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Sample records for craton sao francisco

  1. Agriculture, Rio Sao Francisco, Brazil, South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The large field patterns in this view of the Rio Sao Francisco basin, Brazil, South America, (11.5S, 43.5W) indicate a commercial agriculture venture; family subsistence farms are much smaller and laid out in different patterns. Land clearing in Brazil has increased at an alarming rate in recent years and preliminary estimates suggest a 25 to 30% increase in deforestation since 1984. The long term impact on the ecological processes are still unknown.

  2. Radar image of Rio Sao Francisco, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This radar image acquired by SRTM shows an area south of the Sao Francisco River in Brazil. The area is predominantly scrub forest. Areas such as these are difficult to map by traditional methods because of frequent cloud cover and local inaccessibility. Image brightness differences in this image are caused by differences in vegetation type and density. Tributaries of the Sao Francisco are visible in the upper right. The Sao Francisco River is a major source of water for irrigation and hydroelectric power. Mapping such regions will allow scientists to better understand the relationships between flooding cycles, forestation and human influences on ecosystems.

    This radar image was obtained by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission as part of its mission to map the Earth's topography. The image was acquired by just one of SRTM's two antennas, and consequently does not show topographic data but only the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground. This signal, known as radar backscatter, provides insight into the nature of the surface, including its roughness, vegetation cover, and urbanization.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC.

  3. Shaded Relief of Rio Sao Francisco, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This topographic image acquired by SRTM shows an area south of the Sao Francisco River in Brazil. The scrub forest terrain shows relief of about 400 meters (1300 feet). Areas such as these are difficult to map by traditional methods because of frequent cloud cover and local inaccessibility. This region has little topographic relief, but even subtle changes in topography have far-reaching effects on regional ecosystems. The image covers an area of 57 km x 79 km and represents one quarter of the 225 km SRTM swath. Colors range from dark blue at water level to white and brown at hill tops. The terrain features that are clearly visible in this image include tributaries of the Sao Francisco, the dark-blue branch-like features visible from top right to bottom left, and on the left edge of the image, and hills rising up from the valley floor. The San Francisco River is a major source of water for irrigation and hydroelectric power. Mapping such regions will allow scientists to better understand the relationships between flooding cycles, forestation and human influences on ecosystems.

    This shaded relief image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Shaded relief maps are commonly used in applications such as geologic mapping and land use planning.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter

  4. Agricultural and Ranching area, Rio Sao Francisco, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This agricultural and Ranching area, Rio Sao Francisco, Brazil (13.0S, 43.5W) has been under study for several years. See scene STS-31-92-045 for comparison. This area has many small single family subsistence farms, large square and rectangular commercial farms and pastures for livestock grazing. Over the several years of observation, the number and size of farms has increased and center-pivot, swing-arm irrigation systems have been installed.

  5. Dynamic study of the upper Sao Francisco River and the Tres Marias reservoir using MSS/LANDSAT images. [Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Sausen, T. M.

    1981-01-01

    The use of LANDSAT multispectral ban scanner imagery to verify the relationship between the behavior of the Tres Marias reservoir and the dynamics of the Sao Francisco River supply basin is described. The dispersion of suspended sediments and their concentration in the surface layers of the water are considered. A five year survey of the region during both dry and rainy seasons was performed. The drainage network was analyzed based on the patterns of dessication, water rises and soil use in the supply basin. Surface layers of the reservoir were tabulated as a function of the levels of gray in the imagery. In situ observations of water depth and reflectance were performed. Ground truth and LANDSAT data were correlated to determine the factors affecting the dynamics of the supply basin.

  6. Superposed folding and associated fracturing influence hypogene karst development in Neoproterozoic carbonates, São Francisco Craton, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennes-Silva, Renata A.; Bezerra, Francisco H. R.; Nogueira, Francisco C. C.; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Klimchouk, Alexander; Cazarin, Caroline L.; Auler, Augusto S.

    2016-01-01

    Porosity and permeability along fractured zones in carbonates could be significantly enhanced by ascending fluid flow, resulting in hypogene karst development. This work presents a detailed structural analysis of the longest cave system in South America to investigate the relationship between patterns of karst conduits and regional deformation. Our study area encompasses the Toca da Boa Vista (TBV) and Toca da Barriguda (TBR) caves, which are ca. 107 km and 34 km long, respectively. This cave system occurs in Neoproterozoic carbonates of the Salitre Formation in the northern part of the São Francisco Craton, Brazil. The fold belts that are around and at the craton edges were deformed in a compressive setting during the Brasiliano orogeny between 750 and 540 Ma. Based on the integrated analysis of the folds and brittle deformation in the caves and in outcrops of the surrounding region, we show the following: (1) The caves occur in a tectonic transpressive corridor along a regional thrust belt; (2) major cave passages, at the middle storey of the system, considering both length and frequency, developed laterally along mainly (a) NE-SW to E-W and (b) N to S oriented anticline hinges; (3) conduits were formed by dissolutional enlargement of subvertical joints, which present a high concentration along anticline hinges due to folding of competent grainstone layers; (4) the first folding event F1 was previously documented in the region and corresponds with NW-SE- to N-S-trending compression, whereas the second event F2, documented for the first time in the present study, is related to E-W compression; and (5) both folding events occurred during the Brasiliano orogeny. We conclude that fluid flow and related dissolution pathways have a close relationship with regional deformation events, thus enhancing our ability to predict karst patterns in layered carbonates.

  7. Provenance of zircon xenocrysts in the Neoproterozoic Brauna Kimberlite Field, São Francisco Craton, Brazil: Evidence for a thick Palaeoproterozoic lithosphere beneath the Serrinha block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donatti-Filho, José Paulo; Oliveira, Elson P.; McNaughton, Neal J.

    2013-08-01

    The 642 Ma-old Brauna Kimberlite Field is located on the northeastern sector of the São Francisco Craton (Serrinha block) and is one of the rare Neoproterozoic kimberlitic events in South America. Zircon xenocrysts from the volumetric most important kimberlite pipes Brauna 03, Brauna 07 and Brauna 04 were used as a tool to identify different components of the lithosphere beneath the northeast region of the São Francisco craton. A composite kimberlite sample of eight representative and different drill holes and three samples of the host rocks (Nordestina granodiorite) were sampled for SHRIMP geochronology. The results were compared with precise U-Pb age data for the regional rocks, i.e. the Archaean basement and the Palaeoproterozoic Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt. Samples from the Nordestina granodiorite gave three different ages: 2155 Ma in the western part of the batholith, 2139 Ma in its central part, and 2132 Ma in its eastern part. Zircon 207Pb/206Pb ages of the Brauna kimberlite zircon grains spread over the timespan 2107-2223 Ma and indicate four age groups at 2105 ± 3 Ma, 2138 ± 7 Ma, 2166 ± 5 Ma, and 2198 ± 4 Ma. Source rocks for the three former age groups can be found in the Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt, including zircon xenocrysts from the Nordestina granodiorite, whereas the latter age group has not yet been reported in the Serrinha block. The new zircon ages show that only rocks of the Palaeoproterozoic Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt and of a hidden 2.17-2.20 Ga crust were sampled by the kimberlite magma during its ascent through the lithosphere. It is proposed that there is none or a few Archaean crust beneath the kimberlite emplacement area, hence implying a thick Palaeoproterozoic lithosphere for this portion of the São Francisco craton.

  8. Archean crustal evolution in the Southern São Francisco craton, Brazil: Constraints from U-Pb, Lu-Hf and O isotope analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Capucine; Farina, Federico; Lana, Cristiano; Stevens, Gary; Storey, Craig; Gerdes, Axel; Dopico, Carmen Martínez

    2016-12-01

    In this study we present U-Pb and Hf isotope data combined with O isotopes in zircon from Neoarchean granitoids and gneisses of the southern São Francisco craton in Brazil. The basement rocks record three distinct magmatic events: Rio das Velhas I (2920-2850 Ma), Rio das Velhas II (2800-2760 Ma) and Mamona (2750-2680 Ma). The three sampled metamorphic complexes (Bação, Bonfim and Belo Horizonte) have distinct εHf vs. time arrays, indicating that they grew as separate terranes. Paleoarchean crust is identified as a source which has been incorporated into younger magmatic rocks via melting and mixing with younger juvenile material, assimilation and/or source contamination processes. The continental crust in the southern São Francisco craton underwent a change in magmatic composition from medium- to high-K granitoids in the latest stages, indicating a progressive HFSE enrichment of the sources that underwent anatexis in the different stages and possibly shallowing of the melting depth. Oxygen isotope data shows a secular trend towards high δ18O (up to 7.79‰) indicating the involvement of metasediments in the petrogenesis of the high potassium granitoids during the Mamona event. In addition, low δ18O values (down to 2.50‰) throughout the Meso- and Neoarchean emphasize the importance of meteoritic fluids in intra-crustal magmatism. We used hafnium isotope modelling from a compilation of detrital zircon compositions to constrain crustal growth rates and geodynamics from 3.50 to 2.65 Ga. The modelling points to a change in geodynamic process in the southern São Francisco craton at 2.9 Ga, from a regime dominated by net crustal growth in the Paleoarchean to a Neoarchean regime marked by crustal reworking. The reworking processes account for the wide variety of granitoid magmatism and are attributed to the onset of continental collision.

  9. Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic granitoids marginal to the Jeceaba-Bom Sucesso lineament (SE border of the southern São Francisco craton): Genesis and tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, José Carlos Sales; Carneiro, Maurício Antônio

    2008-12-01

    The sialic crust of the southern São Francisco craton along the Jeceaba-Bom Sucesso lineament, central-southern part of Minas Gerais (Brazil), encompasses, among other rock types, Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic granitoids. These granitoids, according to their petrographic, lithogeochemical and geochronologic characteristics, were grouped into two Neoarchean suites (Samambaia-Bom Sucesso and Salto Paraopeba-Babilônia) and three Paleoproterozoic suites (Cassiterita-Tabuões, Ritápolis and São Tiago). Varied processes and tectonic environments were involved in the genesis of these suites. In particular, the lithogeochemistry of the (Archean and Paleoproterozoic) TTG-type granitoids indicates an origin by partial melting of hydrated basaltic crust in a subduction environment. In the Neoarchean, between 2780 and 2703 Ma, a dominant TTG granitoid genesis related to an active continental margin was followed by another granite genesis related to crustal anatexis processes at 2612-2550 Ma. In the Paleoproterozoic, the generation of TTG and granites s.s. occurred at three distinct times: 2162, 2127 and 1887 Ma. This fact, plus the rock-type diversity produced by this granite genesis, indicates that the continental margin of the southern portion of the São Francisco craton was affected by more than one consumption episode of oceanic crust, involving different island arc segments, and the late Neoarchean consolidate continent. A Paleoproterozoic tectonic evolution in three stages is proposed in this work.

  10. Disclosing the Paleoarchean to Ediacaran history of the São Francisco craton basement: The Porteirinha domain (northern Araçuaí orogen, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Luiz Carlos da; Pedrosa-Soares, Antonio Carlos; Armstrong, Richard; Pinto, Claiton Piva; Magalhães, Joana Tiago Reis; Pinheiro, Marco Aurélio Piacentini; Santos, Gabriella Galliac

    2016-07-01

    This geochronological and isotopic study focuses on one of the Archean-Paleoproterozoic basement domains of the São Francisco craton reworked in the Araçuaí orogen, the Porteirinha domain, Brazil. It also includes a thorough compilation of the U-Pb geochronological data related to the adjacent Archean and Rhyacian terranes from the São Francisco craton and Araçuaí orogen. The main target of this study is the TTG gneisses of the Porteirinha complex (Sample 1). The gneiss dated at 3371 ± 6 Ma unraveled a polycyclic evolution characterized by two metamorphic overprinting episodes, dated at 3146 ± 24 Ma (M1) and ca. 600 Ma (M2). The former (M1) is so far the most reliable evidence of the oldest metamorphic episode ever dated in Brazil. The latter (M2), in turn, is endemic in most of the exposed eastern cratonic margin within the Araçuaí orogen. Whole-rock Sm-Nd analysis from the gneiss provided a slightly negative εNd(t3370) = - 0.78 value, and a depleted mantle model (TDM) age of 3.5 Ga, indicating derivation mainly from the melting of a ca. 3.5 Ga tholeiitic source. Sample 2, a K-rich leuco-orthogneiss from the Rio Itacambiriçu Complex, was dated at 2657 ± 25 Ma and also presents a ca. 600 Ma M2 overprinting M2 age. The other two analyses were obtained from Rhyacian granitoids. Sample 3 is syn-collisional, peraluminous leucogranite from the Tingui granitic complex, showing a crystallization age of 2140 ± 14 Ma and strong post-crystallization Pb*-loss, also ascribed to the Ediacaran overprinting. Accordingly, it is interpreted as a correlative of the late Rhyacian (ca. 2150-2050 Ma) collisional stage of the Mantiqueira orogenic system/belt (ca. 2220-2000 Ma), overprinted by the Ediacaran collage. Sample 4 is a Rhyacian post-orogenic (post-collisional), mixed-source, peralkaline, A1-type suite, with a crystallization age of 2050 ± 10 Ma, presenting an important post-crystallization Pb*-loss related to Ediacaran collision. The focused region records some

  11. Fission track analysis of apatites from São Francisco craton and Mesozoic alcaline-carbonatite complexes from central and southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, G.; Born, H.; Hadler, J. C. N.; Iunes, P. J.; Kawashita, K.; Machado, D. L.; Oliveira, E. P.; Paulo, S. R.; Tello, C. A. S.

    1997-07-01

    Thermal histories on seven Brazilian apatites were obtained by fission track analysis using Monte Carlo simulations. The apatites were collected from two distinct geotectonic provinces. One group, originated from São Francisco craton, represents a typical cratonic domain with Proterozoic and Eopaleozoic rocks and yielded Permo-Triassic ages (counted since the instant when temperature was low enough so that the damage produced by fission tracks in apatite started to be preserved). The common thermal history accepted by all samples of this group is a linear cooling from ~90 to ~25 °C for the last 240 Ma, in agreement with present day thermal gradient and denudation rates. The other group, from Mesozoic alkaline-carbonatite complexes, in central and southeastern Brazil, yielded Cretaceous ages, close to those of the intrusions. For the samples of central Brazil, fission track analysis suggests a slow cooling from ~95 ° to ~85 °C between 90 and 60 Ma ago, followed by a faster cooling from ~85 ° to ~27 °C for the last 60 Ma. Otherwise, two trends exist for the samples of southeastern Brazil. The primary one is an increase in temperature from ~75 ° to ~95 °C, which occurred between 140 and 60 Ma ago. In this period, there is also another trend: a cooling from ~100 ° to ~80 °C. However, both trends are followed by a common thermal history during the last 60 Ma: a cooling from approximately ~80 ° to ~25 °C.

  12. Asymmetry of Non-Volcanic Passive Margins Induced by the Proximity of a Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres-Martinez, M.; Perez-Gussinye, M.; Morgan, J. P.; Araujo, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Symmetry of conjugated rifted margins is controlled by the rheology of the crust and the mantle, extension velocities and heterogeneities in the lithosphere. However, there is a lack of knowledge on how the feedbacks between these initial conditions influence the final architecture of passive margins and the polarity of the asymmetry. Here we focus on cratons as stiff heterogeneities which potentially induce asymmetry. For simplicity, we choose to address only non-volcanic rifted margins developed next to cratons, such as the Brazil-Congo and Australia-Antarctica margin pairs. In the South Atlantic case, where cratons are closer to the margins (north of Sao Francisco craton and north and south of Congo craton) the margins are narrow, while wide margins develop far away from cratons. Extreme asymmetry occurs where rifting takes place close to a craton in one margin (narrow) and a fold belt in the conjugate (wide). The same is observed for the Australia-Antarctic pair in the sector of Recherche basin, where the Australian margin is narrow next to the Yilgarn craton and widens towards the east as it lays further from the craton. We use numerical models in order to study how cratons induce asymmetry of conjugated rifted margins and affect the polarity of the asymmetry. We ran experiments with different lower crustal rheologies for a fold belt lithosphere in order to understand which rheologies 'naturally' result in asymmetric margins. We also ran experiments where a cratonic lithosphere is placed next to a fold belt lithosphere, and where rifting is initiated by a weak seed in the fold belt at different distances from the craton. We found that where some fold belt experiments result in symmetric margins, their equivalent experiments with craton result in asymmetric margins. Furthermore, strong- and intermediate-rheology experiments with cratons showcase narrow margins in the craton side and wide margins on the fold belt side. We also observe that the distance from the

  13. Studies of the Hydrological Cycle for the Sao Francisco Basin using a combination of modeling and satellite remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebello, V.; Martins, T.; Rotunno Filho, O. C.; Araujo, A. A.; Lakshmi, V.

    2015-12-01

    The EPHSTC land surface hydrological model is used here in a case study for the São Francisco River Basin (area 630.000 km²) located in Northeast Brazil. The model solves the surface fluxes using ISBA prognostic equations and a gravitational drainage, a vertical diffusion process. A mechanism for subgrid-scale surface runoff generation was added. Another feature implemented in this model is the lateral redistribution of the soil water. This work will be a first attempt of evaluating EPHSTC results in a Brazil catchment for a long time period - 2001 to 2014. The GLDAS model input surface parameters would be used. Validation will be performed by the model values of soil moisture with corresponding GDLAS soil moisture (0-10,10-40,40-60 cm) and latent and heat fluxes. The two time series will be compared by calculation of the coefficient of determination and root mean square error.

  14. Tectonic fabric revealed by AARM of the proterozoic mafic dike swarm in the Salvador city (Bahia State): São Francisco Craton, NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raposo, M. Irene B.; Berquó, Thelma S.

    2008-04-01

    Magnetic fabric and rock magnetism studies were performed on 25 unmetamorphosed mafic dikes of the Meso-Late Proterozoic (˜1.02 Ga) dike swarm from Salvador (Bahia State, NE Brazil). This area lies in the north-eastern part of the São Francisco Craton, which was dominantly formed/reworked during the Transamazonian orogeny (2.14-1.94 Ga). The dikes crop out along the beaches and in quarries around Salvador city, and cut across both amphibolite dikes and granulites. Their widths range from a few centimeters up to 30 m with an average of ˜4 m, and show two main trends N140-190 and N100-120 with vertical dips. Magnetic fabrics were determined using both anisotropy of low-field magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and anisotropy of anhysteretic remanent magnetization (AARM). The magnetic mineralogy was investigated by many experiments including remanent magnetization measurements at variable low temperatures (10-300 K), Mössbauer spectroscopy, high temperature magnetization curves (25-700 °C) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The rock magnetism study suggests pseudo-single-domain magnetite grains carrying the bulk magnetic susceptibility and AARM fabrics. The magnetite grains found in these dikes are large and we discard the presence of single-domain grains. Its composition is close to stoichiometric with low Ti substitution, and its Verwey transition occurs around 120 K. The main AMS fabric recognized in the swarm is so-called normal, in which the Kmax- Kint plane is parallel to the dike plane and the magnetic foliation pole ( Kmin) is perpendicular to it. This fabric is interpreted as due to magma flow, and analysis of the Kmax inclination permitted to infer that approximately 80% of the dikes were fed by horizontal or sub-horizontal flows ( Kmax < 30°). This interpretation is supported by structural field evidence found in five dikes. In addition, based on the plunge of Kmax, two mantle sources could be inferred; one of them which fed about 80% of the swarm

  15. The 2012-2013 Montes Claros earthquake series in the São Francisco Craton, Brazil: new evidence for non-uniform intraplate stresses in mid-plate South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agurto-Detzel, Hans; Assumpção, Marcelo; Ciardelli, Caio; Albuquerque, Diogo Farrapo; Barros, Lucas V.; França, George S. L.

    2015-01-01

    On 2012 May 19, an mb = 4 earthquake shook the town of Montes Claros, Brazil in the middle of the São Francisco Craton. Because of the scarce seismicity in the area, an event like this could provide valuable information to characterize the governing seismotectonics and stress field for the region. Here, we present the results of more than 1 yr of local seismic monitoring after the main shock. We found that the seismicity originated at approximately 1-km depth in an NNW-oriented blind reverse fault, dipping to the E. The magnitude of the main shock was 4mb, with aftershocks reaching up to 3.6mb. Focal mechanisms from first motion polarities and waveform moment tensor inversions indicate a reverse faulting in agreement with the orientation of the aftershock locations. In addition, we derived a new 1-D local velocity model using a simultaneous inversion of hypocentres and velocity layers. The results indicate P-wave velocities of 4.5 km s-1 for the upper layer of carbonate rocks and 5.23 and 5.69 km s-1 for the lower fractured and compact crystalline basement layers, respectively. Higher Vp/Vs ratios were obtained for the upper two layers compared to the lowermost layer, possibly indicating presence of rock fracturing and percolated water. The calculated stress drop for the main event is 0.33 MPa, which is a relatively low value for an intraplate earthquake but still within the observed range. The inversion of the main shock focal mechanism and previously published focal mechanisms suggests a compressional stress regime in the central part of the São Francisco Craton, which is different from the strike-slip regime in the southern part, although both have an EW-oriented σ1. On the other hand, focal mechanisms of events located to the west of the craton indicate an NW-SE oriented σ1 for central Brazil. This variability highlights the importance of local sources of stresses (e.g. flexural stresses) in mid-plate South America, unlike other mid-plate areas of the world

  16. [Evaluation of a program for the control of schistosomiasis in municipalities located on the basin of the Sao Francisco River, Minas Gerais, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Lima e Costa, M F; Guerra, H L; Pimenta, F G; Firmo, J O; Uchoa, E

    1996-01-01

    An evaluation of the control program on schistosomiasis (PCE/PCDEN) was performed in the region of São Francisco river in MInas Gerais. The study area comprises six municipalities, with 130,000 inhabitants and 916 localities situated in an area with 10,722 km2. The activities initiated in 1983-85 in four municipalities and in 1987 in the other two. The main measures of control were repeated treatment with oxamniquine and use of niclosamide. The prevalence of infection by Schistosoma mansoni in the first four municipalities, that was initially around 18 and 32%, dropped abruptly after the first intervention (1983/85) and remained in levels below the initial ones until the last assessment (1990-94); similar trends were observed for the proportion of infected snails. In these municipalities, the proportion of localities without infection or with prevalence below 5% increased in relation to those with higher prevalence. In the other two municipalities, with initial prevalence below 5%, there were no substantial changes in S. mansoni prevalence or proportion of infected snails; the cost benefit of the program in these municipalities need to be assessed and the priorities redirected to eradicate focal areas and prevent spread to non infected localities. The authors call attention to the difficulties in the long term of a control program based on repeated treatments. Information on factors associated with S. mansoni infection in each locality, or in groups of similar localities, would allow to develop additional measures to treatment that could last longer and be less dependent on the continuous use of chemotherapy.

  17. The Caraguataí syenitic suite, a ca. 2.7 Ga-old alkaline magmatism (petrology, geochemistry and U-Pb zircon ages). Southern Gavião block (São Francisco Craton), Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Simone Cerqueira Pereira; Peucat, Jean-Jacques; Teixeira, Leo; Carneiro, Maurício Antônio; Marques Martins, Adriano Alberto; Santana, Jocilene dos Santos; de Souza, Jailma Santos; Barbosa, Johildo Salomão Figueiredo; Leal, Ângela Beatriz Menezes; Dantas, Elton; Pimentel, Marcio

    2012-08-01

    corresponding negative ɛ(t) values (-4 to -6), suggest that the alkaline magmas are mainly derived from partial melting of Paleoarchean gneisses in an intraplate setting similar to those from the surrounding Aracatu region. The isotopic data obtained in this work together with published data suggest that in the southern sector of the Gavião Block an important event of crustal recycling occurred ca. 2.7 Ga ago. Similar ages have been found in other parts of the São Francisco Craton.

  18. Sao Paulo Map Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, G. Robert

    1985-01-01

    Describes geographical, subject, and chronological aspects of 25 cartographic collections housed in university, public, special, state, and semi-state libraries in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Three size categories of map holdings (more than 10,000, 1,000-10,000, less than 1,000) are distinguished. A list of 27 Sao Paulo institutions housing map collections…

  19. Precambrian Cratons and Fold-Belts in Brazil: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuck, R.

    2008-05-01

    The main Precambrian terrains recognized in Brazil comprise the Amazonian, São Francisco and Rio de la Plata cratons, surrounded by Neoproterozoic Brasiliano fold belts, making up the Borborema, Mantiqueira and Tocantins provinces. The Amazonian craton comprises an Archean core, surrounded by Paleoproterozoic terrains (Maroni-Itacaiunas, Ventuari-Tapajós, Rio Negro-Juruena), which southwestwards give way to the Mesoproterozoic Rondoniano-San Ignacio and Sunsas belts, the latter thought to be related to the Grenville belt of North America. The São Francisco craton comprises several Archean blocks (Gavião, Serrinha, Jequié) amalgamated by the Paleoproterozoic high-grade Itabuna-Salvador-Curaçá orogen. The Rio de la Plata craton, largely covered by Phanerozoic strata, is made of Paleoproterozoic basement gneiss and several Paleoproterozoic greenstone belts. Other cratonic blocks are hidden below large Phanerozoic basins, like the Paranapanema and Parnaíba blocks below the Paraná and Parnaíba basins, respectively. Several smaller Archean/Paleoproterozoic blocks appear within the Brasiliano provinces: some were strongly reworked during the Neoproterozoic orogenic events (São José do Campestre, Pernambuco-Alagoas, Goiás, Guanhães, Juiz de Fora, Curitiba), others were only marginally affected (São Luiz, Rio Apa, Luís Alves). The Brasiliano provinces are the result of Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic orogenic events within the framework of West Gondwana amalgamation. The Mantiqueira Province extends from eastern Brazil to southern Uruguay and includes the Araçuaí, Ribeira and Dom Feliciano fold belts, bordering the São Francisco, Paranapanema and Rio de la Plata cratons and surrounding the Luís Alves craton. The Tocantins province in central Brazil includes the Araguaia, Paraguay and Brasília fold belts, the former bordering the Amazonian craton, the second bordering both the southern Amazonian craton and the Rio Apa block, and the last established on

  20. University of Sao Paulo

    SciTech Connect

    Acquadro, J.C.; Added, N.; Ferraretto, M.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne has agreed to assist the University of Sao Paulo (USP) in the construction of a small superconducting heavy-ion linac to serve as an energy booster for projectiles from their 8-MV tandem. This booster will be similar in many respects to the ANL booster linac built in the late 1970s. The ANL contribution to this project will be (1) to build (at USP expense) 14 split-ring niobium resonators and some of the associated rf electronics, (2) to provide technical information, and (3) to train USP staff members in several phases of superconducting-linac technology. Two Brazilian engineers worked at Argonne for one year, gaining experience in cryogenics and in superconducting-resonator technology. Another engineer worked on the new control system at ATLAS for two years, the first year supported by Sao Paulo and the second with direct ANL support. Sao Paulo personnel returned to ANL in 1993 for assembly and testing of the first batch of completed resonators. The fabrication of the resonators will be completed by early 1995 when the Sao Paulo personnel will come back for final assembly and testing. Fabrication of electronics modules at ANL is still in progress.

  1. Origin of cratonic basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev. Klein, George; Hsui, Albert T.

    1987-12-01

    Tectonic subsidence curves show that the Illinois, Michigan, and Williston basins formed by initial fault-controlled mechanical subsidence during rifting and by subsequent thermal subsidence. Thermal subsidence began around 525 Ma in the Illinois Basin, 520 460 Ma in the Michigan Basin, and 530 500 Ma in the Williston Basin. In the Illinois Basin, a second subsidence episode (middle Mississippian through Early Permian) was caused by flexural foreland subsidence in response to the Alleghanian-Hercynian orogeny. Resurgent Permian rifting in the Illinois Basin is inferred because of intrusion of well-dated Permian alnoites; such intrusive rocks are normally associated with rifting processes. The process of formation of these cratonic basins remains controversial. Past workers have suggested mantle phase changes at the base of the crust, mechanical subsidence in response to isostatically uncompensated excess mass following igneous intrusions, intrusion of mantle plumes into the crust, or regional thermal metamorphic events as causes of basin initiation. Cratonic basins of North America, Europe, Africa, and South America share common ages of formation (around 550 to 500 Ma), histories of sediment accumulation, temporal volume changes of sediment fills, and common dates of interregional unconformities. Their common date of formation suggests initiation of cratonic basins in response to breakup of a late Precambrian super-continent. This supercontinent acted as a heat lens that caused partial melting of the lower crust and upper mantle followed by emplacement of anorogenic granites during extensional tectonics in response to supercontinent breakup. Intrusion of anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks weakened continental lithosphere, thus providing a zone of localized regional stretching and permitting formation of cratonic basins almost simultaneously over sites of intrusion of these anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks.

  2. Understanding cratonic flood basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Paul G.; Behn, Mark D.; Kelley, Katherine; Schmitz, Mark; Savage, Brian

    2006-05-01

    The origin of continental flood basalts has been debated for decades. These eruptions often produce millions of cubic kilometers of basalt on timescales of only a million years. Although flood basalts are found in a variety of settings, no locale is more puzzling than cratonic areas such as southern Africa or the Siberian craton, where strong, thick lithosphere is breached by these large basaltic outpourings. Conventionally, flood basalts have been interpreted as melting events produced by one of two processes: 1) elevated temperatures associated with mantle plumes and/or 2) adiabatic-decompression melting associated with lithospheric thinning. In southern Africa, however, there are severe problems with both of these mechanisms. First, the rifting circumstances of several well-known basaltic outpourings clearly reflect lithospheric control rather than the influence of a deep-seated plume. Specifically, rift timing and magmatism are correlated with stress perturbations to the lithosphere associated with the formation of collisional rifts. Second, the substantial lithospheric thinning required for adiabatic decompression melting is inconsistent with xenolith evidence for the continued survival of thick lithosphere beneath flood basalt domains. As an alternative to these models, we propose a new two-stage model that interprets cratonic flood basalts not as melting events, but as short-duration drainage events that tap previously created sublithospheric reservoirs of molten basalt formed over a longer time scale. Reservoir creation/existence (Stage I) requires long-term (e.g. ≫ 1 Ma) supersolidus conditions in the sublithospheric mantle that could be maintained by an elevated equilibrium geotherm (appropriate for the Archean), a slow thermal perturbation (e.g. thermal blanketing or large-scale mantle upwelling), or a subduction-related increase in volatile content. The drainage event (Stage II) occurs in response to an abrupt stress change in the lithosphere, which

  3. Craton destruction and related resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Rixiang; Zhang, Hongfu; Zhu, Guang; Meng, Qingren; Fan, Hongrui; Yang, Jinhui; Wu, Fuyuan; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zheng, Tianyu

    2017-02-01

    Craton destruction is a dynamic event that plays an important role in Earth's evolution. Based on comprehensive observations of many studies on the North China Craton (NCC) and correlations with the evolution histories of other cratons around the world, craton destruction has be defined as a geological process that results in the total loss of craton stability due to changes in the physical and chemical properties of the involved craton. The mechanisms responsible for craton destruction would be as the follows: (1) oceanic plate subduction; (2) rollback and retreat of a subducting oceanic plate; (3) stagnation and dehydration of a subducting plate in the mantle transition zone; (4) melting of the mantle above the mantle transition zone caused by dehydration of a stagnant slab; (5) non-steady flow in the upper mantle induced by melting, and/or (6) changes in the nature of the lithospheric mantle and consequent craton destruction caused by non-steady flow. Oceanic plate subduction itself does not result in craton destruction. For the NCC, it is documented that westward subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate should have initiated at the transition from the Middle-to-Late Jurassic, and resulted in the change of tectonic regime of eastern China. We propose that subduction, rollback and retreat of oceanic plates and dehydration of stagnant slabs are the main dynamic factors responsible for both craton destruction and concentration of mineral deposits, such as gold, in the overriding continental plate. Based on global distribution of gold deposits, we suggest that convergent plate margins are the most important setting for large gold concentrations. Therefore, decratonic gold deposits appear to occur preferentially in regions with oceanic subduction and overlying continental lithospheric destruction/modification/growth.

  4. Widespread refertilization of cratonic and circum-cratonic lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Ying, Ji-Feng; Su, Ben-Xun

    2013-03-01

    Studies of mantle xenoliths have confirmed that Archean subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) is highly depleted in basaltic components (such as Al, Ca and Na) due to high-degree extraction of mafic and ultramafic melts and thus is refractory and buoyant, which made it chronically stable as tectonically independent units. However, increasing studies show that ancient SCLM can be refertilized by episodic rejuvenation events like infiltration of upwelling fertile material. The North China Craton is one of the most typical cases for relatively complete destruction of its Archean keel since the eruption of Paleozoic kimberlites, as is evidenced by a dramatic change in the compositions of mantle xenoliths sampled by Paleozoic to Cenozoic magmas, reflecting significant lithospheric thinning and the change in the character of the SCLM. The compositional change has been interpreted as the result of refertilization of Archean SCLM via multiple-stage peridotite-melt reactions, suggested by linear correlations between MgO and indices of fertility, covariations of Al2O3 with CaO, La/Yb, 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, 187Os/188Os and Re-depletion ages (TRD), high Re abundances, scatter in Re-Os isotopic plot, variable in situ TRD ages of sulfides, and correlation between TRD ages and olivine Fo of peridotite xenoliths in Paleozoic kimberlites and Cenozoic basalts on the craton. By integrating major and trace element, Sr, Nd and Os isotopic compositions of peridotite xenoliths and orogenic massif peridotites from the continents of Europe, Asia, America, Africa and Australia, together with previous studies of petrology and geochemistry of global peridotites, we suggest that (1) refertilization of cratonic and circum-cratonic lithospheric mantle is widespread; (2) Archean SCLM worldwide has experienced a multi-stage history of melt depletion and refertilization since segregation from the convecting mantle; (3) cratonic SCLM may be more susceptible to compositional change caused by

  5. Application of multi-dimensional discrimination diagrams and probability calculations to Paleoproterozoic acid rocks from Brazilian cratons and provinces to infer tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sanjeet K.; Oliveira, Elson P.

    2013-08-01

    In present work, we applied two sets of new multi-dimensional geochemical diagrams (Verma et al., 2013) obtained from linear discriminant analysis (LDA) of natural logarithm-transformed ratios of major elements and immobile major and trace elements in acid magmas to decipher plate tectonic settings and corresponding probability estimates for Paleoproterozoic rocks from Amazonian craton, São Francisco craton, São Luís craton, and Borborema province of Brazil. The robustness of LDA minimizes the effects of petrogenetic processes and maximizes the separation among the different tectonic groups. The probability based boundaries further provide a better objective statistical method in comparison to the commonly used subjective method of determining the boundaries by eye judgment. The use of readjusted major element data to 100% on an anhydrous basis from SINCLAS computer program, also helps to minimize the effects of post-emplacement compositional changes and analytical errors on these tectonic discrimination diagrams. Fifteen case studies of acid suites highlighted the application of these diagrams and probability calculations. The first case study on Jamon and Musa granites, Carajás area (Central Amazonian Province, Amazonian craton) shows a collision setting (previously thought anorogenic). A collision setting was clearly inferred for Bom Jardim granite, Xingú area (Central Amazonian Province, Amazonian craton) The third case study on Older São Jorge, Younger São Jorge and Maloquinha granites Tapajós area (Ventuari-Tapajós Province, Amazonian craton) indicated a within-plate setting (previously transitional between volcanic arc and within-plate). We also recognized a within-plate setting for the next three case studies on Aripuanã and Teles Pires granites (SW Amazonian craton), and Pitinga area granites (Mapuera Suite, NW Amazonian craton), which were all previously suggested to have been emplaced in post-collision to within-plate settings. The seventh case

  6. Origin and evolution of the Amazonian craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, A. K.; Wirth, K. R.

    1986-01-01

    The Amazonian craton appears to be formed and modifed by processes much like those of the better-known Precambrian cratons, but the major events did not always follow conventional sequences nor did they occur synchronously with those of other cratons. Much of the craton's Archean style continental crust formation, recorded in granite-greenstone and high-grade terranes, occurred in the Early Proterozoic: a period of relative quiescence in many other Precambrian regions. The common Archean to Proterozoic transition in geological style did not occur here, but an analogous change from abundant marine volcanism to dominantly continental sedimentary and eruptive styles occurred later. Amazonian geology is summarized, explaining the evolution of the craton.

  7. The metropolitan area of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hakkert, R; Gondo, C T

    1984-08-01

    This discussion of the metropolitan area of Sao Paulo, Brazil focuses on: administrative divisions; diversity and population growth; households, fertility, and mortality; migration; ethnicity, race, and religion; housing; transport; labor and income; and consumption. Currently, the metropolitan area of Sao Paulo, or Greater Sao Paula, is considered the 2nd largest urban agglomeration in Latin America after Mexico City. An estimated 9.5 million people live within the 583 square mile area of the central city. Another 5 million people live in 1 of the 36 other municipalities included in the metropolitan area which includes all 37 municipalities. Central city refers to the municipalities of Sao Paulo and Osasco. The city of Sao Paulo refers only to the municipality of Sao Paulo. The metropolitan area contains 3110 square miles in total and is still the smallest of the 11 administrative regions that comprise the State of Sao Paulo. The population, urban infrastructure, and economic activities are unevenly spread among the 37 municipalities. Greater Sao Paulo's population grew an average of 4.5 year during the 1970, down slightly from a peak of 5.9 year in the 1950s. The central city has a current growth rate of 3.7, a year, with the increase concentrated mainly in the southern and eastern districts that are removed from the city center and where land prices are still relatively low. Mortality plays a minor role in the population trends of Sao Paulo. Fertility is now slowly becoming the dominant factors in its natural increase. The average number of children a woman will bear is 3.3 in the metropolitan area and 3 in the city, low compared with the Brazilian national average of 4.2 children. According to a 1978 survey, 60% of the women use some form of birth control. The most common methods are oral contraceptives 27%, and sterilization, 15%. Despite declining fertility, the birthrate of the metropolitan area increased from 26 in 1970 to 30 in 1980 because of the changes

  8. Speculations on the formation of cratons and cratonic basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Dan; Priestley, Keith

    2016-02-01

    Surface wave tomography using Rayleigh waves has shown that Tibet and the surrounding mountain ranges that are now being shortened are underlain by thick lithosphere, of similar thickness to that beneath cratons. Both their elevation and lithospheric thickness can result from pure shear shortening of normal thickness continental lithosphere by about a factor of two. The resulting thermal evolution of the crust and lithosphere is dominated by radioactive decay in the crust. It raises the temperature of the lower part of the crust and of the upper part of the lithosphere to above their solidus temperatures, generating granites and small volumes of mafic alkaline rocks from beneath the Moho, as well as generating high temperature metamorphic assemblages in the crust. Thermal models of this process show that it can match the P, T estimates determined from metamorphic xenoliths from Tibet and the Pamirs, and can also match the compositions of the alkaline rocks. The seismological properties of the upper part of the lithosphere beneath northern Tibet suggest that it has already been heated by the blanketing effect and radioactivity of the thick crust on top. If the crustal thickness is reduced by erosion alone to its normal value at low elevations, without any tectonic extension, over a time scale that is short compared to the thermal time constant of thick lithosphere, of ∼250 Ma, thermal subsidence will produce a basin underlain by thick lithosphere. Though this simple model accounts for the relevant observations, there is not yet sufficient information available to be able to model in detail the resulting thermal evolution of the sediments deposited in such cratonic basins.

  9. The SAO {AXAF} Simulation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerius, D.; Freeman, M.; Gaetz, T.; Hughes, J. P.; Podgorski, W.

    As part of our efforts to support the AXAF program, the SAO AXAF Mission Support Team has developed a software suite to simulate the AXAF telescope. The software traces the fate of photons through the telescope, from the X-ray source through apertures, baffles, the telescope optics, and finally to the photons' ultimate interactions with the focal plane detectors. We model relevant physical processes, including geometrical reflection, scattering due to surface microroughness, distortions of the optics due to the mirror mounts, attenuation through baffles, etc. The software is composed of programs and scripts, each specialized to a given task, which communicate through UNIX pipes. Software tasks are centered about functional components of the telescope (e.g., apertures, mirrors, detectors) and provide a comfortable and flexible paradigm for performing simulations. The use of separate programs and the UNIX pipe facility allows great flexibility in building different configurations of the telescope and distilling diagnostics from the photon stream through the telescope. We are able to transparently use symmetric multi-processing (e.g., SPARCStation 10s and SGI Challenges) and can easily use sequential multi-processing (via workstation clusters). Some of the tasks are amenable to parallel processing and have been implemented using the MPI standard.

  10. Ambient Noise Imaging of Craton Modification: Examples from the Kaapvaal craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. C.; Shirey, S. B.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    Mapping of crustal and upper-mantle seismic velocities can give important insight into the geologic evolution of cratonic regions. In order to better understand the formation and evolution of the Kaapvaal craton and surrounding regions, we use ambient noise tomography to produce a new crustal and upper-mantle 3D shear-velocity model for southeastern Africa using data collected during the (1995-1999) Kaapvaal Seismic Experiment. Ambient noise tomography enables imaging of shear-velocity variations at smaller scales (10s of km) and shallower depths (< 10 km) than previously determined using natural-source body- and surface-wave techniques within the region. The goal of this work is to image geological features of the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton such as kimberlite pipe density, flood basalt feeder dike systems, granite-greenstone belts, layered mafic intrusions and craton assembly/collision patterns at mid- lower crustal levels where information is typically lacking. Our results provide important constraints on the evolution of the Kaapvaal craton, including the collision with the Zimbabwe craton and the formation of the Bushveld Complex and Witwatersrand basin, and the impact of these events on lithospheric structure. Preliminary images exhibit key first-order features of the craton. At depth ranges of 4-12 km, reduced shear velocities correlate with the Bushveld-Malopo Farms complexes. At a depth interval of 10-18 km, lower velocities are associated with the Witwatersrand sedimentary basin, and higher velocities may be attributed to unroofed mid-crustal rocks of high metamorphic grade formed during the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton collision. At depths of 36-46 km, velocity patterns reflect Moho topography, with thinner crust associated with the undisturbed regions of the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons and thicker crust associated with the Limpopo Belt and Namaqua-Natal Mobile Belt. At greater depths, higher upper-mantle velocities are observed in the southern Kaapvaal

  11. Cratonic lithosphere: an electrifying view (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    Deep-probing electromagnetic studies reveal the vertical and lateral electrical conductivity structure of cratonic lithosphere. At lithospheric temperatures and for silicate mantle minerals, semi-conduction is from small polaron hopping and, in the presence of water, proton conduction, both of which is thermally-driven and can be described by an Arrhenius equation. There is little compositional sensitivity, save for the far higher water contents prevalent in pyroxenes (typically 200-400 wt ppm) compared to olivine (typically 10-100 wt ppm), with the latter exhibiting a depth dependence and the former none. Seismological methods are sensitive to temperature and composition, and virtually insensitive to low amounts of water. Taken together, the two are highly complementary. Seismological and magnetotelluric studies across Southern Africa can be employed together to constraint temperature and water content, where there is a significant difference at 100 km depth between the Kaapvaal Craton compared to the Angola (Congo) Craton compared to the Zimbabwe Craton. The Congo Craton is driest but hottest, the Kaapvaal Craton exhibits laterally-varying water content and is coldest, and the Zimbabwe Craton is the wettest and intermediate in temperature. Such thermal and water content variation results in lateral rheological variation, with the wettest and warmest being more deformable. For the Canadian Shield, there is again significant lateral variation at 100 km, with the Superior Province being mostly dry, and the Slave Craton and Rae/Hearne Provinces being far wetter. By 200 km however, all of the Canadian Shield is dry, consistent with the xenolith-based observations from the Kaapvaal Craton of far higher water contents in olivine at 100 km (50-100 wt ppm) decreasing with depth to around 10 wt ppm at 200 km. The lithosphere beneath the Kimberley area of the Kaapvaal Craton has been forward modeled in a manner that is self-consistent not only with the seismological and

  12. Water in the Cratonic Mantle Lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    The fact that Archean and Proterozoic cratons are underlain by the thickest (>200 km) lithosphere on Earth has always puzzled scientists because the dynamic convection of the surrounding asthenosphere would be expected to delaminate and erode these mantle lithospheric "keels" over time. Although density and temperature of the cratonic lithosphere certainly play a role in its strength and longevity, the role of water has only been recently addressed with data on actual mantle samples. Water in mantle lithologies (primarily peridotites and pyroxenites) is mainly stored in nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, pyroxene, garnet) where it is incorporated as hydrogen bonded to structural oxygen in lattice defects. The property of hydrolytic weakening of olivine [4] has generated the hypothesis that olivine, the main mineral of the upper mantle, may be dehydrated in cratonic mantle lithospheres, contributing to its strength. This presentation will review the distribution of water concentrations in four cratonic lithospheres. The distribution of water contents in olivine from peridotite xenoliths found in kimberlites is different in each craton (Figure 1). The range of water contents of olivine, pyroxene and garnet at each xenolith location appears linked to local metasomatic events, some of which occurred later then the Archean and Proterozoic when these peridotites initially formed via melting. Although the low olivine water contents (<10 ppm wt H2O) at > 6 GPa at the base of the Kaapvaal cratonic lithosphere may contribute to its strength, and prevent its delamination, the wide range of those from Siberian xenoliths is not compatible with providing a high enough viscosity contrast with the asthenophere. The water content in olivine inclusions from Siberian diamonds, on the other hand, have systematically low water contents (<20 ppm wt H2O). The xenoliths may represent a biased sample of the cratonic lithosphere with an over-­abundance of metasomatized peridotites with

  13. HD-SAO-DM cross index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, T. A.; Mead, J.

    1978-01-01

    A table of correspondence SAO-HD-DM-GC was prepared by Morin (1973). The machine-readable version of this cross identification was obtained from the Centre de Donnees Stellaires (Strasbourg, France). The table was sorted at the Goddard Space Flight Center by HD number and all blank HD number records were removed to produce the HD-SAO-DM table presented. There were 258997 entries in the original table; there are 180411 entries after removing the blank HD records. The Boss General Catalogue (GC) numbers were retained on the machine-readable version after the sort.

  14. Kimberlites of the Man craton, West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, E. M. W.; Apter, D. B.; Morelli, C.; Smithson, N. K.

    2004-09-01

    The Man craton in West Africa is an Archaean craton formerly joined to the Guyana craton (South America) that was rifted apart in the Mesozoic. Kimberlites of the Man craton include three Jurassic-aged clusters in Guinea, two Jurassic-aged clusters in Sierra Leone, and in Liberia two clusters of unknown age and one Neoproterozoic cluster recently dated at ˜800 Ma. All of the kimberlites irrespective of age occur as small pipes and prolific dykes. Some of the Banankoro cluster pipes in Guinea, the Koidu pipes in Sierra Leone and small pipes in the Weasua cluster in Liberia contain hypabyssal-facies kimberlite and remnants of the so-called transitional-facies and diatreme-facies kimberlite. Most of the Man craton kimberlites are mineralogically classified as phlogopite kimberlites, although potassium contents are relatively low. They are chemically similar to mica-poor Group 1A Southern African examples. The Jurassic kimberlites are considered to represent one province of kimberlites that track from older bodies in Guinea (Droujba 153 Ma) to progressively younger kimberlites in Sierra Leone (Koidu, 146 Ma and Tongo, 140 Ma). The scarcity of diatreme-facies kimberlites relative to hypabyssal-facies kimberlites and the presence of the so-called transitional-facies indicate that the pipes have been eroded down to the interface between the root and diatreme zones. From this observation, it is concluded that extensive erosion (1-2 km) has occurred since the Jurassic. In addition to erosion, the presence of abundant early crystallizing phlogopite is considered to have had an effect on the relatively small sizes of the Man craton kimberlites.

  15. Greater Sao Paulo Newer Library Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Dulce Didio

    1991-01-01

    This followup to a 1981 study presents descriptions of automated projects or activities in academic, public, and special libraries or information centers in the Greater Sao Paulo region that developed from 1981 through 1987. It is noted that an overall increase in the level of automation since 1981 has been observed. (four references) (Author/MAB)

  16. Manuel francisco allende

    PubMed

    Thivolet

    2000-06-01

    It was on the occasion of my first visit to San Francisco that I got to know Manuel Frank Allende. He was born in Uruguay in 1918 but spent time in Paris where he worked as a hospital registrar shortly before the war. In 1940, he saw the occupation of France by the Germans. He passed over the Spanish border, was briefly interned and then set off back to the United States. He had a brief "stay" at Ellis Island opposite Manhattan, before obtaining a resident's permit enabling him to continue his speciality, dermatology. He then left for California, his wife, Katharine's home state. Manuel Frank was very open-minded, benefiting from the Spanish, French and American cultures, a "man of the world" before the term had been invented. We soon got on well, he liked skiing, which he had practised in Alpe d'Huez before the war. I visited him in San Francisco where he lived in a house dominating the Bay near the Golden Gate. He drew and painted the wonderful view he had from his windows. He died suddenly on the slopes in the Rocky Mountains. Katharine still lives in San Francisco where she has long been a member of the governing body of the French hospital. Manuel Frank left a marvellous collection of drawings which illustrate well the kind of man he was.

  17. Lithospheric growth at margins of cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.

    2002-09-01

    Deep seismic reflection profiles collected across Proterozoic-Archean margins are now sufficiently numerous to formulate a consistent hypothesis of how continental nuclei grow laterally to form cratonic shields. This picture is made possible both because the length of these regional profiles spans all the tectonic elements of an orogen on a particular cratonic margin and because of their great depth range. Key transects studied include the LITHOPROBE SNORCLE 1 transect and the BABEL survey, crossing the Slave and Baltic craton margins, respectively. In most cases, the older (Archean) block appears to form a wedge of uppermost mantle rock embedded into the more juvenile (Proterozoic) block by as much as 100-200 km at uppermost mantle depths and Archean lithosphere is therefore more laterally extensive at depth than at the surface. Particularly bright reflections along the Moho are cited as evidence of shear strain within a weak, low-viscosity lower crustal channel that lies along the irregular top of the indenting wedge. The bottom of the wedge is an underthrust/subduction zone, and associated late reversal in subduction polarity beneath the craton margin emerges as a common characteristic of these margins although related arc magmatism may be minor.

  18. Cyclic Cratonic Carbonates and Phanerozoic Calcite Seas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Bruce H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses causes of cyclicity in cratonic carbonate sequences and evidence for and potential significance of postulated primary calcite sediment components in past Paleozoic seas, outlining problems, focusing on models explaining existing data, and identifying background. Future sedimentary geologists will need to address these and related areas…

  19. Phanerozoic surface history of the Slave craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Alexis K.; Flowers, Rebecca M.; Bowring, Samuel A.

    2013-09-01

    apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) thermochronometry data and key geologic constraints from Slave craton kimberlites are used to develop a model for the Phanerozoic burial, unroofing, and hypsometric history of the northwestern Canadian shield. AHe dates range from 210 ± 13 to 382 ± 79 Ma, are older in the eastern Slave craton and decrease westward, and resolve the spatial extent, thickness, and history of now-denuded sedimentary units. Results indicate Paleozoic heating to temperatures ≥85-90°C, suggesting regional burial beneath ≥2.8 km of strata while the region was at sea level, followed by the westward migration of unroofing across the craton. This Paleozoic-Mesozoic history does not correlate with sea level change, instead requiring Paleozoic subsidence of the craton followed by surface uplift. The AHe data restrict Cretaceous burial to ≤1.6 km, followed by unroofing, Eocene terrestrial sediment deposition, and removal of Phanerozoic sedimentary cover across the region by present day. The craton underwent ≥300 m of post-100 Ma elevation gain, based on ~100 Ma marine sedimentary xenoliths entrained in ~75-45 Ma kimberlites at modern elevations of 550-600 m. The transition from Paleozoic-Mesozoic subsidence to surface uplift may signal a change from predominantly northern (Franklinian-Innuitian) to western (Canadian Cordillera) plate boundary controls on continental interior processes, with the latter driving the east-to-west wave of unroofing. Canadian Cordillera evolution also affected the Cretaceous-early Tertiary history. Dynamic topography due to changing mantle flow regimes and proximity to sediment sources influenced the Phanerozoic surface evolution of the northwestern Canadian shield.

  20. The electrical structure of the Slave craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Alan G.; Lezaeta, Pamela; Ferguson, Ian J.; Chave, Alan D.; Evans, Rob L.; Garcia, Xavier; Spratt, Jessica

    2003-12-01

    The Slave craton in northwestern Canada, a relatively small Archean craton (600×400 km), is ideal as a natural laboratory for investigating the formation and evolution of Mesoarchean and Neoarchean sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM). Excellent outcrop and the discovery of economic diamondiferous kimberlite pipes in the centre of the craton during the early 1990s have led to an unparalleled amount of geoscientific information becoming available. Over the last 5 years deep-probing electromagnetic surveys were conducted on the Slave, using the natural-source magnetotelluric (MT) technique, as part of a variety of programs to study the craton and determine its regional-scale electrical structure. Two of the four types of surveys involved novel MT data acquisition; one through frozen lakes along ice roads during winter, and the second using ocean-bottom MT instrumentation deployed from float planes. The primary initial objective of the MT surveys was to determine the geometry of the topography of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) across the Slave craton. However, the MT responses revealed, completely serendipitously, a remarkable anomaly in electrical conductivity in the SCLM of the central Slave craton. This Central Slave Mantle Conductor (CSMC) anomaly is modelled as a localized region of low resistivity (10-15 Ω m) beginning at depths of ˜80-120 km and striking NE-SW. Where precisely located, it is spatially coincident with the Eocene-aged kimberlite field in the central part of the craton (the so-called "Corridor of Hope"), and also with a geochemically defined ultra-depleted harzburgitic layer interpreted as oceanic or arc-related lithosphere emplaced during early tectonism. The CSMC lies wholly within the NE-SW striking central zone defined by Grütter et al. [Grütter, H.S., Apter, D.B., Kong, J., 1999. Crust-mantle coupling; evidence from mantle-derived xenocrystic garnets. Contributed paper at: The 7th International Kimberlite Conference

  1. Lithospheric layering in the North American craton.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Huaiyu; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2010-08-26

    How cratons-extremely stable continental areas of the Earth's crust-formed and remained largely unchanged for more than 2,500 million years is much debated. Recent studies of seismic-wave receiver function data have detected a structural boundary under continental cratons at depths too shallow to be consistent with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, as inferred from seismic tomography and other geophysical studies. Here we show that changes in the direction of azimuthal anisotropy with depth reveal the presence of two distinct lithospheric layers throughout the stable part of the North American continent. The top layer is thick ( approximately 150 km) under the Archaean core and tapers out on the surrounding Palaeozoic borders. Its thickness variations follow those of a highly depleted layer inferred from thermo-barometric analysis of xenoliths. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary is relatively flat (ranging from 180 to 240 km in depth), in agreement with the presence of a thermal conductive root that subsequently formed around the depleted chemical layer. Our findings tie together seismological, geochemical and geodynamical studies of the cratonic lithosphere in North America. They also suggest that the horizon detected in receiver function studies probably corresponds to the sharp mid-lithospheric boundary rather than to the more gradual lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary.

  2. Cratonization: a thermal and petrological perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, H.N.

    1985-01-01

    The long term thermal and tectonic history of the continental lithosphere derives from the processes that lead to crationization. Cratons are characterized by mechanical stability, buoyancy and freeboard, a paucity of magmatism, and deep roots. The process is not slow and gradual, extending over aeons, but rather is relatively rapid, being accomplished in a period on the order of 300-500 Ma; cratonic nuclei existed by the end of the Archean. The essential process is devolatilization of the upper mantle, in associations with major orogenic events, to a depth of about 300 km. Devolatilization has the following effects: 1) it elevates the solidus of the affected lithosphere, making it less vulnerable to subsequent melting, 2) it augments the mechanical strength and stiffness of the region by increasing the activation energy, thereby 3) enhancing the structural stability of the lithosphere, thickening it, and extending to greater depths the region in which conduction is the principal mode of heat transfer, thereby 4) maintaining freeboard by the thermal expansion of the extended lithosphere because of the higher temperatures of the conductive thermal regime, and 5) enhancement of buoyancy by thermal expansion and petrological differentiation. The process of cratonization can be reversed by reintroduction of volatiles for the deeper mantle, or by raising the temperature sufficiently to reach the volatile-free refractory solidus. Mantle metasomatic processes probably promote destabilization by recharging the thick need lithosphere with both volatiles and heat producing isotopes.

  3. Tracing origins of cratonic eclogites by magnesium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Teng, F. Z.; Rudnick, R. L.; Li, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Cratonic eclogites are samples of lithospheric mantle preserved beneath ancient continental cratons. Hence, the origin of cratonic eclogites is closely related to the formation and evolution of cratonic mantle. Here we report Mg isotopic compositions for 27 cratonic eclogites and 52 garnet and clinopyroxene mineral separates from Koidu, Bellsbank and Kaalvallei kimberlite pipes in South and West Africa. Whole-rock Mg isotopic compositions vary widely, with δ26Mg ranging from -1.60 to +0.17, significantly different from the value (δ26Mg = -0.25 ± 0.07) of peridotite xenoliths. Garnet and clinopyroxene in these cratonic eclogites record equilibrium inter-mineral Mg isotope partitioning at mantle temperatures, with Δ26MgCpx-Grt (= δ26MgCpx - δ26MgGrt) in the range of 0.43 - 0.85 ‰. The constructed bulk δ26Mg values based on mineral compositions are identical to the measured whole-rock values, indicating limited influence of kimberlite infiltration on Mg isotopic compositions of cratonic eclogites. As significant Mg isotope fractionation can only occur during low-temperature surface processes, the large Mg isotopic variations of cratonic eclogites suggest the incorporation of subducted materials in their protoliths. Therefore, our Mg isotopic data suggest the cratonic eclogites are the remnants of subducted oceanic crust within the lithospheric mantle. Collectively, Mg isotopes are potentially excellent tracers of the formation and evolution of sub-continental lithospheric mantle.

  4. Geology of interior cratonic sag basins

    SciTech Connect

    Leighton, M.W.; Eidel, J.J.; Kolata, D.R.; Oltz, D.F. )

    1990-05-01

    Interior cratonic sag basins are thick accumulations of sediment, generally more or less oval in shape, located entirely in the interiors of continental masses. Some are single-cycle basins and others are characterized by repeated sag cycles or are complex polyhistory basins. Many appear to have developed over ancient rift systems. Interior cratonic sag basins are typified by a dominance of flexural over fault-controlled subsidence, and a low ratio of sediment volume to surface area of the basin. The Baltic, Carpentaria, Illinois, Michigan, Parana, Paris, and Williston basins are examples of interior cratonic sag basins. Tectonics played a dominant role in controlling the shapes and the geometries of the juxtaposed packets of sedimentary sequences. While the mechanics of tectonic control are not clear, evidence suggests that the movements are apparently related to convergence of lithospheric plates and collision and breakup of continents. Whatever the cause, tectonic movements controlled the freeboard of continents, altering base level and initiating new tectono-sedimentologic regimes. Sag basins situated in low latitudes during their development commonly were sites of thick carbonates (e.g., Illinois, Michigan, Williston, and Paris basins). In contrast, siliciclastic sedimentation characterized basins that formed in higher latitudes (e.g., Parana and Carpentaria basins). Highly productive sag basins are characterized by widespread, mature, organic-rich source rocks, large structures, and good seals. Nonproductive basins have one or more of the following characteristics: immature source rocks, leaky plumbing, freshwater flushing, and/or complex geology due to numerous intrusions that inhibit mapping of plays.

  5. Mesoproterozoic rapakivi granites of the Rondonia Tin Province, southwestern border of the Amazonian craton, Brazil-I. Reconnaissance U-Pb geochronology and regional implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bettencourt, Jorge S.; Tosdal, R.M.; Leite, W.B.; Payolla, B.L.

    1999-01-01

    Rapakivi granites and associated mafic and ultramafic rocks in the Rondonia Tin Province, southwestern Amazonian craton, Brazil were emplaced during six discrete episodes of magmatism between ca 1600 and 970 Ma. The seven rapakivi granite suites emplaced at this time were the Serra da Providencia Intrusive Suite (U-Pb ages between 1606 and 1532 Ma); Santo Antonio Intrusive Suite (U-Pb age 1406 Ma); Teotonio Intrusive Suite (U-Pb age 1387 Ma); Alto Candeias Intrusive Suite (U-Pb ages between 1346 and 1338 Ma); Sao Lourenco-Caripunas Intrusive Suite (U-Pb ages between 1314 and 1309 Ma); Santa Clara Intrusive Suite (U-Pb ages between 1082 and 1074 Ma); and Younger Granites of Rondonia (U-Pb ages between 998 and 974 Ma). The Serra da Providencia Intrusive Suite intruded the Paleoproterozoic (1.80 to 1.70 Ga) Rio Negro-Juruena crust whereas the other suites were emplaced into the 1.50 to 1.30 Ga Rondonia-San Ignacio crust. Their intrusion was contemporaneous with orogenic activity in other parts of the southwestern Amazonian craton, except for the oldest, Serra da Providencia Intrusive Suite. Orogenic events coeval with emplacement of the Serra da Providencia Intrusive Suite are not clearly recognized in the region. The Santo Antonio, Teotonio, Alto Candeias and Sao Lourenco-Caripunas Intrusive Suites are interpreted to represent extensional anorogenic magmatism associated with the terminal stages of the Rondonian-San Ignacio orogeny. At least the Sao Lourenco-Caripunas rapakivi granites and coeval intra-continental rift sedimentary rocks may, in contrast, represent the products of extensional tectonics and rifting preceding the Sunsas/Aguapei orogeny (1.25 to 1.0 Ga). The two youngest rapakivi suites, the Santa Clara Intrusive Suite and Younger Granites of Rondonia, seemingly represent inboard magmatism in the Rondonian-San Ignacio Province during a younger episode of reworking in the Rio Negro-Juruena Province during the waning stages of the collisional 1.1 to 1.0 Ga

  6. Overview of buildings with San Francisco skyline in background, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of buildings with San Francisco skyline in background, looking 84 degrees east - Presidio of San Francisco, Enlisted Men's Barracks Type, West end of Crissy Field, between Pearce & Maudlin Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  7. 408. Delineator Unknown September 19, 1933 SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    408. Delineator Unknown September 19, 1933 SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; STUDY FOR SAN FRANCISCO ANCHORAGE; TIMOTHY L. PFLUEGER, ARTHUR BROWN JR., JOHN J. DONOVAN; BOARD OF CONSULTING ARCHITECTS; SHEET NO. 26 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  8. 78 FR 18238 - Safety Zone; SFPD Training Safety Zone; San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Hunters Point in San Francisco, CA in support of the San Francisco Police Department's maritime... of Homeland Security FR Federal Register SFPD San Francisco Police Department NPRM Notice of Proposed....C sections 1221 et seq.). San Francisco Police Department will host the SFPD Training Safety Zone...

  9. 75 FR 39166 - Safety Zone; San Francisco Giants Baseball Game Promotion, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Promotion, San Francisco, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast... Bay off San Francisco, CA in support of the San Francisco Giants Baseball Game Promotion. This safety... Giants will sponsor the San Francisco Giants Baseball Game Promotion on July 16, 2010, on the...

  10. Chinatown Chinese: The San Francisco Dialect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Lorraine; Hom, Marlon K.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses factors that make the language spoken in San Francisco's Chinatown so dynamic and, at times, inconsistent. Provides a glossary that includes transliterated and partially transliterated terms, translated terms, new terms, and special San Francisco terms. (Author/GC)

  11. The Building of the Archean Superior Craton: Thermal Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaupart, C. P.; Mareschal, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The building of a craton involves the extraction of continental crust from the Earth's mantle and the lateral accretion of juvenile volcanic terranes. Ascertaining which conditions allow a newborn continental assemblage to survive requires information on its mechanical strength, which depends on the amount and vertical distribution of radioactive elements in the crust. There is thus a connection between crust formation mechanisms and a successful amalgamation process. To address outstanding questions concerning Archean cratons, the Superior province in Canada is the perfect region because it contains a well preserved geological record of accretion that provides compelling evidence for plate tectonic processes at 2.7 Ga. At almost the same time, the rate of continental growth decreased significantly, which may result from either slower crust formation or enhanced destruction through erosion and subduction. These issues are linked to the strength of the newborn continent. The extensive heat flow data set now available in the Superior Province reveals a clear demarcation between a chemically depleted and differentiated craton core and weakly differentiated enriched juvenile accreted terranes. The Superior craton was thus made of a strong core surrounded by weak terranes. This dichotomy implies that the accretion process could not involve complex imbrication of the accreted belts into the craton core. Subsequently, the craton may have been protected from convective disruption or delamination by its weak margins. Differences between the craton core and accreted terranes may be due to different crustal extraction processes, such as melting in a mantle plume or magmatism in a subduction zone. If subduction started at about 3 Ga, as advocated by several authors, the assembly and survival of large cratons may well be a consequence of this key shift in mantle activity. Alternatively, the chemical depletion of the craton core may be due to a prolonged history of internal

  12. Cratons: Why Are The Little Ones So Tough?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    Cratons are ancient (>1 Ga) survivors of multiple tectonic events and diverse tectonic regimes. The question that arises is why are they so tough? If one looks around the world at relatively small cratons, the answer at least partly lies in their crustal structure. This is not to say that their lithospheric mantle is not also part of the answer, but mapping the LAB is still a challenge. Some examples of relatively small cratons in North America that are relatively well studied are the Wyoming and SASK cratons. A good example in Africa is the Tanzanian craton, and a good example in China is the North China craton. The Wyoming craton initially formed at ~2.5 Ga and formed has very thick (~50 km) crust that includes a high velocity layer (Vp ~7.5 km/s) at its base. Recent xenolith studies indicate that at least some of this high velocity layer was underplated at ~1.8 Ga. The recently discovered Sask craton in Canada was caught up in the Trans-Hudson orogen and is completely covered by younger rocks. It also has a thick crust. The Tanzanian craton has been strong enough to cause the East African rift system to split into two arms that wrap around it. It has relatively thick crust (and lithospheric keel?). The Colorado plateau in the western U. S. and the Ordos block in north China are very similar in many respects and have resisted deformation in the their interiors while they are bounded on three sides by rifts. A common theme among these examples is relatively thick crust, and in most cases, a unusually fast lower crust.

  13. Redox preconditioning deep cratonic lithosphere for kimberlite genesis - evidence from the central Slave Craton.

    PubMed

    Yaxley, G M; Berry, A J; Rosenthal, A; Woodland, A B; Paterson, D

    2017-12-01

    We present the first oxygen fugacity (fO2) profile through the cratonic lithospheric mantle under the Panda kimberlite (Ekati Diamond Mine) in the Lac de Gras kimberlite field, central Slave Craton, northern Canada. Combining this data with new and existing data from garnet peridotite xenoliths from an almost coeval kimberlite (A154-N) at the nearby Diavik Diamond Mine demonstrates that the oxygen fugacity of the Slave cratonic mantle varies by several orders of magnitude as a function of depth and over short lateral distances. The lower part of the diamond-bearing Slave lithosphere (>120-130 km deep) has been oxidized by up to 4 log units in fO2, and this is clearly linked to metasomatic enrichment. Such coupled enrichment and oxidation was likely caused by infiltrating carbonate-bearing, hydrous, silicate melts in the presence of diamond, a process proposed to be critical for "pre-conditioning" deep lithospheric mantle and rendering it suitable for later generation of kimberlites and other SiO2-undersaturated magmas.

  14. Limiting depth of magnetization in cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toft, Paul B.; Haggerty, Stephen E.

    1988-01-01

    Values of magnetic susceptibility and natural remanent magnetization (NRM) of clino-pyroxene-garnet-plagioclase granulite facies lower crustal xenoliths from a kimberlite in west Africa are correlated to bulk geochemistry and specific gravity. Thermomagnetic and alternating-field demagnetization analyses identify magnetite (Mt) and native iron as the dominant magnetic phases (totaling not more than 0.1 vol pct of the rocks) along with subsidiary sulfides. Oxidation states of the granulites are not greater than MW, observed Mt occurs as rims on coarse (about 1 micron) Fe particles, and inferred single domain-pseudosingle domain Mt may be a result of oxidation of fine-grained Fe. The deepest limit of lithospheric ferromagnetism is 95 km, but a limit of 70 km is most reasonable for the West African Craton and for modeling Magsat anomalies over exposed Precambrian shields.

  15. Origin of cratonic lithospheric mantle roots: A geochemical study of peridotites from the North Atlantic Craton, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, N.; Pearson, D. G.; Webb, M.; Ottley, C. J.; Irvine, G. J.; Kopylova, M.; Jensen, S. M.; Nowell, G. M.

    2008-09-01

    A critical examination of the extent to which geodynamic information on the initial mantle depletion and accretion event(s) is preserved in kimberlite-borne cratonic SCLM peridotite xenoliths is attempted by using new major and trace element data of whole-rock peridotites ( n = 55) sampled across the North Atlantic Craton (NAC; West Greenland). We also present additional whole-rock trace element data of mantle xenoliths from Somerset Island, the Slave and Kaapvaal cratons for comparison. Peridotites comprising the West Greenland SCLM are distinctly more olivine-rich and orthopyroxene-poor than most other cratonic peridotites, in particular those from the Kaapvaal craton. The West Greenland peridotites have higher Mg/Si but lower Al/Si, Al 2O 3 and CaO than cratonic mantle from the Kaapvaal Craton. We suggest that the more orthopyroxene depleted, harzburgite to dunite character of the NAC peridotites reflects more of the original melting history than peridotites from other cratons and in that sense may be more typical of cratonic lithosphere compositions prior to extensive modification. Despite this, some modal and cryptic metasomatism has clearly taken place in the West Greenland lithosphere. The insensitivity of major elements to pressure of melting at high degrees of melt extraction combined with the ease with which these elements may be changed by modal metasomatism mean that we cannot confidently constrain the depth of melting of peridotites using this approach. Mildly incompatible trace elements offer much more promise in terms of providing geodynamic information about the original Archean melting regime. The very low, systematically varying heavy REE abundances in NAC whole-rock peridotites and in peridotites from all other cratons where high-quality data are available provide ubiquitous evidence for a shallow melting regime in the absence of, or to the exhaustion of garnet. This finding explicitly excludes large extents of deep (iso- and polybaric) melting

  16. Seeking Justice in San Francisco

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascopella, Angela

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the life of Carlos A. Garcia, superintendent at the San Francisco Unified School District. Garcia was born in Chicago, but his parents shortly thereafter moved back to their homeland of Mexico for a few years. When Garcia was almost 5, his family moved to Los Angeles, where his parents worked in factories and Garcia was…

  17. Late Precambrian aulacogens of the North China craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, X.

    1985-01-01

    According to tectonic styles, the Precambrian evolution history of the North China craton may be subdivided into four stages: (1) Archean consolidation in 3.5 to 2.5 Ga, (2) Early Proterozoic rifting in 2.5 to 1.8 Ga, (3) Late Precambrian aulacogen in 1.8 to 0.8 Ga and (4) Platform regime after 0.8 Ga. In the Late Precambrian aulacogen stage of the North China craton there were two main aulacogens, Yanliao and Zhongtiao (Y and Z), developed in Middle Proterozoic time with an age 1.8 to 1.0 Ga. Their NE trend caused them to meet together in the central part of the craton and build up one great Y-Z aulacogen throughout the craton.

  18. Geological evolution of the Antongil Craton, NE Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schofield, D.I.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Goodenough, K.M.; De Waele, B.; Pitfield, P.E.J.; Key, R.M.; Bauer, W.; Walsh, G.J.; Lidke, D.J.; Ralison, A.V.; Rabarimanana, M.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Randriamananjara, T.

    2010-01-01

    The Antongil Craton, along with the Masora and Antananarivo cratons, make up the fundamental Archaean building blocks of the island of Madagascar. They were juxtaposed during the late-Neoproterozoic to early Palaeozoic assembly of Gondwana. In this paper we give a synthesis of the geology of the Antongil Craton and present previously published and new geochemical and U-Pb zircon analyses to provide an event history for its evolution.The oldest rocks in the Antongil Craton form a nucleus of tonalitic gneiss, characteristic of Palaeo-Mesoarchaean cratons globally, including phases dated between 3320 ?? 14. Ma to 3231 ?? 6. Ma and 3187 ?? 2. Ma to 3154 ?? 5. Ma. A series of mafic dykes was intruded into the Mesoarchaean tonalites and a sedimentary succession was deposited on the craton prior to pervasive deformation and migmatisation of the region. The age of deposition of the metasediments has been constrained from a volcanic horizon to around 3178 ?? 2. Ma and subject to migmatisation at around 2597 ?? 49. Ma. A subsequent magmatic episode generated voluminous, weakly foliated granitic rocks, that also included additions from both reworked older crustal material and younger source components. An earlier granodiorite-dominated assemblage, dated between 2570 ?? 18. Ma and 2542 ?? 5. Ma, is largely exposed in xenoliths and more continuously in the northern part of the craton, while a later monzogranite-dominated phase, dated between 2531 ?? 13. Ma and 2513 ?? 0.4. Ma is more widely developed. Together these record the stabilisation of the craton, attested to by the intrusion of a younger dyke swarm, the age of which is constrained by a sample of metagabbro dated at 2147 ?? 6. Ma, providing the first evidence for Palaeoproterozoic rocks from the Antongil Craton.The youngest events recorded in the isotopic record of the Antongil Craton are reflected in metamorphism, neocrystallisation and Pb-loss at 792 ?? 130. Ma to 763 ?? 13. Ma and 553 ?? 68. Ma. These events are

  19. Construction and destruction of some North American cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Humphreys, G.

    2015-12-01

    Construction histories of Archean cratons remain poorly understood; their destruction is even less clear because of, by definition, its rarity. By assembling geophysical and geochemical data in 3-D lithosphere models, a clearer understanding of the geometry of major structures within the Rae, Slave and Wyoming cratons of central North America is now possible. Little evidence exists of subducted slabs similar to modern oceanic lithosphere in these construction histories whereas underthrusting and wedging of proto-continental lithosphere is inferred from multiple dipping discontinuities. Archean continental building blocks may resemble the modern lithosphere of Ontong-Java-Hikurangi oceanic plateau. Radiometric dating of xenoliths provides estimates of rock types and ages at depth beneath sparse kimberlite occurrences. These ages can be correlated to surface rocks. The 3.6-2.6 Ga Rae, Slave and Wyoming cratons comprise smaller continental terranes that 'cratonized' during a granitic bloom at 2.61-2.55 ga. Cratonization probably represents the final differentiation of early crust into a relatively homogeneous, uniformly thin (35-42 km), tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite crust with pyroxenite layers near the Moho atop depleted lithospheric mantle. Peak thermo-tectonic events at 1.86-1.7 Ga broadly metasomatized, mineralized and recrystallized mantle and lower crustal rocks, apparently making mantle peridotite more 'fertile' and conductive by introducing or concentrating sulfides or graphite throughout the lithosphere at 80-120 km depths. This metasomatism may have also weakened the lithosphere or made it more susceptible to tectonic or chemical erosion. The arrival of the subducted Shatsky Rise conjugate at the Wyoming craton at 65-75 Ma appears to have eroded and displaced the thus weakened base of the craton below 140-160 km. This replaced old refertilized continental mantle with new depleted oceanic mantle. Is this the same craton?

  20. Water in the Cratonic Mantle: Insights from FTIR Data on Lac De Gras Xenoliths (Slave Craton, Canada)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Brandon, Alan D.; Schaffer, Lillian Aurora; O'Reilly, Suzanne Yvette; Griffin, William L.; Morris, Richard V.; Graff, Trevor G.; Agresti, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The mantle lithosphere beneath the cratonic part of continents is the deepest (> 200 km) and oldest (>2-3 Ga) on Earth, remaining a conundrum as to how these cratonic roots could have resisted delamination by asthenospheric convection over time. Water, or trace H incorporated in mineral defects, could be a key player in the evolution of continental lithosphere because it influences melting and rheology of the mantle. Mantle xenoliths from the Lac de Gras kimberlite in the Slave craton were analyzed by FTIR. The cratonic mantle beneath Lac de Gras is stratified with shallow (<145 km) oxidized ultradepleted peridotites and pyroxenites with evidence for carbonatitic metasomatism, underlain by reduced and less depleted peridotites metasomatized by kimberlite melts. Peridotites analyzed so far have H O contents in ppm weight of 7-100 in their olivines, 58 to 255 in their orthopyroxenes (opx), 11 to 84 in their garnet, and 139 in one clinopyroxene. A pyroxenite contains 58 ppm H2O in opx and 5 ppm H2O in its olivine and garnet. Olivine and garnet from the deep peridotites have a range of water contents extending to higher values than those from the shallow ones. The FTIR spectra of olivines from the shallow samples have more prominent Group II OH bands compared to the olivines from the deep samples, consistent with a more oxidized mantle environment. The range of olivine water content is similar to that observed in Kaapvaal craton peridotites at the same depths (129-184 km) but does not extend to as high values as those from Udachnaya (Siberian craton). The Slave, Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons will be compared in terms of water content distribution, controls and role in cratonic root longevity.

  1. Majorite Garnet and Lithosphere Evolution: Kaapvaal Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, W. L.; Tessalina, S.; O'Reilly, S. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The uppermost 50-70 km of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath the Kaapvaal Craton (S. Africa) consists largely of highly-depleted chromite harzburgites. These rocks are understudied, mainly because of their uniformity and their lack of indicator minerals such as garnet and clinopyroxene (cpx). Kimberlite-borne xenoliths of these rocks contain rare volumes of cpx-spinel (modal 76/24) symplectite, with smooth grain boundaries; many studies have suggested that these might represent low-pressure breakdown products of garnet (majorite + olivine → cpx + spinel). Our reconstruction of a suite of these grains, using element mapping and EMP analysis of constituent minerals, gives a majoritic garnet with mean composition 21.8% CaO, 15.8% Cr2O3, 9.22% Al2O3, Si=3.118, mg#=0.93. The majorite contents suggest formation at depths of 250-280 km. Ni contents imply temperatures ≥1500 °C, but have large uncertainties related to the subtraction of olivine (ca 20%) during the reconstruction calculation. LAM-ICPMS analyses show strongly sinuous REE patterns with CN Dy/Lu <0.1 and Ce/Dy >100. Most analyses have negative Eu anomalies, consistent with chromite compositions that indicate strongly reducing conditions (ΔfO2(FMQ) = -4 to -5). Melt modeling suggests that the harzburgites are products of 30-40% melting of asthenospheric mantle at 250 km depth, leaving residues of ol+opx+chromite. The presence of the majorites and their overall LREE enrichment are ascribed to the introduction of carbonatitic metasomatic fluids, similar to those recorded by diamond-inclusions (subcalcic garnets), shortly after the depletion. We suggest that the melting, the metasomatism and the ultimate breakdown of the majorite track a process of mantle upwelling, with melt-extraction at depth providing the buoyancy that allowed the residual harzburgites to rise to shallow levels and stabilize the SCLM. Os-isotope analyses of sulfides associated with the majorites give TRD = 2.5-3.4 Ga

  2. 10. Office of the Post Engineer, Presidio of San Francisco. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Office of the Post Engineer, Presidio of San Francisco. Location of Water Lines, Presidio of San Francisco. Sheet 30. November 1943. SHOWING EASTERN PORTION OF CRISSY FIELD AND AREA A. - Presidio of San Francisco, Storehouse & Administration, Crissy Field North cantonment, Allen Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  3. 9. Office of the Post Engineer, Presidio of San Francisco. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Office of the Post Engineer, Presidio of San Francisco. Location of Water Lines, Presidio of San Francisco. Sheet 29. June 1944. SHOWING EASTERN PORTION OF CRISSY FIELD. - Presidio of San Francisco, Storehouse & Administration, Crissy Field North cantonment, Allen Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. 112. Dennis Hill, Photographer January 1998 VIEW OF SAN FRANCISCO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    112. Dennis Hill, Photographer January 1998 VIEW OF SAN FRANCISCO VIADUCT (RIGHT), UPPER DECK OFF-RAMP (LEFT), AND LOWER DECK ON-RAMP FROM TRANSBAY TERMINAL BUS LOOP, FACING NORTHEAST. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. Pampia: A large cratonic block missing in the Rodinia supercontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Victor A.; Vujovich, Graciela; Martino, Roberto; Otamendi, Juan

    2010-09-01

    The large cratonic block of Pampia, at present in southern South America, is commonly missing in recent comprehensive reconstructions of Rodinia. This block was the conjugate margin of the Amazonia craton that corresponds to the W-NW-trending segment of the Sunsás orogen. This segment developed between Sucre in Bolivia and Corumbá in Brazil as a result of a Mesoproterozoic collision. The western margin of Pampia partially coincides with the southern part of the Arequipa-Antofalla terrane that was also amalgamated during the Mesoproterozoic. The Cuyania terrane, a Laurentian rifted continental block, was accreted to the southern sector of this margin of Pampia in middle Ordovician times. The northern sector of the eastern margin of Pampia is the lower plate of the Brasiliano belt developed along the Paranapanema craton during the early Cambrian collision associated with the closure of the Clymene Ocean. The southern sector of the eastern margin partially coincides with the southern extension of the Transbrasiliano lineament, which juxtaposed the Rio de La Plata Craton with the Pampia cratonic block. Along this eastern margin the Pampean-Paraguay orogen was formed during the late Brasiliano cycle in latest Proterozoic-Early Cambrian time. The southern margin was generated by the collision of Patagonia during late Paleozoic times. This cratonic block of Pampia, so defined, has western and northern sectors formed by Mesoproterozoic orogens, while the eastern sector is partially formed by juvenile Neoproterozoic crust, although older rocks cannot be ruled out. The Pampia cratonic block was the locus of several magmatic belts associated with important metamorphism during the Paleozoic and preserved in the central part at lower crustal levels.

  6. SAO HMC photodetector/event timer engineering model test report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-05

    The test unit is a custom photodetector/event timer, PET, built for the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, SAO, by Los Alamos which records elapsed time in 10 ps steps. The 1 Kg, 12 cm diameter PET unit uses 10 watts of electrical power and was tested to SAO`s specified flight conditions. The event timer has two inputs -- a reference clock oscillator input and a stop signal. Like a stop watch with split timing capability, the event timer records the instant a stop signal arrives. At that sample instant, the number of elapsed clock cycles are stored and the sample instant position between two reference clock edges is interpolated and stored. Then that stored data can be shifted serially to an external computer. The photodetector part of the PET responds to an optical input and provides the electrical output signal to the event timer specifying the sample instant. This test report discusses the event timer test results. Test equipment is shown for most of the operational tests. The relay rack contains test pursers and clocks. The environmental chamber controls temperature. The computer reads and records the serial data from the PET. Reported testing topics include: Pulse shapes to be used as test inputs, test results obtained using the electrical source`s input, optical test results which are the best simulation of specified operational conditions, heat sink operation in vacuum. Vibration tests performed to SAO`s specification.

  7. ASTER Flyby of San Francisco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer, ASTER, is an international project: the instrument was supplied by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint US/Japan science team developed algorithms for science data products, and is validating instrument performance. With its 14 spectral bands, extremely high spatial resolution, and 15 meter along-track stereo capability, ASTER is the zoom lens of the Terra satellite. The primary mission goals are to characterize the Earth's surface; and to monitor dynamic events and processes that influence habitability at human scales. ASTER's monitoring and mapping capabilities are illustrated by this series of images of the San Francisco area. The visible and near infrared image reveals suspended sediment in the bays, vegetation health, and details of the urban environment. Flying over San Francisco (3.2MB) (high-res (18.3MB)), we see the downtown, and shadows of the large buildings. Past the Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz Island, we cross San Pablo Bay and enter Suisun Bay. Turning south, we fly over the Berkeley and Oakland Hills. Large salt evaporation ponds come into view at the south end of San Francisco Bay. We turn northward, and approach San Francisco Airport. Rather than landing and ending our flight, we see this is as only the beginning of a 6 year mission to better understand the habitability of the world on which we live. For more information: ASTER images through Visible Earth ASTER Web Site Image courtesy of MITI, ERSDAC, JAROS, and the U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  8. A Precambrian cratonic block in the west-central Chihuahua - The Sierra del Nido cratonic block

    SciTech Connect

    Goodell, P.C. . Dept. of Geological)

    1993-02-01

    Precambrian rocks in west-central Chihuahua have been recognized by Denison (1969) and Mauger et al. (1983), on the basis of radiometric dating. The rocks are rhyolite clasts, and an allucthonous block, respectively, however their source direction and vergence can be measured. They point back to and are on the edge of a large, uniform, negative Bouguer gravity anomaly, having values greater than 200 milligals. The isotopic geochemical character of several Tertiary felsic fields within this anomalous are has been determined, and initial strontium isotopic ratios are all greater than 0.7055. Outside the anomalous area these ratios are lower, and Basin and Range extension tectonism is more evident. It is proposed that a Precambrian cratonic block, the Sierra del Nido, is present in the crust in west-central Chihuahua. It is reasonable to propose that it was decreted from North America during a Precambrian extensional (1.1. By ) event, from somewhere along the Arizona Transition Zone-Texas Linament region. The Sierra del Nido Block is separated form the ATZ-TL by a region of disrupted craton and extended crust, the Basin and Range Province. Implications of the pressure of the Sierra del Nido Block on other regional tectonic events will be discussed.

  9. Platinum-group element (PGE) geochemistry of Deccan orangeites, Bastar craton, central India: Implication for a non-terrestrial origin for iridium enrichment at the K-Pg boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalapathi Rao, N. V.; Lehmann, B.; Balaram, V.

    2014-04-01

    We report platinum group element (PGE) concentrations of twelve bulk-rock samples from the Behradih and Kodomali orangeite intrusions in the Mainpur field, Bastar craton, central India, which are emplaced synchronously with the Deccan flood basalts. Their palladium-group PGE (PPGE) (1.8-5.2 ppb Pt, 1.2-6.4 ppb Pd) contents are distinctly higher compared to their iridium-group PGE (IPGE) concentrations (0.8-2 ppb Os, 0.8-1.2 ppb Ir, 3.2-4.2 ppb Ru, and 0.2-0.8 ppb Rh). Their PGE contents as well as Pd/Ir ratios are either similar or even lower than those from the Mesoproterozoic and Cretaceous kimberlites and orangeites from the Kaapvaal craton (southern Africa), Cretaceous kimberlites from the Sao Fransisco craton (Brazil), Ordovician kimberlites from the North China craton and the Mesoproterozoic southern Indian kimberlites from the Eastern Dharwar craton. Anomalously elevated iridium (and other PGE) contents in sediments at the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary are commonly attributed either to a large bolide impact triggering the K-Pg mass extinction or to terrestrial causes such as volcanic eruptions (Deccan flood basalts) or even to mantle-plume derived lithospheric gaseous explosions (Verneshots). Lack of unusually high abundances of PGE in the Mainpur orangeties as well as in the co-eval Deccan flood basalts and associated alkaline rocks implies that the anomalous iridium enrichment reported at the K-Pg boundary sections was not sourced from the mantle and likely originated from an extraterrestrial source.

  10. 76 FR 14051 - Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... inventory of human remains in the control of San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA. The human... American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by San Francisco State University...

  11. The 3-dimensional construction of the Rae craton, central Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, David B.; Craven, James A.; Pilkington, Mark; Hillier, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Reconstruction of the 3-dimensional tectonic assembly of early continents, first as Archean cratons and then Proterozoic shields, remains poorly understood. In this paper, all readily available geophysical and geochemical data are assembled in a 3-D model with the most accurate bedrock geology in order to understand better the geometry of major structures within the Rae craton of central Canada. Analysis of geophysical observations of gravity and seismic wave speed variations revealed several lithospheric-scale discontinuities in physical properties. Where these discontinuities project upward to correlate with mapped upper crustal geological structures, the discontinuities can be interpreted as shear zones. Radiometric dating of xenoliths provides estimates of rock types and ages at depth beneath sparse kimberlite occurrences. These ages can also be correlated to surface rocks. The 3.6-2.6 Ga Rae craton comprises at least three smaller continental terranes, which "cratonized" during a granitic bloom. Cratonization probably represents final differentiation of early crust into a relatively homogeneous, uniformly thin (35-42 km), tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite crust with pyroxenite layers near the Moho. The peak thermotectonic event at 1.86-1.7 Ga was associated with the Hudsonian orogeny that assembled several cratons and lesser continental blocks into the Canadian Shield using a number of southeast-dipping megathrusts. This orogeny metasomatized, mineralized, and recrystallized mantle and lower crustal rocks, apparently making them more conductive by introducing or concentrating sulfides or graphite. Little evidence exists of thin slabs similar to modern oceanic lithosphere in this Precambrian construction history whereas underthrusting and wedging of continental lithosphere is inferred from multiple dipping discontinuities.

  12. Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) star catalog (Sao staff 1966, edition ADC 1989): Documentation for the machine-readable version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Nancy G.; Warren, Wayne H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    An updated, corrected, and extended machine readable version of the catalog is described. Published and unpublished errors discovered in the previous version were corrected, and multiple star and supplemental BD identifications were added to stars where more than one SAO entry has the same Durchmusterung number. Henry Draper Extension (HDE) numbers were added for stars found in both volumes of the extension. Data for duplicate SAO entries (those referring to the same star) were flagged. J2000 positions in usual units and in radians were added.

  13. Formation of cratonic lithosphere: An integrated thermal and petrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzberg, Claude; Rudnick, Roberta

    2012-09-01

    The formation of cratonic mantle peridotite of Archean age is examined within the time frame of Earth's thermal history, and how it was expressed by temporal variations in magma and residue petrology. Peridotite residues that occupy the lithospheric mantle are rare owing to the effects of melt-rock reaction, metasomatism, and refertilization. Where they are identified, they are very similar to the predicted harzburgite residues of primary magmas of the dominant basalts in greenstone belts, which formed in a non-arc setting (referred to here as "non-arc basalts"). The compositions of these basalts indicate high temperatures of formation that are well-described by the thermal history model of Korenaga. In this model, peridotite residues of extensive ambient mantle melting had the highest Mg-numbers, lowest FeO contents, and lowest densities at ~ 2.5-3.5 Ga. These results are in good agreement with Re-Os ages of kimberlite-hosted cratonic mantle xenoliths and enclosed sulfides, and provide support for the hypothesis of Jordan that low densities of cratonic mantle are a measure of their high preservation potential. Cratonization of the Earth reached its zenith at ~ 2.5-3.5 Ga when ambient mantle was hot and extensive melting produced oceanic crust 30-45 km thick. However, there is a mass imbalance exhibited by the craton-wide distribution of harzburgite residues and the paucity of their complementary magmas that had compositions like the non-arc basalts. We suggest that the problem of the missing basaltic oceanic crust can be resolved by its hydration, cooling and partial transformation to eclogite, which caused foundering of the entire lithosphere. Some of the oceanic crust partially melted during foundering to produce continental crust composed of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG). The remaining lithosphere gravitationally separated into 1) residual eclogite that continued its descent, and 2) buoyant harzburgite diapirs that rose to underplate cratonic nuclei

  14. The Role of Water in the Stability of Cratonic Keels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Woodland, Alan B.; Bell, David R.; Lazarov, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Cratons are typically underlain by large, deep, and old lithospheric keels (to greater than 200 km depth, greater than 2.5 Ga old) projecting into the asthenosphere (e.g., Jordan, 1978; Richardson et al., 1984). This has mystified Earth scientists as the dynamic and relatively hot asthenosphere should have eroded away these keels over time (e.g., Sleep, 2003; O'Neill et al., 2008; Karato, 2010). Three key factors have been invoked to explain cratonic root survival: 1) Low density makes the cratonic mantle buoyant (e.g., Poudjom Djomani et al., 2001). 2) Low temperatures (e.g., Pollack, 1986; Boyd, 1987), and 3) low water contents (e.g., Pollack, 1986), would make cratonic roots mechanically strong. Here we address the mechanism of the longevity of continental mantle lithosphere by focusing on the water parameter. Although nominally anhydrous , olivine, pyroxene and garnet can accommodate trace amounts of water in the form of H bonded to structural O in mineral defects (e.g., Bell and Rossman, 1992). Olivine softens by orders of magnitude if water (1-1000 ppm H2O) is added to its structure (e.g., Mackwell et al., 1985). Our recent work has placed constraints on the distribution of water measured in peridotite minerals in the cratonic root beneath the Kaapvaal in southern Africa (Peslier et al., 2010). At P greater than 5 GPa, the water contents of pyroxene remain relatively constant while those of olivine systematically decrease from 50 to less than 10 ppm H2O at 6.4 GPa. We hypothesized that at P greater than 6.4 GPa, i.e. at the bottom of the cratonic lithosphere, olivines are essentially dry (greater than 10 ppm H2O). As olivine likely controls the rheology of the mantle, we calculated that the dry olivines could be responsible for a contrast in viscosity between cratonic lithosphere and surrounding asthenosphere large enough to explain the resistance of cratonic root to asthenospheric delamination.

  15. Archean crustal evolution of the northern North China Craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Xianglin; Chen, Yaping; Liu, Jinzhong

    1988-01-01

    The Archean granultie facies rocks of the North China (Sino-Korean) Craton mostly occur inside the northern boundary forming a unique and spectacular granulite belt trending roughly E-W from eastern Hebei, North China in the east to Mt. Daqinchan, western Inner Mongolia in the west, ranging about 1,000 km long. Over the years in the middle portion of this Archean high-grade metamorphic belt a stratigraphic unconformity between the khondalite rock assemblage and the medium in composition granulite assemblage in Datong-Xinghe area is determined. The geological structural properties of the North China Craton are discussed.

  16. The great San Francisco earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nason, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    Seventy-five years ago on April 18, 1906, the most devastating earthquake in United States history occurred in northern California. This earthquake, which occurred at 5:2 in the morning just as the dawn was breaking, came from rupture of the San Andreas fault from San Juan Bautista (near Hollister) northqard for 270 miles to the coast near Eureka. Buildings were damaged everywhere in this region, for a north-south distance of 370 miles, from Arcata to Salinas, and an east-west width of 50 miles inland from the coast. The larger cities of San Francisco, Sna Jose, and Santa Rosa suffered the msot severe damage. 

  17. San Francisco floating STOLport study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The operational, economic, environmental, social and engineering feasibility of utilizing deactivated maritime vessels as a waterfront quiet short takeoff and landing facility to be located near the central business district of San Francisco was investigated. Criteria were developed to evaluate each site, and minimum standards were established for each criterion. Predicted conditions at the two sites were compared to the requirements for each of the 11 criteria as a means of evaluating site performance. Criteria include land use, community structure, economic impact, access, visual character, noise, air pollution, natural environment, weather, air traffic, and terminal design.

  18. South San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Peter; Gibbons, Helen

    2007-01-01

    View eastward. Elevations in mapped area color coded: purple (approx 15 m below sea level) to red-orange (approx 90 m above sea level). South San Francisco Bay is very shallow, with a mean water depth of 2.7 m (8.9 ft). Trapezoidal depression near San Mateo Bridge is where sediment has been extracted for use in cement production and as bay fill. Land from USGS digital orthophotographs (DOQs) overlaid on USGS digital elevation models (DEMs). Distance across bottom of image approx 11 km (7 mi); vertical exaggeration 1.5X.

  19. Jack London and the San Francisco earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sachs, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    After it was over, it seemed to many, and especially to eyewitnesses like Jack London, that the earthquake and fire had devastated San Francisco. However people were confident that, like the phoeniz, San Francisco would rise from the ashes and regain her palce as the "Imperial City of the West." 

  20. Trouble Brewing in San Francisco. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    The city of San Francisco will face enormous budgetary pressures from the growing deficits in public pensions, both at a state and local level. In this policy brief, the author estimates that San Francisco faces an aggregate $22.4 billion liability for pensions and retiree health benefits that are underfunded--including $14.1 billion for the city…

  1. Promoting the Earth Charter in Sao Paulo's Municipal Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inojosa, Rose Marie

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the process of widespread teacher training based on the Earth Charter in the municipal area of Sao Paulo, Brazil, South America. This effort diffused knowledge of the Earth Charter through 800 educators and by means of them, to one million children. This process was developed by the team from UMAPAZ--Open University of the…

  2. Constructing a Public Popular Education in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Pia Lindquist

    1995-01-01

    Examines school reform implemented by Paulo Freire and the Workers' Party in Sao Paulo during 1989-92. Focuses on various institutional mechanisms created to support teachers' efforts to learn the skills necessary for realization of reform objectives. Appendices list reform objectives and outline phases and activities in a teacher-directed…

  3. Automation in the Libraries of the City of Sao Paulo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty selected Sao Paulo, Brazil, librarians who were interviewed indicated that, in their opinion, the development of library automation in this city is hampered by poor resources and cooperation, lack of professional and technical automation expertise, communication, and other psychological, organizational, and human related factors.…

  4. Prelimary Photoelectric Light Curve for DHK29=SAO 70629

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Daniel H.; Gunn, Jerry B.; Lamb, Charles F.; Sullivan, Philip

    The newly discovered eclipsing binary star DHK 29 = SAO 70629 has been observed photoelectrically from October 1992 to October 1993. With the light curve coverage 75% complete, it is apparent that the initial 1.9-day period reported in IB VS 3815 is the half-period. Three times of primary minima have been determined. New light elements are given.

  5. Biological effects of air pollution in Sao Paulo and Cubatao

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, G.M.S.; Saldiva, P.H.; Pasqualucci, C.A.; Massad, E.; Martins M de, E.; Zin, W.A.; Cardoso, W.V.; Criado, P.M.; Komatsuzaki, M.; Sakae, R.S. )

    1989-08-01

    Rats were used as biological indicators of air quality in two heavily polluted Brazilian towns: Sao Paulo and Cubatao. They were exposed for 6 months to ambient air in areas where the pollution was known to be severe. The following parameters were studied and compared to those of control animals: respiratory mechanics, mucociliary transport, morphometry of respiratory epithelium and distal air spaces, and general morphological alterations. The results showed lesions of the distal and upper airways in rats exposed in Cubatao, whereas the animals from Sao Paulo showed only alterations of the upper airways but of greater intensity than those observed in the Cubatao group. There are both qualitative and quantitative differences in the pollutants of these places: in Sao Paulo automobile exhaust gases dominate and in Cubatao the pollution is due mainly to particulates of industrial sources. The correlation of the pathological findings with the pollutants is discussed and it is concluded that biological indicators are useful to monitor air pollutions which reached dangerous levels in Sao Paulo and Cubatao.

  6. The story of a craton from heart to margins: illuminating cratonic lithosphere with Rayleigh wave phase velocities in Eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrescu, L.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Gilligan, A.; Bastow, I. D.; Totten, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Cratons are Precambrian continental nuclei that are geologically distinct from modern continental regions and are typically underlain by seismically fast lithospheric roots (keels) to at least 200 km depth. Both plate and non-plate tectonic origin theories such as stacking of subducted slabs or multiple mantle plume underplating have been proposed to explain keel growth.Eastern Canada is an ideal continental region to investigate cratonization processes and the onset of plate tectonics. It comprises part of the largest Archean craton in the world, the Superior Province, flanked by a ~1.1 Ga Himalayan-scale orogenic belt, the Grenville Province, and the 500-300 Ma old Appalachian orogenic province, following the same general SW-NE axial trend. The region is also cross-cut by the Great Meteor Hotspot track, providing an excellent opportunity to study the interaction of hotspot tectonism with progressively younger lithospheric domains.We investigate the lithospheric structure of Precambrian Eastern Canada using teleseismic earthquake data recorded at permanent and temporary networks. We measure interstation dispersion curves of Rayleigh wave phase velocities between ~15 and 220 s, and compare the results to standard continental and cratonic reference models. We combine the dispersion curves via a tomographic inversion which solves for isotropic phase velocity heterogeneity and azimuthal anisotropy across the region at a range of periods. The phase velocity maps indicate variations in lithospheric properties from the heart of the Superior craton to the SE Canadian coast.The new regional-scale models will help to understand the processes that generated, stabilized and reworked the cratonic roots through their billion-year tectonic history. We investigate how surface tectonic boundaries relate to deeper lithospheric structural changes, and consider the effects of the multiple Wilson cycles that affected Laurentia.

  7. Physico-chemical constraints on cratonic lithosphere discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulbach, Sonja; Rondenay, Stéphane; Huismans, Ritske

    2014-05-01

    The origins of the mid-lithospheric discontinuity (MLD) and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) have received much attention over the recent years. Peculiarities of cratonic lithosphere construction - compositional and rheological stratification due to thickening in collisional settings or by plume subcretion, multiple metasomatic overprints due to longevity - offer a variety of possibilities for the generation of discontinuities. Interconnected small degrees of conductive partial melt (carbonate-rich melts, such as carbonatites and kimberlites, or highly alkaline melts) at the cratonic LAB, which produce seismic discontinuities, may be generated in the presence of volatiles. These depress the peridotite solidus sufficiently to intersect the mantle adiabat at depths near the cratonic LAB at ~160-220 km, i.e. above the depth of metal saturation where carbonatite becomes unstable. The absence of agreement between the different seismic and magnetotelluric estimates for the depth of the LAB beneath Kaapvaal may be due to impingement of a plume, leading to a pervasively, but heterogeneously metasomatised ('asthenospherised') hot and deep root. Such a root and hot sublithosphere may yield conflicting seismic-thermal-geochemical depths for the LAB. The question arises whether the chemical boundary layer should be defined as above or below the asthenospherised part of the SCLM, which has preserved isotopic, compositional (non-primitive olivine forsterite content) and physical evidence (e.g. from teleseismic tomography and receiver functions) for a cratonic heritage and which therefore is still distinguishable from the asthenospheric mantle. If cratonic lithosphere overlies anomalously hot mantle for extended periods of time, the LAB may be significantly thinned, aided by penetration of relatively high-degree Fe-rich partial melts, as has occurred beneath the Tanzanian craton. Xenoliths from the deep Slave craton show little evidence for 'asthenospherisation'. Its root

  8. Water in the Cratonic Mantle: Insights from FTIR Data on Lac de Gras Xenoliths (Slave Craton, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peslier, A. H.; Brandon, A. D.; Schaffer, L. A.; O'Reilly, S. Y.; Griffin, W. L.; Morris, R. V.; Graff, T. G.; Agresti, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    The mantle lithosphere beneath the cratonic part of continents is the deepest (> 200 km) and oldest (>2-3 Ga) on Earth, remaining a conundrum as to how these cratonic roots could have resisted delamination by asthenospheric convection over time. Water, or trace H incorporated in mineral defects, could be a key player in the evolution of continental lithosphere because it influences melting and rheology of the mantle [e.g., 1]. Mantle xenoliths from the Lac de Gras kimberlite in the Slave craton [2] were analyzed by FTIR. The cratonic mantle beneath Lac de Gras is stratified with shallow (<145 km) oxidized ultradepleted peridotites and pyroxenites with evidence for carbonatitic metasomatism, underlain by reduced and less depleted peridotites metasomatized by kimberlite melts [3,4]. Peridotites analyzed so far have H2O contents in ppm weight of 7-100 in their olivines, 58 to 255 in their orthopyroxenes (opx), 11 to 84 in their garnet, and 139 in one clinopyroxene. A pyroxenite contains 58 ppm H2O in opx and 5 ppm H2O in its olivine and garnet. Olivine and garnet from the deep peridotites have a range of water contents extending to higher values than those from the shallow ones. The FTIR spectra of olivines from the shallow samples have more prominent Group II OH bands compared to the olivines from the deep samples, consistent with a more oxidized mantle environment [5]. The range of olivine water content is similar to that observed in Kaapvaal craton peridotites at the same depths (129-184 km [1]) but does not extend to as high values as those from Udachnaya (Siberian craton [6]). The Slave, Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons will be compared in terms of water content distribution, controls and role in cratonic root longevity. [1] Peslier et al. 2010 Nature 467, 78-81. [2] Aulbach et al. 2007 CMP 154, 409-427. [3] Creighton et al. 2009 CMP 157, 491-504. [4] Aulbach et al. 2013 CG 352, 153-169. [5] Bai & Kohlstedt 1993 PCM 19, 460-471. [6] Doucet et al. 2014 GCA 137, 159-187.

  9. Recycling lower continental crust in the North China craton.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Rudnick, Roberta L; Yuan, Hong-Ling; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Wen-Liang; Ling, Wen-Li; Ayers, John; Wang, Xuan-Che; Wang, Qing-Hai

    2004-12-16

    Foundering of mafic lower continental crust into underlying convecting mantle has been proposed as one means to explain the unusually evolved chemical composition of Earth's continental crust, yet direct evidence of this process has been scarce. Here we report that Late Jurassic high-magnesium andesites, dacites and adakites (siliceous lavas with high strontium and low heavy-rare-earth element and yttrium contents) from the North China craton have chemical and petrographic features consistent with their origin as partial melts of eclogite that subsequently interacted with mantle peridotite. Similar features observed in adakites and some Archaean sodium-rich granitoids of the tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite series have been interpreted to result from interaction of slab melts with the mantle wedge. Unlike their arc-related counterparts, however, the Chinese magmas carry inherited Archaean zircons and have neodymium and strontium isotopic compositions overlapping those of eclogite xenoliths derived from the lower crust of the North China craton. Such features cannot be produced by crustal assimilation of slab melts, given the high Mg#, nickel and chromium contents of the lavas. We infer that the Chinese lavas derive from ancient mafic lower crust that foundered into the convecting mantle and subsequently melted and interacted with peridotite. We suggest that lower crustal foundering occurred within the North China craton during the Late Jurassic, and thus provides constraints on the timing of lithosphere removal beneath the North China craton.

  10. Establishment and characterization of a new highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cell line derived from Saos2

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lin; Fan, Qiming; Tu, Bing; Yan, Wei; Tang, Tingting

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone in adolescents and young adults. There is a shortage of tumorigenic and highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cell lines that can be used for metastasis study. Here we establish and characterize a highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cell line that is derived from Saos2 cell line based on bioluminescence. The occasional pulmonary metastatic cells developed from Saos2 were isolated, harvested, characterized and named Saos2-l. The parental Saos2 and Saos2-l cells were further characterized both in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that Saos2-l cells demonstrated increased cell adhesion, migration and invasion compared to the parental Saos2 cells. Conversely, Saos2-l cells grew at a slightly slower rate than that of the parental cells. When injected into nude mice, Saos2-l cells had a greater increase in developing pulmonary metastases compared to the parental Saos2 cells. Further transcriptional profiling analysis revealed that some gene expression were up-regulated or down-regulated in the highly metastatic Saos2-l cells, indicating possible influencing factors of metastasis. Thus, we have established and characterized a highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cell line that should serve as a valuable tool for future investigations on the pathogenesis, metastasis and potential treatments of human osteosarcoma. PMID:25031706

  11. Temperature-dependent transient creep and dynamics of cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birger, Boris I.

    2013-11-01

    Large-scale mantle convection forms the upper boundary layer (lithosphere) where the vertical temperature drop is about 1300 K. Theoretical rheology and laboratory experiments with rock samples show that transient creep occurs while creep strains are sufficiently small. The transient creep is described by the temperature-dependent Andrade rheological model. Since plate tectonics allows only small deformations in lithospheric plates, creep of the lithosphere plates is transient whereas steady-state creep, described by non-Newtonian power-law rheological model, takes place in the underlying mantle. The solution of stability problem shows that the lithosphere is stable but small-scale convective oscillations are attenuated very weakly in regions of thickened lithosphere beneath continental cratons (subcratonic roots) where the thickness of the lithosphere is about 200 km. These oscillations create small-scale convective cells (the horizontal dimensions of the cells are of the order of the subcratonic lithosphere thickness). Direction of motion within the cells periodically changes (the period of convective oscillations is of the order of 3 × 108 yr). In this study, the oscillations of cratonic lithosphere caused by initial relief perturbation are considered. This relief perturbation is assumed to be created by overthrusting in orogenic belts surrounding cratons. The perturbation of the Earth's surface relief leads to a fast isothermal process of isostatic recovery. In the presence of vertical temperature gradient, vertical displacements, associated with the recovery process in the lithosphere interior, instantly produce the initial temperature perturbations exciting thermoconvective oscillations in the cratonic lithosphere. These small-amplitude convective oscillations cause oscillatory crustal movements which form sedimentary basins on cratons.

  12. 22. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Building # ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Building # 1049 Letterman General Hospital. Alterations to EKG Cardiology Clinic. November 1963. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  13. 21. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army Hospital. EKG Cardiology Clinic, Building 1049. December 1955. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  14. 42. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army Hospital, X-Ray Department and Second Floor Plan, X-Ray Department Plan, Building 1006. no date. BUILDING 1006. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. Presidio of San Francisco. Sheet 27. June 1945. SHOWING EASTERN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Presidio of San Francisco. Sheet 27. June 1945. SHOWING EASTERN PORTION OF AREA B, BUILDINGS 901-919 AND WESTERN PORTION OF CRISSY FIELD - Presidio of San Francisco, Enlisted Men's Barracks Type, West end of Crissy Field, between Pearce & Maudlin Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. Presidio of San Francisco. Sheet 26. March 1943. SHOWING AREA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Presidio of San Francisco. Sheet 26. March 1943. SHOWING AREA B, BUILDINGS 901-919; PART OF BUILDINGS 949 AND 950 ARE SHOWN IN UPPER LIFT CORNER OF DRAWING - Presidio of San Francisco, Enlisted Men's Barracks Type, West end of Crissy Field, between Pearce & Maudlin Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  17. Lithospheric thinning in the Eastern Indian Craton: Evidence for lithospheric delamination below the Archean Singhbhum Craton?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Prantik

    2017-02-01

    We herein present shear velocity structure extending down to 300 km depth below the Archean Singhbhum-Odisha Craton (SOC) and Proterozoic Chotanagpur granitic-gneissic terrain (CGGT), which has been obtained through the inversion modeling of P-receiver functions. We use three-component broadband recordings of 200 teleseismic earthquakes (30° ≤ ∆ ≤ 90°) from a 15 station seismic network that has been operational in the Eastern Indian shield since February 2013. We obtain the thinnest crust of 35 km overlying a thin lithosphere of 78 km, below the region near south Singhbhum shear zone, which could be attributed to the 1.6 Ga plume activity associated with Dalma volcanic. However, the thickest crust of 47 km overlying a thin lithosphere of 81 km is noticed below the region near the Singhbhum granite of 3.6 Ga. This thinning of lithosphere could be attributed to the delamination of lithospheric root due to the Himalayan orogeny with a shortening rate of 2 cm/year. This delamination model in SOC gets further support from the densification of the lower crust, which could result from repeated episodes of basaltic underplating associated with episodes related to Dalma ( 1.6 Ga) and Rajmahal ( 117 Ma) volcanisms. This led to relatively more mafic, heterogeneous and deformed crustal structure in SOC as well as EGMB (with an average crustal Vs of 4.0 km/s) in comparison to that in CGGT (with an average crustal Vs of 3.9 km/s), as seen through our modeling results. The thickest lithosphere of 100 km is observed in the southwestern SOC as well as northeastern CGGT. We also notice that a sharp and flat Moho in CGGT, which could be attributed to thermal reactivation and large volume melting of the mafic cratonic crust during the late Archean subduction process and associated volcanism episodes. This model gets further support from the estimated 169 km thick lower Vs zone in the upper mantle below CGGT. Our modeling results also support a northward subduction of Archean

  18. Space Radar Image of San Francisco, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This image of San Francisco, California shows how the radar distinguishes between densely populated urban areas and nearby areas that are relatively unsettled. Downtown San Francisco is at the center and the city of Oakland is at the right across the San Francisco Bay. Some city areas, such as the South of Market, called the SOMA district in San Francisco, appear bright red due to the alignment of streets and buildings to the incoming radar beam. Various bridges in the area are also visible including the Golden Gate Bridge (left center) at the opening of San Francisco Bay, the Bay Bridge (right center) connecting San Francisco and Oakland, and the San Mateo Bridge (bottom center). All the dark areas on the image are relatively smooth water: the Pacific Ocean to the left, San Francisco Bay in the center, and various reservoirs. Two major faults bounding the San Francisco-Oakland urban areas are visible on this image. The San Andreas fault, on the San Francisco peninsula, is seen in the lower left of the image. The fault trace is the straight feature filled with linear reservoirs which appear dark. The Hayward fault is the straight feature on the right side of the image between the urban areas and the hillier terrain to the east. The image is about 42 kilometers by 58 kilometers (26 miles by 36 miles) with north toward the upper right. This area is centered at 37.83 degrees north latitude, 122.38 degrees east longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture (SIR-C/X-SAR) imaging radar when it flew aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 3, 1994. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  19. 78 FR 34895 - Safety Zone; San Francisco Independence Day Fireworks Display, San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... Display in the Captain of the Port, San Francisco area of responsibility during the dates and times noted below. This action is necessary to protect life and property of the maritime public from the...

  20. 2. SAN FRANCISCO STREET PROFILES: Photocopy of engraving, c. 1880, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SAN FRANCISCO STREET PROFILES: Photocopy of engraving, c. 1880, showing street profiles of two San Francisco cable railroads. Figure 10 illustrates the mainline of the Sutter Street Railroad on Sutter Street, while Figure 11 shows the route of the Presidio & Ferries Railroad along Union Street. Note the lack of significant grades along the Sutter Street route. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. 1. SAN FRANCISCO STREET PROFILES: Photocopy of engraving, c. 1880, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SAN FRANCISCO STREET PROFILES: Photocopy of engraving, c. 1880, showing street profiles of three San Francisco cable lines. Figure 7, at bottom of engraving, is the profile of Hallidie's Clay Street Hill Railroad. Figures 8 and 9 show the grades for the California Street Cable Railroad and the Geary Street Park & Ocean Railroad respectively. Note the lack of significant grades along Geary Street. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. On the Origin of Cratonic Sag Basins: Did They Sag?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jason P.

    2015-04-01

    Cratonic sag basins are regions of long-lived, extremely slow (~20-30 m/Myr) shallow water and terrestrial sediment accumulation that have no striking signs of tectonic activity (cf. Allen and Armitage, 2012). In their evolution, hundreds of Myr-long periods of slow sediment accumulation are separated by unconformities. The mechanisms for their formation resist geodynamic characterization by other common hypotheses for basin subsidence because of their extremely slow subsidence and lack of evident tectonic activity. I propose their dynamics are better understood within the geodynamic context of continental cratons that ride over a ~250km-deep sub-asthenospheric mantle with lateral temperature variations between a few wide and persistent 1000s-km broad ~1400C 'superplume' upwelling mantle structures (e.g. currently beneath S. African Atlantic and French Polynesia) and prevalent surrounding ~1150C average temperature sub-asthenospheric mantle. When continents pass over typical mantle plumes, buoyant plume material tends to drain beneath the continent along junctions between cratons where the lithosphere is relatively thin, keeping the lithosphere over regions where plume material drains hotter than the average temperature of ~250km-deep mantle. (e.g., the Cameroon Line.) Regions where melting of plume material occurs during decompression associated with either plume ascent or lateral drainage beneath continents are associated with the addition of a buoyant rind of more depleted mantle to the continent. In addition, regions where plume material can pond in a relatively thin sub-lithospheric 'anti-basin' beneath a continent, or that stay stationary for long times over super plumes will heat to a lithospheric basal temperature of ~1400C instead of ~1150C, with ~700m of associated uplift. (e.g., Southern Africa). In this scenario (cf. Yamamoto, Morgan, and Morgan in "Plumes, Plates, and Paradigms"), it is the relative plume-passage-induced uplift of arches between

  3. 33 CFR 165.1187 - Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. 165.1187 Section 165.1187... San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. (a) Location. All waters extending... Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, in San Francisco Bay, California....

  4. 33 CFR 165.1187 - Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. 165.1187 Section 165.1187... San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. (a) Location. All waters extending... Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, in San Francisco Bay, California....

  5. Paleomagnetism of the Wyoming Craton: A Pre-Laurentian Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, T.; Chamberlain, K.; Mitchell, R. N.; Evans, D. A.; Bleeker, W.; Lecheminant, A. N.

    2010-12-01

    The Archean Wyoming craton is mostly buried beneath Phanerozoic sediments in the Rocky Mountains of the west central United States. Exposures of the craton are entirely in thrust-bounded Laramide uplifts and contain numerous swarms of Neoarchean-Proterozoic mafic dikes. U-Pb ages from these dikes include ~2685 Ma from a dike in the Owl Creek Mountains (Frost et al., 2006) as well as another in the Bald Mountain region of the Bighorn Mountains (this study), ~2170 Ma from the Wind River Mountain quartz diorite (Harlan et al., 2003), ~2110 Ma from a dike in the Granite Mountains (Bowers and Chamberlain, 2006), ~2010 Ma from a Kennedy dike in the Laramie Range (Cox et al., 2000), and ~780 Ma for dikes in the Beartooth and Teton Mountains (Harlan et al., 1997). These possible age ranges of magmatic events will allow a detailed comparison with other cratons, especially Superior and Slave. Prior to the assembly of Laurentia, Wyoming may have been connected with Slave in supercraton Sclavia (Bleeker, 2003; Frost et al., 2007), or alternatively, Wyoming may have been attached to the present southern margin of Superior in the supercraton Superia, as judged by similarities of the thrice-glaciated Huronian and Snowy Pass sedimentary successions (Roscoe and Card, 1993). Paleomagnetic results will be presented from over 150 dikes in the Wyoming craton. All dikes were from the basement uplifts of the Beartooth Mountains, Bighorn Mountains, Owl Creek Mountains, Granite Mountains, Ferris Mountains and Laramie Range. Dikes range in widths from 1 to >100 meters, and trends vary across all orientations. Stable remanence is observed in majority of sites with at least 8 different directions from the various uplifts. Structural corrections are applied when necessary to restore shallowly dipping Cambrian strata to horizontal. The paleomagnetic study is being integrated with precise U-Pb geochronology of dikes that bear stable remanence directions. Results will eventually allow a

  6. Secrets Shared: A Conversation with Francisco Jimemez.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera, Rosalinda B.

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Francisco Jimenez. Notes that he recently received the Tomas Rivera Mexican American Book Award for his authorship of "Breaking Through." Discusses his works and new ideas for future writing. (SG)

  7. The Fazenda Largo off-craton kimberlites of Piauí State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminsky, Felix V.; Sablukov, Sergei M.; Sablukova, Ludmila I.; Zakharchenko, Olga D.

    2009-10-01

    In the late 1990s, the Fazenda Largo kimberlite cluster was discovered in the Piauí State of Brazil. As with earlier known kimberlites in this area - Redondão, Santa Filomena-Bom Jesus (Gilbues) and Picos - this cluster is located within the Palaeozoic Parnaiba Sedimentary Basin that separates the São Francisco and the Amazonian Precambrian cratons. Locations of kimberlites are controlled by the 'Transbrasiliano Lineament'. The Fazenda Largo kimberlites are intensely weathered, almost completely altered rocks with a fine-grained clastic structure, and contain variable amounts of terrigene admixture (quartz sand). These rocks represent near-surface volcano-sedimentary deposits of the crater parts of kimberlite pipes. By petrographic, mineralogical and chemical features, the Fazenda Largo kimberlites are similar to average kimberlite. The composition of the deep-seated material in the Fazenda Largo kimberlites is quite diverse: among mantle microxenoliths are amphibolitised pyrope peridotites, garnetised spinel peridotites, ilmenite peridotites, chromian spinel + chromian diopside + pyrope intergrowths, and large xenoliths of pyrope dunite. High-pressure minerals are predominantly of the ultramafic suite, Cr-association minerals (purplish-red and violet pyrope, chromian spinel, chromian diopside, Cr-pargasite and orthopyroxene). The Ti-association minerals of the ultramafic suite (picroilmenite and orange pyrope), as well as rare grains of orange pyrope-almandine of the eclogite association, are subordinate. Kimberlites from all four pipes contain rare grains of G10 pyrope of the diamond association, but chromian spinel of the diamond association was not encountered. By their tectonic position, by geochemical characteristics, and by the composition of kimberlite indicator minerals, the Fazenda Largo kimberlites, like the others of such type, are unlikely to be economic.

  8. On craton thinning/destruction: Insight from 2D thermal-mechanical numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Although most cratons maintain stable, some exceptions are present, such as the North China craton, North Atlantic craton, and Wyoming craton, which have experienced dramatic lithospheric deformation/thinning. Mechanisms triggering cratonic thinning remains enigmatic [Lee et al., 2011]. Using a 2D thermo-mechanical coupled numerical model [Gerya and Yuen, 2007], we investigate two possible mechanisms: (1) stratification of cratonic lithospheric mantle, and (2) rheological weakening due to hydration.Lithospheric mantle stratification is a common feature in cratonic areas which has been demonstrated by geophysical and geochemical studies [Thybo and Perchuc, 1997; Griffin et al., 2004; Romanowicz, 2009; Rychert and Shearer, 2009; Yuan and Romanowicz, 2010]. The influence of lithospheric mantle stratification during craton evolution remains poorly understood. A rheologically weak layer representing hydrated and/or metasomatized composition is implemented in the lithospheric mantle. Our results show that the weak mantle layer changes the dynamics of lithospheric extension by enhancing the deformation of the overlying mantle and crust and inhibiting deformation of the underlying mantle [Liao et al., 2013; Liao and Gerya, 2014]. Modeling results are compared with North China and North Atlantic cratons. Our work indicates that although the presence of a weak layer may not be sufficient to initiate craton deformation, it enhances deformation by lowering the required extensional plate boundary force. Rheological weakening due to hydration is a possible mechanism triggering/enhancing craton deformation, especially for cratons jaxtaposing with a subduction, since water can release from a subducting slab. We investigate the influence of wet mantle flow laws [Hirth and Kohlstedt, 2003], in which a water parameter (i.e. constant water content) is involved. Our results show that wet dislocation alone does not accelerate cratonic deformation significantly. However, if wet diffusion

  9. One View of the Genesis of Cratonic Mantle and Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Jull, M.; Kelly, R.

    2002-12-01

    Kelemen et al. [1] proposed that SiO2-rich, cratonic mantle peridotite xenoliths from Kaapvaal and Siberia had a two stage history. First, they underwent ca. 40% polybaric decompression melting, ending in spinel peridotite facies, to produce depleted, SiO2-poor residues [2]. Second, residues reacted with migrating, felsic melt to become SiO2-rich and light REE-enriched, in accord with previous work [3-5]. Modified melt rose to form continental crust. In this way, cratonic upper mantle and crust may be genetically linked. This differs from theories in which SiO2-rich cratonic mantle formed via high pressure melting and crystal fractionation involving komatiitic melts, with a coincidental relationship between SiO2-rich peridotites and SiO2-rich crust. With regard to Stage 1, average melt removed from primitive mantle [6] to form depleted, SiO2-poor, Archean mantle in Greenland is similar to experimental partial melts at 2.5 to 3 GPa [2]. Also, heavy REE in cratonic peridotite xenoliths are correlated with Ca, suggesting that residual garnet was exhausted early in melting, long before residual clinopyroxene [1]. This, combined with data on melting as a function of pressure [7], yields an average pressure for polybaric melting ca. 3 GPa. Thus, depleted cratonic peridotites recording equilibration pressures greater than 3 GPa have undergone subsolidus pressure increase and garnet growth. Pressure increase could be in response to thickening via tectonic imbrication, pure shear during continental collision, viscous flow in a "mantle wedge", or diapirism of buoyant, depleted residues through dense, subducting, basaltic crust. We will examine these hypotheses in the light of new calculations of the density of cratonic peridotites as a function of P and T. With regard to Stage 2, this provides an explanation for positive correlation between Ni in olivine and modal orthopyroxene, seen in xenolith suites from some kimberlites, and in a global comparison of cratonic xenoliths

  10. Middle Paleozoic kimberlite magmatism in the northeastern Siberian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, E. O.; Afanas'ev, V. P.; Pokhilenko, N. P.

    2016-10-01

    The mineral chemistry and crystal morphology of kimberlite pyropes from the Billyakh River placer in the northeastern Siberian craton are characterised in terms of the placer history. The pyropes bear signatures of chemical weathering (dissolution), presumably in a Middle Paleozoic laterite profile, and therefore were originally hosted by Middle Paleozoic kimberlites. The broad occurrence of placer pyropes with lateritic dissolution signatures points to the presence of Middle Paleozoic diamond-bearing kimberlites in the study area.

  11. Construction and destruction of some North American cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, David B.; Humphreys, Eugene; Pearson, D. Graham

    2017-01-01

    Construction histories of Archean cratons remain poorly understood; their destruction is even less clear because of its rarity, but metasomatic weakening is an essential precursor. By assembling geophysical and geochemical data in 3-D lithosphere models, a clearer understanding of the geometry of major structures within the Rae, Slave and Wyoming cratons of central North America is now possible. Little evidence exists of subducted slab-like geometries similar to modern oceanic lithosphere in these construction histories. Underthrusting and wedging of proto-continental lithosphere is inferred from multiple dipping discontinuities, emphasizing the role of lateral accretion. Archean continental building blocks may resemble the modern lithosphere of oceanic plateau, but they better match the sort of refractory crust expected to have formed at Archean ocean spreading centres. Radiometric dating of mantle xenoliths provides estimates of rock types and ages at depth beneath sparse kimberlite occurrences, and these ages can be correlated to surface rocks. The 3.6-2.6 Ga Rae, Slave and Wyoming cratons stabilized during a granitic bloom at 2.61-2.55 Ga. This stabilization probably represents the final differentiation of early crust into a relatively homogeneous, uniformly thin (35-42 km), tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite crust with pyroxenite layers near the Moho atop depleted lithospheric mantle. Peak thermo-tectonic events at 1.86-1.7 Ga broadly metasomatized, mineralized and recrystallized mantle and lower crustal rocks, apparently making mantle peridotite more 'fertile' and more conductive by introducing or concentrating sulfides or graphite at 80-120 km depths. This metasomatism may have also weakened the lithosphere or made it more susceptible to tectonic or chemical erosion. Late Cretaceous flattening of Farallon lithosphere that included the Shatsky Rise conjugate appears to have weakened, eroded and displaced the base of the Wyoming craton below 140-160 km. This

  12. Electrical lithosphere beneath the Kaapvaal craton, southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Rob L.; Jones, Alan G.; Garcia, Xavier; Muller, Mark; Hamilton, Mark; Evans, Shane; Fourie, C. J. S.; Spratt, Jessica; Webb, Susan; Jelsma, Hielke; Hutchins, Dave

    2011-04-01

    A regional-scale magnetotelluric (MT) experiment across the southern African Kaapvaal craton and surrounding terranes, called the Southern African Magnetotelluric Experiment (SAMTEX), has revealed complex structure in the lithospheric mantle. Large variations in maximum resistivity at depths to 200-250 km relate directly to age and tectonic provenance of surface structures. Within the central portions of the Kaapvaal craton are regions of resistive lithosphere about 230 km thick, in agreement with estimates from xenolith thermobarometry and seismic surface wave tomography, but thinner than inferred from seismic body wave tomography. The MT data are unable to discriminate between a completely dry or slightly "damp" (a few hundred parts per million of water) structure within the transitional region at the base of the lithosphere. However, the structure of the uppermost ˜150 km of lithosphere is consistent with enhanced, but still low, conductivities reported for hydrous olivine and orthopyroxene at levels of water reported for Kaapvaal xenoliths. The electrical lithosphere around the Kimberley and Premier diamond mines is thinner than the maximum craton thickness found between Kimberley and Johannesburg/Pretoria. The mantle beneath the Bushveld Complex is highly conducting at depths around 60 km. Possible explanations for these high conductivities include graphite or sulphide and/or iron metals associated with the Bushveld magmatic event. We suggest that one of these conductive phases (most likely melt-related sulphides) could electrically connect iron-rich garnets in a garnet-rich eclogitic composition associated with a relict subduction slab.

  13. Magnesium isotopic variations in cratonic eclogites: Origins and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shui-Jiong; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Williams, Helen M.; Li, Shu-Guang

    2012-12-01

    Cratonic eclogites play an important role in the formation and dynamic evolution of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. However, their origin, whether as fragments of subducted oceanic crust or high-pressure mantle cumulates, remains controversial. Here, we report Mg isotopic compositions (δ26Mg) for cratonic eclogites from Kaalvallei and Bellsbank kimberlite pipes, South Africa. We find that clinopyroxene is 0.375±0.069 to 0.676±0.075‰ heavier than coexisting garnet, which reflects equilibrium isotope fractionation between these phases, primarily driven by the difference in Mg coordination between clinopyroxene and garnet. Bulk eclogites have strikingly variable Mg isotopic compositions, which range from -0.797±0.075 to -0.139±0.061‰, values that are significantly lighter than the range displayed by global mantle peridotites to date (-0.25±0.07‰, 2SD). As significant Mg isotope fractionation is only known to occur during low-temperature water-rock interaction, our results provide further evidence for the derivation of cratonic eclogites from subducted altered oceanic crust. In addition, the lack of correlation between Δ26Mg and Δ57Fe provides evidence for redox control on equilibrium inter-mineral Fe isotope fractionation.

  14. Seismic structure and dynamics of cratons: Stability and modification, continental collision and subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Sergei; Meier, Thomas; Schaeffer, Andrew J.; Agius, Matthew R.; Adam, Joanne M.-C.

    2014-05-01

    The Archean crust of stable cratons within today's continents is typically underlain by cold, thick mantle lithosphere. These mechanically strong, compositionally buoyant mantle roots (overall, roughly neutrally buoyant due to the density increase caused by low temperatures) have ensured the survival of cratons since their formation. Global and regional seismic tomography detects cratons readily by the anomalously high seismic velocities within their mantle lithosphere. The increasing resolution of seismic imaging now enables detailed mapping of the locations, boundaries and properties of cratons and offers new insight into their dynamics and evolution. Here, we summarise inferences on cratonic structure and dynamics based on recent multimode-waveform tomography on the global and continental (Europe, N America) scales and from regional, surface-wave array imaging. Where crustal cratonic boundaries can be mapped at the surface, they are, normally, closely matched by the boundaries of the high-velocity (thick and cold) mantle lithosphere beneath. Where the ancient crust is covered by sediments, with crustal block boundaries thus unclear, cratons can be mapped accurately by the seismic imaging of their high-velocity lithosphere. (Important exceptions include cratons that lost their ancient mantle roots in the Phanerozoic, e.g., eastern Sino-Korean Craton). On average, the upper mantle beneath cratons shows shear-wave speeds higher than elsewhere down to depths smaller than 300 km; large shear-speed anomalies are seen down to around 200 km depth only. Layered azimuthal anisotropy within cratonic lithosphere indicates frozen fabric that is probably a record of complex, vertically stratified deformation during the formation and stabilisation of cratons. Lateral variations in seismic velocities within cratonic roots present evidence for their modification and evolution after their formation. Beneath cratons in northern Europe, the locations of kimberlites coincide with

  15. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey deYoung Museum, San Francisco MISSION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey deYoung Museum, San Francisco MISSION BEFORE 1835 (ORIANA DAY PAINTINGS - (1861 - 1885) - Mission San Francisco de Asis, Mission & Sixteenth Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. Dating brittle deformation in the Archean Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thebaud, N.; Zwingmann, H.

    2012-12-01

    Major deformation throughout the Archean Yilgarn Craton has mostly been interpreted to be Neoarchean (Blewett and Czarnota, 2007). The timing of the deformation events of the brittle/ductile deformation generally relies on dating of cross-cutting intrusions or unconformities. Proterozoic overprinting and reactivation of Archean structures in the north-western part of the Yilgarn Craton has previously been dated from direct dating of the structures and fabrics from the Narryer Terrane(Spaggiari et al., 2008). However, the brittle deformation that postdates Neoarchean brittle-ductile structures in the Yilgarn Craton have received little attention to date. In the centre of the Yilgarn Craton, the Eastern Goldfields present a well developed network of E-W trending of normal brittle faults and fractures. Typically these structures are interpreted to have developed in result of a late Neoarchean tectonic relaxation following the main Yilgarn wide E-W contraction (Blewett and Czarnota, 2007). Poorly preserved and weathered faulted rocks in the subsurface environment preclude direct dating of fault gouge. However, exposure from the underground Agnew mine, in the Agnew Wiluna greenstone belt, recently provided access to fresh fault gouge material suitable for analysis. The clay gouge was characterized by SEM, TEM and XRD methods prior to age dating indicating an authigenic origin (Zwingmann et al., 2010). K-Ar illite age data of a whole rock sample split yielded an age of 1148 ± 23 Ma, which is within error close to the <2 micron clay fraction yielding an age of 1094 ± 22 Ma (Mesoproterozoic-Stenian). Our result is the first documentation of the age of the brittle deformation that affects the Yilgarn Craton. This age is within error of the Gilles event which is an extension event that affected the whole Australian continent and is responsible for the emplacement of the Warakurna Large Igneous Province and related dolerite dykes in the Yilgarn Craton (Evins et al., 2010

  17. Modeling the QBO and SAO Driven by Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Chan, K. L.; Porter, H. S.

    1999-01-01

    Hines' Doppler spread parameterization (DSP) for small scale gravity waves (GW) is applied in a global scale numerical spectral model (NSM) to describe the semi-annual and quasi-biennial oscillations (SAO and QBO) as well as the long term interannual variations that are driven by wave mean flow interactions. This model has been successful in simulating the salient features observed near the equator at altitudes above 20 km, including the QBO extension into the upper mesosphere inferred from UARS measurements. The model has now been extended to describe also the mean zonal and meridional circulations of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere that affect the equatorial QBO and its global scale extension. This is accomplished in part through tuning of the GW parameterization, and preliminary results lead to the following conclusions: (1) To reproduce the upwelling at equatorial latitudes associated with the Brewer/Dobson circulation that in part is modulated in the model by the vertical component of the Coriolis force, the eddy diffusivity in the lower stratosphere had to be enhanced and the related GW spectrum modified to bring it in closer agreement with the form recommended for the DSP. (2) To compensate for the required increase in the diffusivity, the observed QBO requires a larger GW source that is closer to the middle of the range recommended for the DSP. (3) Through global scale momentum redistribution, the above developments are conducive to extending the QBO and SAO oscillations to higher latitudes. Multi-year interannual oscillations are generated through wave filtering by the solar driven annual oscillation in the zonal circulation. (4) In a 3D version of the model, wave momentum is absorbed and dissipated by tides and planetary waves. Thus, a somewhat larger GW source is required to generate realistic amplitudes for the QBO and SAO.

  18. Geothermal resources of Sao Miguel Island, Azores, Portugal

    SciTech Connect

    Duffield, W.A.; Muffler, L.J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Geothermal studies were carried out on the island of Sao Miguel, Azores to characterize the nature of the resource, to estimate its magnitude, and to identify target areas toward which exploration and developmental drilling might be directed. The main geothermal resource areas are Furnas, Agua de Pau, and Sete Cidades, three Quaternary silicic volcanic centers characterized by summit calderas beneath which magmatic heat sources provide thermal energy to overlying hydrothermal convection systems. For each of the systems, the studies have defined the size of the system, the subsurface temperature, the thermodynamic state of fluid in the system, the chemical composition of the fluid, and permeable parts of the system. 8 figs. (ACR)

  19. Analysis of Deuteron-Nucleus Scattering Using Sao Paulo Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibraheem, Awad A.

    2016-12-01

    Deuteron elastic and inelastic scattering from 6Li, 12C, 16O, 24Mg, 32S, 50V, 58Ni, 70Ge, 90Zr, and 116Sn targets at different incident energies have been analyzed. Both Phenomenological Woods-Saxon and double-folding optical model potentials have been used. The folding calculations were based upon the Sao Paulo potential. A semi-microscopic representation has been proposed to study the effect of the dynamic polarization potential. Comparisons between our results and measured angular distributions of the differential cross sections showed a pronounced success of our theoretical predictions. The corresponding reaction cross sections have also been investigated.

  20. The young active star SAO 51891 (V383 Lacertae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biazzo, K.; Frasca, A.; Marilli, E.; Covino, E.; Alcalã, J. M.; Ćakirli, Ö.; Klutsch, A.; Meyer, M. R.

    2009-05-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to investigate the surface inhomogeneities of a young, late-type star, SAO 51891, at different atmospheric levels, from the photosphere to the upper chromosphere, analyzing contemporaneous optical high-resolution spectra and broad-band photometry. Methods: The full spectral range of FOCES@CAHA (R ≃ 40 000) is used to perform the spectral classification and to determine the rotational and radial velocities. The lithium abundance is measured to obtain an age estimate. The {BVRIJHK}s photometric bands are used to construct the spectral energy distribution (SED). The variations in the observed BV fluxes and effective temperature are used to infer the presence of photospheric spots and observe their behavior over time. The chromospheric activity is studied applying the spectral subtraction technique to Hα, Ca ii H & K, Hɛ, and Ca ii IRT lines. Results: We find SAO 51891 to be a young K0-1V star with a lithium abundance close to the Pleiades upper envelope, confirming its youth ( 100 Myr), which is also inferred from its kinematical membership of the Local Association. No infrared excess is detected from analysis of its SED, limiting the amount of remaining circumstellar dust. We detect a rotational modulation of the luminosity, effective temperature, Ca ii H & K, Hɛ, and Ca ii IRT total fluxes. A simple spot model with two main active regions, about 240 K cooler than the surrounding photosphere, fits the observed light and temperature curves very well. The small-amplitude radial velocity variations are also well reproduced by our spot model. The anti-correlation of light curves and chromospheric diagnostics indicates chromospheric plages spatially associated with the spots. The largest modulation amplitude is observed for the Hɛ flux suggesting that this line is very sensitive to the presence of chromospheric plages. Conclusions: SAO 51891 is a young active star, lacking significant amounts of circumstellar dust or any evidence of low

  1. 6. Photocopy of painting (from California Historical Society, San Francisco, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of painting (from California Historical Society, San Francisco, California, Oriana Day, artist, 1879) EXTERIOR, VIEW FROM AN ANGLE OF MISSION AND SURROUNDING STRUCTURES - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

  2. 5. Photocopy of painting (from De Young Museum, San Francisco, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy of painting (from De Young Museum, San Francisco, California, Oriana Day, artist, c. 1861-1885) EXTERIOR VIEW OF MISSION BEFORE 1835 - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

  3. 40. Historic American Buildings Survey San Francisco Chronicle Collection San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Historic American Buildings Survey San Francisco Chronicle Collection San Francisco, California March 24, 1924 VIEW OF HIGH ALTAR - Mission San Carlos Borromeo, Rio Road & Lausen Drive, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Monterey County, CA

  4. 19. Photocopy of photograph (from De Young Museum, San Francisco, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photocopy of photograph (from De Young Museum, San Francisco, California, late 1890's) EXTERIOR, GENERAL VIEW OF MISSION, LATE 1890'S - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

  5. 18. Photocopy of photograph (from De Young Museum, San Francisco, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of photograph (from De Young Museum, San Francisco, California, 1895) EXTERIOR, SOUTH FRONT OF MISSION AND CONVENTO, 1895 - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

  6. 13. Photocopy of photograph (from Golden Gate Museum, San Francisco, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of photograph (from Golden Gate Museum, San Francisco, California, 1850's) EXTERIOR, VIEW OF CONVENTO BEFORE RESTORATION, 1850'S - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

  7. A Glorious Century of Art Education: San Francisco's Art Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, Stephen Mark

    1976-01-01

    Author described the life and times of the San Francisco Art Institute and reviewed the forces that made San Francisco a city of more than ordinary awareness of the arts in its civic and civil existence. (Editor/RK)

  8. Smad7 mediates inhibition of Saos2 osteosarcoma cell differentiation by NF{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Eliseev, Roman A. . E-mail: Roman_Eliseev@urmc.rochester.edu; Schwarz, Edward M.; Zuscik, Michael J.; O'Keefe, Regis J.; Drissi, Hicham; Rosier, Randy N.

    2006-01-01

    The transcription factor NF{kappa}B is constitutively activated in various tumor cells where it promotes proliferation and represses apoptosis. The bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) delay cell proliferation and promote differentiation and apoptosis of bone cells through activation of Smad downstream effectors and via Smad-independent mechanisms. Thus, NF{kappa}B and BMP pathways play opposing roles in regulating osteoblastic cell fate. Here, we show that in osteosarcoma Saos2 osteoblasts, NF{kappa}B regulates the activity of the BMP/Smad signaling. Inhibition of NF{kappa}B by overexpression of mI{kappa}B leads to the induction of osteoblast differentiation. Saos2 cells overexpressing mI{kappa}B (Saos2-mI{kappa}B) exhibit higher expression of osteoblast phenotypic genes such as alkaline phosphatase, Runx2 and osteocalcin and are more responsive to BMP2 in comparison to wild-type cells (Saos2-wt) or empty vector infected controls (Saos2-EV). Furthermore, BMP-2 signaling and Smad phosphorylation are significantly increased in Saos2-mI{kappa}B cells in comparison to Saos2-EV cells. Inhibition of NF{kappa}B signaling in Saos2-mI{kappa}B cells is associated with decreased expression of the BMP signaling inhibitor Smad7. While gain of Smad7 function in Saos2-mI{kappa}B cells results in inhibition of BMP signaling, anti-sense knockdown of Smad7 in Saos2-EV cells leads to upregulation of BMP signaling. We therefore conclude that in osteosarcoma Saos2 cells, NF{kappa}B represses BMP/Smad signaling and BMP2-induced differentiation through Smad7.

  9. Craton stability and continental lithosphere dynamics during plume-plate interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Van Hunen, J.; Pearson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Survival of thick cratonic roots in a vigorously convecting mantle system for billions of years has long been studied by the geodynamical community. A high cratonic root strength is generally considered to be the most important factor. We first perform and discuss new numerical models to investigate craton stability in both Newtonian and non-Newtonian rheology in the stagnant lid regime. The results show that only a modest compositional rheological factor of Δη=10 with non-Newtonian rheology is required for the survival of cratonic roots in a stagnant lid regime. A larger rheological factor (100 or more) is needed to maintain similar craton longevity in a Newtonian rheology environment. Furthermore, chemical buoyancy plays an important role on craton stability and its evolution, but could only work with suitable compositional rheology. During their long lifespan, cratons experienced a suite of dynamic, tectonothermal events, such as nearby subduction and mantle plume activity. Cratonic nuclei are embedded in shorter-lived, more vulnerable continental areas of different thickness, composition and rheology, which would influence the lithosphere dynamic when tectonothermal events happen nearby. South Africa provides a very good example to investigate such dynamic processes as it hosts several cratons and there are many episodic thermal events since the Mesozoic as indicated by a spectrum of magmatic activity. We numerically investigate such an integrated system using the topographic evolution of cratons and surrounding lithosphere as a diagnostic observable. The post-70Ma thinning of pericratonic lithosphere by ~50km around Kaapvaal craton (Mather et al., 2011) is also investigated through our numerical models. The results show that the pericratonic lithosphere cools and grows faster than cratons do, but is also more likely to be effected by episodic thermal events. This leads to surface topography change that is significantly larger around the craton than within

  10. San Francisco Bay Long Term Management Strategy for Dredging

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The San Francisco Bay Long Term Management Strategy (LTMS) is a cooperative effort to develop a new approach to dredging and dredged material disposal in the San Francisco Bay area. The LTMS serves as the Regional Dredging Team for the San Francisco area.

  11. The San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Priest, S.S.; Duffield, W.A.; Malis-Clark, Karen; Hendley, J. W.; Stauffer, P.H.

    2001-01-01

    Northern Arizona's San Francisco Volcanic Field, much of which lies within Coconino and Kaibab National Forests, is an area of young volcanoes along the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau. During its 6-million-year history, this field has produced more than 600 volcanoes. Their activity has created a topographically varied landscape with forests that extend from the Pi?on-Juniper up to the Bristlecone Pine life zones. The most prominent landmark is San Francisco Mountain, a stratovolcano that rises to 12,633 feet and serves as a scenic backdrop to the city of Flagstaff.

  12. Latest Jurassic-early Cretaceous regressive facies, northeast Africa craton

    SciTech Connect

    van Houten, F.B.

    1980-06-01

    Nonmarine to paralic detrital deposits accumulated in six large basins between Algeria and the Arabo-Nubian shield during major regression in latest Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time. The Ghadames Sirte (north-central Libya), and Northern (Egypt) basins lay along the cratonic margin of northeastern Africa. The Murzuk, Kufra, and Southern (Egypt) basins lay in the south within the craton. Data for reconstructing distribution, facies, and thickness of relevant sequences are adequate for the three northern basins only. High detrital influx near the end of Jurassic time and in mid-Cretaceous time produced regressive nubian facies composed largely of low-sinuosity stream and fahdelta deposits. In the west and southwest the Ghadames, Murzuk, and Kufra basins were filled with a few hundred meters of detritus after long-continued earlier Mesozoic aggradation. In northern Egypt the regressive sequence succeeded earlier Mesozoic marine sedimentation; in the Sirte and Southern basins correlative deposits accumulated on Precambrian and Variscan terranes after earlier Mesozoic uplift and erosion. Waning of detrital influx into southern Tunisia and adjacent Libya in the west and into Israel in the east initiated an Albian to early Cenomanian transgression of Tethys. By late Cenomanian time it had flooded the entire cratonic margin, and spread southward into the Murzuk and Southern basins, as well as onto the Arabo-Nubian shield. Latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, mid-Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous transgressions across northeastern Africa recorded in these sequences may reflect worldwide eustatic sea-level rises. In contrast, renewed large supply of detritus during each regression and a comparable subsidence history of intracratonic and marginal basins imply regional tectonic control. 6 figures.

  13. Teleseismic receiver functions modeling of the eastern Indian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Prantik; Biswas, Koushik

    2016-09-01

    We estimate receiver functions (RFs) through the time-domain deconvolution using three-component broadband data of 100 teleseismic events (30° ⩽ ∧ ⩽ 90°) from 15 seismographs in the eastern Indian craton. Estimated radial RFs show a positive phase at 4.6-5.8 s delay time corresponding to the crustal thicknesses of 37-46 km. Through the differential evolution (DE) waveform inversion modeling of radial receiver functions, we delineate the crustal structure at 15 broadband stations. On an average, the Archean Singhbhum Odisha Craton (SOC) is characterized by a thick crust of 43 ± 3 km in comparison to a relatively thin crust of 41 ± 1 km underlying the Proterozoic Chotanagpur Granite Gneissic terrain (CGGT). While, a thin crust of 38 ± 1 km characterizes the younger Eastern Ghats Mobile Belt (EGMB). The main results of our modeling reveal a 46 km thick Archean crust underlying the Singhbhum granite (SG) of 3.6 Ga, which is characterized by a 3 km crustal thickening probably resulted from the Archean subduction process. Our modeling also detects a 2-3 km crustal thinning with the thinnest crust of 37 km below the region near South Singhbhum Shear Zone, which could be attributed to the 1.6 Ga plume activity associated with Dalma volcanic. Our modeling also led to the delineation of a crustal thinning of 2-3 km underlying the region in EGMB, which was influenced by a much younger (∼117 Ma) Rajmahal magmatism associated with the Gondwana break-up episode. However, our study could not detect any age-dependent variation of crustal thicknesses in the eastern Indian craton. The main result of our modeling suggests a two-phase crustal evolution process for the SOC viz. older E-W crustal thickening due to E-W plate compression and later crustal thinning episodes associated with the Dalma volcanism in the north and the Rajmahal volcanism in the South.

  14. A Cooperative Project for Electrical Engineering Education at UNESP--Sao Paulo State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akamatsu, Janio Itiro; Torres, Germano Lambert; Origa de Oliveira, Luiz C.; Loyolla, Waldomiro

    UNESP--Sao Paulo State University--is a successful experiment at the Multicampus University in Brazil, maintaining intense and diversified education activities in the most developed state of the Federation, the Sao Paulo State. The multicampus structure that consists of 15 university campuses and two advanced ones, distributed throughout the State…

  15. Remobilization in the cratonic lithosphere recorded in polycrystalline diamond

    PubMed

    Jacob; Viljoen; Grassineau; Jagoutz

    2000-08-18

    Polycrystalline diamonds (framesites) from the Venetia kimberlite in South Africa contain silicate minerals whose isotopic and trace element characteristics document remobilization of older carbon and silicate components to form the framesites shortly before kimberlite eruption. Chemical variations within the garnets correlate with carbon isotopes in the diamonds, indicating contemporaneous formation. Trace element, radiogenic, and stable isotope variations can be explained by the interaction of eclogites with a carbonatitic melt, derived by remobilization of material that had been stored for a considerable time in the lithosphere. These results indicate more recent formation of diamonds from older materials within the cratonic lithosphere.

  16. [Sanitary battles and scientific clashes: Emilio Ribas and yellow fever in Sao Paulo].

    PubMed

    Almeida, M

    Emilio Ribas, an administrative physician and sanitarian from Sao Paulo, was an advocate of the microbiological conception during the long period when he directed the Servico Sanitario de Sao Paulo (1898-1917). This article offers a brief analysis of his stance in the flight against yellow fever during the early 20th century, considered a highlight of his career. The scientists and professionals linked to this sanitary agency in Sao Paulo found themselves in a tense, unstable work environment, where experimental proof played an important role in corroborating new medical-sanitary conceptions and practices. The article takes a close look at the medical experiments on yellow fever directed by Emilio Ribas and conducted at Sao Paulo's Hospital de Isolamento in 1902-03. It examines these same studies in an effort to better understand how the significance of yellow fever was transformed and to explore its implications regarding the history of public health in Sao Paulo.

  17. 33 CFR 165.T11-534 - Safety zone; Bay Bridge construction, San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety zone; Bay Bridge construction, San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, CA. 165.T11-534 Section 165.T11-534 Navigation and Navigable... Eleventh Coast Guard District § 165.T11-534 Safety zone; Bay Bridge construction, San Francisco Bay,...

  18. 76 FR 81371 - Safety Zone; San Francisco New Year's Eve Fireworks Display, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... Captain of the Port, San Francisco area of responsibility during the dates and times noted below. This action is necessary to protect life and property of the maritime public from the hazards associated...

  19. 77 FR 37603 - Safety Zone; San Francisco Independence Day Fireworks Display, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... Captain of the Port, San Francisco area of responsibility during the dates and times noted below. This action is necessary to protect life and property of the maritime public from the hazards associated...

  20. 77 FR 37604 - Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, City of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... of the Port, San Francisco area of responsibility during the dates and times noted below. This action is necessary to protect life and property of the maritime public from the hazards associated with...

  1. Simulations of the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Petersson, A; Tkalcic, H

    2005-12-16

    Simulations of the Great 1906 San Francisco earthquake are being performed as part of the event's centenary. LLNL is participating in a large effort to study this event and possible consequences if the event were to happen today. This document is meant to describe our efforts to others participating in the project.

  2. Civil Service College in San Francisco.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samii, Farhad

    1978-01-01

    The Civil Service College in San Francisco provides preentry level training, inservice training, and promotional training for public employment. The free classes are open to the general public and cover five curriculum areas: supervision and management, clerical and secretarial, communication, community service, and technical. (MB)

  3. San Francisco's New Zoo's Connections for Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Routman, Emily

    2001-01-01

    Provides information on a redevelopment project at the San Francisco Zoo known as the New Zoo. The explicit goal of the project is to inspire a sense of caring and appreciation for wildlife that is the foundation of a conservation ethic. (DDR)

  4. The Third International San Francisco Book Fair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmon, Winn; And Others

    Friends of Books and Comics presents its catalog of the Third International San Francisco Book Fair, a marketplace of alternative books, comics, and magazines. Nearly 200 alternative and small presses are listed alphabetically with address, telephone number, names of principal people involved, and a brief description of type and subject of…

  5. Upper mantle P velocities beneath the North America craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, R.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we determined the detailed mechanisms of three earthquakes occurring in Quebec, Texas and Idaho for use in modeling triplication data. The first event provided pure-path triplication recordings at over 400 USArray stations. Although amplitudes of the direct P waves are small, the depth phase sP is clear and displays shadow-zone characteristics indicative a low velocity layer (LVL) in the upper mantle, where the amplitude of the AB branch decreases rapidly at a distance of 16 degrees. Another feature of the LVL is that the AB branch can be seen at distances larger than 23 degrees. Similar to the Canadian Shield velocity model S25 (LeFevre and Helmberger, 1989), we found a LVL between 160 km and 215 km and obtained excellent fits assuming 1D model. The other two events are located near the craton margins and have been recorded by the MOMA array (Texas event) and CANOE array (Idaho event). These mixed paths are mostly craton with modified 1D models producing good fits. We, also, produced 2D modeling results that use tomographic images for correcting the source structures.

  6. The Sao Paulo Microtron: Equipment and Planned Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, M. N.; Maidana, N. L.; Vanin, V. R.

    2007-10-26

    The Linear Accelerator Laboratory (LAL) of the Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFUSP) is building a two-stage racetrack microtron, which will generate continuous wave electron beams with energies up to 38 MeV. This paper describes the characteristics of the accelerator, and reports on the experimental equipment that will be available in order to pursue the photonuclear physics research program. Operation will begin with the first stage (5 MeV), and concentrate on NRF (Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence) measurements and radiation physics studies. Planned experiments for the second stage explore the cw character of the beam on coincidence experiments. A photon tagger has been already tested with radioactive sources and is ready to be installed. Gamma and neutron detector arrays are being developed for the detailed study of photoneutron reactions. Plans include the study of NRF and pygmy resonances, near the neutron binding energy.

  7. Properties of QBO and SAO Generated by Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Reddy, C. A.; Chan, K. L.; Porter, H. S.

    1999-01-01

    We present an extension for the 2D (zonal mean) version of our Numerical Spectral Mode (NSM) that incorporates Hines' Doppler spread parameterization (DSP) for small scale gravity waves (GW). This model is applied to describe the seasonal variations and the semi-annual and quasi-biennial oscillations (SAO and QBO). Our earlier model reproduced the salient features of the mean zonal circulation in the middle atmosphere, including the QBO extension into the upper mesosphere inferred from UARS measurements. In the present model we incorporate also tropospheric heating to reproduce the upwelling at equatorial latitudes associated with the Brewer-Dobson circulation that affects significantly the dynamics of the stratosphere as Dunkerton had pointed out. Upward vertical winds increase the period of the QBO observed from the ground. To compensate for that, one needs to increase the eddy diffusivity and the GW momentum flux, bringing the latter closer to values recommended in the DSP. The QBO period in the model is 30 months (mo), which is conducive to synchronize this oscillation with the seasonal cycle of solar forcing. Multi-year interannual oscillations are generated through wave filtering by the solar driven annual oscillation in the zonal circulation. Quadratic non-linearities generate interseasonal variations to produce a complicated pattern of variability associated with the QBO. The computed temperature amplitudes for the SAO and QBO are in substantial agreement with observations at equatorial and extratropical latitudes. At high latitudes, however, the observed QBO amplitudes are significantly larger, which may be a signature of propagating planetary waves not included in the present model. The assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium not being imposed, we find that the effects from the vertical Coriolis force associated with the equatorial oscillations are large for the vertical winds and significant for the temperature variations even outside the tropics but are

  8. 3-D Structure of the Slave and Rae Cratons Provides Clues to Their Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Deep geologic structures within cratons that make up continental cores were long neglected. Recently acquired geophysical data from large observational arrays and geochemical data resulting from exploration for diamond has now made possible co-registration of large-scale (400-km depth), truly 3-dimensional data sets. P-waves, surface waves and magnetotelluric observations provide 3-D wavespeed and conductivity models. Multi-azimuthal receiver functions map seismic discontinuity surfaces in 3-D. Xenolith suites erupted in kimberlites provide rock samples at key lithospheric depths, albeit at sparsely distributed locations. These multi-disciplinary models are becoming available for several key cratons worldwide; here the deep structure of the Slave and Rae cratons of the Canadian Shield is described. Lithospheric layers with tapered, wedge-shaped margins are common. Slave craton layers are sub-horizontal and indicate construction of the craton core at 2.7 Ga by underthrusting and flat stacking of lithosphere. The central Rae craton has predominantly dipping discontinuities that indicate construction at 1.9 Ga by thrusting similar to that observed in crustal ';thick-skinned' fold-and-thrust belts. 3-D mapping of conductivity and metasomatism, the latter via mineral recrystallization and resetting of isotopic ages, overprints primary structures in both cratons. Distribution of more conductivitve mantle suggests that assumed causative pervasive metasomatism occurs at 100-200 km depths with ';chimneys' reaching to shallower depths, typically in locations where kimberlites or mineralization has occurred.

  9. Stalled Orogen Linked to East Antarctic Craton Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martos, Y. M.; Ferraccioli, F.; Finn, C.; Bell, R. E.; Jordan, T. A.; Damaske, D.

    2015-12-01

    The interior of East Antarctica is often regarded as a coherent Archean craton surrounded by Paleo to Neoproterozoic orogenic belts. Here we use recent aerogeophysical, satellite magnetic, satellite gravity and passive seismic results in central East Antarctica to challenge this view. Firstly, anomalously thick crust (compared to most other cratons) has been imaged in East Antarctica by both passive seismic and gravity modelling with values up to 60 km (Ferraccioli et al., 2011, Nature; An et al., 2015, JGR). The thick crust underlies both the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains and an elevated region between Lake Vostok and Dronning Maud Land, referred to as the East Antarctic Mountain Ranges plateau (An et al., 2015). Second, satellite magnetic data reveal that the Gamburtev Province lies in between the Ruker/Princess Elizabeth Land, Vostok, Nimrod/South Pole and Recovery provinces. The Nimrod/ South Pole province is a Paleo to Meso Proterozoic igneous province formed along the edges of the Archean/Paleoproterozoic Mawson continent (e.g. Goodge and Fanning, 2010 JGR). Our aerogeophysical and sediment provenance data interpretations suggest that the Gamburtsev Province represents a distinct Grenvillian-age orogenic belt. A stalled orogen with thick crust (i.e. an orogen where widespread orogenic collapse and root delamination has not occurred)- is preserved in the interior of East Antarctica resembling e.g. the Paleoproterozoic Trans Hudson Orogen and segments of Grenvillian orogens in Laurentia. The stalled orogen may relate to widespread accretionary and collisional events within Rodinia. However, passive seismic interpretations (An et al., 2015) favour linking crustal thickening to the Pan-African age assembly of Greater India, East Antarctica and Australia within Gondwana (e.g. Aitken et al., 2014 GRL). Further aerogeophysical observations over Princess Elizabeth Land are timely to enable more robust correlations with geological observations and to help dating the

  10. Origins of cratonic mantle discontinuities: A view from petrology, geochemistry and thermodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulbach, Sonja; Massuyeau, Malcolm; Gaillard, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Geophysically detectible mid-lithospheric discontinuities (MLD) and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundaries (LAB) beneath cratons have received much attention over recent years, but a consensus on their origin has not yet emerged. Cratonic lithosphere composition and origin is peculiar due to its ultra-depletion during plume or accretionary tectonics, cool present-day geothermal gradients, compositional and rheological stratification and multiple metasomatic overprints. Bearing this in mind, we integrate current knowledge on the physical properties, chemical composition, mineralogy and fabric of cratonic mantle with experimental and thermodynamic constraints on the formation and migration of melts, both below and within cratonic lithosphere, in order to find petrologically viable explanations for cratonic mantle discontinuities. LABs characterised by strong seismic velocity gradients and increased conductivity require the presence of melts, which can form beneath intact cratonic roots reaching to 200-250 km depth only in exceptionally warm and/or volatile-rich mantle, thus explaining the paucity of seismical LAB observations beneath cratons. When present, pervasive interaction of these - typically carbonated - melts with the deep lithosphere leads to densification and thermochemical erosion, which generates topography at the LAB and results in intermittent seismic LAB signals or conflicting seismic, petrologic and thermal LAB depths. In rare cases (e.g. Tanzanian craton), the tops of live melt percolation fronts may appear as MLDs and, after complete lithosphere rejuvenation, may be sites of future, shallower LABs (e.g. North China craton). Since intact cratons are presently tectonomagmatically quiescent, and since MLDs produce both positive and negative velocity gradients, in some cases with anisotropy, most MLDs may be best explained by accumulations (metasomes) of seismically slow minerals (pyroxenes, phlogopite, amphibole, carbonates) deposited during past

  11. A Sharp Edge of the Cratonic Lithosphere of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, T. B.; Skryzalin, P. A.; Menke, W. H.; Levin, V. L.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Using teleseismic travel time delays, we develop a tomographic model of the lithosphere beneath northeastern North America, from the shore of James Bay in Quebec to the Atlantic coast of New England and to a depth of 300 km. Three major terranes lie within this cratonic margin: the 2.7 Ga Superior province, the 1 Ga Grenville orogenic belt and the 0.3-0.4 Ga Appalachian terranes, which are bounded by the Grenville Front (GF) and Appalachian Front (AF), respectively. Additionally, the 0.8 Ga Avalon terrain was accreted to coastal New England by strike-skip faulting during the Appalachian orogeny. Our tomographic model uses earthquake seismograms recorded by permanent US and Canadian stations, the Transportable Array and the temporary QMIII deployment. All data were corrected for instrument response and record sections were examined visually to identify gross errors in response and timing. Differential arrival times of P and PKP waves were determined by cross-correlation and have a maximum amplitude of about ±1 second. In our model, lithospheric boundaries do not correlate well with geological boundaries, nor do they strike parallel to them. The seismically-fast (by 5% relative to AK135) cratonic lithosphere of North America is much thicker than that of the younger terranes, extending to 200 km or more depth but with a sharp east-dipping eastern edge located (at Moho depths) 100-250 km northwest of the GF. The lithosphere beneath the Grenville and Appalachian terranes, which were affected by subduction during the Grenville and Appalachian orogenies, is slower (by 4%). A sliver of seismically-fast lithosphere, extending to ~150 km depth, occurs along the Atlantic coast and is interpreted as the Avalonian lithosphere.

  12. Radar image San Francisco Bay Area, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The San Francisco Bay Area in California and its surroundings are shown in this radar image from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). On this image, smooth areas, such as the bay, lakes, roads and airport runways appear dark, while areas with buildings and trees appear bright. Downtown San Francisco is at the center and the city of Oakland is at the right across the San Francisco Bay. Some city areas, such as the South of Market district in San Francisco, appear bright due to the alignment of streets and buildings with respect to the incoming radar beam. Three of the bridges spanning the Bay are seen in this image. The Bay Bridge is in the center and extends from the city of San Francisco to Yerba Buena and Treasure Islands, and from there to Oakland. The Golden Gate Bridge is to the left and extends from San Francisco to Sausalito. The Richmond-San Rafael Bridge is in the upper right and extends from San Rafael to Richmond. Angel Island is the large island east of the Golden Gate Bridge, and lies north of the much smaller Alcatraz Island. The Alameda Naval Air Station is seen just below the Bay Bridge at the center of the image. Two major faults bounding the San Francisco-Oakland urban areas are visible on this image. The San Andreas fault, on the San Francisco peninsula, is seen on the left side of the image. The fault trace is the straight feature filled with linear reservoirs, which appear dark. The Hayward fault is the straight feature on the right side of the image between the urban areas and the hillier terrain to the east.

    This radar image was acquired by just one of SRTM's two antennas and, consequently, does not show topographic data, but only the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground. This signal, known as radar backscatter, provides insight into the nature of the surface, including its roughness, vegetation cover and urbanization. The overall faint striping pattern in the images is a data processing artifact due to the

  13. San Francisco and Bay Area, CA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Although clouds obscure part of the city of San Francisco and the mouth of the Bay (37.5N, 122.0W), many cultural and natural features in the immediate vicinity are obvious. The Bay Bridge which was damaged in the 1989 earthquake, Candlestick Park, San Mateo and Dumbarton Bridges as well as the various colored settling ponds rimming the south end of the Bay, the San Andreas and Calaveras faults and many of the major highways can be seen.

  14. An overview of San Francisco Bay PORTS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; McKinnie, David; English, Chad; Smith, Richard E.

    1998-01-01

    The Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System (PORTS) provides observations of tides, tidal currents, and meteorological conditions in real-time. The San Francisco Bay PORTS (SFPORTS) is a decision support system to facilitate safe and efficient maritime commerce. In addition to real-time observations, SFPORTS includes a nowcast numerical model forming a San Francisco Bay marine nowcast system. SFPORTS data and nowcast numerical model results are made available to users through the World Wide Web (WWW). A brief overview of SFPORTS is presented, from the data flow originated at instrument sensors to final results delivered to end users on the WWW. A user-friendly interface for SFPORTS has been designed and implemented. Appropriate field data analysis, nowcast procedures, design and generation of graphics for WWW display of field data and nowcast results are presented and discussed. Furthermore, SFPORTS is designed to support hazardous materials spill prevention and response, and to serve as resources to scientists studying the health of San Francisco Bay ecosystem. The success (or failure) of the SFPORTS to serve the intended user community is determined by the effectiveness of the user interface.

  15. New aerosol particles formation in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela, Angel; Andrade, Maria de Fatima; Ynoue, Rita

    2016-04-01

    The Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA), in the southeast region of Brazil, is considered a megalopolis comprised of Sao Paulo city and more 38 municipalities. The air pollutant emissions in the SPMA are related to the burning of the fuels: etanol, gasohol (gasoline with 25% ethanol) and diesel. According to CETESB (2013), the road vehicles contributed up to about 97, 87, and 80% of CO, VOCs and NOx emissions in 2012, respectively, being most of NOx associated to diesel combustion and most of CO and VOCs from gasohol and ethanol combustion. Studies conducted on ambient air pollution in the SPMA have shown that black carbon (BC) explains 21% of mass concentration of PM2.5 compared with 40% of organic carbon (OC), 20% of sulfates, and 12% of soil dust (Andrade et al., 2012). Most of the observed ambient PM2.5 mass concentration usually originates from precursors gases such as sulphur dioxide (SO2), ammonia (NH3), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and VOCs as well as through the physico-chemical processes such as the oxidation of low volatile hydrocarbons transferring to the condensed phase (McMurry et al., 2004). The Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry model (WRF-Chem; Grell et al. 2005), configured with three nested grid cells: 75, 15, and 3 km, is used as photochemical modeling to describe the physico-chemical processes leading to evolution of particles number and mass size distribution from a vehicular emission model developed by the IAG-USP laboratory of Atmospheric Processes and based on statistical information of vehicular activity. The spatial and temporal distributions of emissions in the finest grid cell are based on road density products compiled by the OpenStreetMap project and measurements performed inside tunnels in the SPMA, respectively. WRF-Chem simulation with coupled primary aerosol (dust and sea-salt) and biogenic emission modules and aerosol radiative effects turned on is conducted as the baseline simulation (Case_0) to evaluate the model

  16. Concept and Use of Psychoactive Drugs Among University Students in the Sao Paulo Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanini, Antonio C.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a medical-social questionnaire made by members of the Scientific Commission of the First International Congress of Drug Addiction Among University Students, Sao Paulo, Brazil, 1974. (Author)

  17. The SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System: A Gateway to the Planetary Sciences Literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneken, E. A.; Accomazzi, A.; Grant, C. S.; Kurtz, M. J.; Thompson, D.; Bohlen, E.; Murray, S. S.

    2009-03-01

    The SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) provides various free services for finding, accessing, and managing bibliographic data, including a basic search form, the myADS notification service, and private libraries, plus access to scanned published articles.

  18. Vehicular emissions of organic particulate matter in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, B. S.; Andrade, M. F.; Herckes, P.; Dusek, U.; Röckmann, T.; Holzinger, R.

    2015-12-01

    Vehicular emissions have a strong impact on air pollution in big cities. Many factors affect these emissions: type of vehicle, type of fuel, cruising velocity, and brake use. This study focused on emissions of organic compounds by Light (LDV) and Heavy (HDV) duty vehicle exhaust. The study was performed in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil, where vehicles run on different fuels: gasoline with 25 % ethanol (called gasohol), hydrated ethanol, and diesel (with 5 % of biodiesel). The vehicular emissions are an important source of pollutants and the principal contribution to fine particulate matter (smaller than 2.5 μm, PM2.5) in Sao Paulo. The experiments were performed in two tunnels: Janio Quadros (TJQ) where 99 % of the vehicles are LDV, and Rodoanel Mario Covas (TRA) where up to 30 % of the fleet was HDV. The PM2.5 samples were collected on quartz filters in May and July 2011 at TJQ and TRA, respectively, using two samplers operating in parallel. The samples were analyzed by Thermal-Desorption Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass-Spectrometry (TD-PTR-MS), and by Thermal-Optical Transmittance (TOT). The organic aerosol (OA) desorbed at TD-PTR-MS represented around 30 % of the OA estimated by the TOT method, mainly due to the different desorption temperatures, with a maximum of 870 and 350 °C for TOT and TD-PTR-MS, respectively. Average emission factors (EF) organic aerosol (OA) and organic carbon (OC) were calculated for HDV and LDV fleet. We found that HDV emitted more OA and OC than LDV, and that OC emissions represented 36 and 43 % of total PM2.5 emissions from LDV and HDV, respectively. More than 700 ions were identified by TD-PTR-MS and the EF profiles obtained from HDV and LDV exhibited distinct features. Nitrogen-containing compounds measured in the desorbed material up to 350 °C contributed around 20 % to the EF values for both types of vehicles, possibly associated with incomplete fuel burning. Additionally, 70 % of the organic compounds measured from the aerosol

  19. Seismic Tomography of Central Sao Miguel, Azores Islands (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendros, J.; Zandomeneghi, D.; Saccorotti, G.; Barclay, A.; Ibáñez, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    The Azores Archipelago consists of nine volcanic islands, located at about 38° N and 28°W, in the triple junction of the American, Eurasian and African plates. The largest island is Sao Miguel. It has rift zones mainly trending NW-SE and E-W; calderas, as Fogo and Furnas, at the intersection of these tectonic lineaments; and thermal springs and fumaroles distributed along these fault systems. Furnas, Sete Cidades and Fogo are the most active volcanic complexes: central volcanoes with a dominantly trachytic production. Furnas is the youngest and consists of a steep-sided caldera structure formed during several collapses. The most important thermal features lie on an E-W lineament which cuts the Furnas caldera complex. The Fogo volcanic edifice is built over an older submarine lava basement and composed by lava flows, domes and pyroclastic flows deposits, with the summit truncated by a caldera.Thermal manifestations are associated with a NW-SE fault system and consist mainly of fumarolic activity. São Miguel was selected as a site for a seismic experiment in a European Union-sponsored project with the aim of quantifying the seismicity of various quiescent volcanoes in inhabited areas.The 3D distribution of P- and S-wave velocities is derived for central São Miguel, by traveltime tomography. We use P- and S-wave arrival times of 289 local earthquakes by a network of 23 seismometers. The model has good resolution in the shallowest 5 km. There are several Vp anomalies, referred to a composite picture of geologic deposits, volcanic structures and tectonic features. Furnas caldera has a shallow, low Vp value probably marking volcaniclastic sediments. A negative Vp anomaly is associated with the geothermal field of Ribeira Grande. Another low Vp area is related to the highly fractured NW-SE tectonic lineament connecting two geothermal areas in central São Miguel. Conversely, high velocity zones mark a central seismogenetic zone at 4-5 km of depth and the Altiprado

  20. Observations of gravity waves from satellite and implications for the wave driving of the SAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Riese, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics at low latitudes in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere is governed by an interplay of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and the semiannual oscillation (SAO) of the zonal wind. It is known that tropical dynamics has significant influence on the atmosphere over a large range of altitudes and latitudes. For example, QBO and SAO effects are seen in the MLT region, and there is a significant influence of the QBO on surface weather and climate in the Northern Hemisphere during winter. Still, global models have large difficulties in simulating a realistic QBO and SAO. One main uncertainty is the wave driving of these oscillations, in particular the driving by gravity waves (GWs). We derive GW temperature variances, GW momentum fluxes and potential GW drag from over three years of High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) satellite data in the stratopause region. These observations are compared with the SAO driving due to planetary waves, as well as the zonal wind tendencies, both determined from the ECMWF ERA-Interim (ERAI) reanalysis. HIRDLS satellite observations and ERAI support the general assumption that, due to selective filtering of the GW spectrum by the QBO in the stratosphere, GWs mainly contribute to the SAO momentum budget during SAO eastward wind shear. However, during SAO westward wind shear the GW contribution is usually smaller, and the wave driving is dominated by planetary waves, probably of extratropical origin. Still, we find indications in both satellite observations and ERAI that sometimes GW drag is important also during SAO westward wind shear.

  1. Space Radar Image of San Francisco, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of San Francisco, California, taken on October 3,1994. The image is about 40 kilometers by 55 kilometers (25 miles by 34 miles) with north toward the upper right. Downtown San Francisco is visible in the center of the image with the city of Oakland east (to the right) across San Francisco Bay. Also visible in the image is the Golden Gate Bridge (left center) and the Bay Bridge connecting San Francisco and Oakland. North of the Bay Bridge is Treasure Island. Alcatraz Island appears as a small dot northwest of Treasure Island. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on orbit 56. The image is centered at 37 degrees north latitude, 122degrees west longitude. This single-frequency SIR-C image was obtained by the L-band (24 cm) radar channel, horizontally transmitted and received. Portions of the Pacific Ocean visible in this image appear very dark as do other smooth surfaces such as airport runways. Suburban areas, with the low-density housing and tree-lined streets that are typical of San Francisco, appear as lighter gray. Areas with high-rise buildings, such as those seen in the downtown areas, appear in very bright white, showing a higher density of housing and streets which run parallel to the radar flight track. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: the L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes

  2. Plume-induced dynamic instabilities near cratonic blocks: Implications for P-T-t paths and metallogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou-Frottier, L.; Burov, E.; Cloetingh, S.; Le Goff, E.; Deschamps, Y.; Huet, B.; Bouchot, V.

    2012-06-01

    Plume head-lithosphere interactions around cratonic blocks result in thermo-mechanical disturbances that lead to heating and burial phases of crustal rocks. We present results from numerical models of plume head-cratonic blocks interactions where a free upper surface condition and realistic rheologies are accounted for. These models include distinct cratonic blocks embedded within a continental lithosphere and separated by several hundreds of kilometers. Surface topography, thermal field and effective viscosity values are tracked for 20 Myr of interactions. The modeled dynamic interaction of a plume head around cratonic blocks results in two main types of instabilities, each of them resulting in a distinct P-T-t path. The "slab-like" instability, focused on cratonic edges when plume head is away from the craton center, shows a near-isothermal burial phase, while the "drip-like" instability occurring above plume head material results in a near-isobaric heating phase. Consequently, both clockwise and counterclockwise P-T-t paths can be expected around cratons, as actually observed around the Tanzanian craton and other cratonic areas. Metallogenic data from gemstone-bearing rocks in south-east Africa and data from ultrahigh temperature and ultrahigh pressure metamorphism are compatible with our model. It appears that vertical mantle dynamics around cratons may also explain thermobarometric signatures that are often attributed to horizontal tectonics.

  3. On the relations between cratonic lithosphere thickness, plate motions, and basal drag

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artemieva, I.M.; Mooney, W.D.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of seismic, thermal, and petrological evidence on the structure of Precambrian lithosphere suggests that its local maximum thickness is highly variable (140-350 km), with a bimodal distribution for Archean cratons (200-220 km and 300-350 km). We discuss the origin of such large differences in lithospheric thickness, and propose that the lithospheric base can have large depth variations over short distances. The topography of Bryce Canyon (western USA) is proposed as an inverted analog of the base of the lithosphere. The horizontal and vertical dimensions of Archean cratons are strongly correlated: larger cratons have thicker lithosphere. Analysis of the bimodal distribution of lithospheric thickness in Archean cratons shows that the "critical" surface area for cratons to have thick (>300 km) keels is >6-8 ?? 106 km2 . Extrapolation of the linear trend between Archean lithospheric thickness and cratonic area to zero area yields a thickness of 180 km. This implies that the reworking of Archean crust should be accompanied by thinning and reworking of the entire lithospheric column to a thickness of 180 km in accord with thickness estimates for Proterozoic lithosphere. Likewise, extrapolation of the same trend to the size equal to the total area of all Archean cratons implies that the lithospheric thickness of a hypothesized early Archean supercontinent could have been 350-450 km decreasing to 280-400 km for Gondwanaland. We evaluate the basal drag model as a possible mechanism that may thin the cratonic lithosphere. Inverse correlations are found between lithospheric thickness and (a) fractional subduction length and (b) the effective ridge length. In agreement with theoretical predictions, lithospheric thickness of Archean keels is proportional to the square root of the ratio of the craton length (along the direction of plate motion) to the plate velocity. Large cratons with thick keels and low plate velocities are less eroded by basal drag than small

  4. ASTER Images San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image of the San Francisco Bay region was acquired on March 3, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters about 50 to 300 feet ), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    Image: This image covers an area 60 kilometers (37 miles) wide and 75 kilometers (47 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. The combination of bands portrays vegetation in red, and urban areas in gray. Sediment in the Suisun Bay, San Pablo Bay, San Francisco Bay, and the Pacific Ocean shows up as lighter shades of blue. Along the west coast of the San Francisco Peninsula, strong surf can be seen as a white fringe along the shoreline. A powerful rip tide is visible extending westward from Daly City into the Pacific Ocean. In the lower right corner, the wetlands of the South San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge appear as large dark blue and brown polygons. The high spatial resolution of ASTER allows fine detail to be observed in the scene. The main bridges of the area (San Mateo, San Francisco-Oakland Bay, Golden Gate, Richmond-San Rafael, Benicia-Martinez, and Carquinez) are easily picked out, connecting the different communities in the Bay area. Shadows of the towers along the Bay Bridge can be seen over the adjacent bay water. With enlargement the entire road network can be easily mapped; individual buildings are visible, including the shadows of the high-rises in downtown San Francisco.

    Inset: This enlargement of the San Francisco Airport highlights the high spatial resolution of ASTER. With further enlargement and careful examination, airplanes can be seen at the terminals.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth

  5. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey DeYoung Museum, San Francisco RUSSIAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey DeYoung Museum, San Francisco RUSSIAN HILL HOUSES (Photo taken in Middle 1850's) - Captain Dakin House, Taylor & Vallejo Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey San Francisco CallBulletin Library VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey San Francisco Call-Bulletin Library VIEW OF FACADE Demolished August 1940 - St. Rose's Church, North Brannan & Fifth Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  7. English Articulation between the San Francisco Unified School District and the City College of San Francisco. Youth Data Archive Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurantz, Oded

    2012-01-01

    San Francisco's Bridge to Success (BtS) initiative brings together the City and County of San Francisco, the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD), the City College of San Francisco (CCSF), and key community organizations to promote postsecondary success for underrepresented students. Various working groups, each comprised of staff from…

  8. 33 CFR 334.1065 - U.S. Coast Guard Station, San Francisco Bay, Yerba Buena Island, San Francisco Bay, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false U.S. Coast Guard Station, San Francisco Bay, Yerba Buena Island, San Francisco Bay, California; restricted area. 334.1065 Section 334.1065... Island, San Francisco Bay, California; restricted area. (a) The area. San Francisco Bay on the east...

  9. 33 CFR 334.1065 - U.S. Coast Guard Station, San Francisco Bay, Yerba Buena Island, San Francisco Bay, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. Coast Guard Station, San Francisco Bay, Yerba Buena Island, San Francisco Bay, California; restricted area. 334.1065 Section 334.1065... Island, San Francisco Bay, California; restricted area. (a) The area. San Francisco Bay on the east...

  10. 33 CFR 334.1065 - U.S. Coast Guard Station, San Francisco Bay, Yerba Buena Island, San Francisco Bay, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false U.S. Coast Guard Station, San Francisco Bay, Yerba Buena Island, San Francisco Bay, California; restricted area. 334.1065 Section 334.1065... Island, San Francisco Bay, California; restricted area. (a) The area. San Francisco Bay on the east...

  11. 33 CFR 334.1065 - U.S. Coast Guard Station, San Francisco Bay, Yerba Buena Island, San Francisco Bay, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false U.S. Coast Guard Station, San Francisco Bay, Yerba Buena Island, San Francisco Bay, California; restricted area. 334.1065 Section 334.1065... Island, San Francisco Bay, California; restricted area. (a) The area. San Francisco Bay on the east...

  12. 33 CFR 334.1065 - U.S. Coast Guard Station, San Francisco Bay, Yerba Buena Island, San Francisco Bay, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false U.S. Coast Guard Station, San Francisco Bay, Yerba Buena Island, San Francisco Bay, California; restricted area. 334.1065 Section 334.1065... Island, San Francisco Bay, California; restricted area. (a) The area. San Francisco Bay on the east...

  13. G-protein Stimulatory α Subunit Is Involved in Osteogenic Activity in Osteoblastic Cell Line SaOS-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Miwa; Suzuki, Akira; Ozono, Keiichi; Michigami, Toshimi

    2006-01-01

    In an attempt to study the roles of G-protein stimulatory subunit α (Gsα) in osteoblasts, we introduced an expression vector encoding Gsα into human osteoblastic cell line SaOS-2, and established the clones stably overexpressing Gsα (SaOS-2-Gsα). In SaOS-2-Gsα, the intracellular content of cyclic AMP (cAMP) was increased compared with the parental SaOS-2 cells. In addition, when treated with PTH[1-34], SaOS-2-Gsα exhibited more accumulation of intracellular cAMP compared with the parental cells, suggesting an increased responsiveness to PTH. We evaluated the proliferation rates of SaOS-2-Gsα and the parental SaOS-2 cells, and found that the proliferation was accelerated in SaOS-2-Gsα cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses exhibited the increased expression of Runx2, a transcription factor involved in osteoblast differentiation, in SaOS-2-Gsα cells. Finally, to examine the osteoblastic function in vivo, we inoculated SaOS-2-Gsα or parental SaOS-2 cells subcutaneously to immunocompromised nude mice. Although tumors in nude mice were not formed after inoculation of parental SaOS-2 cells, SaOS-2-Gsα cells proliferated in host animals leading to the formation of tumors with mineralized bone-like tissues. Taken together, these results suggest that the signals via Gsα play critical roles in the proliferation and osteogenic functions of osteoblasts.

  14. Implementing Technology for Science Classrooms in Sao Tome and Principe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardim, Maria Dolores Rodrigues

    This qualitative bounded case study was designed to understand how technology integration in schools could be addressed in a first-wave country. The integration of educational technology in Sao Tome and Principe (STP), a first-wave agricultural civilization, can narrow the divide between STP and third-wave information age societies. The conceptual framework was based on theories of change, learning, and context. Toffler's wave theory described how societies changed while Fullan's change theory examined how the people might change. Roger's diffusion of innovations addressed how processes change. Bandura, Vygotsky, and Siemen provided the framework for the learning within the model of change. Finally, the context theories of Tessmer and Richey's instructional design, Lave and Wenger's situated learning, and Sticht's functional context theory were applied. Twenty five individuals from 5 schools, including teachers, school directors, key educational stakeholders, and the minister of education were involved in a pilot project to integrate technology into the science curriculum. The data were collected via interviews, reflective summaries, and confidential narratives. The resulting data were analyzed to find emerging patterns. The results of this analysis showed that a first-wave civilization can adopt a third-wave civilization's features in terms of technology integration, when there is the support of opinion leaders and most of the necessary contextual requirements are in place. The study contributes to social change by providing access to knowledge through technology integration, which empowers both teachers and students.

  15. Lithospheric Structure of the North American Craton Imaged Using Waveform Inversion of Global and Usarray Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, A. J.; Lebedev, S.

    2014-12-01

    The North American Craton, now forming the stable core of North America, has a long, eventful tectonic history. The assembly of the craton, collisions and accretion at its current boundaries, major rifting episodes within it, and the loss of ancient lithosphere beneath parts of it are type examples of these key components of cratonic dynamics and evolution. Seismic tomography offers rich evidence on the structure and evolution of the cratonic lithosphere. With the deployment of the USArray during the last decade, much of the North American continent has been densely sampled with broadband seismic data. The resolution of regional-scale imaging, however, remains uneven, with important questions regarding deep structure, lateral extent and evolution difficult to answer. Here we present a new high-resolution model of the upper mantle beneath North America constrained by waveform fits of over 700,000 vertical-component broadband seismograms. Automated multimode waveform inversion was used to extract structural information from surface and S waveforms, yielding resolving power from the crust down to the transition zone, and improved resolution for a variety of features in North America. The internal structure of the Craton is resolved in detail. The lithosphere surrounding the 1 Ga failed Mid-Continental Rift shows reduced wavespeeds compared to the surrounding craton, likely indicating thermo-chemical alteration of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle. The sharp northern boundaries of the cratonic lithosphere closely follow the coastlines, with North America's and Greenland's lithospheric roots clearly separated. Strong lateral velocity gradients at depth observed in western Canada indicate the transition from cratonic lithosphere to Cordillera closely follows the surface trace of the Deformation Front. On the eastern margin of the continent, where multiple episodes of continental rifting are superimposed, the craton boundary coincides with the western extent of the

  16. San Francisco and Bay Area, CA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Although clouds obscure part of the city of San Francisco and the mouth of the Bay (37.5N, 122.0W), many cultural and natural features in the immediate vicinity are obvious. The Bay Bridge which was damaged in the 1989 earthquake, Candlestick Park, San Mateo and Dumbarton Bridges as well as the various colored settling ponds rimming the south end of the Bay, the San Andreas and Calaveras faults and many of the major highways can be seen. Color infrared photography is very useful for haze penetration and greater definition of the imagery as well as vegetation detection, depicted as shades of red.

  17. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  18. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  19. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  20. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  1. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  2. Book Buddies. Volunteers Bring Stories to San Francisco's Hospitalized Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Marcia

    This report describes Book Buddies, a volunteer-based outreach project of the San Francisco Public Library, whose goal is to provide reading services and to promote reading aloud to children and their families in San Francisco hospitals and pediatric clinics. The introduction chronicles the need for such a program; offers background information on…

  3. 8. Photocopy of drawing (from California Historical Society, San Francisco, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopy of drawing (from California Historical Society, San Francisco, California, Sherman, artist, before 1846) GENERAL VIEW OF MISSION (RIGHT), BARRACKS (TO LEFT OF MISSION) & GENERAL VALLEJO RESIDENCE (CENTER, WITH TOWER) - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

  4. Lithopsheric anisotropy in the Archean Slave craton, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Bostock, M.; Lockhart, G. D.

    2003-12-01

    Shear wave anisotropy and discontinuity studies of teleseismic earthquakes recorded at single seismic stations help to define vertical mantle stratigraphic columns. Beneath the Archean outcrops of the central Slave craton seismic discontinuities at 38, 115, 140, and 190 km appear to bound two distinct anisotropic layers. The discontinuity at 38 km is the Moho; discontinuities at 110-120 and 140-150 km depths observed at multiple nearby stations indicate that a layer of low velocity or distinct anisotropy exists between these depths. The coherent pulses at about 13 seconds on the radial component indicates a strong decrease in velocity at 110 km depth north and west of the Ekati diamond mine, but not to the south. The response on the transverse component indicates a rotation of anisotropic fabric at 117 km depth, a reversal at 140 km, and another rotation at 190 km. A flip in polarity at a back azimuth of about 280° occurs in the 117 km discontinuity and apparently marks an axis of symmetry of anisotropy, here probably the dip direction of steep layering or planar fabric. SKS anisotropy studies at this station indicate that the upper of two anisotopic layers has a fast-axis direction of 010° . Geochemical studies of xenolith samples from nearby kimberlites suggest that the boundaries at 115 and 140 bound a layer of ultra-depleted harzburgite, almost pure olivine, that formed as oceanic crust.

  5. Architecture of the Sulu crustal suture between the North China Craton and Yangtze Craton: Constraints from Mesozoic granitoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui; Wang, Qingfei; Liu, Xuefei; Wang, Wei; Pan, Ruiguang

    2016-12-01

    The Yangtze Craton (YC) and the North China Craton (NCC) collided in the Triassic, producing the prominent NNE-trending Sulu high-ultrahigh pressure metamorphic belt and associated crustal thickening. Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous granitic plutons in the Sulu orogenic belt and the Jiaobei terrane to the west were used to investigate the crustal architecture across the suture. Our new data show that the granitoids from these two regions have similar chemical and isotope compositions. They are all characterized by very high Sr and low Y-Yb contents, high Sr/Y and (La/Yb)N ratios, similar ƐNd(t) values from - 18.2 to - 21.4, and similar initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios from 0.7076 to 0.7119. The calculated Nd two-stage model ages (TDM2) based on whole rock data vary from 2415 to 2662 Ma. Co-magmatic zircon crystals from the granitoids have variably negative ƐHf(t) values from - 26.8 to - 12.8, with the calculated Hf TDM2 from 2008 to 2892 Ma. The inherited zircon crystals from these rocks are dominated by Neoproterozoic (800-600 Ma) and Triassic-Early Jurassic ( 220 Ma and 180 Ma) ages. The ƐHf(t) values of the inherited zircon crystals with U-Pb ages between 180 Ma and 800 Ma from Sulu and Jiaobei range from - 21.6 to 4.2 and from - 23 to - 1.9, respectively. They all plot within the field of crustal evolution between 1385 and 2583 Ma. The similar whole rock geochemical signatures and similar inherited zircon data indicate a similar source for the granitoids in these two regions. We propose that the source regions across the suture all belong to the YC. The occurrence of the YC crust beneath the NCC at this location is thought to have resulted from the westward subduction of the YC beneath the NCC and subsequent continental collision in the Triassic. In this model, the abundant 800 to 230 Ma inherited zircon crystals in the granitoids are interpreted to have been derived from the source region whereas the rare older inherited zircon crystals are thought to have been

  6. Spatial distribution of eclogite in the Slave cratonic mantle: The role of subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, Maya G.; Beausoleil, Yvette; Goncharov, Alexey; Burgess, Jennifer; Strand, Pamela

    2016-03-01

    We reconstructed the spatial distribution of eclogites in the cratonic mantle based on thermobarometry for ~ 240 xenoliths in 4 kimberlite pipes from different parts of the Slave craton (Canada). The accuracy of depth estimates is ensured by the use of a recently calibrated thermometer, projection of temperatures onto well-constrained local peridotitic geotherms, petrological screening for unrealistic temperature estimates, and internal consistency of all data. The depth estimates are based on new data on mineral chemistry and petrography of 148 eclogite xenoliths from the Jericho and Muskox kimberlites of the northern Slave craton and previously reported analyses of 95 eclogites from Diavik and Ekati kimberlites (Central Slave). The majority of Northern Slave eclogites of the crustal, subduction origin occurs at 110-170 km, shallower than in the majority of the Central Slave crustal eclogites (120-210 km). The identical geochronological history of these eclogite populations and the absence of steep suture boundaries between the central and northern Slave craton suggest the lateral continuity of the mantle layer relatively rich in eclogites. We explain the distribution of eclogites by partial preservation of an imbricated and plastically dispersed oceanic slab formed by easterly dipping Proterozoic subduction. The depths of eclogite localization do not correlate with geophysically mapped discontinuities. The base of the depleted lithosphere of the Slave craton constrained by thermobarometry of peridotite xenoliths coincides with the base of the thickened lithospheric slab, which supports contribution of the recycled oceanic lithosphere to formation of the cratonic root. Its architecture may have been protected by circum-cratonic subduction and shielding of the shallow Archean lithosphere from the destructive asthenospheric metasomatism.

  7. Episodic, Multi-staged Lithospheric Delamination Responsible for Destruction of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Wang, Y.; Zhong, S.

    2013-12-01

    Archean cratons represent the oldest tectonic units on the Earth and most of them are tectonically stable for >3 Ga. The North China Craton (NCC), however, had undergone extensive destruction during the Mesozoic to Cenozoic as seen from surface volcanism, magmatism, and tectonic deformation and geochemical and seismic observations suggesting removal and replacement of thick, old, and fertile cratonic lithosphere with thin, young, and depleted oceanic-type lithosphere [Griffin et al., 1998; Xu, 2001; Menzies et al., 2007; Zhu et al., 2012; Zhang et al., 2012]. Lithospheric delamination has been proposed to explain different episodes of volcanism in the Jurassic [Gao et al., 2004; 2008] and Cretaceous [Yang et al., 2003; Wu et al., 2003] on NCC and hence as a mechanism for destruction of NCC. However, the relatively long period (~100 Myr) of volcanism associated with the destruction of NCC was considered as a challenge to the delamination process [Menzies et al., 2007] which typically lasts for several Myr [Conrad and Molnar, 1999]. Here we show that delamination for cratonic lithosphere with chemically buoyant root and non-Newtonian rheology, different from that for normal lithosphere that was considered in most previous geodynamic studies, is episodic and multi-staged and may last for tens to 100 Myrs. For cratonic lithosphere with non-Newtonian rheology with relatively large chemical buoyancy, the cold, shallow part of the lithosphere goes unstable first, causing significant stirring and mixing of asthenospheric mantle and cratonic lithosphere. This delamination process may explain the main geochemical signatures in the Jurassic and Cretaceous volcanic rocks found in the NCC including their eclogite component [Gao et al., 2004, 2008] and sourcing both cratonic lithosphere and asthenosphere [Zheng et al., 2000]. Subduction process, by increasing tectonic stress and water content, helps reduce the lithospheric viscosity sufficiently to delaminate the entire

  8. Giant Mesozoic gold provinces related to the destruction of the North China craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Wei; Bi, Shi-Jian; Selby, David; Chen, Lei; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Thiede, David; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Zhao, Xin-Fu; Li, Zhan-Ke; Qiu, Hua-Ning

    2012-10-01

    Lode gold deposits in Precambrian cratons represent the world's major gold source and were mostly generated during formation and stabilization of the cratons. However, there is an extraordinary exception in the North China craton (NCC), where lode gold deposits formed after prolonged stabilization of the craton. Molybdenite Re-Os and hydrothermal sericite and biotite 40Ar/39Ar dating of major gold deposits from the Xiaoqinling district, southern NCC, bracket their emplacement in the range of 154.1±1.1 to 118.9±1.2 Ma (n=23), postdating formation of the craton by more than 1.7 billion years. Fluid inclusions extracted from gold-bearing pyrite have elevated 3He/4He ratios (1.52-0.22 Ra) and mantle-like Ne isotopes (20Ne/22Ne=10.02-9.22 and 21Ne/22Ne=0.033-0.027), indicating presence of mantle-derived fluids in the ore system. Measured δ34S of pyrite and δD and δ18O of hydrothermal micas and fluid inclusion waters in auriferous quartz further confirm a magmatic/mantle source for sulfur and ore fluids. Gold deposits of similar ages also widely occur in the eastern and northern margins of the NCC, which, together with those in the Xiaoqinling district, have a total reserve of ˜2500 t gold, forming the only known giant late Mesozoic gold province in the world's Precambrian cratons. These deposits formed coevally with extensive felsic to mafic magmatism, development of intracontinental rift basins, and exhumation of metamorphic core complexes across the eastern NCC, events interpreted as indicating thinning and destruction of the lithosphere beneath the craton. Rising of asthenosphere coupled with destruction of the lithosphere has generated voluminous mafic and felsic magmas that provided sufficient fluids, sulfur and, by inference, other ore components to form the giant gold provinces.

  9. 33 CFR 165.T11-630 - Safety zone; Giants Enterprises Fireworks Display, San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Fireworks Display, San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, CA. 165.T11-630 Section 165.T11-630 Navigation and... Areas Eleventh Coast Guard District § 165.T11-630 Safety zone; Giants Enterprises Fireworks Display, San... safety zone applies to the nearest point of the fireworks barge within a radius of 100 feet during...

  10. The Preservation of Meso- Archean Refractory Lithospheric Mantle Underneath the Eastern Margin of the Tanzania Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Q.; Liu, J.; Pearson, G. D.; Gibson, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies on the petrology and geochemistry of peridotite xenoliths from the Tanzanian Craton and its rifted margins have investigated the origin, chemical change and thermal state of the cratonic roots from its core area (Nzega and Mwadui), its Northern (Marsabit) and Eastern margin Labait and Lashaine area (e.g. Dawson, 1964; Henjes-Kunst and Altherr, 1991; Lee & Rudnick, 1999; Chesley et al., 1999; Gibson et al., 2013). These studies suggest that the Tanzanian cratonic mantle formed via high degrees of melt extraction in the Archean (oldest Re-depletion age TRD = 3.4 Ga, Burton et al., 2000) and sev­eral episodes of refertilization. In order to gain further temporal and chemical understanding on the effects of tectonic processes on cratonic roots, we carried out a Re-Os isotopic study on peridotites (n = 11) from Lashaine, which will be followed by Lu-Hf, Sm-Nd and Sr isotope investigations of the constituent minerals of the same samples. The preliminary whole-rock Os isotope data from Lashaine peridotites show a large range of 187Os/188Os (0.1061 - 0.1261), with TRD ages from Meso-Archean to very young (3.1 Ga to 0.3 Ga). There is a negative correlation between TRD and bulk alumina contents. One sample with the lowest Al2O3 yields the oldest age of 3.1 Ga. Five samples range from 2.5 to 2.8 Ga, three give ages close to 2 Ga, and one sample with a high Al2O3 has a TRD at 0.3 Ga. The positive Al2O3-187Os/188Os correlation trend passes above the PM composition may reflect ancient metasomatism by high Re/Os melts or recent metasomatism by very radiogenic Os plume-derived melts. These processes could be related to the evolution of the peripheral Proterozoic mobile belts, or Cenozoic rifting on the Eastern margin. Collectively, our new Os isotope data demonstrate that Meso-Archean (at least 3.1 Ga old) mantle portions are still retained underneath the rifted Eastern margin of the Craton. This is in line with previous results indicating that Archean cratonic

  11. High Water Contents in the Siberian Cratonic Mantle: An FTIR Study of Udachnaya Peridotite Xenoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doucet, Luc S.; Peslier, Anne H.; Ionov, Dimitri A.; Brandon, Alan D.; Golovin, Alexander V.; Ashchepkov, Igor V.

    2013-01-01

    Water is believed to be a key factor controlling the long-term stability of cratonic lithosphere, but mechanisms responsible for the water content distribution in the mantle remain poorly constrained. Water contents were obtained by FTIR in olivine, pyroxene and garnet for 20 well-characterized peridotite xenoliths from the Udachnaya kimberlite (central Siberian craton) and equilibrated at 2-7 GPa. Water contents in minerals do not appear to be related to interaction with the host kimberlite. Diffusion modeling indicates that the core of olivines preserved their original water contents. The Udachnaya peridotites show a broad range of water contents in olivine (6.5 +/- 1.1 to 323 +- 65 ppm H2O (2 sigma)), and garnet (0 - 23 +/- 6 ppm H2O). The water contents of olivine and garnet are positively correlated with modal clinopyroxene, garnet and FeO in olivine. Water-rich garnets are also rich in middle rare earth elements. This is interpreted as the result of interaction between residual peridotites and water rich-melts, consistent with modal and cryptic metasomatism evidenced in the Siberian cratonic mantle. The most water-rich Udachnaya minerals contain 2 to 3 times more water than those from the Kaapvaal craton, the only craton with an intact mantle root for which water data is available. The highest water contents in olivine and orthopyroxene in this study (>= 300 ppm) are found at the bottom of the lithosphere (> 6.5 GPa). This is in contrast with the Kaapvaal craton where the olivines of peridotites equilibrated at > 6.4 GPa have < 1 ppm H2O. The latter "dry" olivine may make the base of the Kaapvaal cratonic root strong and thus protects it from erosion by the convective mantle The calculated viscosity for water-rich Udachnaya peridotites at > 6 GPa is lower or similar (8.4× 10(exp 16) to 8.0× 10(exp 18) Pa./s) to that of the asthenosphere (<= 3.7x10(exp 18) Pa./s ). Such lithologies would not be able to resist delamination by the convecting asthenosphere

  12. Supercontinents, True Polar Wander, and Paleogeography of the Slave Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Ross Nelson

    evidence in support of a long-lived, Ediacaran-aged hotspot. The consistency of paleocurrent directions derived from the Great Slave Supergroup argues against significant regional vertical-axis rotations and for large and rapid TPW to explain discordant paleomagnetic directions observed within section. The last frontier for paleomagnetic constraints on supercontinents, TPW, and the antiquity of plate tectonics is earliest Proterozoic time. Laurentia, one of Earth's oldest continents that formed at the core supercontinent Nuna, contains several cratons that have adequate paleomagnetic and geochronologic data with which to test for evidence of early TPW and relative plate motion, the hallmark of tectonics. Although past comparisons have been made between the Slave and Superior cratons at each "bookend" of Laurentia, new paleomagnetic data supported by baked contact tests allow for conclusive early Proterozoic reconstructions. Similar to periods following Proterozoic supercontinents Nuna and Rodinia, early Proterozoic time is characterized by large TPW oscillations and large-scale plate reorganizations prior to amalgamation, possibly indicating the presence of `Kenorland', an Archean supercontinent.

  13. Surface Curvature in Island Groups and Discontinuous Cratonic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, M. S.

    2002-05-01

    The Canadian Archipelago includes eight major islands and a host of smaller ones. They are separated by water bodies, of varying widths attributable to glacial activity and ocean currents. Land form varies from relatively rugged mountains (~2000 m) in eastern, glacial, islands, to low lying western, similar to the continental topography adjacent. The Arctic region is thought to have been low average elevation before the Pleistocene. To a picture puzzler, it all looks like it fit together. Experimentally cutting apart the islands from large scale maps shows that the rough edges match fairly well. However, when those independent pieces are sutured together, without restraint, as in free air, the fit is far better. Far more importantly, they consistently form a noticeably concave surface. This tendency is not at all apparent in flat surface or computer screen manipulation; the pieces need to be "hand joined" or on a molded surface to allow the assembly to freely form as it will. Fitting together the coastlines above 60 \\deg north, from 120 \\deg west to 45 \\deg east, and comparing the resulting contracted area to the original, obtains an 8 percent area reduction. The curvature "humps" a trial planar section of 15 cms by 1.6 cm, a substantial difference in the radius of curvature. If you rashly suggest applying that formula globally, the resulting sphere would have a surface area of 4.7 x108,(down from 5 x108), and therefore radius of 6117 km, down from 6400, which is a rather preposterous conclusion. As nobody would believe it, I tested the idea elsewhere. The Huronian succession of six named cratons is adjacent on the south. I cut this map apart, too, and fit it together, once again getting a curvature, this time more pronounced. I am trying it with the Indonesian Archipelago, although this area has volcanic complications, and with Precambrian Basins in western Australia and Nimibia, Africa. Indications are - an essentially similar pattern of fit, but non uniform

  14. Crustal velocity structure of western Dharwar Craton, South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, D.; Chandrakala, K.; Padmavathi Devi, P.; Sridhar, A. R.; Sain, K.; Reddy, P. R.

    2001-03-01

    A deep seismic sounding (DSS) experiment was carried out across the Indian shield in 1972-1975. Kaila et al. (Kaila, K.L., Roy Chowdhury, K., Reddy, P.R., Krishna, V.G., Hari Narain, Subbotin, S.I., Sollogub, V.B., Chekunov, A.V., Kharetchko, G.E., Lazarenko, M.A., Ilchenko T.V., 1979. Crustal structure along Kavali-Udipi profile in the Indian peninsular shield from deep seismic sounding. J. Geol. Soc. of Ind., 20, 307-333) presented a crustal depth section based on the interpretation of the analog seismic data. In this paper, we re-examine the crustal structure of the Western Dharwar Craton (WDC) by reprocessing the data of three major shot points. Kinematic 1-D inversion, followed by 2-D forward modeling of the first arrival refraction and a few persistent wide-angle reflection phases, was carried out to build, a first order two-dimensional velocity model of this segment of the profile. This model brings out a simple crustal velocity structure consisting of an upper and lower crust. The upper crust (velocity 6.0-6.2 km/s) is on average 23 km thick, which is underlain by a lower crust of velocity 6.8-7.0 km/s. The average Moho depth in this part is about 37-40 km, with higher-than-normal P n velocity of 8.4 km/s. A relatively deep Moho in this part of the Archean peninsular shield is associated with relatively low velocities in the lower crust, perhaps indicating absence of underplating in this region. Present results bring out the fact that the crust of WDC is not so typical as many other Archean crusts, in terms of both thickness and velocities.

  15. Developing Early Warning Indicators for the San Francisco Unified School District. Youth Data Archive Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    San Francisco's Bridge to Success (BtS) initiative brings together the City and County of San Francisco, the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD), the City College of San Francisco (CCSF), and key community organizations to promote postsecondary success for underrepresented students. Partners agree that the first step in achieving this…

  16. Optical properties of rare earth doped strontium aluminate (SAO) phosphors: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kshatri, D. S.; Khare, A.

    2014-11-01

    After the first news on rare earth (RE) doped strontium aluminate (SAO) phosphors in late 1990s, researchers all over the world geared up to develop stable and efficient persistent phosphors. Scientists studied various features of long lasting phosphors (LLP) and tried to earmark appropriate mechanism. However, about two decades after the discovery of SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+, the number of persistent luminescent materials is not significant. In this review, we present an overview of the optical characteristics of RE doped SAO phosphors in terms of photoluminescence (PL), thermoluminescence (TL) and afterglow spectra. Also, we refresh the work undertaken to study diverse factors like dopant concentration, temperature, surface energy, role of activator, etc. Simultaneously, some of our important findings on SAO are reported and discussed in the end.

  17. Microbial biogeography of San Francisco Bay sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. A.; Francis, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The largest estuary on the west coast of North America, San Francisco Bay is an ecosystem of enormous biodiversity, and also enormous human impact. The benthos has experienced dredging, occupation by invasive species, and over a century of sediment input as a result of hydraulic mining. Although the Bay's great cultural and ecological importance has inspired numerous surveys of the benthic macrofauna, to date there has been almost no investigation of the microbial communities on the Bay floor. An understanding of those microbial communities would contribute significantly to our understanding of both the biogeochemical processes (which are driven by the microbiota) and the physical processes (which contribute to microbial distributions) in the Bay. Here, we present the first broad survey of bacterial and archaeal taxa in the sediments of the San Francisco Bay. We conducted 16S rRNA community sequencing of bacteria and archaea in sediment samples taken bimonthly for one year, from five sites spanning the salinity gradient between Suisun and Central Bay, in order to capture the effect of both spatial and temporal environmental variation on microbial diversity. From the same samples we also conducted deep sequencing of a nitrogen-cycling functional gene, nirS, allowing an assessment of evolutionary diversity at a much finer taxonomic scale within an important and widespread functional group of bacteria. We paired these sequencing projects with extensive geochemical metadata as well as information about macrofaunal distribution. Our data reveal a diversity of distinct biogeographical patterns among different taxa: clades ubiquitous across sites; clades that respond to measurable environmental drivers; and clades that show geographical site-specificity. These community datasets allow us to test the hypothesis that salinity is a major driver of both overall microbial community structure and community structure of the denitrifying bacteria specifically; and to assess

  18. Genistein modulates the effects of parathyroid hormone in human osteoblastic SaOS-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Fang; Wong, Man-Sau

    2006-06-01

    Genistein and parathyroid hormone (PTH) are anabolic agents that stimulate bone formation through their direct actions in osteoblastic cells. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether genistein modulates the actions of PTH in human osteoblastic SaOS-2 cells in an oestrogen-depleted condition. The present results showed that genistein (10(-8) to 10(-6) m) induced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteoprotegrin (OPG) expression in SaOS-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. These effects could be completely abolished by co-treatment with oestrogen antagonist ICI 182780 (7alpha-[9-[(4,4,5,5,5-pentafluoropentyl)sulfonyl]nonyl]-estra-1,3,5(10)-triene-3,17beta-diol). Genistein (at 1 microM) could stimulate the mRNA expression of receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). As OPG and RANKL are known to modulate osteoclastogenesis, the ability of genistein to modulate OPG and RANKL expression in SaOS-2 cells suggested that it might modulate osteoclastogenesis through its direct actions on osteoblastic cells. PTH (at 10 nM) stimulated ALP activity, induced RANKL mRNA expression and suppressed OPG mRNA expression in SaOS-2 cells, confirming its bi-directional effects on osteoblastic cells. Pre-treatment of SaOS-2 cells with genistein and oestrogen not only enhanced PTH-induced ALP activity, but also attenuated PTH up regulation of RANKL mRNA expression and PTH down regulation of OPG mRNA expression. Taken together, the present study provides the first evidence that genistein could modulate the actions of PTH in human osteoblastic SaOS-2 cells in an oestrogen-depleted condition.

  19. African hot spot volcanism: small-scale convection in the upper mantle beneath cratons.

    PubMed

    King, S D; Ritsema, J

    2000-11-10

    Numerical models demonstrate that small-scale convection develops in the upper mantle beneath the transition of thick cratonic lithosphere and thin oceanic lithosphere. These models explain the location and geochemical characteristics of intraplate volcanos on the African and South American plates. They also explain the presence of relatively high seismic shear wave velocities (cold downwellings) in the mantle transition zone beneath the western margin of African cratons and the eastern margin of South American cratons. Small-scale, edge-driven convection is an alternative to plumes for explaining intraplate African and South American hot spot volcanism, and small-scale convection is consistent with mantle downwellings beneath the African and South American lithosphere.

  20. East asian gold: Deciphering the anomaly of phanerozoic gold in precambrian cratons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldfarb, R.J.; Hart, C.; Davis, G.; Groves, D.

    2007-01-01

    Early Cretaceous orogenic gold deposits in eastern Asia are globally unique in that large Phanerozoic lode gold deposits occur in Archean-Paleoproterozoic cratons. In the northern Pacific region, ca. 125 Ma orogenic gold deposits in the North China, Yangzte, and Siberian craton margins, as well as in young terranes in California, may ultimately relate to the giant Cretaceous mantle plume in the southern Pacific basin and the relatively rapid tectonic consequences along both continental margins from resulting Pacific plate reconfigurations. In eastern Asia, such consequences include reactivation of and fluid flow along major fault systems, with fluid focusing into simultaneously forming, isolated core complexes of uncertain genesis. Deposition of gold ores in previously devolatilized high-grade Precambrian metamorphic rocks requires an exotic source of ore fluid, most likely subducted Mesozoic oceanic crust and/or overlying sediment. An implication is that Phanerozoic metamorphic core complexes in other destabilized craton margins could host large gold resources. ?? 2007 by Economic Geology.

  1. The Tropical Semiannual Oscillation (SAO) in Temperature and Ozone as Observed by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, E.; Holton, J. R.; Fishbein, E. F.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    The first two years of MLS temperature and ozone data are used to examine the tropical upper stratospheric SAO. Time series analysis revealed the strongest amplitudes of the SAO to occur near the equator at 2 mb for temperature and 5 mb for ozone, consistent with previous observations.

  2. Forecasting the Next Great San Francisco Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, P.; Rundle, J. B.; Turcotte, D. L.; Donnellan, A.; Yakovlev, G.; Tiampo, K. F.

    2005-12-01

    The great San Francisco earthquake of 18 April 1906 and its subsequent fires killed more than 3,000 persons, and destroyed much of the city leaving 225,000 out of 400,000 inhabitants homeless. The 1906 earthquake occurred on a km segment of the San Andreas fault that runs from the San Juan Bautista north to Cape Mendocino and is estimated to have had a moment magnitude m ,l 7.9. Observations of surface displacements across the fault were in the range m. As we approach the 100 year anniversary of this event, a critical concern is the hazard posed by another such earthquake. In this talk we examine the assumptions presently used to compute the probability of occurrence of these earthquakes. We also present the results of a numerical simulation of interacting faults on the San Andreas system. Called Virtual California, this simulation can be used to compute the times, locations and magnitudes of simulated earthquakes on the San Andreas fault in the vicinity of San Francisco. Of particular importance are new results for the statistical distribution of interval times between great earthquakes, results that are difficult or impossible to obtain from a purely field-based approach. We find that our results are fit well under most circumstances by the Weibull statistical distribution, and we compute waiting times to future earthquakes based upon our simulation results. A contrasting approach to the same problem has been adopted by the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, who use observational data combined with statistical assumptions to compute probabilities of future earthquakes.

  3. Continental lithospheric evolution: Constraints from the geochemistry of felsic volcanic rocks in the Dharwar Craton, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikyamba, C.; Ganguly, Sohini; Saha, Abhishek; Santosh, M.; Rajanikanta Singh, M.; Subba Rao, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    Felsic magmatism associated with ocean-ocean and ocean-continent subduction processes provide important evidence for distinct episodes of crust-generation and continental lithospheric evolution. Rhyolites constitute an integral component of the tholeiitic to calc-alkaline basalt-andesite-dacite-rhyolite (BADR) association and contribute to crustal growth processes at convergent plate margins. The evolution of the Dharwar Craton of southern peninsular India during Meso- to Neoarchean times was marked by extensive development of greenstone belts. These granite-greenstone terranes have distinct volcano-sedimentary associations consistent with their geodynamic setting. The present study deals with geochemistry of rhyolites from the Chitradurga-Shimoga greenstone belts of western (WDC) and the Gadwal-Kadiri greenstone belts of eastern (EDC) sectors of Dharwar Craton to compare and evaluate their petrogenesis and geodynamic setting and their control on the continental lithospheric evolution of the Dharwar Craton. At a similar range of SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, the rhyolites of WDC are more potassic, whereas the EDC rhyolites are more sodic and less magnesian with slight increase in TiO2. Minor increase in MgO content of WDC rhyolites reflects their ferromagnesian trace elements which are comparatively lower in the rhyolites of EDC. The relative enrichment in LILE (K, Rb) and depletion in HFSE (Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf) marked by negative Nb-Ta, Zr-Hf and Ti anomalies endorse the convergent margin processes for the generation of rhyolites of both the sectors of Dharwar Craton. The high silica potassic rhyolites of Shimoga and Chitradurga greenstone belts of WDC showing prominent negative Eu and Ti anomalies, flat HREE patterns correspond to Type 3 rhyolites and clearly point towards their generation and emplacement in an active continental margin environment. The geochemical characteristics of Gadwal and Kadiri rhyolites from eastern Dharwar Craton marked by aluminous compositions with

  4. Seismic evidence for stratification in composition and anisotropic fabric within the thick lithosphere of Kalahari Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodoudi, F.; Yuan, X.; Kind, R.; Lebedev, S.; Tilmann, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    S receiver functions obtained from the data of 97 seismic stations present evidence for the existence of a layered and thick lithosphere beneath the Kalahari Craton. We identified three negative discontinuities within the lithosphere of the Archean cratons and Proterozoic mobile belts of southern Africa. We also employed a novel combination of SRFs and surface-wave analysis to constrain the anisotropic properties of the lithosphere and its internal layering. Our results show that frozen-in anisotropy and compositional changes can generate sharp Mid-Lithospheric Discontinuities (MLD) at depths of 85 and 150-200 km, respectively. We found that a 50 km thick anisotropic layer containing 3% S wave anisotropy and with a fast-velocity axis different from that in the layer beneath can account for the first MLD at about 85 km depth. This depth is largely consistent with that of 8° discontinuity suggested as a global characteristic of cratonic lithosphere. Significant correlation between the depths of an apparent boundary separating the depleted and metasomatic refertilized lithosphere, as inferred from chemical tomography, and those of our second MLD (at 150-200 km depth) led us to characterize this negative discontinuity as a compositional boundary, most likely due to the modification of the cratonic mantle lithosphere by magma infiltration. We detected this MLD at a depth of about 150 km beneath the Zimbabwe Craton and Limpopo belt with a steep deepening to about 200 km underneath the Kaapvaal Craton and its passive margin. The deepening of this boundary is spatially correlated with the surficial expression of the ancient Thabazimbi-Murchison Lineament (TML). This may imply that the translithospheric TML isolates the lithospheric block of the relatively younger Limpopo terrane from that of the ancient Kaapvaal terrane. Finally, the largest velocity contrast (3.6-4.7%) is observed at a boundary located at depths of 260-280 km beneath the Archean domains and the older

  5. Paleomagnetism of the early Paleoproterozoic, volcanic Hekpoort Formation (Transvaal Supergroup) of the Kaapvaal craton, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humbert, F.; Sonnette, L.; de Kock, M. O.; Robion, P.; Horng, C. S.; Cousture, A.; Wabo, H.

    2017-02-01

    The Kaapvaal craton (South Africa) was the host of several major magmatic events during the Paleoproterozoic, including the volcanic Hekpoort and Ongeluk formations. Their possible comagmatic origin is the subject of a long debate. We performed a paleomagnetic study of the Hekpoort Formation to get a primary pole can be compared with the available paleopole of the Ongeluk Formation, but also to contribute to the apparent pole wander path of the Kaapvaal craton. Characterization of magnetic mineralogy by 3-axis thermal demagnetization of IRM and magnetic susceptibility vs temperature points out magnetite as the main remanence carrier in most samples.

  6. Building early Archean cratons from recycled Hadean crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neil, J.; Carlson, R. W.; Boyet, M.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of Earth's early crust and the geological processes leading to creation and preservation of stable Archean cratons are still poorly understood. Archean terrains are dominated by felsic Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite (TTG) rocks. These felsic rocks however, cannot be directly produced from melting of the mantle but must instead be derived from the melting of an older mafic precursor. Despite growing evidence for a basaltic >4.3 Ga primordial crust on Earth, there are only a few occurrences of zircons older than 4.0 Ga; in the Jack Hills conglomerates and in the Acasta gneisses. Only after ~3.8 Ga does the zircon record become more prominent. The zircon age distribution in itself suggests a long quiescence period of over half a billion years before the mafic primitive crust was extensively recycled to produce a significant amount of felsic magma. The Nuvvuagittuq greenstone belt (NGB) provides a glimpse at the nature of the mafic primitive crust. The mafic rocks from the Nuvvuagittuq greenstone belt (NGB), called the Ujaraaluk unit, have 146Sm-142Nd systematics consistent with them being formed in the Hadean, between 4.3 and 4.4 Ga. The NGB also comprises multiple generations of TTG ranging from 3.75 Ga to 3.35 Ga. Despite the fact that the mafic and felsic lithologies of the NGB show strong evidence of disturbance in the 147Sm-143Nd and 176Lu-177Hf long-lived isotopic systems, the NGB TTGs yield 142Nd and 182W anomalies that can be only generated in the Hadean. Moreover, zircons from the 3.35 to 3.65 TTGs have strongly subchondritic initial ɛHf values and display an ɛHf vs. age array consistent with their derivation from a Hadean mafic precursor. The NGB TTGs appear to have been formed primarily from melting of a source compositionally similar to the 4.4 Ga Ujaraaluk unit. The crustal history recorded in the NGB seems to be similar to the early crustal evolution recorded in the Jack Hills Hadean zircons where reworking of a >4.3 Ga enriched

  7. An Integrated Crustal Analysis of Craton-Terrane Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contenti, S. M.; Gu, Y. J.; Shen, L.

    2012-12-01

    velocities along the Thorsby/Rimbey domains. The proximity of these two domains to the STZ may shed new light on the spatial variability of subduction during the Proterozoic era. The combination of crustal depth, velocity, Vp/Vs ratios and anisotropy enables a careful re-examination of the existing tectonic model regarding the domain formation and reworking near the western edge of the North American Craton.

  8. The Hales discontinuity and upper mantle anisotropy beneath cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musacchio, G.; White, D. J.; Thomson, C. J.

    2003-04-01

    Seismic velocity discontinuities are commonly found within the upper 100 km of the mantle lithosphere, with great variability in their depth, lateral extent, and the polarity of velocity jump. Among the more commonly observed is the Hales discontinuity, identified in a variety of tectonic environments, and commonly associated with a high-velocity, highly reflective and sometimes anisotropic layer. In the Archean Western Superior Province of the Canadian Shield, long range R/WAR profiling gives a high-resolution estimate of the mantle V_P in the shallow upper mantle, providing a more certain determination of the nature of the Hales dicontinuity. Ray-based travel-time inversion of the data, have shown that Vp in the uppermost mantle is 8.0-8.3 km/s. A 15-20 km thick layer (layer-H) with >6% seismic anisotropy (N-S V_P of 8.3 km/s and E-W V_P of 8.8 km/s) dips northward at ˜10^o from a minimum depth of 48-50 km. The attitude of layer-H is consistent with the general tectonic strike; its depth range (50-75 km) falls within that of the Hales discontinuity. If a link between the Hales discontinuity and layer-H can be drawn, observations strengthen the objection that the estimated velocity contrast (0.2 to 0.4 km/s depending on the direction of wave propagation) is relatively high if layer-H represents a phase transition, and thus (re)opens the debate on the nature of shallow upper-mantle boundaries beneath continents. The high V_P and intermediate anisotropy of upper-mantle layer-H requires a harzburgite peridotitic composition with the a-axis of olivine aligned E-W. Layer-H might have emplaced during accretion (2.7 Ga Kenoran orogeny) of the North American proto-craton and be relic oceanic lithosphere. The Hales discontinuity might be an expression of continents accretion and map relic slabs in the shallow upper mantle.

  9. RadNet Air Data From San Francisco, CA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for San Francisco, CA from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  10. Salinity and Flow Monitoring in the San Francisco Bay Delta

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report describes the utility and approximate cost of expanding the salinity water quality monitoring network along the axis of the San Francisco Estuary from Suisun Bay to Rio Vista on the Sacramento River.

  11. 22. Photocopy of photograph (from San Francisco Chronicle Collection) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of photograph (from San Francisco Chronicle Collection) Photographer unknown, Date unknown SIDE VIEW OF CHURCH - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  12. 18. Photocopy of photograph (from De Young Museum, San Francisco, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of photograph (from De Young Museum, San Francisco, CA. c. 1900) Photographer unknown, February 1940 EXTERIOR VIEW FROM NORTHEAST - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  13. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey From Gleason Collection San Francisco ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey From Gleason Collection San Francisco College for Women Original: About 1884 Re-photo: March 1940 VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST - Mission Nuestra Senora de la Soledad, Soledad, Monterey County, CA

  14. 33 CFR 161.50 - Vessel Traffic Service San Francisco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... area consists of all the navigable waters of San Francisco Bay Region south of the Mare Island Causeway Bridge and the Petaluma River Entrance Channel Daybeacon 19 and Petaluma River Entrace Channel Light...

  15. 33 CFR 161.50 - Vessel Traffic Service San Francisco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... area consists of all the navigable waters of San Francisco Bay Region south of the Mare Island Causeway Bridge and the Petaluma River Entrance Channel Daybeacon 19 and Petaluma River Entrace Channel Light...

  16. 33 CFR 161.50 - Vessel Traffic Service San Francisco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... area consists of all the navigable waters of San Francisco Bay Region south of the Mare Island Causeway Bridge and the Petaluma River Entrance Channel Daybeacon 19 and Petaluma River Entrace Channel Light...

  17. 33 CFR 161.50 - Vessel Traffic Service San Francisco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... area consists of all the navigable waters of San Francisco Bay Region south of the Mare Island Causeway Bridge and the Petaluma River Entrance Channel Daybeacon 19 and Petaluma River Entrace Channel Light...

  18. 33 CFR 161.50 - Vessel Traffic Service San Francisco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... area consists of all the navigable waters of San Francisco Bay Region south of the Mare Island Causeway Bridge and the Petaluma River Entrance Channel Daybeacon 19 and Petaluma River Entrace Channel Light...

  19. 27 CFR 9.157 - San Francisco Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Mountain, California, scale 1:24,000, dated 1956, Photorevised 1980; (25) Half Moon Bay, California, scale... Francisco South, Montara Mountain, Half Moon Bay, San Gregorio, Pigeon Point, Franklin Point, Año Nuevo...

  20. 27 CFR 9.157 - San Francisco Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Mountain, California, scale 1:24,000, dated 1956, Photorevised 1980; (25) Half Moon Bay, California, scale... Francisco South, Montara Mountain, Half Moon Bay, San Gregorio, Pigeon Point, Franklin Point, Año Nuevo...

  1. 27 CFR 9.157 - San Francisco Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Mountain, California, scale 1:24,000, dated 1956, Photorevised 1980; (25) Half Moon Bay, California, scale... Francisco South, Montara Mountain, Half Moon Bay, San Gregorio, Pigeon Point, Franklin Point, Año Nuevo...

  2. 27 CFR 9.157 - San Francisco Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Mountain, California, scale 1:24,000, dated 1956, Photorevised 1980; (25) Half Moon Bay, California, scale... Francisco South, Montara Mountain, Half Moon Bay, San Gregorio, Pigeon Point, Franklin Point, Año Nuevo...

  3. 27 CFR 9.157 - San Francisco Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Mountain, California, scale 1:24,000, dated 1956, Photorevised 1980; (25) Half Moon Bay, California, scale... Francisco South, Montara Mountain, Half Moon Bay, San Gregorio, Pigeon Point, Franklin Point, Año Nuevo...

  4. 24. Historic American Buildings Survey From Gleason Collection San Francisco ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Historic American Buildings Survey From Gleason Collection San Francisco College for Women Original: About 1895 Re-photo: March 1940 CHAPEL - Mission Nuestra Senora de la Soledad, Soledad, Monterey County, CA

  5. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey National Park Service San Francisco, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey National Park Service San Francisco, California Year Built: 1835 Photo Taken: 1939 GENERAL VIEW - Pacific House, 200-222 Calle Principal, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  6. Late-Archaean Potassic Granite from the Bundelkhand Craton, Central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Saheli; Saha, Lopamudra; Nasipuri, Pritam; Pati, Jayanta Kumar; Patole, Vishal

    2014-05-01

    Late-Archaean granitoids, show wide range of compositional variation: (i) TTG like granitoids with strongly fractionated REE patterns, which can be both Na-rich and K-Mg-rich (Sanukitoids) (ii) K-rich, Mg-poor biotite granites with less fractionated REE patterns and showing negative Eu-anomalies (type area, the Closepet Granite, Eastern Dharwar Craton, India). Amongst them Late-Archaean Sanukitoid or K-rich Closepet-type granitoids are most widely reported from the Archaean Cratons world-wide: Superior Province, Canada, Pilbara Craton, Yilgarn Craton, Antarctica, Limpopo Belt, Dharwar Craton. Several models proposed so far for the origin of these granitoids mostly include partial melting of hydrated basalts, reaction of slab melts with mantle wedge peridotites, re-melting of an enriched mantle and then mixing of the resulting melt with the anatectic melt generated during the melting of continental crust in subduction zone settings. The Closepet-type potassic biotite-rich granites were mostly produced by re-melting of TTG-like continental basements most likely in a subduction zone setting. Most of the proposed models suggest such partial melting to have taken place in garnet-stability field and some in orthopyroxene-stability field. In this study we report late-Archaean (~2.61-2.5 Ga) potassic granite from the Bundelkhand Craton in central India. The Late-Archaean granitoids recorded from the craton are intrusive into the high-grade supracrustal rocks of the craton. They are classified as coarse grained grey, pink porphyritic granite, medium granied pink granite, granite porphyry and fine-grained pink granite. The supracrustal rocks of the craton have been metamorphosed at ~2.78 Ga under high-pressure conditions (~17-18 kbar)- medium temperature (600ºC) in a subduction zone setting. The intrusions of the granitoids at ~2.6-2.5 Ga mark the stability of the craton. The pink-porphyritic granite studied here preserves plagioclase-potash feldspar

  7. Draft Environmental Impact Statement, San Francisco Bay to Stockton, California Project. John F. Baldwin Ship Channel. Phase II. Central San Francisco Bay Segment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Ship Channels) Authorization River and Harbor Act of 1965 Public Law 89-298 Water Body San Francisco Bay Counties and State Contra Costa and San...Francisco, California Purpose Naviga t ion Local Sponsor Contra Costa County 2. NAVIGATION DATA Location Central San Francisco Bay near Ricbmond, California...Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board. Numerous local interests also contributed including Contra Costa County, City of Richmond, Richmond Model

  8. 76 FR 19519 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Downtown San Francisco Ferry Terminal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... Francisco Ferry Terminal Expansion Project in the City and County of San Francisco, CA AGENCY: Federal... Downtown San Francisco Ferry Terminal at the Port of San Francisco Ferry Building. The proposed project... document. Purpose and Need for the Project The purpose of the Downtown San Francisco Ferry...

  9. The People Speak Their Word: Learning to Read and Write in Sao Tome and Principe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freire, Paulo

    1981-01-01

    Freire reflects on his role as consultant to the Adult Literacy Program in Sao Tome and Principe. Emphasizing the political aspects of pedagogy, he describes how adults learn to read and write, as well as to think critically and participate in national development. (SK)

  10. Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) activity regulates osteoblast differentiation and mineralization in the SAOS-2 cell line.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaoxue; Chen, Zhongqiang; Liu, Zhongjun; Song, Chunli

    2012-08-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (type II, TG2) has long been postulated to directly promote skeletal matrix calcification and play an important role in ossification. However, limited information is available on the expression, function and modulating mechanism of TG2 during osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. To address these issues, we cultured the well-established human osteosarcoma cell line SAOS-2 with osteo-inductive conditioned medium and set up three time points (culture days 4, 7, and 14) to represent different stages of SAOS-2 differentiation. Osteoblast markers, mineralization, as well as TG2 expression and activity, were then assayed in each stage. Furthermore, we inhibited TG activity with cystamine and then checked SAOS-2 differentiation and mineralization in each stage. The results showed that during the progression of osteoblast differentiation SAOS-2 cells presented significantly high levels of osteocalcin (OC) mRNA, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and collagen I, significantly high alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and the increased formation of calcified matrix. With the same tendency, TG2 expression and activity were up-regulated. Furthermore, inhibition of TG activity resulted in a significant decrease of OC, collagen I, and BMP-2 mRNA and of ALP activity and mineralization. This study demonstrated that TG2 is involved in osteoblast differentiation and may play a role in the initiation and regulation of the mineralization processes. Moreover, the modulating effects of TG2 on osteoblasts may be related to BMP-2.

  11. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase induces apoptosis in human osteosarcoma SAOS-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jialiang; Zu, Jianing; Xu, Gongping; Zhao, Wei; Jinglong, Yan

    2014-02-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a non-receptor tyrosine kinase protein, acts as an early modulator of integrin signaling cascade, regulating basic cellular functions. In transformed cells, unopposed FAK signaling has been considered to promote tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. The aim of this study was to assess the role of focal adhesion kinase in human osteosarcoma SAOS-2 cells. SAOS-2 cells were transfected with PGPU6/GFP/shNC, and PGPU6/GFP/FAK-334 (shRNA-334), respectively. Expression of FAK was detected by real-time PCR and western blots. MTT assay was used to examine changes in cell proliferation. Cell apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry. The expression of caspase-3,-7,-9 was measured by Western blots. The expression of FAK in SAOS-2 cells significantly decreased in shRNA-334 group contrast to the control group (P < 0.01). Cells proliferation was inhibited by shRNA-334 and shRNA-334 + cisplatin, and the effects were clearly enhanced when cells treated with the anticancer agents. The level of cell apoptosis in shRNA-334 and shRNA-334 + cisplatin group was higher than in the control group (P < 0.01). The current data support evidence that down-regulation of FAK could induce SAOS-2 apoptosis through the caspase-dependent cell death pathway. Inhibition of the kinases may be important for therapies designed to enhance the apoptosis in osteosarcoma.

  12. Contemporary Art at School: The Educational Sector at the Sao Paulo Biennial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Almeida, Ana Cristina Pereira

    1989-01-01

    Describes how the Educational Sector of the Sao Paulo Biennial assists art teachers in introducing contemporary art into the schools. Outlines how students were observed viewing the exhibition and creating artworks. Describes how training programs and materials were provided to help the schools. (KM)

  13. Paulo Freire as Secretary of Education in the Municipality of Sao Paulo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Carlos Alberto

    1994-01-01

    Examines educational policy formation in Sao Paulo, 1989-92, under the leadership of Paulo Freire. Explores theoretical and policy controversies surrounding the diminishing role of the state in Latin America, the impact of social movements on educational policymaking, and the limits and possibilities of democratic-socialist perspectives in…

  14. The Social Distribution of Reports of Health-Related Concerns among Adolescents in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Moura, S. L.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the health-related concerns of adolescents living on streets as compared to poor and privileged adolescents living with their families in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The different groups of respondents were similar in terms of individuals' fear of disease and lack of concern about health in old age. AIDS and cancer were feared by…

  15. FAP Group Supervision: Reporting Educational Experiences at the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wielenska, Regina Christina; Oshiro, Claudia Kami Bastos

    2012-01-01

    The present article describes and analyzes educational experiences related to the teaching of FAP for psychology graduate students and psychiatry residents at the University of Sao Paulo. The first experience involved psychology graduate students and includes an example of the shaping process occurring within the supervisor-supervisee…

  16. "Conscientizacao" through Graffiti Literacies in the Streets of a Sao Paulo Neighborhood: An Ecosocial Semiotic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iddings, Ana Christina DaSilva; McCafferty, Steven G.; da Silva, Maria Lucia Teixeira

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we applied an ecosocial semiotic theoretical framework to the analysis of graffiti literacies in the Vila Madalena neighborhood of Sao Paulo, Brazil, to inquire about the nature and processes of "conscientizacao" (critical awareness) for adult street dwellers who had no or little ability to read and write (as traditionally…

  17. The Social Distribution of Explanations of Health and Illness among Adolescents in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Moura, Sergio Luiz; Harpham, Trudy; Lyons, Michal

    2003-01-01

    Investigates explanations of health and illness among adolescents from three socio-economic backgrounds in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The findings showed that adolescents from different socio-economic conditions draw upon similar explanatory models to make sense of health and illness. The findings suggest a need for health professionals to be sensitive to…

  18. The diameter of 88 Thisbe from its occultation of SAO 187124

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, R. L.; Wasserman, L. H.; Franz, O. G.; White, N. M.; Bowell, E.; Klemola, A.; Elliott, R. C.; Smethells, W. G.; Price, P. M.; Mckay, C. P.

    1982-01-01

    The 7 October, 1981 occultation of SAO 187124 by 88 Thisbe was observed at twelve sites. The occultation observations, together with information about the asteroid's light curve, gives a mean diameter for Thisbe of 232 + or - 10 km. This value is 10 percent larger than the previously published radiometric diameter of Thisbe.

  19. Landscape risk factors for attacks of vampire bats on cattle in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Murilo Novaes; Monteiro, Antonio Miguel Vieira; Lewis, Nicola; Gonçalves, Celso Alberto; Filho, Vladimir de Souza Nogueira

    2010-02-01

    Vampire-bat (Desmodus rotundus) attacks on cattle are a major concern for cattle-raising area. Blood loss and paralytic rabies due to bat bites can impose severe losses on the livestock. We took four municipalities inside the Sao Joao da Boa Vista veterinary district (Sao Paulo, Brazil) as a study area and tested a set of landscape features for spatial correlation with distance to areas in which vampire-bat attacks on cattle were documented. Bat- and cattle-related data from the Sao Paulo State Rabies Control Program were used. Landscape data (first-order rivers and their tributaries, main roads, railways and urban areas) were obtained from official cartographic agencies; forest, sugarcane and pasture data were acquired from remote-sensing mappings. The study area was taken as a grid split into 178 cells. Each 4kmx4km cell was filled with bat, cattle and landscape data. Our analysis detected that grid cells that were closer to areas of bat attacks on cattle had higher cattle density and a greater percentage of the land committed to sugarcane cropping, and were close to forest fragments. These results shed light on the need for rethink the Rabies Control Program strategies for defining the surveillance of vampire-bat populations and rabies control in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

  20. 33 CFR 3.55-20 - Sector San Francisco: San Francisco Bay Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Francisco Bay Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.55-20 Section 3.55-20 Navigation and..., MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Eleventh Coast Guard District § 3.55-20 Sector San Francisco: San Francisco Bay Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. The Sector San...

  1. 33 CFR 3.55-20 - Sector San Francisco: San Francisco Bay Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Francisco Bay Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.55-20 Section 3.55-20 Navigation and..., MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Eleventh Coast Guard District § 3.55-20 Sector San Francisco: San Francisco Bay Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. The Sector San...

  2. 33 CFR 3.55-20 - Sector San Francisco: San Francisco Bay Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Francisco Bay Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.55-20 Section 3.55-20 Navigation and..., MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Eleventh Coast Guard District § 3.55-20 Sector San Francisco: San Francisco Bay Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. The Sector San...

  3. 33 CFR 3.55-20 - Sector San Francisco: San Francisco Bay Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Francisco Bay Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.55-20 Section 3.55-20 Navigation and..., MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Eleventh Coast Guard District § 3.55-20 Sector San Francisco: San Francisco Bay Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. The Sector San...

  4. 33 CFR 3.55-20 - Sector San Francisco: San Francisco Bay Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Francisco Bay Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.55-20 Section 3.55-20 Navigation and..., MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Eleventh Coast Guard District § 3.55-20 Sector San Francisco: San Francisco Bay Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. The Sector San...

  5. A proteomic study on a human osteosarcoma cell line Saos-2 treated with diallyl trisulfide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong Kui; Zhang, Xu Hua; Li, Jian Min; Sun, De Sheng; Yang, Qiang; Diao, Dong Mei

    2009-09-01

    Garlic is generally used as a therapeutic reagent against various diseases, and numerous studies have indicated that garlic and its derivatives can reduce the risk of various types of human cancer. Diallyl trisulfide (DATS), a major member of garlic derivatives, could inhibit the cell proliferation by triggering either cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell lines as shown in many studies. However, whether DATS has the same effect on human osteosarcoma cells remains unknown. In this study, we have attempted to analyze the effects of DATS on cell proliferation, cell cycle, induction of apoptosis, global protein expression pattern in a human osteosarcoma cell line Saos-2 cells, and the potential molecular mechanisms of the action of DATS. Saos-2 cells, a human osteosarcoma cell line, were treated with or without 25, 50, and 100 micromol/l DATS for various time intervals. The cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis were examined in this study. Then, after treatment with or without 50 micromol/l DATS for 48 h, protein add pattern in Saos-2 cells were systematically studied using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. DATS could inhibit the proliferation of Saos-2 cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Moreover, the percentage of apoptotic cell and cell arrest in G0/G1 phase was also dose-dependent and time-dependent upon DATS treatment. A total of 27 unique proteins in Saos-2 cells, including 18 downregulated proteins and nine upregulated proteins, were detected with significant changes in their expression levels corresponding to DATS administration. Interestingly, almost half of these proteins (13 of 27) are related to either the cell cycle or apoptosis. DATS has the ability to suppress cell proliferation of Saos-2 cells by blocking cell cycle progression and inducing apoptosis in a dose and time-dependent manner. The proteomic results presented, therefore, provide additional support to the hypothesis

  6. Benthic fluxes in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammond, Douglas E.; Fuller, C.; Harmon, D.; Hartman, Blayne; Korosec, M.; Miller, L.G.; Rea, R.; Warren, S.; Berelson, W.; Hager, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of benthic fluxes have been made on four occasions between February 1980 and February 1981 at a channel station and a shoal station in South San Francisco Bay, using in situ flux chambers. On each occasion replicate measurements of easily measured substances such as radon, oxygen, ammonia, and silica showed a variability (??1??) of 30% or more over distances of a few meters to tens of meters, presumably due to spatial heterogeneity in the benthic community. Fluxes of radon were greater at the shoal station than at the channel station because of greater macrofaunal irrigation at the former, but showed little seasonal variability at either station. At both stations fluxes of oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and silica were largest following the spring bloom. Fluxes measured during different seasons ranged over factors of 2-3, 3, 4-5, and 3-10 (respectively), due to variations in phytoplankton productivity and temperature. Fluxes of oxygen and carbon dioxide were greater at the shoal station than at the channel station because the net phytoplankton productivity is greater there and the organic matter produced must be rapidly incorporated in the sediment column. Fluxes of silica were greater at the shoal station, probably because of the greater irrigation rates there. N + N (nitrate + nitrite) fluxes were variable in magnitude and in sign. Phosphate fluxes were too small to measure accurately. Alkalinity fluxes were similar at the two stations and are attributed primarily to carbonate dissolution at the shoal station and to sulfate reduction at the channel station. The estimated average fluxes into South Bay, based on results from these two stations over the course of a year, are (in mmol m-2 d-1): O2 = -27 ?? 6; TCO2 = 23 ?? 6; Alkalinity = 9 ?? 2; N + N = -0.3 ?? 0.5; NH3 = 1.4 ?? 0.2; PO4 = 0.1 ?? 0.4; Si = 5.6 ?? 1.1. These fluxes are comparable in magnitude to those in other temperate estuaries with similar productivity, although the seasonal

  7. Sao Paulo Lightning Mapping Array (SP-LMA): Deployment, Operation and Initial Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R.; Bailey, J. C.; Carey, L. D.; Rudlosky, S.; Goodman, S. J.; Albrecht, R.; Morales, C. A.; Anseimo, E. M.; Pinto, O.

    2012-01-01

    An 8-10 station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) network is being deployed in the vicinity of Sao Paulo to create the SP-LMA for total lightning measurements in association with the international CHUVA [Cloud processes of the main precipitation systems in Brazil: A contribution to cloud resolving modeling and to the GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement)] field campaign. Besides supporting CHUVA science/mission objectives and the Sao Luiz do Paraitinga intensive operation period (IOP) in November-December 2011, the SP-LMA will support the generation of unique proxy data for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), both sensors on the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R (GOES-R), presently under development and scheduled for a 2015 launch. The proxy data will be used to develop and validate operational algorithms so that they will be ready for use on "day1" following the launch of GOES-R. A preliminary survey of potential sites in the vicinity of Sao Paulo was conducted in December 2009 and January 2010, followed up by a detailed survey in July 2010, with initial network deployment scheduled for October 2010. However, due to a delay in the Sao Luiz do Paraitinga IOP, the SP-LMA will now be installed in July 2011 and operated for one year. Spacing between stations is on the order of 15-30 km, with the network "diameter" being on the order of 30-40 km, which provides good 3-D lightning mapping 150 km from the network center. Optionally, 1-3 additional stations may be deployed in the vicinity of Sao Jos dos Campos.

  8. Dynamic study of the upper Sao Francisco river and Tres Marias reservoir using MSS/LANDSAT images. M.S. Thesis; [BRazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Sausen, T. M.

    1981-01-01

    The relationship between the dispersion and concentration of sediment in the superficial layers of the Tres Marias reservoir and the dynamics of the drainage basins of its tributaries was verified using LANDSAT MSS imagery. The drainage network, dissection patterns, and land use of each watershed were considered in an analysis of multispectral images, corresponding to bands 4,5, and 7, of dry and rainy seasons in 1973, 1975, 1977, and 1978. The superficial layer water layers of the reservoir were also divided according to the grey level pattern of each image. Two field trips were made to collect Secchi depths and in situ water reflectance. It is concluded that it is possible to determine the main factors that act in the dynamics of the drainage basins of a reservoir by simultaneous control of the physical variables and the antropic action of each basin.

  9. Integrated Seismic Arrays for Imaging the North China Craton: the ¡°Destruction of the North China Craton¡± Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. J.; Chen, L.; Zheng, T.; Zhou, S.

    2007-12-01

    It has been known, mostly according to the petrological and geochemical studies particularly the xenolith's data, that the North China craton (NCC), which is part of the Archaean Sino-Korean craton, had been reactivated since Mesozoic, and experienced widespread extension and volcanism through much of the Cenozoic. Currently the NCC is characterized by a thin lithosphere (as thin as 80 km according to published studies) and strong internal deformation, where over half of the eastern China's earthquakes occurred while the two major plate boundaries about China are thousands kilometers away. Although it is seismically quite active this region encompasses the China's capital and several mega cities which together hosts a large population and are very important to China's growing economy. Supported by the Chinese earth science community, the Chinese NSF recently started a major research program, the ¡°Destruction of the North China craton¡± (DNCC). About 150 million RMB (~ 20 million US dollars) will be allocated for this 5-year multi-disciplinary research program which is open for competition for all the earth scientists in China. Here we report one major seismic observation project of ¡°Integrated Seismic Arrays of DNCC¡± just funded during the first phase funding of DNCC. This observation-driven project integrates two groups at the Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Peking University, and both institutions have their own broadband seismometers and have recently conducted pilot portable seismic array studies in North China. Up to seven linear broadband seismic arrays, each consists of 60-100 stations, are planned within the NCC. The principle objectives are to quantify the range and degree of the craton destruction in spatial domain with major focus on the east-west variation from the previously proposed intact craton in the west to the rejuvenated region in the east and the transition zone in the middle. With the expected

  10. Lithosphere structure underneath the North China Craton inferred from elevation, gravity and geoid anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.

    2015-12-01

    The North China Craton (NCC) is a classical example of ancient destroyed cratons. The NCC experienced widespread thermotectonic reactivations in the Phanerozoic. Recent work suggested that the old craton has been significantly modified or destroyed during this process. However, most of the studies were confined to the Eastern NCC, the nature and evolution of the lithosphere beneath the Central and Western NCC was less constrained due to the lack of data. While, recent geodetic data, with the advantages of high resolution and coverage, offers an opportunity to study the deep structure underneath the whole NCC. Here we construct a lithospheric-scale 3D model based on the integration of regional elevation, gravity, geoid and thermal data together with available seismic data. The combined interpretation of these data provides information on the density and temperature distribution at different depth ranges. In the Eastern NCC, a rapid thickness decrease of both crust and lithosphere is reflected, concordant with abrupt changes in surface topography and Bouguer gravity anomaly. Our results together with the widespread magmatic rocks suggest that the Eastern NCC has experienced significant destruction of the lithospheric mantle with substantial modifications and thinning of the crust. In the Central and Western NCC, the generally thick and 'cold' lithosphere suggests that the cratonic mantle root is preserved in the central and western NCC, in agreement with the relatively low heat flow, rare magmatic activity and long-term tectonic stability observed at the surface, with some areas mildly modified as indicated by thin lithosphere.

  11. Geology of the Terre Adélie Craton (135 – 146˚ E)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ménot, R.P.; Duclaux, G.; Peucat, J.J.; Rolland, Y.; Guillot, S.; Fanning, M.; Bascou, J.; Gapais, D.; Pêcher, A.

    2007-01-01

    More than 15 years of field and laboratory investigations on samples from Terre Adélie to the western part of George Vth Land (135 to 146°E) during the GEOLETA program allow a reassessment of the Terre Adélie Craton (TAC) geology. The TAC represents the largest exposed fragment of the East Antarctic Shield preserved from both Grenville and Ross tectono-metamorphic events. Therefore it corresponds to a well-preserved continental segment that developed from the Neoarchean to the Paleoproterozoic. Together with the Gawler Craton in South Australia, the TAC is considered as part of the Mawson continent, i.e. a striking piece of the Rodinia Supercontinent. However, this craton represents one of the less studied parts of the East Antarctic Shield. The three maps presented here clearly point out the extent of two distinct domains within the Terre Adélie Craton and suggest that the TAC was built up through a polyphased evolution during the Neoarchean-Siderian (c.a. 2.5Ga) and the Statherian (c.a. 1.7Ga) periods. These data support a complete re-assessment of the TAC geology and represent a valuable base for the understanding of global geodynamics changes during Paleoproterozoic times.

  12. Lithospheric architecture of the Slave craton, northwest Canada, as determined from an interdisciplinary 3-D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Hillier, M. J.; Kjarsgaard, B. A.; de Kemp, E. A.; Craven, J. A.

    2014-05-01

    geologic structures characteristic of mantle lithosphere within cratons found in continent interiors are interpreted using geo-registered diverse data sets from the Slave craton of northwest Canada. We developed and applied a new method for mapping seismic discontinuities in three dimensions using multiyear observations at sparse, individual broadband receivers. New, fully 3-D conductivity models used all available magnetotelluric data. Discontinuity surfaces and conductivity models were geo-registered with previously published P-wave and surface-wave velocity models to confirm first-order structures such as a midlithosphere discontinuity. Our 3-D model to 400 km depth was calibrated by "drill hole" observations derived from xenolith suites extracted from kimberlites. A number of new structural discontinuities emerge from direct comparison of coregistered data sets and models. Importantly, we distinguish primary mantle layers from secondary features related to younger metasomatism. Subhorizontal Slave craton layers with tapered, wedge-shaped margins indicate construction of the craton core at 2.7 Ga by underthrusting and flat stacking of lithosphere. Mapping of conductivity and metasomatism in 3-D, the latter inferred via mineral recrystallization and resetting of isotopic ages in xenoliths, indicates overprinting of the primary layered structures. The observed distribution of relatively conductive mantle at 100-200 km depths is consistent with pervasive metasomatism; vertical "chimneys" reaching to crustal depths in locations where kimberlites erupted or where Au mineralization is known.

  13. An isotopic perspective on growth and differentiation of Proterozoic orogenic crust: From subduction magmatism to cratonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Simon P.; Korhonen, Fawna J.; Kirkland, Christopher L.; Cliff, John B.; Belousova, Elena A.; Sheppard, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The in situ chemical differentiation of continental crust ultimately leads to the long-term stability of the continents. This process, more commonly known as 'cratonization', is driven by deep crustal melting with the transfer of those melts to shallower regions resulting in a strongly chemically stratified crust, with a refractory, dehydrated lower portion overlain by a complementary enriched upper portion. Since the lower to mid portions of continental crust are rarely exposed, investigation of the cratonization process must be through indirect methods. In this study we use in situ Hf and O isotope compositions of both magmatic and inherited zircons from several felsic magmatic suites in the Capricorn Orogen of Western Australia to highlight the differentiation history (i.e. cratonization) of this portion of late Archean to Proterozoic orogenic crust. The Capricorn Orogen shows a distinct tectonomagmatic history that evolves from an active continental margin through to intracratonic reworking, ultimately leading to thermally stable crust that responds similarly to the bounding Archean Pilbara and Yilgarn Cratons. The majority of magmatic zircons from the main magmatic cycles have Hf isotopic compositions that are generally more evolved than CHUR, forming vertical arrays that extend to moderately radiogenic compositions. Complimentary O isotope data, also show a significant variation in composition. However, combined, these data define not only the source components from which the magmas were derived, but also a range of physio-chemical processes that operated during magma transport and emplacement. These data also identify a previously unknown crustal reservoir in the Capricorn Orogen.

  14. Distribution of mineral deposits in accreted terranes and cratonal rocks of western United States.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    The western margin of the USA, covering approx 777 000 km2, is an agglomeration of tectonostratigraphic terrains accreted to the North American craton mainly during Mesozoic time. The terrains represent a number of fundamental crustal types: oceanic crust, island-arc crust, melange, various combinations of the preceding three, batholithic, miogeoclinal and platform. The distribution patterns of types of mineral deposits show that miogeoclinal terrains of the craton are characterized by replacement and vein-type Pb-Zn-Ag, skarn W deposits, Mo and Sn, whereas accreted terrains contain all the known volcanic massive sulphide deposits, all chromite and chert-associated Mn, and all the large Au quartz-vein deposits, except Goldfield, Nevada. Carlin-type disseminated fine-grained Au deposits occur mostly in windows of Palaeozoic miogeoclinal rocks in Nevada, but the only known fine-grained Au deposit in California is in very youthful volcanic rocks overlying oceanic-crust terrain. Large bedded-type baryte deposits, although in the same area and showing the same trend as disseminated Au in Nevada, are in allochthonous oceanic terrain. Hg and Sb are dominantly in accreted terrains, but Sb also forms important deposits in cratonal rocks. Most of the large Fe deposits are in the craton, but a few are in accreted island-arc terrains.-P.Br.

  15. Microxenoliths from the Slave craton: Archives of diamond formation along fluid conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulbach, Sonja; Stachel, Thomas; Heaman, Larry M.; Carlson, Jon A.

    2011-10-01

    A suite of 23 diamondiferous microxenoliths from the Ekati kimberlites in the central Slave craton was studied to elucidate the tectonothermal evolution of the lithosphere during craton formation and modification along craton margins, and associated diamond formation. Major- and trace-element abundances of eclogites (n = 16) reveal the presence of two compositionally distinct suites: a group of three eclogites with typical gabbroic trace-element patterns (flat REE N and low ΣREE, positive Sr N and Pb N, negative Zr N anomalies) and a group of 13 eclogites that are characterised by lower Mg#, Cr, Sc and Sr combined with higher Al 2O 3, TiO 2 and Na 2O, and a conspicuously stepped REE pattern with lower LREE/HREE. Inclusions in diamonds from the central Slave craton consistently plot with the latter group. The unusual trace-element characteristics of the second group are strikingly similar to those produced along fluid conduits in younger subduction zones, where infiltration of a metasomatic fluid induced eclogitisation. Eclogitic diamonds contain an average of 540 at.ppm nitrogen that is poorly aggregated (12% in the B centre), similar to eclogitic diamonds recovered from the A154 kimberlite (Diavik Mine, ~ 30 km southeast) that were dated to 1.85 Ga and linked to subduction at the western craton margin. This suggests that (1) by 1.85 Ga subduction-related reactive fluid transport and element mobilisation similar to younger examples were established, and (2) this fluid flow not only catalysed eclogitisation of subducting oceanic crust, but also was a prerequisite for the majority of eclogitic diamond formation beneath the central Slave craton. Harzburgitic and lherzolitic diamondiferous microxenoliths (n = 4) may document diamond formation in the Slave craton prior to emplacement of eclogites. Peridotitic garnets have sinusoidal REE-patterns with strong depletions in Ti, consistent with carbonate-melt or fluid metasomatism that may have also prompted diamond growth

  16. Vulnerability Assessment of a Coastal Dune System at São Francisco do Sul Island, Santa Catarina, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alquini, Fernanda; Bertoni, Duccio; Sarti, Giovanni; Ciccarelli, Daniela; Pozzebon, Alessandro; Ferreira de Melo Júnior, João Carlos; Voos Vieira, Celso

    2016-10-01

    In this paper a Coastal Dune Vulnerability Index (CDVI) has been applied on a beach located in the eastern side of Sao Francisco do Sul Island (Brazil). The aim of this study is to assess the vulnerability of a coastal dune system and to identify the areas that result most sensitive to environmental changes. The CDVI has been applied along six transects traced out on two sectors that have been selected based on dune characteristics: Zone A is characterized by well developed parabolic dunes, whereas Zone B is characterized by transverse dunes. The analysis involved 51 quantitative and qualitative variables, divided into five groups: geomorphological dune system condition, marine influence, Aeolian effect, vegetation condition and human effect. The total CDVI was computed as the unweighted average of the partial vulnerability indices. In summary, the total vulnerability can be classified as medium: the geomorphological factor must be monitored at Grande beach, in particular the blowouts in Zone A and the frontal dune retreat in Zone B. The results of the study confirm that the management of coastal areas might be improved using a tool such as the CDVI, which can be easily applied on a regular basis to take under control the factors that mostly affect the evolution of the site.

  17. The Río de la Plata craton and the assembly of SW Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapela, C. W.; Pankhurst, R. J.; Casquet, C.; Fanning, C. M.; Baldo, E. G.; González-Casado, J. M.; Galindo, C.; Dahlquist, J.

    2007-07-01

    The extent and nature of the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic craton of Río de la Plata of southern South America, a major but poorly understood crustal component in Neoproterozoic plate reconstructions, as well as the depositional, metamorphic and magmatic history of the surrounding orogenic belts, are reviewed and reassessed, in part through the analysis of material recovered from deep boreholes in western Argentina that penetrated Palaeozoic cover into basement. U-Pb SHRIMP zircon ages for these samples of 2162 ± 6 Ma (diorite), 2189 ± 14 Ma (amphibolitic schist) and 2088 ± 6 Ma (granite) encompass the range of ages determined for the major Palaeoproterozoic orogenic events in the exposed parts of the craton close to the Atlantic coasts of Uruguay and Argentina. Taken together with the geochemical and Nd-isotope characteristics of these samples and an olivine gabbro from a further borehole that failed to yield zircon, these results strongly suggest that the Río de la Plata craton is extremely uniform in its dominant chrono-tectonic and lithological make-up, and that it extends westwards as far as the 535-520 Ma Pampean orogenic belt, against which it probably has a fault contact. U-Pb SHRIMP zircon detrital age patterns are presented for representative metasedimentary samples from the craton cover in the Tandilia belt of eastern Argentina, and from the Pampean (Cambrian) and Famatinian (Ordovician) belts to the west of the craton. Whereas the oldest cover rocks in Tandilia clearly show material derived from the underlying craton, such detritus only appears in the younger (Ordovician) units to the west. Sedimentary protoliths in the Pampean belt were dominated by Neoproterozoic (broadly ˜ 600 Ma) and late Mesoproterozoic (broadly ˜ 1100 Ma) provenance, and derivation from the Río de la Plata craton is highly unlikely. Regional considerations, including previously published zircon data, palaeocurrent and structural data, suggest that these rocks must have had an

  18. Multiscale finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography of the Kaapvaal craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrot, S.; Zhao, L.

    2007-04-01

    We have measured phase delays of fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves for 12 events recorded by the Southern Africa Seismic Experiment at frequencies between 0.005 and 0.035 Hz. A novel multiscale finite-frequency tomographic method based on wavelet decomposition of 3-D sensitivity kernels for the phase of Rayleigh waves is used to map the shear velocities in the upper mantle beneath southern Africa. The kernels are computed by summing coupled normal modes over a very fine grid surrounding the seismic array. To estimate and minimize the biases in the model resulting from structures outside the tomographic grid, a jackknife inversion method is implemented. The contribution of heterogeneities outside the target volume is significant, but produces artefacts in the tomographic model that are easily identified and discarded before interpretation. With structures on length scales as short as 100 km retrieved beneath the array, the deep structure of the Kaapvaal craton is revealed with unprecedented detail. Outside the array, the corresponding resolution is 200 km. High velocity cratonic roots are confined to the Archean craton, and extend to depths of at least 250 km. Confirming earlier surface structural studies, we recognize two distinct units in the Kaapvaal craton. The eastern Witwatersrand block and the western Kimberley block are separated by a major near-vertical translithospheric boundary which coincides with the Colesberg Lineament. Lower than average velocities south and east of the Kaapvaal craton reveal extensive metasomatism and heating of the lithosphere, probably related to the Karoo magmatic event and to the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean.

  19. Neoproterozoic-Early Paleozoic rifting of the craton margin in eastern Kentucky: Evidence from subsidence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, P.T. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Walker, D. )

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of subsidence along the craton margin in eastern Kentucky indicates a Neoproterozoic to Early through Middle Cambrian rifting event developing on a subsiding passive margin of the Laurentian craton to the Iapetus Ocean. Subsidence associated with rifting is confined to the Rome Trough; an internally broken half-graben within the Laurentian craton; the trough trends sub-parallel to the Appalachian orogenic belt. In cross section the through as an abrupt faulted margin on the carton side and a tapering, gentle extension toward the orogenic belt. The stratigraphic sequence within the Rome Trough and toward the orogen consists of Neoproterozoic or early Cambrian basal sands overlying Grenville basement, and succeeded by silts, shales and discontinuous carbonates of the Rome Fm. that are overlain by shales and carbonates of the Conesauga Fm. Stratigraphic relationships suggest that an out-of-sequence, inboard rift developed along the Laurentian margin adjacent to a drift-phase continental shelf represented by strata of the Blue Ridge and Valley and Ridge. Analysis of the subsidence history of this region reveals trends which support the notion that the subsidence history of this area cannot be accounted for by typical passive-margin development. The subsidence history of the area within the Rome Trough presents a pattern of high thermal subsidence and produces beta values greater than in areas nearer the craton margin. These data indicate that an inboard locus of anomalous crustal extension occurred in the area of the Rome Trough while the remainder of the cratonal margin underwent drift-phase subsidence, and that the timing and magnitude of this event is related to the development of the Iapetan margin.

  20. Craton Development and Stabilization: Insights from SE Canada using P and S Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, A.; Bastow, I. D.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Gilligan, A.; Ellwood, A.; Levin, V. L.; Menke, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    Cratons, the ancient cores of the continents, are the longest-lived parts of Earth's surface that have survived thermal and mechanical erosion during multiple Wilson cycles. They are visible in tomographic images due to their thick (>200km), seismically fast keels or roots. The Laurentian keel beneath North America is intriguing since its root is thought to extend beneath both the Archean Superior craton and the Proterozoic Grenville province thus implying that keel formation may not have been restricted to Archean times. In order to address this issue we present a P and S wave relative arrival-time tomographic study using data from seismograph networks in SE Canada and the NE US, stretching from the southern tip of Hudson Bay within the Superior craton to the coastal Phanerozoic Appalachian terranes. The tomographic images display three broad zones of increasing mantle wavespeed from globally "slow" in the Appalachian terranes, to a "fast" Grenville Province and "extremely fast" Superior craton. We observe a linear low-velocity feature resulting from modification of the Laurentian keel by the passage of the Great Meteor hotspot. This feature is progressively offset southwestward with depth, potentially due to viscous coupling with mantle flow. No major plate-scale underthrusting during the Grenville Orogeny is apparent, which contradicts the inferred results from crustal seismic reflection and refraction studies. Our results therefore may have fundamental implications for the nature of the Grenville orogenic collision and cratonic stabilization of North America. The results also support the developing consensus that keels form in two stages: a chemically depleted core of Archean age followed by a thermally developed, less-depleted lithosphere during Proterozoic times, highlighted by an abrupt wavespeed contrast in the tomographic images.

  1. The invisible hand in San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Bouvier, L; Davis, C; Gardner, B; Haupt, A; Kent, M; Molajo, D; Merrick, T; Scully, J; Van Der Tak, J

    1986-05-01

    Over 1000 population enthusiasts found their way to San Francisco for the 1986 meetings of the Population Association of America (PAA) April 3-5. 2 pre-meetings included: 1) the Association for Population/Family Planning Libraries and Information Centers-International (APLIC), and 2) the psychosocial workshop. Sexual activity was a major topic of the session on "Fertility: Early and Late." Further investigation of the effects of marriage and fertility on behavior was reviewed in a session entitled "Trends in Household Composition and Living Arrangements." The session "Demography of Crime and Justice" gave the demographic answer to such questions as: Is the crime rate really falling? Opinions in a panel on the future of US international population policy were sharply divided; Agency for International Development representative Alison Rosenberg outlined the re-examination of the Agency's population program that had taken place since the population conference in Mexico City in 1984. The Presidential Address was preceded by the annual awards ceremony. PAA President Paul Demeny focused on an issue that has been at the core of the debate about whether population has good, bad, indifferent, or indeterminate effects on economic development: the extent to which society can entrust the solution of population problems to market forces. This year's PAA meeting echoed growing concern in the population field about low fertility in the more developed world as well as increasing skepticism over the negative consequences of rapid developing country population growth.

  2. Environmental setting of San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conomos, T.J.; Smith, R.E.; Gartner, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    San Francisco Bay, the largest bay on the California coast, is a broad, shallow, turbid estuary comprising two geographically and hydrologically distinct subestuaries: the northern reach lying between the connection to the Pacific Ocean at the Golden Gate and the confluence of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River system, and the southern reach (herein called South Bay) between the Golden Gate and the southern terminus of the bay. The northern reach is a partially mixed estuary dominated by seasonally varying river inflow, and the South Bay is a tidally oscillating lagoon-type estuary. Freshwater inflows, highest during winter, generate strong estuarine circulation and largely determine water residence times. They also bring large volumes of dissolved and particulate materials to the estuary. Tidal currents, generated by mixed semidiurnal and diurnal tides, mix the water column and, together with river inflow and basin geometry, determine circulation patterns. Winds, which are strongest during summer and during winter storms, exert stress on the bay's water surface, thereby creating large waves that resuspend sediment from the shallow bay bottom and, together with the tidal currents, contribute markedly to the transport of water masses throughout the shallow estuary. ?? 1985 Dr W. Junk Publishers.

  3. [Deafness and mentality in Francisco Goya's paintings].

    PubMed

    Betlejewski, Stanisław; Ossowski, Roman

    2009-01-01

    The famous painter Francisco Goya y Lucientes (1746-1828) suffered during his life one or several diseases, the nature of which has not been determined with certainty. At age of 46, Goya suffered from severe illness that lasted a few months. It caused loss of vision and hearing, tinnitus, dizziness, a right-sides paralysis, weakness and general malaise. Although he recovered from a cerebral stroke which accompanied it, the deafness remained unaltered. The illness divides Goya's artistic life into two great different periods. After in the painter produces his greatest works. The visual experience after the illness was heightened by the exclusion of acoustics stimuli and the artist's talent rose to the highest level. His character became more withdrawn and introspective and his entire vitality was direscted to his painting. Goya's painting became progressively more gloom and satirical during his long convalescence. The artist suffered a stroke at age 73 that again rendered him paralysed on the right side. The precise cause of his illness has long been debated. Ome medical writers have favored the diagnosis of syphilis, some consider the possibility of an exogenous psychosis, and other suggests that the symptoms of the illness are more congruent with heavy metal poisoning, particulary lead. It is interesting to speculate how the Goya's deafness influenced the artist's mentality and the changes of his painting. Interesting is also the problem of the sensory compensation in fact of disturbance of physiological function of one of the senses.

  4. SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cells bind fibroblasts via ICAM-1 and this is increased by tumour necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    David, Manu S; Kelly, Elizabeth; Cheung, Ivan; Xaymardan, Munira; Moore, Malcolm A S; Zoellner, Hans

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported exchange of membrane and cytoplasmic markers between SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cells and human gingival fibroblasts (h-GF) without comparable exchange of nuclear markers, while similar h-GF exchange was seen for melanoma and ovarian carcinoma cells. This process of "cellular sipping" changes phenotype such that cells sharing markers of both SAOS-2 and h-GF have morphology intermediate to that of either cell population cultured alone, evidencing increased tumour cell diversity without genetic change. TNF-α increases cellular sipping between h-GF and SAOS-2, and we here study binding of SAOS-2 to TNF-α treated h-GF to determine if increased cellular sipping can be accounted for by cytokine stimulated SAOS-2 binding. More SAOS-2 bound h-GF pe-seeded wells than culture plastic alone (p<0.001), and this was increased by h-GF pre-treatment with TNF-α (p<0.001). TNF-α stimulated binding was dose dependent and maximal at 1.16 nM (p<0.05) with no activity below 0.006 nM. SAOS-2 binding to h-GF was independent of serum, while the lipopolysaccharide antagonist Polymyxin B did not affect results, and TNF-α activity was lost on boiling. h-GF binding of SAOS-2 started to increase after 30min TNF-α stimulation and was maximal by 1.5 hr pre-treatment (p<0.001). h-GF retained maximal binding up to 6 hrs after TNF-α stimulation, but this was lost by 18 hrs (p<0.001). FACS analysis demonstrated increased ICAM-1 consistent with the time course of SAOS-2 binding, while antibody against ICAM-1 inhibited SAOS-2 adhesion (p<0.04). Pre-treating SAOS-2 with TNF-α reduced h-GF binding to background levels (p<0.003), and this opposite effect to h-GF cytokine stimulation suggests that the history of cytokine exposure of malignant cells migrating across different microenvironments can influence subsequent interactions with fibroblasts. Since cytokine stimulated binding was comparable in magnitude to earlier reported TNF-α stimulated cellular sipping, we conclude that TNF

  5. Documentation for the machine-readable version of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Star catalogue (SAO) version 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, N. G.; Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An updated, corrected and extended machine readable version of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory star catalog (SAO) is described. Published and unpublished errors discovered in the previous version have been corrected, and multiple star and supplemental BD identifications added to stars where more than one SAO entry has the same Durchmusterung number. Henry Draper Extension (HDE) numbers have been added for stars found in both volumes of the extension. Data for duplicate SAO entries (those referring to the same star) have been blanked out, but the records themselves have been retained and flagged so that sequencing and record count are identical to the published catalog.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide overload increases adriamycin-induced apoptosis of SaOS(2)FM, a manganese superoxide dismutase-overexpressing human osteosarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yadi; Kuroda, Masahiro; Gao, Xian-Shu; Asaumi, Jun-Ichi; Shibuya, Kohichi; Kawasaki, Shoji; Akaki, Shiro; St Clair, Daret; Hiraki, Yoshio; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2005-05-01

    We previously developed a new microscopic observation system that enables time-lapse quantitative analysis of apoptosis and necrosis. With this system we quantitatively analyzed adriamycin (ADR)-induced cell death using manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD)- and wild-type p53-gene transfectants on SaOS(2), a p53-deficient human osteosarcoma cell line. A highly MnSOD-overexpressing cell line, SaOS(2)FM(H), acquired ADR-tolerance compared to the parent cell line SaOS(2). The ADR-tolerance of SaOS(2)FM(H) diminished by L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO), which did not change ADR-sensitivity of SaOS(2), to the similar ADR-sensitivity of SaOS(2). A wild-type p53-expressing cell line, SaOS(2)wtp53, significantly increased in ADR-sensitivity compared to SaOS(2). This ADR-sensitivity of SaOS(2)wtp53 was enhanced by BSO. When isosorbide 5-mononitrate was combined with BSO, isosorbide 5-mononitrate increased ADR sensitivity of a moderately MnSOD-overexpressing cell line, SaOS(2)FM(L), decreased that of SaOS(2) FM(H), and did not change those of SaOS(2) and SaOS(2)wtp53 compared to BSO alone. Time-lapse microscopic observations during ADR treatment for 24 h indicated that the most cells of each cell line underwent apoptosis, and a few cells (less than 11%) died by necrosis. When cells were treated with iso-concentration of ADR, apoptosis of SaOS(2)FM(H) was less than that of SaOS(2). BSO, which did not change ADR-sensitivity of SaOS(2), increased appearance rate of ADR-induced apoptosis, but not necrosis of MnSOD-overexpressing cell lines. When iso-survival dose of ADR, which reduced surviving fraction to 0.01, was given for each cell line, no difference was observed in appearance of either apoptosis or necrosis between SaOS(2) and MnSOD-overexpressing cell lines. On the other hands, appearance of both apoptosis and the following secondary necrosis of SaOS(2) wtp53 was significantly accelerated compared to those of SaOS(2). These findings indicate that hydrogen peroxide

  7. A preliminary assessment of metal bioaccumulation in the blue crab, Callinectes danae S., from the Sao Vicente Channel, Sao Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bordon, Isabella C A C; Sarkis, Jorge E S; Tomás, Acácio R G; Souza, Marcelo R; Scalco, Allan; Lima, Mariana; Hortellani, Marcos A

    2012-04-01

    The concentrations of metals in tissues of Callinectes danae were evaluated, aiming to determine the bioaccumulation process of this species. Gills presented the highest mean concentrations for most metals, except for Hg (Sao Vicente Channel is included) would be important to confirm if this pattern of bioaccumulation can be extended to the population of C. danae of this estuary.

  8. Breeding avifauna of the south San Francisco Bay estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, Robert E.

    1977-01-01

    San Francisco Bay represents one of the largest estuarine areas on the Pacific Coast of North America. Its open waters, tidal flats, tidal marshes and solar evaporation ponds provide critical foraging, resting and breeding habitat for migratory and resident birds. The avifauna of San Francisco Bay has received considerable attention; however, little of it has been directed toward assessing the overall importance of the Bay as a nesting area. Works by Grinnell and Wythe (1927), Grinnell and Miller (1944) and Sibley (1952) are the only comprehensive studies of San Francisco Bay avifauna. These studies, while major contributions, are broad in scope as they relate to the breeding avifauna of the Bay's estuarine areas. Several studies by Johnston (1955, 1956a, b), Marshall (1948a, b), DeGroot (1927, 1931) and Zucca (1954) have concentrated on the breeding biology of individual species; however, much of the marsh reclamation and Bay fill has occurred since. The present breeding status of many resident and migratory birds is poorly known for San Francisco Bay. Included among these are three rare or endangered forms: California Black Rail, California Clapper Rail and California Least Tern. In addition, some species now found in the area represent recent breeding range extensions. This study, undertaken from March to September 1971 and including a few more recent data, presents a quantitative assessment of the present breeding bird populations in the South San Francisco Bay area.

  9. ASTER Images San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    These images of the San Francisco Bay region were acquired on March 3, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. Each covers an area 60 kilometers (37 miles) wide and 75 kilometers (47 miles) long. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image the Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    Upper Left: The color infrared composite uses bands in the visible and reflected infrared. Vegetation is red, urban areas are gray; sediment in the bays shows up as lighter shades of blue. Thanks to the 15 meter (50-foot) spatial resolution, shadows of the towers along the Bay Bridge can be seen.

    Upper right: A composite of bands in the short wave infrared displays differences in soils and rocks in the mountainous areas. Even though these regions appear entirely vegetated in the visible, enough surface shows through openings in the vegetation to allow the ground to be imaged.

    Lower left: This composite of multispectral thermal bands shows differences in urban materials in varying colors. Separation of materials is due to differences in thermal emission properties, analogous to colors in the visible.

    Lower right: This is a color coded temperature image of water temperature, derived from the thermal bands. Warm waters are in white and yellow, colder waters are blue. Suisun Bay in the upper right is fed directly from the cold Sacramento River. As the water flows through San Pablo and San Francisco Bays on the way to the Pacific, the waters warm up.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is

  10. Community Heavy Metal Exposure, San Francisco, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, A.; Devine, M.; Ho, T.; Zapata, I.; Bissell, M.; Neiss, J.

    2008-12-01

    Heavy metals are natural elements that generally occur in minute concentrations in the earth's crust. While some of these elements, in small quantities, are vital to life, most are harmful in larger doses. Various industrial and agricultural processes can result in dangerously high concentrations of heavy metals in our environment. Consequently, humans can be exposed to unsafe levels of these elements via the air we breathe, the water and food we consume, and the many products we use. During a two week study we collected numerous samples of sediments, water, food, and household items from around the San Francisco Bay Area that represent industrial, agricultural, and urban/residential settings. We analyzed these samples for Mercury (Hg), Lead (Pb), and Arsenic (As). Our goal was to examine the extent of our exposure to heavy metals in our daily lives. We discovered that many of the common foods and materials in our lives have become contaminated with unhealthy concentrations of these metals. Of our food samples, many exceeded the EPA's Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) set for each metal. Meats (fish, chicken, and beef) had higher amounts of each metal than did non-meat items. Heavy metals were also prevalent in varying concentrations in the environment. While many of our samples exceeded the EPA's Sediment Screening Level (SSL) for As, only two other samples surpassed the SSL set for Pb, and zero of our samples exceeded the SSL for Hg. Because of the serious health effects that can result from over-exposure to heavy metals, the information obtained in this study should be used to influence our future dietary and recreational habits.

  11. Sex worker health: San Francisco style

    PubMed Central

    Cohan, D; Lutnick, A; Davidson, P; Cloniger, C; Herlyn, A; Breyer, J; Cobaugh, C; Wilson, D; Klausner, J

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To describe the characteristics of sex workers accessing care at a peer based clinic in San Francisco and to evaluate predictors of sexually transmitted infections (STI). Methods We conducted an observational study of sex workers at St James Infirmary. Individuals underwent an initial questionnaire, and we offered screening for STI at each clinic visit. We performed univariate, bivariate, and multivariable analyses to assess for predictors of STI in this population. Results We saw 783 sex workers identifying as female (53.6%), male (23.9%), male to female transgender (16.1%), and other (6.5%). 70% had never disclosed their sex work to a medical provider. Participants represented a wide range of ethnicities, educational backgrounds, and types of sex work. The most common substance used was tobacco (45.8%). Nearly 40% reported current illicit drug use. Over half reported domestic violence, and 36.0% reported sex work related violence. Those screened had gonorrhoea (12.4%), chlamydia (6.8%), syphilis (1.8%), or herpes simplex virus 2 (34.3%). Predictors of STI included African‐American race (odds ratio (OR) 3.3), male gender (OR 1.9), and sex work related violence (OR 1.9). In contrast, participants who had only ever engaged in collective sex work were less likely to have an STI (OR 0.4). Conclusions The majority of sex workers have never discussed their work with a medical provider. Domestic violence is extremely prevalent as is work related violence. Working with other sex workers appears to be protective of STIs. STI prevention interventions should target African‐American and male sex workers. Addressing violence in the workplace and encouraging sex workers to work collectively may be effective prevention strategies. PMID:16854996

  12. 76 FR 45421 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; China Basin, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... necessary to allow the public to cross the bridge to participate in the scheduled San Francisco Marathon, a..., 2011, to allow participants in the San Francisco Marathon to cross the bridge during the event....

  13. 78 FR 31414 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; China Basin, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... cross the bridge to participate in the scheduled San Francisco Marathon, a community event. This... participants in the San Francisco Marathon to cross the bridge during the event. This temporary deviation...

  14. 41. Historic American Buildings Survey San Francisco CallBulletin Library San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Historic American Buildings Survey San Francisco Call-Bulletin Library San Francisco, California INTERIOR VIEW OF CHURCH BEFORE RESTORATION - 1934 - Mission San Carlos Borromeo, Rio Road & Lausen Drive, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Monterey County, CA

  15. Nucleus deformation of SaOs-2 cells on rhombic µ-pillars.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Melanie; Stannard, Cleo; Anselme, Karine; Rühe, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    It has been previously shown that osteosarcoma (SaOs-2) cells respond to micropillared surfaces consisting of poly-L-lactic acid with strong deformation of the cell body and nucleus. Until now, cell nucleus deformation of SaOs-2 cells was only studied by exposing them to square shaped micropillars in an isotropic pattern. Here we report on experiments of the cell nucleus response of such cells to rhombic structures of different topographies generated from a rubbery polymer, namely poly(n-butyacrylate). It is observed that cells orientate themselves perpendicular to the long axis of the rhombi. While their spreading on the surface is not influenced by the opening angle of the structures, rhombic structures with sharper angles induce stronger deformation of the cells and accordingly more elongated nuclei.

  16. Phenotypic instability of Saos-2 cells in long-term culture

    SciTech Connect

    Hausser, Heinz-Juergen . E-mail: heinz-juergen.hausser@medizin.uni-ulm.de; Brenner, Rolf E.

    2005-07-22

    The human osteosarcoma cell line Saos-2 is widely used as a model system for human osteoblastic cells, though its phenotypic stability has not been ascertained. We therefore propagated these cells over 100 passages and compared relevant phenotypic properties. In general, higher passage cells exhibited higher proliferation rates and lower specific alkaline phosphatase activities, though mineralization was significantly more pronounced in cultures of late passage cells. Whereas expression of most genes investigated did not vary profoundly, some genes exhibited remarkable differences. Decorin, for instance, that has been discussed as a regulator of proliferation and mineralization, is strongly expressed only in early passage cells, and two receptors for pleiotrophin and midkine exhibited an almost mutually exclusive expression pattern in early and late passage cells, respectively. Our observations indicate that special care is required when results obtained with Saos-2 cells with different culture history are to be compared.

  17. Geologic mapping of the Bauru Group in Sao Paulo state by LANDSAT images. [Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Godoy, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    The occurrence of the Bauru Group in Sao Paulo State was studied, with emphasis on the western plateau. Regional geological mapping was carried out on a 1:250.000 scale with the help of MSS/LANDSAT images. The visual interpretation of images consisted basically of identifying different spectral characteristics of the geological units using channels 5 and 7. Complementary studies were made for treatment of data with an Interative Image (I-100) analyser in order to facilitate the extraction of information, particularly for areas where visual interpretation proved to be difficult. Regional characteristics provided by MSS/LANDSAT images, coupled with lithostratigraphic studies carried out in the areas of occurrence of Bauru Group sediments, enabled the homogenization of criteria for the subdivision of this group. A spatial distribution of the mapped units was obtained for the entire State of Sao Paulo and results were correlated with proposed stratigraphic divisions.

  18. Radiocarbon dates for lava flows and pyroclastic deposits on Sao Miguel, Azores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.; Rubin, M.

    1991-01-01

    We report 63 new radiocarbon analyses of samples from Sao Miguel, the largest island in the Azores archipelago. The samples are mainly carbonized tree roots and other plant material collected from beneath 20 mafic lava flows and spatter deposits and from within and beneath 42 trachytic pyroclastic flow, pyroclastic surge, mudflow, pumice-fall and lacustrine deposits and lava flows. One calcite date is reported. These dates establish ages for 48 previously undated lava flows and pyroclastic deposits, and revise three ages previously reported. These data are critical to deciphering the Holocene and late Pleistocene eruptive history of Sao Miguel and evaluating its potential volcanic hazards. Average dormant intervals during the past 3000 years are about 400 years for Sete Cidades volcano, 145 years for volcanic Zone 2, 1150 years for Agua de Pau volcano and 320 years for Furnas volcano. No known eruptions have occurred in volcanic Zone 4 during the past 3000 years. -from Authors

  19. p27kip1 overexpression promotes paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in pRb-defective SaOs-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Gabellini, Chiara; Pucci, Bruna; Valdivieso, Paola; D'Andrilli, Giuseppina; Tafani, Marco; De Luca, Antonio; Masciullo, Valeria

    2006-08-15

    p27kip1 is a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, which controls several cellular processes in strict collaboration with pRb. We evaluated the role of p27kip1 in paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in the pRb-defective SaOs-2 cells. Following 48 h of exposure of SaOs-2 cells to 100 nM paclitaxel, we observed an increase in p27kip1 expression caused by the decrease of the ubiquitin-proteasome activity. Such increase was not observed in SaOs-2 cells treated with the caspase inhibitors Z-VAD-FMK, suggesting that p27kip1 enhancement at 48 h is strictly related to apoptosis. Finally, we demonstrated that SaOs-2 cells transiently overexpressing the p27kip1 protein are more susceptible to paclitaxel-induced apoptosis than SaOs-2 cells transiently transfected with the empty vector. Indeed, after 48 h of paclitaxel treatment, 41.8% of SaOs-2 cells transiently transfected with a pcDNA3-p27kip1 construct were Annexin V-positive compared to 30.6% of SaOs-2 cells transfected with the empty vector (P < 0.05). In conclusion, we demonstrated that transfection of the pRb-defective SaOs-2 cells with the p27kip1 gene via plasmid increases their susceptibility to paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. The promoting effect of p27kip1 overexpression on apoptosis makes p27kip1 and proteasomal inhibitors interesting tools for therapy in patients with pRb-defective cancers.

  20. San Francisco Bay, California as seen from STS-59

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    San Francisco Bay as seen from STS-59. View is oriented with the sea up. The delta of the combined Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers occupies the foreground with San Francisco Bay in the middle distance, then the Pacific Ocean. Variations in water color caused both by sediment load and by wind streaking strike the eye. Man-made features dominate this scene. The Lafayette/Concord complex is left of the bay head, Vallejo is to the right, the Berkeley/Oakland complex rims the shoreline of the main bay, and San Francisco fills the peninsula beyond. Salt-evaporation ponds contain differently-colored algae depending on salinity. The low altitude (less than 120 nautical miles) and unusually-clear air combine to provide unusually-strong green colors in this Spring scene.

  1. What is causing the phytoplankton increase in San Francisco Bay?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.; Jassby, A.D.; Schraga, T.S.; Dallas, K.L.

    2006-01-01

    The largest living component of San Francisco Bay is the phytoplankton, a suspension of microscopic cells that convert sunlight energy into new living biomass through the same process of photosynthesis used by land plants. This primary production is the ultimate source of food for clams, zooplankton, crabs, sardines, halibut, sturgeon, diving ducks, pelicans, and harbor seals. From measurements made in 1980, we estimated that phytoplankton primary production in San Francisco Bay was about 200,000 tons of organic carbon per year (Jassby et al. 1993). This is equivalent to producing the biomass of 5500 adult humpback whales, or the calories to feed 1.8 million people. These numbers may seem large, but primary production in San Francisco Bay is low compared to many other nutrient-enriched estuaries.

  2. Osteogenic potential of biosilica on human osteoblast-like (SaOS-2) cells.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Matthias; Wang, Xiaohong; Schlossmacher, Ute; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Glasser, Gunnar; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2010-12-01

    Biosilica is a natural polymer, synthesized by the poriferan enzyme silicatein from monomeric silicate substrates. Biosilica stimulates mineralizing activity and gene expression of SaOS-2 cells. To study its effect on the formation of hydroxyapatite (HA), SaOS-2 cells were grown on different silicatein/biosilica-modified substrates (bone slices, Ca-P-coated coverslips, glass coverslips). Growth on these substrates induced the formation of HA nodules, organized in longitudinal arrays or spherical spots. Nodules of sizes above 1 μm were composed of irregularly arranged HA prism-like nanorods, formed by aggregates of three to eight SaOS-2 cells. Moreover, growth on silicatein/biosilica-modified substrates elicited increased [(3)H]dT incorporation into DNA, indicative of enhanced cell proliferation. Consequently, an in vitro-based bioassay was established to determine the ratio between [(3)H]dT incorporation and HA formation. This ratio was significantly higher for cells that grew on silicatein/biosilica-modified substrates than for cells on Ca-P-coated coverslips or plain glass slips. Hence, we propose that this ratio of in vitro-determined parameters reflects the osteogenic effect of different substrates on bone-forming cells. Finally, qRT-PCR analyses demonstrated that growth of SaOS-2 cells on a silicatein/biosilica matrix upregulated BMP2 (bone morphogenetic protein 2, inducer of bone formation) expression. In contrast, TRAP (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, modulator of bone resorption) expression remained unaffected. We conclude that biosilica shows pronounced osteogenicity in vitro, qualifying this material for studies of bone replacement also in vivo.

  3. Atlantic tropical forest mapping in the northern coastal zone of Sao Paulo State, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Simi, R. Jr.; Almeida, S.A.S.; Manso, A.P.

    1997-06-01

    The northern coastal zone of Sao Paulo State includes the cities of Ubatuba, Caraguatatuba, Sao Sebastiao and Ilha Bela. Large development projects, such as road and highway constructions and joint real estate exploration of susceptible coastal ecosystems have threatened the harmony and ecological stability of these ecosystems. Recently, the Atlantic tropical rain forest has been the most destructed ecosystem in the coastal zone in response to real estate investments in urban areas along the main roads. In the northern coastal zone of Sao Paulo State, 80% of the counties are included in the State Park of Serra do Mar. As tourism is a strong growing economical activity, as well as coastal production, it should be of interest to create a plan for sustainable development. The objective of this study is to map and characterize land use cover changes with emphasis on the Atlantic tropical rain forest degradation using Landsat TM images. Preliminary results for land use cover changes indicate that the Atlantic tropical rain forest was reduced by 6.1 % during the period of July 1992 and October 1995.

  4. Preliminary Goddard geopotential using optical tracking data and a comparison with SAO models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, F. J.; Wagner, C. A.; Putney, B. H.; Nickerson, K. G.

    1971-01-01

    A preliminary Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) geopotential and center of mass station coordinate solution was obtained from satellite orbital data using numerical integration theory. This geodetic solution is a prelude to a more general solution which will combine the 1971 International Satellite Geodesy Experiment (ISAGEX) laser data with the present data being employed. The present GSFC geopotential solution consists of the spherical harmonic coefficients through degree and order eight with higher order satellite resonant coefficients. The solution represents a first iteration result from 17 satellites with approximately 150 weekly orbital arcs containing some 40,000 optical observations. The GSFC preliminary result is compared with final results from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) solutions including the 1969 SAO Standard Earth II solution. One aspect of interest for the comparison is that SAO uses an analytic theory for the orbital solution whereas GSFC uses a numerical integration theory. The comparison of geopotential results shows that good agreement exists in general but that there are some areas of minor differences.

  5. Hospitalization flow in the public and private systems in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juan Stuardo Yazlle; Monteiro, Rosane Aparecida; Moreira, Marizélia Leão

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the migration flows of demand for public and private hospital care among the health regions of the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. METHODS Study based on a database of hospitalizations in the public and private systems of the state of Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2006. We analyzed data from 17 health regions of the state, considering people hospitalized in their own health region and those who migrated outwards (emigration) or came from other regions (immigration). The index of migration effectiveness of patients from both systems was estimated. The coverage (hospitalization coefficient) was analyzed in relation to the number of inpatient beds per population and the indexes of migration effectiveness. RESULTS The index of migration effectiveness applied to the hospital care demand flow allowed characterizing health regions with flow balance, with high emigration of public and private patients, and with high attraction of public and private patients. CONCLUSIONS There are differences in hospital care access and opportunities among health regions in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. PMID:26465661

  6. Hospitalization flow in the public and private systems in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juan Stuardo Yazlle; Monteiro, Rosane Aparecida; Moreira, Marizélia Leão

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the migration flows of demand for public and private hospital care among the health regions of the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil.METHODS Study based on a database of hospitalizations in the public and private systems of the state of Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2006. We analyzed data from 17 health regions of the state, considering people hospitalized in their own health region and those who migrated outwards (emigration) or came from other regions (immigration). The index of migration effectiveness of patients from both systems was estimated. The coverage (hospitalization coefficient) was analyzed in relation to the number of inpatient beds per population and the indexes of migration effectiveness.RESULTS The index of migration effectiveness applied to the hospital care demand flow allowed characterizing health regions with flow balance, with high emigration of public and private patients, and with high attraction of public and private patients.CONCLUSIONS There are differences in hospital care access and opportunities among health regions in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

  7. 33 CFR 165.1192 - Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport, San Francisco Bay... Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International...

  8. 33 CFR 165.1192 - Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport, San Francisco Bay... Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International...

  9. 33 CFR 165.1192 - Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport, San Francisco Bay... Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International...

  10. 33 CFR 165.1192 - Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport, San Francisco Bay... Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International...

  11. 33 CFR 165.1192 - Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport, San Francisco Bay... Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International...

  12. Developing Alternative Placement Criteria for English Courses at City College of San Francisco. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castrechini, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing the need to improve postsecondary access and success for underrepresented populations, the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD), City College of San Francisco (CCSF), the City and County of San Francisco, and key community organizations formed the Bridge to Success initiative in 2009. The John W. Gardner Center for Youth and…

  13. 77 FR 73311 - Special Local Regulation and Safety Zone; America's Cup Sailing Events, San Francisco, CA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... waters of San Francisco Bay adjacent to the City of San Francisco waterfront in the vicinity of the... access to pier space and facilities along the City of San Francisco waterfront and to minimize other...-September 23, 2013). An image illustrating the location of the transit zone is available in the docket....

  14. Variations of the lithospheric strength across the edges of the North American craton and their relation to intraplate earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Kaban, Mikhail; Mooney, Walter; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2016-04-01

    Seismic tomography models revealed a pronounced velocity contrast between the cratonic and off-cratonic regions of North America. However, the location of the transition between the fast/slow velocities characterizing the Archean-Proterozoic and Phanerozoic regions, respectively, is still under debate. In order to understand the structure of the edges of North American (NA) cratons, we analyze the results of two recent thermal and strength models of the NA continent, obtained using seismic and gravity data (Kaban et al., 2014; Tesauro et al., 2014; 2015). We could observe that in the peripheral parts of the cratons, as the Proterozoic Canadian Platform, the Grenville, and the western part of the Yavapai-Mazatzal province, the integrated strength for one model is 10 times larger than the other one, due to a temperature difference of >200°C in the uppermost mantle. The differences in the effective elastic thickness (Te) between the two models are less pronounced. In both models, Proterozoic regions reactivated by Meso-Cenozoic tectonics (e.g., Rocky Mountains and the Mississippi Embayment), are characterized by a weak lithosphere due to the absence of the mechanically strong part of the mantle lithospheric layer. Furthermore, intraplate earthquakes are distributed along the edges of the cratons, demonstrating that tectonic stress accumulates there, while the cores of the cratons remain undeformed. In both models, intraplate seismicity occurs in weak lithosphere or in the regions characterized by pronounced contrasts of strength and Te.

  15. Mantle density beneath the Siberian craton based on free board constrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanova, Yulia; Artemieva, Irina

    2014-05-01

    We present the mantle density model of the Archean-Proterozoic Siberian Craton (SC). The density model is constrained by free-board (buoyancy) modeling (Lachenbruch and Morgan, 1990). The approach assumes isostatic compensation of the region, and is justified by the near-zero free-air gravity for most of the region, except for the flanking orogenic belts with high topography. Despite a relatively uniform topography of the SC (ca. 400 m for most of the region and reaching 700 m in the shields), the craton has a strongly heterogeneous crustal structure with large regional variations in Moho and average crustal Vp (Cherepanova et al., 2013) which reflects its complex tectonic evolution. Formed by amalgamation of several Archean terranes, the craton has been significantly affected by Proterozoic collisional and extensional events, the late- Proterozoic rifting at its margins, the Devonian rifting of the Vilyui rift, several pulses of kimberlite magmatism, and the Permo-Triassic trap basalt magmatism. The strong lateral and vertical heterogeneity of the lithospheric mantle has been documented so far in the studied of the mantle xenoliths from kimberlite pipes and in a limited number of geophysical studies. Here we extend geophysical analysis of mantle compositional heterogeneity by evaluating mantle density structure and interpreting its regional variations in terms of mantle mg#. We link regional large-amplitude variations in mantle depletion to the tectonic evolution of the craton and compare these results with geophysical models and petrologic data. We speculate on the origin of compositional heterogeneity of the lithospheric mantle, which is in overall agreement with results of a joint analysis of seismic and thermal data (Artemieva, 2009) and mantle xenolith studies which provide information on metasomatic enrichment of the depleted lithospheric mantle by the tectonic events. The results indicate the heterogeneous structure of mantle density, with the average

  16. Thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere as a potential trigger for mass-extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilet, Sebastien; Guex, Jean; Muntener, Othmar; Bartolini, Annachiara; Spangenberg, Jorge; Schoene, Blair; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    The temporal coincidence between large igneous provinces (LIPs) and mass extinctions has led many to pose a causal relationship between the two. However, there is still no consensus on a mechanistic model that explains how magmatism leads to the turnover of terrestrial and marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Here, we present a synthesis of stratigraphic constraints on the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) and Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Pl-To) boundaries combined with geochronological data in order to establish the sequence of events that initiate two of the major mass extinctions recorded in Earth's history. This synthesis demonstrates that these biotic crises are both associated with rapid change from an initial cool period to greenhouse conditions. The initial regressive events recorded at T-J and Pl-To boundaries seem difficult to reconcile either with large initial CO2 degassing associated with plume activity or by volatile-release (CO2, CH4, Cl2) from deep sedimentary reservoirs during contact metamorphism associated to dykes and sills intrusion because massive CO2 degassing is expected to produce super greenhouse conditions. We evaluate, here, an alternative suggesting that the initial cooling could be due to gas release during the initial thermal erosion of the cratonic lithosphere due to emplacement of the CAMP and Karoo-Ferrar volcanic provinces. Petrological constraints on primary magmas indicate that the mantle is hotter and melts more extensively to produce LIP lavas than for current oceanic islands basalts. However, available data suggest that the Karoo and CAMP areas were underlain by thick lithosphere (>200 km) prior to continental break up. The presence of thick lithosphere excludes significant melting of the asthenospheric mantle without initial stage of thermal erosion of the cratonic lithosphere. This initial step of thermal erosion / thermal heating of the cratonic lithosphere is critical to understand the volatile budget associated with LIPs while

  17. Magnetotelluric investigations of the lithosphere beneath the central Rae craton, mainland Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spratt, Jessica E.; Skulski, Thomas; Craven, James A.; Jones, Alan G.; Snyder, David B.; Kiyan, Duygu

    2014-03-01

    New magnetotelluric soundings at 64 locations throughout the central Rae craton on mainland Nunavut constrain 2-D resistivity models of the crust and lithospheric mantle beneath three regional transects. Responses determined from colocated broadband and long-period magnetotelluric recording instruments enabled resistivity imaging to depths of > 300 km. Strike analysis and distortion decomposition on all data reveal a regional trend of 45-53°, but locally the geoelectric strike angle varies laterally and with depth. The 2-D models reveal a resistive upper crust to depths of 15-35 km that is underlain by a conductive layer that appears to be discontinuous at or near major mapped geological boundaries. Surface projections of the conductive layer coincide with areas of high grade, Archean metasedimentary rocks. Tectonic burial of these rocks and thickening of the crust occurred during the Paleoproterozoic Arrowsmith (2.3 Ga) and Trans-Hudson orogenies (1.85 Ga). Overall, the uppermost mantle of the Rae craton shows resistivity values that range from ~3000 Ω m in the northeast (beneath Baffin Island and the Melville Peninsula) to ~10,000 Ω m beneath the central Rae craton, to >50,000 Ω m in the south near the Hearne Domain. Near-vertical zones of reduced resistivity are identified within the uppermost mantle lithosphere that may be related to areas affected by mantle melt or metasomatism associated with emplacement of Hudsonian granites. A regional decrease in resistivities to values of ~500 Ω m at depths of 180-220 km, increasing to 300 km near the southern margin of the Rae craton, is interpreted as the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary.

  18. Early proterozoic evolution of the saskatchewan craton and its allochthonous coyer, trans-hudson Orogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiarenzelli, J.; Aspler, L.; Villeneuve, M.; Lewry, J.

    1998-01-01

    The composition, chronology, and structural relations of the Saskatchewan Craton and enveloping mylonitic rocks exposed in basement windows of the Glennie Domain, Trans-Hudson Orogen, have been determined by geochemical, geochronologic, and structural studies accompanying detailed field mapping. Basement windows lie along the hinge zone of a regional crustal culmination and consist mostly of 2.4-2.5 Ga felsic plutonic rocks enveloped by the Nistowiak Thrust. The Nistowiak Thrust is a folded, 1-2 km thick, upper amphibolite facie??s mylonite zone formed during emplacement of the Flin Flon-Glennie Complex across the Saskatchewan Craton. It is likely correlative to the Pelican Thrust, which envelops basement windows in the Hanson Lake Block -100 km to the east. An internal high strain zone within the overlying nappe pile, the Guncoat Thrust, is composed primarily of mylonitized porphyroclastic pelitic and psammitic migmatites. U-Pb geochronological results suggest calc-alkaline plutonism from 1889-1837 Ma, thrust stacking, peak metamorphism and associated anatexis between 1837 and 1809 Ma, isotopic closure of titanite at 1790-1772 Ma, and intrusion of late granitic rocks at 1770-1762 Ma. This is in agreement with ages from the Hanson Lake Block, and La Ronge, Kisseynew, and Flin-Flon domains in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and from the Ungava-Baffin portion of Trans-Hudson Orogen, suggesting broadly synchronous thermotectonic processes along a strike length of 2000 km. We speculate that the Saskatchewan Craton, rather than representing an exotic continental fragment, rifted from the Superior and/or Hearne Provinces at ca. 2.1 Ga and that the Trans-Hudson Orogen is an internal orogen. In this scenario the Maniwekan Ocean, developed between the Rae-Hearne and Superior cratons, opened and closed about similar pole(s) of plate motion. ?? 1998 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  19. Cold cratonic roots and thermal blankets: How continents affect mantle convection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trubitsyn, V.P.; Mooney, W.D.; Abbott, D.H.

    2003-01-01

    Two-dimensional convection models with moving continents show that continents profoundly affect the pattern of mantle convection. If the continents are wider than the wavelength of the convection cells (???3000 km, the thickness of the mantle), they cause neighboring deep mantle thermal upwellings to coalesce into a single focused upwelling. This focused upwelling zone will have a potential temperature anomaly of about 200??C, much higher than the 100??C temperature anomaly of upwelling zones generated beneath typical oceanic lithosphere. Extensive high-temperature melts (including flood basalts and late potassic granites) will be produced, and the excess temperature anomaly will induce continental uplift (as revealed in sea level changes) and the eventual breakup of the supercontinent. The mantle thermal anomaly will persist for several hundred million years after such a breakup. In contrast, small continental blocks (<1000 km diameter) do not induce focused mantle upwelling zones. Instead, small continental blocks are dragged to mantle downwelling zones, where they spend most of their time, and will migrate laterally with the downwelling. As a result of sitting over relatively cold mantle (downwellings), small continental blocks are favored to keep their cratonic roots. This may explain the long-term survival of small cratonic blocks (e.g., the Yilgarn and Pilbara cratons of western Australia, and the West African craton). The optimum size for long-term stability of a continental block is <3000 km. These results show that continents profoundly affect the pattern of mantle convection. These effects are illustrated in terms of the timing and history of supercontinent breakup, the production of high-temperature melts, and sea level changes. Such two-dimensional calculations can be further refined and tested by three-dimensional numerical simulations of mantle convection with moving continental and oceanic plates.

  20. Lower Crustal Seismicity, Volatiles, and Evolving Strain Fields During the Initial Stages of Cratonic Rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, C.; Muirhead, J.; Ebinger, C. J.; Tiberi, C.; Roecker, S. W.; Ferdinand-Wambura, R.; Kianji, G.; Mulibo, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    The volcanically active East African rift system in southern Kenya and northern Tanzania transects thick cratonic lithosphere, and comprises several basins characterized by deep crustal seismicity. The US-French-Tanzania-Kenya CRAFTI project aims to understand the role of magma and volatile movement during the initiation and evolution of rifting in cratonic lithosphere. Our 38-station broadband network spans all or parts of fault-bounded rift segments, enabling comparison of lithospheric structure, fault kinematics, and seismogenic layer thickness with age and proximity to the deeply rooted Archaen craton. Seismicity levels are high in all basins, but we find profound differences in seismogenic layer thickness along the length of the rift. Seismicity in the Manyara basin occurs almost exclusively within the lower crust, and in spatial clusters that have been active since 1990. In contrast, seismicity in the ~ 5 My older Magadi basin is localized in the upper crust, and the long border fault bounding the west side of the basin is seismically inactive. Between these two basins lies the Natron rift segment, which shows seismicity between ~ 20 and ~2 km depth, and high concentrations at Oldoinyo Lengai and Gelai volcanoes. Older volcanoes on the uplifted western flank (e.g., Ngorongoro) experience swarms of activity, suggesting that active magmatism and degassing are widespread. Focal mechanisms of the frequent earthquakes recorded across the array are spatially variable, and indicate a stress field strongly influenced by (1) Holocene volcanoes, (2) mechanical interactions between adjacent rift basins, and (3) a far-field ESE-WNW extensional stress regime. We explore the spatial correlation between zones of intense degassing along fault systems and seismicity, and examine the influence of high gas pressures on lower and upper crustal seismicity in this youthful cratonic rift zone.

  1. Olivine water contents in the continental lithosphere and the longevity of cratons.

    PubMed

    Peslier, Anne H; Woodland, Alan B; Bell, David R; Lazarov, Marina

    2010-09-02

    Cratons, the ancient cores of continents, contain the oldest crust and mantle on the Earth (>2 Gyr old). They extend laterally for hundreds of kilometres, and are underlain to depths of 180-250 km by mantle roots that are chemically and physically distinct from the surrounding mantle. Forming the thickest lithosphere on our planet, they act as rigid keels isolated from the flowing asthenosphere; however, it has remained an open question how these large portions of the mantle can stay isolated for so long from mantle convection. Key physical properties thought to contribute to this longevity include chemical buoyancy due to high degrees of melt-depletion and the stiffness imparted by the low temperatures of a conductive thermal gradient. Geodynamic calculations, however, suggest that these characteristics are not sufficient to prevent the lithospheric mantle from being entrained during mantle convection over billions of years. Differences in water content are a potential source of additional viscosity contrast between cratonic roots and ambient mantle owing to the well-established hydrolytic weakening effect in olivine, the most abundant mineral of the upper mantle. However, the water contents of cratonic mantle roots have to date been poorly constrained. Here we show that olivine in peridotite xenoliths from the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary region of the Kaapvaal craton mantle root are water-poor and provide sufficient viscosity contrast with underlying asthenosphere to satisfy the stability criteria required by geodynamic calculations. Our results provide a solution to a puzzling mystery of plate tectonics, namely why the oldest continents, in contrast to short-lived oceanic plates, have resisted recycling into the interior of our tectonically dynamic planet.

  2. Crustal and Lithospheric Structure across the Boundary of the East European Craton from Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapmeyer-Endrun, B.; Krueger, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ), which extends from the North Sea to the Black Sea, marks a fundamental lithospheric boundary in Europe. It separates the East European Craton to the north-east, which has been stable for at least 1.45 Ga, from the younger lithosphere of Phanerozoic Europe to the south-west. In this study we use a large dataset of more than 40,000 teleseismic P- and S-receiver functions from almost 500 seismological stations to image crustal and lithospheric structure across central and eastern Europe between the Benelux and the Baltic countries. An important data source is the PASSEQ project, which deployed close to 200 temporary stations between Germany and Lithuania for two years with the aim to obtain detailed, 3D information on the upper mantle structure across the TESZ. Combining P and S observations, we find a stepwise transition in crustal thickness, spread over 200 km laterally, from on average of 30 km in Phanerozoic Europe to more than 45 km beneath the East European Craton. Individual Paleoproterozoic terranes in Lithuania can also be distinguished based on crustal thickness. Crustal layering is not resolved with the receiver functions, but a high Poisson's ratio of 0.27 is obtained for the craton, compared to 0.25 for Phanerozoic Europe, which is consistent with a thick mafic lower crust. Moho depth results show an excellent correlation with the interpretation of a seismic line in the area, lending confidence to the interpretation of deeper structures. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), as mapped by S-receiver functions, is located at an average depth of 90 km beneath Phanerozoic Europe. Towards the east, the LAB is dipping to about 125 km depth beneath the Elbe Line. Below the craton, a mid-lithospheric discontinuity is found at about 80 km depth, whereas weak indications of the LAB are found at an average depth of 260 km.

  3. Intraplate deformation on north-dipping basement structures in the Northern Gawler Craton, Australia: reactivation of original terrane boundaries or later intra-cratonic thrusts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, G.; Giles, D.; Betts, P. G.; Backé, G.

    2007-12-01

    Multiple intraplate orogenic events have deformed Neoproterozoic to Carboniferous sedimentary sequences that cover the Archean to Mesoproterozoic basement of the northern Gawler Craton, Australia. These intraplate orogenies reactivated north-dipping basement penetrating faults that are imaged on seismic reflection profiles. These north-dipping structures pre-date Neoproterozoic deposition but their relationships to significant linear magnetic and gravity anomalies that delineate unexposed Archean to Early Mesoproterozoic basement terranes are unclear. The north-dipping structures are either terrane boundaries that formed during continental amalgamation or later faults, which formed during a mid- to late-Mesoproterozoic transpressional orogeny and cross-cut the original lithological terrane boundaries. We model magnetic and gravity data to determine the 3D structure of the unexposed basement of the northern Gawler Craton. These models are constrained by drill hole and surface observations, seismic reflection profiles and petrophysical data, such that geologically reasonable models that can satisfy the data are limited. The basement structures revealed by this modelling approach constrain the origin and significance of the north-dipping structures that were active during the later intraplate Petermann, Delamerian and Alice Springs Orogenies. These results have bearing on which structures are likely to be active during present-day intraplate deformation in other areas, including, for example, current seismic activity along similar basement structures in the Adelaide "Geosyncline".

  4. Thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere as a potential trigger for mass-extinction

    PubMed Central

    Guex, Jean; Pilet, Sebastien; Müntener, Othmar; Bartolini, Annachiara; Spangenberg, Jorge; Schoene, Blair; Sell, Bryan; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-01-01

    The temporal coincidence between large igneous provinces (LIPs) and mass extinctions has led many to pose a causal relationship between the two. However, there is still no consensus on a mechanistic model that explains how magmatism leads to the turnover of terrestrial and marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Here we present a synthesis of ammonite biostratigraphy, isotopic data and high precision U-Pb zircon dates from the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) and Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Pl-To) boundaries demonstrating that these biotic crises are both associated with rapid change from an initial cool period to greenhouse conditions. We explain these transitions as a result of changing gas species emitted during the progressive thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere by plume activity or internal heating of the lithosphere. Our petrological model for LIP magmatism argues that initial gas emission was dominated by sulfur liberated from sulfide-bearing cratonic lithosphere before CO2 became the dominant gas. This model offers an explanation of why LIPs erupted through oceanic lithosphere are not associated with climatic and biotic crises comparable to LIPs emitted through cratonic lithosphere. PMID:27009463

  5. An isotopic perspective on growth and differentiation of Proterozoic orogenic crust: From subduction magmatism to cratonization

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Simon P.; Korhonen, Fawna J.; Kirkland, Christopher L.; Cliff, John B.; Belousova, Elena A.; Sheppard, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The in situ chemical differentiation of continental crust ultimately leads to the long-term stability of the continents. This process, more commonly known as ‘cratonization’, is driven by deep crustal melting with the transfer of those melts to shallower regions resulting in a strongly chemically stratified crust, with a refractory, dehydrated lower portion overlain by a complementary enriched upper portion. Since the lower to mid portions of continental crust are rarely exposed, investigation of the cratonization process must be through indirect methods. In this study we use in situ Hf and O isotope compositions of both magmatic and inherited zircons from several felsic magmatic suites in the Capricorn Orogen of Western Australia to highlight the differentiation history (i.e. cratonization) of this portion of late Archean to Proterozoic orogenic crust. The Capricorn Orogen shows a distinct tectonomagmatic history that evolves from an active continental margin through to intracratonic reworking, ultimately leading to thermally stable crust that responds similarly to the bounding Archean Pilbara and Yilgarn Cratons.

  6. How Did the North China Craton Move from Nuna to Rodinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Several models that include the paleogeographic positions of the North China Craton (NCC) in Precambrian supercontinents Nuna and Rodinia were tested in this study using Proterozoic global paleomagnetic database. During ca. 1.8 - 1.4 Ga, the NCC can be placed far from Laurentia and Baltica. In Nuna, the present southern margin of the NCC faced an open ocean, whilst its present northern margin was likely connected to Indian and Australian cratons. In Rodinia, however, during ca. 1.1 - 0.85 Ga, the paleomagnetic data indicate a proximate connection between the NCC and the arctic side of Laurentia. These two models, if both are right, suggest that the NCC may have moved a long distance since the departure from Nuna to the joining of Rodinia. Moreover, paleomagnetic data and our reconstructions require many cratons to drift away from their connections in Nuna after ca. 1.35 Ga. These reconstructions strongly challenges the currently influential speculation of limited breakup of Nuna, which is mainly based on the observation of low abundance of passive margins that were formed during the boring billion years (ca. 1.75 - 0.75 Ga).

  7. Thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere as a potential trigger for mass-extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guex, Jean; Pilet, Sebastien; Müntener, Othmar; Bartolini, Annachiara; Spangenberg, Jorge; Schoene, Blair; Sell, Bryan; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-03-01

    The temporal coincidence between large igneous provinces (LIPs) and mass extinctions has led many to pose a causal relationship between the two. However, there is still no consensus on a mechanistic model that explains how magmatism leads to the turnover of terrestrial and marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Here we present a synthesis of ammonite biostratigraphy, isotopic data and high precision U-Pb zircon dates from the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) and Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Pl-To) boundaries demonstrating that these biotic crises are both associated with rapid change from an initial cool period to greenhouse conditions. We explain these transitions as a result of changing gas species emitted during the progressive thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere by plume activity or internal heating of the lithosphere. Our petrological model for LIP magmatism argues that initial gas emission was dominated by sulfur liberated from sulfide-bearing cratonic lithosphere before CO2 became the dominant gas. This model offers an explanation of why LIPs erupted through oceanic lithosphere are not associated with climatic and biotic crises comparable to LIPs emitted through cratonic lithosphere.

  8. Reactivation and mantle dynamics of North China Craton: insight from P-wave anisotropy tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, You; Zhao, Dapeng

    2013-12-01

    We determined the first 3-D P-wave anisotropic tomography beneath the North China Craton (NCC) using a large number of high-quality arrival-time data from local earthquakes and teleseismic events, which reveals depth-dependent azimuthal anisotropy in the crust and upper mantle down to 600 km depth. In the NCC western block, the fast velocity direction (FVD) varies from east-west in the southern part to northeast-southwest in the northern part, which may reflect either the interaction between the Yangtze block and NCC or fossil lithospheric fabrics in the craton. Under the NCC eastern block, a uniform northwest-southeast FVD is revealed in the lower part of the upper mantle (300-410 km depths) and the mantle transition zone (410-660 km depths), which may reflect horizontal and upwelling flows in the big mantle wedge (BMW) above the stagnant Pacific slab in the mantle transition zone. The NCC central block exhibits a northeast-southwest FVD, consistent with the surface tectonic orientation there, suggesting that the cold and thick (>300 km) cratonic root of the NCC western block may obstruct the northwest-southeast trending mantle flow induced by the Pacific Plate subduction, resulting in a northeast-southwest trending mantle flow under the central block. Our present results indicate that the corner flow in the BMW associated with the deep subduction of the Pacific Plate is the main cause of NCC reactivation and mantle dynamics under East China.

  9. Moho offsets beneath the Western Ghat and the contact of Archean crusts of Dharwar Craton, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Utpal; Rai, S. S.; Meena, Rishikesh; Prasad, B. N. V.; Borah, Kajaljyoti

    2016-03-01

    We present the Moho depth variation along a 600 km long profile from the west to the east coast of South India covering the passive continental margin, and the Western Ghat escarpment created during India-Madagascar separation at ~ 85 Ma; Archean western and eastern Dharwar Craton, and Proterozoic basin. The image is generated through three different approaches: H - vP/vS stacking, common conversion point (CCP) migration and inversion of teleseismic receiver functions at 38 locations. The Moho depth along the profile varies smoothly between 34 and 41 km, except beneath the Western Ghat and at the contact of east and west Dharwar Craton, where it is offset by up to ~ 8 km. The study suggests (i) the possible differential uplift of the Western Ghat, as a consequence of India-Madagascar separation and the prominent role of deep crustal structure in the location of the escarpment, compared to the surface process and (ii) presence of long-lived steeply dipping fault separating the two distinct Archean crustal blocks indicative of mechanically strong continental lithosphere beneath the Dharwar Craton.

  10. Plateau uplift in western Canada caused by lithospheric delamination along a craton edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xuewei; Eaton, David W.; Guest, Bernard

    2014-11-01

    Continental plateaux, such as the Tibetan Plateau in Asia and the Altiplano-Puna Plateau in South America, are thought to form partly because upwelling, hot asthenospheric mantle replaces some of the denser, lower lithosphere, making the region more buoyant. The spatial and temporal scales of this process are debated, with proposed mechanisms ranging from delamination of fragments to that of the entire lithosphere. The Canadian Cordillera is an exhumed ancient plateau that abuts the North American Craton. The region experienced rapid uplift during the mid-to-late Eocene, followed by voluminous magmatism, a transition from a compressional to extensional tectonic regime and removal of mafic lower crust. Here we use Rayleigh-wave tomographic and thermochronological data to show that these features can be explained by delamination of the entire lithosphere beneath the Canadian Cordillera. We show that the transition from the North American Craton to the plateau is marked by an abrupt reduction in lithospheric thickness by more than 150 km and that asthenosphere directly underlies the crust beneath the plateau region. We identify a 250-km-wide seismic anomaly about 150-250 km beneath the plateau that we interpret as a block of intact, delaminated lithosphere. We suggest that mantle material upwelling along the sharp craton edge triggered large-scale delamination of the lithosphere about 55 million years ago, and caused the plateau to uplift.

  11. Thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere as a potential trigger for mass-extinction.

    PubMed

    Guex, Jean; Pilet, Sebastien; Müntener, Othmar; Bartolini, Annachiara; Spangenberg, Jorge; Schoene, Blair; Sell, Bryan; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-03-24

    The temporal coincidence between large igneous provinces (LIPs) and mass extinctions has led many to pose a causal relationship between the two. However, there is still no consensus on a mechanistic model that explains how magmatism leads to the turnover of terrestrial and marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Here we present a synthesis of ammonite biostratigraphy, isotopic data and high precision U-Pb zircon dates from the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) and Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Pl-To) boundaries demonstrating that these biotic crises are both associated with rapid change from an initial cool period to greenhouse conditions. We explain these transitions as a result of changing gas species emitted during the progressive thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere by plume activity or internal heating of the lithosphere. Our petrological model for LIP magmatism argues that initial gas emission was dominated by sulfur liberated from sulfide-bearing cratonic lithosphere before CO2 became the dominant gas. This model offers an explanation of why LIPs erupted through oceanic lithosphere are not associated with climatic and biotic crises comparable to LIPs emitted through cratonic lithosphere.

  12. Lithospheric Structure of the Northeastern North China Craton Imaged by S Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingchen; Ding, Zhifeng; Zhu, Lupei

    2016-08-01

    Lithosphere thickness variation is important for understanding the significant tectonic reactivation of the North China Craton (NCC) in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic time. Here, we determined the lithospheric structure in the northeastern NCC using S receiver functions from 305 teleseismic events recorded by 223 seismic stations. The Moho and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) are imaged clearly beneath the region. The Moho depth decreases from ~45 km beneath the western NCC to ~25 km beneath the eastern NCC. We found that the lithospheric thickness varies from 60 to 80 km beneath the Trans-North China Orogen (TNCO) and eastern NCC with no significant change of the LAB depth. The lithosphere thickness beneath the northwestern Ordos plateau is 100-130 km. In addition, there is a mid-lithosphere discontinuity at a depth of 80 km beneath the plateau that is connected to the base of thinned lithosphere in TNCO and eastern NCC. We suggest that the mid-lithosphere discontinuity represents a mechanically weak zone in the original cratonic lithosphere of the NCC. The material in the lower lithosphere of the craton, when warmed and hydrated by water released from the subducting slab of Western Pacific, became weak due to decrease in viscosity and/or partial melting and was subsequently removed through small-scale mantle convections.

  13. Phanerozoic deposition, erosion, and vertical motion history of the Slave craton from apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. K.; Flowers, R. M.; Bowring, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Resolving the history and causes of elevation change in cratonic settings is a challenging problem. We integrate apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry (AHe) data and geologic observations to constrain the Phanerozoic burial, unroofing, and hypsometric evolution of the Archean Slave craton and surrounding Proterozoic belts in the northwestern Canadian shield. Although the craton currently lacks Phanerozoic strata, Phanerozoic sedimentary xenoliths contained within kimberlites of different ages demonstrate that such rocks once covered the craton. The thermochronometry data allow us to constrain the spatial extent, thickness, and history of these now-denuded sedimentary units. New AHe results consist of 94 apatite analyses for 16 samples and, together with previously published data, yield one of the largest published cratonic AHe datasets. AHe dates range from 210 ± 12 Ma to 363 ± 37 Ma. Dates are older in the eastern Slave craton and decrease to the west. Thermal history simulations are consistent with Paleozoic heating to temperatures ≥88-90 °C, suggesting burial beneath ≥3.5 km of sedimentary rocks across the region, followed by cooling and unroofing that progressed from east to west. Model results also permit heating in Cretaceous time, consistent with burial to ≤1.3 km and subsequent unroofing. When combined with other AHe datasets, regional unconformities, and sedimentary xenolith data, the results show that an episode of Paleozoic-early Mesozoic burial and unroofing affected most of the western Canadian shield. This history is out of sequence with sea level chronologies and demands Paleozoic subsidence of the craton followed by surface uplift. The Slave craton subsequently underwent at least 300 m of post-100 Ma elevation gain, based on ca. 100 Ma marine sedimentary xenoliths entrained in ~75-45 Ma kimberlites of the central Slave craton at modern 500-600 m elevations. Comparison of this hypsometric history with far-field plate boundary activity suggests

  14. Solar for Your Present Home. San Francisco Bay Area Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnaby, Charles S.; And Others

    This publication provides information about present uses of solar energy for space, water, and swimming pool heating that are practical for the San Francisco Bay area. It attempts to provide interested persons with the information needed to make decisions regarding installations of solar heating systems. The point of view taken is that any…

  15. San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund RFP Webinar Registration

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA Region 9 is hosting a free webinar to provide a detailed review of the FY 2017 San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund RFP and help answer your proposal submittal questions.Date: Thursday, April 20, 2017Time: 2 PM – 3:30 PM Pacific

  16. VIEW OF PELTON WATER WHEEL COMPANY (SAN FRANCISCO) TURBINE: SPEED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PELTON WATER WHEEL COMPANY (SAN FRANCISCO) TURBINE: SPEED 225 RPM, 17,500 HP. PHOTO BY JET LOWE, HAER, 1995. (Note: the dark hole in the concrete column to the left is from a tear in the negative.) - Elwha River Hydroelectric System, Glines Hydroelectric Dam & Plant, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  17. Observations from moored current meters in San Francisco Bay, 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Cheng, Ralph T.

    1981-01-01

    Current-meter data collected at eight stations in the San Francisco Bay estuarine system between August 1978 and December 1978 are compiled in this report. The measurements include current speed and direction, and water temperature and salinity (computed from conductivity and temperature). Data are presented in graphical format with each parameter plotted separately.

  18. Observations from remote weather stations in San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Cheng, R.T.

    1983-01-01

    Weather data collected at three remote weather stations in the San Francisco Bay estuarine system between November 1979 and September 1981 are compiled in this report. Measurements include average and maximum wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, atmospheric pressure, and irradiance. Data are presented in time-series plots with each graph covering one calendar month. Daily averages of all measurements are tabulated.

  19. The San Francisco Joint Institutional Transportation Systems Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Ira; LaPointe, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Transportation systems management (TSM) programs are discussed, particularly the 1977 program of the University of California, San Francisco, which led to traffic reduction and improved vehicle flow. The city's implementation plan for a similar TSM program for 14 educational institutions and hospitals is described. (MLW)

  20. Late Holocene Marsh Expansion in Southern San Francisco Bay, California

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, the largest tidal wetlands restoration project on the US Pacific Coast is being planned and implemented in southern San Francisco Bay; however, knowledge of baseline conditions of salt marsh extent in the region prior to European settlement is limited. Here, analysis o...

  1. San Francisco Bay test case for 3-D model verification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Peter E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a field test case for 3-D hydrodynamic model verification using data from Carquinez Strait in San Francisco Bay, California. It will be disseminated by the ASCE Computational Hydraulics task committee on 3-D Free-Surface Hydrodynamic Model Verifications during late 1994.

  2. A Water Quality Study: Heron's Head Park, San Francisco, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, A.; Wu, K.; Neiss, J.

    2007-12-01

    Heron's Head Park, formerly known as Pier 98, is a 24-acre restored wetland, owned and operated by the Port of San Francisco and situated at the base of the Hunter's Point Power Plant. Heron's Head is a unique environment that is built on landfill and is now a thriving marsh maintained primarily by youth and community volunteers. Adjacent to the park stands a PG&E power plant (closed May 2006), a county waste transfer station, and a combined sewer overflow (CSO) pipe. The park is bordered by San Francisco Bay on the north, east and south sides of the park. We examined the levels of ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, phosphate and fecal coliform at nine sites around the park. Utilizing historical data from other San Francisco Bay sites and other similar estuarine settings in California, we assessed the health of the Bay waters surrounding the park. We found the levels of ammonia, nitrate, nitrite and phosphates to be within the parameters of historical San Francisco Bay data and similar to settings such as Elkhorn Slough, Tomales Bay and Tijuana Estuary. In our study we did find a potential hazard to human health. Fecal coliform concentrations in waters that border the park range from 340 MPN/100 mL - 24,000 MPN/100 mL. This level significantly exceeds Environmental Protection Agency recommendations of 300 MPN/100 mL for human contact with water.

  3. The Health, Mobility & Safety Lab at San Francisco State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee, Darlene; Melichar, Joseph F.

    The purpose of this research project at San Francisco State University was to develop and evaluate integrated assessment and intervention strategies to locate the "at risk" older driver and remediate deficits in knowledge or skills about driving and traffic safety. The identification of the "at risk" older driver should suggest…

  4. Ethnicity and Phonetic Variation in a San Francisco Neighborhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall-Lew, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation advances research in sociolinguistics by analyzing phonetic variation in a majority Asian American community in San Francisco, California. As one of the first community studies focusing on Asian Americans in an urban US context, this work speaks to ongoing discussions about speaker ethnicity, phonetic variation, and regional…

  5. 1906 Letter to the San Francisco Health Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmachtenberg, Kristin

    2006-01-01

    On Wednesday, April 18, 1906, an earthquake, measuring 7.8 on the Richter magnitude scale and lasting 48 seconds, erupted along the San Andreas fault with a flash point originating in the San Francisco Bay area. The force of the earthquake tore apart buildings and roads, causing water and gas mains to twist and break. The resulting effects of the…

  6. Asian American Students: A Look at San Francisco State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okutsu, James K.

    The attitudes of American Asian students at San Francisco State University toward their education were studied. Responses were obtained from 585 students who were enrolled in Asian American Studies classes in spring 1986. Sixty percent of the sample were of Chinese ancestry, 20% were Filipino, and 20% were other Asian (including Japanese, Korean,…

  7. Working Paper for the Revision of San Francisco's Cable Franchise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Francisco Public Library, CA. Video Task Force.

    Ideas are presented for the revision of San Francisco's cable franchise. The recommendations in the report are based upon national research of library and urban use of cable communications and are designed to help the city's present and future cable franchises to comply with the regulations of the Federal Communications Commission by March 31,…

  8. Cultural Factors Related to Smoking in San Francisco's Irish Bars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlund, Travis D.; Antin, Tamar M. J.; Lee, Juliet P.; Moore, Roland S.

    2009-01-01

    California's Smoke-Free Workplace Act was extended to include bars in 1998. While the majority of bars in the state have become smoke free, in many bars patrons and staff continue to smoke despite the law. The authors present findings from a study which assessed cultural factors related to continued smoking in bars in the city of San Francisco. In…

  9. Helical grip for the cable cars of San Francisco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peyran, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A helical cable car grip to minimize high maintenance costs of San Francisco's cable car operation is presented. The grip establishes a rolling contact between the cable and grip to reduce sliding friction and associated cable wear. The design, development, and testing of the helical cable car grip are described.

  10. Auckland--New Zealand's Los Angeles or San Francisco?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogunovich, Dushko

    1995-01-01

    Compares Auckland (New Zealand) with San Francisco (California) in terms of topographical structure, geographic location, and urban development. Both cities contain striking similarities. Maintains that Auckland can become a world-class city renowned for its beauty if developers and government work in tandem. (MJP)

  11. Extremely depleted lithospheric mantle and diamonds beneath the southern Zimbabwe Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Chris B.; Pearson, D. Graham; Bulanova, Galina P.; Beard, Andrew D.; Carlson, Richard W.; Wittig, Nadine; Sims, Keith; Chimuka, Lovemore; Muchemwa, Ellah

    2009-11-01

    Inclusion-bearing diamonds, mantle xenoliths, and kimberlite concentrates from the Cambrian-aged Murowa and Sese kimberlites have been studied to characterise the nature of the lithospheric mantle beneath the southern Zimbabwe Craton. The diamonds are mostly octahedral, moderately rich in nitrogen with moderate to high aggregation, and contain mainly dunite-harzburgite mineral inclusions. Similarly, dunite xenoliths predominate over harzburgite and lherzolite and carry olivines with Mg/Mg + Fe (Mg#) values of 0.92-0.95, spanning the average signatures for Kaapvaal Craton peridotites. Eclogitic xenoliths are extremely rare, in contrast to the Kaapvaal mantle lithosphere. The Zimbabwe mantle assemblage has been only slightly affected by later silicic metasomatism and re-fertilisation with re-introduction of pyroxenes in contrast to the Kaapvaal and many cratonic lithospheric blocks elsewhere where strong metasomatism and re-fertilisation is widespread. Pyroxene, garnet and spinel thermobarometry suggests an ambient 40 mW m - 2 geotherm, with the lithosphere extending down to 210 km at the time of kimberlite eruption. Whole rock peridotite Re-Os isotope analyses yield T RD model ages of 2.7 to 2.9 Ga, providing minimum estimates of the time of melt depletion, are slightly younger in age than the basement greenstone formation. These model ages coincide with the mean T RD age of > 200 analyses of Kaapvaal Craton peridotites, whereas the average Re-Os model age for the Zimbabwe peridotites is 3.2 Ga. The Os data and low Yb n/Lu n ratios suggest a model whereby thick lithospheric mantle was stabilised during the early stages of crustal development by shallow peridotite melting required for formation of residues with sufficiently high Cr/Al to stabilise chromite which then transforms to low Ca, high Cr garnet. Sulphide inclusions in diamond produce minimum T RD model ages of 3.4 Ga indicating that parts of the lithosphere were present at the earliest stages of crust

  12. Seismic Tomography of the Arctic: Continental Cratons, Ancient Orogens, Oceanic Lithosphere and Convecting Mantle Beneath (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S.; Schaeffer, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Lateral variations in seismic velocities in the upper mantle, mapped by seismic tomography, reflect primarily the variations in the temperature of the rock at depth. Seismic tomography thus reveals lateral changes in the temperature and thickness of the lithosphere; it maps deep boundaries between tectonic blocks with different properties and with different age of the lithosphere. Our new global, shear-wave tomographic model of the upper mantle and the crust is constrained by an unprecedentedly large number of broadband waveform fits (nearly one million seismograms, with both surface and S waves included) and provides improved resolution of the lithosphere across the whole of the Arctic region, compared to other available models. The most prominent high-velocity anomalies, seen down to 150-200 km depths, indicate the cold, thick, stable mantle lithosphere beneath Precambrian cratons. The northern boundaries of the Canadian Shield's and Greenland's cratonic lithosphere closely follow the coastlines, with the Greenland and North American cratons clearly separated from each other. In Eurasia, in contrast, cratonic lithosphere extends hundreds of kilometres north of the coast of the continent, beneath the Barents and eastern Kara Seas. The boundaries of the Archean cratons mapped by tomography indicate the likely offshore extensions of major Phanerozoic sutures in northern Eurasia. The old oceanic lithosphere of the Canada Basin is much colder and thicker than the younger lithosphere beneath the adjacent Amundsen Basin, north of the Gakkel Ridge. Beneath the slow-spreading Gakkel Ridge, we detect the expected low-velocity anomaly associated with partial melting in the uppermost mantle; the anomaly is weaker, however, than beneath faster-spreading ridges globally. South of the ridge, the Nansen Basin shows higher seismic velocities in the upper mantle beneath it, compared to the Amundsen Basin. At 150-250 km depth, most of the oceanic portions of the central Arctic (the

  13. Aeromagnetic interpretation in the south-central Zimbabwe Craton: (reappraisal of) crustal structure and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganai, Rubeni T.; Whaler, Kathryn A.; Ebinger, Cynthia J.

    2016-11-01

    Regional aeromagnetic data from the south-central Zimbabwe Craton have been digitally processed and enhanced for geological and structural mapping and tectonic interpretation integrated with gravity data, to constrain previous interpretations based on tentative geologic maps and provide new information to link these structural features to known tectonic events. The derived maps show excellent correlation between magnetic anomalies and the known geology, and extend lithological and structural mapping to the shallow/near subsurface. In particular, they reveal the presence of discrete crustal domains and several previously unrecognised dykes, faults, and ultramafic intrusions, as well as extensions to others. Five regional structural directions (ENE, NNE, NNW, NW, and WNW) are identified and associated with trends of geological units and cross-cutting structures. The magnetic lineament patterns cut across the >2.7 Ga greenstone belts, which are shown by gravity data to be restricted to the uppermost 10 km of the crust. Therefore, the greenstone belts were an integral part of the lithosphere before much of the upper crustal (brittle) deformation occurred. Significantly, the observed magnetic trends have representatives craton-wide, implying that our interpretation and inferences can be applied to the rest of the craton with confidence. Geological-tectonic correlation suggests that the interpreted regional trends are mainly 2.5 Ga (Great Dyke age) and younger, and relate to tectonic events including the reactivation of the Limpopo Belt at 2.0 Ga and the major regional igneous/dyking events at 1.8-2.0 Ga (Mashonaland), 1.1 Ga (Umkondo), and 180 Ma (Karoo). Thus, their origin is here inferred to be inter- and intra-cratonic collisions and block movements involving the Zimbabwe and Kaapvaal Cratons and the Limpopo Belt, and later lithospheric heating and extension associated with the break-up of Gondwana. The movements produced structures, or reactivated older fractures

  14. Spatial distribution of kimberlite in the Slave craton, Canada: a geometrical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubley, M. P.

    2004-09-01

    Exploration within the Slave craton has revealed clusters of kimberlite intrusions, commonly with internally consistent geochemical and temporal characteristics. Translation diagrams ("Fry analysis") allow an unbiased geometrical examination of the distance and direction between each kimberlite occurrence and all others in the database. Recurrent patterns are visually accentuated due to the square function in data density. Circular histograms quantify the azimuthal density of kimberlite at various distances. For this study, the database comprises the geographic position of 212 kimberlite occurrences of which 70% are from the Lac de Gras field (LDG). Analyses are presented separately for the LDG data and for all non-LDG data in order to test for regional variations and to avoid overwhelming the craton-scale studies by the high density of LDG data. Empirical grouping of kimberlite locations results in delineation of five elliptical clusters that encompass all but four kimberlite occurrences. Clusters within the western part of the craton are elongate to the north-northeast and align within a narrow zone ("Western Corridor"). Elsewhere, the clusters are elongate to the northwest or west-northwest and appear to be arranged en echelon within a poorly defined north-northwest trending zone ("Central Corridor"). Geometrical spatial analyses of kimberlite locations highlight the craton-scale pattern of emplacement within the two main corridors. At regional and local scales, individual intrusions are preferentially located towards the west-northwest (ca. 280°) and north-northeast (ca. 015°) of other intrusions, and these orientations are interpreted to reflect upper mantle trends in magma generation. At local scales (10-25 km), kimberlite of the central and southern craton tends to be located to the northeast (ca. 045°), and possibly weakly to the east-northeast (ca. 070°), of other intrusions, and these orientations correspond to major crustal fractures systems. It is

  15. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in San Francisco Bay.

    PubMed

    Davis, J A; Hetzel, F; Oram, J J; McKee, L J

    2007-09-01

    San Francisco Bay is facing a legacy of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) spread widely across the land surface of the watershed, mixed deep into the sediment of the Bay, and contaminating the Bay food web to a degree that poses health risks to humans and wildlife. In response to this persistent problem, water quality managers are establishing a PCB total maximum daily load (TMDL) and implementation plan to accelerate the recovery of the Bay from decades of PCB contamination. This article provides a review of progress made over the past 15 years in managing PCBs and understanding their sources, pathways, fate, and effects in the Bay, and highlights remaining information needs that should be addressed in the next 10 years. The phaseout of PCBs during the 1970s and the 1979 federal ban on sale and production led to gradual declines from the 1970s to the present. However, 25 years after the ban, PCB concentrations in some Bay sport fish today are still more than ten times higher than the threshold of concern for human health. Without further management action it appears that the general recovery of the Bay from PCB contamination will take many more decades. PCB concentrations in sport fish were, along with mercury, a primary cause of a consumption advisory for the Bay and the consequent classification of the Bay as an impaired water body. Several sources of information indicate that PCB concentrations in the Bay may also be high enough to adversely affect wildlife, including rare and endangered species. The greater than 90% reduction in food web contamination needed to meet the targets for protection of human health would likely also generally eliminate risks to wildlife. PCB contamination in the Bay is primarily associated with industrial areas along the shoreline and in local watersheds. Strong spatial gradients in PCB concentrations persist decades after the release of these chemicals to Bay Area waterways. Through the TMDL process, attention is being more sharply

  16. The building and stabilization of an Archean Craton in the Superior Province, Canada, from a heat flow perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaupart, C.; Mareschal, J.-C.; Bouquerel, H.; Phaneuf, C.

    2014-12-01

    How continental lithosphere responds to tectonic stresses and mantle convective processes is determined in large part by its mechanical strength and temperature distribution, which depend on crustal heat production. In order to establish reliable crustal and thermal models for the Superior Craton, Canadian Shield, new measurements of heat flux and heat production in 28 deep boreholes at 16 sites are combined with a larger set of older data. The Superior Province was assembled by the docking of volcanic/plutonic and metasedimentary terranes and continental fragments to the southern margin of an older core around 2.7 Ga. The average heat flux is much lower in the craton core than in the accreted terranes, 31 versus 43 mW m-2. The major accreted volcanic/plutonic belts share the same heat production characteristics, testifying to the remarkable uniformity of crust-building mechanisms. The marked difference between the crusts of the core and the accreted belts supports the operation of two different crust-forming processes. The crust of the craton core has an enriched upper layer, in contrast to that of the younger belts which lack marked internal differentiation. At the end of amalgamation, the lithosphere of the craton core was colder and mechanically stronger than the lithosphere beneath newly accreted material. Surrounding the craton core with weaker belts may have ensured its stability against tectonic and mantle convection perturbations. This large strength contrast accounts for the lack of lithospheric imbrication at the edge of the craton core as well as for the different characteristics of seismic anisotropy in the lithospheres of the craton core and the younger terranes.

  17. A comparative proteomics study on matrix vesicles of osteoblast-like Saos-2 and U2-OS cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liang; Cui, Yazhou; Luan, Jing; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Xiaoying; Han, Jinxiang

    2013-05-01

    Matrix vesicles (MVs) play an important role in the initial stage of the process of bone mineralization, and are involved in multiple rare skeletal diseases with pathological mineralization or calcification. The aim of the study was to compare the proteomic profiling of osteoblast-like cells with and without mineralization ability (Saos-2 and U2-OS), and to identify novel mineralization-associated MV proteins. MVs were extracted using ExoQuick solution from mineralization-induced Saos-2 and U2-OS cells, and then were validated by transmission electron microscopy. A label-free quantitative proteomic method was used to compare the protein profiling of MVs from Saos-2 and U2-OS cells. Western-blots were used to confirm the expression of MVs proteins identified in proteomic studies. In our proteomic studies, we identified that 89 mineralization-related proteins were significantly up-regulated in Saos-2 MVs compared with U2-OS MVs. We further validated that two MVs proteins, protein kinase C α and ras-related protein Ral-A, were up-regulated in MVs of Saos-2 cells compared to those of U2-OS cells under mineralization-induction. Our findings suggest that protein kinase C α and ras-related protein Ral-A might be involved in bone mineralization as MVs components.

  18. [Comparison between nutritional status of school children of low socioeconomic level from Santiago, Chile and Sao Paulo, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Amigo, H; Leone, C; Bustos, P; Gallo, P

    1995-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine and compare the anthropometric profiles of schoolchildren from low income household from Santiago, Chile and Sao Paulo, Brasil. A total of 1779 children from Santiago and 2210 from Sao Paulo were evaluated. Z-score distribution of the height/age (H/A), weight/age (W/A) and weight/height (W/H) indicators were utilized to assess the children. As a reference, the pattern recommended by WHO was used. The distribution of the H/A curves from both cities were deviated to the left. This deviation was more evident in Santiago. This situation points out the existence of a greater prevalence of growth retardation of the children from this city. In relation to the W/A indicator, both groups showed a similar distribution curves, Sao Paulo group however, had an increment of cases in the left extreme of the curve, under -2 . According to the W/H indicator the profile of both groups are different; one-Santiago-is deviated to the excess and Sao Paulo to the deficit. The differences observed in both groups of children studied indicated higher deficit of height, but lower current undernutrition in Santiago and increased wasting with conservated height in Sao Paulo. The observed situation suggests that the distinct patterns are consequences of socioeconomic factors at different stages of the growing process of the children and/or etnic differences of the population.

  19. Cytoprotective role of autophagy during paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in Saos-2 osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Jun; Lee, Seung Gee; Kim, Yoon-Jae; Park, Ji-Eun; Lee, Kyu Yeol; Yoo, Young Hyun; Kim, Jong-Min

    2013-06-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant bone cancer in children and adolescents. Although paclitaxel (PCX) has been considered one of the most important cancer chemotherapeutic drugs, the current protocols for OS treatment do not incorporate this agent. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the induction of cell death in OS cells after exposure to PCX, to identify the cell death mechanism(s) activated by PCX and to investigate whether autophagy is associated with PCX-induced apoptosis. The results of the present study confirmed that exposure to low PCX concentrations can induce apoptotic cell death in Saos-2 cells; furthermore, caspase-3 activation, PARP degradation and XIAP downregulation were observed in combination with PCX-induced apoptosis. The potential involvement of mitochondrial events (intrinsic apoptotic pathway) in PCX-induced apoptosis in OS cells was verified by the alteration (depolarization) of mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, pretreatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA), a specific inhibitor of autophagy, significantly increased PCX-induced apoptotic cell death in Saos-2 cells. The augmentation of PCX-induced apoptosis by 3-MA was accompanied by increase in the cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, caspase-3 activity and XIAP downregulation, which suggests that inhibiting autophagy further stimulates the PCX-induced mitochondrion-related (intrinsic) apoptotic pathway by provoking caspase-3 activation. Thus, autophagy observed during PCX-induced apoptosis in Saos-2 OS cells represents the role of cytoprotection in cellular homeostatic processes. In conclusion, the results of this study revealed that PCX exposure effectively induces OS cell death by apoptosis associated with the mitochondrial-mediated caspase-dependent pathway. PCX can increase autophagic activity and suppressing autophagy enhances PCX-induced apoptosis in OS cells. Therefore, it is suggested that combination treatment involving low

  20. Large-scale Asymmetries in the Transitional Disks of SAO 206462 and SR 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Laura M.; Isella, Andrea; Carpenter, John M.; Chandler, Claire J.

    2014-03-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations in the dust continuum (690 GHz, 0.45 mm) and 12CO J = 6-5 spectral line emission of the transitional disks surrounding the stars SAO 206462 and SR 21. These ALMA observations resolve the dust-depleted disk cavities and extended gaseous disks, revealing large-scale asymmetries in the dust emission of both disks. We modeled these disk structures with a ring and an azimuthal Gaussian, where the azimuthal Gaussian is motivated by the steady-state vortex solution from Lyra & Lin. Compared to recent observations of HD 142527, Oph IRS 48, and LkHα 330, these are low-contrast (lsim 2) asymmetries. Nevertheless, a ring alone is not a good fit, and the addition of a vortex prescription describes these data much better. The asymmetric component encompasses 15% and 28% of the total disk emission in SAO 206462 and SR 21, respectively, which corresponds to a lower limit of 2 M Jup of material within the asymmetry for both disks. Although the contrast in the dust asymmetry is low, we find that the turbulent velocity inside it must be large (~20% of the sound speed) in order to drive these azimuthally wide and radially narrow vortex-like structures. We obtain residuals from the ring and vortex fitting that are still significant, tracing non-axisymmetric emission in both disks. We compared these submillimeter observations with recently published H-band scattered light observations. For SR 21 the scattered light emission is distributed quite differently from the submillimeter continuum emission, while for SAO 206462 the submillimeter residuals are suggestive of spiral-like structure similar to the near-IR emission.

  1. Sao Paulo Lightning Mapping Array (SP-LMA): Deployment and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, J. C.; Carey, L. D.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Albrecht, R.; Morales, C. A.; Pinto, O., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    An 8-10 station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) network is being deployed in the vicinity of Sao Paulo to create the SP-LMA for total lightning measurements in association with the international CHUVA [Cloud processes of tHe main precipitation systems in Brazil: A contribUtion to cloud resolVing modeling and to the GPM (GlobAl Precipitation Measurement)] field campaign. Besides supporting CHUVA science/mission objectives and the Sao Luz Paraitinga intensive operation period (IOP) in December 2011-January 2012, the SP-LMA will support the generation of unique proxy data for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), both sensors on the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R (GOES-R), presently under development and scheduled for a 2015 launch. The proxy data will be used to develop and validate operational algorithms so that they will be ready for use on "day1" following the launch of GOES-R. A preliminary survey of potential sites in the vicinity of Sao Paulo was conducted in December 2009 and January 2010, followed up by a detailed survey in July 2010, with initial network deployment scheduled for October 2010. However, due to a delay in the Sa Luz Paraitinga IOP, the SP-LMA will now be installed in July 2011 and operated for one year. Spacing between stations is on the order of 15-30 km, with the network "diameter" being on the order of 30-40 km, which provides good 3-D lightning mapping 150 km from the network center. Optionally, 1-3 additional stations may be deployed in the vicinity of Sa Jos dos Campos.

  2. Airport Choice in Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area: An Application of the Conditional Logit Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, Marcelo Baena; Muller, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    Using the conditional LOGIT model, this paper addresses the airport choice in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area. In this region, Guarulhos International Airport (GRU) and Congonhas Airport (CGH) compete for passengers flying to several domestic destinations. The airport choice is believed to be a result of the tradeoff passengers perform considering airport access characteristics, airline level of service characteristics and passenger experience with the analyzed airports. It was found that access time to the airports better explain the airport choice than access distance, whereas direct flight frequencies gives better explanation to the airport choice than the indirect (connections and stops) and total (direct plus indirect) flight frequencies. Out of 15 tested variables, passenger experience with the analyzed airports was the variable that best explained the airport choice in the region. Model specifications considering 1, 2 or 3 variables were tested. The model specification most adjusted to the observed data considered access time, direct flight frequencies in the travel period (morning or afternoon peak) and passenger experience with the analyzed airports. The influence of these variables was therefore analyzed across market segments according to departure airport and flight duration criteria. The choice of GRU (located neighboring Sao Paulo city) is not well explained by the rationality of access time economy and the increase of the supply of direct flight frequencies, while the choice of CGH (located inside Sao Paulo city) is. Access time was found to be more important to passengers flying shorter distances while direct flight frequencies in the travel period were more significant to those flying longer distances. Keywords: Airport choice, Multiple airport region, Conditional LOGIT model, Access time, Flight frequencies, Passenger experience with the analyzed airports, Transportation planning

  3. LARGE-SCALE ASYMMETRIES IN THE TRANSITIONAL DISKS OF SAO 206462 AND SR 21

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, Laura M.; Chandler, Claire J.; Isella, Andrea; Carpenter, John M.

    2014-03-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations in the dust continuum (690 GHz, 0.45 mm) and {sup 12}CO J = 6-5 spectral line emission of the transitional disks surrounding the stars SAO 206462 and SR 21. These ALMA observations resolve the dust-depleted disk cavities and extended gaseous disks, revealing large-scale asymmetries in the dust emission of both disks. We modeled these disk structures with a ring and an azimuthal Gaussian, where the azimuthal Gaussian is motivated by the steady-state vortex solution from Lyra and Lin. Compared to recent observations of HD 142527, Oph IRS 48, and LkHα 330, these are low-contrast (≲ 2) asymmetries. Nevertheless, a ring alone is not a good fit, and the addition of a vortex prescription describes these data much better. The asymmetric component encompasses 15% and 28% of the total disk emission in SAO 206462 and SR 21, respectively, which corresponds to a lower limit of 2 M {sub Jup} of material within the asymmetry for both disks. Although the contrast in the dust asymmetry is low, we find that the turbulent velocity inside it must be large (∼20% of the sound speed) in order to drive these azimuthally wide and radially narrow vortex-like structures. We obtain residuals from the ring and vortex fitting that are still significant, tracing non-axisymmetric emission in both disks. We compared these submillimeter observations with recently published H-band scattered light observations. For SR 21 the scattered light emission is distributed quite differently from the submillimeter continuum emission, while for SAO 206462 the submillimeter residuals are suggestive of spiral-like structure similar to the near-IR emission.

  4. Finding Aedes aegypti in a natural breeding site in an urban zone, Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Camara, Tamara Nunes; Urbinatti, Paulo Roberto; Chiaravalloti-Neto, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This is the description of how nine Aedes aegypti larvae were found in a natural breeding site in the Pinheiros neighborhood, city of Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil. The record was conducted in December 2014, during an entomological surveillance program of dengue virus vectors, with an active search of potential breeding sites, either artificial or natural. Finding Ae. aegypti larvae in a tree hole shows this species’ ability to use both artificial and natural environments as breeding sites and habitats, which points towards the importance of maintaining continuous surveillance on this mosquito in all kinds of water-holding containers. PMID:26982959

  5. Elevation of a cane-growing area of the state of Sao Paulo using LANDSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Mendonca, F. J.; Lee, D. C. L.; Tardin, A. T.; Shimabukuro, Y. E.; Chen, S. C.; Lucht, L. A. M.; Moreira, M. A.; Delima, A. M.; Maia, F. C. S.

    1981-01-01

    Images at a scale of 1:250.000 were visually interpreted for identification and area estimates of sugar cane plantations in Sao Paulo. The basic criteria for crop identification were the spectral characteristics of channels 5 and 7 and their temporal variations observed from different LANDSAT passes. Using this technique, it was possible to map the sugar cane areas as well as the sugar cane already harvested. An area of 801,950 hectares was estimated within the study area. The confidence interval of correct classification ranged from 87.11% to 94.71%.

  6. Visceral leishmaniasis in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil: spatial and space-time analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cardim, Marisa Furtado Mozini; Guirado, Marluci Monteiro; Dibo, Margareth Regina; Chiaravalloti, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To perform both space and space-time evaluations of visceral leishmaniasis in humans in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. METHODS The population considered in the study comprised autochthonous cases of visceral leishmaniasis and deaths resulting from it in Sao Paulo, between 1999 and 2013. The analysis considered the western region of the state as its studied area. Thematic maps were created to show visceral leishmaniasis dissemination in humans in the municipality. Spatial analysis tools Kernel and Kernel ratio were used to respectively obtain the distribution of cases and deaths and the distribution of incidence and mortality. Scan statistics were used in order to identify spatial and space-time clusters of cases and deaths. RESULTS The visceral leishmaniasis cases in humans, during the studied period, were observed to occur in the western portion of Sao Paulo, and their territorial extension mainly followed the eastbound course of the Marechal Rondon highway. The incidences were characterized as two sequences of concentric ellipses of decreasing intensities. The first and more intense one was found to have its epicenter in the municipality of Castilho (where the Marechal Rondon highway crosses the border of the state of Mato Grosso do Sul) and the second one in Bauru. Mortality was found to have a similar behavior to incidence. The spatial and space-time clusters of cases were observed to coincide with the two areas of highest incidence. Both the space-time clusters identified, even without coinciding in time, were started three years after the human cases were detected and had the same duration, that is, six years. CONCLUSIONS The expansion of visceral leishmaniasis in Sao Paulo has been taking place in an eastbound direction, focusing on the role of highways, especially Marechal Rondon, in this process. The space-time analysis detected the disease occurred in cycles, in different spaces and time periods. These meetings, if considered, may

  7. Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (SAO OMPS) formaldehyde retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Abad, Gonzalo; Vasilkov, Alexander; Seftor, Colin; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents our new formaldehyde (H2CO) retrievals, obtained from spectra recorded by the nadir instrument of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) flown on board NASA's Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SUOMI-NPP) satellite. Our algorithm is similar to the one currently in place for the production of NASA's Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) operational H2CO product. We are now able to produce a set of long-term data from two different instruments that share a similar concept and a similar retrieval approach. The ongoing overlap period between OMI and OMPS offers a perfect opportunity to study the consistency between both data sets. The different spatial and spectral resolution of the instruments is a source of discrepancy in the retrievals despite the similarity of the physic assumptions of the algorithm. We have concluded that the reduced spectral resolution of OMPS in comparison with OMI is not a significant obstacle in obtaining good-quality retrievals. Indeed, the improved signal-to-noise ratio of OMPS with respect to OMI helps to reduce the noise of the retrievals performed using OMPS spectra. However, the size of OMPS spatial pixels imposes a limitation in the capability to distinguish particular features of H2CO that are discernible with OMI. With root mean square (RMS) residuals ˜ 5 × 10-4 for individual pixels we estimate the detection limit to be about 7.5 × 1015 molecules cm-2. Total vertical column density (VCD) errors for individual pixels range between 40 % for pixels with high concentrations to 100 % or more for pixels with concentrations at or below the detection limit. We compare different OMI products (SAO OMI v3.0.2 and BIRA OMI v14) with our OMPS product using 1 year of data, between September 2012 and September 2013. The seasonality of the retrieved slant columns is captured similarly by all products but there are discrepancies in the values of the VCDs. The mean biases among the two OMI products and our OMPS product

  8. Geophysical data on the cratonic lithosphere structure and composition in the Northern Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenkova, Ninel; Pavlenkova, Galina; Yegorova, Tamara

    2014-05-01

    The seismic profiles made in Russia with Peaceful Nuclear Explosions (PNE), were interpreted with the purpose of constructing the upper mantle velocity models of the Northern Eurasia. The profiles show that the horizontal inhomogeneity of the upper mantle correlates with tectonics and geophysical fields. Higher velocities (8.2-8.4 km/s) are characteristic of the uppermost mantle of the cold East European and Siberian cratons, the velocities of 8.0-8.1 km/s are observed in the young plates with higher heat flows. The PNE data show a clear velocity and rheology stratification of the craton lithospheres. The asthenosphere is not traced as a low velocity layer, on the contrary, the 10-20 km thick velocity inversion zone is revealed at a depth of around 100 km. Several seismic boundaries are traced along all the profiles at depths of 100, 150, 200 and 300 km. The boundaries are not simple discontinuities. The reflections from these boundaries are complicated many-phase groups which may be explained by the reflective zones with alternation of the high- and low-velocity layers. The most important boundaries are the N boundary (depth of 80-120 km) which underlies the lithosphere brittle part, and the L boundary (depth of 200-250 km) which is the lithosphere bottom. The 2D gravity modelling for the PNE profiles shows differences in the lithosphere composition of the East European and of the Siberian cratons. The Siberian Craton is characterized by the decreased densities which may be a result of the lithosphere material depletion. These data are in good agreement with the petrophysical modelling based on the xsenolite and thermal data. The higher densities are characteristic of the fertile matter of the primitive mantle, the lower densities - of the depleted mantle represented mainly by the garnet peridotites. The seismic boundary L may be a transition from the depleted to the fertile upper mantle. The obtained data show that an important role in the mantle dynamics belongs

  9. 33 CFR 165.1187 - Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. 165.1187 Section 165.1187... Limited Access Areas Eleventh Coast Guard District § 165.1187 Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and...

  10. 33 CFR 165.1187 - Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. 165.1187 Section 165.1187... Limited Access Areas Eleventh Coast Guard District § 165.1187 Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and...

  11. 33 CFR 165.1187 - Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. 165.1187 Section 165.1187... Limited Access Areas Eleventh Coast Guard District § 165.1187 Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and...

  12. "13 BB star" - broadband seismic array at the edge of East European Craton in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek; Wilde-Piórko, Monika; Suchcicki, Jerzy; Arant, Tadeusz

    2014-05-01

    "13 BB star" is a dense array of 13 Reftek 151-120 broadband seismometers located in unpopulated forests in northern Poland - just on the edge of East European Craton. The shape of array was designed as a "star" with one central station and 12 station located on two circles (radius of about 30 and 60 km) around it. This geometry allows us to study seismic waves (in particular surface waves) incoming from all azimuths. Our "13 BB star" array stations are self powered (solar panels and batteries), equipped with local storage system and on-line transmission of seismic and auxiliary data using 2G and 3G cellular network. We also developed on-line application for monitoring array status (transmission, connections, power, temperature, etc.) and on-line data visualization. Main advantages of our array are: 1) 120s broadband seismometers recording with 100Hz sampling, 2) density of array - distances between neighboring stations does not exceed 30 km, 3) station placement in underground wells, 4) stations located in forests far (usually 2-3 km) from industries, roads, villages and other human activity. "13 BB star" started operating in July 2013 and since that time recorded several local, regional, and teleseismic events proving good array functionality. The scientific aim of the "13 BB star" project is development of a quantitative model of the lithosphere-asthenosphere-structure in the marginal zone of the East European Craton in northern Poland. New acquired data will be analyzed using integrated seismic methods, which will yield images of lithosphere-asthenosphere system hitherto unknown for this area. The knowledge of detailed structure of the cratonic lithosphere-asthenosphere system is crucial for the better understanding of the regional, as well as global mantle dynamics and evolution of the Earth's interior. This work was supported by NCN-grant DEC 2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  13. Tectonics of the junction region between the East European craton and West Arctic platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, A. S.; Morozov, Y. A.; Terekhov, E. N.; Bayanova, T. B.; Tyupanov, S. N.

    2016-09-01

    The region of the junction and interaction between the East European Craton (EEC) and the West Arctic Craton (WAC) is regarded as a complexly built zone or assembly of both the volumetric and dividing linear tectonic elements: the Trollfjord-Rybachi-Kanin (TRK) Lineament, the pericratonic subsidence zone of the EEC, the Karpinskii Lineament, the Murmansk Block of the Fennoscandian (Baltic) Shield, and the Kolmozero-Voronya Zone, which are briefly characterized in this paper. Evidences of thrusting have been established not only in the TRK Suture Zone and on the Rybachi Peninsula, which represent a fragment of the Timanides fold-thrust belt, but also to the southwest, in the Upper Riphean and Vendian terrigenous sequences making up the Sredni Peninsula and related to the pericratonic trough of the VEC. Two phases of fold-thrust deformations with elements of left-lateral strike-slip offset pertaining to the activity and evolution of the lineament suture dividing the Sredni and Rybachi peninsulas have been recorded. The variously oriented fault-fold systems within this fault zone are evidence for multistage deformation and can be explained by an at least twostage change in the kinematics that control displacement along the fault. The disintegrated granitic massifs of the Archean crystalline basement tectonically squeezed out in the upper crust as protrusions are localized within TRK Fault Zone. Plagiogranitic bodies, which underwent superposed fault-fold deformations of both kinematic stages, are an evidence of the vigorous tectonic event that predated folding and two-stage strike-slip displacement along the TRK Fault—by thrusting of Riphean sequences from north to south toward the Archean craton. The nappe-thrust regional structure was formed at this stage; elements of it have been recognized in the Sredni, Rybachi, and Kanin peninsulas. The main stages of tectonic evolution in the junction zone between the EEC and the WAP have been revealed and substantiated.

  14. Sediment budget of cratons: insights from West Africa over the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Louis, G.; Chardon, D.; Rouby, D.; Beauvais, A.

    2015-12-01

    The sediment load of rivers constitutes the material that builds the stratigraphic successions found from continental margins to the deep ocean. Measure of this flux is relevant to understanding continental controls on denudation, riverine transport and basin filling. An increasing number of sediment yield measures is available but whether these modern values can be extrapolated at geological timescales for large watersheds is still questioned. One reason is the lack of long-term data. Here, we present a sediment budget for Sub-Saharan West Africa over the Cenozoic to compare with the modern rates. The denudation of this cratonic area is constrained using three regional lateritic paleo-landsurfaces that formed during periods of enhanced weathering since the Paleocene-Eocene greenhouse peak. The 3D interpolation of these surfaces allowed building three successive denudation maps for the 45-24, 24-11 and 11-0 Ma intervals together with reconstructions of the paleo-drainage. The regional distribution of erosion suggests the influence of lithospheric deformation, concentrated around a southern marginal upwarp and eastern hotspot swells. The export of large-scale drainages was calculated by converting denudated volumes into sediment fluxes using the porosity and density of lateritic regolith. Exported volumes calculated for the Niger watershed fall within the same range as the Cenozoic clastic accumulations of the Niger delta. Comparisons also show that modern fluxes can be an order of magnitude above the long-term fluxes for moderately large watersheds but that modern and long-term yields are similar for the largest watersheds (e.g. Niger, Volta, Senegal). These results suggest that the export of very large cratonic watersheds is independent of the measurement timescale and that their modern yields can be extrapolated at long-timescale. Finally, it allows assessing the relative contribution of cratons, i.e. non-active orogenic areas, to the global sediment budgets at

  15. Craton vs. rift uppermost mantle contributions to magnetic anomalies in the United States interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, S. A.; Feinberg, J. M.; Ferré, E. C.; Demory, F.; Martín-Hernández, F.; Conder, J. A.; Rochette, P.

    2014-06-01

    The interpretation of satellite magnetic information (Magsat, Oersted, CHAMP, Swarm) requires the understanding of the mineralogy of crustal and mantle sources. Also, spectral analysis of magnetic data over forearcs and cratons calls for upper mantle contribution. The prospect of such a contribution contradicts the view that the mantle is too hot and its magnetism is too weak to influence magnetic anomalies. Here we examine the rock magnetic properties of fresh mantle xenoliths from four settings across the United States: phlogopite-spinel dunites from the Bearpaw Mountains, Montana, and lherzolites/harzburgites from San Carlos, Arizona; Kilbourne Hole, New Mexico; and Knippa, Texas. Paleomagnetic results show single-component natural remanent magnetizations (NRMs), which, combined with optical and secondary electron microscopy support the lack of post-eruption alteration and absence of host-rock contamination. The NRM carriers include magnetite at Bearpaw Mountain and San Carlos, and pyrrhotite at Kilbourne Hole and Knippa. These four areas show continental crust of distinct thicknesses and various geotherms. The potential mantle contribution to magnetic anomalies is forward modeled using crustal thickness, current geotherm and average magnetic properties of xenoliths. The San Carlos and Kilbourne Hole mantle, situated near the Rio Grande Rift is too hot and its magnetism is too weak to contribute to anomalies. The sulfide-dominated assemblage at Knippa does not support magnetization at mantle depths. In contrast, the Bearpaw Mountains combine a relatively cold geotherm (craton) and abundance of magnetite formed at mantle depth. This cratonic mantle, metasomatized by fluids from the Farallon plate, may contribute to long wavelength magnetic anomalies.

  16. Cambrian-Ordovician craton margin section, southern Great Basin: A sequence stratigraphic perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.D. ); Edwards, J.C. )

    1991-02-01

    The Upper Cambrian through Upper Ordovician cratonal to miogeoclinal transition section in southern Nevada and eastern California accumulated on a gentle homoclinal ramp and includes a variety of peritidal and subtidal carbonate facies. This section consists of a westward-thickening wedge assigned to the Nopah and Mountain Springs formations and can be related to one type 1 and least four type 2 sequences. The basal part of the section is the Dunderberg Shale Member of the Nopah Formation, which is composed of meter-scale cyclical shale-carbonate bundles. Carbonate interbeds signify a variety of peritidal to deep subtidal paleoenvironments that comprise shelf margin and transgressive systems tracts. The progradation of a thrombolitic bank complex in the overlying upper Nopah may reflect emergence on the craton, evidenced by the Sauk II-Sauk III cratonic disconformity. The overlying A' member of the Mountain Springs Formation rests in sharp and, in places, slightly discordant contact with the top of the Nopah. This contact is interpreted as a marine flooding surface and type 2 sequence boundary. Member A consists of Lower Ordovician transgressive and highstand systems tracts comprised of oolitic shoal and back-shoal to intertidal carbonates. The type 1 unconformity that separates member A from overlying B' member is the top of the first-order Sauk Sequence. The B' member is a thin stratal interval of late Middle to Late Ordovician age and consists of dark, burrow-mottled skeletal wackestone and mudstone that is part of a transgressive systems tract. It is bounded above by another type 1 unconformity and therefore represents the first-order Tippecanoe sequence of Sloss.

  17. Bouguer images of the North American craton and its structural evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Bowring, S.; Eddy, M.; Guinness, E.; Leff, C.; Bindschadler, D.

    1984-01-01

    Digital image processing techniques have been used to generate Bouguer images of the North American craton that diplay more of the granularity inherent in the data as compared with existing contour maps. A dominant NW-SE linear trend of highs and lows can be seen extending from South Dakota, through Nebraska, and into Missouri. The structural trend cuts across the major Precambrian boundary in Missouri, separating younger granites and rhyolites from older sheared granites and gneisses. This trend is probably related to features created during an early and perhaps initial episode of crustal assembly by collisional processes. The younger granitic materials are probably a thin cover over an older crust.

  18. Madagascar: A continental fragment of the paleo-super Dharwar craton of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, P. K.; Pandey, O. P.; Negi, J. G.

    1992-06-01

    The morphological kinship of Madagascar to its immediate neighbors on the west (African continent) and east (Indian subcontinent) during the Early and middle Cretaceous has been debated for the past two decades on the basis of available geologic, tectonic, and paleomagnetic information. Most of the paleoreconstructions of Madagascar have shown its attachment to the east African continent. We present magnetic satelite and gravity data, and morphological, geophysical, and geotectonic similarities to hypothesize that in the period before the breakup of Gondwana, Madagascar was a continental fragment of the paleo-super Dharwar craton of India.

  19. Isotopic composition of Mg and Fe in garnet peridotites from the Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yajun; Huang, Jin-Xiang; Griffin, W. L.; Liu, Chuanzhou; Huang, Fang

    2017-03-01

    We present Mg and Fe isotopic data for whole rocks and separated minerals (olivine, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, garnet, and phlogopite) of garnet peridotites that equilibrated at depths of 134-186 km beneath the Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons. There is no clear difference in δ26Mg and δ56Fe of garnet peridotites from these two cratons. δ26Mg of whole rocks varies from -0.243‰ to -0.204‰ with an average of -0.225 ± 0.037‰ (2σ, n = 19), and δ56Fe from -0.038‰ to 0.060‰ with an average of -0.003 ± 0.068‰ (2σ, n = 19). Both values are indistinguishable from the fertile upper mantle, indicating that there is no significant Mg-Fe isotopic difference between the shallow and deep upper mantle. The garnet peridotites from ancient cratons show δ26Mg similar to komatiites and basalts, further suggesting that there is no obvious Mg isotopic fractionation during different degrees of partial melting of deep mantle peridotites and komatiite formation. The precision of the Mg and Fe isotope data (⩽±0.05‰ for δ26Mg and δ56Fe, 2σ) allows us to distinguish inter-mineral isotopic fractionations. Olivines are in equilibrium with opx in terms of Mg and Fe isotopes. Garnets have the lowest δ26Mg and δ56Fe among the coexisting mantle minerals, suggesting the dominant control of crystal structure on the Mg-Fe isotopic compositions of garnets. Elemental compositions and mineralogy suggest that clinopyroxene and garnet were produced by later metasomatic processes as they are not in chemical equilibrium with olivine or orthopyroxene. This is consistent with the isotopic disequilibrium of Mg and Fe isotopes between orthopyroxene/olivine and garnet/clinopyroxene. Combined with one sample showing slightly heavy δ26Mg and much lighter δ56Fe, these disequilibrium features in the garnet peridotites reveal kinetic isotopic fractionation due to Fe-Mg inter-diffusion during reaction between peridotites and percolating melts in the Kaapvaal craton.

  20. The ambient noise and earthquake surface wave tomography of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Obrebski, M. J.; Wu, Q.; Li, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The North China Craton (NCC) is unique for its unusual Phanerozoic tectonic activity. The NCC was internally tectonically stable until Jurassic when its southern margin collided with the Yangzte Craton. Subsequently, the eastern and central part of the NCC underwent distinctive evolutions during the Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic. In contrast to the Erdos block located in the western part of NCC and that seems to have preserved the typical features of a stable craton, the eastern NCC has experienced significant lithospheric thinning as evidenced by widespread magmatism activity and normal faulting, among other manifestations. The eastern part of the NCC is also one of the most seismically active intracontinental regions in the world. Here we focus on the region that comprises the North China Basin and the Yanshan-Taihang Mountains, two major tectonic units located to the east and in the center of the NCC, respectively. We combine ambient noise data and ballistic surface wave data recorded by the dense temporary seismic array deployed in the North China to obtain phase velocity maps at periods ranging from 5s to 60s. 1587 and 3667 ray paths were obtained from earthquake surface waves and ambient noise correlations, respectively. The phase velocity distribution was reconstructed with grid size 0.25x0.25 degrees and 0.5x0.5 degrees from ambient noise tomography and earthquake surface wave tomography. For periods shorter than 15s, the phase velocity variations are well correlated with the principal geological units in the NCC, with low-speed anomalies corresponding to the major sedimentary basins and high-speed anomalies coinciding with the main mountain ranges. Within the period range from 20s to 30s, the phase velocity variations seem to be related to the local variations of the crustal thickness. For the periods above 30s, the strength of the phase velocity variations decreases with increasing periods, which may imply that the uppermost mantle is much more homogeneous

  1. How did the 1906 San Francisco earthquake occur?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.

    1976-01-01

    The 1906 earthquake in San Francisco was of magnitude 8.3 and was the most destructive in the history of the United States. Because this part of California is now much more heavily populated, intense studies have been made of the 1906 earthquake in an effort to understand how it occurred and, more importantly, what likelihood there is of future large earthquakes near San Francisco. Great emphasis has been put on geodetic data- ground surveys of the region have been made frequently since 1853 (see "The California geodimeter network: measuring movement along the San Andreas fault" by J.C Savage, Earthquake Information Bulletin, vol. 6 no. 3, May-June 1974).  

  2. Sand waves at the mouth of San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Hanes, Daniel M.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Iampietro, Pat J.

    2006-01-01

    A multibeam bathymetric survey that produced unprecedented high resolution images of the mouth of San Francisco Bay was conducted in 2004 and 2005. The survey, performed over forty-four days by the Seafloor Mapping Lab at California State University, Monterey Bay, consisted of 1,138 track lines, 1.1 billion soundings, and covered an area of 154 km2 (60 mi2). The goals of this survey were to analyze sediment transport pathways at the mouth of San Francisco Bay and to calculate bathymetric change since the last survey was completed in 1956. The survey showed that significant bathymetric changes have occurred over the past 50 years. It also revealed that the study area contains sand waves that are among the largest and bedform morphologies that are among the most varied in the world. This set of five sheets shows views of the sand waves on the seafloor from different perspectives along with descriptive text.

  3. Sand waves at the mouth of San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbons, Helen; Barnard, Patrick L.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey; California State University, Monterey Bay; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; and Center for Integrative Coastal Observation, Research and Education partnered to map central San Francisco Bay and its entrance under the Golden Gate Bridge using multibeam echosounders. View eastward, through the Golden Gate into central San Francisco Bay. Depth of sea floor color coded: red (less than 10 m deep) to purple (more than 100 m deep). Land from USGS digital orthophotographs (DOQs) overlaid on USGS digital elevation models (DEMs). Sand waves in this view average 6 m in height and 80 m from crest to crest. Golden Gate Bridge is about 2 km long. Vertical exaggeration is approximately 4x for sea floor, 2x for land.

  4. GABPβ2 expression during osteogenic differentiation from human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyuan; Xiong, Jianjun; Wang, Tao; Zheng, Meirong; Wu, Ping; Wang, Xinping; Jiang, He; Yi, Benyi; Lang, Bin; Li, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    The E26 transformation-specific (ETS) family of transcription factors plays an important role in osteogenic differentiation. Whether GA-binding protein β2 (GABPβ2), a member of the ETS family, is involved in osteogenic differentiation has not been previously reported. In the present study, directed differentiation of human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells was induced and validated by examining alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, presence of mineralized nodule and other phenotypic characteristics of the cells on days 0, 3, 6 and 9, thus establishing their osteogenic potential. Real-time PCR revealed that similarly to the bone-specific transcription factor Runx2, the expression of Gabpb2 in Saos-2 cells also peaked on day 3 and was significantly reduced on days 6 and 9. Immunocytochemical staining showed that changes in the immunoreactivity of GABPβ2 also exhibited a similar trend to that of Runx2. Initially, Runx2 was predominantly localized in the nuclei, while GABPβ2 was relatively diffuse. Both exhibited a significant increase in immunoreactivity on day 3, with presence in both the nuclei and cytoplasm. By day 6, both showed a significant decrease in immunoreactivity and were mainly localized in the nuclei. Therefore, we surmise that GABPβ2, as an ETS family member, may play a regulatory role in early osteoblastic differentiation and potentially act in synergy with Runx2.

  5. An Einstein Observatory SAO-based catalog of B-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillo, F.; Sciortino, S.; Micela, G.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    About 4000 X-ray images obtained with the Einstein Observatory are used to measure the 0.16-4.0 keV emission from 1545 B-type SAO stars falling in the about 10 percent of the sky surveyed with the IPC. Seventy-four detected X-ray sources with B-type stars are identified, and it is estimated that no more than 15 can be misidentified. Upper limits to the X-ray emission of the remaining stars are presented. In addition to summarizing the X-ray measurements and giving other relevant optical data, the present extensive catalog discusses the reduction process and analyzes selection effects associated with both SAO catalog completeness and IPC target selection procedures. It is concluded that X-ray emission, at the level of Lx not less than 10 exp 30 ergs/s, is quite common in B stars of early spectral types (B0-B3), regardless of luminosity class, but that emission, at the same level, becomes less common, or nonexistent, in later B-type stars.

  6. Seasonality of the Mediterranean Fruit Fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) on Terceira and Sao Jorge Islands, Azores, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, R; Lopes, D J H; Mexia, A M M; Mumford, J D

    2017-01-01

    Population dynamics studies are very important for any area-wide control program as they provide detailed knowledge about the relationship of Medfly [Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann)] life cycle with host availability and abundance. The main goal of this study is to analyse seasonality of C. capitata in Terceira and Sao Jorge Islands (Azores archipelago) using field and laboratory data collected during (2010-2014) CABMEDMAC (MAC/3/A163) project. The results from Sao Jorge Island indicate significantly lower male/female ratio than on Terceira Island. This is an important finding specially regarding when stablishing the scenario parameters for a sterile insect technique application in each island. The population dynamics of C. capitata are generally linked with host fruit availability and abundance. However, on Terceira Island fruit infestation levels are not synchronized with the trap counts. For example, there was Medfly infestations in some fruits [e.g., Solanum mauritianum (Scop.)] while in the nearby traps there were no captures at the same time. From this perspective, it is important to denote the importance of wild invasive plants, on the population dynamics of C. capitata, as well important to consider the possibility of having different densities of traps according to the characteristics of each area in order to improve the network of traps surveillance's sensitivity on Terceira Island.

  7. Wavefront alignment research of segmented mirror synthetic aperture optical (SAO) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian; An, Xiaoqiang; Tian, Hao

    2010-05-01

    Wavefront control technology and imaging experiment are introduced for a segmented mirror SAO system with deformable sub-mirrors. This system is a RC style with 300mm aperture, 4.5 F#, +/-0.4°FOV, 0.45~0.75μm wave band, and diffraction-limit design MTF. The primary mirror is composed by three sub-mirrors, with parabolic shape, and each deformable sub-mirror has 19 actuators to control and keep the surface shape, and 5 actuators to align sub-mirrors location in 5 degree of freedom. Interferometer is used to feed back and control exit wavefront error, and base on measurement and finite element analysis, location and quanitity of actuators are optimized, making the surface shape and misadjustment errors interact and compensate each other, and the synthetic system exit pupil wavefront error is controlled. The integrated exit pupil wavefront errors are gotten by ZYGO interferometer, and central FOV is 0.077λRMS, and edge FOV is 0.093λRMS. At the end, an imaging experiment is executed, and good results are obtained, which proves, the deformable sub-mirrors have the ability to meliorate alignment and the latter can retroact the former, and this relationship iterate make system exit pupil wavefront error convergence and improve segmented mirror SAO system imaging ability.

  8. Application of echinoid sperm and embryo bioassays for the pollution assessment of Sao Sebastiao Channel, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboni, A.J.; Nipper, M.G.

    1995-12-31

    The Sao Sebastiao Channel, located on the Southeastern Brazilian coast, encompasses the largest oil terminal in the country and is also a highly touristic area. Frequent oil spills are responsible for chronic contamination problems and sewage disposal in the waters of the channel is also common practice. the water and sediment quality in different sites along Sao Sebastiao Channel was evaluated quarterly throughout a year, by toxicity testing with sperm cells and embryos of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus. Water samples were collected from two depths (1 m below surface and 1 m above the bottom). Sediments, collected by a grab sampler, had their pore water extracted by centrifuging. It was then analyzed for toxicity. The results showed that the pore water from most sites impaired sperm viability and embryo development of the test organisms. Sediments were further characterized for particle size distribution, TOC, heavy metals and petroleum hydrocarbons content. They contained baseline concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni and Fe, but the hydrocarbons levels were above the average for nearby coastal areas. The overlying water from the deeper layer was of better quality than the surface, but very fast changes were observed along time and space. This seems to be intimately associated with the predominant hydrodynamic and meteorological phenomena in that region. The results showed that these toxicity test methods can be applied in association with other forms of analysis, for the establishment of quality criteria for Brazilian coastal environments.

  9. Seasonality of the Mediterranean Fruit Fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) on Terceira and Sao Jorge Islands, Azores, Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, R.; Lopes, D.J.H.; Mexia, A.M.M.; Mumford, J.D.

    2017-01-01

    Population dynamics studies are very important for any area-wide control program as they provide detailed knowledge about the relationship of Medfly [Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann)] life cycle with host availability and abundance. The main goal of this study is to analyse seasonality of C. capitata in Terceira and Sao Jorge Islands (Azores archipelago) using field and laboratory data collected during (2010–2014) CABMEDMAC (MAC/3/A163) project. The results from Sao Jorge Island indicate significantly lower male/female ratio than on Terceira Island. This is an important finding specially regarding when stablishing the scenario parameters for a sterile insect technique application in each island. The population dynamics of C. capitata are generally linked with host fruit availability and abundance. However, on Terceira Island fruit infestation levels are not synchronized with the trap counts. For example, there was Medfly infestations in some fruits [e.g., Solanum mauritianum (Scop.)] while in the nearby traps there were no captures at the same time. From this perspective, it is important to denote the importance of wild invasive plants, on the population dynamics of C. capitata, as well important to consider the possibility of having different densities of traps according to the characteristics of each area in order to improve the network of traps surveillance’s sensitivity on Terceira Island. PMID:28082349

  10. Updated Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Ozone Monitoring Instrument (SAO OMI) formaldehyde retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Abad, G.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.; Wang, H.; Kurosu, T. P.; Suleiman, R.

    2015-01-01

    We present and discuss the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) formaldehyde (H2CO) retrieval algorithm for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) which is the operational retrieval for NASA OMI H2CO. The version of the algorithm described here includes relevant changes with respect to the operational one, including differences in the reference spectra for H2CO, the fit of O2-O2 collisional complex, updates in the high-resolution solar reference spectrum, the use of a model reference sector over the remote Pacific Ocean to normalize the retrievals, an updated air mass factor (AMF) calculation scheme, and the inclusion of scattering weights and vertical H2CO profile in the level 2 products. The setup of the retrieval is discussed in detail. We compare the results of the updated retrieval with the results from the previous SAO H2CO retrieval. The improvement in the slant column fit increases the temporal stability of the retrieval and slightly reduces the noise. The change in the AMF calculation has increased the AMFs by 20%, mainly due to the consideration of the radiative cloud fraction. Typical values for retrieved vertical columns are between 4 × 1015 and 4 × 1016 molecules cm-2, with typical fitting uncertainties ranging between 45 and 100%. In high-concentration regions the errors are usually reduced to 30%. The detection limit is estimated at 1 × 1016 molecules cm-2.

  11. Prevalence of Bluetongue virus serotype 4 in cattle in the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hellmeister de Campos Nogueira, Adriana; De Stefano, Eliana; de Souza Nunes Martins, Maira; Okuda, Liria Hiromi; Dos Santos Lima, Michele; da Silva Garcia, Thais; Heinz Hellwig, Otto; Alves de Lima, José Eduardo; Savini, Giovanni; Pituco, Edviges Maristela

    2016-09-30

    Bluetongue (BT) is considered endemic in several regions of Brazil. The State of Sao Paulo was divided into 7 cattle production regions (circuits) according the different systems of breeding, operational and logistical capacity of the state veterinary service. At least 1 animal from each property (a total of 1,716 farms) was tested by competitive ELISA for the presence of antibodies against BTV. Sero‑positive sera were subsequently also tested by virus neutralization tests (VNT) using serial dilutions from 1:10 (cutoff) up to 1:640 (in MEM). BTV‑4 neutralizing antibodies were detected in 86% (1,483/1,716) of the animals tested. These results show that BTV‑4 is endemic and widespread in the State of San Paulo and indirectly confirm that in the State there are favourable conditions for the multiplication of competent vectors. However, as no clinical signs have ever been reported in cattle in the region, BTV‑4 infection is likely to occur silently in the State of Sao Paulo.

  12. Estimation of turbulence production by nocturnal low level jets in Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beu, Cassia M. L.; Marques, Márcia T. A.; Nakaema, Walter M.; Sakagami, Yoshiaki; Santos, Pedro A. A.; Moreira, A. C. de C. A.; Landulfo, Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    Two Doppler lidars were recently used to collect data from the planetary boundary layer (PBL) in Sao Paulo city (23°32'S, 46°38'W). The measurement campaign was carried out from December-2015 to February-2016, during the summer, which is the rainy season. Although Sao Paulo is the main city of a huge metropolitan region with more than 11 million of inhabitants and 7 millions of vehicles, according to the government agencies, the lack of PBL observational data is still a limitation for the atmospheric dispersion studies. Therefore, this work should contribute to the comprehension of PBL mechanisms and also for future atmospheric modeling studies. The data revealed that the nocturnal low-level jets (LLJs) frequently occurred along those 3 months, but its height is highly variable, from 100 m up to 650 m. It was also seen that the nocturnal LLJs can extend for several hours, right before the sunset until sunrise. This work aims to investigate the turbulence production by the nocturnal LLJs and its influence into the stable boundary layer (SBL).

  13. Evaluation of antisera used for detecting enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in Sao Paulo.

    PubMed Central

    Guth, B E; Trabulsi, L R

    1985-01-01

    The usefulness of antisera in detecting enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains in Sao Paulo was evaluated. Polyvalent antisera detected 49% of ETEC isolates and were more effective in identifying E. coli that produced heat-labile and heat-stable enterotoxins and in strains that produced only heat-stable enterotoxin. ETEC strains not detected by the antisera belonged to different serogroups not isolated in Sao Paulo before; 34% of these strains had undetermined O antigens, and most of them produced only heat-labile toxin. A variation of serogroups over time was especially observed among strains that produced heat-stable toxin. The importance of H-antigen determinations in the effectiveness of ETEC diagnosis by serological methods became evident, as non-ETEC strains were also detected by polyvalent antisera, but their serotypes were different from those of ETEC strains. Although antisera can be used to identify O:H types of ETEC strains with accuracy, serotyping cannot be recommended for routine diagnosis. However, such a procedure may be useful for studying outbreaks of ETEC diarrhea if the involved serotypes are already known. PMID:3908475

  14. High resolution spectroscopy of the high latitude rapidly evolving post-AGB star SAO 85766 (= IRAS 18062+2410)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, M.; García-Lario, P.; Sivarani, T.; Manchado, A.; Sanz Fernández de Córdoba, L.

    2000-05-01

    SAO 85766 (b = +20o) is an IRAS source with far-infrared colours similar to planetary nebulae. According to the HDE catalogue, its spectrum in 1940 was that of an A5 star. The UV fluxes and colours derived from data obtained by the TD1 satellite in 1972 also indicate that SAO 85766 was an A-type supergiant at that epoch. However, high resolution spectra of SAO 85766 obtained in 1993 in the wavelength interval 4350Ä to 8820Ä shows that now it is similar to that of an early B type post-AGB supergiant. In addition to the absorptions lines typical of a B1I type star, the spectrum of SAO 85766 is found to show numerous permitted and forbidden emission lines of several elements, typically observed in the spectra of young high density low excitation planetary nebulae. From an analysis of the absorption lines we have estimated Teff=22000+/-500 K, log g=3.0+/-0.5, xi t=15+/-2km s-1 and [M/H]=-0.6. Carbon is found to be strongly underabundant ([C/Fe] = -1.0), similarly to what has been observed in other high galactic latitude hot post-AGB stars. The underabundance of carbon and metals, high galactic latitude, high radial velocity (46 km s-1), the presence of planetary nebula type detached cold circumstellar dust shell and also the presence of low excitation nebular emission lines in the spectrum indicate that SAO 85766 is a low mass star in the post-AGB stage of evolution. The above mentioned characteristics and the variations observed in the spectrum of SAO 85766 suggest that it has rapidly evolved during the past 50 years and it is now in the early stages of the planetary nebula phase. The central star may just have become hot enough to photoionize the circumstellar envelope ejected during the previous AGB phase. >From an analysis of the nebular emission lines we find Te=10000+/- 500K and Ne=2.5 104 cm-3. The nebula also shows an abundance pattern similar to that of the central star. The rapid post-AGB evolution of SAO 85766 appears to be similar to that observed in the

  15. Trace Metal and Nutrient Cycling in San Francisco Bay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-30

    interest in the cycling of contaminant metals and the role of benthic macrofauna in the Bay (especially the invasive species such as Potamocorbula) but...potential role of benthic macrofauna in collaboration with Dr. Jan Thompson (USGS/WRD) and are working with her to improve the chamber design as...study of South San Francisco Bay. In addition, we also included an objective to increase our understanding of the direct influence of benthic

  16. Ice, quakes, and a wobble shake San Francisco

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1995-01-06

    The fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in San Francisco last month was bumped to the Moscone Center while the Civic Auditorium, its venue in past years, was being reinforced against earthquakes. And that may have been fitting, given the meeting`s focus on sudden events in Earth history; the first moments of fault rupture, repeated outbursts of icebergs during the last ice age, and a shift in the seasons in the middle of this century.

  17. Groundwater quality in the San Francisco Bay groundwater basins, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Mary C.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Selected groundwater basins of the San Francisco Bay area constitute one of the study units being evaluated.

  18. San Francisco Vessel Traffic Service/Maritime Community Interrelationship.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    FRANCISCO VESSEL TRAFFIC SERVICE/MARITIME March 1983 *COMMUNITY INTERRELATIONSHIP 6. Perferming Orgenzaee Cede TSC/DTS-5 3 7...the main only as excellent. Members of the Coalition representing just about all aspects of the maritime community were extremely cooperative in the...be pointed out that much of the success of the SFVTS is due to cooperation of the members of the maritime community who participate voluntarily in

  19. Aggregate Settling Velocities in San Francisco Estuary Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. M.; Stacey, M. T.; Variano, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    One way that humans impact aquatic ecosystems is by adding nutrients and contaminants, which can propagate up the food web and cause blooms and die-offs, respectively. Often, these chemicals are attached to fine sediments, and thus where sediments go, so do these anthropogenic influences. Vertical motion of sediments is important for sinking and burial, and also for indirect effects on horizontal transport. The dynamics of sinking sediment (often in aggregates) are complex, thus we need field data to test and validate existing models. San Francisco Bay is well studied and is often used as a test case for new measurement and model techniques (Barnard et al. 2013). Settling velocities for aggregates vary between 4*10-5 to 1.6*10-2 m/s along the estuary backbone (Manning and Schoellhamer 2013). Model results from South San Francisco Bay shoals suggest two populations of settling particles, one fast (ws of 9 to 5.8*10-4 m/s) and one slow (ws of < 1*10-7 to 1.4*10-5 m/s) (Brand et al. 2015). While the open waters of San Francisco Bay and other estuaries are well studied and modeled, sediment and contaminants often originate from the margin regions, and the margins remain poorly characterized. We conducted a 24 hour field experiment in a channel slough of South San Francisco Bay, and measured settling velocity, turbulence and flow, and suspended sediment concentration. At this margin location, we found average settling velocities of 4-5*10-5 m/s, and saw settling velocities decrease with decreasing suspended sediment concentration. These results are consistent with, though at the low end of, those seen along the estuary center, and they suggest that the two population model that has been successful along the shoals may also apply in the margins.

  20. The earthquake educational institute at San Francisco State University

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, R.; Pestrong, R.; Strongin, H.

    1980-01-01

    The Earthquake Educational Institute was established in 1978 at San Francisco State University under a grant from the U.S National Science Foundation. The goal of the Institute is to develop earthquake-related curricula for use in elementary and secondary schools in the hope that, by educating students about earthquakes, they will be better prepared for the disruptions associated with a major quake. To date, about 140 elementary and secondary school teachers and administrators have enrolled in the program. 

  1. Contaminant levels in fish tissue from San Francisco Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Fairey, R.; Taberski, K.

    1995-12-31

    Edible fish species were collected from thirteen locations throughout San Francisco Bay, during the spring of 1994, for determination of contaminants levels in muscle tissue. Species collected included white croaker, surfperch, leopard and brown smoothhound sharks, striped bass, white sturgeon and halibut Sixty six composite tissue samples were analyzed for the presence of PAHs, PCBs, pesticides, trace elements and dioxin/furans. The US EPA approach to assessing chemical contaminant data for fish tissue consumption was used for identifying the primary chemicals of concern. Six chemicals or chemical groups were found to exceed screening levels established using the US EPA approach. PCBs (as total Aroclors) exceeded the screening level of 3 ppb in all sixty six tissue samples, with the highest concentrations (638 ppb) found near San Francisco`s industrial areas. Mercury was elevated (> 0.14 ppm) in forty of the sixty-six samples with the highest levels (1.26 ppm) occurring in shark muscle tissues. Concentrations of the organochlorine pesticides dieldrin, total chlordanes and total DDTs exceeded screening levels in a number of samples. Dioxin/furans (as TEQs) were elevated (above 0.15 ppt) in 16 of the 19 samples analyzed. Fish with high lipid content (croaker and surfperch) in their muscle tissue generally exhibited higher contaminant levels while fish with low lipid levels (halibut and shark) exhibited lower organic contaminant levels. Tissue samples taken from North Bay stations most often exhibited high levels of chemical contamination. The California Office of Health Hazard Assessment is currently evaluating the results of this study and has issued an interim Health Advisory concerning the human consumption of fish tissue from San Francisco Bay.

  2. Two Moments of School Architecture in Sao Paulo: Ramos de Azevedo and His Republican Pioneering Schools/Helio Duarte and the "Educational Agreement"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lima, Ana Gabriela Godinho

    2005-01-01

    There are two peculiar moments in the history of the "struggle for national education", which, specifically in the city of Sao Paulo, capital of the State of Sao Paulo, one of the major and richest cities in Brazil, produced very interesting results in school architecture. The first moment happened in the period called the "First…

  3. The Prince, the Captain and "The State": An Examination of the Mesquita Family Ownership of "O Estado de Sao Paulo" to 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etsinger, Jean

    Julio Mesquita joined the staff of "O Estado de Sao Paulo" in 1885 and became a director in 1891, when he also began his first term as a deputy of the Sao Paulo state assembly. Until his death in 1927, Mesquita guided the newspaper's growth in all respects--editorial, political, technological, and economic. Julio de Mesquita Filho…

  4. Nature of the mantle roots beneath the North American craton: mantle xenolith evidence from Somerset Island kimberlites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidberger, S. S.; Francis, D.

    1999-09-01

    The recently discovered Nikos kimberlite on Somerset Island, in the Canadian Arctic, hosts an unusually well preserved suite of mantle xenoliths dominated by garnet-peridotite (lherzolite, harzburgite, dunite) showing coarse and porphyroclastic textures, with minor garnet-pyroxenite. The whole rock and mineral data for 54 Nikos xenoliths indicate a highly refractory underlying mantle with high olivine forsterite contents (ave. Fo=92.3) and moderate to high olivine abundances (ave. 80 wt.%). These characteristics are similar to those reported for peridotites from the Archean Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons (ave. olivine Fo=92.5), but are clearly distinct from the trend defined by oceanic peridotites and mantle xenoliths in alkaline basalts and kimberlites from post-Archean continental terranes (ave. olivine Fo=91.0). The Nikos xenoliths yield pressures and temperatures of last equilibration between 20 and 55 kb and 650 and 1300°C, and a number of the peridotite nodules appear to have equilibrated in the diamond stability field. The pressure and temperature data define a conductive paleogeotherm corresponding to a surface heat flow of 44 mW/m 2. Paleogeotherms based on xenolith data from the central Slave province of the Canadian craton require a lower surface heat flow (˜40 mW/m 2) indicating a cooler geothermal regime than that beneath the Canadian Arctic. A large number of kimberlite-hosted peridotites from the Kaapvaal craton in South Africa and parts of the Siberian craton are characterized by high orthopyroxene contents (ave. Kaapvaal 32 wt.%, Siberia 20 wt.%). The calculated modal mineral assemblages for the Nikos peridotites show moderate to low contents of orthopyroxene (ave. 12 wt.%), indicating that the orthopyroxene-rich mineralogy characteristic of the Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons is not a feature of the cratonic upper mantle beneath Somerset Island.

  5. Source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosol in Sao Paulo using 13C and 14C measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Beatriz; Andrade, Maria de Fatima; Holzinger, Rupert; Röckmann, Thomas; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Dusek, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    The Metropolitan Area of Sao Paulo is affected by high aerosol concentrations, which contain a large fraction of organic material. Up to date, not much is known about the composition and origin of the organic aerosol in this city. We present the first source apportionment of the carbonaceous aerosol fraction in Sao Paulo, using stable (13C) and radioactive carbon isotopes (14C). 14C provides a clear-cut distinction between fossil sources, which contain no 14C, and contemporary sources such as biofuels, biomass burning, or biogenic sources, which contain a typical contemporary 14C/12C ratio. 13C can be used to distinguish C3 plants, such as maize and sugarcane, from C4 plants. This can help to identify a possible impact of sugarcane field burning in the rural areas of Sao Paulo State on the aerosol carbon in the city. In the first part of the study, we compare two tunnel studies: Tunnel 1 is frequented only by light duty vehicles, which run mainly on mixtures of gasoline with ethanol (gasohol, 25% ethanol and 85% gasoline) or hydrated ethanol (5% water and 95% ethanol). Tunnel 2 contains a significant fraction of heavy-duty diesel vehicles, and therefore the fraction of biofuels in the average fleet is lower. Comparison of 14C in organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) shows that in both tunnels there is no significant contribution of biofuels to EC. Combusting ethanol-gasoline fuels in a vehicle engine does apparently not result in significant EC formation from ethanol. Biofuels contribute around 45% to OC in Tunnel 1 an only 20% in Tunnel 2, reflecting a strong impact of diesel vehicles in Tunnel 2. In the second part of the study we conduct a source apportionment of ambient aerosol carbon collected in a field study during winter (July-August) 2012. Ambient EC has two main sources, vehicular emissions and biomass burning. We estimate a contribution of vehicular sources to EC of roughly 90% during weekdays and 80% during weekends, using the 14C values measured in

  6. Landslide risk in the San Francisco Bay region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coe, J.A.; Crovelli, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    We have used historical records of damaging landslides triggered by rainstorms, and a newly developed Probabilistic Landslide Assessment Cost Estimation System (PLACES), to estimate the numbers and direct costs of future landslides in the San Francisco Bay region. The estimated annual cost of future landslides in the entire region is about US $15 million (year 2000 $). The estimated annual cost is highest for San Mateo County ($3.32 million) and lowest for Solano County ($0.18 million). Normalizing costs by dividing by the percentage of land area with slopes equal or greater than about 10° indicates that San Francisco County will have the highest cost per square km ($7,400), whereas Santa Clara County will have the lowest cost per square km ($230). These results indicate that the San Francisco Bay region has one of the highest levels of landslide risk in the United States. Compared to landslide cost estimates from the rest of the world, the risk level in the Bay region seems high, but not exceptionally high.

  7. Microbial diversity in restored wetlands of San Francisco Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Theroux, Susanna; Hartman, Wyatt; He, Shaomei; Tringe, Susannah

    2013-12-09

    Wetland ecosystems may serve as either a source or a sink for atmospheric carbon and greenhouse gases. This delicate carbon balance is influenced by the activity of belowground microbial communities that return carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere. Wetland restoration efforts in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region may help to reverse land subsidence and possibly increase carbon storage in soils. However, the effects of wetland restoration on microbial communities, which mediate soil metabolic activity and carbon cycling, are poorly studied. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors which shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities in a suite of restored and historic wetlands in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with greenhouse gas monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of the wetland soil microbial communities along biogeochemical and wetland age gradients. Our results show relationships among geochemical gradients, availability of electron acceptors, and microbial community composition. Our study provides the first genomic glimpse into microbial populations in natural and restored wetlands of the San Francisco Bay-Delta region and provides a valuable benchmark for future studies.

  8. Merchandising of cigarettes in San Francisco pharmacies: 27 years later

    PubMed Central

    Eule, B; Sullivan, M; Schroeder, S; Hudmon, K

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To estimate changes since 1976 in the proportion of San Francisco pharmacies that sell cigarettes and to characterise the advertising of cigarettes and the merchandising of non-prescription nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) products in these retail establishments. Methods and setting: 100 randomly selected San Francisco pharmacies were visited in 2003. Pharmacies were characterised based on the sale of cigarettes, advertising for cigarettes, and the merchandising of non-prescription NRT products. Results: In 2003, 61% of pharmacies sold cigarettes, a significant decrease compared to 89% of pharmacies selling cigarettes in 1976 (p < 0.001); 84% of pharmacies selling cigarettes also displayed cigarette advertising. Non-prescription NRT products were stocked by 78% of pharmacies, and in 55% of pharmacies selling cigarettes, the NRT products were stocked immediately adjacent to the cigarettes. Conclusions: Since 1976, there has been a decline in the overall proportion of pharmacies in San Francisco that sell cigarettes yet most pharmacies, particularly traditional chain pharmacies, continue to merchandise the primary known risk factor for death in the USA. PMID:15564630

  9. Zircon from East Antarctica: evidence for Archean intracrustal recycling in the Kaapvaal-Grunehogna Craton from O and Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschall, H. R.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Storey, C.; Leat, P. T.; Dhuime, B.

    2010-12-01

    The Grunehogna Craton (GC, East Antarctica) is interpreted as part of the Archean Kaapvaal Craton of southern Africa prior to Gondwana breakup. The basement of the GC is only exposed within a small area comprising the dominantly leucocratic Annandagstoppane (ADT) granite. The granite (and hence the craton) has been dated previously only by Rb-Sr and Pb-Pb mica and whole-rock methods. Here, the crystallisation age of the granite was determined to 3,067 ± 8 Ma by U-Pb dating of zircon. This age is coeval with granitoids and volcanics in the Swaziland and Witwatersrand blocks of the Kaapvaal Craton. Inherited grains in the ADT granite were discovered with ages of up to 3,433 ±7 Ma, and are the first evidence of Palaeoarchean basement in Dronning-Maud Land. The age spectrum of the inherited grains reflects well-known tectono-magmatic events in the Kaapvaal Craton and form important pieces of evidence for the connection of the GC to the Kaapvaal Craton for at least three billion years and probably longer. Whole-rock chemistry and zircon O isotopes demonstrate a supracrustal sedimentary source for the granite, and Hf model ages show that at least two or three different crustal sources were contributing to the magma with model ages of ~3.50, ~3.75 and possibly ~3.90 Ga, respectively. 3.1 Ga granites covering ~60 % of the outcrop area of the Kaapvaal-Grunehogna Craton played a major role in the mechanical stabilisation of the continental crust during the establishment of the craton in the Mesoarchean. Combined zircon Hf-O isotope data and the lack of juvenile additions to the crust in the Mesoarchean strongly suggest that crustal melting and granite formation was caused by the deep burial of clastic sediments and subsequent incubational heating of the crust. Intracrustal recycling of this type may be an important process during cratonisation and the long-term stabilisation of continental crust.

  10. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 98-0041-2741, San Francisco Municipal Railway, Flynn Facility, San Francisco, California

    SciTech Connect

    Blade, L.M.; Mortimer, V.D.

    1999-06-01

    The Director of Public Transportation for the City and County of San Francisco, California, requested that the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSHS) conduct a health hazard evaluation (HHE) at the San Francisco Municipal Railway's Flynn Facility. This facility serves as a base of operations for approximately 123 diesel-powered buses, leading to employee exposures to diesel-engine exhaust emissions in the workplace air. The requester, concerned about the potential adverse effects of these exposures on workers' health and about the apparent ineffectiveness of the facility's ventilation systems and other exposure-control measures, asked that NIOSH evaluate workplace exposures along with the ventilation system and other control measure and recommend appropriate improvements.

  11. Alcatraz Disposal Site Investigation. Report 3. San Francisco Bay- Alcatraz Disposal Site Erodibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    MISCELLANEOUS PAPER HL-86-1 ALCATRAZ DISPOSAL SITE INVESTIGATION in Report 3 91X FILE COP’Y SAN FRANCISCO BAY- ALCATRAZ DISPOSAL SITE ERODIBILITY (V...Street ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO San Francisco, CA 94105-1905 ________________ 11 TITLE (include Security Classification) Alcatraz Disposal Site...Investigation; Report 3, San Francisco Day- Alcatraz Disposal Site Teeter, Allen M. 13a TYPE OF REPORT 113b TIME COVERED 114 DATE OF REPORT (Year, A4oiith

  12. Probing the edge of the West African Craton: A first seismic glimpse from Niger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Leo, Jeanette F.; Wookey, James; Kendall, J.-Michael; Selby, Neil D.

    2015-03-01

    Constraints on crustal and mantle structure of the Eastern part of the West African Craton have to date been scarce. Here we present results of P receiver function and SK(K)S wave splitting analyses of data recorded at International Monitoring System array TORD in SW Niger. Despite lacking in lateral coverage, our measurements sharply constrain crustal thickness (˜41 km), VP/VS ratio (1.69 ± 0.03), mantle transition zone (MTZ) thickness (˜247 km), and a midlithospheric discontinuity at ˜67 km depth. Splitting delay times are low with an average of 0.63 ± 0.01 s. Fast directions follow the regional surface geological trend with an average of 57 ± 1°. We suggest that splitting is due to fossil anisotropic fabrics in the crust and lithosphere, incurred during the Paleoproterozoic Eburnean Orogeny, with possible contributions from the later Pan-African Orogeny and present-day mantle flow. The MTZ appears to be unperturbed, despite the proximity of the sampled region to the deep cratonic root.

  13. Abnormal lithium isotope composition from the ancient lithospheric mantle beneath the North China Craton

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Deloule, Etienne; Su, Ben-Xun; Ying, Ji-Feng; Santosh, M.; Xiao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Lithium elemental and isotopic compositions of olivines in peridotite xenoliths from Hebi in the North China Craton provide direct evidence for the highly variable δ7Li in Archean lithospheric mantle. The δ7Li in the cores of olivines from the Hebi high-Mg# peridotites (Fo > 91) show extreme variation from −27 to +21, in marked deviation from the δ7Li range of fresh MORB (+1.6 to +5.6) although the Li abundances of the olivines are within the range of normal mantle (1–2 ppm). The Li abundances and δ7Li characteristics of the Hebi olivines could not have been produced by recent diffusive-driven isotopic fractionation of Li and therefore the δ7Li in the cores of these olivines record the isotopic signature of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Our data demonstrate that abnormal δ7Li may be preserved in the ancient lithospheric mantle as observed in our study from the central North China Craton, which suggest that the subcontinental lithospheric mantle has experienced modification of fluid/melt derived from recycled oceanic crust. PMID:24589693

  14. Neogene cratonic erosion fluxes and landform evolution processes from regional regolith mapping (Burkina Faso, West Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaud, Jean-Louis; Chardon, Dominique; Metelka, Václav; Beauvais, Anicet; Bamba, Ousmane

    2015-07-01

    The regionally correlated and dated regolith-paleolandform sequence of Sub-Saharan West Africa offers a unique opportunity to constrain continental-scale regolith dynamics as the key part of the sediment routing system. In this study, a regolith mapping protocol is developed and applied at the scale of Southwestern Burkina Faso. Mapping combines field survey and remote sensing data to reconstruct the topography of the last pediplain that formed over West Africa in the Early and Mid-Miocene (24-11 Ma). The nature and preservation pattern of the pediplain are controlled by the spatial variation of bedrock lithology and are partitioned among large drainage basins. Quantification of pediplain dissection and drainage growth allows definition of a cratonic background denudation rate of 2 m/My and a minimum characteristic timescale of 20 Ma for shield resurfacing. These results may be used to simulate minimum export fluxes of drainage basins of constrained size over geological timescales. Background cratonic denudation results in a clastic export flux of ~ 4 t/km2/year, which is limited by low denudation efficiency of slope processes and correlatively high regolith storage capacity of tropical shields. These salient characteristics of shields' surface dynamics would tend to smooth the riverine export fluxes of shields through geological time.

  15. Abnormal lithium isotope composition from the ancient lithospheric mantle beneath the North China Craton.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Deloule, Etienne; Su, Ben-Xun; Ying, Ji-Feng; Santosh, M; Xiao, Yan

    2014-03-04

    Lithium elemental and isotopic compositions of olivines in peridotite xenoliths from Hebi in the North China Craton provide direct evidence for the highly variable δ(7)Li in Archean lithospheric mantle. The δ(7)Li in the cores of olivines from the Hebi high-Mg# peridotites (Fo > 91) show extreme variation from -27 to +21, in marked deviation from the δ(7)Li range of fresh MORB (+1.6 to +5.6) although the Li abundances of the olivines are within the range of normal mantle (1-2 ppm). The Li abundances and δ(7)Li characteristics of the Hebi olivines could not have been produced by recent diffusive-driven isotopic fractionation of Li and therefore the δ(7)Li in the cores of these olivines record the isotopic signature of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Our data demonstrate that abnormal δ(7)Li may be preserved in the ancient lithospheric mantle as observed in our study from the central North China Craton, which suggest that the subcontinental lithospheric mantle has experienced modification of fluid/melt derived from recycled oceanic crust.

  16. Organic matter in the Neoproterozoic cap carbonate from the Amazonian Craton, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa Júnior, Gustavo R.; Nogueira, Afonso C. R.; Santos Neto, Eugênio V.; Moura, Candido A. V.; Araújo, Bruno Q.; Reis, Francisco de A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Bitumen found in Neoproterozoic carbonates from the southern Amazonian Craton, Brazil, represents a great challenge for its geochemical characterization (origin, thermal maturity and the degree of preservation) within a context of petroleum system. This organic material occurs in the basal Araras Group, considered as a Neoproterozoic cap carbonate, composed of dolostones (Mirassol d'Oeste Formation) overlaid by limestones and shales (Guia Formation). Geochemical analyses in samples of carbonate with bitumen from two open pits (Terconi and Tangará quarries) have shown low to very low total organic carbon content. Analyses of representative samples of Guia and Mirassol d'Oeste formations allowed us to obtain Gas chromatography (GC) traces and diagnostic biomarkers. n-C14 to n-C37 alkane distribution patterns in all samples suggests a major contribution of marine algae. Mid-chain monomethyl alkanes (C14sbnd C25) identified in both sets of samples were also reported in all mid to late Proterozoic oils and source rocks. However, there are significant differences among terpane distribution between the Mirassol d'Oeste and Tangará da Serra regions. The integration of organic geochemistry data and geological information suggests an indigenous origin for studied bitumen, primarily accumulated as hydrocarbon fluids migrated to carbonate rocks with higher porosity and permeability, and afterwards, altered to bitumen or migrabitumen. Although further investigations are required, this work provides a significant contribution to the knowledge about the remnant of this hypothetical Neoproterozoic petroleum system developed in the Southern Amazonian Craton.

  17. Multibeam Data and Socio-Economic Issues in West-Central San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chin, John L.; Carlson, Paul R.; Wong, Florence L.; Cacchione, David A.

    1998-01-01

    San Francisco Bay is the largest estuary on the conterminous U.S. Pacific Coast and is one of the world's largest natural harbors. It is a biologically productive and diverse environment. San Francisco Bay has a maritime economy that annually generates over $7.5 billion, handles 50 million tons of cargo, and involves thousands of jobs. Recent investigations by the USGS in this estuary help address both socio-economic and scientific issues: *Trimming pinnacles may prevent a calamitous oil spill. *Can San Francisco Bay accept more dredge spoil? *Bay floor biological habitats are quite varied. *How thick and how variable is the sediment fill in central San Francisco Bay?

  18. Plankton studies in San Francisco Bay; II, Phytoplankton abundance and species composition, July 1977-December 1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Raymond L. J.; Cloern, James E.

    1981-01-01

    Data are presented on the phytoplankton species composition and abundance in San Francisco Bay from July 1977 through December 1979. Phytoplankton identification and enumerations were made at selected stations. Sample collections were made at selected stations in the main channel of the Bay from Rio Vista on the Sacramento River to Calaveras Point in South San Francisco Bay, and at shoal stations in the central portion of South San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, and Suisun Bay. Also reported, from October 1978 through December 1979, are the calculated phytoplankton carbon and percent nondiatom carbon, and the species list. This study is one component of an ongoing interdisciplinary study of San Francisco Bay. (USGS)

  19. Structural framework across the Bastar craton - the Eastern Ghats Granulite Belt interface: Implications for making of eastern Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patole, Vishal; Nasipuri, Pritam

    2015-04-01

    The transformation of palaeo-continents involve breakup, dispersal and reassembly of cratonic blocks by collisional suturing that develop a network of orogenic (mobile) belts around the periphery of the stable cratons. During the collision, partial melting of the different crustal blocks produces migmatites at the craton-mobile belt interface. Thus, migmatites at the craton-mobile belt contact can provide valuable information regarding the pressure-temperature conditions of the melting of lower crust during supercontinent building processes. In this contribution, we document the structural framework across the Bastar craton- Eastern Ghats Granulite Belt (EGGB) interface that developed during the accretion of EGGB over Bastar craton. Near Bhawanipatna, Orissa, Eastern India, the granulites of the mobile belt are juxtaposed against the granitic rocks of the Bastar craton. Away from the contact domain, the cratonic granite is non-migmatitic and blasto-porphyritic in nature that gradually transforms to migmatitic variety towards the contact domain. In the non-migmatitic variety, the E-W trending stromatic leucozomes and biotite-hornblende rich fabric (S1) wraps around recrystallized K-feldspar augens. In the migmatitic variety towards the contact domain, NNE-SSW trending diatexite leucozomes (S2) are prominent and the intensity of melting and tightness of folding increases towards the contact domain. Structural measurements indicate that the S1 fabric is folded with the development of NNE-SSW axial plane with easterly plunging fold axis (50 -> 050N). To correlate the geological history of EGGB in the context of supercontinent reconstruction, the existence of a cratonic block consisting of India - Madagascar - Sri Lanka - Enderby Land-Kalahari ("IMSLEK") from 3000 Ma upto 750 Ma has been invoked by several authors. The apparent continuity of the Grenvillian metamorphic orogen along the East Antarctica-Australia-India margin has been taken as conclusive evidence for the

  20. Mantle density structure of the Siberian craton and the West Siberian basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanova, Y. V.; Artemieva, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    We present a mantle density model of the Proterozoic- Paleozoic West Siberian basin (WSB) and the Archean -Proterozoic Siberian craton (SC) based on free-board constraints. Given complex tectonic evolution of both WSB and SC, a strong compositional heterogeneity of mantle lithosphere is expected, but has never been documented so far in regional geophysical studies. In particular, the Siberian craton, formed by amalgamation of Archean terranes, has been significantly affected by Proterozoic collisional and extensional events, Devonian rifting of the Vilyui rift, and several pulses of kimberlite magmatism. The basement of the West Siberian basin, the largest in the world intracontinental basin, was formed by amalgamation of island arcs, terranes, micro-continents, and relict ocean basins during late Proterozoic-Paleozoic orogenic events, and was later affected by the Permian-early Triassic rifting, followed by emplacement of the Siberian traps, which cover much of the SC and the WSB. Their source region and geodynamic origin are still a subject of debate, although a strong reworking of the lithosphere is expected to be associated with the Siberian LIP. The present-day West Siberian basin and the Siberian craton lack significant surface topography variations, whereas the crustal structure is highly heterogeneous with large lateral variations in crustal thickness (ca. 20 km), thickness of sediments (ca. 15 km), and average crustal density (Cherepanova et al., 2013). Similarly, thermal regime of the lithosphere is also heterogeneous, ranging from typical cold cratonic geotherms in much of the SC with up-to 350 km thick lithosphere to hot geotherms in the rifted part of the WSB, where the lithosphere thickness is ca. 90-130 km (Artemieva and Mooney, 2001). Nonetheless, free air gravity is near-zero for much of Siberia suggesting that it is close to isostatic equilibrium. Topography, through the lithosphere buoyancy, is controlled by the structure of the mantle

  1. Provenances of the Mesozoic sediments in the Ordos Basin and implications for collision between the North China Craton (NCC) and the South China Craton (SCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Bao; Yuelong, Chen; Dapeng, Li; Shanhui, Wang

    2014-12-01

    To constrain the provenance of the Ordos Basin and the evolution history of the Qinling Orogen Belt from the Triassic to the Jurassic, 10 samples from the Dongsheng area and 28 samples from the Yan'an area were analyzed for U-Pb ages and Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd isotopic compositions. The results indicate that Middle Jurassic sediments in the Dongsheng area were derived from the Khondalite Belt, Langshan Mountain and the Yinshan Terrane. Mesozoic sediments in the Yan'an area consist of two parts. One part is derived from the North China Craton (NCC), which has U-Pb age groups of ∼1.8 Ga and ∼2.5 Ga, and Hf model ages of ∼2.8 Ga. The other part is derived from the Qilian-Qinling Orogenic Belt, which has U-Pb age groups of 600-1500 Ma and 100-500 Ma, and Nd and Hf isotopic model ages of less than 2.2 Ga. Combining the U-Pb ages with the Hf and Nd isotopic model ages, Mesozoic detrital zircons with U-Pb age groups of ∼1.8 Ga and ∼2.5 Ga in the Yan'an area are found to also be derived from the Khondalite Belt, Langshan Mountain and the Yinshan Terrane, not from the Trans-China Orogen Belt. From the late-Late Triassic sediments of the Yan'an area, the low average values of the Hf (2.03 Ga) and Nd (2.03 Ga) model ages and the characteristic age population of 600-1500 Ma reveal that the main collision or continental subduction between the NCC and the South China Craton (SCC) occurred in the late-Late Triassic. After the main collision or continental subduction, the proportion of sediments from the Qinling-Qilian Orogenic Belt began to decrease (recorded in the early Jurassic samples), which may be in response to the gradual slowing of the uplift speed of the Qinling Orogenic Belt. In the early-middle Jurassic, the sediments have a main U-Pb age population of 100-500 Ma, low detrital zircon Hf model ages (average value is 1.17 Ga) and low whole rock Nd model ages (average value is 1.13 Ga), which suggests that the Qilian-Qinling Orogenic Belt may have a fast uplift

  2. SAO and Kelvin Waves in the EuroGRIPS GCMS and the UK Meteorological Offices Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amodei, M.; Pawson, S.; Scaife, A. A.; Lahoz, W.; Langematz, U.; Li, Ding Min; Simon, P.

    2000-01-01

    This work is an intercomparison of four tropospheric-stratospheric climate models, the Unified Model (UM) of the U.K. Meteorological Office (UKMO), the model of the Free University in Berlin (FUB). the ARPEGE-climat model of the National Center for Meteorological Research (CNRM), and the Extended UGAMP GCM (EUGCM) of the Center for Global Atmospheric Modelling (CGAM), against the UKMO analyses. This comparison has been made in the framework of the "GSM-Reality Intercomparison Project for SPARC" (GRIPS). SPARC (Stratospheric Processes and their Role in Climate) aims are to investigate the effects of the middle atmosphere on climate and the GRIPS purpose is to organized a comprehensive assessment of current Middle Atmosphere-Climate Models (MACMs). The models integrations were made without identical contraints e.g. boundary conditions, incoming solar radiation). All models are able to represent the dominant features of the extratropical circulation. In this paper, the structure of the tropical winds and the strengths of the Kelvin waves are examined. Explanations for the differences exhibited. between the models. as well as between models and analyses, are also proposed. In the analyses a rich spectrum of waves (eastward and westward) is present and contributes to drive the SAO (SemiAnnual Oscillation) and the QBO (Quasi-Biennal Oscillation). The amplitude of the Kelvin waves is close to the one observed in UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) data. In agreement with observations, the Kelvin waves generated in the models propagate into the middle atmosphere as wave packets which underlines convective forcing origin. In most models, slow Kelvin waves propagate too high and are hence overestimated in the upper stratosphere and in the mesosphere, except for the UM which is more diffusive. These waves are not sufficient to force realistic westerlies of the QBO or SAO westerly phases. If the SAO is represented by all models only two of them are able to generate

  3. Quantifying impacts on air quality of vehicular emissions in Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Ferreira de Brito, Joel; Godoy, José Marcus; Luiza Godoy, Maria; Junior, Djacinto

    2016-04-01

    Vehicular emissions in megacities such as Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro are increasingly becoming a global issue. The São Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA), located in Southeast of Brazil, is a megacity with a population of 18 million people, with 7 million cars and large-scale industrial emissions. Rio de Janeiro is also a large city with different meteorology than São Paulo. All cars in Brazil runs gasohol, with 23% ethanol in gasoline, and for the last 10 years, flex cars that can run on gasohol, ethanol or any mixture dominate the market. Overall ethanol accounts for about 30-40% of fuel burned in both cities. To improve the understanding of vehicular emission impacts on aerosol composition and life cycle in these two large megacities a source apportionment study, combining online and offline measurements, was performed. Aerosols were collected for one year to capture seasonal variability at 4 sites in each city, with inorganic and organic aerosol component being sampled. Organic and elemental carbon were measured using a Sunset Laboratory Dual Optics (transmission and reflectance) Carbon Analyzer and about 22 trace elements has been measured using polarized X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF). Aerosol mass and black carbon were also measured, as well as trace gases to help in aerosol source apportionment. In Sao Paulo, the average PM2.5 mass concentration obtained varied from 9.6 to 12.2 μg m-3 for the several sites, and similar concentrations were measured in Rio de Janeiro. At all sites, organic matter (OM) has dominated fine mode aerosol concentration with 42 to 60% of the aerosol mass. EC accounted for 21 to 31% of fine mode aerosol mass concentration. Sulfate accounted for 21 to 26% of PM2.5 for the sites. Aerosol source apportionment was done with receptor analysis and integration with online data such as PTR-MS, Aethalometers, Nephelometers and ACSM helped to apportion vehicular emissions. For the 8 sites operated in Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, vehicular

  4. Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (SAO OMPS) formaldehyde retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Abad, G.; Vasilkov, A.; Seftor, C.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents our new formaldehyde (H2CO) retrievals, obtained from spectra recorded by the nadir instrument of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) flown on-board NASA's Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SUOMI-NPP) satellite. Our algorithm is similar to the one currently in place for the production of NASA's Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) operational H2CO product. We are now able to produce a consistent set of long term data from two different instruments that share a similar concept. The ongoing overlap period between OMI and OMPS offers a perfect opportunity to study the consistency between both data sets. The different spatial and spectral resolution of the instruments is a source of discrepancy in the retrievals despite the similarity of the physic assumptions of the algorithm. We have concluded that the reduced spectral resolution of OMPS in comparison with OMI is not a significant obstacle in obtaining good quality retrievals. Indeed, the improved signal to noise ratio (SNR) of OMPS with respect to OMI helps to reduce the noise of the retrievals performed using OMPS spectra. However, the size of OMPS spatial pixels imposes a limitation in the capability to distinguish particular features of H2CO that are discernible with OMI. With root mean square (RMS) residuals ~ 5 × 10-4 for individual pixels we estimate the detection limit to be about 7.5 × 1015 molecules cm-2. Total vertical column densities (VCD) errors for individual pixels range between 40 % for pixels with high concentrations to 100 % or more for pixels with concentrations at or below the detection limit. We compare different OMI products with our OMPS product using one year of data, between September 2012 and September 2013. The seasonality of the retrieved slant columns is captured similarly by all products but there are discrepancies in the values of the VCDs. The mean biases among the two OMI products and our OMPS product are 21 % between OMI SAO and OMPS SAO and 38

  5. Tumstatin induces apoptosis and stimulates phosphorylation of p65NF-κB in human osteoblastic osteosarcoma Saos-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yin, Ruo-Feng; Teng, Jia-Song

    2016-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of tumstatin on inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in Saos-2 human osteosarcoma cells and to understand the mechanism involved. Inhibition of cell proliferation was analyzed by MTT assay and induction of apoptosis through nuclear fragmentation assay. Viability of Saos-2 cells was reduced to 19% on treatment with 25 µM concentration of tumstatin after 48 h. Presence of characteristic apoptotic nuclei, rounded cell shape and shrunken size were caused by tumstatin treatment at 25 µM concentration. The level of mRNA corresponding to PTEN, FasR and FasL was increased significantly in tumstatin treated Saos-2 cells compared to untreated control. Investigation of the mechanism revealed NF-κB activation by phosphorylation on serine 536. The activated NF-κB was translocated into the nucleus from the cytoplasm on treatment with tumstatin. Degradation of the IκBα by tumstatin was found to be much slower compared to that induced by treatment with TNF-α. Thus, tumstatin inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in Saos-2 cells through activation of NF-κB and its translocation to the nucleus. Therefore, tumstatin can play an important role in the treatment of osteosarcoma.

  6. Effects of Cissus quadrangularis on the proliferation, differentiation and matrix mineralization of human osteoblast like SaOS-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Muthusami, Sridhar; Senthilkumar, Krishnamoorthy; Vignesh, Chandragandan; Ilangovan, Ramachandran; Stanley, Jone; Selvamurugan, Nagarajan; Srinivasan, Narasimhan

    2011-04-01

    Osteoporosis is a public health problem which is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The repair of bone defect is still a big challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Traditional use of Cissus quadrangularis (C. quadrangularis) in the treatment of bone disorders has been documented. The present study was employed to delineate the effects of ethanolic extract of C. quadrangularis on the proliferation, differentiation and matrix mineralization of human osteoblast like SaOS-2 cells. Lactate dehydrogenase assayed in the conditioned medium of control and C. quadrangularis treated cells did not differ significantly indicating that ethanolic extract of C. quadrangularis is nontoxic to osteoblastic cells. [(3)H] Thymidine incorporation assay revealed that C. quadrangularis treatment has increased the DNA synthesis of human osteoblastic SaOS-2 cells indicating increased proliferation of these cells. The data on alizarin red and ALP staining revealed increased matrix mineralization of human osteoblast like SaOS-2 cells. The study also revealed that the anabolic actions of ethanolic extract of C. quadrangularis in human osteoblast like cells are mediated through increased mRNA and protein expression of Runx2, a key transcription factor involved in the regulation of bone matrix proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed increased transcriptional activity of Runx2 on the promoter of osteocalcin after C. quadrangularis treatment. These results indicate positive regulation of C. quadrangularis on the proliferation, differentiation, and matrix mineralization of human osteoblast like SaOS-2 cells.

  7. Body fat distribution in stunted compared with normal-height children from the shantytowns of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether central fat distribution varies between children who were growth retarded as young children, compared to normal height children from the same impoverished communities of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Research methods and procedures: A prospectiv...

  8. SURVEY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ASSOCIATED WITH AUTOMOTIVE EMISSIONS IN THE URBAN AIRSHED OF SAO PAULO, BRAZIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metropolitan Region of Sao Paulo (MRSP), Brazil, is one of the largest metropolitan areas in the world (population 17 million, approx.) and relies heavily on alcohol-based fuels for automobiles. It is estimated that about 40% of the total volume of fuel is ethanol with som...

  9. Education, Training and Employment in Small-Scale Enterprises: Three Industries in Sao Paulo, Brazil. IIEP Research Report No. 63.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leite, Elenice M.; Caillods, Francoise

    Despite the prophecies forecasting their probable disappearance or annihilation, small-scale enterprises have persisted in the Brazilian industrial structure since 1950. To account for the survival of small firms in Brazil, specifically in the state of Sao Paulo, a study examined 100 small firms in three industrial sectors: clothing, mechanical…

  10. Validation of OMI Total Ozone Retrievals from the SAO Ozone Profile Algorithm and Three Operational Algorithms 3 with Brewer Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Juseon; Kim, Jae H.; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly

    2015-04-01

    The optimal estimation (OE) based ozone profile algorithm developed at Smithsonian 3 Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) is assessed as to its accuracy to extract total ozone amount from 4 Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements through the validation using Brewer ground 5 based measurements between January 2005 and December 2008. We compare it against the quality of 6 three OMI operational ozone products, derived from NASA TOMS, KNMI DOAS, and KNMI OE 7 algorithms, respectively. The validation demonstrates that the SAO ozone profile algorithm generally 8 has the best total ozone retrieval performance compared to the three OMI operational ozone products. 9 The individual station comparisons show an agreement between SAO and Brewer within ± 1% except 10 at polar stations (~ -2 %), with a high correlation coefficient of ~ 0.99 at most stations. The KNMI OE 11 algorithm systematically overestimates the true total ozone value at all stations with a bias from 2 % 12 at low/mid latitude stations to 5 % at high latitude stations. On the other hand, TOMS/DOAS 13 algorithm underestimates total ozone by ~ -1.7 % on average. The standard deviations of differences 14 are ~ 1.8 % for SAO and TOMS while DOAS and KNMI show the standard deviation values of 2.2 15 and 2.5 %, respectively. The remarkable stability of SAO OE algorithm is found with no significant 16 dependency on algorithmic variables such as viewing geometries, cloud parameters, and time. In 17 comparison, the severe dependency on both solar and viewing zenith angles is found in KNMI OE 18 algorithm, which is characterized with a negative (positive) correlation with smaller (larger) solar 19 zenith angles and the strong cross-track dependent biases ranging from 4% at nadir and 1% at off-20 nadir positions. The dependence of DOAS and TOMS algorithms on the algorithmic variables is 21 marginal compared to KNMI OE algorithm, but distinct compared to SAO OE algorithm. Relative 22 differences between SAO/DOAS and

  11. A Sm-Nd and Pb isotope study of Archaean greenstone belts in the southern Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.; Carlson, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    An Sm-Nd and Pb study on a wide variety of lithologies in Archaean greenstone belt fragments in the southern Kaapvaal Craton reveals a complex petrogenetic history. The fragments are important because they represent a 350 km transect through the craton south of Barberton to its southern margin. The Commondale greenstone belt yields a precise Sm-Nd age of 3334 + or - 18 Ma on an exceptionally well preserved peridotite suite of komatiitic affinity. The wide range of Sm/Nd from 0.6 to 1.0 is attributed to the unusual occurrence of orthopyroxene in the spinifex-bearing rocks. A considerably younger age of about 3.2 Ga is suggested for the Nondweni greenstone belt close to the southern margin of the craton on the basis of separate Sm-Nd isochrons on individual lithologies ranging from komatiite, through komatiitic basalt and basalt to felsic volcanic rocks. On the basis of the present study the greenstone belts appear to have been emplaced at progressively younger ages toward the southern margin of the craton.

  12. Influence of cratonic lithosphere on the formation and evolution of flat slabs: Insights from 3-D time-dependent modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taramón, Jorge M.; Rodríguez-González, Juan; Negredo, Ana M.; Billen, Magali I.

    2015-09-01

    Several mechanisms have been suggested for the formation of flat slabs including buoyant features on the subducting plate, trenchward motion and thermal or cratonic structure of the overriding plate. Analysis of episodes of flat subduction indicate that not all flat slabs can be attributed to only one of these mechanisms and it is likely that multiple mechanisms work together to create the necessary conditions for flat slab subduction. In this study we examine the role of localized regions of cratonic lithosphere in the overriding plate in the formation and evolution of flat slabs. We explicitly build on previous models, by using time-dependent simulations with three-dimensional variation in overriding plate structure. We find that there are two modes of flat subduction: permanent underplating occurs when the slab is more buoyant (shorter or younger), while transient flattening occurs when there is more negative buoyancy (longer or older slabs). Our models show how regions of the slab adjacent to the subcratonic flat portion continue to pull the slab into the mantle leading to highly contorted slab shapes with apparent slab gaps beneath the craton. These results show how the interpretation of seismic images of subduction zones can be complicated by the occurrence of either permanent or transient flattening of the slab, and how the signature of a recent flat slab episode may persist as the slab resumes normal subduction. Our models suggest that permanent underplating of slabs may preferentially occur below thick and cold lithosphere providing a built-in mechanism for regeneration of cratons.

  13. Supraphysiological Levels of Quercetin Glycosides are Required to Alter Mineralization in Saos2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Leslie A.; Peters, Sandra J.; Sullivan, Philip J.; Ward, Wendy E.

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoid intake is positively correlated to bone mineral density (BMD) in women. Flavonoids such as quercetin exhibit strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity that may be beneficial for bone health. Quercetin, previously shown to positively influence osteoblasts, is metabolized into glycosides including rutin and hyperoside. We compared the effects of these glycosides on mineralization in human osteoblast (Saos2) cells. Administration of rutin (≥25 µM) and hyperoside (≥5 µM) resulted in higher mineral content, determined using the alizarin red assay. This was accompanied by higher alkaline phosphatase activity with no cell toxicity. The expression of osteopontin, sclerostin, TNFα and IL6, known stimuli for decreasing osteoblast activity, were reduced with the addition of rutin or hyperoside. In summary, rutin and hyperoside require supraphysiological levels, when administered individually, to positively influence osteoblast activity. This information may be useful in developing nutraceuticals to support bone health. PMID:27136576

  14. Urban land use of the Sao Paulo metropolitan area by automatic analysis of LANDSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Niero, M.; Foresti, C.

    1983-01-01

    The separability of urban land use classes in the metropolitan area of Sao Paulo was studied by means of automatic analysis of MSS/LANDSAT digital data. The data were analyzed using the media K and MAXVER classification algorithms. The land use classes obtained were: CBD/vertical growth area, residential area, mixed area, industrial area, embankment area type 1, embankment area type 2, dense vegetation area and sparse vegetation area. The spectral analysis of representative samples of urban land use classes was done using the "Single Cell" analysis option. The classes CBD/vertical growth area, residential area and embankment area type 2 showed better spectral separability when compared to the other classes.

  15. APPLICATION OF AUDIO-MAGNETOTELLURIC SURVEYS ON SAO MIGUEL ISLAND, AZORES PORTUGAL.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoover, Donald; Rodrigues Da Silva, A.; Pierce, Herbert A.; Amaral, Roberto

    1984-01-01

    Geothermal exploration and development has been under way on Sao Miguel Island, Azores since 1975. This work had been restricted to the Fogo volcano, one of three dormant silicic volcanic centers on the island. The USGS in 1982 and 1983 conducted reconnaissance natural-source audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) surveys of all three silicic centers to evaluate the potential for geothermal systems at each and to demonstrate the utility of the method in areas of difficult terrain. Results on Fogo showed a low resistivity trend extending from the present production area upslope to the caldera boundary. The upper part of this trend is the upwelling zone of a thermal plume which supplies the production area. Further exploration and drilling are now planned for this area.

  16. SAO/NASA joint investigation of astronomical viewing quality at Mount Hopkins Observatory: 1969-1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, M. R.; Bufton, J. L.; Hogan, D.; Kurtenbach, D.; Goodwin, K.

    1974-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the astronomical seeing conditions have been made with a stellar-image monitor system at the Mt. Hopkins Observatory in Arizona. The results of this joint SAO-NASA experiment indicate that for a 15-cm-diameter telescope, image motion is typically 1 arcsec or less and that intensity fluctuations due to scintillation have a coefficient of irradiance variance of less than 0.12 on the average. Correlations between seeing quality and local meteorological conditions were investigated. Local temperature fluctuations and temperature gradients were found to be indicators of image-motion conditions, while high-altitude-wind conditions were shown to be somewhat correlated with scintillation-spectrum bandwidth. The theoretical basis for the relationship of atmospheric turbulence to optical effects is discussed in some detail, along with a description of the equipment used in the experiment. General site-testing comments and applications of the seeing-test results are also included.

  17. SEISMIC STUDY OF THE AGUA DE PAU GEOTHERMAL PROSPECT, SAO MIGUEL, AZORES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Rodrigues da Silva, Antonio; Iyer, H.M.; Evans, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A 16 station array was operated over the 200 km**2 central portion of Sao Miguel utilizing 8 permanent Instituto Nacional de Meterologia e Geofisica stations and 8 USGS portable stations. Forty four local events with well constrained solutions and 15 regional events were located. In addition, hundreds of unlocatable seismic events were recorded. The most interesting seismic activity occurred in a swarm on September 6 and 7, 1983 when over 200 events were recorded in a 16 hour period. The seismic activity around Agua de Pau was centered on the east and northeast slopes of the volcano. The data suggest a boiling hydrothermal system beneath the Agua de Pau volcano, consistent with a variety of other data.

  18. Upgrading and performance of the SAO laser ranging system in Matera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, J.; Pearlman, M.; Throp, J.; Wohn, J.

    1983-01-01

    The performance of the SAO lasers was improved considerably in terms of accuracy, range noise, data yield, and reliability. With the narrower laser pulse (2.5-3.0 nsec) and a new analog pulse processing system, the systematic range errors were reduced to 3-5 cm and range noise has been reduced to 5-15 cm on low satellites and 10-18 cm on Lageos. Pulse repetition rate was increased to 30 ppm and considerable improvement has been made in signal-to-noise ratio by using a 3 Angstrom interference filter and by reducing the range gate window down to 200-400 nsec. The first upgraded system was installed in Arequipa, Peru in the spring of 1982. The second upgraded system is now in operation in Matera, Italy. The third system is expected to be installed in Israel during 1984.

  19. Mineralization of bone-related SaOS-2 cells under physiological hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Tolba, Emad; Diehl-Seifert, Bärbel; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is a physiological energy-rich polymer with multiple phosphoric anhydride bonds. In cells such as bone-forming osteoblasts, glycolysis is the main pathway generating metabolic energy in the form of ATP. In the present study, we show that, under hypoxic culture conditions, the growth/viability of osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells is not impaired. The addition of polyP to those cells, administered as amorphous calcium polyP nanoparticles (aCa-polyP-NP; approximate size 100 nm), significantly increased the proliferation of the cells. In the presence of polyP, the cells produce significant levels of lactate, the end product of anaerobic glycolysis. Under those conditions, an eight-fold increase in the steady-state level of the membrane-associated carbonic anhydrase IX is found, as well as a six-fold induction of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1. Consequently, biomineral formation onto the SaOS-2 cells decreases under low oxygen tension. If the polyP nanoparticles are added to the cells, the degree of mineralization is enhanced. These changes had been measured also in human mesenchymal stem cells. The assumption that the bicarbonate, generated by the carbonic anhydrase in the presence of polyP under low oxygen, is deposited as a constituent of the bioseeds formed during initial hydroxyapatite formation is corroborated by the identification of carbon besides of calcium, oxygen and phosphorus in the initial biomineral deposit onto the cells using the sensitive technology of high-resolution energy dispersive spectrometry mapping. Based on these data, we conclude that polyP is required for the supply of metabolic energy during bone mineral formation under physiological, hypoxic conditions, acting as a 'metabolic fuel' for the cells to grow.

  20. IS THE POST-AGB STAR SAO 40039 MILDLY HYDROGEN-DEFICIENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S. Sumangala; Pandey, Gajendra; Giridhar, Sunetra; Lambert, David L. E-mail: pandey@iiap.res.in E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2011-08-10

    We have conducted an LTE abundance analysis for SAO 40039, a warm post-AGB star whose spectrum is known to show surprisingly strong He I lines for its effective temperature and has been suspected of being H-deficient and He-rich. High-resolution optical spectra are analyzed using a family of model atmospheres with different He/H ratios. Atmospheric parameters are estimated from the ionization equilibrium set by neutral and singly ionized species of Fe and Mg, the excitation of Fe I and Fe II lines, and the wings of the Paschen lines. On the assumption that the He I lines are of photospheric and not chromospheric origin, a He/H ratio of approximately unity is found by imposing the condition that the adopted He/H ratio of the model atmosphere must equal the ratio derived from the observed He I triplet lines at 5876, 4471, and 4713 A, and singlet lines at 4922 and 5015 A. Using the model with the best-fitting atmospheric parameters for this He/H ratio, SAO 40039 is confirmed to exhibit mild dust-gas depletion, i.e., the star has an atmosphere deficient in elements of high condensation temperature. The star appears to be moderately metal-deficient with [Fe/H] = -0.4 dex. But the star's intrinsic metallicity as estimated from Na, S, and Zn, elements of a low condensation temperature, is [Fe/H]{sub o} {approx_equal} -0.2 ([Fe/H]{sub o} refers to the star's intrinsic metallicity). The star is enriched in N and perhaps O as well, changes reflecting the star's AGB past and the event that led to He enrichment.

  1. The Impact of Antipsychotic Polytherapy Costs in the Public Health Care in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Razzouk, Denise; Kayo, Monica; Sousa, Aglaé; Gregorio, Guilherme; Cogo-Moreira, Hugo; Cardoso, Andrea Alves; Mari, Jair de Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Guidelines for the treatment of psychoses recommend antipsychotic monotherapy. However, the rate of antipsychotic polytherapy has increased over the last decade, reaching up to 60% in some settings. Studies evaluating the costs and impact of antipsychotic polytherapy in the health system are scarce. Objective To estimate the costs of antipsychotic polytherapy and its impact on public health costs in a sample of subjects with psychotic disorders living in residential facilities in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Method A cross-sectional study that used a bottom-up approach for collecting costs data in a public health provider´s perspective. Subjects with psychosis living in 20 fully-staffed residential facilities in the city of Sao Paulo were assessed for clinical and psychosocial profile, severity of symptoms, quality of life, use of health services and pharmacological treatment. The impact of polytherapy on total direct costs was evaluated. Results 147 subjects were included, 134 used antipsychotics regularly and 38% were in use of antipsychotic polytherapy. There were no significant differences in clinical and psychosocial characteristics between polytherapy and monotherapy groups. Four variables explained 30% of direct costs: the number of antipsychotics, location of the residential facility, time living in the facility and use of olanzapine. The costs of antipsychotics corresponded to 94.4% of the total psychotropic costs and to 49.5% of all health services use when excluding accommodation costs. Olanzapine costs corresponded to 51% of all psychotropic costs. Conclusion Antipsychotic polytherapy is a huge economic burden to public health service, despite the lack of evidence supporting this practice. Great variations on antipsychotic costs explicit the need of establishing protocols for rational antipsychotic prescriptions and consequently optimising resource allocation. Cost-effectiveness studies are necessary to estimate the best value for money

  2. Cretaceous mantle of the Congo craton: Evidence from mineral and fluid inclusions in Kasai alluvial diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosman, Charles W.; Kopylova, Maya G.; Stern, Richard A.; Hagadorn, James W.; Hurlbut, James F.

    2016-11-01

    Alluvial diamonds from the Kasai River, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) are sourced from Cretaceous kimberlites of the Lucapa graben in Angola. Analysis of 40 inclusion-bearing diamonds provides new insights into the characteristics and evolution of ancient lithospheric mantle of the Congo craton. Silicate inclusions permitted us to classify diamonds as peridotitic, containing Fo91-95 and En92-94, (23 diamonds, 70% of the suite), and eclogitic, containing Cr-poor pyrope and omphacite with 11-27% jadeite (6 diamonds, 18% of the suite). Fluid inclusion compositions of fibrous diamonds are moderately to highly silicic, matching compositions of diamond-forming fluids from other DRC diamonds. Regional homogeneity of Congo fibrous diamond fluid inclusion compositions suggests spatially extensive homogenization of Cretaceous diamond forming fluids within the Congo lithospheric mantle. In situ cathodoluminescence, secondary ion mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveal large heterogeneities in N, N aggregation into B-centers (NB), and δ13C, indicating that diamonds grew episodically from fluids of distinct sources. Peridotitic diamonds contain up to 2962 ppm N, show 0-88% NB, and have δ13C isotopic compositions from - 12.5‰ to - 1.9‰ with a mode near mantle-like values. Eclogitic diamonds contain 14-1432 ppm N, NB spanning 29%-68%, and wider and lighter δ13C isotopic compositions of - 17.8‰ to - 3.4‰. Fibrous diamonds on average contain more N (up to 2976 ppm) and are restricted in δ13C from - 4.1‰ to - 9.4‰. Clinopyroxene-garnet thermobarometry suggests diamond formation at 1350-1375 °C at 5.8 to 6.3 GPa, whereas N aggregation thermometry yields diamond residence temperatures between 1000 and 1280 °C, if the assumed mantle residence time is 0.9-3.3 Ga. Integrated geothermobaromtery indicates heat fluxes of 41-44 mW/m2 during diamond formation and a lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) at 190-210 km. The hotter

  3. Constraints on the depth and thermal history of cratonic lithosphere from peridotite xenoliths, xenocrysts and seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, Kathy A.; Pearson, D. Graham; McKenzie, Dan; Kjarsgaard, Bruce A.; Priestley, Keith

    2011-07-01

    the southern African lithosphere. We find very similar estimates for the heat flow and thickness of the lithosphere between SW Namibia (off-craton) and Bultfontein (on-craton). This supports suggestions of a cratonic thermal regime and equivalent lithospheric thickness across that region of southern Africa at the time of kimberlite sampling, with concurrent local thermal disturbance evident in Namibia. Complimentary, novel, seismically-obtained geotherm estimates show that the lithosphere in Namibia is now significantly thinner than the estimate at 70 Ma obtained from xenolith thermobarometry.

  4. Cover sequences at the northern margin of the Antongil Craton, NE Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauer, W.; Walsh, G.J.; De Waele, B.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Horstwood, M.S.A.; Bracciali, L.; Schofield, D.I.; Wollenberg, U.; Lidke, D.J.; Rasaona, I.T.; Rabarimanana, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    The island of Madagascar is a collage of Precambrian, generally high-grade metamorphic basement domains, that are locally overlain by unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks and poorly understood low-grade metasediments. In the Antalaha area of NE Madagascar, two distinct cover sequences rest on high-grade metamorphic and igneous basement rocks of the Archaean Antongil craton and the Neoproterozoic Bemarivo belt. The older of these two cover sequences, the Andrarona Group, consists of low-grade metasedimentary rocks. The younger sequence, the newly defined Ampohafana Formation, consists of unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks. The Andrarona Group rests on Neoarchaean granites and monzogranites of the Antongil craton and consists of a basal metagreywacke, thick quartzites and an upper sequence of sericite-chlorite meta-mudstones, meta-sandstones and a volcaniclastic meta-sandstone. The depositional age of the volcaniclastic meta-sandstone is constrained in age by U–Pb laser-ablation ICP-MS analyses of euhedral zircons to 1875 ± 8 Ma (2σ). Detrital zircons of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic age represent an input from the Antongil craton and a newly defined Palaeoproterozoic igneous unit, the Masindray tonalite, which underlies the Andrarona Group, and yielded a U–Pb zircon age of 2355 ± 11 Ma (2σ), thus constraining the maximum age of deposition of the basal part of the Andrarona Group. The Andrarona Group shows a low-grade metamorphic overprint in the area near Antalaha; illite crystallinity values scatter around 0.17°Δ2Θ CuKα, which is within the epizone. The Ampohafana Formation consists of undeformed, polymict conglomerate, cross-bedded sandstone, and red mudstone. An illite crystallinity value of >0.25°Δ2Θ CuKα obtained from the rocks is typical of the diagenetic zone. Occurrences of rhyodacite pebbles in the Ampohafana Formation and the intrusion of a basaltic dyke suggest a deposition in a WSW-ENE-trending graben system during the opening of the Indian

  5. Paleogene post-collisional lamprophyres in western Yunnan, western Yangtze Craton: Mantle source and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yong-Jun; Campbell McCuaig, T.; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Jourdan, Fred; Hart, Craig J. R.; Hou, Zeng-Qian; Tang, Suo-Han

    2015-09-01

    A suite of lamprophyres, spatially associated with mafic lavas and potassic felsic intrusive rocks, was emplaced between 36.5 ± 0.2 and 33.7 ± 0.5 Ma (based on phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar dating) on the eastern side of the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone in the western Yangtze Craton. These shoshonitic and ultrapotassic intrusive rocks post-date the 60-55 Ma collisional event between the Indian and the Asian continents. They are characterized by: (1) enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements and light rare-earth elements with (La/Sm)n = 3.15-7.15; (2) strong positive Pb spikes; (3) depletion in high-field-strength elements (e.g. Nb/La = 0.08-0.98); (4) high initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.706-0.709) with negative εNd(t) values of - 10.5 to - 0.9; (5) old Nd model ages of 1542-945 Ma; and (6) radiogenic (207Pb/204Pb)i of 15.57-15.70 and (208Pb/204Pb)i (38.70-39.06). These features suggest that the mantle source was metasomatized by Proterozoic subduction beneath the Yangtze Craton. The lamprophyres have similar trace element patterns, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions, as coeval mafic lava, indicating a common source of metasomatized veined continental lithospheric mantle (CLM). Lower degree partial melting of metasomatic veins likely generated the lamprophyres, whereas the coeval mafic lava was likely derived from melting of phlogopite harzburgite. The lamprophyres and mafic lava have similar Sr-Nd isotope systematics as CLM-derived Neoproterozoic mafic rocks and Late Permian Emeishan low-Ti basalt in the region, indicating that they share the same Proterozoic source. We envisage that mantle plumes thermally eroded the Proterozoic metasomatized CLM beneath the western part of the Yangtze Craton during 825-750 Ma and 260-250 Ma, although residual metasomatized domains remained before being tapped by delamination after the India-Asia continental collision during the Paleogene period.

  6. The synergistic effect of SaOS-2 cell extract and other bone-inducing agents on human bone cell cultivation.

    PubMed

    Saif, Ashraf; Wende, Kristian; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2012-12-01

    Human osteosarcoma cell line SaOS-2 is an osteoblastic cell model that contains factors like bone morphogenetic proteins necessary for initiating bone formation. The cell line also expresses high levels of osteoinductive activity. In contrast to highly complicated and expensive ways to identify, purify, and separate specific bone-inducing agents from SaOS-2 cells, lysate can be used as an alternative to isolated bone-stimulating factors. Lysates of SaOS-2 stimulate the activity of the alkaline phosphatase of human osteoblastic cells HOS 58 in vitro. In other words, they probably possess osteoinductive activity. Different serial concentrations of substances like dexamethasone and insulin were tested with and without a lysate of SaOS-2 cells to assay their synergistic action. Results showed that a lysate of the SaOS-2 cell line acts as a synergistic agent and increases the osteoinductive activity of known bone-inducing agents. SaOS-2 cell lysate could be used in the future as a clinical agent to promote bone repair and possibly enhance osteointegration. Using SaOS-2 total cellular extract offers the possibility of lowering the effective dose of other bone-inducing agents.

  7. San Francisco Bay Sand Mining Resource Evaluation and Impact Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenical, S.; Tirindelli, M.; Sicular, D.; Gragg, J.; Huitt, C.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents results of the evaluation of potential future sand resources within certain Central San Francisco Bay (Central Bay) sand mining lease areas, as well as the potential impacts of further mining these areas for a ten-year period. The study consisted of morphological analysis using field measurements and hydrodynamic modeling, and covered a wide spectrum of physical processes including tidal and river circulation, salinity, sediment transport, and morphology. The study was conducted within the framework of an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) prepared by the California State Lands Commission (CSLC) as part of the discretionary approval process for issuing new mining leases. The results of the morphological analysis indicate a measurable depletion of sand resources in the Central Bay lease areas during the period 1997-2008, and that for the purposes of the proposed ten-year mining lease renewal, sand mining resources in Central Bay are largely limited to material already in place. The morphological analysis results also indicate that the proposed additional ten years of sand mining in the Central Bay lease areas are not likely to cause a significant impact on sediment transport and budgets in areas outside the vicinity of the lease areas, such as the San Francisco Bar, Ocean Beach, etc. Numerical modeling results, including particle tracking exercises, do indicate a net seaward transport of sand, and that a linkage exists between the mining areas and offshore areas (San Francisco Bar, Ocean Beach, etc). However, the modeling results demonstrate that the linkage is weak, and that any measurable changes in hydrodynamics, salinity and sediment transport/morphology caused by the mining activities are likely to be confined to the vicinity of the mining areas.

  8. The Precambrian of Transangaria, Yenisei Ridge (Siberia): Neoproterozoic microcontinent, Grenville-age orogen, or reworked margin of the Siberian craton?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmichev, Alexander B.; Sklyarov, Eugene V.

    2016-01-01

    The Yenisei Ridge was traditionally perceived as an uplifted segment of the western Siberian craton affected by Neoproterozoic collision events. However, the suggestions for Archaean or Palaeoproterozoic ('Siberian') basement in Transangaria have not been confirmed by reliable geochronological data. A new view regards most of the Ridge, namely, its Transangarian segment, to be an exotic Neoproterozoic terrane that collided with Siberia in the late Neoproterozoic. This paper presents new U-Pb SHRIMP zircon ages demonstrating that Archaean rocks (2611 ± 12 Ma) actually exist in this territory. We also provide a review of published U-Pb zircon ages for igneous and metamorphic rocks of Transangaria together with our new age data. This geochronological dataset clarifies the geology of the Yenisei Ridge and leads to new conclusions, as follows. (1) It is likely that Transangaria was originally underlain by an Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic basement, similar to that of the Siberian craton. (2) Geochronological data do not confirm the idea of widespread "Greenvillian age" granitoides in Transangaria. (3) The Neoproterozoic evolution of the Yenisei Ridge segment of the Siberian craton margin includes the following events. (i) Collision of an unidentified terrane with the western margin (in recent coordinates) of the Siberian craton during 900-855 Ma. The colliding terrane is no longer present in the current structure. (ii) Dextral shearing during 830-800 Ma may have been caused by counter-clockwise rotation of the Siberian craton. (iii) Extensional conditions prevailed during 800-700 Ma. The Isakovka oceanic basin formed at this time interval. (iv) Thrusting of the Isakovka island arc and accretionary prism onto the Siberian margin occurred during the late Neoproterozoic (650-630 Ma) and caused high-pressure metamorphism.

  9. Swash zone characteristics at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erikson, L.H.; Hanes, D.M.; Barnard, P.L.; Gibbs, A.E.

    2007-01-01

    Runup data collected during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA are analyzed and considered to be typical summer swash characteristics at this site. Analysis shows that the beach was dissipative with Iribarren numbers between 0.05 and 0.4 and that infragravity energy dominated. Foreshore slopes were mild between 0.01 and 0.05 with swash periods on the order of a minute. Predicted runup heights obtained with six previously developed analytical runup formulae were compared to measured extreme runup statistics. Formulations dependent on offshore wave height, foreshore slope and deep water wavelength gave reasonable results.

  10. Characterizing the scientific potential of satellite sensors. [San Francisco, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Analytical and programming support is to be provided to characterize the potential of the LANDSAT thematic mapper (TM) digital imagery for scientific investigations in the Earth sciences and in terrestrial physics. In addition, technical support to define lower atmospheric and terrestrial surface experiments for the space station and technical support to the Research Optical Sensor (ROS) study scientist for advanced studies in remote sensing are to be provided. Eleven radiometric calibration and correction programs are described. Coherent noise and bright target saturation correction are discussed along with image processing on the LAS/VAX and Hp-300/IDIMS. An image of San Francisco, California from TM band 2 is presented.

  11. A review of benthic faunal surveys in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, Frederic H.

    1973-01-01

    During the past 60 years, considerable effort has been expended in studies of the relations of the biotic community and physicochemical characteristics of San Francisco Bay water. In very recent years these studies have emphasized the relations between the 'state of health' of bottom-living invertebrates (the benthos) and the levels of pollutants in the bay. Benthic organisms, generally sessile, are unable to escape deleterious environmental changes, and they reflect these changes in alterations of normal species composition of assemblages and species abundance. Data that expands understanding of these relations in urbanized areas such as San Francisco Bay are critical. Because of the implications of such data in control of water quality, the U.S. Geological Survey undertook a review of the results and major conclusions of San Francisco Bay benthic surveys. The size and species composition of faunal assemblages are largely controlled by the salinity of the water, the texture of the bottom sediments, and locally by wastes discharged into the bay. Efforts to describe the structure and function of benthic communities of the bay and to quantify the effects of waste discharge on them have been hampered by inconsistent and often faulty sampling methodology and species identification. Studies made show a lack of information on the normal life processes of the organisms concerned. The diversity index (a mathematical expression of the number of kinds of organisms present at a location), commonly used to describe the 'health' of the benthic community, has been employed without regard for the need for standardizing methodology and species identifications or for understanding natural biological processes that affect such mathematical indices. There are few reliable quantitative data on the distribution of benthic organisms in San Francisco Bay with which future assessments of the 'health' of the benthic community might be compared. Methods for study of the benthos must be

  12. Nutritional assessment of free meal programs in San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Lyles, Courtney R; Drago-Ferguson, Soledad; Lopez, Andrea; Seligman, Hilary K

    2013-05-30

    Free meals often serve as a primary food source for adults living in poverty, particularly the homeless. We conducted a nutritional analysis of 22 meals from 6 free meal sites in San Francisco to determine macronutrient and micronutrient content. Meals provided too little fiber and too much fat but appropriate levels of cholesterol. They were also below target for potassium, calcium, and vitamins A and E. These findings may inform development of nutritional content standards for free meals, particularly for vulnerable patients who might have, or be at risk of developing, a chronic illness.

  13. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of San Francisco, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Greene, H. Gary; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Endris, Charles A.; Manson, Michael W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Watt, Janet Tilden; Ross, Stephanie L.; Bruns, Terry R.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Circulation over the continental shelf in the Offshore of San Francisco map area is dominated by the southward-flowing California Current, an eastern limb of the North Pacific Gyre that flows from Oregon to Baja California. At its midpoint offshore of central California, the California Current transports subarctic surface waters southeastward, about 150 to 1,300 km from shore. Seasonal northwesterly winds that are, in part, responsible for the California Current, generate coastal upwelling. Ocean temperatures offshore of central California have increased over the past 50 years, driving an ecosystem shift from the productive subarctic regime towards a depopulated subtropical environment.

  14. A week of SRI 2003 in San Francisco

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Art

    2003-09-29

    The Eighth International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation (SRI 2003) ended its August 25-28 run at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco with almost as many in attendance as at the beginning. The steady attendance was surely a tribute to the quality of the program and the excitement it generated among the more than 700 registrants who gathered for four days of plenary talks, parallel sessions, and posters, as well as facility tours of the ALS and SSRL on August 29.

  15. Varnished Serpentinite on the Floor of San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, B. R.; Kimbrough, D.

    2012-12-01

    Serpentinite clasts recovered from dredge hauls in San Francisco Bay during commercial sand mining operations are typically covered with a dark, shiny varnish. Such a varnish is not developed on clasts of the same material from the nearby ocean and bay shores. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis of a varnished pebble showed little significant difference in composition between the varnish and the interior of the pebble. The time of immersion in seawater required for the varnish to develop is not known, however, a simple experiment indicates that it may begin within approximately one year.

  16. The Unimpressible Race. A Century of Educational Struggle by the Chinese in San Francisco.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, Victor

    This book traces the history of the Chinese experience in America, particularly in the San Francisco area, from the California Gold Rush era of the 1850s to the construction of a new all-Chinese school in San Francisco's Chinatown district in the 1950s. The first five chapters of the book detail the withholding of school privileges from both…

  17. 78 FR 54171 - Safety Zone; SFOBB Demolition Safety Zone, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... support of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge (SFOBB) Demolition Safety Zone from September 1, 2013... San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge A. Regulatory History and Information The Coast Guard is issuing this... known as ``E4'' Pier. The demolition project is necessary to facilitate the completion of the Bay...

  18. 76 FR 71260 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; China Basin, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... necessary to allow the City of San Francisco to inspect the bridge structure as required by the U.S. Department of Transportation. This deviation allows the bridge to be secured in the closed-to-navigation..., to allow the City of San Francisco to inspect the bridge structure as required by the U.S....

  19. San Francisco, Sacramento and San Jose lead nation on EPAs Energy Star Top Cities list

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released its seventh-annual list of the top 25 U.S. metropolitan areas with the most Energy Star certified buildings in 2014. This year, San Francisco ranks fifth with Sacramento coming

  20. 77 FR 59969 - Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University, Department of Anthropology, San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Anthropology, San Francisco, CA; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; correction... Department of Anthropology). The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Marin County... San Francisco State University Department of Anthropology records. In the Federal Register (73...

  1. 33 CFR 167.405 - Off San Francisco: Main ship channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Off San Francisco: Main ship channel. 167.405 Section 167.405 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.405 Off San Francisco: Main ship...

  2. 33 CFR 167.405 - Off San Francisco: Main ship channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Off San Francisco: Main ship channel. 167.405 Section 167.405 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.405 Off San Francisco: Main ship...

  3. 33 CFR 167.405 - Off San Francisco: Main ship channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Off San Francisco: Main ship channel. 167.405 Section 167.405 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.405 Off San Francisco: Main ship...

  4. 33 CFR 167.405 - Off San Francisco: Main ship channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Off San Francisco: Main ship channel. 167.405 Section 167.405 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.405 Off San Francisco: Main ship...

  5. 33 CFR 167.405 - Off San Francisco: Main ship channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Off San Francisco: Main ship channel. 167.405 Section 167.405 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.405 Off San Francisco: Main ship...

  6. 75 FR 56919 - Port Access Route Study: The Approaches to San Francisco

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 167 Port Access Route Study: The Approaches to San Francisco AGENCY: Coast... meeting regarding its Port Access Route Study in the Approaches to San Francisco on Wednesday October 20... a public meeting to receive comments on the study entitled ``Port Access Route Study: Off...

  7. 76 FR 65120 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Islais Creek, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... necessary to allow the City of San Francisco to make emergency electrical repairs on the bridge. This....163(b), the draw shall open on signal if at least 72 hours advance notice is given to the San... 6 p.m. on November 18, 2011, to allow the City of San Francisco to complete emergency...

  8. East-China Geochemistry Database (ECGD):A New Networking Database for North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Ma, W.

    2010-12-01

    North China Craton is one of the best natural laboratories that research some Earth Dynamic questions[1]. Scientists made much progress in research on this area, and got vast geochemistry data, which are essential for answering many fundamental questions about the age, composition, structure, and evolution of the East China area. But the geochemical data have long been accessible only through the scientific literature and theses where they have been widely dispersed, making it difficult for the broad Geosciences community to find, access and efficiently use the full range of available data[2]. How to effectively store, manage, share and reuse the existing geochemical data in the North China Craton area? East-China Geochemistry Database(ECGD) is a networking geochemical scientific database system that has been designed based on WebGIS and relational database for the structured storage and retrieval of geochemical data and geological map information. It is integrated the functions of data retrieval, spatial visualization and online analysis. ECGD focus on three areas: 1.Storage and retrieval of geochemical data and geological map information. Research on the characters of geochemical data, including its composing and connecting of each other, we designed a relational database, which based on geochemical relational data model, to store a variety of geological sample information such as sampling locality, age, sample characteristics, reference, major elements, rare earth elements, trace elements and isotope system et al. And a web-based user-friendly interface is provided for constructing queries. 2.Data view. ECGD is committed to online data visualization by different ways, especially to view data in digital map with dynamic way. Because ECGD was integrated WebGIS technology, the query results can be mapped on digital map, which can be zoomed, translation and dot selection. Besides of view and output query results data by html, txt or xls formats, researchers also can

  9. A major Archean, gold- and crust-forming event in the Kaapvaal craton, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Jason; Ruiz, Joaquin; Chesley, John; Walshe, John; England, Gavin

    2002-09-13

    The 2.89- to 2.76-gigayear-old conglomerates of the Central Rand Group of South Africa host an immense concentration of gold. The gold and rounded pyrites from the conglomerates yield a rhenium-osmium isochron age of 3.03 +/- 0.02 gigayears and an initial 187Os/188Os ratio of 0.1079 +/- 0.0001. This age is older than that of the conglomerates. Thus, the gold is detrital and was not deposited by later hydrothermal fluids. This Middle Archean gold mineralization event corresponds to a period of rapid crustal growth in which much of the Kaapvaal craton was formed and is evidence for a significant noble metal flux from the mantle.

  10. Refined Proterozoic evolution of the Gawler Craton, South Australia, through U-Pb zircon geochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fanning, C.M.; Flint, R.B.; Parker, A.J.; Ludwig, K. R.; Blissett, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    Through the application of both conventional U-Pb zircon analyses and small-sample U-Pb isotopic analyses, the nature and timing of tectonic events leading to the formation of the Gawler Craton have been defined more precisely. Constraints on deposition of Early Proterozoic iron formation-bearing sediments have been narrowed down to the period 1960-1847 Ma. Deformed acid volcanics, including the economically important Moonta Porphyry, have zircon ages of ??? 1790 and 1740 Ma. The voluminous acid Gawler Range Volcanics and correlatives to the east were erupted over a short interval at 1592 ?? 2 Ma, and were intruded by anorogenic granites at ??? 1575 Ma. Small-sample zircon analyses proved to be an extremely valuable adjunct to conventional analyses, generally yielding more-concordant data which forced a curved discordia through an upper intercept slightly younger than from a conventional straight-line discordia. ?? 1988.

  11. Mid-lithosphere discontinuities beneath the western and central North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weijia; Kennett, B. L. N.

    2017-02-01

    By analyzing P reflectivity extracted from stacked autocorrelograms for teleseismic events on a dense seismic profile, we obtain a detailed image of the mid-lithosphere discontinuity (MLD) beneath western and central North China Craton (NCC). This seismic daylight imaging exploits a broad high-frequency band (0.5-4 Hz) to reveal the fine-scale component of multi-scale lithospheric heterogeneity. The depth of the MLD beneath the western and central parts of the NCC ranges 80-120 km, with a good match to the transition to negative S velocity gradient with depth from Rayleigh wave tomography. The MLD inferred from seismic daylight imaging also has good correspondence with the transition from conductive to convective regimes estimated from heat flow data indicating likely thermal control within the seismological lithosphere.

  12. The Butana Region of Central Sudan: Sahara Craton or Arabian-Nubian Shield?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Alam, T.; Stüwe, K.

    2012-04-01

    The Butana region lies 250 km south east of Khartoum and is one of the few exposures of Proterozoic basement in Central Sudan. The area is characterized by a flat surface and isolated basement exposures. Various authors have allocated the region to part of the Arabian-Nubian Shield or to part of the reworked Sahara Craton. Although the area is indeed located in the rough region of this transition, little information exists on the details of the basement geology in Butana. Field work indicates that the geology of the study area is similar to the other parts of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. The area consists of low-grade metavolcanic rocks (arc assemblage), pre- and syn-tectonic granitic intrusions. In particular the presence of serpentinites, ophiolitic metagabbro and high-grade metamorphic rocks may identify it as part of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. The main metamorphic foliation trend in the low-grade rocks is northeast-southwest with steep foliation plains and sub-horizontal lineation. In the high-grade rocks, at least three deformation phases were observed in the field. D1 associates with northeast-southwest foliation planes and D2 associates with high temperature folding mechanism which gave the high-grade rocks domal pattern. While D3 is a faulting phase with brittle features. The peak metamorphism most probably occurred after the D2 as indicated by the migmatic features. Geochronological work is in progress in order to identify uniquely if the region should be allocated to the Arabian-Nubian Shield or the Sahara Craton.

  13. Seismic evidence for stratification in composition and anisotropic fabric within the thick lithosphere of Kalahari Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodoudi, Forough; Yuan, Xiaohui; Kind, Rainer; Lebedev, Sergei; Adam, Joanne M.-C.; Kästle, Emanuel; Tilmann, Frederik

    2013-12-01

    Based on joint consideration of S receiver functions and surface-wave anisotropy we present evidence for the existence of a thick and layered lithosphere beneath the Kalahari Craton. Our results show that frozen-in anisotropy and compositional changes can generate sharp Mid-Lithospheric Discontinuities (MLD) at depths of 85 and 150-200 km, respectively. We found that a 50 km thick anisotropic layer, containing 3% S wave anisotropy and with a fast-velocity axis different from that in the layer beneath, can account for the first MLD at about 85 km depth. Significant correlation between the depths of an apparent boundary separating the depleted and metasomatised lithosphere, as inferred from chemical tomography, and those of our second MLD led us to characterize it as a compositional boundary, most likely due to the modification of the cratonic mantle lithosphere by magma infiltration. The deepening of this boundary from 150 to 200 km is spatially correlated with the surficial expression of the Thabazimbi-Murchison Lineament (TML), implying that the TML isolates the lithosphere of the Limpopo terrane from that of the ancient Kaapvaal terrane. The largest velocity contrast (3.6-4.7%) is observed at a boundary located at depths of 260-280 km beneath the Archean domains and the older Proterozoic belt. This boundary most likely represents the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, which shallows to about 200 km beneath the younger Proterozoic belt. Thus, the Kalahari lithosphere may have survived multiple episodes of intense magmatism and collisional rifting during the billions of years of its history, which left their imprint in its internal layering.

  14. (142)Nd evidence for an enriched Hadean reservoir in cratonic roots.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Dewashish; Scherer, Erik E; Mezger, Klaus

    2009-06-25

    The isotope (146)Sm undergoes alpha-decay to (142)Nd, with a half-life of 103 million years. Measurable variations in the (142)Nd/(144)Nd values of rocks resulting from Sm-Nd fractionation could therefore only have been produced within about 400 million years of the Solar System's formation (that is, when (146)Sm was extant). The (142)Nd/(144)Nd compositions of terrestrial rocks are accordingly a sensitive monitor of the main silicate differentiation events that took place in the early Earth. High (142)Nd/(144)Nd values measured in some Archaean rocks from Greenland hint at the existence of an early incompatible-element-depleted mantle. Here we present measurements of low (142)Nd/(144)Nd values in 1.48-gigayear-(Gyr)-old lithospheric mantle-derived alkaline rocks from the Khariar nepheline syenite complex in southeastern India. These data suggest that a reservoir that was relatively enriched in incompatible elements formed at least 4.2 Gyr ago and traces of its isotopic signature persisted within the lithospheric root of the Bastar craton until at least 1.48 Gyr ago. These low (142)Nd/(144)Nd compositions may represent a diluted signature of a Hadean (4 to 4.57 Gyr ago) enriched reservoir that is characterized by even lower values. That no evidence of the early depleted mantle has been observed in rocks younger than 3.6 Gyr (refs 3, 4, 7) implies that such domains had effectively mixed back into the convecting mantle by then. In contrast, some early enriched components apparently escaped this fate. Thus, the mantle sampled by magmatism since 3.6 Gyr ago may be biased towards a depleted composition that would be balanced by relatively more enriched reservoirs that are 'hidden' in Hadean crust, the D'' layer of the lowermost mantle or, as we propose here, also within the roots of old cratons.

  15. Eastern Barents Sea: crustal structure of the craton-shelf transition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgin, Alexey; Mjelde, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    The former disputed area of the Barents Sea is a hot area for geophysical investigations, since little is known so far about its deep crustal structure, while the area is of a particular interest for hydrocarbon prospecting. Once the territorial disputes have been finally settled recently, a regional ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) survey was conducted in this area in summer 2012. The seismic line is a northeast-southwest trending profile located in the easternmost area of the Norwegian waters. The transect is approximately 600 km long and includes marine and onshore parts. The major part of the profile was recorded on the 38 OBS with an average spacing of 13 km. In addition, 80 land stations (with 1 km spacing) were deployed during the field campaign: 50 of them on the southern continuation of the marine profile, and 30 were deployed semi-parallel to the marine profile along the eastern coast of the Varanger Peninsula. We present the crustal model of the craton-shelf transition obtained from the seismic tomography and gravity modeling. The model shows the presence of six principally different crustal domains, which correlate with the near-surface observations. The interpretation of these changes along the profile links to the different tectonic settings along the profile. Presence of the large volumes of the underplated material is attributed to the rifting events on the shelf. The lateral variations in the seismic velocities in the onshore part of the transect is interpreted as a change from the typical cratonic crust to the continental type crust of the Varanger terrane. We also show the results of the ongoing work on the S-waves tomography modeling for the same profile. The combined interpretation of P and S data will provide additional details on the compositional differences between crustal domains and will give extra information on the origin of the underplating.

  16. Wisconsin gravity minimum: Solution of a geologic and geophysical puzzle and implications for cratonic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.J.; Hinze, W.J. )

    1992-06-01

    An intense Bouguer gravity anomaly minimum extending across much of Wisconsin cannot be explained by the surface Phanerozoic sedimentary strata, the basement Precambrian geology, or the topography of the region. The most intense ({minus}100 mgal) part of the minimum coincides with the 1.47 Ga anorogenic granitic Wolf River batholith of northeastern Wisconsin. In southern Wisconsin, however, the densities of the Precambrian basement rocks, which are older than the batholith, provide no clue to the origin of the anomaly. The gradients of the minimum indicate that the source of the anomaly is in the upper crust. Furthermore, nearby deep seismic reflection data indicate that lower crustal structures do not significantly contribute to the gravity minimum. Thus, the minimum is appropriately interpreted as originating from the low-density Wolf River batholith that crops out only in northeastern Wisconsin but is buried beneath a veneer of older rocks in the southern and central parts of the state. Gravity modeling suggests that the batholith is at least 10 km thick and encompasses an area of {approximately}50,000 km{sup 2}. This interpretation provides an important clue to the origin of similar negative gravity anomalies of the Phanerozoic strata-covered craton. Also, the presence of this massive granitic body appears to have influenced the evolution of the craton - e.g., by controlling the location of the 1.1 Ga Midcontinent rift system and the Paleozoic Wisconsin arch. The fact that the Wolf River batholith is mostly buried suggests that central Wisconsin has been tectonically stable for the past 1.47 b.y. and that the Precambrian basement has been minimally eroded.

  17. Is the Paleoproterozoic Jiao-Liao-Ji Belt (North China Craton) a rift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhuang; Chen, Bin; Wei, Chunjing

    2017-01-01

    As a typical example of the Paleoproterozoic crust in the Eastern Block of the North China Craton, the Paleoproterozoic Jiao-Liao-Ji Belt consists principally of the Liaohe Group (and its equivalents), Liaoji granites and mafic intrusions. Previous studies indicate that the evolution of the Jiao-Liao-Ji Belt has been mainly attributed to the opening and closing of an intracontinental rift along the eastern continental margin of the North China Craton. Here we synthesize the Paleoproterozoic magmatism, sedimentation, metamorphism and metallogeny against the rift model and propose a process of arc-continent collision between the northern Longgang and the southern Nangrim Blocks. This conclusion is consistent with the observations, including that (a) the 2.0- to 2.2-Ga magmatism shows a typical subalkaline series, rather than a bimodal distribution, since the mafic rocks mostly have arc affinities and the acidic-intermediate rocks belong to the calc-alkaline series; (b) the main source of the 1.9- to 2.0-Ga sedimentary rocks is the Paleoproterozoic arc materials, indicating a fore-arc or back-arc basin setting; (c) a couple of big borate deposits occur in the boron-rich volcanic rocks that were formed in convergent continental margins; (d) the North and South Liaohe Groups show different rock associations and metamorphic histories (P-T paths); and (e) the Nangrim and Longgang Blocks vary in lithological units, geochronology and metamorphic features. Thus, an arc-continent collision tectonic scenario for the Paleoproterozoic Jiao-Liao-Ji Belt is involved: (a) a southward subduction in the period 2.0-2.2 Ga; (b) sedimentation during the period 1.9-2.0 Ga; (c) arc-continent collision at ca. 1.9 Ga; and (d) post-collisional extension at 1.82-1.87 Ga, marking the end of the Paleoproterozoic tectonothermal event.

  18. Further constraints of the North American Craton structure provided by the recent Oklahoma earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, R.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic velocities and attenuation are essential for understanding the structure of continental lithosphere and geodynamics of the earth. Chu et al. (2012abc) used USArray waveform data from small regional earthquakes in Quebec and Virginia to investigate the upper-mantle P velocity structure (CR) beneath the North American Craton. These results suggest a lithospheric thickness of ~200 km with an 8° discontinuity at a depth of ~120 km. Here we present results from the 2011 Oklahoma earthquake to investigate the S-velocity structure and seismic attenuation. We first obtain the source parameters of the earthquake using the Cut-and-Paste method. Next we use this source to model the regional waveform data. This strike-slip event produced excellent profiles of broadband tangential motions to the edge of the array (14°). The crossover of crustal S to Sn is well observed where SmS has a critical distance of ~2°. The strength of this critical-angle reflection allows the crustal multiples to setup and be strong out to 14° before crossing into the stronger crustal Love waves. These waveforms are modeled broadband (2~100 s) by assuming a three-layer crust and CR-type mantle. The best model is accessed through a grid-search approach as used above. Our results favor a weak low-velocity layer in the lower crust with a shear velocity of 3.6 km/s. This low-velocity zone appear to be responsible for the high frequency shaking at larger distances in eastern United States. Below the Moho, S-velocity slightly decreases with depth, which agrees with the CR model. Synthetic calculations using various undulating Moho depths and sediment thickness suggest that sediment structures have a strong impact on the crustal multiples, which may be why those multiples are not commonly observed. Preliminary work on the attenuation suggests that the Q in the craton is relatively high (Q~600).

  19. Low water contents in diamond mineral inclusions: Proto-genetic origin in a dry cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Logvinova, Alla M.; Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Liu, Yang; Peslier, Anne H.; Rossman, George R.; Guan, Yunbin; Chen, Yang; Sobolev, Nikolay V.

    2016-01-01

    The mantle is the major reservoir of Earth's water, hosted within Nominally Anhydrous Minerals (NAMs) (e.g., Bell and Rossman, 1992; Peslier et al., 2010; Peslier, 2010; Nestola and Smyth, 2015), in the form of hydrogen bonded to the silicate's structural oxygen. From whence cometh this water? Is the water in these minerals representative of the Earth's primitive upper mantle or did it come from melting events linked to crustal formation or to more recent metasomatic/re-fertilization events? During diamond formation, NAMs are encapsulated at hundreds of kilometers depth within the mantle, thereby possibly shielding and preserving their pristine water contents from re-equilibrating with fluids and melts percolating through the lithospheric mantle. Here we show that the NAMs included in diamonds from six locales on the Siberian Craton contain measurable and variable H2O concentrations from 2 to 34 parts per million by weight (ppmw) in olivine, 7 to 276 ppmw in clinopyroxene, and 11-17 ppmw in garnets. Our results suggest that if the inclusions were in equilibrium with the diamond-forming fluid, the water fugacity would have been unrealistically low. Instead, we consider the H2O contents of the inclusions, shielded by diamonds, as pristine representatives of the residual mantle prior to encapsulation, and indicative of a protogenetic origin for the inclusions. Hydrogen diffusion in the diamond does not appear to have modified these values significantly. The H2O contents of NAMs in mantle xenoliths may represent some later metasomatic event(s), and are not always representative of most of the continental lithospheric mantle. Results from the present study also support the conclusions of Peslier et al. (2010) and Novella et al. (2015) that the dry nature of the SCLM of a craton may provide stabilization of its thickened continental roots.

  20. Giant sand waves at the mouth of San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, P.L.; Hanes, D.M.; Rubin, D.M.; Kvitek, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    A field of giant sand waves, among the largest in the world, recently was mapped in high resolution for the first time during a multibeam survey in 2004 and 2005 through the strait of the Golden Gate at the mouth of San Francisco Bay in California (Figure la). This massive bed form field covers an area of approximately four square kilometers in water depths ranging from 30 to 106 meters, featuring more than 40 distinct sand waves with crests aligned approximately perpendicular to the dominant tidally generated cross-shore currents, with wavelengths and heights that measure up to 220 meters and 10 meters, respectively. Sand wave crests can be traced continuously for up to two kilometers across the mouth of this energetic tidal inlet, where depth-averaged tidal currents through the strait below the Golden Gate Bridge exceed 2.5 meters per second during peak ebb flows. Repeated surveys demonstrated that the sand waves are active and dynamic features that move in response to tidally generated currents. The complex temporal and spatial variations in wave and tidal current interactions in this region result in an astoundingly diverse array of bed form morphologies, scales, and orientations. Bed forms of approximately half the scale of those reported in this article previously were mapped inside San Francisco Bay during a multibeam survey in 1997 [Chin et al., 1997].

  1. Early Effects of the San Francisco Paid Sick Leave Policy

    PubMed Central

    Colla, Carrie H.; Dow, William H.; Dube, Arindrajit; Lovell, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined employers’ responses to San Francisco, California’s 2007 Paid Sick Leave Ordinance. Methods. We used the 2009 Bay Area Employer Health Benefits Survey to describe sick leave policy changes and the policy’s effects on firm (n = 699) operations. Results. The proportion of firms offering paid sick leave in San Francisco grew from 73% in 2006 to 91% in 2009, with large firms (99%) more likely to offer sick leave than are small firms (86%) in 2009. Most firms (57%) did not make any changes to their sick leave policy, although 17% made a major change to sick leave policy to comply with the law. Firms beginning to offer sick leave reported reductions in other benefits (39%), worse profitability (32%), and increases in prices (18%) but better employee morale (17%) and high support for the policy (71%). Many employers (58%) reported some difficulty understanding legal requirements, complying administratively, or reassigning work responsibilities. Conclusions. There was a substantial increase in paid sick leave coverage after the mandate. Employers reported some difficulties in complying with the law but supported the policy overall. PMID:24432927

  2. Deep Borehole Instrumentation Along San Francisco Bay Bridges - 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchings, L.; Kasameyer, P.; Turpin, C.; Long, L.; Hollfelder, J.; McEvilly, T.; Clymer, R.; Uhrhammer, R.

    2000-03-01

    This is a progress report on the Bay Bridges downhole network. Between 2 and 8 instruments have been spaced along the Dumbarton, San Mateo, Bay, and San Rafael bridges in San Francisco Bay, California. The instruments will provide multiple use data that is important to geotechnical, structural engineering, and seismological studies. The holes are between 100 and 1000 ft deep and were drilled by Caltrans. There are twenty-one sensor packages at fifteen sites. The downhole instrument package contains a three component HS-1 seismometer and three orthogonal Wilcox 731 accelerometers, and is capable of recording a micro g from local M = 1.0 earthquakes to 0.5 g strong ground motion form large Bay Area earthquakes. Preliminary results on phasing across the Bay Bridge, up and down hole wave amplification at Yerba Buena Island, and sensor orientation analysis are presented. Events recorded and located during 1999 are presented. Also, a senior thesis on the deep structure of the San Francisco Bay beneath the Bay Bridge is presented as an addendum.

  3. 2005 hydrographic survey of south San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foxgrover, Amy C.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Hovis, Gerald T.; Martin, Craig A.; Hubbard, James R.; Samant, Manoj R.; Sullivan, Steve M.

    2007-01-01

    An acoustic hydrographic survey of South San Francisco Bay (South Bay) was conducted in 2005. Over 20 million soundings were collected within an area of approximately 250 sq km (97 sq mi) of the bay extending south of Coyote Point on the west shore, to the San Leandro marina on the east, including Coyote Creek and Ravenswood, Alviso, Artesian, and Mud Sloughs. This is the first survey of this scale that has been conducted in South Bay since the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Ocean Service (NOS) last surveyed the region in the early 1980s. Data from this survey will provide insight to changes in bay floor topography from the 1980s to 2005 and will also serve as essential baseline data for tracking changes that will occur as restoration of the South San Francisco Bay salt ponds progress. This report provides documentation on how the survey was conducted, an assessment of accuracy of the data, and distributes the sounding data with Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) compliant metadata. Reports from NOS and Sea Surveyor, Inc., containing additional survey details are attached as appendices.

  4. Preliminary analysis of cores from north San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allison, Dan; Hampton, Margaret; Jaffe, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    In March 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey collected sediment cores in the study area to determine the location of mercury-contaminated hydraulic mining debris. The study area (Figure 1) comprises 400 km2 and consists of San Pablo Bay and Suisun Bay, both of which are part of the San Francisco Bay estuary. Grizzly Bay, a subembayment of Suisun Bay, is also part of the study area. For the purpose of this report the term Suisun Bay will be used collectively for both areas. The present channel system in Suisun Bay is composed of three channels that flow through the bay. The primary channel runs in the southern section of Suisun Bay. A smaller channel flows between Roe Island and Ryer Island. The deepest channel flows through Suisun Cutoff, north of Ryer Island, and past Grizzly Bay. All three channels join at Carquinez Strait where they continue through the southern section of San Pablo Bay, and into San Francisco Bay. The average depths in San Pablo and Suisun Bays at mean sea level are 3.7 m and 5.8 m, respectively (Smith et al., 2002).

  5. Littoral processes: US Coast Guard Station, Fort Point, San Francisco

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, R.M.; Whelan, G.

    1983-10-01

    The US Coast Guard Station, Fort Point is located three-quarters of a nautical mile southeast of the Golden Gate Strait, the entrance to San Francisco Bay. The existing storm wave conditions at Fort Point Station pier make it extremely dangerous for the SAR crews to get on and off the Motor Life Boats at times requiring the vessels to be moored at the San Francisco Yacht Harbor about 1.5 miles east of the Fort Point Station. To mitigate these harsh working conditions the US Coast Guard is considering the feasibility of constructing suitable all-weather moorings for the three Motor Life Boats at the Fort Point Station to enable unimpeded SAR operations, to provide safe working conditions for Coast Guard small boat crews, and to improve small boat maintenance conditions at Fort Point Station. The purpose of this report is to identify, analyze and evaluate physical environmental factors that could affect all-weather moorings siting, configuration and entrance location, as well as potential post construction alterations to littoral conditions and processes. This report includes a description of the site, description of pertinent littoral processes, evaluation of how these processes could affect construction of all-weather moorings, and discussion of design considerations, as well as mitigation measures to minimize potential adverse effects to the physical environment. 19 references, 27 figures, 26 tables.

  6. Indoor Particulate Matter in Houses of Elderly in the Metropolitan Area of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segalin, B.; Goncalves, F. T.; Fornaro, A.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental Company of the State of Sao Paulo (CETESB), Brazil, is responsible for particulate matter measurements (PM) in the Metropolitan Area of Sao Paulo (MASP). However, there are few works with indoor measures for MASP. Therefore, the aim of this work is to investigate the PM in households in the MASP. The chosen households were there are aged people over 60 years old. The measurements were sampled during 24 hours using a Personal Cascade Impactor (SKC Cat No. 225-370), which the following aerodynamic diameters: 10.0 - 2.5 (A); 1.0 - 2.5 (B); 0.50 - 1.0 (C); 0.25 - 0.50 (D), and < 0.25 μm (E). Together the impactor, there is a Leland Legacy pump (SKC Cat No. 100-3002) with a flow of 9L/min. It was analyzed 56 households with average values of PM10 and PM2.5 of 30.7 and 23.4 μg/m3, respectively. On average, 76% of PM10 consists of PM2.5, percentage higher than the outdoor environment (60% - CETESB), and 43% of the PM2.5 consists of PM smaller than 0.25 μm. Among all households, there was no exceedance of thresholds national standards PM10 (120 μg/m3) and PM2.5 (60 μg/m3). However, 10.7% of residences exceeded the PM10 threshold of the World Health Organization (50 μg/m3) and 39.2% for PM2.5 (20 μg/m3). The cluster analysis grouped the measures in the houses in four profiles. In three of them were greater amount of mass in ultrafine particles (E), followed by coarse particles (A) with the minimum in C level. The maximum in E may be due to the high contribution vehicular and secondary aerosol outdoor environment. The secondary maximum in A may be due to particles ressuspension and also arising from outdoors. These three groups differ only by the amount of PM measured in the households; they represent high, medium and low PM concentrations. The fourth group has average concentrations, but it presents a different profile because its maximum is in the D rather than E. All data will be analyzed concerning the possible sources.

  7. Label-free quantification proteomics reveals novel calcium binding proteins in matrix vesicles isolated from mineralizing Saos-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoying; Cui, Yazhou; Luan, Jing; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Genglin; Zhang, Xiumei; Han, Jinxiang

    2013-06-01

    Matrix vesicles (MVs) involved in the initiation of mineralization by deposition of hydroxyapatite (HA) in their lumen are released by the budding of mineralization-competent cells during skeletogenesis and bone development. To identify additional mineralization-related proteins, MVs were isolated from non-stimulated and stimulated Saos-2 cells in culture via an Exoquick™ approach and the corresponding proteomes were identified and quantified with label-free quantitative proteome technology. The isolated MVs were confirmed by electron microscopy, alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP), biomarkers, and mineral formation analyses. Label-free quantitative proteome analysis revealed that 19 calcium binding proteins (CaBPs), including Grp94, calnexin, calreticulin, calmodulin, and S100A4/A10, were up-regulated in MVs of Saos-2 cells upon stimulation of mineralization. This result provides new clues to study the mechanism of the initiation of MV-mediated mineralization.

  8. Inorganic polyphosphate triggers upregulation of interleukin 11 in human osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lui, Eric Lik-Hang; Ao, Carl Ka-Leong; Li, Lina; Khong, Mei-Li; Tanner, Julian Alexander

    2016-10-28

    Polyphosphate (polyP) is abundant in bone but its roles in signaling and control of gene expression remain unclear. Here, we investigate the effect of extracellular polyP on proliferation, migration, apoptosis, gene and protein expression in human osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells. Extracellular polyP promoted SaOS-2 cell proliferation, increased rates of migration, inhibited apoptosis and stimulated the rapid phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) directly through basic fibroblast growth factor receptor (bFGFR). cDNA microarray revealed that polyP induced significant upregulation of interleukin 11 (IL-11) at both RNA and protein levels.

  9. Species determination within Staphylococcus genus by extended PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism of saoC gene.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Michal; Polakowska, Klaudia; Ilczyszyn, Weronika M; Sitarska, Agnieszka; Nytko, Kinga; Kosecka, Maja; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek; Dubin, Adam; Wladyka, Benedykt

    2015-01-01

    Genetic methods based on PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) are widely used for microbial species determination. In this study, we present the application of saoC gene as an effective tool for species determination and within-species diversity analysis for Staphylococcus genus. The unique sequence diversity of saoC allows us to apply four restriction enzymes to obtain RFLP patterns, which appear highly distinctive even among closely related species as well as atypical isolates of environmental origin. Such patterns were successfully obtained for 26 species belonging to Staphylococcus genus. What is more, tracing polymorphisms detected by different restriction enzymes allowed for basic phylogeny analysis for Staphylococcus aureus, which is potentially applicable for other staphylococcal species.

  10. Reconnaissance for uranium in the coal of Sao Paulo, Santa Catarina, and Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haynes, Donald D.; Pierson, Charles T.; White, Max G.

    1958-01-01

    Uranium-bearing coal and carbonaceous shale of the Rio Bonito formation of Pennsylvanian age have been found in the States of Sao Paulo, Santa Catarlna and Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The uranium oxide content of the samples collected in the State of Sao Paulo ranges from 0.001 percent to 0.082 percent. The samples collected in Santa Catarina averaged about 0.002 percent uranium oxide; those collected in Rio Grande do Sul, about 0.003 percent uranium oxide. Since the field and laboratory investigations are still in their initial stages, only raw data on the radioactivity and uranium content of Brazilian coals are given in this report.

  11. Fluoride promotes viability and differentiation of osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells via BMP/Smads signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Huo, Liangliang; Liu, Kangkang; Pei, Junrui; Yang, Yanmei; Ye, Yan; Liu, Yang; Sun, Jing; Han, Hepeng; Xu, Weimin; Gao, Yanhui

    2013-10-01

    The BMP/Smad signaling pathway plays an important role in the viability and differentiation of osteoblast; however, it is not clear whether this pathway is involved in the fluoride-induced osteoblast differentiation. In this study, we investigated the role of BMP/Smad signaling pathway in fluoride-induced osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells differentiation. Cells were exposed to fluoride of different concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.6 mM), and cell proliferation was determined using WST assays. The expression of osteoblast marker genes such as osteocalcin (BGP) and bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP) were detected by qRT-PCR. We found that fluoride enhanced the proliferation of Saos-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner and 0.2 mM of fluoride resulted in a higher expression of osteoblast marker genes. In addition, immunofluorescence analysis showed that the promotion effects of 0.2 mM of fluoride on Saos-2 cells differentiation were associated with the activation of the BMP/Smad pathway. Expression of phosphorylated Smad1/5(p-Smad1/5) was higher in cells exposed to 0.2 mM of fluoride. Plasmid expression vectors encoding the short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting Smad4 gene were used to block the BMP/Smad pathway, which resulted in a significantly reduced expression of BGP and BALP as well as their corresponding mRNA. The mRNA levels after transfection remained low even in the presence of fluoride. The present results reveal that BMP/Smad signaling pathway was altered during the period of osteogenesis, and that the activities of p-Smad1/5 were required for Saos-2 cells viability and differentiation induced by fluoride.

  12. RUNX2 regulates the effects of TNFalpha on proliferation and apoptosis in SaOs-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Olfa, Ghali; Christophe, Chauveau; Philippe, Lencel; Romain, Salomez; Khaled, Hani; Pierre, Hardouin; Odile, Broux; Jean-Christophe, Devedjian

    2010-04-01

    The runt-related transcriptional factor RUNX2 is an essential mediator of the osteoblast phenotype and plays a pivotal role in the process of osteoblast differentiation. The involvement of RUNX2 includes the regulation of genes that are important in committing cells to the osteoblast lineage. Increasing evidences are consistent with a requirement of RUNX2 for stringent control of osteoblast proliferation and recent data even suggested that RUNX2 might act as a proapoptotic factor. Among the cytokines described as modulators of osteoblast functions, TNFalpha affects both apoptosis and the differentiation rate from mesenchymal precursor cells of osteoblast. Thus we evaluated on the human osteosarcoma cell line SaOs-2 stably transfected with a RUNX2 dominant negative construct (DeltaRUNX2) the effects of serum and TNFalpha on proliferation and apoptosis. In this study we showed that SaOs-2 clones expressing high levels of DeltaRUNX2 presented a higher proliferation rate than clones transfected with an empty vector. This increase in cell growth was accompanied by a rise in cyclins A1, B1 and E1 expression and a decrease in the cyclin inhibitor p21. Moreover we observed that the expression of the RUNX2 transgene protected the SaOs-2 cells from the antiproliferative and the apoptotic effects induced by TNFalpha. This was accompanied by the inhibition of Bax and activation of Bcl2 expression. Experiments done on SaOs-2 cells transiently transfected with siRNA confirmed that RUNX2 represents a critical link between cell fate, proliferation and growth control. This study also suggested that RUNX2 might control osteoblastic growth depending on the differentiation stage of the cells by regulating expression of elements involved in hormones and cytokines sensitivity.

  13. Determinants of the use of health care services: multilevel analysis in the Metropolitan Region of Sao Paulo

    PubMed Central

    Chiavegatto, Alexandre Dias Porto; Wang, Yuan-Pang; Malik, Ana Maria; Takaoka, Julia; Viana, Maria Carmen; Andrade, Laura Helena

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the individual and contextual determinants of the use of health care services in the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo. METHODS Data from the Sao Paulo Megacity study – the Brazilian version of the World Mental Health Survey multicenter study – were used. A total of 3,588 adults living in 69 neighborhoods in the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil, including 38 municipalities and 31 neighboring districts, were selected using multistratified sampling of the non-institutionalized population. Multilevel Bayesian logistic models were adjusted to identify the individual and contextual determinants of the use of health care services in the past 12 months and presence of a regular physician for routine care. RESULTS The contextual characteristics of the place of residence (income inequality, violence, and median income) showed no significant correlation (p > 0.05) with the use of health care services or with the presence of a regular physician for routine care. The only exception was the negative correlation between living in areas with high income inequality and presence of a regular physician (OR: 0.77; 95%CI 0.60;0.99) after controlling for individual characteristics. The study revealed a strong and consistent correlation between individual characteristics (mainly education and possession of health insurance), use of health care services, and presence of a regular physician. Presence of chronic and mental illnesses was strongly correlated with the use of health care services in the past year (regardless of the individual characteristics) but not with the presence of a regular physician. CONCLUSIONS Individual characteristics including higher education and possession of health insurance were important determinants of the use of health care services in the metropolitan area of Sao Paulo. A better understanding of these determinants is essential for the development of public policies that promote equitable use of health care

  14. Determinants of the use of health care services: multilevel analysis in the Metropolitan Region of Sao Paulo.

    PubMed

    Chiavegatto Filho, Alexandre Dias Porto; Wang, Yuan-Pang; Malik, Ana Maria; Takaoka, Julia; Viana, Maria Carmen; Andrade, Laura Helena

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the individual and contextual determinants of the use of health care services in the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo. METHODS Data from the Sao Paulo Megacity study - the Brazilian version of the World Mental Health Survey multicenter study - were used. A total of 3,588 adults living in 69 neighborhoods in the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil, including 38 municipalities and 31 neighboring districts, were selected using multistratified sampling of the non-institutionalized population. Multilevel Bayesian logistic models were adjusted to identify the individual and contextual determinants of the use of health care services in the past 12 months and presence of a regular physician for routine care. RESULTS The contextual characteristics of the place of residence (income inequality, violence, and median income) showed no significant correlation (p > 0.05) with the use of health care services or with the presence of a regular physician for routine care. The only exception was the negative correlation between living in areas with high income inequality and presence of a regular physician (OR: 0.77; 95%CI 0.60;0.99) after controlling for individual characteristics. The study revealed a strong and consistent correlation between individual characteristics (mainly education and possession of health insurance), use of health care services, and presence of a regular physician. Presence of chronic and mental illnesses was strongly correlated with the use of health care services in the past year (regardless of the individual characteristics) but not with the presence of a regular physician. CONCLUSIONS Individual characteristics including higher education and possession of health insurance were important determinants of the use of health care services in the metropolitan area of Sao Paulo. A better understanding of these determinants is essential for the development of public policies that promote equitable use of health care

  15. Seasonal/Yearly Salinity Variations in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, David H.; Cayan, Daniel R.; Dettinger, Michael D.; DiLeo, Jeanne Sandra; Hager, Stephen E.; Knowles, Noah; Nichols, Frederic H.; Schemel, Laurence E.; Smith, Richard E.; Uncles, Reginald J.

    1995-01-01

    The ability of resource agencies to manage fish, wildlife and freshwater supplies of San Francisco Bay estuary requires an integrated knowledge of the relations between the biota and their physical environment. A key factor in these relations is the role of salinity in determining both the physical and the biological character of the estuary. The saltiness of the water, and particularly its seasonal and interannual patterns of variability, affects which aquatic species live where within the estuary. Salinity also determines where water can and cannot be diverted for human consumption and irrigated agriculture, and plays a role in determining the capacity of the estuary to cleanse itself of wastes. In short, salinity is a fundamental property of estuarine physics and chemistry that, in turn, determines the biological characteristics of each estuary. Freshwater is a major control on estuarine salinity. Most freshwater supplied to the Bay is from river flow through the Delta, which is primarily runoff from the Sierra Nevada. Most contaminants in San Francisco Bay are from the Sacramento/San Joaquin Valley and the local watershed around the Bay rather than the sea or atmosphere. Land is the primary source of freshwater and freshwater serves as a tracer of land-derived substances such as the trace metals (copper, lead and selenium), pesticides and plant nutrients (nitrate and phosphate). The U.S. Geological Survey is collaborating with other agencies and institutions in studying San Francisco Bay salinity using field observations and numerical simulations to define the physical processes that control salinity. The issues that arise from salinity fluctuations, however, differ in the northern and southern parts of the bay. In North Bay we need to know how salinity responds to freshwater flow through the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta; this knowledge will benefit water managers who determine how much delta flow is needed a) to protect freshwater supplies for municipal water

  16. Coastal Adaptation: The Case of Ocean Beach, San Francisco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, S.

    2012-12-01

    Coastal erosion, storms, sea-level rise, and tsunamis all lead to inundation that puts people and communities at risk. Adapting to these coastal hazards has gained increasing attention with climate change. Instead of promoting one particular strategy such as seawalls or defending against one type of hazard, scholars and practitioners encourage a combination of existing methods and strategies to promote synergistic effects. The recently published Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on climate extremes reflects this trend in the integration of disaster risk management and climate change adaptation. This paper focuses on the roles, compatibilities, and synergies of three coastal adaptation options - engineering, vegetation, and policy - in the case of Ocean Beach in San Francisco. Traditionally engineering approach and ecosystem conservation often have stood in opposition as hard shoreline structures destroy coastal habitats, worsen coastal erosion, divert ocean currents, and prevent the natural migration of shores. A natural migration of shores without structure translates into the abandonment of properties in the coastal zone, and is at odds with property rights and development. For example, policies of relocation, retreat, and insurance may not be popular given the concerns of infrastructure and coastal access. As such, engineering, natural defense, and policy can be more conflictual than complementary. Nonetheless, all these responses are used in combination in many locations. Complementarities and compatibilities, therefore, must be assessed when considering the necessity of engineering responses, natural defense capabilities, and policy options. In this light, the question is how to resolve the problem of mixed responses and short- and long-term interests and values, identify compatibilities, and generate synergies. In the case of Ocean Beach, recent erosions that endangered San Francisco's wastewater treatment system acted as major

  17. Reciprocal hybrid formation of Spartina in San Francisco Bay.

    PubMed

    Anttila, C K; King, R A; Ferris, C; Ayres, D R; Strong, D R

    2000-06-01

    Diversity in the tRNALEU1 intron of the chloroplast genome of Spartina was used to study hybridization of native California cordgrass, Spartina foliosa, with S. alterniflora, introduced to San Francisco Bay approximately 25 years ago. We sequenced 544 bases of the tRNALEU1 intron and found three polymorphic sites, a pyrimidine transition at site 126 and transversions at sites 382 and 430. Spartina from outside of San Francisco Bay, where hybridization between these species is impossible, gave cpDNA genotypes of the parental species. S. foliosa had a single chloroplast haplotype, CCT, and this was unique to California cordgrass. S. alterniflora from the native range along the Atlantic coast of North America had three chloroplast haplotypes, CAT, TAA, and TAT. Hybrids were discriminated by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) phenotypes developed in a previous study. We found one hybrid that contained a cpDNA haplotype unknown in either parental species (TCT). The most significant finding was that hybridization proceeds in both directions, assuming maternal inheritance of cpDNA; 26 of the 36 hybrid Spartina plants from San Francisco Bay contained the S. foliosa haplotype, nine contained haplotypes of the invading S. alterniflora, and one had the cpDNA of unknown origin. Furthermore, cpDNA of both parental species was distributed throughout the broad range of RAPD phenotypes, suggesting ongoing contributions to the hybrid swarm from both. The preponderance of S. foliosa cpDNA has entered the hybrid swarm indirectly, we propose, from F1s that backcross to S. foliosa. Flowering of the native precedes by several weeks that of the invading species, with little overlap between the two. Thus, F1 hybrids would be rare and sired by the last S. foliosa pollen upon the first S. alterniflora stigmas. The native species produces little pollen and this has low viability. An intermediate flowering time of hybrids as well as pollen that is more vigourous and abundant than that of

  18. Human mesenchymal stem cells promote growth of osteosarcoma: involvement of interleukin-6 in the interaction between human mesenchymal stem cells and Saos-2.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhen-Yu; Fan, Qi-Ming; Li, Gang; Xu, Wen-Ting; Tang, Ting-Ting

    2010-12-01

    Our previous study showed that exogenous human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) targeted established osteosarcoma and promoted its growth and pulmonary metastasis in vivo. As a follow-up, the present study aimed to investigate how hMSCs would interact with Saos-2 through autocrine/paracrine communication. The results showed that co-injection of hMSCs with Saos-2 into the proximal tibia of nude mice could promote tumor growth and progression. In vitro, the proliferation of Saos-2 and hMSCs was promoted by each other's conditioned medium, in which interleukin-6 (IL-6) played an important role. Osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs could be inhibited by conditioned medium of Saos-2, in which IL-6 was also involved. Furthermore, decreased IL-6 secretion by hMSCs during its osteogenesis and increased IL-6 secretion in response to conditioned medium of Saos-2 were observed. Based on these data, we suggest that there was a positive feedback loop of IL-6 in the interaction between hMSCs and Saos-2.

  19. Water Soluble Components of 'Osteocare' Promote Cell Proliferation, Differentiation, and Matrix Mineralization in Human Osteoblast-Like SaOS-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sandeep R; Sharath Kumar, L M; Vidyashankar, Satyakumar; Patki, Pralhad Sadashiv

    2014-01-01

    Osteocare, a herbal formulation, has been found to be very effective in bone mineralization and support of the microstructure of bone tissue. The water-soluble components of Osteocare (WSCO) induced osteogenic activity in human osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells. The addition of WSCO (100 μg/ml) to SaOS-2 cells was effective in increasing the cell proliferation by 41.49% and DNA content by 1.9-fold. WSCO increased matrix mineralization in SaOS-2 cells by increased alkaline phosphatase levels and calcium-rich deposits as observed by Alizarin red staining. WSCO markedly increased mRNA expression for osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OCN), type I collagen (Col I) in SaOS-2 cells, and it down-regulated IL-6 mRNA levels in SaOS-2 cells. The present study showed that WSCO plays an important role in osteoblastic bone formation through enhanced activities of ALP, Col I, bone matrix proteins such as OPN and OCN, down-regulation of cytokines like IL-6, as well as promoting mineralization in SaOS-2 cells.

  20. Effect of low level laser therapy and zoledronate on the viability and ALP activity of Saos-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Hilal; Kenar, Halime; Taşar, Ferda; Hasırcı, Vasıf

    2013-01-01

    A limited number of clinical studies indicate the supportive role of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on medical and/or surgical approaches carried out in treatment modalities for bisphosphonate related necrosis of jaws (BRONJ), the most common side effect of bisphosphonates used to inhibit bone resorption. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of LLLT on cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of human osteoblast-like cells (Saos-2) treated with different doses of zoledronate, the most potent bisphosphonate. Saos-2 cells were treated with different concentrations of zoledronate and were irradiated with diode laser (wavelength 808 nm, 10 s, 0.25 or 0.50 W). Cell numbers and ALP activity of the cells were determined. LLLT mildly increased the proliferation rate or ALP activity, while zoledronate reduced both. When applied together, LLLT lessened the detrimental effects of zoledronate and improved cell function and/or proliferation. Based on the results of this study, it was concluded that LLLT has biostimulative effects on Saos-2 cells, even after treatment with zoledronate. LLLT may serve as a useful supportive method for BRONJ treatment through enhancement of healing by osteoblasts.

  1. Systematically organized nanopillar arrays reveal differences in adhesion and alignment properties of BMSC and Saos-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Özçelik, Hayriye; Padeste, Celestino; Hasirci, Vasif

    2014-07-01

    Polymeric test surfaces of P(L-D,L)LA and of a P(L-D,L)LA:PLGA blend decorated with 25 nanopillar covered fields, were used to investigate differences in growth of bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) and osteosarcoma cells (Saos-2). The fields were populated with pillars (ca. 900 nm tall, 200 nm×200 nm area) separated systematically from each other with 1-10 μm gaps. Saos-2 cells populated fields decorated with pillars 1 μm apart but they avoided pillar-free surfaces. In contrast, BMSCs avoided fields with interpillar distances <2 μm. Both BMSCs and Saos-2 cells aligned in the direction of the shorter distance when at least one of the interpillar distances was greater than 1.5 μm. Coating the P(L-D,L)LA surfaces with cell adhesive protein fibronectin enabled the BMSC to populate fields with high pillar density which they had avoided when uncoated. Decreasing the stiffness of the film surface by using a blend of (P(L-D,L)LA and PLGA) made them more acceptable for attachment by the BMSC cells.

  2. Heat flow, heat generation and crustal thermal structure of the northern block of the South Indian Craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Mohan L.; Sharma, S. R.; Sundar, A.

    1988-01-01

    Heat flow values and heat generation data calculated from the concentration of heat producing radioactive elements, U, Th and K in surface rocks were analyzed. The South Indian Craton according to Drury et al., can be divided into various blocks, separated by late Proterozoic shear belts. The northern block comprises Eastern and Western Dharwar Cratons of Rogers (1986), Naqvi and Rogers (1987) and a part of the South Indian granulite terrain up to a shear system occupying the Palghat-Cauvery low lands. The geothermal data analysis clearly demonstrates that the present thermal characteristics of the above two Archaean terrains of the Indian and Australian Shields are quite similar. Their crustal thermal structures are likely to be similar also.

  3. 2.6-2.7 Ga continental crust growth in Yangtze craton, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Gao, S.; Wu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A combined study of zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopes and whole rock major and trace elements and Sr-Nd isotopes has been conducted for 10 granitic and tonalitic-trondhjemitic-granodioritic (TTG) gneisses from the Kongling terrain, the only known Archean microcontinent in the Yangtze craton, South China. The results reveal a significant magmatic event at ~2.6-2.7 Ga (Fig. 1), in addition to the previously reported ~2.9 Ga and ~3.2-3.3 Ga magmatism (Zhang et al., 2006; Jiao et al., 2009; Gao et al., 2011). The ~2.6-2.7 Ga rocks show relatively high REE (530-1074 ppm), apparently negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu* = 0.22-0.35), low #Mg (19.51-22.63) and low LaN/YbN (10.3-24.2). Besides, they have high K-feldspar proportion and relatively evaluated (K2O+Na2O)/CaO, TFeO/MgO, Zr, Nb, Ce and Y contents. Their 10000 × Ga/Al ratios range between 3.00 and 3.54. All these features suggest that the protoliths of these gneisses are A-type granites. Most of the ~2.6-2.7 Ga zircon grains have ɛHf(t) values >0 (up to 7.93, close to the depleted mantle value). This clearly indicates a considerably higher proportion of new crustal components in the ~2.6-2.7 Ga granitoids compared to the ~3.2-3.3 Ga and ~2.9 Ga TTGs. Our results support the conclusion of worldwide studies of igneous and detrital zircons that age peaks at 2.65-2.76 Ga represent increases in the volume of juvenile continental crust. The present study also confirms the existence of the two older magmatic events in the Kongling terrain. Both whole rock ɛNd(t) values (-3.74 to 1.59) and the zircon ɛHf(t) values (-11.18 to 3.55) for the ~2.9 Ga TTG and the Hf isotopes of ~3.2-3.3 Ga igneous zircons (-7.37 to 3.12) are chondritic or subchondritic, suggesting that they were mainly generated by reworking of older rocks with a small amount of new crustal additions. References Gao, S., Yang, J., Zhou, L., Li, M., Hu, Z.C., Guo, J.L., Yuan, H.L., Gong, H.J., Xiao, G.Q., Wei, J.Q., 2011. Age and growth of the Archean Kongling terrain

  4. Adenosine Triphosphate stimulates differentiation and mineralization in human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Cutarelli, Alessandro; Marini, Mario; Tancredi, Virginia; D'Arcangelo, Giovanna; Murdocca, Michela; Frank, Claudio; Tarantino, Umberto

    2016-05-01

    In the last years adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and subsequent purinergic system activation through P2 receptors were investigated highlighting their pivotal role in bone tissue biology. In osteoblasts ATP can regulate several activities like cell proliferation, cell death, cell differentiation and matrix mineralization. Since controversial results exist, in this study we analyzed the ATP effects on differentiation and mineralization in human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. We showed for the first time the altered functional activity of ATP receptors. Despite that, we found that ATP can reduce cell proliferation and stimulate osteogenic differentiation mainly in the early stages of in vitro maturation as evidenced by the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Osteocalcin (OC) genes and by the increased ALP activity. Moreover, we found that ATP can affect mineralization in a biphasic manner, at low concentrations ATP always increases mineral deposition while at high concentrations it always reduces mineral deposition. In conclusion, we show the osteogenic effect of ATP on both early and late stage activities like differentiation and mineralization, for the first time in human osteoblastic cells.

  5. Enhancement of uranium 234 in springwaters of Aguas da Prata, Sao Paulo, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Bonotto, D.M. )

    1993-07-01

    In this study, the effect of combined chemical etch and leach processes on the generation of enhanced activity ratios (ARs) was investigated for mineral water samples from several spring of Aguas de Prata. Aguas de Prata is an important tourist site in Sao Paulo State, Brazil, located at the western edge of the Pocos de Caldas alkaline complex. Results show that active uranium dissolution is occurring in the springwaters. Enhanced Uranium 234/Uranium 238 activity ratios for dissolved U are explained in terms of combined chemical etch and leach processes responsible for the bulk dissolution of rock matrix rather than by alpha recoil effects. Several direct correlations support the effectiveness of etch/leach mechanisms, for example, between AR and total dissolved solids, ionic strength, carbon dioxide partial pressure, traditional index of base exchange, and new index of base exchange. A higher AR value is found to be directly related to a higher value of dissolution rate and a higher value of Radon 222 content is found to be related to a higher value of specific surface area. These relationships explain a good inverse logarithmic correlation between AR and Radon 22 content of the studied waters.

  6. The acoustics for speech of eight auditoriums in the city of Sao Paulo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistafa, Sylvio R.

    2002-11-01

    Eight auditoriums with a proscenium type of stage, which usually operate as dramatic theaters in the city of Sao Paulo, were acoustically surveyed in terms of their adequacy to unassisted speech. Reverberation times, early decay times, and speech levels were measured in different positions, together with objective measures of speech intelligibility. The measurements revealed reverberation time values rather uniform throughout the rooms, whereas significant variations were found in the values of the other acoustical measures with position. The early decay time was found to be better correlated with the objective measures of speech intelligibility than the reverberation time. The results from the objective measurements of speech intelligibility revealed that the speech transmission index STI, and its simplified version RaSTI, are strongly correlated with the early-to-late sound ratio C50 (1 kHz). However, it was found that the criterion value of acceptability of the latter is more easily met than the former. The results from these measurements enable to understand how the characteristics of the architectural design determine the acoustical quality for speech. Measurements of ST1-Gade were made as an attempt to validate it as an objective measure of ''support'' for the actor. The preliminary diagnosing results with ray tracing simulations will also be presented.

  7. Incidence of Leptospirosis infection in the East Zone of Sao Paulo City, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a zoonosis which is spread through contamined running water. This contaminations is seriously affected by the flooding which occurs in the area surrounding the Aricanduva river. The transmission of the disease results mainly from the contact of water with soil contaminated by the urine of infected animals. We aimed to conduct an epidemiological survey on Leptospirosis cases in Sao Paulo East Zone area. Method The analysis conducted in this study was based on data collected from the health authorities of that region close the Aricanduva river between 2007 and 2008 years, which give the rates of confirmed cases, mortality and death from human Leptospirosis. Other information concerned with the relationships among rainfall index, points of flooding and incidence of Leptospirosis. Results We observed a direct and important water contamination. Records of flooding points and dates of the reported cases in the region showed a direct relationship from which the period of higher rainfall also recorded an increase in cases. The annual record of the city and the region and rainfall regions also presented correlation. Conclusion The association between the indices of flooding and Leptospirosis cases indicates that preventive measures are necessary to avoid exposing the community. PMID:23672682

  8. Tiering strategic environmental assessment and project environmental impact assessment in highway planning in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Luis E. Silva-Sanchez, Solange S.

    2008-10-15

    Constructing highways in dense urban areas is always a challenge. In Sao Paulo Metropolitan Region, heavy truck traffic contributes to clog streets and expressways alike. As part of the traffic neither originates nor head to the region, a peripheral highway has been proposed to reduce traffic problems. This project, called Rodoanel, is an expressway approximately 175 km long. The fact that the projected south and north sections would cross catchments that supply most of the metropolis water demand was strongly disputed and made the environmental permitting process particularly difficult. The agency in charge commissioned a strategic environmental assessment (SEA) of a revamped project, and called it the Rodoanel Programme. However, the SEA report failed to satisfactorily take account of significant strategic issues. Among these, the highway potential effect of inducing urban sprawl over water protection zones is the most critical issue, as it emerged later as a hurdle to project licensing. Conclusion is that, particularly where no agreed-upon framework for SEA exists, when vertical tiering with downstream project EIA is sought, then a careful scoping of strategic issues is more than necessary. If an agreement on 'what is strategic' is not reached and not recognized by influential stakeholders, then the unsettled conflicts will be transferred to project EIA. In such a context, SEA will have added another loop to the usually long road to project approval.

  9. The effects of Sao Paulo urban heat island on lightning activity: Decadal analysis (1999-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourscheidt, Vandoir; Pinto, Osmar; Naccarato, Kleber P.

    2016-05-01

    Eleven years of lightning data from the Brazilian Integrated National Lightning Detection Network were used to analyze the effects of the urban heat island (UHI) of Sao Paulo on lightning activity, extending the investigation of previous works. Cloud-to-ground lightning data were analyzed in both spatial and temporal perspectives, using different approaches: flash density, flash rate, thunderstorm hours (TH), and the cell initiation technique (CIT), which aims to identify the onset of thunderstorms. Land surface temperature (LST) from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) was used to analyze the UHI evolution over the years. MODIS data were validated using ground stations, distributed within the urban area. Different time intervals (seasonal and intraday) were used in an attempt to separate local convective systems from synoptic-scale events. The results indicate significant effects of the UHI (using LST) on THs and CIT. The CIT showed a nearly ring pattern, especially during the afternoon (14:00-18:00 LT) of summer months, reinforcing temperature contrast as a condition for storm initiation. The results also suggest an amplification of the UHI effects on thunderstorm activity by local factors (sea and country breeze, synoptic events, and terrain). Higher flash rates were also observed throughout the urban region, which influences the lightning density. Temporal analysis indicates that minimum temperature and lightning activity increase in wintertime. In summary, the results agree with previous studies about the UHI and indicate its importance on lightning occurrence, especially by increasing the temperature contrast and the instability in these regions.

  10. Imaging polarimetry of distant comets at the 6-m BTA telescope of the SAO RAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Oleksandra; Afanasiev, Viktor; Rosenbush, Vera; Kiselev, Nikolai

    2016-07-01

    Results of the recent polarimetric observations of distant comets C/2013 V4 (Catalina), C/2014 A4 (SONEAR), C/2010 S1 (LINEAR), C/2010 R1 (LINEAR), and 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 are presented together with analysis of their photometry and spectroscopy. Observations were carried out at the 6-m telescope BTA of the SAO RAS with the multi-mode focal reducer SCORPIO-2 from 2011 to 2015. Comets were observed in the range of heliocentric distances from 4.2 to 7.0 AU and phase angles from 4.9 to 9.4 degrees. The maps of intensity and linear polarization over the coma are derived. The comets observed show a considerable activity at heliocentric distances far exceeding a zone of water sublimation. Molecular emissions were only detected in the spectra of comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. The linear polarization of distant comets with a high level of activity is the first ever measured at the heliocentric distances larger than 5 AU. The degree of linear polarization (from -2 to -3.7%) for these comets is significantly higher (in absolute value) than the typical value of the whole coma polarization (about -1.5 %) at the minimum of negative polarization branch for close to the Sun comets.

  11. Deformation of the Continental Lithosphere at the Margins of the North American Craton: Constraints from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, M. D.; Benoit, M. H.; Ford, H. A.; Wirth, E. A.; Aragon, J. C.; Abrahams, L.; McNamara, J.; Jackson, K.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's continents exhibit striking properties, including relatively thick and low-density crust and a strong, thick, long-lived mantle lithosphere. Major questions related to the formation, stability, evolution, and dynamics of cratonic lithosphere remain unanswered. One promising avenue for understanding the stability of cratonic lithosphere through geologic time is to understand how their margins are deformed via tectonic processes such as orogenesis and rifting. Here we present results of several recent and ongoing studies which aim to constrain past lithospheric deformation along the eastern margin of the North American craton. Each of these studies focuses on constraining seismic anisotropy, or the directional dependence of seismic wavespeeds, in the lithospheric upper mantle. Because there is a causative link between upper mantle deformation and the resulting seismic anisotropy, studies of anisotropic structure in the upper mantle beneath continental interiors can shed light on the deformation processes associated with past tectonic events. The recent explosion in the availability of seismic data in the eastern United States, largely due to the EarthScope initiative, has enabled detailed studies of lithospheric deformation using anisotropic receiver function (RF) analysis and SKS splitting analysis. A comparison of lithospheric structure inferred from RFs for stations located to the east of the Grenville deformation front with those located within the cratonic interior argues for extensive deformation of the lithosphere during the formation and/or breakup of Rodinia. The pattern of fast SKS splitting directions measured at USArray Transportable Array (TA) stations shows clear evidence for a specific lithospheric anisotropy signature at stations beneath the Appalachian Mountains, indicating strong, coherent lithospheric deformation associated with Appalachian orogenesis. The Mid-Atlantic Geophysical Integrative Collaboration (MAGIC) experiment, a linear array

  12. Precambrian Processes, the Trans-Hudson Orogen, and Cratonic Keels: Insights From Teleseismic Tomography in Northern Hudson Bay, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddell, M. V.; Bastow, I. D.; Gilligan, A.; Kendall, J. M.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Earth conditions in the Precambrian, and their effect upon the formation of cratons and orogenies from that era, are not fully understood. For example, the precise onset of modern plate tectonics remains ambiguous; it has been hypothesised to have begun anywhere from ~4.1Ga (Hopkins, 2008) to ~1Ga (Stern, 2005). Also, the exceptional depth to which fast wave-speed and geoid anomalies extend beneath some cratons points to the existence of thick "cratonic keels", the origin of which remains unexplained. To improve our understanding of the early Earth processes, geological evidence preserved within ancient plates that have remained largely unchanged since the Precambrian can be used. The rocks of northern Hudson Bay include Archean domains, the Paleoproterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO), and lie atop one of the largest cratonic keels on Earth (Bastow et al., 2013), making this region an ideal laboratory for study of Precambrian processes. Here, we use seismological data recorded at Canadian POLARIS and Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment (HuBLE) stations to perform a relative arrival-time study of northern Hudson Bay region and the THO. Waveforms are aligned using the adaptive stacking routine of Rawlinson et al. (2004), and inversions are produced using the Fast Marching Tomography (FMTOMO) inversion code of Rawlinson et al. (2006). Our inversions provide an improved velocity model of the lithosphere and upper mantle of northern Canada, suggesting updated boundaries between lithospheric blocks at mantle depths and constituting new body-wave constraints on their structure. The results are used to address a number of outstanding questions regarding the processes that formed the THO and the Laurentian Keel of North America.

  13. Characterizing the scientific potential of satellite sensors. [San Francisco, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Eleven thematic mapper (TM) radiometric calibration programs were tested and evaluated in support of the task to characterize the potential of LANDSAT TM digital imagery for scientific investigations in the Earth sciences and terrestrial physics. Three software errors related to integer overflow, divide by zero, and nonexist file group were found and solved. Raw, calibrated, and corrected image groups that were created and stored on the Barker2 disk are enumerated. Black and white pixel print files were created for various subscenes of a San Francisco scene (ID 40392-18152). The development of linear regression software is discussed. The output of the software and its function are described. Future work in TM radiometric calibration, image processing, and software development is outlined.

  14. Visualizing the ground motions of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourasia, Amit; Cutchin, Steve; Aagaard, Brad

    2008-12-01

    With advances in computational capabilities and refinement of seismic wave-propagation models in the past decade large three-dimensional simulations of earthquake ground motion have become possible. The resulting datasets from these simulations are multivariate, temporal and multi-terabyte in size. Past visual representations of results from seismic studies have been largely confined to static two-dimensional maps. New visual representations provide scientists with alternate ways of viewing and interacting with these results potentially leading to new and significant insight into the physical phenomena. Visualizations can also be used for pedagogic and general dissemination purposes. We present a workflow for visual representation of the data from a ground motion simulation of the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake. We have employed state of the art animation tools for visualization of the ground motions with a high degree of accuracy and visual realism.

  15. Visualizing the ground motions of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chourasia, A.; Cutchin, S.; Aagaard, B.

    2008-01-01

    With advances in computational capabilities and refinement of seismic wave-propagation models in the past decade large three-dimensional simulations of earthquake ground motion have become possible. The resulting datasets from these simulations are multivariate, temporal and multi-terabyte in size. Past visual representations of results from seismic studies have been largely confined to static two-dimensional maps. New visual representations provide scientists with alternate ways of viewing and interacting with these results potentially leading to new and significant insight into the physical phenomena. Visualizations can also be used for pedagogic and general dissemination purposes. We present a workflow for visual representation of the data from a ground motion simulation of the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake. We have employed state of the art animation tools for visualization of the ground motions with a high degree of accuracy and visual realism. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Evolution of San Francisco Bay Area urban trails.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Bree

    2011-01-01

    The Family and Child Guidance Clinic of the Native American Health Center (NAHC) has developed strong working relationships with San Francisco Bay Area system partners in order to serve the mental health needs of American Indian/Alaska Native children and families. NAHC worked relentlessly with stakeholders to pave the Urban Trails that urban Indigenous community members utilize to access culturally competent care. These Urban Trails have been grounded in a community-based system of care model and cultural framework that links substance abuse and mental health through a holistic approach congruent with Indigenous values and traditions. This article describes how NAHC has partnered with community members and organizational stakeholders to develop and sustain an effective holistic system for serving urban Indigenous people.

  17. Historical Seismicity in the South San Francisco Bay Region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Locations (intensity centers) and moment magnitude M for 24 earthquakes (1858-1911) in the southern San Francisco Bay area are estimated from Modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) assignments. The uncertainties in location and M are generally large because there are few MMI assignments available. Preferred locations are selected to be consistent with a simple model for seismic activity on the central and southern Calaveras fault. Significant seismic activity can be explained by repetitive failure of the same fault areas in nearly identical earthquakes. Significant earthquake activity occurred on both east- and west-Bay faults in the ten or so years before the 1868 east-Bay earthquake and before the1906 and 1989 west-Bay earthquakes.

  18. [Francisco Varela's neurophenomenology of time: temporality of consciousness explained?].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Esteban; Canales-Johnson, Andrés; Claudio Fuentes, B

    2013-01-01

    This article attempts to clarify Francisco Varela's proposal of a neurophenomenology of time consciousness in the light of distinctions based on the philosophical literature of phenomenology and recent advances of neurobiology. The analysis is carried out considering three aspects. In the first of them, we discuss the phenomenological aspect of consciousness, accessible in first-person, which describes time as a structure with three inseparable moments (past-present-future) and three levels of temporality, and not merely as the chronometric time or clock time. In the second one, we analyze the neurobiological aspect of consciousness that tends to "explain" the phenomenological time in terms of three possible levels of neuronal integration. Thus, we propose a correspondence between the levels of phenomenological time and neural integration processes. Finally, we try to analyze this "correspondence" and the issues that follow from this by considering that the notion of time in this correspondence is, in essence, the clock time and not the phenomenological time consciousness.

  19. Rocks and geology in the San Francisco Bay region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffer, Philip W.

    2002-01-01

    The landscape of the San Francisco Bay region is host to a greater variety of rocks than most other regions in the United States. This introductory guide provides illustrated descriptions of 46 common and important varieties of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rock found in the region. Rock types are described in context of their identification qualities, how they form, and where they occur in the region. The guide also provides discussion about of regional geology, plate tectonics, the rock cycle, the significance of the selected rock types in relation to both earth history and the impact of mineral resources on the development in the region. Maps and text also provide information where rocks, fossils, and geologic features can be visited on public lands or in association with public displays in regional museums, park visitor centers, and other public facilities.

  20. Water temperatures of California streams, San Francisco Bay subregion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blodgett, J.C.

    1971-01-01

    A summary of water-temperature records is presented for data collected through September 1968 in the San Francisco Bay Subregion of California. This report is one of a series covering the 11 hydrologic subregions of the State and includes data for 87 stream sites. Water temperatures, in degrees Celsius, are summarized by months, years, and for the period of record. A description is included to identify each station where data were collected. A tolerance interval analysis indicated that 99 percent of the point water-temperature observations, determined either with thermograph probes or hand-held thermometers, should be ±0.6°C of the mean water temperature at the 95-percent confidence level. The probable total error ranges from ±0.8°C for periodic data to ±1.4°C for thermograph data.