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Sample records for cre-loxp recombination vectors

  1. Construction of gene-targeting vectors by recombineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Song-Choon; Wang, Wei; Liu, Pentao

    2009-01-01

    Recombineering is a technology that utilizes the efficient homologous recombination functions encoded by gamma phage to manipulate DNA in Escherichia coli. Construction of knockout vectors has been greatly facilitated by recombineering as it allows one to choose any genomic region to manipulate. We describe here an efficient recombineering-based protocol for making mouse conditional knockout targeting vectors.

  2. HSV Recombinant Vectors for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manservigi, Roberto; Argnani, Rafaela; Marconi, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    The very deep knowledge acquired on the genetics and molecular biology of herpes simplex virus (HSV), has allowed the development of potential replication-competent and replication-defective vectors for several applications in human healthcare. These include delivery and expression of human genes to cells of the nervous systems, selective destruction of cancer cells, prophylaxis against infection with HSV or other infectious diseases, and targeted infection to specific tissues or organs. Replication-defective recombinant vectors are non-toxic gene transfer tools that preserve most of the neurotropic features of wild type HSV-1, particularly the ability to express genes after having established latent infections, and are thus proficient candidates for therapeutic gene transfer settings in neurons. A replication-defective HSV vector for the treatment of pain has recently entered in phase 1 clinical trial. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are becoming a suitable and powerful tool to eradicate brain tumours due to their ability to replicate and spread only within the tumour mass, and have reached phase II/III clinical trials in some cases. The progress in understanding the host immune response induced by the vector is also improving the use of HSV as a vaccine vector against both HSV infection and other pathogens. This review briefly summarizes the obstacle encountered in the delivery of HSV vectors and examines the various strategies developed or proposed to overcome such challenges. PMID:20835362

  3. Nonreplicating vaccinia vector efficiently expresses recombinant genes.

    PubMed

    Sutter, G; Moss, B

    1992-11-15

    Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), a highly attenuated vaccinia virus strain that has been safety tested in humans, was evaluated for use as an expression vector. MVA has multiple genomic deletions and is severely host cell restricted: it grows well in avian cells but is unable to multiply in human and most other mammalian cells tested. Nevertheless, we found that replication of viral DNA appeared normal and that both early and late viral proteins were synthesized in human cells. Proteolytic processing of viral structural proteins was inhibited, however, and only immature virus particles were detected by electron microscopy. We constructed an insertion plasmid with the Escherichia coli lacZ gene under the control of the vaccinia virus late promoter P11, flanked by sequences of MVA DNA, to allow homologous recombination at the site of a naturally occurring 3500-base-pair deletion within the MVA genome. MVA recombinants were isolated and propagated in permissive avian cells and shown to express the enzyme beta-galactosidase upon infection of nonpermissive human cells. The amount of enzyme made was similar to that produced by a recombinant of vaccinia virus strain Western Reserve, which also had the lacZ gene under control of the P11 promoter, but multiplied to high titers. Since recombinant gene expression is unimpaired in nonpermissive human cells, MVA may serve as a highly efficient and exceptionally safe vector.

  4. Recombinant vector and eukaryotic host transformed thereby

    SciTech Connect

    Sugden, W.M.

    1987-08-11

    A recombinant plasmid is described comprising: a segment from a first plasmid which is not a lymphotrophic herpes virus segment and which facilitates the replication of the recombinant plasmid in a prokaryotic host; a segment from a lymphotrophic herpes virus which is linked to the first plasmid segment such that is a capable of assisting in maintaining the recombinant plasmid as a plasmid if the recombinant plasmid is inserted into a eukaryotic host that has been transformed by the lymphotrophic herpes virus; and a foreign eukaryotic gene component linked as part of the recombinant plasmid.

  5. Antigenic structures stably expressed by recombinant TGEV-derived vectors.

    PubMed

    Becares, Martina; Sanchez, Carlos M; Sola, Isabel; Enjuanes, Luis; Zuñiga, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are positive-stranded RNA viruses with potential as immunization vectors, expressing high levels of heterologous genes and eliciting both secretory and systemic immune responses. Nevertheless, its high recombination rate may result in the loss of the full-length foreign gene, limiting their use as vectors. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was engineered to express porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) small protein domains, as a strategy to improve heterologous gene stability. After serial passage in tissue cultures, stable expression of small PRRSV protein antigenic domains was achieved. Therefore, size reduction of the heterologous genes inserted in CoV-derived vectors led to the stable expression of antigenic domains. Immunization of piglets with these TGEV vectors led to partial protection against a challenge with a virulent PRRSV strain, as immunized animals showed reduced clinical signs and lung damage. Further improvement of TGEV-derived vectors will require the engineering of vectors with decreased recombination rate.

  6. Herpes simplex virus type 1-derived recombinant and amplicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Fraefel, Cornel; Marconi, Peggy; Epstein, Alberto L

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153 kbp double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes (1) the two approaches most commonly used to prepare recombinant vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria, and (2) the two methodologies currently used to generate helper-free amplicon vectors, either using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based approach or a Cre/loxP site-specific recombination strategy.

  7. Recombinant Salmonella Bacteria Vectoring HIV/AIDS Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Ruhanya, Vurayai

    2013-01-01

    HIV/AIDS is an important public health problem globally. An affordable, easy-to-deliver and protective HIV vaccine is therefore required to curb the pandemic from spreading further. Recombinant Salmonella bacteria can be harnessed to vector HIV antigens or DNA vaccines to the immune system for induction of specific protective immunity. These are capable of activating the innate, humoral and cellular immune responses at both mucosal and systemic compartments. Several studies have already demonstrated the utility of live recombinant Salmonella in delivering expressed foreign antigens as well as DNA vaccines to the host immune system. This review gives an overview of the studies in which recombinant Salmonella bacteria were used to vector HIV/AIDS antigens and DNA vaccines. Most of the recombinant Salmonella-based HIV/AIDS vaccines developed so far have only been tested in animals (mainly mice) and are yet to reach human trials.

  8. Novel recombinant alphaviral and adenoviral vectors for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Osada, Takuya; Morse, Michael A; Hobeika, Amy; Lyerly, H Kim

    2012-06-01

    Although cellular immunotherapy based on autolgous dendritic cells (DCs) targeting antigens expressed by metastatic cancer has demonstrated clinical efficacy, the logistical challenges in generating an individualized cell product create an imperative to develop alternatives to DC-based cancer vaccines. Particularly attractive alternatives include in situ delivery of antigen and activation signals to resident antigen-presenting cells (APCs), which can be achieved by novel fusion molecules targeting the mannose receptor and by recombinant viral vectors expressing the antigen of interest and capable of infecting DCs. A particular challenge in the use of viral vectors is the well-appreciated clinical obstacles to their efficacy, specifically vector-specific neutralizing immune responses. Because heterologous prime and boost strategies have been demonstrated to be particularly potent, we developed two novel recombinant vectors based on alphaviral replicon particles and a next-generation adenovirus encoding an antigen commonly overexpressed in many human cancers, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The rationale for developing these vectors, their unique characteristics, the preclinical studies and early clinical experience with each, and opportunities to enhance their effectiveness will be reviewed. The potential of each of these potent recombinant vectors to efficiently generate clinically active anti-tumor immune response alone, or in combination, will be discussed.

  9. Specific transduction and labeling of pancreatic ducts by targeted recombinant viral infusion into mouse pancreatic ducts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ping; Xiao, Xiangwei; El-Gohary, Yousef; Criscimanna, Angela; Prasadan, Krishna; Rymer, Christopher; Shiota, Chiyo; Wiersch, John; Gaffar, Iliana; Esni, Farzad; Gittes, George K

    2013-11-01

    Specific labeling of pancreatic ducts has proven to be quite difficult. Such labeling has been highly sought after because of the power it would confer to studies of pancreatic ductal carcinogenesis, as well as studies of the source of new insulin-producing β-cells. Cre-loxp recombination could, in theory, lineage-tag pancreatic ducts, but results have been conflicting, mainly due to low labeling efficiencies. Here, we achieved a high pancreatic duct labeling efficiency using a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) with a duct-specific sox9 promoter infused into the mouse common biliary/pancreatic duct. We saw rapid, diffuse duct-specific labeling, with 50 and 89% labeling in the pancreatic tail and head region, respectively. This highly specific labeling of ducts should greatly enhance our ability to study the role of pancreatic ducts in numerous aspects of pancreatic growth, development and function.

  10. Vaxvec: The first web-based recombinant vaccine vector database and its data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shunzhou; Martin, Carly; Patil, Rasika; Zhu, Felix; Zhao, Bin; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2015-01-01

    A recombinant vector vaccine uses an attenuated virus, bacterium, or parasite as the carrier to express a heterologous antigen(s). Many recombinant vaccine vectors and related vaccines have been developed and extensively investigated. To compare and better understand recombinant vectors and vaccines, we have generated Vaxvec (http://www.violinet.org/vaxvec), the first web-based database that stores various recombinant vaccine vectors and those experimentally verified vaccines that use these vectors. Vaxvec has now included 59 vaccine vectors that have been used in 196 recombinant vector vaccines against 66 pathogens and cancers. These vectors are classified to 41 viral vectors, 15 bacterial vectors, 1 parasitic vector, and 1 fungal vector. The most commonly used viral vaccine vectors are double-stranded DNA viruses, including herpesviruses, adenoviruses, and poxviruses. For example, Vaxvec includes 63 poxvirus-based recombinant vaccines for over 20 pathogens and cancers. Vaxvec collects 30 recombinant vector influenza vaccines that use 17 recombinant vectors and were experimentally tested in 7 animal models. In addition, over 60 protective antigens used in recombinant vector vaccines are annotated and analyzed. User-friendly web-interfaces are available for querying various data in Vaxvec. To support data exchange, the information of vaccine vectors, vaccines, and related information is stored in the Vaccine Ontology (VO). Vaxvec is a timely and vital source of vaccine vector database and facilitates efficient vaccine vector research and development. PMID:26403370

  11. Vaxvec: The first web-based recombinant vaccine vector database and its data analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shunzhou; Martin, Carly; Patil, Rasika; Zhu, Felix; Zhao, Bin; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2015-11-27

    A recombinant vector vaccine uses an attenuated virus, bacterium, or parasite as the carrier to express a heterologous antigen(s). Many recombinant vaccine vectors and related vaccines have been developed and extensively investigated. To compare and better understand recombinant vectors and vaccines, we have generated Vaxvec (http://www.violinet.org/vaxvec), the first web-based database that stores various recombinant vaccine vectors and those experimentally verified vaccines that use these vectors. Vaxvec has now included 59 vaccine vectors that have been used in 196 recombinant vector vaccines against 66 pathogens and cancers. These vectors are classified to 41 viral vectors, 15 bacterial vectors, 1 parasitic vector, and 1 fungal vector. The most commonly used viral vaccine vectors are double-stranded DNA viruses, including herpesviruses, adenoviruses, and poxviruses. For example, Vaxvec includes 63 poxvirus-based recombinant vaccines for over 20 pathogens and cancers. Vaxvec collects 30 recombinant vector influenza vaccines that use 17 recombinant vectors and were experimentally tested in 7 animal models. In addition, over 60 protective antigens used in recombinant vector vaccines are annotated and analyzed. User-friendly web-interfaces are available for querying various data in Vaxvec. To support data exchange, the information of vaccine vectors, vaccines, and related information is stored in the Vaccine Ontology (VO). Vaxvec is a timely and vital source of vaccine vector database and facilitates efficient vaccine vector research and development.

  12. Construction of human artificial chromosome vectors by recombineering.

    PubMed

    Kotzamanis, George; Cheung, Wing; Abdulrazzak, Hassan; Perez-Luz, Sara; Howe, Steven; Cooke, Howard; Huxley, Clare

    2005-05-23

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) can be formed de novo by transfection of large fragments of cloned alphoid DNA into human HT1080 cells in tissue culture. In order to generate HACs carrying a gene of interest, one can either co-transfect the alphoid DNA and the gene of interest, or one can clone both into a single vector prior to transfection. Here we describe linking approximately 70 kb of alphoid DNA onto a 156-kb BAC carrying the human HPRT gene using Red homologous recombination in the EL350 Escherichia coli host [Lee et al., Genomics 73 (2001) 56-65]. A selectable marker and EGFP marker were then added by loxP/Cre recombination using the arabinose inducible cre gene in the EL350 bacteria. The final construct generates minichromosomes in HT1080 cells and the HPRT gene is expressed. The retrofitting vector can be used to add the approximately 70 kb of alphoid DNA to any BAC carrying a gene of interest to generate a HAC vector. The method can also be used to link any unrelated BAC or PAC insert onto another BAC clone. The EL350 bacteria are an excellent host for building up complex vectors by a combination of homologous and loxP/Cre recombination.

  13. Recombinant adenovirus vectors for gene therapy and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Nász, I; Adám, E

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade adenovirus (AdV) vectors have emerged as promising technology in gene therapy. They have been used for genetic modification of a variety of somatic cells in vitro and in vivo. They have been widely used as gene delivery vectors in experiments both with curative and preventive purposes. AdV vectors have been used in the experimental and in some extent in the clinical gene therapy of a variety of cancers. The combination of recombinant AdV technology with chemotherapy (pro drug system) seems to be promising, too. AdV vectors offer several advantages over other vectors. Replication defective vectors can be produced in very high titers (10(11) pfu/ml) thus allowing a substantially greater efficiency of direct gene transfer; they have the capacity to infect both replicating and nonreplicating (quiescent) cells from a variety of tissues and species. Several important limitations of adenovirus mediated gene transfer are also known, such as the relatively short-term (transient) expression of foreign genes, induction of the host humoral and cellular immune response to viral proteins and viral infected cells, which may substantially inhibit the effect of repeated treatment with AdV vectors, the limited cloning capacity and the lack of target cell specificity. However, the well-understood structure, molecular biology and host cell interactions of AdV-s offer some potential solutions to these limitations.

  14. Characterization of recombinant Raccoonpox Vaccine Vectors in Chickens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hwa, S.-H.; Iams, Keith P.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Kingstad, B.A.; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2010-01-01

    Raccoonpox virus (RCN) has been used as a recombinant vector against several mammalian pathogens but has not been tested in birds. The replication of RCN in chick embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) and chickens was studied with the use of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 hemagglutinin (HA) as a model antigen and luciferase (luc) as a reporter gene. Although RCN replicated to low levels in CEFs, it efficiently expressed recombinant proteins and, in vivo, elicited anti-HA immunoglobulin yolk (IgY) antibody responses comparable to inactivated influenza virus. Biophotonic in vivo imaging of 1-wk-old chicks with RCN-luc showed strong expression of the luc reporter gene lasting up to 3 days postinfection. These studies demonstrate the potential of RCN as a vaccine vector for avian influenza and other poultry pathogens. ?? American Association of Avian Pathologists 2010.

  15. Recombinant adeno-associated viral vector reference standards.

    PubMed

    Moullier, Philippe; Snyder, Richard O

    2012-01-01

    Reference standard materials (RSMs) exist for a variety of biologics including vaccines but are not readily available for gene therapy vectors. To date, a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 RSM (rAAV2 RSM) has been produced and characterized and was made available to the scientific community in 2010. In addition, a rAAV8 RSM has been produced and will be characterized in the coming months. The use of these reference materials by members of the gene therapy field facilitates the calibration of individual laboratory vector-specific internal standards and the eventual comparison of preclinical and clinical data based on common dosage units. Normalization of data to determine therapeutic dose ranges of rAAV vectors for each particular tissue target and disease indication is important information that can enhance the safety and protection of patients.

  16. Biosafety of recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Dismuke, David J; Tenenbaum, Liliane; Samulski, R Jude

    2013-12-01

    It is hoped that the use of gene transfer technology to treat both monogenetic and acquired diseases may soon become a common therapy option in medicine. For gene therapy to achieve this objective, any gene delivery method will have to meet several criteria, including ease of manufacturing, efficient gene transfer to target tissue, long-term gene expression to alleviate the disease, and most importantly safety in patients. Viral vectors are an attractive choice for use in gene therapy protocols due to their relative efficiency in gene delivery. Since there is inherent risk in using viruses, investigators in the gene therapy community have devoted extensive efforts toward reengineering viral vectors for enhance safety. Here we review the approaches and technologies that are being evaluated for the use of recombinant vectors based upon adeno-associated virus (AAV) in the treatment of a variety of human diseases. AAV is currently the only known human DNA virus that is non-pathogenic and AAV-based vectors are classified as Risk Group 1 agents for all laboratory and animal studies carried out in the US. Although its apparent safety in natural infection and animals appears well documented, we examine the accumulated knowledge on the biology and vectorology of AAV, lessons learned from gene therapy clinical trials, and how this information is impacting current vector design and manufacturing with an overall emphasis on biosafety.

  17. Clinical gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Mueller, C; Flotte, T R

    2008-06-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors possess a number of properties that may make them suitable for clinical gene therapy, including being based upon a virus for which there is no known pathology and a natural propensity to persist in human cells. Wild-type adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are now known to be very diverse and ubiquitous in humans and nonhuman primates, which adds to the degree of confidence one may place in the natural history of AAV, namely that it has never been associated with any human tumors or other acute pathology, other than sporadic reports of having been isolated from spontaneously aborted fetuses. On the basis of this understanding of AAV biology and a wide range of preclinical studies in mice, rabbits, dogs and nonhuman primates, a growing number of clinical trials have been undertaken with this class of vectors. Altogether, over 40 clinical trials have now been approved. Although all previous trials were undertaken using AAV serotype 2 vectors, at least two current trials utilize AAV2 vector genomes cross-packaged or pseudotyped into AAV1 capsids, which appear to mediate more efficient gene delivery to muscle. The explosion of capsid isolates available for use as vectors to over 120 has now provided the potential to broaden the application of AAV-based gene therapy to other cell types.

  18. EASE vectors for rapid stable expression of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, Teri L; Viaje, Aurora; Morris, Arvia E

    2003-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments have become an increasingly important source of therapeutic molecules in the biotechnology industry. Drug development strategies rely on screening large numbers of candidate molecules in search of an optimized drug candidate. This strategy requires efficient production of ten to a few hundred milligrams of candidate molecules for screening in bioassays and animal models. Typically, this amount of recombinant protein expression involves large numbers of transient transfections or cloning of a recombinant cell line. Both of these approaches are time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this report, we describe the application of an EASE vector system that is capable of generating stable pools of transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. These pooled populations of cells produce high quantities of antibody candidates without labor-intensive cloning in a 3-5 week time frame. When an optimal drug candidate has been selected, pools generated with EASE-containing vectors can also be used in subsequent cloning steps to make cell lines with improved expression levels. We demonstrate that EASE increases expression in nonamplified pools in addition to increasing amplification and viability of clonal cell lines generated with the EASE-containing vectors compared with pools and cell lines generated without EASE.

  19. Vaccinia virus vectors: new strategies for producing recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Hruby, D E

    1990-01-01

    The development and continued refinement of techniques for the efficient insertion and expression of heterologous DNA sequences from within the genomic context of infectious vaccinia virus recombinants are among the most promising current approaches towards effective immunoprophylaxis against a variety of protozoan, viral, and bacterial human pathogens. Because of its medical relevance, this area is the subject of intense research interest and has evolved rapidly during the past several years. This review (i) provides an updated overview of the technology that exists for assembling recombinant vaccinia virus strains, (ii) discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches, (iii) outlines the areas of outgoing research directed towards overcoming the limitations of current techniques, and (iv) provides some insight (i.e., speculation) about probable future refinements in the use of vaccinia virus as a vector. PMID:2187593

  20. Combination recombinant simian or chimpanzee adenoviral vectors for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Lingshu; Ko, Sung-Youl; Kong, Wing-Pui; Schmidt, Stephen D; Gall, Jason G D; Colloca, Stefano; Seder, Robert A; Mascola, John R; Nabel, Gary J

    2015-12-16

    Recombinant adenoviral vector (rAd)-based vaccines are currently being developed for several infectious diseases and cancer therapy, but pre-existing seroprevalence to such vectors may prevent their use in broad human populations. In this study, we investigated the potential of low seroprevalence non-human primate rAd vectors to stimulate cellular and humoral responses using HIV/SIV Env glycoprotein (gp) as the representative antigen. Mice were immunized with novel simian or chimpanzee rAd (rSAV or rChAd) vectors encoding HIV gp or SIV gp by single immunization or in heterologous prime/boost combinations (DNA/rAd; rAd/rAd; rAd/NYVAC or rAd/rLCM), and adaptive immunity was assessed. Among the rSAV and rChAd tested, rSAV16 or rChAd3 vector alone generated the most potent immune responses. The DNA/rSAV regimen also generated immune responses similar to the DNA/rAd5 regimen. rChAd63/rChAd3 and rChAd3 /NYVAC induced similar or even higher levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell and IgG responses as compared to rAd28/rAd5, one of the most potent combinations of human rAds. The optimized vaccine regimen stimulated improved cellular immune responses and neutralizing antibodies against HIV compared to the DNA/rAd5 regimen. Based on these results, this type of novel rAd vector and its prime/boost combination regimens represent promising candidates for vaccine development.

  1. Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG as an HIV Vaccine Vector

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Rosamund; Chege, Gerald; Shephard, Enid; Stutz, Helen; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 has resulted in a devastating AIDS pandemic. An effective HIV/AIDS vaccine that can be used to either, prevent HIV infection, control infection or prevent progression of the disease to AIDS is needed. In this review we discuss the use of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the tuberculosis vaccine, as a vaccine vector for an HIV vaccine. Numerous features make BCG an attractive vehicle to deliver HIV antigens. It has a good safety profile, elicits long-lasting cellular immune responses and in addition manufacturing costs are affordable, a necessary consideration for developing countries. In this review we discuss the numerous factors that influence generation of a genetically stable recombinant BCG vaccine for HIV. PMID:20353397

  2. [Recombinant viruses of poultry as vector vaccines against fowl plague].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Walter; Veits, Jutta; Mettenleiter, Thomas C

    2006-01-01

    To help in the control of fowl plague caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza A viruses of hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes H5 and H7 several vaccines have been developed. A prophylactic immunization of poultry with inactivated influenza viruses in non-endemic situations is questionable, however, due to the impairment of serological identification of field virus-infected animals which hinders elimination of the infectious agent from the population. This problem might be overcome by the use of genetically engineered marker vaccines which contain only the protective influenza virus hemagglutinin. Infected animals could then be unambiguously identified by their serum antibodies against other influenza virus proteins, e.g. neuraminidase or nucleoprotein. For such a use, purified HA or HA-expressing DNA vaccines are conceivable. Economically advantageous and easier to apply are modified live virus vaccines in use against other poultry diseases, which have been modified to express influenza virus HA. So far, recombinant HA-expressing fowlpox virus (FPV) as well as infectious laryngotracheitis and Newcastle disease viruses have been asssessed in animal experiments. An H5-expressing FPV recombinant is already in use in Central America and Southeast Asia but without accompanying marker diagnostics. Advantages and disadvantages of the different viral vectors are discussed.

  3. Design and generation of recombinant rabies virus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Osakada, Fumitaka; Callaway, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    Rabies viruses, negative-strand RNA viruses, infect neurons through axon terminals and spread transsynaptically in a retrograde direction between neurons. Rabies viruses whose glycoprotein (G) gene is deleted from the genome cannot spread across synapses. Complementation of G in trans, however, enables transsynaptic spreading of G-deleted rabies viruses to directly-connected, presynaptic neurons. Recombinant rabies viruses can encode genes of interest for labeling cells, controlling gene expression, and monitoring or manipulating neural activity. Cre-dependent or bridge-protein-mediated transduction and single-cell electroporation via EnvA/TVA or EnvB/TVB system allow cell-type-specific or single-cell-specific targeting. These rabies virus-based approaches permit the linking of connectivity to cell morphology and circuit function for particular cell types or single cells. Here we describe methods for construction of rabies viral vectors, recovery of G-deleted rabies viruses from cDNA, amplification of the viruses, pseudotyping them with EnvA or EnvB, and concentration and titration of the viruses. The entire protocol takes 6–8 weeks. PMID:23887178

  4. Retroviral vectors for homologous recombination provide efficient cloning and expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Eiji; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Horii, Masae; Hamana, Hiroshi; Nagai, Terumi; Muraguchi, Atsushi

    2014-02-14

    Homologous recombination technologies enable high-throughput cloning and the seamless insertion of any DNA fragment into expression vectors. Additionally, retroviral vectors offer a fast and efficient method for transducing and expressing genes in mammalian cells, including lymphocytes. However, homologous recombination cannot be used to insert DNA fragments into retroviral vectors; retroviral vectors contain two homologous regions, the 5'- and 3'-long terminal repeats, between which homologous recombination occurs preferentially. In this study, we have modified a retroviral vector to enable the cloning of DNA fragments through homologous recombination. To this end, we inserted a bacterial selection marker in a region adjacent to the gene insertion site. We used the modified retroviral vector and homologous recombination to clone T-cell receptors (TCRs) from single Epstein Barr virus-specific human T cells in a high-throughput and comprehensive manner and to efficiently evaluate their function by transducing the TCRs into a murine T-cell line through retroviral infection. In conclusion, the modified retroviral vectors, in combination with the homologous recombination method, are powerful tools for the high-throughput cloning of cDNAs and their efficient functional analysis.

  5. Development of non-defective recombinant densovirus vectors for microRNA delivery in the invasive vector mosquito, Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peiwen; Li, Xiaocong; Gu, Jinbao; Dong, Yunqiao; Liu, Yan; Santhosh, Puthiyakunnon; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that mosquito densoviruses (MDVs) are potential vectors for delivering foreign nucleic acids into mosquito cells. However, considering existing expression strategies, recombinant viruses would inevitably become replication-defective viruses and lose their ability for secondary transmission. The packaging limitations of the virion represent a barrier for the development of MDVs for viral paratransgenesis or as high-efficiency bioinsecticides. Herein, we report the development of a non-defective recombinant Aedes aegypti densovirus (AaeDV) miRNA expression system, mediated by an artificial intron, using an intronic miRNA expression strategy. We demonstrated that this recombinant vector could be used to overexpress endogenous miRNAs or to decrease endogenous miRNAs by generating antisense sponges to explore the biological functions of miRNAs. In addition, the vector could express antisense-miRNAs to induce efficient gene silencing in vivo and in vitro. The recombinant virus effectively self-replicated and retained its secondary transmission ability, similar to the wild-type virus. The recombinant virus was also genetically stable. This study demonstrated the first construction of a non-defective recombinant MDV miRNA expression system, which represents a tool for the functional analysis of mosquito genes and lays the foundation for the application of viral paratransgenesis for dengue virus control. PMID:26879823

  6. Development of non-defective recombinant densovirus vectors for microRNA delivery in the invasive vector mosquito, Aedes albopictus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peiwen; Li, Xiaocong; Gu, Jinbao; Dong, Yunqiao; Liu, Yan; Santhosh, Puthiyakunnon; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2016-02-16

    We previously reported that mosquito densoviruses (MDVs) are potential vectors for delivering foreign nucleic acids into mosquito cells. However, considering existing expression strategies, recombinant viruses would inevitably become replication-defective viruses and lose their ability for secondary transmission. The packaging limitations of the virion represent a barrier for the development of MDVs for viral paratransgenesis or as high-efficiency bioinsecticides. Herein, we report the development of a non-defective recombinant Aedes aegypti densovirus (AaeDV) miRNA expression system, mediated by an artificial intron, using an intronic miRNA expression strategy. We demonstrated that this recombinant vector could be used to overexpress endogenous miRNAs or to decrease endogenous miRNAs by generating antisense sponges to explore the biological functions of miRNAs. In addition, the vector could express antisense-miRNAs to induce efficient gene silencing in vivo and in vitro. The recombinant virus effectively self-replicated and retained its secondary transmission ability, similar to the wild-type virus. The recombinant virus was also genetically stable. This study demonstrated the first construction of a non-defective recombinant MDV miRNA expression system, which represents a tool for the functional analysis of mosquito genes and lays the foundation for the application of viral paratransgenesis for dengue virus control.

  7. Purification of recombinant adeno-associated virus type 8 vectors by ion exchange chromatography generates clinical grade vector stock.

    PubMed

    Davidoff, Andrew M; Ng, Catherine Y C; Sleep, Susan; Gray, John; Azam, Selina; Zhao, Yuan; McIntosh, Jenny H; Karimipoor, Morteza; Nathwani, Amit C

    2004-11-01

    Recombinant vectors based on the recently isolated AAV serotype 8 (rAAV-8) shows great promise for gene therapy, particularly for disorders affecting the liver. Transition of this vector system to the clinic, however, is limited by the lack of an efficient scaleable purification method. In this report, we describe a simple method for purification of rAAV-8 vector particles based on ion exchange chromatography that generates vector stocks with greater than 90% purity. The average yield of purified rAAV-8 from five different vector preparation was 41%. Electron microscopy of these purified stocks revealed typical icosohedral virions with less than 10% empty particles. Liver targeted delivery of ion-exchange purified rAAV-8 vector encoding the human factor IX (hFIX) gene, resulted in plasma hFIX levels approaching 30% of normal in immunocompetent mice, which is 20-fold higher than observed with an equivalent number of rAAV-5 ion exchange purified vector particles. The method takes less then 5 h to process and purify rAAV-8 vector from producer cells and represents a significant advance on the CsCl density centrifugation technique in current use for purification of rAAV-8 vector systems and will likely facilitate the transition of the rAAV-8 vector system to the clinic.

  8. Bioreactor production of recombinant herpes simplex virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Knop, David R; Harrell, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Serotypical application of herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors to gene therapy (type 1) and prophylactic vaccines (types 1 and 2) has garnered substantial clinical interest recently. HSV vectors and amplicons have also been employed as helper virus constructs for manufacture of the dependovirus adeno-associated virus (AAV). Large quantities of infectious HSV stocks are requisite for these therapeutic applications, requiring a scalable vector manufacturing and processing platform comprised of unit operations which accommodate the fragility of HSV. In this study, production of a replication deficient rHSV-1 vector bearing the rep and cap genes of AAV-2 (denoted rHSV-rep2/cap2) was investigated. Adaptation of rHSV production from T225 flasks to a packed bed, fed-batch bioreactor permitted an 1100-fold increment in total vector production without a decrease in specific vector yield (pfu/cell). The fed-batch bioreactor system afforded a rHSV-rep2/cap2 vector recovery of 2.8 x 10(12) pfu. The recovered vector was concentrated by tangential flow filtration (TFF), permitting vector stocks to be formulated at greater than 1.5 x 10(9) pfu/mL.

  9. Linearization of baculovirus DNA enhances the recovery of recombinant virus expression vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Kitts, P A; Ayres, M D; Possee, R D

    1990-01-01

    Engineered derivatives of Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) possessing a unique restriction site provide a source of viral DNA that can be linearized by digestion with a specific endonuclease. Circular or linearized DNA from two such viruses were compared in terms of their infectivity and recombinogenic activities. The linear forms were 15- to 150-fold less infectious than the corresponding circular forms, when transfected into Spodoptera frugiperda cells using the calcium phosphate method. Linear viral DNA was, however, proficient at recombination on co-transfection with an appropriate transfer vector. Up to 30% of the progeny viruses were recombinant, a 10-fold higher fraction of recombinants than was obtained from co-transfections with circular AcMNPV DNA. The isolation of a recombinant baculovirus expression vector from any of the AcMNPV transfer vectors currently in use can thus be facilitated by linearization of the viral DNA at the appropriate location. Images PMID:2216760

  10. Development of Recombinant HSV-Based Vaccine Vectors.

    PubMed

    Voellmy, Richard; Bloom, David C; Vilaboa, Nuria; Feller, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) causes significant morbidity on the human population through such clinical syndromes as cold sores, genital herpes, herpes stromal keratitis, and encephalitis. Attempts to generate efficacious vaccines to date have failed. We have recently described the use of a conditionally replication-competent HSV-1 vector to immunize mice against a lethal challenge of HSV-1. The unique feature of this vaccine vector is that its replication is tightly controlled and can only occur in the presence of local heat and the presence of a small molecule inducer (an antiprogestin). This gives it the safety advantage of a replication-defective vaccine vector as well as the advantage of a replication-competent vector in that it is able to stimulate innate and adaptive aspects of the immune response in a natural context that a replication-defective vector cannot. In this chapter we provide a brief overview of HSV vaccines followed by the methodology used to propagate and utilize replication-conditional HSV vectors as vaccines.

  11. Construction of adenovirus vectors encoding the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Fang; Qi, Bing; Tu, Lei-Lei; Liu, Lian; Yu, Guo-Cheng; Zhong, Jing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To construct adenovirus vectors of lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology to further understand the role of lumican gene in myopia. METHODS Gateway recombinant cloning technology was used to construct adenovirus vectors. The wild-type (wt) and mutant (mut) forms of the lumican gene were synthesized and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The lumican cDNA fragments were purified and ligated into the adenovirus shuttle vector pDown-multiple cloning site (MCS)-/internal ribozyme entry site (IRES)/enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Then the desired DNA fragments were integrated into the destination vector pAV.Des1d yielding the final expression constructs pAV.Ex1d-cytomegalovirus (CMV)>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES /EGFP, respectively. RESULTS The adenovirus plasmids pAV.Ex1d-CMV>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES/EGFP were successfully constructed by gateway recombinant cloning technology. Positive clones identified by PCR and sequencing were selected and packaged into recombinant adenovirus in HEK293 cells. CONCLUSION We construct adenovirus vectors containing the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology, which provides a basis for investigating the role of lumican gene in the pathogenesis of high myopia. PMID:27672590

  12. Direct facile screening of recombinant DNA vector constructs.

    PubMed

    Winnard, Paul T; Challa, Rushi; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Raman, Venu

    2014-04-01

    Direct efficient facile screening of bacterial transformants with the goal of selecting, retrieving, and using recombinant DNA is exemplified by simple visual-based colorimetric inspections or fluorescent protein-based assays. We describe pRedScript, which introduces the constitutive expression of a very bright red fluorescent protein into transformants. On agar plates, red colonies are simply visualized in ambient white light in stark contrast to recombinant transformants that are white. In addition, the bright red fluorescence of the reporter protein can also be harnessed as a sensitive signal for screening bacterial promoters during the development of optimized fermentation conditions.

  13. A 5' Noncoding Exon Containing Engineered Intron Enhances Transgene Expression from Recombinant AAV Vectors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiamiao; Williams, James A; Luke, Jeremy; Zhang, Feijie; Chu, Kirk; Kay, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed a mini-intronic plasmid (MIP) expression system in which the essential bacterial elements for plasmid replication and selection are placed within an engineered intron contained within a universal 5' UTR noncoding exon. Like minicircle DNA plasmids (devoid of bacterial backbone sequences), MIP plasmids overcome transcriptional silencing of the transgene. However, in addition MIP plasmids increase transgene expression by 2 and often >10 times higher than minicircle vectors in vivo and in vitro. Based on these findings, we examined the effects of the MIP intronic sequences in a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector system. Recombinant AAV vectors containing an intron with a bacterial replication origin and bacterial selectable marker increased transgene expression by 40 to 100 times in vivo when compared with conventional AAV vectors. Therefore, inclusion of this noncoding exon/intron sequence upstream of the coding region can substantially enhance AAV-mediated gene expression in vivo.

  14. Plasmid-Chromosome Recombination of Irradiated Shuttle Vector DNA in African Green Monkey Kidney Cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudgett, John Stuart

    1987-09-01

    An autonomously replicating shuttle vector was used to investigate the enhancement of plasmid-chromosome recombination in mammalian host cells by ultraviolet light and gamma radiation. Sequences homologous to the shuttle vector were stably inserted into the genome of African Green Monkey kidney cells to act as the target substrate for these recombination events. The SV40- and pBR322-derived plasmid DNA was irradiated with various doses of radiation before transfection into the transformed mammalian host cells. The successful homologous transfer of the bacterial ampicillin resistance (amp^{rm r}) gene from the inserted sequences to replace a mutant amp^->=ne on the shuttle vector was identified by plasmid extraction and transformation into E. coli host cells. Ultraviolet light (UV) was found not to induce homologous plasmid-chromosome recombination, while gamma radiation increased the frequency of recombinant plasmids detected. The introduction of specific double -strand breaks in the plasmid or prolonging the time of plasmid residence in the mammalian host cells also enhanced plasmid-chromosome recombination. In contrast, plasmid mutagenesis was found to be increased by plasmid UV irradiation, but not to change with time. Plasmid survival, recombination, and mutagenesis were not affected by treating the mammalian host cells with UV light prior to plasmid transfection. The amp^{rm r} recombinant plasmid molecules analyzed were found to be mostly the result of nonconservative exchanges which appeared to involve both homologous and possibly nonhomologous interactions with the host chromosome. The observation that these recombinant structures were obtained from all of the plasmid alterations investigated suggests a common mechanistic origin for plasmid -chromosome recombination in these mammalian cells.

  15. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-derived recombinant vectors for gene transfer and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Peggy; Fraefel, Cornel; Epstein, Alberto L

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153-kilobase pair (kbp) double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes the approach most commonly used to prepare recombinant HSV-1 vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria.

  16. Analytical Ultracentrifugation as an Approach to Characterize Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Burnham, Brenda; Nass, Shelley; Kong, Elton; Mattingly, MaryEllen; Woodcock, Denise; Song, Antonius; Wadsworth, Samuel; Cheng, Seng H; Scaria, Abraham; O'Riordan, Catherine R

    2015-12-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors represent a novel class of biopharmaceutical drugs. The production of clinical-grade rAAV vectors for gene therapy would benefit from analytical methods that are able to monitor drug product quality with regard to homogeneity, purity, and manufacturing consistency. Here, we demonstrate the novel application of analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) to characterize the homogeneity of preparations of rAAV vectors. We show that a single sedimentation velocity run of rAAV vectors detected and quantified a number of different viral species, such as vectors harboring an intact genome, lacking a vector genome (empty particles), and containing fragmented or incomplete vector genomes. This information is obtained by direct boundary modeling of the AUC data generated from refractometric or UV detection systems using the computer program SEDFIT. Using AUC, we show that multiple parameters contributed to vector quality, including the AAV genome form (i.e., self-complementary vs. single-stranded), vector genome size, and the production and purification methods. Hence, AUC is a critical tool for identifying optimal production and purification processes and for monitoring the physical attributes of rAAV vectors to ensure their quality.

  17. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vector mediates postexposure protection against Sudan Ebola hemorrhagic fever in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Geisbert, Thomas W; Daddario-DiCaprio, Kathleen M; Williams, Kinola J N; Geisbert, Joan B; Leung, Anders; Feldmann, Friederike; Hensley, Lisa E; Feldmann, Heinz; Jones, Steven M

    2008-06-01

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors expressing homologous filoviral glycoproteins can completely protect rhesus monkeys against Marburg virus when administered after exposure and can partially protect macaques after challenge with Zaire ebolavirus. Here, we administered a VSV vector expressing the Sudan ebolavirus (SEBOV) glycoprotein to four rhesus macaques shortly after exposure to SEBOV. All four animals survived SEBOV challenge, while a control animal that received a nonspecific vector developed fulminant SEBOV hemorrhagic fever and succumbed. This is the first demonstration of complete postexposure protection against an Ebola virus in nonhuman primates and provides further evidence that postexposure vaccination may have utility in treating exposures to filoviruses.

  18. High density recombinant AAV particles are competent vectors for in vivo transduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors have recently achieved clinical successes in human gene therapy. However, the commonly observed heavier particles found in AAV preparations have traditionally been ignored due to its low in vitro infectivity. In this study, we systemically compared t...

  19. Recombinant viral vectored vaccines for the control of avian influenza: a review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The poultry industry has been at the forefront of developing recombinant viral vectored vaccines in an attempt to improve the immune response to vaccination. With AIV, the hemagglutinin surface glycoprotein is the key antigen for protection against infection. This allows a single gene to be transf...

  20. Exploration of BAC versus plasmid expression vectors in recombinant CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Mader, Alexander; Prewein, Bernhard; Zboray, Katalin; Casanova, Emilio; Kunert, Renate

    2013-05-01

    Vector engineering approaches are commonly used to increase recombinant protein production in mammalian cells, and among various concepts, bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) have been proposed to serve as open chromatin regions to omit chromosome positional effects. For proof of concept, we developed stable recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines using different expression vector systems: the plasmid vectors contained the identical expression cassette as the BAC constructs. Two anti-HIV1 antibody derivates served as model proteins (3D6scFc and 2F5scFc) for generation of four stable recombinant CHO cell lines. The BAC-derived clones showed three to four times higher specific productivity, and therefore, gene copy numbers and transcript level were quantified. The active chromatin region provided with the BAC environment significantly improved transcription evidenced with both model proteins. Specific transcription was approximately six times higher from BAC-based vectors compared to the corresponding plasmid vectors for both single-chain fragment crystallizable (scFc) proteins. Our accurate investigations elucidated also differences between translational activities related to the protein of choice. 3D6scFc expressed specifically three to four times more product than 2F5scFc indicating that the product by itself also contributes to enhanced productivity. This study indicated comparable increase of transcription level for both scFc proteins when using the BAC system, but translation, maturation, and secretion of individual proteins seem to be protein specific.

  1. Efficient production of dual recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors for factor VIII delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qizhao; Dong, Biao; Firrman, Jenni; Roberts, Sean; Moore, Andrea Rossi; Cao, Wenjing; Diao, Yong; Kapranov, Philipp; Xu, Ruian; Xiao, Weidong

    2014-08-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors have gained attention for human gene therapy because of their high safety and clinical efficacy profile. For factor VIII gene delivery, splitting the coding region between two AAV vectors remains a viable strategy to avoid the packaging capacity limitation (∼5.0 kb). However, it is time-consuming and labor-intensive to produce two rAAV vectors in separate batches. Here we demonstrated successful production of dual rAAV vectors for hemophilia A gene therapy in a single preparation. When the AAV vector plasmids carrying the human factor VIII heavy chain (hHC) and the light chain (hLC) expression cassettes were cotransfected into 293 cells along with the AAV rep&cap and mini-adenovirus helper plasmids, both rAAV-hHC and rAAV-hLC were produced at the desired ratio and in high titer. Interestingly, the rAAV-hHC vectors always yielded higher titers than rAAV-hLC vectors as a result of more efficient replication of rAAV-hHC genomes. The resulting vectors were effective in transducing the tissue culture cells in vitro. When these vectors were administered to hemophilia A mice, factor VIII was detected in the mouse plasma by both the activated partial thromboplastin time assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The functional activity as well as the antigen levels of secreted factor VIII were similar to those of vectors produced by the traditional method. The dual-vector production method has been successfully extended to both AAV2 and AAV8 serotypes. In conclusion, cotransfection of vector plasmids presents an efficient method for producing dual or multiple AAV vectors at significantly reduced cost and labor.

  2. A Novel and Simple Method for Rapid Generation of Recombinant Porcine Adenoviral Vectors for Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Wang, Wenbin; Zhang, Lu; Tikoo, Suresh K.; Yang, Zengqi

    2015-01-01

    Many human (different serotypes) and nonhuman adenovirus vectors are being used for gene delivery. However, the current system for isolating recombinant adenoviral vectors is either time-consuming or expensive, especially for the generation of recombinant non-human adenoviral vectors. We herein report a new and simple cloning approach for the rapid generation of a porcine adenovirus (PAdV-3) vector which shows promise for gene transfer to human cells and evasion of human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5) immunity. Based on the final cloning plasmid, pFPAV3-CcdB-Cm, and our modified SLiCE strategy (SLiCE cloning and lethal CcdB screening), the process for generating recombinant PAdV-3 plasmids required only one step in 3 days, with a cloning efficiency as high as 620±49.56 clones/ng and zero background (100% accuracy). The recombinant PAdV-3 plasmids could be successfully rescued in porcine retinal pigment epithelium cells (VR1BL), which constitutively express the HAdV-5 E1 and PAdV-3 E1B 55k genes, and the foreign genes were highly expressed at 24 h after transduction into swine testicle (ST) cells. In conclusion, this strategy for generating recombinant PAdV-3 vectors based on our modified SLiCE cloning system was rapid and cost-efficient, which could be used as universal cloning method for modification the other regions of PAdV-3 genome as well as other adenoviral genomes. PMID:26011074

  3. Protection against infectious laryngotracheitis by in ovo vaccination with commercially available viral vector recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Deirdre I; Vagnozzi, Ariel; Dorea, Fernanda; Riblet, Sylva M; Mundt, Alice; Zavala, Guillermo; García, Maricarmen

    2010-12-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). The disease is mainly controlled through biosecurity and by vaccination with live-attenuated vaccines. The chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines, although proven to be effective in experimental settings, have limited efficacy in controlling the disease in dense broiler production sites due to unrestricted use and poor mass vaccination coverage. These factors allowed CEO vaccines to regain virulence, causing long lasting and, consequently, severe outbreaks of the disease. A new generation of viral vector fowl poxvirus (FPV) and herpesvirus of turkey (HVT) vaccines carrying ILTV genes has been developed and such vaccines are commercially available. These vaccines are characterized by their lack of transmission, lack of ILTV-associated latent infections, and no reversion to virulence. HVT-vectored ILTV recombinant vaccines were originally approved for subcutaneous HVT or transcutaneous (pox) delivery. The increased incidence of ILTV outbreaks in broiler production sites encouraged the broiler industry to deliver the FPV-LT and HVT-LT recombinant vaccines in ovo. The objective of this study was to evaluate the protection induced by ILTV viral vector recombinant vaccines after in ovo application in 18-day-old commercial broiler embryos. The protection induced by recombinant ILTV vaccines was assessed by their ability to prevent clinical signs and mortality; to reduce challenge virus replication in the trachea; to prevent an increase in body temperature; and to prevent a decrease in body weight gain after challenge. In this study, both recombinant-vectored ILTV vaccines provided partial protection, thereby mitigating the disease, but did not reduce challenge virus loads in the trachea.

  4. Embryonic stem cell gene targeting using bacteriophage lambda vectors generated by phage-plasmid recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, T; Rancourt, D E

    1998-01-01

    Targeted mutagenesis is an extremely useful experimental approach in molecular medicine, allowing the generation of specialized animals that are mutant for any gene of interest. Currently the rate determining step in any gene targeting experiment is construction of the targeting vector (TV). In order to streamline gene targeting methods and avoid problems encountered with plasmid TVs, we describe the direct application of lambda phage in targeted mutagenesis. The recombination-proficient phage vector lambda2TK permits generation of TVs by conventional restriction-ligation or recombination-mediated methods. The resulting lambdaTV DNA can then be cleaved with restriction endonucleases to release the bacteriophage arms and can subsequently be electroporated directly into ES cells to yield gene targets. We demonstrate that in vivo phage-plasmid recombination can be used to introduce neo and lacZ - neo mutations into precise positions within a lambda2TK subclone via double crossover recombination. We describe two methods for eliminating single crossover recombinants, spi selection and size restriction, both of which result in phage TVs bearing double crossover insertions. Thus TVs can be easily and quickly generated in bacteriophage without plasmid subcloning and with little genomic sequence or restriction site information. PMID:9461458

  5. Recombination and deletion of sequences in shuttle vector plasmids in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Joffe, S; Seidman, M M

    1985-09-01

    Shuttle vector plasmids were constructed with directly repeated sequences flanking a marker gene. African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells were infected with the constructions, and after a period of replication, the progeny plasmids were recovered and introduced into bacteria. Those colonies with plasmids that had lost the marker gene were identified, and the individual plasmids were purified and characterized by restriction enzyme digestion. Recombination between the repeated elements generated a plasmid with a precise deletion and a characteristic restriction pattern, which distinguished the recombined molecules from those with other defects in the marker gene. Recombination among the following different sequences was measured in this assay: (i) the simian virus 40 origin and enhancer region, (ii) the AGMK Alu sequence, and (iii) a sequence from plasmid pBR322. Similar frequencies of recombination among these sequences were found. Recombination occurred more frequently in Cos1 cells than in CV1 cells. In these experiments, the plasmid population with defective marker genes consisted of the recombined molecules and of the spontaneous deletion-insertion mutants described earlier. The frequency of the latter class was unaffected by the presence of the option for recombination represented by the direct repeats. Both recombination and deletion-insertion mutagenesis were stimulated by double-strand cleavage between the repeated sequences and adjacent to the marker, and the frequency of the deletion-insertion mutants in this experiment was again independent of the presence of the direct repeats. We concluded that although recombination and deletion-insertion mutagenesis were both stimulated by double-strand cleavage, the molecules which underwent the two types of change were drawn from separate pools.

  6. Recombination and deletion of sequences in shuttle vector plasmids in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, S; Joffe, S; Seidman, M M

    1985-01-01

    Shuttle vector plasmids were constructed with directly repeated sequences flanking a marker gene. African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells were infected with the constructions, and after a period of replication, the progeny plasmids were recovered and introduced into bacteria. Those colonies with plasmids that had lost the marker gene were identified, and the individual plasmids were purified and characterized by restriction enzyme digestion. Recombination between the repeated elements generated a plasmid with a precise deletion and a characteristic restriction pattern, which distinguished the recombined molecules from those with other defects in the marker gene. Recombination among the following different sequences was measured in this assay: (i) the simian virus 40 origin and enhancer region, (ii) the AGMK Alu sequence, and (iii) a sequence from plasmid pBR322. Similar frequencies of recombination among these sequences were found. Recombination occurred more frequently in Cos1 cells than in CV1 cells. In these experiments, the plasmid population with defective marker genes consisted of the recombined molecules and of the spontaneous deletion-insertion mutants described earlier. The frequency of the latter class was unaffected by the presence of the option for recombination represented by the direct repeats. Both recombination and deletion-insertion mutagenesis were stimulated by double-strand cleavage between the repeated sequences and adjacent to the marker, and the frequency of the deletion-insertion mutants in this experiment was again independent of the presence of the direct repeats. We concluded that although recombination and deletion-insertion mutagenesis were both stimulated by double-strand cleavage, the molecules which underwent the two types of change were drawn from separate pools. Images PMID:3869955

  7. Limited infection upon human exposure to a recombinant raccoon pox vaccine vector.

    PubMed

    Rocke, Tonie E; Dein, F Joshua; Fuchsberger, Martina; Fox, Barry C; Stinchcomb, Dan T; Osorio, Jorge E

    2004-07-29

    A laboratory accident resulted in human exposure to a recombinant raccoon poxvirus (RCN) developed as a vaccine vector for antigens of Yersinia pestis for protection of wild rodents (and other animals) against plague. Within 9 days, the patient developed a small blister that healed within 4 weeks. Raccoon poxvirus was cultured from the lesion, and the patient developed antibody to plague antigen (F1) and RCN. This is the first documented case of human exposure to RCN.

  8. 8-Methoxypsoralen photoinduced plasmid-chromosome recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a centromeric vector.

    PubMed Central

    Meira, L B; Henriques, J A; Magaña-Schwencke, N

    1995-01-01

    The characterization of a new system to study the induction of plasmid-chromosome recombination is described. Single-stranded and double-stranded centromeric vectors bearing 8-methoxypsoralen photoinduced lesions were used to transform a wild-type yeast strain bearing the leu2-3,112 marker. Using the SSCP methodology and DNA sequencing, it was demonstrated that repair of the lesions in plasmid DNA was mainly due to conversion of the chromosomal allele to the plasmid DNA. Images PMID:7784218

  9. Transgene expression in Penaeus monodon cells: evaluation of recombinant baculoviral vectors with shrimp specific hybrid promoters.

    PubMed

    Puthumana, Jayesh; Philip, Rosamma; Bright Singh, I S

    2016-08-01

    It has been realized that shrimp cell immortalization may not be accomplished without in vitro transformation by expressing immortalizing gene in cells. In this process, efficiency of transgene expression is confined to the ability of vectors to transmit gene of interests to the genome. Over the years, unavailability of such vectors has been hampering application of such a strategy in shrimp cells. We report the use of recombinant baculovirus mediated transduction using hybrid promoter system for transgene expression in lymphoid cells of Penaeus monodon. Two recombinant baculovirus vectors with shrimp viral promoters (WSSV-Ie1 and IHHNV-P2) were constructed (BacIe1-GFP and BacP2-GFP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) used as the transgene. The GFP expression in cells under the control of hybrid promoters, PH-Ie1 or PH-P2, were analyzed and confirmed in shrimp cells. The results indicate that the recombinant baculovirus with shrimp specific viral promoters (hybrid) can be employed for delivery of foreign genes to shrimp cells for in vitro transformation.

  10. Activities of wildtype and mutant p53 in suppression of homologous recombination as measured by a retroviral vector system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiongbin; Lozano, Guillermina; Donehower, Lawrence A

    2003-01-28

    DNA repair of double strand breaks, interstrand DNA cross-links, and other types of DNA damage utilizes the processes of homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining to repair the damage. Aberrant homologous recombination is likely to be responsible for a significant fraction of chromosomal deletions, duplications, and translocations that are observed in cancer cells. To facilitate measurement of homologous recombination frequencies in normal cells, mutant cells, and cancer cells, we have developed a high titer retroviral vector containing tandem repeats of mutant versions of a GFP-Zeocin resistance fusion gene and an intact neomycin resistance marker. Recombination between the tandem repeats regenerates a functional GFP-Zeo(R) marker that can be easily scored. This retroviral vector was used to assess homologous recombination frequencies in human cancer cells and rodent fibroblasts with differing dosages of wild type or mutant p53. Absence of wild type p53 stimulated spontaneous and ionizing radiation-induced homologous recombination, confirming previous studies. Moreover, p53(+/-) mouse fibroblasts show elevated levels of homologous recombination compared to their p53(+/+) counterparts following retroviral vector infection, indicating that p53 is haploinsufficient for suppression of homologous recombination. Transfection of vector-containing p53 null Saos-2 cells with various human cancer-associated p53 mutants revealed that these altered p53 proteins retain some recombination suppression function despite being totally inactive for transcriptional transactivation. The retroviral vector utilized in these studies may be useful in performing recombination assays on a wide array of cell types, including those not readily transfected by normal vectors.

  11. Transient and stable gene expression in mammalian cells transduced with a recombinant baculovirus vector

    PubMed Central

    Condreay, J. Patrick; Witherspoon, Sam M.; Clay, William C.; Kost, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses can serve as gene-transfer vehicles for transient expression of recombinant proteins in a wide range of mammalian cell types. Furthermore, by inclusion of a dominant selectable marker in the viral vector, cell lines can be derived that stably express recombinant genes. A virus was constructed containing two expression cassettes controlled by constitutive mammalian promoters: the cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter/enhancer directing expression of green fluorescent protein and the simian virus 40 (SV40) early promoter controlling neomycin phosphotransferase II. Using this virus, efficient gene delivery and expression was observed and measured in numerous cell types of human, primate, and rodent origin. In addition to commonly used transformed cell lines such as HeLa, CHO, Cos-7, and 293, this list includes primary human keratinocytes and bone marrow fibroblasts. In all cases, addition of butyrate or trichostatin A (a selective histone deacetylase inhibitor) to transduced cells markedly enhanced the levels of reporter protein expression observed. When transduced cells are put under selection with the antibiotic G418, cell lines can be obtained at high frequency that stably maintain the expression cassettes of the vector DNA and exhibit stable, high-level expression of the reporter gene. Stably transduced derivatives have been selected from a substantial number of different cell types, suggesting that stable lines can be derived from any cell type that exhibits transient expression. PMID:9874783

  12. Relevance of a pre-existing measles immunity prior immunization with a recombinant measles virus vector.

    PubMed

    Knuchel, Marlyse C; Marty, René R; Morin, Teldja Neige Azzouz; Ilter, Orhan; Zuniga, Armando; Naim, Hussein Y

    2013-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) vectors are promising candidates for designing new recombinant vaccines since the parental live vaccines have a well-known safety and efficacy record. Like all viral vectors, the MV vector efficacy in inducing a protecting immune answer could be affected by the pre-existing immunity among the human population. In order to determine the optimal immunization route and regimen, we mimicked a MV pre-immunity by passively administrating MV neutralizing antibodies (MV-nAb) prior intramuscular (i.m.) and/or intranasal (i.n.) immunization with recombinant MV expressing the SIV-gag antigen (rMV-SIVgag). Our results revealed that 500 mIU of MV-nAb allowed the induction of a humoral and cellular immune response against the vector and the transgene, while higher titers of the MV-nAb were significantly inhibitory. In a prime-boost regimen, in the presence of MV-nAb, the intranasal-intramuscular (i.n.-i.m.) or intramuscular-intramuscular (i.m.-i.m.) routes induced higher humoral immune responses against the vector and the transgene (SIV-gag). In naive animals, cellular immune response was significantly higher by i.m. immunization; however, MV pre-immunity did not seem to affect the cellular immune response after an i.n. immunization.   In summary, we show that a pre-existing immunity of up to 500 mIU anti-MV neutralizing antibodies had little effect on the replication of rMV and did not inhibit the induction of significant humoral and cellular immune responses in immune-competent mice.

  13. A universal vector for high-efficiency multi-fragment recombineering of BACs and knock-in constructs.

    PubMed

    Dolt, Karamjit Singh; Lawrence, Melanie L; Miller-Hodges, Eve; Slight, Joan; Thornburn, Anna; Devenney, Paul S; Hohenstein, Peter

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing need for more efficient generation of transgenic constructs. Here we present a universal multi-site Gateway vector for use in recombineering reactions. Using transgenic mouse models, we show its use for the generation of BAC transgenics and targeting vectors. The modular nature of the vector allows for rapid modification of constructs to generate different versions of the same construct. As such it will help streamline the generation of series of related transgenic models.

  14. Herpes simplex virus clearance during purification of a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 1 vector.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guo-jie; Scotti, Marina M; Thomas, Darby L; Wang, Lijun; Knop, David R; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2014-12-01

    Gene delivery vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) have potential utility for treatment of many genetic disorders. Current AAV vector manufacturing methods employ helper viruses to deliver functions needed to produce replication-defective recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors, and clearance of infectious helper virus from the drug substance is essential for ensuring the safety of rAAV-based therapies. We have developed a manufacturing method for the production of rAAV vectors using a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 (rHSV) complementation system in suspension baby hamster kidney cells. The manufacturing process includes three primary unit operations, detergent lysis of the cell harvest and two downstream column chromatography steps, which achieve viral clearance. These unit operations inactivate and remove HSV, including replication-competent HSV present at low levels in rHSV helper stocks. Here we report results quantifying the reduction in HSV achieved during rAAV vector purification. Clearance of HSV was at least 6.84 log10 with 1% Triton X-100, 4.34 log10 with CIM Q column chromatography, and 2.86 log10 with AVB affinity chromatography. Combined, these three orthogonal methods achieved clearance of at least 14.04 log10 of HSV. The total input quantity of rHSV in a 100-liter production batch is approximately 1.2×10(12) plaque-forming units (pfu), and after purification, the concentration of residual rHSV in the resulting drug substance of approximately 450 ml would be less than 2.42×10(-5) pfu/ml. A rAAV vector produced using this method was used in a clinical trial in which subjects receive up to 100 intramuscular injections of 1.35 ml each, which would contain a maximum of 3.27×10(-3) pfu of HSV. These results support the safety of rAAV vectors produced using our rHSV complementation method.

  15. Manufacturing of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Nathalie; Grieger, Joshua C

    2016-01-01

    The ability to elicit robust and long-term transgene expression in vivo together with minimal immunogenicity and little to no toxicity are only a few features that make recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors ideally suited for many gene therapy applications. Successful preclinical studies have encouraged the use of rAAV for therapeutic gene transfer to patients in the clinical setting. Nevertheless, the use of rAAV in clinical trials has underscored the need for production and purification systems capable of generating large amounts of highly pure rAAV particles. To date, generating vector quantities sufficient to meet the expanding clinical demand is still a hurdle when using current production systems. In this chapter, we will provide a description of the current methods to produce clinical grade of rAAV under current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) settings. PMID:27014711

  16. Production of Recombinant Cholera Toxin B Subunit in Nicotiana benthamiana Using GENEWARE® Tobacco Mosaic Virus Vector.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lauren; Hamorsky, Krystal; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a method to produce a recombinant cholera toxin B subunit in Nicotiana benthamiana plants (CTBp) using the GENEWARE(®) tobacco mosaic virus vector system. Infectious transcripts of the vector RNA are generated in vitro and inoculated on N. benthamiana seedlings. After 11 days, CTBp is extracted in a simple tris buffer at room temperature. No protease inhibitor is required. The leaf homogenate is treated with mild heat and a pH shift to selectively precipitate host-derived proteins. CTBp is purified to >95 % homogeneity by two-step chromatography using immobilized metal affinity and ceramic hydroxyapatite resins. This procedure yields on average 400 mg of low-endotoxin CTBp from 1 kg of fresh leaf material.

  17. Gene transfer to the nonhuman primate retina with recombinant feline immunodeficiency virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Lotery, Andrew J; Derksen, Todd A; Russell, Stephen R; Mullins, Robert F; Sauter, Sybille; Affatigato, Louisa M; Stone, Edwin M; Davidson, Beverly L

    2002-04-10

    We hypothesize that recombinant feline immunodeficiency viral (rFIV) vectors may be useful for gene transfer to the nonhuman primate retina. We performed vitrectomies and subretinal injections in the right eyes of 11 cynomolgus monkeys. Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped rFIV that expressed the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene was injected into eight eyes. Sham vehicle or lactose buffer injections were also performed in two of these eight study eyes. rFIV pseudotyped with an amphotropic envelope was used in two eyes, and in one animal injections of lactose buffer only were given. After surgery the animals were clinically evaluated by retinal photography and electroretinography. beta-Galactosidase expression was evaluated, at a final end point, in histological sections. We found photoreceptor and Müller cells to have the greatest transgene expression. Focal inflammatory responses localized to the injection site were seen histologically in all eyes. No difference in transduction efficiency was seen between injections near the macula and more peripheral injections. Visual function as assessed by electroretinography was not significantly affected by vector or vehicle injections. We conclude that rFIV vectors administered beneath the retina can transduce a variety of retinal cells in the nonhuman primate retina. rFIV vectors have therapeutic potential and could be exploited to develop gene therapy for the human eye.

  18. Degradation of nonionic surfactants and polychlorinated biphenyls by recombinant field application vectors.

    PubMed

    Lajoie, C A; Layton, A C; Easter, J P; Menn, F M; Sayler, G S

    1997-10-01

    Degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the environment is limited by their aqueous solubility and the degradative competence of indigenous populations. Field application vectors (FAVs) have been developed in which surfactants are used to both increase the solubility of the PCBs and support the growth of surfactant-degrading strains engineered for PCB degradation. Surfactant and PCB degradation by two recombinant strains were investigated. Pseudomonas putida IPL5 utilizes both alkylethoxylate [polyoxyethylene 10 lauryl ether (POL)] and alkylphenolethoxylate [Igepal CO-720 (IGP)] surfactants as growth substrates, but only degrades the ethoxylate moiety. The resulting degradation products from the alkyl- and alkylphenolethoxylate surfactants were 2-(dodecyloxy)ethanol and nonylphenoldiethoxylates, respectively. Ralstonia eutropha B30P4 grows on alkylethoxylate surfactants without the appearance of solvent-extractable degradation products. It also degrades the 2-(dodecyloxy)ethanol produced by strain IPL5 from the alkylethoxylate surfactants. The extent of degradation of the alkylethoxylate surfactant (POL) was greater for strain IPL5 (90%) than for B30P4 (60%) as determined by the cobaltothiocyanate active substances method (CTAS). The recombinant strain B30P4::TnPCB grew on biphenyl. In contrast, the recombinant strain IPL5::TnPCB could not grow on biphenyl, and PCB degradation was inhibited in the presence of biphenyl. The most extensive surfactant and PCB degradation was achieved by the use of both recombinant strains together in the absence of biphenyl. PCB (Aroclor 1242) and surfactant (POL) concentrations were reduced from 25 ppm and 2000 ppm, respectively, to 6.5 ppm and 225 ppm, without the accumulation of surfactant degradation products. Given the inherent complexity of commercial surfactant preparations, the use of recombinant consortia to achieve extensive surfactant and PCB degradation appears to be an environmentally acceptable and effective

  19. New Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Expression Vectors: Improving Genetic Control over Mycobacterial Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Alex I.; Goulart, Cibelly; Rofatto, Henrique K.; Oliveira, Sergio C.; Leite, Luciana C. C.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of many antigens, stimulatory molecules, or even metabolic pathways in mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium bovis BCG or M. smegmatis was made possible through the development of shuttle vectors, and several recombinant vaccines have been constructed. However, gene expression in any of these systems relied mostly on the selection of natural promoters expected to provide the required level of expression by trial and error. To establish a systematic selection of promoters with a range of strengths, we generated a library of mutagenized promoters through error-prone PCR of the strong PL5 promoter, originally from mycobacteriophage L5. These promoters were cloned upstream of the enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter gene, and recombinant M. smegmatis bacteria exhibiting a wide range of fluorescence levels were identified. A set of promoters was selected and identified as having high (pJK-F8), intermediate (pJK-B7, pJK-E6, pJK-D6), or low (pJK-C1) promoter strengths in both M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG. The sequencing of the promoter region demonstrated that it was extensively modified (6 to 11%) in all of the plasmids selected. To test the functionality of the system, two different expression vectors were demonstrated to allow corresponding expression levels of the Schistosoma mansoni antigen Sm29 in BCG. The approach used here can be used to adjust expression levels for synthetic and/or systems biology studies or for vaccine development to maximize the immune response. PMID:26850295

  20. Single-Vector, Single-Injection Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vaccines Against High-Containment Viruses.

    PubMed

    Whitt, Michael A; Geisbert, Thomas W; Mire, Chad E

    2016-01-01

    There are many avenues for making an effective vaccine against viruses. Depending on the virus these can include one of the following: inactivation of whole virions; attenuation of viruses; recombinant viral proteins; non-replication-competent virus particles; or surrogate virus vector systems such as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). VSV is a prototypic enveloped animal virus that has been used for over four decades to study virus replication, entry, and assembly due to its ability to replicate to high titers in a wide variety of mammalian and insect cells. The use of reverse genetics to recover infectious and single-cycle replicating VSV from plasmid DNA transfected in cell culture began a revolution in the study of recombinant VSV (rVSV). This platform can be manipulated to study the viral genetic sequences and proteins important in the virus life cycle. Additionally, foreign genes can be inserted between naturally occurring or generated start/stop signals and polyadenylation sites within the VSV genome. VSV has a tolerance for foreign gene expression which has led to numerous rVSVs reported in the literature. Of particular interest are the very effective single-dose rVSV vaccine vectors against high-containment viruses such as filoviruses, henipaviruses, and arenaviruses. Herein we describe the methods for selecting foreign antigenic genes, selecting the location within the VSV genome for insertion, generation of rVSV using reverse genetics, and proper vaccine study designs.

  1. New Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Expression Vectors: Improving Genetic Control over Mycobacterial Promoters.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Alex I; Goulart, Cibelly; Rofatto, Henrique K; Oliveira, Sergio C; Leite, Luciana C C; McFadden, Johnjoe

    2016-04-01

    The expression of many antigens, stimulatory molecules, or even metabolic pathways in mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium bovis BCG or M. smegmatis was made possible through the development of shuttle vectors, and several recombinant vaccines have been constructed. However, gene expression in any of these systems relied mostly on the selection of natural promoters expected to provide the required level of expression by trial and error. To establish a systematic selection of promoters with a range of strengths, we generated a library of mutagenized promoters through error-prone PCR of the strong PL5 promoter, originally from mycobacteriophage L5. These promoters were cloned upstream of the enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter gene, and recombinant M. smegmatis bacteria exhibiting a wide range of fluorescence levels were identified. A set of promoters was selected and identified as having high (pJK-F8), intermediate (pJK-B7, pJK-E6, pJK-D6), or low (pJK-C1) promoter strengths in both M. smegmatis and M. bovisBCG. The sequencing of the promoter region demonstrated that it was extensively modified (6 to 11%) in all of the plasmids selected. To test the functionality of the system, two different expression vectors were demonstrated to allow corresponding expression levels of the Schistosoma mansoni antigen Sm29 in BCG. The approach used here can be used to adjust expression levels for synthetic and/or systems biology studies or for vaccine development to maximize the immune response.

  2. Using RT-prone recombination to promote re-building of complete retroviral vectors from two defective precursors: low efficiency and sequence specificities.

    PubMed

    Bru, Thierry; Galetto, Román; Piver, Eric; Collin, Christine; Negroni, Matteo; Pagès, Jean-Christophe

    2007-06-01

    Retroviral recombination has been suggested as a useful way to modify retroviral vectors. The possibility to combine two multiply deleted retroviral vectors into a novel vector was evaluated. To investigate this possibility we have constructed two defective vectors containing a shared internal ribosome entry site (IRES). The IRES was selected for its complex secondary structure, a feature described to favour retroviral recombination. The IRES was expected to promote a recombination event leading to the formation of a unique, functional retroviral vector. By supporting expression of two transgenes from a single promoter, this sequence was also expected to allow straightforward detection of the recombination event. The present data confirms the achievement of recombination-dependent rescue, albeit at low efficiency. Unexpectedly, a preferential use of the packaging signal (Psi) for recombination was observed, as compared to the IRES. Together these observations mitigate the idea of using this technique for the design of retroviral vectors.

  3. Specific CEA-producing colorectal carcinoma cell killing with recombinant adenoviral vector containing cytosine deaminase gene

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-Zong; Wu, Wen-Xi; Xu, De-Hua; Zheng, Zhong-Cheng; Liu, Xin-Yuan; Ding, Qiang; Hua, Yi-Bing; Yao, Kun

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To kill CEA positive colorectal carcinoma cells specifically using the E coli cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene, a new replication-deficient recombinant adenoviral vector was constructed in which CD gene was controlled under CEA promoter and its in vitro cytotoxic effects were evaluated. METHODS: Shuttle plasmid containing CD gene and regulatory sequence of the CEA gene was constructed and recombined with the right arm of adenovirus genome DNA in 293 cell strain. Dot blotting and PCR were used to identify positive plaques. The purification of adenovirus was performed with ultra-concentration in CsCl step gradients and the titration was measured with plaque formation assay. Cytotoxic effects were assayed with MTT method, The fifty percent inhibition concentration (IC50) of 5-FC was calculated using a curve-fitting parameter. The human colorectal carcinoma cell line, which was CEA-producing, and the CEA-nonproducing Hela cell line were applied in cytological tests. An established recombinant adenovirus vector AdCMVCD, in which the CD gene was controlled under CMV promoter, was used as virus control. Quantitative results were expressed as the mean ± SD of the mean. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA test. RESULTS: The desired recombinant adenovirus vector was named AdCEACD. The results of dot blotting and PCR showed that the recombinant adenovirus contained CEA promoter and CD gene. Virus titer was about 5.0 × 1014 pfu/L-1 after purification. The CEA-producing Lovo cells were sensitive to 5-FC and had the same cytotoxic effect after infection with AdCEACD and AdCMVCD (The IC50 values of 5-FC in parent Lovo cells, Lovo cells infected with 100 M.O.I AdCEACD and Lovo cells infected with 10 M.O.I AdCMVCD were > 15000, 216.5 ± 38.1 and 128.8 ± 25.4 μmol•L⁻¹, P < 0.001, respectively), and the cytotoxicity of 5-FC increased accordingly when the M.O.I of adenoviruses were enhanced (The value of IC50 of 5-FC was reduced to 27.9 ± 4.2 μmol•L-1

  4. Current Good Manufacturing Practice Production of an Oncolytic Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Viral Vector for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Meseck, M.; Derecho, I.; Lopez, P.; Knoblauch, C.; McMahon, R.; Anderson, J.; Dunphy, N.; Quezada, V.; Khan, R.; Huang, P.; Dang, W.; Luo, M.; Hsu, D.; Woo, S.L.C.; Couture, L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus currently being investigated as a promising tool to treat cancer because of its ability to selectively replicate in cancer cells. To enhance the oncolytic property of the nonpathologic laboratory strain of VSV, we generated a recombinant vector [rVSV(MΔ51)-M3] expressing murine gammaherpesvirus M3, a secreted viral chemokine-binding protein that binds to a broad range of mammalian chemokines with high affinity. As previously reported, when rVSV(MΔ51)-M3 was used in an orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats, it suppressed inflammatory cell migration to the virus-infected tumor site, which allowed for enhanced intratumoral virus replication leading to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged survival. These encouraging results led to the development of this vector for clinical translation in patients with HCC. However, a scalable current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP)-compliant manufacturing process has not been described for this vector. To produce the quantities of high-titer virus required for clinical trials, a process that is amenable to GMP manufacturing and scale-up was developed. We describe here a large-scale (50-liter) vector production process capable of achieving crude titers on the order of 109 plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml under cGMP. This process was used to generate a master virus seed stock and a clinical lot of the clinical trial agent under cGMP with an infectious viral titer of approximately 2 × 1010 PFU/ml (total yield, 1 × 1013 PFU). The lot has passed all U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated release testing and will be used in a phase 1 clinical translational trial in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:21083425

  5. Serotype-dependent transduction efficiencies of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors in monkey neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Gerits, Annelies; Vancraeyenest, Pascaline; Vreysen, Samme; Laramée, Marie-Eve; Michiels, Annelies; Gijsbers, Rik; Van den Haute, Chris; Moons, Lieve; Debyser, Zeger; Baekelandt, Veerle; Arckens, Lutgarde; Vanduffel, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Viral vector-mediated expression of genes (e.g., coding for opsins and designer receptors) has grown increasingly popular. Cell-type specific expression is achieved by altering viral vector tropism through crosspackaging or by cell-specific promoters driving gene expression. Detailed information about transduction properties of most recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) serotypes in macaque cortex is gradually becoming available. Here, we compare transduction efficiencies and expression patterns of reporter genes in two macaque neocortical areas employing different rAAV serotypes and promoters. A short version of the calmodulin-kinase-II (CaMKIIα0.4) promoter resulted in reporter gene expression in cortical neurons for all tested rAAVs, albeit with different efficiencies for spread: rAAV2/5>>rAAV2/7>rAAV2/8>rAAV2/9>>rAAV2/1 and proportion of transduced cells: rAAV2/1>rAAV2/5>rAAV2/7=rAAV2/9>rAAV2/8. In contrast to rodent studies, the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter appeared least efficient in macaque cortex. The human synapsin-1 promoter preceded by the CMV enhancer (enhSyn1) produced homogeneous reporter gene expression across all layers, while two variants of the CaMKIIα promoter resulted in different laminar transduction patterns and cell specificities. Finally, differences in expression patterns were observed when the same viral vector was injected in two neocortical areas. Our results corroborate previous findings that reporter-gene expression patterns and efficiency of rAAV transduction depend on serotype, promoter, cortical layer, and area. PMID:26839901

  6. Current good manufacturing practice production of an oncolytic recombinant vesicular stomatitis viral vector for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ausubel, L J; Meseck, M; Derecho, I; Lopez, P; Knoblauch, C; McMahon, R; Anderson, J; Dunphy, N; Quezada, V; Khan, R; Huang, P; Dang, W; Luo, M; Hsu, D; Woo, S L C; Couture, L

    2011-04-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus currently being investigated as a promising tool to treat cancer because of its ability to selectively replicate in cancer cells. To enhance the oncolytic property of the nonpathologic laboratory strain of VSV, we generated a recombinant vector [rVSV(MΔ51)-M3] expressing murine gammaherpesvirus M3, a secreted viral chemokine-binding protein that binds to a broad range of mammalian chemokines with high affinity. As previously reported, when rVSV(MΔ51)-M3 was used in an orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats, it suppressed inflammatory cell migration to the virus-infected tumor site, which allowed for enhanced intratumoral virus replication leading to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged survival. These encouraging results led to the development of this vector for clinical translation in patients with HCC. However, a scalable current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP)-compliant manufacturing process has not been described for this vector. To produce the quantities of high-titer virus required for clinical trials, a process that is amenable to GMP manufacturing and scale-up was developed. We describe here a large-scale (50-liter) vector production process capable of achieving crude titers on the order of 10(9) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml under cGMP. This process was used to generate a master virus seed stock and a clinical lot of the clinical trial agent under cGMP with an infectious viral titer of approximately 2 × 10(10) PFU/ml (total yield, 1 × 10(13) PFU). The lot has passed all U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated release testing and will be used in a phase 1 clinical translational trial in patients with advanced HCC.

  7. The pEAQ vector series: the easy and quick way to produce recombinant proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Peyret, Hadrien; Lomonossoff, George P

    2013-09-01

    The pEAQ vectors are a series of plasmids designed to allow easy and quick production of recombinant proteins in plants. Their main feature is the use of the Cowpea Mosaic Virus hypertranslational "CPMV-HT" expression system, which provides high yields of recombinant protein through extremely high translational efficiency without the need for viral replication. Since their creation, the pEAQ vectors have been used to produce a wide variety of proteins in plants. Viral proteins and Virus-Like Particles (VLPs) have been of particular interest, but other types of proteins including active enzymes have also been expressed. While the pEAQ vectors have mostly been used in a transient expression context, through agroinfiltration of leaves, they have also been shown to be suitable for the production of stably transformed lines of both cell cultures and whole plants. This paper looks back on the genesis of the pEAQ vectors and reviews their use so far.

  8. Construction of the first shuttle vectors for gene cloning and homologous recombination in Mycoplasma agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini; Marenda, Marc; Rosengarten, Renate; Jechlinger, Wolfgang; Citti, Christine

    2005-12-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae is a worldwide ruminant pathogen that causes significant economic losses by inflicting contagious agalactia in sheep and goats. The development of efficient control strategies requires a better understanding of the mycoplasma factors that promote successful infection. However, lack of genetic tools has been a major impediment in studying the pathogenic mechanisms of M. agalactiae. This study describes the identification and cloning of the M. agalactiae origin of replication (oriC) in order to construct the first shuttle vectors for targeted gene disruption, gene complementation and expression studies. Additionally, this report provides the first evidence of the occurrence of homologous recombination and the functionality of heterologous tetM determinant in this pathogen.

  9. Production of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors and Use in In Vitro and In Vivo Administration

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Steven J; Choi, Vivian W.; Asokan, Aravind; Haberman, Rebecca A.; McCown, Thomas J.; Samulski, Richard Jude

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus is a nonpathogenic human virus that has been developed into a gene-delivery vector due to its high efficiency of infection for many different cell types and its ability to persist and lead to long-term gene expression. This unit describes efficient methods to generate high-titer, research-grade, adenovirus-free recombinant single-stranded and self-complementary adeno-associated virus in various serotypes, along with methods to quantify the viral vectors. Two detailed methods are provided for viral vector delivery into the rodent brain and spinal cord, and for histological detection of transgene expression of GFP. PMID:21971848

  10. Scalable Downstream Strategies for Purification of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors in Light of the Properties

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Weihong; Wang, Mingxi; Wu, Yaqing; Xu, Ruian

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector is one of the promising delivery tools for gene therapy. Currently, hundreds of clinical trials are performed but the major barrier for clinical application is the absence of any ideal large scale production technique to obtain sufficient and highly pure rAAV vector. The large scale production technique includes upstream and downstream processing. The upstream processing is a vector package step and the downstream processing is a vector purification step. For large scale downstream processing, the scientists need to recover rAAV from dozens of liters of cell lysate or medium, and a variety of purification strategies have been developed but not comprehensively compared till now. Consequently, this review will evaluate the scalable downstream purification strategies systematically, especially those based on the physicochemical properties of AAV virus, and attempt to find better scalable downstream strategies for rAAV vectors.

  11. A new method for rapidly generating gene-targeting vectors by engineering BACs through homologous recombination in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinicius; Schonhoff, Susan; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Leiter, Andrew; Snapper, Scott B

    2003-09-01

    Generating knockout mice is still an expensive and highly time-consuming process. Target construct generation, the first labor-intensive step in this process, requires the manipulation of large fragments of DNA and numerous, and often cumbersome, cloning steps. Here we show the development of a rapid approach for generating targeting constructs that capitalizes on efficient homologous recombination between linear DNA fragments and circular plasmids in Escherichia coli ("recombineering"), the availability of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), and the accessibility of the sequence of the mouse genome. Employing recombineering, we demonstrate with only 1-2 template plasmids, short homologies (40-50bp) between donor and target DNA, and one subcloning step that we can efficiently manipulate BACs in situ to generate a complicated targeting vector. This procedure avoids the need to construct or screen genomic libraries and permits the generation of most standard, conditional, or knock-in targeting vectors, often within two weeks.

  12. New high-cloning-efficiency vectors for complementation studies and recombinant protein overproduction in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    VanDrisse, C M; Escalante-Semerena, J C

    2016-07-01

    Galloway et al. recently described a method to alter vectors to include Type IIS restriction enzymes for high efficiency cloning. Utilizing this method, the multiple cloning sites of complementation and overexpression vectors commonly used in our laboratory were altered to contain recognition sequences of the Type IIS restriction enzyme, BspQI. Use of this enzyme increased the rate of cloning success to >97% efficiency. L(+)-Arabinose-inducible complementation vectors and overexpression vectors encoding N-terminal recombinant tobacco etch virus protease (rTEV)-cleavable H6-tags were altered to contain BspQI sites that allowed for cloning into all vectors using identical primer overhangs. Additionally, a vector used for directing the synthesis of proteins with a C-terminal, rTEV-cleavable H6-tag was engineered to contain BspQI sites, albeit with different overhangs from that of the previously mentioned vectors. Here we apply a method used to engineer cloning vectors to contain BspQI sites and the use of each vector in either in vivo complementation studies or in vitro protein purifications.

  13. Exogenous surfactant enhances the delivery of recombinant adenoviral vectors to the lung.

    PubMed

    Katkin, J P; Husser, R C; Langston, C; Welty, S E

    1997-01-20

    Somatic gene therapy for pulmonary diseases must be accomplished in vivo, requiring the spread of a gene transfer vector across a vast expanse of respiratory epithelium. Surfactant, a naturally occurring protein and lipid mixture used to treat the respiratory distress syndrome of prematurity, disperses rapidly and evenly throughout the lung. We employed exogenous bovine surfactant (Survanta beractant) as a carrier vehicle for pulmonary delivery of a recombinant adenovirus expressing beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal). Rats treated with an adenovirus-beractant mixture demonstrated more uniform lobar distribution of transgene expression than rats treated with the same amount of virus in saline. Tissue homogenates were examined for quantitative beta-Gal expression by reaction with o-nitrophenol beta-n-galactopyranoside (ONPG). The degree of beta-Gal activity was affected by both the volume and type of carrier used to deliver the virus. At low volumes (0.5 ml, 1.3 ml/kg), beractant-treated animals demonstrated significantly greater pulmonary beta-Gal activity than saline-treated animals (p < 0.002) and untreated controls. At high volume (1.2 ml, 4 ml/kg), average beta-Gal activity was similar between groups treated with beractant or saline, but was more variable within the saline treated group. Higher volumes of delivery medium were associated with increased levels of beta-Gal expression regardless of the carrier used. Survanta was well tolerated by the animals and did not affect the duration of transgene expression. Exogenous beractant provides a useful medium for delivering recombinant adenoviruses to the lung when diffuse distribution of transgene expression is desired.

  14. Use of recombinant adenovirus vectored consensus IFN-α to avert severe arenavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Gowen, Brian B; Ennis, Jane; Russell, Andrew; Sefing, Eric J; Wong, Min-Hui; Turner, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Several arenaviruses can cause viral hemorrhagic fever, a severe disease with case-fatality rates in hospitalized individuals ranging from 15-30%. Because of limited prophylaxis and treatment options, new medical countermeasures are needed for these viruses classified by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) as top priority biodefense Category A pathogens. Recombinant consensus interferon alpha (cIFN-α) is a licensed protein with broad clinical appeal. However, while cIFN-α has great therapeutic value, its utility for biodefense applications is hindered by its short in vivo half-life, mode and frequency of administration, and costly production. To address these limitations, we describe the use of DEF201, a replication-deficient adenovirus vector that drives the expression of cIFN-α, for pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis of acute arenaviral infection modeled in hamsters. Intranasal administration of DEF201 24 h prior to challenge with Pichindé virus (PICV) was highly effective at protecting animals from mortality and preventing viral replication and liver-associated disease. A significant protective effect was still observed with a single dosing of DEF201 given two weeks prior to PICV challenge. DEF201 was also efficacious when administered as a treatment 24 to 48 h post-virus exposure. The protective effect of DEF201 was largely attributed to the expression of cIFN-α, as dosing with a control empty vector adenovirus did not protect hamsters from lethal PICV challenge. Effective countermeasures that are highly stable, easily administered, and elicit long lasting protective immunity are much needed for arena and other viral infections. The DEF201 technology has the potential to address all of these issues and may serve as a broad-spectrum antiviral to enhance host defense against a number of viral pathogens.

  15. BTK gene targeting by homologous recombination using a helper-dependent adenovirus/adeno-associated virus hybrid vector.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Ishimura, M; Ochiai, M; Takada, H; Kusuhara, K; Nakatsu, Y; Tsuzuki, T; Mitani, K; Hara, T

    2016-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is one of the most common humoral immunodeficiencies, which is caused by mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. To examine the possibility of using gene therapy for XLA, we constructed a helper-dependent adenovirus/adeno-associated virus BTK targeting vector (HD-Ad.AAV BTK vector) composed of a genomic sequence containing BTK exons 6-19 and a green fluorescence protein-hygromycin cassette driven by a cytomegalovirus promoter. We first used NALM-6, a human male pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, as a recipient to measure the efficiency of gene targeting by homologous recombination. We identified 10 clones with the homologous recombination of the BTK gene among 107 hygromycin-resistant stable clones isolated from two independent experiments. We next used cord blood CD34⁺ cells as the recipient cells for the gene targeting. We isolated colonies grown in medium containing cytokines and hygromycin. We found that the targeting of the BTK gene occurred in four of the 755 hygromycin-resistant colonies. Importantly, the gene targeting was also observed in CD19⁺ lymphoid progenitor cells that were differentiated from the homologous recombinant CD34⁺ cells during growth in selection media. Our study shows the potential for the BTK gene therapy using the HD-Ad.AAV BTK vector via homologous recombination in hematopoietic stem cells.

  16. Stable integration vector for nutrient broth-based selection of attenuated Listeria monocytogenes strains with recombinant antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Laurel L; Huang, William A; Zhou, Chenghui; Li, Zhongxia; Calendar, Richard

    2008-09-01

    Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes strains induce strong cellular immune responses and may prove useful for antigen delivery for the vaccination of humans. However, the genetic systems currently available for the stable expression of recombinant antigens by L. monocytogenes rely on the use of antibiotic resistance genes. We report on a derivative, pPL2dalGlnA, of the Listeria monocytogenes pPL2 integration vector that completely lacks drug resistance genes. The selectable markers in pPL2dalGlnA are glutamine synthetase (GlnA) and alanine racemase (Dal). This novel vector was stably maintained in auxotropic L. monocytogenes strains that normally require d-alanine. The pPL2dalGlnA vector also partially restored the ability of an L. monocytogenes Deltadal Deltadat strain to colonize the spleens and livers of infected mice. A novel, highly attenuated strain of L. monocytogenes with quadruple deletions was also engineered by deleting the L. monocytogenes actA and plcB virulence genes from a Deltadal Deltadat strain. Infection of mice with recombinants of this mutant strain that express the antigen from pPL2dalGlnA were shown to elicit CD8(+) T-cell responses to human immunodeficiency virus Tat. This vector system is thus useful for stable antigen expression and vaccination studies.

  17. Effects of vector fusion peptides on the conformation and immune reactivity of epitope-shuffled, recombinant multi-epitope antigens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Lin, Yahui; Cai, Pengfei; Wang, Heng

    2011-01-01

    The use of multi-epitopes has been considered as a promising strategy to overcome the obstacle of antigenic variation in malarial vaccine development. Previously, we constructed a multi-epitope artificial antigen, Malaria Random Constructed Antigen-1(M.RCAg-1), to optimize expression of the antigen, and we subcloned the gene into three prokaryotic expression vectors that contain different fusion tags at the N-terminus. Three recombinant proteins expressed by these vectors, named M.RCAg-1/Exp.V-1, V-2, and V-3, were purified after the cleavage of the fusion tag. All three recombinant proteins were able to induce similar levels of antigenicity in BALB/c murine models. However, the antibody responses against the individual epitope peptides of the recombinant products were dramatically different. Additionally, the different epitopes elicited various CD4(+) T-cell responses, as shown by the resulting lymphocyte proliferation and varied IFN-γ and IL-4 levels determined by EILSPOT; however, each could be distinctly recognized by sera derived from malaria patients. Additionally, the rabbit antibody induced by these proteins showed diverse efficacy in malaria parasite growth inhibition assays in vitro. Furthermore, analysis via circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed that the secondary structure was different among these recombinant proteins. These results suggest that the expressed multi-epitope artificial antigens originating from the different vector fusion peptides indeed affect the protein folding and, subsequently, the epitope exposure. Thus, these proteins are able to induce both distinct humoral and cellular immune responses in animal models, and they affect the efficacy of immune inhibition against the parasite. This work should lead to a further understanding of the impact of vector fusion peptides on the conformation and immune reactivity of recombinant proteins and could provide a useful reference for the development of artificial multi-epitope vaccines.

  18. Establishment of a novel cell line for the enhanced production of recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Satkunanathan, Stifani; Wheeler, Jun; Thorpe, Robin; Zhao, Yuan

    2014-11-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors show great promise because of their excellent safety profile; however, pre-existing immune responses have necessitated the administration of high titer AAV, posing a significant challenge to the advancement of gene therapy involving AAV vectors. Recombinant AAV vectors contain minimum viral proteins necessary for their assembly and gene delivery functions. During the process of AAV assembly and production, AAV vectors acquire, inherently and submissively, various cellular proteins, but the identity of these proteins is poorly characterized. We reason that by identifying host cell proteins inherently associated with AAV vectors we may better understand the contribution of cellular components to AAV vector assembly and, ultimately, may improve the production of AAV vectors for gene therapy. In this study, three serotypes of recombinant AAV, namely AAV2, AAV5, and AAV8, were investigated. We used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods to identify protein composition in purified AAV vectors, confirmed protein identities using western blotting, and explored the potential function of selected proteins in AAV vector production using small hairpin (shRNA) methods. Using LC-MS/MS, we identified 44 AAV-associated cellular proteins including Y-box binding protein (YB1). We showed for the first time that the establishment of a novel producer cell line by introducing an shRNA sequence down-regulating YB1 resulted in up to 45- and 9-fold increase in physical vector genome titers of AAV2 and AAV8, respectively, and up to 7-fold increase in AAV2 transduction vector genome titers. Our results revealed that YB1 gene knockdown promoted AAV2 rep expression and vector DNA production and reduced the number of empty particles in AAV2 products, suggesting that YB1 plays an important role in AAV vector assembly by competition with adenovirus E2A and AAV capsid proteins for binding to the inverted terminal repeat

  19. Establishment of a Novel Cell Line for the Enhanced Production of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Satkunanathan, Stifani; Wheeler, Jun; Thorpe, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors show great promise because of their excellent safety profile; however, pre-existing immune responses have necessitated the administration of high titer AAV, posing a significant challenge to the advancement of gene therapy involving AAV vectors. Recombinant AAV vectors contain minimum viral proteins necessary for their assembly and gene delivery functions. During the process of AAV assembly and production, AAV vectors acquire, inherently and submissively, various cellular proteins, but the identity of these proteins is poorly characterized. We reason that by identifying host cell proteins inherently associated with AAV vectors we may better understand the contribution of cellular components to AAV vector assembly and, ultimately, may improve the production of AAV vectors for gene therapy. In this study, three serotypes of recombinant AAV, namely AAV2, AAV5, and AAV8, were investigated. We used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods to identify protein composition in purified AAV vectors, confirmed protein identities using western blotting, and explored the potential function of selected proteins in AAV vector production using small hairpin (shRNA) methods. Using LC-MS/MS, we identified 44 AAV-associated cellular proteins including Y-box binding protein (YB1). We showed for the first time that the establishment of a novel producer cell line by introducing an shRNA sequence down-regulating YB1 resulted in up to 45- and 9-fold increase in physical vector genome titers of AAV2 and AAV8, respectively, and up to 7-fold increase in AAV2 transduction vector genome titers. Our results revealed that YB1 gene knockdown promoted AAV2 rep expression and vector DNA production and reduced the number of empty particles in AAV2 products, suggesting that YB1 plays an important role in AAV vector assembly by competition with adenovirus E2A and AAV capsid proteins for binding to the inverted terminal

  20. Immunotherapy for Lewis lung carcinoma utilizing dendritic cells infected with CK19 gene recombinant adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    SUN, Q.F.; ZHAO, X.N.; PENG, C.L.; HAO, Y.T.; ZHAO, Y.P.; JIANG, N.; XUE, H.; GUO, J.Z.; YUN, C.H.; CONG, B.; ZHAO, X.G.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) as 'professional' antigen-presenting cells (APCs) initiate and regulate immune responses to various antigens. DC-based vaccines have become a promising modality in cancer immunotherapy. Cytokeratin 19 (CK19) protein is expressed at high levels in lung cancer and many other tumor cells, suggesting CK19 as a potential tumor-specific target for cancer immune therapy. We constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the CK19 gene (rAd-CK19). DCs transfected with rAd-CK19 were used to vaccinate C57BL/6 mice bearing xenografts derived from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. The transfected DCs gave rise to potent CK19-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) capable of lysing LLC cells. Mice immunized with the rAd-CK19-DCs exhibited significantly attenuated tumor growth (including tumor volume and weight) when compared to the tumor growth of mice immunized with rAd-c DCs or DCs during the 24-day observation period (P<0.05). The results revealed that the mice vaccinated with the rAd-CK19-DCs exhibited a potent protective and therapeutic antitumor immunity to LLC cells in the subcutaneous model along with an inhibitive effect on tumor growth compared to the mice vaccinated with the rAd-c DCs or DCs alone. The present study proposes a meaningful mode of action utilizing rAd-CK19 DCs in lung cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26323510

  1. Long-Term Immunological Memory Induced by Recombinant Oral Salmonella Vaccine Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, James J.; Pathangey, Latha; Hasona, Adnan; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Brown, Thomas A.

    2000-01-01

    We have previously shown that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing the hagB hemagglutinin gene from Porphyromonas gingivalis can induce primary and recall immune responses in serum and secretions in mice; however, the longevity of memory induced by oral Salmonella carriers has not been adequately demonstrated. In this study, we examined the capacity of mice to mount a recall response 52 weeks after primary immunization. Recall responses were seen in serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA following boosting at week 52, and in most cases, they were equal to or greater than the primary responses. Significant mucosal IgA recall responses in saliva and vaginal wash were also detected following boosting at week 52. In addition, there was a considerable residual response in secretions at week 51, prior to boosting. These results indicate that oral Salmonella vectors can induce long-term memory to recombinant HagB and are particularly effective at inducing long-lasting mucosal responses as well as at inducing the capacity for mucosal recall responses. PMID:10858264

  2. Assessment of toxicity and biodistribution of recombinant AAV8 vector-mediated immunomodulatory gene therapy in mice with Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gensheng; Young, Sarah P; Bali, Deeksha; Hutt, Julie; Li, Songtao; Benson, Janet; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2014-01-01

    A preclinical safety study was conducted to evaluate the short- and long-term toxicity of a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV2/8) vector that has been developed as an immune-modulatory adjunctive therapy to recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA, Myozyme) enzyme replacement treatment (ERT) for patients with Pompe disease (AAV2/8-LSPhGAApA). The AAV2/8-LSPhGAApA vector at 1.6 × 10(13) vector particles/kg, after intravenous injection, did not cause significant short- or long-term toxicity. Recruitment of CD4(+) (but not CD8(+)) lymphocytes to the liver was elevated in the vector-dosed male animals at study day (SD) 15, and in group 8 animals at SD 113, in comparison to their respective control animals. Administration of the vector, either prior to or after the one ERT injection, uniformly prevented the hypersensitivity induced by subsequent ERT in males, but not always in female animals. The vector genome was sustained in all tissues through 16-week postdosing, except for in blood with a similar tissue tropism between males and females. Administration of the vector alone, or combined with the ERT, was effective in producing significantly increased GAA activity and consequently decreased glycogen accumulation in multiple tissues, and the urine biomarker, Glc4, was significantly reduced. The efficacy of the vector (or with ERT) was better in males than in females, as demonstrated both by the number of tissues showing significantly effective responses and the extent of response in a given tissue. Given the lack of toxicity for AAV2/8LSPhGAApA, further consideration of clinical translation is warranted in Pompe disease.

  3. A concept of eliminating nonhomologous recombination for scalable and safe AAV vector generation for human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Biao; Moore, Andrea R; Dai, Jihong; Roberts, Sean; Chu, Kirk; Kapranov, Philipp; Moss, Bernard; Xiao, Weidong

    2013-07-01

    Scalable and efficient production of high-quality recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) for gene therapy remains a challenge despite recent clinical successes. We developed a new strategy for scalable and efficient rAAV production by sequestering the AAV helper genes and the rAAV vector DNA in two different subcellular compartments, made possible by using cytoplasmic vaccinia virus as a carrier for the AAV helper genes. For the first time, the contamination of replication-competent AAV particles (rcAAV) can be completely eliminated in theory by avoiding ubiquitous nonhomologous recombination. Vector DNA can be integrated into the host genomes or delivered by a nuclear targeting vector such as adenovirus. In suspension HeLa cells, the achieved vector yield per cell is similar to that from traditional triple-plasmid transfection method. The rcAAV contamination was undetectable at the limit of our assay. Furthermore, this new concept can be used not only for production of rAAV, but also for other DNA vectors.

  4. In vitro characterization of felid herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1) mutants generated by recombineering in a recombinant BAC vector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Felid herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1) mutants were constructed using two-step Red-mediated recombination techniques based on a virulent full-length FHV-1 BAC clone. The individual mutant viruses generated were deficient in glycoprotein C (gC), glycoprotein E (gE),US3 serine/threonine protein kinase (PK), or b...

  5. A Vector System for ABC Transporter-Mediated Secretion and Purification of Recombinant Proteins in Pseudomonas Species

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jaewook; Lee, Ukjin; Park, Jiye; Yoo, Do-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is an efficient platform for recombinant protein production. P. fluorescens has an ABC transporter secreting endogenous thermostable lipase (TliA) and protease, which can be exploited to transport recombinant proteins across the cell membrane. In this study, the expression vector pDART was constructed by inserting tliDEF, genes encoding the ABC transporter, along with the construct of the lipase ABC transporter recognition domain (LARD), into pDSK519, a widely used shuttle vector. When the gene for the target protein was inserted into the vector, the C-terminally fused LARD allowed it to be secreted through the ABC transporter into the extracellular medium. After secretion of the fused target protein, the LARD containing a hydrophobic C terminus enabled its purification through hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) using a methyl-Sepharose column. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) were used to validate the expression, export, and purification of target proteins by the pDART system. Both proteins were secreted into the extracellular medium in P. fluorescens. In particular, AP was secreted in several Pseudomonas species with its enzymatic activity in extracellular media. Furthermore, purification of the target protein using HIC yielded some degree of AP and GFP purification, where AP was purified to almost a single product. The pDART system will provide greater convenience for the secretory production and purification of recombinant proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, such as Pseudomonas species. PMID:25548043

  6. Recombinant Newcastle disease viral vector expressing hemagglutinin or fusion of canine distemper virus is safe and immunogenic in minks.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jinying; Wang, Xijun; Tian, Meijie; Gao, Yuwei; Wen, Zhiyuan; Yu, Guimei; Zhou, Weiwei; Zu, Shulong; Bu, Zhigao

    2015-05-15

    Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) infects many carnivores and cause several high-mortality disease outbreaks. The current CDV live vaccine cannot be safely used in some exotic species, such as mink and ferret. Here, we generated recombinant lentogenic Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota expressing either envelope glycoproyein, heamagglutinine (H) or fusion protein (F), named as rLa-CDVH and rLa-CDVF, respectively. The feasibility of these recombinant NDVs to serve as live virus-vectored CD vaccine was evaluated in minks. rLa-CDVH induced significant neutralization antibodies (NA) to CDV and provided solid protection against virulent CDV challenge. On the contrast, rLa-CDVF induced much lower NA to CDV and fail to protected mink from virulent CDV challenge. Results suggest that recombinant NDV expressing CDV H is safe and efficient candidate vaccine against CDV in mink, and maybe other host species.

  7. Design and construction of improved new vectors for Zymomonas mobilis recombinants.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hong-Wei; Bao, Jie; Ryu, Dewey D Y; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2011-07-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is a very important gram-negative bacterium having a potential application to simultaneous co-production of biofuel and other high value-added products through biorefinery process technology development. Up to now, pLOI193 has been used as the plasmid of choice for Z. mobilis strains. However, its application has been limited due to its relatively low transformation efficiency, a large plasmid size (13.4 kb), and limited choice of cloning sites for gene manipulations. Some of these limitations can be overcome by the newly designed and constructed plasmid pHW20a, which provides significantly higher transformation efficiency (about two orders of magnitude greater), better stability (for at least 120 generation times), and an ease of gene manipulations. The pHW20a contains three complete cis-acting genes (repA, repB, and repC) encoding the Rep proteins for primosome formation. It has the origin of replication (oriV) to ensure replication in gram-negative bacteria, two mob genes that enhances transformation efficiency, a screening marker (lacZα), expanded multiple cloning sites (MCS) that enables easy gene manipulation, and the tetracycline resistance gene (tc(r) ). The utility of screening marker, lacZα with MCS, was confirmed by the blue-white screening test. Several examples of applications of gene expression in Z. mobilis ZM4 have been demonstrated in this article by using several new pHW20a-derived plasmids and expressing the homologous genes (gfo and ppc) and the heterologous genes (bglA, mdh, and fdh1). The results show that pHW20a is a very useful new vector for construction of new Z. mobilis recombinant strains that will enable simultaneous co-production of biofuel and high value added products.

  8. Receptor-targeted recombinant adenovirus conglomerates: a novel molecular conjugate vector with improved expression characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzenberger, P; Hunt, J D; Robert, E; Theodossiou, C; Kolls, J K

    1997-01-01

    To develop improved strategies for gene transfer to hematopoietic cells, we have explored targeted gene transfer using molecular conjugate vectors (MCVs). MCVs are constructed by condensing plasmid DNA containing the gene of interest with polylysine (PL), PL linked to a replication-incompetent adenovirus (endosomolytic agent), and PL linked to streptavidin for targeting with biotinylated ligands. In this report, we compare gene transfer to K562 cells by using the previously described transferrin-targeted MCV (Trans-MCV) to a novel transferrin-targeted MCV. In the novel MCV, the transferred gene (luciferase) is in the genome of recombinant replication-incompetent adenovirus (recMCV), which also acts as the endosomolytic agent. The level of luciferase gene expression was fivefold higher in K562 cells transfected with Trans-recMCV than in cells transfected with Trans-MCV. Furthermore, targeted transfection with recMCV resulted in prolonged luciferase expression that declined 14 to 20 days after transfection, in comparison with Trans-MCV, where luciferase expression declined by 4 to 8 days. Moreover, targeted transfection of K562 cells with the Trans-recMCV resulted in persistent luciferase gene expression for 6 months. Analysis of luciferase gene expression in K562 single-cell clones that were subcloned 5 weeks after transfection with Trans-recMCV showed that 35 to 50% of the single-cell clones had intermediate to high levels of luciferase gene expression that was stable for 6 months, with the remaining clones showing low or no luciferase gene expression. Stable gene expression was associated with integration of adenovirus sequences into genomic DNA. PMID:9343214

  9. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors as therapeutic tools for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, T; Graham, I R; Foster, H; Dickson, G

    2004-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal genetic muscle disorder caused by recessive mutations in the dystrophin gene. The size of the gene (2.4 Mb) and mRNA (14 kb) in addition to immunogenicity problems and inefficient transduction of mature myofibres by currently available vector systems are formidable obstacles to the development of efficient gene therapy approaches. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors overcome many of the problems associated with other vector systems (nonpathogenicity and minimal immunogenicity, extensive cell and tissue tropism) but accommodate limited transgene capacity (<5 kb). As a result of these observations, a number of laboratories worldwide have engineered a series of microdystrophin cDNAs based on genotype-phenotype relationship in Duchenne (DMD) and Becker (BMD) dystrophic patients, and transgenic studies in mdx mice. Recent progress in characterization of AAV serotypes from various species has demonstrated that alternative AAV serotypes are far more efficient in transducing muscle than the traditionally used AAV2. This article summarizes the current progress in the field of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) delivery for DMD, including optimization of recombinant AAV-microdystrophin vector systems/cassettes targeting the skeletal and cardiac musculature.

  10. Vaccination With a Highly Attenuated Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vector Protects Against Challenge With a Lethal Dose of Ebola Virus.

    PubMed

    Matassov, Demetrius; Marzi, Andrea; Latham, Terri; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Joan B; Mire, Chad E; Hamm, Stefan; Nowak, Becky; Egan, Michael A; Geisbert, Thomas W; Eldridge, John H; Feldmann, Heinz; Clarke, David K

    2015-10-01

    Previously, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) pseudotypes expressing Ebolavirus glycoproteins (GPs) in place of the VSV G protein demonstrated protection of nonhuman primates from lethal homologous Ebolavirus challenge. Those pseudotype vectors contained no additional attenuating mutations in the rVSV genome. Here we describe rVSV vectors containing a full complement of VSV genes and expressing the Ebola virus (EBOV) GP from an additional transcription unit. These rVSV vectors contain the same combination of attenuating mutations used previously in the clinical development pathway of an rVSV/human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vaccine. One of these rVSV vectors (N4CT1-EBOVGP1), which expresses membrane-anchored EBOV GP from the first position in the genome (GP1), elicited a balanced cellular and humoral GP-specific immune response in mice. Guinea pigs immunized with a single dose of this vector were protected from any signs of disease following lethal EBOV challenge, while control animals died in 7-9 days. Subsequently, N4CT1-EBOVGP1 demonstrated complete, single-dose protection of 2 macaques following lethal EBOV challenge. A single sham-vaccinated macaque died from disease due to EBOV infection. These results demonstrate that highly attenuated rVSV vectors expressing EBOV GP may provide safer alternatives to current EBOV vaccines.

  11. Vaccination With a Highly Attenuated Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vector Protects Against Challenge With a Lethal Dose of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Matassov, Demetrius; Marzi, Andrea; Latham, Terri; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Joan B.; Mire, Chad E.; Hamm, Stefan; Nowak, Becky; Egan, Michael A.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Eldridge, John H.; Feldmann, Heinz; Clarke, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Previously, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) pseudotypes expressing Ebolavirus glycoproteins (GPs) in place of the VSV G protein demonstrated protection of nonhuman primates from lethal homologous Ebolavirus challenge. Those pseudotype vectors contained no additional attenuating mutations in the rVSV genome. Here we describe rVSV vectors containing a full complement of VSV genes and expressing the Ebola virus (EBOV) GP from an additional transcription unit. These rVSV vectors contain the same combination of attenuating mutations used previously in the clinical development pathway of an rVSV/human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vaccine. One of these rVSV vectors (N4CT1-EBOVGP1), which expresses membrane-anchored EBOV GP from the first position in the genome (GP1), elicited a balanced cellular and humoral GP-specific immune response in mice. Guinea pigs immunized with a single dose of this vector were protected from any signs of disease following lethal EBOV challenge, while control animals died in 7–9 days. Subsequently, N4CT1-EBOVGP1 demonstrated complete, single-dose protection of 2 macaques following lethal EBOV challenge. A single sham-vaccinated macaque died from disease due to EBOV infection. These results demonstrate that highly attenuated rVSV vectors expressing EBOV GP may provide safer alternatives to current EBOV vaccines. PMID:26109675

  12. Preclinical characterization of a recombinant adeno-associated virus type 1-pseudotyped vector demonstrates dose-dependent injection site inflammation and dissemination of vector genomes to distant sites.

    PubMed

    Flotte, Terence R; Conlon, Thomas J; Poirier, Amy; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Byrne, Barry J

    2007-03-01

    To translate the potential advantages of recombinant adeno-associated virus type 1 (rAAV1) vectors into a clinical application for muscle-directed gene therapy for alpha1 -antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, we performed safety studies in 170 C57BL/6 mice and 26 New Zealand White rabbits. A mouse toxicology study included 8 cohorts of 10 mice each (5 per sex). Mice were killed either 21 or 90 days after intramuscular injection of doses ranging up to 1x10(13)vector genomes (VG), equivalent to 4 x 10(14)VG/kg. A mouse biodistribution study was performed in 5 cohorts of 10 mice, receiving intramuscular injections at the same doses; as well as in a lower dose cohort (3 x 10(8) VG; equivalent to 1.2 x 10(10)VG/kg); and in 4 other cohorts (excluding the vehicle control) injected with identical doses intravenously. Finally, biodistribution was examined in rabbits, with serial collection of blood and semen, as well as terminal tissue collection. Two significant findings were present, both of which were dose dependent. First, inflammatory cell infiltrates were detected at the site of injection 21, 60, or 90 days after intramuscular injection of 1 x 10(13)VG. This was not associated with loss of transgene expression. Second, vector DNA sequences were detected in most animals, levels being highest with the highest doses and earliest time points. Vector DNA was also present in liver, spleen, kidneys, and a number of other organs, including the gonads of animals receiving the highest dose. Likewise, vector DNA was present in the semen of male rabbits at higher doses. The copy number of vector DNA in the blood and semen declined over time throughout the study. These two dose-dependent findings have served to guide to the design of a phase 1 human trial of rAAV1-AAT.

  13. Role of cellular FKBP52 protein in intracellular trafficking of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Weihong; Wu Jianqing ||; Zhong Li; Chen Linyuan; Weigel-Kelley, Kirsten A. |; Qing Keyun; Larsen, Steven H.; Shou Weinian; Warrington, Kenneth H. |; Srivastava, Arun |. E-mail: asrivastava@gtc.ufl.edu

    2006-09-30

    We have reported that tyrosine-phosphorylated forms of a cellular protein, FKBP52, inhibit the second-strand DNA synthesis of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV), leading to inefficient transgene expression from recombinant AAV vectors. To further explore the role of FKBP52 in AAV-mediated transduction, we established murine embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) cultures from FKBP52 wild-type (WT), heterozygous (HE), and knockout (KO) mice. Conventional AAV vectors failed to transduce WT MEFs efficiently, and the transduction efficiency was not significantly increased in HE or KO MEFs. AAV vectors failed to traffic efficiently to the nucleus in these cells. Treatment with hydroxyurea (HU) increased the transduction efficiency of conventional AAV vectors by {approx}25-fold in WT MEFs, but only by {approx}4-fold in KO MEFs. The use of self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors, which bypass the requirement of viral second-strand DNA synthesis, revealed that HU treatment increased the transduction efficiency {approx}23-fold in WT MEFs, but only {approx}4-fold in KO MEFs, indicating that the lack of HU treatment-mediated increase in KO MEFs was not due to failure of AAV to undergo viral second-strand DNA synthesis. Following HU treatment, {approx}59% of AAV genomes were present in the nuclear fraction from WT MEFs, but only {approx}28% in KO MEFs, indicating that the pathway by which HU treatment mediates nuclear transport of AAV was impaired in KO MEFs. When KO MEFs were stably transfected with an FKBP52 expression plasmid, HU treatment-mediated increase in the transduction efficiency was restored in these cells, which correlated directly with improved intracellular trafficking. Intact AAV particles were also shown to interact with FKBP52 as well as with dynein, a known cellular protein involved in AAV trafficking. These studies suggest that FKBP52, being a cellular chaperone protein, facilitates intracellular trafficking of AAV, which has implications in the optimal use of recombinant

  14. Comparison of recombinant α-hemoglobin from Crocodylus siamensis expressed in different cloning vectors and their biological properties.

    PubMed

    Maijaroen, Surachai; Anwised, Preeyanan; Klaynongsruang, Sompong; Daduang, Sakda; Boonmee, Atcha

    2016-02-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is an important component in red blood cells of the vertebrate. It is a major respiratory protein with oxygen or carbon dioxide transport function. Hb has been reported to contain bioactive peptides which have antibacterial and antioxidant activities. In this study, the alpha-chain hemoglobin(αHb) gene of Crocodylus siamensis was cloned into the three different expression vectors and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant αHb proteins from all constructs could be expressed and purified. The result from UV-visible absorption spectra showed a similar pattern of all recombinant proteins to the oxy-hemoglobin form of intact Hb. The different recombinant αHb could exhibit antioxidant activities. All recombinant proteins could inhibit the growth of Bacillus spp. Especially, most of the recombinant proteins could inhibit the growth of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TISTR 1045 better than intact one. The result obtained from this study can provide us further information about the possibility using of αHb as a supplementary food.

  15. In vivo repopulation of cytoplasmically gene transferred hematopoietic cells by temperature-sensitive mutant of recombinant Sendai viral vector.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kumi; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Sakura; Yoshida, Shuro; Shibata, Satoko; Kondo, Haruhiko; Okano, Shinji; Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Akashi, Koichi; Inoue, Makoto; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Sueishi, Katsuo

    2007-09-28

    Recent clinical studies revealed 'proof of concept' of gene therapy targeting hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to treat hematopoietic disorders. However, vector integration-related adverse events of retroviral vectors have slowed progress in this field. As an initial step to overcoming this hurdle, we examined the potential of an improved cytoplasmic RNA vector, temperature-sensitive mutant non-transmissible recombinant Sendai virus (ts-rSeV/dF), for gene transfer to murine HSCs and progenitors. Both conventional vector and ts-rSeV/dF-GFP showed efficient gene transfer to T-lymphocyte-depleted syngeneic bone marrow cells (BMCs) (>85%), but only BMCs treated with ts-rSeV/dF-GFP but not with conventional vector efficiently repopulated in the recipient mice, associated with multilineage differentiation in vitro and in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the in vivo reconstruction of hematopoietic series by cytoplasmically gene transferred BMCs, that warrants further investigation to realize this strategy in clinical settings.

  16. Using Recombinant Proteins from Lutzomyia longipalpis Saliva to Estimate Human Vector Exposure in Visceral Leishmaniasis Endemic Areas

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Ana Paula; Andrade, Bruno Bezerril; Aquino, Dorlene; Entringer, Petter; Miranda, José Carlos; Alcantara, Ruan; Ruiz, Daniel; Soto, Manuel; Teixeira, Clarissa R.; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; de Oliveira, Camila Indiani; Brodskyn, Cláudia Ida; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina

    2010-01-01

    Background Leishmania is transmitted by female sand flies and deposited together with saliva, which contains a vast repertoire of pharmacologically active molecules that contribute to the establishment of the infection. The exposure to vector saliva induces an immune response against its components that can be used as a marker of exposure to the vector. Performing large-scale serological studies to detect vector exposure has been limited by the difficulty in obtaining sand fly saliva. Here, we validate the use of two sand fly salivary recombinant proteins as markers for vector exposure. Methodology/principal findings ELISA was used to screen human sera, collected in an area endemic for visceral leishmaniasis, against the salivary gland sonicate (SGS) or two recombinant proteins (rLJM11 and rLJM17) from Lutzomyia longipalpis saliva. Antibody levels before and after SGS seroconversion (n = 26) were compared using the Wilcoxon signed rank paired test. Human sera from an area endemic for VL which recognize Lu. longipalpis saliva in ELISA also recognize a combination of rLJM17 and rLJM11. We then extended the analysis to include 40 sera from individuals who were seropositive and 40 seronegative to Lu. longipalpis SGS. Each recombinant protein was able to detect anti-saliva seroconversion, whereas the two proteins combined increased the detection significantly. Additionally, we evaluated the specificity of the anti-Lu. longipalpis response by testing 40 sera positive to Lutzomyia intermedia SGS, and very limited (2/40) cross-reactivity was observed. Receiver-operator characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was used to identify the effectiveness of these proteins for the prediction of anti-SGS positivity. These ROC curves evidenced the superior performance of rLJM17+rLJM11. Predicted threshold levels were confirmed for rLJM17+rLJM11 using a large panel of 1,077 serum samples. Conclusion Our results show the possibility of substituting Lu. longipalpis SGS for two

  17. Screening for recombinants of Crambe abyssynica after transformation by the pMF1 marker-free vector based on chemical selection and meristematic regeneration.

    PubMed

    Qi, Weicong; Tinnenbroek-Capel, Iris E M; Salentijn, Elma M J; Schaart, Jan G; Cheng, Jihua; Denneboom, Christel; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Xiaolin; Zhao, Han; Visser, Richard G F; Huang, Bangquan; Van Loo, Eibertus N; Krens, Frans A

    2015-09-11

    The T-DNA region of pMF1 vector of marker-free system developed by Wageningen UR, has Recombinase R-LBD gene fusion and nptII and codA gene fusion between two recombination sites. After transformation applying dexamethasone (DEX) can activate the recombinase to remove the T-DNA fragment between recombination sites. The recombinant ought to be selected on 5-fluorocytocine (5-FC) because of codA converting 5-FC into 5-fluorouracil the toxic. A PMF1 vector was transformed into hexaploid species Crambe abyssinica. Two independent transformants were chosen for DEX-induced recombination and later 5-FC selection. In contrast to earlier pMF1 experiments, the strategy of stepwise selection based on meristematic regeneration was engaged. After a long period of 5-FC selection, recombinants were obtained successfully, but most of the survivors were wildtype and non-recombinant. The results revealed when applying the PMF1 marker-free system on C. abyssinica, 1) Increasing in the DEX concentration did not correspondingly enhance the success of recombination; 2) both of the DEX-induced recombination and 5-FC negative selection were apparently insufficient which was leading to the extremely high frequency in chimerism occurring for recombinant and non-recombinant cells in tissues; 3) the strategy of stepwise selection based on meristem tissue regeneration was crucial for successfully isolating the recombinant germplasm from the chimera.

  18. Screening for recombinants of Crambe abyssynica after transformation by the pMF1 marker-free vector based on chemical selection and meristematic regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Weicong; Tinnenbroek-Capel, Iris E. M.; Salentijn, Elma M. J.; Schaart, Jan G.; Cheng, Jihua; Denneboom, Christel; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Xiaolin; Zhao, Han; Visser, Richard G. F.; Huang, Bangquan; Van Loo, Eibertus N.; Krens, Frans A.

    2015-01-01

    The T-DNA region of pMF1 vector of marker-free system developed by Wageningen UR, has Recombinase R-LBD gene fusion and nptII and codA gene fusion between two recombination sites. After transformation applying dexamethasone (DEX) can activate the recombinase to remove the T-DNA fragment between recombination sites. The recombinant ought to be selected on 5-fluorocytocine (5-FC) because of codA converting 5-FC into 5-fluorouracil the toxic. A PMF1 vector was transformed into hexaploid species Crambe abyssinica. Two independent transformants were chosen for DEX-induced recombination and later 5-FC selection. In contrast to earlier pMF1 experiments, the strategy of stepwise selection based on meristematic regeneration was engaged. After a long period of 5-FC selection, recombinants were obtained successfully, but most of the survivors were wildtype and non-recombinant. The results revealed when applying the PMF1 marker-free system on C. abyssinica, 1) Increasing in the DEX concentration did not correspondingly enhance the success of recombination; 2) both of the DEX-induced recombination and 5-FC negative selection were apparently insufficient which was leading to the extremely high frequency in chimerism occurring for recombinant and non-recombinant cells in tissues; 3) the strategy of stepwise selection based on meristem tissue regeneration was crucial for successfully isolating the recombinant germplasm from the chimera. PMID:26358007

  19. A versatile bacterial expression vector designed for single-step cloning of multiple DNA fragments using homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Mats A; Gowda, Naveen Kumar Chandappa; Andréasson, Claes

    2014-06-01

    Production of recombinant proteins is the starting point for biochemical and biophysical analyses and requires methodology to efficiently proceed from gene sequence to purified protein. While optimized strategies for the efficient cloning of single-gene fragments for bacterial expression is available, efficient multiple DNA fragment cloning still presents a challenge. To facilitate this step, we have developed an efficient cloning strategy based on yeast homologous recombination cloning (YHRC) into the new pET-based bacterial expression vector pSUMO-YHRC. The vector supports cloning for untagged expression as well as fusions to His6-SUMO or His6 tags. We demonstrate that YHRC from single PCR products of 6 independent genes into the vector results in virtually no background. Importantly, in a quantitative assay for functional expression we find that single-step YHRC of 7 DNA fragments can be performed with very high cloning efficiencies. The method and reagents described in this paper significantly simplifies the construction of expression plasmids from multiple DNA fragments, including complex gene fusions, chimeric genes and polycistronic constructs.

  20. Differential targeting of feline photoreceptors by recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors: implications for preclinical gene therapy trials.

    PubMed

    Minella, A L; Mowat, F M; Willett, K L; Sledge, D; Bartoe, J T; Bennett, J; Petersen-Jones, S M

    2014-10-01

    The cat is emerging as a promising large animal model for preclinical testing of retinal dystrophy therapies, for example, by gene therapy. However, there is a paucity of studies investigating viral vector gene transfer to the feline retina. We therefore sought to study the tropism of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors for the feline outer retina. We delivered four rAAV serotypes: rAAV2/2, rAAV2/5, rAAV2/8 and rAAV2/9, each expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of a cytomegalovirus promoter, to the subretinal space in cats and, for comparison, mice. Cats were monitored for gene expression by in vivo imaging and cellular tropism was determined using immunohistochemistry. In cats, rAAV2/2, rAAV2/8 and rAAV2/9 vectors induced faster and stronger GFP expression than rAAV2/5 and all vectors transduced the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptors. Unlike in mice, cone photoreceptors in the cat retina were more efficiently transduced than rod photoreceptors. In mice, rAAV2/2 only transduced the RPE whereas the other vectors also transduced rods and cones. These results highlight species differences in cellular tropism of rAAV vectors in the outer retina. We conclude that rAAV serotypes are suitable for use for retinal gene therapy in feline models, particularly when cone photoreceptors are the target cell.

  1. Rapid modification of the pET-28 expression vector for ligation independent cloning using homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gay, Glen; Wagner, Drew T; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T; Gay, Darren C

    2014-11-01

    The ability to rapidly customize an expression vector of choice is a valuable tool for any researcher involved in high-throughput molecular cloning for protein overexpression. Unfortunately, it is common practice to amend or neglect protein targets if the gene that encodes the protein of interest is incompatible with the multiple-cloning region of a preferred expression vector. To address this issue, a method was developed to quickly exchange the multiple-cloning region of the popular expression plasmid pET-28 with a ligation-independent cloning cassette, generating pGAY-28. This cassette contains dual inverted restriction sites that reduce false positive clones by generating a linearized plasmid incapable of self-annealing after a single restriction-enzyme digest. We also establish that progressively cooling the vector and insert leads to a significant increase in ligation-independent transformation efficiency, demonstrated by the incorporation of a 10.3 kb insert into the vector. The method reported to accomplish plasmid reconstruction is uniquely versatile yet simple, relying on the strategic placement of primers combined with homologous recombination of PCR products in yeast.

  2. Enhancing Transgene Expression from Recombinant AAV8 Vectors in Different Tissues Using Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus Post-Transcriptional Regulatory Element

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lizheng; Wang, Zixuan; Zhang, Fangfang; Zhu, Rui; Bi, Jinpeng; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Hui; Kong, Wei; Yu, Bin; Yu, Xianghui

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been utilized extensively in gene therapy and gene function studies, as strong transgene expression is a prerequisite for positive outcomes. AAV8 was reported as the most efficient AAV serotype for transduction of the liver, brain and muscle compared with other serotypes. However, AAV8-mediated transduction of human hepatocytes is rather poor with approximately 20-fold lower efficiency compared with that of mouse hepatocytes. Therefore, we applied the woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE) to enhance AAV8-mediated transgene expression driven by a combination promoter (CAG promoter) with a CMV-IE enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter for a more efficient viral vector. Transgene expression from recombinant AAV8 (rAAV8) vectors harboring a red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter gene with or without WPRE were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrated that WPRE improved AAV8-mediated RFP expression in different cell lines with clear increases of transgene expression in the liver, brain or muscle of animals. The findings of this study will help to substantially reduce the quantity of viral particles that must be injected in order to reach a therapeutic level of transgene expression in gene therapy. Consequently, such dose reductions may lessen the potential risks associated with high doses of viral vectors. PMID:27076785

  3. Vector-primed mice display hypo-responsiveness to foreign antigen presented by recombinant Salmonella regardless of the route of delivery.

    PubMed

    Attridge, Stephen R; Vindurampulle, Christofer J

    2005-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that mice which have been orally primed with an attenuated Salmonella vector [S. enterica serovar Stanley] are hypo-responsive to foreign antigens later delivered orally by the same vector strain, responding with significantly impaired serum and intestinal antibody responses compared with those seen in unprimed controls. Initial vector priming of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) is likely to result in impaired persistence of recombinant Salmonella later administered orally. Delivery of recombinant bacteria by the intra-peritoneal or intra-nasal route, to avoid exposure to a primed GALT, did not allow vector-primed recipients to mount normal antibody responses to the foreign pilus protein K88. The negative impact of vector priming could be largely overcome, however, if mice were exposed to the foreign protein just prior to priming with the vector strain. Using this strategy, vector-primed mice displayed normal gut IgA and intermediate serum IgG responses to K88 following oral administration of recombinant Salmonella. Our findings are compatible with the concept of epitopic suppression, in which failure to respond to the foreign vaccine antigen reflects the clonal dominance of B cells specific for epitopes associated with the vector strain.

  4. Generation of Recombinant Capripoxvirus Vectors for Vaccines and Gene Knockout Function Studies.

    PubMed

    Boshra, Hani; Cao, Jingxin; Babiuk, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate capripoxvirus through gene knockouts and gene insertions has become an increasingly valuable research tool in elucidating the function of individual genes of capripoxvirus, as well as in the development of capripoxvirus-based recombinant vaccines. The homologous recombination technique is used to generate capripoxvirus knockout viruses (KO), and is based on the targeting a particular viral gene of interest. This technique can also be used to insert a gene of interest. A protocol for the generation of a viral gene knockout is described. This technique involves the use of a plasmid which encodes the flanking sequences of the regions where the homologous recombination will occur, and will result in the insertion of an EGFP reporter gene for visualization of recombinant virus, as well as the E. coli gpt gene as a positive selection marker. If an additional gene is to be incorporated, this can be achieved by inserting a gene of interest for expression under a poxvirus promoter into the plasmid between the flanking regions for insertion. This chapter describes a protocol for generating such recombinant capripoxviruses.

  5. [Construction of recombinant human nerve growth factor (rh-β-NGF) eukaryotic vector and its expression in HEK293 cells].

    PubMed

    Li, Jingchuan; Xue, Bofu; Yuan, Yuan; Ma, Mo; Zhu, Lin; Milburn, Rebecca; Le, Li; Hu, Peizhen; Ye, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Human nerve growth factor (NGF) is a nerve cell growth regulation factor, which can provide nutrition for the neurons and promote the neurites outgrowth. In order to produce large-scale recombinant human nerve growth factor (rh-beta-NGF), we constructed a plasmid vector, which can stably express the rh-beta-NGF in the HEK293 cell lines. First, the plasmid of pCMV-beta-NGF-IRES-dhfr was constructed and transformed into HEK293 cells. Then MTX pressurized filter and limiting dilution methods were used to obtain monoclonal HEK293 cell lines. After stepwise reducing serum in culture media, the cells eventually adapted to serum-free medium and secreted rh-beta-NGF. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the expression product owned a molecular weight of about 13 kDa and a purity of more than 50%. The peptide mapping sequencing analysis demonstrated the sequences of rh-beta-NGF matched with the theoretical ones. Later we purified this protein by ion exchange and molecular sieve chromatograph. Finally, our experimental results exhibited that the recombinant cell lines can stably express rh-beta-NGF with a high efficiency of more than 20 pg/cell x day. In addition, this protein could successfully induce differentiation of PC12 cells. In summary, our recombinant HEK293 cells can express bio-active rh-beta-NGF with great efficiency and stability, which supply a valid basis to large-scale production of rh-beta-NGF.

  6. Properties of a herpes simplex virus multiple immediate-early gene-deleted recombinant as a vaccine vector

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Brockman, Mark A.; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Mathews, Lydia; Lucas, William T.; Murphy, Cynthia G.; Felber, Barbara K.; Pavlakis, George N.; Deluca, Neal A.; Knipe, David M. . E-mail: david_knipe@hms.harvard.edu

    2007-01-20

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) recombinants induce durable immune responses in rhesus macaques and mice and have induced partial protection in rhesus macaques against mucosal challenge with virulent simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). In this study, we evaluated the properties of a new generation HSV vaccine vector, an HSV-1 multiple immediate-early (IE) gene deletion mutant virus, d106, which contains deletions in the ICP4, ICP27, ICP22, and ICP47 genes. Because several of the HSV IE genes have been implicated in immune evasion, inactivation of the genes encoding these proteins was expected to result in enhanced immunogenicity. The d106 virus expresses few HSV gene products and shows minimal cytopathic effect in cultured cells. When d106 was inoculated into mice, viral DNA accumulated at high levels in draining lymph nodes, consistent with an ability to transduce dendritic cells and activate their maturation and movement to lymph nodes. A d106 recombinant expressing Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase induced durable {beta}-gal-specific IgG and CD8{sup +} T cell responses in naive and HSV-immune mice. Finally, d106-based recombinants have been constructed that express simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gag, env, or a rev-tat-nef fusion protein for several days in cultured cells. Thus, d106 shows many of the properties desirable in a vaccine vector: limited expression of HSV gene products and cytopathogenicity, high level expression of transgenes, ability to induce durable immune responses, and an ability to transduce dendritic cells and induce their maturation and migration to lymph nodes.

  7. Recombinant AAV Vectors for Enhanced Expression of Authentic IgG

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sebastian P.; Martinez-Navio, José M.; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has become a vector of choice for the treatment of a variety of genetic diseases that require safe and long-term delivery of a missing protein. Muscle-directed gene transfer for delivery of protective antibodies against AIDS viruses and other pathogens has been used experimentally in mice and monkeys. Here we examined a number of variations to AAV vector design for the ability to produce authentic immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules. Expression of rhesus IgG from a single single-stranded AAV (ssAAV) vector (one vector approach) was compared to expression from two self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors, one for heavy chain and one for light chain (two vector approach). Both the one vector and the two vector approaches yielded considerable levels of expressed full-length IgG. A number of modifications to the ssAAV expression system were then examined for their ability to increase the efficiency of IgG expression. Inclusion of a furin cleavage sequence with a linker peptide just upstream of the 2A self-cleaving sequence from foot-and-mouth disease virus (F2A) increased IgG expression approximately 2 fold. Inclusion of these sequences also helped to ensure a proper sequence at the C-terminal end of the heavy chain. Inclusion of the post-transcriptional regulatory element from woodchuck hepatitis virus (WPRE) further increased IgG expression 1.5–2.0 fold. IgG1 versions of the two rhesus IgGs that were examined consistently expressed better than the IgG2 forms. In contrast to what has been reported for AAV2-mediated expression of other proteins, introduction of capsid mutations Y445F and Y731F did not increase ssAAV1-mediated expression of IgG as determined by transduction experiments in cell culture. Our findings provide a rational basis for AAV vector design for expression of authentic IgG. PMID:27332822

  8. Recombinant AAV Vectors for Enhanced Expression of Authentic IgG.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sebastian P; Martinez-Navio, José M; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has become a vector of choice for the treatment of a variety of genetic diseases that require safe and long-term delivery of a missing protein. Muscle-directed gene transfer for delivery of protective antibodies against AIDS viruses and other pathogens has been used experimentally in mice and monkeys. Here we examined a number of variations to AAV vector design for the ability to produce authentic immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules. Expression of rhesus IgG from a single single-stranded AAV (ssAAV) vector (one vector approach) was compared to expression from two self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors, one for heavy chain and one for light chain (two vector approach). Both the one vector and the two vector approaches yielded considerable levels of expressed full-length IgG. A number of modifications to the ssAAV expression system were then examined for their ability to increase the efficiency of IgG expression. Inclusion of a furin cleavage sequence with a linker peptide just upstream of the 2A self-cleaving sequence from foot-and-mouth disease virus (F2A) increased IgG expression approximately 2 fold. Inclusion of these sequences also helped to ensure a proper sequence at the C-terminal end of the heavy chain. Inclusion of the post-transcriptional regulatory element from woodchuck hepatitis virus (WPRE) further increased IgG expression 1.5-2.0 fold. IgG1 versions of the two rhesus IgGs that were examined consistently expressed better than the IgG2 forms. In contrast to what has been reported for AAV2-mediated expression of other proteins, introduction of capsid mutations Y445F and Y731F did not increase ssAAV1-mediated expression of IgG as determined by transduction experiments in cell culture. Our findings provide a rational basis for AAV vector design for expression of authentic IgG.

  9. Rapid, scalable, and low-cost purification of recombinant adeno-associated virus produced by baculovirus expression vector system

    PubMed Central

    Buclez, Pierre-Olivier; Dias Florencio, Gabriella; Relizani, Karima; Beley, Cyriaque; Garcia, Luis; Benchaouir, Rachid

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV) are largely used for gene transfer in research, preclinical developments, and clinical trials. Their broad in vivo biodistribution and long-term efficacy in postmitotic tissues make them good candidates for numerous gene transfer applications. Upstream processes able to produce large amounts of rAAV were developed, particularly those using baculovirus expression vector system. In parallel, downstream processes present a large panel of purification methods, often including multiple and time consuming steps. Here, we show that simple tangential flow filtration, coupled with an optimized iodixanol-based isopycnic density gradient, is sufficient to purify several liters of crude lysate produced by baculovirus expression vector system in only one working day, leading to high titers and good purity of rAAV products. Moreover, we show that the viral vectors retain their in vitro and in vivo functionalities. Our results demonstrate that simple, rapid, and relatively low-cost methods can easily be implemented for obtaining a high-quality grade of gene therapy products based on rAAV technology. PMID:27226971

  10. High-throughput recombinant gene expression systems in Pichia pastoris using newly developed plasmid vectors.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Takahiro; Matsui, Makoto; Kobayashi, Yuki; Otagiri, Masato; Moriya, Shigeharu; Sakamoto, Yasuharu; Ito, Yukishige; Lee, Charles C; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Arioka, Manabu

    2011-01-01

    We describe here the construction of Gateway-compatible vectors, pBGP1-DEST and pPICZα-DEST, for rapid and convenient preparation of expression plasmids for production of secretory proteins in Pichia pastoris. Both vectors direct the synthesis of fusion proteins consisting of the N-terminal signal and pro-sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-factor, the recognition sites for Kex2 and Ste13 processing proteases, the mature region of a foreign protein flanked by attB1- and attB2-derived sequences at N- and C-termini, respectively, and myc plus hexahistidine tags added at the extreme C-terminus. To test the usefulness of these vectors, production of endo-glucanases and xylanases from termite symbionts, as well as a fungal glucuronoyl esterase, was performed. Enzyme activities were detected in the culture supernatants, indicating that the chimeric proteins were synthesized and secreted as designed.

  11. RNA interference mediated in human primary cells via recombinant baculoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Linda J; Philippe, Marie; Paine, Alan J; Mann, Derek A; Dolphin, Colin T

    2005-04-01

    The success of RNA interference (RNAi) in mammalian cells, mediated by siRNAs or shRNA-generating plasmids, is dependent, to an extent, upon transfection efficiency. This is a particular problem with primary cells, which are often difficult to transfect using cationic lipid vehicles. Effective RNAi in primary cells is thus best achieved with viral vectors, and retro-, adeno-, and lentivirus RNAi systems have been described. However, the use of such human viral vectors is inherently problematic, e.g., Class 2 status and requirement of secondary helper functions. Although insect cells are their natural host, baculoviruses also transduce a range of vertebrate cell lines and primary cells with high efficiency. The inability of baculoviral vectors to replicate in mammalian cells, their Class 1 status, and the simplicity of their construction make baculovirus an attractive alternative gene delivery vector. We have developed a baculoviral-based RNAi system designed to express shRNAs and GFP from U6 and CMV promoters, respectively. Transduction of Saos2, HepG2, Huh7, and primary human hepatic stellate cells with a baculoviral construct expressing shRNAs targeting lamin A/C resulted in effective knockdown of the corresponding mRNA and protein. Development of this baculoviral-based system provides an additional shRNA delivery option for RNAi-based investigations in mammalian cells.

  12. Green fluorescent protein retroviral vectors: low titer and high recombination frequency suggest a selective disadvantage.

    PubMed

    Hanazono, Y; Yu, J M; Dunbar, C E; Emmons, R V

    1997-07-20

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been used as a reporter molecule for gene expression because it fluoresces green after blue-light excitation. Inclusion of this gene in a vector could allow rapid, nontoxic selection of successfully transduced cells. However, many attempts by our laboratory to isolate stable retroviral producer cell clones secreting biologically active vectors containing either the highly fluorescent S65T-GFP mutant or humanized GFP have failed. Vector plasmids containing various forms of GFP and the neomycin resistance gene were transfected into three different packaging cell lines and fluorescence was observed for several days, but stable clones selected with G418 no longer fluoresced. Using confocal microscopy, the brightest cells were observed to contract and die within a matter of days. RNA slot-blot analysis of retroviral producer supernatants showed no viral production from the GFP plasmid-transfected clones, although all clones derived after transfection with an identical retroviral construct not containing GFP produced virus. Genomic Southern analysis of the GFP-transduced clones showed a much higher probability of rearrangement of the priviral sequences than in the control non-GFP clones. Overall, 18/34 S65T-GFP clones and 17/33 humanized-GFP clones had rearrangements, whereas 2/15 control non-GFP clones had rearrangements. Hence, producer cells expressing high levels of these GFP genes seem to be selected against, with stable clones undergoing major rearrangements or other mutations that both abrogate GFP expression and prevent vector production. These observations indicate that GFP may not be an appropriate reporter gene for gene transfer applications in our vector/packaging system.

  13. Diagnosis of eight groups of xeroderma pigmentosum by genetic complementation using recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Toshiharu; Okura, Masae; Ishii-Osai, Yasue; Hida, Tokimasa

    2016-10-01

    Because patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) must avoid ultraviolet (UV) light from an early age, an early diagnosis of this disorder is essential. XP is composed of seven genetic complementation groups, XP-A to -G, and a variant type (XP-V). To establish an easy and accurate diagnosis of the eight disease groups, we constructed recombinant adenoviruses that expressed one of the XP cDNA. When fibroblasts derived from patients with XP-A, -B, -C, -D, -F or -G were infected with the adenovirus expressing XPA, XPB, XPC, XPD, XPF or XPG, respectively, and UV-C at 5-20 J/m(2) was irradiated, cell viability was clearly recovered by the corresponding recombinant adenoviruses. In contrast, XP-E and XP-V cells were not significantly sensitive to UV irradiation and were barely complemented by the matched recombinant adenoviruses. However, co-infection of Ad-XPA with Ad-XPE increased survival rate of XP-E cells after UV-C exposure. When XP-V cell strains, including one derived from a Japanese patient, were infected with Ad-XPV, exposed to UV-B and cultured with 1 mmol/L of caffeine, flow cytometry detected a characteristic decrease in the S phase in all the XP-V cell strains. From these results, the eight groups of XP could be differentiated by utilizing a set of recombinant adenoviruses, indicating that our procedure provides a convenient and correct diagnostic method for all the XP groups including XP-E and XP-V.

  14. Efficient Transient Expression of Recombinant Proteins in Plants by the Novel pEff Vector Based on the Genome of Potato Virus X

    PubMed Central

    Mardanova, Eugenia S.; Blokhina, Elena A.; Tsybalova, Liudmila M.; Peyret, Hadrien; Lomonossoff, George P.; Ravin, Nikolai V.

    2017-01-01

    Agroinfiltration of plant leaves with binary vectors carrying a gene of interest within a plant viral vector is a rapid and efficient method for protein production in plants. Previously, we constructed a self-replicating vector, pA7248AMV, based on the genetic elements of potato virus X (PVX), and have shown that this vector can be used for the expression of recombinant proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. However, this vector is almost 18 kb long and therefore not convenient for genetic manipulation. Furthermore, for efficient expression of the target protein it should be co-agroinfiltrated with an additional binary vector expressing a suppressor of post-transcriptional gene silencing. Here, we improved this expression system by creating the novel pEff vector. Its backbone is about 5 kb shorter than the original vector and it contains an expression cassette for the silencing suppressor, P24, from grapevine leafroll-associated virus-2 alongside PVX genetic elements, thus eliminating the need of co-agroinfiltration. The pEff vector provides green fluorescent protein expression levels of up to 30% of total soluble protein. The novel vector was used for expression of the influenza vaccine candidate, M2eHBc, consisting of an extracellular domain of influenza virus M2 protein (M2e) fused to hepatitis B core antigen. Using the pEff system, M2eHBc was expressed to 5–10% of total soluble protein, several times higher than with original pA7248AMV vector. Plant-produced M2eHBc formed virus-like particles in vivo, as required for its use as a vaccine. The new self-replicating pEff vector could be used for fast and efficient production of various recombinant proteins in plants. PMID:28293244

  15. Interaction between hexon and L4-100K determines virus rescue and growth of hexon-chimeric recombinant Ad5 vectors

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jingyi; Dong, Jianing; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Baoming; Wang, Lizheng; Wang, Zixuan; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Hui; Yu, Bin; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xianghui

    2016-01-01

    The immunogenicity of recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) vectors has been shown to be suppressed by neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) directed primarily against hexon hypervariable regions (HVRs). Preexisting immunity can be circumvented by replacing HVRs of rAd5 hexon with those derived from alternate adenovirus serotypes. However, chimeric modification of rAd5 hexon HVRs tends to cause low packaging efficiency or low proliferation of rAd5 vectors, but the related mechanism remains unclear. In this study, several Ad5-based vectors with precise replacement of HVRs with those derived from Ad37 and Ad43 were generated. We first observed that a HVR-exchanged rAd5 vector displayed a higher efficacy of the recombinant virus rescue and growth improvement compared with the rAd5 vector, although most hexon-chimeric rAd5 vectors constructed by us and other groups have proven to be nonviable or growth defective. We therefore evaluated the structural stability of the chimeric hexons and their interactions with the L4-100K chaperone. We showed that the viability of hexon-chimeric Ad5 vectors was not attributed to the structural stability of the chimeric hexon, but rather to the hexon maturation which was assisted by L4-100K. Our results suggested that the intricate interaction between hexon and L4-100K would determine the virus rescue and proliferation efficiency of hexon-chimeric rAd5 vectors. PMID:26934960

  16. Interaction between hexon and L4-100K determines virus rescue and growth of hexon-chimeric recombinant Ad5 vectors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jingyi; Dong, Jianing; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Baoming; Wang, Lizheng; Wang, Zixuan; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Hui; Yu, Bin; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xianghui

    2016-03-03

    The immunogenicity of recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) vectors has been shown to be suppressed by neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) directed primarily against hexon hypervariable regions (HVRs). Preexisting immunity can be circumvented by replacing HVRs of rAd5 hexon with those derived from alternate adenovirus serotypes. However, chimeric modification of rAd5 hexon HVRs tends to cause low packaging efficiency or low proliferation of rAd5 vectors, but the related mechanism remains unclear. In this study, several Ad5-based vectors with precise replacement of HVRs with those derived from Ad37 and Ad43 were generated. We first observed that a HVR-exchanged rAd5 vector displayed a higher efficacy of the recombinant virus rescue and growth improvement compared with the rAd5 vector, although most hexon-chimeric rAd5 vectors constructed by us and other groups have proven to be nonviable or growth defective. We therefore evaluated the structural stability of the chimeric hexons and their interactions with the L4-100K chaperone. We showed that the viability of hexon-chimeric Ad5 vectors was not attributed to the structural stability of the chimeric hexon, but rather to the hexon maturation which was assisted by L4-100K. Our results suggested that the intricate interaction between hexon and L4-100K would determine the virus rescue and proliferation efficiency of hexon-chimeric rAd5 vectors.

  17. Three-year duration of immunity in dogs vaccinated with a canarypox-vectored recombinant canine distemper virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Larson, L J; Schultz, R D

    2007-01-01

    Two studies evaluated the duration of serologic response to the recombinant, canarypox-vectored canine distemper virus vaccine (Recombitek, Merial). Serologic duration of immunity was shown to be at least 36 months. Thus, Recombitek provides protection when administered less frequently than the manufacturer's label. After the initial vaccination protocol of two or more doses administered approximately 4 weeks apart, with the last dose given at 12 to 16 weeks of age or older, and re-vaccination at 1 year of age, Recombitek can confidently be readministered every 3 years with assurance of protection in immunocompetent dogs. This allows the vaccine to be administered in accordance with the recommendations of the American Animal Hospital Association Canine Vaccine Task Force and others.

  18. Recombinant adenoviral vector expressing HCV NS4 induces protective immune responses in a mouse model of Vaccinia-HCV virus infection: a dose and route conundrum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shakti; Vedi, Satish; Li, Wen; Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2014-05-13

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) leads to chronic infection in the majority of infected patients presumably due to failure or inefficiency of the immune responses generated. Both antibody and cellular immune responses have been suggested to be important in viral clearance. Non-replicative adenoviral vectors expressing antigens of interest are considered as attractive vaccine vectors for a number of pathogens. In this study, we sought to evaluate cellular and humoral immune responses against HCV NS4 protein using recombinant adenovirus as a vaccine vector expressing NS4 antigen. We have also measured the effect of antigen doses and routes of immunization on the quality and extent of the immune responses, especially their role in viral load reduction, in a recombinant Vaccinia-HCV (Vac-HCV) infection mouse model. Our results show that an optimum dose of adenovirus vector (2×10(7)pfu/mouse) administered intramuscularly (i.m.) induces high T cell proliferation, granzyme B-expressing CD8(+) T cells, pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and IL-6, and antibody responses that can significantly reduce the Vac-HCV viral load in the ovaries of female C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrate that recombinant adenovirus vector can induce both humoral and cellular protective immunity against HCV-NS4 antigen, and that immunity is intricately controlled by route and dose of immunizing vector.

  19. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors mediate efficient gene transduction in cultured neonatal and adult microglia.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei; Kang, John; Sopher, Bryce; Gillespie, James; Aloi, Macarena S; Odom, Guy L; Hopkins, Stephanie; Case, Amanda; Wang, David B; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Garden, Gwenn A

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are a specialized population of myeloid cells that mediate CNS innate immune responses. Efforts to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate microglia behaviors have been hampered by the lack of effective tools for manipulating gene expression. Cultured microglia are refractory to most chemical and electrical transfection methods, yielding little or no gene delivery and causing toxicity and/or inflammatory activation. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAVs) vectors are non-enveloped, single-stranded DNA vectors commonly used to transduce many primary cell types and tissues. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility and efficiency of utilizing rAAV serotype 2 (rAAV2) to modulate gene expression in cultured microglia. rAAV2 yields high transduction and causes minimal toxicity or inflammatory response in both neonatal and adult microglia. To demonstrate that rAAV transduction can induce functional protein expression, we used rAAV2 expressing Cre recombinase to successfully excise a LoxP-flanked miR155 gene in cultured microglia. We further evaluated rAAV serotypes 5, 6, 8, and 9, and observed that all efficiently transduced cultured microglia to varying degrees of success and caused little or no alteration in inflammatory gene expression. These results provide strong encouragement for the application of rAAV-mediated gene expression in microglia for mechanistic and therapeutic purposes. Neonatal microglia are functionally distinct from adult microglia, although the majority of in vitro studies utilize rodent neonatal microglia cultures because of difficulties of culturing adult cells. In addition, cultured microglia are refractory to most methods for modifying gene expression. Here, we developed a novel protocol for culturing adult microglia and evaluated the feasibility and efficiency of utilizing Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) to modulate gene expression in cultured microglia.

  20. Stable Expression of Lentiviral Antigens by Quality-Controlled Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Asrican, Rose; Lim, So-Yon; Sixsmith, Jaimie D.; Lukose, Regy; Souther, Sommer J. R.; Rayasam, Swati D. G.; Saelens, Joseph W.; Chen, Ching-ju; Seay, Sarah A.; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Magtanong, Leslie; Vermeul, Kim; Pajanirassa, Priyadharshini; Jimenez, Amanda E.; Ng, Tony W.; Tobin, David M.; Porcelli, Steven A.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Jacobs, William R.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    The well-established safety profile of the tuberculosis vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), makes it an attractive vehicle for heterologous expression of antigens from clinically relevant pathogens. However, successful generation of recombinant BCG strains possessing consistent insert expression has encountered challenges in stability. Here, we describe a method for the development of large recombinant BCG accession lots which stably express the lentiviral antigens, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag, using selectable leucine auxotrophic complementation. Successful establishment of vaccine stability stems from stringent quality control criteria which not only screen for highly stable complemented BCG ΔleuCD transformants but also thoroughly characterize postproduction quality. These parameters include consistent production of correctly sized antigen, retention of sequence-pure plasmid DNA, freeze-thaw recovery, enumeration of CFU, and assessment of cellular aggregates. Importantly, these quality assurance procedures were indicative of overall vaccine stability, were predictive for successful antigen expression in subsequent passaging both in vitro and in vivo, and correlated with induction of immune responses in murine models. This study has yielded a quality-controlled BCG ΔleuCD vaccine expressing HIV gp120 that retained stable full-length expression after 1024-fold amplification in vitro and following 60 days of growth in mice. A second vaccine lot expressed full-length SIV Gag for >1068-fold amplification in vitro and induced potent antigen-specific T cell populations in vaccinated mice. Production of large, well-defined recombinant BCG ΔleuCD lots can allow confidence that vaccine materials for immunogenicity and protection studies are not negatively affected by instability or differences between freshly grown production batches. PMID:25924766

  1. [Construction of replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus vector with hTFPI-2 gene by AdMax system and expression in U937 monocytes in vitro].

    PubMed

    Pan, Junjie; Shi, Haiming; Luo, Xinping; Ma, Duan; Liang, Wang; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Jun; Li, Jian

    2011-04-01

    We tried to construct and identify the recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus vector coding for human tissue factor pathway inhibitor 2 (hTFPI-2) gene by AdMax system in HEK293 cells. Firstly, we obtained hTFPI-2 gene from the recombinant plasmid pIRES2-EGFP-TFPI-2 by PCR using primers with restriction endonuclease site of EcoRI or SacI. After digesting the hTFPI-2 gene and plasmid PDC316-IRES-EGFP shuttle vector, we ligated them with T4 ligase and formed the recombinant shuttle vector PDC316-IRES-EGFP-hTFPI-2. It was confirmed that the ligation product was inserted the gene of hTFPI-2 correctly by sequencing. Then we took cotransfection of HEK293 cells with the recombinant shuttle vector and genomic plasmid pBHGloxdeltaE1,3Cre by liposome lipofectamine2000, and finished the package of recombinant adenovirus Ad-hTFPI-2. The results of the PCR test and restriction endonuclease digestion confirmed the successful construction of the recombinants Ad-hTFPI-2. Furthermore, we measured the titre of Ad-hTFPI-2 with the aid of green fluorescence protein expression after multiplication and purification. The titre was 0.931 x 10(12) pfu/ml. Finally, we infected U937 monocytes by purified Ad-hTFPI-2, and determined the infection efficiency and the TFPI-2's level and activity. The efficiency of Ad-hTFPI-2 infection in U937 cells was 89.33%. After infected by Ad-hTFPI-2, the TFPI-2's level in supernatant increased about 7 fold. Also the TFPI-2 in supernatant had activities of inhibiting trypsin and plasmin. The recombinant adenovirus with the hTFPI-2 gene was constructed successfully. It will be helpful for the further investigation of its potentiality to be applied in antiatherosclerosis.

  2. Further development of a recombinant feline herpesvirus type 1 vector expressing feline calicivirus immunogenic antigen.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, N; Fujita, K; Damiani, A; Sato, E; Kurosawa, K; Miyazawa, T; Ishiguro, S; Mochizuki, M; Maeda, K; Mikami, T

    1998-06-01

    We previously reported the attenuation of thymidine kinase (TK) deficient mutant (C7301dlTK) of feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) in cats and the construction of a recombinant FHV-1 (C7301dlTK-Cap) inserted a precursor capsid gene of feline calcivirus (FCV) into the TK deletion locus of the C7301dlTK. In this study, we constructed a further improved recombinant FHV-1 (dlTK(gCp)-Cap) carrying a putative FHV-1 gC promoter sequence upstream of the FCV precursor capsid gene of the C7301dlTK-Cap. Growth kinetics of the dlTK(gCp)-Cap in cell cultures was similar to those of C7301dlTK and C7301dlTK-Cap. A strong expression of FCV immunogenic antigen by dlTK(gCp)-Cap was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. In addition, one vaccination with dlTK(gCp)-Cap protected cats more effective against subsequent virulent FCV challenge than that with C7301dlTK-Cap.

  3. The HIV Tat protein transduction domain improves the biodistribution of beta-glucuronidase expressed from recombinant viral vectors.

    PubMed

    Xia, H; Mao, Q; Davidson, B L

    2001-07-01

    Treatment of inherited genetic diseases of the brain remains an intractable problem. Methods to improve the distribution of enzymes that are injected or expressed from transduced cells will be required for many human brain therapies. Recent studies showed that a peptide, the protein transduction domain (PTD) from HIV Tat, could improve the distribution of cytoplasmic reporter proteins when administered systemically as fusion proteins or cross-linked chimeras. The utility of this motif for noncytoplasmic proteins has not been determined. Here, we tested how the Tat motif affected uptake and biodistribution of the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucuronidase, the protein deficient in the disease mucopolysaccharidosis VII, when expressed from viral vectors. The Tat motif allowed for mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) independent uptake in vitro and significantly increased the distribution of beta-glucuronidase secreted from transduced cells after intravenous or direct brain injection in mice of recombinant vectors. Thus, enzymes modified to contain protein transduction motifs may represent a general strategy for improving the distribution of secreted proteins following in vivo gene transfer.

  4. Durable cytotoxic immune responses against gp120 elicited by recombinant SV40 vectors encoding HIV-1 gp120 +/- IL-15.

    PubMed

    McKee, Hayley J; T'sao, Patricia Y; Vera, Maria; Fortes, Puri; Strayer, David S

    2004-08-23

    BACKGROUND: A vaccine that elicits durable, powerful anti-HIV immunity remains an elusive goal. In these studies we tested whether multiple treatments with viral vector-delivered HIV envelope antigen (gp120), with and without IL-15, could help to approach that goal. For this purpose, we used recombinant Tag-deleted SV40-derived vectors (rSV40s), since they do not elicit neutralizing antibody responses, and so can be given multiply without loss of transduction efficiency. METHODS: SV(gp120) carried the coding sequences for HIV-1NL4-3 Env, and SV(mIL-15) carried the cDNA for mouse IL-15. Singly, and in combination, these two vectors were given monthly to BALB/cJ mice. Cytotoxic immunity and cytotoxic memory were tested in direct cytotoxicity assays using unselected effector cells. Antibody vs. gp120 was measured in a binding assay. In both cases, targets were P815 cells that were stably transfected with gp120. RESULTS: Multiple injections of SV(gp120) elicited powerful anti-gp120 cytolytic activity (>70% specific lysis) by unselected spleen cells. Cells from multiply-immunized mice that were rested 1 year after their last injections still showed >60% gp120-specific lysis. Anti-gp120 antibody was first detected after 2 monthly injections of SV(gp120) and remained elevated thereafter. Adding SV(mIL-15) to the immunization regimen dramatically accelerated the development of memory cytolytic responses, with >/= 50% specific lysis seen 1 month after two treatments. IL-15 did not alter the development of antibody responses. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, rSV40s encoding antigens and immunostimulatory cytokines may be useful tools for priming and/or boosting immune responses against HIV.

  5. Stability of vaccinia-vectored recombinant oral rabies vaccine under field conditions: a 3-year study.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Joseph R; Fry, Alethea M; Siev, David; Slate, Dennis; Lewis, Charles; Gatewood, Donna M

    2011-10-01

    Rabies is an incurable zoonotic disease caused by rabies virus, a member of the rhabdovirus family. It is transmitted through the bite of an infected animal. Control methods, including oral rabies vaccination (ORV) programs, have led to a reduction in the spread and prevalence of the disease in wildlife. This study evaluated the stability of RABORAL, a recombinant vaccinia virus vaccine that is used in oral rabies vaccination programs. The vaccine was studied in various field microenvironments in order to describe its viability and facilitate effective baiting strategies. Field microenvironments influenced the stability of this vaccine in this study. This study emphasizes the importance of understanding how vaccines perform under varying field conditions in order to plan effective baiting strategies.

  6. Complete correction of hyperphenylalaninemia following liver-directed, recombinant AAV2/8 vector-mediated gene therapy in murine phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Harding, C O; Gillingham, M B; Hamman, K; Clark, H; Goebel-Daghighi, E; Bird, A; Koeberl, D D

    2006-03-01

    Novel recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors pseudotyped with serotype 8 capsid (rAAV2/8) have recently shown exciting promise as effective liver-directed gene transfer reagents. We have produced a novel liver-specific rAAV2/8 vector expressing the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase (Pah) cDNA and have administered this vector to hyperphenylalaninemic PAH-deficient Pah(enu2) mice, a model of human phenylketonuria (PKU). Our hypothesis was that this vector would produce sufficient hepatocyte transduction frequency and PAH activity to correct blood phenylalanine levels in murine PKU. Portal vein injection of recombinant AAV2/8 vector into five adult Pah(enu2) mice yielded complete and stable (up to 17 weeks) correction of serum phenylalanine levels. Liver PAH activity was corrected to 11.5+/-2.4% of wild type liver activity and was associated with a significant increase in phenylalanine clearance following parenteral phenylalanine challenge. Although questions of long-term safety and stability of expression remain, recombinant AAV2/8-mediated, liver-directed gene therapy is a promising novel treatment approach for PKU and allied inborn errors of metabolism.

  7. Complete correction of hyperphenylalaninemia following liver-directed, recombinant AAV2/8 vector-mediated gene therapy in murine phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Harding, CO; Gillingham, MB; Hamman, K; Clark, H; Goebel-Daghighi, E; Bird, A; Koeberl, DD

    2009-01-01

    Novel recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors pseudo-typed with serotype 8 capsid (rAAV2/8) have recently shown exciting promise as effective liver-directed gene transfer reagents. We have produced a novel liver-specific rAAV2/8 vector expressing the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase (Pah) cDNA and have administered this vector to hyperphenylalaninemic PAH-deficient Pahenu2 mice, a model of human phenylketonuria (PKU). Our hypothesis was that this vector would produce sufficient hepatocyte transduction frequency and PAH activity to correct blood phenylalanine levels in murine PKU. Portal vein injection of recombinant AAV2/8 vector into five adult Pahenu2 mice yielded complete and stable (up to 17 weeks) correction of serum phenylalanine levels. Liver PAH activity was corrected to 11.5±2.4% of wild type liver activity and was associated with a significant increase in phenylalanine clearance following parenteral phenylalanine challenge. Although questions of long-term safety and stability of expression remain, recombinant AAV2/8-mediated, liver-directed gene therapy is a promising novel treatment approach for PKU and allied inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:16319949

  8. Protection against henipavirus infection by use of recombinant adeno-associated virus-vector vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ploquin, Aurélie; Szécsi, Judit; Mathieu, Cyrille; Guillaume, Vanessa; Barateau, Véronique; Ong, Kien Chai; Wong, Kum Thong; Cosset, François-Loïc; Horvat, Branka; Salvetti, Anna

    2013-02-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV) are closely related, recently emerged paramyxoviruses that are capable of causing considerable morbidity and mortality in several mammalian species, including humans. Henipavirus-specific vaccines are still commercially unavailable, and development of novel antiviral strategies to prevent lethal infections due to henipaviruses is highly desirable. Here we describe the development of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vaccines expressing the NiV G protein. Characterization of these vaccines in mice demonstrated that a single intramuscular AAV injection was sufficient to induce a potent and long-lasting antibody response. Translational studies in hamsters further demonstrated that all vaccinated animals were protected against lethal challenge with NiV. In addition, this vaccine induced a cross-protective immune response that was able to protect 50% of the animals against a challenge by HeV. This study presents a new efficient vaccination strategy against henipaviruses and opens novel perspectives on the use of AAV vectors as vaccines against emergent diseases.

  9. Myocardial gene delivery using molecular cardiac surgery with recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors in vivo.

    PubMed

    White, J D; Thesier, D M; Swain, J B D; Katz, M G; Tomasulo, C; Henderson, A; Wang, L; Yarnall, C; Fargnoli, A; Sumaroka, M; Isidro, A; Petrov, M; Holt, D; Nolen-Walston, R; Koch, W J; Stedman, H H; Rabinowitz, J; Bridges, C R

    2011-06-01

    We use a novel technique that allows for closed recirculation of vector genomes in the cardiac circulation using cardiopulmonary bypass, referred to here as molecular cardiac surgery with recirculating delivery (MCARD). We demonstrate that this platform technology is highly efficient in isolating the heart from the systemic circulation in vivo. Using MCARD, we compare the relative efficacy of single-stranded (ss) adeno-associated virus (AAV)6, ssAAV9 and self-complimentary (sc)AAV6-encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein, driven by the constitutive cytomegalovirus promoter to transduce the ovine myocardium in situ. MCARD allows for the unprecedented delivery of up to 48 green fluorescent protein genome copies per cell globally in the sheep left ventricular (LV) myocardium. We demonstrate that scAAV6-mediated MCARD delivery results in global, cardiac-specific LV gene expression in the ovine heart and provides for considerably more robust and cardiac-specific gene delivery than other available delivery techniques such as intramuscular injection or intracoronary injection; thus, representing a potential, clinically translatable platform for heart failure gene therapy.

  10. An expression vector taolored for large-scale, high-throughput purification of recombinant proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M.; Zhou, M.; Sanville Millard, C.; Clancy, S.; Stols, L.; Eschenfeldt, W.; Collart, F.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division

    2006-01-01

    Production of milligram quantities of numerous proteins for structural and functional studies requires an efficient purification pipeline. We found that the dual tag, his(6)-tag-maltose-binding protein (MBP), intended to facilitate purification and enhance proteins' solubility, disrupted such a pipeline, requiring additional screening and purification steps. Not all proteins rendered soluble by fusion to MBP remained soluble after its proteolytic removal, and in those cases where the protein remained soluble, standard purification protocols failed to remove completely the stoichiometric amount of his(6)-tagged MBP generated by proteolysis. Both liabilities were alleviated by construction of a vector that produces fusion proteins in which MBP, the his(6)-tag and the target protein are separated by highly specific protease cleavage sites in the configuration MBP-site-his(6)-site-protein. In vivo cleavage at the first site by co-expressed protease generated untagged MBP and his(6)-tagged target protein. Proteins not truly rendered soluble by transient association with MBP precipitated, and untagged MBP was easily separated from the his-tagged target protein by conventional protocols. The second protease cleavage site allowed removal of the his(6)-tag.

  11. Recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors in the treatment of rare diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, Eric; Samulski, R. Jude

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 25 million Americans are living with rare diseases. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy is an emerging therapeutic option for the more than 7,000 identified rare diseases. This paper highlights the benefits of AAV therapy compared to conventional small molecules, discusses current pre-clinical and clinical applications of AAV-mediated gene therapy, and offers insights into cutting edge research that will shape the future of AAV for broad therapeutic use. Areas covered In this review the biology of AAV and our ability to generate disease-specific variants is summarized. Limitations of current therapy are reviewed, with an emphasis on immune detection of virus, viral tropism and tissue targeting, and limitations of gene expression. Information for this review was found using PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov. Expert opinion Currently the scope of clinical trials of AAV gene therapy is concentrated in an array of phase I/II safety trials with less than two dozen rare diseases featured. Pre-clinical, translational studies are expanding in number as developments within the last decade have made generation of improved AAV vectors available to more researchers. Further, one bottleneck that is being overcome is the availability of disease models, which will allow for improved preclinical testing and advancement of AAV to more clinical applications. PMID:27668135

  12. Use of DNA and recombinant canarypox viral (ALVAC) vectors for equine herpes virus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Minke, J M; Fischer, L; Baudu, Ph; Guigal, P M; Sindle, T; Mumford, J A; Audonnet, J C

    2006-05-15

    In this study, experimental canarypox virus (ALVAC) and plasmid DNA recombinant vaccines expressing the gB, gC and gD glycoproteins of EHV-1 were assessed for their ability to protect conventional ponies against a respiratory challenge with EHV-1. In addition, potential means of enhancing serological responses in horses to ALVAC and DNA vaccination were explored. These included co-administration of the antigen with conventional adjuvants, complexation with DMRIE-DOPE and co-expression of the antigen along with equine GM-CSF. Groups of EHV primed ponies were vaccinated twice intra-muscularly with one dose of the appropriate test vaccine at an interval of 5 weeks. Two to 3 weeks after the second vaccination, ponies were infected intra-nasally with the virulent Ab4 strain of EHV-1 after which they were observed clinically and sampled for virological investigations. The results demonstrated that DNA and ALVAC vaccination markedly reduced virus excretion after challenge in terms of duration and magnitude, but failed to protect against cell-associated viremia. Noteworthy was the almost complete absence of virus excretion in the group of ponies vaccinated with ALVAC-EHV in the presence of Carbopol adjuvant or DNA plasmid formulated with aluminium phosphate. The administration of the DNA vaccine in the presence of GM-CSF and formulated in DMRIE-DOPE and of the ALVAC vaccine in the presence of Carbopol adjuvant significantly improved virus neutralising antibody responses to EHV-1. These findings indicate that DNA and ALVAC vaccination is a promising approach for the immunological control of EHV-1 infection, but that more research is needed to identify the immunodominant protective antigens of EHV-1 and their interaction with the equine immune system.

  13. Long-term gene transfer to mouse fetuses with recombinant adenovirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, M; Jerebtsova, M; Batshaw, M L; Newman, K; Ye, X

    2000-12-01

    We have developed a micro-injection technique to deliver recombinant adenovirus and AAV to mouse fetuses at day 15 after conception. Several routes of delivery, including injections to the amniotic fluid, the front limb, the placenta, the liver, and the retro-orbital venus plexus, were tested using an E1-deleted recombinant adenovirus (Ad.CBlacZ) or a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV.CMVlacZ) carrying a beta-galactosidase (lacZ) gene. Injection of Ad.CBlacZ into the amniotic cavity led to transgene expression in the skin and in the digestive tract of the fetuses. Injection of Ad.CBlacZ in the front limb resulted in LacZ expression in all major muscle groups around the injection site and at low levels in the liver. The other three routes of delivery, ie intra-placental, intra-hepatic and retro-orbital injections of Ad.CBlacZ, all led to lacZ expression predominantly in the liver. Further studies revealed a maximal tolerant dose (defined as the highest viral dose with < or =20% mortality in the injected fetuses) of 1 x 10(9) particles per fetus for intra- hepatic injections, 3 x 10(9) particles per fetus for intra-placental injection, 1 x 1010 particles per fetus for retro-orbital and intra-amniotic injections, and 2 x 10(10) particle per fetus for intra-muscular injection. The adenovirus-mediated lacZ expression in liver and muscle persisted for at least 6 weeks. Intra-muscular injection of AAV.CMVlacZ also resulted in lacZ expression in the muscle up to 3 months after birth with no indication of cellular immune response at the injection site. Taken together, our results demonstrated that prolonged transgene expression can be achieved by in utero gene transfer using either adenoviral or AAV vectors. The distribution of virus-mediated gene transfer appeared to determined mostly by the route of viral administration.

  14. In vivo analysis of fibroin heavy chain signal peptide of silkworm Bombyx mori using recombinant baculovirus as vector

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shengpeng; Guo Tingqing; Guo Xiuyang; Huang Junting; Lu Changde . E-mail: cdlu@sibs.ac.cn

    2006-03-24

    In order to investigate the functional signal peptide of silkworm fibroin heavy chain (FibH) and the effect of N- and C-terminal parts of FibH on the secretion of FibH in vivo, N- and C-terminal segments of fibh gene were fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. The fused gene was then introduced into silkworm larvae and expressed in silk gland using recombinant AcMNPV (Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus) as vector. The fluorescence of EGFP was observed with fluorescence microscope. FibH-EGFP fusion proteins extracted from silk gland were analyzed by Western blot. Results showed that the two alpha helices within N-terminal 163 amino acid residues and the C-terminal 61 amino acid residues were not necessary for cleavage of signal peptide and secretion of the fusion protein into silk gland. Then the C-terminal 61 amino acid residues were substituted with a His-tag in the fusion protein to facilitate the purification. N-terminal sequencing of the purified protein showed that the signal cleavage site is between position 21 and 22 amino acid residues.

  15. Postexposure Protection Against Marburg Haemorrhagic Fever with Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vectors in Non-Human Primates: An Efficacy Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-29

    virus (MARV). We aimed to test the effi cacy of a replication -competent vaccine based on attenuated recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV...including vaccines based on recombinant adenoviruses12,13 and recombinant alphaviruses .8 We previously described the generation and assessment of a live...such as Marburg virus (MARV). We aimed to test the efficacy of a replication -competent vaccine based on attenuated recombinant vesicular stomatitis

  16. Generation of recombinant bacillus Calmette-Guérin and Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing BfpA and intimin as vaccine vectors against enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vasconcellos, Halyka Luzorio Franzotti; Scaramuzzi, Karina; Nascimento, Ivan Pereira; Da Costa Ferreira, Jorge M; Abe, Cecilia M; Piazza, Roxane M F; Kipnis, Andre; Dias da Silva, Wilmar

    2012-09-07

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is an important cause of diarrhea in children. EPEC adheres to the intestinal epithelium and causes attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions. Recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis (Smeg) and Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains were constructed to express either BfpA or intimin. The entire bfpA gene and a portion of the intimin gene were amplified by PCR from EPEC genomic DNA and inserted into the pMIP12 vector at the BamHI/KpnI sites. The pMIP_bfpA and pMIP_intimin vectors were introduced separately into Smeg and BCG. Recombinant clones were selected based on kanamycin resistance and designated rSmeg_pMIP_(bfpA or intimin) and rBCG_pMIP_(bfpA or intimin). The expression of bfpA and intimin was detected by Immunoblotting using polyclonal anti-BfpA and anti-intimin antibodies. The immunogenicity of these proteins was assessed in C57BL/6 mice by assaying the feces and serum for the presence of anti-BfpA and anti-intimin IgA and IgG antibodies. TNF-α and INF-γ were produced in vitro by spleen cells from mice immunized with recombinant BfpA, whereas TNF-γ was produced in mice immunized with recombinant intimin. The adhesion of EPEC (E2348/69) to HEp-2 target cells was blocked by IgA or IgG antibodies from mice immunized with recombinant BfpA or intimin but not by antibodies from non-immunized mice. Immunogenic non-infectious vectors containing relevant EPEC virulence genes may be promising vaccine candidates.

  17. Integration-free reprogramming of human somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) without viral vectors, recombinant DNA, and genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are envisaged to be integral components of multicellular systems engineered for therapeutic applications. The reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via recombinant expression of a limited number of transcription factors, which was first achieved by Yamanaka and colleagues in 2007, heralded a major breakthrough in the stem cell field. Since then, there has been rapid progress in the field of iPSC generation, including the identification of various small molecules that can enhance reprogramming efficiency and reduce the number of different transcription factors required for reprogramming. Nevertheless, the major obstacles facing clinical applications of iPSCs are safety concerns associated with the use of viral vectors and recombinant DNA for expressing the appropriate transcription factors during reprogramming. In particular, permanent genetic modifications to newly reprogrammed iPSCs have to be avoided in order to meet stringent safety requirements for clinical therapy. These safety challenges can be overcome by new technology platforms that enable cellular reprogramming to iPSCs without the need to utilize either recombinant DNA or viral vectors. The use of recombinant cell-penetrating peptides and direct transfection of synthetic mRNA encoding appropriate transcription factors have both been shown to successfully reprogram somatic cells to iPSCs. It has also been shown more recently that the direct transfection of certain miRNA species can reprogram somatic cells to pluripotency without the need for any of the transcription factors commonly utilized for iPSC generation. This chapter describes protocols for iPSC generation with these new techniques, which would obviate the use of recombinant DNA and viral vectors in cellular reprogramming, thus avoiding permanent genetic modification to the reprogrammed cells.

  18. High-level recombinant protein production in CHO cells using an adenoviral vector and the cumate gene-switch.

    PubMed

    Gaillet, Bruno; Gilbert, Rénald; Amziani, Rachid; Guilbault, Claire; Gadoury, Christine; Caron, Antoine W; Mullick, Alaka; Garnier, Alain; Massie, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    To facilitate and accelerate the production of eukaryotic proteins with correct post-translational modifications, we have developed a protein production system based on the transduction of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using adenovirus vectors (AdVs). We have engineered a CHO cell line (CHO-cTA) that stably expresses the transactivator (cTA) of our newly developed cumate gene-switch transcription system. This cell line is adapted to suspension culture and can grow in serum-free and protein-free medium. To increase the transduction level of AdVs, we have also generated a cell line (CHO-cTA-CAR) that expresses additional amounts of the coxackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on its surface. Recombinant protein production was tested using an AdV carrying the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) under the control of the CR5 promoter, which is strongly and specifically activated by binding to cTA. The SEAP expression was linked to the expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) to facilitate titration of the AdV. We monitored SEAP expression on a daily basis for 9 days after transduction of CHO-cTA and CHO-cTA-CAR using different quantities of AdVs at 37 and 30 degrees C. Incubation at the latter temperature increased the production of SEAP at least 10-fold, and the presence of CAR increased the transduction level of the AdV. Maximum SEAP production (63 mg/L) was achieved at 6-7 days post-infection at 30 degrees C by transducing CHO-cTA-CAR with 500 infectious particles/cell. Because numerous AdVs can now be generated within a few weeks and large-scale production of AdVs is now a routine procedure, this system could be used to produce rapidly milligram quantities of a battery of recombinant proteins as well as for large-scale protein production.

  19. Vaccine strategies against Babesia bovis based on prime-boost immunizations in mice with modified vaccinia Ankara vector and recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo Ortiz, José Manuel; Del Médico Zajac, María Paula; Zanetti, Flavia Adriana; Molinari, María Paula; Gravisaco, María José; Calamante, Gabriela; Wilkowsky, Silvina Elizabeth

    2014-08-06

    In this study, a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara vector expressing a chimeric multi-antigen was obtained and evaluated as a candidate vaccine in homologous and heterologous prime-boost immunizations with a recombinant protein cocktail. The chimeric multi-antigen comprises immunodominant B and T cell regions of three Babesia bovis proteins. Humoral and cellular immune responses were evaluated in mice to compare the immunogenicity induced by different immunization schemes. The best vaccination scheme was achieved with a prime of protein cocktail and a boost with the recombinant virus. This scheme induced high level of specific IgG antibodies and secreted IFN and a high degree of activation of IFNγ(+) CD4(+) and CD8(+) specific T cells. This is the first report in which a novel vaccine candidate was constructed based on a rationally designed multi-antigen and evaluated in a prime-boost regime, optimizing the immune response necessary for protection against bovine babesiosis.

  20. Evolutionary genetics and vector adaptation of recombinant viruses of the western equine encephalitis antigenic complex provides new insights into alphavirus diversity and host switching

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Andrew B.; Stallknecht, David E.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), Highlands J virus (HJV), and Fort Morgan virus (FMV) are the sole representatives of the WEE antigenic complex of the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, that are endemic to North America. All three viruses have their ancestry in a recombination event involving eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) and a Sindbis (SIN)-like virus that gave rise to a chimeric alphavirus that subsequently diversified into the present-day WEEV, HJV, and FMV. Here, we present a comparative analysis of the genetic, ecological, and evolutionary relationships among these recombinant-origin viruses, including the description of a nsP4 polymerase mutation in FMV that allows it to circumvent the host range barrier to Asian tiger mosquito cells, a vector species that is normally refractory to infection. Notably, we also provide evidence that the recombination event that gave rise to these three WEEV antigenic complex viruses may have occurred in North America. PMID:25463613

  1. Evolutionary genetics and vector adaptation of recombinant viruses of the western equine encephalitis antigenic complex provides new insights into alphavirus diversity and host switching.

    PubMed

    Allison, Andrew B; Stallknecht, David E; Holmes, Edward C

    2015-01-01

    Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), Highlands J virus (HJV), and Fort Morgan virus (FMV) are the sole representatives of the WEE antigenic complex of the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, that are endemic to North America. All three viruses have their ancestry in a recombination event involving eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) and a Sindbis (SIN)-like virus that gave rise to a chimeric alphavirus that subsequently diversified into the present-day WEEV, HJV, and FMV. Here, we present a comparative analysis of the genetic, ecological, and evolutionary relationships among these recombinant-origin viruses, including the description of a nsP4 polymerase mutation in FMV that allows it to circumvent the host range barrier to Asian tiger mosquito cells, a vector species that is normally refractory to infection. Notably, we also provide evidence that the recombination event that gave rise to these three WEEV antigenic complex viruses may have occurred in North America.

  2. Overcoming inefficient secretion of recombinant VEGF-C in baculovirus expression vector system by simple purification of the protein from cell lysate.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Tomasz; Kulesza, Małgorzata; Bzowska, Monika; Wyroba, Barbara; Kilarski, Witold W; Bereta, Joanna

    2015-06-01

    The first reports about successfully expressed recombinant proteins with the use of a baculovirus vector were published over 30years ago. Despite the long time of refining this expression system, early problems with the production of baculovirus-derived secretory proteins are still not satisfactorily solved. The high expression level driven by baculoviral promoters often does not result in the desired yield of secreted recombinant proteins, which frequently accumulate inside insect cells and are only partially processed. During our attempts to produce vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C) with the use of a baculovirus vector we also faced an inefficient secretion of the recombinant protein to culture medium. We were not able to improve the outcome and obtain an acceptable concentration of VEGF-C in the medium by changing the culture conditions or utilizing different signal peptides. However, as a significant amount of native VEGF-C was detected inside the baculovirus-infected cells, we developed a simple method to purify recombinant, glycosylated VEGF-C from a lysate of the cells. The presented results indicate that the lack of a secretory protein in the insect cell culture medium after baculovirus infection does not necessarily signify failure in the production of the protein. As demonstrated by us and contrary to generally accepted views, the lysate of baculovirus-infected cells may constitute a valuable source of the biologically active, secretory protein.

  3. Distribution of AAV8 particles in cell lysates and culture media changes with time and is dependent on the recombinant vector

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Bryan A; Drury, Jason E; Morton, Christopher L; Spence, Yunyu; Lockey, Timothy D; Nathwani, Amit C; Davidoff, Andrew M; Meagher, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    With clinical trials ongoing, efficient clinical production of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to treat large numbers of patients remains a challenge. We compared distribution of AAV8 packaged with Factor VIII (FVIII) in cell culture media and lysates on days 3, 5, 6, and 7 post-transfection and found increasing viral production through day 6, with the proportion of viral particles in the media increasing from 76% at day 3 to 94% by day 7. Compared to FVIII, AAV8 packaged with Factor IX and Protective Protein/Cathepsin A vectors demonstrated a greater shift from lysate towards media from day 3 to 6, implying that particle distribution is dependent on recombinant vector. Larger-scale productions showed that the ratio of full-to-empty AAV particles is similar in media and lysate, and that AAV harvested on day 6 post-transfection provides equivalent function in mice compared to AAV harvested on day 3. This demonstrates that AAV8 production can be optimized by prolonging the duration of culture post-transfection, and simplified by allowing harvest of media only, with disposal of cells that contain 10% or less of total vector yield. Additionally, the difference in particle distribution with different expression cassettes implies a recombinant vector-dependent processing mechanism which should be taken into account during process development. PMID:27069949

  4. The impact of AAV capsid-specific T cell responses on design and outcome of clinical gene transfer trials with recombinant AAV vectors - an evolving controversy.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Hildegund Cj; High, Katherine A

    2017-01-02

    Recombinant adenovirus-associated (rAAV) vectors due to their ease of construction, wide tissue tropism and lack of pathogenicity remain at the forefront for long-term gene replacement therapy. In spite of very encouraging pre-clinical results, clinical trials were initially unsuccessful; expression of the rAAV vector-delivered therapeutic protein was transient. Loss of expression was linked to an expansion of AAV capsid-specific T cell responses, leading to the hypothesis that rAAV vectors recall pre-existing memory T cells that had been induced by natural infections with AAV together with a helper virus. Although this was hotly debated at first, AAV capsid-specific T cell responses were observed in several gene transfer trials that used high doses of rAAV vectors. Subsequent trials designed to circumvent these T cell responses through the use of immunosuppressive drugs, rAAV vectors based on rare serotypes or modified to allow for therapeutic levels of the transgene product at low, non-immunogenic vector doses are now successful in correcting debilitating diseases.

  5. Heterologous prime-boost-boost immunisation of Chinese cynomolgus macaques using DNA and recombinant poxvirus vectors expressing HIV-1 virus-like particles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is renewed interest in the development of poxvirus vector-based HIV vaccines due to the protective effect observed with repeated recombinant canarypox priming with gp120 boosting in the recent Thai placebo-controlled trial. This study sought to investigate whether a heterologous prime-boost-boost vaccine regimen in Chinese cynomolgus macaques with a DNA vaccine and recombinant poxviral vectors expressing HIV virus-like particles bearing envelopes derived from the most prevalent clades circulating in sub-Saharan Africa, focused the antibody response to shared neutralising epitopes. Methods Three Chinese cynomolgus macaques were immunised via intramuscular injections using a regimen composed of a prime with two DNA vaccines expressing clade A Env/clade B Gag followed by boosting with recombinant fowlpox virus expressing HIV-1 clade D Gag, Env and cholera toxin B subunit followed by the final boost with recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing HIV-1 clade C Env, Gag and human complement protein C3d. We measured the macaque serum antibody responses by ELISA, enumerated T cell responses by IFN-γ ELISpot and assessed seroneutralisation of HIV-1 using the TZM-bl β-galactosidase assay with primary isolates of HIV-1. Results This study shows that large and complex synthetic DNA sequences can be successfully cloned in a single step into two poxvirus vectors: MVA and FPV and the recombinant poxviruses could be grown to high titres. The vaccine candidates showed appropriate expression of recombinant proteins with the formation of authentic HIV virus-like particles seen on transmission electron microscopy. In addition the b12 epitope was shown to be held in common by the vaccine candidates using confocal immunofluorescent microscopy. The vaccine candidates were safely administered to Chinese cynomolgus macaques which elicited modest T cell responses at the end of the study but only one out of the three macaques elicited an HIV-specific antibody

  6. Construction of infectious cDNA clone derived from a classical swine fever virus field isolate in BAC vector using in vitro overlap extension PCR and recombination.

    PubMed

    Kamboj, Aman; Saini, Mohini; Rajan, Lekshmi S; Patel, Chhabi Lal; Chaturvedi, V K; Gupta, Praveen K

    2015-12-15

    To develop reverse genetics system of RNA viruses, cloning of full-length viral genome is required which is often challenging due to many steps involved. In this study, we report cloning of full-length cDNA from an Indian field isolate (CSFV/IVRI/VB-131) of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) using in vitro overlap extension PCR and recombination which drastically reduced the number of cloning steps. The genome of CSFV was amplified in six overlapping cDNA fragments, linked by overlap extension PCR and cloned in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector using in vitro recombination method to generate full-length cDNA clone. The full-length CSFV cDNA clone was found stable in E. coli Stellar and DH10B cells. The full-length RNA was transcribed in vitro using T7 RNA polymerase and transfected in PK15 cells using Neon-tip electroporator to rescue infectious CSFV. The progeny CSFV was propagated in PK15 cells and found indistinguishable from the parent virus. The expression of CSFV proteins were detected in cytoplasm of PK15 cells infected with progeny CSFV at 72 h post-infection. We concluded that the in vitro overlap extension PCR and recombination method is useful to construct stable full-length cDNA clone of RNA virus in BAC vector.

  7. [Construction of eukaryotic recombinant vector and expression in COS7 cell of LipL32-HlyX fusion gene from Leptospira serovar Lai].

    PubMed

    Huang, Bi; Bao, Lang; Zhong, Qi; Zhang, Huidong; Zhang, Ying

    2009-04-01

    This study was conducted to construct eukaryotic recombinant vector of LipL32-HlyX fusion gene from Leptospira serovar Lai and express it in mammalian cell. Both of LipL32 gene and HlyX gene were amplified from Leptospira strain O17 genomic DNA by PCR. Then with the two genes as template, LipL32-HlyX fusion gene was obtained by SOE PCR (gene splicing by overlap extension PCR). The fusion gene was then cloned into pcDNA3.1 by restriction nuclease digestion. Having been transformed into E. coli DH5alpha, the recombiant plasmid was identified by restriction nuclease digestion, PCR analysis and sequencing. The recombinant plasmid was then transfected into COS7 cell whose expression was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis. RT-PCR amplified a fragment about 2000 bp and Western blotting analysis found a specific band about 75 KD which was consistent with the expected fusion protein size. In conclusion, the successful construction of eukaryotic recombinant vector containing LipL32-HlyX fusion gene and the effective expression in mammalian have laid a foundation for the application of Leptospira DNA vaccine.

  8. [Construction of a recombinant baculovirus transfer vector with two promoters expressing the anti-human CD28 chimeric antibody by using TP-PCR method].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Chen, Yong-Jing; Qiu, Yu-Hua; Zheng, Feng-Feng; Zhu, Jiang

    2005-09-01

    CD28, a cell surface glycoprotein, predominantly expressed on T cells, belongs to the Ig superfamily and provides critical co-stimulatory signals. The data which have published indicate that the monoclonal antibody against CD28 can decrease curative effects when it was applied in vivo for a long time. In order to avoid the human-anti-mouse action, anti-CD28 mAb must be humanized before it can be used in clinical study. Chimeric antibody, consisting of variable regions of mouse antibody and the constant regions of human IgG1, is often chosen by designers in generating humanized antibody. In this study, to prepare the anti-human CD28 chimeric antibody, the genes coding variable regions of anti-CD28 mAb and the constant regions of human IgG1 were cloned by PCR method. Then, the target genes were assembled by TP-PCR, a novel method developed for fusing genes without designing endonuclease sites at the both end of the target genes, and inserted into the baculovirus transfer vector pAcUW3 respectively. Thus, the recombinant baculovirus transfer vector with two strong promoters, ph and p10 was successfully constructed, which can express two different foreign genes at the same time. The recombinant vector was identified by the methods of restriction digesting, electrophoresis, PCR amplification and further verified by DNA sequence analysis. This work will contribute to expressing the chimeric CD28 antibody in insect cells.

  9. Phase I trial of intramuscular injection of a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 alphal-antitrypsin (AAT) vector in AAT-deficient adults.

    PubMed

    Brantly, Mark L; Spencer, L Terry; Humphries, Margaret; Conlon, Thomas J; Spencer, Carolyn T; Poirier, Amy; Garlington, Wendy; Baker, Dawn; Song, Sihong; Berns, Kenneth I; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Snyder, Richard O; Byrne, Barry J; Flotte, Terence R

    2006-12-01

    A phase I trial of intramuscular injection of a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (rAAV2) alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) vector was performed in 12 AAT-deficient adults, 10 of whom were male. All subjects were either homozygous for the most common AAT mutation (a missense mutation designated PI*Z) or compound heterozygous for PI*Z and another mutation known to cause disease. There were four dose cohorts, ranging from 2.1 x 10(12) vector genomes (VG) to 6.9 x 10(13) VG, with three subjects per cohort. Subjects were injected sequentially in a dose-escalating fashion with a minimum of 14 days between patients. Subjects who had been receiving AAT protein replacement discontinued that therapy 28 days before vector administration. There were no vector-related serious adverse events in any of the 12 participants. Vector DNA sequences were detected in the blood between 1 and 3 days after injection in nearly all patients receiving doses of 6.9 x 10(12) VG or higher. Anti-AAV2 capsid antibodies were present and rose after vector injection, but no other immune responses were detected. One subject who had not been receiving protein replacement exhibited low-level expression of wild-type M-AAT in the serum (82 nM), which was detectable 30 days after receiving an injection of 2.1 x 10(13) VG. Unfortunately, residual but declining M-AAT levels from the washout of the protein replacement elevated background levels sufficiently to obscure any possible vector expression in that range in most of the other individuals in the higher dose cohorts.

  10. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in Cynomolgus Macaques of rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1, a Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Expressing Retinoschisin.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guo-Jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Miller, Paul E; Sharma, Alok K; Ver Hoeve, James N; Howard, Kellie; Knop, David R; Neuringer, Martha; McGill, Trevor; Stoddard, Jonathan; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2015-09-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation is developing rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector for treatment of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS), an inherited retinal disease characterized by splitting (schisis) of retinal layers causing poor vision. We report here results of a study evaluating the safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1 in normal cynomolgus macaques. Three groups of male animals (n = 6 per group) received an intravitreal injection in one eye of either vehicle, or rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1 at one of two dose levels (4 × 10(10) or 4 × 10(11) vg/eye). Half the animals were sacrificed after 14 days and the others after 91 or 115 days. The intravitreal injection procedure was well tolerated in all groups. Serial ophthalmic examinations demonstrated a dose-related anterior and posterior segment inflammatory response that improved over time. There were no test article-related effects on intraocular pressure, electroretinography, visual evoked potential, hematology, coagulation, clinical chemistry, or gross necropsy observations. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal or moderate mononuclear infiltrates in 6 of 12 vector-injected eyes. Immunohistochemical staining showed RS1 labeling of the ganglion cell layer at the foveal slope in vector-injected eyes at both dose levels. Serum anti-AAV antibodies were detected in 4 of 6 vector-injected animals at the day 15 sacrifice and all vector-injected animals at later time points. No animals developed antibodies to RS1. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in the injected eye but minimal or no vector DNA in any other tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1 in clinical studies in patients with XLRS.

  11. Protective immunization of horses with a recombinant canarypox virus vectored vaccine co-expressing genes encoding the outer capsid proteins of African horse sickness virus.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Alan J; Quan, Melvyn; Lourens, Carina W; Audonnet, Jean-Christophe; Minke, Jules M; Yao, Jiansheng; He, Ling; Nordgren, Robert; Gardner, Ian A; Maclachlan, N James

    2009-07-16

    We describe the development and preliminary characterization of a recombinant canarypox virus vectored (ALVAC) vaccine for protective immunization of equids against African horse sickness virus (AHSV) infection. Horses (n=8) immunized with either of two concentrations of recombinant canarypox virus vector (ALVAC-AHSV) co-expressing synthetic genes encoding the outer capsid proteins (VP2 and VP5) of AHSV serotype 4 (AHSV-4) developed variable titres (<10-80) of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies and were completely resistant to challenge infection with a virulent strain of AHSV-4. In contrast, a horse immunized with a commercial recombinant canarypox virus vectored vaccine expressing the haemagglutinin genes of two equine influenza H3N8 viruses was seronegative to AHSV and following infection with virulent AHSV-4 developed pyrexia, thrombocytopenia and marked oedema of the supraorbital fossae typical of the "dikkop" or cardiac form of African horse sickness. AHSV was detected by virus isolation and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in the blood of the control horse from 8 days onwards after challenge infection whereas AHSV was not detected at any time in the blood of the ALVAC-AHSV vaccinated horses. The control horse seroconverted to AHSV by 2 weeks after challenge infection as determined by both virus neutralization and ELISA assays, whereas six of eight of the ALVAC-AHSV vaccinated horses did not seroconvert by either assay following challenge infection with virulent AHSV-4. These data confirm that the ALVAC-AHSV vaccine will be useful for the protective immunization of equids against African horse sickness, and avoids many of the problems inherent to live-attenuated AHSV vaccines.

  12. The successful induction of T-cell and antibody responses by a recombinant measles virus-vectored tetravalent dengue vaccine provides partial protection against dengue-2 infection

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hui-Mei; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Hsiao, Yu-Ju; Wu, Szu-Hsien; Chung, Han-Hsuan; Hsieh, Chun-Hsiang; Chong, Pele; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Pan, Chien-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue has a major impact on global public health, and the use of dengue vaccine is very limited. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a dengue vaccine made from a recombinant measles virus (MV) that expresses envelope protein domain III (ED3) of dengue-1 to 4. Following immunization with the MV-vectored dengue vaccine, mice developed specific interferon-gamma and antibody responses against dengue virus and MV. Neutralizing antibodies against MV and dengue viruses were also induced, and protective levels of FRNT50 ≥ 10 to 4 serotypes of dengue viruses were detected in the MV-vectored dengue vaccine-immunized mice. In addition, specific interferon-gamma and antibody responses to dengue viruses were still induced by the MV-vectored dengue vaccine in mice that were pre-infected with MV. This finding suggests that the pre-existing immunity to MV did not block the initiation of immune responses. By contrast, mice that were pre-infected with dengue-3 exhibited no effect in terms of their antibody responses to MV and dengue viruses, but a dominant dengue-3-specific T-cell response was observed. After injection with dengue-2, a detectable but significantly lower viremia and a higher titer of anti-dengue-2 neutralizing antibodies were observed in MV-vectored dengue vaccine-immunized mice versus the vector control, suggesting that an anamnestic antibody response that provided partial protection against dengue-2 was elicited. Our results with regard to T-cell responses and the effect of pre-immunity to MV or dengue viruses provide clues for the future applications of an MV-vectored dengue vaccine. PMID:26901482

  13. Priming T-cell responses with recombinant measles vaccine vector in a heterologous prime-boost setting in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Diane L; Santra, Sampa; Swett-Tapia, Cindy; Custers, Jerome; Song, Kaimei; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Mach, Linh; Naim, Hussein; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Lifton, Michelle; Goudsmit, Jaap; Letvin, Norman; Roederer, Mario; Radošević, Katarina

    2012-09-07

    Licensed live attenuated virus vaccines capable of expressing transgenes from other pathogens have the potential to reduce the number of childhood immunizations by eliciting robust immunity to multiple pathogens simultaneously. Recombinant attenuated measles virus (rMV) derived from the Edmonston Zagreb vaccine strain was engineered to express simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag protein for the purpose of evaluating the immunogenicity of rMV as a vaccine vector in rhesus macaques. rMV-Gag immunization alone elicited robust measles-specific humoral and cellular responses, but failed to elicit transgene (Gag)-specific immune responses, following aerosol or intratracheal/intramuscular delivery. However, when administered as a priming vaccine to a heterologous boost with recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 expressing the same transgene, rMV-Gag significantly enhanced Gag-specific T lymphocyte responses following rAd5 immunization. Gag-specific humoral responses were not enhanced, however, which may be due to either the transgene or the vector. Cellular response priming by rMV against the transgene was highly effective even when using a suboptimal dose of rAd5 for the boost. These data demonstrate feasibility of using rMV as a priming component of heterologous prime-boost vaccine regimens for pathogens requiring strong cellular responses.

  14. Toxin Fused with SUMO Tag: A New Expression Vector Strategy to Obtain Recombinant Venom Toxins with Easy Tag Removal inside the Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shimokawa-Falcão, Lhiri H. A. L.; Caporrino, Maria C.; Barbaro, Katia C.; Della-Casa, Maisa S.; Magalhães, Geraldo S.

    2017-01-01

    Many animal toxins may target the same molecules that need to be controlled in certain pathologies; therefore, some toxins have led to the formulation of drugs that are presently used, and many other drugs are still under development. Nevertheless, collecting sufficient toxins from the original source might be a limiting factor in studying their biological activities. Thus, molecular biology techniques have been applied in order to obtain large amounts of recombinant toxins into Escherichia coli. However, most animal toxins are difficult to express in this system, which results in insoluble, misfolded, or unstable proteins. To solve these issues, toxins have been fused with tags that may improve protein expression, solubility, and stability. Among these tags, the SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) has been shown to be very efficient and can be removed by the Ulp1 protease. However, removing SUMO is a labor- and time-consuming process. To enhance this system, here we show the construction of a bicistronic vector that allows the expression of any protein fused to both the SUMO and Ulp1 protease. In this way, after expression, Ulp1 is able to cleave SUMO and leave the protein interest-free and ready for purification. This strategy was validated through the expression of a new phospholipase D from the spider Loxosceles gaucho and a disintegrin from the Bothrops insularis snake. Both recombinant toxins showed good yield and preserved biological activities, indicating that the bicistronic vector may be a viable method to produce proteins that are difficult to express. PMID:28264436

  15. Heterologous Prime-Boost Regimens with a Recombinant Chimpanzee Adenoviral Vector and Adjuvanted F4 Protein Elicit Polyfunctional HIV-1-Specific T-Cell Responses in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lorin, Clarisse; Vanloubbeeck, Yannick; Baudart, Sébastien; Ska, Michaël; Bayat, Babak; Brauers, Geoffroy; Clarinval, Géraldine; Donner, Marie-Noëlle; Marchand, Martine; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Mettens, Pascal; Cohen, Joe; Voss, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes are important for HIV-1 replication control. F4/AS01 consists of F4 recombinant fusion protein (containing clade B Gag/p24, Pol/RT, Nef and Gag/p17) formulated in AS01 Adjuvant System, and was shown to induce F4-specific polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses in humans. While replication-incompetent recombinant HIV-1/SIV antigen-expressing human adenoviral vectors can elicit high-frequency antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, their use is hampered by widespread pre-existing immunity to human serotypes. Non-human adenovirus serotypes associated with lower prevalence may offer an alternative strategy. We evaluated the immunogenicity of AdC7-GRN (‘A’), a recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus type 7 vector expressing clade B Gag, RT and Nef, and F4/AS01 (‘P’), when delivered intramuscularly in homologous (PP or AA) and heterologous (AAPP or PPAA) prime-boost regimens, in macaques and mice. Vaccine-induced HIV-1-antigen-specific T cells in peripheral blood (macaques), liver, spleen, and intestinal and genital mucosa (mice) were characterized by intracellular cytokine staining. Vaccine-specific IgG antibodies (macaques) were detected using ELISA. In macaques, only the heterologous prime-boost regimens induced polyfunctional, persistent and balanced CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses specific to each HIV-1 vaccine antigen. AdC7-GRN priming increased the polyfunctionality of F4/AS01-induced CD4+ T cells. Approximately 50% of AdC7-GRN-induced memory CD8+ T cells exhibited an effector-memory phenotype. HIV-1-specific antibodies were detected with each regimen. In mice, antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were detected in the mucosal and systemic anatomical compartments assessed. When administered in heterologous prime-boost regimens, AdC7-GRN and F4/AS01 candidate vaccines acted complementarily in inducing potent and persistent peripheral blood HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses and antibodies in macaques

  16. Recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis with a pMyong2 vector expressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I Gag can induce enhanced virus-specific immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoung-Jun; Gong, Jeong-Ryeol; Kim, Ga-Na; Kim, Bo-Ram; Lee, So-Young; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2017-01-01

    Recently, we have developed a novel Mycobacterium-Escherichia coli shuttle vector system using pMyong2, which can provide an enhanced expression of heterologous genes in recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis (rSmeg). To investigate the usefulness of rSmeg using pMyong2 in vaccine application, we vaccinated M. smegmatis with pMyong2 system expressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I (HIV-1) Gag p24 antigen (rSmeg-pMyong2-p24) into mice and examined its cellular and humoral immune responses against HIV gag protein. We found that rSmeg-pMyong2-p24 expressed higher levels of Gag protein in bacteria, macrophage cell line (J774A.1) and mouse bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) compared to rSmeg strains using two other vector systems, pAL5000 derived vector (rSmeg-pAL-p24) and the integrative plasmid, pMV306 (rSmeg-pMV306-p24). Inoculation of mice with rSmeg-pMyong2-p24 elicited more effective immunity compared to the other two rSmeg strains, as evidenced by higher levels of HIV-1 Gag-specific CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte proliferation, interferon gamma ELISPOT cell induction, and antibody production. Furthermore, rSmeg-pMyong2-p24 showed a higher level of cytotoxic T cell response against target cells expressing Gag p24 proteins. Our data suggest that Mycobacterium-Escherichia coli shuttle vector system with pMyong2 may provide an advantage in vaccine application of rSmeg over other vector systems. PMID:28300196

  17. A potyvirus vector efficiently targets recombinant proteins to chloroplasts, mitochondria and nuclei in plant cells when expressed at the amino terminus of the polyprotein.

    PubMed

    Majer, Eszter; Navarro, José-Antonio; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Plant virus-based expression systems allow quick and efficient production of recombinant proteins in plant biofactories. Among them, a system derived from tobacco etch virus (TEV; genus potyvirus) permits coexpression of equimolar amounts of several recombinant proteins. This work analyzed how to target recombinant proteins to different subcellular localizations in the plant cell using this system. We constructed TEV clones in which green fluorescent protein (GFP), with a chloroplast transit peptide (cTP), a nuclear localization signal (NLS) or a mitochondrial targeting peptide (mTP) was expressed either as the most amino-terminal product or embedded in the viral polyprotein. Results showed that cTP and mTP mediated efficient translocation of GFP to the corresponding organelle only when present at the amino terminus of the viral polyprotein. In contrast, the NLS worked efficiently at both positions. Viruses expressing GFP in the amino terminus of the viral polyprotein produced milder symptoms. Untagged GFPs and cTP and NLS tagged amino-terminal GFPs accumulated to higher amounts in infected tissues. Finally, viral progeny from clones with internal GFPs maintained the extra gene better. These observations will help in the design of potyvirus-based vectors able to coexpress several proteins while targeting different subcellular localizations, as required in plant metabolic engineering.

  18. NIH oversight of human gene transfer research involving retroviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated virus vectors and the role of the NIH recombinant DNA advisory committee.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Marina; Shipp, Allan; Rosenthal, Eugene; Jambou, Robert; Shih, Tom; Montgomery, Maureen; Gargiulo, Linda; Patterson, Amy; Corrigan-Curay, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    In response to public and scientific concerns regarding human gene transfer research, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) developed a transparent oversight system that extends to human gene transfer protocols that are either conducted with NIH funding or conducted at institutions that receive NIH funding for recombinant DNA research. The NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) has been the primary advisory body to NIH regarding the conduct of this research. Human gene transfer research proposals that are subject to the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines) must be submitted to the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA), and protocols that raise novel scientific, safety, medical, ethical, or social issues are publicly discussed at the RAC's quarterly public meetings. OBA also convenes gene transfer safety symposia and policy conferences to provide a public forum for scientific experts to discuss emerging issues in the field. This transparent system of review promotes the rapid exchange of important scientific information and dissemination of data. The goal is to optimize the conduct of individual research protocols and to advance gene transfer research generally. This process has fostered the development of retroviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated viral vector mediated gene delivery.

  19. Analysis of particle content of recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 8 vectors by ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lock, Martin; Alvira, Mauricio R; Wilson, James M

    2012-02-01

    Advances in adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy have brought the possibility of commercial manufacturing of AAV vectors one step closer. To realize this prospect, a parallel effort with the goal of ever-increasing sophistication for AAV vector production technology and supporting assays will be required. Among the important release assays for a clinical gene therapy product, those monitoring potentially hazardous contaminants are most critical for patient safety. A prominent contaminant in many AAV vector preparations is vector particles lacking a genome, which can substantially increase the dose of AAV capsid proteins and lead to possible unwanted immunological consequences. Current methods to determine empty particle content suffer from inconsistency, are adversely affected by contaminants, or are not applicable to all serotypes. Here we describe the development of an ion-exchange chromatography-based assay that permits the rapid separation and relative quantification of AAV8 empty and full vector particles through the application of shallow gradients and a strong anion-exchange monolith chromatography medium.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Cesium Chloride- and Iodixanol-Based Purification of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors for Preclinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Benjamin; Miller, Felix D; Rist, Wolfgang; Lamla, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    Cesium chloride (CsCl)- and iodixanol-based density gradients represent the core step in most protocols for serotype-independent adeno-associated virus (AAV) purification established to date. However, despite controversial reports about the purity and bioactivity of AAV vectors derived from each of these protocols, systematic comparisons of state-of-the-art variants of these methods are sparse. To define exact conditions for such a comparison, we first fractionated both gradients to analyze the distribution of intact, bioactive AAVs and contaminants, respectively. Moreover, we tested four different polishing methods (ultrafiltration, size-exclusion chromatography, hollow-fiber tangential flow filtration, and polyethylene glycol precipitation) implemented after the iodixanol gradient for their ability to deplete iodixanol and protein contaminations. Last, we conducted a side-by-side comparison of the CsCl and iodixanol/ultrafiltration protocol. Our results demonstrate that iodixanol-purified AAV preparations show higher vector purity but harbor more (∼20%) empty particles as compared with CsCl-purified vectors (<1%). Using mass spectrometry, we analyzed prominent protein impurities in the AAV vector product, thereby identifying known and new, possibly AAV-interacting proteins as major contaminants. Thus, our study not only provides a helpful guide for the many laboratories entering the AAV field, but also builds a basis for further investigation of cellular processes involved in AAV vector assembly and trafficking.

  1. Pre-Clinical Development of a Recombinant, Replication-Competent Adenovirus Serotype 4 Vector Vaccine Expressing HIV-1 Envelope 1086 Clade C

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jeff; Mendy, Jason; Vang, Lo; Avanzini, Jenny B.; Garduno, Fermin; Manayani, Darly J.; Ishioka, Glenn; Farness, Peggy; Ping, Li-Hua; Swanstrom, Ronald; Parks, Robert; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Montefiori, David C.; LaBranche, Celia; Smith, Jonathan; Gurwith, Marc; Mayall, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a well-acknowledged need for an effective AIDS vaccine that protects against HIV-1 infection or limits in vivo viral replication. The objective of these studies is to develop a replication-competent, vaccine vector based on the adenovirus serotype 4 (Ad4) virus expressing HIV-1 envelope (Env) 1086 clade C glycoprotein. Ad4 recombinant vectors expressing Env gp160 (Ad4Env160), Env gp140 (Ad4Env140), and Env gp120 (Ad4Env120) were evaluated. Methods The recombinant Ad4 vectors were generated with a full deletion of the E3 region of Ad4 to accommodate the env gene sequences. The vaccine candidates were assessed in vitro following infection of A549 cells for Env-specific protein expression and for posttranslational transport to the cell surface as monitored by the binding of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). The capacity of the Ad4Env vaccines to induce humoral immunity was evaluated in rabbits for Env gp140 and V1V2-specific binding antibodies, and HIV-1 pseudovirus neutralization. Mice immunized with the Ad4Env160 vaccine were assessed for IFNγ T cell responses specific for overlapping Env peptide sets. Results Robust Env protein expression was confirmed by western blot analysis and recognition of cell surface Env gp160 by multiple bNAbs. Ad4Env vaccines induced humoral immune responses in rabbits that recognized Env 1086 gp140 and V1V2 polypeptide sequences derived from 1086 clade C, A244 clade AE, and gp70 V1V2 CASE A2 clade B fusion protein. The immune sera efficiently neutralized tier 1 clade C pseudovirus MW965.26 and neutralized the homologous and heterologous tier 2 pseudoviruses to a lesser extent. Env-specific T cell responses were also induced in mice following Ad4Env160 vector immunization. Conclusions The Ad4Env vaccine vectors express high levels of Env glycoprotein and induce both Env-specific humoral and cellular immunity thus supporting further development of this new Ad4 HIV-1 Env vaccine platform in Phase 1 clinical

  2. Transgene expression and effective gene silencing in vagal afferent neurons in vivo using recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Kollarik, M; Carr, M J; Ru, F; Ring, C J A; Hart, V J; Murdock, P; Myers, A C; Muroi, Y; Undem, B J

    2010-01-01

    Vagal afferent fibres innervating thoracic structures such as the respiratory tract and oesophagus are diverse, comprising several subtypes of functionally distinct C-fibres and A-fibres. Both morphological and functional studies of these nerve subtypes would be advanced by selective, effective and long-term transduction of vagal afferent neurons with viral vectors. Here we addressed the hypothesis that vagal sensory neurons can be transduced with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in vivo, in a manner that would be useful for morphological assessment of nerve terminals, using enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), as well as for the selective knock-down of specific genes of interest in a tissue-selective manner. We found that a direct microinjection of AAV vectors into the vagal nodose ganglia in vivo leads to selective, effective and long-lasting transduction of the vast majority of primary sensory vagal neurons without transduction of parasympathetic efferent neurons. The transduction of vagal neurons by pseudoserotype AAV2/8 vectors in vivo is sufficiently efficient such that it can be used to functionally silence TRPV1 gene expression using short hairpin RNA (shRNA). The eGFP encoded by AAV vectors is robustly transported to both the central and peripheral terminals of transduced vagal afferent neurons allowing for bright imaging of the nerve endings in living tissues and suitable for structure–function studies of vagal afferent nerve endings. Finally, the AAV2/8 vectors are efficiently taken up by the vagal nerve terminals in the visceral tissue and retrogradely transported to the cell body, allowing for tissue-specific transduction. PMID:20736420

  3. Protection induced by commercially available live-attenuated and recombinant viral vector vaccines against infectious laryngotracheitis virus in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Vagnozzi, Ariel; Zavala, Guillermo; Riblet, Sylva M; Mundt, Alice; García, Maricarmen

    2012-01-01

    Viral vector vaccines using fowl poxvirus (FPV) and herpesvirus of turkey (HVT) as vectors and carrying infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) genes are commercially available to the poultry industry in the USA. Different sectors of the broiler industry have used these vaccines in ovo or subcutaneously, achieving variable results. The objective of the present study was to determine the efficacy of protection induced by viral vector vaccines as compared with live-attenuated ILTV vaccines. The HVT-LT vaccine was more effective than the FPV-LT vaccine in mitigating the disease and reducing levels of challenge virus when applied in ovo or subcutaneously, particularly when the challenge was performed at 57 days rather than 35 days of age. While the FPV-LT vaccine mitigated clinical signs more effectively when administered subcutaneously than in ovo, it did not reduce the concentration of challenge virus in the trachea by either application route. Detection of antibodies against ILTV glycoproteins expressed by the viral vectors was a useful criterion to assess the immunogenicity of the vectors. The presence of glycoprotein I antibodies detected pre-challenge and post challenge in chickens vaccinated with HVT-LT indicated that the vaccine induced a robust antibody response, which was paralleled by significant reduction of clinical signs. The chicken embryo origin vaccine provided optimal protection by significantly mitigating the disease and reducing the challenge virus in chickens vaccinated via eye drop. The viral vector vaccines, applied in ovo and subcutaneously, provided partial protection, reducing to some degree clinical signs, and challenge VIRUS replication in the trachea.

  4. Safety of recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2-RPE65 vector delivered by ocular subretinal injection.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Aleman, Tomas S; Schwartz, Sharon B; Cideciyan, Artur V; Zeiss, Caroline J; Komaromy, Andras M; Kaushal, Shalesh; Roman, Alejandro J; Windsor, Elizabeth A M; Sumaroka, Alexander; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Conlon, Thomas J; Chiodo, Vincent A; Boye, Sanford L; Flotte, Terence R; Maguire, Albert M; Bennett, Jean; Hauswirth, William W

    2006-06-01

    AAV2 delivery of the RPE65 gene to the retina of blind RPE65-deficient animals restores vision. This strategy is being considered for human trials in RPE65-associated Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), but toxicity and dose efficacy have not been defined. We studied ocular delivery of AAV-2/2.RPE65 in RPE65-mutant dogs. There was no systemic toxicity. Ocular examinations showed mild or moderate inflammation that resolved over 3 months. Retinal histopathology indicated that traumatic lesions from the injection were common, but thinning within the injection region occurred only at the two highest vector doses. Biodistribution studies at 3 months postinjection showed no vector in optic nerve or visual centers in the brain and only isolated non-dose-related detection in other organs. We also performed biodistribution studies in normal rats at about 2 weeks and 2 months postinjection and vector was not widespread outside the injected eye. Dose-response results in RPE65-mutant dogs indicated that the highest 1.5-log unit range of vector doses proved efficacious. The efficacy and toxicity limits defined in this study lead to suggestions for the design of a subretinal AAV-2/2.RPE65 human trial of RPE65-associated LCA.

  5. Evaluation of recombinant invasive, non-pathogenic Eschericia coli as a vaccine vector against the intracellular pathogen, Brucella

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Jerome S; Durward, Marina A; Magnani, Diogo M; Splitter, Gary A

    2009-01-01

    Background There is no safe, effective human vaccine against brucellosis. Live attenuated Brucella strains are widely used to vaccinate animals. However these live Brucella vaccines can cause disease and are unsafe for humans. Killed Brucella or subunit vaccines are not effective in eliciting long term protection. In this study, we evaluate an approach using a live, non-pathogenic bacteria (E. coli) genetically engineered to mimic the brucellae pathway of infection and present antigens for an appropriate cytolitic T cell response. Methods E. coli was modified to express invasin of Yersinia and listerialysin O (LLO) of Listeria to impart the necessary infectivity and antigen releasing traits of the intracellular pathogen, Brucella. This modified E. coli was considered our vaccine delivery system and was engineered to express Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) or Brucella antigens for in vitro and in vivo immunological studies including cytokine profiling and cytotoxicity assays. Results The E. coli vaccine vector was able to infect all cells tested and efficiently deliver therapeutics to the host cell. Using GFP as antigen, we demonstrate that the E. coli vaccine vector elicits a Th1 cytokine profile in both primary and secondary immune responses. Additionally, using this vector to deliver a Brucella antigen, we demonstrate the ability of the E. coli vaccine vector to induce specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTLs). Conclusion Protection against most intracellular bacterial pathogens can be obtained mostly through cell mediated immunity. Data presented here suggest modified E. coli can be used as a vaccine vector for delivery of antigens and therapeutics mimicking the infection of the pathogen and inducing cell mediated immunity to that pathogen. PMID:19126207

  6. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Recombinant Adenovirus Serotype 35-Vectored HIV-1 Vaccine in Adenovirus Serotype 5 Seronegative and Seropositive Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jonathan D; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Frahm, Nicole; Morgan, Cecilia; Gilbert, Peter B; Kochar, Nidhi; DeRosa, Stephen C; Tomaras, Georgia D; Wagner, Theresa M; Baden, Lindsey R; Koblin, Beryl A; Rouphael, Nadine G; Kalams, Spyros A; Keefer, Michael C; Goepfert, Paul A; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Mayer, Kenneth H; Swann, Edith; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Graham, Barney S; McElrath, M Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Background Recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5)-vectored HIV-1 vaccines have not prevented HIV-1 infection or disease and pre-existing Ad5 neutralizing antibodies may limit the clinical utility of Ad5 vectors globally. Using a rare Ad serotype vector, such as Ad35, may circumvent these issues, but there are few data on the safety and immunogenicity of rAd35 directly compared to rAd5 following human vaccination. Methods HVTN 077 randomized 192 healthy, HIV-uninfected participants into one of four HIV-1 vaccine/placebo groups: rAd35/rAd5, DNA/rAd5, and DNA/rAd35 in Ad5-seronegative persons; and DNA/rAd35 in Ad5-seropositive persons. All vaccines encoded the HIV-1 EnvA antigen. Antibody and T-cell responses were measured 4 weeks post boost immunization. Results All vaccines were generally well tolerated and similarly immunogenic. As compared to rAd5, rAd35 was equally potent in boosting HIV-1-specific humoral and cellular immunity and responses were not significantly attenuated in those with baseline Ad5 seropositivity. Like DNA, rAd35 efficiently primed rAd5 boosting. All vaccine regimens tested elicited cross-clade antibody responses, including Env V1/V2-specific IgG responses. Conclusions Vaccine antigen delivery by rAd35 is well-tolerated and immunogenic as a prime to rAd5 immunization and as a boost to prior DNA immunization with the homologous insert. Further development of rAd35-vectored prime-boost vaccine regimens is warranted. PMID:26587311

  7. Evaluation of Readministration of a Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Expressing Acid Alpha-Glucosidase in Pompe Disease: Preclinical to Clinical Planning

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Manuela; Cleaver, Brian; Clément, Nathalie; Conlon, Thomas J.; Faris, Kaitlyn J.; Wang, Gensheng; Benson, Janet; Tarantal, Alice F.; Fuller, Davis; Herzog, Roland W.; Byrne, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    A recombinant serotype 9 adeno-associated virus (rAAV9) vector carrying a transgene that expresses codon-optimized human acid alpha-glucosidase (hGAA, or GAA) driven by a human desmin (DES) promoter (i.e., rAAV9-DES-hGAA) has been generated as a clinical candidate vector for Pompe disease. The rAAV9-DES-hGAA vector is being developed as a treatment for both early- and late-onset Pompe disease, in which patients lack sufficient lysosomal alpha-glucosidase leading to glycogen accumulation. In young patients, the therapy may need to be readministered after a period of time to maintain therapeutic levels of GAA. Administration of AAV-based gene therapies is commonly associated with the production of neutralizing antibodies that may reduce the effectiveness of the vector, especially if readministration is required. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of rAAV9-DES-hGAA to correct cardiac and skeletal muscle pathology in Gaa−/− mice, an animal model of Pompe disease. This article describes the IND-enabling preclinical studies supporting the program for a phase I/II clinical trial in adult patients with Pompe. These studies were designed to evaluate the toxicology, biodistribution, and potential for readministration of rAAV9-DES-hGAA injected intramuscularly into the tibialis anterior muscle using an immune modulation strategy developed for this study. In the proposed clinical study, six adult participants with late-onset Pompe disease will be enrolled. The goal of the immune modulation strategy is to ablate B-cells before the initial exposure of the study agent in one leg and the subsequent exposure of the same vector to the contralateral leg four months after initial dosing. The dosing of the active agent is accompanied by a control injection of excipient dosing in the contralateral leg to allow for blinding and randomization of dosing, which may also strengthen the evidence generated from gene therapy studies in the future. Patients will act as their own

  8. Mucosal immunotherapy in an Alzheimer mouse model by recombinant Sendai virus vector carrying Aβ1-43/IL-10 cDNA.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hideo; Mouri, Akihiro; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Tabira, Takeshi

    2011-10-06

    Based on the amyloid cascade hypothesis, many reports have indicated that immunotherapy is beneficial for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We developed a mucosal immunotherapy for AD by nasal administration of recombinant Sendai virus vector carrying Aβ1-43 and mouse IL-10 cDNA. Nasal but not intramuscular administration of the vaccine induced good antibody responses to Aβ. When APP transgenic mice (Tg2576) received this vaccine once nasally, the Aβ plaque burden was significantly decreased 8 weeks after without inducing inflammation in the brain. The amount of Aβ measured by ELISA was also reduced in both soluble and insoluble fractions of the brain homogenates, and notably the Aβ oligomer (12-mer) was also apparently decreased. Tg2576 mice showed significant improvement in cognitive functions examined at 3 months after vaccination. Thus, this is an alternative immunotherapy for AD, which has an advantage in non-invasive, safe and relatively long lasting features.

  9. Identification of Optimal Insertion Site in Recombinant Newcastle Disease Virus (rNDV) Vector Expressing Foreign Gene to Enhance Its Anti-Tumor Effect

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ziye; He, Jinjiao; Rasoul, Lubna M.; Liu, Yunye; Che, Ruixiang; Ding, Yun; Guo, Xiaocheng; Yang, Jiarui; Zou, Dehua; Zhang, Hua; Li, Deshan; Cao, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant Newcastle disease virus (rNDV) is tumor selective and intrinsically oncolytic, which has been developed as a vector to express exogenous genes to enhance its oncolytic efficacy. Our previous studies found that insertion sites of foreign gene in rNDV vector affected its expression and anti-tumor activities. However, the optimal insertion site for foreign genes remains unknown. In this study, we inserted the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) and IL2 genes into four different intergenic regions of the rNDV using reverse genetics technology. Recombinants rNDV-EGFPs and rNDV-IL2s were successfully rescued, which displayed the similar growth kinetics with parental virus. Both EGFP mRNA and protein levels were most abundant in HepG2 cells, when EGFP gene was inserted between the NP/P site of the rNDV. Similarly, the IL-2 expressed by HepG2 cells infected with rNDV-IL2 was highest, when IL2 was inserted into NP/P site. To test whether these rNDVs that express higher foreign genes could induce stronger anti-tumor response, we treated the H22-oxter-tumor-bearing C57BL/6J mice with rNDV-IL2s and then examined the oncolytic efficacy. The results showed that rNDV-IL2-NP/P had the strongest inhibition of murine hepatoma carcinoma tumors. The splenocytes isolated from the mice treated with rNDV-IL2-NP/P reached the highest degrees of CD4+ T and CD8+ T cells. In addition, animals’ survival rate in rNDV-IL2-NP/P-treated group was higher than that of other groups. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NP and P gene junction in rNDV is the optimal insertion site for foreign genes expression to enhance rNDV’s anti-tumor effects. PMID:27736965

  10. A pilot study comparing the development of EIAV Env-specific antibodies induced by DNA/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccines and an attenuated Chinese EIAV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinglai; Lin, Yuezhi; Ma, Jian; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Liping; Li, Shenwei; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jianhua; Shen, Rongxian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shao, Yiming

    2012-12-01

    Data from successful attenuated lentiviral vaccine studies indicate that fully mature Env-specific antibodies characterized by high titer, high avidity, and the predominant recognition of conformational epitopes are associated with protective efficacy. Although vaccination with a DNA prime/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccine boost strategy has been found to be effective in some trials with non-human primate/simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) models, it remains unclear whether this vaccination strategy could elicit mature equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) Env-specific antibodies, thus protecting vaccinated horses against EIAV infection. Therefore, in this pilot study we vaccinated horses using a strategy based on DNA prime/recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTTV)-vectored vaccines encoding EIAV env and gag genes, and observed the development of Env-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and p26-specific antibodies. Vaccination with DNA induced low titer, low avidity, and the predominant recognition of linear epitopes by Env-specific antibodies, which was enhanced by boosting vaccinations with rTTV vaccines. However, the maturation levels of Env-specific antibodies induced by the DNA/rTTV vaccines were significantly lower than those induced by the attenuated vaccine EIAV(FDDV). Additionally, DNA/rTTV vaccines did not elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with a virulent EIAV strain, all of the vaccinees and control horses died from EIAV disease. These data indicate that the regimen of DNA prime/rTTV vaccine boost did not induce mature Env-specific antibodies, which might have contributed to immune protection failure.

  11. Immunogenicity of next-generation HPV vaccines in non-human primates: Measles-vectored HPV vaccine versus Pichia pastoris recombinant protein vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Gaurav; Giannino, Viviana; Rishi, Narayan; Glueck, Reinhard

    2016-09-07

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease worldwide. HPVs are oncogenic small double-stranded DNA viruses that are the primary causal agent of cervical cancer and other types of cancers, including in the anus, oropharynx, vagina, vulva, and penis. Prophylactic vaccination against HPV is an attractive strategy for preventing cervical cancer and some other types of cancers. However, there are few safe and effective vaccines against HPV infections. Current first-generation commercial HPV vaccines are expensive to produce and deliver. The goal of this study was to develop an alternate potent HPV recombinant L1-based vaccines by producing HPV virus-like particles into a vaccine that is currently used worldwide. Live attenuated measles virus (MV) vaccines have a well-established safety and efficacy record, and recombinant MV (rMV) produced by reverse genetics may be useful for generating candidate HPV vaccines to meet the needs of the developing world. We studied in non-human primate rMV-vectored HPV vaccine in parallel with a classical alum adjuvant recombinant HPV16L1 and 18L1 protein vaccine produced in Pichia pastoris. A combined prime-boost approach using both vaccines was evaluated, as well as immune interference due to pre-existing immunity against the MV. The humoral immune response induced by the MV, Pichia-expressed vaccine, and their combination as priming and boosting approaches was found to elicit HPV16L1 and 18L1 specific total IgG and neutralizing antibody titres. Pre-existing antibodies against measles did not prevent the immune response against HPV16L1 and 18L1.

  12. Murine myeloid cell lines derived by in vitro infection with recombinant c-myb retroviruses express myb from rearranged vector proviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Gonda, T J; Ramsay, R G; Johnson, G R

    1989-01-01

    To date, cellular transformation in vitro by the myb oncogene has been described for avian haemopoietic cells only. In order to exploit the well-characterized murine haemopoietic system to study transformation by myb, we have infected fetal liver cells with retroviral vectors carrying cDNAs that encode either complete or carboxy-terminally truncated c-myb proteins. We describe four cell lines which, despite our ability to efficiently infect haemopoietic target cells, were generated at low frequency. This was due, as least in part, to the requirement for a rearrangement within the vector that allowed expression of myb sequences. Three of the lines express a truncated myb protein while the fourth apparently expresses a normal c-myb protein, and thus constitutes an exception to the general association of truncation with transformation by myb. All four cell lines resemble immature cells of the myelomonocytic lineage and are dependent on colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) for their growth in vitro. One representative line could be converted to CSF-independence by infection with either Abelson murine leukaemia virus or a recombinant granulocyte-macrophage-CSF-encoding retrovirus; unlike the parental line, the resultant sublines were highly tumorigenic when injected into syngeneic mice. Images PMID:2670561

  13. Introduction of a point mutation into the mouse genome by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells using a replacement type vector with a selectable marker.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, M; Japón, M A; Low, M J

    1993-06-11

    The introduction of small mutations instead of null alleles into the mouse genome has broad applications to the study of protein structure-function relationships and the creation of animal models of human genetic diseases. To test a simple mutational strategy we designed a targeting vector for the mouse proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene containing a single nucleotide insertion that converts the initial tyrosine codon of beta-endorphin 1-31 to a premature translational termination codon and introduces a unique Hpal endonuclease restriction site. The targeting vector also contains a neo cassette immediately 3' to the last POMC exon and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase cassette to allow positive and negative selection. Homologous recombination occurred at a frequency of 1/30 clones of electroporated embryonic stem cells selected in G418 and gancyclovir. 10/11 clones identified initially by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategy had the predicted structure without evidence of concatemer formation by Southern blot analysis. We used a combination of Hpa I digestion of PCR amplified fragments and direct nucleotide sequencing to further confirm that the point mutation was retained in 9/10 clones. The POMC gene was transcriptionally silent in embryonic stem cells and the targeted allele was not activated by the downstream phosphoglycerate kinase-1 promoter that transcribed the neo gene. Under the electroporation conditions used, we have demonstrated that a point mutation can be introduced with high efficiency and precision into the POMC gene using a replacement type vector containing a retained selectable marker without affecting expression of the allele in the embryonic stem cells. A similar strategy may be useful for a wide range of genes.

  14. Validation of Recombinant Salivary Protein PpSP32 as a Suitable Marker of Human Exposure to Phlebotomus papatasi, the Vector of Leishmania major in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Bettaieb, Jihene; Abdeladhim, Maha; Hadj Kacem, Saoussen; Abdelkader, Rania; Gritli, Sami; Chemkhi, Jomaa; Aslan, Hamide; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ben Salah, Afif; Louzir, Hechmi; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Ben Ahmed, Melika

    2015-01-01

    Background During a blood meal, female sand flies, vectors of Leishmania parasites, inject saliva into the host skin. Sand fly saliva is composed of a large variety of components that exert different pharmacological activities facilitating the acquisition of blood by the insect. Importantly, proteins present in saliva are able to elicit the production of specific anti-saliva antibodies, which can be used as markers for exposure to vector bites. Serological tests using total sand fly salivary gland extracts are challenging due to the difficulty of obtaining reproducible salivary gland preparations. Previously, we demonstrated that PpSP32 is the immunodominant salivary antigen in humans exposed to Phlebotomus papatasi bites and established that humans exposed to P. perniciosus bites do not recognize it. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein, we have validated, in a large cohort of 522 individuals, the use of the Phlebotomus papatasi recombinant salivary protein PpSP32 (rPpSP32) as an alternative method for testing exposure to the bite of this sand fly. We also demonstrated that screening for total anti-rPpSP32 IgG antibodies is sufficient, being comparable in efficacy to the screening for IgG2, IgG4 and IgE antibodies against rPpSP32. Additionally, sera obtained from dogs immunized with saliva of P. perniciosus, a sympatric and widely distributed sand fly in Tunisia, did not recognize rPpSP32 demonstrating its suitability as a marker of exposure to P. papatasi saliva. Conclusions/Significance Our data indicate that rPpSP32 constitutes a useful epidemiological tool to monitor the spatial distribution of P. papatasi in a particular region, to direct control measures against zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis, to assess the efficiency of vector control interventions and perhaps to assess the risk of contracting the disease. PMID:26368935

  15. Improving baculovirus recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuguang; Chapman, David A. G.; Jones, Ian M.

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses have established themselves as a favoured technology for the high-level expression of recombinant proteins. The construction of recombinant viruses, however, is a time consuming step that restricts consideration of the technology for high throughput developments. Here we use a targeted gene knockout technology to inactivate an essential viral gene that lies adjacent to the locus used for recombination. Viral DNA prepared from the knockout fails to initiate an infection unless rescued by recombination with a baculovirus transfer vector. Modified viral DNA allows 100% recombinant virus formation, obviates the need for further virus purification and offers an efficient means of mass parallel recombinant formation. PMID:12527795

  16. Three-year duration of immunity in cats vaccinated with a canarypox-vectored recombinant rabies virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Jas, D; Coupier, C; Toulemonde, C Edlund; Guigal, P-M; Poulet, H

    2012-11-19

    Despite the availability of efficacious vaccines for animals and humans, rabies is still a major zoonosis. Prevention of rabies in dogs and cats is key for reducing the risk of transmission of this deadly disease to humans. Most veterinary vaccines are adjuvanted inactivated vaccines and have been shown to provide one to four-year duration of immunity. In response to debates about the safety of adjuvanted vaccines in cats, a non-adjuvanted feline rabies vaccine with one-year duration of immunity claim was specifically developed using the canarypoxvirus vector technology. The objective of this study was to validate a vaccination program based on primary vaccination, revaccination one year later and boosters every three years. Seronegative cats were vaccinated at 12 weeks of age and received a booster vaccination one year later. This vaccination regimen induced a strong and sustained antibody response, and all vaccinated animals were protected against virulent rabies challenge carried out 3 years after vaccination. These results validated 3-year duration of immunity after a complete basic vaccination program consisting in primary vaccination from 12 weeks of age followed by revaccination one year later with a non-adjuvanted canarypox-vectored vaccine.

  17. Recombinant canarypox vectored West Nile virus (WNV) vaccine protects dogs and cats against a mosquito WNV challenge.

    PubMed

    Karaca, K; Bowen, R; Austgen, L E; Teehee, M; Siger, L; Grosenbaugh, D; Loosemore, L; Audonnet, J-C; Nordgren, R; Minke, J M

    2005-05-31

    The safety and efficacy of a canarypox vector expressing PrM and E genes of West Nile virus (WNV) (ALVAC-WNV) was evaluated in dogs and cats. One group of 17 dogs (vaccinated with 10(5.6) TCID(50)) and two groups of cats (groups 1 [n=14] vaccinated with 10(7.5) TCID(50) and 2 [n=8] 10(5.6) TCID(50)) were vaccinated twice at 28-day intervals. Fifteen dogs and eleven cats served as negative controls. The cats and dogs were challenged 120 and 135 days after the second immunization, respectively via the bites of Aedes albopictus mosquitoes infected with WNV. The first dose of vaccine induced a detectable antibody response in four dogs and five cats (one immunized with low and four with high doses). After the second dose, all the vaccinated dogs and all of the cats, immunized with high dose had detectable antibody titers, whereas only four of eight cats in the low dose group were seropositive. None of the vaccinated dogs and one vaccinated cat developed viremia following the WNV mosquito-challenge. In contrast, 14 of the 15 control dogs and 9 of the 11 control cats developed viremia. The experimental vaccine described in this study may be of value in the prevention of WNV infection in dogs and cats.

  18. Evaluation of the Newcastle disease virus F and HN proteins in protective immunity by using a recombinant avian paramyxovirus type 3 vector in chickens.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sachin; Nayak, Baibaswata; Collins, Peter L; Samal, Siba K

    2011-07-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) belongs to serotype 1 of the avian paramyxoviruses (APMV-1) and causes severe disease in chickens. Current live attenuated NDV vaccines are not fully satisfactory. An alternative is to use a viral vector vaccine that infects chickens but does not cause disease. APMV serotype 3 infects a wide variety of avian species but does not cause any apparent disease in chickens. In this study, we constructed a reverse-genetics system for recovery of infectious APMV-3 strain Netherlands from cloned cDNAs. Two recombinant viruses, rAPMV3-F and rAPMV3-HN, were generated expressing the NDV fusion (F) and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) proteins, respectively, from added genes. These viruses were used to immunize 2-week-old chickens by the oculonasal route in order to evaluate the contribution of each protein to the induction of NDV-specific neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity. Each virus induced high titers of NDV-specific hemagglutination inhibition and serum neutralizing antibodies, but the response to F protein was greater. Protective immunity was evaluated by challenging the immunized birds 21 days later with virulent NDV via the oculonasal, intramuscular, or intravenous route. With oculonasal or intramuscular challenge, all three recombinant viruses (rAPMV3, rAPMV3-F, and rAPMV3-HN) were protective, while all unvaccinated birds succumbed to death. These results indicated that rAPMV3 alone can provide cross-protection against NDV challenge. However, with intravenous challenge, birds immunized with rAPMV3 were not protected, whereas birds immunized with rAPMV3-F alone or in combination with rAPMV3-HN were completely protected, and birds immunized with rAPMV3-HN alone were partially protected. These results indicate that the NDV F and HN proteins are independent neutralization and protective antigens, but the contribution by F is greater. rAMPV3 represents an avirulent vaccine vector that can be used against NDV and other poultry

  19. Recombinant Marek's Disease Virus as a Vector-Based Vaccine against Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J in Chicken.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongzhen; Li, Kai; Gao, Yulong; Gao, Li; Zhong, Li; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-11-04

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is an immunosuppressive virus that causes considerable economic losses to the chicken industry in China. However, there is currently no effective vaccine to prevent ALV-J infection. In order to reduce the losses caused by ALV-J, we constructed two effective ALV-J vaccines by inserting the ALV-J (strain JL093-1) env or gag+env genes into the US2 gene of the Marek's disease herpesviruses (MDV) by transfection of overlapping fosmid DNAs, creating two recombinant MDVs, rMDV/ALV-gag+env and rMDV/ALV-env. Analysis of cultured chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with the rMDVs revealed that Env and Gag were successfully expressed and that there was no difference in growth kinetics in cells infected with rMDVs compared with that of cells infected with the parent MDV. Chickens vaccinated with either rMDV revealed that positive serum antibodies were induced. Both rMDVs also effectively reduced the rate of positive viremia in chicken flocks challenged with ALV-J. The protective effect provided by rMDV/ALV-env inoculation was slightly stronger than that provided by rMDV/ALV-gag+env. This represents the first study where a potential rMDV vaccine, expressing ALV-J antigenic genes, has been shown to be effective in the prevention of ALV-J. Our study also opens new avenues for the control of MDV and ALV-J co-infection.

  20. Recombinant Marek’s Disease Virus as a Vector-Based Vaccine against Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J in Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongzhen; Li, Kai; Gao, Yulong; Gao, Li; Zhong, Li; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is an immunosuppressive virus that causes considerable economic losses to the chicken industry in China. However, there is currently no effective vaccine to prevent ALV-J infection. In order to reduce the losses caused by ALV-J, we constructed two effective ALV-J vaccines by inserting the ALV-J (strain JL093-1) env or gag+env genes into the US2 gene of the Marek’s disease herpesviruses (MDV) by transfection of overlapping fosmid DNAs, creating two recombinant MDVs, rMDV/ALV-gag+env and rMDV/ALV-env. Analysis of cultured chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with the rMDVs revealed that Env and Gag were successfully expressed and that there was no difference in growth kinetics in cells infected with rMDVs compared with that of cells infected with the parent MDV. Chickens vaccinated with either rMDV revealed that positive serum antibodies were induced. Both rMDVs also effectively reduced the rate of positive viremia in chicken flocks challenged with ALV-J. The protective effect provided by rMDV/ALV-env inoculation was slightly stronger than that provided by rMDV/ALV-gag+env. This represents the first study where a potential rMDV vaccine, expressing ALV-J antigenic genes, has been shown to be effective in the prevention of ALV-J. Our study also opens new avenues for the control of MDV and ALV-J co-infection. PMID:27827933

  1. Priming Immunization with DNA Augments Immunogenicity of Recombinant Adenoviral Vectors for Both HIV-1 Specific Antibody and T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Koup, Richard A.; Roederer, Mario; Lamoreaux, Laurie; Fischer, Jennifer; Novik, Laura; Nason, Martha C.; Larkin, Brenda D.; Enama, Mary E.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Bailer, Robert T.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Graham, Barney S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Induction of HIV-1-specific T-cell responses relevant to diverse subtypes is a major goal of HIV vaccine development. Prime-boost regimens using heterologous gene-based vaccine vectors have induced potent, polyfunctional T cell responses in preclinical studies. Methods The first opportunity to evaluate the immunogenicity of DNA priming followed by recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) boosting was as open-label rollover trials in subjects who had been enrolled in prior studies of HIV-1 specific DNA vaccines. All subjects underwent apheresis before and after rAd5 boosting to characterize in depth the T cell and antibody response induced by the heterologous DNA/rAd5 prime-boost combination. Results rAd5 boosting was well-tolerated with no serious adverse events. Compared to DNA or rAd5 vaccine alone, sequential DNA/rAd5 administration induced 7-fold higher magnitude Env-biased HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell responses and 100-fold greater antibody titers measured by ELISA. There was no significant neutralizing antibody activity against primary isolates. Vaccine-elicited CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells expressed multiple functions and were predominantly long-term (CD127+) central or effector memory T cells and that persisted in blood for >6 months. Epitopes mapped in Gag and Env demonstrated partial cross-clade recognition. Conclusion Heterologous prime-boost using vector-based gene delivery of vaccine antigens is a potent immunization strategy for inducing both antibody and T-cell responses. Trial Registration ClinicalTrails.gov NCT00102089, NCT00108654 PMID:20126394

  2. Recombinant Baculovirus Isolation.

    PubMed

    King, Linda A; Hitchman, Richard; Possee, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Although there are several different methods available of making recombinant baculovirus expression vectors (reviewed in Chapter 3 ), all require a stage in which insect cells are transfected with either the virus genome alone (Bac-to-Bac(®) or BaculoDirect™, Invitrogen) or virus genome and transfer vector. In the latter case, this allows the natural process of homologous recombination to transfer the foreign gene, under control of the polyhedrin or other baculovirus gene promoter, from the transfer vector to the virus genome to create the recombinant virus. Previously, many methods required a plaque-assay to separate parental and recombinant virus prior to amplification and use of the recombinant virus. Fortunately, this step is no longer required for most systems currently available. This chapter provides an overview of the historical development of increasingly more efficient systems for the isolation of recombinant baculoviruses (Chapter 3 provides a full account of the different systems and transfer vectors available). The practical details cover: transfection of insect cells with either virus DNA or virus DNA and plasmid transfer vector; a reliable plaque-assay method that can be used to separate recombinant virus from parental (nonrecombinant) virus where this is necessary; methods for the small-scale amplification of recombinant virus; and subsequent titration by plaque-assay or real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methods unique to the Bac-to-Bac(®) system are also covered and include the transformation of bacterial cells and isolation of bacmid DNA ready for transfection of insect cells.

  3. Characterization of cognitive deficits in rats overexpressing human alpha-synuclein in the ventral tegmental area and medial septum using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors.

    PubMed

    Hall, Hélène; Jewett, Michael; Landeck, Natalie; Nilsson, Nathalie; Schagerlöf, Ulrika; Leanza, Giampiero; Kirik, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Intraneuronal inclusions containing alpha-synuclein (a-syn) constitute one of the pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD) and are accompanied by severe neurodegeneration of A9 dopaminergic neurons located in the substantia nigra. Although to a lesser extent, A10 dopaminergic neurons are also affected. Neurodegeneration of other neuronal populations, such as the cholinergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic cell groups, has also been documented in PD patients. Studies in human post-mortem PD brains and in rodent models suggest that deficits in cholinergic and dopaminergic systems may be associated with the cognitive impairment seen in this disease. Here, we investigated the consequences of targeted overexpression of a-syn in the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic and septohippocampal cholinergic pathways. Rats were injected with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors encoding for either human wild-type a-syn or green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the ventral tegmental area and the medial septum/vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca, two regions rich in dopaminergic and cholinergic neurons, respectively. Histopathological analysis showed widespread insoluble a-syn positive inclusions in all major projections areas of the targeted nuclei, including the hippocampus, neocortex, nucleus accumbens and anteromedial striatum. In addition, the rats overexpressing human a-syn displayed an abnormal locomotor response to apomorphine injection and exhibited spatial learning and memory deficits in the Morris water maze task, in the absence of obvious spontaneous locomotor impairment. As losses in dopaminergic and cholinergic immunoreactivity in both the GFP and a-syn expressing animals were mild-to-moderate and did not differ from each other, the behavioral impairments seen in the a-syn overexpressing animals appear to be determined by the long term persisting neuropathology in the surviving neurons rather than by neurodegeneration.

  4. Immunization with recombinant DNA and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vectors delivering PSCA and STEAP1 antigens inhibits prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Krupa, Magdalena; Canamero, Marta; Gomez, Carmen E; Najera, Jose L; Gil, Jesus; Esteban, Mariano

    2011-02-04

    Despite recent advances in early detection and improvement of conventional therapies, there is an urgent need for development of additional approaches for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer, and the use of immunotherapeutic modalities, such as cancer vaccines, is one of the most promising strategies. In this study, we evaluated the prophylactic efficacy of an active immunization protocol against prostate cancer associated antigens mPSCA and mSTEAP1 in experimental prostate cancer. Two antigen delivery platforms, recombinant DNA and MVA vectors, both encoding either mPSCA or mSTEAP1 were used in diversified DNA prime/MVA boost vaccination protocol. Antitumour activity was evaluated in TRAMP-C1 subcutaneous syngeneic tumour model and TRAMP mice. DNA prime/MVA boost immunization against either mPSCA or mSTEAP1, delayed tumour growth in TRAMP-C1 cells-challenged mice. Furthermore, simultaneous vaccination with both antigens produced a stronger anti-tumour effect against TRAMP-C1 tumours than vaccination with either mPSCA or mSTEAP1 alone. Most importantly, concurrent DNA prime/MVA boost vaccination regimen with those antigens significantly decreased primary tumour burden in TRAMP mice without producing any apparent adverse effects. Histopathological analysis of prostate tumours from vaccinated and control TRAMP mice revealed also that mPSCA/mSTEAP1 based-vaccination was effective at reducing the severity of prostatic lesions and incidence of high-grade poorly differentiated prostate cancer. Suppression of the disease progression in TRAMP mice was correlated with decreased proliferation index and increased infiltration of T-cells in prostate tissue. Active immunization against PSCA and STEAP1 using DNA prime/MVA boost strategy is a promising approach for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer.

  5. Construction of a Baculovirus-Silkworm Multigene Expression System and Its Application on Producing Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shuo; Yao, Ning; He, Jian; Peng, Li; Sun, Jingchen

    2012-01-01

    A new baculovirus-silkworm multigene expression system named Bombyx mori MultiBac is developed and described here, by which multiple expression cassettes can be introduced into the Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) genome efficiently. The system consists of three donor vectors (pCTdual, pRADM and pUCDMIG) and an invasive diaminopimelate (DAP) auxotrophic recipient E. coli containing BmNPV-Bacmid (BmBacmid) with a homologous recombination region, an attTn7 site and a loxp site. Two genes carried by pCTdual are firstly inserted into BmBacmid by homologous recombination, while the other eight genes in pRADM and pUCDMIG are introduced into BmBacmid through Tn7 transposition and cre-loxp recombination. Then the invasive and DAP auxotrophic E. coli carrying recombinant BmBacmid is directly injected into silkworm for expressing heterologous genes in larvae or pupae. Three structural genes of rotavirus and three fluorescent genes have been simultaneously expressed in silkworm larvae using our new system, resulting in the formation of virus-like particles (VLPs) of rotavirus and the color change of larvae. The VLPs were purified from hemolymph by ultracentrifugation using CsCl gradients, with a yield of 12.7 µg per larva. For the great capacity of foreign genes and the low cost of feeding silkworm, this high efficient BmMultiBac expression system provides a suitable platform to produce VLPs or protein complexes. PMID:22403668

  6. C-reactive protein (CRP) is essential for efficient systemic transduction of recombinant adeno-associated virus vector 1 (rAAV-1) and rAAV-6 in mice.

    PubMed

    Denard, Jerome; Marolleau, Beatrice; Jenny, Christine; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Fehling, Hans Jörg; Voit, Thomas; Svinartchouk, Fedor

    2013-10-01

    The clinical relevance of gene therapy using the recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors often requires widespread distribution of the vector, and in this case, systemic delivery is the optimal route of administration. Humoral blood factors, such as antibodies or complement, are the first barriers met by the vectors administered systemically. We have found that other blood proteins, galectin 3 binding protein (G3BP) and C-reactive protein (CRP), can interact with different AAV serotypes in a species-specific manner. While interactions of rAAV vectors with G3BP, antibodies, or complement lead to a decrease in vector efficacy, systemic transduction of the CRP-deficient mouse and its respective control clearly established that binding to mouse CRP (mCRP) boosts rAAV vector 1 (rAAV-1) and rAAV-6 transduction efficiency in skeletal muscles over 10 times. Notably, the high efficacy of rAAV-6 in CRP-deficient mice can be restored by reconstitution of the CRP-deficient mouse with mCRP. Human CRP (hCRP) does not interact with either rAAV-1 or rAAV-6, and, consequently, the high efficiency of mCRP-mediated muscle transduction by these serotypes in mice cannot be translated to humans. No interaction of mCRP or hCRP was observed with rAAV-8 and rAAV-9. We show, for the first time, that serum components can significantly enhance rAAV-mediated tissue transduction in a serotype- and species-specific manner. Bioprocessing in body fluids should be considered when transfer of a preclinical proof of concept for AAV-based gene therapy to humans is planned.

  7. Safety considerations in vector development.

    PubMed

    Kappes, J C; Wu, X

    2001-11-01

    The inadvertent production of replication competent retrovirus (RCR) constitutes the principal safety concern for the use of lentiviral vectors in human clinical protocols. Because of limitations in animal models to evaluate lentiviral vectors for their potential to recombine and induce disease, the vector design itself should ensure against the emergence of RCR in vivo. Issues related to RCR generation and one approach to dealing with this problem are discussed in this chapter. To assess the risk of generating RCR, a highly sensitive biological assay was developed to specifically detect vector recombination in transduced cells. Analysis of lentiviral vector stocks has shown that recombination occurs during reverse transcription in primary target cells. Rejoining of viral protein-coding sequences of the packaging construct and cis-acting sequences of the vector was demonstrated to generate env-minus recombinants (LTR-gag-pol-LTR). Mobilization of recombinant lentiviral genomes was also demonstrated but was dependent on pseudotyping of the vector core with an exogenous envelope protein. 5' sequence analysis has demonstrated that recombinants consist of U3, R, U5, and the psi packaging signal joined with an open gag coding region. Analysis of the 3' end has mapped the point of vector recombination to the poly(A) tract of the packaging construct's mRNA. The state-of-the-art third generation packaging construct and SIN vector also have been shown to generate env-minus proviral recombinants capable of mobilizing retroviral DNA when pseudotyped with an exogenous envelope protein. A new class of HIV-based vector (trans-vector) was recently developed that splits the gag-pol component of the packaging construct into two parts: one that expresses Gag/Gag-Pro and another that expresses Pol (RT and IN) fused with Vpr. Unlike other lentiviral vectors, the trans-vector has not been shown to form recombinants capable of DNA mobilization. These results indicate the trans-vector

  8. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in Cynomolgus Macaques of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a Recombinant AAV Vector for Treatment of Achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guo-jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Nork, T Michael; Miller, Paul E; Sharma, Alok K; Ver Hoeve, James N; Smith, Leia M; Arndt, Tara; Calcedo, Roberto; Gaskin, Chantelle; Robinson, Paulette M; Knop, David R; Hauswirth, William W; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (AGTC) is developing rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector expressing the human CNGB3 gene, for treatment of achromatopsia, an inherited retinal disorder characterized by markedly reduced visual acuity, extreme light sensitivity, and absence of color discrimination. We report here results of a study evaluating the safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in cynomolgus macaques. Three groups of animals (n = 2 males and 2 females per group) received a subretinal injection in one eye of 300 μl containing either vehicle or rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 at one of two concentrations (4 × 10(11) or 4 × 10(12) vector genomes/ml) and were evaluated over a 3-month period before being euthanized. Administration of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 was associated with a dose-related anterior and posterior segment inflammatory response that was greater than that observed in eyes injected with the vehicle control. Most manifestations of inflammation improved over time except that vitreous cells persisted in vector-treated eyes until the end of the study. One animal in the lower vector dose group was euthanized on study day 5, based on a clinical diagnosis of endophthalmitis. There were no test article-related effects on intraocular pressure, visual evoked potential responses, hematology or clinical chemistry parameters, or gross necropsy observations. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal mononuclear infiltrates in all vector-injected eyes. Serum anti-AAV antibodies developed in all vector-injected animals. No animals developed antibodies to CNGB3. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in the injected eye but minimal or no vector DNA in any other tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in clinical studies in patients with achromatopsia caused by CNGB3 mutations.

  9. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in Cynomolgus Macaques of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a Recombinant AAV Vector for Treatment of Achromatopsia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Guo-jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Nork, T. Michael; Miller, Paul E.; Sharma, Alok K.; Ver Hoeve, James N.; Smith, Leia M.; Arndt, Tara; Calcedo, Roberto; Gaskin, Chantelle; Robinson, Paulette M.; Knop, David R.; Hauswirth, William W.; Chulay, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (AGTC) is developing rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector expressing the human CNGB3 gene, for treatment of achromatopsia, an inherited retinal disorder characterized by markedly reduced visual acuity, extreme light sensitivity, and absence of color discrimination. We report here results of a study evaluating the safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in cynomolgus macaques. Three groups of animals (n = 2 males and 2 females per group) received a subretinal injection in one eye of 300 μl containing either vehicle or rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 at one of two concentrations (4 × 1011 or 4 × 1012 vector genomes/ml) and were evaluated over a 3-month period before being euthanized. Administration of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 was associated with a dose-related anterior and posterior segment inflammatory response that was greater than that observed in eyes injected with the vehicle control. Most manifestations of inflammation improved over time except that vitreous cells persisted in vector-treated eyes until the end of the study. One animal in the lower vector dose group was euthanized on study day 5, based on a clinical diagnosis of endophthalmitis. There were no test article-related effects on intraocular pressure, visual evoked potential responses, hematology or clinical chemistry parameters, or gross necropsy observations. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal mononuclear infiltrates in all vector-injected eyes. Serum anti-AAV antibodies developed in all vector-injected animals. No animals developed antibodies to CNGB3. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in the injected eye but minimal or no vector DNA in any other tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in clinical studies in patients with achromatopsia caused by CNGB3 mutations. PMID:27003753

  10. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated high-efficiency, transient expression of the murine cationic amino acid transporter (ecotropic retroviral receptor) permits stable transduction of human HeLa cells by ecotropic retroviral vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Bertran, J; Miller, J L; Yang, Y; Fenimore-Justman, A; Rueda, F; Vanin, E F; Nienhuis, A W

    1996-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus has a broad host range, is nonpathogenic, and integrates into a preferred location on chromosome 19, features that have fostered development of recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV) as gene transfer vectors for therapeutic applications. We have used an rAAV to transfer and express the murine cationic amino acid transporter which functions as the ecotropic retroviral receptor, thereby rendering human cells conditionally susceptible to infection by an ecotropic retroviral vector. The proportion of human HeLa cells expressing the receptor at 60 h varied as a function of the multiplicity of infection (MOI) with the rAAV. Cells expressing the ecotropic receptor were efficiently transduced with an ecotropic retroviral vector encoding a nucleus-localized form of beta-galactosidase. Cells coexpressing the ecotropic receptor and nucleus-localized beta-galactosidase were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and cell lines were recovered by cloning at limiting dilution. After growth in culture, all clones contained the retroviral vector genome, but fewer than 10% (3 of 47) contained the rAAV genome and continued to express the ecotropic receptor. The ecotropic receptor coding sequences in the rAAV genome were under the control of a tetracycline-modulated promoter. In the presence of tetracycline, receptor expression was low and the proportion of cells transduced by the ecotropic retroviral vector was decreased. Modulation of receptor expression was achieved with both an episomal and an integrated form of the rAAV genome. These data establish that functional gene expression from an rAAV genome can occur transiently without genome integration. PMID:8794313

  11. The recombinant adeno-associated virus vector (rAAV2)-mediated apolipoprotein B mRNA-specific hammerhead ribozyme: a self-complementary AAV2 vector improves the gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shumei; Sun, Shihua; Teng, Ba-Bie

    2004-01-01

    Background In humans, overproduction of apolipoprotein B (apoB) is positively associated with premature coronary artery diseases. To reduce the levels of apoB mRNA, we have designed an apoB mRNA-specific hammerhead ribozyme targeted at nucleotide sequences GUA6679 (RB15) mediated by adenovirus, which efficiently cleaves and decreases apoB mRNA by 80% in mouse liver and attenuates the hyperlipidemic condition. In the current study, we used an adeno-associated virus vector, serotype 2 (AAV2) and a self-complementary AAV2 vector (scAAV2) to demonstrate the effect of long-term tissue-specific gene expression of RB15 on the regulation apoB mRNA in vivo. Methods We constructed a hammerhead ribozyme RB15 driven by a liver-specific transthyretin (TTR) promoter using an AAV2 vector (rAAV2-TTR-RB15). HepG2 cells and hyperlipidemic mice deficient in both the low density lipoprotein receptor and the apoB mRNA editing enzyme genes (LDLR-/-Apobec1-/-; LDb) were transduced with rAAV2-TTR-RB15 and a control vector rAAV-TTR-RB15-mutant (inactive ribozyme). The effects of ribozyme RB15 on apoB metabolism and atherosclerosis development were determined in LDb mice at 5-month after transduction. A self-complementary AAV2 vector expressing ribozyme RB15 (scAAV2-TTR-RB15) was also engineered and used to transduce HepG2 cells. Studies were designed to compare the gene expression efficiency between rAAV2-TTR-RB15 and scAAV2-TTR-RB15. Results The effect of ribozyme RB15 RNA on reducing apoB mRNA levels in HepG2 cells was observed only on day-7 after rAAV2-TTR-RB15 transduction. And, at 5-month after rAAV2-TTR-RB15 treatment, the apoB mRNA levels in LDb mice were significantly decreased by 43%, compared to LDb mice treated with control vector rAAV2-TTR-RB15-mutant. Moreover, both the rAAV2-TTR-RB15 viral DNA and ribozyme RB15 RNA were still detectable in mice livers at 5-month after treatment. However, this rAAV2-TTR-RB15 vector mediated a prolonged but low level of ribozyme RB15 gene

  12. Synergistic inhibition of PARP-1 and NF-κB signaling downregulates immune response against recombinant AAV2 vectors during hepatic gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Hareendran, Sangeetha; Ramakrishna, Banumathi; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2016-01-01

    Host immune response remains a key obstacle to widespread application of adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy. Thus, targeted inhibition of the signaling pathways that trigger such immune responses will be beneficial. Previous studies have reported that DNA damage response proteins such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) negatively affect the integration of AAV in the host genome. However, the role of PARP-1 in regulating AAV transduction and the immune response against these vectors has not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that repression of PARP-1 improves the transduction of single-stranded AAV vectors both in vitro (∼174%) and in vivo (two- to 3.4-fold). Inhibition of PARP-1, also significantly downregulated the expression of several proinflammatory and cytokine markers such as TLRs, ILs, NF-κB subunit proteins associated with the host innate response against self-complementary AAV2 vectors. The suppression of the inflammatory response targeted against these vectors was more effective upon combined inhibition of PARP-1 and NF-κB signaling. This strategy also effectively attenuated the AAV capsid-specific cytotoxic T-cell response, with minimal effect on vector transduction, as demonstrated in normal C57BL/6 and hemophilia B mice. These data suggest that targeting specific host cellular proteins could be useful to attenuate the immune barriers to AAV-mediated gene therapy.

  13. Comparative Analysis of the Magnitude, Quality, Phenotype and Protective Capacity of SIV Gag-Specific CD8+ T Cells Following Human-, Simian- and Chimpanzee-Derived Recombinant Adenoviral Vector Immunisation

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kylie M.; Costa, Andreia Da; Yamamoto, Ayako; Berry, Dana; Lindsay, Ross W.B.; Darrah, Patricia A.; Wang, Lingshu; Cheng, Cheng; Kong, Wing-Pui; Gall, Jason G.D.; Nicosia, Alfredo; Folgori, Antonella; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Gomez, Carmen E.; Esteban, Mariano; Wyatt, Linda S.; Moss, Bernard; Morgan, Cecilia; Roederer, Mario; Bailer, Robert T.; Nabel, Gary J.; Koup, Richard A.; Seder, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors (rAds) are the most potent recombinant vaccines for eliciting CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity in humans; however, prior exposure from natural adenoviral infection can decrease such responses. Here we show low seroreactivity in humans against simian- (sAd11, sAd16), or chimpanzee-derived (chAd3, chAd63) compared to human-derived (rAd5, rAd28, rAd35) vectors across multiple geographic regions. We then compared the magnitude, quality, phenotype and protective capacity of CD8+ T cell responses in mice vaccinated with rAds encoding SIV Gag. Using a dose range (1 × 107 to 109 PU), we defined a hierarchy among rAd vectors based on the magnitude and protective capacity of CD8+ T cell responses, from most to least as: rAd5 and chAd3, rAd28 and sAd11, chAd63, sAd16, and rAd35. Selection of rAd vector or dose could modulate the proportion and/or frequency of IFNγ+TNFα+IL-2+ and KLRG1+CD127- CD8+ T cells, but strikingly ~30–80% of memory CD8+ T cells co-expressed CD127 and KLRG1. To further optimise CD8+ T cell responses, we assessed rAds as part of prime-boost regimens. Mice primed with rAds and boosted with NYVAC generated Gag-specific responses that approached ~60% of total CD8+ T cells at peak. Alternatively, priming with DNA or rAd28 and boosting with rAd5 or chAd3 induced robust and equivalent CD8+ T cell responses compared to prime or boost alone. Collectively, these data provide the immunologic basis for using specific rAd vectors alone or as part of prime-boost regimens to induce CD8+ T cells for rapid effector function or robust long-term memory, respectively. PMID:23390298

  14. Comparative analysis of the magnitude, quality, phenotype, and protective capacity of simian immunodeficiency virus gag-specific CD8+ T cells following human-, simian-, and chimpanzee-derived recombinant adenoviral vector immunization.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Kylie M; Da Costa, Andreia; Yamamoto, Ayako; Berry, Dana; Lindsay, Ross W B; Darrah, Patricia A; Wang, Lingshu; Cheng, Cheng; Kong, Wing-Pui; Gall, Jason G D; Nicosia, Alfredo; Folgori, Antonella; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Gomez, Carmen E; Esteban, Mariano; Wyatt, Linda S; Moss, Bernard; Morgan, Cecilia; Roederer, Mario; Bailer, Robert T; Nabel, Gary J; Koup, Richard A; Seder, Robert A

    2013-03-15

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors (rAds) are the most potent recombinant vaccines for eliciting CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity in humans; however, prior exposure from natural adenoviral infection can decrease such responses. In this study we show low seroreactivity in humans against simian- (sAd11, sAd16) or chimpanzee-derived (chAd3, chAd63) compared with human-derived (rAd5, rAd28, rAd35) vectors across multiple geographic regions. We then compared the magnitude, quality, phenotype, and protective capacity of CD8(+) T cell responses in mice vaccinated with rAds encoding SIV Gag. Using a dose range (1 × 10(7)-10(9) particle units), we defined a hierarchy among rAd vectors based on the magnitude and protective capacity of CD8(+) T cell responses, from most to least, as: rAd5 and chAd3, rAd28 and sAd11, chAd63, sAd16, and rAd35. Selection of rAd vector or dose could modulate the proportion and/or frequency of IFN-γ(+)TNF-α(+)IL-2(+) and KLRG1(+)CD127(-)CD8(+) T cells, but strikingly ∼30-80% of memory CD8(+) T cells coexpressed CD127 and KLRG1. To further optimize CD8(+) T cell responses, we assessed rAds as part of prime-boost regimens. Mice primed with rAds and boosted with NYVAC generated Gag-specific responses that approached ∼60% of total CD8(+) T cells at peak. Alternatively, priming with DNA or rAd28 and boosting with rAd5 or chAd3 induced robust and equivalent CD8(+) T cell responses compared with prime or boost alone. Collectively, these data provide the immunologic basis for using specific rAd vectors alone or as part of prime-boost regimens to induce CD8(+) T cells for rapid effector function or robust long-term memory, respectively.

  15. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in CNGB3-Deficient Mice of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a Recombinant AAV Vector for Treatment of Achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guo-jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Nork, T Michael; Miller, Paul E; McPherson, Leslie; Ver Hoeve, James N; Smith, Leia M; Arndt, Tara; Mandapati, Savitri; Robinson, Paulette M; Calcedo, Roberto; Knop, David R; Hauswirth, William W; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (AGTC) is developing rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing the human CNGB3 gene, for treatment of achromatopsia, an inherited retinal disorder characterized by markedly reduced visual acuity, extreme light sensitivity, and absence of color discrimination. We report here results of a study evaluating safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in CNGB3-deficient mice. Three groups of animals (n = 35 males and 35 females per group) received a subretinal injection in one eye of 1 μl containing either vehicle or rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 at one of two dose concentrations (1 × 10(12) or 4.2 × 10(12) vg/ml) and were euthanized 4 or 13 weeks later. There were no test-article-related changes in clinical observations, body weights, food consumption, ocular examinations, clinical pathology parameters, organ weights, or macroscopic observations at necropsy. Cone-mediated electroretinography (ERG) responses were detected after vector administration in the treated eyes in 90% of animals in the higher dose group and 31% of animals in the lower dose group. Rod-mediated ERG responses were reduced in the treated eye for all groups, with the greatest reduction in males given the higher dose of vector, but returned to normal by the end of the study. Microscopic pathology results demonstrated minimal mononuclear cell infiltrates in the retina and vitreous of some animals at the interim euthanasia and in the vitreous of some animals at the terminal euthanasia. Serum anti-AAV antibodies developed in most vector-injected animals. No animals developed antibodies to hCNGB3. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in vector-injected eyes but little or no vector DNA in nonocular tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in clinical studies in patients with achromatopsia caused by CNGB3 mutations.

  16. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in Cynomolgus Macaques of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a Recombinant AAV Vector for Treatment of Achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guo-Jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Nork, T Michael; Miller, Paul E; Sharma, Alok K; Ver Hoeve, James N; Smith, Leia; Arndt, Tara; Calcedo, Roberto; Gaskin, Chantelle; Robinson, Paulette; Knop, David R; Hauswirth, William W; Chulay, Jeffrey David

    2016-03-08

    AGTC is developing rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing the human CNGB3 gene, for treatment of achromatopsia, an inherited retinal disorder characterized by markedly reduced visual acuity, extreme light sensitivity and absence of color discrimination. We report here results of a study evaluating the safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in cynomolgus macaques. Three groups of animals (n=2 males and 2 females per group) received a subretinal injection in one eye of 300 µL containing either vehicle or rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 at one of two concentrations (4 × 1011 or 4 × 1012 vg/mL) and were evaluated over a 3 month period prior to being euthanized. Administration of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 was associated with a dose-related anterior and posterior segment inflammatory response that was greater than that observed in eyes injected with the vehicle control. Most manifestations of inflammation improved over time except that vitreous cells persisted in vector-treated eyes until the end of the study. One animal in the lower vector dose group was euthanized on Study Day 5 based on a clinical diagnosis of endophthalmitis. There were no test article-related effects on intraocular pressure, visual evoked potential responses, hematology or clinical chemistry parameters, or gross necropsy observations. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal mononuclear infiltrates in all vector-injected eyes. Serum anti-AAV antibodies developed in all vector-injected animals. No animals developed antibodies to CNGB3. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in the injected eye but minimal or no vector DNA in any other tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in clinical studies in patients with achromatopsia caused by CNGB3 mutations.

  17. Efficacy of vaccination with recombinant vaccinia and fowlpox vectors expressing NY-ESO-1 antigen in ovarian cancer and melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Odunsi, Kunle; Matsuzaki, Junko; Karbach, Julia; Neumann, Antje; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Miller, Austin; Beck, Amy; Morrison, Carl D; Ritter, Gerd; Godoy, Heidi; Lele, Shashikant; duPont, Nefertiti; Edwards, Robert; Shrikant, Protul; Old, Lloyd J; Gnjatic, Sacha; Jäger, Elke

    2012-04-10

    Recombinant poxviruses (vaccinia and fowlpox) expressing tumor-associated antigens are currently being evaluated in clinical trials as cancer vaccines to induce tumor-specific immune responses that will improve clinical outcome. To test whether a diversified prime and boost regimen targeting NY-ESO-1 will result in clinical benefit, we conducted two parallel phase II clinical trials of recombinant vaccinia-NY-ESO-1 (rV-NY-ESO-1), followed by booster vaccinations with recombinant fowlpox-NY-ESO-1 (rF-NY-ESO-1) in 25 melanoma and 22 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients with advanced disease who were at high risk for recurrence/progression. Integrated NY-ESO-1-specific antibody and CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were induced in a high proportion of melanoma and EOC patients. In melanoma patients, objective response rate [complete and partial response (CR+PR)] was 14%, mixed response was 5%, and disease stabilization was 52%, amounting to a clinical benefit rate (CBR) of 72% in melanoma patients. The median PFS in the melanoma patients was 9 mo (range, 0-84 mo) and the median OS was 48 mo (range, 3-106 mo). In EOC patients, the median PFS was 21 mo (95% CI, 16-29 mo), and median OS was 48 mo (CI, not estimable). CD8(+) T cells derived from vaccinated patients were shown to lyse NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor targets. These data provide preliminary evidence of clinically meaningful benefit for diversified prime and boost recombinant pox-viral-based vaccines in melanoma and ovarian cancer and support further evaluation of this approach in these patient populations.

  18. Ocular and systemic safety of a recombinant AAV8 vector for X-linked retinoschisis gene therapy: GLP studies in rabbits and Rs1-KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Marangoni, Dario; Bush, Ronald A; Zeng, Yong; Wei, Lisa L; Ziccardi, Lucia; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Bartoe, Joshua T; Palyada, Kiran; Santos, Maria; Hiriyanna, Suja; Wu, Zhijian; Colosi, Peter; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is a retinal disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the protein retinoschisin (RS1) and is one of the most common causes of macular degeneration in young men. Our therapeutic approach for XLRS is based on the administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS, an adeno-associated viral vector coding the human RS1 protein, via the intravitreal (IVT) route. Two Good Laboratory Practice studies, a 9-month study in New Zealand White rabbits (n = 124) injected with AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS at doses of 2E9, 2E10, 2E11, and 1.5E12 vector genomes/eye (vg/eye), and a 6-month study in Rs1-KO mice (n = 162) dosed with 2E9 and 2E10 vg/eye of the same vector were conducted to assess ocular and systemic safety. A self-resolving, dose-dependent vitreal inflammation was the main ocular finding, and except for a single rabbit dosed with 1.5E12 vg/eye, which showed a retinal detachment, no other ocular adverse event was reported. Systemic toxicity was not identified in either species. Biodistribution analysis in Rs1-KO mice detected spread of vector genome in extraocular tissues, but no evidence of organ or tissues damage was found. These studies indicate that IVT administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS is safe and well tolerated and support its advancement into a phase 1/2a clinical trial for XLRS. PMID:27626041

  19. One-prime multi-boost strategy immunization with recombinant DNA, adenovirus, and MVA vector vaccines expressing HPV16 L1 induces potent, sustained, and specific immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Li; Wang, He-Rong; Zhou, Zhi-Yi; Luo, Jing; Xiao, Xiang-Qian; Wang, Xiao-Li; Li, Jin-Tao; Zhou, Yu-Bai; Zeng, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with various human diseases, including cancer, and developing vaccines is a cost-efficient strategy to prevent HPV-related disease. The major capsid protein L1, which an increasing number of studies have confirmed is typically expressed early in infection, is a promising antigen for such a vaccine, although the E6 and E7 proteins have been characterized more extensively. Thus, the L1 gene from HPV16 was inserted into a recombinant vector, AdHu5, and MVA viral vectors, and administered by prime-boost immunization. Virus-like particles were used as control antigens. Our results indicate that prime-boost immunization with heterologous vaccines induced robust and sustained cellular and humoral response specific to HPV16 L1. In particular, sera obtained from mice immunized with DNA + DNA + Ad + MVA had excellent antitumor activity in vivo. However, the data also confirm that virus-like particles can only elicit low levels cellular immunity and not be long-lasting, and are therefore unsuitable for treatment of existing HPV infections.

  20. Canine Recombinant Adenovirus Vector Induces an Immunogenicity-Related Gene Expression Profile in Skin-Migrated CD11b+ -Type DCs

    PubMed Central

    Jouneau, Luc; Bourge, Mickael; Bouet-Cararo, Coraline; Bonneau, Michel; Zientara, Stephan; Klonjkowski, Bernard; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression profiling of the blood cell response induced early after vaccination has previously been demonstrated to predict the immunogenicity of vaccines. In this study, we evaluated whether the analysis of the gene expression profile of skin-migrated dendritic cells (DCs) could be informative for the in vitro prediction of immunogenicity of vaccine, using canine adenovirus serotype 2 (CAV2) as vaccine vector. CAV2 has been shown to induce immunity to transgenes in several species including sheep and is an interesting alternative to human adenovirus-based vectors, based on the safety records of the parental strain in dogs and the lack of pre-existing immunity in non-host species. Skin-migrated DCs were collected from pseudo-afferent lymph in sheep. Both the CD11b+ -type and CD103+ -type skin-migrated DCs were transduced by CAV2. An analysis of the global gene response to CAV2 in the two skin DC subsets showed that the gene response in CD11b+ -type DCs was far higher and broader than in the CD103+ -type DCs. A newly released integrative analytic tool from Ingenuity systems revealed that the CAV2-modulated genes in the CD11b+ -type DCs clustered in several activated immunogenicity-related functions, such as immune response, immune cell trafficking and inflammation. Thus gene profiling in skin-migrated DC in vitro indicates that the CD11b+ DC type is more responsive to CAV2 than the CD103+ DC type, and provides valuable information to help in evaluating and possibly improving viral vector vaccine effectiveness. PMID:23300693

  1. Particle-mediated delivery of recombinant expression vectors to rabbit skin induces high-titered polyclonal antisera (and circumvents purification of a protein immunogen).

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, P; Xiao, W; Brandsma, J L

    1996-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies were generated in rabbits by delivery to skin of gold particles coated with mammalian expression vectors encoding a cytoplasmic (beta-galactosidase) or a nuclear (L1 capsid of cottontail rabbit papillomavirus) protein. One primary and one booster immunization of 30 micrograms DNA per rabbit yielded specific antisera with titers from 1:24 000 to 1:120 000 in each of eight rabbits, as detected by ELISA and Western blot analysis. Genetic immunization requires relatively small amounts of DNA, eliminates the need to purify the protein immunogen, and does not require irritating adjuvants. PMID:8614644

  2. Recombinant baculovirus as a highly potent vector for gene therapy of human colorectal carcinoma: molecular cloning, expression, and in vitro characterization.

    PubMed

    Paul, Arghya; Jardin, Barbara A; Kulamarva, Arun; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Elias, Cynthia B; Prakash, Satya

    2010-06-01

    Present therapeutic strategies for most cancers are restricted mainly to the primary tumors and are also not very effective in controlling metastatic states. Alternatively, gene therapy can be a potential option for treating such cancers. Currently mammalian viral-based cancer gene therapy is the most popular approach, but the efficacy has been shown to be quite low in clinical trials. In this study, for the first time, the insect cell-specific baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) has been evaluated as a vector for gene delivery to colorectal cancer cells. Experiments involving factorial design were employed to study the individual and combined effects of different parameters such as multiplicity of infection (MOI), viral incubation time and epigenetic factors on transduction efficiency. The results demonstrate that baculovirus gene delivery system holds immense potential for development of a new generation of highly effective virotherapy for colorectal, as well as other major carcinomas (breast, pancreas, and brain), and offers significant benefits to traditional animal virus-based vectors with respect to safety concerns.

  3. Preclinical dose-finding study with a liver-tropic, recombinant AAV-2/8 vector in the mouse model of galactosialidosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huimin; Gomero, Elida; Bonten, Erik; Gray, John T; Allay, Jim; Wu, Yanan; Wu, Jianrong; Calabrese, Christopher; Nienhuis, Arthur; d'Azzo, Alessandra

    2012-02-01

    Galactosialidosis (GS) is a lysosomal storage disease linked to deficiency of the protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA). Similarly to GS patients, Ppca-null mice develop a systemic disease of the reticuloendothelial system, affecting most visceral organs and the nervous system. Symptoms include severe nephropathy, visceromegaly, infertility, progressive ataxia, and shortened life span. Here, we have conducted a preclinical, dose-finding study on a large cohort of GS mice injected intravenously at 1 month of age with increasing doses of a GMP-grade rAAV2/8 vector, expressing PPCA under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Treated mice, monitored for 16 weeks post-treatment, had normal physical appearance and behavior without discernable side effects. Despite the restricted expression of the transgene in the liver, immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses of other systemic organs, serum, and urine showed a dose-dependent, widespread correction of the disease phenotype, suggestive of a protein-mediated mechanism of cross-correction. A notable finding was that rAAV-treated GS mice showed high expression of PPCA in the reproductive organs, which resulted in reversal of their infertility. Together these results support the use of this rAAV-PPCA vector as a viable and safe method of gene delivery for the treatment of systemic disease in non-neuropathic GS patients.

  4. Designing plasmid vectors.

    PubMed

    Tolmachov, Oleg

    2009-01-01

    Nonviral gene therapy vectors are commonly based on recombinant bacterial plasmids or their derivatives. The plasmids are propagated in bacteria, so, in addition to their therapeutic cargo, they necessarily contain a bacterial replication origin and a selection marker, usually a gene conferring antibiotic resistance. Structural and maintenance plasmid stability in bacteria is required for the plasmid DNA production and can be achieved by carefully choosing a combination of the therapeutic DNA sequences, replication origin, selection marker, and bacterial strain. The use of appropriate promoters, other regulatory elements, and mammalian maintenance devices ensures that the therapeutic gene or genes are adequately expressed in target human cells. Optimal immune response to the plasmid vectors can be modulated via inclusion or exclusion of DNA sequences containing immunostimulatory CpG sequence motifs. DNA fragments facilitating construction of plasmid vectors should also be considered for inclusion in the design of plasmid vectors. Techniques relying on site-specific or homologous recombination are preferred for construction of large plasmids (>15 kb), while digestion of DNA by restriction enzymes with subsequent ligation of the resulting DNA fragments continues to be the mainstream approach for generation of small- and medium-size plasmids. Rapid selection of a desired recombinant plasmid against a background of other plasmids continues to be a challenge. In this chapter, the emphasis is placed on efficient and flexible versions of DNA cloning protocols using selection of recombinant plasmids by restriction endonucleases directly in the ligation mixture.

  5. Baculovirus Transfer Vectors.

    PubMed

    Possee, Robert D; King, Linda A

    2016-01-01

    The production of a recombinant baculovirus expression vector normally involves mixing infectious virus DNA with a plasmid-based transfer vector and then co-transfecting insect cells to initiate virus infection. The aim of this chapter is to provide an update on the range of baculovirus transfer vectors currently available. Some of the original transfer vectors developed are now difficult to obtain but generally have been replaced by superior reagents. We focus on those that are available commercially and should be easy to locate. These vectors permit the insertion of single or multiple genes for expression, or the production of proteins with specific peptide tags that aid subsequent protein purification. Others have signal peptide coding regions permitting protein secretion or plasma membrane localization. A table listing the transfer vectors also includes information on the parental virus that should be used with each one. Methods are described for the direct insertion of a recombinant gene into the virus genome without the requirement for a transfer vector. The information provided should enable new users of the system to choose those reagents most suitable for their purposes.

  6. Intramyocardial Injection of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vector Coexpressing PR39/Adrenomedullin Enhances Angiogenesis and Reduces Apoptosis in a Rat Myocardial Infarction Model

    PubMed Central

    An, Rui; Xi, Cong; Xu, Jian; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Shumiao; Wang, Yuemin

    2017-01-01

    Cotransfer of angiogenic and antiapoptotic genes could be the basis of new gene therapy strategies for myocardial infarction. In this study, rAAV-PR39-ADM, coexpressing antimicrobial peptide (PR39) and adrenomedullin (ADM), was designed with the mediation of recombinant adeno-associated virus. In vitro, CRL-1730 cells were divided into four groups, namely, the sham group, the AAV-null group, the NS (normal saline) group, and the PR39-ADM group. Immunocytochemistry analysis, CCK-8 assays, Matrigel assays, and apoptotic analysis were performed; in vivo, myocardial infarction model was established through ligation of the left coronary artery on rats, and treatment groups corresponded to those used in vitro. Myocardial injury, cardiac performance, and the extent of myocardial apoptosis were assessed. Results suggested that rAAV-PR39-ADM administration after myocardial infarction improved cell viability and cardiac function, attenuated apoptosis and myocardial injury, and promoted angiogenesis. Subsequently, levels of 6×His, HIF-1α, VEGF, p-Akt, Akt, ADM, Bcl-2, and Bax were measured by western blot. rAAV-PR39-ADM increased p-Akt, HIF-1α, and VEGF levels and induced higher Bcl-2 expression and lower Bax expression. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that rAAV-PR39-ADM mitigates myocardial injury by promoting angiogenesis and reducing apoptosis. This study suggests a potential novel gene therapy-based method that could be used clinically for myocardial infarction. PMID:28348718

  7. A novel process of viral vector barcoding and library preparation enables high-diversity library generation and recombination-free paired-end sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Davidsson, Marcus; Diaz-Fernandez, Paula; Schwich, Oliver D.; Torroba, Marcos; Wang, Gang; Björklund, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Detailed characterization and mapping of oligonucleotide function in vivo is generally a very time consuming effort that only allows for hypothesis driven subsampling of the full sequence to be analysed. Recent advances in deep sequencing together with highly efficient parallel oligonucleotide synthesis and cloning techniques have, however, opened up for entirely new ways to map genetic function in vivo. Here we present a novel, optimized protocol for the generation of universally applicable, barcode labelled, plasmid libraries. The libraries are designed to enable the production of viral vector preparations assessing coding or non-coding RNA function in vivo. When generating high diversity libraries, it is a challenge to achieve efficient cloning, unambiguous barcoding and detailed characterization using low-cost sequencing technologies. With the presented protocol, diversity of above 3 million uniquely barcoded adeno-associated viral (AAV) plasmids can be achieved in a single reaction through a process achievable in any molecular biology laboratory. This approach opens up for a multitude of in vivo assessments from the evaluation of enhancer and promoter regions to the optimization of genome editing. The generated plasmid libraries are also useful for validation of sequencing clustering algorithms and we here validate the newly presented message passing clustering process named Starcode. PMID:27874090

  8. Correction in trans for Fabry disease: expression, secretion and uptake of alpha-galactosidase A in patient-derived cells driven by a high-titer recombinant retroviral vector.

    PubMed Central

    Medin, J A; Tudor, M; Simovitch, R; Quirk, J M; Jacobson, S; Murray, G J; Brady, R O

    1996-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked metabolic disorder due to a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-gal A; EC 3.2.1.22). Patients accumulate glycosphingolipids with terminal alpha-galactosyl residues that come from intracellular synthesis, circulating metabolites, or from the biodegradation Of senescent cells. Patients eventually succumb to renal, cardio-, or cerebrovascular disease. No specific therapy exists. One possible approach to ameliorating this disorder is to target corrective gene transfer therapy to circulating hematopoietic cells. Toward this end, an amphotropic virus-producer cell line has been developed that produces a high titer (>10(6) i.p. per ml) recombinant retrovirus constructed to transduce and correct target cells. Virus-producer cells also demonstrate expression of large amounts of both intracellular and secreted alpha-gal A. To examine the utility of this therapeutic vector, skin fibroblasts from Fabry patients were corrected for the metabolic defect by infection with this recombinant virus and secreted enzyme was observed. Furthermore, the secreted enzyme was found to be taken up by uncorrected cells in a mannose-6-phosphate receptor-dependent manner. In related experiments, immortalized B cell lines from Fabry patients, created as a hematologic delivery test system, were transduced. As with the fibroblasts, transduced patient B cell lines demonstrated both endogenous enzyme correction and a small amount of secretion together with uptake by uncorrected cells. These studies demonstrate that endogenous metabolic correction in transduced cells, combined with secretion, may provide a continuous source of corrective material in trans to unmodified patient bystander cells (metabolic cooperativity). Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:8755577

  9. Genetic stability of a recombinant adenovirus vaccine vector seed library expressing human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Chen, Ke-DA; Gao, Meng; Chen, Gang; Jin, Su-Feng; Zhuang, Fang-Cheng; Wu, Xiao-Hong; Jiang, Yun-Shui; Li, Jian-Bo

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to understand the genetic stability of a master seed bank (MSB) and a working seed bank (WSB) of an adenovirus vector vaccine expressing the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E6 and E7 fusion proteins (Ad-HPV16E6E7). Microscopic examination and viral infectious efficacy were used to measure the infectious titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB. Polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the stability of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 target gene insertion, while western blot analysis and immunofluorescence were used to assess the expression levels of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 target protein. A C57BL/6 mouse TC-1 tumor cell growth inhibition model was used to evaluate the biological effect of Ad-HPV16E6E7 administration. The infectious titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB were 6.31×10(9) IU/ml and 3.0×10(9) IU/ml, respectively. In addition, the expression levels of the inserted target genes and target proteins were found to be stable. In the mouse TC-1 tumor inhibition analysis, when the virus titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB were 10(9) IU/ml, the tumor inhibition rate was 100%, which was significantly different when compared with the control group (χ(2)MSB=20.00 and χ(2)WSB=20.00; P<0.01). Therefore, the Ad-HPV16E6E7 vaccine seed bank is genetically stable and meets the requirements for vaccine development.

  10. Making recombinant extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Florence; Koch, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    A variety of approaches to understand extracellular matrix protein structure and function require production of recombinant proteins. Moreover, the expression of heterologous extracellular matrix proteins, in particular collagens, using the recombinant technology is of major interest to the biomedical industry. Although extracellular matrix proteins are large, modular and often multimeric, most of them have been successfully produced in various expression systems. This review provides important factors, including the design of the construct, the cloning strategies, the expression vectors, the transfection method and the host cell systems, to consider in choosing a reliable and cost-effective way to make recombinant extracellular matrix proteins. Advantages and drawbacks of each system have been appraised. Protocols that may ease efficient recombinant production of extracellular matrix are described. Emphasis is placed on the recombinant collagen production. Members of the collagen superfamily exhibit specific structural features and generally require complex post-translational modifications to retain full biological activity that make more arduous their recombinant production.

  11. Applications and challenges of multivalent recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Naim, Hussein Y

    2013-03-01

    The exceptional discoveries of antigen/gene delivery systems have allowed the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine candidates. The vaccine candidates employ various antigen-delivery systems, particularly recombinant viral vectors. Recombinant viral vectors are experimental vaccines similar to DNA vaccines, but they use attenuated viruses or bacterium as a carrier "vector" to introduce microbial DNA to cells of the body. They closely mimic a natural infection and therefore can efficiently stimulate the immune system. Although such recombinant vectors may face extensive preclinical testing and will possibly have to meet stringent regulatory requirements, some of these vectors (e.g. measles virus vectors) may benefit from the profound industrial and clinical experience of the parent vaccine. Most notably, novel vaccines based on live attenuated viruses combine the induction of broad, strong and persistent immune responses with acceptable safety profiles. We assess certain technologies in light of their use against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

  12. Prime-boost vaccination with recombinant H5-fowlpox and Newcastle disease virus vectors affords lasting protection in SPF Muscovy ducks against highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Niqueux, Eric; Guionie, Olivier; Amelot, Michel; Jestin, Véronique

    2013-08-28

    Vaccination protocols were evaluated in one-day old Muscovy ducklings, using an experimental Newcastle disease recombinant vaccine (vNDV-H5) encoding an optimized synthetic haemagglutinin gene from a clade 2.2.1 H5N1 highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza virus (AIV), either as a single administration or as a boost following a prime inoculation with a fowlpox vectored vaccine (vFP89) encoding a different H5 HP haemagglutinin from an Irish H5N8 strain. These vaccination schemes did not induce detectable levels of serum antibodies in HI test using a clade 2.2.1 H5N1 antigen, and only induced H5 ELISA positive response in less than 10% of vaccinated ducks. However, following challenge against a clade 2.2.1 HPAIV, both protocols afforded full clinical protection at six weeks of age, and full protection against mortality at nine weeks. Only the prime-boost vaccination (vFP89+vNDV-H5) was still fully protecting Muscovy ducks against disease and mortality at 12 weeks of age. Reduction of oropharyngeal shedding levels was also constantly observed from the onset of the follow-up at 2.5 or three days post-infection in vaccinated ducks compared to unvaccinated controls, and was significantly more important for vFP89+vNDV-H5 vaccination than for vNDV-H5 alone. Although the latter vaccine is shown immunogenic in one-day old Muscovy ducks, the present work is original in demonstrating the high efficacy of the successive administration of two different vector vaccines encoding two different H5 in inducing lasting protection (at least similar to the one induced by an inactivated reassortant vaccine, Re-5). In addition, such a prime-boost schedule allows implementation of a DIVA strategy (to differentiate vaccinated from infected ducks) contrary to Re-5, involves easy practice on the field (with injection at the hatchery and mass vaccination later on), and should avoid eventual interference with NDV maternally derived antibodies. Last, the HA insert could be updated according to

  13. Experimental and Field Results Regarding Immunity Induced by a Recombinant Turkey Herpesvirus H5 Vector Vaccine Against H5N1 and Other H5 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Challenges.

    PubMed

    Gardin, Yannick; Palya, Vilmos; Dorsey, Kristi Moore; El-Attrache, John; Bonfante, Francesco; Wit, Sjaak de; Kapczynski, Darrell; Kilany, Walid Hamdy; Rauw, Fabienne; Steensels, Mieke; Soejoedono, Retno D

    2016-05-01

    Vaccination against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (AI) virus (HPAIV) is one of the possible complementary means available for affected countries to control AI when the disease has become, or with a high risk of becoming, endemic. Efficacy of the vaccination against AI relies essentially, but not exclusively, on the capacity of the vaccine to induce immunity against the targeted virus (which is prone to undergo antigenic variations), as well as its capacity to overcome interference with maternal immunity transmitted by immunized breeding hens to their progeny. This property of the vaccine is a prerequisite for its administration at the hatchery, which assures higher and more reliable vaccine coverage of the populations than vaccination at the farm. A recombinant vector vaccine (Vectormune® AI), based on turkey herpesvirus expressing the hemagglutinin gene of an H5N1 HPAIV as an insert, has been used in several experiments conducted in different research laboratories, as well as in controlled field trials. The results have demonstrated a high degree of homologous and cross protection against different genetic clades of the H5N1 HPAIV. Furthermore, vaccine-induced immunity was not impaired by the presence of passive immunity, but on the contrary, cumulated with it for improved early protection. The demonstrated levels of protection against the different challenge viruses exhibited variations in terms of postchallenge mortality, as well as challenge virus shedding. The data presented here highlight the advantages of this vaccine as a useful and reliable tool to complement biosecurity and sanitary policies for better controlling the disease due to HPAIV of H5 subtypes, when the vaccination is applied as a control measure.

  14. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  15. Bacteriophage gene targeting vectors generated by transplacement.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, C; Woltjen, K; Mansergh, F C; Ishidate, K; Rancourt, D E

    2002-10-01

    A rate-determining step in gene targeting is the generation of the targeting vector. We have developed bacteriophage gene targeting vectorology, which shortens the timeline of targeting vector construction. Using retro-recombination screening, we can rapidly isolate targeting vectors from an embryonic stem cell genomic library via integrative and excisive recombination. We have demonstrated that recombination can be used to introduce specific point mutations or unique restriction sites into gene targeting vectors via transplacement. Using the choline/ethanolamine kinase alpha and beta genes as models, we demonstrate that transplacement can also be used to introduce specifically a neo resistance cassette into a gene targeting phage. In our experience, the lambdaTK gene targeting system offers considerable flexibility and efficiency in TV construction, which makes generating multiple vectors in one week's time possible.

  16. Experimental risk assessment of recombinant Newcastle disease virus vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) used as live vaccines were assessed for: 1) the potential for recombinant NDV-vectored vaccines (rNDV) containing the Avian Influenza virus (AIV) H5 gene to recombine with low pathogenicity H5, H6 and H9 AIV strains, and originate a virus with increased vi...

  17. Molecular genetics of DNA viruses: recombinant virus technology.

    PubMed

    Neuhierl, Bernhard; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant viral genomes cloned onto BAC vectors can be subjected to extensive molecular genetic analysis in the context of E. coli. Thus, the recombinant virus technology exploits the power of prokaryotic genetics to introduce all kinds of mutations into the recombinant genome. All available techniques are based on homologous recombination between a targeting vector carrying the mutated version of the gene of interest and the recombinant virus. After modification, the mutant viral genome is stably introduced into eukaryotic cells permissive for viral lytic replication. In these cells, mutant viral genomes can be packaged into infectious particles to evaluate the effect of these mutations in the context of the complete genome.

  18. Improvement in the visual discrimination of recombinant clones by size reduction of non-recombinant colonies.

    PubMed

    Sektas, Marian; Furmanek-Blaszk, Beata

    2013-11-01

    A flexible approach circumventing cloning problems related to incomplete vector double digest is described. DNA methyltransferase gene insertion into MCS of commonly used expression vectors facilitates identification of both: i) the correct linear fragment in agarose gels due to the dilator effect, and ii) recombinant colonies by size and opacity differences resulting from methyltransferase toxicity.

  19. Recombinant allergens

    PubMed Central

    Jutel, Marek; Solarewicz-Madejek, Katarzyna; Smolinska, Sylwia

    2012-01-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only known causative treatment of allergic diseases. Recombinant allergen-based vaccination strategies arose from a strong need to both to improve safety and enhance efficacy of SIT. In addition, new vaccines can be effective in allergies including food allergy or atopic dermatitis, which poorly respond to the current treatment with allergen extracts. A number of successful clinical studies with both wild-type and hypoallergenic derivatives of recombinant allergens vaccines have been reported for the last decade. They showed high efficacy and safety profile as well as very strong modulation of T and B cell responses to specific allergens. PMID:23095874

  20. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  1. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  2. Recombinant gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Lathi, R B; Milki, A A

    2001-10-01

    Recombinant DNA technology makes it possible to produce large amounts of human gene products for pharmacologic applications, supplanting the need for human tissues. The genes for the alpha and beta subunits of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) have been characterized and cloned. Recombinant FSH (rFSH) has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of fertility disorders. In comparison with the urinary gonadotropin products, human menopausal gonadotropins (HMG), and urinary follitropins (uFSH), rFSH is more potent and better tolerated by patients. Recombinant HCG appears to be as efficacious as urinary HCG with the benefit of improved local tolerance. Recombinant LH (rLH) is likely to be recommended as a supplement to rFSH for ovulation induction in hypogonadotropic women. It may also benefit in vitro fertilization patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with rFSH combined with pituitary suppression, with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist or antagonist.

  3. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  4. Recombinant protein expression in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Nobuyuki; Davis, Keith R; Palmer, Kenneth E

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant protein pharmaceuticals are now widely used in treatment of chronic diseases, and several recombinant protein subunit vaccines are approved for human and veterinary use. With growing demand for complex protein pharmaceuticals, such as monoclonal antibodies, manufacturing capacity is becoming limited. There is increasing need for safe, scalable, and economical alternatives to mammalian cell culture-based manufacturing systems, which require substantial capital investment for new manufacturing facilities. Since a seminal paper reporting immunoglobulin expression in transgenic plants was published in 1989, there have been many technological advances in plant expression systems to the present time where production of proteins in leaf tissues of nonfood crops such as Nicotiana species is considered a viable alternative. In particular, transient expression systems derived from recombinant plant viral vectors offer opportunities for rapid expression screening, construct optimization, and expression scale-up. Extraction of recombinant proteins from Nicotiana leaf tissues can be achieved by collection of secreted protein fractions, or from a total protein extract after grinding the leaves with buffer. After separation from solids, the major purification challenge is contamination with elements of the photosynthetic complex, which can be solved by application of a variety of facile and proven strategies. In conclusion, the technologies required for safe, efficient, scalable manufacture of recombinant proteins in Nicotiana leaf tissues have matured to the point where several products have already been tested in phase I clinical trials and will soon be followed by a rich pipeline of recombinant vaccines, microbicides, and therapeutic proteins.

  5. Equivalent Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The cross-product is a mathematical operation that is performed between two 3-dimensional vectors. The result is a vector that is orthogonal or perpendicular to both of them. Learning about this for the first time while taking Calculus-III, the class was taught that if AxB = AxC, it does not necessarily follow that B = C. This seemed baffling. The…

  6. Vector carpets

    SciTech Connect

    Dovey, D.

    1995-03-22

    Previous papers have described a general method for visualizing vector fields that involves drawing many small ``glyphs`` to represent the field. This paper shows how to improve the speed of the algorithm by utilizing hardware support for line drawing and extends the technique from regular to unstructured grids. The new approach can be used to visualize vector fields at arbitrary surfaces within regular and unstructured grids. Applications of the algorithm include interactive visualization of transient electromagnetic fields and visualization of velocity fields in fluid flow problems.

  7. Recent advances in recombinant protein production

    PubMed Central

    Kunert, Renate; Casanova, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Designing appropriate expression vectors is one of the critical steps in the generation of stable cell lines for recombinant protein production. Conventional expression vectors are severely affected by the chromatin environment surrounding their integration site into the host genome, resulting in low expression levels and transgene silencing. In the past, a new generation of expression vectors and different strategies was developed to overcome the chromatin effects. Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are cloning vectors capable of accommodating up to 350 Kb. Thus, BACs can carry a whole eukaryotic locus with all the elements controlling the expression of a gene; therefore, BACs harbor their own chromatin environment. Expression vectors based on BACs containing open/permissive chromatin loci are not affected by the chromatin surrounding their integration site in the host cell genome. Consequently, BAC-based expression vectors containing the appropriate loci confer predictable and high levels of expression over time. These properties make BAC-based expression vectors a very attractive tool applied to the recombinant protein production field. PMID:23680894

  8. Intracerebral Gene Therapy Using AAVrh.10-hARSA Recombinant Vector to Treat Patients with Early-Onset Forms of Metachromatic Leukodystrophy: Preclinical Feasibility and Safety Assessments in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Zerah, Michel; Piguet, Françoise; Colle, Marie-Anne; Raoul, Sylvie; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Deniaud, Johan; Gautier, Benoit; Toulgoat, Frédérique; Bieche, Ivan; Laurendeau, Ingrid; Sondhi, Dolan; Souweidane, Mark M; Cartier-Lacave, Nathalie; Moullier, Philippe; Crystal, Ronald G; Roujeau, Thomas; Sevin, Caroline; Aubourg, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    No treatment is available for early-onset forms of metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD), a lysosomal storage disease caused by autosomal recessive defect in arylsulfatase A (ARSA) gene causing severe demyelination in central and peripheral nervous systems. We have developed a gene therapy approach, based on intracerebral administration of AAVrh.10-hARSA vector, coding for human ARSA enzyme. We have previously demonstrated potency of this approach in MLD mice lacking ARSA expression. We describe herein the preclinical efficacy, safety, and biodistribution profile of intracerebral administration of AAVrh.10-hARSA to nonhuman primates (NHPs). NHPs received either the dose planned for patients adjusted to the brain volume ratio between child and NHP (1×dose, 1.1×10(11) vg/hemisphere, unilateral or bilateral injection) or 5-fold this dose (5×dose, 5.5×10(11) vg/hemisphere, bilateral injection). NHPs were subjected to clinical, biological, and brain imaging observations and were euthanized 7 or 90 days after injection. There was no toxicity based on clinical and biological parameters, nor treatment-related histological findings in peripheral organs. A neuroinflammatory process correlating with brain MRI T2 hypersignals was observed in the brain 90 days after administration of the 5×dose, but was absent or minimal after administration of the 1×dose. Antibody response to AAVrh.10 and hARSA was detected, without correlation with brain lesions. After injection of the 1×dose, AAVrh.10-hARSA vector was detected in a large part of the injected hemisphere, while ARSA activity exceeded the normal endogenous activity level by 14-31%. Consistently with other reports, vector genome was detected in off-target organs such as liver, spleen, lymph nodes, or blood, but not in gonads. Importantly, AAVrh.10-hARSA vector was no longer detectable in urine at day 7. Our data demonstrate requisite safe and effective profile for intracerebral AAVrh.10-hARSA delivery in NHPs, supporting its

  9. The Cre-loxP recombination-based reporter system for plant transcriptional expression studies.

    PubMed

    Shigaki, Toshiro; Vyzasatya, Ravindranadha R; Sivitz, Ali B; Ward, John M; Sze, Heven; Hirschi, Kendal D

    2005-05-01

    To facilitate the characterization of plant genes, the Cre-loxP site-specific recombination system was adapted to make reporter vectors for plant expression studies. This system allows promoter fragments to be cloned into a small vector (univector) and subsequently recombined in vitro with binary vectors containing different reporter genes precisely at near-perfect efficiency. We have constructed univector-adapted vectors with three reporters, beta-glucuronidase, luciferase, and green fluorescent protein, and a BASTA-resistance gene for selection of plant transformants. Expression in plants using the new system was validated by comparison to conventional reporter vectors. These new vectors are efficient and economical alternatives to the other plant reporter vectors currently available. The royalty-free Cre-loxP system serves as a platform for the future expansion of recombination-based cloning vectors for plant research.

  10. Alphavirus vectors for cancer gene therapy (review).

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Ryuya

    2004-04-01

    Alphaviruses have several characteristics that make them attractive as gene therapy vectors such as transient and high-level expression of a heterologous gene. Alphavirus vectors, Semliki Forest virus (SFV), Sindbis virus (SIN) and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) have been developed as gene expression vectors. Alphaviruses are positive-strand RNA viruses that can mediate efficient cytoplasmic gene expression in mammalian cells. The alphavirus RNA replication machinery has been engineered for high level heterologous gene expression. Since an RNA virus vector cannot integrate into chromosomal DNA, concerns about cell transformation are reduced. Alphavirus vectors demonstrate promise for the safe tumor-killing and tumor-specific immune responses. Recombinant alphavirus RNA replicons may facilitate gene therapy of cancer.

  11. 75 FR 69687 - Office of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines) ACTION: Notice of consideration of proposed...- vector system may be certified only after review by the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC)...

  12. 76 FR 27653 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines... Kluyveromyces lactis as a host-vector 1 system has been reviewed by the NIH ] Recombinant DNA Advisory...

  13. Genetically engineering adenoviral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors are commonly used for various gene therapy applications. Significant advances in the genetic engineering of Ad vectors in recent years has highlighted their potential for the treatment of metastatic disease. There are several methods to genetically modify the Ad genome to incorporate retargeting peptides which will redirect the natural tropism of the viruses, including homologous recombination in bacteria or yeast. However, homologous recombination in yeast is highly efficient and can be achieved without the need for extensive cloning strategies. In addition, the method does not rely on the presence of unique restriction sites within the Ad genome and the reagents required for this method are widely available and inexpensive. Large plasmids containing the entire adenoviral genome (~36 kbp) can be modified within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and genomes easily rescued in Escherichia coli hosts for analysis or amplification. A method for two-step homologous recombination in yeast is described in this chapter.

  14. Recombinant MVA vaccines: dispelling the myths.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, Matthew G; Carroll, Miles W

    2013-09-06

    Diseases such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and cancer are prime targets for prophylactic or therapeutic vaccination, but have proven partially or wholly resistant to traditional approaches to vaccine design. New vaccines based on recombinant viral vectors expressing a foreign antigen are under intense development for these and other indications. One of the most advanced and most promising vectors is the attenuated, non-replicating poxvirus MVA (modified vaccinia virus Ankara), a safer derivative of the uniquely successful smallpox vaccine. Despite the ability of recombinant MVA to induce potent humoral and cellular immune responses against transgenic antigen in humans, especially when used as the latter element of a heterologous prime-boost regimen, doubts are occasionally expressed about the ultimate feasibility of this approach. In this review, five common misconceptions over recombinant MVA are discussed, and evidence is cited to show that recombinant MVA is at least sufficiently genetically stable, manufacturable, safe, and immunogenic (even in the face of prior anti-vector immunity) to warrant reasonable hope over the feasibility of large-scale deployment, should useful levels of protection against target pathogens, or therapeutic benefit for cancer, be demonstrated in efficacy trials.

  15. Optimal expression condition of recombinant RAP.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Hong; Bi, Hao; Liu, Zhiguo; Guo, Jianli; Qu, Shen

    2007-02-01

    In order to construct the expression recombinant of human receptor associated protein (RAP), optimize its expression condition and obtain the recombinant protein after expression with high efficiency, two prokaryotic expression vectors-pT7-PL and pET-28a(+) were used to construct the expression recombinant containing RAP cDNA, and the expression efficiency of two kinds of expression E. coli of BL21 strains was compared. The effect of different induction conditions on the expression of recombinant RAP was observed. After recombinant protein was purified with Ni(+) -nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni(+) -NTA) affinity chromatogram, its binding ability with microphage was observed. The results showed that two recombinant plasmids both obtained high expression of RAP. The expression levels of RAP in plasmid pT7-PL-RAP in BL21 (DE3, plysS) strain were significantly higher than in BL21 (DE3) strain. The expression of pT7-PL-RAP in the presence of chloramphenicol was higher than in the absence of chloramphenicol, and most of the inducible expressed RAP was soluble. The RAP which was purified by Ni(+) -NTA resin could strongly bind with the RAW264.7 cells rich in low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family receptors. It was concluded that the expression condition of recombinant RAP was optimized and functional RAP was obtained, which offered a good foundation for the further production of RAP as research tool.

  16. Gene targeting with a replication-defective adenovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, A; Sakagami, K; Kanegae, Y; Saito, I; Kobayashi, I

    1995-01-01

    Wide application of the gene-targeting technique has been hampered by its low level of efficiency. A replication-defective adenovirus vector was used for efficient delivery of donor DNA in order to bypass this problem. Homologous recombination was selected between a donor neo gene inserted in the adenovirus vector and a target mutant neo gene on a nuclear papillomavirus plasmid. These recombinant adenoviruses allowed gene transfer to 100% of the treated cells without impairing their viability. Homologous recombinants were obtained at a level of frequency much higher than that obtained by electroporation or a calcium phosphate procedure. The structure of the recombinants was analyzed in detail after recovery in an Escherichia coli strain. All of the recombinants examined had experienced a precise correction of the mutant neo gene. Some of them had a nonhomologous rearrangement of their sequences as well. One type of nonhomologous recombination took place at the end of the donor-target homology. The vector adenovirus DNA was inserted into some of the products obtained at a high multiplicity of infection. The insertion was at the end of the donor-target homology with a concomitant insertion of a 10-bp-long filler sequence in one of the recombinants. The possible relationship between these rearrangements and the homologous recombination is discussed. These results demonstrate the applicability of adenovirus-mediated gene delivery in gene targeting and gene therapy. PMID:7666520

  17. Evaluation of attenuation, immunogenicity and efficacy of a bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV-3) vaccine and a recombinant chimeric bovine/human PIV-3 vaccine vector in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Pennathur, Sridhar; Haller, Aurelia A; MacPhail, Mia; Rizzi, Tom; Kaderi, Sepideh; Fernandes, Fiona; Bicha, Leenas; Schickli, Jeanne H; Tang, Roderick S; Chen, Wendy; Nguyen, Nick; Mathie, Sharon; Mehta, Hersh; Coelingh, Kathleen L

    2003-12-01

    Restricted replication in the respiratory tract of rhesus monkeys is an intrinsic property of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (bPIV-3) strains. This host range phenotype of bPIV-3 has been utilized as a marker to evaluate the attenuation of bPIV-3 vaccines for human use. Two safety, immunogenicity and efficacy studies in primates evaluated and compared three human parainfluenza virus type 3 (hPIV-3) vaccine candidates: biologically derived bPIV-3, a plasmid-derived bPIV-3 (r-bPIV-3) and a chimeric bovine/human PIV-3 (b/hPIV-3). These studies also examined the feasibility of substituting Vero cells, cultured in the presence or absence of foetal bovine serum, for foetal rhesus lung-2 (FRhL-2) cells as the tissue culture substrate for the production of bPIV-3 vaccine. The results demonstrated that (i) Vero cell-produced bPIV-3 was as attenuated, immunogenic and efficacious as bPIV-3 vaccine grown in FRhL-2 cells, (ii) plasmid-derived bPIV-3 was as attenuated, immunogenic and efficacious as the biologically derived bPIV-3 and (iii) the b/hPIV-3 chimera displayed an intermediate attenuation phenotype and protected animals completely from hPIV-3 challenge. These results support the use of bPIV-3 vaccines propagated in Vero cells in human clinical trials and the use of b/hPIV-3 as a virus vaccine vector to express foreign viral antigens.

  18. Viral vector-based influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Rory D.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antigenic drift of seasonal influenza viruses and the occasional introduction of influenza viruses of novel subtypes into the human population complicate the timely production of effective vaccines that antigenically match the virus strains that cause epidemic or pandemic outbreaks. The development of game-changing vaccines that induce broadly protective immunity against a wide variety of influenza viruses is an unmet need, in which recombinant viral vectors may provide. Use of viral vectors allows the delivery of any influenza virus antigen, or derivative thereof, to the immune system, resulting in the optimal induction of virus-specific B- and T-cell responses against this antigen of choice. This systematic review discusses results obtained with vectored influenza virus vaccines and advantages and disadvantages of the currently available viral vectors. PMID:27455345

  19. Engineering HSV-1 vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Goins, William F; Huang, Shaohua; Cohen, Justus B; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2014-01-01

    Virus vectors have been employed as gene transfer vehicles for various preclinical and clinical gene therapy applications, and with the approval of Glybera (alipogene tiparvovec) as the first gene therapy product as a standard medical treatment (Yla-Herttuala, Mol Ther 20: 1831-1832, 2013), gene therapy has reached the status of being a part of standard patient care. Replication-competent herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors that replicate specifically in actively dividing tumor cells have been used in Phase I-III human trials in patients with glioblastoma multiforme, a fatal form of brain cancer, and in malignant melanoma. In fact, T-VEC (talimogene laherparepvec, formerly known as OncoVex GM-CSF) displayed efficacy in a recent Phase III trial when compared to standard GM-CSF treatment alone (Andtbacka et al. J Clin Oncol 31: sLBA9008, 2013) and may soon become the second FDA-approved gene therapy product used in standard patient care. In addition to the replication-competent oncolytic HSV vectors like T-VEC, replication-defective HSV vectors have been employed in Phase I-II human trials and have been explored as delivery vehicles for disorders such as pain, neuropathy, and other neurodegenerative conditions. Research during the last decade on the development of HSV vectors has resulted in the engineering of recombinant vectors that are totally replication defective, nontoxic, and capable of long-term transgene expression in neurons. This chapter describes methods for the construction of recombinant genomic HSV vectors based on the HSV-1 replication-defective vector backbones, steps in their purification, and their small-scale production for use in cell culture experiments as well as preclinical animal studies.

  20. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  1. Vectors--shuttle vehicles for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J M

    1997-01-01

    Gene therapy is being considered for the treatment of various inherited and acquired disorders. The basic premise of this new therapeutic modality is manipulation of gene expression towards a therapeutic end. The early development of the field focused on a technique called ex vivo gene therapy in which autologous cells are genetically manipulated in culture prior to transplantation. Recent advances have stimulated the development of in vivo gene therapy approaches based on direct delivery of the therapeutic gene to cells in vivo. The rate-limiting technologies of gene therapy are the gene delivery vehicles, called vectors, used to accomplish gene transfer. The most efficient vectors are based on recombinant versions of viruses with retroviral vectors serving as prototypes. This viral vector system has been exploited in ex vivo approaches of gene therapy in which cultured, dividing cells are transduced with the recombinant virus resulting in integration of the proviral DNA into the chromosomal DNA of the recipient cell. The use of retroviral vectors in gene therapy has been restricted to ex vivo approaches because of difficulties in purifying the virion and the requirement that the target cell is dividing at the time of transduction. More recently, vectors based on adenoviruses have been developed for in vivo gene therapy. These viruses can be grown in large quantities and highly purified. Importantly, they efficiently transduce the recombinant genome into non-dividing cells. Applications include in vivo gene delivery to a variety of targets such as muscle, lung, liver and the central nervous system. Clinical trials of in vivo delivery with adenoviruses have been undertaken for the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

  2. Recombinant baculoviruses for insect control.

    PubMed

    Inceoglu, A B; Kamita, S G; Hinton, A C; Huang, Q; Severson, T F; Kang, K; Hammock, B D

    2001-10-01

    Baculoviruses are double-stranded DNA viruses which are highly selective for several insect groups. They are valuable natural control agents, but their utility in many agricultural applications has been limited by their slow speed of kill and narrow host specificity. Baculoviruses have been genetically modified to express foreign genes under powerful promoters in order to accelerate their speed of kill. In our and other laboratories, the expression of genes coding for insect juvenile hormone esterases and various peptide neurotoxins has resulted in recombinant baculoviruses with promise as biological insecticides. These viruses are efficacious in the laboratory, greenhouse and field and dramatically reduce damage caused by insect feeding. The recombinant viruses synergize and are synergized by classical pesticides such as pyrethroids. Since they are highly selective for pest insects, they can be used without disrupting biological control. Because the recombinant virus produces fewer progeny in infected larvae than the wild-type virus, they are rapidly out-competed in the ecosystem. The viruses can be used effectively with crops expressing endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis. They can be produced industrially but also by village industries, indicating that they have the potential to deliver sustainable pest control in developing countries. It remains to be seen, however, whether the current generation of recombinant baculoviruses will be competitive with the new generation of synthetic chemical pesticides. Current research clearly indicates, though, that the use of biological vectors of genes for insect control will find a place in agriculture. Baculoviruses will also prove valuable in testing the potential utility of proteins and peptides for insect control.

  3. Detection of homologous recombination between yeast artificial chromosomes with overlapping inserts.

    PubMed Central

    Cellini, A; Lacatena, R M; Tocchini-Valentini, G P

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a system which facilitates the detection of recombination between Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YAC's) carrying homologous inserts. The system consists of a classical YAC vector, a new YAC vector and two appropriately labelled yeast strains of opposite mating type. The new YAC vector differs in markers from the canonical YAC vector. To test whether homologous recombination takes place, phage lambda DNA was cloned in the two vectors to provide a region of homology. The two constructs were then introduced into yeast strains of opposite mating type in which the endogenous genes for the selective markers present in the vectors are not expressed. Artificial chromosomes obtained by meiotic recombination are detected in the spores resulting from the mating. PMID:1826951

  4. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  5. A transient assay for recombination demonstrates that Arabidopsis SNM1 and XRCC3 enhance non-homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R A; Hellens, R P; Love, D R

    2011-09-16

    Replacement of endogenous genes by homologous recombination is rare in plants; the majority of genetic modifications are the result of transforming DNA molecules undergoing random genomic insertion by way of non-homologous recombination. Factors that affect chromatin remodeling and DNA repair are thought to have the potential to enhance the frequency of homologous recombination in plants. Conventional tools to study the frequencies of genetic recombination often rely on stable transformation-based approaches, with these systems being rarely capable of high-throughput or combinatorial analysis. We developed a series of vectors that use chemiluminescent (LUC and REN) reporter genes to assay the relative frequency of homologous and non-homologous recombination in plants. These transient assay vectors were used to screen 14 candidate genes for their effects on recombination frequencies in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Over-expression of Arabidopsis genes with sequence similarity to SNM1 from yeast and XRCC3 from humans enhanced the frequency of non-homologous recombination when assayed using two different donor vectors. Transient N. benthamiana leaf systems were also used in an alternative assay for preliminary measurements of homologous recombination frequencies, which were found to be enhanced by over-expression of RAD52, MIM and RAD51 from yeast, as well as CHR24 from Arabidopsis. The findings for the assays described here are in line with previous studies that analyzed recombination frequencies using stable transformation. The assays we report have revealed functions in non-homologous recombination for the Arabidopsis SNM1 and XRCC3 genes, so the suppression of these genes' expression offers a potential means to enhance the gene targeting frequency in plants. Furthermore, our findings also indicate that plant gene targeting frequencies could be enhanced by over-expression of RAD52, MIM, CHR24, and RAD51 genes.

  6. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  7. Permissive growth of human adenovirus type 4 vaccine strain-based vector in porcine cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong-sheng; Li, Xiao-jing; Wan, Wen-yan; Li, Hong-jie; Wang, Xiao-xue; Yang, Xia; Li, Yong-tao; Chang, Hong-tao; Chen, Lu; Wang, Chuan-qing; Zhao, Jun

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in using adenoviruses as live vectors to develop recombinant vaccines. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of HIV/SIV and influenza vaccine candidates based on human adenovirus type 4 (Ad4) replication-competent vectors in rhesus macaque and human model. To explore the possibility of human Ad4 vaccine strain used as a vector in developing porcine vaccines, the growth properties of replication-competent human Ad4 vaccine strain recombinant encoding EGFP in different porcine cell lines were investigated. All tested cell lines are permissive for Ad4 vaccine strain vector with varied replication efficiency. Thus, human Ad4 based vectors would be promising supplement to adenovirus vectors as a delivery vehicle for recombinant vaccines in swine industry.

  8. Photoionization and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretically self-consistent calculations for photoionization and (e + ion) recombination are described. The same eigenfunction expansion for the ion is employed in coupled channel calculations for both processes, thus ensuring consistency between cross sections and rates. The theoretical treatment of (e + ion) recombination subsumes both the non-resonant recombination ("radiative recombination"), and the resonant recombination ("di-electronic recombination") processes in a unified scheme. In addition to the total, unified recombination rates, level-specific recombination rates and photoionization cross sections are obtained for a large number of atomic levels. Both relativistic Breit-Pauli, and non-relativistic LS coupling, calculations are carried out in the close coupling approximation using the R-matrix method. Although the calculations are computationally intensive, they yield nearly all photoionization and recombination parameters needed for astrophysical photoionization models with higher precision than hitherto possible, estimated at about 10-20% from comparison with experimentally available data (including experimentally derived DR rates). Results are electronically available for over 40 atoms and ions. Photoionization and recombination of He-, and Li-like C and Fe are described for X-ray modeling. The unified method yields total and complete (e+ion) recombination rate coefficients, that can not otherwise be obtained theoretically or experimentally.

  9. Magnetic field spectrum at cosmological recombination revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saga, Shohei; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Takahashi, Keitaro; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2015-06-01

    If vector type perturbations are present in the primordial plasma before recombination, the generation of magnetic fields is known to be inevitable through the Harrison mechanism. In the context of the standard cosmological perturbation theory, nonlinear couplings of first-order scalar perturbations create second-order vector perturbations, which generate magnetic fields. Here we reinvestigate the generation of magnetic fields at second-order in cosmological perturbations on the basis of our previous study, and extend it by newly taking into account the time evolution of purely second-order vector perturbations with a newly developed second-order Boltzmann code. We confirm that the amplitude of magnetic fields from the product-terms of the first-order scalar modes is consistent with the result in our previous study. However, we find, both numerically and analytically, that the magnetic fields from the purely second-order vector perturbations partially cancel out the magnetic fields from one of the product-terms of the first-order scalar modes, in the tight coupling regime in the radiation dominated era. Therefore, the amplitude of the magnetic fields on small scales, k ≳10 h Mpc-1 , is smaller than the previous estimates. The amplitude of the generated magnetic fields at cosmological recombination is about Brec=5.0 ×10-24 Gauss on k =5.0 ×10-1 h Mpc-1 . Finally, we discuss the reason for the discrepancies that exist in estimates of the amplitude of magnetic fields among other authors.

  10. Vaccine Vector for Sustained High-Level Antitumor CTL Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    vector pCMV-Kan/neo which contains a CMV promoter immediately upstream of the insert site. A kanamycin resistant gene flanked by two FRT sequences...the entire MCMV genome and the NEU expression cassette. Following selection of recombinant BACs on the basis of kanamycin resistance, the Kan marker...was removed by flp-mediated recombination. [ polyA, polyadenylation site; Kan, kanamycin resistance gene for selection in bacteria; Frt, flp

  11. Selective isolation of cosmid clones by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Poustka, A; Rackwitz, H R; Frischauf, A M; Hohn, B; Lehrach, H

    1984-01-01

    A procedure for selection of specific cosmid clones by homologous recombination between cosmid clones from a library and sequences cloned into a plasmid has been developed. Cosmid libraries constructed in a rec- host strain are packaged in vivo into lambda particles. Appropriate aliquots are then introduced into a rec+ host containing the sequence used for selection cloned into a plasmid vector without sequence homology to the cosmid vector. After a short time for recombination, the cosmids are packaged in vivo. Cosmids that have taken up the plasmid by homologous recombination are isolated by plating under conditions selecting for the antibiotic resistance markers carried by both vectors. The recombined cosmids can lose the inserted sequence by another homologous recombination event and, after packaging in vivo, these revertants can be identified on appropriate indicator plates. Images PMID:6330743

  12. Light axial vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kan; Pang, Cheng-Qun; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by the abundant experimental observation of axial-vector states, we study whether the observed axial-vector states can be categorized into the conventional axial-vector meson family. In this paper we carry out an analysis based on the mass spectra and two-body Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-allowed decays. Besides testing the possible axial-vector meson assignments, we also predict abundant information for their decays and the properties of some missing axial-vector mesons, which are valuable for further experimental exploration of the observed and predicted axial-vector mesons.

  13. Utilization of Site-Specific Recombination in Biopharmaceutical Production.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Damavandi, Narges; Akbari Eidgahi, Mohammad Reza; Davami, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian expression systems, due to their capacity in post-translational modification, are preferred systems for biopharmaceutical protein production. Several recombinant protein systems have been introduced to the market, most of which are under clinical development. In spite of significant improvements such as cell line engineering, introducing novel expression methods, gene silencing and process development, expression level is unpredictable and unstable because of the random location of integration in the genome. Site-specific recombination techniques are capable of producing stable and high producer clonal cells; therefore, they are gaining more importance in the biopharmaceutical production. Site-specific recombination methods increase the recombinant protein production by specifically inserting a vector at a locus with specific expression trait. The present review focused on the latest developments in site-specific recombination techniques, their specific features and comparisons.

  14. Utilization of Site-Specific Recombination in Biopharmaceutical Production

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Damavandi, Narges; Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Davami, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian expression systems, due to their capacity in post-translational modification, are preferred systems for biopharmaceutical protein production. Several recombinant protein systems have been introduced to the market, most of which are under clinical development. In spite of significant improvements such as cell line engineering, introducing novel expression methods, gene silencing and process development, expression level is unpredictable and unstable because of the random location of integration in the genome. Site-specific recombination techniques are capable of producing stable and high producer clonal cells; therefore, they are gaining more importance in the biopharmaceutical production. Site-specific recombination methods increase the recombinant protein production by specifically inserting a vector at a locus with specific expression trait. The present review focused on the latest developments in site-specific recombination techniques, their specific features and comparisons. PMID:26602035

  15. Novel cloning vectors for Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Baum, J A; Coyle, D M; Gilbert, M P; Jany, C S; Gawron-Burke, C

    1990-11-01

    Seven replication origins from resident plasmids of Bacillus thuringienis subsp. kurstaki HD263 and HD73 were cloned in Escherichia coli. Three of these replication origins, originating from plasmids of 43, 44, and 60 MDa, were used to construct a set of compatible shuttle vectors that exhibit structural and segregational stability in the Cry- strain B. thuringiensis HD73-26. These shuttle vectors, pEG597, pEG853, and pEG854, were designed with rare restriction sites that permit various adaptations, including the construction of small recombinant plasmids lacking antibiotic resistance genes. The cryIA(c) and cryIIA insecticidal crystal protein genes were inserted into these vectors to demonstrate crystal protein production in B. thuringiensis. Introduction of a cloned cryIA(c) gene from strain HD263 into a B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai strain exhibiting good insecticidal activity against Spodoptera exigua resulted in a recombinant strain with an improved spectrum of insecticidal activity. Shuttle vectors of this sort should be valuable in future genetic studies of B. thuringiensis as well as in the development of B. thuringiensis strains for use as microbial pesticides.

  16. Novel cloning vectors for Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, J A; Coyle, D M; Gilbert, M P; Jany, C S; Gawron-Burke, C

    1990-01-01

    Seven replication origins from resident plasmids of Bacillus thuringienis subsp. kurstaki HD263 and HD73 were cloned in Escherichia coli. Three of these replication origins, originating from plasmids of 43, 44, and 60 MDa, were used to construct a set of compatible shuttle vectors that exhibit structural and segregational stability in the Cry- strain B. thuringiensis HD73-26. These shuttle vectors, pEG597, pEG853, and pEG854, were designed with rare restriction sites that permit various adaptations, including the construction of small recombinant plasmids lacking antibiotic resistance genes. The cryIA(c) and cryIIA insecticidal crystal protein genes were inserted into these vectors to demonstrate crystal protein production in B. thuringiensis. Introduction of a cloned cryIA(c) gene from strain HD263 into a B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai strain exhibiting good insecticidal activity against Spodoptera exigua resulted in a recombinant strain with an improved spectrum of insecticidal activity. Shuttle vectors of this sort should be valuable in future genetic studies of B. thuringiensis as well as in the development of B. thuringiensis strains for use as microbial pesticides. Images PMID:2268153

  17. Virus-Vectored Influenza Virus Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Tripp, Ralph A.; Tompkins, S. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of an inactivated vaccine that has been licensed for >50 years, the influenza virus continues to cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. Constant evolution of circulating influenza virus strains and the emergence of new strains diminishes the effectiveness of annual vaccines that rely on a match with circulating influenza strains. Thus, there is a continued need for new, efficacious vaccines conferring cross-clade protection to avoid the need for biannual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines. Recombinant virus-vectored vaccines are an appealing alternative to classical inactivated vaccines because virus vectors enable native expression of influenza antigens, even from virulent influenza viruses, while expressed in the context of the vector that can improve immunogenicity. In addition, a vectored vaccine often enables delivery of the vaccine to sites of inductive immunity such as the respiratory tract enabling protection from influenza virus infection. Moreover, the ability to readily manipulate virus vectors to produce novel influenza vaccines may provide the quickest path toward a universal vaccine protecting against all influenza viruses. This review will discuss experimental virus-vectored vaccines for use in humans, comparing them to licensed vaccines and the hurdles faced for licensure of these next-generation influenza virus vaccines. PMID:25105278

  18. Recombination of cluster ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1993-01-01

    Some of our recent work on molecular band emissions from recombination of molecular dimer ions (N4(+) and CO(+) CO) is discussed. Much of the experimental work was done by Y. S. Cao; the results on N4(+) recombination have been published. A brief progress report is given on our ongoing measurements of neutral products of recombination using the flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe technique in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence.

  19. Replicon RNA Viral Vectors as Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Single-stranded RNA viruses of both positive and negative polarity have been used as vectors for vaccine development. In this context, alphaviruses, flaviviruses, measles virus and rhabdoviruses have been engineered for expression of surface protein genes and antigens. Administration of replicon RNA vectors has resulted in strong immune responses and generation of neutralizing antibodies in various animal models. Immunization of mice, chicken, pigs and primates with virus-like particles, naked RNA or layered DNA/RNA plasmids has provided protection against challenges with lethal doses of infectious agents and administered tumor cells. Both prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy has been achieved in cancer immunotherapy. Moreover, recombinant particles and replicon RNAs have been encapsulated by liposomes to improve delivery and targeting. Replicon RNA vectors have also been subjected to clinical trials. Overall, immunization with self-replicating RNA viruses provides high transient expression levels of antigens resulting in generation of neutralizing antibody responses and protection against lethal challenges under safe conditions. PMID:27827980

  20. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in cyanobacterial cultures

    DOEpatents

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2014-09-30

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  1. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in Cyanobacterial cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2016-04-19

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  2. Non-replicating expression vectors: applications in vaccine development and gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Limbach, K. J.; Paoletti, E.

    1996-01-01

    This review presents experimental, preclinical and clinical data illustrating the multiple uses of recombinant non-replicating virus vectors in the fields of immunoprophylaxis and gene therapy. PMID:8666067

  3. Emerging adenoviral vectors for stable correction of genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Jager, Lorenz; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2007-08-01

    Recent drawbacks in treating patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disorders with retroviral vectors underline the importance of generating novel tools for stable transduction of mammalian cells. Substantial progress has been made over the recent years which may offer important steps towards stable and more importantly safer correction of genetic diseases. This article discusses recent advances for stable transduction of target cells based on adenoviral gene transfer. There is accumulating evidence that recombinant adenoviral vectors (AdVs) based on various human serotypes with a broad cellular tropism and adenoviruses (Ads) from different species will play an important role in future gene therapy applications. In combination with recombinant AdVs for somatic integration these gene transfer vectors offer high transduction efficiencies with potentially safer integration patterns. Other approaches for persistent transgene expression include excision of stable episomes from the adenoviral vector genome, but also long-term persistence of the complete adenoviral vector genome as an episomal DNA molecule was demonstrated and exemplified by the treatment of various genetic diseases in small and large animal models. This review displays advantages but also limitations of these Ad based vector systems. This is the perfect time to pursue such approaches because alternative strategies for stable transduction of mammalian cells undergoing many cell divisions are urgently needed. Looking into the future, we believe that a combination of different components from different viral vectors in concert with non-viral vector systems will be successful in designing significantly optimized transfer vehicles for a broad range of different genetic diseases.

  4. Alphavirus vectors: applications for DNA vaccine production and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, K

    2000-01-01

    Replication-deficient alphavirus vectors have been developed for efficient high-level transgene expression. The broad host range of alphaviruses has allowed infection of a wide variety of mammalian cell lines and primary cultures. Particularly, G protein-coupled receptors have been expressed at high levels and subjected to binding and functional studies. Expression in suspension cultures has greatly facilitated production of large quantities of recombinant proteins for structural studies. Injection of recombinant alphavirus vectors into rodent brain resulted in local reporter gene expression. Highly neuron-specific expression was obtained in hippocampal slice cultures in vivo. Additionally, preliminary studies in animal models suggest that alphavirus vectors can be attractive candidates for gene therapy applications. Traditionally alphavirus vectors, either attenuated strains or replication-deficient particles, have been used to elicit efficient immune responses in animals. Recently, the application of alphaviruses has been extended to naked nucleic acids. Injection of DNA as well as RNA vectors has demonstrated efficient antigen production. In many cases, protection against lethal challenges has been obtained after immunization with alphavirus particles or nucleic acid vectors. Alphavirus vectors can therefore be considered as potentially promising vectors for vaccine production.

  5. Understanding Singular Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Botteron, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    matrix yields a surprisingly simple, heuristical approximation to its singular vectors. There are correspondingly good approximations to the singular values. Such rules of thumb provide an intuitive interpretation of the singular vectors that helps explain why the SVD is so…

  6. A study of recombinant protective H. pylori antigens

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zheng; Tao, Xiao-Hong; Huang, Ai-Long; Wang, Pi-Long

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant vector which can express Mr26000 outer membrane protein (OMP) from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), and to obtain the vaccine protecting against H. pylori infection and a diagnostic reagent kit quickly detecting H. pylori infection. METHODS: The gene encoding the structural Mr26000 outer membrane protein of H. pylori was amplified from H. pylori chromosomal DNA by PCR, and inserted in the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a(+), which was transformed into the Top10 E. coli strain. Recombinant vector was selected, identified and transformed into BL-21(DE3) E. coli strain. The recombinant fusion proteins were expressed. The antigenicity of recombinant protein was studied by ELISA or immunoblotting and immunized Balb/c mice. RESULTS: The gene of Mr26000 OMP was amplified to be 594 base pairs, 1.1% of the cloned genes was mutated and 1.51% of amino acid residues was changed, but there was homogeneity between them. The recombinant fusion protein encoded objective polypeptides of 198 amino acid residues, corresponding to calculated molecular masses of Mr26000. The level of soluble expression products was about 38.96% of the total cell protein. After purification by Ni-NTA agarose resin columniation, the purity of objective protein became about 90%. The ELISA results showed that recombinant fusion protein could be recognized by patient serum infected with H. pylori and rabbit serum immunized with the recombinant protein. Furthermore, Balb/c mice immunized with the recombinant protein were protected against H. pylori infection. CONCLUSION: Mr26000 OMP may be a candidate vaccine preventing H. pylori infection. PMID:11925614

  7. [Detection and antigenic characteristics of the recombinant nucleocapsid proteins of Lassa and Marburg viruses].

    PubMed

    Vladyko, A S; Scheslenok, E P; Fomina, E G; Semizhon, P A; Ignat'ev, G M; Shkolina, T V; Kras'ko, A G; Semenov, S F; Vinokurov, N V

    2012-01-01

    Two plasmid vectors, which allow the recombinant polypeptides of Lassa and Marburg viruses to be expressed in prokaryotic cells E. coli strain BL21 (DE3), were produced. The two recombinant polypeptides are able to bind specific antibodies. This provides an opportunity to use them as antigenic components of immunoassay diagnostic test kits.

  8. Rhotrix Vector Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aminu, Abdulhadi

    2010-01-01

    By rhotrix we understand an object that lies in some way between (n x n)-dimensional matrices and (2n - 1) x (2n - 1)-dimensional matrices. Representation of vectors in rhotrices is different from the representation of vectors in matrices. A number of vector spaces in matrices and their properties are known. On the other hand, little seems to be…

  9. Insulated Foamy Viral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Browning, Diana L; Collins, Casey P; Hocum, Jonah D; Leap, David J; Rae, Dustin T; Trobridge, Grant D

    2016-03-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy is promising, but genotoxicity has limited its use in the clinic. Genotoxicity is highly dependent on the retroviral vector used, and foamy viral (FV) vectors appear relatively safe. However, internal promoters may still potentially activate nearby genes. We developed insulated FV vectors, using four previously described insulators: a version of the well-studied chicken hypersensitivity site 4 insulator (650cHS4), two synthetic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-based insulators, and an insulator based on the CCAAT box-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (7xCTF/NF1). We directly compared these insulators for enhancer-blocking activity, effect on FV vector titer, and fidelity of transfer to both proviral long terminal repeats. The synthetic CTCF-based insulators had the strongest insulating activity, but reduced titers significantly. The 7xCTF/NF1 insulator did not reduce titers but had weak insulating activity. The 650cHS4-insulated FV vector was identified as the overall most promising vector. Uninsulated and 650cHS4-insulated FV vectors were both significantly less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors. Integration sites were evaluated in cord blood CD34(+) cells and the 650cHS4-insulated FV vector had fewer hotspots compared with an uninsulated FV vector. These data suggest that insulated FV vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy.

  10. Recombination spots prediction using DNA physical properties in the saccharomyces cerevisiae genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shou-Hui; Xu, Li-Qin; Chen, Wei; Liu, Guo-Qing; Lin, Hao

    2012-09-01

    The prediction of meiotic recombination is difficult and current available methods are limited. In this study, we propose a novel method for discriminating between recombination hotspots and coldspots using support vector machine(SVM) with the DNA physical properties. Results of optimized pseudo-tetranucleotide show overall accuracy of 83.1% by using 5-fold cross-validation. High predictive successful rate exhibit that this model can be applied for discriminating between recombination hotspots and coldspots.

  11. Alphavirus vectors as tools in neuroscience and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-05-02

    Alphavirus-based vectors have been engineered for in vitro and in vivo expression of heterelogous genes. The rapid and easy generation of replication-deficient recombinant particles and the broad range of host cell infection have made alphaviruses attractive vehicles for applications in neuroscience and gene therapy. Efficient delivery to primary neurons and hippocampal slices has allowed localization studies of gene expression and electrophysiological recordings of ion channels. Alphavirus vectors have also been applied for in vivo delivery to rodent brain. Due to the strong local transient expression provided by alphavirus vectors a number of immunization and gene therapy approaches have demonstrated both therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy in various animal models.

  12. Covariantized vector Galileons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Matthew; Koyama, Kazuya; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2016-03-01

    Vector Galileons are ghost-free systems containing higher derivative interactions of vector fields. They break the vector gauge symmetry, and the dynamics of the longitudinal vector polarizations acquire a Galileon symmetry in an appropriate decoupling limit in Minkowski space. Using an Arnowitt-Deser-Misner approach, we carefully reconsider the coupling with gravity of vector Galileons, with the aim of studying the necessary conditions to avoid the propagation of ghosts. We develop arguments that put on a more solid footing the results previously obtained in the literature. Moreover, working in analogy with the scalar counterpart, we find indications for the existence of a "beyond Horndeski" theory involving vector degrees of freedom that avoids the propagation of ghosts thanks to secondary constraints. In addition, we analyze a Higgs mechanism for generating vector Galileons through spontaneous symmetry breaking, and we present its consistent covariantization.

  13. Systems and methods for the secretion of recombinant proteins in gram negative bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Withers, III, Sydnor T.; Dominguez, Miguel A.; DeLisa, Matthew P.; Haitjema, Charles H.

    2017-02-21

    Disclosed herein are systems and methods for producing recombinant proteins utilizing mutant E. coli strains containing expression vectors carrying nucleic acids encoding the proteins, and secretory signal sequences to direct the secretion of the proteins to the culture medium. Host cells transformed with the expression vectors are also provided.

  14. Systems and methods for the secretion of recombinant proteins in gram negative bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, III, Sydnor T.; Dominguez, Miguel A; DeLisa, Matthew P.; Haitjema, Charles H.

    2016-08-09

    Disclosed herein are systems and methods for producing recombinant proteins utilizing mutant E. coli strains containing expression vectors carrying nucleic acids encoding the proteins, and secretory signal sequences to direct the secretion of the proteins to the culture medium. Host cells transformed with the expression vectors are also provided.

  15. Allelic exchange in Mycobacterium tuberculosis with long linear recombination substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, V; Pavelka, M S; Bardarov, S S; Martin, J; Weisbrod, T R; McAdam, R A; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1996-01-01

    Genetic studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been greatly hampered by the inability to introduce specific chromosomal mutations. Whereas the ability to perform allelic exchanges has provided a useful method of gene disruption in other organisms, in the clinically important species of mycobacteria, such as M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis, similar approaches have thus far been unsuccessful. In this communication, we report the development of a shuttle mutagenesis strategy that involves the use of long linear recombination substrates to reproducibly obtain recombinants by allelic exchange in M. tuberculosis. Long linear recombination substrates, approximately 40 to 50 kb in length, were generated by constructing libraries in the excisable cosmid vector pYUB328. The cosmid vector could be readily excised from the recombinant cosmids by digestion with PacI, a restriction endonuclease for which there exist few, if any, sites in mycobacterial genomes. A cosmid containing the mycobacterial leuD gene was isolated, and a selectable marker conferring resistance to kanamycin was inserted into the leuD gene in the recombinant cosmid by interplasmid recombination in Escherichia coli. A long linear recombination substrate containing the insertionally mutated leuD gene was generated by PacI digestion. Electroporation of this recombination substrate containing the insertionally mutated leuD allele resulted in the generation of leucine auxotrophic mutants by homologous recombination in 6% of the kanamycin-resistant transformants for both the Erdman and H37Rv strains of M. tuberculosis. The ability to perform allelic exchanges provides an important approach for investigating the biology of this pathogen as well as developing new live-cell M. tuberculosis-based vaccines. PMID:8550428

  16. Methods of treating Parkinson's disease using viral vectors

    DOEpatents

    Bankiewicz, Krystof; Cunningham, Janet

    2016-11-15

    Methods of delivering viral vectors, particularly recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) virions, to the central nervous system (CNS) using convection enhanced delivery (CED) are provided. The rAAV virions include a nucleic acid sequence encoding a therapeutic polypeptide. The methods can be used for treating CNS disorders such as for treating Parkinson's Disease.

  17. [Construction of directional T vector for gene cloning and expression].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xing; Zhai, Chao; Chen, Liang; Yu, Xiaolan; Jiang, Sijing; Yan, Hong; Yang, Dengxiang; Ma, Lixin

    2013-04-01

    Traditional T vector cloning method requires onerous procedures for identifying recombinant, and directional cloning was impossible. In order to overcome these problems, we have devised a directional T vector pETG based on pET-23a(+). For gene cloning, 7 bp partial LacO sequence was introduced into DNA fragment to reconstitute a full length LacO with Bfu I digested T vector. After transformation, blue colonies were selected on LB plate supplemented with X-gal. Restriction enzyme digestion and PCR identification showed that all blue colonies contained the directionally inserted recombinants and the recombinant efficiency was nearly 100%. We have successfully cloned 103 genes from human liver cDNA; in the study complicated procedures for screening of recombinant were not required. Eight pETG clones were picked for protein expression, and all the clones successfully produced corresponding proteins. We demonstrated that the directional T vector was successfully constructed, and it was very suitable for gene cloning and expression.

  18. Dissociative recombination in aeronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of dissociative recombination in planetary aeronomy is summarized, and two examples are discussed. The first is the role of dissociative recombination of N2(+) in the escape of nitrogen from Mars. A previous model is updated to reflect new experimental data on the electronic states of N produced in this process. Second, the intensity of the atomic oxygen green line on the nightside of Venus is modeled. Use is made of theoretical rate coefficients for production of O (1S) in dissociative recombination from different vibrational levels of O2(+).

  19. Recent patents on alphavirus protein expression and vector production.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Alejandro; Ruiz-Guillen, Marta; Quetglas, Jose I; Bezunartea, Jaione; Casales, Erkuden; Smerdou, Cristian

    2011-12-01

    Alphaviruses contain a single-strand RNA genome that can be modified to express heterologous genes at high levels. Alphavirus vectors can be packaged within viral particles (VPs) or used as DNA/RNA layered systems. The broad tropism and high expression levels of alphavirus vectors have made them very attractive for applications like recombinant protein expression, vaccination or gene therapy. Expression mediated by alphavirus vectors is generally transient due to induction of apoptosis. However, during the last years several non-cytopathic mutations have been identified within the replicase sequence of different alphaviruses, allowing prolonged protein expression in culture cells. Some of these mutants, which have been patented, have allowed the generation of stable cell lines able to express recombinant proteins for extended periods of time in a constitutive or inducible manner. Production of alphavirus VPs usually requires cotransfection of cells with vector and helper RNAs providing viral structural proteins in trans. During this process full-length wild type (wt) genomes can be generated through recombination between different RNAs. Several new strategies to reduce wt virus generation during packaging, optimize VP production, increase packaging capacity, and provide VPs with specific targeting have been recently patented. Finally, hybrid vectors between alphavirus and other types of viruses have led to a number of patents with applications in vaccination, cancer therapy or retrovirus production.

  20. Molecular neurosurgery: vectors and vector delivery strategies.

    PubMed

    White, Edward

    2012-12-01

    Molecular neurosurgery involves the use of vector-mediated gene therapy and gene knockdown to manipulate in vivo gene expression for the treatment of neurological diseases. These techniques have the potential to revolutionise the practice of neurosurgery. However, significant challenges remain to be overcome before these techniques enter routine clinical practice. These challenges have been the subject of intensive research in recent years and include the development of strategies to facilitate effective vector delivery to the brain and the development of both viral and non-viral vectors that are capable of efficient cell transduction without excessive toxicity. This review provides an update on the practice of molecular neurosurgery with particular focus on the practical neurosurgical aspects of vector delivery to the brain. In addition, an introduction to the key vectors employed in clinical trials and a brief overview of previous gene therapy clinical trials is provided. Finally, key areas for future research aimed at increasing the likelihood of the successful translation of gene therapy into clinical trials are highlighted.

  1. Homologous recombination contributes to the repair of zinc-finger-nuclease induced double strand breaks in pig primary cells and facilitates recombination with exogenous DNA.

    PubMed

    Klymiuk, Nikolai; Fezert, Pauline; Wünsch, Annegret; Kurome, Mayuko; Kessler, Barbara; Wolf, Eckhard

    2014-05-10

    Site-specific nucleases have become powerful tools for genome editing by the introduction of end-joining-mediated mutations, but it is unclear to which extent induced double strand breaks will also facilitate homologous recombination with exogenous DNA. This question is, however, of particular importance for somatic cells, which have to be modified for the generation of large animal models, but, on the other hand, have also been described to be reluctant to recombination-based DNA repair. Here, we examined zinc-finger nucleases for their potential to introduce modifications in pig somatic cells via end-joining or recombination. We found that co-transfection with nuclease-encoding plasmids resulted in a dramatic boost of recombination with different targeting vectors, suggesting a much more prominent role of this repair pathway in somatic cells than was previously thought. Although recombination with any of the vectors even occurred on both alleles of the target gene, we found also evidence for distinct properties of the used vectors regarding their preference for mono-allelic or bi-allelic modification. Thus, we show that the combined usage of site-specific nucleases and targeting vectors does not only promote homologous recombination in somatic cells but might also resemble a promising tool for detailed examination of DNA repair pathways.

  2. Recombining overlapping BACs into single large BACs.

    PubMed

    Kotzamanis, George; Kotsinas, Athanassios

    2015-01-01

    BAC clones containing the entire genomic region of a gene including the long-range regulatory elements are very useful for gene functional analysis. However, large genes often span more than the insert of a BAC clone, and single BACs covering the entire region of interest are not available. Here, we describe a general system for linking two or more overlapping BACs into a single clone. Two rounds of homologous recombination are used. In the first, the BAC inserts are subcloned into the pBACLink vectors. In the second, the two BACs are combined together. Multiple BACs in a contig can be combined by alternating use of the pBACLInk vectors, resulting in several BAC clones containing as much of the genomic region of a gene as required. Such BACs can then be used in gene expression studies and/or gene therapy applications.

  3. Generation and evaluation of a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine for rabies.

    PubMed

    Weyer, Jacqueline; Rupprecht, Charles E; Mans, Janet; Viljoen, Gerrit J; Nel, Louis H

    2007-05-22

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has become a vaccine vector of choice for recombinant vaccine development. A MVA-based rabies vaccine would be advantageous for use as a vaccine for dogs (and wildlife), particularly if it proves innocuous and efficacious by the oral route. Here, the generation and immunological testing of a recombinant MVA expressing a rabies virus glycoprotein gene is described. In a murine model, higher dosages of recombinant MVA were needed to induce equivocal immune responses as with Vaccinia Copenhagen or Vaccinia Western Reserve recombinants, when administered by a parenteral route. The MVA recombinant was not immunogenic or efficacious when administered per os in naïve mice. The ability of the recombinant MVA to induce anamnestic responses in dogs and raccoons was also investigated. Recombinant MVA boosted humoral immune responses in these animals when administered peripherally, but not when administered orally.

  4. Vehicle Based Vector Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-28

    300001 1 of 16 VEHICLE-BASED VECTOR SENSOR STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and...unmanned underwater vehicle that can function as an acoustic vector sensor . (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004] It is known that a propagating...mechanics. An acoustic vector sensor measures the particle motion via an accelerometer and combines Attorney Docket No. 300001 2 of 16 the

  5. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  6. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  7. Multiphoton Assisted Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, E. S.; Jones, R. R.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2008-12-01

    We have observed multiphoton assisted recombination in the presence of a 38.8 GHz microwave field. Stimulated emission of up to ten microwave photons results in energy transfer from continuum electrons, enabling recombination. The maximum electron energy loss is far greater than the 2Up predicted by the standard “simpleman’s” model. The data are well reproduced by both an approximate analytic expression and numerical simulations in which the combined Coulomb and radiation fields are taken into account.

  8. Delivery of recombinant alphavirus into hippocampal slice tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2012-08-01

    The alphaviruses Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and Sindbis virus (SIN) have been used frequently as expression vectors in vitro and in vivo. Usually, these systems consist of replication-deficient vectors that require a helper vector for packaging of recombinant particles. Replication-proficient vectors have also been engineered. Alphaviral vectors can be used as nucleic-acid-based vectors (DNA and RNA) or infectious particles. High-titer viral production is achieved in <2 d. The broad host range of alphaviruses facilitates studies in mammalian and nonmammalian cell lines, primary cells in culture, and in vivo. The strong preference for expression in neuronal cells has made alphaviruses particularly useful in neurobiological studies. Unfortunately, their strong cytotoxic effect on host cells, relatively short-term transient expression patterns, and the reasonably high cost of viral production remain drawbacks. However, novel mutant alphaviruses have shown reduced cytotoxicity and prolonged expression. This protocol describes gene delivery of recombinant alphavirus to hippocampal slice cultures. Organotypic slices are covered by a layer of glial cells that impedes the penetration of viral particles to the neurons. Thus, viral particles should be injected manually into the extracellular space of the tissue.

  9. In vivo administration of recombinant alphavirus into rodents.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2012-08-01

    The alphaviruses Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and Sindbis virus (SIN) have been used frequently as expression vectors in vitro and in vivo. Usually, these systems consist of replication-deficient vectors that require a helper vector for packaging of recombinant particles. Replication-proficient vectors have also been engineered. Alphaviral vectors can be used as nucleic-acid-based vectors (DNA and RNA) or infectious particles. High-titer viral production is achieved in <2 d. The broad host range of alphaviruses facilitates studies in mammalian and nonmammalian cell lines, primary cells in culture, and in vivo. The strong preference for expression in neuronal cells has made alphaviruses particularly useful in neurobiological studies. Unfortunately, their strong cytotoxic effect on host cells, relatively short-term transient expression patterns, and the reasonably high cost of viral production remain drawbacks. However, novel mutant alphaviruses have shown reduced cytotoxicity and prolonged expression. This protocol describes stereotactic microinjection of recombinant alphavirus into rodents. Administration can be performed without any purification or concentration of viral stocks. However, filter-sterilization is recommended to ensure that cell debris or other contaminants are not present.

  10. The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG).

    PubMed

    Chen, Robert T; Carbery, Baevin; Mac, Lisa; Berns, Kenneth I; Chapman, Louisa; Condit, Richard C; Excler, Jean-Louis; Gurwith, Marc; Hendry, Michael; Khan, Arifa S; Khuri-Bulos, Najwa; Klug, Bettina; Robertson, James S; Seligman, Stephen J; Sheets, Rebecca; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant viral vectors provide an effective means for heterologous antigen expression in vivo and thus represent promising platforms for developing novel vaccines against human pathogens from Ebola to tuberculosis. An increasing number of candidate viral vector vaccines are entering human clinical trials. The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to improve our ability to anticipate potential safety issues and meaningfully assess or interpret safety data, thereby facilitating greater public acceptance when licensed.

  11. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  12. Homologous Recombination between Autonomously Replicating Plasmids in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ayares, David; Spencer, James; Schwartz, Faina; Morse, Brian; Kucherlapati, Raju

    1985-01-01

    The ability of autonomously replicating plasmids to recombine in mammalian cells was investigated. Two deletion plasmids of the eukaryotic-prokaryotic shuttle vector pSV2neo were cotransfected into transformed monkey COS cells. Examination of the low molecular weight DNA isolated after 48 hr of incubation revealed that recombination between the plasmids had occurred. The DNA was also used to transform recA- E. coli. Yield of neo R colonies signified homologous recombination. Examination of the plasmid DNA from these colonies confirmed this view. Double-strand breaks in one or both of the input plasmids at the sites of deletion resulted in an enhancement of recombination frequency. The recombination process yielded monomeric and dimeric molecules. Examination of these molecules revealed that reciprocal recombination as well as gene conversion events were involved in the generation of plasmids bearing an intact neo gene. The COS cell system we describe is analogous to study of bacteriophage recombination and yeast random-spore analysis. PMID:2996980

  13. [Transfection of HL-60 cells by Venus lentiviral vector].

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Hu, Shao-Yan; Cen, Jian-Nong; Chen, Zi-Xing

    2013-06-01

    In order to study the potential of Venus, lentiviral vector, applied to acute myeloid leukemia, the recombinant vector Venus-C3aR was transfected into 293T packing cells by DNA-calcium phosphate coprecipitation. All virus stocks were collected and transfected into HL-60, the GFP expression in HL-60 cells was measured by flow cytometry. The expression level of C3aR1 in transfected HL-60 cells was identified by RT-PCR and flow cytometry. The lentiviral toxicity on HL-60 was measured by using CCK-8 method and the ability of cell differentiation was observed. The results indicated that the transfection efficacy of lentiviral vector on HL-60 cells was more than 95%, which meets the needs for further study. C3aR1 expression on HL-60 cells increased after being transfected with recombinant lentiviral vector. Before and after transfection, the proliferation and differentiation of cells were not changed much. It is concluded that the lentiviral vector showed a high efficacy to transfect AML cells and can be integrated in genome of HL-60 cells to realize the stable expression of interest gene. Meanwhile, lentiviral vector can not affect HL-60 cell ability to proliferate and differentiate.

  14. Accelerated homologous recombination and subsequent genome modification in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Baena-Lopez, Luis Alberto; Alexandre, Cyrille; Mitchell, Alice; Pasakarnis, Laurynas; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2013-12-01

    Gene targeting by 'ends-out' homologous recombination enables the deletion of genomic sequences and concurrent introduction of exogenous DNA with base-pair precision without sequence constraint. In Drosophila, this powerful technique has remained laborious and hence seldom implemented. We describe a targeting vector and protocols that achieve this at high frequency and with very few false positives in Drosophila, either with a two-generation crossing scheme or by direct injection in embryos. The frequency of injection-mediated gene targeting can be further increased with CRISPR-induced double-strand breaks within the region to be deleted, thus making homologous recombination almost as easy as conventional transgenesis. Our targeting vector replaces genomic sequences with a multifunctional fragment comprising an easy-to-select genetic marker, a fluorescent reporter, as well as an attP site, which acts as a landing platform for reintegration vectors. These vectors allow the insertion of a variety of transcription reporters or cDNAs to express tagged or mutant isoforms at endogenous levels. In addition, they pave the way for difficult experiments such as tissue-specific allele switching and functional analysis in post-mitotic or polyploid cells. Therefore, our method retains the advantages of homologous recombination while capitalising on the mutagenic power of CRISPR.

  15. Development of expression vectors based on pepino mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plant viruses are useful expression vectors because they can mount systemic infections allowing large amounts of recombinant protein to be produced rapidly in differentiated plant tissues. Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) (genus Potexvirus, family Flexiviridae), a widespread plant virus, is a promising candidate expression vector for plants because of its high level of accumulation in its hosts and the absence of severe infection symptoms. We report here the construction of a stable and efficient expression vector for plants based on PepMV. Results Agroinfectious clones were produced from two different PepMV genotypes (European and Chilean), and these were able to initiate typical PepMV infections. We explored several strategies for vector development including coat protein (CP) replacement, duplication of the CP subgenomic promoter (SGP) and the creation of a fusion protein using the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A catalytic peptide. We found that CP replacement vectors were unable to move systemically and that vectors with duplicated SGPs (even heterologous SGPs) suffered from significant transgene instability. The fusion protein incorporating the FMDV 2A catalytic peptide gave by far the best results, maintaining stability through serial passages and allowing the accumulation of GFP to 0.2-0.4 g per kg of leaf tissue. The possible use of PepMV as a virus-induced gene silencing vector to study gene function was also demonstrated. Protocols for the use of this vector are described. Conclusions A stable PepMV vector was generated by expressing the transgene as a CP fusion using the sequence encoding the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A catalytic peptide to separate them. We have generated a novel tool for the expression of recombinant proteins in plants and for the functional analysis of virus and plant genes. Our experiments have also highlighted virus requirements for replication in single cells as well as intercellular and long

  16. Viral Vector Production: Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Julius W; Morshed, Ramin A; Kane, J Robert; Auffinger, Brenda; Qiao, Jian; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have proven to be valuable resources in the development of novel therapies aimed at targeting pathological conditions of the central nervous system, including Alzheimer's disease and neoplastic brain lesions. Not only can some genetically engineered adenoviral vectors achieve remarkably efficient and specific gene delivery to target cells, but they also may act as anticancer agents by selectively replicating within cancer cells.Due to the great interest in using adenoviral vectors for various purposes, the need for a comprehensive protocol for viral vector production is especially apparent. Here, we describe the process of generating an adenoviral vector in its entirety, including the more complex process of adenoviral fiber modification to restrict viral tropism in order to achieve more efficient and specific gene delivery.

  17. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  18. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  19. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  20. Atom Recombination on Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Chai

    Upon high speed re-entry of the Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO) through the earth's atmosphere, oxygen and nitrogen atoms produced in the shock wave in front of the SSO recombine on the surface of the SSO, releasing heat. To minimize the rise of surface temperature due to the reaction, surface material of the SSO should have a low recombination probability, gamma, of atoms impinging on it. To design such material, it is necessary to understand the mechanism of atom recombination. With this in mind, gamma values were measured for recombination of O, N, and H atoms in a diffusion tube reactor between 700 and 1250 K (HT), 300 and 700 K (MT), and at 194 K (LT) on silica. The rate of recombination was first order with respect to the atom concentration from LT to HT. The Arrhenius plots, gamma vs. 1/T, were very complex. All observations are explained by assuming a surface with a small fraction of active sites that irreversibly bind chemisorbed atoms. Everything happens as if the active sites were surrounded by collection zones within which all atoms striking the surface are adsorbed reversibly with an assumed sticking probability of unity. These atoms then diffuse on the surface. Some of them reach the active sites where they can recombine with the chemisorbed atoms. At LT, all atoms striking the surface reach the active sites. As a result of desorption at MT, the collection zones shrink with increasing temperature. At HT, only atoms striking active sites directly from the gas phase lead to recombination. An analytical solution of the diffusion-reaction problem obtained for a model where the active sites are distributed uniformly fits with the experimental data from LT to HT. The two novel features of this work are the identification of the active sites on silica for recombination of H on silica at HT as surface OH groups and the suggestion that another kind of active site is responsible for recombination of O and N atoms at HT as well as for H atoms at LT and MT. Although

  1. Development of novel types of plastid transformation vectors and evaluation of factors controlling expression.

    PubMed

    Herz, Stefan; Füssl, Monika; Steiger, Sandra; Koop, Hans-Ulrich

    2005-12-01

    Two new vector types for plastid transformation were developed and uidA reporter gene expression was compared to standard transformation vectors. The first vector type does not contain any plastid promoter, instead it relies on extension of existing plastid operons and was therefore named "operon-extension" vector. When a strongly expressed plastid operon like psbA was extended by the reporter gene with this vector type, the expression level was superior to that of a standard vector under control of the 16S rRNA promoter. Different insertion sites, promoters and 5'-UTRs were analysed for their effect on reporter gene expression with standard and operon-extension vectors. The 5'-UTR of phage 7 gene 10 in combination with a modified N-terminus was found to yield the highest expression levels. Expression levels were also strongly dependent on external factors like plant or leaf age or light intensity. In the second vector type, named "split" plastid transformation vector, modules of the expression cassette were distributed on two separate vectors. Upon co-transformation of plastids with these vectors, the complete expression cassette became inserted into the plastome. This result can be explained by successive co-integration of the split vectors and final loop-out recombination of the duplicated sequences. The split vector concept was validated with different vector pairs.

  2. In Vitro and In Vivo Gene Delivery by Recombinant Baculoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Hideki; Limn, Chang Kwang; Yap, Chan Choo; Onishi, Masayoshi; Nozaki, Masami; Nishimune, Yoshitake; Okahashi, Nobuo; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Rie; Mochizuki, Rika; Moriishi, Kohji; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2003-01-01

    Although recombinant baculovirus vectors can be an efficient tool for gene transfer into mammalian cells in vitro, gene transduction in vivo has been hampered by the inactivation of baculoviruses by serum complement. Recombinant baculoviruses possessing excess envelope protein gp64 or other viral envelope proteins on the virion surface deliver foreign genes into a variety of mammalian cell lines more efficiently than the unmodified baculovirus. In this study, we examined the efficiency of gene transfer both in vitro and in vivo by recombinant baculoviruses possessing envelope proteins derived from either vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVG) or rabies virus. These recombinant viruses efficiently transferred reporter genes into neural cell lines, primary rat neural cells, and primary mouse osteal cells in vitro. The VSVG-modified baculovirus exhibited greater resistance to inactivation by animal sera than the unmodified baculovirus. A synthetic inhibitor of the complement activation pathway circumvented the serum inactivation of the unmodified baculovirus. Furthermore, the VSVG-modified baculovirus could transduce a reporter gene into the cerebral cortex and testis of mice by direct inoculation in vivo. These results suggest the possible use of the recombinant baculovirus vectors in combination with the administration of complement inhibitors for in vivo gene therapy. PMID:12941888

  3. Tandem recombineering by SLIC cloning and Cre-LoxP fusion to generate multigene expression constructs for protein complex research.

    PubMed

    Haffke, Matthias; Viola, Cristina; Nie, Yan; Berger, Imre

    2013-01-01

    A robust protocol to generate recombinant DNA containing multigene expression cassettes by using sequence and ligation independent cloning (SLIC) followed by multiplasmid Cre-LoxP recombination in tandem for multiprotein complex research is described. The protocol includes polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the desired genes, seamless insertion into the target vector via SLIC, and Cre-LoxP recombination of specific donor and acceptor plasmid molecules, optionally in a robotic setup. This procedure, called tandem recombineering, has been implemented for multiprotein expression in E. coli and mammalian cells, and also for insect cells using a recombinant baculovirus.

  4. Line Integral of a Vector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman

    This programed booklet is designed for the engineering student who understands and can use vector and unit vector notation, components of a vector, parallel law of vector addition, and the dot product of two vectors. Content begins with work done by a force in moving a body a certain distance along some path. For each of the examples and problem…

  5. Null Killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukács, B.; Perjés, Z.; Sebestyén, Á.

    1981-06-01

    Space-times admitting a null Killing vector are studied, using the Newman-Penrose spin coefficient formalism. The properties of the eigenrays (principal null curves of the Killing bivector) are shown to be related to the twist of the null Killing vector. Among the electrovacs, the ones containing a null Maxwell field turn out to belong to the twist-free class. An electrovac solution is obtained for which the null Killing vector is twisting and has geodesic and shear-free eigenrays. This solution is parameterless and appears to be the field of a zero-mass, spinning, and charged source.

  6. Recombinant vaccine for canine parvovirus in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    López de Turiso, J A; Cortés, E; Martínez, C; Ruiz de Ybáñez, R; Simarro, I; Vela, C; Casal, I

    1992-01-01

    VP2 is the major component of canine parvovirus (CPV) capsids. The VP2-coding gene was engineered to be expressed by a recombinant baculovirus under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. A transfer vector that contains the lacZ gene under the control of the p10 promoter was used in order to facilitate the selection of recombinants. The expressed VP2 was found to be structurally and immunologically indistinguishable from authentic VP2. The recombinant VP2 shows also the capability to self-assemble, forming viruslike particles similar in size and appearance to CPV virions. These viruslike particles have been used to immunize dogs in different doses and combinations of adjuvants, and the anti-CPV responses have been measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, monolayer protection assays, and an assay for the inhibition of hemagglutination. A dose of ca. 10 micrograms of VP2 was able to elicit a good protective response, higher than that obtained with a commercially available, inactivated vaccine. The results indicate that these viruslike particles can be used to protect dogs from CPV infection. Images PMID:1313899

  7. Insertional mutagenesis and illegitimate recombination in mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kalpana, G V; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1991-01-01

    Mycobacteria, particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, and Mycobacterium avium, are major pathogens of man. Although insertional mutagenesis has been an invaluable genetic tool for analyzing the mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis, it has not yet been possible to apply it to the mycobacteria. To overcome intrinsic difficulties in directly manipulating the genetics of slow-growing mycobacteria, including M. tuberculosis and bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine strains, we developed a system for random shuttle mutagenesis. A genomic library of Mycobacterium smegmatis was subjected to transposon mutagenesis with Tn5 seq1, a derivative of Tn5, in Escherichia coli and these transposon-containing recombinant plasmids were reintroduced into mycobacterial chromosomes by homologous recombination. This system has allowed us to isolate several random auxotrophic mutants of M. smegmatis. To extend this strategy to M. tuberculosis and BCG, targeted mutagenesis was performed using a cloned BCG methionine gene that was subjected to Tn5 seq1 mutagenesis in E. coli and reintroduced into the mycobacteria. Surprisingly for prokaryotes, both BCG and M. tuberculosis were found to incorporate linear DNA fragments into illegitimate sites throughout the mycobacterial genomes at a frequency of 10(-5) to 10(-4) relative to the number of transformants obtained with autonomously replicating vectors. Thus the efficient illegitimate recombination of linear DNA fragments provides the basis for an insertional mutagenesis system for M. tuberculosis and BCG. Images PMID:2052623

  8. Production of recombinant allergens in plants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A large percentage of allergenic proteins are of plant origin. Hence, plant-based expression systems are considered ideal for the recombinant production of certain allergens. First attempts to establish production of plant-derived allergens in plants focused on transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana infected with recombinant viral vectors. Accordingly, allergens from birch and mugwort pollen, as well as from apple have been expressed in plants. Production of house dust mite allergens has been achieved by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of tobacco plants. Beside the use of plants as production systems, other approaches have focused on the development of edible vaccines expressing allergens or epitopes thereof, which bypasses the need of allergen purification. The potential of this approach has been convincingly demonstrated for transgenic rice seeds expressing seven dominant human T cell epitopes derived from Japanese cedar pollen allergens. Parallel to efforts in developing recombinant-based diagnostic and therapeutic reagents, different gene-silencing approaches have been used to decrease the expression of allergenic proteins in allergen sources. In this way hypoallergenic ryegrass, soybean, rice, apple, and tomato were developed. PMID:21258627

  9. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  10. The dissociative recombination of ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubé, S.; Lehfaoui, L.; Rowe, B. R.; Mitchell, J. B. A.

    1998-09-01

    The dissociative recombination rate coefficient for 0953-4075/31/18/016/img2 has been measured at 300 K using a flowing afterglow Langmuir probe-mass spectrometer apparatus. A value of 0953-4075/31/18/016/img3 has been found.

  11. Introduction to dissociative recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.; Mitchell, J. Brian A.

    1989-01-01

    Dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions with electrons has important consequences in many areas of physical science. Ab-initio calculations coupled with resonant scattering theory and multichannel quantum defect studies have produced detailed results illuminating the role of ion vibrational excitation, the quantum yields of the DR products, and the role of Rydberg states. The theoretical and experimental results are discussed.

  12. Recombineering linear BACs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingwen; Narayanan, Kumaran

    2015-01-01

    Recombineering is a powerful genetic engineering technique based on homologous recombination that can be used to accurately modify DNA independent of its sequence or size. One novel application of recombineering is the assembly of linear BACs in E. coli that can replicate autonomously as linear plasmids. A circular BAC is inserted with a short telomeric sequence from phage N15, which is subsequently cut and rejoined by the phage protelomerase enzyme to generate a linear BAC with terminal hairpin telomeres. Telomere-capped linear BACs are protected against exonuclease attack both in vitro and in vivo in E. coli cells and can replicate stably. Here we describe step-by-step protocols to linearize any BAC clone by recombineering, including inserting and screening for presence of the N15 telomeric sequence, linearizing BACs in vivo in E. coli, extracting linear BACs, and verifying the presence of hairpin telomere structures. Linear BACs may be useful for functional expression of genomic loci in cells, maintenance of linear viral genomes in their natural conformation, and for constructing innovative artificial chromosome structures for applications in mammalian and plant cells.

  13. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  14. Targeted adenoviral vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Joanne T.

    The practical implementation of gene therapy in the clinical setting mandates gene delivery vehicles, or vectors, capable of efficient gene delivery selectively to the target disease cells. The utility of adenoviral vectors for gene therapy is restricted by their dependence on the native adenoviral primary cellular receptor for cell entry. Therefore, a number of strategies have been developed to allow CAR-independent infection of specific cell types, including the use of bispecific conjugates and genetic modifications to the adenoviral capsid proteins, in particular the fibre protein. These targeted adenoviral vectors have demonstrated efficient gene transfer in vitro , correlating with a therapeutic benefit in preclinical animal models. Such vectors are predicted to possess enhanced efficacy in human clinical studies, although anatomical barriers to their use must be circumvented.

  15. Vector inflation and vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.M. )

    1991-09-15

    A vector field {ital A}{sub {mu}} is coupled to the Einstein equations with a linearly perturbed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric, constructed to generate first-order vector perturbations. A working classical chaotic vector inflation is demonstrated and then quantum fluctuations of the field are used to constrain the cosmological perturbations. In particular, the vector momentum flux {ital T}{sub 0{ital i}} is tracked to the epoch where radiation-dominated matter exists. Matching conditions using observational constraints of the cosmic microwave background radiation give rise to a peculiar cosmological velocity of the order of 10{sup {minus}100}{ital c}. Amplification of this number, e.g., by breaking the conformal invariance of the field, could be used to generate cosmic magnetic fields using a dynamo mechanism.

  16. The Vector Decomposition Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Maki; Mitsunari, Shigeo; Fujiwara, Toru

    This paper introduces a new computational problem on a two-dimensional vector space, called the vector decomposition problem (VDP), which is mainly defined for designing cryptosystems using pairings on elliptic curves. We first show a relation between the VDP and the computational Diffie-Hellman problem (CDH). Specifically, we present a sufficient condition for the VDP on a two-dimensional vector space to be at least as hard as the CDH on a one-dimensional subspace. We also present a sufficient condition for the VDP with a fixed basis to have a trapdoor. We then give an example of vector spaces which satisfy both sufficient conditions and on which the CDH is assumed to be hard in previous work. In this sense, the intractability of the VDP is a reasonable assumption as that of the CDH.

  17. Development of Streptococcus pneumoniae Vaccines Using Live Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shifeng; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae still causes severe morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in young children and the elderly. Much effort has been dedicated to developing protein-based universal vaccines to conquer the current shortcomings of capsular vaccines and capsular conjugate vaccines, such as serotype replacement, limited coverage and high costs. A recombinant live vector vaccine delivering protective antigens is a promising way to achieve this goal. In this review, we discuss the researches using live recombinant vaccines, mainly live attenuated Salmonella and lactic acid bacteria, to deliver pneumococcal antigens. We also discuss both the limitations and the future of these vaccines. PMID:25309747

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Shuttle vectors.

    PubMed

    Gnügge, Robert; Rudolf, Fabian

    2017-01-10

    Yeast shuttle vectors are indispensable tools in yeast research. They enable cloning of defined DNA sequences in Escherichia coli and their direct transfer into Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. There are three types of commonly used yeast shuttle vectors: centromeric plasmids, episomal plasmids and integrating plasmids. In this review, we discuss the different plasmid systems and their characteristic features. We focus on their segregational stability and copy number and indicate how to modify these properties. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Poynting-vector filter

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, Charles R.

    2011-08-02

    A determination is made of frequency components associated with a particular bearing or location resulting from sources emitting electromagnetic-wave energy for which a Poynting-Vector can be defined. The broadband frequency components associated with a specific direction or location of interest are isolated from other components in the power spectrum that are not associated with the direction or location of interest. The collection of pointing vectors can be used to characterize the source.

  20. Bloch vector projection noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Li-Jun; Bacon, A. M.; Zhao, H.-Z.; Thomas, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    In the optical measurement of the Bloch vector components describing a system of N two-level atoms, the quantum fluctuations in these components are coupled into the measuring optical field. This paper develops the quantum theory of optical measurement of Bloch vector projection noise. The preparation and probing of coherence in an effective two-level system consisting of the two ground states in an atomic three-level lambda-scheme are analyzed.

  1. Distribution of Brugia malayi larvae and DNA in vector and non-vector mosquitoes: implications for molecular diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to extend prior studies of molecular detection of Brugia malayi DNA in vector (Aedes aegypti- Liverpool) and non-vector (Culex pipiens) mosquitoes at different times after ingestion of infected blood. Results Parasite DNA was detected over a two week time course in 96% of pooled thoraces of vector mosquitoes. In contrast, parasite DNA was detected in only 24% of thorax pools from non-vectors; parasite DNA was detected in 56% of midgut pools and 47% of abdomen pools from non-vectors. Parasite DNA was detected in vectors in the head immediately after the blood meal and after 14 days. Parasite DNA was also detected in feces and excreta of the vector and non-vector mosquitoes which could potentially confound results obtained with field samples. However, co-housing experiments failed to demonstrate transfer of parasite DNA from infected to non-infected mosquitoes. Parasites were also visualized in mosquito tissues by immunohistololgy using an antibody to the recombinant filarial antigen Bm14. Parasite larvae were detected consistently after mf ingestion in Ae. aegypti- Liverpool. Infectious L3s were seen in the head, thorax and abdomen of vector mosquitoes 14 days after Mf ingestion. In contrast, parasites were only detected by histology shortly after the blood meal in Cx. pipiens, and these were not labeled by the antibody. Conclusion This study provides new information on the distribution of filarial parasites and parasite DNA in vector and non-vector mosquitoes. This information should be useful for those involved in designing and interpreting molecular xenomonitoring studies. PMID:19922607

  2. A novel integrative expression vector for Sulfolobus species.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyoung-Hwa; Hwang, Sungmin; Yoon, Naeun; Cha, Jaeho

    2014-11-28

    With the purpose of facilitating the process of stable strain generation, a shuttle vector for integration of genes via a double recombination event into two ectopic sites on the Sulfolobus acidocaldarius chromosome was constructed. The novel chromosomal integration and expression vector pINEX contains a pyrE gene from S. solfataricus P2 (pyrE(sso)) as an auxotrophic selection marker, a multiple cloning site with histidine tag, the internal sequences of malE and malG for homologous recombination, and the entire region of pGEM-T vector, except for the multiple cloning region, for propagation in E. coli. For stable expression of the target gene, an α-glucosidase-producing strain of S. acidocaldarius was generated employing this vector. The malA gene (saci_1160) encoding an α-glucosidase from S. acidocaldarius fused with the glutamate dehydrogenase (gdhA(saci)) promoter and leader sequence was ligated to pINEX to generate pINEX_malA. Using the "pop-in" and "pop-out" method, the malA gene was inserted into the genome of MR31 and correct insertion was verified by colony PCR and sequencing. This strain was grown in YT medium without uracil and purified by His-tag affinity chromatography. The α-glucosidase activity was confirmed by the hydrolysis of pNPαG. The pINEX vector should be applicable in delineating gene functions in this organism.

  3. Syngeneic AAV pseudo-vectors potentiates full vector transduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An excessive amount of empty capsids are generated during regular AAV vector production process. These pseudo-vectors often remain in final vectors used for animal studies or clinical trials. The potential effects of these pseudo-vectors on AAV transduction have been a major concern. In the current ...

  4. Chromatography purification of canine adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Segura, María Mercedes; Puig, Meritxell; Monfar, Mercè; Chillón, Miguel

    2012-06-01

    Canine adenovirus vectors (CAV2) are currently being evaluated for gene therapy, oncolytic virotherapy, and as vectors for recombinant vaccines. Despite the need for increasing volumes of purified CAV2 preparations for preclinical and clinical testing, their purification still relies on the use of conventional, scale-limited CsCl ultracentrifugation techniques. A complete downstream processing strategy for CAV2 vectors based on membrane filtration and chromatography is reported here. Microfiltration and ultra/diafiltration are selected for clarification and concentration of crude viral stocks containing both intracellular and extracellular CAV2 particles. A DNase digestion step is introduced between ultrafiltration and diafiltration operations. At these early stages, concentration of vector stocks with good recovery of viral particles (above 80%) and removal of a substantial amount of protein and nucleic acid contaminants is achieved. The ability of various chromatography techniques to isolate CAV2 particles was evaluated. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography using a Fractogel propyl tentacle resin was selected as a first chromatography step, because it allows removal of the bulk of contaminating proteins with high CAV2 yields (88%). An anion-exchange chromatography step using monolithic supports is further introduced to remove the remaining contaminants with good recovery of CAV2 particles (58-69%). The main CAV2 viral structural components are visualized in purified preparations by electrophoresis analyses. Purified vector stocks contained intact icosahedral viral particles, low contamination with empty viral capsids (10%), and an acceptable total-to-infectious particle ratio (below 30). The downstream processing strategy that was developed allows preparation of large volumes of high-quality CAV2 stocks.

  5. Vector-Mediated In Vivo Antibody Expression.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    This article focuses on a novel vaccine strategy known as vector-mediated antibody gene transfer, with a particular focus on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This strategy provides a solution to the problem of current vaccines that fail to generate neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 infection and AIDS. Antibody gene transfer allows for predetermination of antibody affinity and specificity prior to "immunization" and avoids the need for an active humoral immune response against the HIV envelope protein. This approach uses recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors, which have been shown to transduce muscle with high efficiency and direct the long-term expression of a variety of transgenes, to deliver the gene encoding a broadly neutralizing antibody into the muscle. Following rAAV vector gene delivery, the broadly neutralizing antibodies are endogenously synthesized in myofibers and passively distributed to the circulatory system. This is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. Vector-mediated gene transfer studies in mice and monkeys with anti-HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-neutralizing antibodies demonstrated long-lasting neutralizing activity in serum with complete protection against intravenous challenge with virulent HIV and SIV. These results indicate that existing potent anti-HIV antibodies can be rapidly moved into the clinic. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV. The general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets such as hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis.

  6. Hybrid adeno-associated virus bearing nonhomologous inverted terminal repeats enhances dual-vector reconstruction of minigenes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ziying; Lei-Butters, Diana C M; Zhang, Yulong; Zak, Roman; Engelhardt, John F

    2007-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that hybrid adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors bearing nonhomologous inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) enhance directional intermolecular recombination and the efficiency of dual-AAV vector trans-splicing in cultured cells. Using hybrid-ITR vectors carrying two exons of a lacZ minigene, we demonstrate that this dual-vector approach also mediates higher levels (3- to 6-fold) of gene reconstitution in mouse skeletal muscle, liver, and heart. Inhibition of the proteasome by systemic administration of Doxil (Food and Drug Administration-approved lipid-formulated doxorubicin) further enhanced dual-vector trans-splicing 6- to 12-fold in two mouse strains. Hence, using hybrid-ITR AAV vectors in combination with proteasome modulation enhanced dual-vector delivery of a transgene approximately 36-fold over the current dual-vector trans-splicing approaches. These data provide in vivo evidence that ITR sequence-dependent homologous recombination, rather than nonhomologous end joining, is the predominant mechanism for AAV genome heterodimerization. Hence, enhanced directional recombination provided by hybrid-ITR vectors may be a useful in vivo strategy for improving dual-vector delivery of transgenes larger than the AAV packaging limit.

  7. Limited human infection due to recombinant raccoon pox virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, T.E.; Dein, F.J.; Fuchsberger, M.; Fox, B.C.; Stinchcomb, D.T.; Osorio, J.G.

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory accident resulted in human exposure to a recombinant raccoon poxvirus (RCN) developed as a vaccine vector for antigens of Yersinia pestis for protection of wild rodents (and other animals) against plague. Within 9 days, the patient developed a small blister that healed within 4 weeks. Raccoon poxvirus was cultured from the lesion, and the patient developed antibody to plague antigen (F1) and RCN. This is the first documented case of human exposure to RCN.

  8. A strand invasion 3' polymerization intermediate of mammalian homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Si, Weiduo; Mundia, Maureen M; Magwood, Alissa C; Mark, Adam L; McCulloch, Richard D; Baker, Mark D

    2010-06-01

    Initial events in double-strand break repair by homologous recombination in vivo involve homology searching, 3' strand invasion, and new DNA synthesis. While studies in yeast have contributed much to our knowledge of these processes, in comparison, little is known of the early events in the integrated mammalian system. In this study, a sensitive PCR procedure was developed to detect the new DNA synthesis that accompanies mammalian homologous recombination. The test system exploits a well-characterized gene targeting assay in which the transfected vector bears a gap in the region of homology to the single-copy chromosomal immunoglobulin mu heavy chain gene in mouse hybridoma cells. New DNA synthesis primed by invading 3' vector ends copies chromosomal mu-gene template sequences excluded by the vector-borne double-stranded gap. Following electroporation, specific 3' extension products from each vector end are detected with rapid kinetics: they appear after 0.5 hr, peak at 3-6 hr, and then decline, likely as a result of the combined effects of susceptibility to degradation and cell division. New DNA synthesis from each vector 3' end extends at least approximately 1000 nucleotides into the gapped region, but the efficiency declines markedly within the first approximately 200 nucleotides. Over this short distance, an average frequency of 3' extension for the two invading vector ends is approximately 0.007 events/vector backbone. DNA sequencing reveals precise copying of the cognate chromosomal mu-gene template. In unsynchronized cells, 3' extension is sensitive to aphidicolin supporting involvement of a replicative polymerase. Analysis suggests that the vast majority of 3' extensions reside on linear plasmid molecules.

  9. Vector platforms for gene therapy of inherited retinopathies.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Ivana; Puppo, Agostina; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Inherited retinopathies (IR) are common untreatable blinding conditions. Most of them are inherited as monogenic disorders, due to mutations in genes expressed in retinal photoreceptors (PR) and in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The retina's compatibility with gene transfer has made transduction of different retinal cell layers in small and large animal models via viral and non-viral vectors possible. The ongoing identification of novel viruses as well as modifications of existing ones based either on rational design or directed evolution have generated vector variants with improved transduction properties. Dozens of promising proofs of concept have been obtained in IR animal models with both viral and non-viral vectors, and some of them have been relayed to clinical trials. To date, recombinant vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) represent the most promising tool for retinal gene therapy, given their ability to efficiently deliver therapeutic genes to both PR and RPE and their excellent safety and efficacy profiles in humans. However, AAVs' limited cargo capacity has prevented application of the viral vector to treatments requiring transfer of genes with a coding sequence larger than 5 kb. Vectors with larger capacity, i.e. nanoparticles, adenoviral and lentiviral vectors are being exploited for gene transfer to the retina in animal models and, more recently, in humans. This review focuses on the available platforms for retinal gene therapy to fight inherited blindness, highlights their main strengths and examines the efforts to overcome some of their limitations.

  10. pELMO, an optimised in-house cloning vector.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Andrea E; Muñoz, Marina; Moreno-Pérez, Darwin A; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2017-12-01

    DNA cloning is an essential tool regarding DNA recombinant technology as it allows the replication of foreign DNA fragments within a cell. pELMO was here constructed as an in-house cloning vector for rapid and low-cost PCR product propagation; it is an optimally designed vector containing the ccdB killer gene from the pDONR 221 plasmid, cloned into the pUC18 vector's multiple cloning site (Thermo Scientific). The ccdB killer gene has a cleavage site (CCC/GGG) for the SmaI restriction enzyme which is used for vector linearisation and cloning blunt-ended products. pELMO transformation efficiency was evaluated with different sized inserts and its cloning efficiency was compared to that of the pGEM-T Easy commercial vector. The highest pELMO transformation efficiency was observed for ~500 bp DNA fragments; pELMO vector had higher cloning efficiency for all insert sizes tested. In-house and commercial vector cloned insert reads after sequencing were similar thus highlighting that sequencing primers were designed and localised appropriately. pELMO is thus proposed as a practical alternative for in-house cloning of PCR products in molecular biology laboratories.

  11. Constraining primordial vector mode from B-mode polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Saga, Shohei; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Shiraishi, Maresuke E-mail: maresuke.shiraishi@pd.infn.it

    2014-10-01

    The B-mode polarization spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) may be the smoking gun of not only the primordial tensor mode but also of the primordial vector mode. If there exist nonzero vector-mode metric perturbations in the early Universe, they are known to be supported by anisotropic stress fluctuations of free-streaming particles such as neutrinos, and to create characteristic signatures on both the CMB temperature, E-mode, and B-mode polarization anisotropies. We place constraints on the properties of the primordial vector mode characterized by the vector-to-scalar ratio r{sub v} and the spectral index n{sub v} of the vector-shear power spectrum, from the Planck and BICEP2 B-mode data. We find that, for scale-invariant initial spectra, the ΛCDM model including the vector mode fits the data better than the model including the tensor mode. The difference in χ{sup 2} between the vector and tensor models is Δχ{sup 2} = 3.294, because, on large scales the vector mode generates smaller temperature fluctuations than the tensor mode, which is preferred for the data. In contrast, the tensor mode can fit the data set equally well if we allow a significantly blue-tilted spectrum. We find that the best-fitting tensor mode has a large blue tilt and leads to an indistinct reionization bump on larger angular scales. The slightly red-tilted vector mode supported by the current data set can also create O(10{sup -22})-Gauss magnetic fields at cosmological recombination. Our constraints should motivate research that considers models of the early Universe that involve the vector mode.

  12. Constraining primordial vector mode from B-mode polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saga, Shohei; Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ichiki, Kiyotomo

    2014-10-01

    The B-mode polarization spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) may be the smoking gun of not only the primordial tensor mode but also of the primordial vector mode. If there exist nonzero vector-mode metric perturbations in the early Universe, they are known to be supported by anisotropic stress fluctuations of free-streaming particles such as neutrinos, and to create characteristic signatures on both the CMB temperature, E-mode, and B-mode polarization anisotropies. We place constraints on the properties of the primordial vector mode characterized by the vector-to-scalar ratio rv and the spectral index nv of the vector-shear power spectrum, from the Planck and BICEP2 B-mode data. We find that, for scale-invariant initial spectra, the ΛCDM model including the vector mode fits the data better than the model including the tensor mode. The difference in χ2 between the vector and tensor models is Δχ2 = 3.294, because, on large scales the vector mode generates smaller temperature fluctuations than the tensor mode, which is preferred for the data. In contrast, the tensor mode can fit the data set equally well if we allow a significantly blue-tilted spectrum. We find that the best-fitting tensor mode has a large blue tilt and leads to an indistinct reionization bump on larger angular scales. The slightly red-tilted vector mode supported by the current data set can also create Script O(10-22)-Gauss magnetic fields at cosmological recombination. Our constraints should motivate research that considers models of the early Universe that involve the vector mode.

  13. Vector and Axial Vector Pion Form Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitz, Michael; PEN Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Radiative pion decay π+ -->e+ νγ (RPD) provides critical input to chiral perturbation theory (χPT). Aside from the uninteresting ``inner bremsstrahlung'' contribution from QED, the RPD rate contains ``structure dependent'' terms given by FV and FA, the vector and axial-vector pion form factors, respectively. The two appear in the decay rate in combinations FV -FA and FV +FA , i.e., in the so-called SD- and SD+ terms, respectively. The latter has been measured to high precision by the PIBETA collaboration. We report on the analysis of new data, measured by the PEN collaboration in runs between 2008 and 2010 at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. We particularly focus on the possibility of improvement in the determination of the SD- term. Precise determinations of FV and FA test the validity of the CVC hypothesis, provide numerical input for the l9 +l10 terms in the χPT lagrangian, and constrain potential non-(V - A) terms, such as a possible tensor term FT. NSF grants PHY-0970013, 1307328, and others.

  14. Bunyavirus-vector interactions.

    PubMed

    Beaty, B J; Bishop, D H

    1988-06-01

    Recent advances in the genetics and molecular biology of bunyaviruses have been applied to understanding bunyavirus-vector interactions. Such approaches have revealed which virus gene and gene products are important in establishing infections in vectors and in transmission of viruses. However, much more information is required to understand the molecular mechanisms of persistent infections of vectors which are lifelong but apparently exert no untoward effect. In fact, it seems remarkable that LAC viral antigen can be detected in almost every cell in an ovarian follicle, yet no untoward effect on fecundity and no teratology is seen. Similarly the lifelong infection of the vector would seem to provide ample opportunity for bunyavirus evolution by genetic drift and, under the appropriate circumstances, by segment reassortment. The potential for bunyavirus evolution by segment reassortment in vectors certainly exists. For example the Group C viruses in a small forest in Brazil seem to constitute a gene pool, with the 6 viruses related alternately by HI/NT and CF reactions, which assay respectively M RNA and S RNA gene products (Casals and Whitman, 1960; Shope and Causey, 1962). Direct evidence for naturally occurring reassortant bunyaviruses has also been obtained. Oligonucleotide fingerprint analyses of field isolates of LAC virus and members of the Patois serogroup of bunyaviruses have demonstrated that reassortment does occur in nature (El Said et al., 1979; Klimas et al., 1981; Ushijima et al., 1981). Determination of the genotypic frequencies of viruses selected by the biological interactions of viruses and vectors after dual infection and segment reassortment is an important issue. Should a virus result that efficiently interacts with alternate vector species, the virus could be expressed in different circumstances with serious epidemiologic consequences. Dual infection of vectors with different viruses is not unlikely, because many bunyaviruses are sympatric in

  15. Site directed recombination

    DOEpatents

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  16. Efficiency of insertion versus replacement vector targeting varies at different chromosomal loci.

    PubMed Central

    Hasty, P; Crist, M; Grompe, M; Bradley, A

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed the targeting frequencies and recombination products generated with isogenic vectors at the fah and fgr loci in embryonic stem cells. A single vector which could be linearized at different sites to generate either a replacement or an insertion vector was constructed for each locus. A replacement event predominated when the vectors were linearized at the edge of the homologous sequences, while an insertion event predominated when the vectors were linearized within the homologous sequences. However, the ratio of the targeting frequencies exhibited by the different vector configurations differed for the two loci. When the fgr vector was linearized as an insertion vector, the ratio of targeted to random integrations was four- to eightfold greater than when the vector was linearized as a replacement vector. By contrast, the ratio of targeted to random integrations at the fah locus did not vary with the linearization site of the vector. The different relationships between the targeting frequency and the vector configuration at the fgr and fah loci may indicate a DNA sequence or chromatin structure preference for different targeting pathways. Images PMID:7969173

  17. Live bacterial vaccine vectors: An overview

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Adilson José; Zangirolami, Teresa Cristina; Novo-Mansur, Maria Teresa Marques; Giordano, Roberto de Campos; Martins, Elizabeth Angélica Leme

    2014-01-01

    Genetically attenuated microorganisms, pathogens, and some commensal bacteria can be engineered to deliver recombinant heterologous antigens to stimulate the host immune system, while still offering good levels of safety. A key feature of these live vectors is their capacity to stimulate mucosal as well as humoral and/or cellular systemic immunity. This enables the use of different forms of vaccination to prevent pathogen colonization of mucosal tissues, the front door for many infectious agents. Furthermore, delivery of DNA vaccines and immune system stimulatory molecules, such as cytokines, can be achieved using these special carriers, whose adjuvant properties and, sometimes, invasive capacities enhance the immune response. More recently, the unique features and versatility of these vectors have also been exploited to develop anti-cancer vaccines, where tumor-associated antigens, cytokines, and DNA or RNA molecules are delivered. Different strategies and genetic tools are constantly being developed, increasing the antigenic potential of agents delivered by these systems, opening fresh perspectives for the deployment of vehicles for new purposes. Here we summarize the main characteristics of the different types of live bacterial vectors and discuss new applications of these delivery systems in the field of vaccinology. PMID:25763014

  18. The recombination epoch revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies of cosmological recombination have shown that this process produces as a by-product a highly superthermal population of Ly-alpha photons which retard completion of recombination. Cosmological redshifting was thought to determine the frequency distribution of the photons, while two-photon decay of hydrogen's 2s state was thought to control their numbers. It is shown here that frequency diffusion due to photon scattering dominate the cosmological redshift in the frequency range near line center which fixes the ratio of ground state to excited state population, while incoherent scattering into the far-red damping wing effectively destroys Ly-alpha photons as a rate which is competitive with two-photon decay. The former effect tends to hold back recombination, while the latter tends to accelerate it; the net results depends on cosmological parameters, particularly the combination Omega(b) h/sq rt (2q0), where Omega(b) is the fraction of the critical density provided by baryons.

  19. Recombinant measles AIK-C vaccine strain expressing heterologous virus antigens.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tetsuo; Sawada, Akihito; Yamaji, Yoshiaki; Ito, Takashi

    2016-01-04

    Further attenuated measles vaccines were developed more than 50 years ago and have been used throughout the world. Recombinant measles vaccine candidates have been developed and express several heterologous virus protective antigens. Immunogenicity and protective actions were confirmed using experimental animals: transgenic mice, cotton rats, and primates. The recent development of measles vaccine-based vectored vaccine candidates has been reviewed and some information on recombinant measles vaccines expressing respiratory syncytial virus proteins has been shown and discussed.

  20. Cell biology of mitotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2015-03-02

    Homologous recombination provides high-fidelity DNA repair throughout all domains of life. Live cell fluorescence microscopy offers the opportunity to image individual recombination events in real time providing insight into the in vivo biochemistry of the involved proteins and DNA molecules as well as the cellular organization of the process of homologous recombination. Herein we review the cell biological aspects of mitotic homologous recombination with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells, but will also draw on findings from other experimental systems. Key topics of this review include the stoichiometry and dynamics of recombination complexes in vivo, the choreography of assembly and disassembly of recombination proteins at sites of DNA damage, the mobilization of damaged DNA during homology search, and the functional compartmentalization of the nucleus with respect to capacity of homologous recombination.

  1. Cell Biology of Mitotic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination provides high-fidelity DNA repair throughout all domains of life. Live cell fluorescence microscopy offers the opportunity to image individual recombination events in real time providing insight into the in vivo biochemistry of the involved proteins and DNA molecules as well as the cellular organization of the process of homologous recombination. Herein we review the cell biological aspects of mitotic homologous recombination with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells, but will also draw on findings from other experimental systems. Key topics of this review include the stoichiometry and dynamics of recombination complexes in vivo, the choreography of assembly and disassembly of recombination proteins at sites of DNA damage, the mobilization of damaged DNA during homology search, and the functional compartmentalization of the nucleus with respect to capacity of homologous recombination. PMID:25731763

  2. Methods of treating Parkinson's disease using viral vectors

    DOEpatents

    Bankiewicz, Krys; Cunningham, Janet

    2012-11-13

    Methods of delivering viral vectors, particularly recombinant AAV virions, to the central nervous system (CNS) are provided for the treatment of CNS disorders, particularly those disorders which involve the neurotransmitter dopamine. The methods entail providing rAAV virions that comprise a transgene encoding aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) and administering the virions to the brain of a mammal using a non-manual pump.

  3. Vector financial rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-11-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields.

  4. Scalar-vector bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejon-Barrera, Fernando; Robbins, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We work out all of the details required for implementation of the conformal bootstrap program applied to the four-point function of two scalars and two vectors in an abstract conformal field theory in arbitrary dimension. This includes a review of which tensor structures make appearances, a construction of the projectors onto the required mixed symmetry representations, and a computation of the conformal blocks for all possible operators which can be exchanged. These blocks are presented as differential operators acting upon the previously known scalar conformal blocks. Finally, we set up the bootstrap equations which implement crossing symmetry. Special attention is given to the case of conserved vectors, where several simplifications occur.

  5. Bunyavirus-Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Kate McElroy; Vanlandingham, Dana L.

    2014-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae family is comprised of more than 350 viruses, of which many within the Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The viruses within the Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, such as mosquitoes, midges, flies, and ticks, and their associated arthropods not only serve as vectors but also as virus reservoirs in many cases. This review presents an overview of several important emerging or re-emerging bunyaviruses and describes what is known about bunyavirus-vector interactions based on epidemiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of members of this virus family. PMID:25402172

  6. Integration-deficient Lentiviral Vectors: A Slow Coming of Age

    PubMed Central

    Wanisch, Klaus; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J

    2009-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are very efficient at transducing dividing and quiescent cells, which makes them highly useful tools for genetic analysis and gene therapy. Traditionally this efficiency was considered dependent on provirus integration in the host cell genome; however, recent results have challenged this view. So called integration-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) can be produced through the use of integrase mutations that specifically prevent proviral integration, resulting in the generation of increased levels of circular vector episomes in transduced cells. These lentiviral episomes lack replication signals and are gradually lost by dilution in dividing cells, but are stable in quiescent cells. Compared to integrating lentivectors, IDLVs have a greatly reduced risk of causing insertional mutagenesis and a lower risk of generating replication-competent recombinants (RCRs). IDLVs can mediate transient gene expression in proliferating cells, stable expression in nondividing cells in vitro and in vivo, specific immune responses, RNA interference, homologous recombination (gene repair, knock-in, and knock-out), site-specific recombination, and transposition. IDLVs can be converted into replicating episomes, suggesting that if a clinically applicable system can be developed they would also become highly appropriate for stable transduction of proliferating tissues in therapeutic applications. PMID:19491821

  7. Recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara-based malaria vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Sarah; Gilbert, Sarah C

    2016-01-01

    A safe and effective malaria vaccine is a crucial part of the roadmap to malaria elimination/eradication by the year 2050. Viral-vectored vaccines based on adenoviruses and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing malaria immunogens are currently being used in heterologous prime-boost regimes in clinical trials for induction of strong antigen-specific T-cell responses and high-titer antibodies. Recombinant MVA is a safe and well-tolerated attenuated vector that has consistently shown significant boosting potential. Advances have been made in large-scale MVA manufacture as high-yield producer cell lines and high-throughput purification processes have recently been developed. This review describes the use of MVA as malaria vaccine vector in both preclinical and clinical studies in the past 5 years.

  8. Gateway-assisted vector construction to facilitate expression of foreign proteins in the chloroplast of single celled algae.

    PubMed

    Oey, Melanie; Ross, Ian L; Hankamer, Ben

    2014-01-01

    With a rising world population, demand will increase for food, energy and high value products. Renewable production systems, including photosynthetic microalgal biotechnologies, can produce biomass for foods, fuels and chemical feedstocks and in parallel allow the production of high value protein products, including recombinant proteins. Such high value recombinant proteins offer important economic benefits during startup of industrial scale algal biomass and biofuel production systems, but the limited markets for individual recombinant proteins will require a high throughput pipeline for cloning and expression in microalgae, which is currently lacking, since genetic engineering of microalgae is currently complex and laborious. We have introduced the recombination based Gateway® system into the construction process of chloroplast transformation vectors for microalgae. This simplifies the vector construction and allows easy, fast and flexible vector design for the high efficiency protein production in microalgae, a key step in developing such expression pipelines.

  9. Development of Gutless Adenoviral Vectors Encoding Anti Angiogenic Proteins for Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    B. Molecular cloning of recombination-inactivatable helper virus A plasmid containing a recombination-inactivatable helper virus genome has been...for gutless vectors, Months 1-18 A. Molecular cloning of conditionally-inactive helper genomes A P-deleted, I-Scel-flanked and El-E2-flipped...Months 1-18 A. Molecular cloning of conditionally inactive helper genomes: completed (see last year’s report). B. Evaluation of the I-Scel- and ore

  10. Recombineering: genetic engineering in bacteria using homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Lynn C; Sawitzke, James A; Li, Xintian; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L

    2014-04-14

    The bacterial chromosome and bacterial plasmids can be engineered in vivo by homologous recombination using PCR products and synthetic oligonucleotides as substrates. This is possible because bacteriophage-encoded recombination proteins efficiently recombine sequences with homologies as short as 35 to 50 bases. Recombineering allows DNA sequences to be inserted or deleted without regard to location of restriction sites. This unit first describes preparation of electrocompetent cells expressing the recombineering functions and their transformation with dsDNA or ssDNA. It then presents support protocols that describe several two-step selection/counter-selection methods of making genetic alterations without leaving any unwanted changes in the targeted DNA, and a method for retrieving onto a plasmid a genetic marker (cloning by retrieval) from the Escherichia coli chromosome or a co-electroporated DNA fragment. Additional protocols describe methods to screen for unselected mutations, removal of the defective prophage from recombineering strains, and other useful techniques.

  11. Bacterial Recombineering: Genome Engineering via Phage-Based Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Pines, Gur; Freed, Emily F; Winkler, James D; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-20

    The ability to specifically modify bacterial genomes in a precise and efficient manner is highly desired in various fields, ranging from molecular genetics to metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Much has changed from the initial realization that phage-derived genes may be employed for such tasks to today, where recombineering enables complex genetic edits within a genome or a population. Here, we review the major developments leading to recombineering becoming the method of choice for in situ bacterial genome editing while highlighting the various applications of recombineering in pushing the boundaries of synthetic biology. We also present the current understanding of the mechanism of recombineering. Finally, we discuss in detail issues surrounding recombineering efficiency and future directions for recombineering-based genome editing.

  12. Novel recombinant DNA vaccine candidates for human respiratory syncytial virus: Preclinical evaluation of immunogenicity and protection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Farrag, Mohamed A; Amer, Haitham M; Öhlschläger, Peter; Hamad, Maaweya E; Almajhdi, Fahad N

    2017-03-08

    The development of safe and potent vaccines for human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is still a challenge for researchers worldwide. DNA-based immunization is currently a promising approach that has been used to generate human vaccines for different age groups. In this study, novel HRSV DNA vaccine candidates were generated and preclinically tested in BALB/c mice. Three different versions of the codon-optimized HRSV fusion (F) gene were individually cloned into the pPOE vector. The new recombinant vectors either express full-length (pPOE-F), secretory (pPOE-TF), or M282-90 linked (pPOE-FM2) forms of the F protein. Distinctive expression of the F protein was identified in HEp-2 cells transfected with the different recombinant vectors using ELISA and immunofluorescence. Mice immunization verified the potential for recombinant vectors to elicit significant levels of neutralizing antibodies and CD8(+) T-cell lymphocytes. pPOE-TF showed higher levels of gene expression in cell culture and better induction of the humoral and cellular immune responses. Following virus challenge, mice that had been immunized with the recombinant vectors were able to control virus replication and displayed lower inflammation compared with mice immunized with empty pPOE vector or formalin-inactivated HRSV vaccine. Moreover, pulmonary cytokine profiles of mice immunized with the 3 recombinant vectors were similar to those of the mock infected group. In conclusion, recombinant pPOE vectors are promising HRSV vaccine candidates in terms of their safety, immunogenicity and protective efficiency. These data encourage further evaluation in phase I clinical trials.

  13. Orientation Dependence in Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K.; Takahashi, N.; Fujitani, Y.; Yoshikura, H.; Kobayashi, I.

    1996-01-01

    Homologous recombination was investigated in Escherichia coli with two plasmids, each carrying the homologous region (two defective neo genes, one with an amino-end deletion and the other with a carboxyl-end deletion) in either direct or inverted orientation. Recombination efficiency was measured in recBC sbcBC and recBC sbcA strains in three ways. First, we measured the frequency of cells carrying neo(+) recombinant plasmids in stationary phase. Recombination between direct repeats was much more frequent than between inverted repeats in the recBC sbcBC strain but was equally frequent in the two substrates in the recBC sbcA strain. Second, the fluctuation test was used to exclude bias by a rate difference between the recombinant and parental plasmids and led to the same conclusion. Third, direct selection for recombinants just after transformation with or without substrate double-strand breaks yielded essentially the same results. Double-strand breaks elevated recombination in both the strains and in both substrates. These results are consistant with our previous findings that the major route of recombination in recBC sbcBC strains generates only one recombinant DNA from two DNAs and in recBC sbcA strains generates two recombinant DNAs from two DNAs. PMID:8722759

  14. Production of lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Hebben, Matthias; Bovolenta, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LV) have seen considerably increase in use as gene therapy vectors for the treatment of acquired and inherited diseases. This review presents the state of the art of the production of these vectors with particular emphasis on their large-scale production for clinical purposes. In contrast to oncoretroviral vectors, which are produced using stable producer cell lines, clinical-grade LV are in most of the cases produced by transient transfection of 293 or 293T cells grown in cell factories. However, more recent developments, also, tend to use hollow fiber reactor, suspension culture processes, and the implementation of stable producer cell lines. As is customary for the biotech industry, rather sophisticated downstream processing protocols have been established to remove any undesirable process-derived contaminant, such as plasmid or host cell DNA or host cell proteins. This review compares published large-scale production and purification processes of LV and presents their process performances. Furthermore, developments in the domain of stable cell lines and their way to the use of production vehicles of clinical material will be presented. PMID:27110581

  15. Vectors Point Toward Pisa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Richard A.

    1971-01-01

    The author shows that the set of all sequences in which each term is the sum of the two previous terms forms a vector space of dimension two. He uses this result to obtain the formula for the Fibonacci sequence and applies the same technique to other linear recursive relations. (MM)

  16. Support vector machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garay, Michael J.; Mazzoni, Dominic; Davies, Roger; Wagstaff, Kiri

    2004-01-01

    Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are a type of supervised learning algorith,, other examples of which are Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Decision Trees, and Naive Bayesian Classifiers. Supervised learning algorithms are used to classify objects labled by a 'supervisor' - typically a human 'expert.'.

  17. Killing vectors and anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, J. P.; Glass, E. N.

    2009-08-15

    We consider an action that can generate fluids with three unequal stresses for metrics with a spacelike Killing vector. The parameters in the action are directly related to the stress anisotropies. The field equations following from the action are applied to an anisotropic cosmological expansion and an extension of the Gott-Hiscock cosmic string.

  18. Singular Vectors' Subtle Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Lachance, Michael; Remski, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Social scientists use adjacency tables to discover influence networks within and among groups. Building on work by Moler and Morrison, we use ordered pairs from the components of the first and second singular vectors of adjacency matrices as tools to distinguish these groups and to identify particularly strong or weak individuals.

  19. Vector potential methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M.

    1989-01-01

    Vector potential and related methods, for the simulation of both inviscid and viscous flows over aerodynamic configurations, are briefly reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of several formulations are discussed and alternate strategies are recommended. Scalar potential, modified potential, alternate formulations of Euler equations, least-squares formulation, variational principles, iterative techniques and related methods, and viscous flow simulation are discussed.

  20. Biosafety considerations for attenuated measles virus vectors used in virotherapy and vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Aline; Galanis, Evanthia; Tangy, Frédéric; Herman, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Attenuated measles virus (MV) is one of the most effective and safe vaccines available, making it attractive candidate vector to prevent infectious diseases. Attenuated MV have acquired the ability to use the complement regulator CD46 as a major receptor to mediate virus entry and intercellular fusion. Therefore, attenuated MV strains preferentially infect and destroy a wide variety of cancer cells making them also attractive oncolytic vectors. The use of recombinant MV vector has to comply with various regulatory requirements, particularly relating to the assessment of potential risks for human health and the environment. The present article highlights the main characteristics of MV and recombinant MV vectors used for vaccination and virotherapy and discusses these features from a biosafety point of view. PMID:26631840

  1. Improved adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 1 and 5 vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sen, Dwaipayan; Balakrishnan, Balaji; Gabriel, Nishanth; Agrawal, Prachi; Roshini, Vaani; Samuel, Rekha; Srivastava, Alok; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant advancements with recombinant AAV2 or AAV8 vectors for liver directed gene therapy in humans, it is well-recognized that host and vector-related immune challenges need to be overcome for long-term gene transfer. To overcome these limitations, alternate AAV serotypes (1-10) are being rigorously evaluated. AAV5 is the most divergent (55% similarity vs. other serotypes) and like AAV1 vector is known to transduce liver efficiently. AAV1 and AAV5 vectors are also immunologically distinct by virtue of their low seroprevalence and minimal cross reactivity against pre-existing AAV2 neutralizing antibodies. Here, we demonstrate that targeted bio-engineering of these vectors, augment their gene expression in murine hepatocytes in vivo (up to 16-fold). These studies demonstrate the feasibility of the use of these novel AAV1 and AAV5 vectors for potential gene therapy of diseases like hemophilia.

  2. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  3. Generation of a vector suite for protein solubility screening

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Agustín; Ortega, Claudia; Obal, Gonzalo; Alzari, Pedro; Vincentelli, Renaud; Oppezzo, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant protein expression has become an invaluable tool for academic and biotechnological projects. With the use of high-throughput screening technologies for soluble protein production, uncountable target proteins have been produced in a soluble and homogeneous state enabling the realization of further studies. Evaluation of hundreds conditions requires the use of high-throughput cloning and screening methods. Here we describe a new versatile vector suite dedicated to the expression improvement of recombinant proteins (RP) with solubility problems. This vector suite allows the parallel cloning of the same PCR product into the 12 different expression vectors evaluating protein expression under different promoter strength, different fusion tags as well as different solubility enhancer proteins. Additionally, we propose the use of a new fusion protein which appears to be a useful solubility enhancer. Above all we propose in this work an economic and useful vector suite to fast track the solubility of different RP. We also propose a new solubility enhancer protein that can be included in the evaluation of the expression of RP that are insoluble in classical expression conditions. PMID:24616717

  4. Production of recombinant Agaricus bisporus tyrosinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Lezzi, Chiara; Bleve, Gianluca; Spagnolo, Stefano; Perrotta, Carla; Grieco, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that Agaricus bisporus tyrosinase is able to oxidize various phenolic compounds, thus being an enzyme of great importance for a number of biotechnological applications. The tyrosinase-coding PPO2 gene was isolated by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using total RNA extracted from the mushroom fruit bodies as template. The gene was sequenced and cloned into pYES2 plasmid, and the resulting pY-PPO2 recombinant vector was then used to transform Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by enzymatic activity staining with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) indicated that the recombinant tyrosinase is biologically active. The recombinant enzyme was overexpressed and biochemically characterized, showing that the catalytic constants of the recombinant tyrosinase were higher than those obtained when a commercial tyrosinase was used, for all the tested substrates. The present study describes the recombinant production of A. bisporus tyrosinase in active form. The produced enzyme has similar properties to the one produced in the native A. bisporus host, and its expression in S. cerevisiae provides good potential for protein engineering and functional studies of this important enzyme.

  5. Recombinant host cells and media for ethanol production

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Brent E; Ingram, Lonnie O; Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W

    2014-02-18

    Disclosed are recombinant host cells suitable for degrading an oligosaccharide that have been optimized for growth and production of high yields of ethanol, and methods of making and using these cells. The invention further provides minimal media comprising urea-like compounds for economical production of ethanol by recombinant microorganisms. Recombinant host cells in accordance with the invention are modified by gene mutation to eliminate genes responsible for the production of unwanted products other than ethanol, thereby increasing the yield of ethanol produced from the oligosaccharides, relative to unmutated parent strains. The new and improved strains of recombinant bacteria are capable of superior ethanol productivity and yield when grown under conditions suitable for fermentation in minimal growth media containing inexpensive reagents. Systems optimized for ethanol production combine a selected optimized minimal medium with a recombinant host cell optimized for use in the selected medium. Preferred systems are suitable for efficient ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using lignocellulose as an oligosaccharide source. The invention also provides novel isolated polynucleotide sequences, polypeptide sequences, vectors and antibodies.

  6. Recombination spot identification Based on gapped k-mers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong; Xu, Yong; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Recombination is crucial for biological evolution, which provides many new combinations of genetic diversity. Accurate identification of recombination spots is useful for DNA function study. To improve the prediction accuracy, researchers have proposed several computational methods for recombination spot identification. The k-mer feature is one of the most useful features for modeling the properties and function of DNA sequences. However, it suffers from the inherent limitation. If the value of word length k is large, the occurrences of k-mers are closed to a binary variable, with a few k-mers present once and most k-mers are absent. This usually causes the sparse problem and reduces the classification accuracy. To solve this problem, we add gaps into k-mer and introduce a new feature called gapped k-mer (GKM) for identification of recombination spots. By using this feature, we present a new predictor called SVM-GKM, which combines the gapped k-mers and Support Vector Machine (SVM) for recombination spot identification. Experimental results on a widely used benchmark dataset show that SVM-GKM outperforms other highly related predictors. Therefore, SVM-GKM would be a powerful predictor for computational genomics. PMID:27030570

  7. [Quantitative specific detection of Staphylococcus aureus based on recombinant lysostaphin and ATP bioluminescence].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuyuan; Mi, Zhiqiang; An, Xiaoping; Zhou, Yusen; Tong, Yigang

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative specific detection of Staphylococcus aureus is based on recombinant lysostaphin and ATP bioluminescence. To produce recombinant lysostaphin, the lysostaphin gene was chemically synthesized and inserted it into prokaryotic expression vector pQE30, and the resulting expression plasmid pQE30-Lys was transformed into E. coli M15 for expressing lysostaphin with IPTG induction. The recombinant protein was purified by Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography. Staphylococcus aureus was detected by the recombinant lysostaphin with ATP bioluminescence, and plate count method. The results of the two methods were compared. The recombinant lysostaphin was successfully expressed, and a method of quantitative specific detection of S. aureus has been established, which showed a significant linear correlation with the colony counting. The detection method developed has good perspective to quantify S. aureus.

  8. Recombinant synthesis of hyaluronan by Agrobacterium sp.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zichao; Chen, Rachel Ruizhen

    2007-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a sugar polymer of a repeating disaccharide, beta1-3 D-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) beta1-4 D-glucuronic acid (GlcA). It finds applications in numerous biomedical procedures such as ophthalmic surgery and osteoarthritis treatment. Until recently, the only commercial sources were extraction of rooster combs and from fermentation of pathogenic Streptococcus. In this work, we demonstrate that metabolic engineering strategies enable the recombinant synthesis of hyaluronan in a safe microorganism. Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749 is a commercial production strain for a food polymer, Curdlan. A broad host range expression vector was successfully developed to express the 3 kb HA synthase gene from Pasteurella multocida, along with a kfiD gene encoding UDP-glucose dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli K5 strain. Coexpression of these two heterologous enzymes enables Agrobacterium to produce HA. Hyaluronan was accumulated up to 0.3 g/L in shaker flask cultivation. The molecular weight of the polymer from various Agrobacterium strains is in the range of 0.7-2 MD. To our knowledge, this is the first successful recombinant hyaluronan synthesis in a Gram-negative bacterium that naturally produces a food product. The ease of genetic modifications provides future opportunities to tailor properties of polymers for specific applications.

  9. Expression of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with "human-like" post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  10. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  11. Tomorrow's vector vaccines for small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Kyriakis, C S

    2015-12-14

    Inactivated and attenuated vaccines have contributed to the control or even the eradication of significant animal pathogens. However, these traditional vaccine technologies have limitations and disadvantages. Inactivated vaccines lack efficacy against certain pathogens, while attenuated vaccines are not always as safe. New technology vaccines, namely DNA and recombinant viral vector vaccines, are being developed and tested against pathogens of small ruminants. These vaccines induce both humoral and cellular immune responses, are safe to manufacture and use and can be utilized in strategies for differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals. Although there are more strict regulatory requirements for the safety standards of these vaccines, once a vaccine platform is evaluated and established, effective vaccines can be rapidly produced and deployed in the field to prevent spread of emerging pathogens. The present article offers an introduction to these next generation technologies and examples of vaccines that have been tested against important diseases of sheep and goats.

  12. UNIT 14A.4 Generation of Recombinant Vaccinia Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Patricia L.; Moss, Bernard; Wyatt, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    This unit describes how to infect cells with vaccinia virus and then transfect them with a plasmid-transfer vector or PCR fragment to generate a recombinant virus. Selection and screening methods used to isolate recombinant viruses and a method for the amplification of recombinant viruses are described. Finally, a method for live immunostaining that has been used primarily for detection of recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is presented. This unit first describes how to infect cells with vaccinia virus and then transfect them with a plasmid-transfer vector or PCR fragment to generate a recombinant virus (see Basic Protocol 1). Also presented are selection and screening methods used to isolate recombinant viruses (see Basic Protocol 2) and a method for the amplification of recombinant viruses (see Basic Protocol 3). Finally, a method for live immunostaining that has been used primarily for detection of recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is presented (see Basic Protocol 4). HeLa S3 cells are recommended for large-scale growth of vaccinia virus. BS-C-1 cells may be used for xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (XGPRT) and plaque size selection, fluorescent protein screening, transfection and determination of virus titer (UNIT 14A.3). For thymidine kinase (TK) selection, HuTK− 143B cells are used. With MVA, all steps are carried out in CEF or BHK-21 cells (UNIT 14A.3). CAUTION Proceed carefully and follow biosafety level 2 (BL-2) practices when working with standard vaccinia virus (see UNIT 14A.3 for safety precautions). [*Copy Editor: The original CPMB unit referenced CPMB Unit 16.15 for safety. The chapter editor asked that the authors include some of the safety information in the revised units – CPMB 16.16 and 16.17 – which are now CPMC Unit 14A.3 and 14A.4. As a result, the authors changed the safety citation here to “Unit 14A.3”, which doesn’t have nearly as much information as the original CPMB Unit 16.15. Perhaps the

  13. The structure of HIV-1 genomic RNA in the gp120 gene determines a recombination hot spot in vivo.

    PubMed

    Galetto, Román; Moumen, Abdeladim; Giacomoni, Véronique; Véron, Michel; Charneau, Pierre; Negroni, Matteo

    2004-08-27

    By frequently rearranging large regions of the genome, genetic recombination is a major determinant in the plasticity of the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) population. In retroviruses, recombination mostly occurs by template switching during reverse transcription. The generation of retroviral vectors provides a means to study this process after a single cycle of infection of cells in culture. Using HIV-1-derived vectors, we present here the first characterization and estimate of the strength of a recombination hot spot in HIV-1 in vivo. In the hot spot region, located within the C2 portion of the gp120 envelope gene, the rate of recombination is up to ten times higher than in the surrounding regions. The hot region corresponds to a previously identified RNA hairpin structure. Although recombination breakpoints in vivo cluster in the top portion of the hairpin, the bias for template switching in this same region appears less marked in a cell-free system. By modulating the stability of this hairpin we were able to affect the local recombination rate both in vitro and in infected cells, indicating that the local folding of the genomic RNA is a major parameter in the recombination process. This characterization of reverse transcription products generated after a single cycle of infection provides insights in the understanding of the mechanism of recombination in vivo and suggests that specific regions of the genome might be prompted to yield different rates of evolution due to the presence of circumscribed recombination hot spots.

  14. Therapeutic Use of Native and Recombinant Enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Ylä-Pelto, Jani; Tripathi, Lav; Susi, Petri

    2016-02-23

    Research on human enteroviruses has resulted in the identification of more than 100 enterovirus types, which use more than 10 protein receptors and/or attachment factors required in cell binding and initiation of the replication cycle. Many of these "viral" receptors are overexpressed in cancer cells. Receptor binding and the ability to replicate in specific target cells define the tropism and pathogenesis of enterovirus types, because cellular infection often results in cytolytic response, i.e., disruption of the cells. Viral tropism and cytolytic properties thus make native enteroviruses prime candidates for oncolytic virotherapy. Copy DNA cloning and modification of enterovirus genomes have resulted in the generation of enterovirus vectors with properties that are useful in therapy or in vaccine trials where foreign antigenic epitopes are expressed from or on the surface of the vector virus. The small genome size and compact particle structure, however, set limits to enterovirus genome modifications. This review focuses on the therapeutic use of native and recombinant enteroviruses and the methods that have been applied to modify enterovirus genomes for therapy.

  15. Vector fields in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, E. A.

    2012-06-01

    Vector fields can arise in the cosmological context in different ways, and we discuss both abelian and nonabelian sector. In the abelian sector vector fields of the geometrical origin (from dimensional reduction and Einstein-Eddington modification of gravity) can provide a very non-trivial dynamics, which can be expressed in terms of the effective dilaton-scalar gravity with the specific potential. In the non-abelian sector we investigate the Yang-Mills SU(2) theory which admits isotropic and homogeneous configuration. Provided the non-linear dependence of the lagrangian on the invariant FμνF~μν, one can obtain the inflationary regime with the exponential growth of the scale factor. The effective amplitudes of the `electric' and `magnetic' components behave like slowly varying scalars at this regime, what allows the consideration of some realistic models with non-linear terms in the Yang-Mills lagrangian.

  16. Correction of a deletion mutant by gene targeting with an adenovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q; Taylor, M W

    1993-01-01

    The usefulness of adenovirus type 5 as a vector for homologous recombination was examined in CHO cells by using the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) gene. Infection of a hemizygous CHO APRT- cell line containing a 3-bp deletion in exon 5 of the aprt gene with a recombinant adenovirus containing the wild-type gene resulted in restoration of the APRT+ phenotype at a frequency of 10(-5) to 10(-6) per infected cell. A relatively high frequency (approximately 6 to 20%) of the transductants appears to result from a homologous recombination event. The mutation on the chromosomal aprt gene is corrected in the homologous recombinants, and APRT expression is restored to a normal hemizygous level. Neither adenovirus nor exogenous promoter sequences are detected in the homologous recombinants. The remaining transductants result from random integration of the aprt gene with the adenovirus sequence. A number of adenovirus vectors containing different promoter sequences linked to the hamster aprt gene were constructed. A possible role for the promoter region in the homologous recombination event was indicated by the lack of homologous recombination in constructs lacking an active promoter. Images PMID:8423811

  17. Adenovirus dodecahedron, a new vector for human gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Fender, P; Ruigrok, R W; Gout, E; Buffet, S; Chroboczek, J

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus is one of most efficient delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, the initial enthusiasm for the use of recombinant adenovirus for gene therapy has been tempered by strong immune responses that develop to the virus and virus-infected cells. Even though recombinant adenoviruses are replication-defective, they introduce into the recipient cell, together with the gene of interest, viral genetes that might lead to fortuitous recombination if the recipient is infected by wild-type adenovirus. We propose the use of a dodecahedron made of adenovirus pentons or penton bases as an alternative vector for human gene therapy. The penton is a complex of two oligomeric proteins, a penton base and fiber, involved in the cell attachment, internalization, and liberation of virus into the cytoplasm. The dodecahedron retains many of the advantages of adenovirus for gene transfer such as efficiency of entry, efficient release of DNA from endosomes, and wide range of cell and tissue targets. Because it consists of only one or two adenovirus proteins instead of the 11 contained in an adenovirus virion and it does not contain the viral genome, it is potentially a safer alternative to recombinant adenovirus.

  18. Vector Magnetograph Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Russell A.

    1996-01-01

    This report covers work performed during the period of November 1994 through March 1996 on the design of a Space-borne Solar Vector Magnetograph. This work has been performed as part of a design team under the supervision of Dr. Mona Hagyard and Dr. Alan Gary of the Space Science Laboratory. Many tasks were performed and this report documents the results from some of those tasks, each contained in the corresponding appendix. Appendices are organized in chronological order.

  19. Some experiences with Krylov vectors and Lanczos vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Su, Tzu-Jeng; Kim, Hyoung M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper illustrates the use of Krylov vectors and Lanczos vectors for reduced-order modeling in structural dynamics and for control of flexible structures. Krylov vectors and Lanczos vectors are defined and illustrated, and several applications that have been under study at The University of Texas at Austin are reviewed: model reduction for undamped structural dynamics systems, component mode synthesis using Krylov vectors, model reduction of damped structural dynamics systems, and one-sided and two-sided unsymmetric block-Lanczos model-reduction algorithms.

  20. Isomap based supporting vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W. N.

    2015-12-01

    This research presents a new isomap based supporting vector machine method. Isomap is a dimension reduction method which is able to analyze nonlinear relationship of data on manifolds. Accordingly, support vector machine is established on the isomap manifold to classify given and predict unknown data. A case study of the isomap based supporting vector machine for environmental planning problems is conducted.

  1. What is a vector?

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Eric René; Booth, Mark; Norman, Rachel; Mideo, Nicole; McCallum, Hamish; Fenton, Andy

    2017-01-01

    Many important and rapidly emerging pathogens of humans, livestock and wildlife are ‘vector-borne’. However, the term ‘vector’ has been applied to diverse agents in a broad range of epidemiological systems. In this perspective, we briefly review some common definitions, identify the strengths and weaknesses of each and consider the functional differences between vectors and other hosts from a range of ecological, evolutionary and public health perspectives. We then consider how the use of designations can afford insights into our understanding of epidemiological and evolutionary processes that are not otherwise apparent. We conclude that from a medical and veterinary perspective, a combination of the ‘haematophagous arthropod’ and ‘mobility’ definitions is most useful because it offers important insights into contact structure and control and emphasizes the opportunities for pathogen shifts among taxonomically similar species with similar feeding modes and internal environments. From a population dynamics and evolutionary perspective, we suggest that a combination of the ‘micropredator’ and ‘sequential’ definition is most appropriate because it captures the key aspects of transmission biology and fitness consequences for the pathogen and vector itself. However, we explicitly recognize that the value of a definition always depends on the research question under study. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Opening the black box: re-examining the ecology and evolution of parasite transmission’. PMID:28289253

  2. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  3. Vector Helmholtz-Gauss and vector Laplace-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Bandres, Miguel A; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2005-08-15

    We demonstrate the existence of vector Helmholtz-Gauss (vHzG) and vector Laplace-Gauss beams that constitute two general families of localized vector beam solutions of the Maxwell equations in the paraxial approximation. The electromagnetic components are determined starting from the scalar solutions of the two-dimensional Helmholtz and Laplace equations, respectively. Special cases of the vHzG beams are TE and TM Gaussian vector beams, nondiffracting vector Bessel beams, polarized Bessel-Gauss beams, modes in cylindrical waveguides and cavities, and scalar Helmholtz-Gauss beams. The general expression of the vHzG beams can be used straightforwardly to obtain vector Mathieu-Gauss and vector parabolic-Gauss beams, which to our knowledge have not yet been reported.

  4. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  5. Variation of dislocation etch-pit geometry: An indicator of bulk microstructure and recombination activity in multicrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, S.; Kivambe, M.; Hofstetter, J.; Rinio, M.; Lai, B.; Buonassisi, T.

    2014-05-01

    Dislocation clusters in multicrystalline silicon limit solar cell performance by decreasing minority carrier diffusion length. Studies have shown that the recombination strength of dislocation clusters can vary by up to two orders of magnitude, even within the same wafer. In this contribution, we combine a surface-analysis approach with bulk characterization techniques to explore the underlying root cause of variations in recombination strength among different clusters. We observe that dislocation clusters with higher recombination strength consist of dislocations with a larger variation of line vector, correlated with a higher degree of variation in dislocation etch-pit shapes (ellipticities). Conversely, dislocation clusters exhibiting the lowest recombination strength contain mostly dislocations with identical line vectors, resulting in very similar etch-pit shapes. The disorder of dislocation line vector in high-recombination clusters appears to be correlated with impurity decoration, possibly the cause of the enhanced recombination activity. Based on our observations, we conclude that the relative recombination activity of different dislocation clusters in the device may be predicted via an optical inspection of the distribution and shape variation of dislocation etch pits in the as-grown wafer.

  6. General method for plasmid construction using homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Raymond, C K; Pownder, T A; Sexson, S L

    1999-01-01

    We describe a general method for plasmid assembly that uses yeast and extends beyond yeast-specific research applications. This technology exploits the homologous recombination, double-stranded break repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to join DNA fragments. Synthetic, double-stranded "recombination linkers" were used to "subclone" a DNA fragment into a plasmid with > 80% efficiency. Quantitative data on the influence of DNA concentration and overlap length on the efficiency of recombination are presented. Using a simple procedure, plasmids were shuttled from yeast into E. coli for subsequent screening and large-scale plasmid preps. This simple method for plasmid construction has several advantages. (i) It bypasses the need for extensive PCR amplification and for purification, modification and/or ligation techniques routinely used for plasmid constructions. (ii) The method does not rely on available restriction sites, thus fragment and vector DNA can be joined within any DNA sequence. This enables the use of multifunctional cloning vectors for protein expression in mammalian cells, other yeast species, E. coli and other expression systems as discussed. (iii) Finally, the technology exploits yeast strains, plasmids and microbial techniques that are inexpensive and readily available.

  7. Chapter 15. transforming lepidopteran insect cells for continuous recombinant protein expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) is widely used to produce large quantities of recombinant proteins. However, yields of extracellular and membrane-bound proteins obtained with this system often are very low, possibly due to the adverse effects of baculovirus infection on the host ins...

  8. S2 expressed from recombinant virus confers broad protection against infectious bronchitis virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously demonstrated that overexposing the IBV (infectious bronchitis virus) S2 to the chicken immune system by means of a vectored vaccine, followed by boost with whole virus, protects chickens against IBV showing dissimilar S1. We developed recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota (...

  9. The Cre/loxP recombination system for production of infectious mouse polyomavirus.

    PubMed

    Hron, Tomáš; Spanielová, Hana; Suchanová, Jiřina; Forstová, Jitka

    2013-09-01

    Murine polyomavirus mutants are frequently produced for experimental as well as therapy purposes. Commonly used methods for preparation of mutant viral genomes from recombinant vectors are laborious and give variable yields and quality. We describe an efficient and reproducible Cre/loxP-mediated recombination system that generates polyomavirus genomes from recombinant plasmid in vivo. We designed and constructed two variants of recombinant vectors containing the wild-type polyomavirus genome flanked by loxP homologous sites. The loxP sites were introduced either into the intronic region of early genes or between the two poly(A) signal sites of convergent transcriptional units. After cotransfection of the recombinant plasmids with the Cre-expressing vector into mouse 3T6 cells, we obtained infectious virus from the genome variant containing loxP site in the intronic region, but we failed to isolate any infectious virus from the viral genome containing loxP site between poly(A) signals. We show that the Cre/loxP-based method of polyomavirus production is simple, expedient, and reproducible and works with satisfactory efficiency.

  10. Vector representation of tourmaline compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Donald M.

    1989-01-01

    The vector method for representing mineral compositions of amphibole and mica groups is applied to the tourmaline group. Consideration is given to the methods for drawing the relevant vector diagrams, relating the exchange vectors to one another, and contouring the diagrams for constant values of Na, Ca, Li, Fe, Mg, Al, Si, and OH. The method is used to depict a wide range of possible tourmaline end-member compositions and solid solutions, starting from a single point. In addition to vector depictions of multicomponent natural tourmalines, vectors are presented for simpler systems such as (Na,Al)-tourmalines, alkali-free tourmalines, and elbaites.

  11. Self-Inactivating Lentivirus Vector for Safe and Efficient In Vivo Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zufferey, Romain; Dull, Thomas; Mandel, Ronald J.; Bukovsky, Anatoly; Quiroz, Dulce; Naldini, Luigi; Trono, Didier

    1998-01-01

    In vivo transduction of nondividing cells by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based vectors results in transgene expression that is stable over several months. However, the use of HIV-1 vectors raises concerns about their safety. Here we describe a self-inactivating HIV-1 vector with a 400-nucleotide deletion in the 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR). The deletion, which includes the TATA box, abolished the LTR promoter activity but did not affect vector titers or transgene expression in vitro. The self-inactivating vector transduced neurons in vivo as efficiently as a vector with full-length LTRs. The inactivation design achieved in this work improves significantly the biosafety of HIV-derived vectors, as it reduces the likelihood that replication-competent retroviruses will originate in the vector producer and target cells, and hampers recombination with wild-type HIV in an infected host. Moreover, it improves the potential performance of the vector by removing LTR sequences previously associated with transcriptional interference and suppression in vivo and by allowing the construction of more-stringent tissue-specific or regulatable vectors. PMID:9811723

  12. Auger recombination in sodium iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Andrew; Kioupakis, Emmanouil; Åberg, Daniel; Schleife, André

    2014-03-01

    Scintillators are an important tool used to detect high energy radiation - both in the interest of national security and in medicine. However, scintillator detectors currently suffer from lower energy resolutions than expected from basic counting statistics. This has been attributed to non-proportional light yield compared to incoming radiation, but the specific mechanism for this non-proportionality has not been identified. Auger recombination is a non-radiative process that could be contributing to the non-proportionality of scintillating materials. Auger recombination comes in two types - direct and phonon-assisted. We have used first-principles calculations to study Auger recombination in sodium iodide, a well characterized scintillating material. Our findings indicate that phonon-assisted Auger recombination is stronger in sodium iodide than direct Auger recombination. Computational resources provided by LLNL and NERSC. Funding provided by NA-22.

  13. A Gateway MultiSite Recombination Cloning Toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Lena K.; Stowers, R. Steven

    2011-01-01

    The generation of DNA constructs is often a rate-limiting step in conducting biological experiments. Recombination cloning of single DNA fragments using the Gateway system provided an advance over traditional restriction enzyme cloning due to increases in efficiency and reliability. Here we introduce a series of entry clones and a destination vector for use in two, three, and four fragment Gateway MultiSite recombination cloning whose advantages include increased flexibility and versatility. In contrast to Gateway single-fragment cloning approaches where variations are typically incorporated into model system-specific destination vectors, our Gateway MultiSite cloning strategy incorporates variations in easily generated entry clones that are model system-independent. In particular, we present entry clones containing insertions of GAL4, QF, UAS, QUAS, eGFP, and mCherry, among others, and demonstrate their in vivo functionality in Drosophila by using them to generate expression clones including GAL4 and QF drivers for various trp ion channel family members, UAS and QUAS excitatory and inhibitory light-gated ion channels, and QUAS red and green fluorescent synaptic vesicle markers. We thus establish a starter toolkit of modular Gateway MultiSite entry clones potentially adaptable to any model system. An inventory of entry clones and destination vectors for Gateway MultiSite cloning has also been established (www.gatewaymultisite.org). PMID:21931740

  14. Vector ecology of equine piroplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Scoles, Glen A; Ueti, Massaro W

    2015-01-07

    Equine piroplasmosis is a disease of Equidae, including horses, donkeys, mules, and zebras, caused by either of two protozoan parasites, Theileria equi or Babesia caballi. These parasites are biologically transmitted between hosts via tick vectors, and although they have inherent differences they are categorized together because they cause similar pathology and have similar morphologies, life cycles, and vector relationships. To complete their life cycle, these parasites must undergo a complex series of developmental events, including sexual-stage development in their tick vectors. Consequently, ticks are the definitive hosts as well as vectors for these parasites, and the vector relationship is restricted to a few competent tick species. Because the vector relationship is critical to the epidemiology of these parasites, we highlight current knowledge of the vector ecology of these tick-borne equine pathogens, emphasizing tick transmissibility and potential control strategies to prevent their spread.

  15. Expression of feline recombinant interferon-gamma in baculovirus and demonstration of biological activity.

    PubMed

    Argyle, D J; Harris, M; Lawrence, C; McBride, K; Barron, R; McGillivray, C; Onions, D E

    1998-07-08

    We have previously reported the cloning of the coding sequence for feline-specific interferon-gamma. Here, we describe the expression of this sequence in a baculovirus system and demonstrate the biological activity of the recombinant protein. The coding sequence for feline interferon was directionally cloned into the baculovirus transfer vector pAcCL29-1. Transfer vector and linearized wild-type AcMNPV (BacPAK6) were used to co-transfect Sf9 cells by calcium phosphate coprecipitation. Subsequently, wild-type and recombinant viruses were separated by plaque assay. Recombinant plaques were expanded and a master stock of virus is produced. Production of biologically active interferon-gamma from infected Sf9 cells was demonstrated using a standard cytopathic effect reduction assay, utilising vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and an MHC class II induction assay.

  16. Plasmid Vectors for Proteomic Analyses in Giardia: Purification of Virulence Factors and Analysis of the Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Stadelmann, Britta; Birkestedt, Sandra; Hellman, Ulf; Svärd, Staffan G.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, proteomics has come of age with the development of efficient tools for purification, identification, and characterization of gene products predicted by genome projects. The intestinal protozoan Giardia intestinalis can be transfected, but there is only a limited set of vectors available, and most of them are not user friendly. This work delineates the construction of a suite of cassette-based expression vectors for use in Giardia. Expression is provided by the strong constitutive ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OCT) promoter, and tagging is possible in both N- and C-terminal configurations. Taken together, the vectors are capable of providing protein localization and production of recombinant proteins, followed by efficient purification by a novel affinity tag combination, streptavidin binding peptide–glutathione S-transferase (SBP-GST). The option of removing the tags from purified proteins was provided by the inclusion of a PreScission protease site. The efficiency and feasibility of producing and purifying endogenous recombinant Giardia proteins with the developed vectors was demonstrated by the purification of active recombinant arginine deiminase (ADI) and OCT from stably transfected trophozoites. Moreover, we describe the tagging, purification by StrepTactin affinity chromatography, and compositional analysis by mass spectrometry of the G. intestinalis 26S proteasome by employing the Strep II-FLAG–tandem affinity purification (SF-TAP) tag. This is the first report of efficient production and purification of recombinant proteins in and from Giardia, which will allow the study of specific parasite proteins and protein complexes. PMID:22611020

  17. Intraparenchymal Stereotaxic Delivery of rAAV and Special Considerations in Vector Handling.

    PubMed

    Benskey, Matthew J; Manfredsson, Fredric P

    2016-01-01

    Stereotaxic surgery enables precise and consistent microinjections to discrete neural nuclei. Using stereotaxic surgery to deliver viral vectors is a powerful tool that provides the ability to manipulate gene expression in specific regions, or even specific cell types in the brain. Here, we describe the proper handling and stereotaxic delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus to various neuroanatomical structures of the rodent brain.

  18. Vector potential photoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Browning, R

    2011-10-01

    A new class of electron microscope has been developed for the chemical microanalysis of a wide range of real world samples using photoelectron spectroscopy. Highly structured, three-dimensional samples, such as fiber mats and fracture surfaces can be imaged, as well as insulators and magnetic materials. The new microscope uses the vector potential field from a solenoid magnet as a spatial reference for imaging. A prototype instrument has demonstrated imaging of uncoated silk, magnetic steel wool, and micron-sized single strand tungsten wires.

  19. Lentiviral vectors can be used for full-length dystrophin gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Counsell, John R.; Asgarian, Zeinab; Meng, Jinhong; Ferrer, Veronica; Vink, Conrad A.; Howe, Steven J.; Waddington, Simon N.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer E.; Danos, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a lack of dystrophin expression in patient muscle fibres. Current DMD gene therapy strategies rely on the expression of internally deleted forms of dystrophin, missing important functional domains. Viral gene transfer of full-length dystrophin could restore wild-type functionality, although this approach is restricted by the limited capacity of recombinant viral vectors. Lentiviral vectors can package larger transgenes than adeno-associated viruses, yet lentiviral vectors remain largely unexplored for full-length dystrophin delivery. In our work, we have demonstrated that lentiviral vectors can package and deliver inserts of a similar size to dystrophin. We report a novel approach for delivering large transgenes in lentiviruses, in which we demonstrate proof-of-concept for a ‘template-switching’ lentiviral vector that harnesses recombination events during reverse-transcription. During this work, we discovered that a standard, unmodified lentiviral vector was efficient in delivering full-length dystrophin to target cells, within a total genomic load of more than 15,000 base pairs. We have demonstrated gene therapy with this vector by restoring dystrophin expression in DMD myoblasts, where dystrophin was expressed at the sarcolemma of myotubes after myogenic differentiation. Ultimately, our work demonstrates proof-of-concept that lentiviruses can be used for permanent full-length dystrophin gene therapy, which presents a significant advancement in developing an effective treatment for DMD. PMID:28303972

  20. Gram negative shuttle BAC vector for heterologous expression of metagenomic libraries.

    PubMed

    Kakirde, Kavita S; Wild, Jadwiga; Godiska, Ronald; Mead, David A; Wiggins, Andrew G; Goodman, Robert M; Szybalski, Waclaw; Liles, Mark R

    2011-04-15

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vectors enable stable cloning of large DNA fragments from single genomes or microbial assemblages. A novel shuttle BAC vector was constructed that permits replication of BAC clones in diverse Gram-negative species. The "Gram-negative shuttle BAC" vector (pGNS-BAC) uses the F replicon for stable single-copy replication in E. coli and the broad-host-range RK2 mini-replicon for high-copy replication in diverse Gram-negative bacteria. As with other BAC vectors containing the oriV origin, this vector is capable of an arabinose-inducible increase in plasmid copy number. Resistance to both gentamicin and chloramphenicol is encoded on pGNS-BAC, permitting selection for the plasmid in diverse bacterial species. The oriT from an IncP plasmid was cloned into pGNS-BAC to enable conjugal transfer, thereby allowing both electroporation and conjugation of pGNS-BAC DNA into bacterial hosts. A soil metagenomic library was constructed in pGNS-BAC-1 (the first version of the vector, lacking gentamicin resistance and oriT), and recombinant clones were demonstrated to replicate in diverse Gram-negative hosts, including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas spp., Salmonella enterica, Serratia marcescens, Vibrio vulnificus and Enterobacter nimipressuralis. This shuttle BAC vector can be utilized to clone genomic DNA from diverse sources, and then transfer it into diverse Gram-negative bacterial species to facilitate heterologous expression of recombinant pathways.

  1. Lentiviral vectors can be used for full-length dystrophin gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Counsell, John R; Asgarian, Zeinab; Meng, Jinhong; Ferrer, Veronica; Vink, Conrad A; Howe, Steven J; Waddington, Simon N; Thrasher, Adrian J; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer E; Danos, Olivier

    2017-12-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a lack of dystrophin expression in patient muscle fibres. Current DMD gene therapy strategies rely on the expression of internally deleted forms of dystrophin, missing important functional domains. Viral gene transfer of full-length dystrophin could restore wild-type functionality, although this approach is restricted by the limited capacity of recombinant viral vectors. Lentiviral vectors can package larger transgenes than adeno-associated viruses, yet lentiviral vectors remain largely unexplored for full-length dystrophin delivery. In our work, we have demonstrated that lentiviral vectors can package and deliver inserts of a similar size to dystrophin. We report a novel approach for delivering large transgenes in lentiviruses, in which we demonstrate proof-of-concept for a 'template-switching' lentiviral vector that harnesses recombination events during reverse-transcription. During this work, we discovered that a standard, unmodified lentiviral vector was efficient in delivering full-length dystrophin to target cells, within a total genomic load of more than 15,000 base pairs. We have demonstrated gene therapy with this vector by restoring dystrophin expression in DMD myoblasts, where dystrophin was expressed at the sarcolemma of myotubes after myogenic differentiation. Ultimately, our work demonstrates proof-of-concept that lentiviruses can be used for permanent full-length dystrophin gene therapy, which presents a significant advancement in developing an effective treatment for DMD.

  2. Noncytopathic Sindbis virus RNA vectors for heterologous gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Agapov, Eugene V.; Frolov, Ilya; Lindenbach, Brett D.; Prágai, Béla M.; Schlesinger, Sondra; Rice, Charles M.

    1998-01-01

    Infection of vertebrate cells with alphaviruses normally leads to prodigious expression of virus-encoded genes and a dramatic inhibition of host protein synthesis. Recombinant Sindbis viruses and replicons have been useful as vectors for high level foreign gene expression, but the cytopathic effects of viral replication have limited their use to transient studies. We recently selected Sindbis replicons capable of persistent, noncytopathic growth in BHK cells and describe here a new generation of Sindbis vectors useful for long-term foreign gene expression based on such replicons. Foreign genes of interest as well as the dominant selectable marker puromycin N-acteyltransferase, which confers resistance to the drug puromycin, were expressed as subgenomic transcripts of noncytopathic replicons or defective-interfering genomes complemented in trans by a replicon. Based on these strategies, we developed vectors that can be initiated via either RNA or DNA transfection and analyzed them for their level and stability of foreign gene expression. Noncytopathic Sindbis vectors express reasonably high levels of protein in nearly every cell. These vectors should prove to be flexible tools for the rapid expression of heterologous genes under conditions in which cellular metabolism is not perturbed, and we illustrate their utility with a number of foreign proteins. PMID:9789028

  3. Producing a Mammalian GFP Expression Vector Containing Neomycin Resistance Gene.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Manizheh; Abiri, Maryam; Keramatipour, Mohammad

    2009-04-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) was originally isolated from the Jellyfish Aequorea Victoria that fluoresces green when exposed to blue light. GFP protein is composed of 238 amino acids with the molecular mass of 26.9 kD. The GFP gene is frequently used in cellular and molecular biology as a reporter gene. To date, many bacterial, yeast, fungal, plants, fly and mammalian cells, including human, have been created which express GFP. Martin Chalfie, Osamu Shimomura, and Roger Tsien were awarded the 2008 noble prize in chemistry for their discovery and development of GFP. In many studies on mammalian cells, GFP gene is introduced into cells using vector-based systems or a recombinant virus to track the location of a target protein or to study the expression level of the gene of interest, but in these studies there is no selection marker to normalize transfection. According to the importance of neomycin gene as a selection marker in mammalian cells, we aimed to produce a GFP expression vector that contains neomycin gene. GFP gene was separated from pEGFP-N1 vector and was inserted in the back-bone of pCDNA3.1/His/LacZ vector that contained the neomycin gene. The resulted vector contained GFP beside neomycin gene.

  4. Vector-mediated antibody gene transfer for infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the emerging field of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer as an alternative vaccine for infectious disease, with a specific focus on HIV. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV-1; the general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets like hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. This approach is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. With vector-mediated gene transfer, the antibody gene is delivered to the host, via a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector; this in turn results in long-term endogenous antibody expression from the injected muscle that confers protective immunity. Vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can rapidly move existing, potent broadly cross-neutralizing HIV-1-specific antibodies into the clinic. The gene transfer products demonstrate a potency and breadth identical to the original product. This strategy eliminates the need for immunogen design and interaction with the adaptive immune system to generate protection, a strategy that so far has shown limited promise.

  5. Delayed recombination and standard rulers

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Galli, Silvia; Silk, Joseph I.; Verde, Licia

    2009-02-15

    Measurements of baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in galaxy surveys have been recognized as a powerful tool for constraining dark energy. However, this method relies on the knowledge of the size of the acoustic horizon at recombination derived from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. This estimate is typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme; additional radiation sources can delay recombination altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from CMB and BAO data. In this paper we quantify the effect of delayed recombination on the determination of dark energy parameters from future BAO surveys such as the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph. We find the impact to be small but still not negligible. In particular, if recombination is nonstandard (to a level still allowed by CMB data), but this is ignored, future surveys may incorrectly suggest the presence of a redshift-dependent dark energy component. On the other hand, in the case of delayed recombination, adding to the analysis one extra parameter describing deviations from standard recombination does not significantly degrade the error bars on dark energy parameters and yields unbiased estimates. This is due to the CMB-BAO complementarity.

  6. Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vector Ebola Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ledgerwood, Julie E; DeZure, Adam D; Stanley, Daphne A; Coates, Emily E; Novik, Laura; Enama, Mary E; Berkowitz, Nina M; Hu, Zonghui; Joshi, Gyan; Ploquin, Aurélie; Sitar, Sandra; Gordon, Ingelise J; Plummer, Sarah A; Holman, LaSonji A; Hendel, Cynthia S; Yamshchikov, Galina; Roman, Francois; Nicosia, Alfredo; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Bailer, Robert T; Schwartz, Richard M; Roederer, Mario; Mascola, John R; Koup, Richard A; Sullivan, Nancy J; Graham, Barney S

    2017-03-09

    Background The unprecedented 2014 epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) prompted an international response to accelerate the availability of a preventive vaccine. A replication-defective recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus type 3-vectored ebolavirus vaccine (cAd3-EBO), encoding the glycoprotein from Zaire and Sudan species, that offers protection in the nonhuman primate model, was rapidly advanced into phase 1 clinical evaluation. Methods We conducted a phase 1, dose-escalation, open-label trial of cAd3-EBO. Twenty healthy adults, in sequentially enrolled groups of 10 each, received vaccination intramuscularly in doses of 2×10(10) particle units or 2×10(11) particle units. Primary and secondary end points related to safety and immunogenicity were assessed throughout the first 8 weeks after vaccination; in addition, longer-term vaccine durability was assessed at 48 weeks after vaccination. Results In this small study, no safety concerns were identified; however, transient fever developed within 1 day after vaccination in two participants who had received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose. Glycoprotein-specific antibodies were induced in all 20 participants; the titers were of greater magnitude in the group that received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose than in the group that received the 2×10(10) particle-unit dose (geometric mean titer against the Zaire antigen at week 4, 2037 vs. 331; P=0.001). Glycoprotein-specific T-cell responses were more frequent among those who received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose than among those who received the 2×10(10) particle-unit dose, with a CD4 response in 10 of 10 participants versus 3 of 10 participants (P=0.004) and a CD8 response in 7 of 10 participants versus 2 of 10 participants (P=0.07) at week 4. Assessment of the durability of the antibody response showed that titers remained high at week 48, with the highest titers in those who received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose. Conclusions Reactogenicity and immune responses

  7. Adenoviral vector DNA for accurate genome editing with engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Henriques, Sara F D; Janssen, Josephine M; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2014-10-01

    Engineered sequence-specific nucleases and donor DNA templates can be customized to edit mammalian genomes via the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Here we report that the nature of the donor DNA greatly affects the specificity and accuracy of the editing process following site-specific genomic cleavage by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 nucleases. By applying these designer nucleases together with donor DNA delivered as protein-capped adenoviral vector (AdV), free-ended integrase-defective lentiviral vector or nonviral vector templates, we found that the vast majority of AdV-modified human cells underwent scarless homology-directed genome editing. In contrast, a significant proportion of cells exposed to free-ended or to covalently closed HR substrates were subjected to random and illegitimate recombination events. These findings are particularly relevant for genome engineering approaches aiming at high-fidelity genetic modification of human cells.

  8. Recombinant production of TEV cleaved human parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Audu, Christopher O; Cochran, Jared C; Pellegrini, Maria; Mierke, Dale F

    2013-08-01

    The parathyroid hormone, PTH, is responsible for calcium and phosphate ion homeostasis in the body. The first 34 amino acids of the peptide maintain the biological activity of the hormone and is currently marketed for calcium imbalance disorders. Although several methods for the production of recombinant PTH(1-34) have been reported, most involve the use of cleavage conditions that result in a modified peptide or unfavorable side products. Herein, we detail the recombinant production of (15) N-enriched human parathyroid hormone, (15) N PTH(1-34), generated via a plasmid vector that gives reasonable yield, low-cost protease cleavage (leaving the native N-terminal serine in its amino form), and purification by affinity and size exclusion chromatography. We characterize the product by multidimensional, heteronuclear NMR, circular dichroism, and LC/MS.

  9. Genetically Engineered Poxviruses for Recombinant Gene Expression, Vaccination, and Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Bernard

    1996-10-01

    Vaccinia virus, no longer required for immunization against smallpox, now serves as a unique vector for expressing genes within the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. As a research tool, recombinant vaccinia viruses are used to synthesize and analyze the structure--function relationships of proteins, determine the targets of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and investigate the types of immune response needed for protection against specific infectious diseases and cancer. The vaccine potential of recombinant vaccinia virus has been realized in the form of an effective oral wild-life rabies vaccine, although no product for humans has been licensed. A genetically altered vaccinia virus that is unable to replicate in mammalian cells and produces diminished cytopathic effects retains the capacity for high-level gene expression and immunogenicity while promising exceptional safety for laboratory workers and potential vaccine recipients.

  10. Recombinant protein production from stable mammalian cell lines and pools.

    PubMed

    Hacker, David L; Balasubramanian, Sowmya

    2016-06-01

    We highlight recent developments for the production of recombinant proteins from suspension-adapted mammalian cell lines. We discuss the generation of stable cell lines using transposons and lentivirus vectors (non-targeted transgene integration) and site-specific recombinases (targeted transgene integration). Each of these methods results in the generation of cell lines with protein yields that are generally superior to those achievable through classical plasmid transfection that depends on the integration of the transfected DNA by non-homologous DNA end-joining. This is the main reason why these techniques can also be used for the generation of stable cell pools, heterogenous populations of recombinant cells generated by gene delivery and genetic selection without resorting to single cell cloning. This allows the time line from gene transfer to protein production to be reduced.

  11. Testing for recombinant erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, Joris R; Bollen, Mathieu; Beullens, Monique

    2008-03-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is a glycoprotein hormone that promotes the production of red blood cells. Recombinant human Epo (rhEpo) is illicitly used to improve performance in endurance sports. Doping in sports is discouraged by the screening of athletes for rhEpo. Both direct tests (indicating the presence of exogeneous Epo isoforms) and indirect tests (indicating hematological changes induced by exogenous Epo administration) can be used for Epo detection. At present, the test adopted by the World Anti Doping Agency is based on a combination of isoelectric focusing and double immunoblotting, and distinguishes between endogenous and rhEpo. However, the adopted monoclonal anti-Epo antibodies are not monospecific. Therefore, the test can occasionally lead to the false-positive detection of rhEpo (epoetin-beta) in post-exercise, protein-rich urine, or in case of contamination of the sample with microorganisms. An improved preanalytical care may counteract a lot of these problems. Adaptation of the criteria may be helpful to further refine direct Epo testing. Indirect tests have the disadvantage that they require blood instead of urine samples, but they can be applied to detect a broader range of performance improving techniques which are illicitly used in sports.

  12. Hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xu-Zhen; Pan, Yue; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2015-12-14

    We present and construct a new kind of orthogonal coordinate system, hyperbolic coordinate system. We present and design a new kind of local linearly polarized vector fields, which is defined as the hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields because the points with the same polarization form a series of hyperbolae. We experimentally demonstrate the generation of such a kind of hyperbolic-symmetry vector optical fields. In particular, we also study the modified hyperbolic-symmetry vector optical fields with the twofold and fourfold symmetric states of polarization when introducing the mirror symmetry. The tight focusing behaviors of these vector fields are also investigated. In addition, we also fabricate micro-structures on the K9 glass surfaces by several tightly focused (modified) hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields patterns, which demonstrate that the simulated tightly focused fields are in good agreement with the fabricated micro-structures.

  13. Extended vector-tensor theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Rampei; Naruko, Atsushi; Yoshida, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    Recently, several extensions of massive vector theory in curved space-time have been proposed in many literatures. In this paper, we consider the most general vector-tensor theories that contain up to two derivatives with respect to metric and vector field. By imposing a degeneracy condition of the Lagrangian in the context of ADM decomposition of space-time to eliminate an unwanted mode, we construct a new class of massive vector theories where five degrees of freedom can propagate, corresponding to three for massive vector modes and two for massless tensor modes. We find that the generalized Proca and the beyond generalized Proca theories up to the quartic Lagrangian, which should be included in this formulation, are degenerate theories even in curved space-time. Finally, introducing new metric and vector field transformations, we investigate the properties of thus obtained theories under such transformations.

  14. Integration of an insertion-type transferred DNA vector from Agrobacterium tumefaciens into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome by gap repair.

    PubMed Central

    Risseeuw, E; Franke-van Dijk, M E; Hooykaas, P J

    1996-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that Agrobacterium tumefaciens can transfer transferred DNA (T-DNA) to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and that this T-DNA, when used as a replacement vector, is integrated via homologous recombination into the yeast genome. To test whether T-DNA can be a suitable substrate for integration via the gap repair mechanism as well, a model system developed for detection of homologous recombination events in plants was transferred to S. cerevisiae. Analysis of the yeast transformants revealed that an insertion type T-DNA vector can indeed be integrated via gap repair. Interestingly, the transformation frequency and the type of recombination events turned out to depend strongly on the orientation of the insert between the borders in such an insertion type T-DNA vector. PMID:8816506

  15. Ability of herpes simplex virus vectors to boost immune responses to DNA vectors and to protect against challenge by simian immunodeficiency virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Amitinder . E-mail: amitinder_kaur@hms.harvard.edu; Sanford, Hannah B.; Garry, Deirdre; Lang, Sabine; Klumpp, Sherry A.; Watanabe, Daisuke; Bronson, Roderick T.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Rosati, Margherita; Pavlakis, George N.; Felber, Barbara K.; Knipe, David M.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2007-01-20

    The immunogenicity and protective capacity of replication-defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector-based vaccines were examined in rhesus macaques. Three macaques were inoculated with recombinant HSV vectors expressing Gag, Env, and a Tat-Rev-Nef fusion protein of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Three other macaques were primed with recombinant DNA vectors expressing Gag, Env, and a Pol-Tat-Nef-Vif fusion protein prior to boosting with the HSV vectors. Robust anti-Gag and anti-Env cellular responses were detected in all six macaques. Following intravenous challenge with wild-type, cloned SIV239, peak and 12-week plasma viremia levels were significantly lower in vaccinated compared to control macaques. Plasma SIV RNA in vaccinated macaques was inversely correlated with anti-Rev ELISPOT responses on the day of challenge (P value < 0.05), anti-Tat ELISPOT responses at 2 weeks post challenge (P value < 0.05) and peak neutralizing antibody titers pre-challenge (P value 0.06). These findings support continued study of recombinant herpesviruses as a vaccine approach for AIDS.

  16. Development of bovine herpesvirus 4 as an expression vector using bacterial artificial chromosome cloning.

    PubMed

    Gillet, L; Daix, V; Donofrio, G; Wagner, M; Koszinowski, U H; China, B; Ackermann, M; Markine-Goriaynoff, N; Vanderplasschen, A

    2005-04-01

    Several features make bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) attractive as a backbone for use as a viral expression vector and/or as a model to study gammaherpesvirus biology. However, these developments have been impeded by the difficulty in manipulating its large genome using classical homologous recombination in eukaryotic cells. In the present study, the feasibility of exploiting bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) cloning and prokaryotic recombination technology for production of BoHV-4 recombinants was explored. Firstly, the BoHV-4 genome was BAC cloned using two potential insertion sites. Both sites of insertion gave rise to BoHV-4 BAC clones stably maintained in bacteria and able to regenerate virions when transfected into permissive cells. Reconstituted virus replicated comparably to wild-type parental virus and the loxP-flanked BAC cassette was excised by growing them on permissive cells stably expressing Cre recombinase. Secondly, BoHV-4 recombinants expressing Ixodes ricinus anti-complement protein I or II (IRAC I/II) were produced using a two-step mutagenesis procedure in Escherichia coli. Both recombinants induced expression of high levels of functional IRAC molecules in the supernatant of infected cells. This study demonstrates that BAC cloning and prokaryotic recombination technology are powerful tools for the development of BoHV-4 as an expression vector and for further fundamental studies of this gammaherpesvirus.

  17. Production and Characterization of Vectors Based on the Cardiotropic AAV Serotype 9.

    PubMed

    Kohlbrenner, Erik; Weber, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Vectors based on adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) efficiently transduce cardiomyocytes in both rodents and large animal models upon either systemic or regional vector delivery. In this chapter, we describe the most widely used production and purification method of AAV9. This production approach does not depend on the use of a helpervirus but instead on transient transfection of HEK293T cells with a plasmid containing the recombinant AAV genome and a second plasmid encoding the AAV9 capsid proteins, the AAV Rep proteins and the adenoviral helper functions. The recombinant AAV is then purified by iodixanol density gradient centrifugation. This chapter also describes in detail the characterization and quality control methods required for assuring high quality vector preparations, which is of particular importance for experiments in large animal models.

  18. Dengue vaccine: an update on recombinant subunit strategies.

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Hermida, L

    2016-03-01

    Dengue is an increasing public health problem worldwide, with the four serotypes of the virus infecting over 390 million people annually. There is no specific treatment or antiviral drug for dengue, and prevention is largely limited to controlling the mosquito vectors or disrupting the human-vector contact. Despite the considerable progress made in recent years, an effective vaccine against the virus is not yet available. The development of a dengue vaccine has been hampered by many unique challenges, including the need to ensure the absence of vaccine-induced enhanced severity of disease. Recombinant protein subunit vaccines offer a safer alternative to other vaccine approaches. Several subunit vaccine candidates are presently under development, based on different structural and non-structural proteins of the virus. Novel adjuvants or immunopotentiating strategies are also being tested to improve their immunogenicity. This review summarizes the current status and development trends of subunit dengue vaccines.

  19. Improved self-inactivating retroviral vectors derived from spleen necrosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, P; Nelson, S; Dornburg, R

    1994-01-01

    Self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral vectors contain a deletion spanning most of the right long terminal repeat's (LTR's) U3 region. Reverse transcription copies this deletion to both LTRs. As a result, there is no transcription from the 5' LTR, preventing further replication. Many previously developed SIN vectors, however, had reduced titers or were genetically unstable. Earlier, we reported that certain SIN vectors derived from spleen necrosis virus (SNV) experienced reconstitution of the U3-deleted LTR at high frequencies. This reconstitution occurred on the DNA level and appeared to be dependent on defined vector sequences. To study this phenomenon in more detail, we developed an almost completely U3-free retroviral vector. The promoter and enhancer of the left LTR were replaced with those of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early genes. This promoter swap did not impair the level of transcription or alter its start site. Our data indicate that SNV contains a strong initiator which resembles that of human immunodeficiency virus. We show that the vectors replicate with efficiencies similar to those of vectors possessing two wild-type LTRs. U3-deleted vectors carrying the hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene did not observably undergo LTR reconstitution, even when replicated in helper cells containing SNV-LTR sequences. However, vectors carrying the neomycin resistance gene did undergo LTR reconstitution with the use of homologous helper cell LTR sequences as template. This supports our earlier finding that sequences within the neomycin resistance gene can trigger recombination. Images PMID:7933088

  20. Three Decades of Recombinant DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Jackie

    1985-01-01

    Discusses highlights in the development of genetic engineering, examining techniques with recombinant DNA, legal and ethical issues, GenBank (a national database of nucleic acid sequences), and other topics. (JN)

  1. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. PMID:24956486

  2. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, H.; Ledjeff, K.

    1984-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive the discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  3. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, Helmut; Ledjeff, Konstantin

    1985-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive he discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  4. Perovskite photovoltaics: Slow recombination unveiled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Jacques-E.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most salient features of hybrid lead halide perovskites is the extended lifetime of their photogenerated charge carriers. This property has now been shown experimentally to originate from a slow, thermally activated recombination process.

  5. Controlled release from recombinant polymers.

    PubMed

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-09-28

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed.

  6. Stable recombination hotspots in birds.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sonal; Leffler, Ellen M; Sannareddy, Keerthi; Turner, Isaac; Venn, Oliver; Hooper, Daniel M; Strand, Alva I; Li, Qiye; Raney, Brian; Balakrishnan, Christopher N; Griffith, Simon C; McVean, Gil; Przeworski, Molly

    2015-11-20

    The DNA-binding protein PRDM9 has a critical role in specifying meiotic recombination hotspots in mice and apes, but it appears to be absent from other vertebrate species, including birds. To study the evolution and determinants of recombination in species lacking the gene that encodes PRDM9, we inferred fine-scale genetic maps from population resequencing data for two bird species: the zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, and the long-tailed finch, Poephila acuticauda. We found that both species have recombination hotspots, which are enriched near functional genomic elements. Unlike in mice and apes, most hotspots are shared between the two species, and their conservation seems to extend over tens of millions of years. These observations suggest that in the absence of PRDM9, recombination targets functional features that both enable access to the genome and constrain its evolution.

  7. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    MedlinePlus

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  8. Generation of Food-Grade Recombinant Lactic Acid Bacterium Strains by Site-Specific Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Martín, M. Cruz; Alonso, Juan C.; Suárez, Juan E.; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2000-01-01

    The construction of a delivery and clearing system for the generation of food-grade recombinant lactic acid bacterium strains, based on the use of an integrase (Int) and a resolvo-invertase (β-recombinase) and their respective target sites (attP-attB and six, respectively) is reported. The delivery system contains a heterologous replication origin and antibiotic resistance markers surrounded by two directly oriented six sites, a multiple cloning site where passenger DNA could be inserted (e.g., the cI gene of bacteriophage A2), the int gene, and the attP site of phage A2. The clearing system provides a plasmid-borne gene encoding β-recombinase. The nonreplicative vector-borne delivery system was transformed into Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 and, by site-specific recombination, integrated as a single copy in an orientation- and Int-dependent manner into the attB site present in the genome of the host strain. The transfer of the clearing system into this strain, with the subsequent expression of the β-recombinase, led to site-specific DNA resolution of the non-food-grade DNA. These methods were validated by the construction of a stable food-grade L. casei ATCC 393-derived strain completely immune to phage A2 infection during milk fermentation. PMID:10831443

  9. Combinatorics in Recombinational Population Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, Laxmi

    The work that I will discuss is motivated by the need for understanding, and processing, the manifestations of recombination events in chromosome sequences. In this talk, we focus on two related problems. First, we explore the very general problem of reconstructability of pedigree history. How plausible is it to unravel the history of a complete unit (chromosome) of inheritance? The second problem deals with reconstructing the recombinational history of a collection of chromosomes.

  10. Recombineering: highly efficient in vivo genetic engineering using single-strand oligos.

    PubMed

    Sawitzke, James A; Thomason, Lynn C; Bubunenko, Mikhail; Li, Xintian; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L

    2013-01-01

    Recombineering provides the ability to make rapid, precise, and inexpensive genetic alterations to any DNA sequence, either in the chromosome or cloned onto a vector that replicates in E. coli (or other recombineering-proficient bacteria), and to do so in a highly efficient manner. Complicated genetic constructs that are impossible to make with in vitro genetic engineering can be created in days with recombineering. Recombineering with single-strand DNA (ssDNA) can be used to create single or multiple clustered point mutations, small or large (up to 10kb) deletions, and small (10-20 base) insertions such as sequence tags. Using optimized conditions, point mutations can be made with such high frequencies that they can be found without selection. This technology excels at creating both directed and random mutations.

  11. Intensive pharmacological immunosuppression allows for repetitive liver gene transfer with recombinant adenovirus in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Fontanellas, Antonio; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Mauleón, Itsaso; Dubrot, Juan; Mancheño, Uxua; Collantes, María; Sampedro, Ana; Unzu, Carmen; Alfaro, Carlos; Palazón, Asis; Smerdou, Cristian; Benito, Alberto; Prieto, Jesús; Peñuelas, Iván; Melero, Ignacio

    2010-04-01

    Repeated administration of gene therapies is hampered by host immunity toward vectors and transgenes. Attempts to circumvent antivector immunity include pharmacological immunosuppression or alternating different vectors and vector serotypes with the same transgene. Our studies show that B-cell depletion with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and concomitant T-cell inhibition with clinically available drugs permits repeated liver gene transfer to a limited number of nonhuman primates with recombinant adenovirus. Adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene was visualized in vivo with a semiquantitative transgene-specific positron emission tomography (PET) technique, liver immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot for the reporter transgene in needle biopsies. Neutralizing antibody and T cell-mediated responses toward the viral capsids were sequentially monitored and found to be repressed by the drug combinations tested. Repeated liver transfer of the HSV1-tk reporter gene with the same recombinant adenoviral vector was achieved in macaques undergoing a clinically feasible immunosuppressive treatment that ablated humoral and cellular immune responses. This strategy allows measurable gene retransfer to the liver as late as 15 months following the first adenoviral exposure in a macaque, which has undergone a total of four treatments with the same adenoviral vector.

  12. Multistage vector (MSV) therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Joy; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2015-12-10

    One of the greatest challenges in the field of medicine is obtaining controlled distribution of systemically administered therapeutic agents within the body. Indeed, biological barriers such as physical compartmentalization, pressure gradients, and excretion pathways adversely affect localized delivery of drugs to pathological tissue. The diverse nature of these barriers requires the use of multifunctional drug delivery vehicles that can overcome a wide range of sequential obstacles. In this review, we explore the role of multifunctionality in nanomedicine by primarily focusing on multistage vectors (MSVs). The MSV is an example of a promising therapeutic platform that incorporates several components, including a microparticle, nanoparticles, and small molecules. In particular, these components are activated in a sequential manner in order to successively address transport barriers.

  13. Entangled vector vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Carvacho, Gonzalo; Graffitti, Francesco; Vitelli, Chiara; Piccirillo, Bruno; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Light beams having a vectorial field structure, or polarization, that varies over the transverse profile and a central optical singularity are called vector vortex (VV) beams and may exhibit specific properties such as focusing into "light needles" or rotation invariance. VV beams have already found applications in areas ranging from microscopy to metrology, optical trapping, nano-optics, and quantum communication. Individual photons in such beams exhibit a form of single-particle quantum entanglement between different degrees of freedom. On the other hand, the quantum states of two photons can be also entangled with each other. Here, we combine these two concepts and demonstrate the generation of quantum entanglement between two photons that are both in VV states: a form of entanglement between two complex vectorial fields. This result may lead to quantum-enhanced applications of VV beams as well as to quantum information protocols fully exploiting the vectorial features of light.

  14. Multistage vector (MSV) therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wolfram, Joy; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the field of medicine is obtaining controlled distribution of systemically administered therapeutic agents within the body. Indeed, biological barriers such as physical compartmentalization, pressure gradients, and excretion pathways adversely affect localized delivery of drugs to pathological tissue. The diverse nature of these barriers requires the use of multifunctional drug delivery vehicles that can overcome a wide range of sequential obstacles. In this review, we explore the role of multifunctionality in nanomedicine by primarily focusing on multistage vectors (MSVs). The MSV is an example of a promising therapeutic platform that incorporates several components, including a microparticle, nanoparticles, and small molecules. In particular, these components are activated in a sequential manner in order to successively address transport barriers. PMID:26264836

  15. Solar imaging vector magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an instrument which has been constructed at the University of Hawaii to make observations of the magnetic field in solar active regions. Detailed knowledge of active region magnetic structures is crucial to understanding many solar phenomena, because the magnetic field both defines the morphology of structures seen in the solar atmosphere and is the apparent energy source for solar flares. The new vector magnetograph was conceived in response to a perceived discrepancy between the capabilities of X ray imaging telescopes to be operating during the current solar maximum and those of existing magnetographs. There were no space-based magnetographs planned for this period; the existing ground-based instruments variously suffered from lack of sensitivity, poor time resolution, inadequate spatial resolution or unreliable sites. Yet the studies of flares and their relationship to the solar corona planned for the 1991-1994 maximum absolutely required high quality vector magnetic field measurements. By 'vector' measurements we mean that the observation attempts to deduce the complete strength and direction of the field at the measurement site, rather than just the line of sight component as obtained by a traditional longitudinal magnetograph. Knowledge of the vector field permits one to calculate photospheric electric currents, which might play a part in heating the corona, and to calculate energy stored in coronal magnetic fields as the result of such currents. Information about the strength and direction of magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere can be obtained in a number of ways, but quantitative data is best obtained by observing Zeeman-effect polarization in solar spectral lines. The technique requires measuring the complete state of polarization at one or more wavelengths within a magnetically sensitive line of the solar spectrum. This measurement must be done for each independent spatial point for which one wants magnetic field data. All the

  16. Chameleon vector bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ann E.

    2008-05-01

    We show that for a force mediated by a vector particle coupled to a conserved U(1) charge, the apparent range and strength can depend on the size and density of the source, and the proximity to other sources. This chameleon effect is due to screening from a light charged scalar. Such screening can weaken astrophysical constraints on new gauge bosons. As an example we consider the constraints on chameleonic gauged B-L. We show that although Casimir measurements greatly constrain any B-L force much stronger than gravity with range longer than 0.1 {mu}m, there remains an experimental window for a long-range chameleonic B-L force. Such a force could be much stronger than gravity, and long or infinite range in vacuum, but have an effective range near the surface of the earth which is less than a micron.

  17. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Beall, David S.; Burchhardt, Gerhard F. H.; Guimaraes, Walter V.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.

    1995-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  18. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, David E.; Horton, Philip G.; Ben-Bassat, Arie

    1996-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  19. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  20. Selected prfA* mutations in recombinant attenuated Listeria monocytogenes strains augment expression of foreign immunogens and enhance vaccine-elicited humoral and cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Qiu, Jin; Chen, Jianbo; Ryan-Payseur, Bridgett; Huang, Dan; Wang, Yunqi; Rong, Lijun; Melton-Witt, Jody A; Freitag, Nancy E; Chen, Zheng W

    2008-08-01

    While recombinant Listeria monocytogenes strains can be explored as vaccine candidates, it is important to develop attenuated but highly immunogenic L. monocytogenes vaccine vectors. Here, prfA* mutations selected on the basis of upregulated expression of L. monocytogenes PrfA-dependent genes and proteins were assessed to determine their abilities to augment expression of foreign immunogens in recombinant L. monocytogenes vectors and therefore enhance vaccine-elicited immune responses (a prfA* mutation is a mutation that results in constitutive overexpression of PrfA and PrfA-dependent virulence genes; the asterisk distinguishes the mutation from inactivation or stop mutations). A total of 63 recombinant L. monocytogenes vaccine vectors expressing seven individual viral or bacterial immunogens each in nine different L. monocytogenes strains carrying wild-type prfA or having prfA* mutations were constructed and investigated. Mutations selected on the basis of increased PrfA activation in recombinant L. monocytogenes prfA* vaccine vectors augmented expression of seven individual protein immunogens remarkably. Consistently, prime and boost vaccination studies with mice indicated that the prfA(G155S) mutation in recombinant L. monocytogenes DeltaactA prfA* strains enhanced vaccine-elicited cellular immune responses. Surprisingly, the prfA(G155S) mutation was found to enhance vaccine-elicited humoral immune responses as well. The highly immunogenic recombinant L. monocytogenes DeltaactA prfA* vaccine strains were as attenuated as the recombinant parent L. monocytogenes DeltaactA vaccine vector. Thus, recombinant attenuated L. monocytogenes DeltaactA prfA* vaccine vectors potentially are better antimicrobial and anticancer vaccines.

  1. Poynting vector and wave vector directions of equatorial chorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubenschuss, Ulrich; Santolík, Ondřej; Breuillard, Hugo; Li, Wen; Le Contel, Olivier

    2016-12-01

    We present new results on wave vectors and Poynting vectors of chorus rising and falling tones on the basis of 6 years of THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) observations. The majority of wave vectors is closely aligned with the direction of the ambient magnetic field (B0). Oblique wave vectors are confined to the magnetic meridional plane, pointing away from Earth. Poynting vectors are found to be almost parallel to B0. We show, for the first time, that slightly oblique Poynting vectors are directed away from Earth for rising tones and toward Earth for falling tones. For the majority of lower band chorus elements, the mutual orientation between Poynting vectors and wave vectors can be explained by whistler mode dispersion in a homogeneous collisionless cold plasma. Upper band chorus seems to require inclusion of collisional processes or taking into account azimuthal anisotropies in the propagation medium. The latitudinal extension of the equatorial source region can be limited to ±6∘ around the B0 minimum or approximately ±5000 km along magnetic field lines. We find increasing Poynting flux and focusing of Poynting vectors on the B0 direction with increasing latitude. Also, wave vectors become most often more field aligned. A smaller group of chorus generated with very oblique wave normals tends to stay close to the whistler mode resonance cone. This suggests that close to the equatorial source region (within ˜20∘ latitude), a wave guidance mechanism is relevant, for example, in ducts of depleted or enhanced plasma density.

  2. Effects of an adenoviral vector containing a suicide gene fusion on growth characteristics of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Heng; Liu, Chunli; Zhu, Ting; Huang, Zonghai; Yang, Liucheng; Li, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV‑TK/GCV) and the cytosine deaminase/5‑fluorocytosine (CD/5‑FC) systems have been widely applied in suicide gene therapy for cancer. Although suicide gene therapy has been successfully used in vitro and in vivo studies, the number of studies on the effects of recombinant adenoviruses (Ads) containing suicide genes on target cancer cells is limited. The aim of this study was to examine whether recombinant Ads containing the CD/TK fusion gene affect cell proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro. In the present study, we explored the use of a recombinant adenoviral vector to deliver the CD/TK fusion gene to the breast cancer cell line MCF‑7. We found that the recombinant adenoviral vector efficiently infected MCF‑7 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that CD and TK proteins are expressed in the infected cells. The infected breast cancer cells did not show any significant changes in morphology, ultrastructure, cell growth, and cell‑cycle distribution compared to the uninfected cells. This study revealed that the Ad‑vascular endothelial growth factor promoter (VEGFp)‑CD/TK vector is non‑toxic to MCF‑7 cells at the appropriate titer. Our results indicate that it is feasible to use a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the CD/TK fusion gene in suicide gene therapy to target breast cancer cells.

  3. Viral Vectors for In Vivo Gene Transfer in Parkinson’s disease: Properties and Clinical Grade Production

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Corinna; Snyder, Richard O.

    2009-01-01

    Because Parkinson’s disease is a progressive degenerative disorder that is mainly confined to the basal ganglia, gene transfer to deliver therapeutic molecules is an attractive treatment avenue. The present review focuses on direct in vivo gene transfer vectors that have been developed to a degree that they have been successfully used in animal model of Parkinson’s disease. Accordingly, the properties of recombinant adenovirus, recombinant adeno-associated virus, herpes simplex virus, and lentivirus are described and contrasted. In order for viral vectors to be developed into clinical grade reagents, they must be manufactured and tested to precise regulatory standards. Indeed, clinical lots of viral vectors can be produced in compliance with current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMPs) regulations using industry accepted manufacturing methodologies, manufacturing controls, and quality systems. The viral vector properties themselves combined with physiological product formulations facilitate long-term storage and direct in vivo administration. PMID:17916354

  4. The Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-based vector: a new and versatile gene delivery platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Frank R.; Gabitzsch, Elizabeth S.; Balint, Joseph P.

    2015-05-01

    Based upon advances in gene sequencing and construction, it is now possible to identify specific genes or sequences thereof for gene delivery applications. Recombinant adenovirus serotype-5 (Ad5) viral vectors have been utilized in the settings of gene therapy, vaccination, and immunotherapy but have encountered clinical challenges because they are recognized as foreign entities to the host. This recognition leads to an immunologic clearance of the vector that contains the inserted gene of interest and prevents effective immunization(s). We have reported on a new Ad5-based viral vector technology that can be utilized as an immunization modality to induce immune responses even in the presence of Ad5 vector immunity. We have reported successful immunization and immunotherapy results to infectious diseases and cancers. This improved recombinant viral platform (Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]) can now be utilized in the development of multiple vaccines and immunotherapies.

  5. Construction of a Helicobacter pylori-Escherichia coli shuttle vector for gene transfer in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W K; An, Y S; Kim, K H; Kim, S H; Song, J Y; Ryu, B D; Choi, Y J; Yoon, Y H; Baik, S C; Rhee, K H; Cho, M J

    1997-01-01

    In this study, a Helicobacter pylori-Escherichia coli shuttle vector was constructed for transferring DNA into H. pylori. The smallest cryptic plasmid (1.2 kb), pHP489, among those harbored by 77 H. pylori isolates was selected as a base replicon for constructing vectors. HindIII-digested pHP489 was ligated with a kanamycin resistance gene [aph(3')-III], which originated from Campylobacter jejuni, to produce the recombinant plasmid pHP489K. pHP489K was efficiently transformed into and stably maintained in H. pylori strains. The shuttle vector pBHP489K (3.6 kb) was constructed by the recombination of pHP489, ColE1, and aph(3')-III sequences. pBHP489K was reciprocally transformed into and maintained in both H. pylori and E. coli. Introduction of the shuttle vector clone DNA (pBHP489K/AB; 6.7 kb), containing the ureA and ureB genes of H. pylori, into urease-negative mutants of H. pylori led to the restoration of their urease activity. The transformants were confirmed to contain the incoming plasmid DNA. pBHP489K satisfied the requirements for an H. pylori-E. coli shuttle vector, implying that it might be a useful vector for investigating pathogenicity and restriction-modification systems of H. pylori. PMID:9406406

  6. A shuttle vector series for precise genetic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gnügge, Robert; Liphardt, Thomas; Rudolf, Fabian

    2016-03-01

    Shuttle vectors allow for an efficient transfer of recombinant DNA into yeast cells and are widely used in fundamental research and biotechnology. While available shuttle vectors are applicable in many experimental settings, their use in quantitative biology is hampered by insufficient copy number control. Moreover, they often have practical constraints, such as limited modularity and few unique restriction sites. We constructed the pRG shuttle vector series, consisting of single- and multi-copy integrative, centromeric and episomal plasmids with marker genes for the selection in all commonly used auxotrophic yeast strains. The vectors feature a modular design and a large number of unique restriction sites, enabling an efficient exchange of every vector part and expansion of the series. Integration into the host genome is achieved using a double-crossover recombination mechanism, resulting in stable single- and multi-copy modifications. As centromeric and episomal plasmids give rise to a heterogeneous cell population, an analysis of their copy number distribution and loss behaviour was performed. Overall, the shuttle vector series supports the efficient cloning of genes and their maintenance in yeast cells with improved copy number control.

  7. Development of Novel Adenoviral Vectors to Overcome Challenges Observed With HAdV-5–based Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Papp, Tibor; Kaján, Győző L; Benkő, Mária; Havenga, Menzo; Lemckert, Angelique; Harrach, Balázs; Baker, Andrew H

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5) have been extensively studied in preclinical models and clinical trials over the past two decades. However, the thorough understanding of the HAdV-5 interaction with human subjects has uncovered major concerns about its product applicability. High vector-associated toxicity and widespread preexisting immunity have been shown to significantly impede the effectiveness of HAdV-5–mediated gene transfer. It is therefore that the in-depth knowledge attained working on HAdV-5 is currently being used to develop alternative vectors. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of data obtained in recent years disqualifying the HAdV-5 vector for systemic gene delivery as well as novel strategies being pursued to overcome the limitations observed with particular emphasis on the ongoing vectorization efforts to obtain vectors based on alternative serotypes. PMID:26478249

  8. Sparse Elimination on Vector Multiprocessors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    vector registers . Several reports have been prepared recently under this effort, and a paper entitled "Task Granularity Studies in a Many-Processor Cray X...measures this effect. To reduce this ratio, it has been shown * possible to assembly-code the X-MP so that accesses are pre-fetched into vector registers

  9. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  10. Vectors on the Basketball Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    An Idea Bank published in the April/May 2009 issue of "The Science Teacher" describes an experiential physics lesson on vectors and vector addition (Brown 2009). Like its football predecessor, the basketball-based investigation presented in this Idea Bank addresses National Science Education Standards Content B, Physical Science, 9-12 (NRC 1996)…

  11. MuLV packaging systems as models for estimating/measuring retrovirus recombination frequency.

    PubMed

    Patience, C; Takeuch, Y; Cosset, F L; Weiss, R A

    2001-01-01

    Interaction of retrovirus vectors and endogenous retroviruses present in packaging cell lines and target cells may result in the formation of recombinant viruses. Using sensitive RT-PCR assays, we have investigated human and murine gene therapy packaging cell lines for the incorporation of endogenous retrovirus transcripts into murine leukaemia virus (MLV) vector particles and whether vector genomes are incorporated into human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) particles. VL30 endogenous retrovirus sequences were packaged in particles produced by the murine AM12 packaging system. For every seven MLV-derived -galactosidase beta-Gal vector genomes present in the particles, one copy of VL30 was also packaged. Although human FLY packaging cells expressed HERV transcripts (HERV-K, HuRT, type C, and RTVL-H), none was detectable in the MLV vector particles released from the cells. Non-specific packaging of the MLV gag-pol expression vector transcripts was detected in the FLY virions at a low level (one in 17,000 sequences). In other experiments, gag proteins produced by HERV-K particles present in human teratocarcinoma cells did not appear to package MLV-based vectors that expressed Gal transcripts. These findings indicate that retrovirus vectors interact with human packaging cells to produce retrovirus particles that are far less contaminated by endogenous viral sequences or other types of extraneous particles than murine packaging cells.

  12. Recombination at the DNA level. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts of papers in the following areas are presented: (1) chromosome mechanics; (2) yeast systems; (3) mammalian homologous recombination; (4) transposons; (5) Mu; (6) plant transposons/T4 recombination; (7) topoisomerase, resolvase, and gyrase; (8) Escherichia coli general recombination; (9) recA; (10) repair; (11) eucaryotic enzymes; (12) integration and excision of bacteriophage; (13) site-specific recombination; and (14) recombination in vitro. (ACR)

  13. Recombination Drives Vertebrate Genome Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kiwoong; Ellegren, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Selective and/or neutral processes may govern variation in DNA content and, ultimately, genome size. The observation in several organisms of a negative correlation between recombination rate and intron size could be compatible with a neutral model in which recombination is mutagenic for length changes. We used whole-genome data on small insertions and deletions within transposable elements from chicken and zebra finch to demonstrate clear links between recombination rate and a number of attributes of reduced DNA content. Recombination rate was negatively correlated with the length of introns, transposable elements, and intergenic spacer and with the rate of short insertions. Importantly, it was positively correlated with gene density, the rate of short deletions, the deletion bias, and the net change in sequence length. All these observations point at a pattern of more condensed genome structure in regions of high recombination. Based on the observed rates of small insertions and deletions and assuming that these rates are representative for the whole genome, we estimate that the genome of the most recent common ancestor of birds and lizards has lost nearly 20% of its DNA content up until the present. Expansion of transposable elements can counteract the effect of deletions in an equilibrium mutation model; however, since the activity of transposable elements has been low in the avian lineage, the deletion bias is likely to have had a significant effect on genome size evolution in dinosaurs and birds, contributing to the maintenance of a small genome. We also demonstrate that most of the observed correlations between recombination rate and genome contraction parameters are seen in the human genome, including for segregating indel polymorphisms. Our data are compatible with a neutral model in which recombination drives vertebrate genome size evolution and gives no direct support for a role of natural selection in this process. PMID:22570634

  14. The effect of the unfolded protein response on the production of recombinant proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David Rhys; Walmsley, Amanda Maree

    2015-02-01

    Recombinant proteins are currently produced through a wide variety of host systems, including yeast, E. coli, insect and mammalian cells. One of the most recent systems developed uses plant cells. While considerable advances have been made in the yields and fidelity of plant-made recombinant proteins, many of these gains have arisen from the development of recombinant factors. This includes elements such as highly effective promoters and untranslated regions, deconstructed viral vectors, silencing inhibitors, and improved DNA delivery techniques. However, unlike other host systems, much of the work on recombinant protein production in plants uses wild-type hosts that have not been modified to facilitate recombinant protein expression. As such, there are still endogenous mechanisms functioning to maintain the health of the cell. The result is that these pathways, such as the unfolded protein response, can actively work to reduce recombinant protein production to maintain the integrity of the cell. This review examines how issues arising from the unfolded protein response have been addressed in other systems, and how these methods may be transferable to plant systems. We further identify several areas of host plant biology that present attractive targets for modification to facilitate recombinant protein production.

  15. Transient Expression of Tetrameric Recombinant Human Butyrylcholinesterase in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Alkanaimsh, Salem; Karuppanan, Kalimuthu; Guerrero, Andrés; Tu, Aye M.; Hashimoto, Bryce; Hwang, Min Sook; Phu, My L.; Arzola, Lucas; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.; Falk, Bryce W.; Nandi, Somen; Rodriguez, Raymond L.; McDonald, Karen A.

    2016-01-01

    To optimize the expression, extraction and purification of plant-derived tetrameric recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase (prBChE), we describe the development and use of plant viral amplicon-based gene expression system; Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) RNA-based overexpression vector (TRBO) to express enzymatically active FLAG-tagged plant made recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (rBChE) in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using transient agroinfiltration. Two gene expression cassettes were designed to express the recombinant protein in either the ER or to the apoplastic compartment. Leaf homogenization was used to isolate ER-retained recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (prBChE-ER) while apoplast-targeted rBChE was isolated by either leaf homogenization (prBChE) or vacuum-extraction of apoplastic wash fluid (prBChE-AWF). rBChE from apoplast wash fluid had a higher specific activity but lower enzyme yield than leaf homogenate. To optimize the isolation and purification of total recombinant protein from leaf homogenates, an acidic extraction buffer was used. The acidic extraction buffer yielded >95% enzymatically active tetrameric rBChE as verified by Coomassie stained and native gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, when compared to human butyrylcholinesterase, the prBChE was found to be similar in terms of tetramerization and enzyme kinetics. The N-linked glycan profile of purified prBChE-ER was found to be mostly high mannose structures while the N-linked glycans on prBChE-AWF were primarily complex. The glycan profile of the prBChE leaf homogenates showed a mixture of high mannose, complex and paucimannose type N-glycans. These findings demonstrate the ability of plants to produce rBChE that is enzymatically active and whose oligomeric state is comparable to mammalian butyrylcholinesterase. The process of plant made rBChE tetramerization and strategies for improving its pharmacokinetics properties are also discussed. PMID:27379103

  16. High yield production of extracellular recombinant levansucrase by Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Korneli, Claudia; Biedendieck, Rebekka; David, Florian; Jahn, Dieter; Wittmann, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a high yield production bioprocess with recombinant Bacillus megaterium for the production of the extracellular enzyme levansucrase (SacB) was developed. For basic optimization of culture parameters and nutrients, a recombinant B. megaterium reporter strain that produced green fluorescent protein under control of a vector-based xylose-inducible promoter was used. It enabled efficient microtiter plate-based screening via fluorescence analysis. A pH value of pH 6, 20 % of dissolved oxygen, 37 °C, and elevated levels of biotin (100 μg L(-1)) were found optimal with regard to high protein yield and reduced overflow metabolism. Among the different compounds tested, fructose and glycerol were identified as the preferred source of carbon. Subsequently, the settings were transferred to a B. megaterium strain recombinantly producing levansucrase SacB based on the plasmid-located xylose-inducible expression system. In shake flask culture under the optimized conditions, the novel strain already secreted the target enzyme in high amounts (14 U mL(-1) on fructose and 17.2 U mL(-1) on glycerol). This was further increased in high cell density fed-batch processes up to 55 U mL(-1), reflecting a levansucrase concentration of 0.52 g L(-1). This is 100-fold more than previous efforts for this enzyme in B. megaterium and more than 10-fold higher than reported values of other extracellular protein produced in this microorganism so far. The recombinant strain could also handle raw glycerol from biodiesel industry which provided the same amount and quality of the recombinant protein and suggests future implementation into existing biorefinery concepts.

  17. In vivo model of adeno-associated virus vector persistence and rescue.

    PubMed Central

    Afione, S A; Conrad, C K; Kearns, W G; Chunduru, S; Adams, R; Reynolds, T C; Guggino, W B; Cutting, G R; Carter, B J; Flotte, T R

    1996-01-01

    Gene therapy vectors based on human DNA viruses could be mobilized or rescued from individuals who are subsequently infected with the corresponding wild-type (wt) helper viruses. This phenomenon has been effectively modeled in vitro with both adenovirus (Ad) and adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors but has not previously been studied in vivo. In the current study, we have developed an in vivo model to study the interactions of a recombinant AAV vector (AAV-CFTR) with wt AAV type 2 (AAV2) and a host range mutant Ad (Ad2HR405) for which monkey cells are permissive (D.E.Brough, S.A.Rice, S.Sell, and D.F.Klessig, J. Virol. 55:206-212, 1985). AAV-CFTR was administered to the respiratory epithelium of the nose or lung of rhesus macaques. Primary cells were harvested from the infusion site at time points up to 3 months after vector administration to confirm vector DNA persistence. Vector DNA was present in episomal form and could be rescued in vitro only by addition of wt AAV2 and Ad. In in vivo rescue studies, vector was administered before or after wt-AAV2 and Ad2HR405 infection, and the shedding of AAV-CFTR was examined. Ad2HR405 and wt-AAV2 infections were established in the nose with concomitant administration. wt-AAV2 replication occurred in the lung when virus was administered directly at a high titer to the lower respiratory tract. AAV-CFTR vector rescue was also observed in the latter setting. Although these studies were performed with small numbers of animals within each group, it appears that AAV-CFTR DNA persists in the primate respiratory tract and that this model may be useful for studies of recombinant AAV vector rescue. PMID:8627804

  18. Construction of a directional T vector for cloning PCR products and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiu-Yi; Liang, Zhi-Cheng; Zhang, Zhi; Zhou, Jiao-Jiao; Liu, Shi-Yu; Tian, Sheng-Li

    2015-05-01

    In order to clone PCR products and express them effectively in Escherichia coli, a directional cloning system was constructed by generating a T vector based on pQE-30Xa. The vector was prepared by inserting an XcmI cassette containing an endonuclease XcmI site, a kanamycin selective marker, a multiple-cloning-site (MCS) region and an opposite endonuclease XcmI site into the vector pQE-30Xa. The T vector pQE-T with single overhanging dT residues at both 3' ends was obtained by digesting with the restriction enzyme XcmI. For directional cloning, a BamHI site was introduced to the ends of the PCR products. A BamHI site was also located on the multiple cloning site of pQE-T. The PCR products were ligated with pQE-T. The directionally inserted recombinants were distinguished by using BamHI to digest the recombinants because there are two BamHI sites located on the both sides of PCR fragment. In order to identify the T-vector functions, the 14-3-3-ZsGreen and hRBP genes were amplified and a BamHI site was added to the ends of the genes to confirm this vector by ligation with pQE-T. Results showed that the 14-3-3-ZsGreen and hRBP were cloned to the vector pQE-T directly and corresponding proteins were successfully produced. It was here demonstrated that this directional vector is capable of gene cloning and is used to manipulate gene expression very easily. The methodology proposed here involves easy incorporation of the construct into other vectors in various hosts.

  19. A virus capsid component mediates virion retention and transmission by its insect vector

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Angel Y. S.; Walker, Gregory P.; Carter, David; Ng, James C. K.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous pathogens of humans, animals, and plants are transmitted by specific arthropod vectors. However, understanding the mechanisms governing these pathogen–vector interactions is hampered, in part, by the lack of easy-to-use analytical tools. We investigated whitefly transmission of Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV) by using a unique immunofluorescent localization approach in which we fed virions or recombinant virus capsid components to whiteflies, followed by feeding them antibodies to the virions or capsid components, respectively. Fluorescent signals, indicating the retention of virions, were localized in the anterior foregut or cibarium of a whitefly vector biotype but not within those of a whitefly nonvector biotype. Retention of virions in these locations strongly corresponded with the whitefly vector transmission of LIYV. When four recombinant LIYV capsid components were individually fed to whitefly vectors, significantly more whiteflies retained the recombinant minor coat protein (CPm). As demonstrated previously and in the present study, whitefly vectors failed to transmit virions preincubated with anti-CPm antibodies but transmitted virions preincubated with antibodies recognizing the major coat protein (CP). Correspondingly, the number of insects that specifically retained virions preincubated with anti-CPm antibodies were significantly reduced compared with those that specifically retained virions preincubated with anti-CP antibodies. Notably, a transmission-defective CPm mutant was deficient in specific virion retention, whereas the CPm-restored virus showed WT levels of specific virion retention and transmission. These data provide strong evidence that transmission of LIYV is determined by a CPm-mediated virion retention mechanism in the anterior foregut or cibarium of whitefly vectors. PMID:21930903

  20. DNA recombination. Recombination initiation maps of individual human genomes.

    PubMed

    Pratto, Florencia; Brick, Kevin; Khil, Pavel; Smagulova, Fatima; Petukhova, Galina V; Camerini-Otero, R Daniel

    2014-11-14

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are introduced in meiosis to initiate recombination and generate crossovers, the reciprocal exchanges of genetic material between parental chromosomes. Here, we present high-resolution maps of meiotic DSBs in individual human genomes. Comparing DSB maps between individuals shows that along with DNA binding by PRDM9, additional factors may dictate the efficiency of DSB formation. We find evidence for both GC-biased gene conversion and mutagenesis around meiotic DSB hotspots, while frequent colocalization of DSB hotspots with chromosome rearrangement breakpoints implicates the aberrant repair of meiotic DSBs in genomic disorders. Furthermore, our data indicate that DSB frequency is a major determinant of crossover rate. These maps provide new insights into the regulation of meiotic recombination and the impact of meiotic recombination on genome function.

  1. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8(+) T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides 'self-adjuvanting' activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches.

  2. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8+ T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides ‘self-adjuvanting’ activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches. PMID:25876176

  3. Viral vectors for targeting the canine retina: a review.

    PubMed

    Petersen-Jones, Simon M

    2012-09-01

    Clinical trials are currently underway using gene therapy to treat retinal disease such as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Viral vectors that have been utilized to target retinal cells include adenoviruses, lentiviruses, and recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV). Of the three classes, rAAV vectors show the greatest promise for retinal gene therapy. Recent developments in virus technology such as the development of hybrid and capsid mutant rAAV vectors mean that specific retinal cells can be targeted and faster stronger transgene expression is now possible compared to that achieved with the first generation of vectors. Gene therapy trials in dogs have been very important in the development of therapy for RPE65 LCA which is currently in phase I/II clinical trials in humans. Recent successes in using gene therapy to treat canine achromatopsia, X-linked progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and the more severe rapid degenerations such as rod-cone dysplasia type 3 may lead also to the translation to human clinical trials. Dogs have played and continue to play an important role as animal models for proof-of-concept studies of retinal gene therapy. As modifications and improvements in gene therapy protocols are made from experience gathered from human clinical trials perhaps gene therapy for the treatment of canine clinical patients will become available to veterinary ophthalmologists.

  4. A tobamovirus expression vector for agroinfection of legumes and Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zun; Kearney, Christopher M

    2010-06-01

    The highest recombinant protein expression levels in plants have been achieved using tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) vectors via agroinoculation of the tobacco, Nicotiana benthamiana. These vectors have been utilized for pharmaceutical protein production and also can serve as rapid gene expression screens for proteonomics. We have constructed a similar vector based on the legume-infecting tobamovirus, sunn hemp mosaic virus (SHMV), by deleting the coat protein gene (SHMV eliminate coat protein gene or SHEC). SHEC/GFP co-agroinoculated with a 35S/p19 binary yielded 600 microg GFP/gfw (25% TSP) in N. benthamiana. In the absence of p19, SHEC/GFP expression was nearly eliminated. SHEC also yielded strong GUS production in agroinoculated Medicago trunculata, Pinto bean, cowpea, pea and lentil even without the aid of systemic infection. A full-length version (SHAC, SHMV alternate coat protein) was created by adding to SHEC the coat protein subgenomic promoter and ORF from the tobamovirus, tobacco mild green mottle virus (TMGMV). SHAC induced a slowly developing, symptomless infection of N. benthamiana and may be of use as a virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) vector.

  5. Tsetse flies: Genetics, evolution, and role as vectors

    PubMed Central

    Krafsur, E. S.

    2009-01-01

    Tsetse flies (Diptera: Glossinidae) are an ancient taxon of one genus, Glossina, and limited species diversity. All are exclusively haematophagous and confined to sub-Saharan Africa. The Glossina are the principal vectors of African trypanosomes Trypanosoma sp (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae) and as such, are of great medical and economic importance. Clearly tsetse flies and trypanosomes are coadapted and evolutionary interactions between them are manifest. Numerous clonally reproducing strains of Trypanosoma sp exist and their genetic diversities and spatial distributions are inadequately known. Here I review the breeding structures of the principle trypanosome vectors, G. morsitans s.l., G. pallidipes, G. palpalis s.l. and G. fuscipes fuscipes. All show highly structured populations among which there is surprisingly little detectable gene flow. Rather less is known of the breeding structure of T. brucei sensu lato vis à vis their vector tsetse flies but many genetically differentiated strains exist in nature. Genetic recombination in Trypanosoma via meiosis has recently been demonstrated in the laboratory thereby furnishing a mechanism of strain differentiation in addition to that of simple mutation. Spatially and genetically representative sampling of both trypanosome species and strains and their Glossina vectors is a major barrier to a comprehensive understanding of their mutual relationships. PMID:18992846

  6. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    DOEpatents

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  7. A new rabies vaccine based on a recombinant ORF virus (parapoxvirus) expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Amann, Ralf; Rohde, Jörg; Wulle, Ulrich; Conlee, Douglas; Raue, Rudiger; Martinon, Olivier; Rziha, Hanns-Joachim

    2013-02-01

    The present study describes the generation of a new Orf virus (ORFV) recombinant, D1701-V-RabG, expressing the rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein that is correctly presented on the surface of infected cells without the need of replication or production of infectious recombinant virus. One single immunization with recombinant ORFV can stimulate high RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody (VNA) titers in mice, cats, and dogs, representing all nonpermissive hosts for the ORFV vector. The protective immune response against severe lethal challenge infection was analyzed in detail in mice using different dosages, numbers, and routes for immunization with the ORFV recombinant. Long-term levels of VNA could be elicited that remained greater than 0.5 IU per ml serum, indicative for the protective status. Single applications of higher doses (10(7) PFU) can be sufficient to confer complete protection against intracranial (i.c.) challenge, whereas booster immunization was needed for protection by the application of lower dosages. Anamnestic immune responses were achieved by each of the seven tested routes of inoculation, including oral application. Finally, in vivo antibody-mediated depletion of CD4-positive and/or CD8-posititve T cell subpopulations during immunization and/or challenge infection attested the importance of CD4 T cells for the induction of protective immunity by D1701-V-RabG. This report demonstrates another example of the potential of the ORFV vector and also indicates the capability of the new recombinant for vaccination of animals.

  8. A New Rabies Vaccine Based on a Recombinant Orf Virus (Parapoxvirus) Expressing the Rabies Virus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Ralf; Rohde, Jörg; Wulle, Ulrich; Conlee, Douglas; Raue, Rudiger; Martinon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes the generation of a new Orf virus (ORFV) recombinant, D1701-V-RabG, expressing the rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein that is correctly presented on the surface of infected cells without the need of replication or production of infectious recombinant virus. One single immunization with recombinant ORFV can stimulate high RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody (VNA) titers in mice, cats, and dogs, representing all nonpermissive hosts for the ORFV vector. The protective immune response against severe lethal challenge infection was analyzed in detail in mice using different dosages, numbers, and routes for immunization with the ORFV recombinant. Long-term levels of VNA could be elicited that remained greater than 0.5 IU per ml serum, indicative for the protective status. Single applications of higher doses (107 PFU) can be sufficient to confer complete protection against intracranial (i.c.) challenge, whereas booster immunization was needed for protection by the application of lower dosages. Anamnestic immune responses were achieved by each of the seven tested routes of inoculation, including oral application. Finally, in vivo antibody-mediated depletion of CD4-positive and/or CD8-posititve T cell subpopulations during immunization and/or challenge infection attested the importance of CD4 T cells for the induction of protective immunity by D1701-V-RabG. This report demonstrates another example of the potential of the ORFV vector and also indicates the capability of the new recombinant for vaccination of animals. PMID:23175365

  9. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  10. [An effective scheme to produce recombinant uracil-DNA glycosylase of Escherichia coli for PCR diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Dmitrochenko, A E; Turiianskaia, O M; Gilep, A A; Usanov, S A; Iantsevich, A V

    2014-01-01

    An effective scheme has been developed to produce recombinant uracil-DNA glycosylase of Escherichia coli K12 intended to be used for PCR diagnostics, making it possible to achieve a high yield of the end product using a two-stage purification. The gene encoding this enzyme was cloned into the pCWori vector within the same reading frame with six residues of histidine in the C-erminal sequence. Using this vector and the E. coli DH5alpha, a host-vector expression system has been developed and conditions for protein synthesis have been optimized. To purify the protein, metal affinity chromatography with further dialysis was used to remove imidazole. The enzyme yield was no less than 60 mg of the end protein per 1 L of the culture medium. The concordance between amino acid sequences of the recombinant and native enzymes was proved by peptide mass fingerprinting and mass spectrometry. A rapid test to determine the activity of the enzyme preparation was suggested. It was found that the activity of 1.0 mg of the recombinant protein is no less than 3 x 10(3) units. The recombinant enzyme was most stable at pH 8.0 and an ionic strength of the solution equal to 200 mM; it lost its activity completely for 10 min at 60 degrees C. Storage during 1 h at 20 degrees C resulted in the loss of no more than 30% of activity. In the enzyme preparation, the activity of DNase was absent. The free energy of the unfolding of the protein globule of the recombinant uracil-DNA glycosylase is 23.1 +/- 0.2 kJ/mol. The data obtained indicate that the recombinant enzyme may be recommended for use in PCR diagnostics to prevent the appearance of false positive results caused by pollution of the reaction mixture by products of the preceding reactions.

  11. Newcastle Disease Virus as a Vaccine Vector for Development of Human and Veterinary Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Samal, Siba K.

    2016-01-01

    Viral vaccine vectors have shown to be effective in inducing a robust immune response against the vaccine antigen. Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian paramyxovirus, is a promising vaccine vector against human and veterinary pathogens. Avirulent NDV strains LaSota and B1 have long track records of safety and efficacy. Therefore, use of these strains as vaccine vectors is highly safe in avian and non-avian species. NDV replicates efficiently in the respiratory track of the host and induces strong local and systemic immune responses against the foreign antigen. As a vaccine vector, NDV can accommodate foreign sequences with a good degree of stability and as a RNA virus, there is limited possibility for recombination with host cell DNA. Using NDV as a vaccine vector in humans offers several advantages over other viral vaccine vectors. NDV is safe in humans due to host range restriction and there is no pre-existing antibody to NDV in the human population. NDV is antigenically distinct from common human pathogens. NDV replicates to high titer in a cell line acceptable for human vaccine development. Therefore, NDV is an attractive vaccine vector for human pathogens for which vaccines are currently not available. NDV is also an attractive vaccine vector for animal pathogens. PMID:27384578

  12. A series of conditional shuttle vectors for targeted genomic integration in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-Ching; Patel, Michael T.; Gartenberg, Marc R.

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to repair exposed DNA ends by homologous recombination has long been used by experimentalists to assemble plasmids from DNA fragments in vivo. While this approach works well for engineering extrachromosomal vectors, it is not well suited to the generation, recovery and reuse of integrative vectors. Here, we describe the creation of a series of conditional centromeric shuttle vectors, termed pXR vectors, that can be used for both plasmid assembly in vivo and targeted genomic integration. The defining feature of pXR vectors is that the DNA segment bearing the centromere and origin of replication, termed CEN/ARS, is flanked by a pair of loxP sites. Passaging the vectors through bacteria that express Cre recombinase reduces the loxP-CEN/ARS-loxP module to a single loxP site, thereby eliminating the ability to replicate autonomously in yeast. Each vector also contains a selectable marker gene, as well as a fragment of the HO locus, which permits targeted integration at a neutral genomic site. The pXR vectors provide a convenient and robust method to assemble DNAs for targeted genomic modifications. PMID:25736914

  13. Newcastle Disease Virus as a Vaccine Vector for Development of Human and Veterinary Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Samal, Siba K

    2016-07-04

    Viral vaccine vectors have shown to be effective in inducing a robust immune response against the vaccine antigen. Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian paramyxovirus, is a promising vaccine vector against human and veterinary pathogens. Avirulent NDV strains LaSota and B1 have long track records of safety and efficacy. Therefore, use of these strains as vaccine vectors is highly safe in avian and non-avian species. NDV replicates efficiently in the respiratory track of the host and induces strong local and systemic immune responses against the foreign antigen. As a vaccine vector, NDV can accommodate foreign sequences with a good degree of stability and as a RNA virus, there is limited possibility for recombination with host cell DNA. Using NDV as a vaccine vector in humans offers several advantages over other viral vaccine vectors. NDV is safe in humans due to host range restriction and there is no pre-existing antibody to NDV in the human population. NDV is antigenically distinct from common human pathogens. NDV replicates to high titer in a cell line acceptable for human vaccine development. Therefore, NDV is an attractive vaccine vector for human pathogens for which vaccines are currently not available. NDV is also an attractive vaccine vector for animal pathogens.

  14. A series of conditional shuttle vectors for targeted genomic integration in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Ching; Patel, Michael T; Gartenberg, Marc R

    2015-05-01

    The capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to repair exposed DNA ends by homologous recombination has long been used by experimentalists to assemble plasmids from DNA fragments in vivo. While this approach works well for engineering extrachromosomal vectors, it is not well suited to the generation, recovery and reuse of integrative vectors. Here, we describe the creation of a series of conditional centromeric shuttle vectors, termed pXR vectors, that can be used for both plasmid assembly in vivo and targeted genomic integration. The defining feature of pXR vectors is that the DNA segment bearing the centromere and origin of replication, termed CEN/ARS, is flanked by a pair of loxP sites. Passaging the vectors through bacteria that express Cre recombinase reduces the loxP-CEN/ARS-loxP module to a single loxP site, thereby eliminating the ability to replicate autonomously in yeast. Each vector also contains a selectable marker gene, as well as a fragment of the HO locus, which permits targeted integration at a neutral genomic site. The pXR vectors provide a convenient and robust method to assemble DNAs for targeted genomic modifications.

  15. The Dissociative Recombination of OH(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical quantum chemical calculations of the cross sections and rates for the dissociative recombination of the upsilon = 0 level of the ground state of OH(+) show that recombination occurs primarily along the 2 (2)Pi diabatic route. The products are 0((1)D) and a hot H atom with 6.1 eV kinetic energy. The coupling to the resonances is very small and the indirect recombination mechanism plays only a minor role. The recommended value for the rate coefficient is (6.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(exp -9)x (T(e)/1300)(exp -0.48) cu.cm/s for 10 less than T(e) less than 1000 K.

  16. DNA recombination: the replication connection.

    PubMed

    Haber, J E

    1999-07-01

    Chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) arise after exposure to ionizing radiation or enzymatic cleavage, but especially during the process of DNA replication itself. Homologous recombination plays a critical role in repair of such DSBs. There has been significant progress in our understanding of two processes that occur in DSB repair: gene conversion and recombination-dependent DNA replication. Recent evidence suggests that gene conversion and break-induced replication are related processes that both begin with the establishment of a replication fork in which both leading- and lagging-strand synthesis occur. There has also been much progress in characterization of the biochemical roles of recombination proteins that are highly conserved from yeast to humans.

  17. Current Drive in Recombining Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2012-05-15

    The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

  18. Chikungunya Virus–Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Lark L.; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Weaver, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed. PMID:25421891

  19. Vector fields in multidimensional cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierovich, Boris E.

    2011-09-01

    Vector fields in the expanding Universe are considered within the multidimensional theory of general relativity. Vector fields in general relativity form a three-parametric variety. Our consideration includes the fields with a nonzero covariant divergence. Depending on the relations between the particular parameters and the symmetry of a problem, the vector fields can be longitudinal and/or transverse, ultrarelativistic (i.e. massless) or nonrelativistic (massive), and so on. The longitudinal and transverse vector fields are considered separately in detail in the background of the de Sitter cosmological metric. In most cases the field equations reduce to Bessel equations, and their temporal evolution is analyzed analytically. The energy-momentum tensor of the most simple zero-mass longitudinal vector fields enters the Einstein equations as an additive to the cosmological constant. In this case the de Sitter metric is the exact solution of the Einstein equations. Hence, the most simple zero-mass longitudinal vector field pretends to be an adequate tool for macroscopic description of dark energy as a source of the expansion of the Universe at a constant rate. The zero-mass vector field does not vanish in the process of expansion. On the contrary, massive fields vanish with time. Though their amplitude is falling down, the massive fields make the expansion accelerated.

  20. An overview of live attenuated recombinant pseudorabies viruses for use as novel vaccines.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bo; Zarlenga, Dante S; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a double-stranded, DNA-based swine virus with a genome approximating 150 kb in size. PRV has many nonessential genes which can be replaced with genes encoding heterologous antigens but without deleterious effects on virus propagation. Recombinant PRVs expressing both native and foreign antigens are able to stimulate immune responses. In this paper, we review the current status of live attenuated recombinant PRVs and live PRV-based vector vaccines with potential for controlling viral infections in animals.

  1. Attenuated vaccinia virus-circumsporozoite protein recombinants confer protection against rodent malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Lanar, D E; Tine, J A; de Taisne, C; Seguin, M C; Cox, W I; Winslow, J P; Ware, L A; Kauffman, E B; Gordon, D; Ballou, W R; Paoletti, E; Sadoff, J C

    1996-01-01

    NYVAC-based vaccinia virus recombinants expressing the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) were evaluated in the Plasmodium berghei rodent malaria model system. Immunization of mice with a NYVAC-based CSP recombinant elicited a high level of protection (60 to 100%). Protection did not correlate with CS repeat-specific antibody responses and was abrogated by in vivo CD8+ T-cell depletion. Protection was not enhanced by modification of the subcellular localization of CSP. These results suggest the potential of poxvirus-based vectors for the development of vaccine candidates for human malaria. PMID:8613376

  2. The mouse Eb meiotic recombination hotspot contains a tissue-specific transcriptional enhancer.

    PubMed

    Ling, X; Shenkar, R; Sakai, D; Arnheim, N

    1993-01-01

    A meiotic recombination hotspot exists within the second intron of the mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene, Eb. In the present study, a small fragment from the intron which contains two potential transcriptional regulatory elements was cloned into an expression vector and its effect on transcription was tested. This fragment was found to contain tissue-specific transcriptional enhancer activity. An octamer-like sequence and a B motif may contribute to this enhancer activity. Similar regulatory sequences with the same orientation and distance from one another are found in another mouse MHC recombination hotspot.

  3. Refined human artificial chromosome vectors for gene therapy and animal transgenesis.

    PubMed

    Kazuki, Y; Hoshiya, H; Takiguchi, M; Abe, S; Iida, Y; Osaki, M; Katoh, M; Hiratsuka, M; Shirayoshi, Y; Hiramatsu, K; Ueno, E; Kajitani, N; Yoshino, T; Kazuki, K; Ishihara, C; Takehara, S; Tsuji, S; Ejima, F; Toyoda, A; Sakaki, Y; Larionov, V; Kouprina, N; Oshimura, M

    2011-04-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) have several advantages as gene therapy vectors, including stable episomal maintenance, and the ability to carry large gene inserts. We previously developed HAC vectors from the normal human chromosomes using a chromosome engineering technique. However, endogenous genes were remained in these HACs, limiting their therapeutic applications. In this study, we refined a HAC vector without endogenous genes from human chromosome 21 in homologous recombination-proficient chicken DT40 cells. The HAC was physically characterized using a transformation-associated recombination (TAR) cloning strategy followed by sequencing of TAR-bacterial artificial chromosome clones. No endogenous genes were remained in the HAC. We demonstrated that any desired gene can be cloned into the HAC using the Cre-loxP system in Chinese hamster ovary cells, or a homologous recombination system in DT40 cells. The HAC can be efficiently transferred to other type of cells including mouse ES cells via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. The transferred HAC was stably maintained in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, tumor cells containing a HAC carrying the suicide gene, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK), were selectively killed by ganciclovir in vitro and in vivo. Thus, this novel HAC vector may be useful not only for gene and cell therapy, but also for animal transgenesis.

  4. Variation in Recombination Rate: Adaptive or Not?

    PubMed

    Ritz, Kathryn R; Noor, Mohamed A F; Singh, Nadia D

    2017-03-27

    Rates of meiotic recombination are widely variable both within and among species. However, the functional significance of this variation remains largely unknown. Is the observed within-species variation in recombination rate adaptive? Recent work has revealed new insight into the scale and scope of population-level variation in recombination rate. These data indicate that the magnitude of within-population variation in recombination is similar among taxa. The apparent similarity of the variance in recombination rate among individuals between distantly related species suggests that the relative costs and benefits of recombination that establish the upper and lower bounds may be similar across species. Here we review the current data on intraspecific variation in recombination rate and discuss the molecular and evolutionary costs and benefits of recombination frequency. We place this variation in the context of adaptation and highlight the need for more empirical studies focused on the adaptive value of variation in recombination rate.

  5. Cloning and expression of Clostridium perfringens type D vaccine strain epsilon toxin gene in E. coli as a recombinant vaccine candidate

    PubMed Central

    Aziminia, Parastoo; Pilehchian-Langroudi, Reza; Esmaeilnia, Kasra

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Clostridium perfringens, a Gram-positive obligate anaerobic bacterium, is able to form resistant spores which are widely distributed in the environment. C. perfringens is subdivided into five types A to E based on its four major alpha, beta, epsilon and iota toxins. The aim of the present study was cloning and expression of C. perfringens type D vaccine strain epsilon toxin gene. Materials and Methods: Genomic DNA was extracted and the epsilon toxin gene was amplified using Pfu DNA polymerase. The PCR product was cloned into pJET1.2/blunt cloning vector. The recombinant vector (pJETε) was sequenced using universal primers. At the next step epsilon toxin gene was subcloned into pET22b(+) expression vector and transformed into E. coli Rosetta (DE3) host strain. Results: The recombinant protein has been expressed in E. coli Rosetta (DE3) cells after subcloning of C. perfringens etx gene (1008 bp) into the expression vector. Conclusion: We concluded that E. coli Rosetta strain was suitable for the expression of recombinant C. perfringens epsilon toxin protein from pET22ε expression vector. This recombinant cell can be used for further research on recombinant vaccine development. PMID:28210460

  6. Selenium incorporation using recombinant techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Walden, Helen

    2010-04-01

    An overview of techniques for recombinant incorporation of selenium and subsequent purification and crystallization of the resulting labelled protein. Using selenomethionine to phase macromolecular structures is common practice in structure determination, along with the use of selenocysteine. Selenium is consequently the most commonly used heavy atom for MAD. In addition to the well established recombinant techniques for the incorporation of selenium in prokaryal expression systems, there have been recent advances in selenium labelling in eukaryal expression, which will be discussed. Tips and things to consider for the purification and crystallization of seleno-labelled proteins are also included.

  7. Insecticide resistance and vector control.

    PubMed Central

    Brogdon, W. G.; McAllister, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    Insecticide resistance has been a problem in all insect groups that serve as vectors of emerging diseases. Although mechanisms by which insecticides become less effective are similar across all vector taxa, each resistance problem is potentially unique and may involve a complex pattern of resistance foci. The main defense against resistance is close surveillance of the susceptibility of vector populations. We describe the mechanisms of insecticide resistance, as well as specific instances of resistance emergence worldwide, and discuss prospects for resistance management and priorities for detection and surveillance. PMID:9866736

  8. Vector statistics of LANDSAT imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayroe, R. R., Jr.; Underwood, D.

    1977-01-01

    A digitized multispectral image, such as LANDSAT data, is composed of numerous four dimensional vectors, which quantitatively describe the ground scene from which the data are acquired. The statistics of unique vectors that occur in LANDSAT imagery are studied to determine if that information can provide some guidance on reducing image processing costs. A second purpose of this report is to investigate how the vector statistics are changed by various types of image processing techniques and determine if that information can be useful in choosing one processing approach over another.

  9. Different expression systems for production of recombinant proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zihe; Tyo, Keith E J; Martínez, José L; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-05-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become an attractive cell factory for production of commodity and speciality chemicals and proteins, such as industrial enzymes and pharmaceutical proteins. Here we evaluate most important expression factors for recombinant protein secretion: we chose two different proteins (insulin precursor (IP) and α-amylase), two different expression vectors (POTud plasmid and CPOTud plasmid) and two kinds of leader sequences (the glycosylated alpha factor leader and a synthetic leader with no glycosylation sites). We used IP and α-amylase as