revealed a varied parasite and symbiotic fauna that have never been reported from this area. Organisms observed included ovacystis virus infecting gametes...

  10. [Community structure of bivalves and gastropods in roots of red mangrove Rhizophora mangle (Rhizophoraceae) in isla Larga, Mochima Bay, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Acosta Balbas, Vanessa; Betancourt Tineo, Rafael; Prieto Arcas, Antulio

    2014-06-01

    The Rhizophora mangle roots form a complex ecosystem where a wide range of organisms are permanently established, reproduce, and find refuge. In this study, we assessed the diversity of bivalves and gastropods that inhabit red mangrove roots, in isla Larga, Mochima, Venezuela Sucre state. Bimonthly collections were made from January 2007 to May 2008, in four study areas denominated: South, North, East and West. In each area, five mangrove roots were sampled, and the specimens were obtained. We analyzed a total of 180 roots and a total of 35 bivalve species and 25 gastropod species were found. The most abundant bivalves were: Isognomon alatus, Isognomon bicolor, Ostrea equestris, Crassostrea rhizophorae and Brachidontes exustus; among gastropods, the most common where: Littorina angulifera, (Cymatium pileare and Diodora cayenensis. The months with the highest abundances and number of individuals for both groups were January and July 2007, and March 2008. The mangrove ecosystem in isla Larga, presented a number of individuals and species higher than those reported for other regions in Venezuela and the Caribbean.

  11. [Community structure of bivalves and gastropods in roots of red mangrove Rhizophora mangle (Rhizophoraceae) in isla Larga, Mochima Bay, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Acosta Balbas, Vanessa; Betancourt Tineo, Rafael; Prieto Arcas, Antulio

    2014-06-01

    The Rhizophora mangle roots form a complex ecosystem where a wide range of organisms are permanently established, reproduce, and find refuge. In this study, we assessed the diversity of bivalves and gastropods that inhabit red mangrove roots, in isla Larga, Mochima, Venezuela Sucre state. Bimonthly collections were made from January 2007 to May 2008, in four study areas denominated: South, North, East and West. In each area, five mangrove roots were sampled, and the specimens were obtained. We analyzed a total of 180 roots and a total of 35 bivalve species and 25 gastropod species were found. The most abundant bivalves were: Isognomon alatus, Isognomon bicolor, Ostrea equestris, Crassostrea rhizophorae and Brachidontes exustus; among gastropods, the most common where: Littorina angulifera, (Cymatium pileare and Diodora cayenensis. The months with the highest abundances and number of individuals for both groups were January and July 2007, and March 2008. The mangrove ecosystem in isla Larga, presented a number of individuals and species higher than those reported for other regions in Venezuela and the Caribbean. PMID:25102639

  12. Molecular identification, phylogeny and geographic distribution of Brazilian mangrove oysters (Crassostrea)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Oysters (Ostreidae) manifest a high degree of phenotypic plasticity, whereby morphology is of limited value for species identification and taxonomy. By using molecular data, the aim was to genetically characterize the species of Crassostrea occurring along the Brazilian coast, and phylogenetically relate these to other Crassostrea from different parts of the world. Sequencing of the partial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I gene (COI), revealed a total of three species of Crassostrea at 16 locations along the Brazilian coast. C. gasar was found from Curuçá (Pará state) to Santos (São Paulo state), and C. rhizophorae from Fortim (Ceará state) to Florianópolis (Santa Catarina state), although small individuals of the latter species were also found at Ajuruteua beach (municipality of Bragança, Pará state). An unidentified Crassostrea species was found only on Canela Island, Bragança. Crassostrea gasar and C. rhizophorae grouped with C. virginica, thereby forming a monophyletic Atlantic group, whereas Crassostrea sp. from Canela Island was shown to be more similar to Indo-Pacific oysters, and either arrived in the Atlantic Ocean before the convergence of the Isthmus of Panama or was accidentally brought to Brazil by ship. PMID:21637433

  13. [Mollusks associated to the submerged roots of the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle (L.), in the Gulf of Santa Fe, Sucre State, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Márquez, B; Jiménez, M

    2002-01-01

    A qualitative and quantitative monthly study of the mollusks community associated to the submerged roots of the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle (L.), between October of 1998 and September of 1999, in six stations of the Gulf of Santa Fe, (Sucre State, Venezuela). Were collected 4,704 specimens, 45 species of mollusks were identified (22 gastropods, 15 bivalves and 8 chitons). The most abundant species were: Crassostrea rhizophorae, Isognomon bicolar, I. alatus and Brachidontes exustus. The highest values in diversity and evenness, and the smallest dominant values, were in the stations three and four, while the opposed happened in the stations one and two. The analysis of likeness showed that in the first five stations the space variations in the composition of the community are bigger than the temporary variations, while in the station six the temporary differences prevail. They were factors that could be important to determine the structure of the community, as vicinity to other ecosystems and/or specific biological aspects of the species like adaptations to fluctuating conditions, nutritious habits and migration in search of shady and protected atmospheres. PMID:12947593

  14. Bacillus crassostreae sp. nov., isolated from an oyster (Crassostrea hongkongensis).

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Tian, Xiang-Rong; Ruan, Ying; Yang, Ling-Ling; He, Ze-Qiang; Tang, Shu-Kun; Li, Wen-Jun; Shi, Huazhong; Chen, Yi-Guang

    2015-05-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, motile, catalase- and oxidase-positive, endospore-forming, facultatively anaerobic rod, designated strain JSM 100118(T), was isolated from an oyster (Crassostrea hongkongensis) collected from the tidal flat of Naozhou Island in the South China Sea. Strain JSM 100118(T) was able to grow with 0-13% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 2-5%), at pH 5.5-10.0 (optimum pH 7.5) and at 5-50 °C (optimum 30-35 °C). The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. The predominant respiratory quinone was menaquinone-7 and the major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, C16 : 0 and C16 : 1ω11c. The polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, an unknown glycolipid and an unknown phospholipid. The genomic DNA G+C content was 35.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain JSM 100118(T) belonged to the genus Bacillus , and was most closely related to Bacillus litoralis SW-211(T) (98.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Bacillus halosaccharovorans E33(T) (98.3%), Bacillus niabensis 4T19(T) (97.8%) and Bacillus herbersteinensis D-1,5a(T) (97.1%). The combination of results from the phylogenetic analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization, and phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characterization supported the conclusion that strain JSM 100118(T) represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus , for which the name Bacillus crassostreae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JSM 100118(T) ( = CTCC AB 2010452(T) =DSM 24486(T) =JCM 17523(T)).

  15. Antioxidant activity of Rhizophora mangle bark.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Janet; Melchor, Gleiby; Martínez, Gregorio; Escobar, Arturo; Faure, Roberto

    2006-02-01

    The antioxidant activity of Rhizophora mangle bark aqueous extract and its majoritary component and high molecular weight polyphenols' fraction were studied using deoxyribose assay. The total extract and its fraction showed scavenging activity of hydroxyl radicals and hability to chelate iron ions. PMID:16436316

  16. DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) DEFENSES ON CLINICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHEMOLYTICUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three clinical (2030, 2062, and 2107) and three environmental (1094, 1163, and ATCC 17802) isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus were exposed to hemocytes and plasma collected from oysters (Crassostrea virginica) to determine their susceptibility to putative oyster defenses. Clinic...

  17. Pollen morphology of Rhizophora L. in Peninsular Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd-Arrabe', A. B.; Noraini, Talip Noraini

    2013-11-27

    Rhizophora L. are common mangrove genus in Peninsular Malaysia, it contains 3 species and 1 hybrid (R. apiculata Blume, R. mucronata Lam., R. stylosa Griff., R. x lamarckii Montrouz). This genus has some unique adaptation towards extreme environment. Rhizophora has looping aerial stilt-root and uniformly viviparous. The aim of this study is to investigate the variation in the pollen morphology of Rhizophora that can be related to their habitat. Methods include in this study is pollen observation under light and acetolysis method under scanning electron microscope. Pollen type of Rhizophora species studied except hybrid species is classified tricolporate, shape spheroidal based on ratio of length polar axis/ length of equatorial axis (1.03 - 1.09). The exine ornamentation is perforate-reticulate for R. apiculata and R. mucronata, while R. stylosa is perforate. For the only hybrid in Peninsular Malaysia, R. x lamarckii (R. apiculata x R. stylosa) differs from others, tricolpate with the absence of porate, shape is subprolate and exine ornamentation is reticulate and striate in equatorial region. Pollenkitt is present due to the salty and extreme environment. This may enhance the volume of pollenkitt present surrounding the pollen grains in Rhizophora for protection and adaptation purposes. Based on these findings, it is evident that pollen morphology is somehow related to its natural habitat.

  18. [Spatial-temporal variation of the macroinvertebrate epibiont community on red mangrove prop roots Rhizophora mangle (Rhizophoraceae) at La Mancha coastal lagoon, Veracruz, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Marcela; López-Portillo, Jorge

    2014-12-01

    La Mancha lagoon is connected to the Gulf of Mexico through an estuarine ephemeral inlet, a sand bar, which opens during the rainy season and closes during the late fall and the winter storm season. As the lagoon fills up with the permanent stream flow into its Southern part, the water level increases and the sand bar opens up, releasing huge volumes of water into the ocean and leaving the previously flooded intertidal zone exposed to drying. In this study, we described the spatial and temporal variations of structure and composition of the community living on the surface of red mangrove prop roots, related to the hydrodynamic of the estuarine inlet. Four red mangrove prop roots were collected every three months, over an annual period, at ten sampling stations. Water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, water depth and transparency were also measured at each sampling event. To describe the identity, abundance, biomass, and specific richness of epibiont coverage on the prop roots, measurements were taken at 10 cm intervals (herein called "horizons"). A total of 59,632 specimens and a total biomass of 172 g/cm2 were registered, and a maximum of eleven horizons presented at least one" species of epibionts. Two species of polychaetes, 12 of mollusks and 14 of crustaceans were identified, with Mytilopsis leucophaeata as the most abundant, Ficopomatus miamiensis as the most common and Crassostrea rhizophorae with the highest contribution in biomass. Sampling effort was assessed using species accumulation curves, resulting that the efficiency was, in general, greater than 90% of the richness predicted by asymptotic models. The hydrodynamics of the estuarine inlet had a great influence on the environmental conditions of the lagoon and on the spatial and temporal variation of the epibiont community: (a) when the inlet is open, there is a North-South gradient in environmental parameters (b) when the inlet is closed and the water level increases, the epibionts especially

  19. [Spatial-temporal variation of the macroinvertebrate epibiont community on red mangrove prop roots Rhizophora mangle (Rhizophoraceae) at La Mancha coastal lagoon, Veracruz, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Marcela; López-Portillo, Jorge

    2014-12-01

    La Mancha lagoon is connected to the Gulf of Mexico through an estuarine ephemeral inlet, a sand bar, which opens during the rainy season and closes during the late fall and the winter storm season. As the lagoon fills up with the permanent stream flow into its Southern part, the water level increases and the sand bar opens up, releasing huge volumes of water into the ocean and leaving the previously flooded intertidal zone exposed to drying. In this study, we described the spatial and temporal variations of structure and composition of the community living on the surface of red mangrove prop roots, related to the hydrodynamic of the estuarine inlet. Four red mangrove prop roots were collected every three months, over an annual period, at ten sampling stations. Water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, water depth and transparency were also measured at each sampling event. To describe the identity, abundance, biomass, and specific richness of epibiont coverage on the prop roots, measurements were taken at 10 cm intervals (herein called "horizons"). A total of 59,632 specimens and a total biomass of 172 g/cm2 were registered, and a maximum of eleven horizons presented at least one" species of epibionts. Two species of polychaetes, 12 of mollusks and 14 of crustaceans were identified, with Mytilopsis leucophaeata as the most abundant, Ficopomatus miamiensis as the most common and Crassostrea rhizophorae with the highest contribution in biomass. Sampling effort was assessed using species accumulation curves, resulting that the efficiency was, in general, greater than 90% of the richness predicted by asymptotic models. The hydrodynamics of the estuarine inlet had a great influence on the environmental conditions of the lagoon and on the spatial and temporal variation of the epibiont community: (a) when the inlet is open, there is a North-South gradient in environmental parameters (b) when the inlet is closed and the water level increases, the epibionts especially

  20. Tension wood fibers are related to gravitropic movement of red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jack B; Tomlinson, P Barry

    2002-02-01

    Freshly collected viviparous seedlings (propagules) were collected from wild plants of Rhizophora mangle and planted in vertical or horizontal positions. A total of 80 seedlings were examined anatomically at various ages and orientations. After rooting, seedlings reoriented from horizontal to vertical by extreme bending in the hook region of the hypocotyl directly above the basal 1 cm where roots formed. Hypocotyl bending occurred over many months. Trends in position and relative abundance of tension fibers (also called gelatinous fibers) over time were followed. The erection of the seedling was related to increased secondary xylem and the number of tension wood fibers on the upper side of the hook region. However, linear regressions had low coefficient of determination (r(2)) values, presumably related to seedlings with high variability. PMID:12884047

  1. Maximum longevities of Rhizophora apiculata and R. mucronata propagules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drexler, J.Z.

    2001-01-01

    The longevity of viviparous mangrove seedlings (propagules) in seawater is a key factor determining their ability to survive dispersal both locally and across large expanses of ocean. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the maximum longevities of propagules from two common Pacific mangrove species: Rhizophora mucronata Lamk. and Rhizophora apiculata Bl. Propagules from each of these species were placed in outdoor tubs with continously flowing seawater. The condition of each propagule was monitored until it sank or started to rot. Propagules were then planted to determine viability. After planting, 50% of R. apiculata propagules and 21% of R. mucronata propagules were viable. For both species, mortality of propagules was strongly related to the length of the floating interval. Maximum longevities for R. mucronata and R. apiculata propagules were 150 (median = 70) and 89 days (median = 7), respectively. Rhizophora mucronata propagules appeared to be better equipped for long-distance dispersal, yet had low survivorship that would decrease overall dispersal opportunities. In comparison, R. apiculata propagules had higher survivorship yet shorter longevity and, thus, appeared to be better equipped for shorter distance dispersal.

  2. Changes in molecular genetic variation at ALFP loci associated with naturalization and domestication of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is an important commercial species in the US Pacific Northwest with a history of propagation first using wild-caught seed imported directly from the Miyagi region of northern Japan (1920s – 1970s) followed by an extended period of seed collection from a few sel...

  3. The Use of Phytochemicals to Effectively Produce Biofuel from Rhizophora mangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, M.; Brinker, R.

    2015-12-01

    After successfully determining the presence of phytochemicals in both the Common Crabgrass (Digitaria ischaemum), and North American Dandelion (Taxacum officinale) , my research focused on the effects of specific phytochemicals, Luteolin from crabgrass and Taxasterol from dandelion, on electrical energy yield from a hydrogen fuel cell. Improvements in hydrogen fuel cell efficiency and cost are sought. By use of red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) propagules as an oxygen source the effects of Luteolin and Taxasterol could be tested as a means to optimize hydrogen fuel cells. The methodology began with physical chemical extraction, then proceeded with separation by column chromatography, and ended with fuel cell testing of the isolated phytochemicals. Published retention factor values were used to isolate Luteolin (.66) and Taxasterol (.30). In order to test electrical energy yield, the amount of current produced by the fuel cell was measured in microamperes (μA[RB1] ) over five minutes for both the three control and three experimental group trials for both experimental groups each. The largest ampere value collected from Luteolin group was 4.3 μA, while the largest value collected from Taxasterol group was 2.5 μA. Out of both experimental groups, taraxsterol had the smallest range, showing more consistency between the control and corresponding experimental groups tested. My hypothesis was not supported. Luteolin treated fuel cell produced a larger electrical energy yield than did fuel cells treated with Taxasterol. [RB1]I found μ by selecting "insert symbol", then looking at Greek symbols.

  4. Rhizophora mucronata var. alokii – a new variety of mangrove species from the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India (Rhizophoraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ragavan, P.; Mohan, P. M.; Jayaraj, R. S. C.; Ravichandran, K.; Saravanan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rhizophora mucronata var. alokii (Rhizophoraceae), a new variety of Rhizophora from the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India, is described and illustrated. The new variety is remarkable in having four stamens, laterally folded leaves, a short peduncle, thick leathery petals, and a four-sided ovary with a sessile style. A key for the species of Rhizophora of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands is also provided. PMID:26312036

  5. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) DEFENSE MEASUREMENTS AND TISSUE CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bivalve mollusks such as Crassostrea virginica typically inhabit estuaries and coastal areas that are increasingly contaminated with anthropogenic chemicals. Oysters may bioaccumulate large quantities of metals, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB...

  6. CHEMICAL EFFECTS ON OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) HEMOCYTE MICROBICIDAL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) hemocytes, or blood cells, perform important internal defense functions such as phagocytosis and intracellular destruction of pathogens and bacteria. Using techniques such as phagocytosis and chemiluminescence assays, potential impairment of hemocyt...

  7. Paleoenvironmental and sclerochronological reconstruction of Crassostrea gryphoides Miocene biostromes from Crete island (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskeridou, E.; Agiadi, K.

    2012-04-01

    The mangrove oyster Crassostrea gasar (Adanson, 1757) is a keystone species mainly along the African Atlantic coasts. It forms biostromes on muddy coasts and typically associated with river mouths in the intertidal zone in depths of 0.60 up to 1 m1. Similarly, many biostrome structures of the fossilized Crassostrea gryphoides are found within Cenozoic deposits of Greece2. Since Crassostrea gasar is the phyllogenetically corresponding species of Crassostrea gryphoides, it is investigated whether the fossil biostromes formed under environmental conditions similar to those favored by modern Crassostrea gasar and if growth rate and longevity are comparable. A biostrome from the Tortonian of Heraklion district, Crete island (southern Greece) was studied to investigate the paleoenvironmental conditions and the life history of these oysters. The shells are big, ranging up to 40 cm in length, thick and positioned mainly horizontally. The biostrome is approximately 2 m in thickness and a few meters in length. Individual oysters, associated fauna and lithologic samples were collected. Paleoenvironmental interpretation was based on the analysis of the oyster taphonomy, the associated fauna and the sclerochronology/stable isotopic geochemistry of the oyster shells. The biostrome is observed in sandy marl which laterally contains Veneridae, Melongena, Terebralia bidentata and oligospecific microfossils, mainly Ammonia beccarii and Miliolids. Borings by many ichnotaxa occur on the external and internal surface of the oyster shells during the pre and /or post-mortem. Using a micromill, successive samples were taken along the hinge/ligament region of an oyster for isotopic analyses. The δ18O values ranged from -2.9 to 0.1. The wide range of values supports the interpretation of changing environmental conditions. The δ13C values ranged from -2.6 to -0.1. A correlation between δ18O and δ13C was observed. The profiles exhibit cyclicity with respect to isotopic and Sr/Ca ratios

  8. Occurrence of annual growth rings in Rhizophora mangle in a region with low climate seasonality.

    PubMed

    Souza, Brunna T; Estrada, Gustavo C D; Soares, Mário L G; Callado, Cátia H

    2016-01-01

    The formation of annual growth rings has been confirmed for several mangrove species in the last decade, among which is the Rhizophora mangle. However, the record of annual rings for this species was made in a region with high hydric seasonality, a widely recognized induction factor of annual rings in tropical species. In this sense, the present study aimed to verify the occurrence of annual growth rings in R. mangle in the mangroves of Guaratiba (Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil), a region with low hydric seasonality. For this purpose, the crossdating technique was applied in ten trees collected with known age (seven years). The growth rings are characterized by alternating layers of low vessel density (earlywood) and high vessel density (latewood). Multiple regression analysis indicated that growth rings width variation is driven by precipitation, water surplus, water deficit and water storage. Crossdating analysis confirmed the existence of annual growth rings in the R. mangle in Guaratiba. This discovery in a region with low hydric seasonality increases the dendrocronological potential of this species and suggests the importance of biological factors (eg. phenological behavior) as complementary inductors for the formation of growth rings in this species. PMID:27142552

  9. Taraxerol and Rhizophora pollen as proxies for tracking past mangrove ecosystems 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteegh, Gerard J. M.; Schefuß, Enno; Dupont, Lydie; Marret, Fabienne; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Jansen, J. H. Fred

    2004-02-01

    Angola Basin and Cape Basin (southeast Atlantic) surface sediments and sediment cores show that maxima in the abundance of taraxerol (relative to other land-derived lipids) covary with maxima in the relative abundance of pollen from the mangrove tree genus Rhizophora and that in the surface sediments offshore maxima in the relative abundance of taraxerol occur at latitudes with abundant coastal mangrove forests. Together with the observation that Rhizophora mangle and Rhizophora racemosa leaves are extraordinarily rich in taraxerol, this strongly indicates that taraxerol can be used as a lipid biomarker for mangrove input to the SE Atlantic. The proxy-environment relations for taraxerol and Rhizophora pollen down-core show that increased taraxerol and Rhizophora pollen abundances occur during transgressions and periods with a humid climate. These environmental changes modify the coastal erosion and sedimentation patterns, enhancing the extent of the mangrove ecosystem and/or the transport of mangrove organic matter offshore. Analyses of mid-Pleistocene sediments show that interruption of the pattern of taraxerol maxima during precession minima occurs almost only during periods of low obliquity. This demonstrates the complex environmental response of the interaction between precession-related humidity cycles and obliquity-related sea-level changes on mangrove input.

  10. Canopy interactions of rainfall in an off-shore mangrove ecosystem dominated by Rhizophora mangle (Belize)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofmann, Julia; Feller, Ilka C.

    2007-10-01

    SummaryBulk precipitation, throughfall and stemflow were collected to study anthropogenic effects on above-ground nutrient cycling in an off-shore mangrove forest ( Rhizophora mangle L.) on Twin Cays, Belize. Samples were collected in a nitrogen limited fringe and phosphorus limited dwarf zone, and from an adjacent nitrogen fertilized fringe and a phosphorus fertilized dwarf zone. Inorganic cations and anions, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) were analysed. Throughfall represented 84% of precipitation volume. Sea salt ions (Cl -, Na +, SO42- and Mg 2+) and DOC accounted for the highest proportion of solutes in rainwater, throughfall and stemflow in R. mangle stands. Non-marine sources dominated the flux of DON, DOC, NO3-, NH4+, and inorganic P (P i) in bulk precipitation and throughfall and partially contributed to Ca 2+ and K +. Deposition ratios (throughfall deposition:bulk deposition) showed that inorganic NH4+, and less so P i were retained in the canopy of R. mangle from throughfall while all other solutes increased. Canopy leaching contributed in increasing order to net throughfall of Ca 2+, Cl -, SO42-/K, Mg 2+ and Na + but dry deposition dominated the net throughfall flux during the investigated period. Fertilizer treatment and zone did only slightly affect solute concentrations of hot-water extracts of leaves, of throughfall and stemflow in stands of similar stature. While litterfall and primary production have previously been shown to increase substantially upon nutrient enrichment of mangroves we therefore conclude that fertilization, as a surrogate of anthropogenic eutrophication, may not increase nutrient leaching from mangrove canopies, and thus may only have a minor effect on soluble organic matter cycling and inputs into mangrove food webs.

  11. Screening of endoglucanase-producing bacteria in the saline rhizosphere of Rhizophora mangle.

    PubMed

    Sá, André Luís Braghini; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Cotta, Simone Raposo; Fasanella, Cristiane Cipola; Andreote, Fernando Dini; de Melo, Itamar Soares

    2014-01-01

    In screening the culturable endoglucanase-producing bacteria in the rhizosphere of Rhizophora mangle, we found a prevalence of genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. These bacteria revealed different activities in endoglucolysis and biofilm formation when exposed to specific NaCl concentrations, indicating modulated growth under natural variations in mangrove salinity.

  12. Protective and antioxidant effects of Rhizophora mangle L. against NSAID-induced gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Berenguer, B; Sánchez, L M; Quílez, A; López-Barreiro, M; de Haro, O; Gálvez, J; Martín, M J

    2006-01-16

    The bark of Rhizophora mangle, the red mangrove, has been used traditionally in folk medicine of Caribbean countries due to its antiseptic, astringent, haemostatic and antifungal properties. Aqueous extracts are rich in tannins and have been proven experimentally to possess antibacterial, wound healing and antiulcerogenic effects. This work was designed to determine the gastroprotective effect of Rhizophora mangle in a model of diclofenac-induced ulcers in rats and to study the mechanisms involved, using the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole as a comparison. The lyophilized extract was given by oral gavage (125 and 62.5mg/kg) three times at 12h intervals before administering diclofenac 100mg/kg. Pretreatment with the extract resulted in a significant decrease of the ulcerated area (P<0.01). Rhizophora mangle induced a recovery of PGE(2) levels, which had been depleted by diclofenac. No anti-inflammatory effect was observed ex vivo or in vitro. The highest dose of the extract provoked a marked increase in glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activity, which was comparable to omeprazole. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation levels were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the gastroprotective effect of Rhizophora mangle in this experimental model appears through an antioxidant and prostaglandin-dependent way. PMID:16182483

  13. Screening of endoglucanase-producing bacteria in the saline rhizosphere of Rhizophora mangle.

    PubMed

    Sá, André Luís Braghini; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Cotta, Simone Raposo; Fasanella, Cristiane Cipola; Andreote, Fernando Dini; de Melo, Itamar Soares

    2014-01-01

    In screening the culturable endoglucanase-producing bacteria in the rhizosphere of Rhizophora mangle, we found a prevalence of genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. These bacteria revealed different activities in endoglucolysis and biofilm formation when exposed to specific NaCl concentrations, indicating modulated growth under natural variations in mangrove salinity. PMID:24948930

  14. Screening of endoglucanase-producing bacteria in the saline rhizosphere of Rhizophora mangle

    PubMed Central

    Sá, André Luís Braghini; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Cotta, Simone Raposo; Fasanella, Cristiane Cipola; Andreote, Fernando Dini; de Melo, Itamar Soares

    2014-01-01

    In screening the culturable endoglucanase-producing bacteria in the rhizosphere of Rhizophora mangle, we found a prevalence of genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. These bacteria revealed different activities in endoglucolysis and biofilm formation when exposed to specific NaCl concentrations, indicating modulated growth under natural variations in mangrove salinity. PMID:24948930

  15. Markers associated with disease resistance in Eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eastern oyster, Crassostrea viginica, is an economically important aquaculture species in the USA, but production has been impacted by diseases such as dermo and MSX. Efforts have been put into the development of disease-resistant oyster lines using selective breeding techniques. However, these met...

  16. Heritability of shell pigmentation in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is a species of considerable economic importance, with among the highest global production of any cultured aquatic animal species. In the interest of increasing the value of Pacific oysters sold as “singles” for the half-shell market, we explored the feasibili...

  17. [Dynamics of soil properties in forests of Rhizophora mangle L. (Rhizophoraceae) in Margarita Island, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Arias, Luz Esther; Paolini, Jorge; Rodríguez, Jon Paul

    2010-06-01

    Biochemical and microbiological properties of soils can provide information related to ecosystems environmental status. With the aim to determine the response of microbial biomass, and enzymatic and microbial activity in hypersaline (IS > or = 55 ups) and saline (IS<55 ups) mangrove soils exposed to interstitial salinities (IS) greater than 36 ups, these properties were measured in mono-specific forests of Rhizophora mangle at Laguna de la Restinga National Park (Margarita Island, Venezuela). During three seasons (dry, wet and transition), a total of 120 soil samples were collected from ten (5 hypersaline and 5 saline) randomly-selected sites of 1000 m2 each. Four soil samples (400-500 g) per plot were randomly collected with a corer at a depth of 10 cm using a 1 m2 quadrat; each sample consisted in the combination of 8 sub-samples (50-60 g ea.). Physical, chemical, enzymatic, biochemical and microbiological properties of soil samples were determined using standard laboratory protocols. The response of microbial biomass and microbial and enzymatic activity was analyzed taking into account spatial and climatic factors and interstitial salinity. Microbial biomass was linked to each locality conditions, and was not sensitive to seasonal or salinity differences. Microbial activity remained functionally active during the study period and presented variable responses. Dehydrogenase activity proved to be a good indicator for flooded and anoxic environments, and arginine ammonification resulted to be the more sensitive microbial activity to changes in salinity. Regarding enzyme activities, spatial variability was the most widespread response. We did not find a unique general pattern between enzymatic activities and spatio-temporal variation; and only the enzyme phosphatase was negatively affected by salinity. We conclude that microbial populations of mangrove soils and their activities have functional adaptations to flooded and highly-saline environments typical of a

  18. Intraspecific Variation in Mitogenomes of Five Crassostrea Species Provides Insight into Oyster Diversification and Speciation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jianfeng; Hou, Zhanhui; Wang, Haiyan; Sun, Ming-An; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Bin; Guo, Ximing

    2016-04-01

    A large number of Crassostrea oysters are found in Asia-Pacific. While analyses of interspecific variation have helped to establish historical relationships among these species, studies on intraspecific variation are necessary to understand their recent evolutionary history and current forces driving population biology. We resequenced 18 and analyzed 31 mitogenomes of five Crassostrea species from China: Crassostrea gigas, Crassostrea angulata, Crassostrea sikamea, Crassostrea ariakensis, and Crassostrea hongkongensis. Our analysis finds abundant insertions, deletions, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in all species. Intraspecific variation varies greatly among species with polymorphic sites ranging from 54 to 293 and nucleotide diversity ranging from 0.00106 to 0.00683. In all measurements, C. hongkongensis that has the narrowest geographic distribution exhibits the least sequence diversity; C. ariakensis that has the widest distribution shows the highest diversity, and species with intermediate distribution show intermediate levels of diversity. Low sequence diversity in C. hongkongensis may reflect recent bottlenecks that are probably exacerbated by human transplantation. High diversity in C. ariakensis is likely due to divergence of northern and southern China populations that have been separated without gene flow. The significant differences in mitogenome diversity suggest that the five sister species of Crassostrea have experienced different evolutionary forces since their divergence. The recent divergence of two C. ariakensis populations and the C. gigas/angulata species complex provides evidence for continued diversification and speciation of Crassostrea species along China's coast, which are shaped by unknown mechanisms in a north-south divide.

  19. The Effect of Increased Sediment Accretion on the Survival and Growth of Rhizophora apiculataSeedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrados, J.; Thampanya, U.; Srichai, N.; Kheowvongsri, P.; Geertz-Hansen, O.; Boromthanarath, S.; Panapitukkul, N.; Duarte, C. M.

    1997-11-01

    The effects of experimental sediment accretion on the survival and growth ofRhizophora apiculataseedlings planted on an expanding mud flat in Pak Phanang Bay (south-east Thailand) were assessed. Seedling mortality rates increased linearly (R2=0·87,F=75·9,P<0·0001) with increasing sediment accretion, at a rate of 3% per cm of sediment deposited, and implied a 96% increase in mortality at the highest sediment accretion applied (32 cm). Similarly, seedling growth declined linearly with increasing sediment accretion (r=-0·95,P<0·01) with the seedlings receiving 32 cm of sediment showing no significant growth. These results clearly show thatRhizophora apiculataseedlings will not be efficient colonizers of coastal areas exposed to sudden events of high (>4 cm) sediment accretion and, therefore, afforestation programmes based on this species are unlikely to be successful in such areas.

  20. Wind pollination and propagule formation in Rhizophora mangle L. (Rhizophoraceae): resource or pollination limitation?

    PubMed

    Nadia, Tarcila L; Machado, Isabel C

    2014-03-01

    Rhizophora mangle is considered as a self-compatible mangrove, and is pollinated by wind and insects. However, there is no information about fruit production by autogamy and agamospermy and on the foraging behavior of its flower visitors. Hence, the present study analyzed the pollination and reproductive systems of R. mangle in a mangrove community in northern Pernambuco, Brazil. Floral morphology, sequence of anthesis, and behavior of flower visitors were described; the proportion of flowers that resulted in mature propagules was also recorded. Autogamy, agamospermy, and wind pollination tests were performed, and a new anemophily index is proposed. The flowers of R. mangle are hermaphrodite, protandric, and have high P/O rate. Flies were observed on flowers only during the male phase, probably feeding on mites that consume pollen. Rhizophora mangle is not agamospermic and its fruit production rate by spontaneous self-pollination is low (2.56%) compared to wind pollination (19.44%). The anemophily index was high 0.98, and thus it was considered as a good indicator. Only 13.79% of the flowers formed mature propagules. The early stages of fruit development are the most critical and susceptible to predation. Rhizophora mangle is, therefore, exclusively anemophilous in the study area and the propagule dispersal seems to be limited by herbivory.

  1. Wind pollination and propagule formation in Rhizophora mangle L. (Rhizophoraceae): resource or pollination limitation?

    PubMed

    Nadia, Tarcila L; Machado, Isabel C

    2014-03-01

    Rhizophora mangle is considered as a self-compatible mangrove, and is pollinated by wind and insects. However, there is no information about fruit production by autogamy and agamospermy and on the foraging behavior of its flower visitors. Hence, the present study analyzed the pollination and reproductive systems of R. mangle in a mangrove community in northern Pernambuco, Brazil. Floral morphology, sequence of anthesis, and behavior of flower visitors were described; the proportion of flowers that resulted in mature propagules was also recorded. Autogamy, agamospermy, and wind pollination tests were performed, and a new anemophily index is proposed. The flowers of R. mangle are hermaphrodite, protandric, and have high P/O rate. Flies were observed on flowers only during the male phase, probably feeding on mites that consume pollen. Rhizophora mangle is not agamospermic and its fruit production rate by spontaneous self-pollination is low (2.56%) compared to wind pollination (19.44%). The anemophily index was high 0.98, and thus it was considered as a good indicator. Only 13.79% of the flowers formed mature propagules. The early stages of fruit development are the most critical and susceptible to predation. Rhizophora mangle is, therefore, exclusively anemophilous in the study area and the propagule dispersal seems to be limited by herbivory. PMID:24804313

  2. A metabolomic investigation of the effects of metal pollution in oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chenglong; Wang, Qing; Wu, Huifeng; Tan, Qiaoguo; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2015-01-15

    Metal pollution has been of great concern in the estuaries in Southern China. In this study, metabolic differences between oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis from clean and metal-polluted sites were characterized using NMR-based metabolomics. We collected oyster samples from one clean (Jiuzhen) and two metal polluted sites (Baijiao and Fugong). The metal concentrations in oyster gills indicated that both the Baijiao and Fugong sites were severely polluted by several metals, including Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ag, Cd and Pb. In particular, Cu and Zn were the major contaminants from the Baijiao and Fugong sites. Compared with those oysters from the clean site (JZ), metal pollution in BJ and FG induced disturbances in osmotic regulation and energy metabolism via different metabolic pathways, as indicated by different metabolic biomarkers. This study demonstrates that NMR-based metabolomics is a useful tool for characterizing metabolic responses induced by metal pollution.

  3. A metabolomic study on the biological effects of metal pollutions in oysters Crassostrea sikamea.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chenglong; Wang, Qing; Wu, Huifeng; Tan, Qiaoguo; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-01-15

    Metal pollution has become a great threat to organisms in the estuaries in South China. In the present study, the oysters Crassostrea sikamea were collected from one clean (Jiuzhen) and five metal polluted sites (Baijiao, Fugong, Gongqian, Jinshan and Songyu). The tissue metal concentrations in oysters indicated that the five metal sites were polluted by several metals, including Cr, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, Ag, Cd and Pb with different patterns. Especially, Cu and Zn were the major contaminants in Baijiao, Fugong and Jinshan sites. The metabolic responses in oysters C. sikamea indicated that the metal pollutions in BJ, FG, JS and SY sites induced disturbances in osmotic regulation and energy metabolism via different metabolic pathways. However, the metal pollution in GQ site mainly influenced the osmotic regulation in the oysters C. sikamea. This study demonstrates that NMR-based metabolomics is useful to characterize metabolic responses induced by metal pollution.

  4. A PCR-based diagnostic assay for the detection of Roseovarius crassostreae in Crassostrea virginica affected by juvenile oyster disease (JOD)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maloy, A.P.; Barber, B.J.; Boettcher, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a PCR-assay for the diagnosis of juvenile oyster disease (JOD) based on the detection of Roseovarius crassostreae directly from affected oysters. Species-specific primers are used to amplify the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of R. crassostreae, and confirmation of product identity is accomplished by restriction enzyme analysis. No false positives were obtained with either closely related bacterial species or from other DNAs present in oyster samples. The assay has the potential to detect as few as 10 cells of R. crassostreae per oyster when samples are taken from the inner valve surfaces of the animal. Inclusion of material from soft body surfaces is not necessary, and may reduce sensitivity approximately 10-fold. In a JOD-affected population, a positive PCR result was obtained from all oysters from which these bacteria were subsequently cultured. The assay also detected the presence of R. crassostreae in 2 oysters from which no R. crassostreae isolates were recovered. No R. crassostreae was detected by either PCR or bacteriology in oysters from a population that was not exhibiting JOD-signs. This assay is expected to advance regional disease management efforts and provide valuable insights into the disease process and epizootiology of JOD. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  5. Comparative Analysis of the Pattern of Population Genetic Diversity in Three Indo-West Pacific Rhizophora Mangrove Species

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yu-Bin; Duke, Norm C.; Sun, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Rhizophora species are the most widely distributed mangrove trees in the Indo-West Pacific (IWP) region. Comparative studies of these species with shared life history traits can help identify evolutionary factors that have played most important roles in determining genetic diversity within and between populations in ocean-current dispersed mangrove tree species. We sampled 935 individuals from 54 natural populations for genotyping with 13 microsatellite markers to investigate the level of genetic variation, population structure, and gene flow on a broad geographic scale in Rhizophora apiculata, Rhizophora mucronata, and Rhizophora stylosa across the IWP region. In contrast to the pattern expected of long-lived woody plants with predominant wind-pollination, water-dispersed seeds and wide geographic range, genetic variation within populations was generally low in all the three species, especially in those peripheral populations from geographic range limits. Although the large water-buoyant propagules of Rhizophora have capacity for long distance dispersal, such events might be rare in reality, as reflected by the low level of gene flow and high genetic differentiation between most of population pairs within each species. Phylogeographic separation of Australian and Pacific island populations from SE Asian lineages previously revealed with DNA sequence data was still detectable in R. apiculata based on genetic distances, but this pattern of disjunction was not always evident in R. mucronata and R. stylosa, suggesting that fast-evolving molecular markers could be more suitable for detecting contemporary genetic structure but not deep evolutionary divergence caused by historical vicariance. Given that mangrove species generally have small effective population sizes, we conclude that genetic drift coupled with limited gene flow have played a dominant role in producing the current pattern of population genetic diversity in the IWP Rhizophora species, overshadowing the

  6. Regeneration of Rhizophora mangle in a Caribbean mangrove forest: interacting effects of canopy disturbance and a stem-boring beetle.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Wayne P; Quek, Swee P; Mitchell, Betsy J

    2003-11-01

    Current theory predicts that in low-density, seed-limited plant populations, seed predation will be more important than competition in determining the number of individuals that reach maturity. However, when plant density is high, competition for microsites suitable for establishment and growth is expected to have a relatively greater effect. This dichotomous perspective does not account for situations in which the risk of seed predation differs inside versus outside recruitment microsites. We report the results of a field experiment and sampling studies that demonstrate such an interaction between microsite quality and the risk of propagule predation in mangrove forests on the Caribbean coast of Panama, where it appears to play a key role in shaping the demography and dynamics of the mangrove, Rhizophora mangle. Rhizophora's water-borne propagules establish wherever they strand, but long-term sampling revealed that only those that do so in or near lightning-created canopy gaps survive and grow to maturity. These microsites afford better growth conditions than the surrounding understory and, as importantly, provide a refuge from predation by the scolytid beetle, Coccotrypes rhizophorae. This refuge effect was confirmed with a field experiment in which Rhizophora seedlings were planted at different positions relative to gap edges, from 5 m inside to 20 m outside the gap. Mortality due to beetle attack increased linearly from an average of 10% inside a gap to 72% at 20 m into the forest. The interaction between canopy disturbance and propagule predation may be having a large impact on the composition of our study forests. Being shade-tolerant, Rhizophora seedlings that escape or survive beetle attack can persist in the understory for years. However, the high rate of beetle-induced mortality effectively eliminates the contribution of advance regeneration by Rhizophora saplings to gap succession. This may explain why the shade-intolerant mangrove, Laguncularia racemosa

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of Crassostrea gasar (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    PubMed

    Cavaleiro, Nathalia P; Solé-Cava, Antonio M; Melo, Cláudio M R; de Almeida, Luiz G; Lazoski, Cristiano; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Crassostrea gasar was sequenced using the Ion Proton technology in combination with 454 Roche GS-FLX plataform data. We assembled a 17,686 bp complete circular mitochondrial genome, containing 13 protein-coding genes, a major non-coding region (MNR), two ribosomal RNA genes and 24 transfer RNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated amino acid sequences from mitochondria showed monophyletic clades formed with high bootstrap values. This is the first complete mitochondrial sequence of an oyster from South America. Mitogenome sequence was deposited in GenBank under the accession number KR856227.

  8. Rhizophores in Rhizophora mangle L: an alternative interpretation of so-called ''aerial roots''.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Nanuza L de

    2006-06-01

    Rhizophora mangle L., one of the most common mangrove species, has an aerial structure system that gives it stability in permanently swampy soils. In fact, these structures, known as "aerial roots" or "stilt roots", have proven to be peculiar branches with positive geotropism, which form a large number of roots when in contact with swampy soils. These organs have a sympodial branching system, wide pith, slightly thickened cortex, collateral vascular bundles, polyarch stele and endarch protoxylem, as in the stem, and a periderm produced by a phellogen at the apex similar to a root cap. They also have the same type of trichosclereid that occurs in the stem, with negative geotropism, unlike true Rhizophora roots, which do not form trichosclereids at all. On the other hand, these branches do not form leaves and in this respect they are similar to roots. These peculiar branches are rhizophores or special root-bearing branches, analogous to those found in Lepidodendrales and other Carboniferous tree ferns that grew in swampy soils. PMID:16710561

  9. Does the wood-borer Sphaeroma terebrans (Crustacea) shape the distribution of the mangrove Rhizophora mucronata?

    PubMed

    Svavarsson, Jörundur; Osore, Melckzedeck K W; Olafsson, Emil

    2002-12-01

    Field surveys were conducted to evaluate the occurrence of the isopod borer Sphaeroma terebrans (Crustacea) in aerial roots (prop roots) of the red mangrove Rhizophora mucronata on several different spatial scales (m to 100 km) in East Africa. In 6 out of 17 sites studied in Kenya and on Zanzibar Island, Tanzania, no signs of the isopods were found. When the isopods were present the frequency of infestation was high. Trees in muddy substrates in the lower intertidal, in particular at fringing channels or the open sea, showed high prevalence and intensity of infestation, with large part of their roots damaged or dead. Trees at the upper range of Rhizophora, in sandy and muddy areas, showed no signs of isopod infestation. This pattern recurred in mangrove forests on large spatial scales and there was no indication that island forests differed from the mainland forests. This indicates that sediment characteristics, vertical height in the tidal zone, and direct exposure to incoming water are the major factors controlling the abundance of S. terebrans. The isopod may play an important role in determining the lower intertidal limits of R. mucronata. Trees with numerous dead or nongrowing roots, as result of Sphaeroma attack, are likely to tumble due to a lack of root support and this is most likely to occur along channels at the lower, muddy intertidal. Tumbled trees were frequently observed along channels in the lower, muddy intertidal, but rarely in the mid or high intertidal. Implications for management of mangrove forests are discussed.

  10. COX-2 and sPLA2 inhibitory activity of aqueous extract and polyphenols of Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove).

    PubMed

    Marrero, Evangelina; Sánchez, Janet; de Armas, Elizabeth; Escobar, Arturo; Melchor, Gleiby; Abad, M J; Bermejo, Paulina; Villar, Angel M; Megías, J; Alcaraz, Maria J

    2006-06-01

    The aqueous extract of Rhizophora mangle bark and its polyphenolic fractions showed remarkable in vitro antiinflammatory activity in a preliminary study. The low molecular weight fraction exhibited cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitory activity while the total aqueous extract and the low molecular weight fraction showed secretory phospholipase A(2) inhibitory activity. PMID:16698195

  11. Interspecific hybridization between Crassostrea angulata and C. ariakensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Tuo; Zhang, Yuehuan; Yan, Xiwu; Wang, Zhaoping; Li, Dongchun; Su, Jiaqi; Yu, Ruihai

    2015-08-01

    Interspecific hybridization can generate heterosis, which is proven to be a useful tool in selective breeding programs for oyster culture. Crassostrea angulata and C. ariakensis are two important economic shellfish species in China. We conducted 2 × 2 reciprocal crosses to determine whether these two species can cross-fertilize and their hybrids can hatch, survive and perform heterosis. Fertilization was found symmetrical without delay. The rate of fertilization success of C. angulata ♀ × C. ariakensis ♂ was lower than that of C. ariakensis ♀ × C. angulata ♂, and the success rate of both hybridizations was lower than that of two intraspecific crosses each. During the planktonic period, survival rate of the progeny was lower in the hybrid crosses than in the intraspecific crosses. On day 360, mean shell height of the progeny of C. angulata ♀ × C. angulata ♂ was highest, which was followed by that of C. angulata ♀ × C. ariakensis ♂, C. ariakensis ♀ × C. ariakensis ♂ and C. ariakensis ♀ × C. angulata ♂ in a descending order. Morphology of adults produced by the hybrid crosses was similar to that of C. angulata. Both hybrids underwent normal gonad development and produced mature gametes in the mating season. This study provided new insights into the quantitative traits in interspecific crosses of Crassostrea species, thus being of guidance value for selective breeding of oyster.

  12. The reproductive cycle of the oyster Crassostrea gasar.

    PubMed

    Gomes, C H A M; Silva, F C; Lopes, G R; Melo, C M R

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the reproductive cycle of the oyster Crassostrea gasar (= C. brasiliana) in the field and the laboratory. The reproductive cycle of the animals was evaluated in the field at Sambaqui Beach, Florianópolis, SC (27° 29'18″ S and 48° 32'12″ W) from May 2008 through November 2009. In July, the animals were in the resting stage. The early growth stage began in August and was followed by the late growth stage in October. In November and December, the oysters began to enter the mature stage. Females in spawning condition were predominant during these months. The stages of the reproductive cycle were positively associated with temperature (r=0.77, P<0.01) and negatively associated with salinity (r=-0.56, P=0.042). These findings demonstrated that increased temperature and reduced salinity influence the reproductive development of Crassostrea gasar. The condition index (CI) of the animals was also associated with the seawater temperature. The highest values of the condition index were observed during the months when the temperature of the seawater was gradually increasing. A laboratory experiment was performed to test the effect of salinity on the reproductive cycle of the oysters. The experiment was conducted in standardized tanks. The animals were conditioned using two salinities (24‰ and 34‰). The salinity regime influenced the development of the gonadal tissue of the oysters. A salinity of 24‰ produced greater reproductive development.

  13. Impact of atrazine on aneuploidy in pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Bouilly, Karine; Leitão, Alexandra; McCombie, Helen; Lapègue, Sylvie

    2003-01-01

    Aneuploidy has previously been described and studied in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, and has been shown to be negatively correlated with growth. The present study investigated the effect of atrazine on the level of aneuploidy in this species. Crassostrea gigas adults and juveniles were subjected to different concentrations of atrazine representing a peak value found in a polluted environment (46.5 nM) and a value 10 times higher (465 nM). Although atrazine did not show any effect on the oyster mortality, significant differences in aneuploidy level were observed between the different treatments (9% for the control, 16% for 46.5 nM and 20% for 465 nM atrazine). Moreover, the same levels of aneuploidy were observed at adult and juvenile stages. This is the first reported evidence for an environmental effect on aneuploidy in C. gigas. These results will be useful for the oyster aquaculture industry and management of resources. The lowest atrazine level in the current study represents realistic potential exposure, and the results suggest that studies should be made on other aquatic species at risk of exposure to atrazine in the wild. This widely used compound may be an important factor causing damage to genetic material.

  14. IN VITRO KILLING OF PERKINSUS MARINUS BY HEMOCYTES OF OYSTERS CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A colorimetric microbicidal assay was adapted, optimized and applied in experiments to characterize the in vitro capacity of eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) hemocytes to kill cultured isolates of Perkinsus marinus, a protozoan parasite causing a highly destructive disease...

  15. RESPONSES OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) HEMOCYTES TO NONPATHOGENIC AND CLINICAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial uptake by oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and bactericidal activity of oyster hemocytes were studied using four environmental isolates and three clinical isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Clinical isolates (2030, 2062, 2107) were obtained from gastroenteritis patien...

  16. WATER QUALITY AND OYSTER HEALTH (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA): AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO DETERMINING HABITAT RESTORATION POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volety, Aswani K., S. Gregory Tolley and James T. Winstead. 2001. Water Quality and Oyster Health (Crassostrea virginica): An Integrated Approach to Determining Habitat Restoration Potential (Abstract). Presented at the 5th International Conference on Shellfish Restoration, 18-21...

  17. Shell hardness and compressive strength of the Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and the Asian oyster, Crassostrea ariakensis.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Sara A; Chon, Grace D; Lee, James Jin-Wu; Lane, Hillary A; Paynter, Kennedy T

    2013-12-01

    The valves of oysters act as a physical barrier between tissues and the external environment, thereby protecting the oyster from environmental stress and predation. To better understand differences in shell properties and predation susceptibilities of two physiologically and morphologically similar oysters, Crassostrea virginica and Crassostrea ariakensis, we quantified and compared two mechanical properties of shells: hardness (resistance to irreversible deformation; GPa) and compressive strength (force necessary to produce a crack; N). We found no differences in the hardness values between foliated layers (innermost and outermost foliated layers), age class (C. virginica: 1, 4, 6, 9 years; C. ariakensis: 4, 6 years), or species. This suggests that the foliated layers have similar properties and are likely composed of the same material. The compressive force required to break wet and dry shells was also not different. However, the shells of both six- and nine-year-old C. virginica withstood higher compressive force than C. virginica shells aged either one or four, and the shells of C. ariakensis at both ages studied (4- and 6-years-old). Differences in ability to withstand compressive force are likely explained by differences in thickness and density between age classes and species. Further, we compared the compressive strength of differing ages of these two species to the crushing force of common oyster predators in the Chesapeake Bay. By studying the physical properties of shells, this work may contribute to a better understanding of the mechanical defenses of oysters as well as of their predation vulnerabilities. PMID:24445443

  18. Proteomic characterization of mucosal secretions in the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Pales Espinosa, Emmanuelle; Koller, Antonius; Allam, Bassem

    2016-01-30

    The soft body surface of marine invertebrates is covered by a layer of mucus, a slippery gel secreted by mucocytes lining epithelia. The functions of this gel are diverse including locomotion, cleansing, food particles processing and defense against physicochemical injuries and infectious agents. In oysters, mucus covering pallial organs has been demonstrated to have a major importance in the processing of food particles and in the interactions with waterborne pathogens. Given the limited information available on mucus in bivalves and the apparent wide spectra of activity of bioactive molecules present in this matrix, the characterization of these mucosal secretions has become a research priority. In this study, mucus was separately collected from the mantle, gills and labial palps of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) and analyzed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed the presence of a wide variety of molecules involved in host-microbe interactions, including putative adhesion molecules (e.g. c-type lectins) confirming that transcripts previously identified in epithelial cells are translated into proteins secreted in mucus. Mucus composition was different among samples collected from different organs. These results generate a reference map for C. virginica pallial mucus to better characterize the various physiological functions of mucosal secretions.

  19. Polyphenol and phytosterol composition in an antibacterial extract from Rhizophora mangle L. bark.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Perera, Luz María; Varcalcel, Lino; Escobar, Arturo; Noa, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Rhizophora mangle L. bark aqueous extract has antimicrobial, wound healing and antiulcerogenic properties. These properties could be associated with its chemical composition. To test this hypothesis, gravimetric, colorimetric, gas chromatography techniques were used to determine the preliminary chemical composition of this extract. Sephadex LH-20 Exclusion Chromatography was used by the fractionation of total extract and fractionation of low molecular weight polyphenols by liquid/liquid extraction. High Performance Liquid Chromatography was used to perform the composition in this low molecular weigh polyphenols fraction. The extract presented polyphenolic structures (54.78%) and other structural components (45.22%). Polymeric tannins were the major polyphenolic component (80%) and 20% were hydrolysable tannins. Epicatechin, catechin, chlorogenic acid, gallic acid and ellagic acid were monomeric structures determined in this extract. Phytosterols (0.0285%): stigmasterol, beta-sitosterol and campesterol were also present. PMID:18928137

  20. Condensed tannins from mangrove species Kandelia candel and Rhizophora mangle and their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang-Liang; Lin, Yi-Ming; Zhou, Hai-Chao; Wei, Shu-Dong; Chen, Jia-Hong

    2010-01-01

    The structures of condensed tannins isolated from two mangrove species, Kandelia candel and Rhizophora mangle, were characterized by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analyses. Results demonstrate that large heterogeneity occurs in degree of polymerization, pattern of hydroxylation, and substitution with monosaccharides in the structures of the condensed tannins. Condensed tannin oligomers from K. candel and R. mangle were shown to be heterogeneous mixtures consisting of procyanidin and prodelphinidin structural units with the former dominating. The MALDI-TOF mass spectra contained masses corresponding to a distinct oligomeric series of glycosylated heteropoly flavan units. In addition, condensed tannins from two mangrove plants were screened for their potential antioxidant activities using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) model systems. PMID:20110901

  1. The effects of electric impulse on growth of Rhizophora mucronata seedlings (Rhizophorales: Rhizophoraceae).

    PubMed

    Kathiresan, K; Rajendran, N

    2000-12-01

    Exposure of mangrove seedlings to electric current was studied at an intensity of 10, 20 and 30 mA to 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h in different combinations, either to plumule or radicle or both parts of the propagules of Rhizophora mucronata Poir (sample size = 30). The electric current-treated propagules and untreated control were cultured hydroponically in sea water for 75 days, and root and shoot growth parameters measured. The root elongation was significantly influenced by duration of exposure, site of propagule treated and combined effects of current intensity x site of propagule treated. Leaf number and area were significantly influenced by intensity of electric current and duration of exposure; whereas shoot elongation was affected by the duration of exposure. The root number was significantly affected by duration of exposure. In general, the electric impulse improved the growth characteristics of shoot and root. PMID:11487936

  2. Sap flow measurements of Ceriops tagal and Rhizophora mucronata mangrove trees by deuterium tracing and lysimetry.

    PubMed

    Lambs, Luc; Saenger, Anaïs

    2011-10-15

    Mangrove forest trees grow in severe conditions such as diurnal submersion and high salinity surface and subsurface waters. This study focuses on two species on Mayotte Island, i.e. Ceriops tagal and Rhizophora mucronata, living in the middle range of the coastal mangrove. The seedlings of these trees were planted in a tropical greenhouse with an original pump system built to reproduce the natural tidal effect. The water used by these saplings, in two contrasted salinity conditions, was measured by lysimetry. For adult species, the trees' water consumption was measured on the field side after being injected with heavy water (D(2)O). Our work shows that this isotopic technique also works in saline conditions, and a water consumption of around 1 ± 0.2 L per day and per centimeter of diameter was found. These values are discussed as follows: the techniques used, the distinctive features of the mangrove trees, and other factors affecting the water absorption.

  3. Biological responses of the american oyster 'Crassostrea virginica' (gmelin) to thermal effluent in the Chesapeake-Delaware Bay area. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tinsman, J.C.; Maurer, D.; Pennachi, K.A.

    1981-01-01

    This report presents the results of a 1979 study of various aspects of the life history of the oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and the effects of temperature-salinity interactions in the mid-Atlantic region. The study was intended to provide input to power plant siting decisions in the Chesapeake Bay area. Eighteen collections of planted oysters were made from effluent and control stations of two power plant sites in the mid-Atlantic region. Oyster mortalities were related to physical extremes at both sites, but were higher at PEPCO. Shell growth was evident at DPL, but not at PEPCO.

  4. Utilization of detrital complexes by the oyster, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin)

    SciTech Connect

    Crosby, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    The contribution of bacteria and nonliving particulate organic matter of detrital complexes to the nutrition of the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, was investigated in the laboratory under normal feeding conditions. Results indicate the oysters were capable of assimilating crude fiber extracted from /sup 14/C-Spartina alterniflora with an efficiency of approximately 3% and that enteric bacteria did not enhance this process. Less than 1% of an oyster's energetic demands could be met by direct utilization of this substrate, in the Choptank River subestuary of the Chesapeake Bay. The potential contribution of refractory organics to oysters in large salt marshes having crude fiber concentration greater than in the Choptank system, are discussed. The ability of the oyster to utilize /sup 14/C and /sup 15/N from cellulolytic marine bacteria, isolated from a S. alterniflora dominated salt marsh, was also studied.

  5. A feeding model of oyster larvae (Crassostrea angulata).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tianlong; Liu, Ying; Zheng, Jimeng; Zhang, Tao; Qi, Jianfei

    2015-08-01

    There is a need to develop more efficient rearing systems for the aquaculture of economically important bivalves, such as oysters. Here, we constructed a model that describes the feeding behavior of larval Crassostrea angulata oysters and tested it in an experimental setting. Larval ingestion rate is closely correlated with larval length. Based on our model, we showed that larval swimming speed, velum diameter and the filtration coefficient, which also determine the ingestion rate, are also correlated with larval length. Our model integrates morphological, locomotory and feeding behavior parameters to establish a relation between them and so provides a mathematical way to describe variation in the feeding behavior of bivalve larvae. The results of this study could facilitate the precise management of the aquaculture of bivalve larvae, in particular the optimum prey density and feeding rate of these important organisms.

  6. Adult Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) May Have Light Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changlu; Wang, Jiao; Yang, Yanjian; Li, Zhuang; Guo, Ting; Li, Yongchuan; Wang, Xiaotong

    2015-01-01

    Light-sensitivity is an important aspect of mollusk survival as it plays a vital role in reproduction and predator avoidance. In the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas light sensitivity has been demonstrated in the larval stage but has not yet been conclusively demonstrated in adult oysters. In this paper we describe an experiment which was undertaken to determine if adult Pacific oysters were sensitive to light. One LED flashlight was used to shine light onto adult oysters while they were filtering seawater through their shell openings. We found that the degree of opening increased gradually during the light period but rapidly decreased when the flashlight was turned off in the treated group but not in the control group. These results suggest that adult Pacific oyster may be sensitive to light.

  7. Preparation and antioxidant activities of oligosaccharides from Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shengjun; Huang, Xiaolian

    2017-02-01

    Oligosaccharides were prepared from Crassostrea gigas by hydrolysis of polysaccharide in C. gigas with peroxide oxygen (H2O2). The hydrolysates were cleared of protein, filtered, ultrafiltered and precipitated with absolute ethanol to give C. gigas oligosaccharides (CGOs). Factors affecting CGO yields, i.e., reaction time, temperature, and H2O2 concentration, were optimised as follows: 2.96h reaction time, 84.71°C reaction temperature, and 2.46% H2O2 concentration. Under these conditions, the maximum yield of CGOs reached 10.61%. The CGOs were then partially characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV spectroscopy, monosaccharide composition, and antioxidant activities. Results indicate that CGOs possessed strong hydroxyl radical activity, 2,2-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl-radical-scavenging activity and reducing capacity at a concentration of 100μg/mL. PMID:27596415

  8. Adult Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) May Have Light Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanjian; Li, Zhuang; Guo, Ting; Li, Yongchuan; Wang, Xiaotong

    2015-01-01

    Light-sensitivity is an important aspect of mollusk survival as it plays a vital role in reproduction and predator avoidance. In the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas light sensitivity has been demonstrated in the larval stage but has not yet been conclusively demonstrated in adult oysters. In this paper we describe an experiment which was undertaken to determine if adult Pacific oysters were sensitive to light. One LED flashlight was used to shine light onto adult oysters while they were filtering seawater through their shell openings. We found that the degree of opening increased gradually during the light period but rapidly decreased when the flashlight was turned off in the treated group but not in the control group. These results suggest that adult Pacific oyster may be sensitive to light. PMID:26474058

  9. A feeding model of oyster larvae (Crassostrea angulata).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tianlong; Liu, Ying; Zheng, Jimeng; Zhang, Tao; Qi, Jianfei

    2015-08-01

    There is a need to develop more efficient rearing systems for the aquaculture of economically important bivalves, such as oysters. Here, we constructed a model that describes the feeding behavior of larval Crassostrea angulata oysters and tested it in an experimental setting. Larval ingestion rate is closely correlated with larval length. Based on our model, we showed that larval swimming speed, velum diameter and the filtration coefficient, which also determine the ingestion rate, are also correlated with larval length. Our model integrates morphological, locomotory and feeding behavior parameters to establish a relation between them and so provides a mathematical way to describe variation in the feeding behavior of bivalve larvae. The results of this study could facilitate the precise management of the aquaculture of bivalve larvae, in particular the optimum prey density and feeding rate of these important organisms. PMID:25921946

  10. Parasites infecting the cultured oyster Crassostrea gasar (Adanson, 1757) in Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, Fernando Ramos; Vianna, Rogério Tubino; Vieira, Cairé Barreto; Farias, Natanael Dantas; Da Silva, Patricia Mirella

    2015-05-01

    The oyster Crassostrea gasar is a species widely used as food and a source of income for the local population of the estuaries of Northeast Brazil. Perkinsus marinus and Perkinsus olseni are deleterious parasites for oyster farming and were recently detected in Brazil. In this study, a histopathologic survey of the oyster C. gasar cultured in the estuary of the River Mamanguape (Paraíba State) was performed. Adult oysters were collected in December 2011 and March, May, August and October 2012 and processed for histology and Perkinsus sp. identification by molecular analyses. Histopathological analysis revealed the presence of parasitic organisms including viral gametocytic hypertrophy, prokaryote-like colonies, protozoans (Perkinsus sp. and Nematopsis sp.) and metazoans (Tylocephalum sp. and cestodes). Other commensal organisms were also detected (the protozoan Ancistrocoma sp. and the turbellarian Urastoma sp.). The protozoan parasite Perkinsus sp. had the highest overall prevalence among the symbiotic organisms studied (48.9%), followed by Nematopsis sp. (36.3%). The other organisms were only sporadically observed. Only the protozoan Perkinsus sp. caused alterations in the oysters' infected organs. Molecular analyses confirmed the presence of P. marinus, P. olseni and Perkinsus beihaiensis infecting the oyster C. gasar. This is the first report of P. beihaiensis in this oyster species.

  11. Identification of differentially expressed genes of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas exposed to prolonged thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Meistertzheim, Anne-Leila; Tanguy, Arnaud; Moraga, Dario; Thébault, Marie-Thérèse

    2007-12-01

    Groups of oysters (Crassostrea gigas) were exposed to 25 degrees C for 24 days (controls to 13 degrees C) to explore the biochemical and molecular pathways affected by prolonged thermal stress. This temperature is 4 degrees C above the summer seawater temperature encountered in western Brittany, France where the animals were collected. Suppression subtractive hybridization was used to identify specific up- and downregulated genes in gill and mantle tissues after 7-10 and 24 days of exposure. The resulting libraries contain 858 different sequences that potentially represent highly expressed genes in thermally stressed oysters. Expression of 17 genes identified in these libraries was studied using real-time PCR in gills and mantle at different time points over the course of the thermal stress. Differential gene expression levels were much higher in gills than in the mantle, showing that gills are more sensitive to thermal stress. Expression of most transcripts (mainly heat shock proteins and genes involved in cellular homeostasis) showed a high and rapid increase at 3-7 days of exposure, followed by a decrease at 14 days, and a second, less-pronounced increase at 17-24 days. A slow-down in protein synthesis occurred after 24 days of thermal stress.

  12. Parasites of the pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis cultured in Nayarit, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Martínez, Jorge; Vasquez-Yeomans, Rebeca; Padilla-Lardizábal, Gloria

    2010-09-01

    The pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis is collected and cultured in Nayarit on the Pacific coast of Mexico, and the improvement and promotion of its culture are seen as a possible source for the economic development of coastal populations. However, information about the parasite fauna of the pleasure oyster is almost completely lacking. A histopathological survey carried out in two estuaries, Boca del Camichín and Pozo Chino, revealed the presence of hypertrophied gametes, rickettsiales-like prokaryotes (RLPs), the protozoan Perkinsus marinus, a protozoan Nematopsis sp., Ancistrocoma-like ciliates (ALCs), Sphenophrya-like ciliates, a turbellarian Urastoma sp., and encysted crustaceans. In general, prevalence and intensity of parasites were similar in both localities except that ALCs and encysted crustaceans were more prevalent in Pozo Chino than in Boca del Camichín. Perkinsus marinus and RLPs seem to represent a more significant risk for the health of pleasure oysters than do the other parasites, and surveillance and control of these parasites are needed for the development of pleasure oyster culture.

  13. A glutamic acid decarboxylase (CgGAD) highly expressed in hemocytes of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijia; Wang, Lingling; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Weilin; Xin, Lusheng; Xu, Jiachao; Wang, Hao; Song, Linsheng

    2016-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), a rate-limiting enzyme to catalyze the reaction converting the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate to inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), not only functions in nervous system, but also plays important roles in immunomodulation in vertebrates. However, GAD has rarely been reported in invertebrates, and never in molluscs. In the present study, one GAD homologue (designed as CgGAD) was identified from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The full length cDNA of CgGAD was 1689 bp encoding a polypeptide of 562 amino acids containing a conserved pyridoxal-dependent decarboxylase domain. CgGAD mRNA and protein could be detected in ganglion and hemocytes of oysters, and their abundance in hemocytes was unexpectedly much higher than those in ganglion. More importantly, CgGAD was mostly located in those granulocytes without phagocytic capacity in oysters, and could dynamically respond to LPS stimulation. Further, after being transfected into HEK293 cells, CgGAD could promote the production of GABA. Collectively, these findings suggested that CgGAD, as a GABA synthase and molecular marker of GABAergic system, was mainly distributed in hemocytes and ganglion and involved in neuroendocrine-immune regulation network in oysters, which also provided a novel insight to the co-evolution between nervous system and immune system. PMID:27208883

  14. Analysis of Stomach and Gut Microbiomes of the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) from Coastal Louisiana, USA

    DOE PAGES

    King, Gary M.; Judd, Craig; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Smith, Conor

    2012-12-12

    In this paper, we used high throughput pyrosequencing to characterize stomach and gut content microbiomes of Crassostrea virginica, the Easter oyster, obtained from two sites, one in Barataria Bay (Hackberry Bay) and the other in Terrebonne Bay (Lake Caillou), Louisiana, USA. Stomach microbiomes in oysters from Hackberry Bay were overwhelmingly dominated by Mollicutes most closely related to Mycoplasma; a more rich community dominated by Planctomyctes occurred in Lake Caillou oyster stomachs. Gut communities for oysters from both sites differed from stomach communities, and harbored a relatively diverse assemblage of phylotypes. Phylotypes most closely related to Shewanella and a Chloroflexi strainmore » dominated the Lake Caillou and Hackberry Bay gut microbiota, respectively. While many members of the stomach and gut microbiomes appeared to be transients or opportunists, a putative core microbiome was identified based on phylotypes that occurred in all stomach or gut samples only. The putative core stomach microbiome comprised 5 OTUs in 3 phyla, while the putative core gut microbiome contained 44 OTUs in 12 phyla. These results collectively revealed novel microbial communities within the oyster digestive system, the functions of the oyster microbiome are largely unknown. Finally, a comparison of microbiomes from Louisiana oysters with bacterial communities reported for other marine invertebrates and fish indicated that molluscan microbiomes were more similar to each other than to microbiomes of polychaetes, decapods and fish.« less

  15. Analysis of Stomach and Gut Microbiomes of the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) from Coastal Louisiana, USA

    SciTech Connect

    King, Gary M.; Judd, Craig; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Smith, Conor

    2012-12-12

    In this paper, we used high throughput pyrosequencing to characterize stomach and gut content microbiomes of Crassostrea virginica, the Easter oyster, obtained from two sites, one in Barataria Bay (Hackberry Bay) and the other in Terrebonne Bay (Lake Caillou), Louisiana, USA. Stomach microbiomes in oysters from Hackberry Bay were overwhelmingly dominated by Mollicutes most closely related to Mycoplasma; a more rich community dominated by Planctomyctes occurred in Lake Caillou oyster stomachs. Gut communities for oysters from both sites differed from stomach communities, and harbored a relatively diverse assemblage of phylotypes. Phylotypes most closely related to Shewanella and a Chloroflexi strain dominated the Lake Caillou and Hackberry Bay gut microbiota, respectively. While many members of the stomach and gut microbiomes appeared to be transients or opportunists, a putative core microbiome was identified based on phylotypes that occurred in all stomach or gut samples only. The putative core stomach microbiome comprised 5 OTUs in 3 phyla, while the putative core gut microbiome contained 44 OTUs in 12 phyla. These results collectively revealed novel microbial communities within the oyster digestive system, the functions of the oyster microbiome are largely unknown. Finally, a comparison of microbiomes from Louisiana oysters with bacterial communities reported for other marine invertebrates and fish indicated that molluscan microbiomes were more similar to each other than to microbiomes of polychaetes, decapods and fish.

  16. The inhibitory role of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on immunomodulation of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijia; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Weilin; Xin, Lusheng; Li, Yiqun; Liu, Zhaoqun; Song, Linsheng

    2016-05-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter to suppress the immune-mediated pro-inflammatory reactions, and it has been used in the treatment of many inflammation-related diseases in vertebrates, while its immunomodulatory role in invertebrates has never been reported. In the present study, GABA was found to exist in the hemolymph of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, and its concentration decreased slightly from 8.00 ± 0.37 μmol L(-1) at normal condition to 7.73 ± 0.15 μmol L(-1) at 6 h after LPS stimulation, and then increased to 9.34 ± 0.15 μmol L(-1), 8.86 ± 0.68 μmol L(-1) at 12 h and 48 h, respectively. After LPS stimulation, the mRNA expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines (CgIL-17 and CgTNF) and immune effectors (CgSOD and CgBPI), and the protein expression of NOS increased significantly, and these increased trends were remarkably inhibited by GABA stimulation. At the same time, the phagocytosis rate and apoptosis rate of immunocytes also increased obviously after LPS stimulation, whereas the increase was repressed with the addition of GABA. The results collectively demonstrated that GABA was an indispensable inhibitory agent for both humoral and cellular immune response, which mainly functioned at the late phase of immune response to avoid the excess immune reactions and maintain the immune homeostasis.

  17. Toxicity assessment of peptaibols and contaminated sediments on Crassostrea gigas embryos.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Laurence; Quiniou, Françoise; Ruiz, Nicolas; Montagu, Monique; Amiard, Jean-Claude; Pouchus, Yves François

    2007-08-01

    Peptaibols are known membrane-modifying peptides that were recently detected in marine sediments and mussels collected from a shellfish farming area (Fier d'Ars, Atlantic coast, France). In this investigation, embryotoxicity bioassays with oysters (Crassostrea gigas) were performed to assess acute toxicity of alamethicin and different groups of peptaibols produced by a Trichoderma longibrachiatum strain isolated from marine environment. C. gigas embryos appeared very sensitive to all the metabolites examined with higher toxic effects for long-sequence peptides (EC50 ranging from 10 to 64 nM). D-shaped larvae with mantle abnormality were particularly noticed when peptaibol concentrations increased. Disturbances of embryogenesis were also observed following exposure to organic and aqueous extract of sediments from Fier d'Ars (EC50=42.4 and 6.6 g L(-1) dry weight, respectively). Although peptaibol concentrations measured in these sediments could explain only a part of the toxic effects observed, this study suggests that these mycotoxins can induce larval abnormalities in a population of exposed animals at environmentally realistic concentrations. Their detection in coastal areas devoted to bivalve culture should be taken into account.

  18. Acanthoparyphium sp. and other metazoan symbionts of the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, from South Texas.

    PubMed

    Fredensborg, B L; Ramirez, J J; Partida, L

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we investigated oysters, Crassostrea virginica , from Laguna Madre in South Texas, where a 45-yr old study recorded metacercarial infections of the echinostomatid trematode, Acanthoparyphium spinulosum , an Asian relative of which, Acanthoparyphium tyosenense, has been associated with human infections via the ingestion of raw mollusks. In an effort to examine the base-line infection parameters of Acanthoparyphium sp. in oysters, we examined the effect of distance from the shoreline, which is the habitat of the first intermediate host snail, Cerithidea pliculosa, as well as temporal changes in oyster infection levels, by conducting quarterly collections of oysters during a year. We found that almost all oysters (prevalence = 97.8-100%) were infected regardless of distance to the shoreline and season. However, the abundance of metacercariae was significantly higher close to the shoreline, while no significant temporal changes could be detected. In addition to the echinostomatid, we found a high abundance of the metacestode Tylocephalum sp. and the presence of 4 other metazoan parasites. None of the infections seemed to incur significant tissue damage to the oysters. Our study shows that at least locally, recreational harvesters of oysters may be exposed to Acanthoparyphium sp. Future studies should examine oysters from snail host habitats in the Gulf of Mexico, and the potential zoonotic risk of Acanthoparyphium sp. should be evaluated using experimental infections of animal models.

  19. A Genetic Discontinuity in a Continuously Distributed Species: Mitochondrial DNA in the American Oyster, Crassostrea Virginica

    PubMed Central

    Reeb, C. A.; Avise, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    Restriction site variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica) was surveyed in continuously distributed populations sampled from the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada, to Brownsville, Texas. mtDNA clonal diversity was high, with 82 different haplotypes revealed among 212 oysters with 13 endonucleases. The mtDNA clones grouped into two distinct genetic arrays (estimated to differ by about 2.6% in nucleotide sequence) that characterized oysters collected north vs. south of a region on the Atlantic mid-coast of Florida. The population genetic ``break'' in mtDNA contrasts with previous reports of near uniformity of nuclear (allozyme) allele frequencies throughout the range of the species, but agrees closely with the magnitude and pattern of mtDNA differentiation reported in other estuarine species in the southeastern United States. This concordance of mtDNA phylogenetic pattern across independently evolving species provides strong evidence for vicariant biogeographic processes in initiating intraspecific population structure. The post-Miocene ecological history of the region suggests that reduced precipitation levels in an enlarged Floridian peninsula may have created discontinuities in suitable estuarine habitat for oysters during glacial periods, and that today such population separations are maintained by the combined influence of ecological gradients and oceanic currents on larval dispersal. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that historical vicariant events, in conjunction with contemporary environmental influences on gene flow, can result in genetic discontinuities in continuously distributed species with high dispersal capability. PMID:1968412

  20. Genetic diversity and substantial population differentiation in Crassostrea hongkongensis revealed by mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Wu, Xiangyun; Yu, Ziniu

    2013-09-01

    The Hong Kong oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis, is an important fisheries resource that is cultivated in the coastal waters of the South China Sea. Despite significant advances in understanding biological and taxonomic aspects of this species, no detailed study of its population genetic diversity in regions of extensive cultivation are available. Direct sequencing of the mtDNA cox1 gene region was used to investigate genetic variation within and between eleven C. hongkongensis populations collected from typical habitats. Sixty-two haplotypes were identified; only haplotype 2 (21.74% of total haplotypes) was shared among all the eleven populations, and most of the observed haplotypes were restricted to individual populations. Both AMOVA and FST analyses revealed significant population structure, and the isolation by distance (IBD) was confirmed. The highest local differentiation was observed between the sample pools from Guangxi versus Guangdong and Fujian, which are separated by a geographic barrier, the Leizhou Peninsula. Current knowledge from seed management suggests that seed transfer from Guangxi province has likely reduced the divergence that somewhat naturally exists between these pools. The findings from the present study could be useful for genetic management and may serve as a baseline by which to monitor future changes in genetic diversity, either due to natural or anthropogenic impacts.

  1. Applications of Multiple Nuclear Genes to the Molecular Phylogeny, Population Genetics and Hybrid Identification in the Mangrove Genus Rhizophora.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongmei; Hou, Yansong; Guo, Zixiao; Wang, Wenqing; Zhong, Cairong; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2015-01-01

    The genus Rhizophora is one of the most important components of mangrove forests. It is an ideal system for studying biogeography, molecular evolution, population genetics, hybridization and conservation genetics of mangroves. However, there are no sufficient molecular markers to address these topics. Here, we developed 77 pairs of nuclear gene primers, which showed successful PCR amplifications across all five Rhizophora species and sequencing in R. apiculata. Here, we present three tentative applications using a subset of the developed nuclear genes to (I) reconstruct the phylogeny, (II) examine the genetic structure and (III) identify natural hybridization in Rhizophora. Phylogenetic analyses support the hypothesis that Rhizophora had disappeared in the Atlantic-East Pacific (AEP) region and was re-colonized from the IWP region approximately 12.7 Mya. Population genetics analyses in four natural populations of R. apiculata in Hainan, China, revealed extremely low genetic diversity, strong population differentiation and extensive admixture, suggesting that the Pleistocene glaciations, particularly the last glacial maximum, greatly influenced the population dynamics of R. apiculata in Hainan. We also verified the hybrid status of a morphologically intermediate individual between R. apiculata and R. stylosa in Hainan. Based on the sequences of five nuclear genes and one chloroplast intergenic spacer, this individual is likely to be an F1 hybrid, with R. stylosa as its maternal parent. The nuclear gene markers developed in this study should be of great value for characterizing the hybridization and introgression patterns in other cases of this genus and testing the role of natural selection using population genomics approaches. PMID:26674070

  2. Applications of Multiple Nuclear Genes to the Molecular Phylogeny, Population Genetics and Hybrid Identification in the Mangrove Genus Rhizophora.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongmei; Hou, Yansong; Guo, Zixiao; Wang, Wenqing; Zhong, Cairong; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2015-01-01

    The genus Rhizophora is one of the most important components of mangrove forests. It is an ideal system for studying biogeography, molecular evolution, population genetics, hybridization and conservation genetics of mangroves. However, there are no sufficient molecular markers to address these topics. Here, we developed 77 pairs of nuclear gene primers, which showed successful PCR amplifications across all five Rhizophora species and sequencing in R. apiculata. Here, we present three tentative applications using a subset of the developed nuclear genes to (I) reconstruct the phylogeny, (II) examine the genetic structure and (III) identify natural hybridization in Rhizophora. Phylogenetic analyses support the hypothesis that Rhizophora had disappeared in the Atlantic-East Pacific (AEP) region and was re-colonized from the IWP region approximately 12.7 Mya. Population genetics analyses in four natural populations of R. apiculata in Hainan, China, revealed extremely low genetic diversity, strong population differentiation and extensive admixture, suggesting that the Pleistocene glaciations, particularly the last glacial maximum, greatly influenced the population dynamics of R. apiculata in Hainan. We also verified the hybrid status of a morphologically intermediate individual between R. apiculata and R. stylosa in Hainan. Based on the sequences of five nuclear genes and one chloroplast intergenic spacer, this individual is likely to be an F1 hybrid, with R. stylosa as its maternal parent. The nuclear gene markers developed in this study should be of great value for characterizing the hybridization and introgression patterns in other cases of this genus and testing the role of natural selection using population genomics approaches.

  3. Applications of Multiple Nuclear Genes to the Molecular Phylogeny, Population Genetics and Hybrid Identification in the Mangrove Genus Rhizophora

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongmei; Hou, Yansong; Guo, Zixiao; Wang, Wenqing; Zhong, Cairong; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2015-01-01

    The genus Rhizophora is one of the most important components of mangrove forests. It is an ideal system for studying biogeography, molecular evolution, population genetics, hybridization and conservation genetics of mangroves. However, there are no sufficient molecular markers to address these topics. Here, we developed 77 pairs of nuclear gene primers, which showed successful PCR amplifications across all five Rhizophora species and sequencing in R. apiculata. Here, we present three tentative applications using a subset of the developed nuclear genes to (I) reconstruct the phylogeny, (II) examine the genetic structure and (III) identify natural hybridization in Rhizophora. Phylogenetic analyses support the hypothesis that Rhizophora had disappeared in the Atlantic-East Pacific (AEP) region and was re-colonized from the IWP region approximately 12.7 Mya. Population genetics analyses in four natural populations of R. apiculata in Hainan, China, revealed extremely low genetic diversity, strong population differentiation and extensive admixture, suggesting that the Pleistocene glaciations, particularly the last glacial maximum, greatly influenced the population dynamics of R. apiculata in Hainan. We also verified the hybrid status of a morphologically intermediate individual between R. apiculata and R. stylosa in Hainan. Based on the sequences of five nuclear genes and one chloroplast intergenic spacer, this individual is likely to be an F1 hybrid, with R. stylosa as its maternal parent. The nuclear gene markers developed in this study should be of great value for characterizing the hybridization and introgression patterns in other cases of this genus and testing the role of natural selection using population genomics approaches. PMID:26674070

  4. Importance of water source in controlling leaf leaching losses in a dwarf red mangrove ( Rhizophora mangle L.) wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Stephen E., III; Childers, Daniel L.

    2007-01-01

    The southern Everglades mangrove ecotone is characterized by extensive dwarf Rhizophora mangle L. shrub forests with a seasonally variable water source (Everglades - NE Florida Bay) and residence times ranging from short to long. We conducted a leaf leaching experiment to understand the influence that water source and its corresponding water quality have on (1) the early decay of R. mangle leaves and (2) the early exchange of total organic carbon (TOC) and total phosphorus (TP) between leaves and the water column. Newly senesced leaves collected from lower Taylor River (FL) were incubated in bottles containing water from one of three sources (Everglades, ambient mangrove, and Florida Bay) that spanned a range of salinity from 0 to 32‰, [TOC] from 710 to 1400 μM, and [TP] from 0.17 to 0.33 μM. We poisoned half the bottles in order to quantify abiotic processes (i.e., leaching) and assumed that non-poisoned bottles represented both biotic (i.e., microbial) and abiotic processes. We sacrificed bottles after 1,2, 5, 10, and 21 days of incubation and quantified changes in leaf mass and changes in water column [TOC] and [TP]. We saw 10-20% loss of leaf mass after 24 h—independent of water treatment—that leveled off by Day 21. After 3 weeks, non-poisoned leaves lost more mass than poisoned leaves, and there was only an effect of salinity on mass loss in poisoned incubations—with greatest leaching-associated losses in Everglades freshwater. Normalized concentrations of TOC in the water column increased by more than two orders of magnitude after 21 days with no effect of salinity and no difference between poisoned and non-poisoned treatments. However, normalized [TP] was lower in non-poisoned incubations as a result of immobilization by epiphytic microbes. This immobilization was greatest in Everglades freshwater and reflects the high P demand in this ecosystem. Immobilization of leached P in mangrove water and Florida Bay water was delayed by several days and may

  5. Root biomechanics in Rhizophora mangle: anatomy, morphology and ecology of mangrove’s flying buttresses

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Alonzo, Rodrigo; Moctezuma, Coral; Ordoñez, Víctor R.; Angeles, Guillermo; Martínez, Armando J.; López-Portillo, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Rhizophora species of mangroves have a conspicuous system of stilt-like roots (rhizophores) that grow from the main stem and resemble flying buttresses. As such, the development of rhizophores can be predicted to be important for the effective transmission of dynamic loads from the top of the tree to the ground, especially where the substrate is unstable, as is often the case in the habitats where Rhizophora species typically grow. This study tests the hypothesis that rhizophore architecture in R. mangle co-varies with their proximity to the main stem, and with stem size and crown position. Methods The allometry and wood mechanical properties of R. mangle (red mangrove) trees growing in a mangrove basin forest within a coastal lagoon in Mexico were compared with those of coexisting, non-buttressed mangrove trees of Avicennia germinans. The anatomy of rhizophores was related to mechanical stress due to crown orientation (static load) and to prevailing winds (dynamic load) at the study site. Key Results Rhizophores buttressed between 10 and 33 % of tree height. There were significant and direct scaling relationships between the number, height and length of rhizophores vs. basal area, tree height and crown area. Wood mechanical resistance was significantly higher in the buttressed R. mangle (modulus of elasticity, MOE = 18·1 ± 2 GPa) than in A. germinans (MOE = 12·1 ± 0·5 GPa). Slenderness ratios (total height/stem diameter) were higher in R. mangle, but there were no interspecies differences in critical buckling height. When in proximity to the main stem, rhizophores had a lower length/height ratio, higher eccentricity and higher xylem/bark and pith proportions. However, there were no directional trends with regard to prevailing winds or tree leaning. Conclusions In comparison with A. germinans, a tree species with wide girth and flare at the base, R. mangle supports a thinner stem of higher mechanical resistance that is

  6. [Abundance and richness of mollusks and crustaceans associated to the submerged roots of red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) at Bocaripo Lagoon, Sucre, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Cedeño, Jennellis; Jiménez Prieto, Mayré; Pereda, Luisana; Allen, Thays

    2010-10-01

    Mangrove roots are important habitats for many species. The abundance and richness of mollusks and crustaceans associated with the roots demerged of Rhizophora mangle was studied. The samples were gathered between February 2005 and January 2006, in Bocaripo lagoon, north coast of Sucre state, Venezuela. Five stations were established inside the lagoon; on every station two roots were chosen at random, put in plastic bags and scraped. The associated organisms were separated by taxa and fixed in 10% formaldehyde. One thousand ninety two specimens of mollusks, distributed in two classes: Bivalve and Gastropod were collected. Bivalve was the most abundant with 943 individuals. The most representative family was Mytilidae with 6 species, being Musculus lateralis the dominant species. The crustaceans were represented by 372 organisms, belonging to the class Malacostraca, where Panopeus herbstii (169 ind.) was the most abundant species. The families Panopeidae, Porcellanidae and Majidae had the highest number of species. Maximum abundance was in February (224 ind.), with a richness of 25 species and the minimums in November (45 ind.) and a richness of 12 species. The stations 1 and 5 presented the major abundance and richness of organisms, which could be related to environmental conditions favorable, as the major availability of microhabitats and nourishing offer; on the contrary the station 4, presented a more inhospitable environment, due to the high values in the salinity and temperature, which contributes with the minor abundance and richness of the present species. PMID:21302531

  7. Chemical ecology of red mangroves, Rhizophora mangle, in the Hawaiian Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fry, Brian; Cormier, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The coastal red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle L., was introduced to the Hawaiian Islands from Florida 100 yr ago and has spread to cover many shallow intertidal shorelines that once were unvegetated mudflats. We used a field survey approach to test whether mangroves at the land-ocean interface could indicate watershed inputs, especially whether measurements of leaf chemistry could identify coasts with high nutrient inputs and high mangrove productivities. During 2001-2002, we sampled mangroves on dry leeward coasts of southern Moloka'i and O'ahu for 14 leaf variables including stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes (delta13C, delta15N), macronutrients (C, N, P), trace elements (B, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn), and cations (Na, Mg, K, Ca). A new modeling approach using leaf Na, N, P, and delta13C indicated two times higher productivity for mangroves in urban versus rural settings, with rural mangroves more limited by low N and P nutrients and high-nutrient urban mangroves more limited by freshwater inputs and salt stress. Leaf chemistry also helped identify other aspects of mangrove dynamics: especially leaf delta15N values helped identify groundwater N inputs, and a combination of strongly correlated variables (C, N, P, B, Cu, Mg, K, Ca) tracked the mangrove growth response to nutrient loading. Overall, the chemical marker approach is an efficient way to survey watershed forcing of mangrove forest dynamics.

  8. Isolation of phenolics from Rhizophora mangle by combined counter-current chromatography and gel-filtration.

    PubMed

    Costa, Fernanda das Neves; da Silva, Marcos Daniel; Borges, Ricardo Moreira; Leitão, Gilda Guimarães

    2014-12-01

    Nine phenolic compounds, quercetin, epi-catechin, catechin, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, kaempferol 3-O-β-glucopyranoside, quercetin 3-O-β-glucopyranoside, quercetin 3-O-6"-trans-coumaroyl-β-glucoside, kaempferol 3-O-β-rutinoside and quercetin 3-O-β-rutinoside, were isolated from the EtOAc leaf extract of Rhizophora mangle (Rhizophoraceae) combining counter-current chromatography (CCC) and gel-filtration. A solvent system of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (1.5:6:1.5:6) was employed at the preliminary stage of EtOAc extract fractionation as it was shown to contain compounds that differed highly in their hydrophobicity. The obtained fractions were further purified by either CCC or gel-filtration depending on their complexity. The isolated compounds were analyzed by NMR spectroscopy and the proposed structures were confirmed by HRES/ESI/TOF MS. Some of these compounds were isolated and/or identified for the first time in R. mangle. PMID:25632470

  9. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-04-29

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ{sup 2} value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ{sup 2} value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  10. Presence of Octopamine and an Octopamine Receptor in Crassostrea virginica

    PubMed Central

    Pryce, Kerri; Samuel, Dahniel; Lagares, Elsie; Myrthil, Mathilde; Bess, Fiana; Harris, Ave; Welsh, Christopher; Carroll, Margaret A; Catapane, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Octopamine is a biogenic amine first identified in octopus. It has been well studied in arthropods and a few gastropods, serving as a neurotransmitter and hormone. The presence of octopamine has rarely been reported in bivalves and has not been reported in Crassostrea virginica. We utilized HPLC to identify and measure octopamine in cerebral ganglia, visceral ganglia, gill, palps, mantle, heart and hemolymph of C. virginica. Endogenous octopamine levels increased when animals were treated with tyramine, an octopamine precursor. A preliminary study in our lab found that octopamine has a cardio-excitatory action on C. virginica heart. In the present study we also used immunoblotting techniques to identify an octopamine-like receptor (Pan TAAR, trace amine-associated receptor) in oyster heart. The study confirms the presence of octopamine in the nervous system, innervated organs and hemolymph of C. virginica and identifies the presence of an octopamine-like receptor in heart, strengthening the contention that octopamine is important in the physiology of C. virginica as it is in other invertebrates. PMID:26594670

  11. Stress-induced immune changes in the oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, Arnaud; Malham, Shelagh K; Gélébart, Florence; Cueff, Anne; Poulet, Serge A

    2002-01-01

    Information concerning the effect of stress on invertebrate immune functions are scarce. The present study investigated the consequences of a 15-min mechanical disturbance on immune parameters in oysters Crassostrea gigas. As indicated by noradrenaline and dopamine measurements, the mechanical disturbance caused a transient state of stress in oysters. The number of circulating hemocytes, the migratory and phagocytic activities and reactive oxygen species production of hemocytes were measured before, during and after application of the stressor. Results show that all immune functions were significantly downregulated during stress and a transient period of immunostimulation was observed 30-240 min after the end of the disturbance. Taken together, these results suggest that stress can exert a profound influence on oyster immune functions and they may explain why stress and the outbreak of disease are often linked in shellfish culture. Furthermore, the present study strongly suggests that checking the stress status of animals may be necessary to avoid biases when studying oyster immune responses in vivo.

  12. Crassostrea virginica grazing on toxic and non-toxic diatoms.

    PubMed

    Thessen, A E; Soniat, T M; Dortch, Q; Doucette, G J

    2010-01-01

    Despite high abundances of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia spp. over Louisiana oyster beds (Crassostrea virginica; eastern oyster) there have been no documented cases of amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP) in the state. Two possible explanations are that oysters do not readily feed on long pointed chains of Pseudo-nitzschia cells or they discriminate against toxic cells while grazing. To test these hypotheses, short-term grazing experiments were conducted with several diatoms, including the domoic acid (DA)-producing Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries (1.31+/-0.057 pg DA cell(-1)) and the non-toxic Pseudo-nitzschia delicatissima, Thalassiosira weissflogii, and Ditylum brightwellii. Grazing rates on the small centric species T. weissflogii were significantly higher than on the larger and pointier D. brightwellii and either Pseudo-nitzschia species. Grazing on toxic P. multiseries and non-toxic P. delicatissima was not significantly different. Pseudofeces production was higher and feces production was occasionally lower in oysters fed Pseudo-nitzschia spp. than in oysters fed the other two diatoms. Our data demonstrate lower filtration rates of C. virginica on Pseudo-nitzschia spp. relative to the other diatoms tested and comparable filtration on toxic and non-toxic Pseudo-nitzschia spp. These findings suggest that eastern oysters do not discriminate amongst food types due to DA content. PMID:19835902

  13. Stress-induced immune changes in the oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, Arnaud; Malham, Shelagh K; Gélébart, Florence; Cueff, Anne; Poulet, Serge A

    2002-01-01

    Information concerning the effect of stress on invertebrate immune functions are scarce. The present study investigated the consequences of a 15-min mechanical disturbance on immune parameters in oysters Crassostrea gigas. As indicated by noradrenaline and dopamine measurements, the mechanical disturbance caused a transient state of stress in oysters. The number of circulating hemocytes, the migratory and phagocytic activities and reactive oxygen species production of hemocytes were measured before, during and after application of the stressor. Results show that all immune functions were significantly downregulated during stress and a transient period of immunostimulation was observed 30-240 min after the end of the disturbance. Taken together, these results suggest that stress can exert a profound influence on oyster immune functions and they may explain why stress and the outbreak of disease are often linked in shellfish culture. Furthermore, the present study strongly suggests that checking the stress status of animals may be necessary to avoid biases when studying oyster immune responses in vivo. PMID:11687258

  14. Study of atrazine effects on Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, haemocytes.

    PubMed

    Gagnaire, B; Renault, T; Bouilly, K; Lapegue, S; Thomas-Guyon, H

    2003-01-01

    Shellfish farming is an important economic activity around the world. This activity often takes place in areas subjected to various recurring pollutions. The recrudescent use of herbicides in agriculture including atrazine implies pollutant transfer towards aquatic environment in estuarine areas. Harmful effects of such substances on animals in marine environment, particularly on cultured bivalves, are poorly documented. Bivalve molluscs such as mussels and oysters have been postulated as ideal indicator organisms because of their way of life. They filter large volumes of seawater and may therefore accumulate and concentrate contaminants within their tissues. Moreover, development of techniques allowing effect analysis of such compounds on bivalve biology may lead to the development of diagnosis tools adapted to analyze pollutant transfer towards estuarine areas. In this context, influence of atrazine on defence mechanisms was analyzed in Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas. Atrazine was tested in vitro and in vivo on oyster haemocytes, and its effects were analyzed by flow cytometry. Haemocyte viability, cell cycle and cellular activities were monitored. Atrazine induced no significant effect in oyster under tested conditions except for peroxidase activity.

  15. Ultrasonic-assisted production of antioxidative polysaccharides from Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bingna; Pan, Jianyu; Wan, Peng; Chen, Deke; Long, Shujun; Sun, Huili

    2014-10-01

    The beneficial effects of oyster extract against various disorders and diseases induced by oxidative stress have aroused great interest. In this article, ultrasonic-assisted enzymolysis was employed to produce polysaccharides of Crassostrea hongkongensis (CHP) and their antioxidant activity was investigated. A single-factor experiment and then a four-factor, three-level Box-Behnken design were first used to optimize ultrasonic extraction for polysaccharides. On the basis of ridge analysis, the optimum conditions are obtained as ultrasonic treatment time of 24 min, power of 876 W, temperature of 49°C, and material-solvent ratio of 1:6 (w/v). It is found that ultrasound pretreatment before protease hydrolysis was a great help to improve CHP yield and purity, especially more favorable with flavorzyme, neutrase, alcalase, and pepsin. Furthermore, the polysaccharide fraction, which was obtained by ultrasonic pretreatment and then alcalase hydrolysis at the conditions of 3000 U/g, 55°C, pH 8.0, for 4 hr, exhibited an obvious scavenging effect on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and hydroxyl radical (98.48 ± 0.55% and 99.20 ± 0.12%, respectively) and a lenoleic acid peroxidation inhibition effect (85.48 ± 0.65%) at a concentration of 5.0 mg/mL. These results reveal the potential application of CHP in functional food and nutraceuticals.

  16. Mass attenuation coefficient of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using 16.59 - 25.26 keV photon energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Yusof, Mohd Fahmi; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz

    2015-04-01

    The Rhizophora spp. particleboards were fabricated using ≤ 104 µm particle size at three different fabrication methods; binderless, steam pre-treated and tannin-added. The mass attenuation coefficient of Rhizophora spp. particleboards were measured using x-ray fluorescent (XRF) photon from niobium, molybdenum, palladium, silver and tin metal plates that provided photon energy between 16.59 to 25.26 keV. The results were compared to theoretical values for water calculated using photon cross-section database (XCOM).The results showed that all Rhizophora spp. particleboards having mass attenuation coefficient close to calculated XCOM for water. Tannin-added Rizophora spp. particleboard was nearest to calculated XCOM for water with χ2 value of 13.008 followed by binderless Rizophora spp. (25.859) and pre-treated Rizophora spp. (91.941).

  17. DNA barcoding reveals that the common cupped oyster in Taiwan is the Portuguese oyster Crassostrea angulata (Ostreoida; Ostreidae), not C. gigas

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Sheng-Tai; Chuang, Shin-Chang; Chen, Kao-Sung; Ho, Ping-Ho; Wu, Chi-Lun; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2016-01-01

    The Pacific cupped oyster, Crassostrea gigas, is one of the major aquacultural shellfish species that has been introduced to Europe and America from its native source in the West Pacific. In Taiwan, the cultivated cupped oysters along the west coast have been identified as C. gigas for over centuries; however, several molecular phylogenetic studies have cast doubt upon the existence of this species in Taiwan and adjacent waters. Indeed, our analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequences from 313 Crassostrea collected from 12 locations along Taiwanese and southern Chinese coastlines confirm that all samples were the Portuguese oyster, C. angulata, rather than C. gigas. Multiple lines of evidence, including haplotypic and nucleotide diversity of the COI gene, demographic history, and population genetics, suggest that Taiwanese C. angulata is unique, probably experienced a sudden population expansion after the Last Glacial Maxima around 20,000 years ago, and has a significantly limited genetic connectivity across the Taiwan Strait. Our study applies an extended sampling and DNA barcoding to confirm the absence of C. gigas in natural and cultivated populations in Taiwan and southern China, where we only found C. angulata. We highlight the importance of conserving the gene pool of the C. angulata population in Taiwan, particularly considering the current threats by large-scale environmental disturbances such as marine pollution, habitat destruction, and climate change. PMID:27666088

  18. Identification of CYP genes in Mytilus (mussel) and Crassostrea (oyster) species: First approach to the full complement of cytochrome P450 genes in bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Zanette, Juliano; Goldstone, Jared V.; Bainy, Afonso C. D.; Stegeman, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the fate and effects of organic chemicals in animals requires knowledge of cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes, which thus far are poorly known in bivalve mollusks. We searched for CYP sequences in EST databases for Mytilus and Crassostrea species, lophotrochozoan representatives of the protostomes. From ESTs averaging ca. 924 bp, we identified 58 CYP genes in Mytilus californianus and 39 CYP genes in Crassostrea gigas. The sequences fell in all known animal CYP clans, and collectively they clustered in phylogenetic analysis with vertebrate CYP families 1, 2, 3, 4, 17, 20, 26 and 27. As in deuterostomes, a majority of the sequences fell in Clan 2. The CYP sequences found thus far in bivalves suggest a diversity consistent with that found in many other animal species. The present description of mollusk genes provides the overall framework for classification of any additional bivalve sequences. The sequences identified also will be useful in obtaining full-length sequences and in designing primers for analysis of expression of mussel and oyster CYP genes, or for recombinant protein expression to identify potential substrates for the bivalve CYP proteins, and understand their roles in xenobiotic detoxification and physiology of bivalves. PMID:19926125

  19. DNA barcoding reveals that the common cupped oyster in Taiwan is the Portuguese oyster Crassostrea angulata (Ostreoida; Ostreidae), not C. gigas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Sheng-Tai; Chuang, Shin-Chang; Chen, Kao-Sung; Ho, Ping-Ho; Wu, Chi-Lun; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2016-09-01

    The Pacific cupped oyster, Crassostrea gigas, is one of the major aquacultural shellfish species that has been introduced to Europe and America from its native source in the West Pacific. In Taiwan, the cultivated cupped oysters along the west coast have been identified as C. gigas for over centuries; however, several molecular phylogenetic studies have cast doubt upon the existence of this species in Taiwan and adjacent waters. Indeed, our analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequences from 313 Crassostrea collected from 12 locations along Taiwanese and southern Chinese coastlines confirm that all samples were the Portuguese oyster, C. angulata, rather than C. gigas. Multiple lines of evidence, including haplotypic and nucleotide diversity of the COI gene, demographic history, and population genetics, suggest that Taiwanese C. angulata is unique, probably experienced a sudden population expansion after the Last Glacial Maxima around 20,000 years ago, and has a significantly limited genetic connectivity across the Taiwan Strait. Our study applies an extended sampling and DNA barcoding to confirm the absence of C. gigas in natural and cultivated populations in Taiwan and southern China, where we only found C. angulata. We highlight the importance of conserving the gene pool of the C. angulata population in Taiwan, particularly considering the current threats by large-scale environmental disturbances such as marine pollution, habitat destruction, and climate change.

  20. Arsenic and arsenic species in cultured oyster (Crassostrea gigas and C. corteziensis) from coastal lagoons of the SE Gulf of California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bergés-Tiznado, Magdalena E; Páez-Osuna, Federico; Notti, Alessandra; Regoli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioavailability of arsenic (As) through cultured oyster Crassostrea gigas and Crassostrea corteziensis from four coastal lagoons (SE Gulf of California). Organisms were collected in two seasons (rainy and dry season), and they were analyzed for total arsenic and chemical speciation of this element. The concentrations of As in oyster soft tissue fluctuated between 5.44 and 9.56 μg/g for rainy season and 6.46 and 8.33 μg/g for dry season (dry weight) in C. gigas. In C. corteziensis, the As concentrations were <5 μg/g for both seasons (dry weight). Arsenic speciation indicated arsenobetaine as the major arseno-compound accounting for 43.2-76.3 % of total content of As. Lower contributions were obtained for non-extractable As (11.3-17.5 %) and other molecules such as arsenocholine and methyl-arsonate (<5 %). Inorganic arsenic was detectable in only two samples, at concentrations lower than <0.1 μg/g. These As data are the first generated for these mollusks in NW Mexico and indicate that C. gigas and C. corteziensis farmed in this area are safe for human consumption in terms of arseno-compounds.

  1. Arsenic and arsenic species in cultured oyster (Crassostrea gigas and C. corteziensis) from coastal lagoons of the SE Gulf of California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bergés-Tiznado, Magdalena E; Páez-Osuna, Federico; Notti, Alessandra; Regoli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioavailability of arsenic (As) through cultured oyster Crassostrea gigas and Crassostrea corteziensis from four coastal lagoons (SE Gulf of California). Organisms were collected in two seasons (rainy and dry season), and they were analyzed for total arsenic and chemical speciation of this element. The concentrations of As in oyster soft tissue fluctuated between 5.44 and 9.56 μg/g for rainy season and 6.46 and 8.33 μg/g for dry season (dry weight) in C. gigas. In C. corteziensis, the As concentrations were <5 μg/g for both seasons (dry weight). Arsenic speciation indicated arsenobetaine as the major arseno-compound accounting for 43.2-76.3 % of total content of As. Lower contributions were obtained for non-extractable As (11.3-17.5 %) and other molecules such as arsenocholine and methyl-arsonate (<5 %). Inorganic arsenic was detectable in only two samples, at concentrations lower than <0.1 μg/g. These As data are the first generated for these mollusks in NW Mexico and indicate that C. gigas and C. corteziensis farmed in this area are safe for human consumption in terms of arseno-compounds. PMID:23129525

  2. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients of Eremurus-Rhizophora spp. particleboards for X-ray in the 16.63-25.30 keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tousi, E. T.; Bauk, S.; Hashim, R.; Jaafar, M. S.; Abuarra, A.; Aldroobi, K. S. A.; Al-Jarrah, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    The roots of Eremurus spp. were used as a bio-adhesive in the fabrication of Rhizophora spp. particleboards. The mass attenuation coefficients of Eremurus-Rhizophora spp. particleboard of six samples with two different weight percentages of the Eremurus spp. root (6% and 12%) and three various Rhizophora spp. particle sizes (≤149 μm, 149-500 μm and 500-1000 μm) were determined by using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) photons in 16.63 keV and 25.30 keV of the photon energy range. The results were compared with theoretically calculated mass attenuations using the XCOM computer program for younger-age (breast 1: 75% muscle+25% fat), middle-age (breast 2: 50% muscle+50% fat), and old-age (breast 3: 25% muscle+75% fat) breasts. The results indicated that Eremurus-Rhizophora spp. particleboard is the appropriate suitable phantom in the diagnostic energy region. The mass attenuation coefficient in the low weight percentage of the bio-adhesive and the large Rhizophora spp. particle size were found very close to breast 1. Moreover the mass attenuation coefficient of the sample with high weight percentage of the bio-adhesive and small Rhizophora spp. particle size was found very close to water as a standard material phantom. In addition, the viscosity of dissolved Eremurus spp. root in water could be considerably higher than that of formaldehyde-based adhesives, which affects on some properties such as high strength and high binding.

  3. Red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) reproduction and seedling colonization after Hurricane Charley: Comparisons of Charlotte Harbor and Tampa Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Proffitt, C.E.; Milbrandt, E.C.; Travis, S.E.

    2006-01-01

    Reproductive aspects of life history are known to be important in recovery following disturbance in many plant species although this has not been well studied in mangroves. Hurricane Charley devastated large areas of mangroves in Charlotte Harbor, Florida, in August 2004. We surveyed 6 forests in Charlotte Harbor (2002, 2003, and 2005) and 16 in Tampa Bay, Florida (2001, 2002, 2003, and 2005) for total numbers of reproducing trees and trees heterozygotic for albinism that produce both normal and albino propagules. Tree size (estimated height and diameter at breast height) was also recorded for sentinel heterozygotic trees. Total number of reproducing trees km-1 was used as an index of reproductive output of the population, and deviation from the 3:1 (normal:albino propagules) ratio on heterozygotic trees expected with 100% selfing was used to estimate outcrossing. Numbers of Rhizophora mangle reproducing trees km-1 of shoreline in Charlotte Harbor were reduced by an order of magnitude following Hurricane Charley, while numbers of reproducing trees in Tampa Bay were similar to those of previous years. Reduced reproduction in Charlotte Harbor was accompanied by fewer new recruits in plots on Sanibel and Captiva Islands. Numbers of new recruits after the storm also tended to be fewer in plots where canopy loss was greater. More new recruits occurred in sites that had higher densities of pre-storm Rhizophora seedlings and greater relative dominance by Rhizophora. Outcrossing of sentinel trees was 2.5 times greater in Charlotte Harbor (mean site-1 = 33.6 ?? 6.7%; with 17% of forest sites completely selfing) than in Tampa Bay (mean site-1 = 13.4 ?? 4.7%; with 40% of sites completely selfing), although the implications for seedling recruitment of this difference are not known. ?? 2006 Estuarine Research Federation.

  4. Depuration of metals by the green-colored oyster Crassostrea sikamea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of metals (especially copper) in oysters has led to green-color now being found in Chinese estuaries. In the present study, the authors quantified the depuration of 8 metals (Ag, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in green-colored oysters (Crassostrea sikamea) collected from an estuary that is heavily contaminated by metals as a result of industrial effluent releases. The oysters were depurated under laboratory conditions for 4 mo; the accumulated concentrations and the subcellular distribution of metals were measured at different time intervals. Results showed that the green color of oysters faded to light yellow (nearly normal) after 4 mo of depuration. Depuration of metals could be described by a first-order kinetic process. The calculated overall depuration rate constants of metals were in the range of 0.008 d(-1) to 0.024 d(-1) , with a biological retention half-life of 30 d to 70 d. The depuration rates of green-colored contaminated oysters were significantly higher for Cd, Cu, Cr, and Ni than the rates of oysters from a less contaminated site, whereas the depuration rates of Ag, Co, Pb, and Zn were comparable between the 2 populations. When corrected for the change of oyster tissue weight, the actual efflux rate constants of the metals (0.0708-0.1014 d(-1) ) were much higher than the overall depuration rate constants. Cellular debris and metallothionein-like proteins were the important fractions binding with the metals in the oysters. Significant changes in metal subcellular distribution were observed during the 4-mo depuration for Ag, Cd, Cu, and Zn. Metallothionein-like protein became more important in sequestering the metals during the depuration period, with a concomitant decrease in metals associated with the cellular debris fraction.

  5. A cytokine-like factor astakine accelerates the hemocyte production in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiqun; Jiang, Shuai; Li, Meijia; Xin, Lusheng; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Hao; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-02-01

    Astakine has been reported to be a hematopoietic growth factor of prokineticin homolog firstly found in arthropods freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. In the present study, an astakine homologous gene was identified from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (designated CgAstakine). The full length cDNA of CgAstakine encoded a polypeptide of 103 amino acids containing a prokineticin (PK) domain homologous to that in astakine from freshwater crayfish P. leniusculus. The deduced amino acid sequence of CgAstakine shared higher similarity with those of other invertebrate astakines than prokineticins from vertebrates. The mRNA of CgAstakine was highly expressed in hepatopancreas and adductor muscle of oyster, while the CgAstakine protein was mainly distributed in hepatopancreas, gill and hemocytes. The mRNA expression of CgAstakine in hemocytes was significantly increased (p < 0.01) and maintained at a high level from 3 h to 9 h after Vibrio anguillarum challenge. After the oyster hemocytes were incubated with 5 μg/mL recombinant CgAstakine protein (rCgAstakine) for 24 h in vitro, the proliferation of hemocytes was significantly increased to 1.89 fold of that in control group (p < 0.05). Moreover, the total count of oyster hemocytes was significantly upregulated (2.45 fold of that in control group, p < 0.05) at 12 h after the oysters were received an injection of rCgAstakine (0.5 μg/g). These results collectively indicated that CgAstakine could modulate the hemocytes proliferation both in vitro and in vivo, and probably involved in the hematopoietic process fighting against the invasion of foreign pathogens.

  6. The immunomodulation of inducible hydrogen sulfide in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhibin; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Zhi; Jiang, Qiufen; Yi, Qilin; Yang, Chuanyan; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gasotransmitter, which plays indispensable roles in cardiovascular, nervous and immune systems of vertebrates. However, the information about the immunomodulation of H2S in invertebrates is still very limited. In the present study, the temporal expression profile of cystathionine γ lyase in oyster Crassostrea gigas (CgCSE) was investigated after the oysters were stimulated by lipopolysaccharide. The expression levels of CgCSE mRNA transcripts in hemocytes increased significantly at 12h (1.31-fold of the PBS group, P<0.05) after LPS stimulation. The immunomodulation of inducible H2S in oyster was examined by monitoring the alterations of both cellular and humoral immune parameters in response to the stimulations of LPS, LPS+Na2S and LPS+propargylglycine (PAG). The total hemocyte counts (THC) and hemolymph PO activity increased significantly after LPS stimulation, and the increase could be further enhanced by adding PAG, while inhibited by appending Na2S. The phagocytosis activity of hemocytes was also increased firstly after LPS treatment, and the increase was enhanced by adding Na2S but inhibited after appending PAG. The anti-bacterial activity in hemolymph increased at 3h post LPS treatment, and then decreased after adding PAG. The total SOD activity of hemolymph was also elevated at 6h post LPS treatment, and the elevated activity was depressed by adding Na2S. These results collectively indicated that H2S might play crucial roles in the immune response of oyster via modulating the turnover and phagocytosis of hemocytes, and regulating the anti-bacterial activity and proPO activation in the hemolymph.

  7. A new non-phagocytic TLR6 with broad recognition ligands from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weilin; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Lingling; Xu, Jiachao; Li, Meijia; Zhang, Anguo; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-12-01

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) are evolutionarily prevalent recognition molecules in the Animalia and Plantae kingdom, which play vital roles in immune defense and homeostasis maintenance. Recently, the expansion of TLRs has been reported in invertebrate genomes, but the characters and immune functions of these expanded TLRs were still not well known. In the present study, a new member of TLR family with five LRR domains was identified in Crassostrea gigas (designated CgTLR6). It shared homology with TLRs from other organisms with the closest phylogenic relationship with molluscan TLRs. The recombinant protein of CgTLR6 (rCgTLR6) displayed direct bind activity to gram-negative bacteria Vibrio anguillarum and Vibrio splendidus, gram-positive bacteria Staphylococci aureus and Micrococcus luteus, and fungi Pichia pastoris, but not to fungi Yarrowia lipolytica. It also exhibited affinity to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan (PGN), while no affinity to mannan (MAN). The mRNA of CgTLR6 was mainly detected in hemocytes and hepatopancreas, and was significantly induced (p < 0.01) in hemocytes after the oyster was stimulated with LPS, PGN or bacteria V. splendidus. Immunofluorescence analysis indicated that CgTLR6 was mainly located at the membrane of hemocytes. The blockage of CgTLR6 by anti-rCgTLR6 antibody did not significantly inhibit the phagocytic rates of hemocytes toward recognized gram-negative bacteria V. anguillarum and V. splendidus, and unrecognized fungi Y. lipolytica. These results collectively implied that CgTLR6 was a novel non-phagocytic receptor of C. gigas to mediate humoral immune response by recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns on the invaders. PMID:27443817

  8. Antiradical and antidiabetic properties of standardized extract of Sunderban mangrove Rhizophora mucronata

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Tapas Kumar; Hazra, Alok Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Dipankar; Hazra, Avijit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mangroves have the ability to grow where no other vascular plants survive. Rhizophora mucronata is a true mangrove and traditionally used to treat diabetes and its allied complications. Objectives: In the present study, we standardized the 80% methanolic standardized extract of R. mucronata leaves (RH) and found out its antiradical and antidiabetic activities. Materials and Methods: The methanolic extract of R. mucronata leaves (RH) was standardized and quantified for phenolics, flavonoinds, gallic acid, quercetin, and coumarin. The reducing abilities and antiradical activities of RH were performed in vitro methods like, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, nitric oxides, superoxides, hydroxyl, and ABTS (2,2’-azino-bis-3-ethyl benzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid). Thereafter, RH was evaluated for it antidiabetic potentialities on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type-2 diabetes. STZ (90 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) was administered to 2 days old pups to induce diabetes. RH was fed at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg and glibenclamide (positive control) at 5 mg/kg, when the rats were 6 weeks old and continued for 10 weeks. Fasting glucose was monitored before and after the treatment. Further, lipid peroxides and reduced glutathione level were estimated on rat liver. Results: The results obtained from this study revealed RH possesses flavonoinds and also gallic acid, quercetin, and coumarin. Further, it has antiradical activities. It has also reduced blood glucose level in type-2 diabetic rats and reduced the formation of lipid peroxidation in liver. RH enhanced the level of glutathione in liver tissue. Conclusion: RH exhibits source of natural antioxidants and great potentialities as an antidiabetic agent by improving the hyperglycemia through its antiradical action. PMID:25829780

  9. Landscape characteristics of Rhizophora mangle forests and propagule deposition in coastal environments of Florida (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sengupta, R.; Middleton, B.; Yan, C.; Zuro, M.; Hartman, H.

    2005-01-01

    Field dispersal studies are seldom conducted at regional scales even though reliable information on mid-range dispersal distance is essential for models of colonization. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential distance of dispersal of Rhizophora mangle propagules by comparing deposition density with landscape characteristics of mangrove forests. Propagule density was estimated at various distances to mangrove sources (R. mangle) on beaches in southwestern Florida in both high-and low-energy environments, either facing open gulf waters vs. sheltered, respectively. Remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems were used to identify source forests and to determine their landscape characteristics (forest size and distance to deposition area) for the regression analyses. Our results indicated that increasing density of propagules stranded on beaches was related negatively to the distance of the deposition sites from the nearest stands of R. mangle and that deposition was greatly diminished 2 km or more from the source. Measures of fragmentation such as the area of the R. mangle forests were related to propagule deposition but only in low-energy environments. Our results suggest that geographic models involving the colonization of coastal mangrove systems should include dispersal dynamics at mid-range scales, i.e., for our purposes here, beyond the local scale of the forest and up to 5 km distant. Studies of mangrove propagule deposition at various spatial scales are key to understanding regeneration limitations in natural gaps and restoration areas. Therefore, our study of mid-range propagule dispersal has broad application to plant ecology, restoration, and modeling. ?? Springer 2005.

  10. Culturable bacterial endophytes isolated from Mangrove tree (Rhizophora apiculata Blume) enhance seedling growth in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Deivanai, Subramanian; Bindusara, Amitraghata Santhanam; Prabhakaran, Guruswamy; Bhore, Subhash Janardhan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endophytic bacteria do have several potential applications in medicine and in other various sectors of biotechnology including agriculture. Bacterial endophytes need to be explored for their potential applications in agricultural biotechnology. One of the potential applications of bacterial endophytes in agricultural is to enhance the growth of the agricultural crops. Hence, this study was undertaken to explore the plant growth promoting potential application of bacterial endophytes. Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the effect of endophytic bacteria from mangrove tree (Rhizophora apiculata Blume) for their efficacy in promoting seedling growth in rice. Materials and Methods: Eight endophytic bacterial isolates (EBIs) isolated from twig and petiole tissues of the mangrove were identified based on their 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene sequence homology. Separately, surface sterilized paddy seeds were treated with cell-free broth and cell suspension of the EBIs. Rice seedlings were analyzed by various bioassays and data was recorded. Results: The gene sequences of the isolates were closely related to two genera namely, Bacillus and Pantoea. Inoculation of EBIs from R. apiculata with rice seeds resulted in accelerated root and shoot growth with significant increase in chlorophyll content. Among the isolates, Pantoea ananatis (1MSE1) and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (3MPE1) had shown predominance of activity. Endophytic invasion was recognized by the non-host by rapid accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and was counteracted by the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxide. The results demonstrated that EBIs from mangrove tree can increase the fitness of the rice seedlings under controlled conditions. Conclusion: These research findings could be useful to enhance the seedling growth and could serve as foundation in further research on enhancing the growth of the rice crop using endophytic bacteria. PMID

  11. [Critical tidal level for forestation with hypocotyls of Rhizophora stylosa Griff along Guangxi coast of China].

    PubMed

    He, Bin-Yuan; Lai, Ting-He

    2007-08-01

    From August 2004 to August 2005, three replicated experimental platforms were constructed in a section of tidal flat in Yingluo Bay of Guangxi to study the growth and physiological responses of Rhizophora stylosa Griff seedlings to the waterlogging stress of tide in diurnal tide zone. A total of eight tidal flat elevation (TFE) treatments, i. e., 320 cm, 330 cm, 340 cm, 350 cm, 360 cm, 370 cm, 380 cm and 390 cm above Yellow Sea Datum (YSD), were created on each platform. The results showed that lower TFEs (320-330 cm YSD) slightly increased the stem height of 1-year old seedlings, while higher TFFs ( > 340 cm YSD) increased the seedlings growth significantly. Moderate TFEs (350-370 cm YSD) favored the development of knots. Leaf number, leaf conservation rate, and leaf area per seedling all decreased dramatically with decreasing TFE. Lower TFEs had a larger damage to Chl a, but Chl b was less affected. The Chl a/b ratio decreased with decreasing TFE. Prolonged waterlogging induced a higher SOD activity in root, while moderate TFE inhibited the SOD activity in leaf. The POD activity in root and leaf increased with decreasing TFE. Waterlogging stress decreased the biomass of individual organs and whole seedling. With increasing waterlogging, the biomass partitioning in 1-year old seedlings increased from leaf to stem. The survival rate decreased sharply from 88.9% to 40.0% as TFE decreased, while more than 80% of the seedlings could survive at the TFE being 370 cm YSD and above. It was proposed that the local mean sea level could be adopted as the critical tidal level for the forestation with hypocotyls of R. stylosa along the Guangxi coast.

  12. Fine root respiration in the mangrove Rhizophora mangle over variation in forest stature and nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Catherine E; Ruess, Roger W; Feller, Ilka C

    2006-12-01

    Root respiration uses a significant proportion of photosynthetically fixed carbon (C) and is a globally important source of C liberated from soils. Mangroves, which are an important and productive forest resource in many tropical and subtropical countries, sustain a high ratio of root to shoot biomass which may indicate that root respiration is a particularly important component in mangrove forest carbon budgets. Mangroves are often exposed to nutrient pollution from coastal waters. Here we assessed the magnitude of fine root respiration in mangrove forests in Belize and investigated how root respiration is influenced by nutrient additions. Respiration rates of excised fine roots of the mangrove, Rhizophora mangle L., were low (4.01 +/- 0.16 nmol CO(2) g(-1) s(-1)) compared to those measured in temperate tree species at similar temperatures. In an experiment where trees where fertilized with nitrogen (N) or phosphorus (P) in low productivity dwarf forests (1-2 m height) and more productive, taller (4- 7 m height) seaward fringing forests, respiration of fine roots did not vary consistently with fertilization treatments or with forest stature. Fine roots of taller fringe trees had higher concentrations of both N and P compared to dwarf trees. Fertilization with P enhanced fine root P concentrations in both dwarf and fringe trees, but reduced root N concentrations compared to controls. Fertilization with N had no effect on root N or P concentrations. Unlike photosynthetic C gain and growth, which is strongly limited by P availability in dwarf forests at this site, fine root respiration (expressed on a mass basis) was variable, but showed no significant enhancements with nutrient additions. Variation in fine root production and standing biomass are, therefore, likely to be more important factors determining C efflux from mangrove sediments than variations in fine root respiration per unit mass. PMID:17169899

  13. Influence of salinity on hydrogen isotope fractionation in Rhizophora mangroves from Micronesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, S. Nemiah; Sachs, Julian P.

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios (2H/1H or δ2H) of plant leaf waxes typically covary with those of precipitation, and are therefore used as a proxy for past hydrologic variability. Mangroves present an important exception to this relationship, as salinity can strongly influence 2H fractionation in leaf lipids. To better understand and calibrate this effect, δ2H values of taraxerol and n-alkanes were measured in the leaves of Rhizophora spp. (red mangroves) from three estuaries and four brackish lakes on the Micronesian islands of Pohnpei and Palau, and compared to the δ2H and δ18O values of leaf water, xylem water and surface water. Net 2H discrimination between surface water and taraxerol increased by 0.9 ± 0.2‰ per part per thousand (ppt-1) over a salinity range of 1-34 ppt. Xylem water was always depleted in 2H relative to surface water, and the magnitude of this depletion increased with salinity, which is most likely due to a combination of greater 2H discrimination by roots during water uptake and opportunistic use of freshwater. Changes in the 2H content of xylem water can account for up to 43% of the change in net taraxerol fractionation with salinity. Leaf water isotopes were minimally enriched relative to xylem water and there was not significant variability in leaf water enrichment with salinity, which is consistent with a Péclet-modified Craig-Gordon model of leaf water enrichment. As leaf water enrichment is therefore unlikely to be responsible for increased 2H/1H fractionation in mangrove leaf lipids at elevated salinities, the majority of this signal is most likely explained either by changes in biosynthetic fractionation in response to salt stress or by salinity influenced changes in the timing of water uptake and lipid synthesis.

  14. IN VITRO KILLING OF PERKINSUS MARINUS BY HEMOCYTES OF OYSTERS CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presented at the 92nd Annual Meeting of the National Shellfisheries Association, 19-23 March 2000, Seattle, WA.

    A colorimetric microbicidal assay was adapted, optimized and used in experiments to characterize the capacity of eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) hemocytes...

  15. SETTLEMENT AND SURVIVAL OF THE OYSTER CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA ON CREATED OYSTER REEF HABITATS IN CHESAPEAKE BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efforts to restore the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) reef habitats in Chesapeake Bay typically begin with the placement of hard substrata to form three-dimensional mounds on the seabed to serve as a base for oyster recruitment and growth. A shortage of oyster shell for ...

  16. PARASITIC AND SYMBIOTIC FAUNA INHABITING OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) SAMPLED FROM THE CALOOSAHATCHEE ESTUARY, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oysters, Crassostrea virginica, inhabiting 5 sites in the Caloosahatchee River estuary were studied over a 13 month period to determine the suitability of oyster habitat in relation to their health and condition. Histological examination of 650 oysters (10 animals per station per...

  17. A POTENTIAL ECOFORECAST FOR PROTOZOAL INFECTIONS OF THE EASTERN OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    McLaughlin, Shawn M. and Stephen J. Jordan. 2003. Potential Ecoforecast for Protozoal Infections of the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) in the Upper Chesapeake Bay. In: Ecological Forecasting: New Tools for Coastal Marine Ecosystem Management. Nathalie Valette-Silver and D...

  18. Uptake of heavy metals and PAHs from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill by soft tissues and shells of the coastal oyster Crassostrea virginica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roopnarine, P. D.; Roopnarine, D.; Gillikin, D. P.; Anderson, L. C.; Ballester, M.; Goodwin, D. H.

    2011-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill, which dumped more than 600,000 tons of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) between April and August 2010 is the largest accidental spill in history. While immediate environmental impacts of the spill, such as direct and fatal fouling of wildlife and the physical contamination of coastal areas were easily observed, any long-term effects of the spill are still being determined. Here we examined the incorporation of spill components into the shells and soft tissues of the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Specifically, we searched for evidence that heavy metals or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in the carbonate shell (metals only) or various tissues of the oyster. Crassostrea virginica is a species of great economic significance, and is also an important basal primary consumer in the coastal GOM food web. Preliminary evidence presented in 2010 compared shells of specimens from the GOM collected in the 20th century, May 2010 prior to landfall of Deepwater oil on the Louisiana coast, and August 2010. Those results indicated that specimens collected in August 2010 had relatively higher concentrations of vanadium (V) and lead (Pb) in their shells compared to historical and May 2010 specimens. Those results have now been confirmed, and we show that specimens collected in August 2010, after exposure to the spill, have significantly higher concentrations of V, Pb and chromium (Cr) in their shells. Furthermore, examination of soft tissues shows that V, Pb and cobalt (Co) are present in significantly higher concentrations in gill and muscle tissues of August 2010 specimens. Analyses of PAH concentrations are currently being conducted on the soft tissues of specimens collected in May and August 2010, as well as specimens collected outside of spill-affected areas in the GOM. Ultimately, compilation of contaminant occurrences and concentrations coupled with food web models will allow us to predict the potential for

  19. AN OVACYSTIS-LIKE CONDITION IN THE AMERICAN OYSTER CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA GMELIN FROM THE NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Histological examination of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, from a study in Pensacola Bay, Florida, revealed two cases of abnormally large, basophilic ova that resemble ovacystis disease previously reported in oysters from Maine and Long Island. The hypertrophied gamet...

  20. GREATER HEMOCYTE BACTERICIDAL ACTIVITY IN OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) FROM A RELATIVELY CONTAMINATED SITE IN PENSACOLA BAY, FLORIDA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bivalve mollusks such as Crassostrea virginica inhabiting polluted estuaries and coastal areas may bioaccumulate high concentrations of contaminants without apparent ill effects. However, changes in putative internal defense activities have been associated with contaminant accumu...

  1. PROTOZOAL INFECTIONS OF THE EASTERN OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) IN THE UPPER CHESAPEAKE BAY: A POTENTIAL ECOLOGICAL FORECAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perkinsus marinus and Haplosporidium nelsoni cause devasting infections in populations of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, along the US Atlantic coast and Gulf of Mexico. Salinity and temperature are considered major controlling factors in the prevalence and infection i...

  2. PROGRESSION OF DISEASES CAUSED BY THE OYSTER PARASITES, PERKINSUS MARINUS AND HAPLOSPORIDIUM NELSONI IN CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA ON CONSTRUCTED INTERTIDAL REEFS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The progression of diseases caused by the oyster parasites, Perkinsus marinus and Haplosporidium nelsoni, were evaluated by periodic sampling (May 1994 - December 1995) of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, on an artificial reef located in the Piankatank River, Virginia. The infecti...

  3. Combined effect of lime (Citrus aurantitolia) and drying on reducing bacteria of public health significance in Edible Oyster (Crassostrea madrasensis).

    PubMed

    Hassan, Femeena; Geethalakshmi, V; Jeeva, J Charles; Babu, M Remya

    2013-02-01

    Combined effect of lime and drying on bacteria of public health significance in Edible Oyster (Crassostrea madrasensis) from Munambam coastal belt (Kerala, India) were studied (without depuration). Samples were examined for Total Plate Count (TPC), Staphylococcus aureus (hygiene indicator), Total coliforms, Faecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, (faecal indicator) Faecal Streptococci (faecal indicator), Salmonella, Vibrio cholera and Listeria monocytogenes. The fresh oyster meat though did not confirm to the specifications laid by National shellfish sanitation programme (NSSP), after treatment with lime with and without drying found to show significant reduction in counts and meet the required standards. Prevalence of faecal indicators in the fresh sample indicated faecal pollution in the area. The isolation of potentially pathogenic bacteria, V. parahaemolyticus in fresh sample indicates high risk of people consuming and handling oysters in raw and semi processed form and also it may lead to cross contamination. The present study indicates that treatment with natural organic product like lime and simple preservation technique, drying can effectively reduce the bacterial load. The study also revealed that TPC of water and soil collected from the site from where oysters were collected was less than from the meat. PMID:24425910

  4. Accumulation of six metals in the mangrove crab Ucides cordatus (Crustacea: Ucididae) and its food source, the red mangrove Rhizophora mangle (Angiosperma: Rhizophoraceae).

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Marcelo Antonio Amaro; Silva, Pablo Pena Gandara E; Duarte, Luis Felipe de Almeida; Almeida, Alaor Aparecido; Zanotto, Flavia Pinheiro

    2012-07-01

    The crab Ucides cordatus and the red mangrove Rhizophora mangle are endemic mangrove species and potential bio-accumulators of metals. This study quantified the accumulation of six metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn and Pb) in different organs (claw muscle, hepatopancreas and gills) of U. cordatus, as well as in different maturation stages of the leaves (buds, green mature, and pre-abscission senescent) of R. mangle. Samples were collected from mangrove areas in Cubatão, state of São Paulo, a heavily polluted region in Brazil. Data for metal contents in leaves were evaluated by one-way ANOVA; while for crabs a factorial ANOVA was used to investigate the effect of different tissues, animal size and the interactions between them. Means were compared by Tukey test at five percent, and the association between the metal concentrations in each crab organ, depending on the size, was evaluated by Pearson's linear correlation coefficient (r). Concentrations of Pb and Hg were undetectable for the different leaf stages and crab tissues, while Cd concentrations were undetectable in the leaf stages. In general, the highest accumulation of metals in R. mangle leaves occurred in pre-abscission senescent and green mature leaves, except for Cu, which was found in the highest concentrations in buds and green mature leaves. For the crab, Cd, Cu, Cr and Mn were present in concentrations above the detection limit, with the highest accumulation in the hepatopancreas, followed by the gills. Cu was accumulated mostly in the gills. Patterns of bioaccumulation between the crab and the mangrove tree differed for each metal, probably due to the specific requirements of each organism for essential metals. However, there was a close and direct relationship between metal accumulation in the mangrove trees and in the crabs feeding on them. Tissues of R. mangle leaves and U. cordatus proved effective for monitoring metals, acting as important bioindicators of mangrove areas contaminated by various

  5. Tissue analysis of the oyster Crassostrea virginica after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roopnarine, D.; Roopnarine, P. D.; Anderson, L.; Chung, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon accident (DWH) of April 20th, 2010, in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) released crude oil into the ocean column for 4 months. An estimated 685,000 tons of crude oil was released, making DWH spill the largest accidental spill in maritime history. The immediate impacts of the spill were evident, including oil slicks, fouled beaches and fouled, often dead wildlife. Longer-term impacts are less understood, and reliance on studies of past spills, e.g. Exxon Valdez, may not be applicable given the substantially greater magnitude of DWH (Valdez spilled 37,000 tons) and different environmental settings (predominantly rocky shorelines vs. saltmarsh-dominated coastlines). Many molluscan species exhibit responses to oil spills or other hydrocarbon contamination. Bivalved molluscs are commonly used as bioindicator organisms in part because they concentrate both metals and organic contaminants in their soft tissues. We used the American oyster Crassostrea virginica to measure exposure to and impact of the spill as the abnormal transformation of soft-tissues, or metaplasia. Metaplasia is the reversible transformation of one cell type into another. Molluscan metaplasia has been associated with exposure to petroleum contamination. While oyster epithelium is normally stratified columnar and ciliated, experimental exposures often result in metaplasia of gill, digestive and renal tissues. The occurrence and frequency of metaplasia may also be an indication of the longevity of a spill's impact. For example, individuals of the mussel Mytilus trossulus in Prince William Sound continued to exhibit metaplasia of the digestive gland more than 5 years after the Exxon Valdez spill, with an occurrence directly related to concentrations of PAHs in the animals. We focused on the hypothesis that DWH spill exposure resulted in metaplasia of gill and digestive epithelial tissues, both during and after the spill. Those transformations are eventually reversible, although on an unknown

  6. [Anti-bacterial activity of extracts from fungi collected from mangrove Rhizophora mangle (Rhizophoraceae) roots in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Castillo-Machalskis, Isabel; D'Armas, Haydelba; Malaver, Nora; Núñez, Maximiano

    2007-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of marine fungi extracts was evaluated by a test of efficiency. The fungi were previously inoculated in Malt Agar (EMA) extract with 50% of seawater and growth for 60 days. Triplicate antibiograms were carried out with the extracts. An ANOVA I with a posteriori Duncan test were applied to the diameters of inhibition zones. The extracts of Aspergillus ochraceus 3MCMC3 and Penicillium citrinum (14) 4MCMC16 present wide spectral antibacterial properties, inhibiting 100% and 80% of the developing germs, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa 9027. The extract of Penicillium (1) 3MLLC5 had the highest efficiency on this strain; P. aeruginosa 9027 and Escherichia coli 10536 were the most sensitive germs when treated with these extracts. These marine fungi can be an important source of antibacterial secondary metabolites. PMID:19086381

  7. Experimental infection of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas spat by ostreid herpesvirus 1: demonstration of oyster spat susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In 2008 and 2009, acute mortalities occurred in France among Pacific cupped oyster, Crassostrea gigas, spat. Different hypothesis including the implication of environmental factors, toxic algae and/or pathogens have been explored. Diagnostic tests indicated that OsHV-1 including a particular genotype, termed OsHV-1 μVar, was detected in most of samples and especially in moribund oysters with the highlighting of virus particles looking like herpes viruses by TEM examination. In this study, an experimental protocol to reproduce OsHV-1 infection in laboratory conditions was developed. This protocol was based on the intramuscular injection of filtered (0.22 μm) tissue homogenates prepared from naturally OsHV-1 infected spat collected on French coasts during mortality outbreaks in 2008. Results of the experimental trials showed that mortalities were induced after injection. Moreover, filtered tissue homogenates induced mortalities whereas the same tissue homogenates exposed to an ultraviolet (UV) treatment did not induce any mortality suggesting that oyster spat mortalities require the presence of a UV sensitive agent. Furthermore, analysis of injected oyster spat revealed the detection of high amounts of OsHV-1 DNA by real-time quantitative PCR. Finally, TEM analysis demonstrated the presence of herpes virus particles. The developed protocol allowed to maintain sources of infective virus which can be useful for the development of further studies concerning the transmission and the development of OsHV-1 infection. PMID:21314910

  8. Effects of storage temperature and duration on toxicity of sediments assessed by Crassostrea gigas oyster embryo bioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Beiras, R.; His, E.; Seaman, M.N.L.

    1998-10-01

    The effects of temperature and duration of storage on the toxicity of estuarine sediments were investigated with the Crassostrea gigas oyster embryo bioassay. Sediments ranging from unpolluted (controls) to extremely polluted with heavy metals (>100 ppm Hg, Cu, Zn, and Pb) and total hydrocarbons (>1,000 ppm) were collected from sites in southwest France and northern Spain, Control sediments were toxic only at the highest concentrations tested and after freezing in liquid nitrogen ({minus}196 C). Polluted sediments significantly reduced the success of oyster embryogenesis. Analysis of variance showed that the effect of storage temperature on toxicity increased with the prolongation of storage. Prolonged storage of fresh (4 C) sediments resulted in a loss of toxicity, which was more rapid in the less-polluted sediments. Deep-frozen sediments ({minus}196 C) were highly toxic regardless of origin and storage time, and because deep-freezing causes spurious toxicity in the control samples, it cannot be recommended for toxicological studies. In the context of the assessment of sediment toxicity by embryo-larval bioassays, fresh (4 C) storage is recommended when sediments need to be stored for no longer than a few days. The advisable duration of fresh storage to avoid false-negative results is directly related to the degree of toxicity. Should the sediments require prolonged storage, freezing at {minus}20 C appears to be the best choice.

  9. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of Deepwater Horizon slick oil and dispersant on oyster (Crassostrea virginica) larvae.

    PubMed

    Vignier, J; Soudant, P; Chu, F L E; Morris, J M; Carney, M W; Lay, C R; Krasnec, M O; Robert, R; Volety, A K

    2016-09-01

    In April 2010, crude oil was spilled from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil platform for 87 days, coincident with the spawning season and recruitment of the oyster, Crassostrea virginica, in the Gulf of Mexico. Impacts of acute exposures to surface-collected DWH oil (HEWAF), dispersed oil (CEWAF) and dispersant alone (Corexit 9500A(®)) on planktonic larval stages of C. virginica (veliger, umbo and pediveliger) were tested in the laboratory. Exposures to HEWAF, CEWAF and dispersant were toxic to larvae impairing growth, settlement success and ultimately survival. Larval growth and settlement were reduced at concentrations of tPAH50 ranging from 1.7 to 106 μg L(-1) for HEWAF and 1.1-35 μg L(-1) for CEWAF, concentrations well within the range of water sampled during the DWH oil spill. Sublethal effects induced by oil and dispersant could have significant ecological implications on oyster populations and on the whole estuarine ecosystem. PMID:27423003

  10. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of Deepwater Horizon slick oil and dispersant on oyster (Crassostrea virginica) larvae.

    PubMed

    Vignier, J; Soudant, P; Chu, F L E; Morris, J M; Carney, M W; Lay, C R; Krasnec, M O; Robert, R; Volety, A K

    2016-09-01

    In April 2010, crude oil was spilled from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil platform for 87 days, coincident with the spawning season and recruitment of the oyster, Crassostrea virginica, in the Gulf of Mexico. Impacts of acute exposures to surface-collected DWH oil (HEWAF), dispersed oil (CEWAF) and dispersant alone (Corexit 9500A(®)) on planktonic larval stages of C. virginica (veliger, umbo and pediveliger) were tested in the laboratory. Exposures to HEWAF, CEWAF and dispersant were toxic to larvae impairing growth, settlement success and ultimately survival. Larval growth and settlement were reduced at concentrations of tPAH50 ranging from 1.7 to 106 μg L(-1) for HEWAF and 1.1-35 μg L(-1) for CEWAF, concentrations well within the range of water sampled during the DWH oil spill. Sublethal effects induced by oil and dispersant could have significant ecological implications on oyster populations and on the whole estuarine ecosystem.

  11. Histology, ultrastructure, and morphogenesis of a rickettsia-like organism causing disease in the oyster, Crassostrea ariakensis Gould.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingfeng; Wu, Xinzhong

    2004-07-01

    Moribund specimens of the oyster, Crassostrea ariakensis Gould, aged 2-3 years were collected from Hailing Bay in Yangxi County of Guangdong Province from February to May and November to December in the years 2001, 2002, and 2003. A massive infection by an obligate intracellular prokaryote, specifically a rickettsia-like organism (RLO), was found. Here we report investigations of this RLO in the tissues of the oyster C. ariakensis Gould and describe the histology, ultrastructure, and morphogenesis of this pathogen in C. ariakensis Gould. Light microscopic observations of stained tissues revealed cytoplasmic inclusion bodies typical of prokaryote infection in about 87% (26/30) of the oysters. Most inclusions were observed in epithelial cells and connective tissues of the gill, mantle, and digestive gland of most of the infected oysters. The shape, size, and color of inclusions from different tissues were polymorphic. Electron microscopic examination of digestive gland, gill, and mantle tissues showed that the RLOs were intracytoplasmic. RLOs were often round, dumb-bell-shaped (undergoing binary fission), or occasionally rod-shaped and ranged from approximately 0.58 to 1.20microm in size. The organisms exhibited an ultrastructure characteristic of prokaryotic bacteria-like cells, including a trilaminar cell wall, electron-dense periplasmic ribosome zone, and a DNA nucleoid. Reproductive stages, including transverse binary fission, were observed by TEM. These stages were frequently observed within membrane-bound cytoplasmic vacuoles. Hexagonal phage-like particles in the cytoplasm of RLOs were also observed. PMID:15261771

  12. The modulation of haemolymph arginine kinase on the extracellular ATP induced bactericidal immune responses in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Jia, Zhihao; Chen, Hao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-07-01

    Arginine kinase is an important phosphagen kinase (PK) which plays an essential role in ATP buffering systems in invertebrates. In the present study, an arginine kinase (designated CgAK) was isolated by the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) affinity chromatography from the haemolymph of Crassostrea gigas. CgAK could directly bind to LPS in a concentration-dependent manner with the dissociation constant (Kd) of 2.46 × 10(-6) M. The interaction with LPS significantly decreased the ATP hydrolytic activity of CgAK, which in turn lead to the accumulation of ATP in vitro. The extracellular ATP stimulation could induce Ca(2+) influx, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and the release of lysosomal enzyme in the cellular immune response. In addition, ATP stimulation provoked the bactericidal activity towards Escherichia coli, and the scavenging ROS with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) abrogated the bactericidal activity, indicating that ATP stimulation could induce ROS-dependent antimicrobial activity in haemocytes. Collectively, the results demonstrated that the haemolymph CgAK could serve as an important purinergic regulator to modulate extracellular ATP, which might further have an important effect on the purinergic signaling-activated innate immune response of oyster.

  13. Histology, ultrastructure, and morphogenesis of a rickettsia-like organism causing disease in the oyster, Crassostrea ariakensis Gould.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingfeng; Wu, Xinzhong

    2004-07-01

    Moribund specimens of the oyster, Crassostrea ariakensis Gould, aged 2-3 years were collected from Hailing Bay in Yangxi County of Guangdong Province from February to May and November to December in the years 2001, 2002, and 2003. A massive infection by an obligate intracellular prokaryote, specifically a rickettsia-like organism (RLO), was found. Here we report investigations of this RLO in the tissues of the oyster C. ariakensis Gould and describe the histology, ultrastructure, and morphogenesis of this pathogen in C. ariakensis Gould. Light microscopic observations of stained tissues revealed cytoplasmic inclusion bodies typical of prokaryote infection in about 87% (26/30) of the oysters. Most inclusions were observed in epithelial cells and connective tissues of the gill, mantle, and digestive gland of most of the infected oysters. The shape, size, and color of inclusions from different tissues were polymorphic. Electron microscopic examination of digestive gland, gill, and mantle tissues showed that the RLOs were intracytoplasmic. RLOs were often round, dumb-bell-shaped (undergoing binary fission), or occasionally rod-shaped and ranged from approximately 0.58 to 1.20microm in size. The organisms exhibited an ultrastructure characteristic of prokaryotic bacteria-like cells, including a trilaminar cell wall, electron-dense periplasmic ribosome zone, and a DNA nucleoid. Reproductive stages, including transverse binary fission, were observed by TEM. These stages were frequently observed within membrane-bound cytoplasmic vacuoles. Hexagonal phage-like particles in the cytoplasm of RLOs were also observed.

  14. Occurrence and chemical structure of nonmethylene-interrupted dienoic fatty acids in American oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Paradis, M; Ackman, R G

    1975-01-01

    The American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, was found to contain structurally homologous nonmethylene-interrupted dienoic (NMID) fatty acids. The major C20 and C22 nonmethylene-interrupted dienoic fatty acid isomers were shown to occur as two pairs of homologues 5,13-20:2 with 7,15-22:2 and 5,11-20:2 with 7,13-22:2. A combination of analytical procedures was required for conclusive structure determination.

  15. Biosorption of Pb2+ from aqueous solution by waste biomass of aerial roots of Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove).

    PubMed

    Horsfall, Michael; Ogban, Fred; Akporhonor, Eyitemi Emmanuel

    2005-09-01

    The processing waste of the aerial roots of Rhizophora mangle was used in both its unmodified or mercaptoacetic acid (MAA) modified form for the sorption of Pb2+ from aqueous solution. The biomass rapidly and strongly sorbed Pb2+ at pH 5.0, which indicated chemisorption. A significant increase in Pb2+ sorption resulted from MAA treatment of the biomass, indicating that sorption occurs through an ion-exchange process. From sorption-capacity experiments, the unmodified and modified materials extracted, at pH 5, 31.3 and 85.5 mg of Pb2+ per gram of biomass, respectively, from aqueous solutions. Our studies may contribute to an innovative method for the economical and ecologically save removal and recovery of heavy-atom metal ions from contaminated waters through biosorption. PMID:17193207

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Aliiroseovarius crassostreae CV919-312, the Causative Agent of Roseovarius Oyster Disease (Formerly Juvenile Oyster Disease).

    PubMed

    Kessner, Linda; Spinard, Edward; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Rowley, David C; Nelson, David R

    2016-01-01

    Aliiroseovarius crassostreae CV919-312 is a marine alphaproteobacterium and the causative agent of Roseovarius oyster disease. We announce here the draft genome sequence of A. crassostreae CV919-312 and identify potential virulence genes involved in pathogenicity. PMID:26988054

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Aliiroseovarius crassostreae CV919-312, the Causative Agent of Roseovarius Oyster Disease (Formerly Juvenile Oyster Disease)

    PubMed Central

    Kessner, Linda; Spinard, Edward; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Rowley, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Aliiroseovarius crassostreae CV919-312 is a marine alphaproteobacterium and the causative agent of Roseovarius oyster disease. We announce here the draft genome sequence of A. crassostreae CV919-312 and identify potential virulence genes involved in pathogenicity. PMID:26988054

  18. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and superoxide anion scavenging activity of Rhizophora mangle (L.) bark

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Janet Calero; García, Roberto Faure; Cors, Ma. Teresa Mitjavila

    2010-01-01

    Background: Rhizophora mangle (L.) produce a variety of substances that possesses pharmacological actions. Although it shown antioxidant properties in some assays, there is no available information about its effect on some free radical species. So the objective of the present research is to evaluate the DPPH radical and superoxide anion scavenging properties of R. mangle extract and its polyphenol fraction. Methods: Rhizophora mangle (L.) bark aqueous extract and its major constituent, polyphenols fraction, were investigated for their antioxidant activities employing 2 in vitro assay systems: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide anion radicals scavenging. Results: IC50 for DPPH radical-scavenging activity was 6.7 µg tannins/mL for extract and 7.6 µg tannins/mL for polyphenolic fraction. The extract showed better activity than its fraction (P < 0.05) in the DPPH radicals reducing power. Polyphenolic fraction exhibited better superoxide anion scavenging ability (IC50 = 21.6 µg tannins/mL) than the extract (IC50 = 31.9 µg tannins/mL). Antioxidant activities of both samples increased with the rise of tannins concentration. The comparison of regression lines showed significant differences (P < 0.05) between extract and its polyphenolic fraction in both assays, indicating that extract was more effective in DPPH radical scavenging than its fraction at tannin concentrations below the crossing point of both lines, while that fraction was more effective than extract inhibiting the superoxide anions generation. Conclusions: R. mangle aqueous extract showed a potent antioxidant activity, achieved by the scavenging ability observed against DPPH radicals and superoxide anions. Regarding its polyphenolic composition, the antioxidant effects observed in this study are due, most probably, to the presence of polyphenolic compounds. PMID:21589751

  19. Molecular and histological identification of Marteilioides infection in Suminoe Oyster Crassostrea ariakensis, Manila Clam Ruditapes philippinarum and Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas on the south coast of Korea.

    PubMed

    Limpanont, Yanin; Yanin, Limpanont; Kang, Hyun-Sil; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Jeung, Hee-Do; Kim, Bong-Kyu; Le, Thanh Cuong; Kim, Young-Ok; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2013-11-01

    The oyster ovarian parasite Marteilioides chungmuensis has been reported from Korea and Japan, damaging the oyster industries. Recently, Marteilioides-like organisms have been identified in other commercially important marine bivalves. In this study, we surveyed Marteilioides infection in the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum, Suminoe oyster Crassostrea ariakensis, and Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, using histology and Marteilioides-specific small subunit (SSU) rDNA PCR. The SSU rDNA sequence of M. chungmuensis (1716 bp) isolated from C. gigas in Tongyoung bay was 99.9% similar to that of M. chungmuensis reported in Japan. Inclusions of multi-nucleated bodies in the oocytes, typical of Marteilioides infection, were identified for the first time in Suminoe oysters. The SSU rDNA sequence of a Marteilioides-like organism isolated from Suminoe oysters was 99.9% similar to that of M. chungmuensis. Marteilioides sp. was also observed from 7 Manila clams of 1840 individuals examined, and the DNA sequences of which were 98.2% similar to the known sequence of M. chungmuensis. Unlike Marteilioides infection of Pacific oysters, no remarkable pathological symptoms, such as large multiple lumps on the mantle, were observed in infected Suminoe oysters or Manila clams. Distribution of the infected Manila clams, Suminoe oysters and Pacific oysters was limited to small bays on the south coast, suggesting that the southern coast is the enzootic area of Marteilioides infection.

  20. Accumulation profile and seasonal variations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in bivalves Crassostrea tulipa (oysters) and Anadara senilis (mussels) at three different aquatic habitats in two seasons in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Dodoo, D K; Essumang, D K; Jonathan, J W A

    2013-02-01

    Research has shown that some polychlorinated biphenyl congeners degrade slowly in the environment and build up in the food chain, causing a wide range of possible adverse effects to humans. In order to ascertain the nature of the situation in Ghana, polychlorinated biphenyls congener residues in Crassostrea tulipa (oysters) and Anadara senilis (mussels) at Narkwa, Ada and Anyanui in the coastal region of Ghana were determined. At Narkwa, both bivalves' species were collected; at Ada only Anadara senilis were collected while at Anyanui, only Crassotrea tulipa were collected. The number of each bivalve species collected from each site was 80 (n=80), making up a total of 320 for the dry and the wet seasons. The PCBs were extracted with (1:1) hexane-acetone mixture and analyzed with a gas chromatogram equipped with (65)Ni electron capture detector, model CP 3800 using the mixed PCBs standard of the ICES 7. Total PCBs in the bivalves ranged from 5.55 to 6.37 μg/kg wet weight in mussels and 2.95-11.41 μg/kg wet weight in oysters, respectively. The composition of the PCB homologues in the bivalves was dominated by tri-, hepta- and hexa-PCBs in descending order. Risk assessments conducted on the samples indicated that edible bivalves from Narkwa, Ada and Anyanui in Ghana might pose some health risk to the consumers.

  1. Perkinsus marinus in pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis from Nayarit, Pacific coast of México.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Martínez, J; Vásquez-Yeomans, R; Padilla-Lardizábal, G; del Río Portilla, M A

    2008-09-01

    Culture of the pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis is emerging as an alternative to the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) for oyster producers, who face severe mortalities since 1997 in Northwest México. For determining the health status of this species, we conducted a histopathological analysis of cultured populations from two estuaries in the Pacific coast of México. Macroscopical analysis revealed animals with transparent and retracted mantle. Histopathological analysis of these specimens showed tissue alterations and parasitic forms consistent with Perkinsus sp. infection. Stages of the parasite identified included tomont and trophozoites with an eccentric vacuole characteristic of Perkinsus spp. Pieces of tissues of infected oysters were incubated in Fluid Thioglycollate Medium (FTM) resulting in blue-black hypnospores after incubation. The identity of the parasite was confirmed by species specific PCR-based assay in DNA samples from oysters, tissue fractions from FTM cultures, and deparaffined samples with Perkinsus-like parasite detected by histology. Sequencing of positive amplified fragments (307bp) showed a sequence similar to Perkinsus marinus strain TXsc NTS ribosomal RNA gene (100% coverage and 98% identity, GenBank Accession No. AF497479.1) and to P. marinus, Genomic DNA, (100% coverage and 97% identity, GenBank Accession No. S78416.1). The prevalence of P. marinus varied from 1 to 5% in Boca del Camichín and from 1 to 6% in Pozo Chino. In general, the intensity of infection was moderate. The infection was observed in oysters from 31 to 110mm of shell length. This is the first record of P. marinus in oysters from the North America Pacific coast and the first record in C. corteziensis. The origin of this parasite in the area is unknown, but it may be associated to introductions of Crassostrea virginica from the East coast of United States of America or Gulf of México.

  2. Isolation and Expression Analysis of Novel Silicon Absorption Gene from Roots of Mangrove (Rhizophora apiculata) via Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M.; Abdullah, Siti Nor Akmar; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Azizi, Parisa; Nejat, Naghmeh; Idris, Abu Seman

    2014-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in soil after oxygen. It is not an essential element for plant growth and formation but plays an important role in increasing plant tolerance towards different kinds of abiotic and biotic stresses. The molecular mechanism of Si absorption and accumulation may differ between plants, such as monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Silicon absorption and accumulation in mangrove plants are affected indirectly by some proteins rich in serine and proline amino acids. The expression level of the genes responsible for Si absorption varies in different parts of plants. In this study, Si is mainly observed in the epidermal roots' cell walls of mangrove plants compared to other parts. The present work was carried out to discover further information on Si stress responsive genes in Rhizophora apiculata, using the suppression subtractive hybridization technique. To construct the cDNA library, two-month-old seedlings were exposed to 0.5, 1, and 1.5 mM SiO2 for 15 hrs and for 1 to 6 days resulting in a total of 360 high quality ESTs gained. Further examination by RT-PCR and real-time qRT-PCR showed the expression of a candidate gene of serine-rich protein. PMID:24516858

  3. Evaluation of immunostimulant activity and chemoprotective effect of mangrove Rhizophora apiculata against cyclophosphamide induced toxicity in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Vinod Prabhu, V; Guruvayoorappan, C

    2012-08-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs available today are immunosuppressant, cytotoxic and with variety of side effects in cancer chemotherapy. Plant based immunomodulators are often an auxiliary therapy to overcome the repulsive effects of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents and to restore immunity with normal health. Mangroves Rhizophora apiculata (R. apiculata) extract was found to protect mice from cyclophosphamide (CTX) induced leukopenia. The leukocyte counts in the R. apiculata extract treated animals was significantly increased (10425 ± 163 mm³) where the control group shows no significant increase (7855 ± 282 mm³). The leukocytes count in CTX induced group treated with R. apiculata extract shows significant increase (5235 ± 303 mm³) when compared with CTX induced group (3416 ± 172 mm³) on the same day. The hemoglobin level of CTX induced group treated with R. apiculata extract shows increase in the level compared with the CTX induced animals. The bone marrow cellularity and α-esterase activity was also significantly higher compared to normal group and CTX induced group. Moreover, R. apiculata extract prevented the loss of organ weight and is increased the organ weight in treated animals. This indicates the efficiency of R. apiculata extract as an effective immunostimulant and better chemoprotectant against CTX induced toxicity in BALB/c mice. PMID:22211366

  4. The Use of a Chlorophyll Meter (SPAD-502) for Field Determinations of Red Mangrove (Rhizophora Mangle L.) Leaf Chlorophyll Amount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connelly, Xana M.

    1997-01-01

    The red mangrove Rhizophora mangle L., is a halophytic woody spermatophyte common to the land-sea interface of tropical and subtropical intertidal zones. It has been reported that 60 to 75% of the coastline of the earth's tropical regions are lined with mangroves. Mangroves help prevent shoreline erosion, provide breeding, nesting and feeding areas for many marine animals and birds. Mangroves are important contributors of primary production in the coastal environment, and this is largely proportional to the standing crop of leaf chlorophylls. Higher intensities of ultraviolet radiation, resulting from stratospheric ozone depletion, can lead to a reduction of chlorophyll in terrestrial plants. Since the most common method for determining chlorophyll concentration is by extraction and this is labor intensive and time consuming, few studies on photosynthetic pigments of mangroves have been reported. Chlorophyll meter readings have been related to leaf chlorophyll content in apples and maples. It has also been correlated to nitrogen status in corn and cotton. Peterson et al., (1993) used a chlorophyll meter to detect nitrogen deficiency in crops and in determining the need for additional nitrogen fertilizer. Efforts to correlate chlorophyll meter measurements to chlorophyll content of mangroves have not been reported. This paper describes the use of a hand-held chlorophyll meter (Minolta SPAD-502) to determine the amount of red mangrove foliar chlorophyll present in the field.

  5. Isolation and characterization of phytotoxic compounds produced by Streptomyces sp. AMC 23 from red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle).

    PubMed

    Crevelin, Eduardo José; Canova, Sarah Pigato; Melo, Itamar Soares; Zucchi, Tiago Domingues; da Silva, Rafael Eduardo; Moraes, Luiz Alberto Beraldo

    2013-12-01

    Natural products produced by microorganisms have been utilized as sources of new drugs possessing a wide range of agrochemical and pharmacological activities. During our research on Actinomycetes from Brazilian mangroves, the ethyl acetate extract of Streptomyces sp. AMC 23 isolated from the red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) rhizosphere produced a highly active compound against the microalga Chlorella vulgaris, often used to assess the phytotoxic activity. As a result, the bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of the mixture of the known compounds bafilomycin B1 and bafilomycin B2. The chemical structures of bafilomycin B1 and bafilomycin B2 were established based on their spectroscopic data by infrared (IR), mass spectrometry (MS), (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), gradient-enhanced heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (gHMQC), and gradient-enhanced heteronuclear multiple-bond connectivity (gHMBC) as well as comparison with reference data from the literature. Moreover, it was also possible to identify other bafilomycins using non-chromatographic-dependent techniques (Tandem mass spectrometry). Additionally, this is the first report on the phytotoxic activity of bafilomycin B1.

  6. Marinobacterium mangrovicola sp. nov., a marine nitrogen-fixing bacterium isolated from mangrove roots of Rhizophora mangle.

    PubMed

    Alfaro-Espinoza, Gabriela; Ullrich, Matthias S

    2014-12-01

    A nitrogen-fixing marine bacterium, designated strain Gal22(T), was isolated from mangrove roots of Rhizophora mangle. Cells were Gram-stain-negative rods, motile with a single polar flagellum. Growth was observed at 4-42 °C, pH 5.5 to 10 and with 0-18 % (w/v) NaCl. Strain Gal22(T) was positive for catalase and oxidase. Q-8 was the predominant lipoquinone. The DNA G+C content was 57.0 mol%. Based on phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene, strain Gal22(T) belongs to the genus Marinobacterium. The closely related strains were shown to be Marinobacterium lutimaris DSM 22012(T) and Marinobacterium litorale IMCC1877(T) with 99 % and 96 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively. DNA-DNA relatedness analysis indicated that strain Gal22(T) was different from M. lutimaris DSM 22012(T). On the basis of genotypic, morphological and biochemical characteristics, a novel species, Marinobacterium mangrovicola sp. nov. (type strain, Gal22(T) = DSM 27697(T) = CIP 110653(T)), is proposed. PMID:25217624

  7. A multivariate study of mangrove morphology ( Rhizophora mangle) using both above and below-water plant architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, R. Allen; Bell, Susan S.

    2005-11-01

    A descriptive study of the architecture of the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle L., habitat of Tampa Bay, FL, was conducted to assess if plant architecture could be used to discriminate overwash from fringing forest type. Seven above-water (e.g., tree height, diameter at breast height, and leaf area) and 10 below-water (e.g., root density, root complexity, and maximum root order) architectural features were measured in eight mangrove stands. A multivariate technique (discriminant analysis) was used to test the ability of different models comprising above-water, below-water, or whole tree architecture to classify forest type. Root architectural features appear to be better than classical forestry measurements at discriminating between fringing and overwash forests but, regardless of the features loaded into the model, misclassification rates were high as forest type was only correctly classified in 66% of the cases. Based upon habitat architecture, the results of this study do not support a sharp distinction between overwash and fringing red mangrove forests in Tampa Bay but rather indicate that the two are architecturally undistinguishable. Therefore, within this northern portion of the geographic range of red mangroves, a more appropriate classification system based upon architecture may be one in which overwash and fringing forest types are combined into a single, "tide dominated" category.

  8. Nutrient removal in a closed silvofishery system using three mangrove species (Avicennia germinans, Laguncularia racemosa, and Rhizophora mangle).

    PubMed

    De-León-Herrera, R; Flores-Verdugo, F; Flores-de-Santiago, F; González-Farías, F

    2015-02-15

    The removal of ammonium (NH4(+)), nitrite (NO2(-)), nitrate (NO3(-)), and phosphate (PO4(-3)) in a closed silvofishery system was examined using three mangrove species (i.e., Avicennia germinans, Laguncularia racemosa, and Rhizophora mangle). Specifically, six closed tanks were installed for this experiment with a population of 60 Dormitator latifrons fishes per tank. We planted 40 seedlings in each of three experimental tanks separated by species, while the remaining tanks were used as control. During 15 weeks, nutrient concentrations among the three mangrove systems presented no significant differences (P>0.05). However, nutrient removal variability was minimum during the last 2-5 weeks. Mangroves presented an average efficiency of 63% for the removal of NH4(+) and NO2(-). Contrary, the average removal potential of NO3(-) and PO4(-3) was 50%. Results from this study suggest that the three mangrove species could be used in a closed silvofishery systems for the biological removal of NH4(+), NO2(-), NO3(-), and PO4(-3). PMID:25499182

  9. Isolation and characterization of phytotoxic compounds produced by Streptomyces sp. AMC 23 from red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle).

    PubMed

    Crevelin, Eduardo José; Canova, Sarah Pigato; Melo, Itamar Soares; Zucchi, Tiago Domingues; da Silva, Rafael Eduardo; Moraes, Luiz Alberto Beraldo

    2013-12-01

    Natural products produced by microorganisms have been utilized as sources of new drugs possessing a wide range of agrochemical and pharmacological activities. During our research on Actinomycetes from Brazilian mangroves, the ethyl acetate extract of Streptomyces sp. AMC 23 isolated from the red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) rhizosphere produced a highly active compound against the microalga Chlorella vulgaris, often used to assess the phytotoxic activity. As a result, the bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of the mixture of the known compounds bafilomycin B1 and bafilomycin B2. The chemical structures of bafilomycin B1 and bafilomycin B2 were established based on their spectroscopic data by infrared (IR), mass spectrometry (MS), (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), gradient-enhanced heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (gHMQC), and gradient-enhanced heteronuclear multiple-bond connectivity (gHMBC) as well as comparison with reference data from the literature. Moreover, it was also possible to identify other bafilomycins using non-chromatographic-dependent techniques (Tandem mass spectrometry). Additionally, this is the first report on the phytotoxic activity of bafilomycin B1. PMID:23979946

  10. A multivariate study of mangrove morphology (Rhizophora mangle) using both above and below-water plant architecture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, R.A.; Bell, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    A descriptive study of the architecture of the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle L., habitat of Tampa Bay, FL, was conducted to assess if plant architecture could be used to discriminate overwash from fringing forest type. Seven above-water (e.g., tree height, diameter at breast height, and leaf area) and 10 below-water (e.g., root density, root complexity, and maximum root order) architectural features were measured in eight mangrove stands. A multivariate technique (discriminant analysis) was used to test the ability of different models comprising above-water, below-water, or whole tree architecture to classify forest type. Root architectural features appear to be better than classical forestry measurements at discriminating between fringing and overwash forests but, regardless of the features loaded into the model, misclassification rates were high as forest type was only correctly classified in 66% of the cases. Based upon habitat architecture, the results of this study do not support a sharp distinction between overwash and fringing red mangrove forests in Tampa Bay but rather indicate that the two are architecturally undistinguishable. Therefore, within this northern portion of the geographic range of red mangroves, a more appropriate classification system based upon architecture may be one in which overwash and fringing forest types are combined into a single, "tide dominated" category. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nutrient removal in a closed silvofishery system using three mangrove species (Avicennia germinans, Laguncularia racemosa, and Rhizophora mangle).

    PubMed

    De-León-Herrera, R; Flores-Verdugo, F; Flores-de-Santiago, F; González-Farías, F

    2015-02-15

    The removal of ammonium (NH4(+)), nitrite (NO2(-)), nitrate (NO3(-)), and phosphate (PO4(-3)) in a closed silvofishery system was examined using three mangrove species (i.e., Avicennia germinans, Laguncularia racemosa, and Rhizophora mangle). Specifically, six closed tanks were installed for this experiment with a population of 60 Dormitator latifrons fishes per tank. We planted 40 seedlings in each of three experimental tanks separated by species, while the remaining tanks were used as control. During 15 weeks, nutrient concentrations among the three mangrove systems presented no significant differences (P>0.05). However, nutrient removal variability was minimum during the last 2-5 weeks. Mangroves presented an average efficiency of 63% for the removal of NH4(+) and NO2(-). Contrary, the average removal potential of NO3(-) and PO4(-3) was 50%. Results from this study suggest that the three mangrove species could be used in a closed silvofishery systems for the biological removal of NH4(+), NO2(-), NO3(-), and PO4(-3).

  12. PARASITIC AND SYMBIOTIC FAUNA IN OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) AND MUD CRABS (PANOPEUS SPP.) FROM THE CALOOSAHATCHEE ESTUARY, FLORIDA, USA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volety, Aswani K., S. Greg Tolley and James T. Winstead. 2002. Parasitic and Symbiotic Fauna in Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and Mud Crabs (Panopeus spp.) from the Caloosahatchee Estuary, Florida, USA (Abstract). Presented at the 4th International Conference on Molluscan Shell...

  13. RAPID TETRAZOLIUM DYE REDUCTION ASSAY TO ASSESS THE BACTERICIDAL ACTIVITY OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) HEMOCYTES AGAINST VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An assay was developed to assess the ability of oyster, Crassostrea virginica, hemocytes to kill the human pathogenic bacterium, Vibrio parahaemolyticus (ATCC 17802). Bacterial killing was estimated colorimetrically by the enzymatic reduction of a tetrazolium dye, 3-(4,5-dimethyl...

  14. The Kumamoto oyster Crassostrea sikamea is neither rare nor threatened by hybridization in the northern Ariake Sea, Japan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The status of the Kumamoto oyster Crassostrea sikamea in its native Japan is uncertain because of a lack of information about its abundance and distribution and a suggestion that C. sikamea and the Pacific oyster C. gigas hybridize in the northern Ariake Sea. Furthermore, broodstock populations on ...

  15. PROGRESSION OF DISEASES CAUSED BY THE OYSTER PARASITES, PERKINSUS MARINUS AND HAPLOSPORIDIUM NELSONI, IN CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA ON CONSTRUCTED INTERTIDAL REEFS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The progression of diseases caused by the oyster parasites, Perkinsus marinus and Haplosporidium nelsoni, were evaluated by periodic sampling (May 1994-Dec. 1995) of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, that set on an artificial reef located in the Piankatank River, Virginia, in Augus...

  16. Bioinformatic mining of EST-SSR loci in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Ren, R; Yu, Z

    2008-06-01

    A set of expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR) markers of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, was developed through bioinformatic mining of the GenBank public database. As of June 30, 2007, a total of 5132 EST sequences from GenBank were downloaded and screened for di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide repeats, with criteria set at a minimum of 5, 4 and 4 repeats for the three categories of SSRs respectively. Seventeen polymorphic microsatellite markers were characterized. Allele numbers ranged from 3 to 10, and the observed and expected heterozygosity values varied from 0.125 to 0.770 and from 0.113 to 0.732 respectively. Eleven loci were at Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE); the other six loci showed significant departure from HWE (P < 0.01), suggesting possible presence of null alleles. Pairwise check of linkage disequilibrium (LD) indicated that 11 of 136 pairs of loci showed significant LD (P < 0.01), likely due to HWE present in single markers. Cross-species amplification was examined for five other Crassostrea species and reasonable results were obtained, promising usefulness of these markers in oyster genetics.

  17. Mass attenuation coefficient of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using 16.59 – 25.26 keV photon energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-04-29

    The Rhizophora spp. particleboards were fabricated using ≤ 104 µm particle size at three different fabrication methods; binderless, steam pre-treated and tannin-added. The mass attenuation coefficient of Rhizophora spp. particleboards were measured using x-ray fluorescent (XRF) photon from niobium, molybdenum, palladium, silver and tin metal plates that provided photon energy between 16.59 to 25.26 keV. The results were compared to theoretical values for water calculated using photon cross-section database (XCOM).The results showed that all Rhizophora spp. particleboards having mass attenuation coefficient close to calculated XCOM for water. Tannin-added Rizophora spp. particleboard was nearest to calculated XCOM for water with χ2 value of 13.008 followed by binderless Rizophora spp. (25.859) and pre-treated Rizophora spp. (91.941)

  18. Phylogeographic pattern of Rhizophora (Rhizophoraceae) reveals the importance of both vicariance and long-distance oceanic dispersal to modern mangrove distribution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mangroves are key components of coastal ecosystems in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. However, the patterns and mechanisms of modern distribution of mangroves are still not well understood. Historical vicariance and dispersal are two hypothetic biogeographic processes in shaping the patterns of present-day species distributions. Here we investigate evolutionary biogeography of mangroves in the Indo-West Pacific (IWP) and western Atlantic-East Pacific (AEP) regions using a large sample of populations of Rhizophora (the most representative mangrove genus) and a combination of chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences and genome-wide ISSR markers. Results Our comparative analyses of biogeographic patterns amongst Rhizophora taxa worldwide support the hypothesis that ancient dispersals along the Tethys Seaway and subsequent vicariant events that divided the IWP and AEP lineages resulted in the major disjunctions. We dated the deep split between the Old and New World lineages to early Eocene based on fossil calibration and geological and tectonic changes. Our data also provide evidence for other vicariant processes within the Indo-West Pacific region in separating conspecific lineages of SE Asia and Australia-Pacific at the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. Close genetic affinities exist between extant Fijian and American lineages; East African and Australian lineages; and Australian and Pacific lineages; indicating relatively more recent oceanic long-distance dispersal events. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that neither vicariance nor dispersal alone could explain the observed global occurrences of Rhizophora, but a combination of vicariant events and oceanic long-distance dispersals can account for historical diversification and present-day biogeographic patterns of mangroves. PMID:24742016

  19. Microbial utilization of dissolved organic matter from leaves of the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle, in the Fresh Creek estuary, Bahamas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, Ronald; Peele, Emily R.; Hodson, Robert E.

    1986-11-01

    Dissolved organic matter was leached from [ 14C]labeled leaves of the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle, and used in studies to determine the rates and efficiencies of microbial utilization of the water-soluble components of mangrove leaves in the Fresh Creek estuary, Bahamas. Rates of microbial utilization (assimilation plus mineralization) of mangrove leachate ranged from 0·022 to 4·675 μg ml -1 h -1 depending on the concentration of leachate and the size or diversity of microbial populations. Microflora associated with decaying mangrove leaves utilized mangrove leachate at rates up to 18-fold higher than rates of leachate utilization by planktonic microflora. Chemical analyses indicated that tannins and other potentially inhibitory phenolic compounds made up a major fraction (18%) of the dissolved organic matter in mangrove leachate. Mangrove leachate did not appear to be inhibitory to the microbial uptake of leachate or the microbial degradation of the lignocellulosic component of mangrove leaves except at high concentrations (mg ml -1). The availability of molecular oxygen also was an important parameter affecting rates of leachate utilization; rates of microbial utilization of leachate were up to 8-fold higher under aerobic rather than anaerobic conditions. The overall efficiency of conversion of mangrove leachate into microbial biomass was high and ranged from 64% to 94%. As much as 42% of the added leachate was utilized during 2 to 12 h incubations, indicating that a major fraction of the leachable material from mangrove leaves is incorporated into microbial biomass, and thus available to animals in the estuarine food web.

  20. Albino mutation rates in red mangroves (Rhizophora mangle L.) as a bioassay of contamination history in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Proffitt, C.E.; Travis, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the sensitivity of a viviparous estuarine tree species, Rhizophora mangle, to historic sublethal mutagenic stress across a fine spatial scale by comparing the frequency of trees producing albino propagules in historically contaminated (n=4) and uncontaminated (n=11) forests in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA. Data from uncontaminated forests were used to provide estimates of background mutation rates. We also determined whether other fitness parameters were negatively correlated with mutagenic stress (e.g., degree of outcrossing and numbers of reproducing trees km-1). Contaminated sites in Tampa Bay had significantly higher frequencies of trees that were heterozygous for albinism per 1000 total reproducing trees (FHT) than uncontaminated forests (mean ?? SE: 11.4 ?? 4.3 vs 4.3 ?? 0.73, P 25 yrs of subsequent recruitment and tree replacement may have allowed an initial elevation in the FHT to decay. Patterns of FHT were not explained by distance from the bay mouth or the degree of urbanization. However, there was a significant positive relationship between tree size and FHT (r=0.83, P<0.018), which suggests that forests with older or larger trees provide a more lasting record of cumulative mutagenic stress. No other fitness parameters correlated with FHT. There was a difference in FHT between two latitudes, as determined by comparing Tampa Bay with literature values for Puerto Rico. The sensitivity of this bioassay for the effects of mutagens will facilitate future monitoring of contamination events and comparisons of bay-wide recovery in future decades. Development of a database of FHT values for a range of subtropical and tropical estuaries is underway that will provide a baseline against which to compare mutational consequences of global change. ?? 2005, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  1. Biomass, litterfall and decomposition rates for the fringed rhizophora mangle forest lining the Bon Accord Lagoon, Tobago.

    PubMed

    Juman, Rahanna A

    2005-05-01

    The mangrove forest that fringes the Bon Accord Lagoon measures 0.8 km(2) and is dominated by red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle). This forest forms the landward boundary of the Buccoo Reef Marine Park in Southwest Tobago, and is part of a mangrove-seagrass-coral reef continuum. Biomass and productivity, as indicated by litterfall rates, were measured in seven 0.01 ha monospecific plots from February 1998 to February 1999, and decomposition rates were determined. Red mangrove above-ground biomass ranged between 2.0 and 25.9 kg (dry wt.) m(-2). Mean biomass was 14.1+/-8.1 kg (dry wt.) m(-2) yielding a standing crop of 11 318+/-6 488 t. Litterfall rate varied spatially and seasonally. It peaked from May to August (4.2-4.3 g dry wt. m(-2) d(-1)) and was lowest from October to December (2.3-2.8 g dry wt. m(-2) d(-1)). Mean annual litterfall rate was 3.4+/-0.9 g dry wt. m(-2) d(-1). Leaf degradation rates ranged from 0.3% loss d(-1) in the upper intertidal zone to 1% loss d(-1) at a lower intertidal site flooded by sewage effluent. Mean degradation rate was 0.4+/-1% loss d(-1) . The swamp produces 2.8 t dry wt. of litterfall and 12 kg dry wt. of decomposed leaf material daily. Biomass and litterfall rates in Bon Accord Lagoon were compared to five similar sites that also participate in the Caribbean Coastal Marine Productivity Programme (CARICOMP). The Bon Accord Lagoon mangrove swamp is a highly productive fringed-forest that contributes to the overall productivity of the mangrove-seagrass-reef complex. PMID:17465160

  2. Community structure and estimated contribution of primary consumers (Nematodes and Copepods) of decomposing plant litter (Juncus roemerianus and Rhizophora mangle) in South Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Fell, J.W.; Cefalu, R.

    1984-01-01

    The paper discusses the meiofauna associated with decomposing leaf litter from two species of coastal marshland plants: the black needle rush, Juncus roemerianus and the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle. The following aspects were investigated: (1) types of meiofauna present, especially nematodes; (2) changes in meiofaunal community structures with regard to season, station location, and type of plant litter; (3) amount of nematode and copepod biomass present on the decomposing plant litter; and (4) an estimation of the possible role of the nematodes in the decomposition process. 28 references, 5 figures, 9 tables. (ACR)

  3. Optimizing remote sensing and GIS tools for mapping and managing the distribution of an invasive mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) on South Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Iorio, M.; Jupiter, S.D.; Cochran, S.A.; Potts, D.C.

    2007-01-01

    In 1902, the Florida red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle L., was introduced to the island of Molokai, Hawaii, and has since colonized nearly 25% of the south coast shoreline. By classifying three kinds of remote sensing imagery, we compared abilities to detect invasive mangrove distributions and to discriminate mangroves from surrounding terrestrial vegetation. Using three analytical techniques, we compared mangrove mapping accuracy for various sensor-technique combinations. ANOVA of accuracy assessments demonstrated significant differences among techniques, but no significant differences among the three sensors. We summarize advantages and disadvantages of each sensor and technique for mapping mangrove distributions in tropical coastal environments.

  4. Genetic variation in wild and hatchery stocks of Suminoe Oyster (Crassostrea ariakensis) assessed by PCR-RFLP and microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Allen, Standish K; Reece, Kimberly S

    2005-01-01

    Genetic variation in wild Asian populations and U.S. hatchery stocks of Crassostrea ariakensis was examined using polymerase chain reactions with restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of both the mitochondrial COI gene and the nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 region and using 3 microsatellite markers. Hierarchical analysis of molecular variance and pairwise comparisons revealed significant differentiation (P < 0.05) between samples from the northern region, represented by collections from China and Japan, and 2 of 3 samples from southern China. PCR-RFLP patterns were identified that were diagnostic for the northern (N-type) and southern (S-type) groups. Microsatellite marker profiles were used to assign each oyster to one of the two northern or two southern populations. Results for more than 97% of the oysters were consistent with the PCR-RFLP patterns observed for each individual in that oysters with N-type patterns were assigned to one of the northern populations and those with S-type patterns to one of the southern populations. At one site of the Beihai (B) region in southern China a mix of individuals with either the N-type or S-type PCR-RFLP genotypes was found. No heterozygotes at the nuclear ITS-1 locus were found in the sample, possibly indicating reproductive isolation in sympatry. Microsatellite assignment test results of the B individuals were also consistent with identifications as either the N-type or S-type based on PCR-RFLP patterns. The parental population for one hatchery stock was this B sample, which initially was composed of almost equal numbers of northern and southern genetic types. After hatchery spawns, however, more than 97% of the progeny fell into the northern genetic group by PCR-RFLP and microsatellite assignment test analyses, indicating that the individuals with the southern genotype contributed little to the spawn, owing to gametic incompatibility, differential larval survival, or a difference in

  5. Cytochemical characterization of yolk granule acid phosphatase during early development of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiyan; Sun, Hushan; Wang, Yanjie; Yan, Dongchun; Wang, Lei

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a cytochemical method and transmission electron microscopy was used to examine acid phosphatase activities of yolk granules throughout the early developmental stages of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. This study aimed to investigate the dynamic change of yolk granule acid phosphatase, and the mechanisms underlying its involvement in yolk degradation during the early developmental stages of molluscs. Three types of yolk granules (YGI, YGII, and YGIII) that differed in electron density and acid phosphatase reaction were identified in early cleavage, morula, blastula, gastrula, trochophore, and veliger stages. The morphological heterogeneities of the yolk granules were related to acid phosphatase activity and degrees of yolk degradation, indicating the association of acid phosphatase with yolk degradation in embryos and larvae of molluscs. Fusion of yolk granules was observed during embryogenesis and larval development of C. gigas. The fusion of YGI (free of acid phosphatase reaction) with YGII (rich in acid phosphatase reaction) could be the way by which yolk degradation is triggered.

  6. Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) δ15N as a bioindicator of nitrogen sources: Observations and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, B.; Carruthers, T.J.B.; Dennison, W.C.; Fertig, E.J.; Altabet, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) in bioindicators are increasingly employed to identify nitrogen sources in many ecosystems and biological characteristics of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) make it an appropriate species for this purpose. To assess nitrogen isotopic fractionation associated with assimilation and baseline variations in oyster mantle, gill, and muscle tissue δ15N, manipulative fieldwork in Chesapeake Bay and corresponding modeling exercises were conducted. This study (1) determined that five individuals represented an optimal sample size; (2) verified that δ15N in oysters from two locations converged after shared deployment to a new location reflecting a change in nitrogen sources; (3) identified required exposure time and temporal integration (four months for muscle, two to three months for gill and mantle); and (4) demonstrated seasonal δ15N increases in seston (summer) and oysters (winter). As bioindicators, oysters can be deployed for spatial interpolation of nitrogen sources, even in areas lacking extant populations. PMID:20381097

  7. Effect of cadmium body burdens in adult Crassostrea virginica on fecundity and viability of larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Zaroogian, G.E.; Morrison, G.

    1981-09-01

    Because marine bivalves in general and Crassostrea virginica in particular are good accumulators of metals, a study was performed to determine if embryos from parents with high concentrations of cadmium in soft tissues are more sensitive to cadmium toxicity than those from parents with low tissue cadmium concentrations. In addition, the study was designed to investigate the effect of selected cadmium treatments on larval growth. It was found that despite cadmium concentrations as high as 270 micrograms/gram dry weight in the total soft tissues, oysters spawned heavily. It was generally concluded that seawater cadmium concentrations of 5 micrograms/kg are not toxic to oyster embryos, but does cause enough stress to delay development into larvae.

  8. Invasion genetics of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas shaped by aquaculture stocking practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehler, Jenny; Wegner, K. Mathias; Reise, Karsten; Jacobsen, Sabine

    2011-10-01

    As a result of aquaculture activities Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1793) have invaded the European Wadden Sea. Using a variable noncoding mitochondrial marker, we show that the invaded range is the result of two independent invasions. Haplotype frequencies point towards two separate groups, one in the southern and the other in the northern Wadden Sea. We found virtually no genetic differentiation throughout the southern range and the putative source from British Columbia, Canada, suggesting that the Southern region can be considered as a closed population. In the North, mismatch distributions, haplotype ordination and isolation-by-distance analysis suggest a stronger, persistent impact of aquaculture on invasive populations. Due to the ongoing supply of new genetic material from hatchery production the northern invasive populations can therefore be considered as an open population highlighting the importance of aquaculture practice on the genetics of this keystone invader in the Wadden Sea.

  9. Characterization of the mantle transcriptome in bivalves: Pecten maximus, Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Yarra, Tejaswi; Gharbi, Karim; Blaxter, Mark; Peck, Lloyd S; Clark, Melody S

    2016-06-01

    The calcareous shells secreted by bivalve molluscs display diverse and species specific structural compositions, which indicates possible divergent biomineralization processes. Thus, studying multiple mollusc species will provide a more comprehensive understanding of shell formation. Here, the transcriptomes of the mantle tissues responsible for shell deposition were characterized in three commercially relevant bivalve species. Using high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics tools, de novo transcriptome assemblies of mantle tissues were generated for the mussel Mytilus edulis, the oyster Crassostrea gigas and the scallop Pecten maximus. These transcriptomes were annotated, and contigs with similarity to proteins known to have shell formation roles in other species were identified. Comparison of the shell formation specific proteins in the three bivalves indicates the possibility of species specific shell proteins.

  10. The Presence of Histamine and a Histamine Receptor in the Bivalve Mollusc, Crassostrea virginica

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Jarreau; LaFleur, Kisha; Mantone, Daniel; Boisette, Beatrix; Harris, Ave; Catapane, Edward J.; Carroll, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Histamine, a biogenic amine, is a neurotransmitter in neurons and sensory receptors in invertebrates. Histamine has rarely been reported in bivalves. We used HPLC with pre-column derivatization using 2,3-naphthalenedicarboxaldehyde (NDA) as a fluorescent labeling agent to measure histamine in ganglia, and peripheral tissues of the oyster Crassostrea virginica. We also used Western Blot technique to look for the presence of a histamine receptor in the mantle rim. HPLC results found histamine present in ng amounts in both the cerebral and visceral ganglia, as well as the mantle rim and other peripheral tissues of C. virginica. The study confirms and quantifies histamine as an endogenous biogenic amine in C. virginica in the nervous system and innervated organs. Western Blot technique also identified a histamine H2-like receptor present in sensory tissue of the oyster's mantle rim. PMID:26120600

  11. Modulation of Crassostrea virginica hemocyte reactive oxygen species production by Listonella anguillarum.

    PubMed

    Bramble, L; Anderson, R S

    1997-01-01

    Luminol- and lucigenin-augmented chemiluminescence (CL) were used to evaluate the ability of Listonella (formerly Vibrio) anguillarum to stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by Crassostrea virginica hemocytes. Whereas heat-killed L. anguillarum stimulated hemocyte CL in the lucigenin system, viable L. anguillarum did not. Neither viable nor heat-killed bacteria stimulated hemocyte production of luminol CL. Metabolically active L. anguillarum generated ROS, as indicated by luminol and lucigenin CL. It is proposed that bacterial catalase suppressed hemocyte-derived luminol CL. L. anguillarum, which possesses the antioxidant enzyme catalase, suppressed luminol CL generated by zymosan-stimulated hemocytes. Conversely, the catalase negative bacterium Carnobacterium piscicola had no effect on hemocyte-derived luminol CL elicited by zymosan. The inability of viable L. anguillarum to stimulate hemocyte ROS production, as measured by CL, does not support the proposed role for ROS in hemocyte-mediated bactericidal activity. PMID:9303272

  12. A Multi-module Approach to Calculation of Oyster ( Crassostrea virginica) Environmental Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerco, Carl F.

    2015-08-01

    Environmental benefits are one of the motivations for management restoration of depleted bivalve populations. We describe a series of linked modules for benefits calculation. The modules include: oyster ( Crassostrea virginica) bioenergetics, materials transport via the tidal prism, and benefits quantification. Quantified benefits include carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus removal and shell production. The modules are demonstrated through application to the Great Wicomico River, a tributary of Chesapeake Bay, USA. Oysters on seven reefs (total area 2.8 × 105 m2) are calculated to remove 15.2, 6.2, and 0.2 tons per annum of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus, respectively, from the Great Wicomico. Oyster mortality contributes 108 tons per annum dry weight shell to the reefs.

  13. Genome-wide profiling of DNA methylation and gene expression in Crassostrea gigas male gametes

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Claire E.; Roberts, Steven B.

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns and functions are variable across invertebrate taxa. In order to provide a better understanding of DNA methylation in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), we characterized the genome-wide DNA methylation profile in male gamete cells using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing. RNA-Seq analysis was performed to examine the relationship between DNA methylation and transcript expression. Methylation status of over 7.6 million CpG dinucleotides was described with a majority of methylated regions occurring among intragenic regions. Overall, 15% of the CpG dinucleotides were determined to be methylated and the mitochondrial genome lacked DNA methylation. Integrative analysis of DNA methylation and RNA-Seq data revealed a positive association between methylation status, both in gene bodies and putative promoter regions, and expression. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the distribution of DNA methylation in the oyster male gamete tissue and suggests that DNA methylation is involved in gene regulatory activity. PMID:24987376

  14. Influence of eutrophication on metal bioaccumulation and oral bioavailability in oysters, Crassostrea angulata.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Xing; Chen, Li-Hui; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2014-07-23

    Oysters (Crassostrea angulata) are often exposed to eutrophication. However, how these exposures influence metal bioaccumulation and oral bioavailability (OBA) in oysters is unknown. After a four month field experimental cultivation, bioaccumulation factors (BAF) of metals (Fe, Cu, As, Cd, and Pb) from seawater to oysters and metal oral bioavailability in oysters by bionic gastrointestinal tract were determined. A positive effect of macronutrient (nitrate N and total P) concentration in seawater on BAF of Cd in oysters was observed, but such an effect was not significant for Fe, Cu, Pb, and As. Only OBA of As was significantly positively correlated to N and P contents. For Fe, OBA was negatively correlated with N. The regular variation of the OBA of Fe and As may be due to the effect of eutrophication on the synthesis of metal granules and heat-stable protein in oysters, respectively.

  15. A Multi-module Approach to Calculation of Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) Environmental Benefits.

    PubMed

    Cerco, Carl F

    2015-08-01

    Environmental benefits are one of the motivations for management restoration of depleted bivalve populations. We describe a series of linked modules for benefits calculation. The modules include: oyster (Crassostrea virginica) bioenergetics, materials transport via the tidal prism, and benefits quantification. Quantified benefits include carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus removal and shell production. The modules are demonstrated through application to the Great Wicomico River, a tributary of Chesapeake Bay, USA. Oysters on seven reefs (total area 2.8 × 10(5) m(2)) are calculated to remove 15.2, 6.2, and 0.2 tons per annum of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus, respectively, from the Great Wicomico. Oyster mortality contributes 108 tons per annum dry weight shell to the reefs. PMID:25924786

  16. [Accumulation and release characteristics of heavy metals in Crassostrea rivalaris under mixed exposure].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-gang; Jia, Xiao-ping; Lin, Qin; Ma, Sheng-wei; Cai, Wen-gui; Wang, Zeng-huan

    2008-04-01

    With a mixed solution of lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As), this paper studied the accumulation and release characteristics of test heavy metals in Crassostrea rivalaris. The results showed that C. rivalaris had a strong ability to accumulate Pb, Cu, Ni, Cd, Cr and Hg, being able to indicate the concentration levels of these heavy metals in solution, but a weak ability to accumulate Zn and As. In the following 35 days release stage, no significant change was observed in the contents of test heavy metals in C. rivalaris, suggesting that C. rivalaris had weak ability to release heavy metals. Two-compartment kinetic model could well fit the accumulation of heavy metals in C. rivalaris, but failed in simulating their release characteristics.

  17. Bacteriophage as models for virus removal from Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) during re-laying.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, T. J.; Martin, K.

    1993-01-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the feasibility of using naturally-occurring bacteriophages to assess the impact of re-laying on levels of viral contamination in Crassostrea gigas, the Pacific oyster. Two phages were chosen. One, male-specific (F+), was enumerated using Salmonella typhimurium. The other, a somatic phage, was detected using an, as yet, uncharacterized Escherichia coli. Investigations, using a variety of re-laying sites, demonstrated that numbers of F+ phage in oyster tissue declined more rapidly than those of somatic phage. For example, in oysters placed in commercially-used sea water ponds, F+ phage reached undetectable levels within 2-3 weeks, whereas somatic phage could still be detected 5 weeks after re-laying. The studies suggest that F+ phage may not be a suitable indicator for virus removal and that somatic phage may be better suited to this role. PMID:8405159

  18. A Glycoprotein in Shells of Conspecifics Induces Larval Settlement of the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Hebert Ely; Hashimoto, Kyotaro; Yoshida, Asami; Hara, Kenji; Imai, Chisato Chris; Kitamura, Hitoshi; Satuito, Cyril Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Settlement of larvae of Crassostrea gigas on shell chips (SC) prepared from shells of 11 different species of mollusks was investigated. Furthermore, the settlement inducing compound in the shell of C. gigas was extracted and subjected to various treatments to characterize the chemical cue. C. gigas larvae settled on SC of all species tested except on Patinopecten yessoensis and Atrina pinnata. In SC of species that induced C. gigas larvae to settle, settlement was proportionate to the amount of SC supplied to the larvae. When compared to C. gigas SC, all species except Crassostrea nippona showed lower settlement inducing activities, suggesting that the cue may be more abundant or in a more available form to the larvae in shells of conspecific and C. nippona than in other species. The settlement inducing activity of C. gigas SC remained intact after antibiotic treatment. Extraction of C. gigas SC with diethyl ether (Et2O-ex), ethanol (EtOH-ex), and water (Aq-ex) did not induce larval settlement of C. gigas larvae. However, extraction of C. gigas SC with 2N of hydrochloric acid (HCl-ex) induced larval settlement that was at the same level as the SC. The settlement inducing compound in the HCl-ex was stable at 100°C but was destroyed or degraded after pepsin, trypsin, PNGase F and trifluoromethanesulfonic acid treatments. This chemical cue eluted between the molecular mass range of 45 and 150 kDa after gel filtration and revealed a major band at 55 kDa on the SDS-PAGE gel after staining with Stains-all. Thus, a 55 kDa glycoprotein component in the organic matrix of C. gigas shells is hypothesized to be the chemical basis of larval settlement on conspecifics. PMID:24349261

  19. Determination of the antimutagenicity of an aqueous extract of Rhizophora mangle L. (Rhizophoraceae), using in vivo and in vitro test systems

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    An aqueous extract of Rhizophora mangle L. bark is used as raw material in pottery making in the State of Espirito Santo, Brazil. This extract presents large quantities of tannins, compounds possessing antioxidant properties. Tannin antioxidant activity, as a plant chemical defense mechanism in the process of stabilizing free radicals, has been an incentive to studies on anti-mutagenicity. The present work aimed to evaluate possible antimutagenic activity of a R. mangle aqueous extract, using the Allium cepa test-system and micronuclear (MN) assay with blockage of cytokinesis in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1). The Allium cepa test-system indicated antimutagenic activity against the damage induced by the mutagenic agent methyl methanesulfonate. A reduction in both MN cell frequency and chromosome breaks occurred in both the pre and post-treatment protocols. The MN testing of CHO-K1 cells revealed anti-mutagenic activity of the R. mangle extract against methyl methanesulfonate and doxorubicin in pre, simultaneous and post-treatment protocols. These results suggest the presence of phyto-constituents in the extract presenting demutagenic and bio-antimutagenic activities. Since the chemical constitution of Rhizophora mangle species presents elevated tannin content, it is highly probable that these compounds are the antimutagenic promoters themselves. PMID:21637623

  20. Determination of the antimutagenicity of an aqueous extract of Rhizophora mangle L. (Rhizophoraceae), using in vivo and in vitro test systems.

    PubMed

    Malini, Maressa; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio; Jamal, Claudia Masrouah; Nati, Natália; da Silva Passos, Tatiane; Matsumoto, Silvia Tamie

    2010-01-01

    An aqueous extract of Rhizophora mangle L. bark is used as raw material in pottery making in the State of Espirito Santo, Brazil. This extract presents large quantities of tannins, compounds possessing antioxidant properties. Tannin antioxidant activity, as a plant chemical defense mechanism in the process of stabilizing free radicals, has been an incentive to studies on anti-mutagenicity. The present work aimed to evaluate possible antimutagenic activity of a R. mangle aqueous extract, using the Allium cepa test-system and micronuclear (MN) assay with blockage of cytokinesis in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1). The Allium cepa test-system indicated antimutagenic activity against the damage induced by the mutagenic agent methyl methanesulfonate. A reduction in both MN cell frequency and chromosome breaks occurred in both the pre and post-treatment protocols. The MN testing of CHO-K1 cells revealed anti-mutagenic activity of the R. mangle extract against methyl methanesulfonate and doxorubicin in pre, simultaneous and post-treatment protocols. These results suggest the presence of phyto-constituents in the extract presenting demutagenic and bio-antimutagenic activities. Since the chemical constitution of Rhizophora mangle species presents elevated tannin content, it is highly probable that these compounds are the antimutagenic promoters themselves. PMID:21637623

  1. Species identification of Crassostrea and Ostrea oysters by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the 5S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Cross, Ismael; Rebordinos, Laureana; Diaz, Edgardo

    2006-01-01

    A specific multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed for the identification of Crassostrea angulata, C. gigas, Ostrea edulis, and O. stentina oyster species. Universal primers were used for the amplification of complete repetition units of 5S rDNA in each of the 4 species. The alignment of the obtained sequences was the basis for the specific design of species-specific primers (ED1, ED2, ST1, ST2, CR1, and CR2) located in the nontranscribed spacer regions. The different sizes of the species-specific amplicons, separated by agarose gel electrophoresis, allowed identification of Crassostrea and Ostrea species. A multiplex PCR with a set of the 6 designed primers showed that they did not interfere with each other and bound specifically to the DNA target. This genetic marker can be very useful for traceability of the species, application in the management of oyster cultures, and conservation of the genetic resources of the species. PMID:16512239

  2. Ostreid herpesvirus OsHV-1 μVar in Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg 1793) of the Wadden Sea, a UNESCO world heritage site.

    PubMed

    Gittenberger, A; Voorbergen-Laarman, M A; Engelsma, M Y

    2016-01-01

    The Wadden Sea is an extensive wetland area, recognized as UNESCO world heritage site of international importance. Since the mid-1990s, the invasive Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg 1793) population in the area has grown exponentially, having a distinct impact on the ecosystem. The recent spread of the emerging oyster pathogen Ostreid herpesvirus OsHV-1 μVar worldwide and specifically in the oyster culture areas in the south of the Netherlands raised the question whether the virus may also be present in the Wadden Sea. In the summer of 2012 juvenile Pacific oysters were collected from five locations in the Dutch Wadden Sea. The virus was shown to be present in three of the five locations by real-time PCR and sequencing. It was concluded that OsHV-1 μVar has settled itself in Pacific oyster reefs in the Wadden Sea. These results and the recent discoveries of OsHV-1 microvariants in Australia and Korea indicate that OsHV-1 μVar and related variants might be more widespread than can be deduced from current literature. In particular in regions with no commercial oyster culture, similar to the Wadden Sea, the virus may go undetected as wild beds with mixed age classes hamper the detection of mortality among juvenile oysters.

  3. US Mussel Watch 1976-1978: an overview of the trace-metal, DDE, PCB, hydrocarbon, and artificial radionuclide data. [Mytilus edulis, M. californianus, Crassostrea sp

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, J.W.; Goldberg, E.D.; Risebrough, R.W.; Martin, J.H.; Bowen, V.T.

    1983-08-01

    Data are presented for trace metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), aromatic hydrocarbons and /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in Mytilus edulis, M. californianus, and Crassostrea sp. collected in the US Mussel Watch program in 1976-1978 from 62 locations on the US east and west coasts. General similarities in geographical distributions of concentrations were present in all 3 years with at least an order of magnitude elevation of concentrations of Pb, PCBs, and fossil fuel hydrocarbons in bivalves sampled near the larger urban areas. Elevated Cd and /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu concentrations in bivalves from the central California coast are apparently related to enrichments of Cd and nuclear weapons testing fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in intermediate depth water of the North Pacific and upwelling of this water associated with the California Current system. Data have revealed no evidence of local or regional systematic elevations of environmental concentrations of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu as a result of effluent releases from nuclear power reactors.

  4. Hemocyte parameters of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas a year after the Hebei Spirit oil spill off the west coast of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaghy, Ludovic; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Lee, Hee-Jung; Jun, Je-Cheon; Park, Young-Je; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2010-12-01

    In marine bivalves, hemocytes support various physiological functions, including immune defense, nutrient transport, shell repair, and homeostatic maintenance. Although the effects of marine contaminants on the immunological functions of bivalves have been extensively investigated, the impacts of oil spills are not well understood. Therefore, we investigated hemocyte parameters in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas 13 months after the Hebei Spirit oil spill (December 2007) off the west coast of Korea. The parameters studied included hemocyte concentration and mortality, relative proportion of hemocyte populations, and immunological functions such as phagocytosis and oxidative activity using flow cytometry. These immune-related parameters in oysters damaged by the oil spill were also compared to control oysters that were collected from an area unaffected by the spill. The flow cytometry study indicated that granulocyte population, phagocytic capacity, and reactive oxygen species production in oysters exposed to crude oil 13 months prior were depressed compared to the unexposed control oysters. Our data suggest that immunocompetence in oysters affected by the oil spill had not fully recovered 1 year after the accident, although more detailed studies on the physiology and disease resistance should be performed.

  5. Physiological response and resilience of early life-stage Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) to past, present and future ocean acidification

    PubMed Central

    Gobler, Christopher J.; Talmage, Stephanie C.

    2014-01-01

    The Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin, 1791), is the second most valuable bivalve fishery in the USA and is sensitive to high levels of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Here we present experiments that comprehensively examined how the ocean's past, present and projected (21st and 22nd centuries) CO2 concentrations impact the growth and physiology of larval stages of C. virginica. Crassostrea virginica larvae grown in present-day pCO2 concentrations (380 μatm) displayed higher growth and survival than individuals grown at both lower (250 μatm) and higher pCO2 levels (750 and 1500 μatm). Crassostrea virginica larvae manifested calcification rates, sizes, shell thicknesses, metamorphosis, RNA:DNA ratios and lipid contents that paralleled trends in survival, with maximal values for larvae grown at 380 μatm pCO2 and reduced performance in higher and lower pCO2 levels. While some physiological differences among oysters could be attributed to CO2-induced changes in size or calcification rates, the RNA:DNA ratios at ambient pCO2 levels were elevated, independent of these factors. Likewise, the lipid contents of individuals exposed to high pCO2 levels were depressed even when differences in calcification rates were considered. These findings reveal the cascading, interdependent impact that high CO2 can have on oyster physiology. Crassostrea virginica larvae are significantly more resistant to elevated pCO2 than other North Atlantic bivalves, such as Mercenaria mercenaria and Argopecten irradians, a finding that may be related to the biogeography and/or evolutionary history of these species and may have important implications for future bivalve restoration and aquaculture efforts. PMID:27293625

  6. The specifically enhanced cellular immune responses in Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) against secondary challenge with Vibrio splendidus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Qiu, Limei; Sun, Zhibin; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Liu, Rui; Yue, Feng; Sun, Rui; Song, Linsheng

    2014-07-01

    The increasing experimental evidences suggest that there are some forms of specific acquired immunity in invertebrates, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In the present study, Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) stimulated primarily by heat-killed Vibrio splendidus displayed stronger immune responses at cellular and molecular levels when they encountered the secondary challenge of live V. splendidus. The total hemocyte counts (THC) increased significantly after the primary stimulation of heat-killed V. splendidus, and it increased even higher (p < 0.01) and reached the peak earlier (at 6 h) after the secondary challenge with live V. splendidus compared with that of the primary stimulation. The number of new generated circulating hemocytes increased dramatically (p < 0.01) at 6 h after the pre-stimulated oysters received the secondary stimulation with live V. splendidus, and the phagocytic rate was also enhanced significantly (p < 0.01) at 12 h after the secondary stimulation. Meanwhile, the enhanced phagocytosis of hemocytes was highly specific for V. splendidus and they could distinguish Vibrio anguillarum, Vibrio coralliilyticus, Yarrowia lipolytica, and Micrococcus luteus efficiently. In addition, the mRNA expression of 12 candidate genes related to phagocytosis and hematopoiesis were also monitored, and the expression levels of CgIntegrin, CgPI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase), CgRho J, CgMAPKK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase), CgRab32, CgNADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase, CgRunx1 and CgBMP7 (bone morphogenetic protein 7) in the hemocytes of pre-stimulated oysters after the secondary stimulation of V. splendidus were higher (p < 0.01) than that after the primary stimulation, but there was no statistically significant changes for the genes of CgPKC (protein kinase C), CgMyosin, CgActin, and CgGATA 3. These results collectively suggested that the primary stimulation of V. splendidus led to immune priming in

  7. Age structure, carbonate production and shell loss rate in an Early Miocene reef of the giant oyster Crassostrea gryphoides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzhauser, M.; Djuricic, A.; Mandic, O.; Neubauer, T. A.; Zuschin, M.; Pfeifer, N.

    2015-09-01

    We present the first analysis of population structure and cohort distribution in a fossil oyster reef based on more than 1121 shells of the giant oyster Crassostrea gryphoides (Schlotheim, 1813). Data derive from Terrestrial Laser Scanning of a Lower Miocene shell bed covering 459 m2. Within two transects, individual shells were manually outlined on a digital surface model and cross-checked based on high-resolution orthophotos, resulting in accurate information on center line length and area of exposed shell surface. A growth model was calculated, revealing this species as the fastest growing and largest Crassostrea known so far. Non-normal distribution of size, area and age data hints at the presence of at least four distinct recruitment cohorts. The rapid decline of frequency amplitudes with age is interpreted to be a function of mortality and shell loss. The calculated shell half-lives range around few years, indicating that oyster reefs were geologically short-lived structures, which could have been fully degraded on a decadal scale. Crassostrea gryphoides reefs were widespread and common along the Miocene circum-Tethyan coasts. Given its enormous growth performance of ~ 150 g carbonate per year this species has been an important carbonate producer in estuarine settings. Yet, the rapid shell loss impeded the formation of stable structures comparable to coral reefs.

  8. A new non-indigenous Crassostrea species in Southwest Atlantic salt marshes affects mortality of the cordgrass Spartina alterniflora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomovasky, Betina J.; Alvarez, Graciela; Addino, Mariana; Montemayor, Diana I.; Iribarne, Oscar

    2014-07-01

    Biological invasions in marine and coastal systems may produce new trophic and nontrophic interactions influencing the structure of the invaded community. In the intertidal salt marshes of Samborombón Bay (36°19‧20″S, 56°46‧26″W; mouth of La Plata River; Argentina), there is a new non-indigenous oyster species, Crassostrea sp., which settles on the dominant smooth cordgrass Spartina alterniflora. Here, we analyzed if the oyster affects S. alterniflora. Sampling showed that density of live plant was similar across intertidal levels, but there were higher density of dead plant stems at low intertidal levels. This pattern coincides with higher density and larger shell size of Crassostrea sp. at the low intertidal where oysters are attached to the basal part of the plant stems. An experiment manipulating oysters attached to S. alterniflora stems and oyster mimics shows that Crassostrea sp. can indeed increase mortality of S. alterniflora. The negative effect of bivalves on plant could be because several oysters settle around the Spartina stem, and by growing during the year, strangle the plants increasing their mortality rate. Together, all these evidences strongly suggest that these non-indigenous oysters can control the lower intertidal level of plant distribution in this system.

  9. A shell concentration of the Middle Miocene Crassostrea gryphoides (Schlotheim, 1813) from Siwa Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabbagh, Ahmed M.; El Hedeny, Magdy M.

    2016-08-01

    A concentration of heavy, thick-shelled, large-sized, and elongated population of the oyster Crassostrea gryphoides (Schlotheim, 1813) was recorded in shallow-marine deposits of the basal Oasis Member of the Middle Miocene Marmarica Formation exposed at Siwa Oasis, Egypt. The oyster assemblage is resedimented as a lens-shaped bank up to 80-100 cm thick and about 220 m long. Crassostrea gryphoides specimens are embedded in a yellowish green, soft marl matrix. This is the first documented occurrence of this lens at Siwa Oasis. The lensoid structure is bounded by a lower marl and an upper shale beds of about 2 m and 1.5 m thick, respectively. Assemblage within this lens is characterized by extreme variations of Crassostrea gryphoides, forming an almost monotypic assemblage. The shell packing was dense (shell percentages higher than 75%) at the base and the center of the lens, whereas it exhibits loose packing at the top and right and left sides of the lens (shell percentage less than 15%). Valves are poorly sorted and randomly orientated (both in surface and cross section views). Encrustation and bioerosion have observed on both sides of the left and right valves. The relatively limited varieties of encrusters together with moderate frequency of borings indicate moderate to high sedimentation rate. On the other hand, the low abundance of fragmented and abraded shells indicates good preservation and minimal transport. The studied lens concentration is interpreted as proximal tempestites assemblage.

  10. A shell concentration of the Middle Miocene Crassostrea gryphoides (Schlotheim, 1813) from Siwa Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabbagh, Ahmed M.; El Hedeny, Magdy M.

    2016-08-01

    A concentration of heavy, thick-shelled, large-sized, and elongated population of the oyster Crassostrea gryphoides (Schlotheim, 1813) was recorded in shallow-marine deposits of the basal Oasis Member of the Middle Miocene Marmarica Formation exposed at Siwa Oasis, Egypt. The oyster assemblage is resedimented as a lens-shaped bank up to 80-100 cm thick and about 220 m long. Crassostrea gryphoides specimens are embedded in a yellowish green, soft marl matrix. This is the first documented occurrence of this lens at Siwa Oasis. The lensoid structure is bounded by a lower marl and an upper shale beds of about 2 m and 1.5 m thick, respectively. Assemblage within this lens is characterized by extreme variations of Crassostrea gryphoides, forming an almost monotypic assemblage. The shell packing was dense (shell percentages higher than 75%) at the base and the center of the lens, whereas it exhibits loose packing at the top and right and left sides of the lens (shell percentage less than 15%). Valves are poorly sorted and randomly orientated (both in surface and cross section views). Encrustation and bioerosion have observed on both sides of the left and right valves. The relatively limited varieties of encrusters together with moderate frequency of borings indicate moderate to high sedimentation rate. On the other hand, the low abundance of fragmented and abraded shells indicates good preservation and minimal transport. The studied lens concentration is interpreted as proximal tempestites assemblage.

  11. Age structure, carbonate production and shell loss rate in an Early Miocene reef of the giant oyster Crassostrea gryphoides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzhauser, Mathias; Djuricic, Ana; Mandic, Oleg; Neubauer, Thomas A.; Zuschin, Martin; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    We present the first analysis of population structure and cohort distribution in a fossil oyster shell bed based on 1121 shells of the giant oyster Crassostrea gryphoides (von Schlotheim, 1813). Data derive from terrestrial laser scanning of a Lower Miocene shell bed covering 459 m2. Within two transects, individual shells were manually outlined on a digital surface model and cross-checked based on high-resolution orthophotos, resulting in accurate information on center line length and area of exposed shell surface. A growth model was calculated, revealing this species as the fastest growing and largest Crassostrea known so far. Non-normal distribution of size, area and age data hints at the presence of at least four distinct recruitment cohorts. The rapid decline of frequency amplitudes with age is interpreted to be a function of mortality and shell loss. The calculated shell half-lives range around a few years, indicating that oyster reefs were geologically short-lived structures, which could have been fully degraded on a decadal scale. Crassostrea gryphoides reefs were widespread and common along the Miocene circum-Tethyan coasts. Given its enormous growth performance of ˜ 150 g carbonate per year this species has been an important carbonate producer in estuarine settings. Yet, the rapid shell loss impeded the formation of stable structures comparable to coral reefs.

  12. Key metabolic pathways involved in xenobiotic biotransformation and stress responses revealed by transcriptomics of the mangrove oyster Crassostrea brasiliana.

    PubMed

    Lüchmann, Karim H; Clark, Melody S; Bainy, Afonso C D; Gilbert, Jack A; Craft, John A; Chipman, J Kevin; Thorne, Michael A S; Mattos, Jacó J; Siebert, Marília N; Schroeder, Declan C

    2015-09-01

    The Brazilian oyster Crassostrea brasiliana was challenged to three common environmental contaminants: phenanthrene, diesel fuel water-accommodated fraction (WAF) and domestic sewage. Total RNA was extracted from the gill and digestive gland, and cDNA libraries were sequenced using the 454 FLX platform. The assembled transcriptome resulted in ̃20,000 contigs, which were annotated to produce the first de novo transcriptome for C. brasiliana. Sequences were screened to identify genes potentially involved in the biotransformation of xenobiotics and associated antioxidant defence mechanisms. These gene families included those of the cytochrome P450 (CYP450), 70kDa heat shock, antioxidants, such as glutathione S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase and also multi-drug resistance proteins. Analysis showed that the massive expansion of the CYP450 and HSP70 family due to gene duplication identified in the Crassostrea gigas genome also occurred in C. brasiliana, suggesting these processes form the base of the Crassostrea lineage. Preliminary expression analyses revealed several candidates biomarker genes that were up-regulated during each of the three treatments, suggesting the potential for environmental monitoring. PMID:26186662

  13. Influence of N deficiency and salinity on metal (Pb, Zn and Cu) accumulation and tolerance by Rhizophora stylosa in relation to root anatomy and permeability.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Wang, You-Shao; Ye, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Dan-Ting; Wang, Yu-Tu; Peng, Ya-Lan; Wang, Li-Ying

    2012-05-01

    Effects of N deficiency and salinity on root anatomy, permeability and metal (Pb, Zn and Cu) translocation and tolerance were investigated using mangrove seedlings of Rhizophora stylosa. The results showed that salt could directly reduce radial oxygen loss (ROL) by stimulation of lignification within exodermis. N deficiency, oppositely, would reduce lignification. Such an alteration in root permeability may also influence metal tolerance by plants. The data indicated that a moderate salinity could stimulate a lignified exodermis that delayed the entry of metals into the roots and thereby contributed to a higher metal tolerance, while N deficiency would aggravate metal toxicity. The results from sand pot trail further confirmed this issue. This study provides a barrier property of the exodermis in dealing with environments. The plasticity of root anatomy is likely an adaptive strategy to regulate the fluxes of gases, nutrients and toxins at root-soil interface. PMID:22361050

  14. Influence of N deficiency and salinity on metal (Pb, Zn and Cu) accumulation and tolerance by Rhizophora stylosa in relation to root anatomy and permeability.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Wang, You-Shao; Ye, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Dan-Ting; Wang, Yu-Tu; Peng, Ya-Lan; Wang, Li-Ying

    2012-05-01

    Effects of N deficiency and salinity on root anatomy, permeability and metal (Pb, Zn and Cu) translocation and tolerance were investigated using mangrove seedlings of Rhizophora stylosa. The results showed that salt could directly reduce radial oxygen loss (ROL) by stimulation of lignification within exodermis. N deficiency, oppositely, would reduce lignification. Such an alteration in root permeability may also influence metal tolerance by plants. The data indicated that a moderate salinity could stimulate a lignified exodermis that delayed the entry of metals into the roots and thereby contributed to a higher metal tolerance, while N deficiency would aggravate metal toxicity. The results from sand pot trail further confirmed this issue. This study provides a barrier property of the exodermis in dealing with environments. The plasticity of root anatomy is likely an adaptive strategy to regulate the fluxes of gases, nutrients and toxins at root-soil interface.

  15. Contrasting Effects of Historical Sea Level Rise and Contemporary Ocean Currents on Regional Gene Flow of Rhizophora racemosa in Eastern Atlantic Mangroves

    PubMed Central

    Ngeve, Magdalene N.; Van der Stocken, Tom; Menemenlis, Dimitris; Koedam, Nico; Triest, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Mangroves are seafaring taxa through their hydrochorous propagules that have the potential to disperse over long distances. Therefore, investigating their patterns of gene flow provides insights on the processes involved in the spatial genetic structuring of populations. The coastline of Cameroon has a particular geomorphological history and coastal hydrology with complex contemporary patterns of ocean currents, which we hypothesize to have effects on the spatial configuration and composition of present-day mangroves within its spans. A total of 982 trees were sampled from 33 transects (11 sites) in 4 estuaries. Using 11 polymorphic SSR markers, we investigated genetic diversity and structure of Rhizophora racemosa, a widespread species in the region. Genetic diversity was low to moderate and genetic differentiation between nearly all population pairs was significant. Bayesian clustering analysis, PCoA, estimates of contemporary migration rates and identification of barriers to gene flow were used and complemented with estimated dispersal trajectories of hourly released virtual propagules, using high-resolution surface current from a mesoscale and tide-resolving ocean simulation. These indicate that the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) is not a present-day barrier to gene flow. Rather, the Inter-Bioko-Cameroon (IBC) corridor, formed due to sea level rise, allows for connectivity between two mangrove areas that were isolated during glacial times by the CVL. Genetic data and numerical ocean simulations indicated that an oceanic convergence zone near the Cameroon Estuary complex (CEC) presents a strong barrier to gene flow, resulting in genetic discontinuities between the mangrove areas on either side. This convergence did not result in higher genetic diversity at the CEC as we had hypothesized. In conclusion, the genetic structure of Rhizophora racemosa is maintained by the contrasting effects of the contemporary oceanic convergence and historical climate change

  16. Contrasting Effects of Historical Sea Level Rise and Contemporary Ocean Currents on Regional Gene Flow of Rhizophora racemosa in Eastern Atlantic Mangroves.

    PubMed

    Ngeve, Magdalene N; Van der Stocken, Tom; Menemenlis, Dimitris; Koedam, Nico; Triest, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Mangroves are seafaring taxa through their hydrochorous propagules that have the potential to disperse over long distances. Therefore, investigating their patterns of gene flow provides insights on the processes involved in the spatial genetic structuring of populations. The coastline of Cameroon has a particular geomorphological history and coastal hydrology with complex contemporary patterns of ocean currents, which we hypothesize to have effects on the spatial configuration and composition of present-day mangroves within its spans. A total of 982 trees were sampled from 33 transects (11 sites) in 4 estuaries. Using 11 polymorphic SSR markers, we investigated genetic diversity and structure of Rhizophora racemosa, a widespread species in the region. Genetic diversity was low to moderate and genetic differentiation between nearly all population pairs was significant. Bayesian clustering analysis, PCoA, estimates of contemporary migration rates and identification of barriers to gene flow were used and complemented with estimated dispersal trajectories of hourly released virtual propagules, using high-resolution surface current from a mesoscale and tide-resolving ocean simulation. These indicate that the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) is not a present-day barrier to gene flow. Rather, the Inter-Bioko-Cameroon (IBC) corridor, formed due to sea level rise, allows for connectivity between two mangrove areas that were isolated during glacial times by the CVL. Genetic data and numerical ocean simulations indicated that an oceanic convergence zone near the Cameroon Estuary complex (CEC) presents a strong barrier to gene flow, resulting in genetic discontinuities between the mangrove areas on either side. This convergence did not result in higher genetic diversity at the CEC as we had hypothesized. In conclusion, the genetic structure of Rhizophora racemosa is maintained by the contrasting effects of the contemporary oceanic convergence and historical climate change

  17. Contrasting Effects of Historical Sea Level Rise and Contemporary Ocean Currents on Regional Gene Flow of Rhizophora racemosa in Eastern Atlantic Mangroves.

    PubMed

    Ngeve, Magdalene N; Van der Stocken, Tom; Menemenlis, Dimitris; Koedam, Nico; Triest, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Mangroves are seafaring taxa through their hydrochorous propagules that have the potential to disperse over long distances. Therefore, investigating their patterns of gene flow provides insights on the processes involved in the spatial genetic structuring of populations. The coastline of Cameroon has a particular geomorphological history and coastal hydrology with complex contemporary patterns of ocean currents, which we hypothesize to have effects on the spatial configuration and composition of present-day mangroves within its spans. A total of 982 trees were sampled from 33 transects (11 sites) in 4 estuaries. Using 11 polymorphic SSR markers, we investigated genetic diversity and structure of Rhizophora racemosa, a widespread species in the region. Genetic diversity was low to moderate and genetic differentiation between nearly all population pairs was significant. Bayesian clustering analysis, PCoA, estimates of contemporary migration rates and identification of barriers to gene flow were used and complemented with estimated dispersal trajectories of hourly released virtual propagules, using high-resolution surface current from a mesoscale and tide-resolving ocean simulation. These indicate that the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) is not a present-day barrier to gene flow. Rather, the Inter-Bioko-Cameroon (IBC) corridor, formed due to sea level rise, allows for connectivity between two mangrove areas that were isolated during glacial times by the CVL. Genetic data and numerical ocean simulations indicated that an oceanic convergence zone near the Cameroon Estuary complex (CEC) presents a strong barrier to gene flow, resulting in genetic discontinuities between the mangrove areas on either side. This convergence did not result in higher genetic diversity at the CEC as we had hypothesized. In conclusion, the genetic structure of Rhizophora racemosa is maintained by the contrasting effects of the contemporary oceanic convergence and historical climate change

  18. Chronic effects of non-weathered and weathered crude oil and dispersant associated with the Deepwater Horizon incident on development of larvae of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Chris J; Stefansson, Emily S; Pargee, Suzanne M; Blunt, Susanna M; Gage, Susan J; Stubblefield, William A

    2016-08-01

    The present study examined the effects of chronic exposure of eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) larvae to the water-accommodated fractions of fresh and weathered oils collected from the Deepwater Horizon incident, with and without additions of the dispersant Corexit 9500A, as well as to solutions of Corexit alone. Both shell growth of larvae exposed to test materials for a period of 10 d and larval settlement after 28 d of exposure were the most sensitive endpoints, with the 10-d growth endpoint being less variable among replicates. Growth and settlement endpoints were more sensitive than larval survival and normal development after 10 d and 28 d. Acute-to-chronic ratios calculated in the present study suggest that acute toxicities of oils and dispersant for oysters are not predictive of chronic effect levels for growth and settlement; therefore, chronic bioassays are necessary to assess these sublethal effects, in addition to standard 48-h acute toxicity tests. Comparison of 10% effective concentration (EC10) values for chronic 10-d growth and 28-d settlement endpoints with concentrations of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dipropylene glycol n-butyl ether (a marker for Corexit) in seawater samples, collected during and after the Deepwater Horizon incident, indicated it was unlikely that elevated concentrations of water-soluble fractions of oil and dispersant in the nearshore environment had significant adverse effects on the growth and settlement of eastern oyster larvae. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2029-2040. © 2016 SETAC.

  19. Chronic effects of non-weathered and weathered crude oil and dispersant associated with the Deepwater Horizon incident on development of larvae of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Chris J; Stefansson, Emily S; Pargee, Suzanne M; Blunt, Susanna M; Gage, Susan J; Stubblefield, William A

    2016-08-01

    The present study examined the effects of chronic exposure of eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) larvae to the water-accommodated fractions of fresh and weathered oils collected from the Deepwater Horizon incident, with and without additions of the dispersant Corexit 9500A, as well as to solutions of Corexit alone. Both shell growth of larvae exposed to test materials for a period of 10 d and larval settlement after 28 d of exposure were the most sensitive endpoints, with the 10-d growth endpoint being less variable among replicates. Growth and settlement endpoints were more sensitive than larval survival and normal development after 10 d and 28 d. Acute-to-chronic ratios calculated in the present study suggest that acute toxicities of oils and dispersant for oysters are not predictive of chronic effect levels for growth and settlement; therefore, chronic bioassays are necessary to assess these sublethal effects, in addition to standard 48-h acute toxicity tests. Comparison of 10% effective concentration (EC10) values for chronic 10-d growth and 28-d settlement endpoints with concentrations of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dipropylene glycol n-butyl ether (a marker for Corexit) in seawater samples, collected during and after the Deepwater Horizon incident, indicated it was unlikely that elevated concentrations of water-soluble fractions of oil and dispersant in the nearshore environment had significant adverse effects on the growth and settlement of eastern oyster larvae. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2029-2040. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26749151

  20. Bioaccumulation and metabolomics responses in oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis impacted by different levels of metal pollution.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-09-01

    Jiulong River Estuary, located in southern China, was heavily contaminated by metal pollution. In this study, the estuarine oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis were transplanted to two sites with similar hydrological conditions but different levels of metal pollution in Jiulong River Estuary over a six-month period. We characterized the time-series change of metal bioaccumulation and final metabolomics responses of oysters. Following transplantation, all metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in the oyster digestive glands had elevated concentrations over time. By the end of six-month exposure, Cu, Zn and Cd were the main metals significantly differentiating the two sites. Using (1)H NMR metabolite approach, we further demonstrated the disturbance in osmotic regulation, energy metabolism, and glycerophospholipid metabolism induced by metal contaminations. Six months later, the oysters transplanted in the two sites showed a similar metabolite variation pattern when compared with the initial oysters regardless of different metal levels in the tissues. Interestingly, by comparing the oysters from two sites, the more severely polluted oysters accumulated significantly higher amounts of osmolytes (betaine and homarine) and lower energy storage compounds (glycogen) than the less polluted oysters; these changes could be the potential biomarkers for different levels of metal pollution. Our study demonstrated the complexity of biological effects under field conditions, and NMR metabolomics provides an important approach to detect sensitive variation of oyster inner status. PMID:27262129

  1. Pathogenicity testing of shellfish hatchery bacterial isolates on Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas larvae.

    PubMed

    Estes, Robyn M; Friedman, Carolyn S; Elston, Ralph A; Herwig, Russell P

    2004-03-10

    Bacterial diseases are a major cause of larval mortality in shellfish hatcheries. Even with proper sanitation measures, bacterial pathogens cannot be eliminated in all cases. The pathogenicity of bacteria isolated from Pacific Northwest shellfish hatcheries to Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas larvae was investigated. We found 3 highly pathogenic strains and 1 mildly pathogenic strain among 33 isolates tested. These strains appear to be members of the genus Vibrio. Although there have been many studies of bivalve bacterial pathogens, a standard method to assess bacterial pathogenicity in bivalve larvae is needed. Thus, we developed 2 methods using either 15 ml conical tubes or tissue culture plates that were employed for rapidly screening bacterial strains for pathogenicity to Pacific oyster larvae. The tissue culture plates worked well for screening both mildly pathogenic strains and LD50 (lethal dose) assays. This method allowed for non-intrusive and non-destructive observation of the oyster larvae with a dissecting microscope. The LD50 for the 3 highly pathogenic strains ranged between 1.6 and 3.6 x 10(4) colony forming units (CFU) ml(-1) after 24 h and between 3.2 x 102 and 1.9 x 10(3) CFU ml(-1) after 48 h.

  2. Mass mortality in bivalves and the intricate case of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Solomieu, Valérie; Renault, Tristan; Travers, Marie-Agnès

    2015-10-01

    Massive mortality outbreaks in cultured bivalves have been reported worldwide and they have been associated with infection by a range of viral and bacterial pathogens. Due to their economic and social impact, these episodes constitute a particularly sensitive issue in Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) production. Since 2008, mortality outbreaks affecting C. gigas have increased in terms of intensity and geographic distribution. Epidemiologic surveys have lead to the incrimination of pathogens, specifically OsHV-1 and bacteria of the Vibrio genus, in particular Vibrio aestuarianus. Pathogen diversity may partially account for the variability in the outcome of infections. Host factors (age, reproductive status...) including their genetic background that has an impact on host susceptibility toward infection, also play a role herein. Finally, environmental factors have significant effects on the pathogens themselves, on the host and on the host-pathogen interaction. Further knowledge on pathogen diversity, classification, and spread, may contribute toward a better understanding of this issue and potential ways to mitigate the impact of these outbreaks. PMID:26210497

  3. Antimicrobial histones and DNA traps in invertebrate immunity: evidences in Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Aurore C; Schmitt, Paulina; Rosa, Rafael D; Vanhove, Audrey S; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Rubio, Tristan P; Charrière, Guillaume M; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine

    2014-09-01

    Although antimicrobial histones have been isolated from multiple metazoan species, their role in host defense has long remained unanswered. We found here that the hemocytes of the oyster Crassostrea gigas release antimicrobial H1-like and H5-like histones in response to tissue damage and infection. These antimicrobial histones were shown to be associated with extracellular DNA networks released by hemocytes, the circulating immune cells of invertebrates, in response to immune challenge. The hemocyte-released DNA was found to surround and entangle vibrios. This defense mechanism is reminiscent of the neutrophil extracellular traps (ETs) recently described in vertebrates. Importantly, oyster ETs were evidenced in vivo in hemocyte-infiltrated interstitial tissues surrounding wounds, whereas they were absent from tissues of unchallenged oysters. Consistently, antimicrobial histones were found to accumulate in oyster tissues following injury or infection with vibrios. Finally, oyster ET formation was highly dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species by hemocytes. This shows that ET formation relies on common cellular and molecular mechanisms from vertebrates to invertebrates. Altogether, our data reveal that ET formation is a defense mechanism triggered by infection and tissue damage, which is shared by relatively distant species suggesting either evolutionary conservation or convergent evolution within Bilateria.

  4. The simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates complex functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Sun, Ying; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Hou, Zhanhui; Gao, Dahai; Gao, Qiang; Song, Linsheng

    2016-05-01

    The neuroendocrine-immune (NEI) regulatory network is a complex system, which plays an indispensable role in the immunity of the host. In the present study, the bioinformatical analysis of the transcriptomic data from oyster Crassostrea gigas and further biological validation revealed that oyster TNF (CgTNF-1 CGI_10018786) could activate the transcription factors NF-κB and HSF (heat shock transcription factor) through MAPK signaling pathway, and then regulate apoptosis, redox reaction, neuro-regulation and protein folding in oyster haemocytes. The activated immune cells then released neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, norepinephrine and [Met5]-enkephalin to regulate the immune response by arising the expression of three TNF (CGI_10005109, CGI_10005110 and CGI_10006440) and translocating two NF-κB (Cgp65, CGI_10018142 and CgRel, CGI_10021567) between the cytoplasm and nuclei of haemocytes. Neurotransmitters exhibited the immunomodulation effects by influencing apoptosis and phagocytosis of oyster haemocytes. Acetylcholine and norepinephrine could down-regulate the immune response, while [Met5]-enkephalin up-regulate the immune response. These results suggested that the simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster might be activated by oyster TNF and then regulate the immune response by virtue of neurotransmitters, cytokines and transcription factors.

  5. Distinct immune responses of juvenile and adult oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to viral and bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Vergnes, Agnes; Montagnani, Caroline; de Lorgeril, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Since 2008, massive mortality events of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) have been reported worldwide and these disease events are often associated with Ostreid herpesvirus type 1 (OsHV-1). Epidemiological field studies have also reported oyster age and other pathogens of the Vibrio genus are contributing factors to this syndrome. We undertook a controlled laboratory experiment to simultaneously investigate survival and immunological response of juvenile and adult C. gigas at different time-points post-infection with OsHV-1, Vibrio tasmaniensis LGP32 and V. aestuarianus. Our data corroborates epidemiological studies that juveniles are more susceptible to OsHV-1, whereas adults are more susceptible to Vibrio. We measured the expression of 102 immune-genes by high-throughput RT-qPCR, which revealed oysters have different transcriptional responses to OsHV-1 and Vibrio. The transcriptional response in the early stages of OsHV-1 infection involved genes related to apoptosis and the interferon-pathway. Transcriptional response to Vibrio infection involved antimicrobial peptides, heat shock proteins and galectins. Interestingly, oysters in the later stages of OsHV-1 infection had a transcriptional response that resembled an antibacterial response, which is suggestive of the oyster's microbiome causing secondary infections (dysbiosis-driven pathology). This study provides molecular evidence that oysters can mount distinct immune response to viral and bacterial pathogens and these responses differ depending on the age of the host.

  6. Role of Type IV Pilins in Persistence of Vibrio vulnificus in Crassostrea virginica Oysters▿

    PubMed Central

    Paranjpye, Rohinee N.; Johnson, Asta B.; Baxter, Anne E.; Strom, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is part of the natural estuarine microflora and accumulates in shellfish through filter feeding. It is responsible for the majority of seafood-associated fatalities in the United States mainly through consumption of raw oysters. Previously we have shown that a V. vulnificus mutant unable to express PilD, the type IV prepilin peptidase, does not express pili on the surface of the bacterium and is defective in adherence to human epithelial cells (R. N. Paranjpye, J. C. Lara, J. C. Pepe, C. M. Pepe, and M. S. Strom, Infect. Immun. 66:5659-5668, 1998). A mutant unable to express one of the type IV pilins, PilA, is also defective in adherence to epithelial cells as well as biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces (R. N. Paranjpye and M. S. Strom, Infect. Immun. 73:1411-1422, 2005). In this study we report that the loss of PilD or PilA significantly reduces the ability of V. vulnificus to persist in Crassostrea virginica over a 66-h interval, strongly suggesting that pili expressed by this bacterium play a role in colonization or persistence in oysters. PMID:17557854

  7. Cloning and characterization of an apoptosis-related DNA fragmentation factor (DFF) from oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Qu, Fufa; Qi, Lin; Ying, Tong; Li, Jun; Shu, Xiao; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-05-01

    Apoptosis plays an important pathophysiological role in the homeostasis of immune systems. DNA fragmentation factors (DFFs) have been shown to be essential for DNA fragmentation, and the resultant DNA fragments follow a laddering pattern during apoptosis in vertebrates. In invertebrates, the functions of the DFF orthologs are not well characterized; therefore, we cloned and characterized a bivalve DFFA ortholog from the Hong Kong oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis (designated ChDFFA). The full-length cDNA of ChDFFA is 1186 bp in length and encodes a putative protein of 200 amino acids that contains an N-terminal CAD domain and a DFF-C domain at its C-terminus. Real-time RT-PCR results showed that ChDFFA is ubiquitously expressed in several tissues, and its highest expression is in gill. Following a 3- to 48-h challenge by microbial infection, the expression of ChDFFA increased in hemocytes. Using fluorescence microscopy, ChDFFA was localized in nuclei when exogenously expressed in HeLa cells. In addition, over-expression of ChDFFA inhibited the transcriptional activities of p53/p21-Luc reporter genes in HEK293T cells. These results suggest that ChDFFA may be involved in immune response reactions in the Hong Kong oyster C. hongkongensis.

  8. Gill erosion and herpesvirus in Crassostrea gigas cultured in Baja California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Yeomans, Rebeca; García-Ortega, Mauricio; Cáceres-Martínez, Jorge

    2010-03-01

    Recurrent episodes of mortality of Crassostrea gigas cultured in northwestern Mexico have been occurring since 1997. Previous studies on bacteria, protozoans, and metazoans as presumptive causal agents have been inconclusive. However, erosions in the marginal indentation of gills have been frequently observed in oysters from areas affected by mortality events, and in 2000 those lesions were associated with the detection of a herpes-like virus. The present study aimed to describe the histological alterations of eroded gills and to determine whether ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) or a related virus was associated with them using in situ hybridization (ISH). Histology showed that gill filaments were fused. In severe cases, deformation of the interlamellar junctions, swelling, and the loss of water channels was observed. ISH analysis revealed the presence of OsHV-1 DNA or a related virus in cells of the gills. Some labeled cells were large with dark granules inside their cytoplasm. These cells were surrounded by infiltrating hemocytes. Some cells interpreted as hemocytes were labeled and observed in eroded and non-eroded areas of the gill. Large cells detected by ISH were also observed by conventional histology with hematoxylin-eosin staining. Whether the virus produces the erosions in the gills, or the erosions in the gills are produced by an unknown condition and favor the presence of the virus, remains unresolved. It is also not clear whether the lesions contribute to mortality.

  9. Purification and characterization studies of cadmium-binding proteins from the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, B.A.; Engel, D.W.; Brouwer, M.

    1986-03-01

    The previously reported low molecular weight cadmium-binding protein (CdBP) from the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, has been further purified and characterized by improved technical methods. The internal organ distribution of the protein within the oyster and effects of life cycle/season on CdBP production also have been evaluated. CdBP isolated by extended ion-exchange gradients or double ion-exchange chromatography followed by HPLC analysis possesses an electrophoretic R/sub f/ of about 0.7 and contains relatively little Zn. Cysteine, lysine, and glycine are the dominant amino acids. When ion-exchange columns are developed with NaCl gradients, the aromatic residues tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine are found to be present. The ultraviolet absorption spectrum of CdBP also was variable, with 250/280 nm ratios ranging from 17:1 immediately after ion-exchange chromatography to 2:1 following concentration procedures. Internal organ distribution studies showed that the visceral mass contained most of the Cd present with lesser amounts in the gills and mantle. Relative oyster dormancy during the winter also reduces CdBP production in response to Cd, and the protein is obtained most readily during the fall and spring.

  10. Demography of the ecosystem engineer Crassostrea gigas, related to vertical reef accretion and reef persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walles, Brenda; Mann, Roger; Ysebaert, Tom; Troost, Karin; Herman, Peter M. J.; Smaal, Aad C.

    2015-03-01

    Marine species characterized as structure building, autogenic ecosystem engineers are recognized worldwide as potential tools for coastal adaptation efforts in the face of sea level rise. Successful employment of ecosystem engineers in coastal protection largely depends on long-term persistence of their structure, which is in turn dependent on the population dynamics of the individual species. Oysters, such as the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), are recognized as ecosystem engineers with potential for use in coastal protection. Persistence of oyster reefs is strongly determined by recruitment and shell production (growth), processes facilitated by gregarious settlement on extant shell substrate. Although the Pacific oyster has been introduced world-wide, and has formed dense reefs in the receiving coastal waters, the population biology of live oysters and the quantitative mechanisms maintaining these reefs has rarely been studied, hence the aim of the present work. This study had two objectives: (1) to describe the demographics of extant C. gigas reefs, and (2) to estimate vertical reef accretion rates and carbonate production in these oyster reefs. Three long-living oyster reefs (>30 years old), which have not been exploited since their first occurrence, were examined in the Oosterschelde estuary in the Netherlands. A positive reef accretion rate (7.0-16.9 mm year-1 shell material) was observed, consistent with self-maintenance and persistent structure. We provide a framework to predict reef accretion and population persistence under varying recruitment, growth and mortality scenarios.

  11. Phylogeny of forkhead genes in three spiralians and their expression in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mei; Xu, Fei; Liu, Jun; Que, Huayong; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-11-01

    The Fox genes encode a group of transcription factors that contain a forkhead domain, which forms a structure known as a winged helix. These transcription factors play a crucial role in several key biological processes, including development. High-degree identity in the canonical forkhead domain has been used to divide Fox proteins into 23 families (FoxA to FoxS). We surveyed the genome of three spiralians, the oyster Crassostrea gigas, the limpet Lottia gigantea, and the annelid Capitella teleta. We identified 25 C. gigas fox genes, 21 L. gigantea fox genes, and 25 C. teleta fox genes. The C. gigas fox and L. gigantea fox genes represented 19 of the 23 families, whereas FoxI, Q1, R, and S were missing. The majority of the Fox families were observed within the C. teleta fox genes, with the exception of FoxR and S. In addition, the foxAB-like gene, foxY-like gene, and foxH gene were also present in the three genomes. The conserved FoxC-FoxL1 cluster, observed in mammals, was also found in C. gigas. The diversity of temporal expression patterns observed across the developmental process implies the C. gigas fox genes exert a wide range of functions. Further functional studies are required to gain insight into the evolution of Fox genes in bilaterians.

  12. Effects of salinity on embryonic development, survival, and growth of Crassostrea hongkongensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhongming; Wang, Zhaoping; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Yuehuan; Shen, Jianping; Yao, Tuo; Su, Jiaqi; Yu, Ruihai

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the effects of salinity on embryonic development, survival, and growth of the Hong Kong oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis. The embryos, larvae, and juveniles of C. hongkongensis were held in artificial seawater at three different salinities (low, 15; medium, 23; and high, 30) to determine the optimum hatchery and nursery conditions for mass production of the seeds. Results showed that the percentage production of straight-hinged larvae from fertilized eggs was significantly lower at the high salinity than at the low- and medium-salinities ( P < 0.05). The survival rates of larvae and juveniles differed significantly among the three salinity trials, with the highest survival rate observed at the low salinity ( P < 0.05). The shell height of larvae was significantly larger at the low salinity than at the high and medium salinities from days 9 to 15 ( P < 0.05), whereas that of juveniles was significantly larger at the low salinity than at the high and medium salinities on day 70 ( P < 0.05). These results indicate that the larvae and juveniles of C. hongkongensis are tolerant to a wide range of salinities (15 to 30), but show better growth and survival at relatively low salinities. Thus, it is recommended to use relatively low salinities in hatchery and nursery systems for improved yields of C. hongkongensis.

  13. Proteomic analysis of hemolymph from poly(I:C)-stimulated Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Chataway, Timothy; Melwani, Aroon R; Raftos, David A

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic double stranded RNA (Poly(I:C)) injection of Crassostrea gigas results in a systemic antiviral response involving many evolutionary conserved antiviral effectors (ISGs). Compared to mammals, the timing of C. gigas ISG expression to viral or poly(I:C) injection is delayed (>12 h p.i.). It could be interpreted that a cytokine is responsible for the systemic, but delayed expression of C. gigas ISGs. We therefore analysed the acellular fraction of C. gigas hemolymph by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) to identify hemolymph proteins induced by poly(I:C). Poly(I:C) injection increased the relative intensity of four protein spots. These protein spots were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) as a small heat shock protein (sHSP), poly(I:C)-inducible protein 1 (PIP1) and two isoforms of C1q-domain containing protein (C1qDC). RT-qPCR analysis confirmed that the genes encoding these proteins are induced in hemocytes of C. gigas injected with poly(I:C) (p < 0.05). Proteomic data from this experiment corroborates previous microarray and whole transcriptome studies that have reported up-regulation of C1qDC and sHSP during mass mortality events among farmed oysters. PMID:26578249

  14. Temperature-dependent stress response in oysters, Crassostrea virginica: pollution reduces temperature tolerance in oysters.

    PubMed

    Lannig, Gisela; Flores, Jason F; Sokolova, Inna M

    2006-09-12

    Combined effects of temperature and a toxic metal, cadmium (Cd), on energy metabolism were studied in a model marine bivalve, the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, acclimated at 20, 24 and 28 degrees C and exposed to 50microgl(-1) of Cd. Both increasing temperature and Cd exposure led to a rise in standard metabolic rates, and combined stressors appeared to override the capability for aerobic energy production resulting in impaired stress tolerance. Oysters exposed to elevated temperature but not Cd showed no significant change in condition, survival rate and lipid peroxidation, whereas those exposed to both Cd and temperature stress suffered high mortality accompanied by low condition index and elevated lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, RNA/DNA ratios indicative of protein synthesis rate, and levels of glutathione, which is involved in metal detoxification, increased in Cd-exposed oysters at 20 degrees C but not at 28 degrees C. Implications of the synergism between elevated temperatures and cadmium stress on energy metabolism of oysters are discussed in the light of the potential effects of climate change on oyster populations in polluted areas.

  15. Preferential bivalent formation in tetraploid male of pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas Thunberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengrui; Wang, Xinglian; Zhang, Quanqi; Allen, Standish

    2013-11-01

    Artificially induced tetraploid Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, produces more aneuploid gametes than normal diploid one, although they showed a comparable fecundity to diploidy. The meiotic chromosome configuration of 3 tetraploid and 1 tetraploid/triploid mosaic males were analyzed through direct chromosome observation. A majority of metaphase I spermatocytes contained both bivalents and quadrivalents. The chromosome configuration of these males was characterized by preferential formation of bivalents to quadrivalents. Bivalents appeared in all spermatocytes and consisted of 86% of all chromosome aggregates. In comparison, quadrivalents occurred in 91% spermatocytes and consisted of only 12.6% of all chromosome aggregates. The mean bivalent frequency per spermatocyte varied between 14.4 and 17.2; while that of quadrivalents varied between 2.2 and 2.7. Most quadrivalents were tandemly chained (58%) or circled (39%). The total number of chromosome aggregates per spermatocyte ranged from 13 to 20 with an average of 17.6; while 18 (16 bivalents and 2 quadrivalents) was the most frequent. Univalents and trivalents appeared in very low frequency. Aneuploid (hypotetraploid) spermatocytes were observed in a low frequency. The chromosome configuration of in the mosaic individual was similar to that of tetraploid individuals. The percentage of triploid spermatocytes (2%) of the mosaic individual was significantly lower (χ2 =30, P < 0.01) than that of triploid cells (46%) in its somatic tissue.

  16. Autotetraploid Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) obtained using normal diploid eggs: induction and impact on cytogenetic stability.

    PubMed

    Benabdelmouna, Abdellah; Ledu, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    We describe two methods of producing viable and fertile autotetraploid Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg) based on the use of normal-sized oocytes produced by normal diploid females. Our methods showed that the oocyte size is not a limiting factor for the success of the induction to autotetraploidy. These methods offer means of direct introgression of genetic progress from elite diploid lines to tetraploids used as broodstock, avoiding a triploid step with the risk of transferring undesirable traits from highly fecund triploids. High variability in the level of cytogenetic stability was found among the different tetraploid oysters tested, showing that induction method has an important impact on the long-term cytogenetic stability of the tetraploids. It appears that induction method based on the use of triploid females induces a greater cytogenetic instability among tetraploids so obtained, and this compared to tetraploids originating from the two methods described in our present study. As the aneuploidies and reversions observed in tetraploids can have serious consequences for the sustainability of tetraploid broodstock itself, as well as their triploid offspring, the two tetraploid induction methods described in the present work offer means to produce tetraploids with optimal cytogenetic, genetic, and zootechnical performances. PMID:26230146

  17. Ostreid herpesvirus type 1 replication and host response in adult Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Segarra, Amélie; Baillon, Laury; Tourbiez, Delphine; Benabdelmouna, Abdellah; Faury, Nicole; Bourgougnon, Nathalie; Renault, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Since 2008, massive mortality outbreaks associated with OsHV-1 detection have been reported in Crassostrea gigas spat and juveniles in several countries. Nevertheless, adult oysters do not demonstrate mortality in the field related to OsHV-1 detection and were thus assumed to be more resistant to viral infection. Determining how virus and adult oyster interact is a major goal in understanding why mortality events are not reported among adult Pacific oysters. Dual transcriptomics of virus-host interactions were explored by real-time PCR in adult oysters after a virus injection. Thirty-nine viral genes and five host genes including MyD88, IFI44, IkB2, IAP and Gly were measured at 0.5, 10, 26, 72 and 144 hours post infection (hpi). No viral RNA among the 39 genes was detected at 144 hpi suggesting the adult oysters are able to inhibit viral replication. Moreover, the IAP gene (oyster gene) shows significant up-regulation in infected adults compared to control adults. This result suggests that over-expression of IAP could be a reaction to OsHV-1 infection, which may induce the apoptotic process. Apoptosis could be a main mechanism involved in disease resistance in adults. Antiviral activity of haemolymph against herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) was not significantly different between infected adults versus control. PMID:25294338

  18. Epigenetic features in the oyster Crassostrea gigas suggestive of functionally relevant promoter DNA methylation in invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is evolutionarily conserved. Vertebrates exhibit high, widespread DNA methylation whereas invertebrate genomes are less methylated, predominantly within gene bodies. DNA methylation in invertebrates is associated with transcription level, alternative splicing, and genome evolution, but functional outcomes of DNA methylation remain poorly described in lophotrochozoans. Recent genome-wide approaches improve understanding in distant taxa such as molluscs, where the phylogenetic position, and life traits of Crassostrea gigas make this bivalve an ideal model to study the physiological and evolutionary implications of DNA methylation. We review the literature about DNA methylation in invertebrates and focus on DNA methylation features in the oyster. Indeed, though our MeDIP-seq results confirm predominant intragenic methylation, the profiles depend on the oyster's developmental and reproductive stage. We discuss the perspective that oyster DNA methylation could be biased toward the 5′-end of some genes, depending on physiological status, suggesting important functional outcomes of putative promoter methylation from cell differentiation during early development to sustained adaptation of the species to the environment. PMID:24778620

  19. Population genetics of the black scar oyster, Crassostrea iredalei: repercussion of anthropogenic interference.

    PubMed

    Zainal Abidin, Danial Hariz; Mustaffa, Suzana; Rahim, Masazurah A; Nair, Devakie M; Naim, Darlina Md; Mohd Nor, Siti Azizah

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene was utilized to assess the population genetics of the commercially important black scar oyster, Crassostrea iredalei among 11 populations throughout the west and east coasts Peninsular Malaysia and Sabah (Malaysian Borneo). Overall, populations of C. iredalei demonstrated low nucleotide diversity π (0.000-0.004) and low-to-high haplotype diversity h (0.000-0.795) levels. Genetic structuring was detected between the Peninsular Malaysia and Sabah populations as revealed by the FST analysis. However, the COI gene analyses showed minimal and non-significant (p > 0.05) population differentiation within the east and west coasts Peninsular Malaysia and Sabah regions. This was attributed to both high larval dispersal along the east and west coasts and human-driven spat translocation between the two coastlines due to C. iredalei cultivation practices. Phylogeographic relationships inferences were also conducted to further support these hypotheses. The neutrality and mismatch distribution analyses suggested that C. iredalei had experienced a/several bottleneck event(s), followed by population expansion. The molecular information obtained from this study could be incorporated in a pragmatic aquaculture management strategy of wild broodstock and the hatchery lines of C. iredalei in Malaysia.

  20. Microsatellite variation in the oyster Crassostrea plicatula along the coast of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hong; Li, Qi; Yu, Ruihai

    2008-11-01

    Genetic diversity and differentiation of the oyster Crassostrea plicatula populations from China’s coast were studied based on seven microsatellite loci. All loci showed high polymorphism for all five C. plicatula populations, with an average number of allele per locus of 19.3 27.9 and an average expected heterozygosity of 0.889 0.952. Significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and deficits of heterozygotes were observed over most populations at each locus, which were fully explained by null alleles. Microsatellite analysis revealed significant subdivision in the C. plicatula populations. According to the neighbor-joining tree constructed on the basis of the D A distance, the five populations fell into three regional groups, showing a relatively homogeneous genetic structure in geographically close populations. Assignation tests correctly assigned high percentages of individuals to their original populations and groups, and also confirmed the existence of genetic differentiation among C. plicatula populations. The results obtained in this study will facilitate the formulation of appropriate fisheries management programs, stock identification and conservation of biodiversity for the species.

  1. Metals concentrations in sediments and oyster Crassostrea gigas from La Pitahaya lagoon, Sinaloa, NW Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna Varela, R.; Muñoz Sevilla, N.; Campos Villegas, L.; Rodriguez Espinosa, P.; Gongora Gomez, A.; MP, J.

    2013-05-01

    This present study was performed in a culture of Crassostrea gigas in La Pitahaya, Sinaloa, México. The main objective is to identify the enrichment pattern of trace elements (Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Zn, Hg, As, V) also was determine concentrations thereof in oyster. Four sampling sites were selected, two smaller channels which connect the lagoon directly , the region of culture and connection with the sea ; and each sampling consisted of 4 sample sediments and 50 oysters of commercial size per mounth . Concentrations of trace metals were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The higher concentration of elements in certain samples clearly suggests that they are directly fed by the smaller channels which connect the lagoon directly. These small channels often carry the contaminants which are absorbed and deposited in the sediments. The results were also compared with the Effect Range Low (ERL) and Effect Range Medium (ERM) of NOAA and it indicates that Ni is above the ERL values. Cadmium, lead, chrome and copper concentrations exceeded the limits permissible of bivalbe mollusks established by the sanitary regulations

  2. The simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates complex functions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Sun, Ying; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Hou, Zhanhui; Gao, Dahai; Gao, Qiang; Song, Linsheng

    2016-01-01

    The neuroendocrine-immune (NEI) regulatory network is a complex system, which plays an indispensable role in the immunity of the host. In the present study, the bioinformatical analysis of the transcriptomic data from oyster Crassostrea gigas and further biological validation revealed that oyster TNF (CgTNF-1 CGI_10018786) could activate the transcription factors NF-κB and HSF (heat shock transcription factor) through MAPK signaling pathway, and then regulate apoptosis, redox reaction, neuro-regulation and protein folding in oyster haemocytes. The activated immune cells then released neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, norepinephrine and [Met5]-enkephalin to regulate the immune response by arising the expression of three TNF (CGI_10005109, CGI_10005110 and CGI_10006440) and translocating two NF-κB (Cgp65, CGI_10018142 and CgRel, CGI_10021567) between the cytoplasm and nuclei of haemocytes. Neurotransmitters exhibited the immunomodulation effects by influencing apoptosis and phagocytosis of oyster haemocytes. Acetylcholine and norepinephrine could down-regulate the immune response, while [Met5]-enkephalin up-regulate the immune response. These results suggested that the simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster might be activated by oyster TNF and then regulate the immune response by virtue of neurotransmitters, cytokines and transcription factors. PMID:27193598

  3. Shell thickening and chambering in the oyster Crassostrea gigas: natural and anthropogenic influence of tributyltin contamination.

    PubMed

    Higuera-Ruiz, R; Elorza, J

    2011-04-01

    Abnormal thickening and chambering in Crassostrea gigas oysters have been adopted for many years as bioindicators of available tributyltin (TBT) in coastal waters. Nevertheless, since natural causes can also induce the formation of multiple chambers, a field study and laboratory experimentation has been conducted with 72 examples of C. gigas in successive culture media. This work has enabled differences to be established between natural fine sediment-induced characteristics and the influence of TBT on the shells. External shell deformities have been assessed using three biometric indices, shell thickness index, weight index and volume index. Internal differences have been observed in longitudinal sections of the shell: retraction of growth, stagnation of the adductor muscle scar and thinning of the chambers in the TBT-polluted shell secretion. A new index, the opening chambers index, has been proposed, with a value of less than 1 in the TBT-polluted environment and greater than 1 in shells secreted in an unpolluted production site. These conclusions should be borne in mind when C. gigas is used in biomonitoring programmes.

  4. Inheritance and Variation of Genomic DNA Methylation in Diploid and Triploid Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qun; Li, Qi; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng

    2016-02-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism that could be responsive to environmental changes indicating a potential role in natural selection and adaption. In order to evaluate an evolutionary role of DNA methylation, it is essential to first gain a better insight into inheritability. To address this question, this study investigated DNA methylation variation from parents to offspring in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas using fluorescent-labeled methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (F-MSAP) analysis. Most of parental methylated loci were stably transmitted to offspring segregating following Medelian expectation. However, methylated loci deviated more often than non-methylated loci and offspring showed a few de novo methylated loci indicating DNA methylation changes from parents to offspring. Interestingly, some male-specific methylated loci were found in this study which might help to explore sex determination in oyster. Despite environmental stimuli, genomic stresses such as polyploidization also can induce methylation changes. This study also compared global DNA methylation level and individual methylated loci between diploid and triploid oysters. Results showed no difference in global methylation state but a few ploidy-specific loci were detected. DNA methylation variation during polyploidization was less than autonomous methylation variation from parents to offspring.

  5. Linkage disequilibrium in wild and cultured populations of Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiang; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD) can be applied for mapping the actual genes responsible for variation of economically important traits through association mapping. The feasibility and efficacy of association studies are strongly dependent on the extent of LD which determines the number and density of markers in the studied population, as well as the experimental design for an association analysis. In this study, we first characterized the extent of LD in a wild population and a cultured mass-selected line of Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas). A total of 88 wild and 96 cultured individuals were selected to assess the level of genome-wide LD with 53 microsatellites, respectively. For syntenic marker pairs, no significant association was observed in the wild population; however, three significant associations occurred in the cultured population, and the significant LD extended up to 12.7 cM, indicating that strong artificial selection is a key force for substantial increase of genome-wide LD in cultured population. The difference of LD between wild and cultured populations showed that association studies in Pacific oyster can be achieved with reasonable marker densities at a relatively low cost by choosing an association mapping population. Furthermore, the frequent occurrence of LD between non-syntenic loci and rare alleles encourages the joint application of linkage analysis and LD mapping when mapping genes in oyster. The information on the linkage disequilibrium in the cultured population is useful for future association mapping in oyster.

  6. Epizootiology of Perkinsus sp. inCrassostrea gasar oysters in polyculture with shrimps in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Patricia Mirella; Costa, Carolina Pereira; de Araújo, Jaíse Paiva Bragante; Queiroga, Fernando Ramos; Wainberg, Alexandre Alter

    2016-01-01

    Bivalve culture is of considerable economic and social interest in northeastern (NE) Brazil. The polyculture is an alternative approach to traditional monoculture for reducing the environmental impact of shrimp farming and improving oyster culture. Perkinsus marinus and Perkinsus olseni were found infecting oysters in NE Brazil and can threaten oyster production. This study evaluated Perkinsus spp. occurrence in Crassostrea gasar during all production stages. Oyster spats were produced in a hatchery and grown in shrimp ponds in Rio Grande do Norte state. Perkinsus spp. were surveyed by Ray's fluid thioglycollate medium and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Prevalence and intensity of infection were determined in oysters until they reached 7 cm. Results showed that the broodstock was already infected by Perkinsus (60%), but the derived spats were Perkinsus-free. Oyster spats acquired Perkinsus infection when transferred to ponds. The prevalence gradually increased in the seven months following placement in ponds (73%), and then decreased to 17% by the tenth month. The infections were initially mild, but intensity increased at the final growth stage. In conclusion, it is possible to produce Perkinsus-free C. gasar oyster spats from infected broodstock, and their culture in shrimp ponds is feasible.

  7. Extraction and Identification of the Pigment in the Adductor Muscle Scar of Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lei; Li, Jian; Li, Zhonghu; Wang, Xiaotong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, UV (ultraviolet) and IR (infrared radiation) spectral analysis were integrated to identify the pigment in the adductor muscle scar of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The pigment was extracted from the adductor muscle scars of cleaned oyster shells that were pulverized, hydrolyzed in hot hydrochloric acid, purified with diethyl ether, and dissolved in 0.01 mL/L NaOH. The maximum absorption of the pigment in the UV absorption spectrum within the range of 190–500 nm was observed between 210–220 nm. The UV absorbance decreased with increasing wavelength which was consistent with the UV spectral absorption characteristics of melanin. In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy scanning revealed characteristic absorption peaks that emerged near 3440 cm-1 and 1630 cm-1, which was consistent with infrared scanning features of eumelanin (a type of melanin). This study has demonstrated for the first time that the pigment in the adductor muscle scar of the Pacific oyster is melanin, hinting that the adductor muscle could be another organ pigmenting the mollusc shell with melanin other than mantle. PMID:26555720

  8. Stress tolerance of a subtropical Crassostrea virginica population to the combined effects of temperature and salinity

    SciTech Connect

    Heilmayer, Olaf; DiGialleonardo, Julian J.; Qian, Lianfen; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2008-08-10

    The combination of salinity and temperature has synergistic effects on virtually all aspects of the biology of estuarine organisms. Of interest were site-specific characteristics in the response of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, from the St. Lucie River Estuary to the interactive effects of temperature and salinity. This estuary, one of the largest on the central east coast of Florida, is strongly influenced by anthropogenic modifications due to management needs to control the patterns of freshwater flow in the St. Lucie River watershed. C. virginica is designated a valued ecosystem component for monitoring the health of this estuary. Our approach used a multidimensional response surface design to study the effects of temperature and salinity on sublethal measures of oyster performance: (1) body condition index as an overall indicator of bioenergetic status and (2) the RNA/DNA ratio as a biochemical indicator of cellular stress. The results showed that there was a greater ability to withstand extreme salinity conditions at lower temperatures. However, there were no site-specific attributes that differentiated the response of the St. Lucie Estuary population from populations along the distribution range. Condition index was a less variable response than the RNA/DNA ratio, and the final models for mean condition index and the RNA:DNA ratios explained 77.3% and 35.8% of the respective variances.

  9. Bonamia exitiosa transmission among, and incidence in, Asian oyster Crassostrea ariakensis under warm euhaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Audemard, C; Carnegie, R B; Hill, K M; Peterson, C H; Burreson, E M

    2014-07-24

    Previously reported in Australia, New Zealand, and more recently in Europe, the protistan parasite Bonamia exitiosa was also reported in the mid-Atlantic region of the USA after causing serious mortalities there in the Asian oyster Crassostrea ariakensis. At the time, this oyster was being considered for introduction, and the potential consequences of introducing this species were being assessed using field and laboratory studies. B. exitiosa emerged as the most serious disease threat for this oyster species, especially under warm euhaline conditions and for oysters <50 mm in size. To better evaluate how quickly this parasite may be able to spread among C. ariakensis, we investigated B. exitiosa transmission and incidence in C. ariakensis. During a first trial, potential direct transmission of B. exitiosa was evaluated by cohabitating infected C. ariakensis with uninfected C. ariakensis under in vivo quarantine conditions. In a second experiment, B. exitiosa incidence was estimated in situ by determining its prevalence in C. ariakensis deployed in an enzootic area after 4, 7, 14, 21 and 28 d of exposure. Results suggest that under warm euhaline conditions B. exitiosa can be transmitted among C. ariakensis without requiring any other parasite source and that parasite incidence may be at least as high as 40% after only 4 d exposure to an enzootic area. These results underscored the severity of the bonamiasis disease threat to C. ariakensis and provided further evidence that efforts to build an aquaculture industry based on C. ariakensis in the eastern USA might have been thwarted by parasitic disease.

  10. Early embryo and larval development of inviable intergeneric hybrids derived from Crassostrea angulata and Saccostrea cucullata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jiaqi; Wang, Zhaoping; Zhang, Yuehuan; Yan, Xiwu; Li, Qiongzhen; Yu, Ruihai

    2016-06-01

    To detect the intergeneric hybridization between the oyster Crassostrea angulata and Saccostrea cucullata coexisting along the southern coast of China, reciprocal crosses were conducted between the two species. Barriers for sperm recognizing, binding, penetrating the egg, and forming the pronucleus were detected by fluorescence staining. From the results, although fertilization success was observed in hybrid crosses, the overall fertilization rate was lower than that of intraspecific crosses. A large number of hybrid larvae died at 6-8 d after hatching, and those survived could not complete metamorphosis. C. angulata ♀× S. cucullata ♂ larvae had a growth rate similar to that of the maternal species, whereas S. cucullata ♀ × C. angulata ♂ larvae grew the slowest among all crosses. Molecular genetics analysis revealed that hybrid progeny were amphimixis hybrids. This study demonstrated that hybrid embryos generated by crossing C. angulata and S. cucullata could develop normally to the larval state, but could not complete metamorphosis and then develop to the spat stage. Thus, there is a post-reproductive isolation between C. angulata and S. cucullata.

  11. Introduction, establishment and expansion of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in the Oosterschelde (SW Netherlands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaal, A. C.; Kater, B. J.; Wijsman, J.

    2009-03-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas was first introduced as an exotic species by oyster farmers in 1964 in the Oosterschelde estuary (SW Netherlands). The initial phase is not well documented but first natural spatfall was recorded in 1975. Excessive spatfall occurred in 1976 and this is considered the start of the expansion phase of the wild oysters. Oyster beds in intertidal and subtidal areas of the Oosterschelde estuary have been growing since. The development in the intertidal area has been reconstructed by using aerial photography, validated by ground truth in 2000-2002. In the subtidal areas extensive oyster beds have been detected by using side scan sonar; on hard substrates along the dikes coverage with oysters up to 90% locally has been recorded by scuba diving surveys. Expansion has also occurred into adjacent water bodies including the Wadden Sea. By forming resistant reefs the oysters induce structural changes in the ecosystem. It is concluded that bed area is still expanding while decrease of the fraction live animals may indicate adjustment of the stock size to the local conditions.

  12. Distinct immune responses of juvenile and adult oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to viral and bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Vergnes, Agnes; Montagnani, Caroline; de Lorgeril, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Since 2008, massive mortality events of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) have been reported worldwide and these disease events are often associated with Ostreid herpesvirus type 1 (OsHV-1). Epidemiological field studies have also reported oyster age and other pathogens of the Vibrio genus are contributing factors to this syndrome. We undertook a controlled laboratory experiment to simultaneously investigate survival and immunological response of juvenile and adult C. gigas at different time-points post-infection with OsHV-1, Vibrio tasmaniensis LGP32 and V. aestuarianus. Our data corroborates epidemiological studies that juveniles are more susceptible to OsHV-1, whereas adults are more susceptible to Vibrio. We measured the expression of 102 immune-genes by high-throughput RT-qPCR, which revealed oysters have different transcriptional responses to OsHV-1 and Vibrio. The transcriptional response in the early stages of OsHV-1 infection involved genes related to apoptosis and the interferon-pathway. Transcriptional response to Vibrio infection involved antimicrobial peptides, heat shock proteins and galectins. Interestingly, oysters in the later stages of OsHV-1 infection had a transcriptional response that resembled an antibacterial response, which is suggestive of the oyster's microbiome causing secondary infections (dysbiosis-driven pathology). This study provides molecular evidence that oysters can mount distinct immune response to viral and bacterial pathogens and these responses differ depending on the age of the host. PMID:27439510

  13. Growth and Survival of the American Oyster Crassostrea virginica in Jamaica Bay, New York

    PubMed Central

    Sarinsky, Gary; Carroll, Margaret A.; Nduka, Ebere; Catapane, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Jamaica Bay is a major inlet opening to the Atlantic Ocean. It was abundant with oysters until early 1900's. Over-harvesting, pressure from predators, parasitic invasion and declining water quality often are cited as causes. Despite actions to arrest and reverse the pollution, oysters are not reestablished. We are studying factors relating to the rehabitation of Crassostrea virginica in Jamaica Bay to determine if the water quality and environmental conditions are suitable for their survival. Oysters placed in Jamaica Bay grew well when housed in protective containers and growth was influenced by placement near the sediment as compared to the surface. Oysters placed 1 foot above the sediment grew larger that those suspended 1 foot below the surface. Water temperature, pH, turbidity, salinity, conductivity, chlorophyll-a and dissolved O2 were taken to compare water quality at each site. To study growth and survival in a more natural condition, oyster seed and adults were placed just off the bottom in unprotected containers and photographed. After 1 year they are growing and surviving well and there has been evidence of reproduction. Thus far there are no serious signs of predation by crabs or starfish. The study shows that Jamaica Bay water quality is suitable for oyster growth under the various conditions of our experiments. PMID:26862590

  14. Effect of cadmium on the defense response of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas to Listonella anguillarum challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Ming; Lü, Jiasen; Wu, Huifeng; Zhao, Jianmin

    2013-09-01

    Heavy metal pollution can affect the immune capability of organisms. We evaluated the effect of cadmium (Cd) on the defense responses of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas to Listonella anguillarum challenge. The activities of several important defensive enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), acid phosphatase (ACP), Na+, K+ -ATPase in gills and hepatopancreas, and phenoloxidase-like (POL) enzyme in hemolymph were assayed. In addition, the expression levels of several genes, including heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), metallothionein (MT), and bactericidal/permeability increasing (BPI) protein were quantified by fluorescent quantitative PCR. The enzyme activities of SOD, ACP, POL, and GPx in hepatopancreas, and the expression of HSP90 were down-regulated, whereas GPx activity in the gill, Na+, K+-ATPase activities in both tissues, and MT expression was increased in Cdexposed oysters post L. anguillarum challenge. However, BPI expression was not significantly altered by co-stress of L. anguillarum infection and cadmium exposure. Our results suggest that cadmium exposure alters the oysters' immune responses and energy metabolism following vibrio infection.

  15. Effects of subchronic exposure to glyphosate in juvenile oysters (Crassostrea gigas): From molecular to individual levels.

    PubMed

    Mottier, Antoine; Séguin, Alexis; Devos, Alexandre; Pabic, Charles Le; Voiseux, Claire; Lebel, Jean Marc; Serpentini, Antoine; Fievet, Bruno; Costil, Katherine

    2015-06-30

    Glyphosate-based herbicides are extensively used and can be measured in aquatic ecosystems, including coastal waters. The effect of glyphosate on non-target organisms is an issue of worldwide concern. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of subchronic exposure to glyphosate in juvenile oysters, Crassostrea gigas. Yearling oysters were exposed to three concentrations of glyphosate (0.1, 1 and 100μgL(-1)) for 56days. Various endpoints were studied, from the individual level (e.g., gametogenesis and tissue alterations) to the molecular level (mRNA quantification), including biochemical endpoints such as glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase activities and malondialdehyde content. No mortality and growth occurred during the experiment, and individual biomarkers revealed only slight effects. The levels of gene expression significantly increased in oysters exposed to the highest glyphosate concentration (GST and metallothioneins) or to all concentrations (multi-xenobiotic resistance). These results suggested an activation of defence mechanisms at the molecular level.

  16. The effects of cadmium of the growth and metallothionein expression of the bivalve larvae, crassostrea virginica

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, K.D.; Burnett, K.; Ringwood, A.; MacDougal, K.; Kendall, L.

    1994-12-31

    Oyster larvae, Crassostrea virginica, were exposed to 20 ppb of cadmium (Cd) and fed (mixture of Isochrysis galbana & Chaetoceros gracilis, 40mL) in the laboratory for 10 days. On the 0, 4, 7 and 10 day the larvae samples were taken and frozen. Then they were homogenized, centrifuged, ultrafiltered through a membrane separation technique used to segregate substances according to the molecular weight and size. The cytosolic protein was first partially purified by gel permeation, then by PAGE (Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis). The controls and metal exposed larvae were evaluated on total wet weight and the metallothioneins (MT) were identified from the preparations using silver staining techniques. No significant changes could be detected in the controls. However, there was a great number dead at the beginning of the experiment. Cd accumulation began at the time of exposure. This suggests that surface area may play a role in determining short-term accumulation rates. Cd effects on growth (wet weight) was slightly different, the exposed weighed less than or equal to the controls. In addition, the Cd uptake via food played an insignificant role compared to direct uptake from sea water. Between day 0 and 7 there was a number of mortalities for the controls and exposed. In addition, there was a major weight change with the exposed, they appeared to weigh less than the controls on day 7, whereas on day 4 they weighed more. So weight is a very sensitive indicator of toxic stress.

  17. Refrigerated seawater depuration for reducing Vibrio parahaemolyticus contamination in pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    PubMed

    Su, Yi-Cheng; Yang, Qianru; Häse, Claudia

    2010-06-01

    The efficacy of refrigerated-seawater depuration for reducing Vibrio parahaemolyticus levels in Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) was investigated. Raw Pacific oysters were inoculated with a mixed culture of five clinical strains of V. parahaemolyticus (10(5) to 10(6) most probable number [MPN] per g) and depurated with refrigerated seawater (5 degrees C) in a laboratory-scale recirculation system equipped with a 15-W gamma UV sterilizer. Depuration with refrigerated seawater for 96 h reduced V. parahaemolyticus populations by >3.0 log MPN/g in oysters harvested in the winter. However, 144 h of depuration at 5 degrees C was required to achieve a 3-log reduction in oysters harvested in the summer. Depuration with refrigerated seawater at 5 degrees C for up to 144 h caused no significant fatality in the Pacific oyster and could be applied as a postharvest treatment to reduce V. parahaemolyticus contamination in Pacific oysters. Further studies are needed to validate the efficacy of the depuration process for reducing naturally accumulated V. parahaemolyticus in oysters.

  18. High mobility group protein DSP1 negatively regulates HSP70 transcription in Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zongyu; Xu, Delin; Cui, Miao; Zhang, Qizhong

    2016-06-10

    HSP70 acts mostly as a molecular chaperone and plays important roles in facilitating the folding of nascent peptides as well as the refolding or degradation of the denatured proteins. Under stressed conditions, the expression level of HSP70 is upregulated significantly and rapidly, as is known to be achieved by various regulatory factors controlling the transcriptional level. In this study, a high mobility group protein DSP1 was identified by DNA-affinity purification from the nuclear extracts of Crassostrea hongkongensis using the ChHSP70 promoter as a bait. The specific interaction between the prokaryotically expressed ChDSP1 and the FITC-labeled ChHSP70 promoter was confirmed by EMSA analysis. ChDSP1 was shown to negatively regulate ChHSP70 promoter expression by Luciferase Reporter Assay in the heterologous HEK293T cells. Both ChHSP70 and ChDSP1 transcriptions were induced by either thermal or CdCl2 stress, while the accumulated expression peaks of ChDSP1 were always slightly delayed when compared with that of ChHSP70. This indicates that ChDSP1 is involved, very likely to exert its suppressive role, in the recovery of the ChHSP70 expression from the induced level to its original state. This study is the first to report negative regulator of HSP70 gene transcription, and provides novel insights into the mechanisms controlling heat shock protein expression. PMID:27154224

  19. Thermal stress induces a distinct transcriptome profile in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Bo-Mi; Hwang, In Joon; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Choi, Ik-Young; Kim, Youn-Jung; Rhee, Jae-Sung

    2016-09-01

    Oysters are frequently subjected to heat stress during tidal emersion/immersion cycles in their habitats due to attachment on the rocky shore. To understand the effect of temperature elevation on the whole transcriptome over time, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas was exposed to seawater temperature 32°C for 72h from the control 20°C. RNA-seq identified differentially expressed stress responsive transcripts upon thermal stress in the gill tissues of C. gigas. The primary effect of heat stress appears to be significantly induced transcription of molecular chaperones, including members of the heat shock protein (hsp) families, while genes typically associated with protein metabolism, such as those involved in protein degradation (e.g. ATP-dependent proteolysis pathway) and biosynthesis (e.g. ribosomal protein genes), were repressed. In particular, several hsp70 isoforms and a small hsp20 maintained prolonged mRNA expressions for 72h. This study provides preliminary insights into the molecular response of C. gigas to heat stress and suggests a basis for future studies examining molecular adaptation or thermotolerance metabolism in the Pacific oyster. PMID:27341139

  20. Rapid invasion of Crassostrea gigas into the German Wadden Sea dominated by larval supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, G.; Wehrmann, A.; Wirtz, K. W.

    2008-08-01

    Invasions of non-indigenous species into coastal habitats have been a frequent phenomenon in the last decades, sometimes with significant impact on the receiving ecosystem. However, the understanding of the entire process and especially the relative importance of larval supply and local recruitment remains unclear. In this study, we simulate the invasion of a benthic invertebrate into a previously uncolonised habitat over several years and validate the results with field data. Therefore, we present field data from a monitoring programme revealing the rapid invasion of the oyster Crassostrea gigas into the East Frisian Wadden Sea, North Sea, between 2003 and 2005. The applied model combines a simple, spatially-explicit population dynamics model for the adult stage with a particle tracking model for the larval stage of the life cycle. Simulation results are able to reproduce the large-scale pattern of the field data and indicate a domination of larval supply on the population dynamics in the early stage of the invasion. Though monitoring and simulations suggest a single larval source outside the study area in the west, the population dynamics in the eastern part is only explainable with an additional source within the study area attributed to an unintentional input of juveniles by mussel fishery. High sensitivities to uncertain parameters result in distinct deviations between monitoring and simulations at particular sites. Especially the impact of site-specific variations of the post-settlement mortality underlines the variability of local recruitment conditions and indicates the need for spatially resolved information for exact predictions.

  1. Functional analysis of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) β-thymosin: Focus on antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Nam, Bo-Hye; Seo, Jung-Kil; Lee, Min Jeong; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Dong-Gyun; An, Cheul Min; Park, Nam Gyu

    2015-07-01

    An antimicrobial peptide, ∼5 kDa in size, was isolated and purified in its active form from the mantle of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas by C18 reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight analysis revealed 4656.4 Da of the purified and unreduced peptide. A comparison of the N-terminal amino acid sequence of oyster antimicrobial peptide with deduced amino acid sequences in our local expressed sequence tag (EST) database of C. gigas (unpublished data) revealed that the oyster antimicrobial peptide sequence entirely matched the deduced amino acid sequence of an EST clone (HM-8_A04), which was highly homologous with the β-thymosin of other species. The cDNA possessed a 126-bp open reading frame that encoded a protein of 41 amino acids. To confirm the antimicrobial activity of C. gigas β-thymosin, we overexpressed a recombinant β-thymosin (rcgTβ) using a pET22 expression plasmid in an Escherichia coli system. The antimicrobial activity of rcgTβ was evaluated and demonstrated using a bacterial growth inhibition test in both liquid and solid cultures. PMID:25842181

  2. Effects of High Hydrostatic Pressure on the Physical, Microbial, and Chemical Attributes of Oysters (Crassostrea virginica).

    PubMed

    Lingham, Talaysha; Ye, Mu; Chen, Haiqiang; Chintapenta, Lathadevi Karuna; Handy, Eunice; Zhao, Jing; Wu, Changqing; Ozbay, Gulnihal

    2016-05-01

    The change in the quality attributes (physical, microbial, and chemical) of oysters (Crassostrea virginica) after high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment at 300 MPa at room temperature (RT, 25 °C) 300, 450, and 500 MPa at 0 °C for 2 min and control oysters without treatment were evaluated over 3 wk. The texture and tissue yield percentages of oysters HHP treated at 300 MPa, RT increased significantly (P < 0.05) compared to control. Aerobic and psychrotrophic bacteria in control oysters reached the spoilage point of 7 log CFU/g after 15 d. Coliform counts (log MPN/g) were low during storage with total and fecal coliforms less than 3.5 and 1.0. High pressure treated oysters at 500 MPa at 0 °C were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than oysters HHP treated at 300 MPa at 0 °C in lipid oxidation values. The highest pressure (500 MPa) treatment in this study, significantly (P < 0.05) decreased unsaturated fatty acid percentage compared to control. The glycogen content of control oysters at 3 wk was significantly higher (P < 0.05) when compared to HHP treated oysters [300 MPa, (RT); 450 MPa (0 °C); and 500 MPa (0 °C)]. HHP treatments of oysters were not significantly different in pH, percent salt extractable protein (SEP), and total lipid values compared to control. Based on our results, HHP prolongs the physical, microbial, and chemical quality of oysters. PMID:27074447

  3. Moderate establishment success of Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, on a sheltered intertidal mussel bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Mark Wejlemann; Davids, Jens Kristian; Dolmer, Per; Vismann, Bent; Hansen, Benni Winding

    2015-10-01

    The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg 1793) is introduced into marine ecosystems worldwide. In Denmark, C. gigas was introduced into the micro tidal Limfjord, around 1972 for aquaculture. This study describes the population structure of C. gigas at Agger Tange in 2007, 2009, 2010 and 2011. Here, C. gigas use beds of Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) as primary habitat. The mean abundance (± 1 SD) of C. gigas was unchanged during our study (45 ± 2 indv. m- 2), while it increased for M. edulis from 2010 to 2011 (934 ± 610 to 1434 ± 750 indv. m- 2, respectively). In 2009, a newly settled cohort of C. gigas was present, but in the succeeding years no or negligible recruitment was recorded. However, age cohort analyses, based on individual shell size at different ages, suggest successful recruitment in three out of seven years. A comparison with the course of the bioinvasion in List Tidal Basin, suggests that the population at Agger Tange is not in the expansion phase of the bioinvasion, despite of frequent settlement, high shell growth rates and relatively high abundance. So far, C. gigas has had moderate establishment success. We conclude that C. gigas is still in the establishment phase, but that this is prolonged, presumably due to low food availability.

  4. Changes in protein expression of pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas exposed in situ to urban sewage.

    PubMed

    Flores-Nunes, Fabrício; Gomes, Tânia; Company, Rui; Moraes, Roberta R M; Sasaki, Silvio T; Taniguchi, Satie; Bicego, Márcia C; Melo, Cláudio M R; Bainy, Afonso C D; Bebianno, Maria J

    2015-11-01

    The composition and concentration of substances in urban effluents are complex and difficult to measure. These contaminants elicit biological responses in the exposed organisms. Proteomic analysis is a powerful tool in environmental toxicology by evidencing alterations in protein expression due to exposure to contaminants and by providing a useful framework for the development of new potential biomarkers. The aim of this study was to determine changes in protein expression signatures (PES) in the digestive gland of oysters Crassostrea gigas transplanted to two farming areas (LIS and RIB) and to one area contaminated by sanitary sewage (BUC) after 14 days of exposure. This species is one of the most cultivated molluscs in the world. The identified proteins are related to the cytoskeleton (CKAP5 and ACT2), ubiquitination pathway conjugation (UBE3C), G protein-coupled receptor and signal transduction (SVEP1), and cell cycle/division (CCNB3). CKAP5 showed higher expression in oysters kept at BUC in comparison with those kept at the farming areas, while ACT2, UBE3C, SVEP1, and CCNB3 were suppressed. The results suggest that these changes might lead to DNA damage, apoptosis, and interference with the immune system in oyster C. gigas exposed to sewage and give initial information on PES of C. gigas exposed to sanitary sewage, which can subsequently be useful in the development of more sensitive tools for biomonitoring coastal areas, particularly those devoted mainly to oyster farming activities.

  5. Characterization of acetylcholinesterase in Hong Kong oyster (Crassostrea hongkongensis) from South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Zha, Guangcai; Chen, Vicky P; Luk, Wilson K W; Zou, Xianghui; Choi, Roy C Y; Tsim, Karl W K

    2013-03-25

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity has been used to evaluate the exposure of mollusk bivalves to organophosphates, carbamate pesticides, and heavy metals. Crassostrea hongkongensis is a Hong Kong endemic oyster, and has a high commercial value along the coastal area of South China. The use of this species as a bio-indicator of the marine environment, and the use of AChE activity measurements in tissues of C. hongkongensis require prior characterization of AChE in this species. Here, we report that gill tissue contains the highest AChE activity in C. hongkongensis, and that the molecular form of AChE is most likely to be a dimeric form. In addition, the effect of the pesticide acephate on AChE activity in the gill of C. hongkongensis was analyzed, and the mean inhibition concentration (IC50) value was determined. This study suggests that AChE activity in the gill tissue of C. hongkongensis might be used as a biomarker in monitoring organophosphate contamination in the marine fauna of South China.

  6. Identification and function of an evolutionarily conserved signaling intermediate in Toll pathways (ECSIT) from Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fufa; Xiang, Zhiming; Wang, Fuxuan; Zhang, Yang; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuehuan; Xiao, Shu; Yu, Ziniu

    2015-11-01

    Evolutionarily conserved signaling intermediate in Toll pathways (ECSIT) is a multifunctional adaptor protein that plays a key role in the regulation of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway in mammals. However, the function of ECSIT homologs in mollusks, the second most diverse group of animals, is not well understood. In this study, we identified an ECSIT homolog in the Hong Kong oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis (ChECSIT) and investigated its biological functions. The full-length cDNA of ChECSIT is 1734 bp and includes an open reading frame (ORF) of 1074 bp that encodes a polypeptide of 451 amino acids. The predicted ChECSIT protein shares similar structural characteristics with other known ECSIT family proteins. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that ChECSIT mRNA is broadly expressed in all of the examined tissues and at different stages of embryonic development; its transcript level could be significantly up-regulated by challenge with microorganisms (Vibrio alginolyticus, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae). In addition, ChECSIT was found to be located primarily in the cytoplasm, and its overexpression stimulated the transcriptional activity of an NF-κB reporter gene in HEK293T cells. These findings suggest that ChECSIT might be involved in embryogenesis processes and immune responses in C. hongkongensis.

  7. An Mpeg (macrophage expressed gene) from the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas: molecular characterization and gene expression.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaocui; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-03-01

    Mpegs (macrophage expressed genes) encode members of the MACPF (membrane-attack complex/perforin) protein superfamily that play essential roles in innate immunity. In the present study, a homolog of Mpeg1 was identified in Crassostrea gigas and designed Cg-Mpeg1. The complete cDNA of Cg-Mpeg1 is 2781 bp in length, containing an ORF of 2226 bp, which encodes a putative protein of 742 amino acids with a predicted 19-aa hydrophobic signal peptide, an MACPF domain, and a transmembrane domain. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Cg-Mpeg1 is similar to other mollusk MACPF proteins and might originate in an ancient ancestor gene before the divergence of protostomes and deuterostomes. Localization study revealed that Cg-Mpeg1 protein is found primarily in late endosomes. The MACPF domain from Cg-Mpeg1 exhibits significant antibacterial activity to both Gram-negative and positive bacteria. Furthermore, Real-time Quantitative PCR analysis showed that Cg-Mpeg1 is expressed in all tissues detected with highest expression in gill and gonads. Moreover, Mpeg1 mRNA levels are significantly up-regulated following infection with Vibrio alginolyticus. These results highlight that Cg-Mpeg1 plays an essential role in host defense and elimination of pathogens in C. gigas.

  8. The first evidence of positive selection in peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP) genes of Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Yu, Ziniu

    2013-05-01

    The oyster Crassostrea gigas is thought to have developed effective immunity to potentially harmful pathogens while under continuous exposure to marine microorganisms; however, the evolutionary mechanisms by which such immunity developed has not been understood. To understand the evolution of immunity, we characterized the family of peptidoglycan recognition proteins in the oyster (CgPGRPs). These proteins are crucial pattern recognition receptors for peptidoglycans (PGNs) and thereby, for activating the innate immune response of host. Herein, we identify seven new CgPGRP genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the seven new and five previously reported CgPRGP genes reveals that the CgPRGP gene family can be clustered into two groups, CgPRGPS and CgPRGPL. Moreover, the CgPRGPS group can be further divided into five subgroups. A codon-substitution model and three likelihood ratio tests (LRTs) suggest that seven sites in the CgPGRP family of genes have been subjected to strong positive selection (ω = 3.035-4.143), Three dimensional modeling revealed that these sites are found primarily at the periphery of coils and α-helices rather than in β-strands, perhaps allowing PGRP to adapt to, and recognize, variability of PGN structure. In conclusion, our studies provide the first evidence of positive Darwinian selection in the CgPGRP family, contributing to a better understanding of the adaptive mechanism of host-pathogens interaction in marine mollusks.

  9. Effects of ocean acidification on immune responses of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Cao, Ruiwen; Ning, Xuanxuan; You, Liping; Mu, Changkao; Wang, Chunlin; Wei, Lei; Cong, Ming; Wu, Huifeng; Zhao, Jianmin

    2016-02-01

    Ocean acidification (OA), caused by anthropogenic CO2emissions, has been proposed as one of the greatest threats in marine ecosystems. A growing body of evidence shows that ocean acidification can impact development, survival, growth and physiology of marine calcifiers. In this study, the immune responses of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas were investigated after elevated pCO2 exposure for 28 days. The results demonstrated that OA caused an increase of apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in hemocytes. Moreover, elevated pCO2 had an inhibitory effect on some antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased the GSH level in digestive gland. However, the mRNA expression pattern of several immune related genes varied depending on the exposure time and tissues. After exposure to pCO2 at ∼2000 ppm for 28 days, the mRNA expressions of almost all tested genes were significantly suppressed in gills and stimulated in hemocytes. Above all, our study demonstrated that elevated pCO2 have a significant impact on the immune systems of the Pacific oyster, which may constitute as a potential threat to increased susceptibility of bivalves to diseases.

  10. The in vitro biotransformation of 2-aminofluorene in the visceral mass of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Schlenk, D; Buhler, D R

    1990-06-01

    1. The in vitro biotransformation of 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) was examined in visceral mass microsomes from the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. 2. The major metabolite was N-formyl-2-aminofluorene with smaller quantities of N-hydroxy-2-aminofluorene and nitroso-2-aminofluorene or 2-nitrofluorene. 3. The mechanism of N-oxidation was explored using various inhibitors, stimulators, cofactors, and pH modifications within incubations. 4. N-Oxidation may occur via a one electron mechanism which involves a transition metal and/or lipid peroxidation. 5. Flavin-containing monooxygenase and possibly prostaglandin synthase also seem to play a role in N-oxidation.

  11. Species profile: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Gulf of Mexico): American oyster. [Crassostrea virginica

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, J.G.; Sellers, M.A.

    1986-07-01

    The American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, is an important commercial species. Spawning occurs repeatedly during warmer months with millions of eggs released. Embryos and larvae are carried by currents throughout the estuaries and oceanic bays where they occur. The surviving larvae cement themselves to a solid object, where they remain for the remainder of life. Unable to move, they must tolerate changes in the environment that range from -2 to 36/sup 0/C (air temperature), 2 to 40 ppt salinity, and clear or muddy water. The density and occurrence of adults is limited by predators, chiefly oyster drills, whelks, fish, and crabs.

  12. Simultaneous accumulations of naphthalene, a PCB mixture, and benzo(a)pyrene, by the oyster, Crassostrea virginica

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, A.R.; Sick, L.V.

    1985-02-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to assess accumulations or ogranic contaminants when the oyster Crassostrea virginica was simultaneously exposed to several contaminants. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), naphthalene, and benzo(a)pyrene were selected for study due to their toxicity and ubiquitous distribution in the marine environment. The objective included considering the possible significance of contaminant accumulations to humans by using a commercially important organism, and possible antagonistic-synergistic effects of multiple contaminants. The bioavailability of contaminants presented as dissolved versus particulate matter was also investigated.

  13. Survey for protozoan parasites in Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from the Gulf of Maine using PCR-based assays.

    PubMed

    Marquis, Nicholas D; Record, Nicholas R; Robledo, José A Fernández

    2015-10-01

    Protozoan pathogens represent a serious threat to oyster aquaculture, since they can lead to significant production loses. Moreover, oysters can concentrate human pathogens through filter feeding, thus putting at risk raw oyster consumers' health. Using PCR-based assays in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from Maine, we expand the Northeast range in the USA for the protozoans Perkinsus marinus, Perkinsus chesapeaki, and Haplosporidium nelsoni, and report for the first time the detection of the human pathogens Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. Oysters hosting both P. marinus and P. chesapeaki were more than three times as likely to be infected by a non-Perkinsus than those free of Perkinsus infections.

  14. Inheritance of 15 microsatellites in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas: segregation and null allele identification for linkage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Guo, Ximing; Zhang, Guofan

    2009-02-01

    Microsatellites were screened in a backcross family of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Fifteen microsatellite loci were distinguishable and polymorphic with 6 types of allele-combinations. Null alleles were detected in 46.7% of loci, accounting for 11.7% of the total alleles. Four loci did not segregate in Mendelian Ratios. Three linkage groups were identified among 7 of the 15 segregating loci. Fluorescence-based automated capillary electrophoresis (ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer) that used to detect the microsatellite loci, has been proved a fast, precise, and reliable method in microsatellite genotyping.

  15. Sex Ratio and Sex Reversal in Two-year-old Class of Oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Bivalvia: Ostreidae)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Jun; Kim, Hyejin; Kang, Seung Wan; An, Cheul Min; Lee, Sung-Ho; Gye, Myung Chan; Lee, Jung Sick

    2012-01-01

    The sex ratio (F:M) in the same population of oyster, Crassostrea gigas at the commencement of the study (2007) was 1:1.0, but changed to 1:2.8 by the end of the study (2008). The sex reversal rate in two-year-old oysters was 40.2%. Specifically, female to male sex reversal rate was 66.1%, which is higher than the male to female sex reversal rate of 21.1%. The sex reversal pattern of C. gigas appears to go from male⇒female⇒male, and as such is determined to be rhythmical hermaphroditism. PMID:25949114

  16. Sex Ratio and Sex Reversal in Two-year-old Class of Oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Jun; Kim, Hyejin; Kang, Seung Wan; An, Cheul Min; Lee, Sung-Ho; Gye, Myung Chan; Lee, Jung Sick

    2012-12-01

    The sex ratio (F:M) in the same population of oyster, Crassostrea gigas at the commencement of the study (2007) was 1:1.0, but changed to 1:2.8 by the end of the study (2008). The sex reversal rate in two-year-old oysters was 40.2%. Specifically, female to male sex reversal rate was 66.1%, which is higher than the male to female sex reversal rate of 21.1%. The sex reversal pattern of C. gigas appears to go from male⇒female⇒male, and as such is determined to be rhythmical hermaphroditism.

  17. The Effects of Copper and Copper Blocking Agents on Gill Mitochondrial O(2) Utilization of Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Collins, Shanika; McCoy, Kwanza; Catapane, Edward J; Carroll, Margaret A

    2010-01-01

    While essential in trace amounts, excess copper is toxic to cells and tissues. Copper is a major aquatic pollutant. Previously, our lab demonstrated that tissues of the bivalve mollusc Crassostrea virginica readily accumulated copper and other metals from their surrounding environment. In this study we showed that O(2) consumption in isolated gill mitochondria of C. virginica was impaired by in vitro copper additions and that copper's deleterious effects on mitochondria respiration could be blocked by the presence of the membrane channel blocker Diltiazam. PMID:21841976

  18. The Effects of Copper and Copper Blocking Agents on Gill Mitochondrial O2 Utilization of Crassostrea virginica

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Shanika; McCoy, Kwanza; Catapane, Edward J.; Carroll, Margaret A.

    2010-01-01

    While essential in trace amounts, excess copper is toxic to cells and tissues. Copper is a major aquatic pollutant. Previously, our lab demonstrated that tissues of the bivalve mollusc Crassostrea virginica readily accumulated copper and other metals from their surrounding environment. In this study we showed that O2 consumption in isolated gill mitochondria of C. virginica was impaired by in vitro copper additions and that copper’s deleterious effects on mitochondria respiration could be blocked by the presence of the membrane channel blocker Diltiazam. PMID:21841976

  19. Ostreid herpesvirus 1 infection among Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) Spat: relevance of water temperature to virus replication and circulation prior to the onset of mortality.

    PubMed

    Renault, Tristan; Bouquet, Anne Lise; Maurice, Julien-Thomas; Lupo, Coralie; Blachier, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    A number of bivalve species worldwide, including the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, have been affected by mass mortality events associated with herpesviruses, resulting in significant losses. A particular herpesvirus was purified from naturally infected larval Pacific oysters, and its genome was completely sequenced. This virus has been classified as Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) within the family Malacoherpesviridae. Since 2008, mass mortality outbreaks among C. gigas in Europe have been related to the detection of a variant of OsHV-1 called μVar. Additional data are necessary to better describe mortality events in relation to environmental-parameter fluctuations and OsHV-1 detection. For this purpose, a single batch of Pacific oyster spat was deployed in 4 different locations in the Marennes-Oleron area (France): an oyster pond ("claire"), a shellfish nursery, and two locations in the field. Mortality rates were recorded based on regular observation, and samples were collected to search for and quantify OsHV-1 DNA by real-time PCR. Although similar massive mortality rates were reported at the 4 sites, mortality was detected earlier in the pond and in the nursery than at both field sites. This difference may be related to earlier increases in water temperature. Mass mortality was observed among oysters a few days after increases in the number of PCR-positive oysters and viral-DNA amounts were recorded. An initial increment in the number of PCR-positive oysters was reported at both field sites during the survey in the absence of significant mortality. During this period, the water temperature was below 16°C.

  20. A novel junctional adhesion molecule A (CgJAM-A-L) from oyster (Crassostrea gigas) functions as pattern recognition receptor and opsonin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Conghui; Wang, Mengqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Wang, Lingling; Chen, Hao; Liu, Zhaoqun; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-02-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule (JAM), a subfamily of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) with a couple of immunoglobulin domains, can act as regulator in homeostasis and inflammation of vertebrates. In the present study, a structural homolog of JAM-A (designated CgJAM-A-L) was screened out from oyster, Crassostrea gigas, through a search of JAM-A D1 domain (N-terminal Ig domain in JAM-A). The cDNA of CgJAM-A-L was of 1188 bp encoding a predicted polypeptide of 395 amino acids. The immunoreactive area of CgJAM-A-L mainly distributed over the plasma membrane of hemocytes. After Vibro splendidus or tumor necrosis factor (CgTNF-1) stimulation, the mRNA transcripts of CgJAM-A-L in hemocytes increased significantly by 4.46-fold and 9.00-fold (p < 0.01) of those in control group, respectively. The recombinant CgJAM-A-L protein (rCgJAM-A-L) could bind multiple PAMPs including lipopolysaccharides (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), mannose (MAN), β-glucan (GLU) and poly(I:C), and various microorganisms including Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Vibro anguillarum, V. splendidus, Pastoris pastoris and Yarrowia lipolytica. The phagocytic rates of oyster hemocytes towards Gram-negative bacteria V. anguillarum and yeast P. pastoris were significantly enhanced after the incubation of rCgJAM-A-L, and even increased more significantly after the pre-incubation of rCgJAM-A-L with microbes (p < 0.01). The results collectively indicated that CgJAM-A-L functioned as an important pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and opsonin in the immune defense against invading pathogen in oyster. Moreover, as the most primitive specie with homolog of JAMs, the information of CgJAM-A-L in oyster would provide useful clues for the evolutionary study of JAMs and immunoglobulins.

  1. Seasonal changes in mRNA encoding for cell stress markers in the oyster Crassostrea gigas exposed to radioactive discharges in their natural environment.

    PubMed

    Farcy, Emilie; Voiseux, Claire; Lebel, Jean-Marc; Fievet, Bruno

    2007-03-15

    The North Cotentin area (Normandy, France) hosts several nuclear facilities among which the AREVA reprocessing plant of La Hague is responsible for controlled discharges of liquid radioactive wastes into the marine environment. The resulting increase in radioactivity is very small compared to natural radioactivity. However, concerns about environment protection prompted the scientific community to focus on the effects of the chronic exposure to low concentrations of radionuclides in non-human biota. This study contributes to the evaluation of the possible impact of radioactive discharges on the oyster Crassostrea gigas in the field. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the expression levels of genes involved in cell stress in the oyster. They included members of the heat shock protein family (Hsp70, Hsc72, Hsp90), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and metallothionein (MT). Times series measurements were built from periodic samplings in the natural environment in order to characterize the natural variability as well as possible seasonal fluctuations. The genes studied exhibited a general seasonal expression pattern with a peak value in winter. The data inversely correlated with seawater temperature and the nature of the relationship between gene expression and temperature is discussed. In parallel, oysters were collected in four locations on the French shores, exposed or not to radioactive liquid wastes from the nuclear facilities hosted in the North Cotentin. The comparison of data obtained in the reference location on the Atlantic coast (not exposed) and data from oysters of the English Channel (exposed) gave no evidence for any statistical difference. However, because of the complexity of the natural environment, we cannot rule out the possibility that other parameters may have masked the impact of radioactive discharges. This dense set of data is a basis for the use of the expression levels of those genes as biomarkers to address the question of the

  2. A C1q domain containing protein from Crassostrea gigas serves as pattern recognition receptor and opsonin with high binding affinity to LPS.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Li, Hui; Zhang, Daoxiang; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Lingling; Sun, Jinsheng; Song, Linsheng

    2015-08-01

    C1q proteins serve as pattern recognition receptors and involve in the pathogen recognition and complement pathway activation. In the present study, a novel C1q domain containing protein from Crassostrea gigas (designated CgC1qDC-1) was isolated by liposaccharide-Sepharose 6B affinity chromatography. The coding sequence of CgC1qDC-1 gene was determined by performing a homologous search of eight tryptic peptides identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS against the genome of C. gigas. The coding sequence of CgC1qDC-1 was of 387 bp encoding a polypeptide of 128 amino acids containing a typical globular C1q domain. The globular C1q domain possessed eight β strands with a jelly-roll topology structure, which was similar to the structure of human gC1q domain. The mRNA transcripts of CgC1qDC-1 were dominantly expressed in mantle and hemocytes, while low expressed in hepatopancreas, gonad, gill and muscle. The expression level of CgC1qDC-1 increased drastically at 6 h after Vibrio splendidus stimulation, and then gradually fell to the normal level at about 24 h. ELISA assay quantified that CgC1qDC-1 bound to LPS with high binding affinity (Kd = 0.09 × 10(-6) M). Moreover, CgC1qDC-1 significantly enhanced the phagocytosis of oyster hemocytes towards Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and V. splendidus. These results collectively indicated that CgC1qDC-1 could serve as pattern recognition receptor and opsonin in the innate immune response against invading Gram-negative bacteria.

  3. Evaluating the performance of selective-bred lines of eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, at different locations along the east coast of the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Populations of the economically important eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica have been severely affected in the last few decades by diseases such as Dermo, MSX, SSO, and ROD. As the demand for a fast-growing, disease-resistant oyster increases, so has the need for effective breeding programs that...

  4. INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE EFFECTS OF SEASON AND WATER QUALITY ON OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) AND ASSOCIATED FISH ASSEMBLAGES IN THE CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER ESTUARY, FLORIDA: IMPLICATIONS OF ALTERED FRESHWATER INFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    A suite of biological and ecological responses of a Valued Ecosystem Component species, Crassostrea virginica, was used to investigate ecosystem-wide health effects of watershed alterations in the Caloosahatchee River estuary, Florida. The influence of water quality and season on...

  5. Effect of acclimatization on hemocyte functional characteristics of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and carpet shell clam (Ruditapes decussatus).

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Miguel Ángel; da Silva, Patricia Mirella; Le Goïc, Nelly; Palacios, Elena; Soudant, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Most experimental procedures on molluscs are done after acclimatization of wild animals to lab conditions. Similarly, short-term acclimation is often unavoidable in a field survey when biological analysis cannot be done within the day of sample collection. However, acclimatization can affect the general physiological condition and particularly the immune cell responses of molluscs. Our aim was to study the changes in the hemocyte characteristics of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the carpet shell clam Ruditapes decussatus acclimated 1 or 2 days under emersed conditions at 14 ± 1 °C and for 1, 2, 7, or 10 days to flowing seawater conditions (submerged) at 9 ± 1 °C, when compared to hemolymph withdrawn from organisms sampled in the field and immediately analyzed in the laboratory (unacclimated). The hemocyte characteristics assessed by flow cytometry were the total (THC) and differential hemocyte count, percentage of dead cells, phagocytosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Dead hemocytes were lower in oysters acclimated both in emersed and submerged conditions (1%-5%) compared to those sampled in the field (7%). Compared to oysters, the percentage of dead hemocytes was lower in clams (0.4% vs. 1.1%) and showed a tendency to decrease during acclimatization in both emersed and submerged conditions. In comparison to organisms not acclimated, the phagocytosis of hemocytes decreased in both oysters and clams acclimated under submerged conditions, but was similar in those acclimated in emersed conditions. The ROS production remained stable in both oysters and clams acclimated in emersed conditions, whereas in submerged conditions ROS production did not change in both the hyalinocytes and granulocytes of oysters, but increased in clams. In oysters, the THC decreased when they were acclimated 1 and 2 days in submerged conditions and was mainly caused by a decrease in granulocytes, but the decrease in THC in oysters acclimated 2 days in emersed

  6. Hemolymph chemistry and histopathological changes in Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) in response to low salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Graeme; Handlinger, Judith; Jones, Brian; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie

    2014-09-01

    This study described seasonal differences in the histopathological and hemolymph chemistry changes in different family lines of Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, in response to the stress of an abrupt change to low salinity, and mechanical grading. The most significant changes in pallial cavity salinity, hemolymph chemistry and histopathological findings occurred in summer at low salinity. In summer (water temperature 18°C) at low salinity, 9 (25.7% of full salinity), the mean pallial cavity salinity in oysters at day 3 was 19.8±1.6 (SE) and day 10 was 22.8±1.6 (SE) lower than oysters at salinity 35. Associated with this fall in pallial cavity salinity, mean hemolymph sodium for oysters at salinity 9 on day 3 and 10 were 297.2mmol/L±20(SE) and 350.4mmol/L±21.3(SE) lower than oysters at salinity 35. Similarly mean hemolymph potassium in oysters held at salinity 9 at day 3 and 10 were 5.6mmol/L±0.6(SE) and 7.9mmol/L±0.6 (SE) lower than oysters at salinity 35. These oysters at low salinity had expanded intercellular spaces and significant intracytoplasmic vacuolation distending the cytoplasm of epithelial cells in the alimentary tract and kidney and hemocyte infiltrate (diapedesis) within the alimentary tract wall. In contrast, in winter (water temperature 8°C) oyster mean pallial cavity salinity only fell at day 10 and this was by 6.0±0.6 (SE) compared to that of oysters at salinity 35. There were limited histopathological changes (expanded intercellular spaces and moderate intracytoplasmic vacuolation of renal epithelial cells) in these oysters at day 10 in low salinity. Mechanical grading and family line did not influence the oyster response to sudden low salinity. These findings provide additional information for interpretation of non-lethal, histopathological changes associated with temperature and salinity variation.

  7. Metal speciation and toxicity of Tamar Estuary water to larvae of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Money, Cathryn; Braungardt, Charlotte B; Jha, Awadhesh N; Worsfold, Paul J; Achterberg, Eric P

    2011-07-01

    As part of the PREDICT Tamar Workshop, the toxicity of estuarine waters in the Tamar Estuary (southwest England) was assessed by integration of metal speciation determination with bioassays. High temporal resolution metal speciation analysis was undertaken in situ by deployment of a Voltammetric In situ Profiling (VIP) system. The VIP detects Cd (cadmium), Pb (lead) and Cu (copper) species smaller than 4 nm in size and this fraction is termed 'dynamic' and considered biologically available. Cadmium was mainly present in the dynamic form and constituted between 56% and 100% of the total dissolved concentration, which was determined subsequently in the laboratory in filtered discrete samples. In contrast, the dynamic Pb and Cu fractions were less important, with a much larger proportion of these metals associated with organic ligands and/or colloids (45-90% Pb and 46-85% Cu), which probably reduced the toxicological impact of these elements in this system. Static toxicity tests, based on the response of Crassostrea gigas larva exposed to discrete water samples showed a high level of toxicity (up to 100% abnormal development) at two stations in the Tamar, particularly during periods of the tidal cycle when the influence of more pristine coastal water was at its lowest. Competitive ligand-exchange Cu titrations showed that natural organic ligands reduced the free cupric ion concentration to levels that were unlikely to have been the sole cause of the observed toxicity. Nonetheless, it is probable that the combined effect of the metals determined in this work contributed significantly to the bioassay response. PMID:21704365

  8. Effect of Carbonate Chemistry Alteration on the Early Embryonic Development of the Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas)

    PubMed Central

    Gazeau, Frédéric; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Greaves, Mervyn; Elderfield, Henry; Peene, Jan; Heip, Carlo H. R.; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean acidification, due to anthropogenic CO2 absorption by the ocean, may have profound impacts on marine biota. Calcareous organisms are expected to be particularly sensitive due to the decreasing availability of carbonate ions driven by decreasing pH levels. Recently, some studies focused on the early life stages of mollusks that are supposedly more sensitive to environmental disturbances than adult stages. Although these studies have shown decreased growth rates and increased proportions of abnormal development under low pH conditions, they did not allow attribution to pH induced changes in physiology or changes due to a decrease in aragonite saturation state. This study aims to assess the impact of several carbonate-system perturbations on the growth of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae during the first 3 days of development (until shelled D-veliger larvae). Seawater with five different chemistries was obtained by separately manipulating pH, total alkalinity and aragonite saturation state (calcium addition). Results showed that the developmental success and growth rates were not directly affected by changes in pH or aragonite saturation state but were highly correlated with the availability of carbonate ions. In contrast to previous studies, both developmental success into viable D-shaped larvae and growth rates were not significantly altered as long as carbonate ion concentrations were above aragonite saturation levels, but they strongly decreased below saturation levels. These results suggest that the mechanisms used by these organisms to regulate calcification rates are not efficient enough to compensate for the low availability of carbonate ions under corrosive conditions. PMID:21860666

  9. Combined effects of water temperature and copper ion concentration on catalase activity in Crassostrea ariakensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Yang, Hongshuai; Liu, Jiahui; Li, Yanhong; Liu, Zhigang

    2015-07-01

    A central composite experimental design and response surface method were used to investigate the combined effects of water temperature (18-34°C) and copper ion concentration (0.1-1.5 mg/L) on the catalase (CAT) activity in the digestive gland of Crassostrea ariakensis. The results showed that the linear effects of temperature were significant ( P<0.01), the quadratic effects of temperature were significant ( P<0.05), the linear effects of copper ion concentration were not significant ( P>0.05), and the quadratic effects of copper ion concentration were significant ( P<0.05). Additionally, the synergistic effects of temperature and copper ion concentration were not significant ( P>0.05), and the effect of temperature was greater than that of copper ion concentration. A model equation of CAT enzyme activity in the digestive gland of C. ariakensis toward the two factors of interest was established, with R 2, Adj. R 2 and Pred. R 2 values as high as 0.943 7, 0.887 3 and 0.838 5, respectively. These findings suggested that the goodness of fit to experimental data and predictive capability of the model were satisfactory, and could be practically applied for prediction under the conditions of the study. Overall, the results suggest that the simultaneous variation of temperature and copper ion concentration alters the activity of the antioxidant enzyme CAT by modulating active oxygen species metabolism, which may be utilized as a biomarker to detect the effects of copper pollution.

  10. Evaluating Mg/Ca ratios as a temperature proxy in the estuarine oyster, Crassostrea virginica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surge, Donna; Lohmann, Kyger C.

    2008-06-01

    We examined the potential utility of Mg/CaSHELL ratios recorded in shells of the estuarine oyster Crassostrea virginica as a temperature proxy because oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) in estuaries are complicated by the simultaneous fluctuation in temperature and salinity, whereas Mg/CaWATER ratios are assumed to be constant above 10 practical salinity units (psu). We tested this assumption and observed a slight mixing effect between 10 psu and normal marine values emphasizing the need to test this assumption in estuarine settings. Microsamples of shell carbonate were analyzed for δ18O, δ13C, and Mg/Ca ratios. Measured δ18OSHELL and δ13CSHELL were compared to predicted values to assign dates to shell samples. Once samples and dates were aligned, corresponding temperature and salinity for a particular sample were known, enabling comparison of Mg/CaSHELL ratios and temperature. When all Mg/CaSHELL data were compared to temperature, a weak but statistically significant correlation was observed (r2 = 0.05, p < 0.01). Because date assignments may become increasingly uncertain further back in time and earlier studies identified ontogenetic effects in juvenile portions of shells from other bivalve species, we examined the relationship from only the last year of growth. When only data from the last year of growth were compared, a slightly stronger positive relationship between Mg/CaSHELL ratios andDMg (the partition coefficient) emerged (Mg/CaSHELL, r2 = 0.30, p < 0.01; DMg, r2 = 0.33, p < 0.01). The improved correlation may result from either ontogenetic effects influencing the incorporation of Mg into the younger portion of the shell and/or inaccurate date assignments. Regardless of the cause, our equations are similar to previously published equations for C. virginica and other taxa. Despite the low correlations, our improved relationship supports further study under controlled experimental conditions.

  11. Disruption of amylase genes by RNA interference affects reproduction in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Huvet, Arnaud; Béguel, Jean-Philippe; Cavaleiro, Nathalia Pereira; Thomas, Yoann; Quillien, Virgile; Boudry, Pierre; Alunno-Bruscia, Marianne; Fabioux, Caroline

    2015-06-01

    Feeding strategies and digestive capacities can have important implications for variation in energetic pathways associated with ecological and economically important traits, such as growth or reproduction in bivalve species. Here, we investigated the role of amylase in the digestive processes of Crassostrea gigas, using in vivo RNA interference. This approach also allowed us to investigate the relationship between energy intake by feeding and gametogenesis in oysters. Double-stranded (ds)RNA designed to target the two α-amylase genes A and B was injected in vivo into the visceral mass of oysters at two doses. These treatments caused significant reductions in mean mRNA levels of the amylase genes: -50.7% and -59% mRNA A, and -71.9% and -70.6% mRNA B in 15 and 75 µg dsRNA-injected oysters, respectively, relative to controls. Interestingly, reproductive knock-down phenotypes were observed for both sexes at 48 days post-injection, with a significant reduction of the gonad area (-22.5% relative to controls) and germ cell under-proliferation revealed by histology. In response to the higher dose of dsRNA, we also observed reductions in amylase activity (-53%) and absorption efficiency (-5%). Based on these data, dynamic energy budget modeling showed that the limitation of energy intake by feeding that was induced by injection of amylase dsRNA was insufficient to affect gonadic development at the level observed in the present study. This finding suggests that other driving mechanisms, such as endogenous hormonal modulation, might significantly change energy allocation to reproduction, and increase the maintenance rate in oysters in response to dsRNA injection.

  12. The transcriptomic responses of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, to environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Robert W; Mancia, Annalaura; Beal, Marion; Veloso, Artur; Rathburn, Charles; Blair, Anne; Holland, A F; Warr, G W; Didinato, Guy; Sokolova, Inna M; Wirth, Edward F; Duffy, Edward; Sanger, Denise

    2011-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which organisms adapt to environmental conditions is a fundamental question for ecology and evolution. In this study, we evaluate changes in gene expression of a marine mollusc, the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, associated with the physico-chemical conditions and the levels of metals and other contaminants in their environment. The results indicate that transcript signatures can effectively disentangle the complex interactive gene expression responses to the environment and are also capable of disentangling the complex dynamic effects of environmental factors on gene expression. In this context, the mapping of environment to gene and gene to environment is reciprocal and mutually reinforcing. In general, the response of transcripts to the environment is driven by major factors known to affect oyster physiology such as temperature, pH, salinity, and dissolved oxygen, with pollutant levels playing a relatively small role, at least within the range of concentrations found in the studied oyster habitats. Further, the two environmental factors that dominate these effects (temperature and pH) interact in a dynamic and nonlinear fashion to impact gene expression. Transcriptomic data obtained in our study provide insights into the mechanisms of physiological responses to temperature and pH in oysters that are consistent with the known effects of these factors on physiological functions of ectotherms and indicate important linkages between transcriptomics and physiological outcomes. Should these linkages hold in further studies and in other organisms, they may provide a novel integrated approach for assessing the impacts of climate change, ocean acidification and anthropogenic contaminants on aquatic organisms via relatively inexpensive microarray platforms.

  13. Enhanced immunological and detoxification responses in Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, exposed to chemically dispersed oil.

    PubMed

    Luna-Acosta, A; Kanan, R; Le Floch, S; Huet, V; Pineau, P; Bustamante, P; Thomas-Guyon, H

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chemically dispersed oil on an economically and ecologically important species inhabiting coasts and estuaries, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Studies were carried out with juveniles, known to generally be more sensitive to environmental stress than adults. A set of enzyme activities involved in immune defence mechanisms and detoxification processes, i.e. superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catecholase-type phenoloxidase (PO), laccase-type PO and lysozyme were analysed in different oyster tissues, i.e. the gills, digestive gland and mantle, and in the plasma and the haemoycte lysate supernatant (HLS) of the haemolymph. Results indicated that total PAH body burdens were 2.7 times higher in the presence than in the absence of the chemical dispersant. After 2 days of exposure to chemically dispersed oil, alkylated naphthalenes accounted for 55% of the total PAH body burden, whereas alkylated fluorenes and alkylated dibenzothiophenes accounted for 80% when the chemical dispersant was absent. Importantly, a higher number of enzyme activities were modified when oil was chemically dispersed, especially in the plasma and gills. Moreover, independently of the presence or absence of chemical dispersant, oil exposure generally inhibited enzyme activities in the gills and plasma, while they were generally activated in the mantle and haemocytes. These results suggest that the gills and plasma constitute sensitive compartments in C. gigas, and that the mantle and haemocytes may play an important role in protection against xenobiotics. Among the six enzyme activities that were analysed in these body compartments, five were modulated in the chemical dispersion (CD) treatment while only half of the enzyme activities were modulated in the mechanical dispersion treatment. Furthermore, CD treatment effects were often observed following exposure, but also during depuration periods. These results

  14. Assessment of gamete quality for the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) by use of fluorescent dyes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paniagua-Chavez, C. G.; Jenkins, J.; Segovia, M.; Tiersch, T.R.

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of sperm motility is the single most widely used parameter to determine semen quality in mammals and aquatic species. While a good indicator for fresh sperm viability, post-thaw motility is not always effective at predicting fertilizing ability. Techniques using fluorescent dyes can assess functionality of mammalian sperm, but have not been widely applied in aquatic organisms. The eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica is an important mollusk in the United States, and cryopreservation protocols have been developed to preserve sperm and larvae to assist research and hatchery production. In this study, protocols were developed to assess sperm cell membrane integrity and mitochondrial function by flow cytometry and to assess viability of eggs by fluorescence microscopy. The fluorescent dyes SYBR 14 and propidium iodide (PI) (to assess membrane integrity) and rhodamine 123 (R123) (to assess mitochondrial membrane potential) were used to evaluate the quality of thawed oyster sperm previously cryopreserved with different cryoprotectant and thawing treatments. Membrane integrity results were correlated with motility of thawed sperm and mitochondrial membrane potential with fertilizing ability. Fluorescein diacetate (FDA) was used to assess cytotoxicity of cryoprotectant solutions and post-thaw damage to oyster eggs. The results indicated that membrane integrity (P = 0.004) and thawing treatments (P = 0.04), and mitochondrial membrane potential (P = 0.0015) were correlated with motility. Fertilizing ability was correlated with cryoprotectant treatments (P = 0.0258) and with mitochondrial membrane potential (P = 0.001). The dye FDA was useful in indicating structural integrity of fresh and thawed eggs. Exposure of eggs, without freezing, to dimethyl sulfoxide yielded higher percentages of stained eggs and fertilization rate than did exposure to propylene glycol (P = 0.002). Thawed eggs were not stained with FDA (<1%) and larvae were not produced. ?? 2006 Elsevier

  15. Purification and characterization studies of cadmium-binding proteins from the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, B A; Engel, D W; Brouwer, M

    1986-01-01

    The previously reported low molecular weight cadmium-binding protein (CdBP) from the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, has been further purified and characterized by improved technical methods. The internal organ distribution of the protein within the oyster and effects of life cycle/season on CdBP production also have been evaluated. CdBP isolated by extended ion-exchange gradients or double ion-exchange chromatography followed by HPLC analysis possesses an electrophoretic Rf of about 0.7 and contains relatively little Zn, as previously reported. Cysteine, lysine, and glycine are the dominant amino acids. When ion-exchange columns are developed with NaCl gradients, the aromatic residues tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine are found to be present, but these may be largely removed depending upon whether the protein is denatured and carboxymethylated prior to analysis. The ultraviolet absorption spectrum of CdBP also was variable, with 250/280 nm ratios ranging from 17:1 immediately after ion-exchange chromatography to 2:1 following concentration procedures. Internal organ distribution studies showed that the visceral mass contained most of the Cd present with lesser amounts in the gills and mantle. In contrast with mammals, CdBP accounts for only about 30% of the total cell Cd burden in these tissues. Cu displacement of Cd from the protein is a particular problem during the summer spawning season and appears to stem from altered Cu metabolism during this period. Relative oyster dormancy during the winter also reduces CdBP production in response to Cd, and the protein is obtained most readily during the fall and spring.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images FIGURE 7. PMID:3709468

  16. Transcriptional changes in Crassostrea gigas oyster spat following a parental exposure to the herbicide diuron.

    PubMed

    Rondon, R; Akcha, F; Alonso, P; Menard, D; Rouxel, J; Montagnani, C; Mitta, G; Cosseau, C; Grunau, C

    2016-06-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is the main oyster species produced in the world, and a key coastal economic resource in France. High mortalities affect Pacific oysters since 2008 in France and Europe. Their origins have been attributed to a combination of biotic and abiotic factors, underlining the importance of environment quality. The impact of water pollution has been pointed out and one of the pollutants, the genotoxic herbicide diuron, occurs at high concentrations all along the French coasts. Previous work has revealed that a parental exposure to diuron had a strong impact on hatching rates and offspring development even if spats were not exposed to diuron themselves. In this study, we explored for the first time the transcriptional changes occurring in oyster spats (non exposed) originating from genitors exposed to an environmentally relevant concentration of diuron during gametogenesis using the RNAseq methodology. We identified a transcriptomic remodeling revealing an effect of the herbicide. Different molecular pathways involved in energy production, translation and cell proliferation are particularly disturbed. This analysis revealed modulated candidate genes putatively involved in response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in offspring of genitors exposed to diuron. Complementary measures of the activity of enzymes involved in these latter processes corroborate the results obtained at the transcriptomic level. In addition, our results suggested an increase in energy production and mitotic activity in 5-month-spats from diuron-exposed genitors. These results could correspond to a "catch-up growth" phenomenon allowing the spats from diuron-exposed genitors, which displayed a growth delay at 3 months, to gain a normal size when they reach the age of 6 months. These results indicate that exposure to a concentration of diuron that is frequently encountered in the field during the oyster's gametogenesis stage can impact the next generation

  17. The micronucleus assay in Crassostrea gigas for the detection of seawater genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Burgeot, T; His, E; Galgani, F

    1995-04-01

    The micronucleus (MN) test was performed in vivo and in vitro on the oyster Crassostrea gigas to evaluate the genotoxic effect of the marine environment. In vitro tests were carried out on adult and young (spat) specimens exposed to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP: 0.5, 5, 500 and 1000 micrograms.l-1) and an effluent (5, 50, 75 and 100%) of Seine Bay, one of the most highly contaminated sites in France. MN frequency observed after 48 h exposure to the two pollutants was much greater in adults than spats. A preliminary test of the genotoxic effect of BaP (0.05, 0.5, 1 and 500 micrograms.l-1), cupric sulfate (10, 25, 50 and 100 micrograms.l-1) and a paper mill effluent (1, 3, 10 and 30 mg.l-1) was performed in C. gigas heart cells cultured for 6 days. Comparison of the MN assay with the C. gigas larva test showed the clastogenic action of BaP and the toxic effect of cupric sulfate on culture cells as well as the slighter toxic effect of paper mill effluent on spats. An in vivo study was conducted in an oyster-farming area contaminated by cadmium and copper. MN frequency was not very sensitive to a pollution gradient but showed high interindividual variability. The absence of precise criteria for MN identification in mollusks and the identification of highly basophilic spherical inclusions in the cytoplasm of gill tissue hemocytes in oysters during viral infection are handicap for application of the micronuclei assay in the marine environment. Another limitation of the assay is the particularly onerous requirement for manual observation. Optimization of the assay by automated analysis is necessary but can only be achieved if cytologic preparations are of good quality.

  18. Transcriptomic Responses to Salinity Stress in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuelin; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng; Li, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Background Low salinity is one of the main factors limiting the distribution and survival of marine species. As a euryhaline species, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is considered to be tolerant to relative low salinity. The genes that regulate C. gigas responses to osmotic stress were monitored using the next-generation sequencing of whole transcriptome with samples taken from gills. By RNAseq technology, transcript catalogs of up- and down-regulated genes were generated from the oysters exposed to low and optimal salinity seawater. Methodology/Principal Findings Through Illumina sequencing, we reported 1665 up-regulated transcripts and 1815 down-regulated transcripts. A total of 45771 protein-coding contigs were identified from two groups based on sequence similarities with known proteins. As determined by GO annotation and KEGG pathway mapping, functional annotation of the genes recovered diverse biological functions and processes. The genes that changed expression significantly were highly represented in cellular process and regulation of biological process, intracellular and cell, binding and protein binding according to GO annotation. The results highlighted genes related to osmoregulation, signaling and interactions of osmotic stress response, anti-apoptotic reactions as well as immune response, cell adhesion and communication, cytoskeleton and cell cycle. Conclusions/Significance Through more than 1.5 million sequence reads and the expression data of the two libraries, the study provided some useful insights into signal transduction pathways in oysters and offered a number of candidate genes as potential markers of tolerance to hypoosmotic stress for oysters. In addition, the characterization of C. gigas transcriptome will not only provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms about the response to osmotic stress of the oysters, but also facilitate research into biological processes to find underlying physiological adaptations to

  19. Candidate Gene Polymorphisms and their Association with Glycogen Content in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    She, Zhicai; Li, Li; Qi, Haigang; Song, Kai; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-01-01

    Background The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is an important cultivated shellfish that is rich in nutrients. It contains high levels of glycogen, which is of high nutritional value. To investigate the genetic basis of this high glycogen content and its variation, we conducted a candidate gene association analysis using a wild population, and confirmed our results using an independent population, via targeted gene resequencing and mRNA expression analysis. Results We validated 295 SNPs in the 90 candidate genes surveyed for association with glycogen content, 86 of were ultimately genotyped in all 144 experimental individuals from Jiaonan (JN). In addition, 732 SNPs were genotyped via targeted gene resequencing. Two SNPs (Cg_SNP_TY202 and Cg_SNP_3021) in Cg_GD1 (glycogen debranching enzyme) and one SNP (Cg_SNP_4) in Cg_GP1 (glycogen phosphorylase) were identified as being associated with glycogen content. The glycogen content of individuals with genotypes TT and TC in Cg_SNP_TY202 was higher than that of individuals with genotype CC. The transcript abundance of both glycogen-associated genes was differentially expressed in high glycogen content and low glycogen content individuals. Conclusions This study identified three polymorphisms in two genes associated with oyster glycogen content, via candidate gene association analysis. The transcript abundance differences in Cg_GD1 and Cg_GP1 between low- and the high-glycogen content individuals suggests that it is possible that transcript regulation is mediated by variations of Cg_SNP_TY202, Cg_SNP_3021, and Cg_SNP_4. These findings will not only provide insights into the genetic basis of oyster quality, but also promote research into the molecular breeding of oysters. PMID:25951187

  20. Cadmium-dependent oxygen limitation affects temperature tolerance in eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica Gmelin).

    PubMed

    Lannig, Gisela; Cherkasov, Anton S; Pörtner, Hans-O; Bock, Christian; Sokolova, Inna M

    2008-04-01

    Marine ectotherms, including oysters are exposed to variable environmental conditions in coastal shallow waters and estuaries. In the light of global climate change, additional stressors like pollution might pose higher risk to populations. On the basis of the concept of oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance in aquatic ectotherms (40), we show that a persistent pollutant, cadmium, can have detrimental effects on oysters (Crassostrea virginica). During acute warming from 20 to 28 degrees C (4 degrees C/48 h) standard metabolic rate (SMR) rose in control and cadmium-exposed (50 microg Cd2+/l) animals, with a consistently higher SMR in Cd-exposed oysters. Additionally, Cd-exposed oysters showed a stronger temperature-dependent decrease in hemolymph oxygen partial pressures. This observation indicates that the effect of temperature on aerobic metabolism was exacerbated due to the additional Cd stress. The oxygen delivery systems could not provide enough oxygen to cover Cd-induced elevated metabolic demands at high temperatures. Interestingly, cardiac performance (measured as the heart rate and hemolymph supply to tissues) rose to a similar extent in control and Cd-exposed oysters with warming indicating that cardiac output was unable to compensate for elevated energy demand in Cd-exposed oysters. Together with the literature data on metal-induced reduction of ventilatory capacity, these findings suggest that synergistic effects of elevated temperatures and cadmium exposure led to oxygen limitation by impaired performance in oxygen supply through ventilation and circulation. Overall, cadmium exposure resulted in progressive hypoxemia in oysters at high temperatures, suggesting that the thermal tolerance window is narrowed in marine ectotherms inhabiting polluted areas compared with pristine environments. PMID:18272660

  1. Responses to thermal and salinity stress in wild and farmed Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Yang, C-Y; Sierp, M T; Abbott, C A; Li, Yan; Qin, J G

    2016-11-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas was introduced from Japan to many countries in the world for oyster farming, resulting in the establishment of wild populations in intertidal zones and resource competition with local faunas. This study examined physiological responses of wild oysters and farmed oysters to thermal (15°C, 25°C, 37°C and 44°C) and salinity stress (39, 50 and 60ppt). The wild oysters produced more 72kDa heat shock proteins when the temperature increased from 15°C to 25°C and 37°C and the salinity increased from 39 to 50 and 60ppt. However, the amount of 69kDa heat shock protein was similar between farmed and wild oysters when the temperature increased from 15°C to the sublethal temperature 37°C, but it was lower in wild oysters than in farmed oysters when the temperature increased from 15°C to the lethal temperature 44°C. In the tissues, wild oysters used more glycogen to promote metabolic activities by increasing the level of AEC (adenylate energy charge). The results suggest that farmed oysters might have limited ability to cope with heat stress due to low energy reserve and glycolysis activity for HSP synthesis. This study provides experimental evidence on differential responses between wild and farmed oysters to temperature and salinity changes, leading to a better understanding on the pattern of distribution for invading oyster species in the marine environment and the adaptation of marine invertebrates to the threat of climate change.

  2. Cellular responses of eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brian D; Gilbert, Samantha L; Khan, Bushra; Carroll, David L; Ringwood, Amy H

    2015-10-01

    Because of the continued development and production of a variety of nanomaterials and nanoparticles, their uptake and effects on the biota of marine ecosystems must be investigated. Filter feeding bivalve molluscs are highly adapted for capturing particles from the external environment and readily internalize nano- and micro-sized particles through endocytosis, so they are commonly used as valuable indicator species for nanoparticle studies. In these studies, adult eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, were exposed to a range of titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO2-NP) concentrations (5, 50, 500, and 5000 μg/L) in conjunction with natural sunlight. Isolated hepatopancreas tissues were also exposed to the same TiO2-NP concentrations using particles exposed to similar light and dark conditions. Dose-dependent decreases in lysosomal stability were observed in the adult oyster studies as well as in the isolated tissues, at exposures as low as 50 μg/L. Titanium accumulation in isolated hepatopancreas tissue studies was directly correlated to lysosomal destabilization. Based on measurements of lipid peroxidation as an indicator of oxidative stress, TiO2-NPs toxicity was not related to increased ROS production over the short-term course of these exposures. Analysis of particle size using dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicated that concentration had a significant impact on agglomeration rates, and the small agglomerates as well as individual particles are readily processed by oysters. Overall, this study illustrates that low concentrations of TiO2-NPs may cause sublethal toxicity on oysters, which might be enhanced under natural sunlight conditions. In estuarine environments, where these nanomaterials are likely to accumulate, agglomeration rates, interaction with organics, and responses to sunlight are critical in determining the extent of their bioreactivity and biological impacts.

  3. Exploitable Lipids and Fatty Acids in the Invasive Oyster Crassostrea gigas on the French Atlantic Coast

    PubMed Central

    Dagorn, Flore; Couzinet-Mossion, Aurélie; Kendel, Melha; Beninger, Peter G.; Rabesaotra, Vony; Barnathan, Gilles; Wielgosz-Collin, Gaëtane

    2016-01-01

    Economic exploitation is one means to offset the cost of controlling invasive species, such as the introduced Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg) on the French Atlantic coast. Total lipid and phospholipid (PL) fatty acids (FAs) and sterols were examined in an invasive population of C. gigas in Bourgneuf Bay, France, over four successive seasons, with a view to identify possible sources of exploitable substances. The total lipid level (% dry weight) varied from 7.1% (winter) to 8.6% (spring). Of this, PLs accounted for 28.1% (spring) to 50.4% (winter). Phosphatidylcholine was the dominant PL throughout the year (up to 74% of total PLs in winter). Plasmalogens were identified throughout the year as a series of eleven dimethylacetals (DMAs) with chain lengths between C16 and C20 (up to 14.5% of PL FAs + DMAs in winter). Thirty-seven FAs were identified in the PL FAs. Eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3 EPA/7.53% to 14.5%) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3 DHA/5.51% to 9.5%) were the dominant polyunsaturated FAs in all seasons. Two non-methylene-interrupted dienoic (NMID) FAs were identified in all seasons: 7,13-docosadienoic and 7,15-docosadienoic acids, the latter being present at relatively high levels (up to 9.6% in winter). Twenty free sterols were identified, including cholesterol at 29.9% of the sterol mixture and about 33% of phytosterols. C. gigas tissues thus contained exploitable lipids for health benefits or as a potential source of high-quality commercial lecithin. PMID:27231919

  4. Improving management support tools for reintroducing bivalve species (eastern oyster [Crassostrea virginica Gmelin]) in urban estuaries.

    PubMed

    Ravit, Beth; Cooper, Keith; Buckley, Brian; Comi, Meredith; McCandlish, Elizabeth

    2014-10-01

    Successful reintroduction of "ecologically extinct" bivalve species into anthropogenically impaired urban estuaries is problematic when employing existing management tools used in estuaries where bivalves are present (GIS-based restoration models, expanding existing shellfish beds, placement of shell substrate, physical oceanographic parameters). A significant management challenge is appropriate site selection. We are proposing the inclusion of a biological parameter (evaluation of tissue histopathology) in an inexpensive and rapid site selection model to inform management decision making and identify sites with the greatest potential for reintroduction success. Use of biological biomarkers is not a new concept, but it is important that they be included in a multitiered management approach to bivalve reintroduction. This Case Study tested adult Eastern Oysters (Crassostrea virginica Gmelin) from locations that supported comparable short-term survival rates by evaluating growth and tissue health and/or disease. Biomarkers indicated oyster tissues at one site were normal, the female:male sex ratio was 50:50, and female oysters were in spawning condition. Conversely, oyster tissues at the second site exhibited multiple abnormalities, samples were 100% male, and the incidence of disease was high. Using the biomarker tool, we evaluated 4 additional sites where oysters exhibited short-term (1 year) survival. At 2 locations, we observed chronic health impacts that would preclude reintroduction, including samples from one site where a wild population was surviving. We also analyzed tissue and shell heavy metal contents. Soft tissue metal concentrations in Meadowlands samples were at the high range of scientific literature values, averaging 1.1% of total body weight, whereas tissue metal concentrations at the Keyport site were within acceptable ranges. Although initial survival and growth rates at both locations were comparable, site-specific urban stressors reduced oyster

  5. Exploitable Lipids and Fatty Acids in the Invasive Oyster Crassostrea gigas on the French Atlantic Coast.

    PubMed

    Dagorn, Flore; Couzinet-Mossion, Aurélie; Kendel, Melha; Beninger, Peter G; Rabesaotra, Vony; Barnathan, Gilles; Wielgosz-Collin, Gaëtane

    2016-06-01

    Economic exploitation is one means to offset the cost of controlling invasive species, such as the introduced Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg) on the French Atlantic coast. Total lipid and phospholipid (PL) fatty acids (FAs) and sterols were examined in an invasive population of C. gigas in Bourgneuf Bay, France, over four successive seasons, with a view to identify possible sources of exploitable substances. The total lipid level (% dry weight) varied from 7.1% (winter) to 8.6% (spring). Of this, PLs accounted for 28.1% (spring) to 50.4% (winter). Phosphatidylcholine was the dominant PL throughout the year (up to 74% of total PLs in winter). Plasmalogens were identified throughout the year as a series of eleven dimethylacetals (DMAs) with chain lengths between C16 and C20 (up to 14.5% of PL FAs + DMAs in winter). Thirty-seven FAs were identified in the PL FAs. Eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3 EPA/7.53% to 14.5%) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3 DHA/5.51% to 9.5%) were the dominant polyunsaturated FAs in all seasons. Two non-methylene-interrupted dienoic (NMID) FAs were identified in all seasons: 7,13-docosadienoic and 7,15-docosadienoic acids, the latter being present at relatively high levels (up to 9.6% in winter). Twenty free sterols were identified, including cholesterol at 29.9% of the sterol mixture and about 33% of phytosterols. C. gigas tissues thus contained exploitable lipids for health benefits or as a potential source of high-quality commercial lecithin. PMID:27231919

  6. Differential gene transcription, biochemical responses, and cytotoxicity assessment in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas exposed to ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Miguel A S; Gonzalez-Rey, Maria; Mattos, Jacó J; Flores-Nunes, Fabrício; Mello, Álvaro C P; Zacchi, Flávia L; Piazza, Clei E; Siebert, Marília N; Piazza, Rômi S; Alvarez-Muñoz, Diana; Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Barceló, Damià; Bebianno, Maria João; Gomes, Carlos H A M; Melo, Cláudio M R; Bainy, Afonso C D

    2015-11-01

    Pharmaceuticals, such as anti-inflammatory nonsteroidal drugs, are frequently detected in aquatic ecosystems. Studies about the effects of these substances in nontarget organisms, such as bivalves, are relevant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects on antioxidant status caused by ibuprofen (IBU) in oysters Crassostrea gigas exposed for 1, 4, and 7 days at concentrations 1 and 100 μg L(-1). Levels of IBU in tissues of oysters, as well as cell viability of hemocytes, were measured. The transcription of cytochrome P450 genes (CYP2AU2, CYP356A1, CYP3071A1, CYP30C1), glutathione S-transferase isoforms (GST-ω-like and GST-π-like), cyclooxygenase-like (COX-like), fatty acid binding protein-like (FABP-like), caspase-like, heat shock protein-like (HSP70-like), catalase-like (CAT-like), and the activity of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were also evaluated in the gills of oysters. The highest levels of IBU were observed in animals exposed to 100 μg L(-1). A significant upregulation of CYP2AU1, CYP356A1, CYP3071A1, GST-ω-like, GST-π-like, COX-like, and FABP-like was observed in oysters exposed to IBU under different experimental conditions. Oysters exposed to 1 μg L(-1) for 7 days showed a significantly higher transcription of CYP2AU2, CYP356A1, CYP3071A1, GST-ω-like, and GST-π-like but lower GR activity. In conclusion, C. gigas exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of IBU (1 μg L(-1)) exhibited increased transcription of certain genes and alterations on antioxidant and auxiliary enzymes, which could, in the the long term, cause damages to exposed organisms.

  7. The cytochemical and ultrastructural characteristics of phagocytes in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Jia, Zhihao; Xin, Lusheng; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Weilin; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-08-01

    Phagocytes have been proved to play vital roles in the innate immune response. However, the cellular characteristics of phagocytes in invertebrates, especially in molluscs, remain largely unknown. In the present study, fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) was employed to sort the phagocytes from the non-phagocytic haemocytes of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The cytochemical staining analysis revealed that phagocytes were positive staining for α-naphthyl acetate esterase and myeloperoxidase, while negative staining for toluidine blue and periodic acid-Schiff. The non-phagocytic haemocytes exhibited positive staining for periodic acid-Schiff, weak positive staining for toluidine blue, but negative staining for α-naphthyl acetate esterase and myeloperoxidase. In addition, phagocytes exhibited ultrastructural cellular features similar to those of macrophages, with large cell diameter, rough cell membrane and extended pseudopodia revealed by the scanning electron microscopy, while the non-phagocytic haemocytes exhibited small cell diameter, smooth cell surface and round spherical shape. Transmission electron microscopy further demonstrated that phagocytes were abundant of cytoplasmic bodies and mitochondria, while non-phagocytic haemocytes were characterized as the comparatively large cell nucleus with contorted and condensed heterochromatin adherent to the nuclear envelope. Moreover, compared with non-phagocytic haemocytes, phagocytes exhibited significantly higher levels of intracellular cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor, interferon-like protein and interleukin-17, and significantly higher abundance of lysosome and reactive oxygen species, which were of great importance to the activation of immune response and pathogen clearance. Taken together, these findings revealed the different cytochemical and ultrastructural features between phagocytes and non-phagocytic haemocytes in C. gigas, which would provide an important clue to investigate the

  8. An integrin from oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates the phagocytosis toward Vibrio splendidus through LPS binding activity.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhihao; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Shuai; Wang, Mengqiang; Cheng, Qi; Sun, Mingzhe; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2015-11-01

    Integrins are a family of cell adhesion molecules which play important roles in the regulation of cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, apoptosis and phagocytosis. In the present study, the immune function of an integrin from the oyster Crassostrea gigas (designated CgIntegrin) was characterized to understand the regulatory mechanism of hemocyte phagocytosis toward different microbes. The full-length cDNA of CgIntegrin was 2571 bp with an open reading frame (ORF) of 2397 bp, encoding a polypeptide of 799 amino acids. The mRNA transcripts of CgIntegrin were predominantly detected in hemocytes, gonad and adductor muscle, while lowly in hepatopancreas, mantle and gill. The mRNA expression level was up-regulated at 6 h post lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation (p < 0.01), while no significant change was observed after peptidoglycan (PGN) stimulation. The oyster hemocytes with relative high CgIntegrin expression level exhibited different phagocytic abilities towards different microorganism and particles, such as Gram-positive bacteria Vibrio splendidus, Gram-negative bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and latex beads. Moreover, the phagocytic rate towards V. splendidus was significantly decreased after the blockade of CgIntegrin using the polyclonal antibody. The recombinant CgIntegrin (rCgIntegrin) displayed agglutinating activity towards V. splendidus but not S. aureus and Y. lipolytica. It also exhibited a higher binding affinity towards LPS (compared to rTrx group) in a dose-dependent manner with the apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of 5.53 × 10(-6) M. The results indicated that CgIntegrin served as a pattern recognition receptor with LPS binding activity, which could directly bind to V. splendidus and enhance the phagocytosis of oyster hemocytes.

  9. Genome and Transcriptome Analyses Provide Insight into the Euryhaline Adaptation Mechanism of Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linlin; Li, Chunyan; Li, Li; She, Zhicai; Huang, Baoyu; Zhang, Guofan

    2013-01-01

    Background The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, has developed special mechanisms to regulate its osmotic balance to adapt to fluctuations of salinities in coastal zones. To understand the oyster’s euryhaline adaptation, we analyzed salt stress effectors metabolism pathways under different salinities (salt 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 40 for 7 days) using transcriptome data, physiology experiment and quantitative real-time PCR. Results Transcriptome data uncovered 189, 480, 207 and 80 marker genes for monitoring physiology status of oysters and the environment conditions. Three known salt stress effectors (involving ion channels, aquaporins and free amino acids) were examined. The analysis of ion channels and aquaporins indicated that 7 days long-term salt stress inhibited voltage-gated Na+/K+ channel and aquaporin but increased calcium-activated K+ channel and Ca2+ channel. As the most important category of osmotic stress effector, we analyzed the oyster FAAs metabolism pathways (including taurine, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, proline and arginine) and explained FAAs functional mechanism for oyster low salinity adaptation. FAAs metabolism key enzyme genes displayed expression differentiation in low salinity adapted individuals comparing with control which further indicated that FAAs played important roles for oyster salinity adaptation. A global metabolic pathway analysis (iPath) of oyster expanded genes displayed a co-expansion of FAAs metabolism in C. gigas compared with seven other species, suggesting oyster’s powerful ability regarding FAAs metabolism, allowing it to adapt to fluctuating salinities, which may be one important mechanism underlying euryhaline adaption in oyster. Additionally, using transcriptome data analysis, we uncovered salt stress transduction networks in C. gigas. Conclusions Our results represented oyster salt stress effectors functional mechanisms under salt stress conditions and explained the expansion of FAAs metabolism pathways as

  10. Cadmium-dependent oxygen limitation affects temperature tolerance in eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica Gmelin).

    PubMed

    Lannig, Gisela; Cherkasov, Anton S; Pörtner, Hans-O; Bock, Christian; Sokolova, Inna M

    2008-04-01

    Marine ectotherms, including oysters are exposed to variable environmental conditions in coastal shallow waters and estuaries. In the light of global climate change, additional stressors like pollution might pose higher risk to populations. On the basis of the concept of oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance in aquatic ectotherms (40), we show that a persistent pollutant, cadmium, can have detrimental effects on oysters (Crassostrea virginica). During acute warming from 20 to 28 degrees C (4 degrees C/48 h) standard metabolic rate (SMR) rose in control and cadmium-exposed (50 microg Cd2+/l) animals, with a consistently higher SMR in Cd-exposed oysters. Additionally, Cd-exposed oysters showed a stronger temperature-dependent decrease in hemolymph oxygen partial pressures. This observation indicates that the effect of temperature on aerobic metabolism was exacerbated due to the additional Cd stress. The oxygen delivery systems could not provide enough oxygen to cover Cd-induced elevated metabolic demands at high temperatures. Interestingly, cardiac performance (measured as the heart rate and hemolymph supply to tissues) rose to a similar extent in control and Cd-exposed oysters with warming indicating that cardiac output was unable to compensate for elevated energy demand in Cd-exposed oysters. Together with the literature data on metal-induced reduction of ventilatory capacity, these findings suggest that synergistic effects of elevated temperatures and cadmium exposure led to oxygen limitation by impaired performance in oxygen supply through ventilation and circulation. Overall, cadmium exposure resulted in progressive hypoxemia in oysters at high temperatures, suggesting that the thermal tolerance window is narrowed in marine ectotherms inhabiting polluted areas compared with pristine environments.

  11. Identification and functional characterization of two executioner caspases in Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Qu, Tao; Huang, Baoyu; Zhang, Linlin; Li, Li; Xu, Fei; Huang, Wen; Li, Chunyan; Du, Yishuai; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-01-01

    Caspase-3 and caspase-7 are two key effector caspases that play important roles in apoptotic pathways that maintain normal tissue and organ development and homeostasis. However, little is known about the sequence, structure, activity, and function of effector caspases upon apoptosis in mollusks, especially marine bivalves. In this study, we investigated the possible roles of two executioner caspases in the regulation of apoptosis in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. A full-length caspase-3-like gene named Cgcaspase-3 was cloned from C.gigas cDNA, encoding a predicted protein containing caspase family p20 and p10 domain profiles and a conserved caspase active site motif. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that both Cgcaspase-3 and Cgcaspase-1 may function as effector caspases clustered in the invertebrate branch. Although the sequence identities between the two caspases was low, both enzymes possessed executioner caspase activity and were capable of inducing cell death. These results suggested that Cgcaspase-3 and Cgcaspase-1 were two effector caspases in C. gigas. We also observed that nucleus-localized Cgcaspase-3, may function as a caspase-3-like protein and cytoplasm-localized Cgcaspase-1 may function as a caspase-7-like protein. Both Cgcaspase-3 and Cgcaspase-1 mRNA expression increased after larvae settled on the substratum, suggesting that both caspases acted in several tissues or organs that degenerated after oyster larvae settlement. The highest caspase expression levels were observed in the gills indicating that both effector caspases were likely involved in immune or metabolic processes in C. gigas. PMID:24551213

  12. A novel ortholog of serum response factor (SRF) with immune defense function identified in Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Qu, Fufa; Qi, Lin; Zhang, Yang; Xiao, Shu; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-01-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) function is essential for transcriptional regulation of numerous growth-factor-inducible genes and triggers proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of the cells. In this report, the first mollusk serum response factor like homolog gene (designated ChSRF) was identified and characterized from the Hong Kong oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis. The full-length cDNA of ChSRF was 1716 bp in length and encodes a putative protein of 434 amino acids respectively, and shares the MADS domain at the N-terminal. ChSRF is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, with the highest expression level observed in muscle. Temporal expression of ChSRF following microbe infection shows that the expression of ChSRF in hemocytes increases from 3 to 24 h post-challenge. As a target gene of SRF, β-actin demonstrates a similar gene expression mode in constitutive tissue and pathogen infection. Furthermore, some protein profiles of ChSRF was revealed, fluorescence microscopy results show that ChSRF located in the nuclei of HeLa cells and over-expression of ChSRF activated the transcriptional activities of MAPK signal pathway in HEK293T cells. These results indicate that ChSRF maybe play an important role in signal transduction in the immunity and development response of oysters. Furthermore, we found that ChSRF could regulate the expression of β-actin gene, which indicate that ChSRF is a muscle differentiation regulator in the oyster and it will help us to improve aquaculture production.

  13. Characteristic and functional analysis of a ficolin-like protein from the oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Qu, Fufa; Wang, Fuxuan; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuehuan; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-10-01

    Ficolins are a group of soluble animal proteins with multiple roles in innate immunity. These proteins recognize and bind carbohydrates in pathogens and activate the complement system, leading to opsonization, leukocyte activation, and direct pathogen killing, which have been reported in many animal species but might not be present in the shellfish lineage. In the present study, we identified the first fibrinogen-related protein from the oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis. This novel ficolin-like protein contains a typical signal peptide and a fibrinogen-related domain (designated ChFCN) at the N and C termini, respectively, but does not contain the additional collagen-like domain of ficolins. The full-length cDNA of ChFCN is 1105 bp, encoding a putative protein of 297 amino acids with the molecular weight of 35.5 kD. ChFCN is ubiquitously expressed in selected tissues, with the highest expression level observed in the gills. The temporal expression of ChFCN following microbe infection shows that the expression of ChFCN in hemocytes increases at 3 h post-challenge. The ChFCN protein expression was also examined, and fluorescence microscopy revealed that deChFCN (truncated signal peptide) is located in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells. Full-length ChFCN was detected in the medium supernatant by western blot analysis. Recombinant ChFCN proteins with the molecular weight about 50 kD bind Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Staphylococcus haemolyticus or Escherichia coli K-12, but not those from Vibrio alginolyticus. Furthermore, the rChFCN protein could agglutinate Gram-negative bacteria E. coli K-12 and enhance the phagocytosis of C. hongkongensis hemocytes in vitro. These results indicate that ChFCN might play an important role in the immunity response of oysters.

  14. Two superoxide dismutase (SOD) with different subcellular localizations involved in innate immunity in Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ziniu; He, Xiaocui; Fu, Dingkun; Zhang, Yang

    2011-10-01

    SODs are ubiquitous metalloenzymes that can scavenge superoxides in response to various stresses. In the present study, full-length cDNAs of two SOD genes were isolated from Crassostrea hongkongensis (designated ChMnSOD and ChCuZnSOD). The cDNAs are 997 and 918 bp in length with ORFs of 675 and 468 bp (encoding 225 and 156 amino acids), respectively. Sequence analysis revealed a conserved Sod_Fe domain in ChMnSOD, and a Sod_Cu_Zn domain in ChCuZnSOD. Subcellular localization of ChMnSOD is mitochondrial while intracellular expression of ChCuZnSOD is detected. Although their expression overlaps in a wide range of tissues, ChMnSOD mRNA expression is high in gonad while ChCuZnSOD's is strong in adductor muscle. After infection by Vibrio alginolyticus, ChMnSOD mRNA was up-regulated 5 fold (p < 0.05) at 4 h, but returned to normal level 6 h post-infection. The expression of ChCuZnSOD gene showed a slight delay to the infection challenge and was elevated roughly 4 fold after 8 h (p < 0.05), returning to normal at 12 h post-infection. The elevated transcript levels of the two SOD genes in response to V. alginolyticus infection highlights their important functions in eliminating toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) and protecting organisms from bacterial invasion in C. hongkongensis.

  15. Proteomic basis of stress responses in the gills of the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Sun, Jin; Mu, Huawei; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuehuan; Xu, Fengjiao; Xiang, Zhiming; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Yu, Ziniu

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is one of the dominant sessile inhabitants of the estuarine intertidal zone, which is a physically harsh environment due to the presence of a number of stressors. Oysters have adapted to highly dynamic and stressful environments, but the molecular mechanisms underlying such stress adaptation are largely unknown. In the present study, we examined the proteomic responses in the gills of C. gigas exposed to three stressors (high temperature, low salinity, and aerial exposure) they often encounter in the field. We quantitatively compared the gill proteome profiles using iTRAQ-coupled 2-D LC-MS/MS. There were 3165 identified proteins among which 2379 proteins could be quantified. Heat shock, hyposalinity, and aerial exposure resulted in 50, 15, and 33 differentially expressed gill proteins, respectively. Venn diagram analysis revealed substantial different responses to the three stressors. Only xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase showed a similar expression pattern across the three stress treatments, suggesting that reduction of ROS accumulation may be a conserved response to these stressors. Heat shock caused significant overexpression of molecular chaperones and production of S-adenosyl-l-methionine, indicating their crucial protective roles against protein denature. In addition, heat shock also activated immune responses, Ca(2+) binding protein expression. By contrast, hyposalinity and aerial exposure resulted in the up-regulation of 3-demethylubiquinone-9 3-methyltransferase, indicating that increase in ubiquinone synthesis may contribute to withstanding both the osmotic and desiccation stress. Strikingly, the majority of desiccation-responsive proteins, including those involved in metabolism, ion transportation, immune responses, DNA duplication, and protein synthesis, were down-regulated, indicating conservation of energy as an important strategy to cope with desiccation stress. There was a high consistency between the expression

  16. Characteristic and functional analysis of a ficolin-like protein from the oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Qu, Fufa; Wang, Fuxuan; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuehuan; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-10-01

    Ficolins are a group of soluble animal proteins with multiple roles in innate immunity. These proteins recognize and bind carbohydrates in pathogens and activate the complement system, leading to opsonization, leukocyte activation, and direct pathogen killing, which have been reported in many animal species but might not be present in the shellfish lineage. In the present study, we identified the first fibrinogen-related protein from the oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis. This novel ficolin-like protein contains a typical signal peptide and a fibrinogen-related domain (designated ChFCN) at the N and C termini, respectively, but does not contain the additional collagen-like domain of ficolins. The full-length cDNA of ChFCN is 1105 bp, encoding a putative protein of 297 amino acids with the molecular weight of 35.5 kD. ChFCN is ubiquitously expressed in selected tissues, with the highest expression level observed in the gills. The temporal expression of ChFCN following microbe infection shows that the expression of ChFCN in hemocytes increases at 3 h post-challenge. The ChFCN protein expression was also examined, and fluorescence microscopy revealed that deChFCN (truncated signal peptide) is located in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells. Full-length ChFCN was detected in the medium supernatant by western blot analysis. Recombinant ChFCN proteins with the molecular weight about 50 kD bind Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Staphylococcus haemolyticus or Escherichia coli K-12, but not those from Vibrio alginolyticus. Furthermore, the rChFCN protein could agglutinate Gram-negative bacteria E. coli K-12 and enhance the phagocytosis of C. hongkongensis hemocytes in vitro. These results indicate that ChFCN might play an important role in the immunity response of oysters. PMID:25120216

  17. Effects of Potential Therapeutic Agents on Copper Accumulations in Gill of Crassostrea virginica

    PubMed Central

    Luxama, Juan D.; Carroll, Margaret A.; Catapane, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace element for organisms, but when in excess, copper’s redox potential enhances oxyradical formation and increases cellular oxidative stress. Copper is a major pollutant in Jamaica Bay and other aquatic areas. Bivalves are filter feeders that accumulate heavy metals and other pollutants from their environment. Previously it was determined that seed from the bivalve Crassostrea virginica, transplanted from an oyster farm to Jamaica Bay readily accumulated copper and other pollutants into their tissues. In the present study we utilized Atomic Absorption Spectrometry to measure the uptake of copper into C. virginica gill in the presence and absence of three potential copper -blocking agents: diltiazem, lanthanum, and p-aminosalicyclic acid. Diltiazem and lanthanum are known calcium-channel blockers and p-aminosalicylic acid is an anti-infammarory agent with possible metal chelating properties. We also used the DMAB-Rhodanine histochemistry staining technique to confirm that copper was entering gill cells. Our result showed that diltiazem and p-aminosalicyclic acid reduced copper accumulations in the gill, while lanthanum did not. DMAB-Rhodanine histochemistry showed enhanced cellular copper staining in copper-treated samples and further demonstrated that diltiazem was able to reduce copper uptake. The accumulation of copper into oyster gill and its potential toxic effects could be of physiological significance to the growth and long term health of oysters and other marine animals living in a copper polluted environment. Identifying agents that block cellular copper uptake will further the understanding of metal transport mechanisms and may be beneficial in the therapeutic treatment of copper toxicity in humans. PMID:21841975

  18. Effects of Potential Therapeutic Agents on Copper Accumulations in Gill of Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Luxama, Juan D; Carroll, Margaret A; Catapane, Edward J

    2010-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace element for organisms, but when in excess, copper's redox potential enhances oxyradical formation and increases cellular oxidative stress. Copper is a major pollutant in Jamaica Bay and other aquatic areas. Bivalves are filter feeders that accumulate heavy metals and other pollutants from their environment. Previously it was determined that seed from the bivalve Crassostrea virginica, transplanted from an oyster farm to Jamaica Bay readily accumulated copper and other pollutants into their tissues. In the present study we utilized Atomic Absorption Spectrometry to measure the uptake of copper into C. virginica gill in the presence and absence of three potential copper -blocking agents: diltiazem, lanthanum, and p-aminosalicyclic acid. Diltiazem and lanthanum are known calcium-channel blockers and p-aminosalicylic acid is an anti-infammarory agent with possible metal chelating properties. We also used the DMAB-Rhodanine histochemistry staining technique to confirm that copper was entering gill cells. Our result showed that diltiazem and p-aminosalicyclic acid reduced copper accumulations in the gill, while lanthanum did not. DMAB-Rhodanine histochemistry showed enhanced cellular copper staining in copper-treated samples and further demonstrated that diltiazem was able to reduce copper uptake. The accumulation of copper into oyster gill and its potential toxic effects could be of physiological significance to the growth and long term health of oysters and other marine animals living in a copper polluted environment. Identifying agents that block cellular copper uptake will further the understanding of metal transport mechanisms and may be beneficial in the therapeutic treatment of copper toxicity in humans. PMID:21841975

  19. Exposure to the Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Producer Alexandrium catenella Increases the Susceptibility of the Oyster Crassostrea gigas to Pathogenic Vibrios

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Khalil, Celina; Lopez-Joven, Carmen; Abadie, Eric; Savar, Veronique; Amzil, Zouher; Laabir, Mohamed; Rolland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial etiology of massive Crassostrea gigas summer mortalities results from complex interactions between oysters, opportunistic pathogens and environmental factors. In a field survey conducted in 2014 in the Mediterranean Thau Lagoon (France), we evidenced that the development of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella, which produces paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), was concomitant with the accumulation of PSTs in oyster flesh and the occurrence of C. gigas mortalities. In order to investigate the possible role of toxic algae in this complex disease, we experimentally infected C. gigas oyster juveniles with Vibrio tasmaniensis strain LGP32, a strain associated with oyster summer mortalities, after oysters were exposed to Alexandrium catenella. Exposure of oysters to A. catenella significantly increased the susceptibility of oysters to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. On the contrary, exposure to the non-toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense or to the haptophyte Tisochrysis lutea used as a foraging alga did not increase susceptibility to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. This study shows for the first time that A. catenella increases the susceptibility of Crassostrea gigas to pathogenic vibrios. Therefore, in addition to complex environmental factors explaining the mass mortalities of bivalve mollusks, feeding on neurotoxic dinoflagellates should now be considered as an environmental factor that potentially increases the severity of oyster mortality events. PMID:26784228

  20. Epizootiology of Perkinsus marinus, parasite of the pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis, in the Pacific coast of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Martínez, Jorge; Madero-López, Luis Humberto; Padilla-Lardizábal, Gloria; Vásquez-Yeomans, Rebeca

    2016-09-01

    The protozoan parasite Perkinsus marinus is the etiological agent of "dermo disease". This pathogen is considered by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) as reportable due to the high mortalities that it produces in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica in the US. In 2006, this parasite was detected in the pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis in Nayarit on the Pacific coast of Mexico, indicating a new host and an extension of its known distribution. Epizootiological data of P. marinus in the pleasure oyster are unknown. With the objective of determining the prevalence and intensity in relation with temperature and salinity throughout time, as well as for studying interactions of host size and sex with the parasite, a monthly sampling was carried out in two aquaculture sites of Nayarit from 2007 to 2014. A total of 7700 oysters were analyzed. In both localities, prevalence was low in winter (<6%) when temperature and salinity fluctuated around 24°C and 33, respectively; and the highest prevalence values occurred during summer (37%) when temperature and salinity were around 30°C and 20, respectively. Infection intensity increased in summer, but severe cases remained on average <10%. Larger oysters showed the highest prevalence and intensity, and higher prevalence were generally observed in females. No unusual mortalities directly related with P. marinus were observed.

  1. Exposure to the Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Producer Alexandrium catenella Increases the Susceptibility of the Oyster Crassostrea gigas to Pathogenic Vibrios.

    PubMed

    Abi-Khalil, Celina; Lopez-Joven, Carmen; Abadie, Eric; Savar, Veronique; Amzil, Zouher; Laabir, Mohamed; Rolland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-15

    The multifactorial etiology of massive Crassostrea gigas summer mortalities results from complex interactions between oysters, opportunistic pathogens and environmental factors. In a field survey conducted in 2014 in the Mediterranean Thau Lagoon (France), we evidenced that the development of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella, which produces paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), was concomitant with the accumulation of PSTs in oyster flesh and the occurrence of C. gigas mortalities. In order to investigate the possible role of toxic algae in this complex disease, we experimentally infected C. gigas oyster juveniles with Vibrio tasmaniensis strain LGP32, a strain associated with oyster summer mortalities, after oysters were exposed to Alexandrium catenella. Exposure of oysters to A. catenella significantly increased the susceptibility of oysters to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. On the contrary, exposure to the non-toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense or to the haptophyte Tisochrysis lutea used as a foraging alga did not increase susceptibility to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. This study shows for the first time that A. catenella increases the susceptibility of Crassostrea gigas to pathogenic vibrios. Therefore, in addition to complex environmental factors explaining the mass mortalities of bivalve mollusks, feeding on neurotoxic dinoflagellates should now be considered as an environmental factor that potentially increases the severity of oyster mortality events.

  2. Epizootiology of Perkinsus marinus, parasite of the pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis, in the Pacific coast of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Martínez, Jorge; Madero-López, Luis Humberto; Padilla-Lardizábal, Gloria; Vásquez-Yeomans, Rebeca

    2016-09-01

    The protozoan parasite Perkinsus marinus is the etiological agent of "dermo disease". This pathogen is considered by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) as reportable due to the high mortalities that it produces in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica in the US. In 2006, this parasite was detected in the pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis in Nayarit on the Pacific coast of Mexico, indicating a new host and an extension of its known distribution. Epizootiological data of P. marinus in the pleasure oyster are unknown. With the objective of determining the prevalence and intensity in relation with temperature and salinity throughout time, as well as for studying interactions of host size and sex with the parasite, a monthly sampling was carried out in two aquaculture sites of Nayarit from 2007 to 2014. A total of 7700 oysters were analyzed. In both localities, prevalence was low in winter (<6%) when temperature and salinity fluctuated around 24°C and 33, respectively; and the highest prevalence values occurred during summer (37%) when temperature and salinity were around 30°C and 20, respectively. Infection intensity increased in summer, but severe cases remained on average <10%. Larger oysters showed the highest prevalence and intensity, and higher prevalence were generally observed in females. No unusual mortalities directly related with P. marinus were observed. PMID:27403560

  3. Exposure to the Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Producer Alexandrium catenella Increases the Susceptibility of the Oyster Crassostrea gigas to Pathogenic Vibrios.

    PubMed

    Abi-Khalil, Celina; Lopez-Joven, Carmen; Abadie, Eric; Savar, Veronique; Amzil, Zouher; Laabir, Mohamed; Rolland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial etiology of massive Crassostrea gigas summer mortalities results from complex interactions between oysters, opportunistic pathogens and environmental factors. In a field survey conducted in 2014 in the Mediterranean Thau Lagoon (France), we evidenced that the development of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella, which produces paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), was concomitant with the accumulation of PSTs in oyster flesh and the occurrence of C. gigas mortalities. In order to investigate the possible role of toxic algae in this complex disease, we experimentally infected C. gigas oyster juveniles with Vibrio tasmaniensis strain LGP32, a strain associated with oyster summer mortalities, after oysters were exposed to Alexandrium catenella. Exposure of oysters to A. catenella significantly increased the susceptibility of oysters to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. On the contrary, exposure to the non-toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense or to the haptophyte Tisochrysis lutea used as a foraging alga did not increase susceptibility to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. This study shows for the first time that A. catenella increases the susceptibility of Crassostrea gigas to pathogenic vibrios. Therefore, in addition to complex environmental factors explaining the mass mortalities of bivalve mollusks, feeding on neurotoxic dinoflagellates should now be considered as an environmental factor that potentially increases the severity of oyster mortality events. PMID:26784228

  4. Habitat change by the formation of alien Crassostrea-reefs in the Wadden Sea and its role as feeding sites for waterbirds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markert, Alexandra; Esser, Wiebke; Frank, Dietrich; Wehrmann, Achim; Exo, Klaus-Michael

    2013-10-01

    Non-indigenous Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) have been invading the central Wadden Sea since 1998, predominantly settling on intertidal blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) beds which are increasingly transformed into Crassostrea-reefs. Pacific oysters are strong ecosystem engineers and the habitat change is considered to be a threat for waterbirds losing important feeding sites in the intertidal of the Wadden Sea. This study has increased our understanding of the use of foraging habitats by birds according to changing food resources. During the spring and autumn migration period in 2007, we recorded bird densities at two reef types varying in Pacific oyster density and at the adjacent sand flat as a reference site. We also recorded feeding behaviour, choice of prey and assessed peck and intake rate of three target species: Eurasian oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus, Eurasian curlew Numenius arquata and European herring gull Larus argentatus. To evaluate the use of the Crassostrea-reef in the central Wadden Sea, we compared bird densities of the target species at different intertidal feeding habitats in various regions and compared the biomass intake of Eurasian oystercatcher feeding on different prey species. We show that Eurasian oystercatcher and Eurasian curlew have adapted to the new situation and learned to exploit the food supply offered by Crassostrea-reefs. While foraging mainly on Pacific oysters, Eurasian oystercatchers attained sustainable intake rates even though food resource at dense reef during autumn was very poor due to a lack in harvestable oysters. Consolidation of reefs limits the accessibility of prey for Eurasian oystercatchers whereas a successful recruitment of Pacific oysters enhances the suitability of the habitat. Eurasian curlew was promoted by the engineering effects of the Pacific oyster while feeding extensively on shore crabs at the reefs. In contrast, European herring gulls appear hampered in foraging during low tide and hereby

  5. Matching pollution with adaptive changes in mangrove plants by multivariate statistics. A case study, Rhizophora mangle from four neotropical mangroves in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Souza, Iara da Costa; Morozesk, Mariana; Duarte, Ian Drumond; Bonomo, Marina Marques; Rocha, Lívia Dorsch; Furlan, Larissa Maria; Arrivabene, Hiulana Pereira; Monferrán, Magdalena Victoria; Matsumoto, Silvia Tamie; Milanez, Camilla Rozindo Dias; Wunderlin, Daniel Alberto; Fernandes, Marisa Narciso

    2014-08-01

    Roots of mangrove trees have an important role in depurating water and sediments by retaining metals that may accumulate in different plant tissues, affecting physiological processes and anatomy. The present study aimed to evaluate adaptive changes in root of Rhizophora mangle in response to different levels of chemical elements (metals/metalloids) in interstitial water and sediments from four neotropical mangroves in Brazil. What sets this study apart from other studies is that we not only investigate adaptive modifications in R. mangle but also changes in environments where this plant grows, evaluating correspondence between physical, chemical and biological issues by a combined set of multivariate statistical methods (pattern recognition). Thus, we looked to match changes in the environment with adaptations in plants. Multivariate statistics highlighted that the lignified periderm and the air gaps are directly related to the environmental contamination. Current results provide new evidences of root anatomical strategies to deal with contaminated environments. Multivariate statistics greatly contributes to extrapolate results from complex data matrixes obtained when analyzing environmental issues, pointing out parameters involved in environmental changes and also evidencing the adaptive response of the exposed biota.

  6. Linking physiological processes with mangrove forest structure: phosphorus deficiency limits canopy development, hydraulic conductivity and photosynthetic carbon gain in dwarf Rhizophora mangle.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Catherine E; Ball, Marilyn C; Choat, Brendan; Engelbrecht, Bettina M J; Holbrook, N Michelle; Feller, Ilka C

    2006-05-01

    Spatial gradients in mangrove tree height in barrier islands of Belize are associated with nutrient deficiency and sustained flooding in the absence of a salinity gradient. While nutrient deficiency is likely to affect many parameters, here we show that addition of phosphorus (P) to dwarf mangroves stimulated increases in diameters of xylem vessels, area of conductive xylem tissue and leaf area index (LAI) of the canopy. These changes in structure were consistent with related changes in function, as addition of P also increased hydraulic conductivity (Ks), stomatal conductance and photosynthetic assimilation rates to the same levels measured in taller trees fringing the seaward margin of the mangrove. Increased xylem vessel size and corresponding enhancements in stem hydraulic conductivity in P fertilized dwarf trees came at the cost of enhanced mid-day loss of hydraulic conductivity and was associated with decreased assimilation rates in the afternoon. Analysis of trait plasticity identifies hydraulic properties of trees as more plastic than those of leaf structural and physiological characteristics, implying that hydraulic properties are key in controlling growth in mangroves. Alleviation of P deficiency, which released trees from hydraulic limitations, reduced the structural and functional distinctions between dwarf and taller fringing tree forms of Rhizophora mangle.

  7. Matching pollution with adaptive changes in mangrove plants by multivariate statistics. A case study, Rhizophora mangle from four neotropical mangroves in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Souza, Iara da Costa; Morozesk, Mariana; Duarte, Ian Drumond; Bonomo, Marina Marques; Rocha, Lívia Dorsch; Furlan, Larissa Maria; Arrivabene, Hiulana Pereira; Monferrán, Magdalena Victoria; Matsumoto, Silvia Tamie; Milanez, Camilla Rozindo Dias; Wunderlin, Daniel Alberto; Fernandes, Marisa Narciso

    2014-08-01

    Roots of mangrove trees have an important role in depurating water and sediments by retaining metals that may accumulate in different plant tissues, affecting physiological processes and anatomy. The present study aimed to evaluate adaptive changes in root of Rhizophora mangle in response to different levels of chemical elements (metals/metalloids) in interstitial water and sediments from four neotropical mangroves in Brazil. What sets this study apart from other studies is that we not only investigate adaptive modifications in R. mangle but also changes in environments where this plant grows, evaluating correspondence between physical, chemical and biological issues by a combined set of multivariate statistical methods (pattern recognition). Thus, we looked to match changes in the environment with adaptations in plants. Multivariate statistics highlighted that the lignified periderm and the air gaps are directly related to the environmental contamination. Current results provide new evidences of root anatomical strategies to deal with contaminated environments. Multivariate statistics greatly contributes to extrapolate results from complex data matrixes obtained when analyzing environmental issues, pointing out parameters involved in environmental changes and also evidencing the adaptive response of the exposed biota. PMID:24875920

  8. Linking physiological processes with mangrove forest structure: phosphorus deficiency limits canopy development, hydraulic conductivity and photosynthetic carbon gain in dwarf Rhizophora mangle.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Catherine E; Ball, Marilyn C; Choat, Brendan; Engelbrecht, Bettina M J; Holbrook, N Michelle; Feller, Ilka C

    2006-05-01

    Spatial gradients in mangrove tree height in barrier islands of Belize are associated with nutrient deficiency and sustained flooding in the absence of a salinity gradient. While nutrient deficiency is likely to affect many parameters, here we show that addition of phosphorus (P) to dwarf mangroves stimulated increases in diameters of xylem vessels, area of conductive xylem tissue and leaf area index (LAI) of the canopy. These changes in structure were consistent with related changes in function, as addition of P also increased hydraulic conductivity (Ks), stomatal conductance and photosynthetic assimilation rates to the same levels measured in taller trees fringing the seaward margin of the mangrove. Increased xylem vessel size and corresponding enhancements in stem hydraulic conductivity in P fertilized dwarf trees came at the cost of enhanced mid-day loss of hydraulic conductivity and was associated with decreased assimilation rates in the afternoon. Analysis of trait plasticity identifies hydraulic properties of trees as more plastic than those of leaf structural and physiological characteristics, implying that hydraulic properties are key in controlling growth in mangroves. Alleviation of P deficiency, which released trees from hydraulic limitations, reduced the structural and functional distinctions between dwarf and taller fringing tree forms of Rhizophora mangle. PMID:17087463

  9. The distribution and abundance of Sphaeroma terebrans, a wood-boring isopod of red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) habitat within Tampa Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, R.A.; Bell, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the distribution, abundance, and demography of a wood boring isopod, Sphaeroma terebrans Bate, 1866, within the prop roots of the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle L., in eight sites within Tampa Bay, Florida. Sphaeroma terebrans in Tampa Bay displayed reproductive activity year-round and bay-wide synchrony in their density pattern. On average approximately 60% (range: 25%-86%) of the intertidal aerial roots surveyed were occupied by S. terebrans. Although infestation levels by S. terebrans in Tampa Bay were similar to that of more tropical regions, the distribution of S. terebrans was not continuous throughout the study sites. A substantially higher occurrence and density of S. terebrans was found in the northern compared to more southern study sites within the Bay. Additionally, some seemingly suitable areas of the bay (i.e., Pinellas Point, Skyway, Fort Desoto) were actually unoccupied on some dates. Although sites differed in the frequency with which roots were attacked, the density of burrows and isopods in an occupied root was similar, with most attacked roots containing 3-5 burrows. The results of a transplantation experiment indicated that neither abiotic factors nor substrate quality limit the burrowing capabilities or survival of adult S. terebrans in the areas where they are absent. Instead, dispersal limitation, linked with differential juvenile survival, most likely controls isopod distribution and abundance within Tampa Bay.

  10. The immunological capacity in the larvae of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaorui; Wang, Hao; Xin, Lusheng; Xu, Jiachao; Jia, Zhihao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-02-01

    As the immune system has not fully developed during early developmental stages, bivalve larvae are more susceptible for pathogens, which frequently leads to the significant mortality in hatcheries. In the present study, the development of immune system and its response against bacteria challenge were investigated in order to characterize the repertoire of immunological capacity of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas during the ontogenesis. The phagocytosis was firstly observed in the early D-veliger larvae (17 hpf), especially in their velum site, which indicated the appearance of functional hemocytes during early D-veliger larvae stage. The whole-mount immunofluorescence assay of three pattern recognition receptors (integrin β-1, caspase-3 and C-type lectin 3) and one immune effector gene (IL17-5) was performed in blastula, early D-veliger and umbo larvae, suggested that velum and digestive gland were the potential sites of immune system in the larvae. The lowest activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and catalase) and hydrolytic enzyme (lysozyme), as well as descended expression levels of 12 immune genes at the transition between embryogenesis and planktonic, indicated that the larvae at hatching (9 hpf) were in hypo-immunity. While the ascending activities of enzymes and expression levels of seven immune genes during the trochophore stage (15 hpf) suggested the initiation of immune system. The steadily increasing trend of all the 12 candidate genes at the early umbo larvae (120 h) hinted that the immune system was well developed at this stage. After bacterial challenge, some immune recognition (TLR4) and immune effector (IL17-5 and defh2) genes were activated in blastula stage (4 hpf), and other immune genes were up regulated in D-veliger larvae, indicating that the zygotic immune system could respond earlier against the bacterial challenge during its development. These results indicated that the cellular and humoral immune components

  11. Effects of natural oyster reefs (Crassostrea gigas) on the sediment balance of Oosterschelde tidal flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, João; de Vries, Mindert

    2014-05-01

    The realization of the storm surge barrier and the two secondary dams not only changed the hydrodynamics, but also the geomorphological characteristics of the Oosterschelde estuary (SW Netherlands) creating a disequilibrium between erosion and sedimentation. This has lead in the last 25 years to a sand deficit in the Oosterschelde resulting in the erosion of the tidal flats (Smaal & Nienhuis, 1992; Nienhuis & Smaal 1994). Due to these phenomena the habitat for intertidal soft-bottom benthic fauna is slowly disappearing, and with it food sources for estuarine birds that use these areas as foraging grounds (Mulder & Louters, 1994). Erosion of tidal flats also locally exposes deeper peat layers, potentially resulting in reduced water clarity and primary production (Nienhuis & Smaal 1994). Adding to these problems an increased risk of dike failures and flooding during storm surges is expected, as the dikes gradually become more exposed to wave action. In this research the effect of oysters (Crassostrea gigas) as ecosystem engineers, on the sediment balance in the Oosterschelde was studied. In our analysis we compared long term bathymetry data for transects with and without oyster reefs. Based on height differences, the transects sedimentation/erosion rates were calculated and used to determine if there was a difference between transects without oyster reefs and transects crossing oyster reefs. From the long term analysis, the overall erosional trend of the Oosterschelde tidal flats is clear. The mean observed erosion was - 0,012 m per year. When considering the sections crossing oyster reefs , a mean accumulation of sediment of + 0,007 m per year was observed. The results suggest that these ecosystem engineers, that cover large areas in the Oosterschelde slow down the erosion of the tidal flats in the Oosterschelde, as they act as sediment accumulators and stabilizers. We estimate at least 70000 m3 of sediment per year is accreted on tidal flats due to the effect of

  12. Unusually abundant and large ciliate xenomas in oysters, Crassostrea virginica, from Great Bay, New Hampshire, USA.

    PubMed

    McGurk, Emily Scarpa; Ford, Susan; Bushek, David

    2016-06-01

    During routine histological examination of oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from Great Bay, New Hampshire, USA, a high prevalence and intensity of ciliate xenomas has been noted since sampling began in 1997. Xenomas are hypertrophic lesions on the gills of bivalve molluscs caused by intracellular ciliates, likely Sphenophrya sp. Although not known to cause mortality in oysters, xenomas have not previously been reported at this high abundance. The objectives of this study were to characterize the xenomas, describe the ciliates, and gather baseline epizootiological data with correlations to environmental and biological parameters. Upon gross examination, xenomas appeared as white nodules, up to 3mm in diameter, located in the gill tissue and occasionally fusing into large masses along the gill filaments. Light microscopy of histological sections revealed xenomas located in the gill water tubes, which they often completely blocked. Higher magnification revealed dual nuclei, eight kineties, and conjugation of the ciliates. Transmission electron microscopy revealed dual nuclei that varied in density, a maximum of twenty cilia in each kinety radiating from the oral apparatus to the posterior, and a 9+2 axoneme structure within the cilia. These traits place the ciliates into the Order Rhynchodida, but insufficient molecular data exist to confirm classification of this ciliate to the Genus Sphenophrya. Since 1997, xenoma prevalence has fluctuated with peaks in 2000, 2004, and 2011. Infected oysters generally contained <30 xenomas, but 2.1% contained >100, sharply contrasting the rare prevalence and low intensity reported elsewhere. Prevalence increased with oyster size, leveling off near 50% in oysters >60mm. Infection intensity peaked in 70-90mm oysters and declined in larger oysters. Individual oyster condition was not associated with xenoma intensity, but sites with oysters in higher condition generally had a greater prevalence and intensity of xenoma infections

  13. Vibrio mexicanus sp. nov., isolated from a cultured oyster Crassostrea corteziensis.

    PubMed

    González-Castillo, Adrián; Enciso-Ibarrra, Julissa; Bolán-Mejia, M Carmen; Balboa, Sabela; Lasa, Aide; Romalde, Jesús L; Cabanillas-Beltrán, Hector; Gomez-Gil, Bruno

    2015-08-01

    A bacterial strain was taxonomically characterised by means of a genomic approach comprising 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), the DNA G+C content, whole genome analyses (ANI and GGDC) and phenotypic characterisation. The strain CAIM 1540(T) was isolated from a cultured oyster Crassostrea corteziensis in La Cruz, Sinaloa state, México. The isolate was found to be catalase and oxidase positive, cells were observed to be motile, O/129-sensitive and facultatively anaerobic. The almost-complete 16S rRNA gene sequence placed this strain within the genus Vibrio; the closest related species were found to be Vibrio aestivus, Vibrio marisflavi, Vibrio maritimus and Vibrio variabilis with similarity values of 99.02, 97.05, 96.70, and 96.59 % respectively. MLSA of four housekeeping genes (ftsZ, gapA, recA, and topA) was performed with the closely related species. A draft genome sequence of strain CAIM 1540(T) was obtained. The DNA G+C content of this strain was determined to be 43.7 mol%.The ANI values with V. aestivus were 89.6 % (ANIb), 90.6 % (ANIm) and a GGDC value of 39.5 ± 2.5 % was obtained; with V. marisflavi the genomic similarities were 71.5 % (ANIb), 85.5 % (ANIm) and 20.2 ± 2.3 % (GGDC); with V. maritimus 72.6 % (ANIb), 85.7 % (ANIm) and 22.0 ± 2.0 % (GGDC); and with V. variabilis 72.6 % (ANIb), 85.8 % (ANIm) and 21.6 ± 1.6 % (GGDC). These ANI and GGDC values are below the threshold for the delimitation of prokaryotic species, i.e. 95-96 and 70 %, respectively. Phenotypic characters also showed differences with the closest related species analysed. The results presented here support the description of a novel species, for which the name Vibrio mexicanus sp. nov. is proposed, with strain CAIM 1540(T) (= CECT 8828(T), = DSM 100338(T)) as the type strain. In addition, we found that the recently described species Vibrio thalassae and Vibrio madracius might be a single species because the values of ANIb 95.8 %, ANIm 96.6 % and

  14. Purification and characterization of a salt-tolerant cellulase from the mangrove oyster, Crassostrea rivularis.

    PubMed

    An, Tianchen; Dong, Zhu; Lv, Junchen; Liu, Yujun; Wang, Manchuriga; Wei, Shuangshuang; Song, Yanting; Zhang, Yingxia; Deng, Shiming

    2015-04-01

    A cellulase with wide range of pH resistance and high salt tolerance was isolated from the digestive gland of the oyster Crassostrea rivularis living in mangrove forests. The 27 kDa cellulase named as CrCel was purified 40.6 folds by anion exchange chromatography and extraction from the gel after non-reducing sodium dodecylsufate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The specific activity of the purified cellulase was 23.4 U/mg against carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of CrCel was determined to be NQKCQANSRV. CrCel preferably hydrolyzes β-1,4-glucosidic bonds in the amorphous parts of cellulose materials and displays degradation activity toward xylan. The Km and Vmax values of CrCel for CMC were determined to be 2.1% ± 0.4% and 73.5 ± 3.3 U mg(-1), respectively. The optimal pH value and temperature of CrCel were 5.5 and 40°C, respectively. The enzyme was stable in a wide range of pH, retaining over 60% activity after incubation for 80 min in the pH range of 3.0-9.0. In addition, CrCel showed remarkable tolerance to salt and remained active at high NaCl concentrations, but also retained over 70% activity after incubation in 0.5-2 M NaCl for up to 24 h. On the basis of the N-terminal sequence alignment and its similar properties to other animal cellulases, CrCel was regarded as a member of glycosyl hydrolase family 45 β-1,4-glucanases. CrCel is the first reported cellulase isolated from mangrove invertebrates, which suggests that it may participate in the assimilation of cellulolytic materials derived from the food sources of the oyster and contribute to the consumption of mangrove primary production. The unique properties of this enzyme make it a potential candidate for further industrial application.

  15. Calcium mobilisation following shell damage in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Sillanpää, J K; Ramesh, K; Melzner, F; Sundh, H; Sundell, K

    2016-06-01

    Shell growth of oysters requires calcium uptake from the environment and transport to the area of shell formation. A shell regeneration assay in combination with radiolabelled calcium was used to investigate uptake and distribution of calcium to different tissues and hemolymph fractions in Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas (Bivalvia, Ostreoida). Oysters were notched at the shell margin and subsequently sampled for hemolymph and grading of shell regeneration during a two week experimental period. Half of the oysters were additionally exposed to (45)Ca and sampled for hemolymph and tissues. Total plasma calcium concentrations increased in notched oysters compared to controls on 1, 2 and 7days after notching. A decrease in plasma calcium levels was apparent on day 4, for both total and ionic calcium. The shell regeneration assay in the notched oysters resulted in a visible deposition of CaCO3 onto the regenerate from day 7 onwards. This was coinciding with an increased uptake of total calcium on days 11 and 14 as well as free, i.e. ionic and ligand-bound calcium, on day 14. At day 1, notching also increased calcium uptake into the mantle tissues, in areas above the notch and near the hinge. During the experiment, both the total hemocyte count and the number of granulocytes increased in notched compared to control oysters. The present study suggests that induced shell damage results in a dynamic regulation of the calcium uptake from the environment and the distribution of calcium within the body, starting directly after notching. Increases in both total calcium concentrations and uptake rates coincided with the visible depositions of CaCO3 on the regenerate shell. C. gigas was found to transport calcium mainly in the ionic form in the hemolymph, with only minor parts being bound to proteins or smaller ligands. Hemolymph measurement also revealed that C. gigas is able to regulate the extracellular concentrations of calcium and potassium. The changes in plasma calcium

  16. Identification of Dopamine D2 Receptors in Gill of Crassostrea virginica

    PubMed Central

    Anador, Samuel; Brown, Cherryle; Adebesin, Damilola; Cilli, Noelia; Fleming, Renee; Carroll, Margaret A.; Catapane, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    The lateral epithelial cells of gill of Crassostrea virginica are innervated by dopamine and serotonin nerves that regulate the beating rate of their lateral cilia. Terminal release of dopamine slows down the beating rate of the cilia, while serotonin release increases the beating rate. Previously, we showed that the dopaminergic, but not the serotonergic, mechanism regulating the beating rate of the lateral cilia was disrupted by manganese treatments and that this disruption was occurring postsynaptically, at the level of the dopamine receptor or further downstream in the signal transduction pathway. In humans manganese toxicity causes Manganism, a neurological disorder with clinical symptoms similar to Parkinson s disease. In this study we utilized pharmacological agents and an immunohistofluorescence technique to characterize the dopamine receptor type present on the lateral ciliated cells of C. virginica gill. Agonists and antagonists to dopamine D1 or dopamine D2 receptors were applied to gill sections and beating rates of the lateral cilia were measured by stroboscopic microscopy. The D2 agonists and D2 antagonists were effective in mimicking or blocking, respectively, the inhibitory actions of dopamine on lateral cilia beating, while application of either D1 agonists or D1 antagonists had no significant effect. In other experiments we used an epilume fluorescence microscopic fitted with FITC filters to view gill sections treated with a primary antibody against D2 receptors and a FITC-linked secondary antibody. Control gill sections without primary antibody exposure were similarly treated and viewed. The D2 antibody treated sections showed bright fluorescent receptor-antibody complexes present at the lateral ciliated cells and other areas of gill, when compared to controls. The results of our immunofluorescence study identify the presence of D2-like receptors on the lateral ciliated cells of C. virginica gill and our pharmacological results indicate that D2

  17. Transcriptomics Analysis of Crassostrea hongkongensis for the Discovery of Reproduction-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Ying; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Jiaomei; Xiao, Shu; Zhang, Yuehuan; Li, Jun; Chen, Jinhui; Yu, Ziniu

    2015-01-01

    Background The reproductive mechanisms of mollusk species have been interesting targets in biological research because of the diverse reproductive strategies observed in this phylum. These species have also been studied for the development of fishery technologies in molluscan aquaculture. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the reproductive process have been well studied in animal models, the relevant information from mollusks remains limited, particularly in species of great commercial interest. Crassostrea hongkongensis is the dominant oyster species that is distributed along the coast of the South China Sea and little genomic information on this species is available. Currently, high-throughput sequencing techniques have been widely used for investigating the basis of physiological processes and facilitating the establishment of adequate genetic selection programs. Results The C.hongkongensis transcriptome included a total of 1,595,855 reads, which were generated by 454 sequencing and were assembled into 41,472 contigs using de novo methods. Contigs were clustered into 33,920 isotigs and further grouped into 22,829 isogroups. Approximately 77.6% of the isogroups were successfully annotated by the Nr database. More than 1,910 genes were identified as being related to reproduction. Some key genes involved in germline development, sex determination and differentiation were identified for the first time in C.hongkongensis (nanos, piwi, ATRX, FoxL2, β-catenin, etc.). Gene expression analysis indicated that vasa, nanos, piwi, ATRX, FoxL2, β-catenin and SRD5A1 were highly or specifically expressed in C.hongkongensis gonads. Additionally, 94,056 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1,699 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were compiled. Conclusions Our study significantly increased C.hongkongensis genomic information based on transcriptomics analysis. The group of reproduction-related genes identified in the present study constitutes a new tool for research

  18. Comparative chlorine and temperature tolerance of the oyster Crassostrea madrasensis: implications for cooling system fouling.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, S; Venugopalan, V P; van der Velde, G; Jenner, H A

    2003-04-01

    Crassostrea madrasensis is an important fouling oyster in tropical industrial cooling water systems. C. madrasensis individuals attach to surfaces by cementing one of their two valves to the substratum. Therefore, oyster fouling creates more problems than mussel fouling in the cooling conduits of power stations, because unlike the latter, the shell of the former remains attached to the substratum even after the death of the animal. However, there are no published reports on the tolerance of this species to chlorination and heat treatment. The mortality pattern and physiological behaviour (oxygen consumption and filtration rate) of three size groups (13 mm, 44 mm and 64 mm mean shell length) of C. madrasensis were studied at different residual chlorine concentrations (0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 3 to 5 mg 1-1) and temperatures (30 degrees C to 45 degrees C). The effect of shell size (= age) on C. madrasensis mortality in the presence of chlorine and taking into account temperature was significant, with the largest size group oysters showing highest resistance. At 1 mg l-1 residual chlorine, the 13 mm and 64 mm size group oysters, took 504 h (21 d) and 744 h (31 d), respectively to reach 100% mortality. At 39 degrees C, the 13 mm size group oysters took 218 min to reach 100% mortality, whereas the 64 mm size group oysters took 325 min. The oxygen consumption and filtration rate of C. madrasensis showed progressive reduction with increasing residual chlorine concentrations. However, the filtration rate and oxygen consumption responses of C. madrasensis were not significantly different between 30 degrees C (control) and 37.5 degrees C. There was a sharp decrease in the filtration rate and oxygen consumption at 38.5 degrees C. A comparison of the present mortality data with previous reports on other bivalves suggests that the chlorine tolerance of C. madrasensis lies in between that of Perna viridis and Perna perna, while its temperature tolerance is significantly higher

  19. Transformation of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in Crassostrea gigas and Pecten maximus reference materials.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew D; Lewis, Adam M; Hatfield, Robert G; Galloway, Angus W; Higman, Wendy A

    2012-11-01

    Matrix reference materials are an important requirement for the assessment of method performance characteristics and for routine quality control. In the field of marine toxin testing where biological assays have been used and where modern analytical testing methods are now becoming available, this requirement has become an urgent one. Various approaches are utilised for preparation of such materials in the absence of available naturally occurring toxic shellfish samples. Toxin-free shellfish may be artificially fortified through the addition of cultured toxic phytoplankton or shellfish may be incurred through natural feeding on toxic algae in a laboratory environment. Both of these approaches may be potentially affected by issues relating to the degradation or transformation of toxin analytes, so studies were conducted to assess these effects within our laboratory. A range of PSP-toxic shellfish tissues were prepared using the two approaches, in both Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and king scallops (Pecten maximus). Additionally, sub-samples of incurred Pacific oyster tissue were further treated, through addition of artificial chemical stabilisers and gamma irradiation. Two separate month-long stability trials were conducted at +4 °C on each material. Results highlighted clear evidence for improved stability of materials following shellfish feeding experiments in comparison with the tissues which had been spiked with plankton. In addition, there were clear differences in stability of toxins between the two shellfish species studied. There was evidence for good stability of C1&2 toxins in both the incurred tissues and improved stability of some toxins in tissues which had been subjected to either gamma irradiation or treatment with chemical additives. The results therefore highlighted the benefits of conducting shellfish feeding if suitable stable reference materials are to be prepared containing a full range of PSP toxin analytes. The study also highlighted

  20. Interactive effects of salinity and elevated CO2 levels on juvenile eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Gary H; Ivanina, Anna V; Matoo, Omera B; Pörtner, Hans O; Lannig, Gisela; Bock, Christian; Beniash, Elia; Sokolova, Inna M

    2012-01-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric CO(2) lead to acidification of the ocean and alter seawater carbonate chemistry, which can negatively impact calcifying organisms, including mollusks. In estuaries, exposure to elevated CO(2) levels often co-occurs with other stressors, such as reduced salinity, which enhances the acidification trend, affects ion and acid-base regulation of estuarine calcifiers and modifies their response to ocean acidification. We studied the interactive effects of salinity and partial pressure of CO(2) (P(CO2)) on biomineralization and energy homeostasis in juveniles of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, a common estuarine bivalve. Juveniles were exposed for 11 weeks to one of two environmentally relevant salinities (30 or 15 PSU) either at current atmospheric P(CO2) (∼400 μatm, normocapnia) or P(CO2) projected by moderate IPCC scenarios for the year 2100 (∼700-800 μatm, hypercapnia). Exposure of the juvenile oysters to elevated P(CO2) and/or low salinity led to a significant increase in mortality, reduction of tissue energy stores (glycogen and lipid) and negative soft tissue growth, indicating energy deficiency. Interestingly, tissue ATP levels were not affected by exposure to changing salinity and P(CO2), suggesting that juvenile oysters maintain their cellular energy status at the expense of lipid and glycogen stores. At the same time, no compensatory upregulation of carbonic anhydrase activity was found under the conditions of low salinity and high P(CO2). Metabolic profiling using magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed altered metabolite status following low salinity exposure; specifically, acetate levels were lower in hypercapnic than in normocapnic individuals at low salinity. Combined exposure to hypercapnia and low salinity negatively affected mechanical properties of shells of the juveniles, resulting in reduced hardness and fracture resistance. Thus, our data suggest that the combined effects of elevated P(CO2) and

  1. Identification of dopamine D2 receptors in gill of Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Anador, Samuel; Brown, Cherryle; Adebesin, Damilola; Cilli, Noelia; Fleming, Renee; Carroll, Margaret A; Catapane, Edward J

    2011-01-01

    The lateral epithelial cells of gill of Crassostrea virginica are innervated by dopamine and serotonin nerves that regulate the beating rate of their lateral cilia. Terminal release of dopamine slows down the beating rate of the cilia, while serotonin release increases the beating rate. Previously, we showed that the dopaminergic, but not the serotonergic, mechanism regulating the beating rate of the lateral cilia was disrupted by manganese treatments and that this disruption was occurring postsynaptically, at the level of the dopamine receptor or further downstream in the signal transduction pathway. In humans manganese toxicity causes Manganism, a neurological disorder with clinical symptoms similar to Parkinson s disease. In this study we utilized pharmacological agents and an immunohistofluorescence technique to characterize the dopamine receptor type present on the lateral ciliated cells of C. virginica gill. Agonists and antagonists to dopamine D1 or dopamine D2 receptors were applied to gill sections and beating rates of the lateral cilia were measured by stroboscopic microscopy. The D2 agonists and D2 antagonists were effective in mimicking or blocking, respectively, the inhibitory actions of dopamine on lateral cilia beating, while application of either D1 agonists or D1 antagonists had no significant effect. In other experiments we used an epilume fluorescence microscopic fitted with FITC filters to view gill sections treated with a primary antibody against D2 receptors and a FITC-linked secondary antibody. Control gill sections without primary antibody exposure were similarly treated and viewed. The D2 antibody treated sections showed bright fluorescent receptor-antibody complexes present at the lateral ciliated cells and other areas of gill, when compared to controls. The results of our immunofluorescence study identify the presence of D2-like receptors on the lateral ciliated cells of C. virginica gill and our pharmacological results indicate that D2

  2. Sclerochronology of Holocene oyster shells (Crassostrea gigas) from the West Coast of Bohai Sea, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, C.; Koeniger, P.; Wang, H.; Frechen, M.

    2009-04-01

    Sclerochronology, the study of periodic increments in skeletal organisms, can decipher the life history and environmental records preserved in fossil shells. Although there have been a number of studies that apply isotopic analyses to shells in open ocean and fresh water, investigations for brackish environments are rare. One of the common inhabitants in estuaries is the Crassostrea oyster. Kirby et al. (1998) demonstrated a close correspondence between the ligamental increments of convex and concave bands and yearly ^18O cycles; Andrus and Crowe (2000) found a close correspondence between translucent growth bands on the cross-section of the hinge and yearly ^18O cycles. They conclude that the morphological features on hinge and growth bands on the cross-section are formed annually and can be used to determine accurately age and growth rate in this species. However, Surge et al. (2001) could not find that these morphologic features have seasonal significance in the C. virginica shells. Therefore, these concave ridges are not reliable independent proxies of seasonality. These studies were carried out with C. virginica shells; none was studied with nature C. gigas, which was widely distributed along the Pacific coastal area. C. gigas has been introduced from its native home to all over the world, ranging from North America to Australia and Europe; it has become an important commercial harvest in many of these places. Buried Holocene oyster shells of C. gigas were sampled from a huge buried oyster reef on the West of Bohai Sea, China. One of these shells was selected for high resolution micro-sampling and stable isotope analyses testing the assumption that C. gigas ligamental increments are annual in nature. We analyzed 236 consecutive samples from the shell to show that morphologic features both on hinge and cross-section are annual by comparing them to the ^18O profiles. We tested the assumption that the morphologic features of C.gigas are delineated by convex tops

  3. Effect of eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) on sediment carbon and nitrogen dynamics in an urban estuary.

    PubMed

    Hoellein, Timothy J; Zarnoch, Chester B

    2014-03-01

    Oyster reefs have declined globally. Interest in their restoration has motivated research into oyster-mediated ecosystem services including effects on biodiversity, filtration, and nitrogen (N) cycling. Recent evidence suggests oysters may promote denitrification, or anaerobic respiration of nitrate (NO3-) into di-nitrogen gas, via benthic deposition of carbon (C) and N-rich biodeposits. However, the mechanisms whereby biodeposits promote N transformations prerequisite to denitrification (e.g., mineralization and nitrification) are unclear. Previous research has also not measured oysters' influence on N cycling in urbanized areas. In May 2010 we deployed eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) in mesh cages above sand-filled boxes at four sites across a nutrient gradient in Jamaica Bay, New York City (New York, USA). Oysters were arranged at four densities: 0, 40, 85, and 150 oysters/m2. For 17 months we measured water-column nutrients and chlorophyll a, every two weeks to monthly. Every two months we measured sediment ash-free dry mass (AFDM), exchangeable ammonium (NH4+), ammonification, nitrification, denitrification potential (DNP), and NO3- and C limitation of DNP. Oysters increased sediment AFDM at three of four sites, with the greatest increase at high density. Oysters did not affect any N pools or transformations. However, variation among sites and dates illustrated environmental drivers of C and N biogeochemistry in this urban estuary. Overall, nitrification was positively related to net ammonification, water column NH4+, and sediment NH4+, but was not correlated with DNP. Denitrification was consistently and strongly NO3- limited, while C was not limiting or secondarily limiting. Therefore, the oyster-mediated increase in AFDM did not affect DNP because C was not its primary driver. Also, because DNP was unrelated to nitrification, it is unlikely that biodeposit N was converted to NO3- for use as a denitrification substrate. Predicting times or sites

  4. New features of Asian Crassostrea oyster mitochondrial genomes: a novel alloacceptor tRNA gene recruitment and two novel ORFs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangyun; Li, Xiaoling; Li, Lu; Xu, Xiaodong; Xia, Jianjun; Yu, Ziniu

    2012-10-10

    A feasible way to perform evolutionary analyses is to compare characters divergent enough to observe significant differences, but sufficiently similar to exclude saturation of the differences that occurred. Thus, comparisons of invertebrate mitochondrial (mt) genomes at low taxonomic levels can be extremely helpful in investigating patterns of variation and evolutionary dynamics of genomes, as intermediate stages of the process may be identified. Fortunately, in this study, we newly sequenced the mt genome of the eighth member of Asian Crassostrea oysters which can provide necessary intermediate characters for us to believe that the variation of Crassostrea mt genomes is considerably greater than previously acknowledged. Several new features of Asian Crassostrea oyster mitochondrial genomes were revealed, and our results are particularly significant as they 1) suggest a novel model of alloacceptor tRNA gene recruitment, namely "vertical" tRNA gene recruitment, which can be successfully used to explain the origination of the unusually additional trnK and trnQ genes (annotated as trnK(2) and trnQ(2) respectively) in the mt genomes of the five Asian oysters, and we speculate that this recruitment progress may be a common phenomenon in the evolution of the tRNA multigene family; 2) reveal the existence of two additional, lineage-specific, mtDNA-encoded genes that may originate from duplication of nad2 followed by rapid evolutionary change. Each of these two genes encodes a unique amino terminal signal peptide, thus each might possess an unknown function; and 3) identify for the first time the atp8 gene in oysters. The present study thus gives further credence to the comparison of congeneric bivalves as a meaningful strategy to investigate mt genomic evolutionary trends in genome organization, tRNA multigene family, and gene loss and/or duplication that are difficult to undertake at higher taxonomic levels. In particular, our study provides new evidence for the

  5. A review of current state of knowledge concerning Perkinsus marinus effects on Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin) (the eastern oyster).

    PubMed

    Smolowitz, R

    2013-05-01

    The eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin), is both an important component of our estuaries and an important farmed food animal along the east and south coasts of the United States. Its populations have been significantly diminished in the wild due to decades of overfishing beginning in the 1890 s. Unfortunately, in 1950, a new disease in eastern oysters caused by the protistan agent, Perkinsus marinus, was identified. The disease, resulting from infection with this protozoan, leads to high mortality of both wild and cultured eastern oysters. Current restoration efforts are hampered by the disease, as is the aquaculture of this economically important food. The parasite infects hemocytes and causes hemolytic anemia and general degeneration of the tissues, leading to death. Ongoing research efforts are attempting to develop oysters resistant to the disease. Transport regulations exist in may states. Infection with P. marinus is listed as a reportable disease by the World Health Organization. PMID:23462867

  6. Antibiotic resistance monitoring in heterotrophic bacteria from anthropogenic-polluted seawater and the intestines of oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui Xuan; Wang, AnLi; Wang, Jiang Yong

    2014-11-01

    A total of 1,050 strains of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from farming seawater and the intestines of oyster species Crassostrea hongkongensis were tested for resistance to 10 antibiotics by the Kirby-Bauer diffusion method. The resistant rates of seawater-derived bacteria to chloramphenicol, enrofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin were low (less than 20%), whereas the bacteria obtained from oysters showed low resistance to chloramphenicol and enrofloxacin. Many strains showed high resistant rates (more than 40%) to furazolidone, penicillin G, and rifampin. A total of 285 strains from farming seawater and oysters were resistant to more than three antibiotics. Several strains showed resistance to more than nine antibiotics. Furthermore, the peak resistant rates of the seawater-derived strains to multiple antibiotics overlapped in April, June, September, and November, and those of oyster-derived strains overlapped during April, July, and September. The multi-resistant rate patterns of strains from farming seawater and oyster intestines were similar.

  7. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic): American oyster. [Crassostrea virginica

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, J.G.; Sellers, M.A.

    1986-07-01

    The American oyster (Crassostrea virginica) is an important commercial and mariculture species. It is the dominant species in many bays and oyster shells form extensive reefs that modify sedimentation and local currents. Spawning occurs repeatedly during warmer months with millions of eggs released. Embryos and larvae are carried by currents throughout the estuaries and oceanic bays where oysters occur. The few surviving larvae cement themselves to solid objects for the remainder of life. Unable to move, they must tolerate changes in the environment that range from -1.7/sup 0/ to 49/sup 0/C, 5 to 30 ppt salinity, and clear to muddy water. The distribution and abundance of adults are limited by marine predators, so that oysters are limited largely to brackish waters.

  8. Distribution of trace metals in the Pacific Oyster, Crassostrea gigas, and crabs from the east coast of Kyushu Island, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Szefer, P.; Frelek, K.; Geldon, J.

    1997-01-01

    Oysters are known to be exceptional accumulators of Zn and Cu, and their tissue concentrations appear to reflect contamination of metals. According to Lauenstein and Dolvin, oysters clearly have a greater affinity for Ag, Cu and Zn than do mussels, while mussels have greater affinity for Cr and Pb. Oysters have been considered to be potential bioindicators for monitoring metallic pollution in marine environments. Extensive investigations of oysters from the east coast of Kyushu Island, Japan, have been performed. The aim of the study was to examine spatial differences in metal concentrations in soft tissues of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and whole bodies (soft tissues with shells) of the crabs Goetice depressa and Leptodius exaratus inhabiting the Japanese coastal region of the Pacific. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Atlantic): American oyster. [Crassostrea virginica

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, V.G. Jr.

    1986-07-01

    The American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, is an important commercial and recreational species. Spawning occurs continuously in warmer months. Larvae are planktonic and are distributed throughout estuaries by tidal currents. After a 2- to 3-week planktonic stage, larvae permanently attach to a solid substrate. In the South Atlantic region, this solid substrate is usually the shell of other oysters growing in the intertidal zone. This gregarious behaivor results in formation of massive intertidal reefs that are a prominent feature of high salinity bays, creeks and sounds in the region. These reefs serve as habitat and foraging grounds for other species. Oysters tolerate salinity from about 5 ppt to above 40 ppt and temperatures from below freezing to nearly 50/sup 0/C.

  10. A review of current state of knowledge concerning Perkinsus marinus effects on Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin) (the eastern oyster).

    PubMed

    Smolowitz, R

    2013-05-01

    The eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin), is both an important component of our estuaries and an important farmed food animal along the east and south coasts of the United States. Its populations have been significantly diminished in the wild due to decades of overfishing beginning in the 1890 s. Unfortunately, in 1950, a new disease in eastern oysters caused by the protistan agent, Perkinsus marinus, was identified. The disease, resulting from infection with this protozoan, leads to high mortality of both wild and cultured eastern oysters. Current restoration efforts are hampered by the disease, as is the aquaculture of this economically important food. The parasite infects hemocytes and causes hemolytic anemia and general degeneration of the tissues, leading to death. Ongoing research efforts are attempting to develop oysters resistant to the disease. Transport regulations exist in may states. Infection with P. marinus is listed as a reportable disease by the World Health Organization.

  11. Antibiotic resistance monitoring in heterotrophic bacteria from anthropogenic-polluted seawater and the intestines of oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui Xuan; Wang, AnLi; Wang, Jiang Yong

    2014-11-01

    A total of 1,050 strains of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from farming seawater and the intestines of oyster species Crassostrea hongkongensis were tested for resistance to 10 antibiotics by the Kirby-Bauer diffusion method. The resistant rates of seawater-derived bacteria to chloramphenicol, enrofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin were low (less than 20%), whereas the bacteria obtained from oysters showed low resistance to chloramphenicol and enrofloxacin. Many strains showed high resistant rates (more than 40%) to furazolidone, penicillin G, and rifampin. A total of 285 strains from farming seawater and oysters were resistant to more than three antibiotics. Several strains showed resistance to more than nine antibiotics. Furthermore, the peak resistant rates of the seawater-derived strains to multiple antibiotics overlapped in April, June, September, and November, and those of oyster-derived strains overlapped during April, July, and September. The multi-resistant rate patterns of strains from farming seawater and oyster intestines were similar. PMID:25133348

  12. Evaluation of pollution in Camichin estuary (Mexico): pro-oxidant and antioxidant response in oyster (Crassostrea corteziensis).

    PubMed

    Girón-Pérez, M I; Romero-Bañuelos, C A; Toledo-Ibarra, G A; Rojas-García, A E; Medina-Diaz, I M; Robledo-Marenco, M L; Vega-López, A

    2013-08-01

    The physiological system of molluscs, particularly pro-oxidant and antioxidant mechanisms, could be altered by pollutants and induce disturbance on health status and productive parameters of aquatic organisms, such as oyster. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the chemical contamination in water (total metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and oxidative stress parameters in oysters (Crassostrea corteziensis) in Camichin estuary, located in Mexican Tropical Pacific. The results obtained showed the presence of arsenic, lead and zinc, as well as naphthalene, pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene in concentrations relatively higher than criteria established by local and international guidelines. Regarding the biomarkers of oxidative stress response (H2O2 and O2 concentration, catalase activity, lipid peroxidation, and hydroperoxide concentration), differences between oyster from estuary and control group were significant. These results indicate that these pollutants could be related with oxidative stress detected in oyster. PMID:23500622

  13. Characterization of reference genes for qPCR analysis in various tissues of the Fujian oyster Crassostrea angulata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Fei; Yang, Bingye; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-07-01

    Accurate quantification of transcripts using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) depends on the identification of reliable reference genes for normalization. This study aimed to identify and validate seven reference genes, including actin-2 ( ACT-2), elongation factor 1 alpha ( EF-1α), elongation factor 1 beta ( EF-1β), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase ( GAPDH), ubiquitin ( UBQ), β-tubulin ( β-TUB), and 18S ribosomal RNA, from Crassostrea angulata, a valuable marine bivalve cultured worldwide. Transcript levels of the candidate reference genes were examined using qPCR analysis and showed differential expression patterns in the mantle, gill, adductor muscle, labial palp, visceral mass, hemolymph and gonad tissues. Quantitative data were analyzed using the geNorm software to assess the expression stability of the candidate reference genes, revealing that β-TUB and UBQ were the most stable genes. The commonly used GAPDH and 18S rRNA showed low stability, making them unsuitable candidates in this system. The expression pattern of the G protein β-subunit gene ( Gβ) across tissue types was also examined and normalized to the expression of each or both of UBQ and β-TUB as internal controls. This revealed consistent trends with all three normalization approaches, thus validating the reliability of UBQ and β-TUB as optimal internal controls. The study provides the first validated reference genes for accurate data normalization in transcript profiling in Crassostrea angulata, which will be indispensable for further functional genomics studies in this economically valuable marine bivalve.

  14. Developing tools for the study of molluscan immunity: The sequencing of the genome of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Chiarri, Marta; Warren, Wesley C; Guo, Ximing; Proestou, Dina

    2015-09-01

    The eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, provides important ecological and economical services, making it the target of restoration projects and supporting a significant fishery/aquaculture industry with landings valued at more than $100 million in 2012 in the United States of America. Due to the impact of infectious diseases on wild, restored, and cultured populations, the eastern oyster has been the focus of studies on host-pathogen interactions and immunity, as well as the target of selective breeding efforts for disease resistant oyster lines. Despite these efforts, relatively little is known about the genetic basis of resistance to diseases or environmental stress, not only in eastern oyster, but also in other molluscan species of commercial interest worldwide. In order to develop tools and resources to assist in the elucidation of the genomic basis of traits of commercial, biological, and ecological interest in oysters, a team of genome and bioinformatics experts, in collaboration with the oyster research community, is sequencing, assembling, and annotating the first reference genome for the eastern oyster and producing an exhaustive transcriptome from a variety of oyster developmental stages and tissues in response to a diverse set of environmentally-relevant stimuli. These transcriptomes and reference genome for the eastern oyster, added to the already available genome and transcriptomes for the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and other bivalve species, will be an essential resource for the discovery of candidate genes and markers associated with traits of commercial, biological, and ecologic importance in bivalve molluscs, including those related to host-pathogen interactions and immunity.

  15. The effects of arsenic and seawater acidification on antioxidant and biomineralization responses in two closely related Crassostrea species.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Anthony; Figueira, Etelvina; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Freitas, Rosa

    2016-03-01

    Ocean acidification processes are major threats to marine calcifying organisms, mostly affecting biomineralization related processes. Abiotic stressors acting on marine systems do not act alone, rather in a combination of multiple stressors, especially in coastal habitats such as estuaries, where anthropogenic and environmental pressures are high. Arsenic (As) is a widely distributed contaminant worldwide and its toxicity has been studied on a variety of organisms. However, the effect of low pH on the toxicity of As on marine organisms is unknown. Here, we studied the combined effects of ocean acidification and As exposure on two closely related oyster species (Crassostrea angulata and Crassostrea gigas), by use of a biochemical approach. Oxidative stress related parameters were studied along with the assessment of biomineralization enzymes activity after 28days of exposure. Results showed that both species were sensitive to all tested conditions (low pH, As and pH+As), showing enhancement of antioxidant and biotransformation defenses and impairment of biomineralization processes. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) activity were significantly higher in oysters exposed to As, showing activation of detoxification mechanisms, and a lower GSTs activity was observed in low pH+As condition, indicating an impact on the oysters capacity to detoxify As in a low pH scenario. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity was significantly lower in all tested conditions, showing to be affected by both As and low pH, whereas the combined effect of low pH+As was not different from the effect of low pH alone. Multivariate analysis of biochemical data allowed for the comparison of both species performance, showing a clear distinction of response in both species. C. gigas presented overall higher enzymatic activity (GSTs; superoxide dismutase; catalase; CA and acid phosphatase) and higher cytosolic GSH content in As exposed oysters than C. angulata. Results obtained indicate a higher tolerance

  16. Molecular Analysis of Atypical Family 18 Chitinase from Fujian Oyster Crassostrea angulata and Its Physiological Role in the Digestive System.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingye; Zhang, Mingming; Li, Lingling; Pu, Fei; You, Weiwei; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-01-01

    Chitinolytic enzymes have an important physiological significance in immune and digestive systems in plants and animals, but chitinase has not been identified as having a role in the digestive system in molluscan. In our study, a novel chitinase homologue, named Ca-Chit, has been cloned and characterized as the oyster Crassostrea angulate. The 3998bp full-length cDNA of Ca-Chit consisted of 23bp 5-UTR, 3288 ORF and 688bp 3-UTR. The deduced amino acids sequence shares homologue with the chitinase of family 18. The molecular weight of the protein was predicted to be 119.389 kDa, with a pI of 6.74. The Ca-Chit protein was a modular enzyme composed of a glycosyl hydrolase family 18 domain, threonine-rich region profile and a putative membrane anchor domain. Gene expression profiles monitored by quantitative RT-PCR in different adult tissues showed that the mRNA of Ca-Chit expressed markedly higher visceral mass than any other tissues. The results of the whole mount in-situ hybridization displayed that Ca-Chit starts to express the visceral mass of D-veliger larvae and then the digestive gland forms a crystalline structure during larval development. Furthermore, the adult oysters challenged by starvation indicated that the Ca-Chit expression would be regulated by feed. All the observations made suggest that Ca-Chit plays an important role in the digestive system of the oyster, Crassostrea angulate. PMID:26046992

  17. Developing tools for the study of molluscan immunity: The sequencing of the genome of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Chiarri, Marta; Warren, Wesley C; Guo, Ximing; Proestou, Dina

    2015-09-01

    The eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, provides important ecological and economical services, making it the target of restoration projects and supporting a significant fishery/aquaculture industry with landings valued at more than $100 million in 2012 in the United States of America. Due to the impact of infectious diseases on wild, restored, and cultured populations, the eastern oyster has been the focus of studies on host-pathogen interactions and immunity, as well as the target of selective breeding efforts for disease resistant oyster lines. Despite these efforts, relatively little is known about the genetic basis of resistance to diseases or environmental stress, not only in eastern oyster, but also in other molluscan species of commercial interest worldwide. In order to develop tools and resources to assist in the elucidation of the genomic basis of traits of commercial, biological, and ecological interest in oysters, a team of genome and bioinformatics experts, in collaboration with the oyster research community, is sequencing, assembling, and annotating the first reference genome for the eastern oyster and producing an exhaustive transcriptome from a variety of oyster developmental stages and tissues in response to a diverse set of environmentally-relevant stimuli. These transcriptomes and reference genome for the eastern oyster, added to the already available genome and transcriptomes for the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and other bivalve species, will be an essential resource for the discovery of candidate genes and markers associated with traits of commercial, biological, and ecologic importance in bivalve molluscs, including those related to host-pathogen interactions and immunity. PMID:25982405

  18. Characterization of chitinase-like proteins (Cg-Clp1 and Cg-Clp2) involved in immune defence of the mollusc Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Badariotti, Fabien; Lelong, Christophe; Dubos, Marie-Pierre; Favrel, Pascal

    2007-07-01

    Chitinase-like proteins have been identified in insects and mammals as nonenzymatic members of the glycoside hydrolase family 18. Recently, the first molluscan chitinase-like protein, named Crassostrea gigas (Cg)-Clp1, was shown to control the proliferation and synthesis of extracellular matrix components of mammalian chondrocytes. However, the precise physiological roles of Cg-Clp1 in oysters remain unknown. Here, we report the cloning and the characterization of a new chitinase-like protein (Cg-Clp2) from the oyster Crassostrea gigas. Gene expression profiles monitored by quantitative RT-PCR in adult tissues and through development support its involvement in tissue growth and remodelling. Both Cg-Clp1- and Cg-Clp2-encoding genes were transcriptionally stimulated in haemocytes in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide challenge, strongly suggesting that these two close paralogous genes play a role in oyster immunity. PMID:17608806

  19. Suppressive subtractive hybridization libraries prepared from the digestive gland of the oyster Crassostrea brasiliana exposed to a diesel fuel water-accommodated fraction.

    PubMed

    Lüchmann, Karim Hahn; Mattos, Jacó Joaquim; Siebert, Marília Nardelli; Dorrington, Tarquin Stephen; Toledo-Silva, Guilherme; Stoco, Patricia Hermes; Grisard, Edmundo Carlos; Bainy, Afonso Celso Dias

    2012-06-01

    Diesel fuel can cause adverse effects in marine invertebrates by mechanisms that are not clearly understood. The authors used suppressive subtractive hybridization to identify genes up- and downregulated in Crassostrea brasiliana exposed to diesel fuel. Genes putatively involved in protein regulation, innate immune, and stress response, were altered by diesel challenge. Three genes regulated by diesel were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. This study sheds light on transcriptomic responses of oysters to diesel pollution.

  20. Hydraulic redistribution in dwarf Rhizophora mangle trees driven by interstitial soil water salinity gradients: impacts on hydraulic architecture and gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guang-You; Jones, Tim J; Luton, Corene; Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Manzane, Eric; Scholz, Fabian G; Bucci, Sandra J; Cao, Kun-Fang; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2009-05-01

    Rhizophora mangle L. trees of Biscayne National Park (Florida, USA) have two distinct growth forms: tall trees (5-10 m) growing along the coast and dwarf trees (1 m or less) growing in the adjacent inland zone. Sharp decreases in salinity and thus increases in soil water potential from surface soil to about a depth of 1 m were found at the dwarf mangrove site but not at the tall mangrove site. Consistent with our prediction, hydraulic redistribution detected by reverse sap flow in shallow prop roots was observed during nighttime, early morning and late afternoon in dwarf trees, but not in tall trees. In addition, hydraulic redistribution was observed throughout the 24-h period during a low temperature spell. Dwarf trees had significantly lower sapwood-specific hydraulic conductivity, smaller stem vessel diameter, lower leaf area to sapwood area ratio (LA/SA), smaller leaf size and higher leaf mass per area. Leaves of dwarf trees had lower CO(2) assimilation rate and lower stomatal conductance compared to tall trees. Leaf water potentials at midday were more negative in tall trees that are consistent with their substantially higher stomatal conductance and LA/SA. The substantially lower water transport efficiency and the more conservative water use of dwarf trees may be due to a combination of factors such as high salinity in the surface soil, particularly during dry periods, and substantial reverse sap flow in shallow roots that make upper soil layers with high salinity a competing sink of water to the transpiring leaves. There may also be a benefit for the dwarf trees in having hydraulic redistribution because the reverse flow and the release of water to upper soil layers should lead to dilution of the high salinity in the rhizosphere and thus relieve its potential harm to dwarf R. mangle trees.

  1. Preparation, characterization, and microbial degradation of specifically radiolabeled (/sup 14/C)lignocelluloses from marine and fresh water macrophytes. [Spartina alterniflora; Juncus roemerianus; Rhizophora mangle; Carex walteriana

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, R.; Maccubbin, A.E.; Hodson, R.E.

    1984-02-01

    Specifically radiolabeled (/sup 14/C-lignin)lignocelluloses were prepared from the aquatic macrophytes Spartina alterniflora, Juncus roemerianus, Rhizophora mangle, and Carex walteriana by using (/sup 14/C)phenylalanine, (/sup 14/C)tyrosine, and (/sup 14/C)cinnamic acid as precursors. Specifically radiolabeled (/sup 14/C-polysaccharide)lignocelluloses were prepared by using (/sup 14/C)glucose as precursor. The rates of microbial degradation varied among (/sup 14/C-lignin)lignocelluloses labeled with different lignin precursors within the same plant species. In herbaceous plants, significant amounts (8 to 24%) of radioactivity from (/sup 14/C)phenylalanine and (/sup 14/C)tyrosine were found associated with protein. Microbial degradation of radiolabeled protein resulted in overestimation of lignin degradation rates in lignocelluloses derived from herbaceous aquatic plants. Other differences in degradation rates among (/sup 14/C-lignin)lignocelluloses from the same plant species were attributable to differences in the amount of label being associated with ester-linked subunits of peripheral lignin. After acid hydrolysis of (/sup 14/C-polysaccharide)lignocelluloses, radioactivity was detected in several sugars, although most of the radioactivity was distributed between glucose and xylose. After 576 h of incubation with salt marsh sediments, 38% of the polysaccharide component and between 6 and 16% of the lignin component (depending on the precursor) of J. roemerianus lignocellulose was mineralized to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/; during the same incubation period, 30% of the polysaccharide component and between 12 and 18% of the lignin component of S. alterniflora lignocellulose was mineralized.

  2. Post-glacial expansion and population genetic divergence of mangrove species Avicennia germinans (L.) Stearn and Rhizophora mangle L. along the Mexican coast.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Castro, Eduardo; Dodd, Richard S; Riosmena-Rodríguez, Rafael; Enríquez-Paredes, Luis Manuel; Tovilla-Hernández, Cristian; López-Vivas, Juan Manuel; Aguilar-May, Bily; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove forests in the Gulf of California, Mexico represent the northernmost populations along the Pacific coast and thus they are likely to be source populations for colonization at higher latitudes as climate becomes more favorable. Today, these populations are relatively small and fragmented and prior research has indicated that they are poor in genetic diversity. Here we set out to investigate whether the low diversity in this region was a result of recent colonization, or fragmentation and genetic drift of once more extensive mangroves due to climatic changes in the recent past. By sampling the two major mangrove species, Rhizophora mangle and Avicennia germinans, along the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of Mexico, we set out to test whether concordant genetic signals could elucidate recent evolution of the ecosystem. Genetic diversity of both mangrove species showed a decreasing trend toward northern latitudes along the Pacific coast. The lowest levels of genetic diversity were found at the range limits around the Gulf of California and the outer Baja California peninsula. Lack of a strong spatial genetic structure in this area and recent northern gene flow in A. germinans suggest recent colonization by this species. On the other hand, lack of a signal of recent northern dispersal in R. mangle, despite the higher dispersal capability of this species, indicates a longer presence of populations, at least in the southern Gulf of California. We suggest that the longer history, together with higher genetic diversity of R. mangle at the range limits, likely provides a gene pool better able to colonize northwards under climate change than A. germinans. PMID:24699389

  3. Hydraulic redistribution in dwarf Rhizophora mangle trees driven by interstitial soil water salinity gradients: impacts on hydraulic architecture and gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guang-You; Jones, Tim J; Luton, Corene; Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Manzane, Eric; Scholz, Fabian G; Bucci, Sandra J; Cao, Kun-Fang; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2009-05-01

    Rhizophora mangle L. trees of Biscayne National Park (Florida, USA) have two distinct growth forms: tall trees (5-10 m) growing along the coast and dwarf trees (1 m or less) growing in the adjacent inland zone. Sharp decreases in salinity and thus increases in soil water potential from surface soil to about a depth of 1 m were found at the dwarf mangrove site but not at the tall mangrove site. Consistent with our prediction, hydraulic redistribution detected by reverse sap flow in shallow prop roots was observed during nighttime, early morning and late afternoon in dwarf trees, but not in tall trees. In addition, hydraulic redistribution was observed throughout the 24-h period during a low temperature spell. Dwarf trees had significantly lower sapwood-specific hydraulic conductivity, smaller stem vessel diameter, lower leaf area to sapwood area ratio (LA/SA), smaller leaf size and higher leaf mass per area. Leaves of dwarf trees had lower CO(2) assimilation rate and lower stomatal conductance compared to tall trees. Leaf water potentials at midday were more negative in tall trees that are consistent with their substantially higher stomatal conductance and LA/SA. The substantially lower water transport efficiency and the more conservative water use of dwarf trees may be due to a combination of factors such as high salinity in the surface soil, particularly during dry periods, and substantial reverse sap flow in shallow roots that make upper soil layers with high salinity a competing sink of water to the transpiring leaves. There may also be a benefit for the dwarf trees in having hydraulic redistribution because the reverse flow and the release of water to upper soil layers should lead to dilution of the high salinity in the rhizosphere and thus relieve its potential harm to dwarf R. mangle trees. PMID:19324702

  4. Post-Glacial Expansion and Population Genetic Divergence of Mangrove Species Avicennia germinans (L.) Stearn and Rhizophora mangle L. along the Mexican Coast

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval-Castro, Eduardo; Dodd, Richard S.; Riosmena-Rodríguez, Rafael; Enríquez-Paredes, Luis Manuel; Tovilla-Hernández, Cristian; López-Vivas, Juan Manuel; Aguilar-May, Bily; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove forests in the Gulf of California, Mexico represent the northernmost populations along the Pacific coast and thus they are likely to be source populations for colonization at higher latitudes as climate becomes more favorable. Today, these populations are relatively small and fragmented and prior research has indicated that they are poor in genetic diversity. Here we set out to investigate whether the low diversity in this region was a result of recent colonization, or fragmentation and genetic drift of once more extensive mangroves due to climatic changes in the recent past. By sampling the two major mangrove species, Rhizophora mangle and Avicennia germinans, along the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of Mexico, we set out to test whether concordant genetic signals could elucidate recent evolution of the ecosystem. Genetic diversity of both mangrove species showed a decreasing trend toward northern latitudes along the Pacific coast. The lowest levels of genetic diversity were found at the range limits around the Gulf of California and the outer Baja California peninsula. Lack of a strong spatial genetic structure in this area and recent northern gene flow in A. germinans suggest recent colonization by this species. On the other hand, lack of a signal of recent northern dispersal in R. mangle, despite the higher dispersal capability of this species, indicates a longer presence of populations, at least in the southern Gulf of California. We suggest that the longer history, together with higher genetic diversity of R. mangle at the range limits, likely provides a gene pool better able to colonize northwards under climate change than A. germinans. PMID:24699389

  5. Influences of salinity and shade on seedling photosynthesis and growth of two mangrove species, Rhizophora mangle and Bruguiera sexangula, introduced to Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krauss, K.W.; Allen, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Rhizophora mangle was first introduced to Hawaii in 1902 to promote shoreline stabilization. Intertidal competition with native and introduced salt marsh species was low, and beyond the early 1920s, mangrove forests expanded rapidly. An additional mangrove species, Bruguiera sexangula, was introduced in 1922 and currently co-occurs with R. mangle in only a few stands on the north shore and windward sides of Oahu. Where the two species overlap, R. mangle, having colonized intertidal zones first, forms nearly monospecific forest stands. To determine why R. mangle remains the dominant mangrove, we initiated a greenhouse study to compare seedling growth and photosynthetic light response of both species growing at two light levels and contrasting salinity regimes (2, 10, 32 PSU). The asymptotic nature of B. sexangula' s assimilation response is indicative of stomatal regulation, whereas only light level appears to regulate photosynthesis in R. mangle. Shifts in patterns of biomass allocation and physiological response indicate two contrasting strategies relative to sunlight and salinity. B. sexangula's strategy is characterized by slow growth with little variation under favorable conditions and morphological plasticity under stressful conditions, which allows for adjustments in carbon gain efficiency (morphological strategy). On the other hand, R. mangle's strategy involves faster growth under a wide range of environmental conditions with physiological enhancement of carbon assimilation (physiological strategy). Low salinity combined with reduced light, or simply low sunlight alone, appears to favor R. mangle and B. sexangula equally. High salinity places greater, but not overwhelming, stress on B. sexangula seedlings, but tends to favor R. mangle at higher light levels.

  6. Post-glacial expansion and population genetic divergence of mangrove species Avicennia germinans (L.) Stearn and Rhizophora mangle L. along the Mexican coast.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Castro, Eduardo; Dodd, Richard S; Riosmena-Rodríguez, Rafael; Enríquez-Paredes, Luis Manuel; Tovilla-Hernández, Cristian; López-Vivas, Juan Manuel; Aguilar-May, Bily; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove forests in the Gulf of California, Mexico represent the northernmost populations along the Pacific coast and thus they are likely to be source populations for colonization at higher latitudes as climate becomes more favorable. Today, these populations are relatively small and fragmented and prior research has indicated that they are poor in genetic diversity. Here we set out to investigate whether the low diversity in this region was a result of recent colonization, or fragmentation and genetic drift of once more extensive mangroves due to climatic changes in the recent past. By sampling the two major mangrove species, Rhizophora mangle and Avicennia germinans, along the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of Mexico, we set out to test whether concordant genetic signals could elucidate recent evolution of the ecosystem. Genetic diversity of both mangrove species showed a decreasing trend toward northern latitudes along the Pacific coast. The lowest levels of genetic diversity were found at the range limits around the Gulf of California and the outer Baja California peninsula. Lack of a strong spatial genetic structure in this area and recent northern gene flow in A. germinans suggest recent colonization by this species. On the other hand, lack of a signal of recent northern dispersal in R. mangle, despite the higher dispersal capability of this species, indicates a longer presence of populations, at least in the southern Gulf of California. We suggest that the longer history, together with higher genetic diversity of R. mangle at the range limits, likely provides a gene pool better able to colonize northwards under climate change than A. germinans.

  7. Persistent free radical ESR signals in marine bivalve tissues. [Electron Spin Resonance (ESR)

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlorn, R.J. . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering); Mendez, A.T. ); Higashi, R. . Bodega Marine Lab.); Fan, T. )

    1992-08-01

    Freeze-dried homogenates of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae collected from waters in Puerto Rico near urban and industrial sites as well as at relatively pristine locations yielded electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra characteristic of free radicals as well as spectral components of transition metal ions, dominated by manganese. The magnitudes of these ESR signals and the concentrations of trace elements (determined by X-ray fluorescence) varied considerably among oyster samples, masking any potential correlation with polluted waters. Laboratory studies were initiated to identify the factors controlling the magnitudes of the tissue free radical ESR signals. Another mollusc, Mytilus californianus collected at the Bodega Marine laboratory in northern California, was fractionated into goneds and remaining tissue. Freeze-dried homogenates of both fractions exhibited ESR signals that increased gradually with time. ESR signals were observed in freeze-dried perchloric acid (PCA) precipitates of the homogenates, delipidated PCA precipitates, and in chloroform extracts of these precipitates. Acid hydrolysis to degrade proteins to amino acids produced a residue, which yielded much larger ESR free radical signals after freeze-drying. Freshly thawed homogenates of Crassostrea rhizophorae also exhibited ESR signals. A laboratory model of copper stress in Crassostrea rhizophorae was developed to study the effect of this transition metal on dssue free radicals. Preliminary results suggested that sublethal copper exposure had little effect on tissue fire radicals, except possibly for a signal enhancement in an oyster fraction that was enriched in kidney granules. Since kidney granules are known to accumulate heavy metals in mussels and probably other marine bivalves, this signal enhancement may prove to be an indicator of free radical processes associated with heavy metal deposition in molluscs.

  8. Persistent free radical ESR signals in marine bivalve tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlorn, R.J.; Mendez, A.T.; Higashi, R.; Fan, T.

    1992-08-01

    Freeze-dried homogenates of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae collected from waters in Puerto Rico near urban and industrial sites as well as at relatively pristine locations yielded electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra characteristic of free radicals as well as spectral components of transition metal ions, dominated by manganese. The magnitudes of these ESR signals and the concentrations of trace elements (determined by X-ray fluorescence) varied considerably among oyster samples, masking any potential correlation with polluted waters. Laboratory studies were initiated to identify the factors controlling the magnitudes of the tissue free radical ESR signals. Another mollusc, Mytilus californianus collected at the Bodega Marine laboratory in northern California, was fractionated into goneds and remaining tissue. Freeze-dried homogenates of both fractions exhibited ESR signals that increased gradually with time. ESR signals were observed in freeze-dried perchloric acid (PCA) precipitates of the homogenates, delipidated PCA precipitates, and in chloroform extracts of these precipitates. Acid hydrolysis to degrade proteins to amino acids produced a residue, which yielded much larger ESR free radical signals after freeze-drying. Freshly thawed homogenates of Crassostrea rhizophorae also exhibited ESR signals. A laboratory model of copper stress in Crassostrea rhizophorae was developed to study the effect of this transition metal on dssue free radicals. Preliminary results suggested that sublethal copper exposure had little effect on tissue fire radicals, except possibly for a signal enhancement in an oyster fraction that was enriched in kidney granules. Since kidney granules are known to accumulate heavy metals in mussels and probably other marine bivalves, this signal enhancement may prove to be an indicator of free radical processes associated with heavy metal deposition in molluscs.

  9. An examination of the ingestion, bioaccumulation, and depuration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles by the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica).

    PubMed

    Doyle, John J; Ward, J Evan; Mason, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The production rates of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles for consumer products far exceed the pace at which research can determine the effects of these particles in the natural environment. Sedentary organisms such as suspension-feeding bivalves are particularly vulnerable to anthropogenic contaminants, such as nanoparticles, that enter coastal environments. The purpose of this work was to examine the ingestion, bioaccumulation, and depuration rates of TiO2 nanoparticles by two species of suspension-feeding bivalves, the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica). Two representative TiO2 nanoparticles, UV-Titan M212 (Titan) and Aeroxide P25 (P25), were delivered to the animals either incorporated into marine snow or added directly to seawater at a concentration of 1.0 mg/L for exposure periods of 2 and 6 h. After feeding, the animals were transferred to filtered-seawater and allowed to depurate. Feces and tissues were collected at 0, 12, 24, 72, and 120 h, post-exposure, and analyzed for concentrations of titanium by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Results indicated that the capture and ingestion (i.e., transfer to the gut) of TiO2 nanoparticles by both mussels and oysters was not dependent on the presence of marine snow, and weight-standardized clearance rates of bivalves exposed to TiO2 nanoparticles were not significantly different than those of unexposed control animals. Both species ingested about half of the nanoparticles to which they were exposed, and >90% of the nanoparticles were egested in feces within 12 h, post-exposure. The findings of this study demonstrate that mussels and oysters can readily ingest both Titan and P25 nanoparticles regardless of the form in which they are encountered, but depurate these materials over a short period of time. Importantly, bioaccumulation of Titan and P25 nanoparticles does not occur in mussels and oysters following exposures of up to 6 h.

  10. Modelling reveals endogenous osmotic adaptation of storage tissue water potential as an important driver determining different stem diameter variation patterns in the mangrove species Avicennia marina and Rhizophora stylosa

    PubMed Central

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W.; Guyot, Adrien; Hubeau, Michiel; De Swaef, Tom; Lockington, David A.; Steppe, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Background Stem diameter variations are mainly determined by the radial water transport between xylem and storage tissues. This radial transport results from the water potential difference between these tissues, which is influenced by both hydraulic and carbon related processes. Measurements have shown that when subjected to the same environmental conditions, the co-occurring mangrove species Avicennia marina and Rhizophora stylosa unexpectedly show a totally different pattern in daily stem diameter variation. Methods Using in situ measurements of stem diameter variation, stem water potential and sap flow, a mechanistic flow and storage model based on the cohesion–tension theory was applied to assess the differences in osmotic storage water potential between Avicennia marina and Rhizophora stylosa. Key results Both species, subjected to the same environmental conditions, showed a resembling daily pattern in simulated osmotic storage water potential. However, the osmotic storage water potential of R. stylosa started to decrease slightly after that of A. marina in the morning and increased again slightly later in the evening. This small shift in osmotic storage water potential likely underlaid the marked differences in daily stem diameter variation pattern between the two species. Conclusions The results show that in addition to environmental dynamics, endogenous changes in the osmotic storage water potential must be taken into account in order to accurately predict stem diameter variations, and hence growth. PMID:24534674

  11. δ 15N Studies of Nitrogen Use by the Red Mangrove, Rhizophora mangle L. in South Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, B.; Bern, A. L.; Ross, M. S.; Meeder, J. F.

    2000-02-01

    To help define nitrogen (N) sources and patterns of N processing in mangrove ecosystems, mangrove leaf nitrogen contents and δ 15N values were assayed in three marshes along the south Florida coast. In each marsh, leaf samples were collected from dwarf mangroves at interior locations and taller mangroves at the ocean fringe. Leaf % N and δ 15N values did not differ consistently between dwarf and tall mangroves, even though there were large variations in δ 15N (18‰ range, -5 to +13‰) and % N (1·2% range, 0·9-2·1%). Highest % N and δ 15N values occurred along the western margin of Biscayne Bay where canals draining agricultural lands deliver high-nitrate waters to fringing mangrove marshes. High mangrove δ 15N values may be good biomonitors of anthropogenic N loading to south Florida estuaries. Lower values likely reflect less anthropogenic N entering the mangrove marshes, as well as differences in plant physiology that occur along the fringe-dwarf gradient.

  12. Mangroves and shoreline change on Molokai, Hawaii: Assessing the role of introduced Rhizophora mangle in sediment dynamics and coastal change using remote sensing and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Iorio, Margaret Mary

    The Florida red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle, was introduced to the high volcanic island of Molokai, Hawaii in 1902 to trap sediment and stabilize eroding coastal mudflats along the island's reef-fringed south coast. This prolific invasive species now occupies 2.4 km2 of inter-tidal land and borders approximately 20% of the south coast shoreline. Integrating the fundamentals of remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems, this research investigates the effects of mangrove introduction on sediment dynamics and coastal change on south Molokai throughout the 20th century and provides a baseline of mangrove distribution, a detailed record of shoreline change rates, and a chronological history of island land use and environmental change. Monitoring of coastal change associated with mangroves is essential to understanding how natural coastal ecosystems react to alien species introductions and adapt overall to changing climatic regimes. Comparing the accuracy of various remote sensing instruments and processing techniques, this study has shown that the remote sensing with modern airborne and satellite sensors offers an effective management tool for mapping baseline conditions and monitoring change in remote island environments like that on the south coast of Molokai. Shoreline change assessment found that shoreline change rates on the island's south coast varied both alongshore and through time and that the dominant change has been one of progradation. Rates of change peaked in the early part of the 20th century and have since decayed exponentially over time. Changing land use practices coupled with the introduction of invasive species may have strongly influenced observed variability in rates of coastal change. Field observations and sediment analysis suggest that sediment transfer across the coastal boundary on the mangrove-fringed south coast is relatively limited and appears to be mainly event-driven. For shallow, reef-fringed, coastal regions vulnerable to

  13. Bioavailability of cadmium, copper, mercury, lead, and zinc in subtropical coastal lagoons from the southeast Gulf of California using mangrove oysters (Crassostrea corteziensis and Crassostrea palmula).

    PubMed

    Páez-Osuna, Federico; Osuna-Martínez, Carmen C

    2015-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) were assessed in the edible tissues of Crassrotrea corteziensis oysters collected during the rainy and dry seasons in 27 sites from 8 coastal lagoons of the southeast Gulf of California. In addition, C. palmula oysters were sampled at 9 sites from the same mangrove roots where C. corteziensis oysters were collected. Metal analyses were performed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (Cd, Cu, and Zn), graphite furnace (Pb), and cold vapor detection (Hg). The obtained mean levels were (µg g(-1) dry weight) as follows: Cd 6.05 ± 2.77, Cu 60.0 ± 33.4, Hg 0.38 ± 0.17, Pb 1.11 ± 0.63, and Zn 777 ± 528 µg g(-1). For all metals except Hg, the concentrations were greater during dry season than during rainy seasons. The high levels, particularly that for Cd, were related to upwelling along the eastern Gulf of California. High Hg levels in the rainy season were associated with the transport of materials from the watershed to the lagoon. Shrimp farming, agriculture, and other sources were considered as potential sources to explain the differences in metal bioavailability in the 8 lagoons. The mean concentrations of Cd (Santa María-La Reforma lagoon), Cu [San Ignacio-Navachiste-El Macapule (SINM), Urías (URI), and Altata-Ensenada del Pabellón lagoons], and zinc (Zn) (URI, Santa María-Ohuira-Topolobampo, El Colorado, and SINM lagoons) during the dry season were greater than the maximum permissible limits. C. palmula collected in 8 sites where they were present simultaneously with C. corteziensis had consistently greater metal levels than C. corteziensis, but correlation analyses showed a high and significant (P < 0.05) correlation between metal concentrations in both species. The correlation equations obtained are useful where the same species is not distributed and is necessary to compare results from distinct regions.

  14. Vibrio splendidus biovar II as the causative agent of bacillary necrosis of Japanese oyster Crassostrea gigas larvae.

    PubMed

    Sugumar, G; Nakai, T; Hirata, Y; Matsubara, D; Muroga, K

    1998-06-19

    Recurrent outbreaks of a disease leading to mass mortalities in an oyster (Crassostrea gigas) hatchery located in western Japan were investigated. The disease occurred regularly in 2- to 8-d-old larvae and has been experimentally controlled in the hatchery by treating the larval rearing water with streptomycin, without ascertaining the etiological agent. The signs of the disease and the course of infection resembled bacillary necrosis reported in oysters and other bivalve molluscs in the USA and Europe. Quantitative and qualitative examinations of the bacterial flora of hatchery samples including source water, broodstock, larval feed and larvae revealed a very high total bacterial load and presumptive vibrios in diseased larvae. Further, the bacterial profile revealed that Vibrio spp. constituted approximately 60 to 95% of the bacteria isolated from infected larvae and most isolates were identified as V. splendidus biovar II and V. harveyi, suggesting their possible role in the disease. However, experimental challenges proved the pathogenicity of V. splendidus II. Several isolates of V. splendidus II from infected larvae were highly pathogenic, producing 100% mortality at levels of 10(5) cfu ml-1 in 24 h, while isolates from other sources demonstrated a low degree of virulence. Detection of V. splendidus II from broodstock, especially in the gonad of a few breeders, suggests the probability that broodstock could be the source and route of transmission of this pathogen.

  15. Susceptibility of gametes and embryos of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, to Karenia brevis and its toxins.

    PubMed

    Rolton, Anne; Soudant, Philippe; Vignier, Julien; Pierce, Richard; Henry, Michael; Shumway, Sandra E; Bricelj, V Monica; Volety, Aswani K

    2015-06-01

    The bivalve mollusc, Crassostrea virginica, is frequently exposed to blooms of Karenia brevis along the west coast of Florida during periods of spawning and early larval development. A continuous 4-day exposure of gametes and 2-4 cell stage embryos of C. virginica to whole-cell and culture filtrate of K. brevis at 500 and 5000 cells mL(-1), was followed by a 4-day 'recovery' period. Larval growth, percent of normal, abnormal and dead larvae, and the presence of food in the larval gut were measured throughout the exposure period. Results suggest that negative effects mainly occur during embryogenesis and early development. Damage to feeding apparatus/gut may occur during embryonic development or exposure to toxins may act as a feeding deterrent on non-toxic algae. Following 2-h in vitro exposure of gametes, differences in oocyte and sperm cell parameters were investigated using flow cytometry. The reduced sperm viability in the whole-cell 5000 cells mL(-1) treatment suggests the involvement of extracellular brevetoxins (PbTx) and perhaps other harmful, uncharacterized compounds associated with the K. brevis cell membrane. The cumulative effects of reduced sperm viability, fertilization success, embryonic and larval survival, and the near-annual exposure to blooms of K. brevis could cause significant bottlenecks on oyster recruitment.

  16. Are oysters being bored to death? Influence of Cliona celata on Crassostrea virginica condition, growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Carroll, John M; O'Shaughnessy, Kathryn A; Diedrich, Grant A; Finelli, Christopher M

    2015-11-17

    The boring sponge Cliona celata is a nuisance species that can have deleterious effects on eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica growth, condition, and survival. Surprisingly, however, these effects have not been well documented and when examined, results have been equi-vocal. In this study, we provide a direct comparison of growth, condition, and survival of sponge-colonized and uncolonized oysters in southeast North Carolina in 2 separate experiments. In the first experiment, sponge-colonized oysters exhibited significantly slower growth rates, reduced condition, and lower survival relative to uncolonized oysters, although results may have been confounded by oyster source. In the second experiment, using smaller oysters from the same source population, growth rate was again significantly reduced in colonized oysters relative to uncolonized oysters, however neither condition nor survival differed. In field surveys of the same population, colonized individuals across a range of sizes demonstrated significantly reduced condition. Further, condition index was negatively correlated with sponge biomass, which was positively correlated with oyster size, suggesting that the impact of the sponge changes with ontogeny. By investigating clearance rates, tissue isotopic and nutrient content, as well as caloric value, this study provides further evidence that sponge presence causes the oysters to divert energy into costly shell maintenance and repair at the expense of shell and somatic growth. Thus, although variable, our results demonstrate negative impacts of sponge infestation on oyster demographics, particularly as oysters grow larger. PMID:26575154

  17. Novel quantitative TaqMan® MGB real-time PCR for sensitive detection of Vibrio aestuarianus in Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    McCleary, S; Henshilwood, K

    2015-06-01

    Validation of a novel quantitative real-time PCR using TaqMan® minor groove binder (MGB) chemistry is described for sensitive and rapid detection of Vibrio aestuarianus, an increasingly important pathogen of Pacific cupped oyster Crassostrea gigas aquaculture. Primers and TaqMan® MGB hydrolysis probe were designed to specifically amplify a 58bp DNA fragment of the V. aestuarianus dnaJ gene. Real-time PCR selectivity was empirically tested using DNA extracted from isolates of V. aestuarianus and a selection of different aquatic bacterial species, including other Vibrio spp. Theoretical selectivity was assessed through sequence comparison using the NCBI BLAST similarity tool. Quantitative PCR plasmid standards were generated to test assay linearity, amplification efficiency and the limit of quantitation (LOQ), according to International Organisation for Standardisation ISO 16140 validation recommendations. LOQ ranged between 5 and 10 PCR copies, although the detection range extended beyond this with reduced precision. Applied performance was tested using C. gigas samples taken from a selection of Irish aquaculture sites. Increasing levels of V. aestuarianus, accompanied by the development of tissue pathology in examined oysters, were found at 1 site that was sampled repeatedly in 2013. Rapid, sensitive and reproducible detections of V. aestuarianus from C. gigas tissue samples were attained during this validation study with a small sample size, and a practical application for disease management is described.

  18. Genetic Variation and Breeding Signature in Mass Selection Lines of the Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) Assessed by SNP Markers

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiaoxiao; Feng, Dandan; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng; Li, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In breeding industries, a challenging problem is how to keep genetic diversity over generations. To investigate genetic variation and identify breeding signatures in mass selected lines of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), three sixth-generation selected lines and four wild populations were assessed using 103 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. The genetic diversity data indicated that the selected lines exhibited a significant reduction in the observed heterozygosity and observed number of alleles per locus compared with the wild populations (P≤0.05), indicating the selected lines tended to lose genetic diversity contrasted with the wild populations. The unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) analysis showed that the wild populations and selected lines were not separated into two groups. Using four outlier tests, a total of 17 loci were found under selection at two levels. The global outlier detection suggested that 4 common outlier loci were subject to selection using both the hierarchical island model and Bayesian likelihood approaches. At regional level, 3 SNPs were detected as outlier using at least two outlier tests and one outlier SNP (CgSNP309) was overlapped in the two wild-selected population comparisons. The candidate outlier SNPs provide valuable resources for future association studies in C. gigas. PMID:26954577

  19. Identification two novel nacrein-like proteins involved in the shell formation of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaorui; Wang, Xiaotong; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-07-01

    Nacrein-like proteins have carbonic anhydrase (CA)-like domains, but their coding regions are flanked by inserted repeat sequence, such as Gly-X-Asn. Reportedly, nacrein-like proteins show the highest similarity to human carbonic anhydrase 1(α-CA1), possess CA catalytic functions, and play a key role in shell biomineralization. In the present study, two novel nacrein-like proteins were firstly identified from the shell-forming mantle of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. With numerous analyses, it was identified and characterized that both the nacrein-like proteins F1 and F2 were secreted and most closely related to the nacrein-like protein of California mussel Mytilus californianus via phylogenetic analysis. RT-PCR analysis showed that the nacrein-like proteins F1 and F2 were expressed in multiple tissues and the expression levels remarkably rose after entering the spat stage, which were basically consistent with the increase of calcite fractions in the total shell volume. Surprisingly, the Gly-X-Asn repeat domain, which is distinctive in most nacrein-like proteins, was absent in the two newly identified nacrein-like proteins in C. gigas and replaced with a series of acidic amino acids (D/E). Regardless, nacrein-like proteins in mollusks seem to be vital to the deposition of calcium carbonate and likely perform diverse functions. PMID:24584662

  20. Spatio-temporal variations in biological performances and summer mortality of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in Normandy (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costil, Katherine; Royer, Juliette; Ropert, Michel; Soletchnik, Patrick; Mathieu, Michel

    2005-11-01

    Mortality and biological performances of half-grown Crassostrea gigas were studied from spring 2000 to autumn 2001 at six instrumented stations located in two areas (Gefosse and Grandcamp) of the Bay of Veys (Normandy). Shell and meat growth, condition indexes and a macroscopic maturity index were determined on oysters deployed at the six stations in order to assess spatial variability in the influence of environmental conditions. In addition, histological and biochemical analyses were performed in order to determine the sex and establish the reproductive cycle (at all six sites) and the biochemical composition (at four stations). The data set including monthly mean temperatures and data provided by examination of 2,837 oysters were analysed by Principal Component Analysis and a Hierarchical Ascending Clustering which resulted in the formation of four clusters. The highest station on the shoreline belonged to a cluster characterized notably by low total weight due to a short immersion/feeding period, whereas all other stations belonged to another single cluster. Nevertheless, various biological differences were found between these stations, e.g. the reproductive cycle was generally synchronized throughout the bay but some differences relative to spawning occurrence were observed. In 2000, oyster mortality was higher at Gefosse than at Grandcamp, the latter being a more marine area. In 2001, oyster mortalities were significantly higher and all stations were strongly affected. In the Bay of Veys, oyster biological performances and mortality thus showed spatio-temporal variations which were worthy to be discussed.

  1. A fully-spatial ecosystem-DEB model of oyster (Crassostrea virginica) carrying capacity in the Richibucto Estuary, Eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filgueira, R.; Guyondet, T.; Comeau, L. A.; Grant, J.

    2014-08-01

    The success of shellfish aquaculture as well as its sustainability relies on adjusting the cultured biomass to local ecosystem characteristics. Oyster filter-feeding activity can control phytoplankton concentration, reaching severe depletion in extreme situations, which can threaten ecological sustainability. A better understanding of oyster-phytoplankton interaction can be achieved by constructing ecosystem models. In this study, a fully-spatial hydrodynamic biogeochemical model has been constructed for the Richibucto Estuary in order to explore oyster carrying capacity. The biogeochemical model was based on a classical nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) approach with the addition of a Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model of Crassostrea virginica. Natural variation of chlorophyll was used as a benchmark to define a sustainability threshold based on a resilience framework. Scenario building was applied to explore carrying capacity of the system. However, the complex geomorphology of the Richibucto Estuary and the associated heterogeneity in water residence time, which is integral in estuarine functioning, indicate that the carrying capacity assessment must be specific for each area of the system. The model outcomes suggest that water residence time plays a key role in carrying capacity estimations through its influence on ecological resistance.

  2. Exposure to the neurotoxic dinoflagellate, Alexandrium catenella, induces apoptosis of the hemocytes of the oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Medhioub, Walid; Ramondenc, Simon; Vanhove, Audrey Sophie; Vergnes, Agnes; Masseret, Estelle; Savar, Veronique; Amzil, Zouher; Laabir, Mohamed; Rolland, Jean Luc

    2013-12-01

    This study assessed the apoptotic process occurring in the hemocytes of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, exposed to Alexandrium catenella, a paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) producer. Oysters were experimentally exposed during 48 h to the toxic algae. PSTs accumulation, the expression of 12 key apoptotic-related genes, as well as the variation of the number of hemocytes in apoptosis was measured at time intervals during the experiment. Results show a significant increase of the number of hemocytes in apoptosis after 29 h of exposure. Two pro-apoptotic genes (Bax and Bax-like) implicated in the mitochondrial pathway were significantly upregulated at 21 h followed by the overexpression of two caspase executor genes (caspase-3 and caspase-7) at 29 h, suggesting that the intrinsic pathway was activated. No modulation of the expression of genes implicated in the cell signaling Fas-Associated protein with Death Domain (FADD) and initiation-phase (caspase-2) was observed, suggesting that only the extrinsic pathway was not activated. Moreover, the clear time-dependent upregulation of five (Bcl2, BI-1, IAP1, IAP7B and Hsp70) inhibitors of apoptosis-related genes associated with the return to the initial number of hemocytes in apoptosis at 48 h of exposure suggests the involvement of strong regulatory mechanisms of apoptosis occurring in the hemocytes of the Pacific oyster.

  3. Metal-binding protein in the pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas: assessment of the protein as a biochemical environmental indicator

    SciTech Connect

    Imber, B.E.; Thompson, J.A.J.; Ward, S.

    1987-04-01

    In this paper the determination of metal-binding proteins (MBP) in the Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is reported. The objectives of this study were to employ a simple, cost-effective method for quantifying MBP and to assess this parameter for possible use as an indicator of identifiable sources of metal input to biological systems. Abnormally high quantities of zinc had been found previously in C. gigas growing in waters adjacent to the Kraft pump mill at Crofton, British Columbia. From 1971 to 1973 oysters near the effluent outfalls were found to have body-burden zinc six to ten times the zinc concentrations found in reference specimens. Zinc dithionite was used in the pulping process at the mill until 1973. Subsequent to a change to sodium dithionite, concentrations of zinc in oysters decreased steadily. A second potential source of contamination is sited directly south of the pulp mill. In this case, leaching of copper and zinc from smelter slag into Osborn Bay has been identified.

  4. Cloning and expression analysis of a ubiquitin gene ( Ub L40 ) in the haemocytes of Crassostrea hongkongensis under bacterial challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Dingkun; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin, a highly conserved stress-related protein, is assigned multiple functions, such as DNA processing, protein degradation, and ribosome synthesis. The Crassostrea hongkongensis ubiquitin gene (designated ChUb L40 ) was cloned by a combination of suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of ChUb L40 is 496 bp in length, consisting of a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 34 bp, a 3'-UTR of 75 bp and an open reading frame of 387 bp encoding a ubiquitin fusion protein of 128 amino acids. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of ChUb L40 reveals that Ub L40 is highly conservative during evolution. The expression patterns of ChUb L40 gene in various tissues were examined by real-time PCR. The expression level of ChUb L40 in haemocytes is down-regulated at 4 h and gradually returned to its original level from 6 h to 24 h after Vibrio alginolyticus challenge. Our results suggest that ChUb L40 is ubiquitously expressed and plays an important role in immune defense against bacterial challenge.

  5. Role and Value of Nitrogen Regulation Provided by Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) in the Mission-Aransas Estuary, Texas, USA

    PubMed Central

    Beseres Pollack, Jennifer; Yoskowitz, David; Kim, Hae-Cheol; Montagna, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Suspension-feeding activities of oysters impart a potentially significant benefit to estuarine ecosystems via reduction of water column nutrients, plankton and seston biomass, and primary productivity which can have a significant impact on human well-being. This study considered nitrogen regulation by eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica in the Mission-Aransas Estuary, Texas, USA, as a function of denitrification, burial, and physical transport from the system via harvest. Oyster reefs were estimated to remove 502.5 kg N km−2 through denitrification of biodeposits and 251.3 kg N km−2 in burial of biodeposits to sediments. Nitrogen is also physically transported out of the estuary via harvest of oysters. Commercial harvest of oysters in the Mission-Aransas Estuary can remove approximately 21,665 kg N per year via physical transport from the system. We developed a transferable method to value the service of nitrogen regulation by oysters, where the potential cost equivalent value of nitrogen regulation is quantified via cost estimates for a constructed biological nutrient removal (BNR) supplement to a wastewater treatment plant. The potential annual engineered cost equivalent of the service of nitrogen regulation and removal provided by reefs in the Mission-Aransas Estuary is $293,993 yr−1. Monetizing ecosystem services can help increase awareness at the stakeholder level of the importance of oysters beyond commercial fishery values alone. PMID:23762341

  6. Colonisation of the non-indigenous Pacific oyster crassostrea gigas determined by predation, size and initial settlement densities.

    PubMed

    Hedge, Luke H; Johnston, Emma L

    2014-01-01

    Survival of incipient non-indigenous populations is dramatically altered by early predation on new colonisers. These effects can be influenced by morphological traits, such as coloniser size and density. The Australian non-native Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas is generally more fecund and faster growing compared to the native Saccostrea glomerata found in the same habitat. It is therefore important to quantify how the two species differ in survival across coloniser density and predation gradients. This information could become pertinent to the management of wild and aquaculture populations of the non-native C. gigas. Using a field-based factorial experiment we model the survival of incipient populations of both the native S. glomerata and the non-indigenous C. gigas as a function of coloniser density, predator reduction and individual size. Unexpectedly, survival of the non-indigenous C. gigas increased compared to S. glomerata when individuals were larger. The proportional survival of newly colonised oyster populations also increased with larger initial populations, regardless of species identity. Further, predator reduction resulted in increased survival of both oyster species, irrespective of coloniser size or initial density. Here we quantitatively demonstrate the effects of recruit density and size on enhancing the survivability of incipient oyster populations.

  7. Exposure to the Neurotoxic Dinoflagellate, Alexandrium catenella, Induces Apoptosis of the Hemocytes of the Oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Medhioub, Walid; Ramondenc, Simon; Vanhove, Audrey Sophie; Vergnes, Agnes; Masseret, Estelle; Savar, Veronique; Amzil, Zouher; Laabir, Mohamed; Rolland, Jean Luc

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the apoptotic process occurring in the hemocytes of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, exposed to Alexandrium catenella, a paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) producer. Oysters were experimentally exposed during 48 h to the toxic algae. PSTs accumulation, the expression of 12 key apoptotic-related genes, as well as the variation of the number of hemocytes in apoptosis was measured at time intervals during the experiment. Results show a significant increase of the number of hemocytes in apoptosis after 29 h of exposure. Two pro-apoptotic genes (Bax and Bax-like) implicated in the mitochondrial pathway were significantly upregulated at 21 h followed by the overexpression of two caspase executor genes (caspase-3 and caspase-7) at 29 h, suggesting that the intrinsic pathway was activated. No modulation of the expression of genes implicated in the cell signaling Fas-Associated protein with Death Domain (FADD) and initiation-phase (caspase-2) was observed, suggesting that only the extrinsic pathway was not activated. Moreover, the clear time-dependent upregulation of five (Bcl2, BI-1, IAP1, IAP7B and Hsp70) inhibitors of apoptosis-related genes associated with the return to the initial number of hemocytes in apoptosis at 48 h of exposure suggests the involvement of strong regulatory mechanisms of apoptosis occurring in the hemocytes of the Pacific oyster. PMID:24317471

  8. The Nervous System Control of Lateral Ciliary Activity of the Gill of the Bivalve Mollusc, Crassostrea virginica

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Margaret A.; Catapane, Edward J.

    2007-01-01

    Lateral cilia of the gill of Mytilus edulis are controlled by a reciprocal serotonergic-dopaminergic innervation from their ganglia. Other bivalves have been studied to lesser degrees and lateral cilia of most respond to serotonin and dopamine when applied directly to the gill indicating a possible neuro or endocrine mechanism. Lateral cilia in Crassostrea virginica are affected by serotonin and dopamine, but little work has been done regarding ganglionic control of their cilia. We examined the role of the cerebral and visceral ganglia in innervating the lateral ciliated cells of the gill epithelium of C. virginica. Ciliary beating rates were measured in preparations which had the ipsilateral cerebral or visceral ganglia attached. Superfusion of the cerebral or visceral ganglia with serotonin increased ciliary beating rates which was antagonized by pretreating with methysergide. Superfusion with dopamine decreased beating rates and was antagonized by ergonovine. This study demonstrates there is a reciprocal serotonergic-dopaminergic innervation of the lateral ciliated cells, similar to that of M. edulis, originating in the cerebral and visceral ganglia of the animal and this preparation is a useful model to study regulatory mechanisms of ciliary activity as well as the pharmacology of drugs affecting biogenic amines in nervous systems. PMID:17616414

  9. The Neurotoxic Effects of Manganese on the Dopaminergic Innervation of the Gill of the Bivalve Mollusc, Crassostrea virginica

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kesha; Huggins, Turkesha; King, Candice; Carroll, Margaret A.; Catapane, Edward J.

    2008-01-01

    We examined effects of manganese on the nervous system and innervation of lateral cilia of Crassostrea virginica. While essential in trace amounts, tissue manganese accumulation is neurotoxic, inducing Manganism, a Parkinson’s-like disease in humans. Lateral cilia of the gill of C. virginica are controlled by a reciprocal serotonergic-dopaminergic innervation from their ganglia. Oysters were incubated 3 days in the presence of up to 1 mM manganese, followed by superfusion of the cerebral ganglia, visceral ganglia or gill with dopamine or serotonin. Beating rates of cilia were measured by stroboscopic microscopy of isolated gill preparations or gill preparations with the ipsilateral cerebral and/or visceral ganglia attached. Acute manganese treatments impaired the dopaminergic, cilio-inhibitory system, while having no effect on the serotonergic, cilio-excitatory system, which is in agreement with the proposed mechanism of manganese toxicity in humans. Manganese treatments also decreased endogenous dopamine levels in the cerebral and visceral ganglia, and gills, but not serotonin levels. We demonstrated that manganese disrupts the animal’s dopaminergic system, and also that this preparation can be used to investigate mechanisms that underlie manganese neurotoxcity. It also may serve as a model in pharmacological studies of drugs to treat or prevent Manganism and other dopaminergic cell disorders. PMID:18547869

  10. Genetic Variation and Breeding Signature in Mass Selection Lines of the Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) Assessed by SNP Markers.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaoxiao; Feng, Dandan; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng; Li, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In breeding industries, a challenging problem is how to keep genetic diversity over generations. To investigate genetic variation and identify breeding signatures in mass selected lines of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), three sixth-generation selected lines and four wild populations were assessed using 103 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. The genetic diversity data indicated that the selected lines exhibited a significant reduction in the observed heterozygosity and observed number of alleles per locus compared with the wild populations (P≤0.05), indicating the selected lines tended to lose genetic diversity contrasted with the wild populations. The unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) analysis showed that the wild populations and selected lines were not separated into two groups. Using four outlier tests, a total of 17 loci were found under selection at two levels. The global outlier detection suggested that 4 common outlier loci were subject to selection using both the hierarchical island model and Bayesian likelihood approaches. At regional level, 3 SNPs were detected as outlier using at least two outlier tests and one outlier SNP (CgSNP309) was overlapped in the two wild-selected population comparisons. The candidate outlier SNPs provide valuable resources for future association studies in C. gigas.

  11. Molecular cloning of two molluscan caspases and gene functional analysis during Crassostrea angulata (Fujian oyster) larval metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingye; Li, Lingling; Pu, Fei; You, Weiwei; Huang, Heqing; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-05-01

    Caspases have been demonstrated to possess important functions in apoptosis and immune system in vertebrate. But there is less information reported on the oyster larval development. In the present work, two full-length molluscan caspase genes, named Cacaspase-2 and Cacaspase-3, were characterized for the first time from Fujian oyster, Crassostrea angulata. Which respectively encode two predicted proteins both containing two caspase domains of p20 and p10 including the cysteine active site pentapeptide "QACRG" and the histidine active site signature. Otherwise Cacaspase-2 also contains a caspase recruitment domain. Homology and phylogenetic analysis showed that Cacaspase-2 shared high similarity with initiator caspase-2 groups, but Cacaspase-3 clustered together with executioner caspase-3 groups. Cacaspase-2 and Cacaspase-3 mRNA were both highly expressed in gills and labial palp and were significantly expressed highly in larvae during settlement and metamorphosis. Through the whole mount in situ hybridization, the location of Cacaspase-2 is in the foot of the oyster larvae and the location of Cacaspase-3 is in both the foot and velum tissues. These results implied that Cacaspase-2 and Cacaspase-3 genes play a key role in the loss of foot and Cacaspase-3 gene has an important function in the loss of velum during larvae metamorphosis in C. angulata.

  12. Radiation resistances and decontamination of common pathogenic bacteria contaminated in white scar oyster ( Crassostrea belcheri) in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thupila, Nunticha; Ratana-arporn, Pattama; Wilaipun, Pongtep

    2011-07-01

    In Thailand, white scar oyster ( Crassostrea belcheri) was ranked for premium quality, being most expensive and of high demand. This oyster is often eaten raw, hence it may pose health hazards to consumers when contaminated with food-borne pathogens. As limited alternative methods are available to sterilize the oyster while preserving the raw characteristic, irradiation may be considered as an effective method for decontamination. In this study, the radiation resistance of pathogenic bacteria commonly contaminating the oyster and the optimum irradiation doses for sterilization of the most radiation resistant bacteria were investigated. The radiation decimal reduction doses ( D10) of Salmonella Weltevreden DMST 33380, Vibrio parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802 and Vibrio vulnificus DMST 5852 were determined in broth culture and inoculated oyster homogenate. The D10 values of S. Weltevreden, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in broth culture were 0.154, 0.132 and 0.059 kGy, while those of inoculated oyster homogenate were 0.330, 0.159 and 0.140 kGy, respectively. It was found that among the pathogens tested, S. Weltevreden was proved to be the most resistant species. An irradiation dose of 1.5 kGy reduced the counts of 10 5 CFU/g S. Weltevreden inoculated in oyster meat to an undetectable level. The present study indicated that a low-dose irradiation can improve the microbial quality of oyster and further reduce the risks from the food-borne pathogens without adversely affecting the sensory attributes.

  13. Inheritance mode of microsatellite loci and their use for kinship analysis in the Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yu, Ruihai

    2008-08-01

    Five full-sib families of the Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) larvae were used to study the mode of inheritance at eight microsatellite loci, and the feasibility of these markers for kinship estimate was also examined. All eight microsatellite loci were compatible with Mendelian inheritance. Neither evidence of sex-linked barriers to transmission nor evidence of major barriers to fertilization between gametes from the parents was shown. Three of the eight loci showed the presence of null alleles in four families, demonstrating the need to conduct comprehensive species-specific inheritance studies for microsatellite loci used in population genetic studies. Although the null allele heterozygotes were considered as homozygotes in the calculation of genetic distance, offspring from five full-sib families were unambiguously discriminated in the neighbor-joining dendrogram. This result indicates that the microsatellite markers may be capable of discriminating between related and unrelated oyster larvae in the absence of pedigree information, and is applicable to the investigation of the effective number of parents contributing to the hatchery population of the Pacific oyster.

  14. An EGFR gene of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas functions in wound healing and promotes cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingling; Huan, Pin; Wang, Hongxia; Liu, Fengsong; Liu, Baozhong

    2014-05-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an important receptor tyrosine kinase member in animals, which plays versatile functions in development, growth, tissue regeneration etc. Current knowledge on EGFR is poor in bivalve mollusks. In this study, we cloned and analyzed an EGFR gene from the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (cgegfr). A 5,731 bp full-length cDNA of cgegfr was obtained, encoding a peptide with 1,494 amino acids which exhibited a typical EGFR structure, including an extracellular region, a single transmembrane region and an intracellular region. A conserved tyrosine kinase domain was predicted in the intracellular region, while the extracellular region responsible for ligand binding showed comparatively poor conservation. Expression analysis revealed that cgefgr was expressed widely in C. gigas tissues and a highest expression level was observed in adductor tissue. Expression of cgegfr was revealed to be up-regulated during wound healing of mantle, indicating that EGFR might function in the cell proliferation and migration during wound healing. Further functional analysis of cgegfr was conducted in mouse myoblast cell line C2C12, in which different parts of cgegfr were expressed and their effects were measured. The results revealed that cgegfr was able to accelerate cell proliferation of C2C12 cells and the transmembrane region was necessary for self-activation of truncated cgegfr. Our results would provide supports for further studies on the roles of cgegfr in development and growth in C. gigas.

  15. Impacts of Deepwater Horizon oil and associated dispersant on early development of the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Vignier, J; Donaghy, L; Soudant, P; Chu, F L E; Morris, J M; Carney, M W; Lay, C; Krasnec, M; Robert, R; Volety, A K

    2015-11-15

    The explosion of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil platform resulted in large amounts of crude oil and dispersant Corexit 9500A® released into the Gulf of Mexico and coincided with the spawning season of the oyster, Crassostrea virginica. The effects of exposing gametes and embryos of C. virginica to dispersant alone (Corexit), mechanically (HEWAF) and chemically dispersed (CEWAF) DWH oil were evaluated. Fertilization success and the morphological development, growth, and survival of larvae were assessed. Gamete exposure reduced fertilization (HEWAF: EC201h=1650μg tPAH50L(-1); CEWAF: EC201h=19.4μg tPAH50L(-1); Corexit: EC201h=6.9mgL(-1)). CEWAF and Corexit showed a similar toxicity on early life stages at equivalent nominal concentrations. Oysters exposed from gametes to CEWAF and Corexit experienced more deleterious effects than oysters exposed from embryos. Results suggest the presence of oil and dispersant during oyster spawning season may interfere with larval development and subsequent recruitment. PMID:26320981

  16. Effect of parasitism by the pyramidellid gastropod Boonea impressa on the net productivity of oysters ( Crassostrea virginica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. E.; Powell, E. N.; Ray, S. M.

    1988-04-01

    The effect of an ectoparasitic gastropod, Boonea (= Odostomia) impressa, on the energy bidget of its host, the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, was examined. A model was developed from laboratory and field data, as well as from equations developed by Powell and Stanton (1985). The model predicted that net productivity by large (7 cm length) oysters parasitized by 10 and 30 large (6 mm length) snails would be reduced by 21% and 63%, respectively. In contrast, net productivity in small (3 cm length) oysters would be reduced 25% by only 3 snails. Small oysters would have a negative energy balance when parasitized by 10 snails. The predicted reduction in growth was compared with measured growth in small and large oysters parasitized at abundances typical of Texas oyster reefs. Control oysters (no parasites) gained more shell weight than parasitized oysters. In four-week experiments conducted during the spring and fall, small control oysters gained 86% and 75% more weight than highly parasitized oysters. Large control oysters had 29% and 88% more shell deposition. Snail parasitism produced 75% mortality in small, highly parasitized oysters in the summer. In typical field populations in Texas bays, a minimal estimate of 4-12% of the energy otherwise available to the oyster for growth and reproduction is consumed by Boonea impressa.

  17. Multi-species protein similarity clustering reveals novel expanded immune gene families in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Ian C; Modak, Tejashree H; Lane, Chris E; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta

    2016-06-01

    Comparative genomics research in non-model species has highlighted how invertebrate hosts possess complex diversified repertoires of immune molecules. The levels of diversification in particular immune gene families appear to differ between invertebrate lineages and even between species within lineages, reflecting differences not only in evolutionary histories, but also in life histories, environmental niches, and pathogen exposures. The goal of this research was to identify immune-related gene families experiencing high levels of diversification in eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica. Families containing 1) transcripts differentially expressed in eastern oysters in response to bacterial challenge and 2) a larger number of transcripts compared to other species included those coding for the C1q and C-type lectin domain containing proteins (C1qDC and CTLDC), GTPase of the immune-associated proteins (GIMAP), scavenger receptors (SR), fibrinogen-C domain containing proteins (also known as FREPs), dopamine beta-hydrolase (DBH), interferon-inducible 44 (IFI44), serine protease inhibitors, apextrin, and dermatopontin. Phylogenetic analysis of two of the families significantly expanded in bivalves, IFI44 and GIMAP, showed a patchy distribution within both protostomes and deuterostomes, suggesting multiple independent losses and lineage-specific expansions. Increased availability of genomic information for a broader range of non-model species broadly distributed through vertebrate and invertebrate phyla will likely lead to improved knowledge on mechanisms of immune-gene diversification. PMID:27033806

  18. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Full-Length cDNA of Calmodulin Gene from Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing-Xia; Yu, Wen-Chao; Cai, Zhong-Qiang; He, Cheng; Wei, Na

    2016-01-01

    The shell of the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata) mainly comprises aragonite whereas that of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is mainly calcite, thereby suggesting the different mechanisms of shell formation between above two mollusks. Calmodulin (CaM) is an important gene for regulating the uptake, transport, and secretion of calcium during the process of shell formation in pearl oyster. It is interesting to characterize the CaM in oysters, which could facilitate the understanding of the different shell formation mechanisms among mollusks. We cloned the full-length cDNA of Pacific oyster CaM (cgCaM) and found that the cgCaM ORF encoded a peptide of 113 amino acids containing three EF-hand calcium-binding domains, its expression level was highest in the mantle, hinting that the cgCaM gene is probably involved in shell formation of Pacific oyster, and the common ancestor of Gastropoda and Bivalvia may possess at least three CaM genes. We also found that the numbers of some EF hand family members in highly calcified species were higher than those in lowly calcified species and the numbers of these motifs in oyster genome were the highest among the mollusk species with whole genome sequence, further hinting the correlation between CaM and biomineralization. PMID:27703977

  19. Effects of air-exposure gradients on spatial infection patterns of Perkinsus marinus in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Malek, Jennafer C; Breitburg, Denise L

    2016-02-25

    Spatial distributions of species can be shaped by factors such as parasites, mortality, and reproduction, all of which may be influenced by differences in physical factors along environmental gradients. In nearshore tidal waters, an elevational gradient in aerial exposure during low tide can shape the spatial distributions of benthic marine organisms. The eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica is an ecologically and economically important species that can dominate both subtidal and intertidal habitats along the east coast of the USA. Our goal was to determine whether prevalence and intensity of Perkinsus marinus (the causative agent of Dermo disease) infections vary along intertidal to subtidal gradients during summer. We used (1) field experiments conducted at 4 sites in the Chesapeake Bay and a Virginia coastal bay, (2) a controlled air-exposure experiment, and (3) field surveys from 7 sites ranging from Maine to North Carolina to test for effects of tidal exposure on infection. Results from our field surveys suggested that high intertidal oysters tend to have higher infection prevalence than subtidal oysters, but there was no effect on infection intensity. Field experiments rarely yielded significant effects of tidal exposure on infection prevalence and intensity. Overall, our study shows that exposure to air may not be a strong driver of infection patterns in this host-parasite system.

  20. Genomic Analysis of the Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) Reveals Possible Conservation of Vertebrate Sex Determination in a Mollusc

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Xu, Fei; Guo, Ximing

    2014-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of sex in animal kingdom, we have only limited understanding of how sex is determined and evolved in many taxa. The mollusc Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas exhibits complex modes of sexual reproduction that consists of protandric dioecy, sex change, and occasional hermaphroditism. This complex system is controlled by both environmental and genetic factors through unknown molecular mechanisms. In this study, we investigated genes related to sex-determining pathways in C. gigas through transcriptome sequencing and analysis of female and male gonads. Our analysis identified or confirmed novel homologs in the oyster of key sex-determining genes (SoxH or Sry-like and FoxL2) that were thought to be vertebrate-specific. Their expression profile in C. gigas is consistent with conserved roles in sex determination, under a proposed model where a novel testis-determining CgSoxH may serve as a primary regulator, directly or indirectly interacting with a testis-promoting CgDsx and an ovary-promoting CgFoxL2. Our findings plus previous results suggest that key vertebrate sex-determining genes such as Sry and FoxL2 may not be inventions of vertebrates. The presence of such genes in a mollusc with expression profiles consistent with expected roles in sex determination suggest that sex determination may be deeply conserved in animals, despite rapid evolution of the regulatory pathways that in C. gigas may involve both genetic and environmental factors. PMID:25213692

  1. Population genomics shed light on the demographic and adaptive histories of European invasion in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Rohfritsch, Audrey; Bierne, Nicolas; Boudry, Pierre; Heurtebise, Serge; Cornette, Florence; Lapègue, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Crassostrea gigas originated from the Pacific coast of Asia, but was introduced into several European countries in the early 1970s. Natural populations have now spread across the length of the western seaboard of Europe. To elucidate the demographic and selective processes at play during this rapid expansion, genome-scan analysis was performed on different populations. High diversities and low differentiation were observed overall, but significant genetic differentiation was found among newly established populations and between the newly established northern group and a nearly panmictic group composed of southern European populations and a population from Japan. Loss of genetic diversity was also seen in the north, likely caused by founder events during colonization. The few strongly supported outlier loci revealed a genetic structure uncorrelated with the north/south differentiation, but grouping two samples from the Danish fjords (northern group) and one from the Dutch Scheldt estuary (southern group) with the one from Japan. These findings might reflect the following: (i) parallel adaptation to similar environmental pressures (fjord-like environment) within each of the two groups or (ii) a footprint of a secondary introduction of an alternative genomic background maintained by multifarious isolation factors. Our results call for a closer examination of adaptive genetic structure in the area of origin. PMID:24187588

  2. Occurrence and seasonality of Vibrio aestuarianus in sediment and Crassostrea gigas haemolymph at two oyster farms in France.

    PubMed

    Azandégbé, Afi; Garnier, Matthieu; Andrieux-Loyer, Françoise; Kérouel, Roger; Philippon, Xavier; Nicolas, Jean-Louis

    2010-09-17

    Vibrio aestuarianus is frequently found in coastal areas and can infect and induce mortalities in the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. However, nothing is known about its distribution and seasonality in the estuarine environment, especially where oyster farming is practiced. Its occurrence was investigated in sediment and oyster haemolymph at 2 oyster farms in Brittany (France) over 2 yr during 2 periods, from June to September 2007 and from February to June 2008. Total heterotrophic bacteria (HB) were cultured on marine agar while total Vibrio spp. and V aestuarianus were selectively numerated using thiosulfate citrate bile salts sucrose agar (TCBS agar) and the species-specific hybridisation method, respectively. PCR was performed to detect V aestuarianus in sediment when it became unculturable. Both total Vibrio spp. and V aestuarianus had a seasonal trend. The highest concentrations were recovered in the warmest months. Its abundance ranged from 10(2) to 4 x 10(5) CFU ml(-1) in haemolymph and from 10(3) to 1 x 10(4) CFU g(-1) in the sediment. Temperature was the main factor influencing the concentration of Vibrio spp. and V. aestuarianus in the sediment. Thus V aestuarianus might subsist during the cold seasons in the sediment, from which it can emerge when environmental conditions became favourable.

  3. Genomic analysis of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) reveals possible conservation of vertebrate sex determination in a mollusc.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Xu, Fei; Guo, Ximing

    2014-09-11

    Despite the prevalence of sex in animal kingdom, we have only limited understanding of how sex is determined and evolved in many taxa. The mollusc Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas exhibits complex modes of sexual reproduction that consists of protandric dioecy, sex change, and occasional hermaphroditism. This complex system is controlled by both environmental and genetic factors through unknown molecular mechanisms. In this study, we investigated genes related to sex-determining pathways in C. gigas through transcriptome sequencing and analysis of female and male gonads. Our analysis identified or confirmed novel homologs in the oyster of key sex-determining genes (SoxH or Sry-like and FoxL2) that were thought to be vertebrate-specific. Their expression profile in C. gigas is consistent with conserved roles in sex determination, under a proposed model where a novel testis-determining CgSoxH may serve as a primary regulator, directly or indirectly interacting with a testis-promoting CgDsx and an ovary-promoting CgFoxL2. Our findings plus previous results suggest that key vertebrate sex-determining genes such as Sry and FoxL2 may not be inventions of vertebrates. The presence of such genes in a mollusc with expression profiles consistent with expected roles in sex determination suggest that sex determination may be deeply conserved in animals, despite rapid evolution of the regulatory pathways that in C. gigas may involve both genetic and environmental factors.

  4. The Kinome of Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas, Its Expression during Development and in Response to Environmental Factors.

    PubMed

    Epelboin, Yanouk; Quintric, Laure; Guévélou, Eric; Boudry, Pierre; Pichereau, Vianney; Corporeau, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Oysters play an important role in estuarine and coastal marine habitats, where the majority of humans live. In these ecosystems, environmental degradation is substantial, and oysters must cope with highly dynamic and stressful environmental constraints during their lives in the intertidal zone. The availability of the genome sequence of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas represents a unique opportunity for a comprehensive assessment of the signal transduction pathways that the species has developed to deal with this unique habitat. We performed an in silico analysis to identify, annotate and classify protein kinases in C. gigas, according to their kinase domain taxonomy classification, and compared with kinome already described in other animal species. The C. gigas kinome consists of 371 protein kinases, making it closely related to the sea urchin kinome, which has 353 protein kinases. The absence of gene redundancy in some groups of the C. gigas kinome may simplify functional studies of protein kinases. Through data mining of transcriptomes in C. gigas, we identified part of the kinome which may be central during development and may play a role in response to various environmental factors. Overall, this work contributes to a better understanding of key sensing pathways that may be central for adaptation to a highly dynamic marine environment. PMID:27231950

  5. High throughput sequencing of small RNAs transcriptomes in two Crassostrea oysters identifies microRNAs involved in osmotic stress response

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuelin; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng; Liu, Shikai; Li, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that microRNAs post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and are involved in responses to biotic and abiotic stress. However, the role of miRNAs involved in osmotic plasticity remains largely unknown in marine bivalves. In the present study, we performed low salinity challenge with two Crassostrea species (C. gigas and C. hongkongensis), and conducted high-throughput sequencing of four small RNA libraries constructed from the gill tissues. A total of 202 and 87 miRNAs were identified from C. gigas and C. hongkongensis, respectively. Six miRNAs in C. gigas and two in C. hongkongensis were differentially expressed in response to osmotic stress. The expression profiles of these eight miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. Based on GO enrichment and KEGG pathway analysis, genes associated with microtubule-based process and cellular component movement were enriched in both species. In addition, five miRNA-mRNA interaction pairs that showed opposite expression patterns were identified in the C. hongkongensis, Differential expression analysis identified the miRNAs that play important regulatory roles in response to low salinity stress, providing insights into molecular mechanisms that are essential for salinity tolerance in marine bivalves. PMID:26940974

  6. New resources for marine genomics: bacterial artificial chromosome libraries for the Eastern and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea virginica and C. gigas).

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Charles; Hikima, Jun-ichi; Jenny, Matthew J; Chapman, Robert W; Fang, Guang-Chen; Saski, Chris; Lundqvist, Mats L; Wing, Rod A; Cupit, Pauline M; Gross, Paul S; Warr, Greg W; Tomkins, Jeff P

    2006-01-01

    Large-insert genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries of two culturally and economically important oyster species, Crassostrea virginica and C. gigas, have been developed as part of an international effort to develop tools and reagents that will advance our ability to conduct genetic and genomic research. A total of 73,728 C. gigas clones with an average insert size of 152 kb were picked and arrayed representing an 11.8-fold genome coverage. A total of 55,296 clones with an average insert size of 150 kb were picked and arrayed for C. virginica, also representing an 11.8-fold genome coverage. The C. gigas and C. virginica libraries were screened with probes derived from selected oyster genes using high-density BAC colony filter arrays. The probes identified 4 to 25 clones per gene for C. virginica and 5 to 50 clones per gene for C. gigas. We conducted a preliminary analysis of genetic polymorphism represented in the C. gigas library. The results suggest that the degree of divergence among similar sequences is highly variable and concentrated in intronic regions. Evidence supporting allelic polymorphism is reported for two genes and allelic and/or locus specific polymorphism for several others. Classical inheritance studies are needed to confirm the nature of these polymorphisms. The oyster BAC libraries are publicly available to the research community on a cost-recovery basis at (www.genome.clemson.edu). PMID:16896533

  7. A Label-Free Proteomic Analysis on Competent Larvae and Juveniles of the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Pin; Wang, Hongxia; Liu, Baozhong

    2015-01-01

    Current understandings on the molecular mechanisms underlying bivalve metamorphosis are still fragmentary, and a comprehensive description is required. In this study, using a large-scale label-free proteomic approach, we described and compared the proteomes of competent larvae (CL) and juveniles (JU) of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. A total of 788 proteins were identified: 392 in the CL proteome and 636 in the JU proteome. Gene Ontology analysis of the proteome from each sample revealed active metabolic processes in both stages. Further quantitative analyses revealed 117 proteins that were differentially expressed between the two samples. These proteins were divided into eight groups: cytoskeleton and cell adhesion, protein synthesis and degradation, immunity and stress response, development of particular tissues, signal regulation, metabolism and energy supply, transport, and other proteins. A certification experiment using real-time PCR assay confirmed 20 of 30 examined genes exhibited the same trends at the mRNA and protein levels. The differentially expressed proteins may play roles in tissue remodeling, signal transduction, and organ development during and after metamorphosis. Novel roles were proposed for some differentially expressed proteins, such as chymotrypsin. The results of this work provide an overview of metamorphosis and post-metamorphosis development of C. gigas at the protein level. Future studies on the functions of the differentially expressed proteins will help to obtain a more in-depth understanding of bivalve metamorphosis. PMID:26247880

  8. Variations in the pallial organ sizes of the invasive oyster, Crassostrea gigas, along an extreme turbidity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutertre, Mickaël; Barillé, Laurent; Beninger, Peter G.; Rosa, Philippe; Gruet, Yves

    2009-11-01

    Spatial size variations of labial palps, gills and the adductor muscle of the invasive feral oyster, Crassostrea gigas, were studied along two gradients of suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations in the temperate macrotidal Bourgneuf Bay, (annual mean SPM concentration gradient of 21.0-154.0 mg l -1) and the adjacent Loire Estuary (annual mean SPM concentration gradient of 24.1-630.4 mg l -1) on the French Atlantic Coast. The gill-to-palp (G:P) ratios decreased with increasing turbidity, both in the bay and the estuary. Changes in G:P ratios were chiefly related to palp area variations, increasing gradually from low turbidity to very high-turbidity sites, while gill area showed no clear relationship with turbidity conditions. The G:P ratio, showing a significant relationship ( r2 = 0.97) with SPM concentrations, is proposed as a pallial organ index of oyster acclimation to turbidity conditions. The area of the striated part of the adductor muscle was always greater than that of the smooth one, and adductor muscle area tended to decrease when SPM concentration increased. These observations show the morphological capacity of the oyster C. gigas to tolerate SPM concentrations above the feeding cessation thresholds previously determined experimentally. They also suggest that pallial organ size variations could help explain the success of recent feral oyster invasions in temperate turbid ecosystems.

  9. Ostreid herpesvirus 1 detection and relationship with Crassostrea gigas spat mortality in France between 1998 and 2006

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Since its molecular characterisation, Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) has been regularly detected in Crassostrea gigas in France. Although its pathogenicity was demonstrated on larval stages, its involvement during mortality outbreaks at the juvenile stage was highly suspected but not evidenced. To investigate mortality outbreaks, the French National Network for Surveillance and Monitoring of Mollusc Health (REPAMO) carried out two surveys in juvenile C. gigas. The first survey lasted from 1998 to 2006 and was an epidemiological inquiry occurring when oyster farmers reported mortality outbreaks. The second survey, a longitudinal one, was set up in 1998 to complete the network observations on OsHV-1. Data analysis showed a specific pattern of mortality outbreaks associated with OsHV-1 detection. Ostreid herpesvirus 1 detection mainly appeared during the summer, suggesting the influence of the seawater temperature on its occurrence. It mostly presented a patchy distribution in the field in contrast to the nursery. Significant relationship between OsHV-1 detection and spat mortality was found, preferentially in sheltered and closed environments. The longitudinal survey confirmed most of the network observations. Although subsequent works particularly epidemiological surveys would be useful to confirm the causal link between the detection of OsHV-1 and the mortality outbreaks in juvenile C. gigas, the role of OsHV-1 in oyster mortality is progressing. PMID:21635731

  10. Identification of Single-Locus PCR-Based Markers Linked to Shell Background Color in the Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    PubMed

    Ge, Jianlong; Li, Qi; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng

    2015-10-01

    A number of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) with golden shell background color were obtained which show great potential to develop a niche market. To improve the selective breeding progress of true-breeding strains with complete golden oysters, research was conducted to identify genetic markers linked to the shell color locus. An F1-segregating population was obtained by crossing two oysters with golden shell and white shell. Genomic DNA from eight progenies with golden shell and eight progenies with white shell were equally pooled for amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) screening. In bulked segregant analysis, six out of 225 selective primer pair combinations produced seven polymorphic fragments tightly linked to shell color across the segregating population. The seven AFLP markers were all derived from the golden dam and mapped onto a single linkage group flanking the shell color locus. In conversion of the AFLPs into single-locus PCR-based markers, a sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker, named SCARJ8-2, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker, named SNPL2-4, and a simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker, named SSRO11-2, were obtained. These markers obtained in this study will be useful for marker-assisted selection of the Pacific oyster.

  11. Effects of air-exposure gradients on spatial infection patterns of Perkinsus marinus in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Malek, Jennafer C; Breitburg, Denise L

    2016-02-25

    Spatial distributions of species can be shaped by factors such as parasites, mortality, and reproduction, all of which may be influenced by differences in physical factors along environmental gradients. In nearshore tidal waters, an elevational gradient in aerial exposure during low tide can shape the spatial distributions of benthic marine organisms. The eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica is an ecologically and economically important species that can dominate both subtidal and intertidal habitats along the east coast of the USA. Our goal was to determine whether prevalence and intensity of Perkinsus marinus (the causative agent of Dermo disease) infections vary along intertidal to subtidal gradients during summer. We used (1) field experiments conducted at 4 sites in the Chesapeake Bay and a Virginia coastal bay, (2) a controlled air-exposure experiment, and (3) field surveys from 7 sites ranging from Maine to North Carolina to test for effects of tidal exposure on infection. Results from our field surveys suggested that high intertidal oysters tend to have higher infection prevalence than subtidal oysters, but there was no effect on infection intensity. Field experiments rarely yielded significant effects of tidal exposure on infection prevalence and intensity. Overall, our study shows that exposure to air may not be a strong driver of infection patterns in this host-parasite system. PMID:26912044

  12. The neurotoxic effects of manganese on the dopaminergic innervation of the gill of the bivalve mollusc, Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kesha; Huggins, Turkesha; King, Candice; Carroll, Margaret A; Catapane, Edward J

    2008-08-01

    We examined effects of manganese on the nervous system and innervation of lateral cilia of Crassostrea virginica. While essential in trace amounts, tissue manganese accumulation is neurotoxic, inducing Manganism, a Parkinson's-like disease in humans. Lateral cilia of the gill of C. virginica are controlled by a reciprocal serotonergic-dopaminergic innervation from their ganglia. Oysters were incubated 3 days in the presence of up to 1 mM manganese, followed by superfusion of the cerebral ganglia, visceral ganglia or gill with dopamine or serotonin. Beating rates of cilia were measured by stroboscopic microscopy of isolated gill preparations or gill preparations with the ipsilateral cerebral and/or visceral ganglia attached. Acute manganese treatments impaired the dopaminergic, cilio-inhibitory system, while having no effect on the serotonergic, cilio-excitatory system, which is in agreement with the proposed mechanism of manganese toxicity in humans. Manganese treatments also decreased endogenous dopamine levels in the cerebral and visceral ganglia, and gills, but not serotonin levels. We demonstrated that manganese disrupts the animal's dopaminergic system, and also that this preparation can be used to investigate mechanisms that underlie manganese neurotoxicity. It also may serve as a model in pharmacological studies of drugs to treat or prevent Manganism and other dopaminergic cell disorders. PMID:18547869

  13. The nervous system control of lateral ciliary activity of the gill of the bivalve mollusc, Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Margaret A; Catapane, Edward J

    2007-10-01

    Lateral cilia of the gill of Mytilus edulis are controlled by a reciprocal serotonergic-dopaminergic innervation from their ganglia. Other bivalves have been studied to lesser degrees and lateral cilia of most respond to serotonin and dopamine when applied directly to the gill indicating a possible neuro or endocrine mechanism. Lateral cilia in Crassostrea virginica are affected by serotonin and dopamine, but little work has been done regarding ganglionic control of their cilia. We examined the role of the cerebral and visceral ganglia in innervating the lateral ciliated cells of the gill epithelium of C. virginica. Ciliary beating rates were measured in preparations which had the ipsilateral cerebral or visceral ganglia attached. Superfusion of the cerebral or visceral ganglia with serotonin increased ciliary beating rates which was antagonized by pretreating with methysergide. Superfusion with dopamine decreased beating rates and was antagonized by ergonovine. This study demonstrates there is a reciprocal serotonergic-dopaminergic innervation of the lateral ciliated cells, similar to that of M. edulis, originating in the cerebral and visceral ganglia of the animal and this preparation is a useful model to study regulatory mechanisms of ciliary activity as well as the pharmacology of drugs affecting biogenic amines in nervous systems. PMID:17616414

  14. A comparison of the chemiluminescent response of Crassostrea virginica and Morone saxatilis phagocytes to zymosan and viable Listonella anguillarum.

    PubMed

    Bramble, L H; Anderson, R S

    1998-01-01

    If reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by hemocytes of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, impart bactericidal activity, exposure of hemocytes to bacteria should result in increased ROS generation. In an earlier study, this hypothesis was tested using luminol- and lucigenin-augmented chemiluminescence (CL) to measure ROS production. The bacterium Listonella anguillarum did not stimulate a net increase in hemocyte-derived CL, and it was suggested that bacterial antioxidants might suppress hemocyte CL. In the present study a comparison was made, under identical assay conditions, of the zymosan- and bacteria-enhanced luminol CL produced by eastern oyster hemocytes and by striped bass (Morone saxatilis) macrophages, for which L. anguillarum has been shown to be a stimulus in CL reactions. The response to zymosan produced by bass phagocytes was two orders of magnitude greater than that generated by eastern oyster hemocytes. Whereas an increase in net ROS production was not evident when oyster hemocytes were exposed to L. anguillarum, significant stimulation of striped bass macrophage-derived CL occurred. These data suggest that striped bass macrophages have a greater capacity to generate ROS than oyster hemocytes, enabling them to surpass the antioxidant capability of L. anguillarum and produce a luminol CL response. PMID:9617583

  15. Particle selection in the ribbed mussel Geukensia demissa and the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica: Effect of microalgae growth stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pales Espinosa, Emmanuelle; Allam, Bassem; Ford, Susan E.

    2008-08-01

    We studied particle selection in the ribbed mussel Geukensia demissa, an important suspension-feeding inhabitant of estuaries and intertidal zones of salt marshes along the Atlantic coast of North America. Adult mussels were fed on several mixtures of microalgal cultures (1) in exponential or (2) in stationary phase of growth, and the proportional occurrence of algal species in pseudofeces was examined by flow cytometry. The Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, was chosen as a reference. Results showed that both mussels and oysters were able to selectively ingest or reject our experimental microalgae. Moreover, the pre-ingestive particle selection was affected by microalgal growth phase, particularly in mussels. For instance, the sorting efficiency index increased significantly in mussels fed with a blend made of Nitzschia closterium, Isochrysis sp. and Tetraselmis suesica harvested in stationary growth phase, as compared to the same blend made with microalgae in exponential growth phase. Isochrysis sp. and T. suesica were preferentially ingested by both bivalves whereas N. closterium, was preferentially rejected in pseudofeces. These results demonstrate particle selection in ribbed mussel and underline the effect of algae growth phase on the sorting mechanisms.

  16. The Kinome of Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas, Its Expression during Development and in Response to Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Epelboin, Yanouk; Quintric, Laure; Guévélou, Eric; Boudry, Pierre; Pichereau, Vianney; Corporeau, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Oysters play an important role in estuarine and coastal marine habitats, where the majority of humans live. In these ecosystems, environmental degradation is substantial, and oysters must cope with highly dynamic and stressful environmental constraints during their lives in the intertidal zone. The availability of the genome sequence of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas represents a unique opportunity for a comprehensive assessment of the signal transduction pathways that the species has developed to deal with this unique habitat. We performed an in silico analysis to identify, annotate and classify protein kinases in C. gigas, according to their kinase domain taxonomy classification, and compared with kinome already described in other animal species. The C. gigas kinome consists of 371 protein kinases, making it closely related to the sea urchin kinome, which has 353 protein kinases. The absence of gene redundancy in some groups of the C. gigas kinome may simplify functional studies of protein kinases. Through data mining of transcriptomes in C. gigas, we identified part of the kinome which may be central during development and may play a role in response to various environmental factors. Overall, this work contributes to a better understanding of key sensing pathways that may be central for adaptation to a highly dynamic marine environment. PMID:27231950

  17. Transcriptome Profiling of Selectively Bred Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Families that Differ in Tolerance of Heat Shock

    PubMed Central

    Bayne, Christopher J.; Camara, Mark D.; Cunningham, Charles; Jenny, Matthew J.; Langdon, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Sessile inhabitants of marine intertidal environments commonly face heat stress, an important component of summer mortality syndrome in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Marker-aided selection programs would be useful for developing oyster strains that resist summer mortality; however, there is currently a need to identify candidate genes associated with stress tolerance and to develop molecular markers associated with those genes. To identify candidate genes for further study, we used cDNA microarrays to test the hypothesis that oyster families that had high (>64%) or low (<29%) survival of heat shock (43°C, 1 h) differ in their transcriptional responses to stress. Based upon data generated by the microarray and by real-time quantitative PCR, we found that transcription after heat shock increased for genes putatively encoding heat shock proteins and genes for proteins that synthesize lipids, protect against bacterial infection, and regulate spawning, whereas transcription decreased for genes for proteins that mobilize lipids and detoxify reactive oxygen species. RNAs putatively identified as heat shock protein 27, collagen, peroxinectin, S-crystallin, and two genes with no match in Genbank had higher transcript concentrations in low-surviving families than in high-surviving families, whereas concentration of putative cystatin B mRNA was greater in high-surviving families. These ESTs should be studied further for use in marker-aided selection programs. Low survival of heat shock could result from a complex interaction of cell damage, opportunistic infection, and metabolic exhaustion. PMID:19205802

  18. Development of a comet-FISH assay for the detection of DNA damage in hemocytes of Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Pérez-García, C; Rouxel, J; Akcha, F

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the DNA-damaging effect of hydrogen peroxide on the structural integrity of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) was studied for the first time by comet-FISH in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Global DNA damage was assessed in hemocytes using an alkaline version of the comet assay. Next, NOR sensitivity was analyzed by mapping major rDNA repeat unit by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the same comet slides. Exposure of hemocytes to 100 μM of hydrogen peroxide induced a significant increase in both DNA damage and number of FISH-signals of major ribosomal genes versus the control. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was shown between DNA damage as measured by the comet assay (percentage of DNA in comet tail) and the number of signals present in comet tails. This study demonstrates the potential value of the comet-FISH assay for the study of DNA damage induced by genotoxicant exposure of target genes. It offers a perspective for better understanding the impact of genotoxicity on animal physiology and fitness.

  19. Repertoire and evolution of TNF superfamily in Crassostrea gigas: implications for expansion and diversification of this superfamily in Mollusca.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dahai; Qiu, Limei; Gao, Qiang; Hou, Zhanhui; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2015-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) members represent a group of cytokines participating in diverse immunological, pathological and developmental pathways. However, compared with deuterostomia and cnidaia, the composition and evolution of TNF homologous in protostomia are still not well understood. In the present study, a total of 81 TNF superfamily (TNFSF) genes from 15 mollusk species, including 23 TNFSF genes from Crassostrea gigas, were surveyed by genome-wide bioinformatics analysis. The phylogenetic analysis showed that 14 out of 23 C. gigas TNFSF genes in five clades exhibited orthologous relationships with Pinctada fucata TNFSF genes. Moreover, there were 15 C. gigas TNFSF genes located in oyster-specific clusters, which were contributed by small-scaled tandem and/or segmental duplication events in oyster. By comparing the sequences of duplicated TNFSF pairs, exon loss and variant in exon/intron length were revealed as the major modes of divergence in gene structure. Most of the duplicated C. gigas TNFSF pairs were evolved under purifying selection with consistent tissue expression patterns, implying functional constraint shaped diversification. This study demonstrated the expansion and early divergence of TNF superfamily in C. gigas, which provides potential insight into revealing the evolution and function of this superfamily in mollusk.

  20. Role and value of nitrogen regulation provided by oysters (Crassostrea virginica) in the Mission-Aransas Estuary, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Beseres Pollack, Jennifer; Yoskowitz, David; Kim, Hae-Cheol; Montagna, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Suspension-feeding activities of oysters impart a potentially significant benefit to estuarine ecosystems via reduction of water column nutrients, plankton and seston biomass, and primary productivity which can have a significant impact on human well-being. This study considered nitrogen regulation by eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica in the Mission-Aransas Estuary, Texas, USA, as a function of denitrification, burial, and physical transport from the system via harvest. Oyster reefs were estimated to remove 502.5 kg N km(-2) through denitrification of biodeposits and 251.3 kg N km(-2) in burial of biodeposits to sediments. Nitrogen is also physically transported out of the estuary via harvest of oysters. Commercial harvest of oysters in the Mission-Aransas Estuary can remove approximately 21,665 kg N per year via physical transport from the system. We developed a transferable method to value the service of nitrogen regulation by oysters, where the potential cost equivalent value of nitrogen regulation is quantified via cost estimates for a constructed biological nutrient removal (BNR) supplement to a wastewater treatment plant. The potential annual engineered cost equivalent of the service of nitrogen regulation and removal provided by reefs in the Mission-Aransas Estuary is $293,993 yr(-1). Monetizing ecosystem services can help increase awareness at the stakeholder level of the importance of oysters beyond commercial fishery values alone.

  1. Impacts of Deepwater Horizon oil and associated dispersant on early development of the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Vignier, J; Donaghy, L; Soudant, P; Chu, F L E; Morris, J M; Carney, M W; Lay, C; Krasnec, M; Robert, R; Volety, A K

    2015-11-15

    The explosion of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil platform resulted in large amounts of crude oil and dispersant Corexit 9500A® released into the Gulf of Mexico and coincided with the spawning season of the oyster, Crassostrea virginica. The effects of exposing gametes and embryos of C. virginica to dispersant alone (Corexit), mechanically (HEWAF) and chemically dispersed (CEWAF) DWH oil were evaluated. Fertilization success and the morphological development, growth, and survival of larvae were assessed. Gamete exposure reduced fertilization (HEWAF: EC201h=1650μg tPAH50L(-1); CEWAF: EC201h=19.4μg tPAH50L(-1); Corexit: EC201h=6.9mgL(-1)). CEWAF and Corexit showed a similar toxicity on early life stages at equivalent nominal concentrations. Oysters exposed from gametes to CEWAF and Corexit experienced more deleterious effects than oysters exposed from embryos. Results suggest the presence of oil and dispersant during oyster spawning season may interfere with larval development and subsequent recruitment.

  2. Response of a benthic suspension feeder ( Crassostrea virginica Gmelin) to three centuries of anthropogenic eutrophication in Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Michael X.; Miller, Henry M.

    2005-03-01

    Biogenic reefs built by oysters and other suspension feeders are vital components of estuarine ecosystems. By consuming phytoplankton, suspension feeders act to suppress accumulation of organic matter in the water column. Nutrient loading increases the rate of primary production, thereby causing eutrophication. As suspension feeders consume more organic matter from increasing abundance of phytoplankton, their rate of growth should also increase if they are food limited. We show here that the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin), from St. Mary's and Patuxent rivers, Chesapeake Bay, grew faster during anthropogenic eutrophication relative to C. virginica before eutrophication. Growth of shell height, shell thickness and adductor muscle increased after eutrophication began in the late 18th century. After 1860, growth decreased, perhaps reflecting the negative effects of hypoxia, harmful algal blooms, disease and fishing on oyster growth. These results are consistent with the view that an increasing supply of phytoplankton resulting from eutrophication enhanced growth of C. virginica between 1760 and 1860, before oyster reefs were degraded by destructive fishing practices between 1870 and 1930. Alternative factors, such as changes in water temperature, salinity, and fishing are less likely to be responsible for this pattern. These results have implications for restoration of oyster reefs in order to mitigate the effects of eutrophication in estuaries, as well as the paleoecological relationship between suspension feeders and paleoproductivity.

  3. Evidence that the major hemolymph protein of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, has antiviral activity against herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Robinson, Nick; Chataway, Tim; Benkendorff, Kirsten; O'Connor, Wayne; Speck, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Viruses belonging to the family Malacoherpesviridae currently pose a serious threat to global production of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Hemolymph extracts from C. gigas are known to have potent antiviral activity. The compound(s) responsible for this broad-spectrum antiviral activity in oyster hemolymph have not been identified. The objective of this study was to identify these antiviral compound(s) and establish whether hemolymph antiviral activity is under genetic control in the Australian C. gigas population. Hemolymph antiviral activity of 18 family lines of C. gigas were assayed using a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and Vero cell plaque reduction assay. Differences in anti-HSV-1 activity between the family lines were observed (p<0.001) with heritability estimated to be low (h(2)=0.21). A glycoprotein that inhibits HSV-1 replication was identified by resolving oyster hemolymph by native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and assaying extracted protein fractions using the HSV-1 and Vero cell plaque assay. Highest anti-HSV-1 activity corresponded with an N-linked glycoprotein with an estimated molecular mass of 21kDa under non-reducing SDS-PAGE conditions. Amino acid sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry revealed this protein matched the major hemolymph protein, termed cavortin. Our results provide further evidence that cavortin is a multifunctional protein involved in immunity and that assays associated with its activity might be useful for marker-assisted selection of disease resistant oysters. PMID:25169112

  4. Habitat values for artificial oyster ( Crassostrea ariakensis) reefs compared with natural shallow-water habitats in Changjiang River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Weimin; Zheng, Lin; Li, Beijun; An, Chuanguang

    2013-09-01

    Oyster reefs have an equivalent, complex 3-dimensional structure to vegetated habitats and may provide similar functions in estuarine environments. Nevertheless, few studies have compared oyster reefs with adjacent natural shallow-water habitats. Here the resident benthic macroinvertebrate communities in an artificial oyster ( Crassostrea ariakensis) reef and in adjacent natural estuarine shallow-water habitats (salt marsh, intertidal mudflat, and subtidal soft bottom) in the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary were described. The mean total densities and biomass, Margalef's species richness, Pielou's evenness and Shannon-Weaver biodiversity indices of the resident benthic macroinvertebrate communities differed significantly among the habitats. Significantly higher densities and biomass of benthic macroinvertebrates occurred in the oyster reef compared with the other three habitats. Ordination plots showed a clear separation in benthic macroinvertebrate communities among the four habitat types. The results demonstrated that the artificial oyster reef supported distinct and unique benthic communities, playing an important role in the complex estuarine habitat by supplying prey resources and contributing to biodiversity. In addition, the results suggested that the oyster reef had been restored successfully.

  5. Sequencing and de novo Analysis of Crassostrea angulata (Fujian Oyster) from 8 Different Developing Phases Using 454 GSFlx

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Zou, Quan; You, Weiwei; Ke, Caihuan

    2012-01-01

    Research on the mechanism for early development of shellfish, such as body plan, shell formation, settlement and metamorphosis is currently an active research field. However, studies were still limited and not deep enough because of the lack of genomic resources such as genome or transcriptome sequences. In the present research, de novo transcriptome sequencing was performed for Crassostrea angulata, the most economically important cultured oyster species in China, at eight early developmental stages using the 454 sequencing technology. A total of 555,215 reads were produced with an average length of 309 nucleotides that were then assembled into 10,462 contigs. As determined by GO annotation and KEGG pathway mapping, functional annotation of the unigenes recovered diverse biological functions and processes. Six unique sequences related to settlement, metamorphosis and growth were subsequently analyzed by real-time PCR. Given the lack of whole genome information for oysters, transcriptome and de novo analysis of C. angulata from the eight different developing phases will provide important and useful information on early development mechanism and help genetic breeding of shellfish. PMID:22952730

  6. Cloning and expression patterns of two Smad genes during embryonic development and shell formation of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Huan, Pin; Liu, Baozhong

    2014-11-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling pathways play many important roles in the early development of mollusks. However, limited information is known concerning their detailed mechanisms. Here, we describe the identification, cloning and characterization of two Smad genes, the key components of TGF-β signaling pathways, from the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Sequence analysis of the two genes, designated as cgi-smad1/ 5/ 8 and cgi-smad4, revealed conserved functional characteristics. The two genes were widely expressed in embryos and larvae, suggesting multiple roles in the early development of C. gigas. The mRNA of the two genes aggregated in the D quadrant and cgi-smad4 was highly expressed on the dorsal side of the gastrula, indicating that TGF-β signaling pathways may be involved in dorsoventral patterning in C. gigas. Furthermore, high expression levels of the two genes in the shell fields of embryos at different stages suggested important roles for TGF-β signaling pathways in particular phases of shell development, including the formation of the initial shell field and the biomineralization of larval shells. The results of this study provide fundamental support for elucidating how TGF-β signaling pathways participate in the early development of bivalve mollusks, and suggest that further work is warranted to this end.

  7. The first homolog of a TRAF7 (TNF receptor-associated factor 7) gene in a mollusk, Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dingkun; Zhang, Yang; Xiao, Shu; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 7 (TRAF7) is one of several adaptor proteins that are critically involved in the activation of TLR-dependent NF-κB signaling. In this report, the first mollusk TRAF7 (designated ChTRAF7) homolog was isolated from Crassostrea hongkongensis by screening a suppression subtractive library. The full-length cDNA, 2290 bp in length, encodes a putative protein of 686 amino acids that contains a RING finger domain, an adjacent zinc finger domain, and seven WD40 repeats. ChTRAF7 is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues including digestive gland, mantle, gill, heart, hemocytes, muscle, and gonads, with the highest expression observed in gonads. Temporal expression of ChTRAF7 following bacterial infection shows that expression of ChTRAF7 in hemocytes decreases from 2 to 12 h post-challenge, and then recovered to the original level after 24 h. These results indicate that ChTRAF7 may play an important role in signal transduction in the immune response of oysters.

  8. A novel sialic acid binding lectin with anti-bacterial activity from the Hong Kong oyster (Crassostrea hongkongensis).

    PubMed

    He, Xiaocui; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Feng; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-12-01

    Lectins play an important role in immune recognition and host defense. In the present study, a full-length cDNA encoding a novel sialic acid binding lectin was cloned from Crassostrea hongkongensis (designated Ch-salectin) by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). It is 531 bp in length, containing a 21 bp 5' UTR, a 39 bp 3' UTR and a 468 bp ORF coding for 156 amino acids. The Ch-salectin protein contains a signal peptide and a conserved complement component C1q domain. The purified recombinant MBP-tagged Ch-salectin protein can bind to a sialic acid containing protein fetuin and significantly inhibit the growth of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Furthermore, the transcription of Ch-salectin was inducible and significantly up-regulated during Vibrio alginolyticus infection. Thus, these results highlight the essential roles of Ch-salectin in immune recognition and host defense against bacterial infection in C. hongkongensis.

  9. Cloning, characterization and expression analysis of a caspase-8 like gene from the Hong Kong oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Qu, Fufa; Qi, Lin; Zhang, Yang; Tong, Ying; Yu, Ziniu

    2013-12-01

    Apoptosis plays a key role in many biological processes, including homeostasis within the immune system. A family of cysteine proteases, the caspases, constitutes the core of the apoptotic machinery. We have characterized the first bivalve caspase-8 ortholog from the Hong Kong oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis (designated ChCaspase-8). The full-length cDNA is 1945 bp in length encoding a putative protein of 557 amino acids that contains two N-terminal DED domains, and a CASc domain at the C-terminus. ChCaspase-8 is ubiquitously expressed in oysters, with highest expression levels in the gonad and labial palps. Following microbial infection, the expression of ChCaspase-8 increased in hemocytes from 12 to 72 h post-challenge. When expressed in HeLa cells, ChCaspase-8 is located in the cytoplasm, while over-expression of ChCaspase-8 in HEK293T cells activates the transcriptional activities of NF-κB. These results indicate that ChCaspase-8 might play an important role in the immune and apoptotic responses of oysters.

  10. In silico cloning, expression of Rieske-like apoprotein gene and protein subcellular localization in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaocui; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Ziniu

    2010-10-01

    Rieske protein gene in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas was obtained by in silico cloning for the first time, and its expression profiles and subcellular localization were determined, respectively. The full-length cDNA of Cgisp is 985 bp in length and contains a 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions of 35 and 161 bp, respectively, with an open reading frame of 786 bp encoding a protein of 262 amino acids. The predicted molecular weight of 30 kDa of Cgisp protein was verified by prokaryotic expression. Conserved Rieske [2Fe-2S] cluster binding sites and highly matched-pair tertiary structure with 3CWB_E (Gallus gallus) were revealed by homologous analysis and molecular modeling. Eleven putative SNP sites and two conserved hexapeptide sequences, box I (THLGC) and II (PCHGS), were detected by multiple alignments. Real-time PCR analysis showed that Cgisp is expressed in a wide range of tissues, with adductor muscle exhibiting the top expression level, suggesting its biological function of energy transduction. The GFP tagging Cgisp indicated a mitochondrial localization, further confirming its physiological function.

  11. Prostaglandin E receptor 4 (PTGER4) involved in host protection against immune challenge in oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fufa; Xiang, Zhiming; Wang, Fuxuan; Qi, Lin; Xu, Fengjiao; Xiao, Shu; Yu, Ziniu

    2015-02-01

    Prostaglandin E receptor 4 (PTGER4) is an essential receptor that can detect various physiological and pathological stimuli and has been implicated in a wide variety of biological processes, including the regulation of immune responses, cytokine production, and apoptosis. In this report, the first mollusk PTGER4, referred to as ChPTGER4, was cloned and characterized from the Hong Kong oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis. Its full-length cDNA is 1734 bp in length, including 5'- and 3'-untranslated region (UTRs) of 354 bp and 306 bp, respectively, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1074 bp. ChPTGER4 comprises 357 amino acids and shares significant homology with its vertebrate homologs. The results of phylogenetic analysis revealed that ChPTGER4 clusters with PTGER4 from the Pacific oyster. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that ChPTGER4 was constitutively expressed in all tissues examined and that its expression was significantly up-regulated in hemocytes and gills following challenge by pathogens (Vibrio alginolyticus, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs: lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan (PGN). Moreover, fluorescence microscopy analysis revealed that ChPTGER4 localized to the membrane, and its overexpression significantly enhanced NF-κB reporter gene activation in the HEK293T cell line. In summary, this study provides the first experimental evidence of a functional PTGER4 in mollusks, which suggests its involvement in the innate immune response in oyster.

  12. Activator protein-1 (AP-1) and response to pathogen infection in the Hong Kong oyster (Crassostrea hongkongensis).

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Qu, Fufa; Li, Jun; Qi, Lin; Yang, Zhang; Kong, Xiaoyu; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1), a downstream target of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, plays a major role in stimulating the synthesis of immune effector molecules during innate immune responses. We have characterized ChAP-1, an AP-1-like protein in Crassostrea hongkongensis that is a member of the AP-1 family of proteins. ChAP-1 is composed of 290 amino acid residues with a Jun and bZIP domain at the N- and C-termini, respectively, a structure similar to that of known Ap-1 proteins. ChAP-1 mRNA is expressed in several tissues analyzed, with highest expression in the mantle. Expression of ChAP-1 increases in response to Vibrio alginolyticus, Salmo haemolyticus or Salmo cerevisiae infection and, despite the location of GFP-tagged full-length ChAP-1 protein in the cytoplasm, ChAP-1 activates the transcription of an L8G5-luc reporter gene, and its over-expression can also activate the AP-1-Luc reporter gene in HEK293T cells.

  13. ChBax/Bak as key regulators of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway: cloned and characterized in Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Qu, Fufa; Wang, Fuxuan; Xiao, Shu; Jun, Li; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Ziniu

    2015-02-01

    Apoptosis has been primarily investigated in mammals, and little is known about apoptosis in mollusks. The proteins Bax and Bak play critical roles in the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway and in determining cell fate. In this study, ChBax and ChBak, homologs of the well-known Bax and Bak proteins, were identified from the oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis. The ChBax/Bak proteins consist of 207/232 amino acids with the typical domains found in BCL-2 family members. ChBax and ChBak mRNA expression were detected in all 8 of the selected oyster tissues and at the different stages of development. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that the full-length proteins of ChBax/Bak were located in the cytoplasm and mitochondrial outer membrane, of HEK293T cells, respectively. Furthermore, both of the genes' expression levels were found to increase in the hemocytes of oysters challenged with pathogens. The over-expression of ChBax or ChBak activates the p53-Luc reporter gene in HEK293T cells in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that ChBax and ChBak may play important roles in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in oysters.

  14. Allograft inflammatory factor-1 stimulates hemocyte immune activation by enhancing phagocytosis and expression of inflammatory cytokines in Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Li, Jun; Yu, Feng; He, Xiaocui; Yu, Ziniu

    2013-05-01

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is a calcium-binding cytokine associated with immune cell activation and inflammatory response. Presently, we have identified and characterized an AIF-1 in a marine bivalve mollusk, Crassostrea gigas, and designated it as CgAIF-1. The full-length CgAIF-1 cDNA is 794 bp, encoding a protein of 149 amino acids with two conserved EF hand Ca(2+)-binding motifs. CgAIF-1 is constitutively expressed in various tissues with enriched expression in hemocytes. Moreover, CgAIF-1 transcription is induced by multiple Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs), including poly (I: C), LPS, PGN, HKLM and HKVA, but is limited by 1,3-β-glucan. Furthermore, recombinant CgAIF-1 can specifically stimulate phagocytic ability of granulocytes, but not of intermediate cells and hyalinocytes. CgAIF-1 also enhances mRNA levels of MIF, TNF and IL-17. These results provide the first functional evidence that CgAIF-1 is involved in hemocyte activation in C. gigas, revealing conserved functions of AIF-1 in host defense from mollusks to mammals.

  15. Susceptibility of gametes and embryos of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, to Karenia brevis and its toxins.

    PubMed

    Rolton, Anne; Soudant, Philippe; Vignier, Julien; Pierce, Richard; Henry, Michael; Shumway, Sandra E; Bricelj, V Monica; Volety, Aswani K

    2015-06-01

    The bivalve mollusc, Crassostrea virginica, is frequently exposed to blooms of Karenia brevis along the west coast of Florida during periods of spawning and early larval development. A continuous 4-day exposure of gametes and 2-4 cell stage embryos of C. virginica to whole-cell and culture filtrate of K. brevis at 500 and 5000 cells mL(-1), was followed by a 4-day 'recovery' period. Larval growth, percent of normal, abnormal and dead larvae, and the presence of food in the larval gut were measured throughout the exposure period. Results suggest that negative effects mainly occur during embryogenesis and early development. Damage to feeding apparatus/gut may occur during embryonic development or exposure to toxins may act as a feeding deterrent on non-toxic algae. Following 2-h in vitro exposure of gametes, differences in oocyte and sperm cell parameters were investigated using flow cytometry. The reduced sperm viability in the whole-cell 5000 cells mL(-1) treatment suggests the involvement of extracellular brevetoxins (PbTx) and perhaps other harmful, uncharacterized compounds associated with the K. brevis cell membrane. The cumulative effects of reduced sperm viability, fertilization success, embryonic and larval survival, and the near-annual exposure to blooms of K. brevis could cause significant bottlenecks on oyster recruitment. PMID:25771241

  16. A High-Density SNP Genetic Linkage Map and QTL Analysis of Growth-Related Traits in a Hybrid Family of Oysters (Crassostrea gigas × Crassostrea angulata) Using Genotyping-by-Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinpeng; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-01-01

    Oysters are among the most important species in global aquaculture. Crassostrea gigas, and its subspecies C. angulata, are the major cultured species. To determine the genetic basis of growth-related traits in oysters, we constructed a second-generation linkage map from 3367 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) based on genotyping-by-sequencing, genotyped from a C. gigas × C. angulata hybrid family. These 3367 SNPs were distributed on 1695 markers, which were assigned to 10 linkage groups. The genetic linkage map had a total length of 1084.3 cM, with an average of 0.8 cM between markers; it thus represents the densest genetic map constructed for oysters to date. Twenty-seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) for five growth-related traits were detected. These QTL could explain 4.2-7.7% (mean = 5.4%) of the phenotypic variation. In total, 50.8% of phenotypic variance for shell width, 7.7% for mass weight, and 34.1% for soft tissue weight were explained. The detected QTL were distributed among eight linkage groups, and more than half (16) were concentrated within narrow regions in their respective linkage groups. Thirty-eight annotated genes were identified within the QTL regions, two of which are key genes for carbohydrate metabolism. Other genes were found to participate in assembly and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, signal transduction, and regulation of cell differentiation and development. The newly developed high-density genetic map, and the QTL and candidate genes identified provide a valuable genetic resource and a basis for marker-assisted selection for C. gigas and C. angulata. PMID:26994291

  17. A High-Density SNP Genetic Linkage Map and QTL Analysis of Growth-Related Traits in a Hybrid Family of Oysters (Crassostrea gigas × Crassostrea angulata) Using Genotyping-by-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinpeng; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-01-01

    Oysters are among the most important species in global aquaculture. Crassostrea gigas, and its subspecies C. angulata, are the major cultured species. To determine the genetic basis of growth-related traits in oysters, we constructed a second-generation linkage map from 3367 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) based on genotyping-by-sequencing, genotyped from a C. gigas × C. angulata hybrid family. These 3367 SNPs were distributed on 1695 markers, which were assigned to 10 linkage groups. The genetic linkage map had a total length of 1084.3 cM, with an average of 0.8 cM between markers; it thus represents the densest genetic map constructed for oysters to date. Twenty-seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) for five growth-related traits were detected. These QTL could explain 4.2–7.7% (mean = 5.4%) of the phenotypic variation. In total, 50.8% of phenotypic variance for shell width, 7.7% for mass weight, and 34.1% for soft tissue weight were explained. The detected QTL were distributed among eight linkage groups, and more than half (16) were concentrated within narrow regions in their respective linkage groups. Thirty-eight annotated genes were identified within the QTL regions, two of which are key genes for carbohydrate metabolism. Other genes were found to participate in assembly and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, signal transduction, and regulation of cell differentiation and development. The newly developed high-density genetic map, and the QTL and candidate genes identified provide a valuable genetic resource and a basis for marker-assisted selection for C. gigas and C. angulata. PMID:26994291

  18. Metal accumulation and differentially expressed proteins in gill of oyster (Crassostrea hongkongensis) exposed to long-term heavy metal-contaminated estuary.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lianzhong; Ke, Caihuan; Guo, Xiaoyu; Shi, Bo; Huang, Miaoqin

    2014-06-01

    Bio-accumulation and bio-transmission of toxic metals and the toxicological responses of organisms exposed to toxic metals have been focused, due to heavy metal contaminations have critically threatened the ecosystem and food security. However, still few investigations focused on the responses of certain organisms exposed to the long term and severe heavy metal contamination in specific environments. In present investigation, the Hong Kong oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis were obtained from 3 sites which were contaminated by different concentrations of heavy metals (such as zinc, copper, manganese and lead etc.), respectively. Heavy metal concentrations in the sea water samples collected from the 3 sites and the dissected tissues of the oysters with blue visceral mass were determinated to estimate the metal contamination levels in environments and the bio-accumulation ratios of the heavy metals in the different tissues of oysters. Moreover, Proteomic methods were employed to analyze the differentially expressed proteins in the gills of oysters exposed to long-term heavy metal contaminations. Results indicated that the Jiulong River estuary has been severely contaminated by Cu, Zn and slightly with Cr, Ni, Mn, etc, moreover, Zn and Cu were the major metals accumulated by oysters to phenomenally high concentrations (more than 3.0% of Zn and about 2.0% of Cu against what the dry weight of tissues were accumulated), and Cr, Ni, Mn, etc were also significantly accumulated. The differentially expressed proteins in the gills of oysters exposed to heavy metals participate in several cell processes, such as metal binding, transporting and saving, oxidative-reduction balance maintaining, stress response, signal transduction, etc. Significantly up-regulated expression (about 10 folds) of an important metal binding protein, metallothionein (MT) and granular cells was observed in the gills of oysters exposed to long-term and severely heavy-metal-contaminated estuary, it

  19. Metal accumulation and differentially expressed proteins in gill of oyster (Crassostrea hongkongensis) exposed to long-term heavy metal-contaminated estuary.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lianzhong; Ke, Caihuan; Guo, Xiaoyu; Shi, Bo; Huang, Miaoqin

    2014-06-01

    Bio-accumulation and bio-transmission of toxic metals and the toxicological responses of organisms exposed to toxic metals have been focused, due to heavy metal contaminations have critically threatened the ecosystem and food security. However, still few investigations focused on the responses of certain organisms exposed to the long term and severe heavy metal contamination in specific environments. In present investigation, the Hong Kong oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis were obtained from 3 sites which were contaminated by different concentrations of heavy metals (such as zinc, copper, manganese and lead etc.), respectively. Heavy metal concentrations in the sea water samples collected from the 3 sites and the dissected tissues of the oysters with blue visceral mass were determinated to estimate the metal contamination levels in environments and the bio-accumulation ratios of the heavy metals in the different tissues of oysters. Moreover, Proteomic methods were employed to analyze the differentially expressed proteins in the gills of oysters exposed to long-term heavy metal contaminations. Results indicated that the Jiulong River estuary has been severely contaminated by Cu, Zn and slightly with Cr, Ni, Mn, etc, moreover, Zn and Cu were the major metals accumulated by oysters to phenomenally high concentrations (more than 3.0% of Zn and about 2.0% of Cu against what the dry weight of tissues were accumulated), and Cr, Ni, Mn, etc were also significantly accumulated. The differentially expressed proteins in the gills of oysters exposed to heavy metals participate in several cell processes, such as metal binding, transporting and saving, oxidative-reduction balance maintaining, stress response, signal transduction, etc. Significantly up-regulated expression (about 10 folds) of an important metal binding protein, metallothionein (MT) and granular cells was observed in the gills of oysters exposed to long-term and severely heavy-metal-contaminated estuary, it

  20. The identification of the first molluscan Akirin2 with immune defense function in the Hong Kong oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fufa; Xiang, Zhiming; Zhang, Yang; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuehuan; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-12-01

    The Akirin protein is a nuclear factor in the innate immune system that is highly conserved from insects to mammals and plays key roles in diverse biological processes, including immunity, myogenesis, development and the cellular stress response. However, the function of Akirins in mollusk, the second most diverse group of animals, is still poorly understood. In this study, we report the discovery of an Akirin2 gene homolog (ChAkirin2) and its biological functions in the Hong Kong oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis. ChAkirin2 is 189 amino acids in length and shares significant homology with invertebrate homologs. Phylogenetic analysis results revealed that ChAkirin2 is clustered with invertebrate Akirin2s. A sequence analysis of the 5' flanking regions of ChAkirin2 indicated that it harbors several potential PAMP-activated transcription factor binding sites (TFB), including sites for NF-κB, C/EBPα, AP-1, SRF, Oct-1 and GATA-1. An RT-PCR analysis showed that ChAkirin2 mRNA was ubiquitously expressed in various tissues and at different embryonic and larval stages. Additionally, upon infection by pathogens (Vibrio alginolyticus, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs: LPS, PGN and polyI:C), the expression of ChAkirin2 was significantly up-regulated. Moreover, fluorescence microscopy observations show that ChAkirin2 is located in the nuclei of HeLa cells, and the overexpression of ChAkirin2 activated the transcriptional activities of the NF-κB reporter gene in HEK293T cells. Altogether, this report provided the first experimental demonstration that mollusks possess a functional Akirin2 that is involved in the innate defense and embryogenesis processes of the oyster.

  1. Differential sensitivity to cadmium of key mitochondrial enzymes in the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica Gmelin (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    PubMed

    Ivanina, Anna V; Habinck, Emily; Sokolova, Inna M

    2008-07-01

    Combined effects of cadmium (Cd) and temperature on key mitochondrial enzymes [including Complexes I-IV of electron transport chain and Krebs cycle enzymes citrate synthase (CS), and NAD- and NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases (NAD-IDH and NADP-IDH)] were studied in a marine ectotherm, Crassostrea virginica in order to better understand the mechanisms of Cd-induced impairment of mitochondrial function. Matrix enzymes including CS and isocitrate dehydrogenases were the most sensitive to Cd making Krebs cycle a likely candidate to explain Cd-induced impairment of mitochondrial substrate oxidation. CS and NAD-IDH had IC(50) of 26 and 65 microM at the acclimation temperature (15 degrees C) and 65 (CS) and 1.5 (NAD-IDH) microM at elevated temperature (25 degrees C), respectively. Mitochondrial NADP-IDH was the most sensitive to Cd with IC(50) of 14 and 3.4 microM at 15 degrees and 25 degrees C, respectively. Electron transport chain (ETC) complexes were significantly less sensitive to the direct effects of Cd with IC(50) ranging from 260 to >400 microM. Temperature increase led to a higher sensitivity of mitochondrial enzymes to the inhibitory effects of Cd as indicated by a decline in IC(50) with the exception of Complex III from gills and CS from gills and hepatopancreas. Cd exposure also resulted in a decrease in activation energy of mitochondrial enzymes suggesting that mitochondria from Cd-exposed oysters could exhibit reduced capacity to respond to temperature rise with an adequate increase in the substrate flux. These interactive effects of Cd and temperature on mitochondrial enzymes could negatively affect metabolic performance of oysters and possibly other ectotherms in polluted environments during temperature increase such as expected during the global climate change and/or tidal or seasonal warming in estuarine and coastal waters.

  2. Gametogenesis in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas: A Microarrays-Based Analysis Identifies Sex and Stage Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M.; Lelong, Christophe; Huvet, Arnaud; Kellner, Kristell; Dubos, Marie-Pierre; Riviere, Guillaume; Boudry, Pierre; Favrel, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Background The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca, Lophotrochozoa) is an alternative and irregular protandrous hermaphrodite: most individuals mature first as males and then change sex several times. Little is known about genetic and phenotypic basis of sex differentiation in oysters, and little more about the molecular pathways regulating reproduction. We have recently developed and validated a microarray containing 31,918 oligomers (Dheilly et al., 2011) representing the oyster transcriptome. The application of this microarray to the study of mollusk gametogenesis should provide a better understanding of the key factors involved in sex differentiation and the regulation of oyster reproduction. Methodology/Principal Findings Gene expression was studied in gonads of oysters cultured over a yearly reproductive cycle. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering showed a significant divergence in gene expression patterns of males and females coinciding with the start of gonial mitosis. ANOVA analysis of the data revealed 2,482 genes differentially expressed during the course of males and/or females gametogenesis. The expression of 434 genes could be localized in either germ cells or somatic cells of the gonad by comparing the transcriptome of female gonads to the transcriptome of stripped oocytes and somatic tissues. Analysis of the annotated genes revealed conserved molecular mechanisms between mollusks and mammals: genes involved in chromatin condensation, DNA replication and repair, mitosis and meiosis regulation, transcription, translation and apoptosis were expressed in both male and female gonads. Most interestingly, early expressed male-specific genes included bindin and a dpy-30 homolog and female-specific genes included foxL2, nanos homolog 3, a pancreatic lipase related protein, cd63 and vitellogenin. Further functional analyses are now required in order to investigate their role in sex differentiation in oysters. Conclusions

  3. Second-Generation Linkage Maps for the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Reveal Errors in Assembly of Genome Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Hedgecock, Dennis; Shin, Grace; Gracey, Andrew Y.; Den Berg, David Van; Samanta, Manoj P.

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, a widely cultivated marine bivalve mollusc, is becoming a genetically and genomically enabled model for highly fecund marine metazoans with complex life-histories. A genome sequence is available for the Pacific oyster, as are first-generation, low-density, linkage and gene-centromere maps mostly constructed from microsatellite DNA markers. Here, higher density, second-generation, linkage maps are constructed from more than 1100 coding (exonic) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), as well as 66 previously mapped microsatellite DNA markers, all typed in five families of Pacific oysters (nearly 172,000 genotypes). The map comprises 10 linkage groups, as expected, has an average total length of 588 cM, an average marker-spacing of 1.0 cM, and covers 86% of a genome estimated to be 616 cM. All but seven of the mapped SNPs map to 618 genome scaffolds; 260 scaffolds contain two or more mapped SNPs, but for 100 of these scaffolds (38.5%), the contained SNPs map to different linkage groups, suggesting widespread errors in scaffold assemblies. The 100 misassembled scaffolds are significantly longer than those that map to a single linkage group. On the genetic maps, marker orders and intermarker distances vary across families and mapping methods, owing to an abundance of markers segregating from only one parent, to widespread distortions of segregation ratios caused by early mortality, as previously observed for oysters, and to genotyping errors. Maps made from framework markers provide stronger support for marker orders and reasonable map lengths and are used to produce a consensus high-density linkage map containing 656 markers. PMID:26248981

  4. The cholinergic immune regulation mediated by a novel muscarinic acetylcholine receptor through TNF pathway in oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Lingling; Dong, Wenjing; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-12-01

    Muscarinic receptors, which selectively take muscarine as their ligand, are critical for the immunological and physiological processes in animals. In the present study, the open region frame (ORF) of a homologue of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (mAChR) was amplified from oyster Crassostrea gigas (named as CgmAChR-1), whose full length was 1983 bp and the protein it encoded contained 660 amino acids with a seven transmembrane region. Phylogeny analysis suggested that CgmAChR-1 shared homology with M5 muscarinic receptor found in invertebrates including Habropoda laboriosa, Acromyrmex echinatior and Echinococcus granulosus. After cell transfection of CgmAChR-1 into HEK293T cells and ACh incubation, the level of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP increased significantly (p < 0.05). Such trend could be reverted with the addition of M3 and M5 muscarinic receptor antagonists DAMP and DAR. The CgmAChR-1 transcripts were ubiquitously detectable in seven different tissues with the maximal expression level in adductor muscle. When the oysters received LPS stimulation, CgmAChR-1 mRNA expression in haemocyte was increased to the highest level (6.05-fold, p < 0.05) at 24 h, while blocking CgmAChR-1 using receptor antagonists before LPS stimulation promoted the expression of oyster TNF, resulting in the increase of haemocyte apoptosis index. These results suggested that CgmAChR-1 was the key molecule in cholinergic neuroendocrine-immune system contributing to the regulation of TNF expression and apoptosis process. PMID:27394930

  5. Overview and comparison of lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices and oysters (Crassostrea gigas) for assessing organic chemical exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huckins, J.N.; Prest, H.F.; Petty, J.D.; Lebo, J.A.; Hodgins, M.M.; Clark, R.C.; Alvarez, D.A.; Gala, W.R.; Steen, A.; Gale, R.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    We performed 20-d, flow-through exposures of lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to three concentrations (nominally 10, 100, and 250 ng/L) of a diverse mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Exposure water was seawater free of particulates larger than 0.1 ??m. The results of these controlled laboratory studies demonstrated that SPMDs and oysters concentrate the same chemicals but that the relative amounts accumulated are different. For oysters, the 20-d mean (across treatments) concentration factors (CFs) of test compounds with log Kow ??? 4.8 were much lower (4.0- to 20-fold lower) than those of the same compounds in SPMDs. In contrast, the 20-d CFs of PAHs with log K ow ??? 5.6 in oysters from the low-level treatment were higher than the corresponding CFs for SPMDs. The CFs of these compounds in oysters from the low-level treatment ranged from approximately 3.0- to 13-fold higher than those in oysters from the high-level treatment. This physiologically mediated difference in oyster CFs appears to be linked to active feeding in the low-level treatment and to apparent toxicity-induced cessation of feeding (i.e., valve closure) in the high-level treatment. Because CFs for these compounds in oysters were not independent of exposure concentrations, it follows that tissue levels were not proportional to exposure concentration. However, both sampling approaches have advantages and disadvantages, and the appropriateness of their use depends on the goals of a given study.

  6. Effect of simultaneous variation in temperature and ammonia concentration on percent fertilization and hatching in Crassostrea ariakensis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Wang; Jiahui, Liu; Hongshuai, Yang; Jin, Liu; Zhigang, Liu

    2014-04-01

    The combined effects of temperature and ammonia concentration on the percent fertilization and percent hatching in Crassostrea ariakensis were examined under laboratory conditions using the central composite design and response surface methodology. The results indicated: (1) The linear effects of temperature and ammonia concentration on the percent fertilization were significant (P<0.05), and the quadratic effects were highly significant (P<0.01). The interactive effect between temperature and ammonia concentration on the percent fertilization was not significant (P>0.05). (2) The linear effect of temperature on the percent hatching was highly significant (P<0.01), and that of ammonia concentration was nonsignificant (P>0.05). The quadratic effects of temperature and ammonia concentration on the percent hatching were highly significant (P<0.01). The interaction on the percent hatching was not significant (P>0.05). Temperature was more important than ammonia in influencing the fertilization and hatching in C. ariakensis. (3) The model equations of the percent fertilization and hatching towards temperature and ammonia concentration were established, with the coefficients of determination R(2)=99.4% and 99.76%, respectively. Through the lack-of-fit test, these models were of great adequacy. The predictive coefficients of determination for the two model equations were as high as 94.6% and 98.03%, respectively, showing that they could be used for practical projection. (4) Via the statistical simultaneous optimization technique, the optimal factor level combination, i.e., 25°C/0.038mgmL(-1), was derived, at which the greatest percent fertilization 95.25% and hatching 83.26% was achieved, with the desirability being 97.81%. Our results may provide advantageous guidelines for the successful reproduction of C. ariakensis.

  7. Larval settlement and spat recovery rates of the oyster Crassostrea brasiliana (Lamarck, 1819) using different systems to induce metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Silveira, R C; Silva, F C; Gomes, C H M; Ferreira, J F; Melo, C M R

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed at the assessment, in the laboratory, of the larval settlement and spat recovery rates of oysters of the species Crassostrea brasiliana using plastic collectors, epinephrine (C9H13NO3 C4H6O6) and shell powder in settlement tanks. Polypropylene was used attached to bamboo frames. The material was chosen due to its pliability--that favours the spat detachment. Two experiments were carried out; the first between February and April 2008, and the second between November and December 2008 at the Marine Mussel Laboratory of Santa Catarina Federal University (Laboratório de Moluscos Marinhos da Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina). In the first experiment, the scratched plastic collectors were tested consorting them with shell powder; on the second, the plastic collectors were tested consorted with shell powder, only shell powder and epinephrine as the metamorphosis stimulator. The quantification was carried out of the larvae settled in the plastic collectors, and of the recovery and integrity of the spats after their detachment. The first experiment has shown a recovery rate of 48.83% of the spats in comparison with the D larvae used. From this percentage, 4.9% settled in the plastic collectors and 43.93% in shell powder. The second experiment revealed 55.78% regarding the settled spats in comparison with the total of larvae used (using epinephrine), 78.62% in the treatment with the collector plus shell powder and 58.33% in the treatment only with shell powder. Thus, the use of the collector plus shell powder resulted in a greater spat recovery when compared to the other treatments.

  8. New Insight for the Genetic Evaluation of Resistance to Ostreid Herpesvirus Infection, a Worldwide Disease, in Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Dégremont, Lionel; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Pépin, Jean-François; Travers, Marie-Agnès; Renault, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, is the most important commercial oyster species cultivated in the world. Meanwhile, the ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) is one of the major pathogens affecting the Pacific oyster, and numerous mortality outbreaks related to this pathogen are now reported worldwide. To assess the genetic basis of resistance to OsHV-1 infection in spat C. gigas and to facilitate breeding programs for such a trait, if any exist, we compared the mortality of half- and full-sib families using three field methods and a controlled challenge by OsHV-1 in the laboratory. In the field, three methods were tested: (A) one family per bag; (B) one family per small soft mesh bag and all families inside one bag; (C) same as the previous methods but the oysters were individually labelled and then mixed. The mean mortality ranged from 80 to 82% and was related to OsHV-1 based on viral DNA detection. The narrow-sense heritability for mortality, and thus OsHV-1 resistance, ranged from 0.49 to 0.60. The high positive genetic correlations across the field methods suggested no genotype by environment interaction. Ideally, selective breeding could use method B, which is less time- and space-consuming. The narrow sense heritability for mortality under OsHV-1 challenge was 0.61, and genetic correlation between the field and the laboratory was ranged from 0.68 to 0.75, suggesting a weak genotype by environment interaction. Thus, most of families showing the highest survival performed well in field and laboratory conditions, and a similar trend was also observed for families with the lowest survival. In conclusion, this is the first study demonstrating a large additive genetic variation for resistance to OsHV-1 infection in C. gigas, regardless of the methods used, which should help in selective breeding to improve resistance to viral infection in C. gigas. PMID:26039375

  9. Parental exposure to the herbicide diuron results in oxidative DNA damage to germinal cells of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Barranger, Audrey; Heude-Berthelin, Clothilde; Rouxel, Julien; Adeline, Béatrice; Benabdelmouna, Abdellah; Burgeot, Thierry; Akcha, Farida

    2016-02-01

    Chemical pollution by pesticides has been identified as a possible contributing factor to the massive mortality outbreaks observed in Crassostrea gigas for several years. A previous study demonstrated the vertical transmission of DNA damage by subjecting oyster genitors to the herbicide diuron at environmental concentrations during gametogenesis. This trans-generational effect occurs through damage to genitor-exposed gametes, as measured by the comet-assay. The presence of DNA damage in gametes could be linked to the formation of DNA damage in other germ cells. In order to explore this question, the levels and cell distribution of the oxidized base lesion 8-oxodGuo were studied in the gonads of exposed genitors. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV and electrochemical detection analysis showed an increase in 8-oxodGuo levels in both male and female gonads after exposure to diuron. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the presence of 8-oxodGuo at all stages of male germ cells, from early to mature stages. Conversely, the oxidized base was only present in early germ cell stages in female gonads. These results indicate that male and female genitors underwent oxidative stress following exposure to diuron, resulting in DNA oxidation in both early germ cells and gametes, such as spermatozoa, which could explain the transmission of diuron-induced DNA damage to offspring. Furthermore, immunostaining of early germ cells seems indicates that damages caused by exposure to diuron on germ line not only affect the current sexual cycle but also could affect future gametogenesis. PMID:26610786

  10. New Insight for the Genetic Evaluation of Resistance to Ostreid Herpesvirus Infection, a Worldwide Disease, in Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Dégremont, Lionel; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Pépin, Jean-François; Travers, Marie-Agnès; Renault, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, is the most important commercial oyster species cultivated in the world. Meanwhile, the ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) is one of the major pathogens affecting the Pacific oyster, and numerous mortality outbreaks related to this pathogen are now reported worldwide. To assess the genetic basis of resistance to OsHV-1 infection in spat C. gigas and to facilitate breeding programs for such a trait, if any exist, we compared the mortality of half- and full-sib families using three field methods and a controlled challenge by OsHV-1 in the laboratory. In the field, three methods were tested: (A) one family per bag; (B) one family per small soft mesh bag and all families inside one bag; (C) same as the previous methods but the oysters were individually labelled and then mixed. The mean mortality ranged from 80 to 82% and was related to OsHV-1 based on viral DNA detection. The narrow-sense heritability for mortality, and thus OsHV-1 resistance, ranged from 0.49 to 0.60. The high positive genetic correlations across the field methods suggested no genotype by environment interaction. Ideally, selective breeding could use method B, which is less time- and space-consuming. The narrow sense heritability for mortality under OsHV-1 challenge was 0.61, and genetic correlation between the field and the laboratory was ranged from 0.68 to 0.75, suggesting a weak genotype by environment interaction. Thus, most of families showing the highest survival performed well in field and laboratory conditions, and a similar trend was also observed for families with the lowest survival. In conclusion, this is the first study demonstrating a large additive genetic variation for resistance to OsHV-1 infection in C. gigas, regardless of the methods used, which should help in selective breeding to improve resistance to viral infection in C. gigas. PMID:26039375

  11. Significance of physicochemical forms of storage in microalgae in predicting copper transfer to filter-feeding oysters (Crassostrea gigas).

    PubMed

    Amiard-Triquet, Claude; Berthet, Brigitte; Joux, Lamia; Perrein-Ettajani, Hanane

    2006-02-01

    Copper distribution has been examined in two microalgae (Haslea ostrearia, Diatom; Tetraselmis suecica, Prasinophyceae) exposed to Cu at 30 microg/L(-1). Exchangeable copper linked at the cell surface was desorbed using 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonate as complexing agent. Then, incorporated copper was separated between soluble and insoluble fractions. In addition, algae were resuspended in acid solutions, the pHs of which covered the range existing in the digestive tract of bivalves. Considering that the soluble fraction is the most easily transferred in the food chain and that exchangeable Cu is easily desorbed, the percentages of Cu potentially available in microalgae have been assessed. These percentages have been compared with those retained in oysters Crassostrea gigas fed with contaminated microalgae in previous studies. In H. ostrearia, the potentially available fraction of Cu (90%) was very similar to the percentage retained by oysters (93%) when the bivalves were acclimated to this food for 3 weeks. Only half (21%) of the potentially available Cu of T. suecica (42%) was readily assimilated in oysters after 3 weeks. This is in agreement with the results of the desorption tests at physiological pHs which showed that only 15-25% of Cu was lost, despite solubilization of other constituents of T. suecica as demonstrated by the decrease in their dry weight. Bioavailability determined from metal speciation in food allows a relevant prediction of the trophic transfer in the case of H. ostrearia, but caution is recommended in generalizing this mode of assessment as shown in the case of T. suecica.

  12. Utilising caging techniques to investigate metal assimilation in Nucella lapillus, Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas at three Irish coastal locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giltrap, Michelle; Macken, Ailbhe; Davoren, Maria; McGovern, Evin; Foley, Barry; Larsen, Martin; White, Jonathan; McHugh, Brendan

    2013-11-01

    Pollution by metals has been of increasing concern for a number of decades but at present, the mechanism of metal accumulation in sentinel species is not fully understood and further studies are required for environmental risk assessment of metals in aquatic environments. The use of caging techniques has proven to be useful for assessment of water quality in coastal and estuarine environments. This study investigates the application of caging techniques for monitoring uptake of 20 elements [Li, Na, Mg, Al, P, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Co, Cu, As, Sb, Pb, Hg, Cd and Zn] in three marine species namely Nucella lapillus, Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas. Stable isotopes were used to determine predatory effects and also used for modelling metal uptake in test species and to track nutrient assimilation. Metal levels were monitored at three different coastal locations, namely Dublin Bay, Dunmore East and Omey Island over 18 weeks. Significant differences in concentrations of Mn, Co and Zn between mussels and oysters were found. Correlations between cadmium levels in N. lapillus and δ13C and δ15N suggest dietary influences in Cd uptake. Levels of Zn were highest in C. gigas compared to the other two species and levels of Zn were most elevated at the Dunmore East site. Copper levels were more elevated in all test species at both Dublin Bay and Dunmore East. Mercury was raised in all species at Dunmore East compared to the other two sites. Biotic accumulation of metals in the test species demonstrates that caging techniques can provide a valid tool for biomonitoring in metal impacted areas.

  13. Innervation of Gill Lateral Cells in the Bivalve Mollusc Crassostrea virginica Affects Cellular Membrane Potential and Cilia Activity

    PubMed Central

    Catapane, Edward J; Nelson, Michael; Adams, Trevon; Carroll, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Gill lateral cells of Crassostrea virginica are innervated by the branchial nerve, which contains serotonergic and dopaminergic fibers that regulate cilia beating rate. Terminal release of serotonin or dopamine results in an increase or decrease, respectively, of cilia beating rate in lateral gill cells. In this study we used the voltage sensitive fluorescent probe DiBAC4(3) to quantify changes in gill lateral cell membrane potential in response to electrical stimulation of the branchial nerve or to applications of serotonin and dopamine, and correlate these changes to cilia beating rates. Application of serotonin to gill lateral cells caused prolonged membrane depolarization, similar to plateau potentials, while increasing cilia beating rate. Application of dopamine hyperpolarized the resting membrane while decreasing cilia beating rate. Low frequency (5 Hz) electrical stimulations of the branchial nerve, which cause terminal release of endogenous serotonin, or high frequency (20 Hz) stimulations, which cause terminal release of endogenous dopamine, had the same effects on gill lateral cell membrane potentials and cilia beating rate as the respective applications of serotonin or dopamine. The study shows that innervation of gill lateral cells by the branchial nerve affects membrane potential as well as cilia beating rate, and demonstrates a strong correlation between changes in membrane potential and regulation of cilia beating rate. The study furthers the understanding of serotonin and dopamine signaling in the innervation and regulation of gill cilia in bivalves. The study also shows that voltage sensitive fluorescent probes like DiBAC 4(3) can be successfully used as an alternative to microelectrodes to measure changes in membrane potential of ciliated gill cells and other small cells with fast moving cilia. PMID:27489887

  14. Pesticide residues, heavy metals, and DNA damage in sentinel oysters Crassostrea gigas from Sinaloa and Sonora, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Boucard, Celia; Anguiano-Vega, Gerardo; Mercier, Laurence; Rojas del Castillo, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides and heavy metals were analyzed in sentinel Crassostrea gigas oysters placed in six aquaculture sites close to a contaminated agricultural region. Each site was sampled twice. Tests revealed the presence of organochlorine (OC) pesticides in the oysters at concentrations varying from 31.8 to 72.5 μg/kg for gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH); from 1.2 to 3.1 μg/kg for dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4-DDE); from 1.6 to 2.3 μg/kg for endosulfan I; and from 1.4 to 41.2 μg/kg for endosulfan II, as well as heavy metals in concentrations that exceeded Mexican tolerance levels (405.5 to 987.8 μg/g for zinc; 4.2 to 7.3 μg/g for cadmium; and 7.2 to 9.9 μg/g for lead). Significant levels of DNA damage in oyster hemocytes were also detected. There was a significant, positive correlation between genotoxic damage and concentration of nickel or the presence of endosulfan II. Cellular viability evaluated by cytotoxic analyses was found to be high at 80%. Marked inhibition in activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE ) and induction of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity was noted. Data demonstrated a significant relation between AChE activity inhibition and presence of endosulfan II, γ-HCH, copper, lead, and 4,4-DDE, as well as between AChE and GST activity at different sites. PMID:24555676

  15. A thymosin beta-4 is involved in production of hemocytes and immune defense of Hong Kong oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuehuan; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yang; Xiang, Zhiming; Qu, Fufa; Yu, Ziniu

    2016-04-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a ubiquitous protein with multiple and diverse intracellular and extracellular functions in vertebrates. In this study, the full-length cDNA of Tβ4 was cloned and identified in Crassostrea hongkongensis, designated as ChTβ4. The full-length cDNA of ChTβ4 consists of 530 bp with an open reading frame of 126 bp encoding a 41 amino acid polypeptide. SMART analysis indicated that there is one thymosin domain and a highly conserved actin-binding motif (18LKKTET23) in ChTβ4. In vivo injection of recombinant ChTβ4 protein could significantly increase total hemocytes count in oysters, and knockdown of the expression of ChTβ4 resulted in a significant decrease in the circulating hemocytes. Tissue distribution analysis revealed a ubiquitous presence of ChTβ4, with the highest expression in hemocytes. The upregulated transcripts of ChTβ4 in response to bacterial challenge and tissue injury suggest that ChTβ4 is involved in both innate immunity against pathogen infection and wound healing. Moreover, bacteria-clearance experiment showed ChTβ4 could facilitate the clearance of injected bacteria in oysters. In vivo injection with ChTβ4 resulted in reduction of the intracellular ROS in hemocytes, which was associated with increased expression of antioxidant enzymes Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), Catalase, and Glutathione Peroxidase (GPX) by pre-treatment with ChTβ4. These results suggest that ChTβ4 is a thymosin beta-4 homolog and plays a vital role in the immune defense of C. hongkongensis.

  16. Pesticide residues, heavy metals, and DNA damage in sentinel oysters Crassostrea gigas from Sinaloa and Sonora, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Boucard, Celia; Anguiano-Vega, Gerardo; Mercier, Laurence; Rojas del Castillo, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides and heavy metals were analyzed in sentinel Crassostrea gigas oysters placed in six aquaculture sites close to a contaminated agricultural region. Each site was sampled twice. Tests revealed the presence of organochlorine (OC) pesticides in the oysters at concentrations varying from 31.8 to 72.5 μg/kg for gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH); from 1.2 to 3.1 μg/kg for dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4-DDE); from 1.6 to 2.3 μg/kg for endosulfan I; and from 1.4 to 41.2 μg/kg for endosulfan II, as well as heavy metals in concentrations that exceeded Mexican tolerance levels (405.5 to 987.8 μg/g for zinc; 4.2 to 7.3 μg/g for cadmium; and 7.2 to 9.9 μg/g for lead). Significant levels of DNA damage in oyster hemocytes were also detected. There was a significant, positive correlation between genotoxic damage and concentration of nickel or the presence of endosulfan II. Cellular viability evaluated by cytotoxic analyses was found to be high at 80%. Marked inhibition in activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE ) and induction of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity was noted. Data demonstrated a significant relation between AChE activity inhibition and presence of endosulfan II, γ-HCH, copper, lead, and 4,4-DDE, as well as between AChE and GST activity at different sites.

  17. Sex-specific regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Guévélou, Eric; Huvet, Arnaud; Galindo-Sánchez, Clara E; Milan, Massimo; Quillien, Virgile; Daniel, Jean-Yves; Quéré, Claudie; Boudry, Pierre; Corporeau, Charlotte

    2013-10-01

    The hermaphrodite Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas displays a high energy allocation to reproduction. We studied the expression of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) during gametogenesis in the gonad and characterized the mRNA sequences of the AMPK subunits: the AMPK alpha mRNA sequence was previously characterized; we identified AMPK beta, AMPK gamma, and mRNAs of putative AMPK-related targets following bioinformatics mining on existing genomic resources. We analyzed the mRNA expression of the AMPK alpha, beta, and gamma subunits in the gonads of male and female oysters through a reproductive cycle, and we quantified the mRNA expression of genes belonging to fatty acid and glucose metabolism. AMPK alpha mRNA levels were more abundant in males at the first stage of gametogenesis, when mitotic activity and the differentiation of germinal cells occur, and were always more abundant in males than in females. Some targets of fatty acid and glucose metabolism appeared to be correlated with the expression of AMPK subunits at the mRNA level. We then analyzed the sex-specific AMPK activity by measuring the phosphorylation of the catalytic AMPK alpha protein and its expression at the protein level. Both the amount of AMPK alpha protein and threonine 172 phosphorylation appeared to be almost totally inhibited in mature female gonads at stage 3, at the time when accumulation of reserves in oocytes was promoted, while it remained at a high level in mature spermatozoa. Its activation might play a sex-dependent role in the management of energy during gametogenesis in oyster.

  18. Expression of Overdominance for Specific Activity at the Phosphoglucomutase-2 Locus in the Pacific Oyster, Crassostrea Gigas

    PubMed Central

    Pogson, G. H.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental and genetic components of specific activity variation at the phosphoglucomutase-2 locus in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, were examined to assess the direct role played by this polymorphism in a heterozygosity/growth relationship. Both environmental variables studied, season and intertidal position, exerted highly significant effects on phosphoglucomutase specific activity but no interactions occurred between these factors and Pgm-2 genotype. Highly significant differences were also detected between Pgm-2 genotypes. The three most common heterozygotes (Pgm-2(92/100), Pgm-2(96/100) and Pgm-2(100/104)) consistently expressed greater specific activities than the Pgm-2(92/92), Pgm-2(96/96), Pgm-2(100/100) and Pgm-2(104/104) homozygotes. Overall, the specific activities of heterozygotes for the Pgm-2(100) allele exceeded heterozygotes by 24% and 20% in the mantle and adductor muscle tissues, respectively. Heterozygotes formed between the three less frequent Pgm-2(92), Pgm-2(96) and Pgm-2(104) alleles differed sharply from those possessing the Pgm-2(100) allele in being indistinguishable from homozygotes. The possibility of these patterns arising from the undetected presence of an inactive Pgm-2 allele was examined and found to be inconsistent with all of its predicted effects on the specific activity data. Genuine overdominance was shown to be capable of explaining the specific activities of ten structural locus genotypes, allelic frequency distributions in natural populations, and the maintenance of the enzyme polymorphism in a balanced state. The results provide evidence favoring the overdominance explanation for one locus involved in a heterozygosity/growth relationship and suggest that the reported effects of this locus on adult body weight may have been caused by the greater flux capacities of heterozygotes for the Pgm-2(100) allele. PMID:1829426

  19. Transcriptomic Profiling of Gametogenesis in Triploid Pacific Oysters Crassostrea gigas: Towards an Understanding of Partial Sterility Associated with Triploidy

    PubMed Central

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M.; Jouaux, Aude; Boudry, Pierre; Favrel, Pascal; Lelong, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Background Triploidy can occur in many animal species but is often lethal. Among invertebrates, amphibians and fishes, triploids are viable although often sterile or infertile. Most triploids of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas are almost sterile (named “3nβ”) yet a low but significant proportion show an advanced gametogenesis (named “3nα”). These oysters thus constitute an interesting model to study the effect of triploidy on germ cell development. We used microarrays to compare the gonad transcriptomes of diploid 2n and the abovementioned triploid 3nβ and 3nα male and female oysters throughout gametogenesis. Results All triploids displayed an upregulation of genes related to DNA repair and apoptosis and a downregulation of genes associated with cell division. The comparison of 3nα and 3nβ transcriptomes with 2n revealed the likely involvement of a cell cycle checkpoint during mitosis in the successful but delayed development of gonads in 3nα individuals. In contrast, a disruption of sex differentiation mechanisms may explain the sterility of 3nβ individuals with 3nβ females expressing male-specific genes and 3nβ males expressing female-specific genes. Conclusions The disruption of sex differentiation and mitosis may be responsible for the impaired gametogenesis of triploid Pacific oysters. The function of the numerous candidate genes identified in our study should now be studied in detail in order to elucidate their role in sex determination, mitosis/meiosis control, pachytene cell cycle checkpoint, and the control of DNA repair/apoptosis. PMID:25375782

  20. Larval and Post-Larval Stages of Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) Are Resistant to Elevated CO2

    PubMed Central

    R, Dineshram; Dennis, Choi K. S.; Adela, Li J.; Yu, Ziniu; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen

    2013-01-01

    The average pH of surface oceans has decreased by 0.1 unit since industrialization and is expected to decrease by another 0.3–0.7 units before the year 2300 due to the absorption of anthropogenic CO2. This human-caused pH change is posing serious threats and challenges to the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), especially to their larval stages. Our knowledge of the effect of reduced pH on C. gigas larvae presently relies presumptively on four short-term (<4 days) survival and growth studies. Using multiple physiological measurements and life stages, the effects of long-term (40 days) exposure to pH 8.1, 7.7 and 7.4 on larval shell growth, metamorphosis, respiration and filtration rates at the time of metamorphosis, along with the juvenile shell growth and structure of the C. gigas, were examined in this study. The mean survival and growth rates were not affected by pH. The metabolic, feeding and metamorphosis rates of pediveliger larvae were similar, between pH 8.1 and 7.7. The pediveligers at pH 7.4 showed reduced weight-specific metabolic and filtration rates, yet were able to sustain a more rapid post-settlement growth rate. However, no evidence suggested that low pH treatments resulted in alterations to the shell ultrastructures (SEM images) or elemental compositions (i.e., Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios). Thus, larval and post-larval forms of the C. gigas in the Yellow Sea are probably resistant to elevated CO2 and decreased near-future pH scenarios. The pre-adapted ability to resist a wide range of decreased pH may provide C. gigas with the necessary tolerance to withstand rapid pH changes over the coming century. PMID:23724027

  1. Elimination of fecal coliforms and F-specific RNA coliphage from oysters (Crassostrea virginica) relaid in floating containers.

    PubMed

    Kator, H; Rhodes, M

    2001-06-01

    Declining oyster (Crassostrea virginica) production in the Chesapeake Bay has stimulated aquaculture based on floats for off-bottom culture. While advantages of off-bottom culture are significant, the increased use of floating containers raises public health and microbiological concerns, because oysters in floats may be more susceptible to fecal contamination from storm runoff compared to those cultured on-bottom. We conducted four commercial-scale studies with market-size oysters naturally contaminated with fecal coliforms (FC) and a candidate viral indicator, F-specific RNA (FRNA) coliphage. To facilitate sampling and to test for location effects, 12 replicate subsamples, each consisting of 15 to 20 randomly selected oysters in plastic mesh bags, were placed at four characteristic locations within a 0.6- by 3.0-m "Taylor" float, and the remaining oysters were added to a depth not exceeding 15.2 cm. The float containing approximately 3,000 oysters was relaid in the York River, Virginia, for 14 days. During relay, increases in shellfish FC densities followed rain events such that final mean levels exceeded initial levels or did not meet an arbitrary product end point of 50 FC/100 ml. FRNA coliphage densities decreased to undetectable levels within 14 days (16 to 28 degrees C) in all but the last experiment, when temperatures fell between 12 and 16 degrees C. Friedman (nonparametric analysis of variance) tests performed on FC/Escherichia coli and FRNA densities indicated no differences in counts as a function of location within the float. The public health consequences of these observations are discussed, and future research and educational needs are identified. PMID:11403128

  2. Evidence for accumulation of Synechococcus elongatus (Cyanobacteria: Cyanophyceae) in the tissues of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Avila-Poveda, Omar Hernando; Torres-Ariño, Alejandra; Girón-Cruz, Diego Ademir; Cuevas-Aguirre, Angel

    2014-10-01

    Cyanobacteria appear to have direct relations with mollusks in several aspects. This is the first time, distinguishing Gram-negative cyanoprokaryotic Synechococcus elongatus as bright yellow-gold autofluorescence by Lillie's and Hiss' staining methods on paraffin-embedded tissues of Crassostrea gigas. Three diets: cyanoprokaryotes, cyanoprokaryotes with microalgae, and only microalgae were evaluated. Cyanoprokaryotes were intact, densely bundled, and immersed in the cytosol of the digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad of C. gigas, revealing an accumulation systemic without tissue damage observed by histology. Unexpectedly, cyanoprokaryotes were slightly most accumulated with microalgae diet by each of the tissues of the C. gigas than with any other diets. Cyanoprokaryotes tend to be in mean slightly higher in the digestive gland than in any other tissues respectively for each diet, although these values are closely similar to connective tissue. A possible order of exposure of the oyster tissues to accumulation of cyanoprokaryotes was digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad. Thereby, the digestive gland could be the major target tissue for the accumulation. Our observations provide a valuable insight regarding the ability of cyanoprokaryotes to penetrate, spread, and remain inside the oyster tissues, suggesting for S. elongatus: (1) a pre-accumulation in oyster tissues from the natural environment, (2) a phagocytosis and/or endocytosis process rather than ingestion and extracellular digestion, (3) an apparent cellular division in the cytosol of oyster tissues, (4) an apparent inter-tissue movement, and (5) a possible endosymbiosis between C. gigas and S. elongatus. Hereby, it is possible that S. elongatus have a well-developed host-endobiont relationship with oysters, and thereby support future work toward a description of the escape and spreading mechanisms of S. elongatus inside the tissues of mollusks, and put forward questions as

  3. Use of caged Nucella lapillus and Crassostrea gigas to monitor tributyltin-induced bioeffects in Irish coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Giltrap, Michelle; Macken, Ailbhe; Davoren, Maria; Minchin, Dan; McGovern, Evin; Foley, Barry; Strand, Jakob; McHugh, Brendan

    2009-08-01

    Caging studies have been previously reported to be useful for providing valuable information on biological effects of mollusks over short periods of time where resident species are absent. The degree of imposex in caged dog whelk (Nucella lapillus), was measured using the vas deferens sequence index (VSDI) and the Relative Penis Size Index (RPSI) and the extent of shell thickening in caged Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) was investigated at t = 0 and t = 18 weeks. Nucella lapillus, when provided with mussels as a food source at the control site at Omey Island on the west Irish coast, did not demonstrate imposex features, whereas those transplanted to port areas did. Dunmore East exhibited the highest level of imposex (3.25 VDSI and 2.37 RPSI). Shell thickening was evident in C. gigas transplanted to Dunmore East, with low effects evident at the control location, Omey Island, and Dublin Bay at t = 18 weeks. Dry weight whole-body concentrations of organotins were most elevated in all species held at Dunmore East compared with other locations. Greatest delta15N and delta13C enrichment was observed within the tissues of the predatory N. lapillus in all three test sites. Increased assimilation in the Dublin Bay oysters might have been influenced by the presence of more nutrients at this location. Surficial sediment organotin levels were most elevated in the Dunmore East <2-mm fraction (22,707 microg tributyltin/kg dry weight), whereas low organotin levels were determined from Dublin and Omey Island sediments. The valuable application of cost-effective caging techniques to deliver integrated biological effects and chemical measurements in the absence of resident gastropod populations in potential organotin/tributyltin hotspot locations is discussed. PMID:19642828

  4. Bioaccumulation and depuration of brevetoxins in the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) and the northern quahog (= hard clam, Mercenaria mercenaria).

    PubMed

    Griffith, Andrew W; Shumway, Sandra E; Volety, Aswani K

    2013-05-01

    The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) and northern quahog (= hard clam, Mercenaria mercenaria) are two species of economic and ecological significance in east coast waters of the United States and the Gulf of Mexico. Commercial industries for these species, especially within the state of Florida, are significant. The current study was undertaken to build upon the already established body of knowledge surrounding effects of the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis on shellfish, to provide an understanding of the kinetics of brevetoxins within shellfish tissues, and to provide an estimate of brevetoxin retention times in these shellfish after a bloom event. Individual clams and oysters were exposed to the toxic dinoflagellate, K. brevis at a bloom concentration of 5 × 10(5) cells·L(-1) for eight days and then transferred to filtered water for depuration. Individuals were sampled periodically to determine depuration rates. Concentrations of brevetoxins (and/or their metabolites measured as PbTx-3 equivalent) in tissues were determined using an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). After five days of exposure, brevetoxin levels in tissues of both species reached concentrations well above the regulatory limit of 800 ng g(-1) (Pb-TX3 equivalent). Averaged concentration of brevetoxins in clams was 1000 ng g(-1), while the oysters averaged 1986 ng g(-1). After two weeks of depuration, tissue concentrations in both species were below regulatory levels with clams averaging ~204 ng g(-1) and oysters averaging ~437 ng g(-1). Toxins (or their metabolities) remained detectable in both clams (139 days) and oysters (82 days) for the duration of the experiment. PMID:23419594

  5. Evidence for accumulation of Synechococcus elongatus (Cyanobacteria: Cyanophyceae) in the tissues of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Avila-Poveda, Omar Hernando; Torres-Ariño, Alejandra; Girón-Cruz, Diego Ademir; Cuevas-Aguirre, Angel

    2014-10-01

    Cyanobacteria appear to have direct relations with mollusks in several aspects. This is the first time, distinguishing Gram-negative cyanoprokaryotic Synechococcus elongatus as bright yellow-gold autofluorescence by Lillie's and Hiss' staining methods on paraffin-embedded tissues of Crassostrea gigas. Three diets: cyanoprokaryotes, cyanoprokaryotes with microalgae, and only microalgae were evaluated. Cyanoprokaryotes were intact, densely bundled, and immersed in the cytosol of the digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad of C. gigas, revealing an accumulation systemic without tissue damage observed by histology. Unexpectedly, cyanoprokaryotes were slightly most accumulated with microalgae diet by each of the tissues of the C. gigas than with any other diets. Cyanoprokaryotes tend to be in mean slightly higher in the digestive gland than in any other tissues respectively for each diet, although these values are closely similar to connective tissue. A possible order of exposure of the oyster tissues to accumulation of cyanoprokaryotes was digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad. Thereby, the digestive gland could be the major target tissue for the accumulation. Our observations provide a valuable insight regarding the ability of cyanoprokaryotes to penetrate, spread, and remain inside the oyster tissues, suggesting for S. elongatus: (1) a pre-accumulation in oyster tissues from the natural environment, (2) a phagocytosis and/or endocytosis process rather than ingestion and extracellular digestion, (3) an apparent cellular division in the cytosol of oyster tissues, (4) an apparent inter-tissue movement, and (5) a possible endosymbiosis between C. gigas and S. elongatus. Hereby, it is possible that S. elongatus have a well-developed host-endobiont relationship with oysters, and thereby support future work toward a description of the escape and spreading mechanisms of S. elongatus inside the tissues of mollusks, and put forward questions as

  6. Larval and post-larval stages of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) are resistant to elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Ginger, Ko W K; Vera, Chan B S; R, Dineshram; Dennis, Choi K S; Adela, Li J; Yu, Ziniu; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen

    2013-01-01

    The average pH of surface oceans has decreased by 0.1 unit since industrialization and is expected to decrease by another 0.3-0.7 units before the year 2300 due to the absorption of anthropogenic CO2. This human-caused pH change is posing serious threats and challenges to the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), especially to their larval stages. Our knowledge of the effect of reduced pH on C. gigas larvae presently relies presumptively on four short-term (<4 days) survival and growth studies. Using multiple physiological measurements and life stages, the effects of long-term (40 days) exposure to pH 8.1, 7.7 and 7.4 on larval shell growth, metamorphosis, respiration and filtration rates at the time of metamorphosis, along with the juvenile shell growth and structure of the C. gigas, were examined in this study. The mean survival and growth rates were not affected by pH. The metabolic, feeding and metamorphosis rates of pediveliger larvae were similar, between pH 8.1 and 7.7. The pediveligers at pH 7.4 showed reduced weight-specific metabolic and filtration rates, yet were able to sustain a more rapid post-settlement growth rate. However, no evidence suggested that low pH treatments resulted in alterations to the shell ultrastructures (SEM images) or elemental compositions (i.e., Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios). Thus, larval and post-larval forms of the C. gigas in the Yellow Sea are probably resistant to elevated CO2 and decreased near-future pH scenarios. The pre-adapted ability to resist a wide range of decreased pH may provide C. gigas with the necessary tolerance to withstand rapid pH changes over the coming century.

  7. Effects of Alexandrium minutum exposure upon physiological and hematological variables of diploid and triploid oysters, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Haberkorn, Hansy; Lambert, Christophe; Le Goïc, Nelly; Guéguen, Marielle; Moal, Jeanne; Palacios, Elena; Lassus, Patrick; Soudant, Philippe

    2010-04-15

    The effects of an artificial bloom of the toxin-producing dinoflagellate, Alexandrium minutum, upon physiological parameters of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, were assessed. Diploid and triploid oysters were exposed to cultured A. minutum and compared to control diploid and triploid oysters fed T. Isochrysis. Experiments were repeated twice, in April and mid-May 2007, to investigate effects of maturation stage on oyster responses to A. minutum exposure. Oyster maturation stage, Paralytic Shellfish Toxin (PST) accumulation, as well as several digestive gland and hematological variables, were assessed at the ends of the exposures. In both experiments, triploid oysters accumulated more PSTs (approximately twice) than diploid oysters. Significant differences, in terms of phenoloxidase activity (PO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production of hemocytes, were observed between A. minutum-exposed and non-exposed oysters. PO in hemocytes was lower in oysters exposed to A. minutum than in control oysters in an early maturation stage (diploids and triploids in April experiment and triploids in May experiment), but this contrast was reversed in ripe oysters (diploids in May experiment). In the April experiment, granulocytes of oysters exposed to A. minutum produced more ROS than those of control oysters; however, in the May experiment, ROS production of granulocytes was lower in A. minutum-exposed oysters. Moreover, significant decreases in free fatty acid, monoacylglycerol, and diacylglycerol contents in digestive glands of oysters exposed to A. minutum were observed. Concurrently, the ratio of reserve lipids (triacylglycerol, ether glycerides and sterol esters) to structural lipids (sterols) decreased upon A. minutum exposure in both experiments. Also, several physiological responses to A. minutum exposure appeared to be modulated by maturation stage as well as ploidy of the oysters.

  8. Seasonal variation in mitochondrial responses to cadmium and temperature in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin) from different latitudes.

    PubMed

    Cherkasov, A S; Taylor, C; Sokolova, I M

    2010-04-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an important environmental pollutant that can lead to impairment of cellular functions, energy misbalance and negatively impact survival in estuarine organisms including oysters. Like other marine bivalves, oysters can accumulate high Cd burdens in their tissues and are susceptible to the toxic effects of this metal. Presently, the factors that affect sensitivity to Cd toxicity and its variation in wild oyster populations are poorly understood. We analyzed geographical and seasonal variability of mitochondrial responses to elevated temperatures and Cd stress in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica from populations adapted to different thermal regimes (subtropical Texas (TX), warm temperate North Carolina (NC) and cold temperate Washington (WA) areas). Seasonality had a strong effect on mitochondrial function in oysters from the two studied southern populations (TX and NC) but not in their northern (WA) counterparts, with decreased mitochondrial abundance and increased rates of mitochondrial proton leak in gill tissues of TX and NC oysters in summer. Compared to WA oysters, oysters from the two southern populations accumulated Cd faster in their tissues, and their mitochondria were more sensitive to Cd inhibition in resting and ADP-stimulated states at 20 and 28 degrees C. At 12 degrees C, inter-populational differences in Cd accumulation rates and sensitivity of mitochondrial respiration to Cd were not significant. Within each of the three studied populations, sensitivity of mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiration to Cd inhibition increased with increasing temperatures (28>20>12 degrees C). This indicates that oysters from the two southern sites may be more vulnerable to Cd toxicity due to exposure to high environmental temperatures in summer, elevated rates of Cd accumulation and high intrinsic sensitivity of their mitochondria to Cd. This study suggests that data on sensitivity to pollutants obtained for one population of oysters should be

  9. Populations of Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas respond variably to elevated CO2 and predation by Morula marginalba.

    PubMed

    Wright, John M; Parker, Laura M; O'Connor, Wayne A; Williams, Mark; Kube, Peter; Ross, Pauline M

    2014-06-01

    Ocean acidification is anticipated to decrease calcification and increase dissolution of shelled molluscs. Molluscs with thinner and weaker shells may be more susceptible to predation, but not all studies have measured negative responses of molluscs to elevated pCO2. Recent studies measuring the response of molluscs have found greater variability at the population level than first expected. Here we investigate the impact of acidification on the predatory whelk Morula marginalba and genetically distinct subpopulations of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Whelks and eight family lines of C. gigas were separately exposed to ambient (385 ppm) and elevated (1000 ppm) pCO2 for 6 weeks. Following this period, individuals of M. marginalba were transferred into tanks with oysters at ambient and elevated pCO2 for 17 days. The increase in shell height of the oysters was on average 63% less at elevated compared to ambient pCO2. There were differences in shell compression strength, thickness, and mass among family lines of C. gigas, with sometimes an interaction between pCO2 and family line. Against expectations, this study found increased shell strength in the prey and reduced shell strength in the predator at elevated compared to ambient pCO2. After 10 days, the whelks consumed significantly more oysters regardless of whether C. gigas had been exposed to ambient or elevated CO2, but this was not dependent on the family line and the effect was not significant after 17 days. Our study found an increase in predation after exposure of the predator to predicted near-future levels of estuarine pCO2. PMID:25070870

  10. Expression Characterization of Stress Genes Under High and Low Temperature Stresses in the Pacific Oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qihui; Zhang, Linlin; Li, Li; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-04-01

    As a characteristic sessile inhabitant of the intertidal zone, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas occupies one of the most physically stressful environments on earth. With high exposure to terrestrial conditions, oysters must tolerate broad fluctuations in temperature range. However, oysters' cellular and molecular responses to temperature stresses have not been fully characterized. Here, we analyzed oyster transcriptome data under high and low temperatures. We also identified over 30 key temperature stress-responsive candidate genes, which encoded stress proteins such as heat shock proteins and apoptosis-associated proteins. The expression characterization of these genes under short-term cold and hot environments (5 and 35 °C) and long-term cold environments (5 °C) was detected by quantitative real-time PCR. Most of these genes reached expression peaks during the recovery stage after 24 h of heat stress, and these genes were greatly induced around day 3 in long-term cold stress while responded little to short-term cold stress. In addition, in the second heat stress after 2 days of recovery, oysters showed milder expression in these genes and a lower mortality rate, which indicated the existence of plasticity in the oyster's response to heat stress. We confirmed that homeostatic flexibility and anti-apoptosis might be crucial centers of temperature stress responses in oysters. Furthermore, we analyzed stress gene families in 11 different species and found that the linage-specific expansion of stress genes might be implicated in adaptive evolution. These results indicated that both plasticity and evolution played an important role in the stress response adaptation of oysters. PMID:26746430

  11. Exposure to the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella modulates juvenile oyster Crassostrea gigas hemocyte variables subjected to different biotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lassudrie, Malwenn; Soudant, Philippe; Nicolas, Jean-Louis; Miner, Philippe; Le Grand, Jacqueline; Lambert, Christophe; Le Goïc, Nelly; Hégaret, Hélène; Fabioux, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is an important commercial species cultured throughout the world. Oyster production practices often include transfers of animals into new environments that can be stressful, especially at young ages. This study was undertaken to determine if a toxic Alexandrium bloom, occurring repeatedly in French oyster beds, could modulate juvenile oyster cellular immune responses (i.e. hemocyte variables). We simulated planting on commercial beds by conducting a cohabitation exposure of juvenile, "specific pathogen-free" (SPF) oysters (naïve from the environment) with previously field-exposed oysters to induce interactions with new microorganisms. Indeed, toxic Alexandrium spp. exposures have been reported to modulate bivalve interaction with specific pathogens, as well as physiological and immunological variables in bivalves. In summary, SPF oysters were subjected to an artificial bloom of Alexandrium catenella, simultaneously with a cohabitation challenge. Exposure to A. catenella, and thus to the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) and extracellular bioactive compounds produced by this alga, induced higher concentration, size, complexity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production of circulating hemocytes. Challenge by cohabitation with field-exposed oysters also activated these hemocyte responses, suggesting a defense response to new microorganism exposure. These hemocyte responses to cohabitation challenge, however, were partially inhibited by A. catenella exposure, which enhanced hemocyte mortality, suggesting either detrimental effects of the interaction of both stressors on immune capacity, or the implementation of an alternative immune strategy through apoptosis. Indeed, no infection with specific pathogens (herpesvirus OsHV-1 or Vibrio aesturianus) was detected. Additionally, lower PST accumulation in challenged oysters suggests a physiological impairment through alteration of feeding-related processes. Overall, results of this

  12. Exposure to the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella modulates juvenile oyster Crassostrea gigas hemocyte variables subjected to different biotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lassudrie, Malwenn; Soudant, Philippe; Nicolas, Jean-Louis; Miner, Philippe; Le Grand, Jacqueline; Lambert, Christophe; Le Goïc, Nelly; Hégaret, Hélène; Fabioux, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is an important commercial species cultured throughout the world. Oyster production practices often include transfers of animals into new environments that can be stressful, especially at young ages. This study was undertaken to determine if a toxic Alexandrium bloom, occurring repeatedly in French oyster beds, could modulate juvenile oyster cellular immune responses (i.e. hemocyte variables). We simulated planting on commercial beds by conducting a cohabitation exposure of juvenile, "specific pathogen-free" (SPF) oysters (naïve from the environment) with previously field-exposed oysters to induce interactions with new microorganisms. Indeed, toxic Alexandrium spp. exposures have been reported to modulate bivalve interaction with specific pathogens, as well as physiological and immunological variables in bivalves. In summary, SPF oysters were subjected to an artificial bloom of Alexandrium catenella, simultaneously with a cohabitation challenge. Exposure to A. catenella, and thus to the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) and extracellular bioactive compounds produced by this alga, induced higher concentration, size, complexity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production of circulating hemocytes. Challenge by cohabitation with field-exposed oysters also activated these hemocyte responses, suggesting a defense response to new microorganism exposure. These hemocyte responses to cohabitation challenge, however, were partially inhibited by A. catenella exposure, which enhanced hemocyte mortality, suggesting either detrimental effects of the interaction of both stressors on immune capacity, or the implementation of an alternative immune strategy through apoptosis. Indeed, no infection with specific pathogens (herpesvirus OsHV-1 or Vibrio aesturianus) was detected. Additionally, lower PST accumulation in challenged oysters suggests a physiological impairment through alteration of feeding-related processes. Overall, results of this

  13. Salinity influences glutathione S-transferase activity and lipid peroxidation responses in the Crassostrea gigas oyster exposed to diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Zanette, Juliano; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves; da Silva, Angela Zaccaron; Guzenski, João; Ferreira, Jaime Fernando; Di Mascio, Paolo; Marques, Maria Risoleta Freire; Bainy, Afonso Celso Dias

    2011-04-15

    Biochemical responses in bivalve mollusks are commonly employed in environmental studies as biomarkers of aquatic contamination. The present study evaluated the possible influence of salinity (35, 25, 15 and 9ppt) in the biomarker responses of Crassostrea gigas oysters exposed to diesel at different nominal concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 1mL.L(-1)) using a semi-static exposure system. Salinity alone did not resulted in major changes in the gill's catalase activity (CAT), glutathione S-transferase activity (GST) and lipid peroxidation levels (measured as malondialdehyde, MDA), but influenced diesel related responses. At 25ppt salinity, but not at the other salinity levels, oysters exposed to diesel showed a strikingly positive concentration-dependent GST response. At 25ppt and 1mL.L(-1) diesel, the GST activity in the gills remained elevated, even after one week of depuration in clean water. The increased MDA levels in the oysters exposed to diesel comparing to control groups at 9, 15 and 35ppt salinities suggest the occurrence of lipid peroxidation in those salinities, but not at 25ppt salinity. The MDA quickly returned to basal levels after 24h of depuration. CAT activity was unaltered by the treatments employed. High toxicity for 1mL.L(-1) diesel was observed only at 35ppt salinity, but not in the other salinities. Results from this study strongly suggest that salinity influences the diesel related biomarker responses and toxicity in C. gigas, and that some of those responses remain altered even after depuration.

  14. Rapid mitochondrial adjustments in response to short-term hypoxia and re-oxygenation in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Sussarellu, Rossana; Dudognon, Tony; Fabioux, Caroline; Soudant, Philippe; Moraga, Dario; Kraffe, Edouard

    2013-05-01

    As oxygen concentrations in marine coastal habitats can fluctuate rapidly and drastically, sessile marine organisms such as the oyster Crassostrea gigas can experience marked and rapid oxygen variations. In this study, we investigated the responses of oyster gill mitochondria to short-term hypoxia (3 and 12 h, at 1.7 mg O2 l(-1)) and subsequent re-oxygenation. Mitochondrial respiratory rates (states 3 and 4 stimulated by glutamate) and phosphorylation efficiency [respiratory control ratio (RCR) and the relationship between ADP and oxygen consumption (ADP/O)] were measured. Cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) activity and cytochrome concentrations (a, b, c1 and c) were measured to investigate the rearrangements of respiratory chain subunits. The potential implication of an alternative oxidase (AOX) was investigated using an inhibitor of the respiratory chain (antimycin A) and through gene expression analysis in gills and digestive gland. Results indicate a downregulation of mitochondrial capacity, with 60% inhibition of respiratory rates after 12 h of hypoxia. RCR remained stable, while ADP/O increased after 12 h of hypoxia and 1 h of re-oxygenation, suggesting increased phosphorylation efficiency. CCO showed a fast and remarkable increase of its catalytic activity only after 3 h of hypoxia. AOX mRNA levels showed similar patterns in gills and digestive gland, and were upregulated after 12 and 24 h of hypoxia and during re-oxygenation. Results suggest a set of controls regulating mitochondrial functions in response to oxygen fluctuations, and demonstrate the fast and extreme plasticity of oyster mitochondria in response to oxygen variations. PMID:23307802

  15. Two catalase homologs are involved in host protection against bacterial infection and oxidative stress in Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Fu, Dingkun; Yu, Feng; Liu, Qiongyou; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-12-01

    Catalase is one of the key antioxidant enzymes and it appears to be involved in protection against immune infection and oxidative stress. Here, two catalase cDNAs (ChCat-1 and ChCat-2) were isolated from hemocytes of Crassostrea hongkongensis using SSH and RACE. The full-length cDNAs of ChCat-1 and ChCat-2 are 1913 and 2466 bp in length, encoding proteins of 515 and 511 amino acids, respectively. Multiple alignments of amino acid sequences revealed that both ChCat-1 and ChCat-2 possess several characteristic features of the catalase family of enzymes, including one proximal active site signature, one heme-ligand signature, and three catalytic amino acid residues (His(72), Asn(145) and Tyr(355)). Phylogenetic analysis indicates that these two catalases may share a common ancestral gene and result from a gene duplication event following the divergence of bivalves and gastropods. Constitutive expression of ChCat-1 and ChCat-2 was observed in all tissues studied, with highest levels of expression in gill and muscle, respectively. The expression of both genes was inducible by bacterial infection, and reached the maximum at 8 h (9.0-fold) and 12 h (2.3-fold) post-infection, respectively. Furthermore, both the purified ChCat-1 and ChCat-2 protein displayed a strong catalase activity, and S2 cells carrying ChCat-1 or ChCat-2 showed a higher degree of resistance to H(2)O(2) than that of control cells. In a word, this is the first report of the presence of two catalase genes in a single marine bivalve, and our results highlight the involvement of both ChCat-1 and ChCat-2 in host protection against pathogen infection and oxidative stress in C. hongkongensis.

  16. The first invertebrate RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) homolog gene in the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Yu, Feng; Li, Jun; Tong, Ying; Zhang, Yuehuan; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-10-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) is a pivotal receptor that detects numerous RNA and DNA viruses and mediates the innate induction of interferons and pro-inflammatory cytokines upon viral infection. In the present study, we cloned and characterized the first RIG-I gene in a marine mollusk, Crassostrea gigas, and designated it as CgRIG-I. The full-length CgRIG-I cDNA is 3436 bp, including 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of 93 bp and 286 bp, respectively, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 3057 bp. The gene encodes a 1018 amino acid polypeptide with an estimated molecular mass of 116.5 kDa. SMART analysis showed that the CgRIG-I protein had the typical conserved domains, including the caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs), the RNA helicase domain and the C-terminal regulatory domain (RD). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that CgRIG-I was grouped into the clade of its vertebrate homologs. Moreover, CgRIG-I expression could be specifically increased after stimulation by poly(I:C) rather than by other PAMPs such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN), heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) and heat-killed Vibrio alginolyticus (HKVA). Meanwhile, six IRF, three STAT and one NF-κB predicted sites were identified in the CgRIG-I promoter, which was consistent with its high responsiveness to poly(I:C). In summary, this report provides the first CgRIG-I sequence of a mollusk, but its function in the antiviral immune response requires further investigation.

  17. The second bactericidal permeability increasing protein (BPI) and its revelation of the gene duplication in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; He, Xiaocui; Li, Xiaomei; Fu, Dingkun; Chen, Jinhui; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-03-01

    A novel homolog of BPI was cloned from the hemocyte cDNA of Crassostrea gigas and designed as Cg-BPI2, which share the highest sequence identity with the well-known Cg-BPI (designed as Cg-BPI1). The complete cDNA of Cg-BPI2 included an open reading frame (ORF) of 1440 bp, and 3' and 5' untranslated regions (UTR's) of 49 bp and 166 bp, respectively. The ORF encoded a putative protein of 479 amino acids with predicted 22-aa hydrophobic signal peptide. The phylogenetic analysis showed that one of the gene duplications could have resulted in the emergence of two homologs of BPI in oysters, which probably might have occurred after the gastropod-bivalve divergence. Furthermore, molecular modeling analysis showed that both Cg-BPIs are similar to a highly extended boomerang like shape of human BPI, consisting of an N- and C-terminal barrel and a central β-sheet. Comparison of the electrostatic surface potentials revealed that surfaces of Cg-BPI2 have more intense positive charge than that of human BPI and the Cg-BPI1. The recombinant N-terminal barrel domain showed a high affinity to LPS and can effectively kill Gram-negative bacteria. The mRNAs of two Cg-BPIs were observed in all tissues examined with the highest expression in gills. The mRNAs expression profiles in response to bacterial challenge revealed that they were inducible under infection, but with a distinct and complementary expression patterns between Cg-BPI1 and Cg-BPI2. Our findings of this second BPI gene demonstrated presence of its gene duplication for the first time in invertebrate and it appears to be one of effective LPS-binding AMPs in elimination of Gram-negative pathogens C. gigas.

  18. FACTORS INFLUENCING IN VITRO KILLING OF BACTERIA BY HEMOCYTES OF THE EASTERN OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A tetrazolium dye reduction assay was used to study factors governing killing of bacteria by oyster hemocytes. In vitro tests were performed on bacterial strains by using hemocytes from oysters collected from the same location in winter and summer. Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains...

  19. Spermiogenesis and Taxonomical Values of Sperm Ultrastructures in Male Crassostrea ariakensis (Fujita & Wakiya, 1929) (Pteroirmorphia: Ostreidae) in the Estuary of the Seomjin River, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Son, Pal Won; Chung, Jae Seung; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Sung Han; Chung, Ee-Yung

    2014-01-01

    Characteristics of the developmental stages of spermatids during spermiogenesis and phylogenetic classicfication of the species using sperm ultrastructures in male Crassostrea ariakensis were investigated by transmission electron microscope observations. The morphology of the spermatozoon of this species has a primitive type and is similar to those of Ostreidae. Ultrastructures of mature sperms are composed of broad, modified cap-shaped acrosomal vesicle and an axial rod in subacrosomal materials on an oval nucleus, four spherical mitochondria in the sperm midpiece, and satellite fibres which appear near the distal centriole. The axoneme of the sperm tail shows a 9+2 structure. Accordingly, the ultrastructural characteristics of mature sperm of C. ariakensis resemble to those of other investigated ostreids in Ostreidae in the subclass Pteriomorphia. In this study, particularly, two transverse bands (stripes) appear at the anterior region of the acrosomal vesicle of this species, unlike two or three transverse bands (stripes) in C. gigas. It is assumed that differences in this acrosomal substructure are associated with the inability of fertilization between the genus Crassostrea and other genus species in Ostreidae. Therefore, we can use sperm ultrastructures and morphologies in the resolution of taxonomic relationships within the Ostreidae in the subclass Pteriomorphia. These spermatozoa, which contain several ultrastructures such as acrosomal vesicle, an axial rod in the sperm head part and four mitochondria and satellite fibres in the sperm midpiece, belong to the family Ostreidae in the subclass Pteriomorphia. PMID:25949188

  20. Spermiogenesis and Taxonomical Values of Sperm Ultrastructures in Male Crassostrea ariakensis (Fujita & Wakiya, 1929) (Pteroirmorphia: Ostreidae) in the Estuary of the Seomjin River, Korea.

    PubMed

    Son, Pal Won; Chung, Jae Seung; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Sung Han; Chung, Ee-Yung

    2014-09-01

    Characteristics of the developmental stages of spermatids during spermiogenesis and phylogenetic classicfication of the species using sperm ultrastructures in male Crassostrea ariakensis were investigated by transmission electron microscope observations. The morphology of the spermatozoon of this species has a primitive type and is similar to those of Ostreidae. Ultrastructures of mature sperms are composed of broad, modified cap-shaped acrosomal vesicle and an axial rod in subacrosomal materials on an oval nucleus, four spherical mitochondria in the sperm midpiece, and satellite fibres which appear near the distal centriole. The axoneme of the sperm tail shows a 9+2 structure. Accordingly, the ultrastructural characteristics of mature sperm of C. ariakensis resemble to those of other investigated ostreids in Ostreidae in the subclass Pteriomorphia. In this study, particularly, two transverse bands (stripes) appear at the anterior region of the acrosomal vesicle of this species, unlike two or three transverse bands (stripes) in C. gigas. It is assumed that differences in this acrosomal substructure are associated with the inability of fertilization between the genus Crassostrea and other genus species in Ostreidae. Therefore, we can use sperm ultrastructures and morphologies in the resolution of taxonomic relationships within the Ostreidae in the subclass Pteriomorphia. These spermatozoa, which contain several ultrastructures such as acrosomal vesicle, an axial rod in the sperm head part and four mitochondria and satellite fibres in the sperm midpiece, belong to the family Ostreidae in the subclass Pteriomorphia. PMID:25949188

  1. Collection Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Libraries in Canada, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Includes 21 articles that discuss collection development in Canadian school libraries. Topics include digital collections in school library media centers; print and electronic library resources; library collections; collaborative projects; print-disabled students; informing administrators of the importance of collection development; censorship;…

  2. Effects of acclimation temperature and cadmium exposure on mitochondrial aconitase and LON protease from a model marine ectotherm, Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Sanni, Basharat; Williams, Kimberly; Sokolov, Eugene P; Sokolova, Inna M

    2008-01-01

    Temperature and heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd) are important stressors which can strongly affect physiology of marine ectotherms in polluted estuaries. Mitochondria are among the key intracellular targets for these stressors, but the mechanisms of Cd-induced mitochondrial damage are not fully understood. In this study we determined the effects of acclimation temperature (12, 20 and 28 degrees C) and Cd exposure (0 or 50 microg L(-1) Cd) in vivo on activity and mRNA expression of a key mitochondrial enzyme, aconitase, which is known as a sensitive marker of oxidative stress, and on mRNA expression of LON protease involved in the degradation of oxidatively damaged mitochondrial proteins, in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica. Sensitivity of mitochondrial aconitase to exposure to Cd in vitro (0 or 50 microM) was also determined in oysters acclimated to different temperatures and Cd levels. Acclimation at 28 degrees C resulted in a strong decrease in activity of mitochondrial aconitase as well as mRNA expression of aconitase and LON protease suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction at elevated temperatures. Exposure of isolated mitochondria to 50 microM Cd in vitro resulted in a 20-25% inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase reflecting oxidative damage of this enzyme. However, long-term (3-6 weeks) exposure of whole oysters to Cd had no effect on mitochondrial aconitase activity suggesting that this enzyme is well protected against Cd-induced oxidative stress in vivo. Aconitase mRNA expression was positively correlated with the enzyme activity within control and Cd-exposed groups; however, this correlation was strikingly different when compared between control and Cd-exposed oysters. The level of aconitase transcript was considerably lower (3-13-fold) in Cd-exposed oysters while the specific aconitase activities were similar in control and Cd-exposed oysters indicating regulation at the post-transcriptional level. LON protease expression was upregulated by 2-4-fold in

  3. Effects of cadmium exposure on critical temperatures of aerobic metabolism in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin, 1791).

    PubMed

    Bagwe, Rita; Beniash, Elia; Sokolova, Inna M

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and elevated temperatures are common stressors in estuarine and coastal environments. Elevated temperature can sensitize estuarine organisms to the toxicity of metals such as Cd and vice versa, but the physiological mechanisms of temperature-Cd interactions are not well understood. We tested a hypothesis that interactive effects of elevated temperature and Cd stress involve Cd-induced reduction of the aerobic scope of an organism thereby narrowing the thermal tolerance window of oysters. We determined the effects of prolonged Cd exposure (50 μg Cd l(-1)for 30 days) on the upper critical temperature of aerobic metabolism (assessed by accumulation of anaerobic end products L-alanine, succinate and acetate), cellular energy status (assessed by the tissue levels of adenylates, phosphagen/aphosphagen and glycogen and lipid reserves) and oxidative damage during acute temperature rise (20-36 °C) in the eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica. The upper critical temperature (TcII) was shifted to lower values (from 28 to 24 °C) in Cd-exposed oysters in spring and was lower in both control and Cd-exposed groups in winter (24 and <20 °C, respectively). This indicates a reduction of thermal tolerance of Cd-exposed oysters associated with a decrease of the aerobic scope of the organism and early transition to partial anaerobiosis. Acute warming had no negative effects on tissue energy reserves or parameters of cellular energy status of oysters (except a decrease in adenylate content at the extreme temperature of 36 °C) but led to an increase in oxidative lesions of proteins at extreme temperatures. These data show that transition to partial anaerobiosis (indicated by the accumulation of anaerobic end products) is the most sensitive biomarker of temperature-induced transition to energetically non-sustainable state in oysters, whereas disturbances in the cellular energy status (i.e. decline in adenylate and phosphagen levels) and oxidative stress ensue at

  4. Histological responses and localization of the cytochrome P450 (CYP2AU1) in Crassostrea brasiliana exposed to phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    dos Reis, Isis M M; Mattos, Jacó J; Garcez, Ricardo C; Zacchi, Flávia L; Miguelão, Talita; Flores-Nunes, Fabrício; Toledo-Silva, Guilherme; Sasaki, Sílvio T; Taniguchi, Satie; Bícego, Márcia C; Cargnin-Ferreira, Eduardo; Bainy, Afonso C D

    2015-12-01

    Phenanthrene (PHE) is an abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), widely distributed in aquatic environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the histological and molecular effects in the native oyster Crassostrea brasiliana(Lamarck, 1819) exposed to 100 and 1000 μg L(-1) PHE for 1, 5 and 10 days. Histological and chemical analyses were performed to evaluate, respectively, alterations in oyster tissues and bioaccumulation. In situ hybridization (ISH) was used to assess tissue distribution of CYP2AU1, a gene formerly identified as activated by PHE exposure in this species.Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in mantle was carried out to validate ISH data. Oysters bioaccumulated PHE increasingly along the exposure period in both exposure concentrations. Histologic changes, like tubular atrophy in digestive diverticula (digestive gland) and increased number of mucous cells in the mantle were observed in animals exposed to PHE for 10 days. ISH showed the presence of CYP2AU1transcripts in gills, digestive diverticula, mantle, intestine and gonads, but significant differences in transcript detection by ISH between treatments occurred only in gills, mantle and intestine. A positive and significant correlation between tubular atrophy and CYP2AU1hybridization signal was observed in digestive diverticula, suggesting that this gene product might be involved in energetic metabolism in C. brasiliana. Increased mucous cells and CYP2AU1transcript levels were observed in the mantle, where the inner and middle lobes showed higher intensity of hybridization signal. Mantle should be considered as a target organ for CYP2AU1 transcript evaluation and histological alterations in biomonitoring studies. CYP2AU1 signal in female gonads was observed in all follicular cells from different gonadic stages, while in male only the spermatic follicle cells of the wall in the pre-spawning stage showed this signal. ISH was an effective technique to evaluate the effects of PHE

  5. Effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on embryo-larval development and metamorphosis in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Mottier, Antoine; Kientz-Bouchart, Valérie; Serpentini, Antoine; Lebel, Jean Marc; Jha, Awadhesh N; Costil, Katherine

    2013-03-15

    Pesticides may be involved in oyster summer mortality events, not necessarily as a single causative agent but as an additional stressor. In this context, the present study aimed to assess the toxicity of glyphosate, its by-product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and two commercial formulations, Roundup Express(®) (R(EX)) and Roundup Allées et Terrasses(®) (R(AT)), containing glyphosate as the active ingredient, on the early life stages of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. The embryotoxicity of these chemicals were quantified by considering both the rates of abnormalities and the arrested development or types of abnormalities in D-shaped larvae after 48 h exposure. The success of metamorphosis was examined in pediveliger larvae exposed for 24 h. Experiments involving both endpoints included range finding experiments for herbicide concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100,000 μg L(-1). This range was then narrowed down in order to determine precise EC(50) values. Actual concentrations of the herbicide were determined at the beginning and after 48 h (embryotoxicity) and 24 h (metamorphosis) to evaluate the potential temporal variation in the concentrations. During embryo-larval development, no mortalities were recorded at any of the concentrations of glyphosate and AMPA, whereas no embryos or D-shaped larvae could be observed after exposure to 10,000 μg L(-1) of R(EX) or R(AT). Compared with the controls, no effects on embryo-larval development were recorded between 0.1 and 1000 μg L(-1), regardless of the chemical tested. Above a threshold, which varied according to the chemical used, the gradient of herbicide concentrations correlated with a gradient of severity of abnormality ranging from normal larvae to arrested development (an "old embryo" stage). The EC(50) values were 28,315 and 40,617 μg L(-1) for glyphosate and its metabolite, respectively, but much lowered values of 1133 and 1675 μg L(-1) for R(EX) and R(AT), respectively. Metamorphosis tests

  6. Immunomodulation by the interactive effects of cadmium and hypercapnia in marine bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria.

    PubMed

    Ivanina, Anna V; Hawkins, Chelsea; Sokolova, Inna M

    2014-04-01

    Estuarine organisms are exposed to multiple stressors including large fluctuations in partial pressure of carbon dioxide (P2CO) and concentrations of trace metals such as cadmium (Cd) that can affect their survival and fitness. Ocean acidification due to the increasing atmospheric (P2CO) leads to a decrease in pH and shifts in the carbonate chemistry of seawater which can change bioavailability and toxicity of metals. We studied the interactive effects of (P2CO) and Cd exposure on metal levels, metabolism and immune-related functions in hemocytes of two ecologically and economically important bivalve species, Mercenaria mercenaria (hard shell clam) and Crassostrea virginica (Eastern oyster). Clams and oysters were exposed to combinations of three (P2CO) levels (∼400, 800 and 2000 μatm (P2CO), corresponding to the present day conditions and the projections for the years 2100 and 2250, respectively) and two Cd concentrations (0 and 50 μg l(-1)) in seawater. Following four weeks of exposure to Cd, hemolymph of both species contained similar Cd levels (50-70 μg l(-1)), whereas hemocytes accumulated intracellular Cd burdens up to 15-42 mg l(-1), regardless of the exposure P2CO. Clam hemocytes had considerably lower Cd burdens than those of oysters (0.7-1 ng 10(-6) cells vs. 4-6 ng 10(-6) cells, respectively). Cd exposure suppressed hemocyte metabolism and increased the rates of mitochondrial proton leak in normocapnia indicating partial mitochondrial uncoupling. This Cd-induced mitochondrial uncoupling was alleviated in hypercapnia. Cd exposure suppressed immune-related functions in hemocytes of clams and oysters, and these effects were exacerbated at elevated (P2CO). Thus, elevated (P2CO) combined with Cd exposure resulted in decrease in phagocytic activity and adhesion capacity as well as lower expression of mRNA for lectin and heat shock protein (HSP70) in clam and oyster hemocytes. In oysters, combined exposure to elevated (P2CO) and Cd also led to reduced

  7. Impact of ocean acidification on energy metabolism of oyster, Crassostrea gigas--changes in metabolic pathways and thermal response.

    PubMed

    Lannig, Gisela; Eilers, Silke; Pörtner, Hans O; Sokolova, Inna M; Bock, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Climate change with increasing temperature and ocean acidification (OA) poses risks for marine ecosystems. According to Pörtner and Farrell, synergistic effects of elevated temperature and CO₂-induced OA on energy metabolism will narrow the thermal tolerance window of marine ectothermal animals. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of an acute temperature rise on energy metabolism of the oyster, Crassostrea gigas chronically exposed to elevated CO₂ levels (partial pressure of CO₂ in the seawater ~0.15 kPa, seawater pH ~ 7.7). Within one month of incubation at elevated PCo₂ and 15 °C hemolymph pH fell (pH(e) = 7.1 ± 0.2 (CO₂-group) vs. 7.6 ± 0.1 (control)) and P(e)CO₂ values in hemolymph increased (0.5 ± 0.2 kPa (CO₂-group) vs. 0.2 ± 0.04 kPa (control)). Slightly but significantly elevated bicarbonate concentrations in the hemolymph of CO₂-incubated oysters ([HCO₃⁻](e) = 1.8 ± 0.3 mM (CO₂-group) vs. 1.3 ± 0.1 mM (control)) indicate only minimal regulation of extracellular acid-base status. At the acclimation temperature of 15 °C the OA-induced decrease in pH(e) did not lead to metabolic depression in oysters as standard metabolism rates (SMR) of CO₂-exposed oysters were similar to controls. Upon acute warming SMR rose in both groups, but displayed a stronger increase in the CO₂-incubated group. Investigation in isolated gill cells revealed a similar temperature dependence of respiration between groups. Furthermore, the fraction of cellular energy demand for ion regulation via Na+/K+-ATPase was not affected by chronic hypercapnia or temperature. Metabolic profiling using ¹H-NMR spectroscopy revealed substantial changes in some tissues following OA exposure at 15 °C. In mantle tissue alanine and ATP levels decreased significantly whereas an increase in succinate levels was observed in gill tissue. These findings suggest shifts in metabolic pathways following OA-exposure. Our study confirms that OA affects energy

  8. Stanols as a tool to track the origin of microbial contamination of oysters, Crassostrea gigas, in shellfish areas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrault, Loïc; Jardé, Emilie; Jeanneau, Laurent; Petitjean, Patrice

    2013-04-01

    Runoff of cattle manures (cows, pigs, sheeps) or discharge of effluent from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) into aquatic ecosystems can lead to microbiological contamination of waters and living organisms. In coastal ecosystems and particularly in shellfish harvesting areas, the presence of pathogen microorganisms in waters induces fecal contamination of filter feeding bivalves (oysters, mussels, scallops…), therefore leading to human health risks associated to the consumption of these contaminated organisms. Watershed management plans that aim at limiting these risks require the development of tools able to identify fecal contamination sources. The fecal indicator bacteria used in the regulations to determine fecal contamination are not source specific since they are found in the feces of most warm-blooded animals. Thus, microbiological biomarkers have been developed in association with chemical biomarkers as Microbial Source Tracking (MST) methods. Fecal stanols, by-products of sterols obtained by human and animal microbial gut flora, are found in considerable amounts in feces with different relative proportions depending on their animal or human source. Recently, in association with microbiological biomarkers, the stanol fingerprint of contaminated waters has been successfully used to determine the main source of fecal contamination (cow, pig or human sources) in rural watersheds (Brittany, France). Up to now, the use of the stanol fingerprint to track the fecal contamination in shellfish tissues, especially bivalves, has been limited to the analysis of coprostanol, a stanol commonly associated to human contamination. Therefore, whether the stanol fingerprint can be used as a MST method in bivalves or not is still unknown. The first aim of this study was to compare several organic extraction procedures of stanols in the oyster Crassostrea gigas to determine a reliable method for stanol fingerprint analysis in bivalves. Solvent extraction and purification

  9. Histological responses and localization of the cytochrome P450 (CYP2AU1) in Crassostrea brasiliana exposed to phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    dos Reis, Isis M M; Mattos, Jacó J; Garcez, Ricardo C; Zacchi, Flávia L; Miguelão, Talita; Flores-Nunes, Fabrício; Toledo-Silva, Guilherme; Sasaki, Sílvio T; Taniguchi, Satie; Bícego, Márcia C; Cargnin-Ferreira, Eduardo; Bainy, Afonso C D

    2015-12-01

    Phenanthrene (PHE) is an abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), widely distributed in aquatic environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the histological and molecular effects in the native oyster Crassostrea brasiliana(Lamarck, 1819) exposed to 100 and 1000 μg L(-1) PHE for 1, 5 and 10 days. Histological and chemical analyses were performed to evaluate, respectively, alterations in oyster tissues and bioaccumulation. In situ hybridization (ISH) was used to assess tissue distribution of CYP2AU1, a gene formerly identified as activated by PHE exposure in this species.Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in mantle was carried out to validate ISH data. Oysters bioaccumulated PHE increasingly along the exposure period in both exposure concentrations. Histologic changes, like tubular atrophy in digestive diverticula (digestive gland) and increased number of mucous cells in the mantle were observed in animals exposed to PHE for 10 days. ISH showed the presence of CYP2AU1transcripts in gills, digestive diverticula, mantle, intestine and gonads, but significant differences in transcript detection by ISH between treatments occurred only in gills, mantle and intestine. A positive and significant correlation between tubular atrophy and CYP2AU1hybridization signal was observed in digestive diverticula, suggesting that this gene product might be involved in energetic metabolism in C. brasiliana. Increased mucous cells and CYP2AU1transcript levels were observed in the mantle, where the inner and middle lobes showed higher intensity of hybridization signal. Mantle should be considered as a target organ for CYP2AU1 transcript evaluation and histological alterations in biomonitoring studies. CYP2AU1 signal in female gonads was observed in all follicular cells from different gonadic stages, while in male only the spermatic follicle cells of the wall in the pre-spawning stage showed this signal. ISH was an effective technique to evaluate the effects of PHE

  10. Temperature effect on high salinity depuration of Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus from the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica).

    PubMed

    Larsen, A M; Rikard, F S; Walton, W C; Arias, C R

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) are opportunistic human pathogens naturally associated with the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica. The abundances of both pathogens in oysters are positively correlated with temperature, thus ingestion of raw oysters during the warm summer months is a risk factor for contracting illness from these bacteria. Current post-harvest processing (PHP) methods for elimination of these pathogens are expensive and kill the oyster, changing their organoleptic properties and making them less appealing to some consumers. High salinity has proven effective in reducing Vv numbers in the wild and our research aims at developing an indoor recirculating system to reduce pathogenic Vibrios while maintaining the taste and texture of live oysters. The goal of this study was to determine the influence of temperature on the efficacy of high salinity depuration. Vv was enumerated as most probable number (MPN) per gram of oyster tissue using the FDA-approved modified cellobiose polymyxin colistin (mCPC) protocol and with an alternative Vibrio specific media CHROMagar™ Vibrio (CaV). CaV was also used to quantify Vp. Oysters were held at 35 psu for 10 days at three temperatures: low (20°C), mid (22.5°C) and high (25°C). There was no difference in MPN/g of Vv between media; however more Vv isolates were obtained from mCPC than CaV. There was no significant effect of temperature on reduction of Vv or Vp throughout depuration but there was a tendency for low temperatures to be less effective than the higher ones. High salinity resulted in a significant decrease in Vv by day 3 and again by day 10, and a decrease in Vp by day 3. Oyster condition indices were maintained throughout depuration and mortality was low (4% across three trials). Overall these results support the use of mCPC for Vv enumeration and demonstrate the promise of high salinity depuration for PHP of the Eastern oyster. The trend for lower temperatures to be less

  11. Effects of elevated temperature and cadmium exposure on stress protein response in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin).

    PubMed

    Ivanina, A V; Taylor, C; Sokolova, I M

    2009-02-19

    Stress proteins such as heat shock proteins (HSPs) and metallothioneins (MTs) play a key role in cellular protection against environmental stress. Marine ectotherms such as eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica are commonly exposed to multiple stressors including temperature and pollution by metals such as cadmium (Cd) in estuaries and coastal zones; however, the combined effects of these stressors on their cellular protection mechanisms are poorly understood. We acclimated C. virginica from populations adapted to different thermal regimes (Washington, North Carolina and Texas) at a common temperature of 12 degrees C, and analyzed their expression of MTs and HSPs (cytosolic HSP69, HSC72-77, HSP90 and mitochondrial HSP60) in response to the combined acute temperature stress and long-term Cd exposure. Overall, HSP and MT induction patterns were similar in oysters from the three studied geographically distant populations. HSP69 and MTs were significantly up-regulated by Cd and temperature stress implying their important role in cellular stress protection. In contrast, HSC72-77, HSP60 and HSP90 were not consistently induced by either acute heat or Cd exposure. The induction temperature for MTs was higher than for HSP69 (>28 degrees C vs. 20 degrees C, respectively), and MTs were more strongly induced by Cd than by temperature stress (to up to 38-94-fold compared by 3.5-7.5-fold, respectively) consistent with their predominant role in metal detoxification. Notably, heat stress did not result in an additional increase in metallothionein expression in Cd-exposed oysters suggesting a capacity limitation during the combined exposure to Cd and temperature stress. Levels of HSP69 and in some cases, HSC72-77 and HSP90 were lower in Cd-exposed oysters as compared to their control counterparts during heat stress indicating that simultaneous exposure to these two stressors may have partially suppressed the cytoprotective upregulation of molecular chaperones. These limitations of

  12. Temperature effect on high salinity depuration of Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus from the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica).

    PubMed

    Larsen, A M; Rikard, F S; Walton, W C; Arias, C R

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) are opportunistic human pathogens naturally associated with the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica. The abundances of both pathogens in oysters are positively correlated with temperature, thus ingestion of raw oysters during the warm summer months is a risk factor for contracting illness from these bacteria. Current post-harvest processing (PHP) methods for elimination of these pathogens are expensive and kill the oyster, changing their organoleptic properties and making them less appealing to some consumers. High salinity has proven effective in reducing Vv numbers in the wild and our research aims at developing an indoor recirculating system to reduce pathogenic Vibrios while maintaining the taste and texture of live oysters. The goal of this study was to determine the influence of temperature on the efficacy of high salinity depuration. Vv was enumerated as most probable number (MPN) per gram of oyster tissue using the FDA-approved modified cellobiose polymyxin colistin (mCPC) protocol and with an alternative Vibrio specific media CHROMagar™ Vibrio (CaV). CaV was also used to quantify Vp. Oysters were held at 35 psu for 10 days at three temperatures: low (20°C), mid (22.5°C) and high (25°C). There was no difference in MPN/g of Vv between media; however more Vv isolates were obtained from mCPC than CaV. There was no significant effect of temperature on reduction of Vv or Vp throughout depuration but there was a tendency for low temperatures to be less effective than the higher ones. High salinity resulted in a significant decrease in Vv by day 3 and again by day 10, and a decrease in Vp by day 3. Oyster condition indices were maintained throughout depuration and mortality was low (4% across three trials). Overall these results support the use of mCPC for Vv enumeration and demonstrate the promise of high salinity depuration for PHP of the Eastern oyster. The trend for lower temperatures to be less

  13. Impact of Ocean Acidification on Energy Metabolism of Oyster, Crassostrea gigas—Changes in Metabolic Pathways and Thermal Response

    PubMed Central

    Lannig, Gisela; Eilers, Silke; Pörtner, Hans O.; Sokolova, Inna M.; Bock, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Climate change with increasing temperature and ocean acidification (OA) poses risks for marine ecosystems. According to Pörtner and Farrell [1], synergistic effects of elevated temperature and CO2-induced OA on energy metabolism will narrow the thermal tolerance window of marine ectothermal animals. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of an acute temperature rise on energy metabolism of the oyster, Crassostrea gigas chronically exposed to elevated CO2 levels (partial pressure of CO2 in the seawater ~0.15 kPa, seawater pH ~ 7.7). Within one month of incubation at elevated Pco2 and 15 °C hemolymph pH fell (pHe = 7.1 ± 0.2 (CO2-group) vs. 7.6 ± 0.1 (control)) and Peco2 values in hemolymph increased (0.5 ± 0.2 kPa (CO2-group) vs. 0.2 ± 0.04 kPa (control)). Slightly but significantly elevated bicarbonate concentrations in the hemolymph of CO2-incubated oysters ([HCO− 3]e = 1.8 ± 0.3 mM (CO2-group) vs. 1.3 ± 0.1 mM (control)) indicate only minimal regulation of extracellular acid-base status. At the acclimation temperature of 15 °C the OA-induced decrease in pHe did not lead to metabolic depression in oysters as standard metabolism rates (SMR) of CO2-exposed oysters were similar to controls. Upon acute warming SMR rose in both groups, but displayed a stronger increase in the CO2-incubated group. Investigation in isolated gill cells revealed a similar temperaturedependence of respiration between groups. Furthermore, the fraction of cellular energy demand for ion regulation via Na+/K+-ATPase was not affected by chronic hypercapnia or temperature. Metabolic profiling using 1H-NMR spectroscopy revealed substantial changes in some tissues following OA exposure at 15 °C. In mantle tissue alanine and ATP levels decreased significantly whereas an increase in succinate levels was observed in gill tissue. These findings suggest shifts in metabolic pathways following OA-exposure. Our study confirms that OA affects energy metabolism in oysters and

  14. Expression and function analysis of two naturally truncated MyD88 variants in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fengjiao; Zhang, Yang; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuehuan; Xiang, Zhiming; Yu, Ziniu

    2015-08-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) is the classic signaling adaptor that mediates Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR/IL-1R) dependent activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). In this study, two naturally truncated MyD88 members were identified from the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), namely CgMyD88-T1 and CgMyD88-T2. The full-length cDNA of CgMyD88-T1, CgMyD88-T2 are 976 bp and 1038 bp in length, containing an ORF of 552 bp and 555 bp, respectively. The two ORF encode a putative protein of 183 and 184 amino acids, respectively, with a calculated molecular weight of about 21 and 22 kDa. When compared to complete MyD88 paralogues, we found that both CgMyD88-T1 and CgMyD88-T2 contain only TIR domain but lack DD (Death Domain), which share 90.8% of similarity and 71.7% of identity with each other. Phylogenetic tree demonstrated that CgMyD88-T1 and CgMyD88-T2 clustered together and belonged to mollusk branch. Meanwhile, genomic arrangement analysis displayed that the two truncated MyD88s were distributed in tandem in one scaffold, revealing that they may originate from one truncated MyD88 ancestor recently. Expression profile showed that both of CgMyD88 variants were ubiquitously expressed in all tested tissues with highest expression in the gills and hemocytes, respectively. Both truncated CgMyD88 mRNAs were significantly up-regulated in hemocytes under HKLM (heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes) and HKVA (heat-killed Vibrio alginolyticus) challenge. Moreover, either CgMyD88-T1 or CgMyD88-T2 were able to inhibit MyD88 activated Rel/NF-κB activity in HEK293 cell, demonstrating their negative role in regulating MyD88-mediated immune signaling.

  15. Generation and analysis of a 29,745 unique Expressed Sequence Tags from the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) assembled into a publicly accessible database: the GigasDatabase

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Although bivalves are among the most-studied marine organisms because of their ecological role and economic importance, very little information is available on the genome sequences of oyster species. This report documents three large-scale cDNA sequencing projects for the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas initiated to provide a large number of expressed sequence tags that were subsequently compiled in a publicly accessible database. This resource allowed for the identification of a large number of transcripts and provides valuable information for ongoing investigations of tissue-specific and stimulus-dependant gene expression patterns. These data are crucial for constructing comprehensive DNA microarrays, identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms and microsatellites in coding regions, and for identifying genes when the entire genome sequence of C. gigas becomes available. Description In the present paper, we report the production of 40,845 high-quality ESTs that identify 29,745 unique transcribed sequences consisting of 7,940 contigs and 21,805 singletons. All of these new sequences, together with existing public sequence data, have been compiled into a publicly-available Website http://public-contigbrowser.sigenae.org:9090/Crassostrea_gigas/index.html. Approximately 43% of the unique ESTs had significant matches against the SwissProt database and 27% were annotated using Gene Ontology terms.