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Sample records for creb regulate basal

  1. Mechanism of CREB recognition and coactivation by the CREB-regulated transcriptional coactivator CRTC2.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qianyi; Viste, Kristin; Urday-Zaa, Janny Concha; Senthil Kumar, Ganesan; Tsai, Wen-Wei; Talai, Afsaneh; Mayo, Kelly E; Montminy, Marc; Radhakrishnan, Ishwar

    2012-12-18

    Basic leucine zipper (bZip) transcription factors regulate cellular gene expression in response to a variety of extracellular signals and nutrient cues. Although the bZip domain is widely known to play significant roles in DNA binding and dimerization, recent studies point to an additional role for this motif in the recruitment of the transcriptional apparatus. For example, the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcriptional coactivator (CRTC) family of transcriptional coactivators has been proposed to promote the expression of calcium and cAMP responsive genes, by binding to the CREB bZip in response to extracellular signals. Here we show that the CREB-binding domain (CBD) of CRTC2 folds into a single isolated 28-residue helix that seems to be critical for its interaction with the CREB bZip. The interaction is of micromolar affinity on palindromic and variant half-site cAMP response elements (CREs). The CBD and CREB assemble on the CRE with 2:2:1 stoichiometry, consistent with the presence of one CRTC binding site on each CREB monomer. Indeed, the CBD helix and the solvent-exposed residues in the dimeric CREB bZip coiled-coil form an extended protein-protein interface. Because mutation of relevant bZip residues in this interface disrupts the CRTC interaction without affecting DNA binding, our results illustrate that distinct DNA binding and transactivation functions are encoded within the structural constraints of a canonical bZip domain.

  2. Regulation of CREB by moderate hypoxia in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Rust, R T; Hsieh, T; Millhorn, D E

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms by which excitable cells adapt and respond to changes in O2 levels remain largely unknown. We have investigated the effect of hypoxia on the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) transcription factor. PC12 cells were exposed to moderate levels of hypoxia (5% O2) for various times between 20 min and 6 hr. We found that hypoxia rapidly and persistently induced ser133 phosphorylation of CREB. This effect was more robust than that produced by exposing PC12 cells to either forskolin, KCl, or NGF. This effect was not due to activation of any of the previously known CREB kinases, including PKA, CaMK, PKC, p70s6k, or MAPKAP kinase-2. Thus, hypoxia may induce activation of a novel CREB kinase. To test whether phosphorylation of CREB was associated with an activation of CRE-dependent gene expression, cells were transfected with wild type and mutated regions of the 5'-flanking region of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene fused to a CAT reporter gene. Mutation of the CRE element in a TH reporter gene reduced, but did not abolish, the effects of hypoxia on TH gene expression. However, hypoxia did not induce transactivation of a GAL4-luciferase reporter by a GAL4-CREB fusion protein. Thus, the mechanism by which hypoxia regulates CREB is distinct, and more complex, than that induced by forskolin, depolarization, or nerve growth factor. PMID:10849656

  3. Basal variability in CREB phosphorylation predicts trait-like differences in amygdala-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Cowansage, Kiriana K; Bush, David E A; Josselyn, Sheena A; Klann, Eric; Ledoux, Joseph E

    2013-10-01

    Much of what is known about the neurobiology of learning and memory comes from studies of the average behavior. In contrast, intersubject differences that emerge within groups are difficult to study systematically and are often excluded from scientific discussion. Nevertheless, population-wide variability is a virtually universal feature of both complex traits, such as intelligence, and hardwired responses, such as defensive behaviors. Here, we use outbred rats to investigate if cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor that has long been known in experimental settings to be crucial for associative plasticity, participates in natural memory phenotypes. Using a combination of behavioral, biochemical, and viral techniques, we show that a subset of rats with trait-like deficits in aversive memory have basally reduced CREB activity in the lateral amygdala but can be induced to perform at average levels by directly or indirectly enhancing pretraining CREB phosphorylation. These data suggest that endogenous CREB activity in the amygdala may set a critical threshold for plasticity during memory formation. PMID:24062441

  4. CREB activity in dopamine D1 receptor expressing neurons regulates cocaine-induced behavioral effects

    PubMed Central

    Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rieker, Claus; Cannella, Nazzareno; Parlato, Rosanna; Golda, Slawomir; Piechota, Marcin; Korostynski, Michal; Engblom, David; Przewlocki, Ryszard; Schütz, Günther; Spanagel, Rainer; Parkitna, Jan R.

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that striatal cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) regulates sensitivity to psychostimulants. To test the cell-specificity of this hypothesis we examined the effects of a dominant-negative CREB protein variant expressed in dopamine receptor D1 (D1R) neurons on cocaine-induced behaviors. A transgenic mouse strain was generated by pronuclear injection of a BAC-derived transgene harboring the A-CREB sequence under the control of the D1R gene promoter. Compared to wild-type, drug-naïve mutants showed moderate alterations in gene expression, especially a reduction in basal levels of activity-regulated transcripts such as Arc and Egr2. The behavioral responses to cocaine were elevated in mutant mice. Locomotor activity after acute treatment, psychomotor sensitization after intermittent drug injections and the conditioned locomotion after saline treatment were increased compared to wild-type littermates. Transgenic mice had significantly higher cocaine conditioned place preference, displayed normal extinction of the conditioned preference, but showed an augmented cocaine-seeking response following priming-induced reinstatement. This enhanced cocaine-seeking response was associated with increased levels of activity-regulated transcripts and prodynorphin. The primary reinforcing effects of cocaine were not altered in the mutant mice as they did not differ from wild-type in cocaine self-administration under a fixed ratio schedule at the training dose. Collectively, our data indicate that expression of a dominant-negative CREB variant exclusively in neurons expressing D1R is sufficient to recapitulate the previously reported behavioral phenotypes associated with virally expressed dominant-negative CREB. PMID:24966820

  5. CREB activity in dopamine D1 receptor expressing neurons regulates cocaine-induced behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rieker, Claus; Cannella, Nazzareno; Parlato, Rosanna; Golda, Slawomir; Piechota, Marcin; Korostynski, Michal; Engblom, David; Przewlocki, Ryszard; Schütz, Günther; Spanagel, Rainer; Parkitna, Jan R

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that striatal cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) regulates sensitivity to psychostimulants. To test the cell-specificity of this hypothesis we examined the effects of a dominant-negative CREB protein variant expressed in dopamine receptor D1 (D1R) neurons on cocaine-induced behaviors. A transgenic mouse strain was generated by pronuclear injection of a BAC-derived transgene harboring the A-CREB sequence under the control of the D1R gene promoter. Compared to wild-type, drug-naïve mutants showed moderate alterations in gene expression, especially a reduction in basal levels of activity-regulated transcripts such as Arc and Egr2. The behavioral responses to cocaine were elevated in mutant mice. Locomotor activity after acute treatment, psychomotor sensitization after intermittent drug injections and the conditioned locomotion after saline treatment were increased compared to wild-type littermates. Transgenic mice had significantly higher cocaine conditioned place preference, displayed normal extinction of the conditioned preference, but showed an augmented cocaine-seeking response following priming-induced reinstatement. This enhanced cocaine-seeking response was associated with increased levels of activity-regulated transcripts and prodynorphin. The primary reinforcing effects of cocaine were not altered in the mutant mice as they did not differ from wild-type in cocaine self-administration under a fixed ratio schedule at the training dose. Collectively, our data indicate that expression of a dominant-negative CREB variant exclusively in neurons expressing D1R is sufficient to recapitulate the previously reported behavioral phenotypes associated with virally expressed dominant-negative CREB. PMID:24966820

  6. GRM7 Regulates Embryonic Neurogenesis via CREB and YAP

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wenlong; Liu, YanLi; Jiao, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    Summary Metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 (GRM7) has recently been identified to be associated with brain developmental defects, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism. However, the function of GRM7 during brain development remains largely unknown. Here, we used gain- and loss-of-function strategies to investigate the role of GRM7 in early cortical development. We demonstrate that Grm7 knockdown increases neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation, decreases terminal mitosis and neuronal differentiation, and leads to abnormal neuronal morphology. GRM7 regulates the phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and the expression of Yes-associated protein (YAP) by directly interacting with CaM, which subsequently regulates the expression of CyclinD1 and ultimately affects early cortical development. These defects in neurogenesis are ameliorated by Grm7 overexpression, Creb knockdown, or Yap knockdown. Thus, our findings indicate that GRM7 signaling via CREB and YAP is necessary for neurogenesis in the brain. PMID:25921811

  7. CREB regulates memory allocation in the insular cortex.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yoshitake; Shobe, Justin L; Zhou, Miou; Huang, Shan; Shuman, Tristan; Cai, Denise J; Golshani, Peyman; Kamata, Masakazu; Silva, Alcino J

    2014-12-01

    The molecular and cellular mechanisms of memory storage have attracted a great deal of attention. By comparison, little is known about memory allocation, the process that determines which specific neurons in a neural network will store a given memory. Previous studies demonstrated that memory allocation is not random in the amygdala; these studies showed that amygdala neurons with higher levels of the cyclic-AMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) are more likely to be recruited into encoding and storing fear memory. To determine whether specific mechanisms also regulate memory allocation in other brain regions and whether CREB also has a role in this process, we studied insular cortical memory representations for conditioned taste aversion (CTA). In this task, an animal learns to associate a taste (conditioned stimulus [CS]) with the experience of malaise (such as that induced by LiCl; unconditioned stimulus [US]). The insular cortex is required for CTA memory formation and retrieval. CTA learning activates a subpopulation of neurons in this structure, and the insular cortex and the basolateral amygdala (BLA) interact during CTA formation. Here, we used a combination of approaches, including viral vector transfections of insular cortex, arc fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADD) system, to show that CREB levels determine which insular cortical neurons go on to encode a given conditioned taste memory.

  8. Dynamic O-GlcNAc modification regulates CREB-mediated gene expression and memory formation.

    PubMed

    Rexach, Jessica E; Clark, Peter M; Mason, Daniel E; Neve, Rachael L; Peters, Eric C; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C

    2012-01-22

    The transcription factor cyclic AMP-response element binding protein (CREB) is a key regulator of many neuronal processes, including brain development, circadian rhythm and long-term memory. Studies of CREB have focused on its phosphorylation, although the diversity of CREB functions in the brain suggests additional forms of regulation. Here we expand on a chemoenzymatic strategy for quantifying glycosylation stoichiometries to characterize the functional roles of CREB glycosylation in neurons. We show that CREB is dynamically modified with an O-linked β-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine sugar in response to neuronal activity and that glycosylation represses CREB-dependent transcription by impairing its association with CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC; also known as transducer of regulated CREB activity). Blocking glycosylation of CREB alters cellular function and behavioral plasticity, enhancing both axonal and dendritic growth and long-term memory consolidation. Our findings demonstrate a new role for O-glycosylation in memory formation and provide a mechanistic understanding of how glycosylation contributes to critical neuronal functions. Moreover, we identify a previously unknown mechanism for the regulation of activity-dependent gene expression, neural development and memory.

  9. Identification of Creb3l4 as an essential negative regulator of adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, T-H; Jo, S-H; Choi, H; Park, J-M; Kim, M-Y; Nojima, H; Kim, J-W; Ahn, Y-H

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the molecular networks that regulate adipogenesis is crucial for combating obesity. However, the identity and molecular actions of negative regulators that regulate the early development of adipocytes remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of CREB3L4, a member of the CREB3-like family, in the regulation of adiposity. Constitutive overexpression of CREB3L4 resulted in the inhibition of adipocyte differentiation, whereas knockdown of Creb3l4 expression caused differentiation of preadipocytes into mature adipocytes, bypassing the mitotic clonal expansion step. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, Creb3l4 knockdown resulted in increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ2) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBPα), either by increasing the protein stability of C/EBPβ or by decreasing the expression of GATA3, a negative regulator of PPARγ2 expression. Consequently, increased PPARγ2 and C/EBPα levels induced adipocyte differentiation, even in the presence of minimal hormonal inducer. Thus, it can be speculated that CREB3L4 has a role as gatekeeper, inhibiting adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Moreover, adipocytes of Creb3l4-knockout mice showed hyperplasia caused by increased adipogenesis, and exhibited improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, as compared with littermate wild-type mice. These results raise the possibility that Creb3l4 could be a useful therapeutic target in the fight against obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:25412305

  10. CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 enhances CREB-dependent gene expression in spinal cord to maintain the bone cancer pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ying; Liu, Yue; Hou, Bailing; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Ming; Sun, Yu-E; Gu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Background cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-dependent gene expression plays an important role in central sensitization. CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) dramatically increases CREB-mediated transcriptional activity. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2B, and miRNA-212/132, which are highly CREB responsive, function downstream from CREB/CRTC1 to mediate activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and in turn loops back to amplify CREB/CRTC1 signaling. This study aimed to investigate the role of spinal CRTC1 in the maintenance of bone cancer pain using an RNA interference method. Results Osteosarcoma cells were implanted into the intramedullary space of the right femurs of C3H/HeNCrlVr mice to induce bone cancer pain. Western blotting was applied to examine the expression of spinal phospho-Ser133 CREB and CRTC1. We further investigated effects of repeated intrathecal administration with Adenoviruses expressing CRTC1-small interfering RNA (siRNA) on nociceptive behaviors and on the upregulation of CREB/CRTC1-target genes associated with bone cancer pain. Inoculation of osteosarcoma cells induced progressive mechanical allodynia and spontaneous pain, and resulted in upregulation of spinal p-CREB and CRTC1. Repeated intrathecal administration with Adenoviruses expressing CRTC1-siRNA attenuated bone cancer–evoked pain behaviors, and reduced CREB/CRTC1-target genes expression in spinal cord, including BDNF, NR2B, and miR-212/132. Conclusions Upregulation of CRTC1 enhancing CREB-dependent gene transcription in spinal cord may play an important role in bone cancer pain. Inhibition of spinal CRTC1 expression reduced bone cancer pain. Interruption to the positive feedback circuit between CREB/CRTC1 and its targets may contribute to the analgesic effects. These findings may provide further insight into the mechanisms and treatment of bone cancer pain. PMID:27060162

  11. Clock and light regulation of the CREB coactivator CRTC1 in the suprachiasmatic circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kensuke; Norona, Frances E; Alzate-Correa, Diego; Scarberry, Daniel; Hoyt, Kari R; Obrietan, Karl

    2013-05-22

    The CREB/CRE transcriptional pathway has been implicated in circadian clock timing and light-evoked clock resetting. To date, much of the work on CREB in circadian physiology has focused on how changes in the phosphorylation state of CREB regulate the timing processes. However, beyond changes in phosphorylation, CREB-dependent transcription can also be regulated by the CREB coactivator CRTC (CREB-regulated transcription coactivator), also known as TORC (transducer of regulated CREB). Here we profiled both the rhythmic and light-evoked regulation of CRTC1 and CRTC2 in the murine suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the locus of the master mammalian clock. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed rhythmic expression of CRTC1 in the SCN. CRTC1 expression was detected throughout the dorsoventral extent of the SCN in the middle of the subjective day, with limited expression during early night, and late night expression levels intermediate between mid-day and early night levels. In contrast to CRTC1, robust expression of CRTC2 was detected during both the subjective day and night. During early and late subjective night, a brief light pulse induced strong nuclear accumulation of CRTC1 in the SCN. In contrast with CRTC1, photic stimulation did not affect the subcellular localization of CRTC2 in the SCN. Additionally, reporter gene profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that CRTC1 was associated with CREB in the 5' regulatory region of the period1 gene, and that overexpression of CRTC1 leads to a marked upregulation in period1 transcription. Together, these data raise the prospect that CRTC1 plays a role in fundamental aspects of SCN clock timing and entrainment.

  12. PKA-CREB-BDNF signaling regulated long lasting antidepressant activities of Yueju but not ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wenda; Wang, Wei; Gong, Tong; Zhang, Hailou; Tao, Weiwei; Xue, Lihong; Sun, Yan; Wang, Fushun; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Yueju confers antidepressant effects in a rapid and long-lasting manner, similar to ketamine. CREB (cAMP-response element binding protein) signaling is implicated in depression pathology and antidepressant responses. However, the role of CREB and associated brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling in rapid and long-lasting antidepressant effects remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that ICR and Kunming strain mice conferred antidepressant responses lasting for 1 and 5 days, respectively, following a single dose of Yueju. One day post Yueju in Kunming but not ICR strain mice, expression of total and phosphorylated CREB, as well as the CREB signaling activator, PKA (protein kinase A) was up-regulated in the hippocampus. Although BDNF gene expression increased at 3 hours in both strains, it remained up-regulated at 1 day only in Kunming mice. Ketamine showed similar strain-dependent behavioral effects. However, blockade of PKA/CREB signaling blunted the antidepressant effects and reversed the up-regulation of BDNF gene expression by Yueju, but not ketamine. Conversely, blockade of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling led to opposite effects. Taken altogether, prolonged transcriptional up-regulation of hippocampal BDNF may account for the stain-dependent enduring antidepressant responses to Yueju and ketamine, but it was mediated via PKA/CREB pathway only for Yueju. PMID:27197752

  13. Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 regulates retinal neurodegeneration through CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jin; Wang, Xiao-Qun; Li, Yu-Jie; Shan, Kun; Yang, Hong; Wang, Yang-Ning-Zhi; Yao, Mu-Di; Liu, Chang; Li, Xiu-Miao; Shen, Yi; Liu, Jing-Yu; Cheng, Hong; Yuan, Jun; Zhang, Yang-Yang; Jiang, Qin; Yan, Biao

    2016-01-01

    The nervous and vascular systems, although functionally different, share many common regulators of function maintenance. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important players in many biological processes and human disorders. We previously identified a role of MALAT1 in microvascular dysfunction. However, its role in neurodegeneration is still unknown. Here, we used the eye as the model to investigate the role of MALAT1 in retinal neurodegeneration. We show that MALAT1 expression is significantly up-regulated in the retinas, Müller cells, and primary retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) upon stress. MALAT1 knockdown reduces reactive gliosis, Müller cell activation, and RGC survival in vivo and in vitro MALAT1-CREB binding maintains CREB phosphorylation by inhibiting PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation, which leads to continuous CREB signaling activation. Clinical and animal experimentation suggests that MALAT1 dysfunction is implicated in neurodegenerative processes and several human disorders. Collectively, this study reveals that MALAT1 might regulate the development of retinal neurodegeneration through CREB signaling. PMID:26964565

  14. Reciprocal Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species and Phospho-CREB Regulates Voltage Gated Calcium Channel Expression during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, Arti; Antony, Cecil; Singhal, Jhalak; Tiwari, Brijendra K.; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated the roles played by L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCC) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. Here we decipher mechanisms and pathways engaged by the pathogen to regulate VGCC expression in macrophages. We show that M. tb and its antigen Rv3416 use phospho-CREB (pCREB), Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), Protein Kinase C (PKC) and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) to modulate VGCC expression in macrophages. siRNA mediated knockdown of MyD88, IRAK1, IRAK2 or TRAF6 significantly inhibited antigen mediated VGCC expression. Inhibiting Protein Kinase C (PKC) or MEK-ERK1/2 further increased VGCC expression. Interestingly, inhibiting intracellular calcium release upregulated antigen mediated VGCC expression, while inhibiting extracellular calcium influx had no significant effect. siRNA mediated knockdown of transcription factors c-Jun, SOX5 and CREB significantly inhibited Rv3416 mediated VGCC expression. A dynamic reciprocal cross-regulation between ROS and pCREB was observed that in turn governed VGCC expression with ROS playing a limiting role in the process. Further dissection of the mechanisms such as the interplay between ROS and pCREB would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression during M. tb infection. PMID:24797940

  15. CREB-regulated transcription co-activator family stimulates promoter II-driven aromatase expression in preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Samarajeewa, Nirukshi U; Docanto, Maria M; Simpson, Evan R; Brown, Kristy A

    2013-08-01

    The dramatically increased prevalence of breast cancer after menopause is of great concern and is correlated with elevated local levels of estrogens. This is mainly due to an increase in aromatase expression driven by its proximal promoter II (PII). We have previously demonstrated that the CREB co-activator CRTC2 binds directly to PII and stimulates its activity via mechanisms involving LKB1-AMPK in response to prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). There are three members of the CRTC family (CRTC1-3) and this study aimed to characterize the role of other CRTCs in the activation of aromatase PII. The expression and subcellular localization of CRTCs were examined in preadipocytes using qPCR and immunofluorescence. Under basal conditions, CRTC1 expression was the lowest, whereas CRTC3 transcripts were present at higher levels. Basally, CRTC2 and CRTC3 were mainly cytoplasmic and PGE(2) caused their nuclear translocation. Reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) were performed to assess the effect of CRTCs on PII activity and binding. Basal PII activity was significantly increased with all CRTCs. Forskolin (FSK)/phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), to mimic PGE(2), resulted in a further significant increase in PII activity with all CRTCs, with CRTC2 and CRTC3 having greater effects. This was consistent with ChIP data showing an increased binding of CRTCs to PII with FSK/PMA. Moreover, gene silencing of CRTC2 and CRTC3 significantly reduced the FSK/PMA-mediated stimulation of aromatase activity. Interestingly, CRTCs acted cooperatively with CREB1 to increase PII activity, and both CREs were found to be essential for the maximal induction of PII activity by CRTCs. Phosphorylation of CRTC2 at its AMPK target site, Ser 171, dictated its subcellular localization, and the activation of aromatase PII in preadipocytes. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that aromatase regulation in primary human breast preadipocytes involves more than one CRTC.

  16. LIMK1 Regulates Long-Term Memory and Synaptic Plasticity via the Transcriptional Factor CREB

    PubMed Central

    Todorovski, Zarko; Asrar, Suhail; Liu, Jackie; Saw, Ner Mu Nar; Joshi, Krutika; Cortez, Miguel A.; Snead, O. Carter; Xie, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Deletion of the LIMK1 gene is associated with Williams syndrome, a unique neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe defects in visuospatial cognition and long-term memory (LTM). However, whether LIMK1 contributes to these deficits remains elusive. Here, we show that LIMK1-knockout (LIMK1−/−) mice are drastically impaired in LTM but not short-term memory (STM). In addition, LIMK1−/− mice are selectively defective in late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP), a form of long-lasting synaptic plasticity specifically required for the formation of LTM. Furthermore, we show that LIMK1 interacts and regulates the activity of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), an extensively studied transcriptional factor critical for LTM. Importantly, both L-LTP and LTM deficits in LIMK1−/− mice are rescued by increasing the activity of CREB. These results provide strong evidence that LIMK1 deletion is sufficient to lead to an LTM deficit and that this deficit is attributable to CREB hypofunction. Our study has identified a direct gene-phenotype link in mice and provides a potential strategy to restore LTM in patients with Williams syndrome through the enhancement of CREB activity in the adult brain. PMID:25645926

  17. LIMK1 regulates long-term memory and synaptic plasticity via the transcriptional factor CREB.

    PubMed

    Todorovski, Zarko; Asrar, Suhail; Liu, Jackie; Saw, Ner Mu Nar; Joshi, Krutika; Cortez, Miguel A; Snead, O Carter; Xie, Wei; Jia, Zhengping

    2015-04-01

    Deletion of the LIMK1 gene is associated with Williams syndrome, a unique neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe defects in visuospatial cognition and long-term memory (LTM). However, whether LIMK1 contributes to these deficits remains elusive. Here, we show that LIMK1-knockout (LIMK1(-/-)) mice are drastically impaired in LTM but not short-term memory (STM). In addition, LIMK1(-/-) mice are selectively defective in late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP), a form of long-lasting synaptic plasticity specifically required for the formation of LTM. Furthermore, we show that LIMK1 interacts and regulates the activity of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), an extensively studied transcriptional factor critical for LTM. Importantly, both L-LTP and LTM deficits in LIMK1(-/-) mice are rescued by increasing the activity of CREB. These results provide strong evidence that LIMK1 deletion is sufficient to lead to an LTM deficit and that this deficit is attributable to CREB hypofunction. Our study has identified a direct gene-phenotype link in mice and provides a potential strategy to restore LTM in patients with Williams syndrome through the enhancement of CREB activity in the adult brain.

  18. Expression of Iron Regulatory Protein 1 Is Regulated not only by HIF-1 but also pCREB under Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qian-Qian; Qian, Zhong-Ming; Zhou, Yu-Fu; Zhang, Meng-Wan; Wang, Dang; Zhu, Li; Ke, Ya

    2016-01-01

    The inconsistent of responses of IRP1 and HIF-1 alpha to hypoxia and the similar tendencies in the changes of IRP1 and pCREB contents led us to hypothesize that pCREB might be involved in the regulation of IRP1 under hypoxia. Here, we investigated the role of pCREB in IRP1 expression in HepG2 cells under hypoxia using quantitative PCR, western blot, immunofluorescence, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). We demonstrated that 1) Hypoxia increased pCREB levels inside of the nucleus; 2) Putative CREs were found in the IRP1 gene; 3) Nuclear extracts of HepG2 cells treated with hypoxia could bind to CRE1 and CRE3, and 100-fold competitor of putative CREs could abolish the binding activity to varying degrees; 4) pCREB was found in the CRE1 and CRE3 DNA-protein complexes of EMSA; 5) CRE1 and CRE3 binding activity of IRP1 depended on CREB activation but not on HIF-1; 6) Increased IRP1 expression under hypoxia could be prevented by LY294002; 7) ChIP assays demonstrated that pCREB binds to IRP1 promoter; and 8) HIF-1 and/or HIF-2 siRNA had no effect on the expression of pCREB and IRP1 proteins in cells treated with hypoxia for 8 hours. Our findings evidenced for the involvement of pCREB in IRP1 expression and revealed a dominant role of PI3K/Akt pathway in CREB activation under hypoxia and also suggested that dual-regulation of IRP1 expression by HIF-1 and pCERB or other transcription factor(s) under hypoxia might be a common mechanism in most if not all of hypoxia-inducible genes. PMID:27766034

  19. Regulation of basal promoter activity of the human thiamine pyrophosphate transporter SLC44A4 in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nabokina, Svetlana M; Ramos, Mel Brendan; Valle, Judith E; Said, Hamid M

    2015-05-01

    Microbiota of the large intestine synthesize considerable amount of vitamin B1 in the form of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). There is a specific high-affinity regulated carrier-mediated uptake system for TPP in human colonocytes (product of the SLC44A4 gene). The mechanisms of regulation of SLC44A4 gene expression are currently unknown. In this study, we characterized the SLC44A4 minimal promoter region and identified transcription factors important for basal promoter activity in colonic epithelial cells. The 5'-regulatory region of the SLC44A4 gene (1,022 bp) was cloned and showed promoter activity upon transient transfection into human colonic epithelial NCM460 cells. With the use of a series of 5'- and 3'-deletion luciferase reporter constructs, the minimal genomic region that required basal transcription of the SLC44A4 gene expression was mapped between nucleotides -178 and +88 (using the distal transcriptional start site as +1). Mutational analysis performed on putative cis-regulatory elements established the involvement of ETS/ELF3 [E26 transformation-specific sequence (ETS) proteins], cAMP-responsive element (CRE), and SP1/GC-box sequence motifs in basal SLC44A4 promoter activity. By means of EMSA, binding of ELF3 and CRE-binding protein-1 (CREB-1) transcription factors to the SLC44A4 minimal promoter was shown. Contribution of CREB into SLC44A4 promoter activity was confirmed using NCM460 cells overexpressing CREB. We also found high expression of ELF3 and CREB-1 in colonic (NCM460) compared with noncolonic (ARPE19) cells, suggesting their possible contribution to colon-specific pattern of SLC44A4 expression. This study represents the first characterization of the SLC44A4 promoter and reports the importance of both ELF3 and CREB-1 transcription factors in the maintenance of basal promoter activity in colonic epithelial cells.

  20. CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1: important roles in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhan-Cheng; Wang, Chuang; Wang, Qin-Wen; Zhang, Jun-Fang

    2015-04-25

    The cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator, CRTC (also known as transducer of regulated CREB, TORC), is identified as a potent modulator of cAMP response element (CRE)-driven gene transcription. The CRTC family consists of three members (CRTC1-3), among which the CRTC1 shows the highest expression in the brain. Several studies have demonstrated that the CRTC1 plays critical roles in neuronal dendritic growth, long-term synaptic plasticity, memory consolidation and reconsolidation etc., whereas dysfunction of CRTC1 is mainly involved in neurodegenerative disorders. In light of these findings, we aim to review recent research reports that indicate the CRTC1 dysfunction and its underlying mechanisms in the neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. DPPC regulates COX-2 expression in monocytes via phosphorylation of CREB

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.H.K. Tonks, A.J.; Jones, K.P.; Ahluwalia, M.K.; Thomas, A.W.; Tonks, A.; Jackson, S.K.

    2008-05-23

    The major phospholipid in pulmonary surfactant dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) has been shown to modulate inflammatory responses. Using human monocytes, this study demonstrates that DPPC significantly increased PGE{sub 2} (P < 0.05) production by 2.5-fold when compared to untreated monocyte controls. Mechanistically, this effect was concomitant with an increase in COX-2 expression which was abrogated in the presence of a COX-2 inhibitor. The regulation of COX-2 expression was independent of NF-{kappa}B activity. Further, DPPC increased the phosphorylation of the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB; an important nuclear transcription factor important in regulating COX-2 expression). In addition, we also show that changing the fatty acid groups of PC (e.g. using L-{alpha}-phosphatidylcholine {beta}-arachidonoyl-{gamma}-palmitoyl (PAPC)) has a profound effect on the regulation of COX-2 expression and CREB activation. This study provides new evidence for the anti-inflammatory activity of DPPC and that this activity is at least in part mediated via CREB activation of COX-2.

  2. CREB-dependent gene regulation by prion protein: impact on MMP-9 and beta-dystroglycan.

    PubMed

    Pradines, Elodie; Loubet, Damien; Schneider, Benoît; Launay, Jean-Marie; Kellermann, Odile; Mouillet-Richard, Sophie

    2008-11-01

    Corruption of the normal function of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) by the scrapie isoform (PrP(Sc)) emerges as a critical causal event in Transmissible Spongiform Encaphalopathies (TSE) pathogenesis. However, PrP(C) physiological role remains unclear. By exploiting the properties of the 1C11 neuroectodermal cell line, able to convert into 1C11(5-HT) serotonergic or 1C11(NE) noradrenergic neuronal cells, we assigned a signaling function to PrP(C). Here, we establish that antibody-mediated PrP(C) ligation promotes the recruitment of the cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) transcription factor downstream from the MAPK ERK1/2, in 1C11 precursor cells and their 1C11(5-HT) and 1C11(NE) neuronal progenies. Whatever the differentiation state of 1C11 cells, the PrP(C)-dependent CREB activation triggers Egr-1 and c-fos transcription, two immediate early genes that relay CREB's role in cell survival and proliferation as well as in neuronal plasticity. Furthermore, in 1C11-derived neuronal cells, we draw a link between the PrP(C)-CREB coupling and a transcriptional regulation of the metalloproteinase MMP-9 and its inhibitor TIMP-1, which play pivotal roles in neuronal pathophysiology. Finally, the PrP(C)-dependent control on MMP-9 impacts on the processing of the transmembrane protein, beta-dystroglycan. Taken together, our data define molecular mechanisms that likely mirror PrP(C) ubiquitous contribution to cytoprotection and its involvement in neuronal plasticity.

  3. Oxytocin Regulates Stress-Induced Crf Gene Transcription through CREB-Regulated Transcription Coactivator 3

    PubMed Central

    Jurek, Benjamin; Slattery, David A.; Hiraoka, Yuichi; Liu, Ying; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Aguilera, Greti; van den Burg, Erwin H.

    2015-01-01

    The major regulator of the neuroendocrine stress response in the brain is corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), whose transcription is controlled by CREB and its cofactors CRTC2/3 (TORC2/3). Phosphorylated CRTCs are sequestered in the cytoplasm, but rapidly dephosphorylated and translocated into the nucleus following a stressful stimulus. As the stress response is attenuated by oxytocin (OT), we tested whether OT interferes with CRTC translocation and, thereby, Crf expression. OT (1 nmol, i.c.v.) delayed the stress-induced increase of nuclear CRTC3 and Crf hnRNA levels in the paraventricular nucleus of male rats and mice, but did not affect either parameter in the absence of the stressor. The increase in Crf hnRNA levels at later time points was parallel to elevated nuclear CRTC2/3 levels. A direct effect of Thr4 Gly7-OT (TGOT) on CRTC3 translocation and Crf expression was found in rat primary hypothalamic neurons, amygdaloid (Ar-5), hypothalamic (H32), and human neuroblastoma (Be(2)M17) cell lines. CRTC3, but not CRCT2, knockdown using siRNA in Be(2)M17 cells prevented the effect of TGOT on Crf hnRNA levels. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation demonstrated that TGOT reduced CRTC3, but not CRTC2, binding to the Crf promoter after 10 min of forskolin stimulation. Together, the results indicate that OT modulates CRTC3 translocation, the binding of CRTC3 to the Crf promoter and, ultimately, transcription of the Crf gene. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The neuropeptide oxytocin has been proposed to reduce hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation during stress. The underlying mechanisms are, however, elusive. In this study we show that activation of the oxytocin receptor in the paraventricular nucleus delays transcription of the gene encoding corticotropin releasing factor (Crf), the main regulator of the stress response. It does so by sequestering the coactivator of the transcription factor CREB, CRTC3, in the cytosol, resulting in reduced binding of CRTC3 to the Crf

  4. Notch1 Regulates Hippocampal Plasticity Through Interaction with the Reelin Pathway, Glutamatergic Transmission and CREB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Brai, Emanuele; Marathe, Swananda; Astori, Simone; Fredj, Naila Ben; Perry, Elisabeth; Lamy, Christophe; Scotti, Alessandra; Alberi, Lavinia

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling plays a crucial role in adult brain function such as synaptic plasticity, memory and olfaction. Several reports suggest an involvement of this pathway in neurodegenerative dementia. Yet, to date, the mechanism underlying Notch activity in mature neurons remains unresolved. In this work, we investigate how Notch regulates synaptic potentiation and contributes to the establishment of memory in mice. We observe that Notch1 is a postsynaptic receptor with functional interactions with the Reelin receptor, apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2) and the ionotropic receptor, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Targeted loss of Notch1 in the hippocampal CA fields affects Reelin signaling by influencing Dab1 expression and impairs the synaptic potentiation achieved through Reelin stimulation. Further analysis indicates that loss of Notch1 affects the expression and composition of the NMDAR but not AMPAR. Glutamatergic signaling is further compromised through downregulation of CamKII and its secondary and tertiary messengers resulting in reduced cAMP response element-binding (CREB) signaling. Our results identify Notch1 as an important regulator of mechanisms involved in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. These findings emphasize the possible involvement of this signaling receptor in dementia. Highlights In this paper, we propose a mechanism for Notch1-dependent plasticity that likely underlies the function of Notch1 in memory formation: Notch1 interacts with another important developmental pathway, the Reelin cascade. Notch1 regulates both NMDAR expression and composition. Notch1 influences a cascade of cellular events culminating in CREB activation. PMID:26635527

  5. RKIP Regulates Neural Cell Apoptosis Induced by Exposure to Microwave Radiation Partly Through the MEK/ERK/CREB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hongyan; Lin, Tao; Wang, Dewen; Peng, Ruiyun; Wang, Shuiming; Gao, Yabing; Xu, Xinping; Zhao, Li; Wang, Shaoxia; Su, Zhentao

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) is important for neural cell apoptosis induced by microwave exposure and explored the role of MEK/ERK/CREB pathway regulated by RKIP in the apoptosis. Differentiated PC12 cells were exposed to continuous microwave radiation at 2.856 GHz for 5 min with average power density of 30 mW/cm(2). RKIP sense and anti-sense recombinant plasmids were constructed and transfected into PC12 cells, respectively. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining and caspase-3 activity assay were used to detect cell apoptosis. The results showed that RKIP was downregulated after microwave exposure while the MEK/ERK/CREB signaling pathway was activated excessively. Moreover, the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax decreased, activity of caspase-3 increased, and thus apoptotic DNA fragmentation increased. RKIP overexpression significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of MEK, ERK, and CREB, while RKIP downregulation had the reverse effect. Furthermore, U0126 was found to antagonize the changes caused by RKIP downregulation after exposure to radiation. In conclusion, RKIP plays an important role in the neural cell apoptosis induced by microwave radiation, and the regulation of cell apoptosis by RKIP is partly through the MEK/ERK/CREB pathway. This suggests that RKIP may act as a key regulator of neuronal damage caused by microwave radiation.

  6. BzpF is a CREB-like transcription factor that regulates spore maturation and stability in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Eryong; Talukder, Shaheynoor; Hughes, Timothy R.; Curk, Tomaz; Zupan, Blaz; Shaulsky, Gad; Katoh-Kurasawa, Mariko

    2011-01-01

    The cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is a highly conserved transcription factor that integrates signaling through the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) in many eukaryotes. PKA plays a critical role in Dictyostelium development but no CREB homologue has been identified in this system. Here we show that Dictyostelium utilizes a CREB-like protein, BzpF, to integrate PKA signaling during late development. bzpF– mutants produce compromised spores, which are extremely unstable and germination defective. Previously, we have found that BzpF binds the canonical CRE motif in vitro. In this paper, we determined the DNA binding specificity of BzpF using protein binding microarray (PBM) and showed that the motif with the highest specificity is a CRE-like sequence. BzpF is necessary to activate the transcription of at least 15 PKA-regulated, late-developmental target genes whose promoters contain BzpF binding motifs. BzpF is sufficient to activate two of these genes. The comparison of RNA sequencing data between wild type and bzpF– mutant revealed that the mutant fails to express 205 genes, many of which encode cellulose-binding and sugar-binding proteins. We propose that BzpF is a CREB-like transcription factor that regulates spore maturation and stability in a PKA-related manner. PMID:21810415

  7. The CREB coactivator CRTC2 controls hepatic lipid metabolism by regulating SREBP1.

    PubMed

    Han, Jinbo; Li, Erwei; Chen, Liqun; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wei, Fangchao; Liu, Jieyuan; Deng, Haiteng; Wang, Yiguo

    2015-08-13

    Abnormal accumulation of triglycerides in the liver, caused in part by increased de novo lipogenesis, results in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and insulin resistance. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), an important transcriptional regulator of lipogenesis, is synthesized as an inactive precursor that binds to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In response to insulin signalling, SREBP1 is transported from the ER to the Golgi in a COPII-dependent manner, processed by proteases in the Golgi, and then shuttled to the nucleus to induce lipogenic gene expression; however, the mechanisms underlying enhanced SREBP1 activity in insulin-resistant obesity and diabetes remain unclear. Here we show in mice that CREB regulated transcription coactivator 2 (CRTC2) functions as a mediator of mTOR signalling to modulate COPII-dependent SREBP1 processing. CRTC2 competes with Sec23A, a subunit of the COPII complex, to interact with Sec31A, another COPII subunit, thus disrupting SREBP1 transport. During feeding, mTOR phosphorylates CRTC2 and attenuates its inhibitory effect on COPII-dependent SREBP1 maturation. As hepatic overexpression of an mTOR-defective CRTC2 mutant in obese mice improved the lipogenic program and insulin sensitivity, these results demonstrate how the transcriptional coactivator CRTC2 regulates mTOR-mediated lipid homeostasis in the fed state and in obesity. PMID:26147081

  8. Leptin recruits Creb-regulated transcriptional coactivator 1 to improve hyperglycemia in insulin-deficient diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Geun Hyang; Szabo, Andras; King, Emily M.; Ayala, Jennifer; Ayala, Julio E.; Altarejos, Judith Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Leptin alleviates hyperglycemia in rodent models of Type 1 diabetes by activating leptin receptors within the central nervous system. Here we delineate whether non-canonical leptin signaling through the Creb-regulated transcriptional coactivator 1 (Crtc1) contributes to leptin-dependent improvements in diabetic glucose metabolism. Methods We employed mice with a targeted genetic disruption of Crtc1, tracer dilution techniques and neuroanatomical studies to interrogate whether Crtc1 enables leptin to improve glucose metabolism in streptozotocin-induced (STZ) diabetes. Results Here we show that leptin improves diabetic glucose metabolism through Crtc1-dependent and independent mechanisms. We find that leptin reduces diabetic hyperglycemia, hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression and selectively increases glucose disposal to brown adipose tissue and heart, in STZ-diabetic Crtc1WT mice but not Crtc1+/− mice. By contrast, leptin decreases circulating glucagon levels in both STZ-diabetic Crtc1WT and Crtc1+/− mice. We also demonstrate that leptin promotes Crtc1 nuclear translocation in pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) and non-Pomc neurons within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). Accordingly, leptin's ability to induce Pomc gene expression in the ARC is blunted in STZ-diabetic Crtc1+/− mice. Conclusions Our study reveals that Crtc1 functions as a conduit for leptin's glucoregulatory actions in insulin-dependent diabetes. This study also highlights a new role for Crtc1 in modulating peripheral glucose metabolism. PMID:25737949

  9. cAMP/CREB-regulated LINC00473 marks LKB1-inactivated lung cancer and mediates tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zirong; Lin, Shuibin; Cao, Chunxia; Gimbrone, Nicholas T.; Yang, Rongqiang; Fu, Dongtao A.; Carper, Miranda B.; Haura, Eric B.; Schabath, Matthew B.; Cress, W. Douglas; Kaye, Frederic J.

    2016-01-01

    The LKB1 tumor suppressor gene is frequently mutated and inactivated in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Loss of LKB1 promotes cancer progression and influences therapeutic responses in preclinical studies; however, specific targeted therapies for lung cancer with LKB1 inactivation are currently unavailable. Here, we have identified a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) signature that is associated with the loss of LKB1 function. We discovered that LINC00473 is consistently the most highly induced gene in LKB1-inactivated human primary NSCLC samples and derived cell lines. Elevated LINC00473 expression correlated with poor prognosis, and sustained LINC00473 expression was required for the growth and survival of LKB1-inactivated NSCLC cells. Mechanistically, LINC00473 was induced by LKB1 inactivation and subsequent cyclic AMP–responsive element–binding protein (CREB)/CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC) activation. We determined that LINC00473 is a nuclear lncRNA and interacts with NONO, a component of the cAMP signaling pathway, thereby facilitating CRTC/CREB-mediated transcription. Collectively, our study demonstrates that LINC00473 expression potentially serves as a robust biomarker for tumor LKB1 functional status that can be integrated into clinical trials for patient selection and treatment evaluation, and implicates LINC00473 as a therapeutic target for LKB1-inactivated NSCLC. PMID:27140397

  10. cAMP/CREB-regulated LINC00473 marks LKB1-inactivated lung cancer and mediates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zirong; Li, Jian-Liang; Lin, Shuibin; Cao, Chunxia; Gimbrone, Nicholas T; Yang, Rongqiang; Fu, Dongtao A; Carper, Miranda B; Haura, Eric B; Schabath, Matthew B; Lu, Jianrong; Amelio, Antonio L; Cress, W Douglas; Kaye, Frederic J; Wu, Lizi

    2016-06-01

    The LKB1 tumor suppressor gene is frequently mutated and inactivated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Loss of LKB1 promotes cancer progression and influences therapeutic responses in preclinical studies; however, specific targeted therapies for lung cancer with LKB1 inactivation are currently unavailable. Here, we have identified a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) signature that is associated with the loss of LKB1 function. We discovered that LINC00473 is consistently the most highly induced gene in LKB1-inactivated human primary NSCLC samples and derived cell lines. Elevated LINC00473 expression correlated with poor prognosis, and sustained LINC00473 expression was required for the growth and survival of LKB1-inactivated NSCLC cells. Mechanistically, LINC00473 was induced by LKB1 inactivation and subsequent cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)/CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC) activation. We determined that LINC00473 is a nuclear lncRNA and interacts with NONO, a component of the cAMP signaling pathway, thereby facilitating CRTC/CREB-mediated transcription. Collectively, our study demonstrates that LINC00473 expression potentially serves as a robust biomarker for tumor LKB1 functional status that can be integrated into clinical trials for patient selection and treatment evaluation, and implicates LINC00473 as a therapeutic target for LKB1-inactivated NSCLC.

  11. The Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 suppresses CREB signaling by targeting NMDA receptor function.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hailong; Chávez, Andrés E; Wang, Chih-Chieh; Yang, Hongtian; Gu, Hua; Siddoway, Benjamin A; Hall, Benjamin J; Castillo, Pablo E; Xia, Houhui

    2014-10-15

    NMDA receptor signaling plays a complex role in CREB activation and CREB-mediated gene transcription, depending on the subcellular location of NMDA receptors, as well as how strongly they are activated. However, it is not known whether Rac1, the prototype of Rac GTPase, plays a role in neuronal CREB activation induced by NMDA receptor signaling. Here, we report that NSC23766, a widely used specific Rac1 inhibitor, inhibits basal CREB phosphorylation at S133 (pCREB) and antagonizes changes in pCREB levels induced by NMDA bath application in rat cortical neurons. Unexpectedly, we found that NSC23766 affects the levels of neuronal pCREB in a Rac1-independent manner. Instead, our results indicate that NSC23766 can directly regulate NMDA receptors as indicated by their strong effects on both exogenous and synaptically evoked NMDA receptor-mediated currents in mouse and rat neurons, respectively. Our findings strongly suggest that Rac1 does not affect pCREB signaling in cortical neurons and reveal that NSC23766 could be a novel NMDA receptor antagonist.

  12. Differential contribution of CBP:CREB binding to corticotropin-releasing hormone expression in the infant and adult hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Korosi, Aniko; Rice, Courtney J.; Ji, Sung; Rogge, George A.; Wood, Marcelo A.; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) contributes crucially to the regulation of central and peripheral responses to stress. Because of the importance of a finely tuned stress system, CRH expression is tightly regulated in an organ- and brain region-specific manner. Thus, in the hypothalamus, CRH is constitutively expressed and this expression is further enhanced by stress; however, the underlying regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. The regulatory region of the crh gene contains several elements, including the cyclic-AMP response element (CRE), and the role of the CRE interaction with the cyclic-AMP response element binding protein (CREB) in CRH expression has been a focus of intensive research. Notably, whereas thousands of genes contain a CRE, the functional regulation of gene expression by the CRE:CREB system is limited to ~100 genes, and likely requires additional proteins. Here, we investigated the role of a member of the CREB complex, CREB binding protein (CBP), in basal and stress-induced CRH expression during development and in the adult. Using mice with a deficient CREB-binding site on CBP, we found that CBP:CREB interaction is necessary for normal basal CRH expression at the mRNA and protein level in the nine-day-old mouse, prior to onset of functional regulation of hypothalamic CRH expression by glucocorticoids. This interaction, which functions directly on crh or indirectly via regulation of other genes, was no longer required for maintenance of basal CRH expression levels in the adult. However, CBP:CREB binding contributed to stress-induced CRH expression in the adult, enabling rapid CRH synthesis in hypothalamus. CBP:CREB binding deficiency did not disrupt basal corticosterone plasma levels or acute stress-evoked corticosterone release. Because dysregulation of CRH expression occurs in stress-related disorders including depression, a full understanding of the complex regulation of this gene is important in both health and disease. PMID

  13. Transcriptional regulation of miR-15b by c-Rel and CREB in Japanese encephalitis virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bibo; Ye, Jing; Ashraf, Usama; Li, Yunchuan; Chen, Huanchun; Song, Yunfeng; Cao, Shengbo

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been well known to play diverse roles in viral infection at the level of posttranscriptional repression. However, much less is understood about the mechanism by which miRNAs are regulated during viral infection. It is likely that both host and virus contain factors to modulate miRNA expression. Here we report the up-regulation of microRNA-15b (miR-15b) in vitro upon infection with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Analysis of miR-15b precursor, pri-miR-15b and pre-miR-15b, suggest that the regulation occurs transcriptionally. Further, we identified the transcriptional regulatory region of miR-15b that contains consensus binding motif for NF-κB subunit c-Rel and cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), which are known as transcription factor to regulate gene expression. By promoter fusion and mutational analyses, we demonstrated that c-Rel and CREB bind directly to the promoter elements of miR-15b, which are responsible for miR-15b transcription in response to JEV infection. Finally, we showed that pharmacological inhibition of ERK and NF-κB signaling pathway blocked induction of miR-15b in JEV infection, suggesting important roles of ERK and NF-κB pathway in the regulation of miR-15b gene. Therefore, our observations indicate that induced expression of miR-15b is modulated by c-Rel and CREB in response to JEV infection. PMID:26931521

  14. The cAMP Response Element Binding protein (CREB) is activated by Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and regulates myostatin gene expression in skeletal myoblast

    SciTech Connect

    Zuloaga, R.; Fuentes, E.N.; Molina, A.; Valdés, J.A.

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •IGF-1 induces the activation of CREB via IGF-1R/PI3K/PLC signaling pathway. •Calcium dependent signaling pathways regulate myostatin gene expression. •IGF-1 regulates myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription in skeletal myoblast. -- Abstract: Myostatin, a member of the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, plays an important role as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and differentiation. We have previously reported that IGF-1 induces a transient myostatin mRNA expression, through the activation of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) in an IP{sub 3}/calcium-dependent manner. Here we examined the activation of CREB transcription factor as downstream targets of IGF-1 during myoblast differentiation and its role as a regulator of myostatin gene expression. In cultured skeletal myoblast, IGF-1 induced the phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of CREB via IGF-1 Receptor/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ), signaling pathways. Also, IGF-1 induced calcium-dependent molecules such as Calmodulin Kinase II (CaMK II), Extracellular signal-regulated Kinases (ERK), Protein Kinase C (PKC). Additionally, we examined myostatin mRNA levels and myostatin promoter activity in differentiated myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents of myostatin and its reporter activity after treatment with IGF-1. The expression of myostatin in differentiated myoblast was downregulated by the transfection of siRNA–CREB and by pharmacological inhibitors of the signaling pathways involved in CREB activation. By using pharmacological and genetic approaches together these data demonstrate that IGF-1 regulates the myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription factor during muscle cell differentiation.

  15. Regulation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) binding in the mammalian clock pacemaker by light but not a circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Kako, K; Banasik, M; Lee, K; Ishida, N

    1997-02-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythms are considered to be regulated by a clock pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus. The molecular mechanism of entrainment and oscillation of circadian rhythm are not well understood but photic induction of immediate-early gene (IEG) expression in the SCN is thought to play a role. Here we show that under 12 h light:12 h dark (LD) condition, the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) binding to cAMP responsive promoter element (CRE) of NMDAR1/zeta1 promoter region in the SCN is higher during the light than the dark by electro-mobility shift assay (EMSA). When animals are placed in constant dark, CREB DNA binding activity in the SCN is low and does not vary with circadian time when compared with cortex nuclear extract as a control. Most significantly, photic induction of CREB binding activity in the SCN occurs at all circadian times tested, indicating that CREB DNA binding in the SCN is not gated by the endogenous clock. These results implicate the role of CREB in photic neuronal signaling in the SCN and suggest that CREB DNA binding activities may not be regulated by a circadian clock. PMID:9030696

  16. CREB Negatively Regulates IGF2R Gene Expression and Downstream Pathways to Inhibit Hypoxia-Induced H9c2 Cardiomyoblast Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Kung; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; Chang, Hsin-Nung; Pai, Pei-Ying; Lin, Kuan-Ho; Pan, Lung-Fa; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-01-01

    During hypoxia, gene expression is altered by various transcription factors. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF2) is known to be induced by hypoxia, which binds to IGF2 receptor IGF2R that acts like a G protein-coupled receptor, might cause pathological hypertrophy or activation of the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsive element-binding protein (CREB) is central to second messenger-regulated transcription and plays a critical role in the cardiomyocyte survival pathway. In this study, we found that IGF2R level was enhanced in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts exposed to hypoxia in a time-dependent manner but was down-regulated by CREB expression. The over-expression of CREB in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts suppressed the induction of hypoxia-induced IGF2R expression levels and reduced cell apoptosis. Gel shift assay results further indicated that CREB binds to the promoter sequence of IGF2R. With a luciferase assay method, we further observed that CREB represses IGF2R promoter activity. These results suggest that CREB plays an important role in the inhibition of IGF2R expression by binding to the IGF2R promoter and further suppresses H9c2 cardiomyoblast cell apoptosis induced by IGF2R signaling under hypoxic conditions. PMID:26610485

  17. Cadmium up-regulates transcription of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene through phosphorylated CREB rather than SF-1 in K28 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Yun; Gomes, Cynthia; Oh, Sung-Dug; Soh, Jaemog

    2015-04-01

    Cadmium is a widely used heavy metal in industry and affects the male reproductive system of animals, including humans, as a result of occupational and environmental exposures. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its effect on steroidogenesis in gonads remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that exposure of K28 mouse testicular Leydig tumor cells to cadmium led to a significant increase in the mRNA level, promoter activity and protein level of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), an essential factor for steroid biosynthesis. It has been well documented that StAR gene transcription is regulated by multiple transcription factors, including cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) family members and SF-1. Cadmium treatment caused an increase in CREB phosphorylation but did not alter the CREB protein level in the nucleus. EMSA studies revealed that cadmium-induced phosphorylated CREB formed specific complexes with the proximal region of the StAR gene promoter. Furthermore, co-transfection with a CREB expression plasmid significantly increased cadmium-induced StAR promoter activity. However, the nuclear level and the affinity of SF-1 protein for the StAR proximal promoter were dramatically decreased upon exposure to cadmium. Taken together, these results suggest that cadmium up-regulates StAR gene expression through phosphorylated CREB rather than through SF-1 in mouse testicular Leydig cells. PMID:25786521

  18. ZIP4 Regulates Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth by Activating IL-6/STAT3 Pathway via Zinc Finger Transcription Factor CREB

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuqing; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Logsdon, Craig D.; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Li, Min

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies indicate a strong correlation of zinc transporter ZIP4 and pancreatic cancer progression; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We have recently found that ZIP4 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathway through which ZIP4 regulates pancreatic cancer growth. Experimental Design The expression of cyclin D1, IL-6, and STAT3 in pancreatic cancer xenografts and cells were examined by real time PCR, Bio-Plex cytokine assay, and Western blot, respectively. The activity of CREB is examined by a promoter activity assay. Results Cyclin D1 was significantly increased in the ZIP4 overexpressing MIA PaCa-2 cells (MIA-ZIP4)-injected orthotopic xenografts and was downregulated in the ZIP4 silenced ASPC-1 (ASPC-shZIP4) group. The phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), an upstream activator of cyclin D1, was increased in MIA-ZIP4 cells, and decreased in ASPC-shZIP4 cells. IL-6, a known upstream activator for STAT3, was also found to be significantly increased in the MIA-ZIP4 cells and xenografts, and decreased in the ASPC-shZIP4 group. Overexpression of ZIP4 led to a 75% increase of IL-6 promoter activity, and caused increased phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Conclusions Our study suggest that ZIP4 overexpression causes increased IL-6 transcription via CREB, which in turn activates STAT3, and leads to increased cyclin D1 expression, resulting in increased cell proliferation and tumor progression in pancreatic cancer. These results elucidated a novel pathway in ZIP4-mediated pancreatic cancer growth, and suggest new therapeutic targets including ZIP4, IL-6, and STAT3 in pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:20160059

  19. Ca2+ signals regulate mitochondrial metabolism by stimulating CREB-mediated expression of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter gene MCU.

    PubMed

    Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Rajan, Sudarsan; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Zhang, Xueqian; Guo, Shuchi; Kolesar, Jill E; Hines, Kevin J; Ragheb, Jonathan; Jog, Neelakshi R; Caricchio, Roberto; Baba, Yoshihiro; Zhou, Yandong; Kaufman, Brett A; Cheung, Joseph Y; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Gill, Donald L; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2015-03-03

    Cytosolic Ca2+ signals, generated through the coordinated translocation of Ca2+ across the plasma membrane (PM) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, mediate diverse cellular responses. Mitochondrial Ca2+ is important for mitochondrial function, and when cytosolic Ca2+ concentration becomes too high, mitochondria function as cellular Ca2+ sinks. By measuring mitochondrial Ca2+ currents, we found that mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was reduced in chicken DT40 B lymphocytes lacking either the ER-localized inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), which releases Ca2+ from the ER, or Orai1 or STIM1, components of the PM-localized Ca2+ -permeable channel complex that mediates store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in response to depletion of ER Ca2+ stores. The abundance of MCU, the pore-forming subunit of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, was reduced in cells deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter reporter analyses revealed that the Ca2+ -regulated transcription factor CREB (cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein) directly bound the MCU promoter and stimulated expression. Lymphocytes deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1 exhibited altered mitochondrial metabolism, indicating that Ca2+ released from the ER and SOCE-mediated signals modulates mitochondrial function. Thus, our results showed that a transcriptional regulatory circuit involving Ca2+ -dependent activation of CREB controls the Ca2+ uptake capability of mitochondria and hence regulates mitochondrial metabolism.

  20. The coactivator dTAF(II)110/hTAF(II)135 is sufficient to recruit a polymerase complex and activate basal transcription mediated by CREB.

    PubMed

    Felinski, E A; Quinn, P G

    2001-11-01

    A specific TATA binding protein-associated factor (TAF), dTAF(II)110/hTAF(II)135, interacts with cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) through its constitutive activation domain (CAD), which recruits a polymerase complex and activates transcription. The simplest explanation is that the TAF is a coactivator, but several studies have questioned this role of TAFs. Using a reverse two-hybrid analysis in yeast, we previously mapped the interaction between dTAF(II)110 (amino acid 1-308) and CREB to conserved hydrophobic amino acid residues in the CAD. That mapping was possible only because CREB fails to activate transcription in yeast, where all TAFs are conserved, except for the TAF recognizing CREB. To test whether CREB fails to activate transcription in yeast because it lacks a coactivator, we fused dTAF(II)110 (amino acid 1-308) to the TATA binding protein domain of the yeast scaffolding TAF, yTAF(II)130. Transformation of yeast with this hybrid TAF conferred activation by the CAD, indicating that interaction with yTFIID is sufficient to recruit a polymerase complex and activate transcription. The hybrid TAF did not mediate activation by VP16 or vitamin D receptor, each of which interacts with TFIIB, but not with dTAF(II)110 (amino acid 1-308). Enhancement of transcription activation by dTAF(II)110 in mammalian cells required interaction with both the CAD and TFIID and was inhibited by mutation of core hydrophobic residues in the CAD. These data demonstrate that dTAF(II)110/hTAF(II)135 acts as a coactivator to recruit TFIID and polymerase and that this mechanism of activation is conserved in eukaryotes.

  1. Period1 gates the circadian modulation of memory-relevant signaling in mouse hippocampus by regulating the nuclear shuttling of the CREB kinase pP90RSK.

    PubMed

    Rawashdeh, Oliver; Jilg, Antje; Maronde, Erik; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Stehle, Jörg H

    2016-09-01

    Memory performance varies over a 24-h day/night cycle. While the detailed underlying mechanisms are yet unknown, recent evidence suggests that in the mouse hippocampus, rhythmic phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) are central to the circadian (~ 24 h) regulation of learning and memory. We recently identified the clock protein PERIOD1 (PER1) as a vehicle that translates information encoding time of day to hippocampal plasticity. We here elaborate how PER1 may gate the sensitivity of memory-relevant hippocampal signaling pathways. We found that in wild-type mice (WT), spatial learning triggers CREB phosphorylation only during the daytime, and that this effect depends on the presence of PER1. The time-of-day-dependent induction of CREB phosphorylation can be reproduced pharmacologically in acute hippocampal slices prepared from WT mice, but is absent in preparations made from Per1-knockout (Per1(-/-) ) mice. We showed that the PER1-dependent CREB phosphorylation is regulated downstream of MAPK. Stimulation of WT hippocampal neurons triggered the co-translocation of PER1 and the CREB kinase pP90RSK (pMAPK-activated ribosomal S6 kinase) into the nucleus. In hippocampal neurons from Per1(-/-) mice, however, pP90RSK remained perinuclear. A co-immunoprecipitation assay confirmed a high-affinity interaction between PER1 and pP90RSK. Knocking down endogenous PER1 in hippocampal cells inhibited adenylyl cyclase-dependent CREB activation. Taken together, the PER1-dependent modulation of cytoplasmic-to-nuclear signaling in the murine hippocampus provides a molecular explanation for how the circadian system potentially shapes a temporal framework for daytime-dependent memory performance, and adds a novel facet to the versatility of the clock gene protein PER1. We provide evidence that the circadian clock gene Period1 (Per1) regulates CREB phosphorylation in the mouse hippocampus

  2. Recruitment of CREB1 and Histone Deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) to the Mouse Ltbp-1 Promoter Regulates its Constitutive Expression in a Dioxin Receptor-dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Duran, Aurea; Ballestar, Esteban; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose M.; Marlowe, Jennifer L.; Puga, Alvaro; Esteller, Manel; Fernandez-Salguero, Pedro M.

    2010-01-01

    Latent TGFβ-binding protein 1 (LTBP-1) is a key regulator of TGFβ targeting and activation in the extracellular matrix. LTBP-1 is recognized as a major docking molecule to localize, and possibly to activate, TGFβ in the extracellular matrix. Despite this relevant function, the molecular mechanisms regulating Ltbp-1 transcription remain largely unknown. Previous results from our laboratory revealed that mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) lacking dioxin receptor (AhR) had increased Ltbp-1 mRNA expression and elevated TGFβ activity, suggesting that AhR repressed Ltbp-1 transcription. Here, we have cloned the mouse Ltbp-1 gene promoter and analysed its mechanism of transcriptional repression by AhR. Reporter gene assays, AhR over-expression and site-directed mutagenesis showed that basal Ltbp-1 transcription is AhR-dependent. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and RNA interference (RNAi) revealed that AhR regulates Ltbp-1 transcription by a mechanism involving recruitment of co-activators such as CREB1 and co-repressors such as HDAC2 to the Ltbp-1 promoter. In AhR-expressing (AhR+/+) MEF cells, the recruitment of HDAC1, 2 and 4 correlated with decreased K8H4 acetylation and impaired binding of pCREBSer133 to the Ltbp-1 promoter, likely maintaining a constitutive repressed state. AhR−/− MEF cells had the opposite pattern of HDACs and pCREB1Ser133 binding to Ltbp-1 promoter, and therefore, over-expressed Ltbp-1 mRNA. In agreement, siRNA for HDAC2 increased Ltbp-1 expression and K8H4 acetylation in AhR+/+ but not in AhR−/− MEF cells. We suggest that HDAC2 binding keeps Ltbp-1 promoter repressed in AhR+/+ MEF cells, whereas in AhR-null MEF cells the absence of HDAC2 and the binding of pCREBSer133 allow Ltbp-1 transcription. Thus, epigenetics can contribute to constitutive Ltbp-1 repression by a mechanism requiring AhR activity. PMID:18508077

  3. Fsp27/CIDEC is a CREB target gene induced during early fasting in liver and regulated by FA oxidation rate

    PubMed Central

    Vilà-Brau, Anna; De Sousa-Coelho, Ana Luísa; Gonçalves, Joana F.; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F.

    2013-01-01

    FSP27 [cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector c (CIDEC) in humans] is a protein associated with lipid droplets that downregulates the fatty acid oxidation (FAO) rate when it is overexpressed. However, little is known about its physiological role in liver. Here, we show that fasting regulates liver expression of Fsp27 in a time-dependent manner. Thus, during the initial stages of fasting, a maximal induction of 800-fold was achieved, whereas during the later phase of fasting, Fsp27 expression decreased. The early response to fasting can be explained by a canonical PKA-CREB-CRTC2 signaling pathway because: i) CIDEC expression was induced by forskolin, ii) Fsp27 promoter activity was increased by CREB, and iii) Fsp27 expression was upregulated in the liver of Sirt1 knockout animals. Interestingly, pharmacological (etomoxir) or genetic (Hmgcs2 interference) inhibition of the FAO rate increases the in vivo expression of Fsp27 during fasting. Similarly, CIDEC expression was upregulated in HepG2 cells by either etomoxir or HMGCS2 interference. Our data indicate that there is a kinetic mechanism of autoregulation between short- and long-term fasting, by which free FAs delivered to the liver during early fasting are accumulated/exported by FSP27/CIDEC, whereas over longer periods of fasting, they are degraded in the mitochondria through the carnitine palmitoyl transferase system. PMID:23220584

  4. Luman/CREB3 recruitment factor regulates glucocorticoid receptor activity and is essential for prolactin-mediated maternal instinct.

    PubMed

    Martyn, Amanda C; Choleris, Elena; Gillis, Daniel J; Armstrong, John N; Amor, Talya R; McCluggage, Adam R R; Turner, Patricia V; Liang, Genqing; Cai, Kimberly; Lu, Ray

    2012-12-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a major part of the neuroendocrine system in animal responses to stress. It is known that the HPA axis is attenuated at parturition to prevent detrimental effects of glucocorticoid secretion including inhibition of lactation and maternal responsiveness. Luman/CREB3 recruitment factor (LRF) was identified as a negative regulator of CREB3 which is involved in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Here, we report a LRF gene knockout mouse line that has a severe maternal behavioral defect. LRF(-/-) females lacked the instinct to tend pups; 80% of their litters died within 24 h, while most pups survived if cross-fostered. Prolactin levels were significantly repressed in lactating LRF(-/-) dams, with glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling markedly augmented. In cell culture, LRF repressed transcriptional activity of GR and promoted its protein degradation. LRF was found to colocalize with the known GR repressor, RIP140/NRIP1, which inhibits the activity by GR within specific nuclear punctates that are similar to LRF nuclear bodies. Furthermore, administration of prolactin or the GR antagonist RU486 restored maternal responses in mutant females. We thus postulate that LRF plays a critical role in the attenuation of the HPA axis through repression of glucocorticoid stress signaling during parturition and the postpartum period.

  5. Luman/CREB3 Recruitment Factor Regulates Glucocorticoid Receptor Activity and Is Essential for Prolactin-Mediated Maternal Instinct

    PubMed Central

    Martyn, Amanda C.; Choleris, Elena; Gillis, Daniel J.; Armstrong, John N.; Amor, Talya R.; McCluggage, Adam R. R.; Turner, Patricia V.; Liang, Genqing; Cai, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a major part of the neuroendocrine system in animal responses to stress. It is known that the HPA axis is attenuated at parturition to prevent detrimental effects of glucocorticoid secretion including inhibition of lactation and maternal responsiveness. Luman/CREB3 recruitment factor (LRF) was identified as a negative regulator of CREB3 which is involved in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Here, we report a LRF gene knockout mouse line that has a severe maternal behavioral defect. LRF−/− females lacked the instinct to tend pups; 80% of their litters died within 24 h, while most pups survived if cross-fostered. Prolactin levels were significantly repressed in lactating LRF−/− dams, with glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling markedly augmented. In cell culture, LRF repressed transcriptional activity of GR and promoted its protein degradation. LRF was found to colocalize with the known GR repressor, RIP140/NRIP1, which inhibits the activity by GR within specific nuclear punctates that are similar to LRF nuclear bodies. Furthermore, administration of prolactin or the GR antagonist RU486 restored maternal responses in mutant females. We thus postulate that LRF plays a critical role in the attenuation of the HPA axis through repression of glucocorticoid stress signaling during parturition and the postpartum period. PMID:23071095

  6. Cyclic phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid induce hyaluronic acid synthesis via CREB transcription factor regulation in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Maeda-Sano, Katsura; Gotoh, Mari; Morohoshi, Toshiro; Someya, Takao; Murofushi, Hiromu; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko

    2014-09-01

    Cyclic phosphatidic acid (cPA) is a naturally occurring phospholipid mediator and an analog of the growth factor-like phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). cPA has a unique cyclic phosphate ring at the sn-2 and sn-3 positions of its glycerol backbone. We showed before that a metabolically stabilized cPA derivative, 2-carba-cPA, relieved osteoarthritis pathogenesis in vivo and induced hyaluronic acid synthesis in human osteoarthritis synoviocytes in vitro. This study focused on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts, which retain moisture and maintain health in the dermis. We investigated the effects of cPA and LPA on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts (NB1RGB cells). Using particle exclusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, we found that both cPA and LPA dose-dependently induced hyaluronic acid synthesis. We revealed that the expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 messenger RNA and protein is up-regulated by cPA and LPA treatment time dependently. We then characterized the signaling pathways up-regulating hyaluronic acid synthesis mediated by cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. Pharmacological inhibition and reporter gene assays revealed that the activation of the LPA receptor LPAR1, Gi/o protein, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) but not nuclear factor κB induced hyaluronic acid synthesis by the treatment with cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. These results demonstrate for the first time that cPA and LPA induce hyaluronic acid synthesis in human skin fibroblasts mainly through the activation of LPAR1-Gi/o followed by the PI3K, ERK, and CREB signaling pathway.

  7. Presenilins regulate neurotrypsin gene expression and neurotrypsin-dependent agrin cleavage via cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) modulation.

    PubMed

    Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Kim, Sonia N; Benner, Christopher; Herrera, Cheryl M; Kang, David E; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2013-12-01

    Presenilins, the catalytic components of the γ-secretase complex, are upstream regulators of multiple cellular pathways via regulation of gene transcription. However, the underlying mechanisms and the genes regulated by these pathways are poorly characterized. In this study, we identify Tequila and its mammalian ortholog Prss12 as genes negatively regulated by presenilins in Drosophila larval brains and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, respectively. Prss12 encodes the serine protease neurotrypsin, which cleaves the heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin. Altered neurotrypsin activity causes serious synaptic and cognitive defects; despite this, the molecular processes regulating neurotrypsin expression and activity are poorly understood. Using γ-secretase drug inhibitors and presenilin mutants in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found that a mature γ-secretase complex was required to repress neurotrypsin expression and agrin cleavage. We also determined that PSEN1 endoproteolysis or processing of well known γ-secretase substrates was not essential for this process. At the transcriptional level, PSEN1/2 removal induced cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)/CREB-binding protein binding, accumulation of activating histone marks at the neurotrypsin promoter, and neurotrypsin transcriptional and functional up-regulation that was dependent on GSK3 activity. Upon PSEN1/2 reintroduction, this active epigenetic state was replaced by a methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2)-containing repressive state and reduced neurotrypsin expression. Genome-wide analysis revealed hundreds of other mouse promoters in which CREB binding is similarly modulated by the presence/absence of presenilins. Our study thus identifies Tequila and neurotrypsin as new genes repressed by presenilins and reveals a novel mechanism used by presenilins to modulate CREB signaling based on controlling CREB recruitment.

  8. Expression of PDZ-binding kinase (PBK) is regulated by cell cycle-specific transcription factors E2F and CREB/ATF.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Asit K; Rapoport, Aaron P

    2006-04-01

    Earlier we reported that a novel mitotic protein kinase, PDZ-binding kinase (PBK), is expressed in primary hematopoietic neoplasms. Recent reports have suggested a role for PBK in mitotic progression. In the present study, we demonstrate that PBK is down regulated during doxorubicin induced growth arrest of HL60 promyelocytic leukemia cells at least partly due to cell cycle-specific transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, we show that transcriptional control is mostly due to binding of transcription factors E2F and CREB/ATF to two distinct binding sites within the PBK promoter. This was demonstrated by: (i) electrophoretic mobility shift assays showing transcription factor binding within the PBK promoter at the putative E2F (-146bp) and CREB/ATF (-312bp) binding sites; (ii) Western immunoblot analysis of knockdown extracts from siRNA inhibition of transcription factor expression showing that PBK protein expression is dependent upon the presence of these transcription factors; (iii) codistribution of CREB factor and PBK in cell lines of disparate tissue origin; and (iv) luciferase reporter assays showing that PBK promoter activity is dependent on factor binding at intact E2F and CREB/ATF sites. These findings may provide insight into the mechanisms that upregulate PBK expression in proliferative hematologic malignancies and down regulate its expression following growth arrest of leukemic cells. PMID:16171862

  9. Estrogen receptor α L429 and A430 regulate 17β-estradiol-induced cell proliferation via CREB1.

    PubMed

    Pesiri, Valeria; Totta, Pierangela; Segatto, Marco; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Pallottini, Valentina; Marino, Maria; Acconcia, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2)-dependent cell proliferation requires both estrogen receptor α (ERα)-based integrated control of gene transcription and kinase pathways activation. Such coordination of intracellular E2:ERα-dependent signaling mechanisms is finely tuned by receptor association with specific partner proteins. Recently, we identified the leucine (L) 429 and alanine (A) 430 within the ERα ligand binding domain as important residues for receptor non-covalent interaction to ubiquitinated species [i.e., ERα ubiquitin-binding surface (ERα UBS)] and for E2-induced ERα activation. To date, if these two ERα amino acids are involved in the control of E2-dependent pathways required for cell proliferation is unknown. Here, by using stably expressing ERα mutated in L429 and A430 (i.e., L429A,A430G-LAAG) cell lines, we show that L429 and A430 are critical for E2-induced cell proliferation, PI3K/AKT pathway activation, and ERα-mediated transcriptional changes. Moreover, we demonstrate that these two receptor structural determinants direct the E2-induced PI3K/AKT/CREB1 pathway activation and CREB1-mediated transcriptional activity that in turn control the hormone-induced cell proliferation. As a whole, our data demonstrate for the first time that the ERα UBS contributes to the modulation of E2-induced ERα-mediated cell proliferation and provide a novel connection between the receptor structure and the functional molecular mechanisms by which E2:ERα complex can regulate cell processes. PMID:26348925

  10. Altered LKB1/CREB-regulated transcription co-activator (CRTC) signaling axis promotes esophageal cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Gu, Y; Lin, S; Li, J-L; Nakagawa, H; Chen, Z; Jin, B; Tian, L; Ucar, D A; Shen, H; Lu, J; Hochwald, S N; Kaye, F J; Wu, L

    2012-01-26

    LKB1 is a tumor susceptibility gene for the Peutz-Jeghers cancer syndrome and is a target for mutational inactivation in sporadic human malignancies. LKB1 encodes a serine/threonine kinase that has critical roles in cell growth, polarity and metabolism. A novel and important function of LKB1 is its ability to regulate the phosphorylation of CREB-regulated transcription co-activators (CRTCs) whose aberrant activation is linked with oncogenic activities. However, the roles and mechanisms of LKB1 and CRTC in the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer have not been previously investigated. In this study, we observed altered LKB1-CRTC signaling in a subset of human esophageal cancer cell lines and patient samples. LKB1 negatively regulates esophageal cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro. Mechanistically, we determined that CRTC signaling becomes activated because of LKB1 loss, which results in the transcriptional activation of specific downstream targets including LYPD3, a critical mediator for LKB1 loss-of-function. Our data indicate that de-regulated LKB1-CRTC signaling might represent a crucial mechanism for esophageal cancer progression.

  11. Regulation of SREBPs by Sphingomyelin in Adipocytes via a Caveolin and Ras-ERK-MAPK-CREB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Makdissy, Nehman; Haddad, Katia; Mouawad, Charbel; Popa, Iuliana; Younsi, Mohamed; Valet, Philippe; Brunaud, Laurent; Ziegler, Olivier; Quilliot, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Sterol response element binding protein (SREBP) is a key transcription factor in insulin and glucose metabolism. We previously demonstrated that elevated levels of membrane sphingomyelin (SM) were related to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), which is a known target gene of SREBP-1 in adipocytes. However, the role of SM in SREBP expression in adipocytes remains unknown. In human abdominal adipose tissue from obese women with various concentrations of fasting plasma insulin, SREBP-1 proteins decreased in parallel with increases in membrane SM levels. An inverse correlation was found between the membrane SM content and the levels of SREBP-1c/ERK/Ras/PPARγ/CREB proteins. For the first time, we demonstrate the effects of SM and its signaling pathway in 3T3-F442A adipocytes. These cells were enriched or unenriched with SM in a range of concentrations similar to those observed in obese subjects by adding exogenous natural SMs (having different acyl chain lengths) or by inhibiting neutral sphingomyelinase. SM accumulated in caveolae of the plasma membrane within 24 h and then in the intracellular space. SM enrichment decreased SREBP-1 through the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) but not JNK or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Ras/Raf-1/MEK1/2 and KSR proteins, which are upstream mediators of ERK, were down-regulated, whereas SREBP-2/caveolin and cholesterol were up-regulated. In SM-unmodulated adipocytes treated with DL-1-Phenyl-2-Palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PPMP), where the ceramide level increased, the expression levels of SREBPs and ERK were modulated in an opposite direction relative to the SM-enriched cells. SM inhibited the insulin-induced expression of SREBP-1. Rosiglitazone, which is an anti-diabetic agent and potent activator of PPARγ, reversed the effects of SM on SREBP-1, PPARγ and CREB. Taken together, these findings provide novel insights indicating that excess membrane SM might

  12. Co-regulation of nuclear respiratory factor-1 by NFkappaB and CREB links LPS-induced inflammation to mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Hagir B; Sweeney, Timothy E; Withers, Crystal M; Piantadosi, Claude A

    2010-08-01

    The nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF1) gene is activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which might reflect TLR4-mediated mitigation of cellular inflammatory damage via initiation of mitochondrial biogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we examined NRF1 promoter regulation by NFκB, and identified interspecies-conserved κB-responsive promoter and intronic elements in the NRF1 locus. In mice, activation of Nrf1 and its downstream target, Tfam, by Escherichia coli was contingent on NFκB, and in LPS-treated hepatocytes, NFκB served as an NRF1 enhancer element in conjunction with NFκB promoter binding. Unexpectedly, optimal NRF1 promoter activity after LPS also required binding by the energy-state-dependent transcription factor CREB. EMSA and ChIP assays confirmed p65 and CREB binding to the NRF1 promoter and p65 binding to intron 1. Functionality for both transcription factors was validated by gene-knockdown studies. LPS regulation of NRF1 led to mtDNA-encoded gene expression and expansion of mtDNA copy number. In cells expressing plasmid constructs containing the NRF-1 promoter and GFP, LPS-dependent reporter activity was abolished by cis-acting κB-element mutations, and nuclear accumulation of NFκB and CREB demonstrated dependence on mitochondrial H(2)O(2). These findings indicate that TLR4-dependent NFκB and CREB activation co-regulate the NRF1 promoter with NFκB intronic enhancement and redox-regulated nuclear translocation, leading to downstream target-gene expression, and identify NRF-1 as an early-phase component of the host antibacterial defenses.

  13. SUMOylation regulates the nuclear mobility of CREB binding protein and its association with nuclear bodies in live cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Colm M.; Kindle, Karin B.; Collins, Hilary M.; Heery, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The lysine acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP) is required for chromatin modification and transcription at many gene promoters. In fixed cells, a large proportion of CBP colocalises to PML or nuclear bodies. Using live cell imaging, we show here that YFP-tagged CBP expressed in HEK293 cells undergoes gradual accumulation in nuclear bodies, some of which are mobile and migrate towards the nuclear envelope. Deletion of a short lysine-rich domain that contains the major SUMO acceptor sites of CBP abrogated its ability to be SUMO modified, and prevented its association with endogenous SUMO-1/PML speckles in vivo. This SUMO-defective CBP showed enhanced ability to co-activate AML1-mediated transcription. Deletion mapping revealed that the SUMO-modified region was not sufficient for targeting CBP to PML bodies, as C-terminally truncated mutants containing this domain showed a strong reduction in accumulation at PML bodies. Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) experiments revealed that YFP-CBP{Delta}998-1087 had a retarded recovery time in the nucleus, as compared to YFP-CBP. These results indicate that SUMOylation regulates CBP function by influencing its shuttling between nuclear bodies and chromatin microenvironments.

  14. IL-10 Production in Macrophages Is Regulated by a TLR-Driven CREB-Mediated Mechanism That Is Linked to Genes Involved in Cell Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sanin, David E.; Prendergast, Catriona T.

    2015-01-01

    IL-10 is produced by macrophages in diverse immune settings and is critical in limiting immune-mediated pathology. In helminth infections, macrophages are an important source of IL-10; however, the molecular mechanism underpinning production of IL-10 by these cells is poorly characterized. In this study, bone marrow–derived macrophages exposed to excretory/secretory products released by Schistosoma mansoni cercariae rapidly produce IL-10 as a result of MyD88-mediated activation of MEK/ERK/RSK and p38. The phosphorylation of these kinases was triggered by TLR2 and TLR4 and converged on activation of the transcription factor CREB. Following phosphorylation, CREB is recruited to a novel regulatory element in the Il10 promoter and is also responsible for regulating a network of genes involved in metabolic processes, such as glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, skin-resident tissue macrophages, which encounter S. mansoni excretory/secretory products during infection, are the first monocytes to produce IL-10 in vivo early postinfection with S. mansoni cercariae. The early and rapid release of IL-10 by these cells has the potential to condition the dermal microenvironment encountered by immune cells recruited to this infection site, and we propose a mechanism by which CREB regulates the production of IL-10 by macrophages in the skin, but also has a major effect on their metabolic state. PMID:26116503

  15. A Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitor Targeting CREB-CBP Complex Possesses Anti-Cancer Effects along with Cell Cycle Regulation, Autophagy Suppression and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Woo; Park, Hee Sun; Park, Sin-Aye; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Meng, Wuyi; Jürgensmeier, Juliane M.; Kurie, Jonathan M.; Hong, Waun Ki; Boyer, Julie L.; Herbst, Roy S.; Koo, Ja Seok

    2015-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of lung cancer, is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Despite attempts for the treatment of lung cancer which have been accumulating, promising new therapies are still needed. Here, we found that cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-CREB binding protein (CBP) transcription factors complex inhibitor, Naphthol AS-TR phosphate (NASTRp), is a potential therapeutic agent for lung cancer. We show that NASTRp inhibited oncogenic cell properties through cell cycle arrest with concomitant suppression of tumor-promoting autophagy with down-regulations of Atg5-12 and Atg7, and accumulation of p62 in human lung cancer cell lines. In addition, NASTRp induced expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers such as DDIT3/CHOP, and led to apoptosis along with Bim induction. These findings suggest that transcription factor/co-activator complex, CREB-CBP, can be a potential therapeutic target and its inhibition could be a novel therapeutic strategy for lung cancer. PMID:25897662

  16. Mixture of Peanut Skin Extract and Fish Oil Improves Memory in Mice via Modulation of Anti-Oxidative Stress and Regulation of BDNF/ERK/CREB Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Lan; Cao, Xue-Li; Xing, Tian-Yan; Mori, Daisuke; Tang, Rui-Qi; Li, Jing; Gao, Li-Juan; Qi, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Long-term use of fish oil (FO) is known to induce oxidative stress and increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease in humans. In the present study, peanut skin extract (PSE), which has strong antioxidant capacity, was mixed with FO to reduce its side effects while maintaining its beneficial properties. Twelve-week Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice were used to conduct animal behavior tests in order to evaluate the memory-enhancing ability of the mixture of peanut skin extract and fish oil (MPF). MPF significantly increased alternations in the Y-maze and cognitive index in the novel object recognition test. MPF also improved performance in the water maze test. We further sought to understand the mechanisms underlying these effects. A significant decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and an increase in malonyldialdehyde (MDA) in plasma were observed in the FO group. The MPF group showed reduced MDA level and increased SOD activity in the plasma, cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, the gene expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) in the hippocampus were increased in the MPF group, while phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and CREB in the hippocampus were enhanced. MPF improves memory in mice via modulation of anti-oxidative stress and activation of BDNF/ERK/CREB signaling pathways. PMID:27136583

  17. Serotonin- and Training-Induced Dynamic Regulation of CREB2 in "Aplysia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Rong-Yu; Shah, Shreyansh; Cleary, Leonard J.; Byrne, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term memory and plasticity, including long-term synaptic facilitation (LTF) of the "Aplysia" sensorimotor synapse, depend on the activation of transcription factors that regulate genes necessary for synaptic plasticity. In the present study we found that treatment with 5-HT and behavioral training produce biphasic changes in the expression of…

  18. Optogenetic Inhibitor of the Transcription Factor CREB.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed M; Reis, Jakeb M; Xia, Yan; Rashid, Asim J; Mercaldo, Valentina; Walters, Brandon J; Brechun, Katherine E; Borisenko, Vitali; Josselyn, Sheena A; Karanicolas, John; Woolley, G Andrew

    2015-11-19

    Current approaches for optogenetic control of transcription do not mimic the activity of endogenous transcription factors, which act at numerous sites in the genome in a complex interplay with other factors. Optogenetic control of dominant negative versions of endogenous transcription factors provides a mechanism for mimicking the natural regulation of gene expression. Here we describe opto-DN-CREB, a blue-light-controlled inhibitor of the transcription factor CREB created by fusing the dominant negative inhibitor A-CREB to photoactive yellow protein (PYP). A light-driven conformational change in PYP prevents coiled-coil formation between A-CREB and CREB, thereby activating CREB. Optogenetic control of CREB function was characterized in vitro, in HEK293T cells, and in neurons where blue light enabled control of expression of the CREB targets NR4A2 and c-Fos. Dominant negative inhibitors exist for numerous transcription factors; linking these to optogenetic domains offers a general approach for spatiotemporal control of native transcriptional events. PMID:26590638

  19. BDNF–ERK–CREB signalling mediates the role of miR-132 in the regulation of the effects of oleanolic acid in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Li-Tao; Li, Jing; Liu, Bin-Bin; Luo, Liu; Liu, Qing; Geng, Di

    2014-01-01

    Background Although previous study has demonstrated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in the antidepressant-like effect of oleanolic acid, there is little information regarding the details of the molecular mechanism involved in this effect. Methods We used a chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) model to test the antidepressant-like effect of oleanolic acid on depressant-like behaviour, miR-132 expression and synaptic protein expression in the male mouse hippocampus. Furthermore, we explored the possible signalling pathways associated with miR-132 expression that mediate the effect of oleanolic acid on neuronal proliferation. Results The results demonstrated that a 3-week treatment with oleanolic acid ameliorated CUMS-induced anhedonic and anxiogenic behaviours. Furthermore, we found that oleanolic acid led to the BDNF-related phosphorylation and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB), which was associated with the upregulation of miR-132 and hippocampal neuronal proliferation. Moreover, experiments with an miR-132 antagomir revealed that targeting miR-132 led to inhibition of neuronal proliferation and the postsynaptic density protein 95, but did not affect presynaptic protein synapsin I. Limitations Several other stimuli can also induce CREB phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Thus, regulation of miR-132 may not be restricted to neurotrophic signalling. Conclusion Our results show that oleanolic acid induces the upregulation of miR-132, which serves as an important regulator of neurotrophic actions, mainly through the activation of the hippocampal BDNF–ERK–CREB signalling pathways. PMID:25079084

  20. A stress-activated, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-ATF/CREB pathway regulates posttranscriptional, sequence-dependent decay of target RNAs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Wagnon, Jacy L; Protacio, Reine M; Glazko, Galina V; Beggs, Marjorie; Raj, Vinay; Davidson, Mari K; Wahls, Wayne P

    2013-08-01

    Broadly conserved, mitogen-activated/stress-activated protein kinases (MAPK/SAPK) of the p38 family regulate multiple cellular processes. They transduce signals via dimeric, basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors of the ATF/CREB family (such as Atf2, Fos, and Jun) to regulate the transcription of target genes. We report additional mechanisms for gene regulation by such pathways exerted through RNA stability controls. The Spc1 (Sty1/Phh1) kinase-regulated Atf1-Pcr1 (Mts1-Mts2) heterodimer of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe controls the stress-induced, posttranscriptional stability and decay of sets of target RNAs. Whole transcriptome RNA sequencing data revealed that decay is associated nonrandomly with transcripts that contain an M26 sequence motif. Moreover, the ablation of an M26 sequence motif in a target mRNA is sufficient to block its stress-induced loss. Conversely, engineered M26 motifs can render a stable mRNA into one that is targeted for decay. This stress-activated RNA decay (SARD) provides a mechanism for reducing the expression of target genes without shutting off transcription itself. Thus, a single p38-ATF/CREB signal transduction pathway can coordinately induce (promote transcription and RNA stability) and repress (promote RNA decay) transcript levels for distinct sets of genes, as is required for developmental decisions in response to stress and other stimuli. PMID:23732911

  1. A Stress-Activated, p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase–ATF/CREB Pathway Regulates Posttranscriptional, Sequence-Dependent Decay of Target RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Wagnon, Jacy L.; Protacio, Reine M.; Glazko, Galina V.; Beggs, Marjorie; Raj, Vinay

    2013-01-01

    Broadly conserved, mitogen-activated/stress-activated protein kinases (MAPK/SAPK) of the p38 family regulate multiple cellular processes. They transduce signals via dimeric, basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors of the ATF/CREB family (such as Atf2, Fos, and Jun) to regulate the transcription of target genes. We report additional mechanisms for gene regulation by such pathways exerted through RNA stability controls. The Spc1 (Sty1/Phh1) kinase-regulated Atf1-Pcr1 (Mts1-Mts2) heterodimer of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe controls the stress-induced, posttranscriptional stability and decay of sets of target RNAs. Whole transcriptome RNA sequencing data revealed that decay is associated nonrandomly with transcripts that contain an M26 sequence motif. Moreover, the ablation of an M26 sequence motif in a target mRNA is sufficient to block its stress-induced loss. Conversely, engineered M26 motifs can render a stable mRNA into one that is targeted for decay. This stress-activated RNA decay (SARD) provides a mechanism for reducing the expression of target genes without shutting off transcription itself. Thus, a single p38-ATF/CREB signal transduction pathway can coordinately induce (promote transcription and RNA stability) and repress (promote RNA decay) transcript levels for distinct sets of genes, as is required for developmental decisions in response to stress and other stimuli. PMID:23732911

  2. Drosophila salt-inducible kinase (SIK) regulates starvation resistance through cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC).

    PubMed

    Choi, Sekyu; Kim, Wonho; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2011-01-28

    Salt-inducible kinase (SIK), one of the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK)-related kinases, has been suggested to play important functions in glucose homeostasis by inhibiting the cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC). To examine the role of SIK in vivo, we generated Drosophila SIK mutant and found that the mutant flies have higher amounts of lipid and glycogen stores and are resistant to starvation. Interestingly, SIK transcripts are highly enriched in the brain, and we found that neuron-specific expression of exogenous SIK fully rescued lipid and glycogen storage phenotypes as well as starvation resistance of the mutant. Using genetic and biochemical analyses, we demonstrated that CRTC Ser-157 phosphorylation by SIK is critical for inhibiting CRTC activity in vivo. Furthermore, double mutants of SIK and CRTC became sensitive to starvation, and the Ser-157 phosphomimetic mutation of CRTC reduced lipid and glycogen levels in the SIK mutant, suggesting that CRTC mediates the effects of SIK signaling. Collectively, our results strongly support the importance of the SIK-CRTC signaling axis that functions in the brain to maintain energy homeostasis in Drosophila.

  3. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of RNA polymerase II basal transcription activity.

    PubMed Central

    Yonaha, M; Chibazakura, T; Kitajima, S; Yasukochi, Y

    1995-01-01

    Regulation of transcription by RNA polymerase II (pol II) in eukaryotic cells requires both basal and regulatory transcription factors. In this report we have investigated in vitro pol II basal transcription activity during the cell cycle by using nuclear extracts from synchronized HeLa cells. It is shown that pol II basal transcription activity is low in the S and G2 phases and high in early G1 phase and TFIID is the rate limiting component of pol II basal transcription activity during the cell cycle. Further analyses reveal that TFIID exists as a less active form in the S and G2 phases and nuclear extracts from S and G2 phase cells contain a heat-sensitive repressor(s) of TATA box binding protein (TBP). These results suggest that pol II basal transcription activity is regulated by a qualitative change in the TFIID complex, which could involve repression of TBP, during the cell cycle. Images PMID:7479063

  4. Acid activation of Trpv1 leads to an up-regulation of calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons via the CaMK-CREB cascade: a potential mechanism of inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Masako; Hata, Kenji; Nagayama, Tomotaka; Sakurai, Teruhisa; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroki; Hiraga, Toru; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2010-08-01

    Increased production of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in sensory neurons is implicated in inflammatory pain. The inflammatory site is acidic due to proton release from infiltrating inflammatory cells. Acid activation of peripheral nociceptors relays pain signals to the CNS. Here, we examined whether acid activated the transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (Trpv1), a widely recognized acid-sensing nociceptor and subsequently increased CGRP expression. Chemically induced inflammation was associated with thermal hyperalgesia and increased CGRP expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in rats. In organ cultures of DRG, acid (pH 5.5) elevated CGRP expression and the selective Trpv1 antagonist 5'-Iodoresiniferatoxin decreased it. Trpv1-deficient DRG showed reduced CGRP increase by acid. Of note, many of CGRP/Trpv1-positive DRG neurons exhibited the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a nociceptive transcription factor. Knockdown of CREB by small interfering RNA or a dominant-negative form of CREB diminished acid-elevated CGRP expression. Acid elevated the transcriptional activity of CREB, which in turn stimulated CGRP gene promoter activity. These effects were inhibited by a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) inhibitor KN-93. In conclusion, our results suggest that inflammatory acidic environments activate Trpv1, leading to an up-regulation of CGRP expression via CaMK-CREB cascade, a series of events that may be associated with inflammatory pain.

  5. Role of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator 3 (CRTC3) in the initiation of mitochondrial biogenesis and stress response in liver cells.

    PubMed

    Than, Tin Aung; Lou, Huan; Ji, Cheng; Win, Sanda; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2011-06-24

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. PGC-1α expression is under the control of the transcription factor, cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). In searching for candidate transcription factors that mediate mitochondrial stress-initiated mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, we assessed the effect of silencing CREB-regulated transcription co-activators (CRTC). CRTC isoforms are co-activators of CREB-regulated transcription by a CREB phosphorylation-independent pathway. Using cultured HepG2 cells and primary mouse hepatocytes, we determined that mitochondrial stress imposed by the complex I inhibitor rotenone elicited mitochondrial biogenesis, which was dependent on an induction of PGC-1α, which was inhibited by silencing PGC-1α. PGC-1α induction in response to rotenone was inhibited by silencing the expression of CRTC3, which blocked downstream mitochondria biogenesis. In contrast, silencing CRTC2 did not affect the induction of this pathway in response to rotenone. Thus, CRTC3 plays a selective role in mitochondrial biogenesis in response to rotenone.

  6. Angelica sinensis polysaccharides promotes apoptosis in human breast cancer cells via CREB-regulated caspase-3 activation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-Jie; Wang, Sheng; Hu, Zhuang; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Song, Cai-Juan

    2015-11-20

    Angelica sinensis polysaccharide (ASP) is purified from the fresh roots of Angelica sinensis (AS). This traditional Chinese medicine has been used for thousands of years for treating gynecological diseases and used in functional foods for the prevention and treatment of various diseases, such as inflammation and cancer. The antitumor activity of ASP is related to its biological activities, because it suppresses a variety of pro-proliferative or anti-apoptotic factors that are dramatically expressed in cancer cells of given types. In this study, we show that angelica sinensis polysaccharide induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells of T47D over-expressing the Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), inducing apoptosis-related signaling pathway activity. The result also found that ASP caused cell death was linked to caspase activity, accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, and Bax translocation from the cytosol to the mitochondria. We found that ASP significantly affected the poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), Bcl-2 Associated X Protein (Bax), Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and apoptotic protease activating facter-1 (Apaf1) protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. DAPI staining and Flow cytometry were used to analyze apoptosis. The nude mice xenograft model was used to evaluate the antitumor effect of ASP in vivo. ASP has profound antitumor effect on T47D cells, probably by inducing apoptosis through CREB signaling pathway. Thus, these results suggest that ASP would be a promising therapeutic agent for breast cancer.

  7. Regulation of the NRSF/REST gene by methylation and CREB affects the cellular phenotype of small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kreisler, A; Strissel, P L; Strick, R; Neumann, S B; Schumacher, U; Becker, C-M

    2010-10-28

    The neuron-restrictive silencer factor/RE1-silencing transcription factor (NRSF/REST) is a negative regulator of gene expression restricting the expression of neuronal genes to the nervous system. NRSF/REST is highly expressed in non-neuronal tissues like the lung. In previous work, we identified small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines with no detectable NRSF/REST expression that, as a consequence, expressed neuronal markers like L1-cell adhesion molecule (L1-CAM) and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). The loss of NRSF/REST expression was linked to malignant progression; however, its mechanistic role remained elusive. Here, we show that NRSF/REST itself, rather than one of its regulated genes, acts like a classic tumour suppressor, being in part regulated by methylation. In SCLCs, NRSF/REST is positively regulated by CREB, with an NRSF/REST promoter fragment showing cell type specificity. Downstream, NRSF/REST directly regulates AKT2, in which NRSF/REST loss leads to an epidermal growth factor-mediated de-regulation of AKT-Serine473 phosphorylation, important for cellular proliferation and survival. Assaying anchorage-independent growth, we observed that with reduced NRSF/REST expression, proliferation was significantly enhanced, whereas NRSF/REST rescue decreased the potential of cells to grow anchorage independently. Our observations support the fact that NRSF/REST may act as an important modulator of malignant progression in SCLC. PMID:20697351

  8. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-Induced MyD88 Short Expression Is Regulated by Positive IKKβ and CREB Pathways and Negative ERK1/2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Carla S.; Miyata, Masanori; Susuki-Miyata, Seiko; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Komatsu, Kensei; Li, Jian-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are characterized by excessive inflammation and are exacerbated by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Airway epithelial cells mount the initial innate immune responses to invading pathogens and thus modulate inflammation. While inflammation is necessary to eliminate a pathogen, excessive inflammation can cause damage to the host tissue. Therefore, the inflammatory response must be tightly regulated and deciphering the signaling pathways involved in this response will enhance our understanding of the regulation of the host inflammatory response. NTHi binds to TLR2 and signal propagation requires the adaptor molecule myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88). An alternative spliced form of MyD88 is called MyD88 short (MyD88s) and has been identified in macrophages and embryonic cell lines as a negative regulator of inflammation. However, the role of MyD88s in NTHi-induced inflammation in airway epithelial cells remains unknown. Here we show that NTHi induces MyD88s expression and MyD88s is a negative regulator of inflammation in airway epithelial cells. We further demonstrate that MyD88s is positively regulated by IKKβ and CREB and negatively regulated by ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Taken together these data indicate that airway inflammation is controlled in a negative feedback manner involving MyD88s and suggest that airway epithelial cells are essential to maintain immune homeostasis. PMID:26669856

  9. The mitochondrial uncoupler DNP triggers brain cell mTOR signaling network reprogramming and CREB pathway up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Yongqing; Gharavi, Robert; Park, Hee Ra; Lee, Jaewon; Siddiqui, Sana; Telljohann, Richard; Nassar, Matthew R; Cutler, Roy G; Becker, Kevin G; Mattson, Mark P

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is highly responsive to nutrient availability and ongoing activity in neuronal circuits. The molecular mechanisms by which brain cells respond to an increase in cellular energy expenditure are largely unknown. Mild mitochondrial uncoupling enhances cellular energy expenditure in mitochondria and can be induced with 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a proton ionophore previously used for weight loss. We found that DNP treatment reduces mitochondrial membrane potential, increases intracellular Ca(2+) levels and reduces oxidative stress in cerebral cortical neurons. Gene expression profiling of the cerebral cortex of DNP-treated mice revealed reprogramming of signaling cascades that included suppression of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and insulin--PI3K - MAPK pathways, and up-regulation of tuberous sclerosis complex 2, a negative regulator of mTOR. Genes encoding proteins involved in autophagy processes were up-regulated in response to DNP. CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) signaling, Arc and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which play important roles in synaptic plasticity and adaptive cellular stress responses, were up-regulated in response to DNP, and DNP-treated mice exhibited improved performance in a test of learning and memory. Immunoblot analysis verified that key DNP-induced changes in gene expression resulted in corresponding changes at the protein level. Our findings suggest that mild mitochondrial uncoupling triggers an integrated signaling response in brain cells characterized by reprogramming of mTOR and insulin signaling, and up-regulation of pathways involved in adaptive stress responses, molecular waste disposal, and synaptic plasticity. Physiological bioenergetic challenges such as exercise and fasting can enhance neuroplasticity and protect neurons against injury and neurodegeneration. Here, we show that the mitochondrial uncoupling agent 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) elicits adaptive signaling responses in the

  10. Renal proximal tubule Na,K-ATPase is controlled by CREB-regulated transcriptional coactivators as well as salt-inducible kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Taub, Mary; Garimella, Sudha; Kim, Dongwook; Rajkhowa, Trivikram; Cutuli, Facundo

    2015-12-01

    Sodium reabsorption by the kidney is regulated by locally produced natriuretic and anti-natriuretic factors, including dopamine and norepinephrine, respectively. Previous studies indicated that signaling events initiated by these natriuretic and anti-natriuretic factors achieve their effects by altering the phosphorylation of Na,K-ATPase in the renal proximal tubule, and that protein kinase A (PKA) and calcium-mediated signaling pathways are involved. The same signaling pathways also control the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase β subunit gene atp1b1 in renal proximal tubule cells. In this report, evidence is presented that (1) both the recently discovered cAMP-regulated transcriptional coactivators (CRTCs) and salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) contribute to the transcriptional regulation of atp1b1 in renal proximal tubule (RPT) cells and (2) renal effectors, including norepinephrine, dopamine, prostaglandins, and sodium, play a role. Exogenously expressed CRTCs stimulate atp1b1 transcription. Evidence for a role of endogenous CRTCs includes the loss of transcriptional regulation of atp1b1 by a dominant-negative CRTC, as well as by a CREB mutant, with an altered CRTC binding site. In a number of experimental systems, SIK phosphorylates CRTCs, which are then sequestered in the cytoplasm, preventing their nuclear effects. Consistent with such a role of SIK in primary RPT cells, atp1b1 transcription increased in the presence of a dominant-negative SIK1, and in addition, regulation by dopamine, norepinephrine, and monensin was disrupted by a dominant-negative SIK1. These latter observations can be explained if SIK1 is phosphorylated and inactivated in the presence of these renal effectors. Our results support the hypothesis that Na,K-ATPase in the renal proximal tubule is regulated at the transcriptional level via SIK1 and CRTCs by renal effectors, in addition to the previously reported control of the phosphorylation of Na,K-ATPase.

  11. Desipramine improves depression-like behavior and working memory by up-regulating p-CREB in Alzheimer's disease associated mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan-Dan; Li, Jia; Yu, Li-Peng; Wu, Mei-Na; Sun, Li-Na; Qi, Jin-Shun

    2016-06-01

    Aggregation of amyloid [Formula: see text] protein (A[Formula: see text] and progressive loss of memory are the main characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is noteworthy that approximately 40% of AD patients have depressive symptom. The close correlation between cognitive deficits and mental depression suggests a possibility that antidepression treatment might be beneficial to cognitive improvement in AD. The present study, by using tail-suspension test (TST), forced swimming, alternative electro-stimulus Y maze test and immunohistochemistry, examined the neuroprotective effects of desipramine, a newer generation tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), and investigated its possible molecular mechanism. The results showed that: (1) intra-hippocampal injection of A[Formula: see text] induced depression-like behavior and associative learning deficits in mice, with an increased mean immobility time in tail-suspension and forced swimming test and an increased mean error times in Y maze test; (2) after treatment with desipramine (10[Formula: see text]mg/kg, i.p.), the average immobility time significantly decreased, from [Formula: see text][Formula: see text]s in A[Formula: see text] group to [Formula: see text][Formula: see text]s in A[Formula: see text] plus desipramine group ([Formula: see text]) in TST and from [Formula: see text][Formula: see text]s to [Formula: see text][Formula: see text]s ([Formula: see text] or 9, [Formula: see text]) in forced swimming test, respectively;the mean error times of mice in Y maze test also significantly decreased, from [Formula: see text] in A[Formula: see text] group to [Formula: see text] in A[Formula: see text] plus desipramine group ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]); (3) desipramine administration significantly prevented against A[Formula: see text]-induced down-regulation of phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (p-CREB) in the hippocampus. These results indicate that A[Formula: see text] could

  12. Prenatal auditory stimulation alters the levels of CREB mRNA, p-CREB and BDNF expression in chick hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Sraboni; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2009-10-01

    Prenatal auditory stimulation influences the development of the chick auditory pathway and the hippocampus showing an increase in various morphological parameters as well as expression of calcium-binding proteins. Calcium regulates the activity of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-response element binding (CREB) protein. CREB is known to play a role in development, undergo phosphorylation with neural activity as well as regulate transcription of BDNF. BDNF is important for the survival of neurons and regulates synaptic strength. Hence in the present study, we have evaluated the levels of CREB mRNA and protein along with p-CREB protein as well as BDNF mRNA and protein levels in the chick hippocampus at embryonic days (E) 12, E16, E20 and post-hatch day (PH) 1 following activation by prenatal auditory stimulation. Fertilized eggs were exposed to species-specific sound or sitar music (frequency range: 100-6300Hz) at 65dB levels for 15min/h over 24h from E10 till hatching. The control chick hippocampus showed higher CREB mRNA and p-CREB protein in the early embryonic stages, which later decline whereas BDNF mRNA and BDNF protein levels increase until PH1. The CREB mRNA and p-CREB protein were significantly increased at E12, E16 and PH1 in the auditory stimulated groups as compared to control group. A significant increase in the level of BDNF mRNA was observed from E12 and the protein expression from E16 onwards in both auditory stimulated groups. Therefore, enhanced phosphorylation of CREB during development following prenatal sound stimulation may be responsible for cell survival. Increased levels of p-CREB again at PH1 may trigger synthesis of proteins necessary for synaptic plasticity. Further, the increased levels of BDNF may also help in regulating synaptic plasticity. PMID:19559781

  13. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G.; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D.

    2016-01-01

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies. PMID:26888436

  14. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D

    2016-02-18

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies.

  15. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed CREB and serine 133 phospho-CREB binding to the CART gene proximal promoter

    PubMed Central

    Rogge, George A; Shen, Li-Ling; Kuhar, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Both over expression of cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), and intra-accumbal injection of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptides, have been shown to decrease cocaine reward. Also, over expression of CREB in the rat NAc increased CART mRNA and peptide levels, but it is not known if this was due to a direct action of P-CREB on the CART gene promoter. The goal of this study was to test if CREB and P-CREB bound directly to the CRE site in the CART promoter, using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. ChIP assay with anti-CREB antibodies showed an enrichment of the CART promoter fragment containing the CRE region over IgG precipitated material, a non-specific control. Forskolin, which was known to increase CART mRNA levels in GH3 cells, was utilized to show that the drug increased levels of P-CREB protein and P-CREB binding to the CART promoter CRE-containing region. A region of the c-Fos promoter containing a CRE cis-regulatory element was previously shown to bind P-CREB, and it was used here as a positive control. These data suggest that the effects of CREB over expression on blunting cocaine reward could be, at least in part, attributed to the increased expression of the CART gene by direct interaction of P-CREB with the CART promoter CRE site, rather than by some indirect action. PMID:20451507

  16. Pak3 regulates apical-basal polarity in migrating border cells during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Felix, Martina; Chayengia, Mrinal; Ghosh, Ritabrata; Sharma, Aditi; Prasad, Mohit

    2015-11-01

    Group cell migration is a highly coordinated process that is involved in a number of physiological events such as morphogenesis, wound healing and tumor metastasis. Unlike single cells, collectively moving cells are physically attached to each other and retain some degree of apical-basal polarity during the migratory phase. Although much is known about direction sensing, how polarity is regulated in multicellular movement remains unclear. Here we report the role of the protein kinase Pak3 in maintaining apical-basal polarity in migrating border cell clusters during Drosophila oogenesis. Pak3 is enriched in border cells and downregulation of its function impedes border cell movement. Time-lapse imaging suggests that Pak3 affects protrusive behavior of the border cell cluster, specifically regulating the stability and directionality of protrusions. Pak3 functions downstream of guidance receptor signaling to regulate the level and distribution of F-actin in migrating border cells. We also provide evidence that Pak3 genetically interacts with the lateral polarity marker Scribble and that it regulates JNK signaling in the moving border cells. Since Pak3 depletion results in mislocalization of several apical-basal polarity markers and overexpression of Jra rescues the polarity of the Pak3-depleted cluster, we propose that Pak3 functions through JNK signaling to modulate apical-basal polarity of the migrating border cell cluster. We also observe loss of apical-basal polarity in Rac1-depleted border cell clusters, suggesting that guidance receptor signaling functions through Rac GTPase and Pak3 to regulate the overall polarity of the cluster and mediate efficient collective movement of the border cells to the oocyte boundary.

  17. Integrative analysis identifies targetable CREB1/FoxA1 transcriptional co-regulation as a predictor of prostate cancer recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Sunkel, Benjamin; Wu, Dayong; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Chiou-Miin; Liu, Xiangtao; Ye, Zhenqing; Horning, Aaron M.; Liu, Joseph; Mahalingam, Devalingam; Lopez-Nicora, Horacio; Lin, Chun-Lin; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Clinton, Steven K.; Jin, Victor X.; Chen, Chun-Liang; Huang, Tim H.-M.; Wang, Qianben

    2016-01-01

    Identifying prostate cancer-driving transcription factors (TFs) in addition to the androgen receptor promises to improve our ability to effectively diagnose and treat this disease. We employed an integrative genomics analysis of master TFs CREB1 and FoxA1 in androgen-dependent prostate cancer (ADPC) and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell lines, primary prostate cancer tissues and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to investigate their role in defining prostate cancer gene expression profiles. Combining genome-wide binding site and gene expression profiles we define CREB1 as a critical driver of pro-survival, cell cycle and metabolic transcription programs. We show that CREB1 and FoxA1 co-localize and mutually influence each other's binding to define disease-driving transcription profiles associated with advanced prostate cancer. Gene expression analysis in human prostate cancer samples found that CREB1/FoxA1 target gene panels predict prostate cancer recurrence. Finally, we showed that this signaling pathway is sensitive to compounds that inhibit the transcription co-regulatory factor MED1. These findings not only reveal a novel, global transcriptional co-regulatory function of CREB1 and FoxA1, but also suggest CREB1/FoxA1 signaling is a targetable driver of prostate cancer progression and serves as a biomarker of poor clinical outcomes. PMID:26743006

  18. CREB Binds to Multiple Loci on Human Chromosome 22

    PubMed Central

    Euskirchen, Ghia; Royce, Thomas E.; Bertone, Paul; Martone, Rebecca; Rinn, John L.; Nelson, F. Kenneth; Sayward, Fred; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Miller, Perry; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Snyder, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) is an important transcription factor that can be activated by hormonal stimulation and regulates neuronal function and development. An unbiased, global analysis of where CREB binds has not been performed. We have mapped for the first time the binding distribution of CREB along an entire human chromosome. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of CREB-associated DNA and subsequent hybridization of the associated DNA to a genomic DNA microarray containing all of the nonrepetitive DNA of human chromosome 22 revealed 215 binding sites corresponding to 192 different loci and 100 annotated potential gene targets. We found binding near or within many genes involved in signal transduction and neuronal function. We also found that only a small fraction of CREB binding sites lay near well-defined 5′ ends of genes; the majority of sites were found elsewhere, including introns and unannotated regions. Several of the latter lay near novel unannotated transcriptionally active regions. Few CREB targets were found near full-length cyclic AMP response element sites; the majority contained shorter versions or close matches to this sequence. Several of the CREB targets were altered in their expression by treatment with forskolin; interestingly, both induced and repressed genes were found. Our results provide novel molecular insights into how CREB mediates its functions in humans. PMID:15082775

  19. Acinus integrates AKT1 and subapoptotic caspase activities to regulate basal autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Nilay; Tyra, Lauren K.; Stenesen, Drew

    2014-01-01

    How cellular stresses up-regulate autophagy is not fully understood. One potential regulator is the Drosophila melanogaster protein Acinus (Acn), which is necessary for autophagy induction and triggers excess autophagy when overexpressed. We show that cell type–specific regulation of Acn depends on proteolysis by the caspase Dcp-1. Basal Dcp-1 activity in developing photoreceptors is sufficient for this cleavage without a need for apoptosis to elevate caspase activity. On the other hand, Acn was stabilized by loss of Dcp-1 function or by the presence of a mutation in Acn that eliminates its conserved caspase cleavage site. Acn stability also was regulated by AKT1-mediated phosphorylation. Flies that expressed stabilized forms of Acn, either the phosphomimetic AcnS641,731D or the caspase-resistant AcnD527A, exhibited enhanced basal autophagy. Physiologically, these flies showed improvements in processes known to be autophagy dependent, including increased starvation resistance, reduced Huntingtin-induced neurodegeneration, and prolonged life span. These data indicate that AKT1 and caspase-dependent regulation of Acn stability adjusts basal autophagy levels. PMID:25332163

  20. Expression Patterns of CREBs in Oocyte Growth and Maturation of Fish

    PubMed Central

    Wang, De-Shou; Sudhakumari, Cheni-Chery; Kobayashi, Tohru; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    In fish, oocyte meiotic maturation is regulated by 17α, 20β-dihydroxy-progesterone through cAMP. To study the role of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in meiotic maturation, we cloned and characterized the expression pattern of CREBs from two fish models, the Nile tilapia and catfish. In the Nile tilapia three different CREBs were identified where in CREB1 was found in many tissues including gonads with abundant expression in testis. CREB2, few amino acids shorter than CREB1, was expressed in several tissues with abundant expression in ovary. In addition, a 3’UTR variant form, CREB3 was exclusively found in ovary. During natural 14-day ovarian cycle of the Nile tilapia, CREB1 expression was stable throughout vitellogenesis with a sharp decrease on the day of spawning. In contrast, CREB2 remain unchanged throughout the ovarian cycle, however elevated in 11-day full-grown immature ovarian follicle and after hCG-induction. Interestingly, CREB3 expression was induced three folds on the day of spawning as well as during hCG-induced oocyte maturation. Based on the synergistic expression pattern, CREB1 is likely to control oocyte growth, whereas CREB 2 and 3 contribute to oocyte maturation in tilapia and the latter seems to be critical. In catfish, a single form of CREB showed a maximum expression during spawning phase and hCG-induced maturation both in vivo and in vitro augmented CREB expression. These results suggest that spatial and temporal expression of CREBs seems to be important for final oocyte maturation and may also regulate oocyte growth in fish. PMID:26700177

  1. Expression Patterns of CREBs in Oocyte Growth and Maturation of Fish.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaran, Balasubramanian; Sreenivasulu, Gunti; Wang, De-Shou; Sudhakumari, Cheni-Chery; Kobayashi, Tohru; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    In fish, oocyte meiotic maturation is regulated by 17α, 20β-dihydroxy-progesterone through cAMP. To study the role of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in meiotic maturation, we cloned and characterized the expression pattern of CREBs from two fish models, the Nile tilapia and catfish. In the Nile tilapia three different CREBs were identified where in CREB1 was found in many tissues including gonads with abundant expression in testis. CREB2, few amino acids shorter than CREB1, was expressed in several tissues with abundant expression in ovary. In addition, a 3'UTR variant form, CREB3 was exclusively found in ovary. During natural 14-day ovarian cycle of the Nile tilapia, CREB1 expression was stable throughout vitellogenesis with a sharp decrease on the day of spawning. In contrast, CREB2 remain unchanged throughout the ovarian cycle, however elevated in 11-day full-grown immature ovarian follicle and after hCG-induction. Interestingly, CREB3 expression was induced three folds on the day of spawning as well as during hCG-induced oocyte maturation. Based on the synergistic expression pattern, CREB1 is likely to control oocyte growth, whereas CREB 2 and 3 contribute to oocyte maturation in tilapia and the latter seems to be critical. In catfish, a single form of CREB showed a maximum expression during spawning phase and hCG-induced maturation both in vivo and in vitro augmented CREB expression. These results suggest that spatial and temporal expression of CREBs seems to be important for final oocyte maturation and may also regulate oocyte growth in fish. PMID:26700177

  2. Kin of IRRE-like Protein 2 Is a Phosphorylated Glycoprotein That Regulates Basal Insulin Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Yesildag, Burcak; Bock, Thomas; Herrmanns, Karolin; Wollscheid, Bernd; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Direct interactions among pancreatic β-cells via cell surface proteins inhibit basal and enhance stimulated insulin secretion. Here, we functionally and biochemically characterized Kirrel2, an immunoglobulin superfamily protein with β-cell-specific expression in the pancreas. Our results show that Kirrel2 is a phosphorylated glycoprotein that co-localizes and interacts with the adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and β-catenin in MIN6 cells. We further demonstrate that the phosphosites Tyr595–596 are functionally relevant for the regulation of Kirrel2 stability and localization. Analysis of the extracellular and intracellular domains of Kirrel2 revealed that it is cleaved and shed from MIN6 cells and that the remaining membrane spanning cytoplasmic domain is processed by γ-secretase complex. Kirrel2 knockdown with RNA interference in MIN6 cells and ablation of Kirrel2 from mice with genetic deletion resulted in increased basal insulin secretion from β-cells, with no immediate influence on stimulated insulin secretion, total insulin content, or whole body glucose metabolism. Our results show that in pancreatic β-cells Kirrel2 localizes to adherens junctions, is regulated by multiple post-translational events, including glycosylation, extracellular cleavage, and phosphorylation, and engages in the regulation of basal insulin secretion. PMID:26324709

  3. Enhancement by lithium of cAMP-induced CRE/CREB-directed gene transcription conferred by TORC on the CREB basic leucine zipper domain

    PubMed Central

    Böer, Ulrike; Eglins, Julia; Krause, Doris; Schnell, Susanne; Schöfl, Christof; Knepel, Willhart

    2007-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the action of lithium salts in the treatment of bipolar disorder is not well understood. As their therapeutic action requires chronic treatment, adaptive neuronal processes are suggested to be involved. The molecular basis of this are changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors such as CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein). CREB contains a transactivation domain, in which Ser119 is phosphorylated upon activation, and a bZip (basic leucine zipper domain). The bZip is involved in CREB dimerization and DNA-binding, but also contributes to CREB transactivation by recruiting the coactivator TORC (transducer of regulated CREB). In the present study, the effect of lithium on CRE (cAMP response element)/CREB-directed gene transcription was investigated. Electrically excitable cells were transfected with CRE/CREB-driven luciferase reporter genes. LiCl (6 mM or higher) induced an up to 4.7-fold increase in 8-bromo-cAMP-stimulated CRE/CREB-directed transcription. This increase was not due to enhanced Ser119 phosphorylation or DNA-binding of CREB. Also, the known targets inositol monophosphatase and GSK3β (glycogen-synthase-kinase 3β) were not involved as specific GSK3β inhibitors and inositol replenishment did not mimic and abolish respectively the effect of lithium. However, lithium no longer enhanced CREB activity when the CREB-bZip was deleted or the TORC-binding site inside the CREB-bZip was specifically mutated (CREB-R300A). Otherwise, TORC overexpression conferred lithium responsiveness on CREB-bZip or the CRE-containing truncated rat somatostatin promoter. This indicates that lithium enhances cAMP-induced CRE/CREB-directed transcription, conferred by TORC on the CREB-bZip. We thus support the hypothesis that lithium salts modulate CRE/CREB-dependent gene transcription and suggest the CREB coactivator TORC as a new molecular target of lithium. PMID:17696880

  4. Angiotensin AT1 and AT2 Receptors Regulate Basal Skeletal Muscle Microvascular Volume and Glucose Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Weidong; Wang, Wenhui; Liu, Jia; Barrett, Eugene J.; Carey, Robert M.; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II causes vasoconstriction via the type 1 receptor (AT1R) and vasodilatation through the type 2 receptor (AT2R). Both are expressed in muscle microvasculature where substrate exchanges occur. Whether they modulate basal muscle microvascular perfusion and substrate metabolism is not known. We measured microvascular blood volume (MBV), a measure of microvascular surface area and perfusion, in rats during systemic infusion of angiotensin II at either 1 or 100 ng/kg/min. Each caused a significant increase in muscle MBV. Likewise, administration of AT1R blocker losartan increased muscle MBV by >3-fold (p<0.001). Hindleg glucose extraction and muscle interstitial oxygen saturation simultaneously increased by 2–3-fold. By contrast, infusing AT2R antagonist PD123319 significantly decreased muscle MBV by up to 80% (p<0.001). This was associated with a significant decrease in hindleg glucose extraction and muscle oxygen saturation. AT2R antagonism and inhibition of nitric oxide synthase each blocked the losartan-induced increase in muscle MBV and glucose uptake. In conclusion, angiotensin II acts on both AT1R and AT2R to regulate basal muscle microvascular perfusion. Basal AT1R tone restricts muscle MBV and glucose extraction while basal AT2R activity increases muscle MBV and glucose uptake. Pharmacologic manipulation of the balance of AT1R and AT2R activity affords the potential to improve glucose metabolism. PMID:19996061

  5. Prickle3 synergizes with Wtip to regulate basal body organization and cilia growth

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chih-Wen; Ossipova, Olga; Ioannou, Andriani; Sokol, Sergei Y.

    2016-01-01

    PCP proteins maintain planar polarity in many epithelial tissues and have been implicated in cilia development in vertebrate embryos. In this study we examine Prickle3 (Pk3), a vertebrate homologue of Drosophila Prickle, in Xenopus gastrocoel roof plate (GRP). GRP is a tissue equivalent to the mouse node, in which cilia-generated flow promotes left-right patterning. We show that Pk3 is enriched at the basal body of GRP cells but is recruited by Vangl2 to anterior cell borders. Interference with Pk3 function disrupted the anterior polarization of endogenous Vangl2 and the posterior localization of cilia in GRP cells, demonstrating its role in PCP. Strikingly, in cells with reduced Pk3 activity, cilia growth was inhibited and γ-tubulin and Nedd1 no longer associated with the basal body, suggesting that Pk3 has a novel function in basal body organization. Mechanistically, this function of Pk3 may involve Wilms tumor protein 1-interacting protein (Wtip), which physically associates with and cooperates with Pk3 to regulate ciliogenesis. We propose that, in addition to cell polarity, PCP components control basal body organization and function. PMID:27062996

  6. The role of CREB signaling in Alzheimer's disease and other cognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Saura, Carlos A; Valero, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression changes in the brain affect cognition during normal and pathological aging. Progress in understanding the cellular processes regulating gene expression networks in cognition is relevant to develop therapeutic interventions for age-related cognitive disorders. Synaptic efficacy mediating memory storage requires the activation of specific gene expression programs regulated, among others, by the transcription factor cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). CREB signaling is essential for long-lasting changes in synaptic plasticity that mediates the conversion of short-term memory to long-term memory. CREB signaling has been recently involved in several brain pathological conditions including cognitive and neurodegenerative disorders. The β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide, which plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, alters hippocampal-dependent synaptic plasticity and memory and mediates synapse loss through the CREB signaling pathway. The fact that altered CREB signaling has been implicated in other cognitive disorders including Huntington's disease and Rubinstein-Taybi and Coffin-Lowry syndromes suggests a crucial role of CREB signaling in cognitive dysfunction. In this review paper, we summarize recent findings indicating a role of CREB and its coactivators CREB binding protein and CREB-regulated transcription coactivator in cognition during normal and pathological aging. We also discuss the development of novel therapeutic strategies based on CREB targeting to ameliorate cognitive decline in aging and cognitive disorders.

  7. β-Spectrin regulates the hippo signaling pathway and modulates the basal actin network.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kenneth Kin Lam; Li, Wenyang; An, Yanru; Duan, Yangyang; Li, Zhuoheng; Kang, Yibin; Yan, Yan

    2015-03-01

    Emerging evidence suggests functional regulation of the Hippo pathway by the actin cytoskeleton, although the detailed molecular mechanism remains incomplete. In a genetic screen, we identified a requirement for β-Spectrin in the posterior follicle cells for the oocyte repolarization process during Drosophila mid-oogenesis. β-spectrin mutations lead to loss of Hippo signaling activity in the follicle cells. A similar reduction of Hippo signaling activity was observed after β-Spectrin knockdown in mammalian cells. We further demonstrated that β-spectrin mutations disrupt the basal actin network in follicle cells. The abnormal stress fiber-like actin structure on the basal side of follicle cells provides a likely link between the β-spectrin mutations and the loss of the Hippo signaling activity phenotype.

  8. Cell cycle regulation of cyclin A gene expression by the cyclic AMP-responsive transcription factors CREB and CREM.

    PubMed Central

    Desdouets, C; Matesic, G; Molina, C A; Foulkes, N S; Sassone-Corsi, P; Brechot, C; Sobczak-Thepot, J

    1995-01-01

    Cyclin A is a pivotal regulatory protein which, in mammalian cells, is involved in the S phase of the cell cycle. Transcription of the human cyclin A gene is cell cycle regulated. We have investigated the role of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent signalling pathway in this cell cycle-dependent control. In human diploid fibroblasts (Hs 27), induction of cyclin A gene expression at G1/S is stimulated by 8-bromo-cAMP and suppressed by the protein kinase A inhibitor H89, which was found to delay S phase entry. Transfection experiments showed that the cyclin A promoter is inducible by activation of the adenylyl cyclase signalling pathway. Stimulation is mediated predominantly via a cAMP response element (CRE) located at positions -80 to -73 with respect to the transcription initiation site and is able to bind CRE-binding proteins and CRE modulators. Moreover, activation by phosphorylation of the activators CRE-binding proteins and CRE modulator tau and levels of the inducible cAMP early repressor are cell cycle regulated, which is consistent with the pattern of cyclin A inducibility by cAMP during the cell cycle. These results suggest that the CRE is, at least partly, implicated in stimulation of cyclin A transcription at G1/S. PMID:7760825

  9. The Myb-p300-CREB axis modulates intestine homeostasis, radiosensitivity and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sampurno, S; Bijenhof, A; Cheasley, D; Xu, H; Robine, S; Hilton, D; Alexander, W S; Pereira, L; Mantamadiotis, T; Malaterre, J; Ramsay, R G

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium is constantly renewing, depending upon the intestinal stem cells (ISC) regulated by a spectrum of transcription factors (TFs), including Myb. We noted previously in mice with a p300 mutation (plt6) within the Myb-interaction-domain phenocopied Myb hypomorphic mutant mice with regard to thrombopoiesis, and here, changes in GI homeostasis. p300 is a transcriptional coactivator for many TFs, most prominently cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and also Myb. Studies have highlighted the importance of CREB in proliferation and radiosensitivity, but not in the GI. This prompted us to directly investigate the p300–Myb–CREB axis in the GI. Here, the role of CREB has been defined by generating GI-specific inducible creb knockout (KO) mice. KO mice show efficient and specific deletion of CREB, with no evident compensation by CREM and ATF1. Despite complete KO, only modest effects on proliferation, radiosensitivity and differentiation in the GI under homeostatic or stress conditions were evident, even though CREB target gene pcna (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) was downregulated. creb and p300 mutant lines show increased goblet cells, whereas a reduction in enteroendocrine cells was apparent only in the p300 line, further resembling the Myb hypomorphs. When propagated in vitro, crebKO ISC were defective in organoid formation, suggesting that the GI stroma compensates for CREB loss in vivo, unlike in MybKO studies. Thus, it appears that p300 regulates GI differentiation primarily through Myb, rather than CREB. Finally, active pCREB is elevated in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells and adenomas, and is required for the expression of drug transporter, MRP2, associated with resistance to Oxaliplatin as well as several chromatin cohesion protein that are relevant to CRC therapy. These data raise the prospect that CREB may have a role in GI malignancy as it does in other cancer types, but unlike Myb, is not critical for GI

  10. Chronic administration of aripiprazole activates GSK3β-dependent signalling pathways, and up-regulates GABAA receptor expression and CREB1 activity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Bo; Huang, Xu-Feng; Deng, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Aripiprazole is a D2-like receptor (D2R) partial agonist with a favourable clinical profile. Previous investigations indicated that acute and short-term administration of aripiprazole had effects on PKA activity, GSK3β-dependent pathways, GABAA receptors, NMDA receptor and CREB1 in the brain. Since antipsychotics are used chronically in clinics, the present study investigated the long-term effects of chronic oral aripiprazole treatment on these cellular signalling pathways, in comparison with haloperidol (a D2R antagonist) and bifeprunox (a potent D2R partial agonist). We found that the Akt-GSK3β pathway was activated by aripiprazole and bifeprunox in the prefrontal cortex; NMDA NR2A levels were reduced by aripiprazole and haloperidol. In the nucleus accumbens, all three drugs increased Akt-GSK3β signalling; in addition, both aripiprazole and haloperidol, but not bifeprunox, increased the expression of Dvl-3, β-catenin and GABAA receptors, NMDA receptor subunits, as well as CREB1 phosphorylation levels. The results suggest that chronic oral administration of aripiprazole affects schizophrenia-related cellular signalling pathways and markers (including Akt-GSK3β signalling, Dvl-GSK3β-β-catenin signalling, GABAA receptor, NMDA receptor and CREB1) in a brain-region-dependent manner; the selective effects of aripiprazole on these signalling pathways might be associated with its unique clinical effects. PMID:27435909

  11. CREB and the CRTC co-activators: sensors for hormonal and metabolic signals.

    PubMed

    Altarejos, Judith Y; Montminy, Marc

    2011-03-01

    The cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) is phosphorylated in response to a wide variety of signals, yet target gene transcription is only increased in a subset of cases. Recent studies indicate that CREB functions in concert with a family of latent cytoplasmic co-activators called cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activators (CRTCs), which are activated through dephosphorylation. A dual requirement for CREB phosphorylation and CRTC dephosphorylation is likely to explain how these activator-co-activator cognates discriminate between different stimuli. Following their activation, CREB and CRTCs mediate the effects of fasting and feeding signals on the expression of metabolic programmes in insulin-sensitive tissues.

  12. APPL1 regulates basal NF-κB activity by stabilizing NIK

    PubMed Central

    Hupalowska, Anna; Pyrzynska, Beata; Miaczynska, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Summary APPL1 is a multifunctional adaptor protein that binds membrane receptors, signaling proteins and nuclear factors, thereby acting in endosomal trafficking and in different signaling pathways. Here, we uncover a novel role of APPL1 as a positive regulator of transcriptional activity of NF-κB under basal but not TNFα-stimulated conditions. APPL1 was found to directly interact with TRAF2, an adaptor protein known to activate canonical NF-κB signaling. APPL1 synergized with TRAF2 to induce NF-κB activation, and both proteins were necessary for this process and function upstream of the IKK complex. Although TRAF2 was not detectable on APPL endosomes, endosomal recruitment of APPL1 was required for its function in the NF-κB pathway. Importantly, in the canonical pathway, APPL1 appeared to regulate the proper spatial distribution of the p65 subunit of NF-κB in the absence of cytokine stimulation, since its overexpression enhanced and its depletion reduced the nuclear accumulation of p65. By analyzing the patterns of gene transcription upon APPL1 overproduction or depletion we found altered expression of NF-κB target genes that encode cytokines. At the molecular level, overexpressed APPL1 markedly increased the level of NIK, the key component of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway, by reducing its association with the degradative complex containing TRAF2, TRAF3 and cIAP1. In turn, high levels of NIK triggered nuclear translocation of p65. Collectively, we propose that APPL1 regulates basal NF-κB activity by modulating the stability of NIK, which affects the activation of p65. This places APPL1 as a novel link between the canonical and noncanonical machineries of NF-κB activation. PMID:22685329

  13. Overexpression of CREB in the nucleus accumbens shell increases cocaine reinforcement in self-administering rats.

    PubMed

    Larson, Erin B; Graham, Danielle L; Arzaga, Rose R; Buzin, Nicole; Webb, Joseph; Green, Thomas A; Bass, Caroline E; Neve, Rachael L; Terwilliger, Ernest F; Nestler, Eric J; Self, David W

    2011-11-01

    Chronic exposure to addictive drugs enhances cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-regulated gene expression in nucleus accumbens (NAc), and these effects are thought to reduce the positive hedonic effects of passive cocaine administration. Here, we used viral-mediated gene transfer to produce short- and long-term regulation of CREB activity in NAc shell of rats engaging in volitional cocaine self-administration. Increasing CREB expression in NAc shell markedly enhanced cocaine reinforcement of self-administration behavior, as indicated by leftward (long-term) and upward (short-term) shifts in fixed ratio dose-response curves. CREB also increased the effort exerted by rats to obtain cocaine on more demanding progressive ratio schedules, an effect highly correlated with viral-induced modulation of BDNF protein in the NAc shell. CREB enhanced cocaine reinforcement when expressed either throughout acquisition of self-administration or when expression was limited to postacquisition tests, indicating a direct effect of CREB independent of reinforcement-related learning. Downregulating endogenous CREB in NAc shell by expressing a short hairpin RNA reduced cocaine reinforcement in similar tests, while overexpression of a dominant-negative CREB(S133A) mutant had no significant effect on cocaine self-administration. Finally, increasing CREB expression after withdrawal from self-administration enhanced cocaine-primed relapse, while reducing CREB levels facilitated extinction of cocaine seeking, but neither altered relapse induced by cocaine cues or footshock stress. Together, these findings indicate that CREB activity in NAc shell increases the motivation for cocaine during active self-administration or after withdrawal from cocaine. Our results also highlight that volitional and passive drug administration can lead to substantially different behavioral outcomes.

  14. Downregulation of CREB Promotes Cell Proliferation by Mediating G1/S Phase Transition in Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fangjin; Zheng, Ying; Donkor, Paul Owusu; Zou, Peng; Mu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a well-known nuclear transcription factor, has been shown to play an essential role in many cellular processes, including differentiation, cell survival, and cell proliferation, by regulating the expression of downstream genes. Recently, increased expression of CREB was frequently found in various tumors, indicating that CREB is implicated in the process of tumorigenesis. However, the effects of CREB on Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) remain unknown. To clarify the role of CREB in HL, we performed knockdown experiments in HL. We found that downregulation of CREB by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) resulted in enhancement of cell proliferation and promotion of G1/S phase transition, and these effects can be rescued by expression of shRNA-resistant CREB. Meanwhile, the expression level of cell cycle-related proteins, such as cyclin D1, cyclin E1, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), and CDK4, was elevated in response to depletion of CREB. Furthermore, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay and confirmed that CREB directly bound to the promoter regions of these genes, which consequently contributed to the regulation of cell cycle. Consistent with our results, a clinical database showed that high expression of CREB correlates with favorable prognosis in B-cell lymphoma patients, which is totally different from the function of CREB in other cancers such as colorectal cancer, acute myeloid leukemia, and some endocrine cancers. Taken together, all of these features of CREB in HL strongly support its role as a tumor suppressor gene that can decelerate cell proliferation by inhibiting the expression of several cell cycle-related genes. Our results provide new evidence for prognosis prediction of HL and a promising therapeutic strategy for HL patients. PMID:27458098

  15. Mediator MED23 regulates basal transcription in vivo via an interaction with P-TEFb.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yao, Xiao; Huang, Yan; Hu, Xiangming; Liu, Runzhong; Hou, Dongming; Chen, Ruichuan; Wang, Gang

    2013-01-01

    The Mediator is a multi-subunit complex that transduces regulatory information from transcription regulators to the RNA polymerase II apparatus. Growing evidence suggests that Mediator plays roles in multiple stages of eukaryotic transcription, including elongation. However, the detailed mechanism by which Mediator regulates elongation remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that Mediator MED23 subunit controls a basal level of transcription by recruiting elongation factor P-TEFb, via an interaction with its CDK9 subunit. The mRNA level of Egr1, a MED23-controlled model gene, is reduced 4-5 fold in Med23 (-/-) ES cells under an unstimulated condition, but Med23-deficiency does not alter the occupancies of RNAP II, GTFs, Mediator complex, or activator ELK1 at the Egr1 promoter. Instead, Med23 depletion results in a significant decrease in P-TEFb and RNAP II (Ser2P) binding at the coding region, but no changes for several other elongation regulators, such as DSIF and NELF. ChIP-seq revealed that Med23-deficiency partially reduced the P-TEFb occupancy at a set of MED23-regulated gene promoters. Further, we demonstrate that MED23 interacts with CDK9 in vivo and in vitro. Collectively, these results provide the mechanistic insight into how Mediator promotes RNAP II into transcription elongation.

  16. GSK-3α Is a Novel Target of CREB and CREB-GSK-3α Signaling Participates in Cell Viability in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Roy S.; Koo, Ja Seok

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression or activation of cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) has been known to be involved in several human malignancies, including lung cancer. Genes regulated by CREB have been reported to suppress apoptosis, induce cell proliferation, inflammation, and tumor metastasis. However, the critical target genes of CREB in lung cancer have not been well understood. Here, we identified GSK-3α as one of the CREB target genes which is critical for the viability of lung cancer cells. The CREB knockdown significantly reduced the expression of GSK-3α and the direct binding of CREB on the promoter of GSK3A was identified. Kaplan-Meier analysis with a public database showed a prognostic significance of aberrant GSK-3α expression in lung cancer. Inhibition of GSK-3α suppressed cell viability, colony formation, and tumor growth. For the first time, we demonstrated that GSK-3α is regulated by CREB in lung cancer and is required for the cell viability. These findings implicate CREB-GSK-3α axis as a novel therapeutic target for lung cancer treatment. PMID:27049759

  17. p73 regulates basal and starvation-induced liver metabolism in vivo.

    PubMed

    He, Zhaoyue; Agostini, Massimiliano; Liu, He; Melino, Gerry; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    2015-10-20

    As a member of the p53 gene family, p73 regulates cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, neurogenesis, immunity and inflammation. Recently, p73 has been shown to transcriptionally regulate selective metabolic enzymes, such as cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutaminase-2, resulting in significant effects on metabolism, including hepatocellular lipid metabolism, glutathione homeostasis and the pentose phosphate pathway. In order to further investigate the metabolic effect of p73, here, we compared the global metabolic profile of livers from p73 knockout and wild-type mice under both control and starvation conditions. Our results show that the depletion of all p73 isoforms cause altered lysine metabolism and glycolysis, distinct patterns for glutathione synthesis and Krebs cycle, as well as an elevated pentose phosphate pathway and abnormal lipid accumulation. These results indicate that p73 regulates basal and starvation-induced fuel metabolism in the liver, a finding that is likely to be highly relevant for metabolism-associated disorders, such as diabetes and cancer.

  18. Knock-in Luciferase Reporter Mice for In Vivo Monitoring of CREB Activity.

    PubMed

    Akhmedov, Dmitry; Rajendran, Kavitha; Mendoza-Rodriguez, Maria G; Berdeaux, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) is induced during fasting in the liver, where it stimulates transcription of rate-limiting gluconeogenic genes to maintain metabolic homeostasis. Adenoviral and transgenic CREB reporters have been used to monitor hepatic CREB activity non-invasively using bioluminescence reporter imaging. However, adenoviral vectors and randomly inserted transgenes have several limitations. To overcome disadvantages of the currently used strategies, we created a ROSA26 knock-in CREB reporter mouse line (ROSA26-CRE-luc). cAMP-inducing ligands stimulate the reporter in primary hepatocytes and myocytes from ROSA26-CRE-luc animals. In vivo, these animals exhibit little hepatic CREB activity in the ad libitum fed state but robust induction after fasting. Strikingly, CREB was markedly stimulated in liver, but not in skeletal muscle, after overnight voluntary wheel-running exercise, uncovering differential regulation of CREB in these tissues under catabolic states. The ROSA26-CRE-luc mouse line is a useful resource to study dynamics of CREB activity longitudinally in vivo and can be used as a source of primary cells for analysis of CREB regulatory pathways ex vivo. PMID:27336479

  19. Knock-in Luciferase Reporter Mice for In Vivo Monitoring of CREB Activity

    PubMed Central

    Akhmedov, Dmitry; Rajendran, Kavitha; Mendoza-Rodriguez, Maria G.

    2016-01-01

    The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) is induced during fasting in the liver, where it stimulates transcription of rate-limiting gluconeogenic genes to maintain metabolic homeostasis. Adenoviral and transgenic CREB reporters have been used to monitor hepatic CREB activity non-invasively using bioluminescence reporter imaging. However, adenoviral vectors and randomly inserted transgenes have several limitations. To overcome disadvantages of the currently used strategies, we created a ROSA26 knock-in CREB reporter mouse line (ROSA26-CRE-luc). cAMP-inducing ligands stimulate the reporter in primary hepatocytes and myocytes from ROSA26-CRE-luc animals. In vivo, these animals exhibit little hepatic CREB activity in the ad libitum fed state but robust induction after fasting. Strikingly, CREB was markedly stimulated in liver, but not in skeletal muscle, after overnight voluntary wheel-running exercise, uncovering differential regulation of CREB in these tissues under catabolic states. The ROSA26-CRE-luc mouse line is a useful resource to study dynamics of CREB activity longitudinally in vivo and can be used as a source of primary cells for analysis of CREB regulatory pathways ex vivo. PMID:27336479

  20. Hippocampal and prefrontal projections to the basal amygdala mediate contextual regulation of fear after extinction.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Caitlin A; Kim, Jee Hyun; Knapska, Ewelina; Maren, Stephen

    2011-11-23

    Knowing when and where to express fear is essential to survival. Recent work in fear extinction paradigms reveals that the contextual regulation of fear involves a neural network involving the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, and amygdala. The amygdaloid basal nuclei (BA) receive convergent input from the ventral hippocampus (VH) and prelimbic (PL) prefrontal cortex and may integrate VH and PL input to regulate fear expression. To examine the functional organization of this neural circuit, we used cellular imaging of c-fos expression in anatomically defined neuronal populations and circuit disconnections to identify the pathways involved in the contextual control of extinguished fear. Before behavioral testing, we infused a retrograde tracer into the amygdala to label BA-projecting neurons in VH and PL. Rats then underwent fear conditioning and extinction and were tested for their fear to the extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS) in either the extinction context or in another context; freezing behavior served as the index of conditional fear. CS presentation outside the extinction context renewed conditional freezing and was associated with significantly more c-fos expression in BA-projecting neurons in the VH and PL than that induced by CS presentation in the extinction context. We next examined whether direct or indirect projections of VH to BA mediate fear renewal. Interestingly, disconnections of the VH from either the BA or PL eliminated renewal. These findings suggest that convergent inputs from both the VH and PL in the BA mediate the contextual control of fear after extinction.

  1. Regulation of sexual development in the basal termite Cryptotermes secundus: mutilation, pheromonal manipulation or honest signal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korb, Judith

    2005-01-01

    Social insect colonies are not the harmonious entities they were once considered. Considerable conflicts exist between colony members, as has been shown for Hymenoptera. For termites, similar studies are lacking, but aggressive manipulations have been claimed to regulate sexual development, and even to account for the evolution of workers. This study on a basal termite, Cryptotermes secundus (Kalotermitidae), suggests that the importance of aggressive manipulations in termites has been overemphasized. Wing-bud mutilations, a means proposed to regulate the development of dispersing sexuals (alates), seem to be artifacts of handling conditions that cause disturbance. Aggressive behaviors never occurred unless colonies were disturbed. Theoretical considerations further showed that the potential for intense conflict among termite nestmates is low compared to hymenopteran societies. Strong conflicts are only expected to occur over the replacement of natal reproductives that died, while less intense conflicts should exist over the development into alates when food in the colony becomes limiting. Accordingly, intracolonial aggressive interactions over replacement are common, whereas nestmates seem to manipulate alate development via proctodeal feeding when food resources decline. However, the latter is rather an honest signal than a manipulation because only the most competent prospective dispersers can impede the development of nestmates.

  2. A CREB-Sirt1-Hes1 Circuitry Mediates Neural Stem Cell Response to Glucose Availability.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Salvatore; Leone, Lucia; Barbati, Saviana Antonella; Samengo, Daniela; Piacentini, Roberto; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Toietta, Gabriele; Spinelli, Matteo; McBurney, Michael; Pani, Giovambattista; Grassi, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis plays increasingly recognized roles in brain homeostasis and repair and is profoundly affected by energy balance and nutrients. We found that the expression of Hes-1 (hairy and enhancer of split 1) is modulated in neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs) by extracellular glucose through the coordinated action of CREB (cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein) and Sirt-1 (Sirtuin 1), two cellular nutrient sensors. Excess glucose reduced CREB-activated Hes-1 expression and results in impaired cell proliferation. CREB-deficient NSCs expanded poorly in vitro and did not respond to glucose availability. Elevated glucose also promoted Sirt-1-dependent repression of the Hes-1 promoter. Conversely, in low glucose, CREB replaced Sirt-1 on the chromatin associated with the Hes-1 promoter enhancing Hes-1 expression and cell proliferation. Thus, the glucose-regulated antagonism between CREB and Sirt-1 for Hes-1 transcription participates in the metabolic regulation of neurogenesis. PMID:26804914

  3. The WNT-controlled transcriptional regulator LBH is required for mammary stem cell expansion and maintenance of the basal lineage

    PubMed Central

    Lindley, Linsey E.; Curtis, Kevin M.; Sanchez-Mejias, Avencia; Rieger, Megan E.; Robbins, David J.; Briegel, Karoline J.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of multipotent mammary stem cells (MaSCs) has provided an explanation for the unique regenerative capacity of the mammary gland throughout adult life. However, it remains unclear what genes maintain MaSCs and control their specification into the two epithelial lineages: luminal and basal. LBH is a novel transcription co-factor in the WNT pathway with hitherto unknown physiological function. LBH is expressed during mammary gland development and aberrantly overexpressed in aggressive ‘basal’ subtype breast cancers. Here, we have explored the in vivo role of LBH in mammopoiesis. We show that in postnatal mammary epithelia, LBH is predominantly expressed in the Lin−CD29highCD24+ basal MaSC population. Upon conditional inactivation of LBH, mice exhibit pronounced delays in mammary tissue expansion during puberty and pregnancy, accompanied by increased luminal differentiation at the expense of basal lineage specification. These defects could be traced to a severe reduction in the frequency and self-renewal/differentiation potential of basal MaSCs. Mechanistically, LBH induces expression of key epithelial stem cell transcription factor ΔNp63 to promote a basal MaSC state and repress luminal differentiation genes, mainly that encoding estrogen receptor α (Esr1/ERα). Collectively, these studies identify LBH as an essential regulator of basal MaSC expansion/maintenance, raising important implications for its potential role in breast cancer pathogenesis. PMID:25655704

  4. Master regulator for chondrogenesis, Sox9, regulates transcriptional activation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress transducer BBF2H7/CREB3L2 in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hino, Kenta; Saito, Atsushi; Kido, Miori; Kanemoto, Soshi; Asada, Rie; Takai, Tomoko; Cui, Min; Cui, Xiang; Imaizumi, Kazunori

    2014-05-16

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress transducer, box B-binding factor 2 human homolog on chromosome 7 (BBF2H7), is a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transmembrane transcription factor. This molecule is activated in response to ER stress during chondrogenesis. The activated BBF2H7 accelerates cartilage matrix protein secretion through the up-regulation of Sec23a, which is responsible for protein transport from the ER to the Golgi apparatus and is a target of BBF2H7. In the present study, we elucidated the mechanisms of the transcriptional activation of Bbf2h7 in chondrocytes. The transcription of Bbf2h7 is regulated by Sex determining region Y-related high-mobility group box 9 (Sox9), a critical factor for chondrocyte differentiation that facilitates the expression of one of the major cartilage matrix proteins Type II collagen (Col2), through binding to the Sox DNA-binding motif in the Bbf2h7 promoter. BBF2H7 is activated as a transcription factor in response to physiological ER stress caused by abundant synthesis of cartilage matrix proteins, and consequently regulates the secretion of cartilage matrix proteins. Taken together, our findings demonstrate novel regulatory mechanisms of Sox9 for controlling the secretion of cartilage matrix proteins through the activation of BBF2H7-Sec23a signaling during chondrogenesis.

  5. Thermal conductance and basal metabolic rate are part of a coordinated system for heat transfer regulation

    PubMed Central

    Naya, Daniel E.; Spangenberg, Lucía; Naya, Hugo; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Thermal conductance measures the ease with which heat leaves or enters  an organism's body. Although the analysis of this physiological variable in relation to climatic and ecological factors can be traced to studies by Scholander and colleagues, only small advances have occurred ever since. Here, we analyse the relationship between minimal thermal conductance estimated during summer (Cmin) and several ecological, climatic and geographical factors for 127 rodent species, in order to identify the exogenous factors that have potentially affected the evolution of thermal conductance. In addition, we evaluate whether there is compensation between Cmin and basal metabolic rate (BMR)—in such a way that a scale-invariant ratio between both variables is equal to one—as could be expected from the Scholander–Irving model of heat transfer. Our major findings are (i) annual mean temperature is the best single predictor of mass-independent Cmin. (ii) After controlling for the effect of body mass, there is a strong positive correlation between log10 (Cmin) and log10 (BMR). Further, the slope of this correlation is close to one, indicating an almost perfect compensation between both physiological variables. (iii) Structural equation modelling indicated that Cmin values are adjusted to BMR values and not the other way around. Thus, our results strongly suggest that BMR and thermal conductance integrate a coordinated system for heat regulation in endothermic animals and that summer conductance values are adjusted (in an evolutionary sense) to track changes in BMRs. PMID:23902915

  6. Flattop regulates basal body docking and positioning in mono- and multiciliated cells

    PubMed Central

    Gegg, Moritz; Böttcher, Anika; Burtscher, Ingo; Hasenoeder, Stefan; Van Campenhout, Claude; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel; Grant, Seth G N; Lickert, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) regulates basal body (BB) docking and positioning during cilia formation, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we investigate the uncharacterized gene Flattop (Fltp) that is transcriptionally activated during PCP acquisition in ciliated tissues. Fltp knock-out mice show BB docking and ciliogenesis defects in multiciliated lung cells. Furthermore, Fltp is necessary for kinocilium positioning in monociliated inner ear hair cells. In these cells, the core PCP molecule Dishevelled 2, the BB/spindle positioning protein Dlg3, and Fltp localize directly adjacent to the apical plasma membrane, physically interact and surround the BB at the interface of the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton. Dlg3 and Fltp knock-outs suggest that both cooperatively translate PCP cues for BB positioning in the inner ear. Taken together, the identification of novel BB/spindle positioning components as potential mediators of PCP signaling might have broader implications for other cell types, ciliary disease, and asymmetric cell division. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03842.001 PMID:25296022

  7. Stochasticity and bifurcations in a reduced model with interlinked positive and negative feedback loops of CREB1 and CREB2 stimulated by 5-HT.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lijie; Yang, Zhuoqin; Bi, Yuanhong

    2016-04-01

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-response element-binding protein (CREB) family of transcription factors is crucial in regulating gene expression required for long-term memory (LTM) formation. Upon exposure of sensory neurons to the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT), CREB1 is activated via activation of the protein kinase A (PKA) intracellular signaling pathways, and CREB2 as a transcriptional repressor is relieved possibly via phosphorylation of CREB2 by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Song et al. [18] proposed a minimal model with only interlinked positive and negative feedback loops of transcriptional regulation by the activator CREB1 and the repressor CREB2. Without considering feedbacks between the CREB proteins, Pettigrew et al. [8] developed a computational model characterizing complex dynamics of biochemical pathways downstream of 5-HT receptors. In this work, to describe more simply the biochemical pathways and gene regulation underlying 5-HT-induced LTM, we add the important extracellular sensitizing stimulus 5-HT as well as the product Ap-uch into the Song's minimal model. We also strive to examine dynamical properties of the gene regulatory network under the changing concentration of the stimulus, [5-HT], cooperating with the varying positive feedback strength in inducing a high state of CREB1 for the establishment of long-term memory. Different dynamics including monostability, bistability and multistability due to coexistence of stable steady states and oscillations is investigated by means of codimension-2 bifurcation analysis. At the different positive feedback strengths, comparative analysis of deterministic and stochastic dynamics reveals that codimension-1 bifurcation with respect to [5-HT] as the parameter can predict diverse stochastic behaviors resulted from the finite number of molecules, and the number of CREB1 molecules more and more preferentially resides near the high steady state with increasing [5-HT], which contributes to long

  8. Differential regulation of the Hippo pathway by adherens junctions and apical–basal cell polarity modules

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Chao; Graves, Hillary K.; Moya, Ivan M.; Tao, Chunyao; Hamaratoglu, Fisun; Gladden, Andrew B.; Halder, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and cell polarity complexes are key players in the establishment and maintenance of apical–basal cell polarity. Loss of AJs or basolateral polarity components promotes tumor formation and metastasis. Recent studies in vertebrate models show that loss of AJs or loss of the basolateral component Scribble (Scrib) cause deregulation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway and hyperactivation of its downstream effectors Yes-associated protein (YAP) and Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ). However, whether AJs and Scrib act through the same or independent mechanisms to regulate Hippo pathway activity is not known. Here, we dissect how disruption of AJs or loss of basolateral components affect the activity of the Drosophila YAP homolog Yorkie (Yki) during imaginal disc development. Surprisingly, disruption of AJs and loss of basolateral proteins produced very different effects on Yki activity. Yki activity was cell-autonomously decreased but non–cell-autonomously elevated in tissues where the AJ components E-cadherin (E-cad) or α-catenin (α-cat) were knocked down. In contrast, scrib knockdown caused a predominantly cell-autonomous activation of Yki. Moreover, disruption of AJs or basolateral proteins had different effects on cell polarity and tissue size. Simultaneous knockdown of α-cat and scrib induced both cell-autonomous and non–cell-autonomous Yki activity. In mammalian cells, knockdown of E-cad or α-cat caused nuclear accumulation and activation of YAP without overt effects on Scrib localization and vice versa. Therefore, our results indicate the existence of multiple, genetically separable inputs from AJs and cell polarity complexes into Yki/YAP regulation. PMID:25624491

  9. Differential regulation of the Hippo pathway by adherens junctions and apical-basal cell polarity modules.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Chao; Graves, Hillary K; Moya, Ivan M; Tao, Chunyao; Hamaratoglu, Fisun; Gladden, Andrew B; Halder, Georg

    2015-02-10

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and cell polarity complexes are key players in the establishment and maintenance of apical-basal cell polarity. Loss of AJs or basolateral polarity components promotes tumor formation and metastasis. Recent studies in vertebrate models show that loss of AJs or loss of the basolateral component Scribble (Scrib) cause deregulation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway and hyperactivation of its downstream effectors Yes-associated protein (YAP) and Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ). However, whether AJs and Scrib act through the same or independent mechanisms to regulate Hippo pathway activity is not known. Here, we dissect how disruption of AJs or loss of basolateral components affect the activity of the Drosophila YAP homolog Yorkie (Yki) during imaginal disc development. Surprisingly, disruption of AJs and loss of basolateral proteins produced very different effects on Yki activity. Yki activity was cell-autonomously decreased but non-cell-autonomously elevated in tissues where the AJ components E-cadherin (E-cad) or α-catenin (α-cat) were knocked down. In contrast, scrib knockdown caused a predominantly cell-autonomous activation of Yki. Moreover, disruption of AJs or basolateral proteins had different effects on cell polarity and tissue size. Simultaneous knockdown of α-cat and scrib induced both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous Yki activity. In mammalian cells, knockdown of E-cad or α-cat caused nuclear accumulation and activation of YAP without overt effects on Scrib localization and vice versa. Therefore, our results indicate the existence of multiple, genetically separable inputs from AJs and cell polarity complexes into Yki/YAP regulation.

  10. Environmental Enrichment Alters Nicotine-Mediated Locomotor Sensitization and Phosphorylation of DARPP-32 and CREB in Rat Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Adrian M.; Midde, Narasimha M.; Mactutus, Charles F.; Booze, Rosemarie M.; Zhu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Exposure within an environmental enrichment paradigm results in neurobiological adaptations and decreases the baseline of locomotor activity. The current study determined activation of DARPP-32 (dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein-32) and CREB (cAMP response element binding protein), and locomotor activity in rats raised in enriched (EC), impoverished (IC), and standard (SC) conditions following repeated administration of nicotine or saline. In the saline-control group, the basal phosphorylation state of DARPP-32 at Threonine-34 site (pDARPP-32 Thr34) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was lower in EC compared to IC and SC rats, which was positively correlated with their respective baseline activities. While nicotine (0.35 mg/kg, freebase) produced locomotor sensitization across all housing conditions when the nicotine-mediated locomotor activity was expressed as a percent change from their respective saline control, EC rats displayed greater sensitization to nicotine than IC and SC rats. Consistent with the behavioral findings, repeated nicotine injection increased pDARPP-32 Thr34 in PFC of EC and IC rats and in nucleus accumbens of EC rats; however, the magnitude of change from saline control in nicotine-induced enhancement of pDARPP-32 Thr34 in PFC was strikingly increased in EC rats relative to IC rats. Moreover, EC rats had lower basal phosphorylation levels of CREB at serine 133 in PFC and nucleus accumbens compared to IC and SC rats, whereas the nicotine-induced increase in phosphorylated CREB-Ser133 was more pronounced in PFC of EC rats relative to IC and SC rats. Collectively, these findings suggest innovative insights into advancing our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of enrichment-induced changes in the motivational effects of nicotine, and aiding in the identification of new therapeutic strategies for tobacco smokers. PMID:22952905

  11. CREB Selectively Controls Learning-Induced Structural Remodeling of Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middei, Silvia; Spalloni, Alida; Longone, Patrizia; Pittenger, Christopher; O'Mara, Shane M.; Marie, Helene; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2012-01-01

    The modulation of synaptic strength associated with learning is post-synaptically regulated by changes in density and shape of dendritic spines. The transcription factor CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) is required for memory formation and in vitro dendritic spine rearrangements, but its role in learning-induced remodeling of neurons…

  12. Gap junctions and other mechanisms of cell-cell communication regulate basal insulin secretion in the pancreatic islet.

    PubMed

    Benninger, R K P; Head, W Steven; Zhang, Min; Satin, Leslie S; Piston, David W

    2011-11-15

    Cell-cell communication in the islet of Langerhans is important for the regulation of insulin secretion. Gap-junctions coordinate oscillations in intracellular free-calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) and insulin secretion in the islet following elevated glucose. Gap-junctions can also ensure that oscillatory [Ca(2+)](i) ceases when glucose is at a basal levels. We determine the roles of gap-junctions and other cell-cell communication pathways in the suppression of insulin secretion under basal conditions. Metabolic, electrical and insulin secretion levels were measured from islets lacking gap-junction coupling following deletion of connexion36 (Cx36(-/-)), and these results were compared to those obtained using fully isolated β-cells. K(ATP) loss-of-function islets provide a further experimental model to specifically study gap-junction mediated suppression of electrical activity. In isolated β-cells or Cx36(-/-) islets, elevations in [Ca(2+)](i) persisted in a subset of cells even at basal glucose. Isolated β-cells showed elevated insulin secretion at basal glucose; however, insulin secretion from Cx36(-/-) islets was minimally altered. [Ca(2+)](i) was further elevated under basal conditions, but insulin release still suppressed in K(ATP) loss-of-function islets. Forced elevation of cAMP led to PKA-mediated increases in insulin secretion from islets lacking gap-junctions, but not from islets expressing Cx36 gap junctions. We conclude there is a redundancy in how cell-cell communication in the islet suppresses insulin release. Gap junctions suppress cellular heterogeneity and spontaneous [Ca(2+)](i) signals, while other juxtacrine mechanisms, regulated by PKA and glucose, suppress more distal steps in exocytosis. Each mechanism is sufficiently robust to compensate for a loss of the other and still suppress basal insulin secretion.

  13. G alpha 12/13 basally regulates p53 through Mdm4 expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Sung; Lee, Sang Min; Kim, Won Dong; Ki, Sung Hwan; Moon, Aree; Lee, Chang Ho; Kim, Sang Geon

    2007-05-01

    G alpha(12/13), which belongs to the G alpha(12) family, participates in the regulation of diverse physiologic processes. In view of the control of G alpha(12/13) in cell proliferation, this study investigated the role of G alpha(12/13) in the regulation of p53 and mdm4. Immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry revealed that p53 was expressed in control embryonic fibroblasts and was largely localized in the nuclei. G alpha(12) deficiency decreased p53 levels and its DNA binding activity, accompanying p21 repression with Bcl(2) induction, whereas G alpha(13) deficiency exerted weak effects. G alpha(12) or G alpha(13) deficiency did not change p53 mRNA expression. ERK1/2 or Akt was not responsible for p53 repression due to G alpha(12) deficiency. Mdm4, a p53-stabilizing protein, was repressed by G alpha(12) deficiency and to a lesser extent by G alpha(13) deficiency, whereas mdm2, PTEN, beta-catenin, ATM, and Chk2 were unaffected. p53 accumulation by proteasomal inhibition during G alpha(12) deficiency suggested the role of G alpha(12) in p53 stabilization. Constitutively active G alpha(12) (G alpha(12)QL) or G alpha(13) (G alpha(13)QL) promoted p53 accumulation with mdm4 induction in MCF10A cells. p53 accumulation by mdm4 overexpression, but no mdm4 induction by p53 overexpression, and small interfering RNA knockdown verified the regulatory role of mdm4 for p53 downstream of G alpha(12/13). In control or G alpha(12)/G alpha(13)-deficient cells, genotoxic stress led to p53 accumulation. At concentrations increasing the flow cytometric pre-G(1) phase, doxorubicin or etoposide treatment caused serine phosphorylations in G alpha(12)-/- or G alpha(12/13)-/- cells, but did not induce mdm4. G alpha(12/13)QL transfection failed to phosphorylate p53 at serines. Our results indicate that G alpha(12/13) regulate basal p53 levels via mdm4, which constitutes a cell signaling pathway distinct from p53 phosphorylations elicited by genotoxic stress.

  14. Regulation of Neuronal Gene Expression and Survival by Basal NMDA Receptor Activity: A Role for Histone Deacetylase 4

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yelin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Modrusan, Zora

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal gene expression is modulated by activity via calcium-permeable receptors such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs). While gene expression changes downstream of evoked NMDAR activity have been well studied, much less is known about gene expression changes that occur under conditions of basal neuronal activity. In mouse dissociated hippocampal neuronal cultures, we found that a broad NMDAR antagonist, AP5, induced robust gene expression changes under basal activity, but subtype-specific antagonists did not. While some of the gene expression changes are also known to be downstream of stimulated NMDAR activity, others appear specific to basal NMDAR activity. The genes altered by AP5 treatment of basal cultures were enriched for pathways related to class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs), apoptosis, and synapse-related signaling. Specifically, AP5 altered the expression of all three class IIa HDACs that are highly expressed in the brain, HDAC4, HDAC5, and HDAC9, and also induced nuclear accumulation of HDAC4. HDAC4 knockdown abolished a subset of the gene expression changes induced by AP5, and led to neuronal death under long-term tetrodotoxin or AP5 treatment in rat hippocampal organotypic slice cultures. These data suggest that basal, but not evoked, NMDAR activity regulates gene expression in part through HDAC4, and, that HDAC4 has neuroprotective functions under conditions of low NMDAR activity. PMID:25392500

  15. ATP and noradrenaline activate CREB in astrocytes via noncanonical Ca(2+) and cyclic AMP independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Carriba, Paulina; Pardo, Luis; Parra-Damas, Arnaldo; Lichtenstein, Mathieu P; Saura, Carlos A; Pujol, Aurora; Masgrau, Roser; Galea, Elena

    2012-09-01

    In neurons, it is well established that CREB contributes to learning and memory by orchestrating the translation of experience into the activity-dependent (i.e., driven by neurotransmitters) transcription of plasticity-related genes. The activity-dependent CREB-triggered transcription requires the concerted action of cyclic AMP/protein kinase A and Ca(2+) /calcineurin via the CREB-regulated transcription co-activator (CRTC). It is not known, however, whether a comparable molecular sequence occurs in astrocytes, despite the unquestionable contribution of these cells to brain plasticity. Here we sought to determine whether and how ATP and noradrenaline cause CREB-dependent transcription in rat cortical astrocyte cultures. Both transmitters induced CREB phosphorylation (Western Blots), CREB-dependent transcription (CRE-luciferase reporter assays), and the transcription of Bdnf, a canonical regulator of synaptic plasticity (quantitative RT-PCR). We indentified a Ca(2+) and diacylglycerol-independent protein kinase C at the uppermost position of the cascade leading to CREB-dependent transcription. Notably, CREB-dependent transcription was partially dependent on ERK1/2 and CRTC, but independent of cyclic AMP/protein kinase A or Ca(2+) /calcineurin. We conclude that ATP and noradrenaline activate CREB-dependent transcription in cortical astrocytes via an atypical protein kinase C. It is of relevance that the signaling involved be starkly different to the one described in neurons since there is no convergence of Ca(2+) and cyclic AMP-dependent pathways on CRTC, which, moreover, exerts a modulatory rather than a central role. Our data thus point to the existence of an alternative, non-neuronal, glia-based role of CREB in plasticity.

  16. Stimulation of phosphorylation of ERK and CREB by phellopterin and auraptene isolated from Citrusjunos.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Tomoko; Takagi, Mai; Tamura, Hirotoshi; Masuda, Toshiya

    2014-10-01

    Bioactive compounds from citrus fruits contribute many benefits to human health. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling plays an important role in the regulation of multiple cellular processes. Activation of the ERK-cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) signaling is required for long- term memory formation. In this study, auraptene, phellopterin, thymol, coniferyl alcohol 9-methyl ether and methyl ferulate were isolated from Citrus junos. Among the five compounds isolated, auraptene and phellopterin increased the phosphorylation of ERK and CREB. This study provides, to our knowledge, the first evidence that phellopterin potently stimulates the phosphorylation of ERK and CREB. Phellopterin could be a novel neuroprotective agent. PMID:25522543

  17. CREB pathway links PGE2 signaling with macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Luan, Bing; Yoon, Young-Sil; Le Lay, John; Kaestner, Klaus H; Hedrick, Susan; Montminy, Marc

    2015-12-22

    Obesity is thought to promote insulin resistance in part via activation of the innate immune system. Increases in proinflammatory cytokine production by M1 macrophages inhibit insulin signaling in white adipose tissue. In contrast, M2 macrophages have been found to enhance insulin sensitivity in part by reducing adipose tissue inflammation. The paracrine hormone prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) enhances M2 polarization in part through activation of the cAMP pathway, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we show that PGE2 stimulates M2 polarization via the cyclic AMP-responsive element binding (CREB)-mediated induction of Krupple-like factor 4 (KLF4). Targeted disruption of CREB or the cAMP-regulated transcriptional coactivators 2 and 3 (CRTC2/3) in macrophages down-regulated M2 marker gene expression and promoted insulin resistance in the context of high-fat diet feeding. As re-expression of KLF4 rescued M2 marker gene expression in CREB-depleted cells, our results demonstrate the importance of the CREB/CRTC pathway in maintaining insulin sensitivity in white adipose tissue via its effects on the innate immune system.

  18. CREB pathway links PGE2 signaling with macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Bing; Yoon, Young-Sil; Le Lay, John; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Hedrick, Susan; Montminy, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is thought to promote insulin resistance in part via activation of the innate immune system. Increases in proinflammatory cytokine production by M1 macrophages inhibit insulin signaling in white adipose tissue. In contrast, M2 macrophages have been found to enhance insulin sensitivity in part by reducing adipose tissue inflammation. The paracrine hormone prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) enhances M2 polarization in part through activation of the cAMP pathway, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we show that PGE2 stimulates M2 polarization via the cyclic AMP-responsive element binding (CREB)-mediated induction of Krupple-like factor 4 (KLF4). Targeted disruption of CREB or the cAMP-regulated transcriptional coactivators 2 and 3 (CRTC2/3) in macrophages down-regulated M2 marker gene expression and promoted insulin resistance in the context of high-fat diet feeding. As re-expression of KLF4 rescued M2 marker gene expression in CREB-depleted cells, our results demonstrate the importance of the CREB/CRTC pathway in maintaining insulin sensitivity in white adipose tissue via its effects on the innate immune system. PMID:26644581

  19. The LPA1/ZEB1/miR-21-activation pathway regulates metastasis in basal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Debashish; Leblanc, Raphael; Grunewald, Thomas G. P.; Ambatipudi, Srikant; Ribeiro, Johnny; Clézardin, Philippe; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid promoting cancer metastasis. LPA activates a series of six G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1-6). While blockage of LPA1 in vivo inhibits breast carcinoma metastasis, down-stream genes mediating LPA-induced metastasis have not been yet identified. Herein we showed by analyzing publicly available expression data from 1488 human primary breast tumors that the gene encoding the transcription factor ZEB1 was the most correlated with LPAR1 encoding LPA1. This correlation was most prominent in basal primary breast carcinomas and restricted to cell lines of basal subtypes. Functional experiments in three different basal cell lines revealed that LPA-induced ZEB1 expression was regulated by the LPA1/Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase (Pi3K) axis. DNA microarray and real-time PCR analyses further demonstrated that LPA up-regulated the oncomiR miR-21 through an LPA1/Pi3K/ZEB1-dependent mechanism. Strikingly, treatment with a mirVana miR-21 inhibitor, or silencing LPA1 or ZEB1 completely blocked LPA-induced cell migration in vitro, invasion and tumor cell bone colonization in vivo, which can be restored with a mirVana miR-21 mimic. Finally, high LPAR1 expression in basal breast tumors predicted worse lung-metastasis-free survival. Collectively, our results elucidate a new molecular pathway driving LPA-induced metastasis, thus underscoring the therapeutic potential of targeting LPA1 in patients with basal breast carcinomas. PMID:26098771

  20. CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation regulates basal cardiac pacemaker function via modulation of local Ca2+ releases.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Sirenko, Syevda; Riordon, Daniel R; Yang, Dongmei; Spurgeon, Harold; Lakatta, Edward G; Vinogradova, Tatiana M

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous beating of the heart pacemaker, the sinoatrial node, is generated by sinoatrial node cells (SANC) due to gradual change of the membrane potential called diastolic depolarization (DD). Spontaneous, submembrane local Ca(2+) releases (LCR) from ryanodine receptors (RyR) occur during late DD and activate an inward Na(+)/Ca(2+)exchange current to boost the DD rate and fire an action potential (AP). Here we studied the extent of basal Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activation and the role of basal CaMKII-dependent protein phosphorylation in generation of LCRs and regulation of normal automaticity of intact rabbit SANC. The basal level of activated (autophosphorylated) CaMKII in rabbit SANC surpassed that in ventricular myocytes (VM) by approximately twofold, and this was accompanied by high basal level of protein phosphorylation. Specifically, phosphorylation of phospholamban (PLB) at the CaMKII-dependent Thr(17) site was approximately threefold greater in SANC compared with VM, and RyR phosphorylation at CaMKII-dependent Ser(2815) site was ∼10-fold greater in the SA node, compared with that in ventricle. CaMKII inhibition reduced phosphorylation of PLB and RyR, decreased LCR size, increased LCR periods (time from AP-induced Ca(2+) transient to subsequent LCR), and suppressed spontaneous SANC firing. Graded changes in CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation (indexed by PLB phosphorylation at the Thr(17)site) produced by CaMKII inhibition, β-AR stimulation or phosphodiesterase inhibition were highly correlated with changes in SR Ca(2+) replenishment times and LCR periods and concomitant changes in spontaneous SANC cycle lengths (R(2) = 0.96). Thus high basal CaMKII activation modifies the phosphorylation state of Ca(2+) cycling proteins PLB, RyR, L-type Ca(2+) channels (and likely others), adjusting LCR period and characteristics, and ultimately regulates both normal and reserve cardiac pacemaker function. PMID:27402669

  1. Cerebral blood flow regulation in women across menstrual phase: differential contribution of cyclooxygenase to basal, hypoxic, and hypercapnic vascular tone.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, Garrett L; Harrell, John W; Aleckson, Benjamin P; LaPlante, Kaylie M; Crain, Meghan K; Schrage, William G

    2016-08-01

    In healthy young women, basal cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrovascular reactivity may change across the menstrual cycle, but mechanisms remain untested. When compared with the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, we hypothesized women in late follicular phase would exhibit: 1) greater basal CBF, 2) greater hypercapnic increases in CBF, 3) greater hypoxic increases in CBF, and 4) increased cyclooxygenase (COX) signaling. We measured middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv, transcranial Doppler ultrasound) in 11 healthy women (23 ± 1 yr) during rest, hypoxia, and hypercapnia. Subjects completed four visits: two during the early follicular (∼day 3) and two during the late follicular (∼day 14) phases of the menstrual cycle, with and without COX inhibition (oral indomethacin). Isocapnic hypoxia elicited an SPO2 = 90% and SPO2 = 80% for 5 min each. Separately, hypercapnia increased end-tidal CO2 10 mmHg above baseline. Cerebral vascular conductance index (CVCi = MCAv/MABP·100, where MABP is mean arterial blood pressure) was calculated and a positive change reflected vasodilation (ΔCVCi). Basal CVCi was greater in the late follicular phase (P < 0.001). Indomethacin decreased basal CVCi (∼37%) and abolished the phase difference (P < 0.001). Hypoxic ΔCVCi was similar between phases and unaffected by indomethacin. Hypercapnic ΔCVCi was similar between phases, and indomethacin decreased hypercapnic ΔCVCi (∼68%; P < 0.001) similarly between phases. In summary, while neither hypercapnic nor hypoxic vasodilation is altered by menstrual phase, increased basal CBF in the late follicular phase is fully explained by a greater contribution of COX. These data provide new mechanistic insight into anterior CBF regulation across menstrual phases and contribute to our understanding of CBF regulation in women. PMID:27225949

  2. The LPA1/ZEB1/miR-21-activation pathway regulates metastasis in basal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Debashish; Leblanc, Raphael; Grunewald, Thomas G P; Ambatipudi, Srikant; Ribeiro, Johnny; Clézardin, Philippe; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2015-08-21

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid promoting cancer metastasis. LPA activates a series of six G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1-6). While blockage of LPA1in vivo inhibits breast carcinoma metastasis, down-stream genes mediating LPA-induced metastasis have not been yet identified. Herein we showed by analyzing publicly available expression data from 1488 human primary breast tumors that the gene encoding the transcription factor ZEB1 was the most correlated with LPAR1 encoding LPA1. This correlation was most prominent in basal primary breast carcinomas and restricted to cell lines of basal subtypes. Functional experiments in three different basal cell lines revealed that LPA-induced ZEB1 expression was regulated by the LPA1/Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase (Pi3K) axis. DNA microarray and real-time PCR analyses further demonstrated that LPA up-regulated the oncomiR miR-21 through an LPA1/Pi3K/ZEB1-dependent mechanism. Strikingly, treatment with a mirVana miR-21 inhibitor, or silencing LPA1 or ZEB1 completely blocked LPA-induced cell migration in vitro, invasion and tumor cell bone colonization in vivo, which can be restored with a mirVana miR-21 mimic. Finally, high LPAR1 expression in basal breast tumors predicted worse lung-metastasis-free survival. Collectively, our results elucidate a new molecular pathway driving LPA-induced metastasis, thus underscoring the therapeutic potential of targeting LPA1 in patients with basal breast carcinomas. PMID:26098771

  3. Primary Cilia on Horizontal Basal Cells Regulate Regeneration of the Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Joiner, Ariell M.; Green, Warren W.; McIntyre, Jeremy C.; Allen, Benjamin L.; Schwob, James E.

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) is one of the few tissues to undergo constitutive neurogenesis throughout the mammalian lifespan. It is composed of multiple cell types including olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that are readily replaced by two populations of basal stem cells, frequently dividing globose basal cells and quiescent horizontal basal cells (HBCs). However, the precise mechanisms by which these cells mediate OE regeneration are unclear. Here, we show for the first time that the HBC subpopulation of basal stem cells uniquely possesses primary cilia that are aligned in an apical orientation in direct apposition to sustentacular cell end feet. The positioning of these cilia suggests that they function in the detection of growth signals and/or differentiation cues. To test this idea, we generated an inducible, cell type-specific Ift88 knock-out mouse line (K5rtTA;tetOCre;Ift88fl/fl) to disrupt cilia formation and maintenance specifically in HBCs. Surprisingly, the loss of HBC cilia did not affect the maintenance of the adult OE but dramatically impaired the regeneration of OSNs following lesion. Furthermore, the loss of cilia during development resulted in a region-specific decrease in neurogenesis, implicating HBCs in the establishment of the OE. Together, these results suggest a novel role for primary cilia in HBC activation, proliferation, and differentiation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show for the first time the presence of primary cilia on a quiescent population of basal stem cells, the horizontal basal cells (HBCs), in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Importantly, our data demonstrate that cilia on HBCs are necessary for regeneration of the OE following injury. Moreover, the disruption of HBC cilia alters neurogenesis during the development of the OE, providing evidence that HBCs participate in the establishment of this tissue. These data suggest that the mechanisms of penetrance for ciliopathies in the OE extend beyond that of defects in olfactory sensory

  4. The SOX11 transcription factor is a critical regulator of basal-like breast cancer growth, invasion, and basal-like gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jonathan H.; Uray, Ivan P.; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Tsimelzon, Anna; Savage, Michelle; Hilsenbeck, Susan G.; Brown, Powel H.

    2016-01-01

    Basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs) are aggressive breast cancers associated with poor survival. Defining the key drivers of BLBC growth will allow identification of molecules for targeted therapy. In this study, we performed a primary screen integrating multiple assays that compare transcription factor expression and activity in BLBC and non-BLBC at the RNA, DNA, and protein levels. This integrated screen identified 33 transcription factors that were elevated in BLBC in multiple assays comparing mRNA expression, DNA cis-element sequences, or protein DNA-binding activity. In a secondary screen to identify transcription factors critical for BLBC cell growth, 8 of the 33 candidate transcription factors (TFs) were found to be necessary for growth in at least two of three BLBC cell lines. Of these 8 transcription factors, SOX11 was the only transcription factor required for BLBC growth, but not for growth of non-BLBC cells. Our studies demonstrate that SOX11 is a critical regulator of multiple BLBC phenotypes, including growth, migration, invasion, and expression of signature BLBC genes. High SOX11 expression was also found to be an independent prognostic indicator of poor survival in women with breast cancer. These results identify SOX11 as a potential target for the treatment of BLBC, the most aggressive form of breast cancer. PMID:26894864

  5. ALD1 Regulates Basal Immune Components and Early Inducible Defense Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Nicolás M; Jung, Ho Won; Engle, Nancy L; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Greenberg, Jean T

    2015-04-01

    Robust immunity requires basal defense machinery to mediate timely responses and feedback cycles to amplify defenses against potentially spreading infections. AGD2-LIKE DEFENSE RESPONSE PROTEIN 1 (ALD1) is needed for the accumulation of the plant defense signal salicylic acid (SA) during the first hours after infection with the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and is also upregulated by infection and SA. ALD1 is an aminotransferase with multiple substrates and products in vitro. Pipecolic acid (Pip) is an ALD1-dependent bioactive product induced by P. syringae. Here, we addressed roles of ALD1 in mediating defense amplification as well as the levels and responses of basal defense machinery. ALD1 needs immune components PAD4 and ICS1 (an SA synthesis enzyme) to confer disease resistance, possibly through a transcriptional amplification loop between them. Furthermore, ALD1 affects basal defense by controlling microbial-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) receptor levels and responsiveness. Vascular exudates from uninfected ALD1-overexpressing plants confer local immunity to the wild type and ald1 mutants yet are not enriched for Pip. We infer that, in addition to affecting Pip accumulation, ALD1 produces non-Pip metabolites that play roles in immunity. Thus, distinct metabolite signals controlled by the same enzyme affect basal and early defenses versus later defense responses, respectively.

  6. Caffeine and REM sleep deprivation: Effect on basal levels of signaling molecules in area CA1.

    PubMed

    Alkadhi, Karim A; Alhaider, Ibrahim A

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the neuroprotective effect of chronic caffeine treatment on basal levels of memory-related signaling molecules in area CA1 of sleep-deprived rats. Animals in the caffeine groups were treated with caffeine in drinking water (0.3g/l) for four weeks before they were REM sleep-deprived for 24h in the Modified Multiple Platforms paradigm. Western blot analysis of basal protein levels of plasticity- and memory-related signaling molecules in hippocampal area CA1 showed significant down regulation of the basal levels of phosphorylated- and total-CaMKII, phosphorylated- and total-CREB as well as those of BDNF and CaMKIV in sleep deprived rats. All these changes were completely prevented in rats that chronically consumed caffeine. The present findings suggest an important neuroprotective property of caffeine in sleep deprivation.

  7. Caffeine and REM sleep deprivation: Effect on basal levels of signaling molecules in area CA1.

    PubMed

    Alkadhi, Karim A; Alhaider, Ibrahim A

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the neuroprotective effect of chronic caffeine treatment on basal levels of memory-related signaling molecules in area CA1 of sleep-deprived rats. Animals in the caffeine groups were treated with caffeine in drinking water (0.3g/l) for four weeks before they were REM sleep-deprived for 24h in the Modified Multiple Platforms paradigm. Western blot analysis of basal protein levels of plasticity- and memory-related signaling molecules in hippocampal area CA1 showed significant down regulation of the basal levels of phosphorylated- and total-CaMKII, phosphorylated- and total-CREB as well as those of BDNF and CaMKIV in sleep deprived rats. All these changes were completely prevented in rats that chronically consumed caffeine. The present findings suggest an important neuroprotective property of caffeine in sleep deprivation. PMID:26767416

  8. CREB modulates calcium signaling in cAMP-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linxia; Liu, Li; Thompson, Ryan; Chan, Christina

    2014-10-01

    Calcium signaling has a versatile role in many important cellular functions. Despite its importance, regulation of calcium signaling in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) has not been explored extensively. Our previous study revealed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) enabled BMSCs to generate calcium signal upon stimulation by dopamine, KCl and glutamate. Concurrently, cAMP transiently activated the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in BMSCs. Activity of CREB can be modulated by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase signaling pathway, however, whether the calcium signaling observed in cAMP-induced BMSCs requires CREB has not been investigated. In an effort to uncover the role of CREB in the generation of calcium signaling in response to modulators such as dopamine and KCl, we knocked down CREB activity in BMSCs. Our study indicated that BMSCs, but not its close relative fibroblasts, are responsive to dopamine and KCl after cAMP treatment. Calcium signal elicited by dopamine depends, in part, on calcium influx whereas that elicited by KCl depends completely on calcium influx. Knock-down of CREB activity significantly reduced or abolished the cAMP-induced calcium response, and reintroducing a constitutively active CREB partially restored the calcium response.

  9. CREB modulates calcium signaling in cAMP-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linxia; Liu, Li; Thompson, Ryan; Chan, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Calcium signaling has a versatile role in many important cellular functions. Despite its importance, regulation of calcium signaling in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) has not been explored extensively. Our previous study revealed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) enabled BMSCs to generate calcium signal upon stimulation by dopamine, KCl and glutamate. Concurrently, cAMP transiently activated the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in BMSCs. Activity of CREB can be modulated by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase signaling pathway, however, whether the calcium signaling observed in cAMP-induced BMSCs requires CREB has not been investigated. In an effort to uncover the role of CREB in the generation of calcium signaling in response to modulators such as dopamine and KCl, we knocked down CREB activity in BMSCs. Our study indicated that BMSCs, but not its close relative fibroblasts, are responsive to dopamine and KCl after cAMP treatment. Calcium signal elicited by dopamine depends, in part, on calcium influx whereas that elicited by KCl depends completely on calcium influx. Knock-down of CREB activity significantly reduced or abolished the cAMP-induced calcium response, and reintroducing a constitutively active CREB partially restored the calcium response. PMID:25154887

  10. β-TrCP-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of liver-enriched transcription factor CREB-H

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yun; Gao, Wei-Wei; Tang, Hei-Man Vincent; Deng, Jian-Jun; Wong, Chi-Ming; Chan, Chi-Ping; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    CREB-H is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident bZIP transcription factor which critically regulates lipid homeostasis and gluconeogenesis in the liver. CREB-H is proteolytically activated by regulated intramembrane proteolysis to generate a C-terminally truncated form known as CREB-H-ΔTC, which translocates to the nucleus to activate target gene expression. CREB-H-ΔTC is a fast turnover protein but the mechanism governing its destruction was not well understood. In this study, we report on β-TrCP-dependent ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of CREB-H-ΔTC. The degradation of CREB-H-ΔTC was mediated by lysine 48-linked polyubiquitination and could be inhibited by proteasome inhibitor. CREB-H-ΔTC physically interacted with β-TrCP, a substrate recognition subunit of the SCFβ-TrCP E3 ubiquitin ligase. Forced expression of β-TrCP increased the polyubiquitination and decreased the stability of CREB-H-ΔTC, whereas knockdown of β-TrCP had the opposite effect. An evolutionarily conserved sequence, SDSGIS, was identified in CREB-H-ΔTC, which functioned as the β-TrCP-binding motif. CREB-H-ΔTC lacking this motif was stabilized and resistant to β-TrCP-induced polyubiquitination. This motif was a phosphodegron and its phosphorylation was required for β-TrCP recognition. Furthermore, two inhibitory phosphorylation sites close to the phosphodegron were identified. Taken together, our work revealed a new intracellular signaling pathway that controls ubiquitination and degradation of the active form of CREB-H transcription factor. PMID:27029215

  11. Association of MMP7 -181A→G Promoter Polymorphism with Gastric Cancer Risk: INFLUENCE OF NICOTINE IN DIFFERENTIAL ALLELE-SPECIFIC TRANSCRIPTION VIA INCREASED PHOSPHORYLATION OF cAMP-RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN (CREB).

    PubMed

    Kesh, Kousik; Subramanian, Lakshmi; Ghosh, Nillu; Gupta, Vinayak; Gupta, Arnab; Bhattacharya, Samir; Mahapatra, Nitish R; Swarnakar, Snehasikta

    2015-06-01

    Elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase7 (MMP7) has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in cancer invasion. The -181A→G (rs11568818) polymorphism in the MMP7 promoter modulates gene expression and possibly affects cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the impact of -181A→G polymorphism on MMP7 promoter activity and its association with gastric cancer risk in eastern Indian case-control cohorts (n = 520). The GG genotype as compared with the AA genotype was predisposed (p = 0.02; odds ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.1-3.3) to gastric cancer risk. Stratification analysis showed that tobacco addiction enhanced gastric cancer risk in GG subjects when compared with AA subjects (p = 0.03, odds ratio = 2.46, and 95% confidence interval = 1.07-5.68). Meta-analysis revealed that tobacco enhanced the risk for cancer more markedly in AG and GG carriers. Activity and expression of MMP7 were significantly higher in GG than in AA carriers. In support, MMP7 promoter-reporter assays showed greater transcriptional activity toward A to G transition under basal/nicotine-induced/cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) overexpressed conditions in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Moreover, nicotine (a major component of tobacco) treatment significantly up-regulated MMP7 expression due to enhanced CREB phosphorylation followed by its nuclear translocation in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed higher binding of phosphorylated CREB with the -181G than the -181A allele. Altogether, specific binding of phosphorylated CREB to the G allele-carrying promoter enhances MMP7 gene expression that is further augmented by nicotine due to increased CREB phosphorylation and thereby increases the risk for gastric cancer.

  12. Impairment of Memory Consolidation by Galanin Correlates with In-Vivo Inhibition of Both LTP and CREB Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Jefferson W.; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Barr, Alasdair M.; Criado, Jose R.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.; Behrens, M. Margarita; Henriksen, Steven J.; Bartfai, Tamas

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the state of CREB phosphorylation and in LTP in the hippocampus have been associated with learning and memory. Here we show that galanin, the neuropeptide released in the hippocampal formation from cholinergic and noradrenergic fibers, that has been shown to produce impairments in memory consolidation in the Morris water maze task inhibits both LTP and CREB phosphorylation in the rat hippocampus in-vivo. While there are many transmitters regulating CREB phosphorylation none has been shown to suppress behaviorally-induced hippocampal CREB phosphorylation as potently as galanin. The in-vivo inhibition of dentate gyrus-LTP and of CREB phosphorylation by the agonist occupancy of GalR1 and GALR2-type galanin receptors provides strong in-vivo cellular and molecular correlates to galanin-induced learning deficits and designates galanin as a major regulator of the memory consolidation process. PMID:19531380

  13. RNA Helicase DDX5 Regulates MicroRNA Expression and Contributes to Cytoskeletal Reorganization in Basal Breast Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Daojing; Huang, Jing; Hu, Zhi

    2011-11-15

    RNA helicase DDX5 (also p68) is involved in all aspects of RNA metabolism and serves as a transcriptional co-regulator, but its functional role in breast cancer remains elusive. Here, we report an integrative biology study of DDX5 in breast cancer, encompassing quantitative proteomics, global MicroRNA profiling, and detailed biochemical characterization of cell lines and human tissues. We showed that protein expression of DDX5 increased progressively from the luminal to basal breast cancer cell lines, and correlated positively with that of CD44 in the basal subtypes. Through immunohistochemistry analyses of tissue microarrays containing over 200 invasive human ductal carcinomas, we observed that DDX5 was upregulated in the majority of malignant tissues, and its expression correlated strongly with those of Ki67 and EGFR in the triple-negative tumors. We demonstrated that DDX5 regulated a subset of MicroRNAs including miR-21 and miR-182 in basal breast cancer cells. Knockdown of DDX5 resulted in reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and reduction of cellular proliferation. The effects were accompanied by upregulation of tumor suppressor PDCD4 (a known miR-21 target); as well as upregulation of cofilin and profilin, two key proteins involved in actin polymerization and cytoskeleton maintenance, as a consequence of miR-182 downregulation. Treatment with miR-182 inhibitors resulted in morphologic phenotypes resembling those induced by DDX5 knockdown. Using bioinformatics tools for pathway and network analyses, we confirmed that the network for regulation of actin cytoskeleton was predominantly enriched for the predicted downstream targets of miR-182. Our results reveal a new functional role of DDX5 in breast cancer via the DDX5→miR-182→actin cytoskeleton pathway, and suggest the potential clinical utility of DDX5 and its downstream MicroRNAs in the theranostics of breast cancer.

  14. Endotoxin-induced basal respiration alterations of renal HK-2 cells: A sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Quoilin, C.; Mouithys-Mickalad, A.; Duranteau, J.; Gallez, B.; Hoebeke, M.

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A HK-2 cells model of inflammation-induced acute kidney injury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two oximetry methods: high resolution respirometry and ESR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen consumption rates of renal cells decrease when treated with LPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells do not recover normal respiration when the LPS treatment is removed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This basal respiration alteration is a sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation. -- Abstract: To study the mechanism of oxygen regulation in inflammation-induced acute kidney injury, we investigate the effects of a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) on the basal respiration of proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2) both by high-resolution respirometry and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These two complementary methods have shown that HK-2 cells exhibit a decreased oxygen consumption rate when treated with LPS. Surprisingly, this cellular respiration alteration persists even after the stress factor was removed. We suggested that this irreversible decrease in renal oxygen consumption after LPS challenge is related to a pathologic metabolic down-regulation such as a lack of oxygen utilization by cells.

  15. A role for neuronal cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in brain responses to calorie restriction

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Salvatore; Ripoli, Cristian; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Ranieri, Sofia Chiatamone; Leone, Lucia; Toietta, Gabriele; McBurney, Michael W.; Schütz, Günther; Riccio, Antonella; Grassi, Claudio; Galeotti, Tommaso; Pani, Giovambattista

    2012-01-01

    Calorie restriction delays brain senescence and prevents neurodegeneration, but critical regulators of these beneficial responses other than the NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase Sirtuin-1 (Sirt-1) are unknown. We report that effects of calorie restriction on neuronal plasticity, memory and social behavior are abolished in mice lacking cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in the forebrain. Moreover, CREB deficiency drastically reduces the expression of Sirt-1 and the induction of genes relevant to neuronal metabolism and survival in the cortex and hippocampus of dietary-restricted animals. Biochemical studies reveal a complex interplay between CREB and Sirt-1: CREB directly regulates the transcription of the sirtuin in neuronal cells by binding to Sirt-1 chromatin; Sirt-1, in turn, is recruited by CREB to DNA and promotes CREB-dependent expression of target gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and neuronal NO Synthase. Accordingly, expression of these CREB targets is markedly reduced in the brain of Sirt KO mice that are, like CREB-deficient mice, poorly responsive to calorie restriction. Thus, the above circuitry, modulated by nutrient availability, links energy metabolism with neurotrophin signaling, participates in brain adaptation to nutrient restriction, and is potentially relevant to accelerated brain aging by overnutrition and diabetes. PMID:22190495

  16. A role for neuronal cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in brain responses to calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Salvatore; Ripoli, Cristian; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Ranieri, Sofia Chiatamone; Leone, Lucia; Toietta, Gabriele; McBurney, Michael W; Schütz, Günther; Riccio, Antonella; Grassi, Claudio; Galeotti, Tommaso; Pani, Giovambattista

    2012-01-10

    Calorie restriction delays brain senescence and prevents neurodegeneration, but critical regulators of these beneficial responses other than the NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase Sirtuin-1 (Sirt-1) are unknown. We report that effects of calorie restriction on neuronal plasticity, memory and social behavior are abolished in mice lacking cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in the forebrain. Moreover, CREB deficiency drastically reduces the expression of Sirt-1 and the induction of genes relevant to neuronal metabolism and survival in the cortex and hippocampus of dietary-restricted animals. Biochemical studies reveal a complex interplay between CREB and Sirt-1: CREB directly regulates the transcription of the sirtuin in neuronal cells by binding to Sirt-1 chromatin; Sirt-1, in turn, is recruited by CREB to DNA and promotes CREB-dependent expression of target gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and neuronal NO Synthase. Accordingly, expression of these CREB targets is markedly reduced in the brain of Sirt KO mice that are, like CREB-deficient mice, poorly responsive to calorie restriction. Thus, the above circuitry, modulated by nutrient availability, links energy metabolism with neurotrophin signaling, participates in brain adaptation to nutrient restriction, and is potentially relevant to accelerated brain aging by overnutrition and diabetes. PMID:22190495

  17. Quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-d-glucopyranoside suppresses melanin synthesis by augmenting p38 MAPK and CREB signaling pathways and subsequent cAMP down-regulation in murine melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Gug; Kim, Han Hyuk; Paul, Souren; Jang, Jae Yoon; Cho, Yong Hun; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Yu, Jae Myo; Lee, Eun Su; An, Bong Jeun; Kang, Sun Chul; Bang, Byung Ho

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the effect of purified quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-d-glucopyranosid (QCGG) on melanogenesis was investigated. QCGG was isolated from the calyx of a traditional Korean medicinal herb, Persimmon (Diospyros kaki). The hypopigmentation effects of QCGG were determined by examination of cellular melanin contents, tyrosinase activity assay, cAMP assay, and Western blotting of α-MSH-stimulated B16F10 mouse melanoma cells. Our results showed that QCGG inhibited both melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in a concentration-dependent manner as well as significantly reduced the expression of melanogenic proteins such as microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase-related protein-1, tyrosinase-related protein-2, and tyrosinase. Moreover, QCGG inhibited intracellular cAMP levels, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and p38 MAPK expression in α-MSH-stimulated B16F10 cells. Taken together, the suppressive effects of QCGG on melanogenesis may involve down-regulation of MITF and its downstream signaling pathway via phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and CREB along with reduced cAMP levels. These results indicate that QCGG reduced melanin synthesis by reducing expression of tyrosine and tyrosine-related proteins via extracellular signal-related protein kinase (ERK) activation, followed by down-regulation of CREB, p38, and MITF. PMID:26586997

  18. Quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-d-glucopyranoside suppresses melanin synthesis by augmenting p38 MAPK and CREB signaling pathways and subsequent cAMP down-regulation in murine melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun Gug; Kim, Han Hyuk; Paul, Souren; Jang, Jae Yoon; Cho, Yong Hun; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Yu, Jae Myo; Lee, Eun Su; An, Bong Jeun; Kang, Sun Chul; Bang, Byung Ho

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of purified quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-d-glucopyranosid (QCGG) on melanogenesis was investigated. QCGG was isolated from the calyx of a traditional Korean medicinal herb, Persimmon (Diospyros kaki). The hypopigmentation effects of QCGG were determined by examination of cellular melanin contents, tyrosinase activity assay, cAMP assay, and Western blotting of α-MSH-stimulated B16F10 mouse melanoma cells. Our results showed that QCGG inhibited both melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in a concentration-dependent manner as well as significantly reduced the expression of melanogenic proteins such as microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase-related protein-1, tyrosinase-related protein-2, and tyrosinase. Moreover, QCGG inhibited intracellular cAMP levels, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and p38 MAPK expression in α-MSH-stimulated B16F10 cells. Taken together, the suppressive effects of QCGG on melanogenesis may involve down-regulation of MITF and its downstream signaling pathway via phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and CREB along with reduced cAMP levels. These results indicate that QCGG reduced melanin synthesis by reducing expression of tyrosine and tyrosine-related proteins via extracellular signal-related protein kinase (ERK) activation, followed by down-regulation of CREB, p38, and MITF. PMID:26586997

  19. HMGA1 promotes metastatic processes in basal-like breast cancer regulating EMT and stemness

    PubMed Central

    Pegoraro, Silvia; Ros, Gloria; Piazza, Silvano; Sommaggio, Roberta; Ciani, Yari; Rosato, Antonio; Sgarra, Riccardo; Del Sal, Giannino

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease that progresses to the critical hallmark of metastasis. In the present study, we show that the High Mobility Group A1 (HMGA1) protein plays a fundamental role in this process in basal-like breast cancer subtype. HMGA1 knockdown induces the mesenchymal to epithelial transition and dramatically decreases stemness and self-renewal. Notably, HMGA1 depletion in basal-like breast cancer cell lines reduced migration and invasion in vitro and the formation of metastases in vivo. Mechanistically, HMGA1 activated stemness and key migration-associated genes which were linked to the Wnt/beta-catenin, Notch and Pin1/mutant p53 signalling pathways. Moreover, we identified a specific HMGA1 gene expression signature that was activated in a large subset of human primary breast tumours and was associated with poor prognosis. Taken together, these data provide new insights into the role of HMGA1 in the acquisition of aggressive features in breast cancer. PMID:23945276

  20. Transgenic songbirds with suppressed or enhanced activity of CREB transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Kentaro; Matsui, Sumiko; Watanabe, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Songbirds postnatally develop their skill to utter and to perceive a vocal signal for communication. How genetic and environmental influences act in concert to regulate the development of such skill is not fully understood. Here, we report the phenotype of transgenic songbirds with altered intrinsic activity of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcription factor. By viral vector-mediated modification of genomic DNA, we established germ line-transmitted lines of zebra finches, which exhibited enhanced or suppressed activity of CREB. Although intrinsically acquired vocalizations or their hearing ability were not affected, the transgenic birds showed reduced vocal learning quality of their own songs and impaired audio-memory formation against conspecific songs. These results thus demonstrate that appropriate activity of CREB is necessary for the postnatal acquisition of learned behavior in songbirds, and the CREB transgenic birds offer a unique opportunity to separately manipulate both genetic and environmental factors that impinge on the postnatal song learning. PMID:26048905

  1. Transcriptional regulation of the human glycoprotein hormone common alpha subunit gene by cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)/p300 and p53.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xian; Grand, Roger J A; McCabe, Christopher J; Franklyn, Jayne A; Gallimore, Phillip H; Turnell, Andrew S

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the functional interactions between adenovirus early region 1A (AdE1A) protein, the co-activators cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)/p300 and SUG1, and the transcriptional repressor retinoblastoma (Rb) in mediating T3-dependent repression. Utilizing the human glycoprotein hormone common alpha-subunit (alpha-subunit) promoter and AdE1A mutants with selective binding capacity to these molecules we have determined an essential role for CBP/p300. In normal circumstances, wild-type 12 S AdE1A inhibited alpha-subunit activity. In contrast, adenovirus mutants that retain both the SUG1- and Rb-binding sites, but lack the CBP/p300-binding site, were unable to repress promoter activity. We have also identified a role for the tumour-suppressor gene product p53 in regulation of the alpha-subunit promoter. Akin to 12 S AdE1A, exogenous p53 expression repressed alpha-subunit activity. This function resided in the ability of p53 to interact with CBP/p300; an N-terminal mutant incapable of interacting with CBP/p300 did not inhibit alpha-subunit activity. Stabilization of endogenous p53 by UV irradiation also correlated positively with reduced alpha-subunit activity. Intriguingly, T3 stimulated endogenous p53 transcriptional activity, implicating p53 in T3-dependent signalling pathways. These data indicate that CBP/p300 and p53 are key regulators of alpha-subunit activity. PMID:12164786

  2. Striatal microRNA controls cocaine intake through CREB signalling.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Jonathan A; Im, Heh-In; Amelio, Antonio L; Kocerha, Jannet; Bali, Purva; Lu, Qun; Willoughby, David; Wahlestedt, Claes; Conkright, Michael D; Kenny, Paul J

    2010-07-01

    Cocaine addiction is characterized by a gradual loss of control over drug use, but the molecular mechanisms regulating vulnerability to this process remain unclear. Here we report that microRNA-212 (miR-212) is upregulated in the dorsal striatum of rats with a history of extended access to cocaine. Striatal miR-212 decreases responsiveness to the motivational properties of cocaine by markedly amplifying the stimulatory effects of the drug on cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) signalling. This action occurs through miR-212-enhanced Raf1 activity, resulting in adenylyl cyclase sensitization and increased expression of the essential CREB co-activator TORC (transducer of regulated CREB; also known as CRTC). Our findings indicate that striatal miR-212 signalling has a key role in determining vulnerability to cocaine addiction, reveal new molecular regulators that control the complex actions of cocaine in brain reward circuitries and provide an entirely new direction for the development of anti-addiction therapeutics based on the modulation of noncoding RNAs.

  3. Mifepristone Suppresses Basal Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Stem Cells by Down-regulating KLF5 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rong; Shi, Peiguo; Nie, Zhi; Liang, Huichun; Zhou, Zhongmei; Chen, Wenlin; Chen, Haijun; Dong, Chao; Yang, Runxiang; Liu, Suling; Chen, Ceshi

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is currently the most malignant subtype of breast cancers without effective targeted therapies. Mifepristone (MIF), a drug regularly used for abortion, has been reported to have anti-tumor activity in multiple hormone-dependent cancers, including luminal type breast cancers. In this study, we showed that MIF suppressed tumor growth of the TNBC cell lines and patient-derived xenografts in NOD-SCID mice. Furthermore, MIF reduced the TNBC cancer stem cell (CSC) population through down-regulating KLF5 expression, a stem cell transcription factor over-expressed in basal type TNBC and promoting cell proliferation, survival and stemness. Interestingly, MIF suppresses the expression of KLF5 through inducing the expression of miR-153. Consistently, miR-153 decreases CSC and miR-153 inhibitor rescued MIF-induced down-regulation of the KLF5 protein level and CSC ratio. Taken together, our findings suggest that MIF inhibits basal TNBC via the miR-153/KLF5 axis and MIF may be used for the treatment of TNBC. PMID:26941846

  4. Closed-loop firing rate regulation of two interacting excitatory and inhibitory neural populations of the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Ihab; Pasillas-Lépine, William; Chaillet, Antoine; Panteley, Elena; Palfi, Stéphane; Senova, Suhan

    2016-02-01

    This paper develops a new closed-loop firing rate regulation strategy for a population of neurons in the subthalamic nucleus, derived using a model-based analysis of the basal ganglia. The system is described using a firing rate model, in order to analyse the generation of beta-band oscillations. On this system, a proportional regulation of the firing rate reduces the gain of the subthalamo-pallidal loop in the parkinsonian case, thus impeding pathological oscillation generation. A filter with a well-chosen frequency is added to this proportional scheme, in order to avoid a potential instability of the feedback loop due to actuation and measurement delays. Our main result is a set of conditions on the parameters of the stimulation strategy that guarantee both its stability and a prescribed delay margin. A discussion on the applicability of the proposed method and a complete set of mathematical proofs is included.

  5. Side-chain interactions in the regulatory domain of human glutamate dehydrogenase determine basal activity and regulation.

    PubMed

    Mastorodemos, Vasileios; Kanavouras, Konstantinos; Sundaram, Shobana; Providaki, Maria; Petraki, Zoe; Kokkinidis, Michael; Zaganas, Ioannis; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) is central to the metabolism of glutamate, a major excitatory transmitter in mammalian central nervous system (CNS). hGDH1 is activated by ADP and L-leucine and powerfully inhibited by GTP. Besides this housekeeping hGDH1, duplication led to an hGDH2 isoform that is expressed in the human brain dissociating its function from GTP control. The novel enzyme has reduced basal activity (4-6% of capacity) while remaining remarkably responsive to ADP/L-leucine activation. While the molecular basis of this evolutionary adaptation remains unclear, substitution of Ser for Arg443 in hGDH1 is shown to diminish basal activity (< 2% of capacity) and abrogate L-leucine activation. To explore whether the Arg443Ser mutation disrupts hydrogen bonding between Arg443 and Ser409 of adjacent monomers in the regulatory domain ('antenna'), we replaced Ser409 by Arg or Asp in hGDH1. The Ser409Arg-1 change essentially replicated the Arg443Ser-1 mutation effects. Molecular dynamics simulation predicted that Ser409 and Arg443 of neighboring monomers come in close proximity in the open conformation and that introduction of Ser443-1 or Arg409-1 causes them to separate with the swap mutation (Arg409/Ser443) reinstating their proximity. A swapped Ser409Arg/Arg443Ser-1 mutant protein, obtained in recombinant form, regained most of the wild-type hGDH1 properties. Also, when Ser443 was replaced by Arg443 in hGDH2 (as occurs in hGDH1), the Ser443Arg-2 mutant acquired most of the hGDH1 properties. Hence, side-chain interactions between 409 and 443 positions in the 'antenna' region of hGDHs are crucial for basal catalytic activity, allosteric regulation, and relative resistance to thermal inactivation. PMID:25620628

  6. Appetitive Cue-Evoked ERK Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens Requires NMDA and D1 Dopamine Receptor Activation and Regulates CREB Phosphorylation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschmann, Erin K. Z.; Mauna, Jocelyn C.; Willis, Cory M.; Foster, Rebecca L.; Chipman, Amanda M.; Thiels, Edda

    2014-01-01

    Conditioned stimuli (CS) can modulate reward-seeking behavior. This modulatory effect can be maladaptive and has been implicated in excessive reward seeking and relapse to drug addiction. We previously demonstrated that exposure to an appetitive CS causes an increase in the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cyclic-AMP…

  7. Interaction of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons with the glucocorticoid system in stress regulation and cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Saswati; Jeon, Won Kyung; Bizon, Jennifer L.; Han, Jung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A substantial number of studies on basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons (BFCN) have provided compelling evidence for their role in the etiology of stress, cognitive aging, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and other neurodegenerative diseases. BFCN project to a broad range of cortical sites and limbic structures, including the hippocampus, and are involved in stress and cognition. In particular, the hippocampus, the primary target tissue of the glucocorticoid stress hormones, is associated with cognitive function in tandem with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis modulation. The present review summarizes glucocorticoid and HPA axis research to date in an effort to establish the manner in which stress affects the release of acetylcholine (ACh), glucocorticoids, and their receptor in the context of cognitive processes. We attempt to provide the molecular interactive link between the glucocorticoids and cholinergic system that contributes to BFCN degeneration in stress-induced acceleration of cognitive decline in aging and AD. We also discuss the importance of animal models in facilitating such studies for pharmacological use, to which could help decipher disease states and propose leads for pharmacological intervention. PMID:25883567

  8. DNA supercoiling, a critical signal regulating the basal expression of the lac operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fulcrand, Geraldine; Dages, Samantha; Zhi, Xiaoduo; Chapagain, Prem; Gerstman, Bernard S.; Dunlap, David; Leng, Fenfei

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli lac repressor (LacI) is a paradigmatic transcriptional factor that controls the expression of lacZYA in the lac operon. This tetrameric protein specifically binds to the O1, O2 and O3 operators of the lac operon and forms a DNA loop to repress transcription from the adjacent lac promoter. In this article, we demonstrate that upon binding to the O1 and O2 operators at their native positions LacI constrains three (−) supercoils within the 401-bp DNA loop of the lac promoter and forms a topological barrier. The stability of LacI-mediated DNA topological barriers is directly proportional to its DNA binding affinity. However, we find that DNA supercoiling modulates the basal expression from the lac operon in E. coli. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that LacI functions as a topological barrier to constrain free, unconstrained (−) supercoils within the 401-bp DNA loop of the lac promoter. These constrained (−) supercoils enhance LacI’s DNA-binding affinity and thereby the repression of the promoter. Thus, LacI binding is superhelically modulated to control the expression of lacZYA in the lac operon under varying growth conditions. PMID:26763930

  9. [CREB activation is a key player for ischemic tolerance in the brain].

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Kazuo; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Yagita, Yoshiki; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2012-01-01

    Ischemic tolerance is as powerful and reproducible for neuro-protection as hypothermia. Several pathways could be involved in acquisition of ischemic tolerance. CREB is an abundant transcription factor in the brain and plays critical role on synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival. CREB activation has been also shown to be involved in ischemic tolerance. Ischemia or oxygen-glucose deprivation leads to release of glutamate, which binds to synaptic NMDA receptor. Then, influx of calcium ions into intracellular space activates calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CaMK). CaMK I/IV phosphorylates Ser 133 of CREB, and Thr 484 of salt-inducible kinase (SIK). Phosphorylation of SIK2 at Thr 484 triggers degradation of SIK2 through ubiquitin proteasome system. SIK2 maintains the phosphorylation level of CREB-regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC). Degradation of SIK2 induces dephosphorylation of CRTC1, and moves CRTC1 from cytoplasm into nucleus. Thus CRTC1 binds to basic ZIP domain of CREB. Both Ser133 phosphorylation and CRTC1 bound to the basic ZIP domain of CREB enhances CRE-mediated transcription, induces gene expression of survival factors, and renders the neurons resistant to subsequent severe ischemia.

  10. Cortically projecting basal forebrain parvalbumin neurons regulate cortical gamma band oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae; Thankachan, Stephen; McKenna, James T.; McNally, James M.; Yang, Chun; Choi, Jee Hyun; Chen, Lichao; Kocsis, Bernat; Deisseroth, Karl; Strecker, Robert E.; Basheer, Radhika; McCarley, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical gamma band oscillations (GBO, 30–80 Hz, typically ∼40 Hz) are involved in higher cognitive functions such as feature binding, attention, and working memory. GBO abnormalities are a feature of several neuropsychiatric disorders associated with dysfunction of cortical fast-spiking interneurons containing the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV). GBO vary according to the state of arousal, are modulated by attention, and are correlated with conscious awareness. However, the subcortical cell types underlying the state-dependent control of GBO are not well understood. Here we tested the role of one cell type in the wakefulness-promoting basal forebrain (BF) region, cortically projecting GABAergic neurons containing PV, whose virally transduced fibers we found apposed cortical PV interneurons involved in generating GBO. Optogenetic stimulation of BF PV neurons in mice preferentially increased cortical GBO power by entraining a cortical oscillator with a resonant frequency of ∼40 Hz, as revealed by analysis of both rhythmic and nonrhythmic BF PV stimulation. Selective saporin lesions of BF cholinergic neurons did not alter the enhancement of cortical GBO power induced by BF PV stimulation. Importantly, bilateral optogenetic inhibition of BF PV neurons decreased the power of the 40-Hz auditory steady-state response, a read-out of the ability of the cortex to generate GBO used in clinical studies. Our results are surprising and novel in indicating that this presumptively inhibitory BF PV input controls cortical GBO, likely by synchronizing the activity of cortical PV interneurons. BF PV neurons may represent a previously unidentified therapeutic target to treat disorders involving abnormal GBO, such as schizophrenia. PMID:25733878

  11. Phosphorylation of CREB affects its binding to high and low affinity sites: implications for cAMP induced gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, M; Weih, F; Schmid, W; DeVack, C; Kowenz-Leutz, E; Luckow, B; Boshart, M; Schütz, G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP treatment of hepatoma cells leads to increased protein binding at the cyclic AMP response element (CRE) of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene in vivo, as revealed by genomic footprinting, whereas no increase is observed at the CRE of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene. Several criteria establish that the 43 kDa CREB protein is interacting with both of these sites. Two classes of CRE with different affinity for CREB are described. One class, including the TATCRE, is characterized by asymmetric and weak binding sites (CGTCA), whereas the second class containing symmetrical TGACGTCA sites shows a much higher binding affinity for CREB. Both classes show an increase in binding after phosphorylation of CREB by protein kinase A (PKA). An in vivo phosphorylation-dependent change in binding of CREB increases the occupancy of weak binding sites used for transactivation, such as the TATCRE, while high affinity sites may have constitutive binding of transcriptionally active and inactive CREB dimers, as demonstrated by in vivo footprinting at the PEPCK CRE. Thus, lower basal level and higher relative stimulation of transcription by cyclic AMP through low affinity CREs should result, allowing finely tuned control of gene activation. Images PMID:1354612

  12. Involvement of the CREB5 regulatory network in colorectal cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lu; Ding, Yanqing

    2014-07-01

    The signal regulatory network involved in colorectal cancer metastasis is complicated and thus the search for key control steps in the network is of great significance for unraveling colorectal cancer metastasis mechanism and finding drug-target site. Previous studies suggested that CREB5 (cAMP responsive element binding protein 5) might play key role in the metastatic signal network of colorectal cancer. Through colorectal cancer expression profile and enriching analysis of the effect of CREB5 gene expression levels on colorectal cancer molecular events, we found that these molecular events are correlated with tumor metastasis. Based on the feature that CREB5 could combine with c-Jun to form heterodimer, together with enriched binding sites for transcription factor AP-1, we identified 16 genes which were up-regulated in the CREB5 high-expression group, contained AP-1 binding sites, and participated in cancer pathway. The molecular network involving these 16 genes, in particular, CSF1R, MMP9, PDGFRB, FIGF and IL6, regulates cell migration. Therefore, CREB5 might accelerate the metastasis of colorectal cancer by regulating these five key genes.

  13. Large-scale analysis of Arabidopsis transcription reveals a basal co-regulation network

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Analyses of gene expression data from microarray experiments has become a central tool for identifying co-regulated, functional gene modules. A crucial aspect of such analysis is the integration of data from different experiments and different laboratories. How to weigh the contribution of different experiments is an important point influencing the final outcomes. We have developed a novel method for this integration, and applied it to genome-wide data from multiple Arabidopsis microarray experiments performed under a variety of experimental conditions. The goal of this study is to identify functional globally co-regulated gene modules in the Arabidopsis genome. Results Following the analysis of 21,000 Arabidopsis genes in 43 datasets and about 2 × 108 gene pairs, we identified a globally co-expressed gene network. We found clusters of globally co-expressed Arabidopsis genes that are enriched for known Gene Ontology annotations. Two types of modules were identified in the regulatory network that differed in their sensitivity to the node-scoring parameter; we further showed these two pertain to general and specialized modules. Some of these modules were further investigated using the Genevestigator compendium of microarray experiments. Analyses of smaller subsets of data lead to the identification of condition-specific modules. Conclusion Our method for identification of gene clusters allows the integration of diverse microarray experiments from many sources. The analysis reveals that part of the Arabidopsis transcriptome is globally co-expressed, and can be further divided into known as well as novel functional gene modules. Our methodology is general enough to apply to any set of microarray experiments, using any scoring function. PMID:19728874

  14. OASIS/CREB3L1 is epigenetically silenced in human bladder cancer facilitating tumor cell spreading and migration in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Michael; Schubert, Claudia; Dierichs, Laura; Gaisa, Nadine T; Heer, Matthias; Heidenreich, Axel; Knüchel, Ruth; Dahl, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    CREB3L1 has been recently proposed as a novel metastasis suppressor gene in breast cancer. Our current study highlights CREB3L1 expression, regulation, and function in bladder cancer. We demonstrate a significant downregulation of CREB3L1 mRNA expression (n = 64) in primary bladder cancer tissues caused by tumor-specific CREB3L1 promoter hypermethylation (n = 51). Based on pyrosequencing CREB3L1 methylation was shown to be potentially associated with a more aggressive phenotype of bladder cancer. These findings were verified by an independent public data set containing data from 184 bladder tumors. In addition, immunohistochemical evaluation showed that CREB3L1 protein expression is decreased in bladder cancer tissues as well. Interestingly, protein loss is predominately observed in the nuclei of aggressive tumor cells. Based on in vitro models we clearly show that CREB3L1 re-expression mediates suppression of tumor cell migration and colony growth of high grade and invasive bladder cancer cells. The candidate tumor suppressor and TGF-β signaling inhibitor HTRA3 was furthermore identified as putative target gene of CREB3L1 in both invasive J82 bladder cells and primary bladder tumors. Hence, our data provide for the first time evidence that the transcription factor CREB3L1 may have an important role as a putative tumor suppressor in bladder cancer. PMID:25625847

  15. A mutation in negative regulator of basal resistance WRKY17 of Arabidopsis increases susceptibility to Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Benoît; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    Agrobacterium is a phytopathogenic bacterium that induces crown gall disease in many plant species by transferring and integrating a segment of its own DNA (T-DNA) into its host genome. Whereas Agrobacterium usually does not trigger an extensive defense response in its host plants, it induces the expression of several defense-related genes and activates plant stress reactions. In the complex interplay between Agrobacterium and its host plant, Agrobacterium has evolved to take advantage of these plant defense pathways for its own purpose of advancement of the infection process. For example, Agrobacterium utilizes the host stress response transcriptional regulator VIP1 to facilitate nuclear import and proteasomal uncoating of its T-DNA during genetic transformation of the host cell. In Arabidopsis, the VIP1 gene expression is repressed by WRKY17, a negative regulator of basal resistance to Pseudomonas. Thus, we examined whether WRKY17 is also involved in plant susceptibility to genetic transformation by Agrobacterium. Using reverse genetics, we showed that a wrky17 mutant displays higher expression of the VIP1 gene in roots, but not in shoots. In a root infection assay, the wrky17 mutant plants were hyper-susceptible to Agrobacterium compared to wild type plants. WRKY17, therefore, may act as a positive regulator of Arabidopsis resistance to Agrobacterium. This notion is important for understanding the complex regulation of Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation; thus, although this paper reports a relatively small set of data that we do not plan to pursue further in our lab, we believe it might be useful for the broad community of plant pathologists and plant biotechnologists. PMID:24358874

  16. A mutation in negative regulator of basal resistance WRKY17 of Arabidopsis increases susceptibility to Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Benoît; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    Agrobacterium is a phytopathogenic bacterium that induces crown gall disease in many plant species by transferring and integrating a segment of its own DNA (T-DNA) into its host genome. Whereas Agrobacterium usually does not trigger an extensive defense response in its host plants, it induces the expression of several defense-related genes and activates plant stress reactions. In the complex interplay between Agrobacterium and its host plant, Agrobacterium has evolved to take advantage of these plant defense pathways for its own purpose of advancement of the infection process. For example, Agrobacterium utilizes the host stress response transcriptional regulator VIP1 to facilitate nuclear import and proteasomal uncoating of its T-DNA during genetic transformation of the host cell. In Arabidopsis, the VIP1 gene expression is repressed by WRKY17, a negative regulator of basal resistance to Pseudomonas. Thus, we examined whether WRKY17 is also involved in plant susceptibility to genetic transformation by Agrobacterium. Using reverse genetics, we showed that a wrky17 mutant displays higher expression of the VIP1 gene in roots, but not in shoots. In a root infection assay, the wrky17 mutant plants were hyper-susceptible to Agrobacterium compared to wild type plants. WRKY17, therefore, may act as a positive regulator of Arabidopsis resistance to Agrobacterium. This notion is important for understanding the complex regulation of Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation; thus, although this paper reports a relatively small set of data that we do not plan to pursue further in our lab, we believe it might be useful for the broad community of plant pathologists and plant biotechnologists. PMID:24358874

  17. HNRNPA1 interacts with a 5′ flanking distal element of interleukin 6 and up-regulates its basal transcription

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dongling; Worthington, Jenny; Timms, John F.; Woo, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We have shown previously that a region from −5307 to −5202 bp upstream of the IL-6 transcriptional start site is responsible for basal IL-6 gene expression and that there were DNA binding proteins involved from EMSA and transient expression experiments. Here we have combined surface plasmon resonance technology with mass spectrometry analysis and identified nuclear proteins bound to this region. HNRNPA1 and HNRNPA2B1 were found consistently. EMSA supershift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the involvement of HNRNPA1, but not HNRNPA2B1. Knocking down HNRNPA1 expression by siRNA resulted in reduced IL-6 transcriptional activity as assessed from transfection experiments using reporter constructs, mRNA and protein measurements. Overexpression of HNRNPA1 cDNA increased IL-6 mRNA expression. This regulation was dependent on the presence of the sequence from −5307 to −5202 bp of the IL-6 gene. Thus, HNRNPA1 is a novel transcriptional regulator of IL-6 expression, acting via the 5′ flanking sequence of the gene. PMID:23985572

  18. Regulation of ATG4B Stability by RNF5 Limits Basal Levels of Autophagy and Influences Susceptibility to Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Ersheng; Varsano, Tal; Shu, Vincent Chih-Wen; Qi, Jianfei; Niesman, Ingrid R.; Yang, Huei-Jiun; López-Otín, Carlos; Yang, Wei Yuan; Reed, John C.; Broday, Limor; Nizet, Victor; Ronai, Ze'ev A.

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is the mechanism by which cytoplasmic components and organelles are degraded by the lysosomal machinery in response to diverse stimuli including nutrient deprivation, intracellular pathogens, and multiple forms of cellular stress. Here, we show that the membrane-associated E3 ligase RNF5 regulates basal levels of autophagy by controlling the stability of a select pool of the cysteine protease ATG4B. RNF5 controls the membranal fraction of ATG4B and limits LC3 (ATG8) processing, which is required for phagophore and autophagosome formation. The association of ATG4B with—and regulation of its ubiquitination and stability by—RNF5 is seen primarily under normal growth conditions. Processing of LC3 forms, appearance of LC3-positive puncta, and p62 expression are higher in RNF5−/− MEF. RNF5 mutant, which retains its E3 ligase activity but does not associate with ATG4B, no longer affects LC3 puncta. Further, increased puncta seen in RNF5−/− using WT but not LC3 mutant, which bypasses ATG4B processing, substantiates the role of RNF5 in early phases of LC3 processing and autophagy. Similarly, RNF-5 inactivation in Caenorhabditis elegans increases the level of LGG-1/LC3::GFP puncta. RNF5−/− mice are more resistant to group A Streptococcus infection, associated with increased autophagosomes and more efficient bacterial clearance by RNF5−/− macrophages. Collectively, the RNF5-mediated control of membranalATG4B reveals a novel layer in the regulation of LC3 processing and autophagy. PMID:23093945

  19. CREB-mediated synaptogenesis and neurogenesis is crucial for the role of 5-HT1a receptors in modulating anxiety behaviors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Cai, Cheng-Yun; Wu, Hai-Yin; Zhu, Li-Juan; Luo, Chun-Xia; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin 1a-receptor (5-HT1aR) has been specifically implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety. However, the mechanism underlying the role of 5-HT1aR in anxiety remains poorly understood. Here we show in mice that the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the hippocampus functions as an effector of 5-HT1aR in modulating anxiety-related behaviors. We generated recombinant lentivirus LV-CREB133-GFP expressing a dominant negative CREB which could not be phosphorylated at Ser133 to specifically reduce CREB activity, and LV-VP16-CREB-GFP expressing a constitutively active fusion protein VP16-CREB which could be phosphorylated by itself to specifically enhance CREB activity. LV-CREB133-GFP neutralized 5-HT1aR agonist-induced up-regulation of synapse density, spine density, dendrite complexity, neurogenesis, and the expression of synapsin and spinophilin, two well-characterized synaptic proteins, and abolished the anxiolytic effect of 5-HT1aR agonist; whereas LV-VP16-CREB-GFP rescued the 5-HT1aR antagonist-induced down-regulation of synapse density, spine density, dendrite complexity, neurogenesis and synapsin and spinophilin expression, and reversed the anxiogenic effect of 5-HT1aR antagonist. The deletion of neurogenesis by irradiation or the diminution of synaptogenesis by knockdown of synapsin expression abolished the anxiolytic effects of both CREB and 5-HT1aR activation. These findings suggest that CREB-mediated hippoacampus structural plasticity is crucial for the role of 5-HT1aR in modulating anxiety-related behaviors. PMID:27404655

  20. CREB-mediated synaptogenesis and neurogenesis is crucial for the role of 5-HT1a receptors in modulating anxiety behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Cai, Cheng-Yun; Wu, Hai-Yin; Zhu, Li-Juan; Luo, Chun-Xia; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin 1a-receptor (5-HT1aR) has been specifically implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety. However, the mechanism underlying the role of 5-HT1aR in anxiety remains poorly understood. Here we show in mice that the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the hippocampus functions as an effector of 5-HT1aR in modulating anxiety-related behaviors. We generated recombinant lentivirus LV-CREB133-GFP expressing a dominant negative CREB which could not be phosphorylated at Ser133 to specifically reduce CREB activity, and LV-VP16-CREB-GFP expressing a constitutively active fusion protein VP16-CREB which could be phosphorylated by itself to specifically enhance CREB activity. LV-CREB133-GFP neutralized 5-HT1aR agonist-induced up-regulation of synapse density, spine density, dendrite complexity, neurogenesis, and the expression of synapsin and spinophilin, two well-characterized synaptic proteins, and abolished the anxiolytic effect of 5-HT1aR agonist; whereas LV-VP16-CREB-GFP rescued the 5-HT1aR antagonist-induced down-regulation of synapse density, spine density, dendrite complexity, neurogenesis and synapsin and spinophilin expression, and reversed the anxiogenic effect of 5-HT1aR antagonist. The deletion of neurogenesis by irradiation or the diminution of synaptogenesis by knockdown of synapsin expression abolished the anxiolytic effects of both CREB and 5-HT1aR activation. These findings suggest that CREB-mediated hippoacampus structural plasticity is crucial for the role of 5-HT1aR in modulating anxiety-related behaviors. PMID:27404655

  1. Nerve signaling regulates basal keratinocyte proliferation in the blastema apical epithelial cap in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Bryant, Susan V; Gardiner, David M

    2012-06-15

    The ability of adult vertebrates to repair tissue damage is widespread and impressive; however, the ability to regenerate structurally complex organs such as the limb is limited largely to the salamanders. The fact that most of the tissues of the limb can regenerate has led investigators to question and identify the barriers to organ regeneration. From studies in the salamander, it is known that one of the earliest steps required for successful regeneration involves signaling between nerves and the wound epithelium/apical epithelial cap (AEC). In this study we confirm an earlier report that the keratinocytes of the AEC acquire their function coincident with exiting the cell cycle. We have discovered that this unique, coordinated behavior is regulated by nerve signaling and is associated with the presence of gap junctions between the basal keratinocytes of the AEC. Disruption of nerve signaling results in a loss of gap junction protein, the reentry of the cells into the cell cycle, and regenerative failure. Finally, coordinated exit from the cell cycle appears to be a conserved behavior of populations of cells that function as signaling centers during both development and regeneration.

  2. Thyroid-stimulating hormone improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle cells via cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway-dependent upregulation of insulin receptor substrate-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Moon, Min Kyong; Kang, Geun Hyung; Kim, Hwan Hee; Han, Sun Kyoung; Koo, Young Do; Cho, Sun Wook; Kim, Ye An; Oh, Byung-Chul; Park, Do Joon; Chung, Sung Soo; Park, Kyong Soo; Park, Young Joo

    2016-11-15

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor is expressed in extrathyroidal tissues such as hepatocytes, adipocytes, and skeletal muscle, which suggests a possible novel role of TSH in various metabolic processes in extrathyroidal tissues independent of thyroid hormones. We investigated whether TSH has any effects on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in the skeletal muscle using diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse models and rodent skeletal muscle cells. TSH improved glucose tolerance in DIO mice and this was associated with an improvement of skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity resulting from the increased expression of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 protein and mRNA therein. TSH significantly increased both basal and insulin-stimulated glucose transport in rat L6 myotubes and increased the expression of IRS-1 protein and mRNA in these cells as well. TSH also stimulated Irs1 promoter activation; this stimulation was abolished by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibition using H89 or by mutation of the cAMP-response element site located at -1155 to -875 bp of the Irs1 promoter region, supporting a novel role of TSH activated-cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling in the regulation of Irs1 expression. In conclusion, TSH improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle by increasing Irs1 gene expression. This regulatory effect is mediated by a PKA-CREB-dependent pathway.

  3. Sox4 cooperates with CREB in myeloid transformation

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Salemiz; Kraus, Christina; Cho, Er-Chieh; Cho, Michelle; Bies, Juraj; Manara, Elena; Accordi, Benedetta; Landaw, Elliot M.; Wolff, Linda; Pigazzi, Martina

    2012-01-01

    The cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is a nuclear transcription factor that is critical for normal and neoplastic hematopoiesis. Previous studies have demonstrated that CREB is a proto-oncogene whose overexpression promotes cellular proliferation in hematopoietic cells. Transgenic mice that overexpress CREB in myeloid cells develop a myeloproliferative disease with splenomegaly and aberrant myelopoiesis. However, CREB overexpressing mice do not spontaneously develop acute myeloid leukemia. In this study, we used retroviral insertional mutagenesis to identify genes that accelerate leukemia in CREB transgenic mice. Our mutagenesis screen identified several integration sites, including oncogenes Gfi1, Myb, and Ras. The Sox4 transcription factor was identified by our screen as a gene that cooperates with CREB in myeloid leukemogenesis. We show that the transduction of CREB transgenic mouse bone marrow cells with a Sox4 retrovirus increases survival and self-renewal of cells in vitro. Furthermore, leukemic blasts from the majority of acute myeloid leukemia patients have higher CREB, phosphorylated CREB, and Sox 4 protein expression. Sox4 transduction of mouse bone marrow cells results in increased expression of CREB target genes. We also demonstrate that CREB is a direct target of Sox4 by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. These results indicate that Sox4 and CREB cooperate and contribute to increased proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. PMID:22627767

  4. Calmodulin regulation of basal and agonist-stimulated G protein coupling by the mu-opioid receptor (OP(3)) in morphine-pretreated cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Surratt, C K; Sadée, W

    2000-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) has been shown to suppress basal G protein coupling and attenuate agonist-stimulated G protein coupling of the mu-opioid receptor (OP(3)) through direct interaction with the third intracellular (i3) loop of the receptor. Here we have investigated the role of CaM in regulating changes in OP(3)-G protein coupling during morphine treatment, shown to result in CaM release from plasma membranes. Basal and agonist-stimulated G protein coupling by OP(3) was measured before and after morphine pretreatment by incorporation of guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thiotriphosphate) into membranes, obtained from HEK 293 cells transfected with human OP(3) cDNA. The opioid antagonist beta-chlornaltrexamine fully suppressed basal G protein coupling of OP(3), providing a direct measure of basal signaling. Pretreatment of the cells with morphine enhanced basal G protein coupling (sensitization). In contrast, agonist-stimulated coupling was diminished (desensitization), resulting in a substantially flattened morphine dose-response curve. To test whether CaM is involved in these changes, we constructed OP(3)-i3 loop mutants with reduced affinity for CaM (K273A, R275A, and K273A/R275A). Basal signaling of these mutant OP(3) receptors was higher than that of the wild-type receptor and, moreover, unaffected by morphine pretreatment, whereas desensitization to agonist stimulation was only slightly attenuated. Therefore, CaM-OP(3) interactions appear to play only a minor role in the desensitization of OP(3). In contrast, release of CaM from the plasma membrane appears to enhance the inherent basal G protein coupling of OP(3), thereby resolving the paradox that OP(3) displays both desensitization and sensitization during morphine treatment.

  5. Metabolic hormones regulate basal and growth hormone-dependent igf2 mRNA level in primary cultured coho salmon hepatocytes: effects of insulin, glucagon, dexamethasone, and triiodothyronine.

    PubMed

    Pierce, A L; Dickey, J T; Felli, L; Swanson, P; Dickhoff, W W

    2010-03-01

    Igf1 and Igf2 stimulate growth and development of vertebrates. Circulating Igfs are produced by the liver. In mammals, Igf1 mediates the postnatal growth-promoting effects of growth hormone (Gh), whereas Igf2 stimulates fetal and placental growth. Hepatic Igf2 production is not regulated by Gh in mammals. Little is known about the regulation of hepatic Igf2 production in nonmammalian vertebrates. We examined the regulation of igf2 mRNA level by metabolic hormones in primary cultured coho salmon hepatocytes. Gh, insulin, the glucocorticoid agonist dexamethasone (Dex), and glucagon increased igf2 mRNA levels, whereas triiodothyronine (T(3)) decreased igf2 mRNA levels. Gh stimulated igf2 mRNA at physiological concentrations (0.25x10(-9) M and above). Insulin strongly enhanced Gh stimulation of igf2 at low physiological concentrations (10(-11) M and above), and increased basal igf2 (10(-8) M and above). Dex stimulated basal igf2 at concentrations comparable to those of stressed circulating cortisol (10(-8) M and above). Glucagon stimulated basal and Gh-stimulated igf2 at supraphysiological concentrations (10(-7) M and above), whereas T(3) suppressed basal and Gh-stimulated igf2 at the single concentration tested (10(-7) M). These results show that igf2 mRNA level is highly regulated in salmon hepatocytes, suggesting that liver-derived Igf2 plays a significant role in salmon growth physiology. The synergistic regulation of igf2 by insulin and Gh in salmon hepatocytes is similar to the regulation of hepatic Igf1 production in mammals.

  6. Differentiation of axon-related Schwann cells in vitro. I. Ascorbic acid regulates basal lamina assembly and myelin formation

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Rat Schwann cells cultured with dorsal root ganglion neurons in a serum- free defined medium fail to ensheathe or myelinate axons or assemble basal laminae. Replacement of defined medium with medium that contains human placental serum (HPS) and chick embryo extract (EE) results in both basal lamina and myelin formation. In the present study, the individual effects of HPS and EE on basal lamina assembly and on myelin formation by Schwann cells cultured with neurons have been examined. Some batches of HPS were unable to promote myelin formation in the absence of EE, as assessed by quantitative evaluation of cultures stained with Sudan black; such HPS also failed to promote basal lamina assembly, as assessed by immunofluorescence using antibodies against laminin, type IV collagen, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. The addition of EE or L-ascorbic acid with such HPS led to the formation of large quantities of myelin and to the assembly of basal laminae. Pretreatment of EE with ascorbic acid oxidase abolished the EE activity, whereas trypsin did not. Other batches of HPS were found to promote both basal lamina and myelin formation in the absence of either EE or ascorbic acid. Ascorbic acid oxidase treatment or dialysis of these batches of HPS abolished their ability to promote Schwann cell differentiation, whereas the subsequent addition of ascorbic acid restored that ability. Ascorbic acid in the absence of serum was relatively ineffective in promoting either basal lamina or myelin formation. Fetal bovine serum was as effective as HPS in allowing ascorbic acid (and several analogs but not other reducing agents) to manifest its ability to promote Schwann cell differentiation. We suggest that ascorbic acid promotes Schwann cell myelin formation by enabling the Schwann cell to assemble a basal lamina, which is required for complete differentiation. PMID:3624305

  7. Basal regulation of HPA and dopamine systems is altered differentially in males and females by prenatal alcohol exposure and chronic variable stress

    PubMed Central

    Uban, Kristina A.; Comeau, Wendy; Ellis, Linda A.; Galea, Liisa A. M.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Effects of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) on central nervous system function include an increased prevalence of mental health problems, including substance use disorders (SUD). The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and dopamine systems have overlapping neurocircuitries and are both implicated in SUD. PAE alters both HPA and dopaminergic activity and regulation, resulting in increased HPA tone and an overall reduction in tonic dopamine activity. However, effects of PAE on the interaction between HPA and dopamine (DA) systems have not been investigated. The present study examined PAE effects on basal regulation of central stress and dopamine systems in key brain regions where these systems intersect. Adult Sprague-Dawley male and female offspring from prenatal alcohol-exposed (PAE), pairfed (PF), and ad libitum-fed control (C) groups were subjected to chronic variable stress (CVS) or remained as a no stress (non-CVS) control group. Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA, as well as glucocorticoid and DA receptor (DA-R) expression were measured under basal conditions 24 hours following the end of CVS. We show, for the first time, that regulation of basal HPA and DA systems, and likely, HPA-DA interactions, are altered differentially in males and females by PAE and CVS. PAE augmented the typical attenuation in weight gain during CVS in males and caused increased weight loss in females. Increased basal corticosterone levels in control, but not PAE, females suggest that PAE alters the profile of basal hormone secretion throughout CVS. CVS downregulated basal CRH mRNA in the prefrontal cortex and throughout the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in PAE females but only in the posterior BNST of control females. PAE males and females exposed to CVS exhibited more widespread upregulation of basal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mRNA throughout the hippocampus, and an attenuated decrease in DA-R expression throughout the nucleus accumbens and striatum compared

  8. The Uni2 Phosphoprotein is a Cell Cycle–regulated Component of the Basal Body Maturation Pathway in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Piasecki, Brian P.; LaVoie, Matthew; Tam, Lai-Wa; Lefebvre, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the UNI2 locus in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii result in a “uniflagellar” phenotype in which flagellar assembly occurs preferentially from the older basal body and ultrastructural defects reside in the transition zones. The UNI2 gene encodes a protein of 134 kDa that shares 20.5% homology with a human protein. Immunofluorescence microscopy localized the protein on both basal bodies and probasal bodies. The protein is present as at least two molecular-weight variants that can be converted to a single form with phosphatase treatment. Synthesis of Uni2 protein is induced during cell division cycles; accumulation of the phosphorylated form coincides with assembly of transition zones and flagella at the end of the division cycle. Using the Uni2 protein as a cell cycle marker of basal bodies, we observed migration of basal bodies before flagellar resorption in some cells, indicating that flagellar resorption is not required for mitotic progression. We observed the sequential assembly of new probasal bodies beginning at prophase. The uni2 mutants may be defective in the pathways leading to flagellar assembly and to basal body maturation. PMID:17942595

  9. cAMP-response-element-binding protein positively regulates breast cancer metastasis and subsequent bone destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Jieun; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Ha-Neui; Ha, Hyunil Lee, Zang Hee

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} CREB is highly expressed in advanced breast cancer cells. {yields} Tumor-related factors such as TGF-{beta} further elevate CREB expression. {yields} CREB upregulation stimulates metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. {yields} CREB signaling is required for breast cancer-induced bone destruction. -- Abstract: cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) signaling has been reported to be associated with cancer development and poor clinical outcome in various types of cancer. However, it remains to be elucidated whether CREB is involved in breast cancer development and osteotropism. Here, we found that metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibited higher CREB expression than did non-metastatic MCF-7 cells and that CREB expression was further increased by several soluble factors linked to cancer progression, such as IL-1, IGF-1, and TGF-{beta}. Using wild-type CREB and a dominant-negative form (K-CREB), we found that CREB signaling positively regulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, K-CREB prevented MDA-MB-231 cell-induced osteolytic lesions in a mouse model of cancer metastasis. Furthermore, CREB signaling in cancer cells regulated the gene expression of PTHrP, MMPs, and OPG, which are closely involved in cancer metastasis and bone destruction. These results indicate that breast cancer cells acquire CREB overexpression during their development and that this CREB upregulation plays an important role in multiple steps of breast cancer bone metastasis.

  10. Systemic Inhibition of CREB is Well-tolerated in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bingbing X.; Gardner, Ryan; Xue, Changhui; Qian, David Z.; Xie, Fuchun; Thomas, George; Kazmierczak, Steven C.; Habecker, Beth A.; Xiao, Xiangshu

    2016-01-01

    cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) is a nuclear transcription factor activated by multiple extracellular signals including growth factors and hormones. These extracellular cues activate CREB through phosphorylation at Ser133 by various protein serine/threonine kinases. Once phosphorylated, it promotes its association with transcription coactivators CREB-binding protein (CBP) and its paralog p300 to activate CREB-dependent gene transcription. Tumor tissues of different origins have been shown to present overexpression and/or overactivation of CREB, indicating CREB as a potential cancer drug target. We previously identified 666-15 as a potent inhibitor of CREB with efficacious anti-cancer activity both in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we investigated the specificity of 666-15 and evaluated its potential in vivo toxicity. We found that 666-15 was fairly selective in inhibiting CREB. 666-15 was also found to be readily bioavailable to achieve pharmacologically relevant concentrations for CREB inhibition. Furthermore, the mice treated with 666-15 showed no evidence of changes in body weight, complete blood count, blood chemistry profile, cardiac contractility and tissue histologies from liver, kidney and heart. For the first time, these results demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of CREB is well-tolerated in vivo and indicate that such inhibitors should be promising cancer therapeutics. PMID:27694829

  11. Differential basal-to-apical accessibility of lamin A/C epitopes in the nuclear lamina regulated by changes in cytoskeletal tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihalainen, Teemu O.; Aires, Lina; Herzog, Florian A.; Schwartlander, Ruth; Moeller, Jens; Vogel, Viola

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear lamins play central roles at the intersection between cytoplasmic signalling and nuclear events. Here, we show that at least two N- and C-terminal lamin epitopes are not accessible at the basal side of the nuclear envelope under environmental conditions known to upregulate cell contractility. The conformational epitope on the Ig-domain of A-type lamins is more buried in the basal than apical nuclear envelope of human mesenchymal stem cells undergoing osteogenesis (but not adipogenesis), and in fibroblasts adhering to rigid (but not soft) polyacrylamide hydrogels. This structural polarization of the lamina is promoted by compressive forces, emerges during cell spreading, and requires lamin A/C multimerization, intact nucleoskeleton-cytoskeleton linkages (LINC), and apical-actin stress-fibre assembly. Notably, the identified Ig-epitope overlaps with emerin, DNA and histone binding sites, and comprises various laminopathy mutation sites. Our findings should help decipher how the physical properties of cellular microenvironments regulate nuclear events.

  12. The Hox gene Dfd controls organogenesis by shaping territorial border through regulation of basal DE-Cadherin distribution.

    PubMed

    Anais Tiberghien, Marie; Lebreton, Gaelle; Cribbs, David; Benassayag, Corinne; Suzanne, Magali

    2015-09-15

    Hox genes are highly conserved selector genes controlling tissue identity and organogenesis. Recent work indicates that Hox genes also controls cell segregation and segmental boundary in various species, however the underlying cellular mechanisms involved in this function are poorly understood. In Drosophila melanogaster, the Hox gene Deformed (Dfd) is required for specification and organogenesis of the adult Maxillary (Mx) palp. Here, we demonstrate that differential Dfd expression control Mx morphogenesis through the formation of a physical boundary separating the Mx field and the Peripodial Epithelium (PE). We show that this boundary relies on DE-cadherin (DE-cad) basal accumulation in Mx cells controlled by differential Dfd expression. Indeed, Dfd controls boundary formation through cell autonomous basal redistribution of DE-cad which leads to subsequent fold at the Dfd expression border. Finally, the loss of Mx DE-cad basal accumulation and hence of Mx-PE folding is sufficient to prevent Mx organogenesis thus revealing the crucial role of boundaries in organ differentiation. Altogether, these results reveal that Hox coordination of tissue morphogenesis relies on boundary fold formation through the modulation of DE-cad positioning. PMID:26206615

  13. Lifespan extension induced by AMPK and calcineurin is mediated by CRTC-1 and CREB.

    PubMed

    Mair, William; Morantte, Ianessa; Rodrigues, Ana P C; Manning, Gerard; Montminy, Marc; Shaw, Reuben J; Dillin, Andrew

    2011-02-17

    Activating AMPK or inactivating calcineurin slows ageing in Caenorhabditis elegans and both have been implicated as therapeutic targets for age-related pathology in mammals. However, the direct targets that mediate their effects on longevity remain unclear. In mammals, CREB-regulated transcriptional coactivators (CRTCs) are a family of cofactors involved in diverse physiological processes including energy homeostasis, cancer and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Here we show that both AMPK and calcineurin modulate longevity exclusively through post-translational modification of CRTC-1, the sole C. elegans CRTC. We demonstrate that CRTC-1 is a direct AMPK target, and interacts with the CREB homologue-1 (CRH-1) transcription factor in vivo. The pro-longevity effects of activating AMPK or deactivating calcineurin decrease CRTC-1 and CRH-1 activity and induce transcriptional responses similar to those of CRH-1 null worms. Downregulation of crtc-1 increases lifespan in a crh-1-dependent manner and directly reducing crh-1 expression increases longevity, substantiating a role for CRTCs and CREB in ageing. Together, these findings indicate a novel role for CRTCs and CREB in determining lifespan downstream of AMPK and calcineurin, and illustrate the molecular mechanisms by which an evolutionarily conserved pathway responds to low energy to increase longevity.

  14. Nitric oxide protects neuroblastoma cells from apoptosis induced by serum deprivation through cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) activation.

    PubMed

    Ciani, Elisabetta; Guidi, Sandra; Della Valle, Giuliano; Perini, Giovanni; Bartesaghi, Renata; Contestabile, Antonio

    2002-12-20

    The transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) mediates survival in many cells, including neurons. Recently, death of cerebellar granule neurons due to nitric oxide (NO) deprivation was shown to be accompanied by down-regulation of CREB activity (). We now provide evidence that overproduction of endogenous NO or supplementation with exogenous NO renders SK-N-BE human neuroblastoma cells more resistant to apoptosis induced by serum deprivation. Parental cells underwent apoptosis after 24 h of serum deprivation, an outcome largely absent in clones overexpressing human neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). This protective effect was reversed by the inhibition of NOS itself or soluble guanylyl cyclase, pointing at cGMP as an intermediate effector of NO-mediated rescue. A slow-releasing NO donor protected parental cells to a significant extent, thus confirming the survival effect of NO. The impaired viability of serum-deprived parental cells was accompanied by a strong decrease of CREB phosphorylation and transcriptional activity, effects significantly attenuated in nNOS-overexpressing clones. To confirm the role of CREB in survival, the ectopic expression of CREB and/or protein kinase A largely counteracted serum deprivation-induced cell death of SK-N-BE cells, whereas transfection with a CREB negative mutant was ineffective. These experiments indicate that CREB activity is an important step for NO-mediated survival in neuronal cells.

  15. Nitric oxide protects neuroblastoma cells from apoptosis induced by serum deprivation through cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) activation.

    PubMed

    Ciani, Elisabetta; Guidi, Sandra; Della Valle, Giuliano; Perini, Giovanni; Bartesaghi, Renata; Contestabile, Antonio

    2002-12-20

    The transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) mediates survival in many cells, including neurons. Recently, death of cerebellar granule neurons due to nitric oxide (NO) deprivation was shown to be accompanied by down-regulation of CREB activity (). We now provide evidence that overproduction of endogenous NO or supplementation with exogenous NO renders SK-N-BE human neuroblastoma cells more resistant to apoptosis induced by serum deprivation. Parental cells underwent apoptosis after 24 h of serum deprivation, an outcome largely absent in clones overexpressing human neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). This protective effect was reversed by the inhibition of NOS itself or soluble guanylyl cyclase, pointing at cGMP as an intermediate effector of NO-mediated rescue. A slow-releasing NO donor protected parental cells to a significant extent, thus confirming the survival effect of NO. The impaired viability of serum-deprived parental cells was accompanied by a strong decrease of CREB phosphorylation and transcriptional activity, effects significantly attenuated in nNOS-overexpressing clones. To confirm the role of CREB in survival, the ectopic expression of CREB and/or protein kinase A largely counteracted serum deprivation-induced cell death of SK-N-BE cells, whereas transfection with a CREB negative mutant was ineffective. These experiments indicate that CREB activity is an important step for NO-mediated survival in neuronal cells. PMID:12368293

  16. NR2B-containing NMDA receptors promote neural progenitor cell proliferation through CaMKIV/CREB pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mei; Zhang, Dong-Qing; Wang, Xiang-Zhen; Xu, Tie-Jun

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} The NR2B component of the NMDARs is important for the NSPC proliferation. {yields} pCaMKIV and pCREB exist in NSPCs. {yields} The CaMKIV/CREB pathway mediates NSPC proliferation. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence indicates the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in regulating neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation. Functional properties of NMDARs can be markedly influenced by incorporating the regulatory subunit NR2B. Here, we aim to analyze the effect of NR2B-containing NMDARs on the proliferation of hippocampal NSPCs and to explore the mechanism responsible for this effect. NSPCs were shown to express NMDAR subunits NR1 and NR2B. The NR2B selective antagonist, Ro 25-6981, prevented the NMDA-induced increase in cell proliferation. Moreover, we demonstrated that the phosphorylation levels of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) were increased by NMDA treatment, whereas Ro 25-6981 decreased them. The role that NR2B-containing NMDARs plays in NSPC proliferation was abolished when CREB phosphorylation was attenuated by CaMKIV silencing. These results suggest that NR2B-containing NMDARs have a positive role in regulating NSPC proliferation, which may be mediated through CaMKIV phosphorylation and subsequent induction of CREB activation.

  17. Neuronal activity controls Bdnf expression via Polycomb de-repression and CREB/CBP/JMJD3 activation in mature neurons

    PubMed Central

    Palomer, Ernest; Carretero, Javier; Benvegnù, Stefano; Dotti, Carlos G.; Martin, Mauricio G.

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently described that in embryonic stem cells, the expression of some important developmentally regulated genes is repressed, but poised for fast activation under the appropriate stimuli. In this work we show that Bdnf promoters are repressed by Polycomb Complex 2 in mature hippocampal neurons, and basal expression is guaranteed by the coexistence with activating histone marks. Neuronal stimulation triggered by N-methyl-D-aspartate application induces the transcription of these promoters by H3K27Me3 demethylation and H3K27Me3 phosphorylation at Serine 28 leading to displacement of EZH2, the catalytic subunit of Polycomb Repressor Complex 2. Our data show that the fast transient expression of Bdnf promoters II and VI after neuronal stimulation is dependent on acetylation of histone H3K27 by CREB-p/CBP. Thus, regulatory mechanisms established during development seem to remain after differentiation controlling genes induced by different stimuli, as would be the case of early memory genes in mature neurons. PMID:27010597

  18. Neuronal activity controls Bdnf expression via Polycomb de-repression and CREB/CBP/JMJD3 activation in mature neurons.

    PubMed

    Palomer, Ernest; Carretero, Javier; Benvegnù, Stefano; Dotti, Carlos G; Martin, Mauricio G

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently described that in embryonic stem cells, the expression of some important developmentally regulated genes is repressed, but poised for fast activation under the appropriate stimuli. In this work we show that Bdnf promoters are repressed by Polycomb Complex 2 in mature hippocampal neurons, and basal expression is guaranteed by the coexistence with activating histone marks. Neuronal stimulation triggered by N-methyl-D-aspartate application induces the transcription of these promoters by H3K27Me3 demethylation and H3K27Me3 phosphorylation at Serine 28 leading to displacement of EZH2, the catalytic subunit of Polycomb Repressor Complex 2. Our data show that the fast transient expression of Bdnf promoters II and VI after neuronal stimulation is dependent on acetylation of histone H3K27 by CREB-p/CBP. Thus, regulatory mechanisms established during development seem to remain after differentiation controlling genes induced by different stimuli, as would be the case of early memory genes in mature neurons. PMID:27010597

  19. Silymarin suppresses the PGE2 -induced cell migration through inhibition of EP2 activation; G protein-dependent PKA-CREB and G protein-independent Src-STAT3 signal pathways.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seon Min; Min, Kyoung-Jin; Chae, In Gyeong; Chun, Kyung-Soo; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2015-03-01

    Silymarin has been known as a chemopreventive agent, and possesses multiple anti-cancer activities including induction of apoptosis, inhibition of proliferation and growth, and blockade of migration and invasion. However, whether silymarin could inhibit prostaglandin (PG) E2 -induced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) migration and what are the underlying mechanisms are not well elucidated. Here, we found that silymarin markedly inhibited PGE2 -stimulated migration. PGE2 induced G protein-dependent CREB phosphorylation via protein kinase A (PKA) signaling, and PKA inhibitor (H89) inhibited PGE2 -mediated migration. Silymarin reduced PGE2 -induced CREB phosphorylation and CRE-promoter activity. PGE2 also activated G protien-independent signaling pathways (Src and STAT3) and silymarin reduced PGE2 -induced phosphorylation of Src and STAT3. Inhibitor of Src (Saracatinib) markedly reduced PGE2 -mediated migration. We found that EP2, a PGE2 receptor, is involved in PGE2 -mediated cell migration. Down regulation of EP2 by EP2 siRNA and EP2 antagonist (AH6809) reduced PGE2 -inudced migration. In contrast, EP2 agonist (Butaprost) increased cell migration and silymarin effectively reduced butaprost-mediated cell migration. Moreover, PGE2 increased EP2 expression through activation of positive feedback mechanism, and PGE2 -induced EP2 expression, as well as basal EP2 levels, were reduced in silymarin-treated cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates that silymarin inhibited PGE2 -induced cell migration through inhibition of EP2 signaling pathways (G protein dependent PKA-CREB and G protein-independent Src-STAT3).

  20. Cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate basal and tumour necrosis factor-α-induced regulation of myosin light chain kinase gene activity

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Dongmei; Ma, Thomas Y

    2008-01-01

    The patients with Crohn's disease (CD) have a ‘leaky gut’ manifested by an increase in intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ) permeability. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a proto-typical pro-inflammatory cytokine that plays a central role in intestinal inflammation of CD. An important pro-inflammatory action of TNF-α is to cause a functional opening of intestinal TJ barrier. Previous studies have shown that TNF-α increase in TJ permeability was regulated by an increase in myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) gene activity and protein expression. The major aim of this study was to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate basal and TNF-α-induced increase in MLCK gene activity. By progressive 5′ deletion, minimal MLCK promoter was localized between −313 to +118 on MLCK promoter. A p53 binding site located within minimal promoter region was identified as an essential determinant for basal promoter activity. A 4 bp start site and a 5 bp downstream promoter element were required for MLCK gene activity. TNF-α-induced increase in MLCK promoter activity was mediated by NF-κB activation. There were eight κB binding sites on MLCK promoter. The NF-κB1 site at +48 to +57 mediated TNF-α-induced increase in MLCK promoter activity. The NF-κB2 site at −325 to −316 had a repressive role on promoter activity. The opposite effects on promoter activity were due to differences in the NF-κB dimer type binding to the κB sites. p50/p65 dimer preferentially binds to the NF-κB1 site and up-regulates promoter activity; while p50/p50 dimer preferentially binds to the NF-κB2 site and down-regulates promoter activity. In conclusion, we have identified the minimal MLCK promoter region, essential molecular determinants and molecular mechanisms that mediate basal and TNF-α-induced modulation of MLCK promoter activity in Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. These studies provide novel insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate

  1. cAMP-Response Element-Binding 3-Like Protein 1 (CREB3L1) is Required for Decidualization and its Expression is Decreased in Women with Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J I; Yoo, J-Y; Kim, T H; Kim, Y I; Ferguson, S D; Fazleabas, A T; Young, S L; Lessey, B A; Ahn, J Y; Lim, J M; Jeong, J-W

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a major cause of infertility and pelvic pain, affecting more than 10% of reproductive-aged women. Progesterone resistance has been observed in the endometrium of women with this disease, as evidenced by alterations in progesterone-responsive gene and protein expression. cAMPResponse Element-Binding 3-like protein 1 (Creb3l1) has previously been identified as a progesterone receptor (PR) target gene in mouse uterus via high density DNA microarray analysis. However, CREB3L1 function has not been studied in the context of endometriosis and uterine biology. In this study, we validated progesterone (P4) regulation of Creb3l1 in the uteri of wild-type and progesterone receptor knockout (PRKO) mice. Furthermore, we observed that CREB3L1 expression was significantly higher in secretory phase human endometrium compared to proliferative phase and that CREB3L1 expression was significantly decreased in the endometrium of women with endometriosis. Lastly, by transfecting CREB3L1 siRNA into cultured human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs) prior to hormonal induction of in vitro decidualization, we showed that CREB3L1 is required for the decidualization process. Interestingly, phosphorylation of ERK1/2, critical factor for decidualization, was also significantly reduced in CREB3L1-silenced hESCs. It is known that hESCs from patients with endometriosis show impaired decidualization and that dysregulation of the P4-PR signaling axis is linked to a variety of endometrial diseases including infertility and endometriosis. Therefore, these results suggest that CREB3L1 is required for decidualization in mice and humans and may be linked to the pathogenesis of endometriosis in a P4-dependent manner. PMID:26917262

  2. CaMKII-Mediated CREB Phosphorylation Is Involved in Ca2+-Induced BDNF mRNA Transcription and Neurite Outgrowth Promoted by Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhengxu; Huang, Jinghui; He, Fei; Xiao, Wei; Hu, Xueyu; Luo, Zhuojing

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES)-triggered up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurite outgrowth in cultured rat postnatal dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs) is calcium (Ca2+)-dependent. The effects of increased Ca2+ on BDNF up-regulation and neurite outgrowth remain unclear. We showed here that ES increased phosphorylation of the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). Blockade of Ca2+ suppressed CREB phosphorylation and neurite outgrowth. Down-regulation of phosphorylated (p)-CREB reduced BDNF transcription and neurite outgrowth triggered by ES. Furthermore, blockade of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) using the inhibitors KN93 or KN62 reduced p-CREB, and specific knockdown of the CaMKIIα or CaMKIIβ subunit was sufficient to suppress p-CREB. Recombinant BDNF or hyperforin reversed the effects of Ca2+ blockade and CaMKII knockdown. Taken together, these data establish a potential signaling pathway of Ca2+-CaMKII-CREB in neuronal activation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the mechanisms of Ca2+-dependent BDNF transcription and neurite outgrowth triggered by ES. These findings might help further investigation of complex molecular signaling networks in ES-triggered nerve regeneration in vivo. PMID:27611779

  3. CaMKII-Mediated CREB Phosphorylation Is Involved in Ca2+-Induced BDNF mRNA Transcription and Neurite Outgrowth Promoted by Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaodong; Liu, Juanfang; Ye, Zhengxu; Huang, Jinghui; He, Fei; Xiao, Wei; Hu, Xueyu; Luo, Zhuojing

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES)-triggered up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurite outgrowth in cultured rat postnatal dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs) is calcium (Ca2+)-dependent. The effects of increased Ca2+ on BDNF up-regulation and neurite outgrowth remain unclear. We showed here that ES increased phosphorylation of the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). Blockade of Ca2+ suppressed CREB phosphorylation and neurite outgrowth. Down-regulation of phosphorylated (p)-CREB reduced BDNF transcription and neurite outgrowth triggered by ES. Furthermore, blockade of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) using the inhibitors KN93 or KN62 reduced p-CREB, and specific knockdown of the CaMKIIα or CaMKIIβ subunit was sufficient to suppress p-CREB. Recombinant BDNF or hyperforin reversed the effects of Ca2+ blockade and CaMKII knockdown. Taken together, these data establish a potential signaling pathway of Ca2+-CaMKII-CREB in neuronal activation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the mechanisms of Ca2+-dependent BDNF transcription and neurite outgrowth triggered by ES. These findings might help further investigation of complex molecular signaling networks in ES-triggered nerve regeneration in vivo. PMID:27611779

  4. Small molecule kaempferol modulates PDX-1 protein expression and subsequently promotes pancreatic β-cell survival and function via CREB.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanling; Zhen, Wei; Maechler, Pierre; Liu, Dongmin

    2013-04-01

    Chronic hyperlipidemia causes β-cell apoptosis and dysfunction, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Thus, searching for agents to promote pancreatic β-cell survival and improve its function could be a promising strategy to prevent and treat T2D. We investigated the effects of kaempferol, a small molecule isolated from ginkgo biloba, on apoptosis and function of β-cells and further determined the mechanism underlying its actions. Kaempferol treatment promoted viability, inhibited apoptosis and reduced caspase-3 activity in INS-1E cells and human islets chronically exposed to palmitate. In addition, kaempferol prevented the lipotoxicity-induced down-regulation of antiapoptotic proteins Akt and Bcl-2. The cytoprotective effects of kaempferol were associated with improved insulin secretion, synthesis, and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) expression. Chronic hyperlipidemia significantly diminished cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production, protein kinase A (PKA) activation, cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and its regulated transcriptional activity in β-cells, all of which were restored by kaempferol treatment. Disruption of CREB expression by transfection of CREB siRNA in INS-1E cells or adenoviral transfer of dominant-negative forms of CREB in human islets ablated kaempferol protection of β-cell apoptosis and dysfunction caused by palmitate. Incubation of INS-1E cells or human islets with kaempferol for 48h induced PDX-1 expression. This effect of kaempferol on PDX-1 expression was not shared by a host of structurally related flavonoid compounds. PDX-1 gene knockdown reduced kaempferol-stimulated cAMP generation and CREB activation in INS-1E cells. These findings demonstrate that kaempferol is a novel survivor factor for pancreatic β-cells via up-regulating the PDX-1/cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling cascade.

  5. Tau accumulation induces synaptic impairment and memory deficit by calcineurin-mediated inactivation of nuclear CaMKIV/CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yaling; Gao, Di; Wang, Yali; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Wang, Xin; Ye, Jinwang; Wu, Dongqin; Fang, Lin; Pi, Guilin; Yang, Ying; Wang, Xiao-Chuan; Lu, Chengbiao; Ye, Keqiang; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2016-06-28

    Intracellular accumulation of wild-type tau is a hallmark of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the molecular mechanisms underlying tau-induced synapse impairment and memory deficit are poorly understood. Here we found that overexpression of human wild-type full-length tau (termed hTau) induced memory deficits with impairments of synaptic plasticity. Both in vivo and in vitro data demonstrated that hTau accumulation caused remarkable dephosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the nuclear fraction. Simultaneously, the calcium-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) was up-regulated, whereas the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) was suppressed. Further studies revealed that CaN activation could dephosphorylate CREB and CaMKIV, and the effect of CaN on CREB dephosphorylation was independent of CaMKIV inhibition. Finally, inhibition of CaN attenuated the hTau-induced CREB dephosphorylation with improved synapse and memory functions. Together, these data indicate that the hTau accumulation impairs synapse and memory by CaN-mediated suppression of nuclear CaMKIV/CREB signaling. Our findings not only reveal new mechanisms underlying the hTau-induced synaptic toxicity, but also provide potential targets for rescuing tauopathies. PMID:27298345

  6. DNA dynamics play a role as a basal transcription factor in the positioning and regulation of gene transcription initiation

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Gelev, Vladimir; Yoo, Sang Wook; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Bishop, Alan R.; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Usheva, Anny

    2010-01-01

    We assess the role of DNA breathing dynamics as a determinant of promoter strength and transcription start site (TSS) location. We compare DNA Langevin dynamic profiles of representative gene promoters, calculated with the extended non-linear PBD model of DNA with experimental data on transcription factor binding and transcriptional activity. Our results demonstrate that DNA dynamic activity at the TSS can be suppressed by mutations that do not affect basal transcription factor binding–DNA contacts. We use this effect to establish the separate contributions of transcription factor binding and DNA dynamics to transcriptional activity. Our results argue against a purely ‘transcription factor-centric’ view of transcription initiation, suggesting that both DNA dynamics and transcription factor binding are necessary conditions for transcription initiation. PMID:20019064

  7. Identification of host transcriptional networks showing concentration-dependent regulation by HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins in basal cervical squamous epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen P.; Scarpini, Cinzia G.; Groves, Ian J.; Odle, Richard I.; Coleman, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Development of cervical squamous cell carcinoma requires increased expression of the major high-risk human-papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7 in basal cervical epithelial cells. We used a systems biology approach to identify host transcriptional networks in such cells and study the concentration-dependent changes produced by HPV16-E6 and -E7 oncoproteins. We investigated sample sets derived from the W12 model of cervical neoplastic progression, for which high quality phenotype/genotype data were available. We defined a gene co-expression matrix containing a small number of highly-connected hub nodes that controlled large numbers of downstream genes (regulons), indicating the scale-free nature of host gene co-expression in W12. We identified a small number of ‘master regulators’ for which downstream effector genes were significantly associated with protein levels of HPV16 E6 (n = 7) or HPV16 E7 (n = 5). We validated our data by depleting E6/E7 in relevant cells and by functional analysis of selected genes in vitro. We conclude that the network of transcriptional interactions in HPV16-infected basal-type cervical epithelium is regulated in a concentration-dependent manner by E6/E7, via a limited number of central master-regulators. These effects are likely to be significant in cervical carcinogenesis, where there is competitive selection of cells with elevated expression of virus oncoproteins. PMID:27457222

  8. Basal brain oxidative and nitrative stress levels are finely regulated by the interplay between superoxide dismutase 2 and p53.

    PubMed

    Barone, Eugenio; Cenini, Giovanna; Di Domenico, Fabio; Noel, Teresa; Wang, Chi; Perluigi, Marzia; St Clair, Daret K; Butterfield, D Allan

    2015-11-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are the primary reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging enzymes of the cell and catalyze the dismutation of superoxide radicals O2- to H2O2 and molecular oxygen (O2). Among the three forms of SOD identified, manganese-containing SOD (MnSOD, SOD2) is a homotetramer located wholly in the mitochondrial matrix. Because of the SOD2 strategic location, it represents the first mechanism of defense against the augmentation of ROS/reactive nitrogen species levels in the mitochondria for preventing further damage. This study seeks to understand the effects that the partial lack (SOD2(-/+) ) or the overexpression (TgSOD2) of MnSOD produces on oxidative/nitrative stress basal levels in different brain isolated cellular fractions (i.e., mitochondrial, nuclear, cytosolic) as well as in the whole-brain homogenate. Furthermore, because of the known interaction between SOD2 and p53 protein, this study seeks to clarify the impact that the double mutation has on oxidative/nitrative stress levels in the brain of mice carrying the double mutation (p53(-/-) × SOD2(-/+) and p53(-/-) × TgSOD2). We show that each mutation affects mitochondrial, nuclear, and cytosolic oxidative/nitrative stress basal levels differently, but, overall, no change or reduction of oxidative/nitrative stress levels was found in the whole-brain homogenate. The analysis of well-known antioxidant systems such as thioredoxin-1 and Nrf2/HO-1/BVR-A suggests their potential role in the maintenance of the cellular redox homeostasis in the presence of changes of SOD2 and/or p53 protein levels.

  9. Diminished Phosphorylation of CREB Is a Key Event in the Dysregulation of Gluconeogenesis and Glycogenolysis in PCB126 Hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gadupudi, Gopi S; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Robertson, Larry W

    2016-09-19

    The dioxin-like PCB126 elicits toxicity in various target organs. In rat liver, an alteration in the transcript levels of several genes involved in glucose and fatty acid metabolism provides insights into the origin of its hepatotoxicity. To explore the mechanisms, male Sprague-Dawley rats, fed an AIN-93G diet, were injected with PCB126 (1 or 5 μmol/kg) or corn oil and euthanized after 2 weeks. PCB126 significantly decreased serum glucose levels and the transcript levels of genes of many gluconeogenic and glycogenolytic enzymes under the transcriptional control of a nuclear transcription factor, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). As a novel finding, we show that PCB126 significantly decreases CREB phosphorylation, which is important for regulating both gluconeogenesis and fatty acid oxidation in the liver and explains CREB's integrative effects on both carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in PCB126 toxicity. PMID:27509375

  10. CREB in the Pathophysiology of Cancer: Implications for Targeting Transcription Factors for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Kathleen M.; Frank, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors are key regulators of the pattern of gene expression in a cell and directly control central processes such as proliferation, survival, self-renewal, and invasion. Given this critical role, the function of transcription factors is normally regulated closely, often through transient phosphorylation. Although transcription factors are not often directly modified by mutations in cancer cells, they frequently become activated constitutively through mutations affecting “upstream” pathways. By continually driving the expression of key target genes, these oncogenic transcription factors play a central role in tumor pathogenesis. One such transcription factor is the cAMP-regulatory element-binding protein (CREB), which can be activated through phosphorylation by a number of kinases, including Akt, p90Rsk, protein kinase A, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases and regulates genes whose deregulated expression promotes oncogenesis, including cyclins, Bcl-2 family members, and Egr-1. CREB is overexpressed and constitutively phosphorylated in a number of forms of human cancer, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and non – small cell lung cancer, and appears to play a direct role in disease pathogenesis and prognosis. Although transcription factors have not been a central focus of drug development, recent advances suggest that CREB and other such proteins may be worthwhile targets for cancer therapy. PMID:19351775

  11. Association of Notch pathway down-regulation with Triple Negative/Basal-like breast carcinomas and high tumor-infiltrating FOXP3+ Tregs.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Martínez, Fernando; Gutiérrez-Aviñó, Francisco José; Sanmartín, Elena; Pomares-Navarro, Eloy; Villalba-Riquelme, Cristina; García-Martínez, Araceli; Lerma, Enrique; Peiró, Gloria

    2016-06-01

    T regulatory cells (Tregs) are a lineage of lymphocytes involved in immune response suppression that are characterized by the expression of the forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) transcription factor. Notch pathway regulates FOXP3 transcription in Tregs, but its role in breast cancer is unknown. We aimed at studying whether Notch pathway regulates FOXP3 expression and Tregs content in breast cancer, and its association with luminal breast carcinomas. We analyzed by quantitative Real-Time PCR the mRNA levels of FOXP3, Notch pathway genes (Notch1, Notch2, Notch4 and Jagged1) and STAT3 in a series of 152 breast carcinomas including hormone receptor-positive and -negative phenotypes (luminal and Triple Negative/Basal-like). We also studied the protein expression of Notch1, STAT3 and FOXP3 by immunohistochemistry. High FOXP3 mRNA levels correlated with larger tumor size (p=0.010), histological grade 3 (p=0.008) and positive lymph-node status (p=0.031). Also, low levels of Notch pathway genes mRNA correlated with poor prognostic factors such as larger tumor size, positive lymph-node status, tumor phenotype and infiltrating tumor Tregs. A survival analysis for the patients showed that large tumor size, histological grade 3, vascular invasion, infiltrating Tregs and low Notch1 mRNA expression were significantly associated with a decreased patients' overall survival (p≤0.05). On a multivariate analysis, high Tregs content (HR=3.00, 95% CI 1.04-8.90, p=0.042) and low Notch1 mRNA levels (HR=3.33, 95% CI 1.02-10.86, p=0.046) were independent markers for overall survival. Our results support that the Notch pathway up-regulation promotes luminal breast carcinomas, whereas down-regulation correlates with the expression of FOXP3, favors tumor Tregs infiltration and associates with Triple Negative/Basal-like tumors. PMID:27118257

  12. Glucocorticoids Alter CRTC-CREB Signaling in Muscle Cells: Impact on PGC-1α Expression and Atrophy Markers

    PubMed Central

    Rahnert, Jill A.; Zheng, Bin; Hudson, Matthew B.; Woodworth-Hobbs, Myra E.; Price, S. Russ

    2016-01-01

    Muscle wasting associated with chronic diseases has been linked to decreased expression of PGC-1α and overexpression of PGC-1α counters muscle loss. CREB, in conjunction with the CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC2), is a positive modulator of PGC-1α transcription. We previously reported that PGC-1α expression is decreased in skeletal muscle of diabetic rats despite a high level of CREB phosphorylation (i.e., activation), suggesting that CRTC2-CREB signaling may be dysregulated. In this study, the relationship between CREB/CRTC signaling and PGC-1α expression was examined in L6 myotubes treated with dexamethasone (Dex, 48h) to induce atrophy. Dex decreased PGC-1α mRNA and protein as well as the levels of CRTC1 and CRTC2 in the nucleus. Dex also altered the nuclear levels of two known regulators of CRTC2 localization; the amount of calcinuerin catalytic A subunit (CnA) was decreased whereas SIK was increased. To assess PGC-1α transcription, muscle cells were transfected with a PGC-1α luciferase reporter plasmid (PGC-1α-Luc). Dex suppressed PGC-1α luciferase activity while both isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) and over-expression of CRTC1 or CRTC2 increased PGC-1α-Luc activity. Mutation of the CRE binding site from PGC-1α-Luc reporter attenuated the responses to both IBMX and the CRTC proteins. Consistent with the reporter gene results, overexpression of CRTC2 produced an increase in CRTC2 in the nucleus and in PGC-1α mRNA and PGC-1α protein. Overexpression of CRTC2 was not sufficient to prevent the decrease in PGC-1α mRNA or protein by Dex. In summary, these data suggest that attenuated CREB/CRTC signaling contributes to the decrease in PGC-1α expression during atrophy. PMID:27404111

  13. Glucocorticoids Alter CRTC-CREB Signaling in Muscle Cells: Impact on PGC-1α Expression and Atrophy Markers.

    PubMed

    Rahnert, Jill A; Zheng, Bin; Hudson, Matthew B; Woodworth-Hobbs, Myra E; Price, S Russ

    2016-01-01

    Muscle wasting associated with chronic diseases has been linked to decreased expression of PGC-1α and overexpression of PGC-1α counters muscle loss. CREB, in conjunction with the CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC2), is a positive modulator of PGC-1α transcription. We previously reported that PGC-1α expression is decreased in skeletal muscle of diabetic rats despite a high level of CREB phosphorylation (i.e., activation), suggesting that CRTC2-CREB signaling may be dysregulated. In this study, the relationship between CREB/CRTC signaling and PGC-1α expression was examined in L6 myotubes treated with dexamethasone (Dex, 48h) to induce atrophy. Dex decreased PGC-1α mRNA and protein as well as the levels of CRTC1 and CRTC2 in the nucleus. Dex also altered the nuclear levels of two known regulators of CRTC2 localization; the amount of calcinuerin catalytic A subunit (CnA) was decreased whereas SIK was increased. To assess PGC-1α transcription, muscle cells were transfected with a PGC-1α luciferase reporter plasmid (PGC-1α-Luc). Dex suppressed PGC-1α luciferase activity while both isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) and over-expression of CRTC1 or CRTC2 increased PGC-1α-Luc activity. Mutation of the CRE binding site from PGC-1α-Luc reporter attenuated the responses to both IBMX and the CRTC proteins. Consistent with the reporter gene results, overexpression of CRTC2 produced an increase in CRTC2 in the nucleus and in PGC-1α mRNA and PGC-1α protein. Overexpression of CRTC2 was not sufficient to prevent the decrease in PGC-1α mRNA or protein by Dex. In summary, these data suggest that attenuated CREB/CRTC signaling contributes to the decrease in PGC-1α expression during atrophy.

  14. Arabidopsis LIP5, a Positive Regulator of Multivesicular Body Biogenesis, Is a Critical Target of Pathogen-Responsive MAPK Cascade in Plant Basal Defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Shang, Yifen; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2014-01-01

    Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) play essential roles in many cellular processes. The MVB pathway requires reversible membrane association of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transports (ESCRTs) for sustained protein trafficking. Membrane dissociation of ESCRTs is catalyzed by the AAA ATPase SKD1, which is stimulated by LYST-INTERACTING PROTEIN 5 (LIP5). We report here that LIP5 is a target of pathogen-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MPKs) and plays a critical role in plant basal resistance. Arabidopsis LIP5 interacts with MPK6 and MPK3 and is phosphorylated in vitro by activated MPK3 and MPK6 and in vivo upon expression of MPK3/6-activating NtMEK2DD and pathogen infection. Disruption of LIP5 has little effects on flg22-, salicylic acid-induced defense responses but compromises basal resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. The critical role of LIP5 in plant basal resistance is dependent on its ability to interact with SKD1. Mutation of MPK phosphorylation sites in LIP5 does not affect interaction with SKD1 but reduces the stability and compromises the ability to complement the lip5 mutant phenotypes. Using the membrane-selective FM1–43 dye and transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrated that pathogen infection increases formation of both intracellular MVBs and exosome-like paramural vesicles situated between the plasma membrane and the cell wall in a largely LIP5-dependent manner. These results indicate that the MVB pathway is positively regulated by pathogen-responsive MPK3/6 through LIP5 phosphorylation and plays a critical role in plant immune system likely through relocalization of defense-related molecules. PMID:25010425

  15. Arabidopsis LIP5, a positive regulator of multivesicular body biogenesis, is a critical target of pathogen-responsive MAPK cascade in plant basal defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Shang, Yifen; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2014-07-01

    Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) play essential roles in many cellular processes. The MVB pathway requires reversible membrane association of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transports (ESCRTs) for sustained protein trafficking. Membrane dissociation of ESCRTs is catalyzed by the AAA ATPase SKD1, which is stimulated by LYST-interacting protein 5 (LIP5). We report here that LIP5 is a target of pathogen-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MPKs) and plays a critical role in plant basal resistance. Arabidopsis LIP5 interacts with MPK6 and MPK3 and is phosphorylated in vitro by activated MPK3 and MPK6 and in vivo upon expression of MPK3/6-activating NtMEK2DD and pathogen infection. Disruption of LIP5 has little effects on flg22-, salicylic acid-induced defense responses but compromises basal resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. The critical role of LIP5 in plant basal resistance is dependent on its ability to interact with SKD1. Mutation of MPK phosphorylation sites in LIP5 does not affect interaction with SKD1 but reduces the stability and compromises the ability to complement the lip5 mutant phenotypes. Using the membrane-selective FM1-43 dye and transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrated that pathogen infection increases formation of both intracellular MVBs and exosome-like paramural vesicles situated between the plasma membrane and the cell wall in a largely LIP5-dependent manner. These results indicate that the MVB pathway is positively regulated by pathogen-responsive MPK3/6 through LIP5 phosphorylation and plays a critical role in plant immune system likely through relocalization of defense-related molecules.

  16. Independent Regulation of Basal Neurotransmitter Release Efficacy by Variable Ca2+ Influx and Bouton Size at Small Central Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Ermolyuk, Yaroslav S.; Alder, Felicity G.; Henneberger, Christian; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Volynski, Kirill E.

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of action potential evoked neurotransmitter release varies widely even among synapses supplied by the same axon, and the number of release-ready vesicles at each synapse is a major determinant of this heterogeneity. Here we identify a second, equally important, mechanism for release heterogeneity at small hippocampal synapses, the inter-synaptic variation of the exocytosis probability of release-ready vesicles. Using concurrent measurements of vesicular pool sizes, vesicular exocytosis rates, and presynaptic Ca2+ dynamics, in the same small hippocampal boutons, we show that the average fusion probability of release-ready vesicles varies among synapses supplied by the same axon with the size of the spike-evoked Ca2+ concentration transient. We further show that synapses with a high vesicular release probability exhibit a lower Ca2+ cooperativity, arguing that this is a direct consequence of increased Ca2+ influx at the active zone. We conclude that variability of neurotransmitter release under basal conditions at small central synapses is accounted for not only by the number of release-ready vesicles, but also by their fusion probabilities, which are set independently of bouton size by variable spike-evoked presynaptic Ca2+ influx. PMID:23049481

  17. The p90 ribosomal S6 kinase 2 specifically affects mitotic progression by regulating the basal level, distribution and stability of mitotic spindles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yun Yeon; Nam, Hyun-Ja; Do, Mihyang; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    RSK2, also known as RPS6KA3 (ribosomal protein S6 kinase, 90 kDa, polypeptide 3), is a downstream kinase of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, which is important in regulating survival, transcription, growth and proliferation. However, its biological role in mitotic progression is not well understood. In this study, we examined the potential involvement of RSK2 in the regulation of mitotic progression. Interestingly, depletion of RSK2, but not RSK1, caused the accumulation of mitotic cells. Time-lapse analysis revealed that mitotic duration, particularly the duration for metaphase-to-anaphase transition was prolonged in RSK2-depleted cells, suggesting activation of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Indeed, more BubR1 (Bub1-related kinase) was present on metaphase plate kinetochores in RSK2-depleted cells, and depletion of BubR1 abolished the mitotic accumulation caused by RSK2 depletion, confirming BubR1-dependent SAC activation. Along with the shortening of inter-kinetochore distance, these data suggested that weakening of the tension across sister kinetochores by RSK2 depletion led to the activation of SAC. To test this, we analyzed the RSK2 effects on the stability of kinetochore–microtubule interactions, and found that RSK2-depleted cells formed less kinetochore–microtubule fibers. Moreover, RSK2 depletion resulted in the decrease of basal level of microtubule as well as an irregular distribution of mitotic spindles, which might lead to observed several mitotic progression defects such as increase in unaligned chromosomes, defects in chromosome congression and a decrease in pole-to-pole distance in these cells. Taken together, our data reveal that RSK2 affects mitotic progression by regulating the distribution, basal level and the stability of mitotic spindles. PMID:27491410

  18. MiR-582-5p/miR-590-5p targeted CREB1/CREB5–NF-κB signaling and caused opioid-induced immunosuppression in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Long, X; Li, Y; Qiu, S; Liu, J; He, L; Peng, Y

    2016-01-01

    Chronic opioid abusers are more susceptible to bacterial and viral infections, but the molecular mechanism underlying opioid-induced immunosuppression is unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as key players in the control of biological processes, and may participate in immune regulation. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms in opioid-induced and miRNA-mediated immunosuppression, in the context of miRNA dysregulation in opioid abusers. Blood samples of heroin abusers were collected and analyzed using miRNA microarray analysis and quantitative PCR validation. The purified primary human monocytes were cultured in vitro to explore the underlying mechanism. We found that morphine and its derivative heroin significantly decreased the expression levels of miR-582-5p and miR-590-5p in monocytes. cAMP response element-binding protein 1 (CREB1) and CREB5 were detected as direct target genes of miR-582-5p and miR-590-5p, respectively, by using dual-luciferase assay and western bolt. Functional studies showed that knockdown of CREB1/CREB5 increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) level and enhanced expression of phospho–NF-κB p65 and NF-κB p65. Our results demonstrated that miR-582-5p and miR-590-5p play important roles in opioid-induced immunosuppression in monocytes by targeting CREB1/CREB5–NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26978739

  19. Involvement of Phosphorylated "Apis Mellifera" CREB in Gating a Honeybee's Behavioral Response to an External Stimulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, Katrin B.; Heufelder, Karin; Feige, Janina; Bauer, Paul; Dyck, Yan; Ehrhardt, Lea; Kühnemund, Johannes; Bergmann, Anja; Göbel, Josefine; Isecke, Marlene; Eisenhardt, Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) is involved in neuronal plasticity. Phosphorylation activates CREB and an increased level of phosphorylated CREB is regarded as an indicator of CREB-dependent transcriptional activation. In honeybees ("Apis mellifera") we recently demonstrated a particular high…

  20. The DNA methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine decreases melanin synthesis by inhibiting CREB phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jun Seob; Jeong, Hyo-Soon; Kim, Myo-Kyoung; Yun, Hye-Young; Baek, Kwang Jin; Kwon, Nyoun Soo; Kim, Dong-Seok

    2015-10-01

    Here we examined the effects of a DNA methylation inhibitor, 5-azacytidine, on melanogenesis in Mel-Ab cells. We found that 5-azacytidine decreased the melanin content and tyrosinase activity in these cells in a dose-dependent manner; importantly, 5-azacytidine was not cytotoxic at the concentrations used in these experiments. On the other hand, 5-azacytidine did not affect tyrosinase activity in a cell-free system, indicating that 5-azacytidine is not a direct tyrosinase inhibitor. Instead, 5-azacytidine decreased the protein levels of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase. Thus, we investigated the effects of 5-azacytidine on signal transduction pathways related to melanogenesis. However, 5-azacytidine did not have any effect on either Akt or glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) phosphorylation. The phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is well known to regulate MITF expression, thereby also regulating tyrosinase expression. We found that 5-azacytidine decreased the phosphorylation of CREB. Therefore, we propose that 5-azacytidine may decrease melanin synthesis by downregulating MITF and tyrosinase via CREB inactivation.

  1. Striatal dopamine modulates basal ganglia output and regulates social context-dependent behavioral variability through D1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Leblois, Arthur; Wendel, Benjamin J.; Perkel, David J

    2010-01-01

    Cortico–basal ganglia (BG) circuits are thought to promote the acquisition of motor skills through reinforcement learning. In songbirds, a specialized portion of the BG is responsible for song learning and plasticity. This circuit generates song variability that underlies vocal experimentation in young birds and modulates song variability depending on the social context in adult birds. When male birds sing in the presence of a female, a social context associated with decreased BG-induced song variability, the extracellular dopamine (DA) level is increased in the avian BG nucleus Area X. These results suggest that DA could trigger song variability changes through its action in Area X. Consistent with this hypothesis, we report that DA delivered to Area X weakens the output signal of the avian cortico-BG circuit. Acting through D1 receptors, DA reduced responses in Area X to song playback and to electrical stimulation of its afferent cortical nucleus HVC. Specifically, DA reduced the response to direct excitatory input and decreased firing variability in Area X pallidal neurons, which provide the output to the thalamus. As a consequence, DA delivery in Area X also decreased responses to song playback in the cortical output nucleus of the BG loop, the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (LMAN). Further, interfering with D1 receptor transmission in Area X abolished social context-related changes in song variability. In conclusion, we propose that DA acts on D1 receptors in Area X to modulate the BG output signal and trigger changes in song variability. PMID:20410125

  2. Synergistic Neuroprotective Effects of Two Herbal Ingredients via CREB-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Wang, Dongxiao; Zhao, Runqing; Dong, Xianzhe; Hu, Yuan; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    As two natural oligosaccharide esters, 3,6’-Disinapoyl sucrose (DISS) and tenuifolisideA (TFSA) are originating from the root of Polygala tenuifolia Willd, a traditional Chinese medicine used in treatment of mental disorders. Previous reports have shown that both of them possess in vitro neuroprotective effects by stimulating different upstream pathways related with cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). In the present study, we investigated the additive neuroprotective effects of DISS and TFSA on Glu-induced damage of SY5Y cells and purposed the possible underlying mechanism. The interaction between DISS and TFSA showed a clear-cut synergistic effect as evidenced by combination index (CI). Additional evidence from biochemical (NOS activity) assays confirmed their additive inhibition on the Glu-induced NOS hyperactivation. Moreover, we showed that co-treatment of DISS and TFSA resulted in an additively up-regulated phosphorylation of CREB as well as increased expressions of CRTC1 and BDNF. Neuroprotective effects of DISS and TFSA on Glu-induced decrease in cell viability were blocked by MAPK/ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) and PI3-K inhibitor (LY290042). Nevertheless, the CRTC1 or BDNF expression induced by these two compounds was significantly reduced in the presence of either ERK or PI3-K inhibitor, indicating that the two oligosaccharide esters shared some common pathways in the regulation of CREB-BDNF pathway. Taken together, we, for the first time, showed that DISS and TFSA exerted the additive neuroprotective effects on CREB-BDNF signaling pathway through complementary mechanisms. PMID:27729863

  3. Distinct Changes in CREB Phosphorylation in Frontal Cortex and Striatum During Contingent and Non-Contingent Performance of a Visual Attention Task

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Laura; Sacchetti, Giuseppina; Agnoli, Laura; Mainolfi, Pierangela; Invernizzi, Roberto W.; Carli, Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    The cyclic-adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) family of transcription factors has been implicated in numerous forms of behavioral plasticity. We investigated CREB phosphorylation along some nodes of corticostriatal circuitry such as frontal cortex (FC) and dorsal (caudate–putamen, CPu) and ventral (nucleus accumbens, NAC) striatum in response to the contingent or non-contingent performance of the five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) used to assess visuospatial attention. Three experimental manipulations were used; an attentional performance group (contingent, “master”), a group trained previously on the task but for whom the instrumental contingency coupling responding with stimulus detection and reward was abolished (non-contingent, “yoked”) and a control group matched for food deprivation and exposure to the test apparatus (untrained). Rats trained on the 5-CSRTT (both master and yoked) had higher levels of CREB protein in the FC, CPu, and NAC compared to untrained controls. Despite the divergent behavior of “master” and “yoked” rats CREB activity in the FC was not substantially different. In rats performing the 5-CSRTT (“master”), CREB activity was completely abolished in the CPu whereas in the NAC it remained unchanged. In contrast, CREB phosphorylation in CPu and NAC increased only when the contingency changed from goal-dependent to goal-independent reinforcement (“yoked”). The present results indicate that up-regulation of CREB protein expression across cortical and striatal regions possibly reflects the extensive instrumental learning and performance whereas increased CREB activity in striatal regions may signal the unexpected change in the relationship between instrumental action and reinforcement. PMID:22016726

  4. Hyperlipidemia and hepatitis in liver-specific CREB3L3 knockout mice generated using a one-step CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Oikawa, Fusaka; Mizuno, Seiya; Ohno, Hiroshi; Yagishita, Yuka; Satoh, Aoi; Osaki, Yoshinori; Takei, Kenta; Kikuchi, Takuya; Han, Song-iee; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Yahagi, Naoya; Isaka, Masaaki; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Sone, Hirohito; Takahashi, Satoru; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    cAMP responsive element binding protein 3-like 3 (CREB3L3), a transcription factor expressed in the liver and small intestine, governs fasting-response energy homeostasis. Tissue-specific CREB3L3 knockout mice have not been generated till date. To our knowledge, this is the first study using the one-step CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate CREB3L3 floxed mice and subsequently obtain liver- and small intestine-specific Creb3l3 knockout (LKO and IKO, respectively) mice. While LKO mice as well as global KO mice developed hypertriglyceridemia, LKO mice exhibited hypercholesterolemia in contrast to hypocholesterolemia in global KO mice. LKO mice demonstrated up-regulation of hepatic Srebf2 and its corresponding target genes. No phenotypic differences were observed between IKO and floxed mice. Severe liver injury was observed in LKO mice fed a methionine-choline deficient diet, a model for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. These results provide new evidence regarding the hepatic CREB3L3 role in plasma triglyceride metabolism and hepatic and intestinal CREB3L3 contributions to cholesterol metabolism. PMID:27291420

  5. The automatic regulation of the basal dose on the insulin pump for the treatment of patients that have Diabetes type 1.

    PubMed

    Mehanović, Sifet; Mujić, Midhat

    2010-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 1 is a chronic metabolic disorder, and its main characteristic is Hyperglycemia. It usually occurs in the early years because of the absolute or relative absence of the active insulin that is caused by the autoimmune disease of the beta cells of the pancreas. Despite the numerous researches and efforts of the scientists, the therapy for Diabetes type 1 is based on the substitution of insulin. Even though the principles of the therapy have not changed so much, still some important changes have occurred in the production and usage of insulin. Lately, the insulin pumps are more frequent in the therapy for Diabetes type 1. The functioning of the pump is based on the continuing delivery of insulin in a small dose ("the basal dose"), that keeps the level of glycemia in the blood constant. The increase of glycemia during the meal is reduced with the additional dose of insulin ("the bolus dose"). The use of the insulin pumps and the continuing glucose sensors has provided an easier and more efficient monitoring of the diabetes, a better metabolic control and a better life quality for the patient and his/her family. This work presents the way of automatic regulation of the basal dose of insulin through the synthesis of the functions of the insulin pump and the continuing glucose sensor. The aim is to give a contribution to the development of the controlling algorithm on the insulin pump for the automatic regulation of the glucose concentration in the blood. This could be a step further which is closer to the delivery of the dose of insulin that is really needed for the basic needs of the organism, and a significant contribution is given to the development of the artificial pancreas. PMID:20507288

  6. Three nuclear and two membrane estrogen receptors in basal teleosts, Anguilla sp.: Identification, evolutionary history and differential expression regulation.

    PubMed

    Lafont, Anne-Gaëlle; Rousseau, Karine; Tomkiewicz, Jonna; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-09-01

    Estrogens interact with classical intracellular nuclear receptors (ESR), and with G-coupled membrane receptors (GPER). In the eel, we identified three nuclear (ESR1, ESR2a, ESR2b) and two membrane (GPERa, GPERb) estrogen receptors. Duplicated ESR2 and GPER were also retrieved in most extant teleosts. Phylogeny and synteny analyses suggest that they result from teleost whole genome duplication (3R). In contrast to conserved 3R-duplicated ESR2 and GPER, one of 3R-duplicated ESR1 has been lost shortly after teleost emergence. Quantitative PCRs revealed that the five receptors are all widely expressed in the eel, but with differential patterns of tissue expression and regulation. ESR1 only is consistently up-regulated in vivo in female eel BPG-liver axis during induced sexual maturation, and also up-regulated in vitro by estradiol in eel hepatocyte primary cultures. This first comparative study of the five teleost estradiol receptors provides bases for future investigations on differential roles that may have contributed to the conservation of multiple estrogen receptors.

  7. Hepatic Insulin Resistance Following Chronic Activation of the CREB Coactivator CRTC2.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Meghan F; Ravnskjaer, Kim; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Huising, Mark O; Hull, Rebecca L; Kahn, Steven E; Montminy, Marc

    2015-10-23

    Under fasting conditions, increases in circulating concentrations of glucagon maintain glucose homeostasis via the induction of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Triggering of the cAMP pathway in hepatocytes stimulates the gluconeogenic program via the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of CREB and dephosphorylation of the cAMP-regulated CREB coactivators CRTC2 and CRTC3. In parallel, decreases in circulating insulin also increase gluconeogenic gene expression via the de-phosphorylation and activation of the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1. Hepatic gluconeogenesis is increased in insulin resistance where it contributes to the attendant hyperglycemia. Whether selective activation of the hepatic CREB/CRTC pathway is sufficient to trigger metabolic changes in other tissues is unclear, however. Modest hepatic expression of a phosphorylation-defective and therefore constitutively active CRTC2S171,275A protein increased gluconeogenic gene expression under fasting as well as feeding conditions. Circulating glucose concentrations were constitutively elevated in CRTC2S171,275A-expressing mice, leading to compensatory increases in circulating insulin concentrations that enhance FOXO1 phosphorylation. Despite accompanying decreases in FOXO1 activity, hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression remained elevated in CRTC2S171,275A mice, demonstrating that chronic increases in CRTC2 activity in the liver are indeed sufficient to promote hepatic insulin resistance and to disrupt glucose homeostasis.

  8. Hepatic Insulin Resistance Following Chronic Activation of the CREB Coactivator CRTC2*

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Meghan F.; Ravnskjaer, Kim; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Huising, Mark O.; Hull, Rebecca L.; Kahn, Steven E.; Montminy, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Under fasting conditions, increases in circulating concentrations of glucagon maintain glucose homeostasis via the induction of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Triggering of the cAMP pathway in hepatocytes stimulates the gluconeogenic program via the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of CREB and dephosphorylation of the cAMP-regulated CREB coactivators CRTC2 and CRTC3. In parallel, decreases in circulating insulin also increase gluconeogenic gene expression via the de-phosphorylation and activation of the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1. Hepatic gluconeogenesis is increased in insulin resistance where it contributes to the attendant hyperglycemia. Whether selective activation of the hepatic CREB/CRTC pathway is sufficient to trigger metabolic changes in other tissues is unclear, however. Modest hepatic expression of a phosphorylation-defective and therefore constitutively active CRTC2S171,275A protein increased gluconeogenic gene expression under fasting as well as feeding conditions. Circulating glucose concentrations were constitutively elevated in CRTC2S171,275A-expressing mice, leading to compensatory increases in circulating insulin concentrations that enhance FOXO1 phosphorylation. Despite accompanying decreases in FOXO1 activity, hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression remained elevated in CRTC2S171,275A mice, demonstrating that chronic increases in CRTC2 activity in the liver are indeed sufficient to promote hepatic insulin resistance and to disrupt glucose homeostasis. PMID:26342077

  9. DA-9801 promotes neurite outgrowth via ERK1/2-CREB pathway in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Kyong Hoon; Back, Moon Jung; Ha, Hae Chan; Jang, Ji Min; Kim, Ha Hyung; Choi, Sang-Zin; Son, Miwon; Kim, Dae Kyong

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the mechanisms underlying the effect of DA-9801 on neurite outgrowth. We found that DA-9801 elicits its effects via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2-cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) pathway. DA-9801, an extract from a mixture of Dioscorea japonica and Dioscorea nipponica, was reported to promote neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The effects of DA-9801 on cell viability and expression of neuronal markers were evaluated in PC12 cells. To investigate DA-9801 action, specific inhibitors targeting the ERK signaling cascade were used. No cytotoxicity was observed in PC12 cells at DA-9801 concentrations of less than 30 µg/mL. In the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF, 2 ng/mL), DA-9801 promoted neurite outgrowth and increased the relative mRNA levels of neurofilament-L (NF-L), a marker of neuronal differentiation. The Raf-1 inhibitor GW5074 and MEK inhibitor PD98059 significantly attenuated DA-9801-induced neurite outgrowth. Additionally, the MEK1 and MEK2 inhibitor SL327 significantly attenuated the increase in the percentage of neurite-bearing PC12 cells induced by DA-9801 treatment. Conversely, the selective p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor SB203580 did not attenuate the DA-9801 treatment-induced increase in the percentage of neurite-bearing PC12 cells. DA-9801 enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB in PC12 cells incubated with and without NGF. Pretreatment with PD98059 blocked the DA-9801-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB. In conclusion, DA-9801 induces neurite outgrowth by affecting the ERK1/2-CREB signaling pathway. Insights into the mechanism underlying this effect of DA-9801 may suggest novel potential strategies for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy.

  10. Multiple roles for keratin intermediate filaments in the regulation of epithelial barrier function and apico-basal polarity

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Pedro J.; Forteza, Radia; Mashukova, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    abstract As multicellular organisms evolved a family of cytoskeletal proteins, the keratins (types I and II) expressed in epithelial cells diversified in more than 20 genes in vertebrates. There is no question that keratin filaments confer mechanical stiffness to cells. However, such a number of genes can hardly be explained by evolutionary advantages in mechanical features. The use of transgenic mouse models has revealed unexpected functional relationships between keratin intermediate filaments and intracellular signaling. Accordingly, loss of keratins or mutations in keratins that cause or predispose to human diseases, result in increased sensitivity to apoptosis, regulation of innate immunity, permeabilization of tight junctions, and mistargeting of apical proteins in different epithelia. Precise mechanistic explanations for these phenomena are still lacking. However, immobilization of membrane or cytoplasmic proteins, including chaperones, on intermediate filaments (“scaffolding”) appear as common molecular mechanisms and may explain the need for so many different keratin genes in vertebrates. PMID:27583190

  11. Multiple roles for keratin intermediate filaments in the regulation of epithelial barrier function and apico-basal polarity.

    PubMed

    Salas, Pedro J; Forteza, Radia; Mashukova, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    As multicellular organisms evolved a family of cytoskeletal proteins, the keratins (types I and II) expressed in epithelial cells diversified in more than 20 genes in vertebrates. There is no question that keratin filaments confer mechanical stiffness to cells. However, such a number of genes can hardly be explained by evolutionary advantages in mechanical features. The use of transgenic mouse models has revealed unexpected functional relationships between keratin intermediate filaments and intracellular signaling. Accordingly, loss of keratins or mutations in keratins that cause or predispose to human diseases, result in increased sensitivity to apoptosis, regulation of innate immunity, permeabilization of tight junctions, and mistargeting of apical proteins in different epithelia. Precise mechanistic explanations for these phenomena are still lacking. However, immobilization of membrane or cytoplasmic proteins, including chaperones, on intermediate filaments ("scaffolding") appear as common molecular mechanisms and may explain the need for so many different keratin genes in vertebrates. PMID:27583190

  12. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinomas: Infiltrating basal cell carcinomas can be more aggressive and locally destructive than other types of basal ... to treat them early and with slightly more aggressive techniques. Excision – The basal cell carcinoma is cut ...

  13. IL-1β and reactive oxygen species differentially regulate neutrophil directional migration and Basal random motility in a zebrafish injury-induced inflammation model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bo; Han, Peidong; Pan, Lifeng; Lu, Wei; Xiong, Jingwei; Zhang, Mingjie; Zhang, Wenqing; Li, Li; Wen, Zilong

    2014-06-15

    During inflammation, the proper inflammatory infiltration of neutrophils is crucial for the host to fight against infections and remove damaged cells and detrimental substances. IL-1β and NADPH oxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated to play important roles in this process. However, the cellular and molecular basis underlying the actions of IL-1β and ROS and their relationship during inflammatory response remains undefined. In this study, we use the zebrafish model to investigate these issues. We find that, similar to that of NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS signaling, the Il-1β-Myd88 pathway is required for the recruitment of neutrophils, but not macrophages, to the injury-induced inflammatory site, whereas it is dispensable for bacterial-induced inflammation. Interestingly, the Il-1β-Myd88 pathway is independent of NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS signaling and critical for the directional migration, but not the basal random movement, of neutrophils. In contrast, the NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS signaling is required for both basal random movement and directional migration of neutrophils. We further document that ectopic expression of Il-1β in zebrafish induces an inflammatory disorder, which can be suppressed by anti-inflammatory treatment. Our findings reveal that the Il-1β-Myd88 axis and NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS signaling are two independent pathways that differentially regulate neutrophil migration during sterile inflammation. In addition, Il-1β overexpressing Tg(hsp70:(m)il-1β_eGFP;lyz:DsRed2)hkz10t;nz50 transgenic zebrafish provides a useful animal model for the study of chronic inflammatory disorder and for anti-inflammatory drug discovery. PMID:24835391

  14. Endogenous short RNAs generated by Dicer 2 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 regulate mRNAs in the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor; Nicolas, Francisco; Moxon, Simon; Haro, Juan de; Calo, Silvia; Torres-Martinez, Santiago; Moulton, Vincent; Ruiz-Vazquez, Rosa; Dalmay, Tamas

    2011-09-01

    Endogenous short RNAs (esRNAs) play diverse roles in eukaryotes and usually are produced from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by Dicer. esRNAs are grouped into different classes based on biogenesis and function but not all classes are present in all three eukaryotic kingdoms. The esRNA register of fungi is poorly described compared to other eukaryotes and it is not clear what esRNA classes are present in this kingdom and whether they regulate the expression of protein coding genes. However, evidence that some dicer mutant fungi display altered phenotypes suggests that esRNAs play an important role in fungi. Here, we show that the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides produces new classes of esRNAs that map to exons and regulate the expression of many protein coding genes. The largest class of these exonic-siRNAs (ex-siRNAs) are generated by RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase 1 (RdRP1) and dicer-like 2 (DCL2) and target the mRNAs of protein coding genes from which they were produced. Our results expand the range of esRNAs in eukaryotes and reveal a new role for esRNAs in fungi

  15. Dependence of Proximal GC Boxes and Binding Transcription Factors in the Regulation of Basal and Valproic Acid-Induced Expression of t-PA.

    PubMed

    Ulfhammer, Erik; Larsson, Pia; Magnusson, Mia; Karlsson, Lena; Bergh, Niklas; Jern, Sverker

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) release is a pivotal response to protect the circulation from occluding thrombosis. We have shown that the t-PA gene is epigenetically regulated and greatly induced by the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA). We now investigated involvement of known t-PA promoter regulatory elements and evaluated dependence of potential interacting transcription factors/cofactors. Methods. A reporter vector with an insert, separately mutated at either the t-PA promoter CRE or GC box II or GC box III elements, was transfected into HT-1080 and HUVECs and challenged with VPA. HUVECs were targeted with siRNA against histone acetyl transferases (HAT) and selected transcription factors from the Sp/KLF family. Results. An intact VPA-response was observed with CRE mutated constructs, whereas mutation of GC boxes II and III reduced the magnitude of the induction by 54 and 79% in HT-1080 and 49 and 50% in HUVECs, respectively. An attenuated induction of t-PA mRNA was observed after Sp2, Sp4, and KLF5 depletion. KLF2 and p300 (HAT) were identified as positive regulators of basal t-PA expression and Sp4 and KLF9 as repressors. Conclusion. VPA-induced t-PA expression is dependent on the proximal GC boxes in the t-PA promoter and may involve interactions with Sp2, Sp4, and KLF5.

  16. The basal function of teleost prolactin as a key regulator on ion uptake identified with zebrafish knockout models

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yuqin; Lou, Qiyong; Dai, Ziru; Dai, Xiangyan; He, Jiangyan; Hu, Wei; Yin, Zhan

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is an anterior pituitary hormone with a broad range of functions. Its ability to stimulate lactogenesis, maternal behavior, growth and development, osmoregulation, and epithelial ion transport has been reported in many vertebrates. In our present study, we have targeted the zebrafish prl locus via transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). Two independent targeted mutant lines with premature termination of the putative sequence of PRL peptides were generated. All prl-deficient zebrafish progeny died at 6–16 days post-fertilization stage (dpf) in egg water. However, the prl-deficient larvae thrived and survived through adulthood in brackish water (5175 mg/L ocean salts), without obvious defects in somatic growth or reproduction. When raised in egg water, the expression levels of certain key Na+/Cl− cotransporters in the gills and Na+/K+-ATPase subunits, Na+/H+ exchangers and Na+/Cl− transporters in the pronephros of prl-deficient larvae were down-regulated at 5 dpf, which caused Na+/K+/Cl− uptake defects in the mutant fish at 6 dpf. Our present results demonstrate that the primary function of zebrafish prl is osmoregulation via governing the uptake and homeostasis of Na+, K+ and Cl−. Our study provides valuable evidence to understand the mechanisms of PRL function better through both phylogenetic and physiological perspectives. PMID:26726070

  17. CREB Phosphorylation Coincides with Transient Synapse Formation in the Rat Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus Following Avoidance Learning

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Cormac; Gallagher, Helen C.; O'Malley, Aoibheinn; Bourke, Mary; Regan, Ciaran M.

    2000-01-01

    Spine density change in the hippocampal dentate gyrus accompanies memory consolidation and coincides with the increased expression of ribosome-rich, hyperchromatic granule cells. Although this suggests increased protein synthesis to be required for synaptic growth in the 5 to 7 h post-training period, little temporal mapping of the associated molecular mechanisms has been done. Here, we demonstrate a similar frequency of hyperchromatic cells in naïve animals and in those sacrificed 6 h post-training, suggesting a transient repression of protein synthesis in the early post-training period. Immunoblot analysis of CREB phosphorylation in the dentate gyrus supported this view, with downregulation from basal levels observed at 2 to 3 h and at 12 h posttraining. Protein synthesis reactivation appears to be specific for de novo spine production as no change in spine frequency accompanies the immediate post-training period of depressed protein synthesis. These findings support the view that CREB-mediated gene transcription is a requirement for long-term memory consolidation and may be directly implicated in the process of synaptic growth. PMID:11486487

  18. Vasoactive intestinal peptide stimulates melanogenesis in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells via CREB/MITF/tyrosinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xing-Hua; Yao, Cheng; Oh, Jang-Hee; Park, Chi-Hyun; Tian, Yu-Dan; Han, Mira; Kim, Ji Eun; Chung, Jin Ho; Jin, Zhe-Hu; Lee, Dong Hun

    2016-08-26

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), one of the major skin neuropeptides, has been suggested to have active roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin disorders such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, which can commonly cause post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. However, the effect of VIP on melanogenesis remains unknown. In this study, we showed that the melanin contents, tyrosinase activity, and gene expression of tyrosinase and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) were significantly increased by treatment with VIP in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells and the stimulatory melanogenic effect was further examined in human epidermal melanocytes (HEMns). In addition, phosphorylated levels of CRE-binding protein (CREB) and protein kinase A (PKA) were markedly increased after VIP treatment, but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), or Akt, indicating the possible PKA-CREB signaling pathway involved in VIP-induced melanogenesis. This result was further verified by the fact that VIP induced increased melanin synthesis, and protein levels of phosphorylated CREB, MITF, tyrosinase were significantly attenuated by H89 (a specific PKA inhibitor). These data suggest that VIP-induced upregulation of tyrosinase through the CREB-MITF signaling pathway plays an important role in finding new treatment strategy for skin inflammatory diseases related pigmentation disorders. PMID:27343558

  19. Rescue of Impaired Long-Term Facilitation at Sensorimotor Synapses of Aplysia following siRNA Knockdown of CREB1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lian; Zhang, Yili; Liu, Rong-Yu; Smolen, Paul; Cleary, Leonard J.

    2015-01-01

    Memory impairment is often associated with disrupted regulation of gene induction. For example, deficits in cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) binding protein (CBP; an essential cofactor for activation of transcription by CREB) impair long-term synaptic plasticity and memory. Previously, we showed that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced knockdown of CBP in individual sensory neurons significantly reduced levels of CBP and impaired 5-HT-induced long-term facilitation (LTF) in sensorimotor cocultures from Aplysia. Moreover, computational simulations of the biochemical cascades underlying LTF successfully predicted training protocols that restored LTF following CBP knockdown. We examined whether simulations could also predict a training protocol that restores LTF impaired by siRNA-induced knockdown of the transcription factor CREB1. Simulations based on a previously described model predicted rescue protocols that were specific to CREB1 knockdown. Empirical studies demonstrated that one of these rescue protocols partially restored impaired LTF. In addition, the effectiveness of the rescue protocol was enhanced by pretreatment with rolipram, a selective cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor. These results provide further evidence that computational methods can help rescue disruptions in signaling cascades underlying memory formation. Moreover, the study demonstrates that the effectiveness of computationally designed training protocols can be enhanced with complementary pharmacological approaches. PMID:25632137

  20. Rescue of impaired long-term facilitation at sensorimotor synapses of Aplysia following siRNA knockdown of CREB1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lian; Zhang, Yili; Liu, Rong-Yu; Smolen, Paul; Cleary, Leonard J; Byrne, John H

    2015-01-28

    Memory impairment is often associated with disrupted regulation of gene induction. For example, deficits in cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) binding protein (CBP; an essential cofactor for activation of transcription by CREB) impair long-term synaptic plasticity and memory. Previously, we showed that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced knockdown of CBP in individual sensory neurons significantly reduced levels of CBP and impaired 5-HT-induced long-term facilitation (LTF) in sensorimotor cocultures from Aplysia. Moreover, computational simulations of the biochemical cascades underlying LTF successfully predicted training protocols that restored LTF following CBP knockdown. We examined whether simulations could also predict a training protocol that restores LTF impaired by siRNA-induced knockdown of the transcription factor CREB1. Simulations based on a previously described model predicted rescue protocols that were specific to CREB1 knockdown. Empirical studies demonstrated that one of these rescue protocols partially restored impaired LTF. In addition, the effectiveness of the rescue protocol was enhanced by pretreatment with rolipram, a selective cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor. These results provide further evidence that computational methods can help rescue disruptions in signaling cascades underlying memory formation. Moreover, the study demonstrates that the effectiveness of computationally designed training protocols can be enhanced with complementary pharmacological approaches. PMID:25632137

  1. Phosphorylation of CREB at Ser-133 induces complex formation with CREB-binding protein via a direct mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, D; Ferreri, K; Nakajima, T; LaMorte, V J; Evans, R; Koerber, S C; Hoeger, C; Montminy, M R

    1996-01-01

    We have characterized a phosphoserine binding domain in the coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) which interacts with the protein kinase A-phosphorylated, and hence activated, form of the cyclic AMP-responsive factor CREB. The CREB binding domain, referred to as KIX, is alpha helical and binds to an unstructured kinase-inducible domain in CREB following phosphorylation of CREB at Ser-133. Phospho-Ser-133 forms direct contacts with residues in KIX, and these contacts are further stabilized by hydrophobic residues in the kinase-inducible domain which flank phospho-Ser-133. Like the src homology 2 (SH2) domains which bind phosphotyrosine-containing peptides, phosphoserine 133 appears to coordinate with a single arginine residue (Arg-600) in KIX which is conserved in the CBP-related protein P300. Since mutagenesis of Arg-600 to Gln severely reduces CREB-CBP complex formation, our results demonstrate that, as in the case of tyrosine kinase pathways, signal transduction through serine/threonine kinase pathways may also require protein interaction motifs which are capable of recognizing phosphorylated amino acids. PMID:8552098

  2. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2), a new regulator of cell polarity required for metastatic dissemination of basal-like breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Salvador, Fernando; Martín, Alberto; Floristán, Alfredo; Cuevas, Eva P; Santos, Vanesa; Montes, Amalia; Morales, Saleta; Castilla, Maria Angeles; Rojo-Sebastián, Alejandro; Martínez, Alejandra; Hardisson, David; Csiszar, Katalin; Portillo, Francisco; Peinado, Héctor; Palacios, José; Cano, Amparo

    2011-09-01

    Basal-like breast carcinoma is characterized by the expression of basal/myoepithelial markers, undifferentiated phenotype, highly aggressive behaviour and frequent triple negative status (ESR-, PR-, Her2neu-). We have previously shown that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurs in basal-like breast tumours and identified Lysyl-oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) as an EMT player and poor prognosis marker in squamous cell carcinomas. We now show that LOXL2 mRNA is overexpressed in basal-like human breast carcinomas. Breast carcinoma cell lines with basal-like phenotype show a specific cytoplasmic/perinuclear LOXL2 expression, and this subcellular distribution is significantly associated with distant metastatic incidence in basal-like breast carcinomas. LOXL2 silencing in basal-like carcinoma cells induces a mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) associated with a decrease of tumourigenicity and suppression of metastatic potential. Mechanistic studies indicate that LOXL2 maintains the mesenchymal phenotype of basal-like carcinoma cells by a novel mechanism involving transcriptional downregulation of Lgl2 and claudin1 and disorganization of cell polarity and tight junction complexes. Therefore, intracellular LOXL2 is a new candidate marker of basal-like carcinomas and a target to block metastatic dissemination of this aggressive breast tumour subtype.

  3. Obesity-mediated regulation of HGF/c-Met is associated with reduced basal-like breast cancer latency in parous mice.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Sneha; Freemerman, Alex J; Galanko, Joseph A; McNaughton, Kirk K; Bendt, Katharine M; Darr, David B; Troester, Melissa A; Makowski, Liza

    2014-01-01

    It is widely thought that pregnancy reduces breast cancer risk, but this lacks consideration of breast cancer subtypes. While a full term pregnancy reduces risk for estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and luminal breast cancers, parity is associated with increased risk of basal-like breast cancer (BBC) subtype. Basal-like subtypes represent less than 10% of breast cancers and are highly aggressive, affecting primarily young, African American women. Our previous work demonstrated that high fat diet-induced obesity in nulliparous mice significantly blunted latency in C3(1)-TAg mice, a model of BBC, potentially through the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met oncogenic pathway. Experimental studies have examined parity and obesity individually, but to date, the joint effects of parity and obesity have not been studied. We investigated the role of obesity in parous mice on BBC. Parity alone dramatically blunted tumor latency compared to nulliparous controls with no effects on tumor number or growth, while obesity had only a minor role in further reducing latency. Obesity-associated metabolic mediators and hormones such as insulin, estrogen, and progesterone were not significantly regulated by obesity. Plasma IL-6 was also significantly elevated by obesity in parous mice. We have previously reported a potential role for stromal-derived hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) via its cognate receptor c-Met in the etiology of obesity-induced BBC tumor onset and in both human and murine primary coculture models of BBC-aggressiveness. Obesity-associated c-Met concentrations were 2.5-fold greater in normal mammary glands of parous mice. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that, parity in C3(1)-TAg mice dramatically reduced BBC latency compared to nulliparous mice. In parous mice, c-Met is regulated by obesity in unaffected mammary gland and is associated with tumor onset. C3(1)-TAg mice recapitulate epidemiologic findings such that parity drives increased BBC risk and potential

  4. Immune complexes (IC) down-regulate the basal and interferon-γ-induced expression of MHC Class II on human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Barrionuevo, P; Beigier-Bompadre, M; De La Barrera, S; Alves-Rosa, M F; Fernandez, G; Palermo, M S; Isturiz, M A

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of Fc receptors for IgG (FcγRs) on monocytes/macrophages with immune complexes (IC) triggers regulatory and effector functions. Previous studies have shown that FcγR–IC interactions inhibit the IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC class II in murine macrophages. However, the mechanism(s) responsible for these effects have not been elucidated. In addition, whether this IC-dependent effect also occurs in human cells is not known. Taking into account the fact that IC and IFN-γ are frequently found in infections and autoimmune disorders, together with the crucial role MHC class II molecules play in the regulation of immune response, we explored the effect and mechanism of IC-induced MHC class II down-regulation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). This effect was studied either in the presence or absence of IFN-γ. We demonstrate that IC exert a drastic inhibition of basal and IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC class II on human monocytes. This effect was mediated through the interaction of IC with both FcγRI and FcγRII. Moreover, similar results were obtained using supernatants from IC-treated PBMC. The IC-induced down-regulation of MHC class II is abrogated by pepstatin and phosphoramidon, supporting the role of aspartic protease(s) and metalloprotease(s) in this process. In parallel with MHC class II expression, antigen presentation was markedly inhibited in the presence of IC. PMID:11529917

  5. The CREB Coactivator CRTC2 is a Lymphoma Tumor Suppressor that Preserves Genome Integrity Through Transcription of DNA Mismatch Repair Genes

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Minggang; Pak, Magnolia L.; Chamberlain, Lynn; Xing, Wei; Yu, Hongbo; Green, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The CREB-regulated transcription coactivator CRTC2 stimulates CREB target gene expression and has a well-established role in modulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Here we find, unexpectedly, that loss of CRTC2, as well as CREB1 and its coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP), results in a deficiency in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) and a resultant increased mutation frequency. We show that CRTC2, CREB1 and CBP are transcriptional activators of well-established MMR genes, including EXO1, MSH6, PMS1 and POLD2. Mining of expression profiling databases and analysis of patient samples reveal that CRTC2 and its target MMR genes are down-regulated in specific T-cell lymphoma subtypes, which are microsatellite unstable. The levels of acetylated histone H3 on the CRTC2 promoter are significantly reduced in lymphoma compared to normal tissue, explaining the decreased CRTC2 expression. Our results establish a role for CRTC2 as a lymphoma tumor suppressor gene that preserves genome integrity by stimulating transcription of MMR genes. PMID:26004186

  6. The role of estrogen receptor-α in estrogen-mediated regulation of basal and exercise-induced Hsp70 and Hsp27 expression in rat soleus.

    PubMed

    Bombardier, Eric; Vigna, Chris; Bloemberg, Darin; Quadrilatero, Joe; Tiidus, Peter M; Tupling, A Russell

    2013-10-01

    We examined the influence of estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) activation on estrogen-mediated regulation of heat shock proteins 70 (Hsp70) and 27 (Hsp27) in soleus. Ovariectomized rats received estrogen (EST), an ERα agonist (propyl pyrazole triol, PPT), both (EST+PPT), or a sham, and they served as either unexercised controls or were subjected to exercise by having to run downhill (17 m/min, -13.5° grade) for 90 min. At 72 h postexercise, soleus muscles were removed and either immunohistochemically stained for Hsp70 and myosin heavy chain or homogenized for Western blotting for Hsp70 and Hsp27. Elevated (p < 0.05) basal Hsp70 in both type I and II fibres in the unexercised EST, PPT, and EST+PPT groups relative to unexercised sham animals was noted. Compared with Hsp70 levels in the unexercised animals, that in exercised animals was elevated (p < 0.05) in both sham and PPT groups but not in EST and EST+PPT groups. Western blot determined that Hsp27 levels were not significantly different between groups. Hence, the ability of estrogen to augment resting type I and type II muscle fibre Hsp70 content is primarily mediated via muscle ERα. However, the blunted Hsp70 response following damaging exercise in estrogen-supplemented animals does not appear to be fully accounted for by ERα-mediated effects.

  7. Reduced pCREB in Alzheimer's disease prefrontal cortex is reflected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Bartolotti, N; Bennett, D A; Lazarov, O

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) signaling has a critical role in the formation of memories. CREB signaling is dysfunctional in the brains of mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and evidence suggests that CREB signaling may be disrupted in human AD brains as well. Here, we show that both CREB and its activated form pCREB-Ser133 (pCREB) are reduced in the prefrontal cortex of AD patients. Similarly, the transcription cofactors CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 are reduced in the prefrontal cortex of AD patients, indicating additional dysfunction of CREB signaling in AD. Importantly, we show that pCREB expression is reduced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of AD subjects. In addition, pCREB levels in PBMC positively correlated with pCREB expression in the postmortem brain of persons with AD. These results suggest that pCREB expression in PBMC may be indicative of its expression in the brain, and thus offers the intriguing possibility of pCREB as a biomarker of cognitive function and disease progression in AD. PMID:27480489

  8. Spatial learning associated with stimulus response in goldfish Carassius auratus: relationship to activation of CREB signalling.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel; Thangaleela, Subramanian; Balasundaram, Chellam

    2015-06-01

    Earlier, we reported spatial learning ability in goldfish (Carassius auratus) by using spatial paradigm with food reward. Therefore, we hypothesized that goldfish may use associated cue to integrate "where" and "what" for spatial memory. To test our hypothesis, we first trained goldfish to learn to cross the gate1, which is associated with spatial task. Subsequently, they were trained to learn to enter the task chamber and to identify the food reward chamber associated with visual cue (red/green light). Red and green lights were positioned randomly for each trial but always the food reward was kept in green chamber. In addition, to elucidate the role of the signalling cascade in spatial memory associated with visual cue, nicotinamide (NAM, 1000 mg/kg, i.p), a NAD(+) precursor, was used to inhibit the Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) pathway. Fishes were trained for 5 days in a maze after treating with either vehicle (VEH, DD H2O) or NAM, and then, they were individually tested for memory. We found that VEH-treated fish learned and recalled the task successfully by showing less latency and making more correct choices than NAM-treated group. Subsequent analysis showed that NAM treatment significantly down-regulated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), CREB, expression of SirT1 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) in telencephalon. Taken together, our results provide behavioural evidence of spatial memory associated with visual cue in C. auratus, which could be regulated by ERK1/2-CREB-SirT1-Bdnf pathway.

  9. Lithium enhances CRTC oligomer formation and the interaction between the CREB coactivators CRTC and CBP--implications for CREB-dependent gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Annette; von der Heyde, Anne Sophie; Böer, Ulrike; Phu, Do Thanh; Tzvetkov, Mladen; Oetjen, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Lithium salts are important drugs to treat bipolar disorder. Previous work showed that lithium by enforcing the interaction between the transcription factor CREB and its coactivator CRTC1 enhanced cAMP-stimulated CREB-dependent gene transcription. Both CREB and CRTC have been implicated in neuronal adaptation, which might underlie lithium's therapeutic action. In the present study the mechanisms of lithium action on cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription were further elucidated. Transient transfection assays revealed that all three CRTC isoforms conferred lithium responsiveness to CREB whereas their intrinsic transcriptional activities remained unchanged by lithium, suggesting a conformational change of CREB or CRTC by lithium. In in vitro protein-protein interaction assays lithium enhanced the interaction between CREB and both coactivators CRTC and CBP. Furthermore, lithium enforced the oligomerization of CRTC, a prerequisite for CREB interaction. For further evaluation it was investigated whether lithium competes with magnesium, which coordinates the conformation of the CREB basic region leucine zipper (bZip). Mutational analysis of the magnesium coordinating lysine-290 within the bZip, in vitro and intracellular interaction assays and luciferase reporter-gene assays revealed that the effect of lithium on the CREB-CRTC interaction or on the transcriptional activity, respectively, was not affected by the mutation, thus excluding a magnesium-lithium competition. However, the CREB-CRTC interaction was strongly increased in lysine-290-mutants thereby extending the CRTC-CREB interaction domain. Taken together the results exclude a competition between lithium and magnesium at the bZip, but suggest that lithium by enforcing the CRTC-oligomer formation and the interaction of CREB-CBP-CRTC enhances cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription.

  10. Involuntary, Forced and Voluntary Exercises Equally Attenuate Neurocognitive Deficits in Vascular Dementia by the BDNF-pCREB Mediated Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yangyang; Lu, Xiao; Dong, Juntao; He, Xiaokuo; Yan, Tiebin; Liang, Huiying; Sui, Minghong; Zheng, Xiuyuan; Liu, Huihua; Zhao, Jingpu; Lu, Xinxin

    2015-09-01

    A rat model of vascular dementia was used to compare the effects of involuntary exercise induced by functional electrical stimulation (FES), forced exercise and voluntary exercise on the recovery of cognitive function recovery and its underlying mechanisms. In an involuntary exercise (I-EX) group, FES was used to induce involuntary gait-like running on ladder at 12 m/min. A forced exercise group (F-EX) and a voluntary exercise group (V-EX) exercised by wheel running. The Barnes maze was used for behavioral assessment. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) positive cells in hippocampal CA1, CA2/3 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions were evaluated using immunohistochemical methods. Western blotting was used to assess the levels of BDNF, phosphorylated protein kinase B (Akt), tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 and 2 (MEK1/2), ERK1/2 and CREB in BDNF-pCREB signaling in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Involuntary, forced and voluntary exercises were all found to reverse the cognitive deficits of vascular dementia with about equal effectiveness. The number of BDNF, pCREB and pERK1/2 immunopositive cells was significantly increased in the hippocampal CA1, CA2/3 and DG regions in all three exercise groups. In addition, involuntary exercise activated BDNF and the phosphorylation of Akt, TrkB, MEK1/2, ERK1/2 and CREB in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex equally as well as voluntary or forced exercise. These results suggest that involuntary exercise induced by FES may be as beneficial for alleviating cognitive deficits after cerebral ischemia. PMID:26240057

  11. Transcriptional control of the inflammatory response: a role for the CREB-binding protein (CBP).

    PubMed

    Matt, Theresia

    2002-01-01

    The cellular pathophysiology of septic shock is characterized by the activation of genes in response to exposure of cells to bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or endotoxin induce the activation of two major transcription factors, NF-kappa B (nuclear factor-kappaB) and AP-1 (activating protein-1), which in turn induce genes involved in chronic and acute inflammatory responses. The activity of both of them is regulated by phosphorylation and subsequent interaction with the coactivator protein CBP (CREB-binding protein). Thus, the limiting CBP may play an important role in the development of critical illness.

  12. Distinct roles of methamphetamine in modulating spatial memory consolidation, retrieval, reconsolidation and the accompanying changes of ERK and CREB activation in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guofen; Zhu, Jie; Zhong, Qing; Shi, Chaofeng; Dang, Yonghui; Han, Wei; Liu, Xinshe; Xu, Ming; Chen, Teng

    2013-04-01

    Drugs of abuse modulated learning and memory in humans yet the underlying mechanism remained unclear. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) were involved in neuroplastic changes associated with learning and memory. In the current study, we used a Morris water maze to examine the effect of methamphetamine (METH) on different processes of spatial memory in mice. We then investigated the status of ERK and CREB in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). We found that 1.0 mg/kg dose of METH facilitated spatial memory consolidation when it was injected immediately after the last learning trial. In contrast, the same dose of METH had no effect on spatial memory retrieval when it was injected 30 min before the test. Furthermore, 1.0 mg/kg dose of METH injected immediately after retrieval had no effect on spatial memory reconsolidation. Activation of both ERK and CREB in the hippocampus was found following memory consolidation but not after retrieval or reconsolidation in METH-treated mouse groups. In contrast, activation of both ERK and CREB in the PFC was found following memory retrieval but not other processes in METH-treated mouse groups. These results suggested that METH facilitated spatial memory consolidation but not retrieval or reconsolidation. Moreover, activation of the ERK and CREB signaling pathway in the hippocampus might be involved in METH-induced spatial memory changes.

  13. CREB SUMOylation by the E3 ligase PIAS1 enhances spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Chu; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Ma, Yun-Li; Tai, Derek J C; Lee, Eminy H Y

    2014-07-16

    cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and signaling plays an important role in long-term memory formation, but other posttranslational modifications of CREB are less known. Here, we found that CREB1Δ, the short isoform of CREB, could be sumoylated by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1) at Lys271 and Lys290 and PIAS1 SUMOylation of CREB1Δ increased the expression level of CREB1Δ. CREB1Δ could also be sumoylated by other PIAS family proteins, but not by the E3 ligases RanBP2 and Pc2 or by the E2 ligase Ubc9. Furthermore, water maze training increased the level of endogenous CREB SUMOylation in rat CA1 neurons determined by in vitro SUMOylation assay, but this effect was not observed in other brain areas. Moreover, transduction of Lenti-CREBWT to rat CA1 area facilitated, whereas transduction of Lenti-CREB double sumo-mutant (CREBK271RK290R) impaired, spatial learning and memory performance. Transduction of Lenti-CREBWT-SUMO1 fusion vector to rat CA1 area showed a more significant effect in enhancing spatial learning and memory and CREB SUMOylation. Lenti-CREBWT transduction increased, whereas Lenti-CREBK271RK290R transduction decreased, CREB DNA binding to the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf) promoter and decreased bdnf mRNA expression. Knock-down of PIAS1 expression in CA1 area by PIAS1 siRNA transfection impaired spatial learning and memory and decreased endogenous CREB SUMOylation. In addition, CREB SUMOylation was CREB phosphorylation dependent and lasted longer. Therefore, CREB phosphorylation may be responsible for signal transduction during the early phase of long-term memory formation, whereas CREB SUMOylation sustains long-term memory.

  14. Steap4 plays a critical role in osteoclastogenesis in vitro by regulating cellular iron/reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) activation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Ye, Shiqiao; Fujiwara, Toshifumi; Manolagas, Stavros C; Zhao, Haibo

    2013-10-18

    Iron is essential for osteoclast differentiation, and iron overload in a variety of hematologic diseases is associated with excessive bone resorption. Iron uptake by osteoclast precursors via the transferrin cycle increases mitochondrial biogenesis, reactive oxygen species production, and activation of cAMP response element-binding protein, a critical transcription factor downstream of receptor activator of NF-κB-ligand-induced calcium signaling. These changes are required for the differentiation of osteoclast precursors to mature bone-resorbing osteoclasts. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating cellular iron metabolism in osteoclasts remain largely unknown. In this report, we provide evidence that Steap4, a member of the six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of prostate (Steap) family proteins, is an endosomal ferrireductase with a critical role in cellular iron utilization in osteoclasts. Specifically, we show that Steap4 is the only Steap family protein that is up-regulated during osteoclast differentiation. Knocking down Steap4 expression in vitro by lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNAs inhibits osteoclast formation and decreases cellular ferrous iron, reactive oxygen species, and the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein. These results demonstrate that Steap4 is a critical enzyme for cellular iron uptake and utilization in osteoclasts and, thus, indispensable for osteoclast development and function.

  15. A novel epigenetic CREB-miR-373 axis mediates ZIP4-induced pancreatic cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqing; Yang, Jingxuan; Cui, Xiaobo; Chen, Yong; Zhu, Vivian F; Hagan, John P; Wang, Huamin; Yu, Xianjun; Hodges, Sally E; Fang, Jing; Chiao, Paul J; Logsdon, Craig D; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Li, Min

    2013-09-01

    Changes in the intracellular levels of the essential micronutrient zinc have been implicated in multiple diseases including pancreatic cancer; however, the molecular mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism where increased zinc mediated by the zinc importer ZIP4 transcriptionally induces miR-373 in pancreatic cancer to promote tumour growth. Reporter, expression and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate that ZIP4 activates the zinc-dependent transcription factor CREB and requires this transcription factor to increase miR-373 expression through the regulation of its promoter. miR-373 induction is necessary for efficient ZIP4-dependent enhancement of cell proliferation, invasion, and tumour growth. Further analysis of miR-373 in vivo oncogenic function reveals that it is mediated through its negative regulation of TP53INP1, LATS2 and CD44. These results define a novel ZIP4-CREB-miR-373 signalling axis promoting pancreatic cancer growth, providing mechanistic insights explaining in part how a zinc transporter functions in cancer cells and may have broader implications as inappropriate regulation of intracellular zinc levels plays an important role in many other diseases.

  16. Involvement of phosphorylated Apis mellifera CREB in gating a honeybee's behavioral response to an external stimulus.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Katrin B; Heufelder, Karin; Feige, Janina; Bauer, Paul; Dyck, Yan; Ehrhardt, Lea; Kühnemund, Johannes; Bergmann, Anja; Göbel, Josefine; Isecke, Marlene; Eisenhardt, Dorothea

    2016-05-01

    The transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) is involved in neuronal plasticity. Phosphorylation activates CREB and an increased level of phosphorylated CREB is regarded as an indicator of CREB-dependent transcriptional activation. In honeybees(Apis mellifera)we recently demonstrated a particular high abundance of the phosphorylated honeybee CREB homolog (pAmCREB) in the central brain and in a subpopulation of mushroom body neurons. We hypothesize that these high pAmCREB levels are related to learning and memory formation. Here, we tested this hypothesis by analyzing brain pAmCREB levels in classically conditioned bees and bees experiencing unpaired presentations of conditioned stimulus (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (US). We demonstrate that both behavioral protocols display differences in memory formation but do not alter the level of pAmCREB in bee brains directly after training. Nevertheless, we report that bees responding to the CS during unpaired stimulus presentations exhibit higher levels of pAmCREB than nonresponding bees. In addition, Trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor that is thought to enhance histone acetylation by CREB-binding protein, increases the bees' CS responsiveness. We conclude that pAmCREB is involved in gating a bee's behavioral response driven by an external stimulus. PMID:27084927

  17. Distinctive Roles for Amygdalar CREB in Reconsolidation and Extinction of Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tronson, Natalie C.; Wiseman, Shari L.; Neve, Rachael L.; Nestler, Eric J.; Olausson, Peter; Taylor, Jane R.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) plays a critical role in fear memory formation. Here we determined the role of CREB selectively within the amygdala in reconsolidation and extinction of auditory fear. Viral overexpression of the inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) or the dominant-negative mCREB, specifically within the lateral…

  18. Evidence for Conservation of the Calcitonin Superfamily and Activity-regulating Mechanisms in the Basal Chordate Branchiostoma floridae: INSIGHTS INTO THE MOLECULAR AND FUNCTIONAL EVOLUTION IN CHORDATES.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Toshio; Kuwasako, Kenji; Ogasawara, Michio; Takahashi, Hiroki; Matsubara, Shin; Osugi, Tomohiro; Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Sasayama, Yuichi; Suzuki, Nobuo; Satake, Honoo

    2016-01-29

    The calcitonin (CT)/CT gene-related peptide (CGRP) family is conserved in vertebrates. The activities of this peptide family are regulated by a combination of two receptors, namely the calcitonin receptor (CTR) and the CTR-like receptor (CLR), and three receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). Furthermore, RAMPs act as escort proteins by translocating CLR to the cell membrane. Recently, CT/CGRP family peptides have been identified or inferred in several invertebrates. However, the molecular characteristics and relevant functions of the CTR/CLR and RAMPs in invertebrates remain unclear. In this study, we identified three CT/CGRP family peptides (Bf-CTFPs), one CTR/CLR-like receptor (Bf-CTFP-R), and three RAMP-like proteins (Bf-RAMP-LPs) in the basal chordate amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae). The Bf-CTFPs were shown to possess an N-terminal circular region typical of the CT/CGRP family and a C-terminal Pro-NH2. The Bf-CTFP genes were expressed in the central nervous system and in endocrine cells of the midgut, indicating that Bf-CTFPs serve as brain and/or gut peptides. Cell surface expression of the Bf-CTFP-R was enhanced by co-expression with each Bf-RAMP-LP. Furthermore, Bf-CTFPs activated Bf-CTFP-R·Bf-RAMP-LP complexes, resulting in cAMP accumulation. These results confirmed that Bf-RAMP-LPs, like vertebrate RAMPs, are prerequisites for the function and translocation of the Bf-CTFP-R. The relative potencies of the three peptides at each receptor were similar. Bf-CTFP2 was a potent ligand at all receptors in cAMP assays. Bf-RAMP-LP effects on ligand potency order were distinct to vertebrate CGRP/adrenomedullin/amylin receptors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first molecular and functional characterization of an authentic invertebrate CT/CGRP family receptor and RAMPs.

  19. Evidence for Conservation of the Calcitonin Superfamily and Activity-regulating Mechanisms in the Basal Chordate Branchiostoma floridae: INSIGHTS INTO THE MOLECULAR AND FUNCTIONAL EVOLUTION IN CHORDATES.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Toshio; Kuwasako, Kenji; Ogasawara, Michio; Takahashi, Hiroki; Matsubara, Shin; Osugi, Tomohiro; Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Sasayama, Yuichi; Suzuki, Nobuo; Satake, Honoo

    2016-01-29

    The calcitonin (CT)/CT gene-related peptide (CGRP) family is conserved in vertebrates. The activities of this peptide family are regulated by a combination of two receptors, namely the calcitonin receptor (CTR) and the CTR-like receptor (CLR), and three receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). Furthermore, RAMPs act as escort proteins by translocating CLR to the cell membrane. Recently, CT/CGRP family peptides have been identified or inferred in several invertebrates. However, the molecular characteristics and relevant functions of the CTR/CLR and RAMPs in invertebrates remain unclear. In this study, we identified three CT/CGRP family peptides (Bf-CTFPs), one CTR/CLR-like receptor (Bf-CTFP-R), and three RAMP-like proteins (Bf-RAMP-LPs) in the basal chordate amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae). The Bf-CTFPs were shown to possess an N-terminal circular region typical of the CT/CGRP family and a C-terminal Pro-NH2. The Bf-CTFP genes were expressed in the central nervous system and in endocrine cells of the midgut, indicating that Bf-CTFPs serve as brain and/or gut peptides. Cell surface expression of the Bf-CTFP-R was enhanced by co-expression with each Bf-RAMP-LP. Furthermore, Bf-CTFPs activated Bf-CTFP-R·Bf-RAMP-LP complexes, resulting in cAMP accumulation. These results confirmed that Bf-RAMP-LPs, like vertebrate RAMPs, are prerequisites for the function and translocation of the Bf-CTFP-R. The relative potencies of the three peptides at each receptor were similar. Bf-CTFP2 was a potent ligand at all receptors in cAMP assays. Bf-RAMP-LP effects on ligand potency order were distinct to vertebrate CGRP/adrenomedullin/amylin receptors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first molecular and functional characterization of an authentic invertebrate CT/CGRP family receptor and RAMPs. PMID:26644465

  20. Gene Network Inference and Biochemical Assessment Delineates GPCR Pathways and CREB Targets in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Drozdov, Ignat; Svejda, Bernhard; Gustafsson, Bjorn I.; Mane, Shrikant; Pfragner, Roswitha; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M.

    2011-01-01

    Small intestinal (SI) neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are increasing in incidence, however little is known about their biology. High throughput techniques such as inference of gene regulatory networks from microarray experiments can objectively define signaling machinery in this disease. Genome-wide co-expression analysis was used to infer gene relevance network in SI-NETs. The network was confirmed to be non-random, scale-free, and highly modular. Functional analysis of gene co-expression modules revealed processes including ‘Nervous system development’, ‘Immune response’, and ‘Cell-cycle’. Importantly, gene network topology and differential expression analysis identified over-expression of the GPCR signaling regulators, the cAMP synthetase, ADCY2, and the protein kinase A, PRKAR1A. Seven CREB response element (CRE) transcripts associated with proliferation and secretion: BEX1, BICD1, CHGB, CPE, GABRB3, SCG2 and SCG3 as well as ADCY2 and PRKAR1A were measured in an independent SI dataset (n = 10 NETs; n = 8 normal preparations). All were up-regulated (p<0.035) with the exception of SCG3 which was not differently expressed. Forskolin (a direct cAMP activator, 10−5 M) significantly stimulated transcription of pCREB and 3/7 CREB targets, isoproterenol (a selective ß-adrenergic receptor agonist and cAMP activator, 10−5 M) stimulated pCREB and 4/7 targets while BIM-53061 (a dopamine D2 and Serotonin [5-HT2] receptor agonist, 10−6 M) stimulated 100% of targets as well as pCREB; CRE transcription correlated with the levels of cAMP accumulation and PKA activity; BIM-53061 stimulated the highest levels of cAMP and PKA (2.8-fold and 2.5-fold vs. 1.8–2-fold for isoproterenol and forskolin). Gene network inference and graph topology analysis in SI NETs suggests that SI NETs express neural GPCRs that activate different CRE targets associated with proliferation and secretion. In vitro studies, in a model NET cell system, confirmed that transcriptional

  1. Gene network inference and biochemical assessment delineates GPCR pathways and CREB targets in small intestinal neuroendocrine neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Drozdov, Ignat; Svejda, Bernhard; Gustafsson, Bjorn I; Mane, Shrikant; Pfragner, Roswitha; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M

    2011-01-01

    Small intestinal (SI) neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are increasing in incidence, however little is known about their biology. High throughput techniques such as inference of gene regulatory networks from microarray experiments can objectively define signaling machinery in this disease. Genome-wide co-expression analysis was used to infer gene relevance network in SI-NETs. The network was confirmed to be non-random, scale-free, and highly modular. Functional analysis of gene co-expression modules revealed processes including 'Nervous system development', 'Immune response', and 'Cell-cycle'. Importantly, gene network topology and differential expression analysis identified over-expression of the GPCR signaling regulators, the cAMP synthetase, ADCY2, and the protein kinase A, PRKAR1A. Seven CREB response element (CRE) transcripts associated with proliferation and secretion: BEX1, BICD1, CHGB, CPE, GABRB3, SCG2 and SCG3 as well as ADCY2 and PRKAR1A were measured in an independent SI dataset (n = 10 NETs; n = 8 normal preparations). All were up-regulated (p<0.035) with the exception of SCG3 which was not differently expressed. Forskolin (a direct cAMP activator, 10(-5) M) significantly stimulated transcription of pCREB and 3/7 CREB targets, isoproterenol (a selective ß-adrenergic receptor agonist and cAMP activator, 10(-5) M) stimulated pCREB and 4/7 targets while BIM-53061 (a dopamine D(2) and Serotonin [5-HT(2)] receptor agonist, 10(-6) M) stimulated 100% of targets as well as pCREB; CRE transcription correlated with the levels of cAMP accumulation and PKA activity; BIM-53061 stimulated the highest levels of cAMP and PKA (2.8-fold and 2.5-fold vs. 1.8-2-fold for isoproterenol and forskolin). Gene network inference and graph topology analysis in SI NETs suggests that SI NETs express neural GPCRs that activate different CRE targets associated with proliferation and secretion. In vitro studies, in a model NET cell system, confirmed that transcriptional effects are

  2. Gene network inference and biochemical assessment delineates GPCR pathways and CREB targets in small intestinal neuroendocrine neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Drozdov, Ignat; Svejda, Bernhard; Gustafsson, Bjorn I; Mane, Shrikant; Pfragner, Roswitha; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M

    2011-01-01

    Small intestinal (SI) neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are increasing in incidence, however little is known about their biology. High throughput techniques such as inference of gene regulatory networks from microarray experiments can objectively define signaling machinery in this disease. Genome-wide co-expression analysis was used to infer gene relevance network in SI-NETs. The network was confirmed to be non-random, scale-free, and highly modular. Functional analysis of gene co-expression modules revealed processes including 'Nervous system development', 'Immune response', and 'Cell-cycle'. Importantly, gene network topology and differential expression analysis identified over-expression of the GPCR signaling regulators, the cAMP synthetase, ADCY2, and the protein kinase A, PRKAR1A. Seven CREB response element (CRE) transcripts associated with proliferation and secretion: BEX1, BICD1, CHGB, CPE, GABRB3, SCG2 and SCG3 as well as ADCY2 and PRKAR1A were measured in an independent SI dataset (n = 10 NETs; n = 8 normal preparations). All were up-regulated (p<0.035) with the exception of SCG3 which was not differently expressed. Forskolin (a direct cAMP activator, 10(-5) M) significantly stimulated transcription of pCREB and 3/7 CREB targets, isoproterenol (a selective ß-adrenergic receptor agonist and cAMP activator, 10(-5) M) stimulated pCREB and 4/7 targets while BIM-53061 (a dopamine D(2) and Serotonin [5-HT(2)] receptor agonist, 10(-6) M) stimulated 100% of targets as well as pCREB; CRE transcription correlated with the levels of cAMP accumulation and PKA activity; BIM-53061 stimulated the highest levels of cAMP and PKA (2.8-fold and 2.5-fold vs. 1.8-2-fold for isoproterenol and forskolin). Gene network inference and graph topology analysis in SI NETs suggests that SI NETs express neural GPCRs that activate different CRE targets associated with proliferation and secretion. In vitro studies, in a model NET cell system, confirmed that transcriptional effects are

  3. Overlapping ETS and CRE Motifs ((G/C)CGGAAGTGACGTCA) preferentially bound by GABPα and CREB proteins.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Raghunath; Zhao, Jianfei; He, Ximiao; Shlyakhtenko, Andrey; Mann, Ishminder; Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul; Sathyanarayana, B K; FitzGerald, Peter C; Vinson, Charles

    2012-10-01

    Previously, we identified 8-bps long DNA sequences (8-mers) that localize in human proximal promoters and grouped them into known transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). We now examine split 8-mers consisting of two 4-mers separated by 1-bp to 30-bps (X(4)-N(1-30)-X(4)) to identify pairs of TFBS that localize in proximal promoters at a precise distance. These include two overlapping TFBS: the ETS⇔ETS motif ((C/G)CCGGAAGCGGAA) and the ETS⇔CRE motif ((C/G)CGGAAGTGACGTCAC). The nucleotides in bold are part of both TFBS. Molecular modeling shows that the ETS⇔CRE motif can be bound simultaneously by both the ETS and the B-ZIP domains without protein-protein clashes. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) shows that the ETS protein GABPα and the B-ZIP protein CREB preferentially bind to the ETS⇔CRE motif only when the two TFBS overlap precisely. In contrast, the ETS domain of ETV5 and CREB interfere with each other for binding the ETS⇔CRE. The 11-mer (CGGAAGTGACG), the conserved part of the ETS⇔CRE motif, occurs 226 times in the human genome and 83% are in known regulatory regions. In vivo GABPα and CREB ChIP-seq peaks identified the ETS⇔CRE as the most enriched motif occurring in promoters of genes involved in mRNA processing, cellular catabolic processes, and stress response, suggesting that a specific class of genes is regulated by this composite motif. PMID:23050235

  4. Overlapping ETS and CRE Motifs ((G/C)CGGAAGTGACGTCA) preferentially bound by GABPα and CREB proteins.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Raghunath; Zhao, Jianfei; He, Ximiao; Shlyakhtenko, Andrey; Mann, Ishminder; Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul; Sathyanarayana, B K; FitzGerald, Peter C; Vinson, Charles

    2012-10-01

    Previously, we identified 8-bps long DNA sequences (8-mers) that localize in human proximal promoters and grouped them into known transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). We now examine split 8-mers consisting of two 4-mers separated by 1-bp to 30-bps (X(4)-N(1-30)-X(4)) to identify pairs of TFBS that localize in proximal promoters at a precise distance. These include two overlapping TFBS: the ETS⇔ETS motif ((C/G)CCGGAAGCGGAA) and the ETS⇔CRE motif ((C/G)CGGAAGTGACGTCAC). The nucleotides in bold are part of both TFBS. Molecular modeling shows that the ETS⇔CRE motif can be bound simultaneously by both the ETS and the B-ZIP domains without protein-protein clashes. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) shows that the ETS protein GABPα and the B-ZIP protein CREB preferentially bind to the ETS⇔CRE motif only when the two TFBS overlap precisely. In contrast, the ETS domain of ETV5 and CREB interfere with each other for binding the ETS⇔CRE. The 11-mer (CGGAAGTGACG), the conserved part of the ETS⇔CRE motif, occurs 226 times in the human genome and 83% are in known regulatory regions. In vivo GABPα and CREB ChIP-seq peaks identified the ETS⇔CRE as the most enriched motif occurring in promoters of genes involved in mRNA processing, cellular catabolic processes, and stress response, suggesting that a specific class of genes is regulated by this composite motif.

  5. Berberine Suppresses Adipocyte Differentiation via Decreasing CREB Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ruyuan; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Yuqing; Wang, Yao; Liu, Yun; Li, Fengying; Wang, Xiao; Zhou, Libin

    2015-01-01

    Berberine, one of the major constituents of Chinese herb Rhizoma coptidis, has been demonstrated to lower blood glucose, blood lipid, and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The anti-obesity effect of berberine has been attributed to its anti-adipogenic activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. In the present study, we found that berberine significantly suppressed the expressions of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)α, peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2), and other adipogenic genes in the process of adipogenesis. Berberine decreased cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression at the early stage of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation. In addition, CREB phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression induced by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and forskolin were also attenuated by berberine. The binding activities of cAMP responsive element (CRE) stimulated by IBMX and forskolin were inhibited by berberine. The binding of phosphorylated CREB to the promoter of C/EBPβ was abrogated by berberine after the induction of preadipocyte differentiation. These results suggest that berberine blocks adipogenesis mainly via suppressing CREB activity, which leads to a decrease in C/EBPβ-triggered transcriptional cascades. PMID:25928058

  6. Prevention of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and injury-induced neointimal hyperplasia by CREB-mediated p21 induction: An insight from a plant polyphenol.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lan; Zhao, Rui; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Weiku; He, GuoRong; Yang, Shengqian; Song, Junke; Du, Guanhua

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)/cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) signaling cascade negatively regulates platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-induced smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation, which is a critical event in the initiation and development of restenosis and atherosclerotic lesions. Salvianolic acid A (SAA) is one of the most abundant polyphenols extracted from salvia. The aim of this study is to investigate whether SAA exerts an action on PDGF-BB-induced proliferation via cAMP/PKA/CREB mechanism. SAA blunts PDGF-BB-induced human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell (hUASMC) proliferation via p21 induction, as evidenced by its increased mRNA and protein expression levels. The SAA-induced upregulation of p21 involves the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway; a cAMP analog mimicked the effects of SAA and a specific cAMP/PKA inhibitor opposed these effects. SAA also activated CREB, including phosphorylation at Ser133, and induced its nuclear translocation. Deletion and mutational analysis of p21 promoters, co-immunoprecipitation, and western blot analysis showed that CRE is essential for SAA-induced p21 protein expression. Transfection of dominant-negative CREB (mutated Ser133) plasmids into hUASMCs attenuated SAA-stimulated p21 expression. SAA upregulated p21 expression and activated CREB in the neointima of balloon-injured arteries in vivo. Our results indicate that SAA promotes p21 expression in SMCs through the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling cascade in vitro and prevents injury-induced neointimal hyperplasia.

  7. Role of calcium-activated potassium channels in the regulation of basal and agonist-elevated tones in isolated conduit arteries. Short communication.

    PubMed

    Pataricza, J; Márton, Z; Hegedus, Z; Krassói, Irén; Kun, A; Varró, A; Papp, J Gy

    2004-01-01

    Functional role of calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels on the basal and agonist-elevated arterial tones was investigated in isolated rabbit aorta, porcine and canine coronary arteries as well as in human internal mammary artery. The vascular tones enhanced by contractile agents were increased further by preincubation of these conduit blood vessels with selective (charybdotoxin or iberiotoxin) or nonselective (tetraethylammonium) inhibitors of KCa channels. The basal tone (without an agonist) was increased only in the canine coronary artery. The results indicate a feed-back regulatory role of KCa channels counteracting the vasospasm of conduit arteries. PMID:16438119

  8. Frequency-Dependent Regulation of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone β by Pulsatile Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Is Mediated by Functional Antagonism of bZIP Transcription Factors ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Nick A.; Xu, Shuyun; Lacza, Charlemagne T.; Carroll, Rona S.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2010-01-01

    Oscillatory synthesis and secretion of the gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), under the control of pulsatile hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), is essential for normal reproductive development and fertility. The molecular mechanisms by which various patterns of pulsatile GnRH regulate gonadotrope responsiveness remain poorly understood. In contrast to the α and LHβ subunit genes, FSHβ subunit transcription is preferentially stimulated at low rather than high frequencies of pulsatile GnRH. In this study, mutation of a cyclic AMP response element (CRE) within the FSHβ promoter resulted in the loss of preferential GnRH stimulation at low pulse frequencies. We hypothesized that high GnRH pulse frequencies might stimulate a transcriptional repressor(s) to attenuate the action of CRE binding protein (CREB) and show that inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) fulfills such a role. ICER was not detected under basal conditions, but pulsatile GnRH stimulated ICER to a greater extent at high than at low pulse frequencies. ICER binds to the FSHβ CRE site to reduce CREB occupation and abrogates both maximal GnRH stimulation and GnRH pulse frequency-dependent effects on FSHβ transcription. These data suggest that ICER production antagonizes the stimulatory action of CREB to attenuate FSHβ transcription at high GnRH pulse frequencies, thereby playing a critical role in regulating cyclic reproductive function. PMID:20008557

  9. Creb coactivators direct anabolic responses and enhance performance of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Nelson E; Kelly, Kimberly A; Hawkins, Richard; Bramah-Lawani, Mariam; Amelio, Antonio L; Nwachukwu, Jerome C; Nettles, Kendall W; Conkright, Michael D

    2014-05-01

    During the stress response to intense exercise, the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) induces rapid catabolism of energy reserves through the release of catecholamines and subsequent activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Paradoxically, chronic administration of sympathomimetic drugs (β-agonists) leads to anabolic adaptations in skeletal muscle, suggesting that sympathetic outflow also regulates myofiber remodeling. Here, we show that β-agonists or catecholamines released during intense exercise induce Creb-mediated transcriptional programs through activation of its obligate coactivators Crtc2 and Crtc3. In contrast to the catabolic activity normally associated with SNS function, activation of the Crtc/Creb transcriptional complex by conditional overexpression of Crtc2 in the skeletal muscle of transgenic mice fostered an anabolic state of energy and protein balance. Crtc2-overexpressing mice have increased myofiber cross-sectional area, greater intramuscular triglycerides and glycogen content. Moreover, maximal exercise capacity was enhanced after induction of Crtc2 expression in transgenic mice. Collectively these findings demonstrate that the SNS-adrenergic signaling cascade coordinates a transient catabolic stress response during high-intensity exercise, which is followed by transcriptional reprogramming that directs anabolic changes for recovery and that augments subsequent exercise performance.

  10. Effects of neonatal corticosterone and environmental enrichment on retinal ERK1/2 and CREB phosphorylation in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Matteucci, Andrea; Ceci, Chiara; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Macrì, Simone; Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Laviola, Giovanni

    2014-11-01

    Exposure to Stimulating Environments (SE) during development may improve neuroplasticity in central nervous system, protect against neurotoxic damage, and promote neuronal recovery in adult life. While biochemical mechanisms of SE-promoted neuronal plasticity are well known in the brain, much less is known on the signaling cascade governing plasticity and neuroprotection in the retina. In order to investigate if in the retina signaling molecules involved in neuronal plasticity are affected by SE, neonatal CD-1 mice were exposed to moderate corticosterone levels (NC), supplemented through maternal milk during the first postnatal week, or to environmental enrichment (EE) conditions (physical and social stimuli) from early adolescence. Our results showed that both NC and EE increased the phosphorylation level of Extracellularly Regulated Kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in the adult retinal tissue. Furthermore, we observed that activated ERK1/2 was restricted to Müller cells, while pCREB was mostly present in the nuclei of retinal neurons. Neither NC, nor EE modified the expression of GFAP, a marker of Müller cells activation. In conclusion our results indicate that both NC and EE activate ERK1/2 and CREB in the retina and provide a biochemical background for the neuroprotective activity exerted by SE against retinal damage. Furthermore, they support the role of Müller glia as a key cell determinant of retinal neuroplasticity.

  11. Leptin augments recruitment of IRF-1 and CREB to thrombospondin-1 gene promoter in vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Soumyadip; Ganguly, Rituparna; Raman, Priya

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that high pathophysiological concentrations of leptin, the adipocyte-secreted peptide, upregulate the expression of a potent proatherogenic matricellular protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), in vascular smooth muscle cells. Moreover, this regulation was found to occur at the level of transcription; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. The goal of the present study was to investigate the specific transcriptional mechanisms that mediate upregulation of TSP-1 expression by leptin. Primary human aortic smooth muscle cell cultures were transiently transfected with different TSP-1 gene (THBS1) promoter-linked luciferase reporter constructs, and luciferase activity in response to leptin (100 ng/ml) was assessed. We identified a long THBS1 promoter (-1270/+750) fragment with specific leptin response elements that are required for increased TSP-1 transcription by leptin. Promoter analyses, protein/DNA array and gel shift assays demonstrated activation and association of transcription factors, interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), to the distal fragment of the THBS1 promoter in response to leptin. Supershift, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and coimmunoprecipitation assays revealed formation of a single complex between IRF-1 and CREB in response to leptin; importantly, recruitment of this complex to the THBS1 promoter mediated leptin-induced TSP-1 transcription. Finally, binding sequence decoy oligomer and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that regulatory elements for both IRF-1 (-1019 to -1016) and CREB (-1198 to -1195), specific to the distal THBS1 promoter, were required for leptin-induced TSP-1 transcription. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that leptin promotes a cooperative association between IRF-1 and CREB on the THBS1 promoter driving TSP-1 transcription in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:27281481

  12. Transcription factors NF-IL6 and CREB recognize a common essential site in the human prointerleukin 1 beta gene.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, J; Saito, K; Waterman, W R; Webb, A C; Auron, P E

    1994-01-01

    A site located between -2782 and -2729 of the human prointerleukin-1 beta (IL1B) gene functions as a strong lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive enhancer independent of the previously identified enhancer located between -2896 and -2846 (F. Shirakawa, K. Saito, C.A. Bonagura, D.L. Galson, M. J. Fenton, A. C. Webb, and P. E. Auron, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:1332-1344, 1993). Although these two enhancers appear to function cooperatively in the native sequence context, they function independently as LPS-responsive elements upon removal of an interposed silencer sequence. The new enhancer is not induced by dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP) alone but is superinduced by costimulation with LPS-dbcAMP. This pattern of induction depends upon the nature of the sequence, a composite NF-IL6-cAMP response element (CRE) binding site. This pseudosymmetrical sequence is shown to contrast with a classical symmetric CRE which responds to dbcAMP but not LPS. DNA binding studies using in vivo nuclear extract, recombinant proteins, and specific antibodies show that LPS induces the formation of two different complexes at the enhancer: (i) an NF-IL6-CREB heterodimer and (ii) a heterodimer consisting of NF-IL6 and a non-CREB, CRE-binding protein. Cotransfection studies using NF-IL6 and CREB expression vectors show that NF-IL6 transactivates the enhancer in the presence of LPS, whereas CREB acts either positively or negatively, depending upon its cAMP-regulated phosphorylation state. Our data demonstrate that the newly identified enhancer is a specialized LPS-responsive sequence which can be modulated by cAMP as a result of the involvement of NF-IL6-CRE-binding protein heterodimers. Images PMID:7935442

  13. Serine 133 phosphorylation is not required for hippocampal CREB-mediated transcription and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Briand, Lisa A.; Lee, Bridgin G.; Lelay, John; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2015-01-01

    The cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein, CREB, is a transcription factor whose activity in the brain is critical for long-term memory formation. Phosphorylation of Ser133 in the kinase-inducible domain (KID), that in turn leads to the recruitment of the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP), is thought to mediate the activation of CREB. However, the importance of phosphorylation for CREB binding to DNA and subsequent gene transcription in vivo is controversial. To definitively address the role of CREB phosphorylation in gene transcription and learning and memory, we derived mutant mice lacking the Ser133 phosphorylation site. These mice exhibit normal CREB-mediated gene transcription for a number of genes implicated in learning and memory processes. Furthermore these mice have no deficits in hippocampus- or striatum-dependent learning. Strikingly, our findings show that CREB phosphorylation at Ser133 is not necessary for CREB binding to CRE sites, CREB-mediated transcription, or CREB-mediated behavioral phenotypes associated with learning and memory. PMID:25593297

  14. Coupling gene expression to cAMP signalling: role of CREB and CREM.

    PubMed

    Sassone-Corsi, P

    1998-01-01

    Several endocrine and neuronal functions are governed by the cAMP-dependent pathway. Transcriptional regulation upon stimulation of this pathway is mediated by a family of cAMP-responsive nuclear factors. This family consists of a large number of members, which may act as activators or repressors. These factors contain the basic domain/leucine zipper motifs and bind as dimers to cAMP-response elements (CRE). CRE-binding protein (CREBs) function is modulated by phosphorylation by several kinases. Direct activation of gene expression by CREB requires phosphorylation by the cAMP-dependent PKA to serine 133. Among the repressors, ICER (Inducible cAMP Early Repressor) deserves special mention. ICER is generated from an alternative CREM promoter and is the only inducible CRE-binding protein. ICER negatively autoregulates the alternative promoter, generating a feedback loop. ICER expression is tissue specific and developmentally regulated. The kinetics of ICER expression are characteristic of an early response gene. CREM plays a key physiological and developmental role within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The transcriptional activator CREM is highly expressed in postmeiotic cells. The role of CREM in spermiogenesis was addressed using CREM knock-out mice. Spermatogenesis stops at the first step of spermiogenesis in the mutants and there is a significant increase in apoptotic germ cells. This phenotype is reminiscent of cases of human infertility. ICER is regulated in a circadian manner in the pineal gland, the site of the hormone melatonin production. This night-day oscillation is driven by the endogenous clock (located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus). The synthesis of melatonin is regulated by a rate-limiting enzyme, serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT). Analysis of the CREM-null mice and of the promoter of the NAT gene revealed that ICER controls the amplitude and rhythmicity of NAT, and thus the oscillation in the hormonal synthesis of melatonin.

  15. Chronic TNFalpha and cAMP pre-treatment of human adipocytes alter HSL, ATGL and perilipin to regulate basal and stimulated lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Bézaire, Véronic; Mairal, Aline; Anesia, Rodica; Lefort, Corinne; Langin, Dominique

    2009-09-17

    We examined the effects of chronic TNFalpha and dibutyryl-cAMP (Db-cAMP) pre-treatment on the lipolytic machinery of human hMADS adipocytes. TNFalpha decreased adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) protein content and triglycerides (TG)-hydrolase activity but increased basal lipolysis due to a marked reduction in perilipin (PLIN) protein content. Conversely, Db-cAMP increased ATGL and HSL protein content but prevented PLIN phosphorylation, the net result being accentuated basal lipolysis. In forskolin-stimulated conditions, TNFalpha and Db-cAMP pre-treatment decreased stimulated TG-hydrolase activity and impaired PLIN phosphorylation. Together, this resulted in a severely attenuated response to forskolin-stimulated lipolysis. PMID:19695247

  16. Chronic TNFalpha and cAMP pre-treatment of human adipocytes alter HSL, ATGL and perilipin to regulate basal and stimulated lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Bézaire, Véronic; Mairal, Aline; Anesia, Rodica; Lefort, Corinne; Langin, Dominique

    2009-09-17

    We examined the effects of chronic TNFalpha and dibutyryl-cAMP (Db-cAMP) pre-treatment on the lipolytic machinery of human hMADS adipocytes. TNFalpha decreased adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) protein content and triglycerides (TG)-hydrolase activity but increased basal lipolysis due to a marked reduction in perilipin (PLIN) protein content. Conversely, Db-cAMP increased ATGL and HSL protein content but prevented PLIN phosphorylation, the net result being accentuated basal lipolysis. In forskolin-stimulated conditions, TNFalpha and Db-cAMP pre-treatment decreased stimulated TG-hydrolase activity and impaired PLIN phosphorylation. Together, this resulted in a severely attenuated response to forskolin-stimulated lipolysis.

  17. Methylmercury, an environmental electrophile capable of activation and disruption of the Akt/CREB/Bcl-2 signal transduction pathway in SH-SY5Y cells

    PubMed Central

    Unoki, Takamitsu; Abiko, Yumi; Toyama, Takashi; Uehara, Takashi; Tsuboi, Koji; Nishida, Motohiro; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) modifies cellular proteins via their thiol groups in a process referred to as “S-mercuration”, potentially resulting in modulation of the cellular signal transduction pathway. We examined whether low-dose MeHg could affect Akt signaling involved in cell survival. Exposure of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells of up to 2 μM MeHg phosphorylated Akt and its downstream signal molecule CREB, presumably due to inactivation of PTEN through S-mercuration. As a result, the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was up-regulated by MeHg. The activation of Akt/CREB/Bcl-2 signaling mediated by MeHg was, at least in part, linked to cellular defence because either pretreatment with wortmannin to block PI3K/Akt signaling or knockdown of Bcl-2 enhanced MeHg-mediated cytotoxicity. In contrast, increasing concentrations of MeHg disrupted Akt/CREB/Bcl-2 signaling. This phenomenon was attributed to S-mercuration of CREB through Cys286 rather than Akt. These results suggest that although MeHg is an apoptosis-inducing toxicant, this environmental electrophile is able to activate the cell survival signal transduction pathway at lower concentrations prior to apoptotic cell death. PMID:27357941

  18. PFOS Disturbs BDNF-ERK-CREB Signalling in Association with Increased MicroRNA-22 in SH-SY5Y Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wu; He, Qing-zhi; Wu, Cheng-qiu; Pan, Xiao-yuan; Wang, Jing; Tan, Yan; Shan, Xiao-yun; Zeng, Huai-cai

    2015-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, is neurotoxic to mammalian species. However, the underlying mechanism of its neurotoxicity was unclear. We hypothesized that PFOS suppresses BDNF expression to produce its neurotoxic effects by inhibiting the ERK-CREB pathway. SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells were exposed to various concentrations of PFOS to examine the role of the BDNF-ERK-CREB signalling pathway in PFOS-induced apoptosis and cytotoxicity. Furthermore, to ascertain the mechanism by which PFOS reduces BDNF signalling, we examined the expression levels of miR-16 and miR-22, which potentially regulate BDNF mRNA translation at the posttranscriptional level. Results indicated that PFOS significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, BDNF and pERK protein levels decreased after PFOS treatment; however, pCREB protein levels were significantly elevated in PFOS treated groups. TrkB protein expression increased in the 10 μM and 50 μM PFOS groups and significantly decreased in the 100 μM PFOS group. Our results demonstrated that PFOS exposure decreased miR-16 expression and increased miR-22 expression, which may represent a possible mechanism by which PFOS decreases BDNF protein levels. PFOS may inhibit BDNF-ERK-CREB signalling by increasing miR-22 levels, which may, in part, explain the mechanism of PFOS neurotoxicity. PMID:26649298

  19. Bipartite functions of the CREB co-activators selectively direct alternative splicing or transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Amelio, Antonio L; Caputi, Massimo; Conkright, Michael D

    2009-09-16

    The CREB regulated transcription co-activators (CRTCs) regulate many biological processes by integrating and converting environmental inputs into transcriptional responses. Although the mechanisms by which CRTCs sense cellular signals are characterized, little is known regarding how CRTCs contribute to the regulation of cAMP inducible genes. Here we show that these dynamic regulators, unlike other co-activators, independently direct either pre-mRNA splice-site selection or transcriptional activation depending on the cell type or promoter context. Moreover, in other scenarios, the CRTC co-activators coordinately regulate transcription and splicing. Mutational analyses showed that CRTCs possess distinct functional domains responsible for regulating either pre-mRNA splicing or transcriptional activation. Interestingly, the CRTC1-MAML2 oncoprotein lacks the splicing domain and is incapable of altering splice-site selection despite robustly activating transcription. The differential usage of these distinct domains allows CRTCs to selectively mediate multiple facets of gene regulation, indicating that co-activators are not solely restricted to coordinating alternative splicing with increase in transcriptional activity.

  20. TRPA1 Channels Are Regulators of Astrocyte Basal Calcium Levels and Long-Term Potentiation via Constitutive d-Serine Release

    PubMed Central

    Shigetomi, Eiji; Jackson-Weaver, Olan; Huckstepp, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes are found throughout the brain where they make extensive contacts with neurons and synapses. Astrocytes are known to display intracellular Ca2+ signals and release signaling molecules such as d-serine into the extracellular space. However, the role(s) of astrocyte Ca2+ signals in hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a form of synaptic plasticity involved in learning and memory, remains unclear. Here, we explored a recently discovered novel TRPA1 channel-mediated transmembrane Ca2+ flux pathway in astrocytes. Specifically, we determined whether block or genetic deletion of TRPA1 channels affected LTP of Schaffer collateral to CA1 pyramidal neuron synapses. Using pharmacology, TRPA1−/− mice, imaging, electrophysiology, and d-serine biosensors, our data indicate that astrocyte TRPA1 channels contribute to basal Ca2+ levels and are required for constitutive d-serine release into the extracellular space, which contributes to NMDA receptor-dependent LTP. The findings have broad relevance for the study of astrocyte–neuron interactions by demonstrating how TRPA1 channel-mediated fluxes contribute to astrocyte basal Ca2+ levels and neuronal function via constitutive d-serine release. PMID:23761909

  1. Activating PIK3CA Mutations Induce an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Paracrine Signaling Axis in Basal-like Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, Christian D; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Hoshino, Daisuke; Formisano, Luigi; Hanker, Ariella B; Gatza, Michael L; Morrison, Meghan M; Moore, Preston D; Whitwell, Corbin A; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Stricker, Thomas; Bhola, Neil E; Silva, Grace O; Patel, Premal; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M; Levin, Maren; Horiates, Marina; Palma, Norma A; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J; Perou, Charles M; Weaver, Alissa M; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Chang, Jenny C; Park, Ben Ho; Liebler, Daniel C; Cook, Rebecca S; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to transform human mammary epithelial cells (MECs). These mutations are present in all breast cancer subtypes, including basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we identified 72 protein expression changes in human basal-like MECs with knock-in E545K or H1047R PIK3CA mutations versus isogenic MECs with wild-type PIK3CA. Several of these were secreted proteins, cell surface receptors or ECM interacting molecules and were required for growth of PIK3CA mutant cells as well as adjacent cells with wild-type PIK3CA. The proteins identified by MS were enriched among human BLBC cell lines and pointed to a PI3K-dependent amphiregulin/EGFR/ERK signaling axis that is activated in BLBC. Proteins induced by PIK3CA mutations correlated with EGFR signaling and reduced relapse-free survival in BLBC. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors reduced growth of PIK3CA mutant BLBC cell lines and murine mammary tumors driven by a PIK3CA mutant transgene, all together suggesting that PIK3CA mutations promote tumor growth in part by inducing protein changes that activate EGFR. PMID:25953087

  2. Activating PIK3CA Mutations Induce an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Paracrine Signaling Axis in Basal-like Breast Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Young, Christian D.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Hoshino, Daisuke; Formisano, Luigi; Hanker, Ariella B.; Gatza, Michael L.; Morrison, Meghan M.; Moore, Preston D.; Whitwell, Corbin A.; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Stricker, Thomas; Bhola, Neil E.; Silva, Grace O.; Patel, Premal; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M.; Levin, Maren; Horiates, Marina; Palma, Norma A.; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J.; Perou, Charles M.; Weaver, Alissa M.; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A.; Chang, Jenny C.; Park, Ben Ho; Liebler, Daniel C.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to transform human mammary epithelial cells (MECs). These mutations are present in all breast cancer subtypes, including basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we identified 72 protein expression changes in human basal-like MECs with knock-in E545K or H1047R PIK3CA mutations versus isogenic MECs with wild-type PIK3CA. Several of these were secreted proteins, cell surface receptors or ECM interacting molecules and were required for growth of PIK3CA mutant cells as well as adjacent cells with wild-type PIK3CA. The proteins identified by MS were enriched among human BLBC cell lines and pointed to a PI3K-dependent amphiregulin/EGFR/ERK signaling axis that is activated in BLBC. Proteins induced by PIK3CA mutations correlated with EGFR signaling and reduced relapse-free survival in BLBC. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors reduced growth of PIK3CA mutant BLBC cell lines and murine mammary tumors driven by a PIK3CA mutant transgene, all together suggesting that PIK3CA mutations promote tumor growth in part by inducing protein changes that activate EGFR. PMID:25953087

  3. Activating PIK3CA Mutations Induce an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Paracrine Signaling Axis in Basal-like Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, Christian D; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Hoshino, Daisuke; Formisano, Luigi; Hanker, Ariella B; Gatza, Michael L; Morrison, Meghan M; Moore, Preston D; Whitwell, Corbin A; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Stricker, Thomas; Bhola, Neil E; Silva, Grace O; Patel, Premal; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M; Levin, Maren; Horiates, Marina; Palma, Norma A; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J; Perou, Charles M; Weaver, Alissa M; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Chang, Jenny C; Park, Ben Ho; Liebler, Daniel C; Cook, Rebecca S; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to transform human mammary epithelial cells (MECs). These mutations are present in all breast cancer subtypes, including basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we identified 72 protein expression changes in human basal-like MECs with knock-in E545K or H1047R PIK3CA mutations versus isogenic MECs with wild-type PIK3CA. Several of these were secreted proteins, cell surface receptors or ECM interacting molecules and were required for growth of PIK3CA mutant cells as well as adjacent cells with wild-type PIK3CA. The proteins identified by MS were enriched among human BLBC cell lines and pointed to a PI3K-dependent amphiregulin/EGFR/ERK signaling axis that is activated in BLBC. Proteins induced by PIK3CA mutations correlated with EGFR signaling and reduced relapse-free survival in BLBC. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors reduced growth of PIK3CA mutant BLBC cell lines and murine mammary tumors driven by a PIK3CA mutant transgene, all together suggesting that PIK3CA mutations promote tumor growth in part by inducing protein changes that activate EGFR.

  4. Basal cell cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is needed to prove the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. Treatment varies depending on the size, depth, and location of the cancer. Early treatment by a dermatologist may result in a cure rate of more than 95%, but regular examination ...

  5. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lanoue, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly occurring cancer in the world and overall incidence is still on the rise. While typically a slow-growing tumor for which metastases is rare, basal cell carcinoma can be locally destructive and disfiguring. Given the vast prevalence of this disease, there is a significant overall burden on patient well-being and quality of life. The current mainstay of basal cell carcinoma treatment involves surgical modalities, such as electrodessication and curettage, excision, cryosurgery, and Mohs micrographic surgery. Such methods are typically reserved for localized basal cell carcinoma and offer high five-year cure rates, but come with the risk of functional impairment, disfigurement, and scarring. Here, the authors review the evidence and indications for nonsurgical treatment modalities in cases where surgery is impractical, contraindicated, or simply not desired by the patient. PMID:27386043

  6. Nobiletin protects against cerebral ischemia via activating the p-Akt, p-CREB, BDNF and Bcl-2 pathway and ameliorating BBB permeability in rat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan; Zhao, Huiying; Zhang, Xiangjian; Chen, Linyu; Zhao, Xumeng; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Jian

    2013-07-01

    There is cumulative evidence that the serine-threonine kinase Akt and its downstream nuclear transcription factor CREB are involved in neuronal survival and protection. The Akt activates and phosphorylates CREB at Ser133, resulting in the up-regulation of pro-survival CREB target genes such as BDNF and Bcl-2. Thus, Akt/CREB signaling pathway may be one propitious target for treatment of ischemic cerebral injury. Nobiletin (NOB) exhibits a wide spectrum of beneficial biological properties including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic actions and contributes to reverse learning impairment in Alzheimer's disease rat. However, little is currently known regarding the exact role of NOB in ischemic stroke. Here, we designed to evaluate its possible therapeutic effect on cerebral ischemia. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) and randomly divided into five groups: Sham (sham-operated+0.05% Tween-80), MCAO (pMCAO+0.9% saline), Vehicle group (pMCAO+0.05% Tween-80), NOB-L (pMCAO+NOB 10 mg/kg) and NOB-H (pMCAO+NOB 25 mg/kg) groups. Rats were pre-administered intraperitoneally once daily for 3 days before surgery and then received once again immediately after surgery. Neurological deficit scores, brain water content and infarct volume were evaluated at 24 h after stroke. Additionally, the activities of Akt, CREB, BDNF, Bcl-2 and claudin-5 in ischemic brain cortex were analyzed by the methods of immunohistochemistry, western blot and RT-qPCR. Compared with Vehicle group, neurological deficits and brain edema were relieved in NOB-H group (P<0.05), infarct volume was lessened in both NOB-L and NOB-H groups (P<0.05) at 24 h after stroke. Immunohistochemistry, western blot and RT-qPCR analysis indicated that NOB dramatically promoted the activities of Akt, CREB, BDNF and Bcl-2 (P<0.05). Meanwhile, claudin-5 expression was also enhanced. On the basis of these findings, we concluded that NOB protected the

  7. CREB Binding Protein Functions During Successive Stages of Eye Development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Justin P.; Jamal, Tazeen; Doetsch, Alex; Turner, F. Rudolf; Duffy, Joseph B.

    2004-01-01

    During the development of the compound eye of Drosophila several signaling pathways exert both positive and inhibitory influences upon an array of nuclear transcription factors to produce a near-perfect lattice of unit eyes or ommatidia. Individual cells within the eye are exposed to many extracellular signals, express multiple surface receptors, and make use of a large complement of cell-subtype-specific DNA-binding transcription factors. Despite this enormous complexity, each cell will make the correct developmental choice and adopt the appropriate cell fate. How this process is managed remains a poorly understood paradigm. Members of the CREB binding protein (CBP)/p300 family have been shown to influence development by (1) acting as bridging molecules between the basal transcriptional machinery and specific DNA-binding transcription factors, (2) physically interacting with terminal members of signaling cascades, (3) acting as transcriptional coactivators of downstream target genes, and (4) playing a key role in chromatin remodeling. In a screen for new genes involved in eye development we have identified the Drosophila homolog of CBP as a key player in both eye specification and cell fate determination. We have used a variety of approaches to define the role of CBP in eye development on a cell-by-cell basis. PMID:15514061

  8. Dorsal Hippocampal CREB Is Both Necessary and Sufficient for Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekeres, Melanie J.; Neve, Rachael L.; Frankland, Paul W.; Josselyn, Sheena A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the transcription factor CREB has been widely implicated in memory, whether it is sufficient to produce spatial memory under conditions that do not normally support memory formation in mammals is unknown. We found that locally and acutely increasing CREB levels in the dorsal hippocampus using viral vectors is sufficient to induce robust…

  9. Serine 133 Phosphorylation Is Not Required for Hippocampal CREB-Mediated Transcription and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brian, Lisa A.; Lee, Bridgin G.; Lelay, John; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Blendy, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    The cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein, CREB, is a transcription factor whose activity in the brain is critical for long-term memory formation. Phosphorylation of Ser133 in the kinase-inducible domain (KID), that in turn leads to the recruitment of the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP), is thought to mediate the…

  10. Chronic Enhancement of CREB Activity in the Hippocampus Interferes with the Retrieval of Spatial Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viosca, Jose; Malleret, Gael; Bourtchouladze, Rusiko; Benito, Eva; Vronskava, Svetlana; Kandel, Eric R.; Barco, Angel

    2009-01-01

    The activation of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent gene expression is thought to be critical for the formation of different types of long-term memory. To explore the consequences of chronic enhancement of CREB function on spatial memory in mammals, we examined spatial navigation in bitransgenic mice that express in a…

  11. Control of CREB expression in tumors: from molecular mechanisms and signal transduction pathways to therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Steven, André; Seliger, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic AMP response element binding (CREB) protein has pleiotropic activities in physiologic processes. Due to its central position downstream of many growth signaling pathways CREB has the ability to influence cell survival, growth and differentiation of normal, but also of tumor cells suggesting an oncogenic potential of CREB. Indeed, increased CREB expression and activation is associated with tumor progression, chemotherapy resistance and reduced patients' survival. We summarize here the different cellular functions of CREB in tumors of distinct histology as well as its use as potential prognostic marker. In addition, the underlying molecular mechanisms to achieve constitutive activation of CREB including structural alterations, such as gene amplification and chromosomal translocation, and deregulation, which could occur at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational level, will be described. Since downregulation of CREB by different strategies resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation, invasion and induction of apoptosis, the role of CREB as a promising target for cancer therapy will be also discussed. PMID:26934558

  12. Effects of Teraphy with Basal Insulin Analogues Combined with GLP 1 Analogues and Metformin in the Treatment of Obese Patients with Poorly Regulated Postprandial Glycemia

    PubMed Central

    Buturovic, Belma Ascic; Ristic, Lejla Burnazovic; Narancic, Alma Mujanovic

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Patient-oriented therapy represents a modern approach in the treatment of patients with diabetes, an approach which is supported in the most recent guidelines by the ADA and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). The progressive nature of diabetes demands the introduction of insulin therapy much earlier in order to prevent the development of late complications of the disease. Material and methods: The study included 30 patients who had been treated with long-acting insulin analogue and metformin in doses of 3 x 850 mg at least 6 months prior to study entry and in which a good glycaemic control had not been achieved, or with HbA1c > 7%. Patients who had a BMI > 28 kg /m2 were included in the study. Results and discussion: At the beginning of the study the patients were switched to combined therapy with long-acting basal analog, metformin and liraglutide in a dosage of 0.6 mg of 1x1. After 12 weeks of the new therapeutic regimen we recorded a significant reduction in the parameter levels that we monitored in the study. BMI value after the test was 28.2±1.39 kg/m2, p=0.025, HbA1c 7.24±0.47%, p=0.030, fasting blood glucose level 7.04±0.32 mmol/l, p=0.023, postprandial glucose level 7.6±0.46 mmol/l, p=0.012, systolic blood pressure level 123±5.75 mmHg, p=0.015, diastolic blood pressure level 79.1±2.91 mmHg, p=0.03. During research that we have conducted over 12 weeks, a reduction of body weight was achieved while improving the value of parameters significant for the study. Conclusion: There was a significant lowering of HbA1c, fasting blood glucose levels, postprandial glucose levels and better blood pressure control by which we have proved that GLP1 analogues in combination with basal insulin and metformin provide a good glycaemic control with a cardio protective effect, and reduce the risk of late complications. PMID:25568561

  13. Targeted activation of CREB in reactive astrocytes is neuroprotective in focal acute cortical injury.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Luis; Schlüter, Agatha; Valor, Luis M; Barco, Angel; Giralt, Mercedes; Golbano, Arantxa; Hidalgo, Juan; Jia, Peilin; Zhao, Zhongming; Jové, Mariona; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Ruiz, Montserrat; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Masgrau, Roser; Pujol, Aurora; Galea, Elena

    2016-05-01

    The clinical challenge in acute injury as in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is to halt the delayed neuronal loss that occurs hours and days after the insult. Here we report that the activation of CREB-dependent transcription in reactive astrocytes prevents secondary injury in cerebral cortex after experimental TBI. The study was performed in a novel bitransgenic mouse in which a constitutively active CREB, VP16-CREB, was targeted to astrocytes with the Tet-Off system. Using histochemistry, qPCR, and gene profiling we found less neuronal death and damage, reduced macrophage infiltration, preserved mitochondria, and rescued expression of genes related to mitochondrial metabolism in bitransgenic mice as compared to wild type littermates. Finally, with meta-analyses using publicly available databases we identified a core set of VP16-CREB candidate target genes that may account for the neuroprotective effect. Enhancing CREB activity in astrocytes thus emerges as a novel avenue in acute brain post-injury therapeutics.

  14. Identification of compounds that potentiate CREB signaling as possible enhancers of long-term memory

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Guo, Vicky; Southall, Noel; Cho, Ming-Hsuang; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Nirenberg, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have implicated the cAMP Response Element Binding (CREB) protein signaling pathway in long-term memory. To identify small molecule enhancers of CREB activation of gene expression, we screened ≈73,000 compounds, each at 7–15 concentrations in a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) format, for activity in cells by assaying CREB mediated β-lactamase reporter gene expression. We identified 1,800 compounds that potentiated CREB mediated gene expression, with potencies as low as 16 nM, comprising 96 structural series. Mechanisms of action were systematically determined, and compounds that affect phosphodiesterase 4, protein kinase A, and cAMP production were identified, as well as compounds that affect CREB signaling via apparently unidentified mechanisms. qHTS folowed by interrogation of pathway targets is an efficient paradigm for lead generation for chemical genomics and drug development. PMID:19196967

  15. Heterozygous PTCH1 Mutations Impact the Bone Metabolism in Patients With Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Likely by Regulating SPARC Expression.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yingying; Zhang, Jianyun; Zhang, Heyu; Li, Xuefen; Qu, Jiafei; Zhai, Jiemei; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Feng; Li, Tiejun

    2016-07-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by bone and skin abnormalities and a predisposition to various tumors. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs), which are common tumors of the jaw that cause extensive damage to the jawbone, are usually accompanied with NBCCS. Germline PTCH1 mutations in NBCCS tumorigenesis have been frequently studied; however, little is known regarding the pathogenesis of bone abnormalities in this disease. This study sought to investigate the mechanism underlying heterozygous PTCH1 mutation-mediated abnormal bone metabolism in patients with NBCCS. Stromal cells were isolated from the fibrous capsules of patients with NBCCS-associated or non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors and non-syndromic tumor stromal cells without PTCH1 mutations served as controls. Germline PTCH1 heterozygous mutations were confirmed in all NBCCS samples and differential protein expression was identified using tandem mass tag-labeled proteomics analysis. Our findings revealed that osteonectin/SPARC expression was significantly downregulated in syndromic stromal cells compared with non-syndromic stromal cells. SPARC expression was even lower in stromal cells carrying PTCH1 protein truncation mutations. PTCH1 siRNA transfection demonstrated that SPARC downregulation correlates with decreased PTCH1 expression. Furthermore, exogenous SPARC promoted osteogenic differentiation of syndromic stromal cells with enhanced development of calcium nodules. In addition, bone mineral density tests showed that patients with NBCCS exhibit weak bone mass compared with sex- and age-matched controls. This study indicates that germline PTCH1 heterozygous mutations play a major role in bone metabolism in patients with NBCCS, in particular in those with PTCH1 protein truncation mutations. SPARC may represent an important downstream modulator of PTCH1 mediation of bone metabolism. Thus, bone mineral density monitoring is critical

  16. Changes in CREB and deltaFosB are associated with the behavioural sensitization induced by methylenedioxypyrovalerone.

    PubMed

    Buenrostro-Jáuregui, Mario; Ciudad-Roberts, Andres; Moreno, Josep; Muñoz-Villegas, Patricia; López-Arnau, Raúl; Pubill, David; Escubedo, Elena; Camarasa, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) is a synthetic cathinone which has recently emerged as a designer drug of abuse. The objective of this study was to investigate the locomotor sensitization induced by MDPV in adolescent mice, and associated neuroplastic changes in the nucleus accumbens and striatum through deltaFosB and CREB expression. Behavioural testing consisted of three phases: Phase I: conditioning regimen with MDPV (0.3 mg/kg/day for five days) or saline; Phase II: resting (11 days); Phase III: challenged with MDPV (0.3 mg/kg), cocaine (10 mg/kg) or saline on day 16 for both groups. Mice repeatedly exposed to MDPV increased locomotor activity by 165-200% following acute MDPV or cocaine administration after an 11-day resting period, showing a MDPV-induced sensitization to itself and to cocaine. An explanation for this phenomenon could be the common mechanism of action between these two psychostimulants. Furthermore, the MDPV challenge resulted in higher levels of phospho-CREB in MDPV-conditioned mice compared with MDPV-naive mice, probably due to an up-regulation of the cAMP pathway. Likewise, MDPV exposure induced a persistent increase in the striatal expression of deltaFosB; the priming dose of MDPV also produced a significant increase in the accumbal expression of this transcription factor. This study constitutes the first evidence that an exposure to a low dose of MDPV during adolescence induces behavioural sensitization and provides a neurobiological basis for a relationship between MDPV and cocaine. We hypothesize that, similar to cocaine, both CREB and deltaFosB play a role in the induction of this behavioural sensitization. PMID:27147595

  17. Ginger improves cognitive function via NGF-induced ERK/CREB activation in the hippocampus of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soonmin; Moon, Minho; Oh, Hyein; Kim, Hyo Geun; Kim, Sun Yeou; Oh, Myung Sook

    2014-10-01

    Ginger (the rhizome of Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has been used worldwide for many centuries in cooking and for treatment of several diseases. The main pharmacological properties of ginger include anti-inflammatory, antihyperglycemic, antiarthritic, antiemetic and neuroprotective actions. Recent studies demonstrated that ginger significantly enhances cognitive function in various cognitive disorders as well as in healthy brain. However, the biochemical mechanisms underlying the ginger-mediated enhancement of cognition have not yet been studied in normal or diseased brain. In the present study, we assessed the memory-enhancing effects of dried ginger extract (GE) in a model of scopolamine-induced memory deficits and in normal animals by performing a novel object recognition test. We found that GE administration significantly improved the ability of mice to recognize novel objects, indicating improvements in learning and memory. Furthermore, to elucidate the mechanisms of GE-mediated cognitive enhancement, we focused on nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced signaling pathways. NGF enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis revealed that GE administration led to elevated NGF levels in both the mouse hippocampus and rat glioma C6 cells. GE administration also resulted in phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), as revealed by Western blotting analysis. Neutralization of NGF with a specific NGF antibody inhibited GE-triggered activation of ERK and CREB in the hippocampus. Also, GE treatment significantly increased pre- and postsynaptic markers, synaptophysin and PSD-95, which are related to synapse formation in the brain. These data suggest that GE has a synaptogenic effect via NGF-induced ERK/CREB activation, resulting in memory enhancement. PMID:25049196

  18. Ginger improves cognitive function via NGF-induced ERK/CREB activation in the hippocampus of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soonmin; Moon, Minho; Oh, Hyein; Kim, Hyo Geun; Kim, Sun Yeou; Oh, Myung Sook

    2014-10-01

    Ginger (the rhizome of Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has been used worldwide for many centuries in cooking and for treatment of several diseases. The main pharmacological properties of ginger include anti-inflammatory, antihyperglycemic, antiarthritic, antiemetic and neuroprotective actions. Recent studies demonstrated that ginger significantly enhances cognitive function in various cognitive disorders as well as in healthy brain. However, the biochemical mechanisms underlying the ginger-mediated enhancement of cognition have not yet been studied in normal or diseased brain. In the present study, we assessed the memory-enhancing effects of dried ginger extract (GE) in a model of scopolamine-induced memory deficits and in normal animals by performing a novel object recognition test. We found that GE administration significantly improved the ability of mice to recognize novel objects, indicating improvements in learning and memory. Furthermore, to elucidate the mechanisms of GE-mediated cognitive enhancement, we focused on nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced signaling pathways. NGF enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis revealed that GE administration led to elevated NGF levels in both the mouse hippocampus and rat glioma C6 cells. GE administration also resulted in phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), as revealed by Western blotting analysis. Neutralization of NGF with a specific NGF antibody inhibited GE-triggered activation of ERK and CREB in the hippocampus. Also, GE treatment significantly increased pre- and postsynaptic markers, synaptophysin and PSD-95, which are related to synapse formation in the brain. These data suggest that GE has a synaptogenic effect via NGF-induced ERK/CREB activation, resulting in memory enhancement.

  19. Analysis of microRNA-203 function in CREB/MITF/RAB27a pathway: comparison between canine and human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, S; Kumazaki, M; Mori, T; Baba, K; Okuda, M; Mizuno, T; Akao, Y

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNA (miR)-203 is downregulated and acts as an anti-oncomir in melanoma cells. Here, using human and canine melanoma cells, we elucidated the effects of miR-203 on cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB)/microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF)/RAB27a pathway, which is known to be important for the development and progression of human melanoma. In this study, we showed that miR-203 directly targeted CREB1 and regulated its downstream targets, MITF and RAB27a. miR-203 significantly suppressed the growth of human and canine melanoma cells and inhibited melanosome transport through the suppression of the signalling pathway. In conclusion, miR-203 was shown to be a common tumour-suppressive miRNA in human and canine melanoma and thus to play a crucial role in the biological mechanisms of melanoma development.

  20. TLR4 induces CREB-mediated IL-6 production via upregulation of F-spondin to promote vascular smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guan-Lin; Wu, Jing-Yiing; Yeh, Chang-Ching; Kuo, Cheng-Chin

    2016-05-13

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is important in promoting inflammation and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, both of which contribute to atherosclerosis development and progression. But the mechanism underlying the regulation of TLR4 in VSMC migration remains unclear. Stimulation of VSMCs with LPS increased the cellular level of F-spondin which is associated with the regulation of proinflammatory cytokine production. The LPS-induced F-spondin expression depended on TLR4-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway. Suppression of F-spondin level by siRNA inhibited not only F-spondin expression but also LPS-induced phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and IL-6 expression, VSMC migration and proliferation as well as MMP9 expression. Moreover, suppression of CREB level by siRNA inhibited TLR4-induced IL-6 production and VSMC migration. Inhibition of F-spondin siRNA on LPS-induced migration was restored by addition of exogenous recombinant mouse IL-6. We conclude that upon ligand binding, TLR4 activates PI3K/Akt signaling to induce F-spondin expression, subsequently control CREB-mediated IL-6 production to promote VSMC migration. These findings provide vital insights into the essential role of F-spondin in VSMC function and will be valuable for developing new therapeutic strategies against atherosclerosis.

  1. Differences in hippocampal CREB phosphorylation in trace fear conditioning of two inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yoo Kyeong; Song, Jae-Chun; Han, Seol-Heui; Cho, Jeiwon; Smith, Dani R; Gallagher, Michela; Han, Jung-Soo

    2010-07-23

    The effects of genetic background on fear trace conditioning were evaluated in relation to phosphorylated levels of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in the hippocampus using two different inbred strains of mice, C57BL/6 and DBA/2. The male mice received a trace fear conditioning protocol and unpaired control groups were included to assess nonassociative effects on test performance. Both C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice with paired training displayed higher freezing responses during testing than those with unpaired training, respectively. The C57BL/6 mice with paired training also displayed higher freezing responses to the tone-CS during testing than the DBA/2 mice with paired training. Because much evidence implicates the hippocampus as an important neural substrate for trace fear conditioning, the engagement of the hippocampus was examined after testing by measuring levels of CREB and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB). The results revealed that hippocampal CREB levels in both strains of mice were not significantly altered according to the type of training (unpaired vs. paired). However, the hippocampal pCREB levels were significantly higher in the paired training group than the unpaired control group in C57BL/6 mice, but not in DBA/2 mice. These findings indicate that hippocampal pCREB is closely tied to this form of associative conditioning only in C57BL/6 mice and that different neural substrates may support trace conditioning in C57BL/6 and DBA/2 strains. PMID:20501325

  2. Identification, Synthesis and Evaluation of Substituted Benzofurazans as Inhibitors of CREB-mediated Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fuchun; Li, Bingbing X.; Broussard, Candice; Xiao, Xiangshu

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic-AMP response-element binding protein (CREB) is a stimulus-activated transcription factor. Its transcription activity requires its binding with CREB-binding protein (CBP) after CREB is phosphorylated at Ser133. The domains involved for CREB-CBP interaction are kinase-inducible domain (KID) from CREB and KID-interacting domain (KIX) from CBP. Recent studies suggest that CREB is an attractive target for novel cancer therapeutics. To identify novel chemotypes as inhibitors of KIX-KID interaction, we screened the NCI-diversity set of compounds using a split renilla luciferase assay and identified 2-[(7-nitrobenzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)thio]pyridine 1-oxide (compound 1) was identified as a potent inhibitor of KIX-KID interaction. However, compound 1 was not particularly selective against CREB-mediated gene transcription in living HEK 293T cells. Further structure-activity relationship studies identified 4-aniline substituted nitrobenzofurazans with improved selectivity. PMID:23953193

  3. Intra-amygdala injections of CREB antisense impair inhibitory avoidance memory: Role of norepinephrine and acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Infusions of CREB antisense into the amygdala prior to training impair memory for aversive tasks, suggesting that the antisense may interfere with CRE-mediated gene transcription and protein synthesis important for the formation of new memories within the amygdala. However, the amygdala also appears to modulate memory formation in distributed brain sites, through mechanisms that include the release of norepinephrine and acetylcholine within the amygdala. Thus, CREB antisense injections may affect memory by interfering with mechanisms of modulation, rather than storage, of memory. In the present experiment, rats received bilateral intra-amygdala infusions of CREB antisense (2 nmol/1 μL) 6 h prior to inhibitory avoidance training. In vivo microdialysis samples were collected from the right amygdala before, during, and following training. CREB antisense produced amnesia tested at 48 h after training. In addition, CREB antisense infusions dampened the training-related release of norepinephrine, and to a lesser extent of acetylcholine, in the amygdala. Furthermore, intra-amygdala infusions of the β-adrenergic receptor agonist clenbuterol administered immediately after training attenuated memory impairments induced by intra-amygdala injections of CREB antisense. These findings suggest that intra-amygdala treatment with CREB antisense may affect processes involved in modulation of memory in part through interference with norepinephrine and acetylcholine neurotransmission in the amygdala. PMID:18772255

  4. The VGF-derived peptide TLQP62 produces antidepressant-like effects in mice via the BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peipei; Wang, Chuang; Xu, Bing; Gao, Siyun; Guo, Jiejie; Zhao, Xin; Huang, Huihui; Zhang, Junfang; Chen, Xiaowei; Wang, Qinwen; Zhou, Wenhua

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that the neuropeptide VGF (nonacronymic)-derived peptide is regulated in the hippocampus by antidepressant therapies. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) signaling, and monoamine transmitter pathways mediate the behavioral effects of antidepressants, but it is not known if these pathways also contribute to the antidepressant-like effects of VGF-derived peptide TLQP62. Here the antidepressant-like effects of TLQP62 were evaluated by measuring immobility time in the forced swimming and tail suspension tests (FST and TST) following acute microinjection of the TLQP62 (0.25, 0.5 and 1 nmol/side) into the hippocampal CA1 regions. This treatment dose-dependently reduced immobility in the FST and TST compared to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) infusion without affecting locomotor activity in the open field test (OFT). In addition, daily intrahippocampal microinfusion of TLQP62 (1 nmol/side/day; 21 days) also upregulated the expression of BDNF and the phosphorylation of CREB (pCREB) and TrkB (pTrkB) without altering CREB or TrkB. Blocking tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) by microinfusion of tPASTOP or TrkB activation by microinfusion of K252a 60 min prior to TLQP62 infusion almost completely abolished TLQP62-induced antidepressant-like effects, BDNF upregulation, and CREB/TrkB phosphorylation. In contrast, none of these effects were diminished by pretreatment with the non-specific 5-HT receptor antagonist metergoline, the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist NAN-190, the 5-HT synthase inhibitor parachlorophenylalanine, the selective α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin, the β receptor antagonist propranolol, or the D2 receptor antagonist raclopride. Moreover, our study was also to investigate the antidepressant-like effects of TLQP62 (50, 250 and 500 nmol/kg; i.p.) on depression-related behaviors in comparison with fluoxetine (10mg/kg; i.p.). While TLQP62

  5. Repeated aripiprazole treatment regulates Bdnf, Arc and Npas4 expression under basal condition as well as after an acute swim stress in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Luoni, Alessia; Fumagalli, Fabio; Racagni, Giorgio; Riva, Marco A

    2014-02-01

    Despite the rapid control of schizophrenic symptoms is due to the ability of antipsychotic drugs (APDs) to block D2 receptors in the mesolimbic pathway, it is now well-established that the therapeutic effects rely on adaptive mechanisms set in motion by their long-term administration. Such neuroplastic mechanisms depend on the pharmacological profile of the drug employed, with marked differences existing between first and second generation APDs. On these bases, the major accomplishment of this work was to investigate neuroadaptive changes set in motion by repeated treatment with aripiprazole, a novel APD that is unique for being a partial agonist at dopamine D2 receptors. Moreover, given that stress plays a critical role in the exacerbation of disease symptoms, we also investigated whether aripiprazole could influence the dynamic response of the brain to an acute challenge. We found that repeated aripiprazole treatment in rats regulates the expression of different markers of neuroplasticity such as Bdnf, Arc and Npas4 in a brain-region specific fashion; more importantly, the expression of these molecules was significantly up-regulated by an acute swim stress only in aripiprazole-treated animals, which is suggestive of increased ability to cope with the adverse event. We indeed found an overall facilitation of Bdnf expression, an effect that is mainly evident in the prefrontal cortex on the pool of transcripts undergoing dendritic localization. Overall, our results provide novel information regarding the mechanisms through which aripiprazole may regulate brain function and could contribute to improve neuroplastic defects that are associated with schizophrenia symptomatology.

  6. Resveratrol abrogates lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive-like behavior, neuroinflammatory response, and CREB/BDNF signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Ge, Li; Liu, Liwei; Liu, Hansen; Liu, Song; Xue, Hao; Wang, Xueer; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Dexiang

    2015-12-01

    Current evidence supports that depression is accompanied by the activation of the inflammatory-response system, and overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines may play a role in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders. Resveratrol has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-depressant-like properties. Using an animal model of depression induced by a single administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the present study investigated the effects of resveratrol on LPS-induced depressive-like behavior and inflammatory-response in adult mice. Our results showed that pretreatment with resveratrol (80mg/kg, i.p.) for 7 consecutive days reversed LPS-increased the immobility time in the forced swimming test and tail suspension test, and LPS-reduced sucrose preference test. Moreover, the antidepressant action of resveratrol was paralleled by significantly reducing the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and up-regulating phosphorylated cAMP response-element-binding protein (pCREB)/brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus. In addition, resveratrol ameliorated LPS-induced NF-κB activation in the PFC and hippocampus. The results demonstrate that resveratrol may be an effective therapeutic agent for LPS-induced depressive-like behavior, partially due to its anti-inflammatory aptitude and by modulating pCREB and BDNF expression in the brain region of mice.

  7. Polar basal melting on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, Stephen M.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal requirements and implications of polar basal melting on Mars are discussed in detail. The composition, geology, origin, and evolution of the Martian polar terrains are summarized. Thermal calculations and flow calculations of the basal melt are discussed. The significance of the basal melting for the origin of major polar reentrants, the storage of an ancient Martian ice sheet, the mass balance of the polar terrain, and basal melting at temperate latitudes is examined.

  8. Expression of cell wall related genes in basal and ear internodes of silking brown-midrib-3, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) down-regulated, and normal maize plants

    PubMed Central

    Guillaumie, Sabine; Goffner, Deborah; Barbier, Odile; Martinant, Jean-Pierre; Pichon, Magalie; Barrière, Yves

    2008-01-01

    Background Silage maize is a major forage and energy resource for cattle feeding, and several studies have shown that lignin content and structure are the determining factors in forage maize feeding value. In maize, four natural brown-midrib mutants have modified lignin content, lignin structure and cell wall digestibility. The greatest lignin reduction and the highest cell wall digestibility were observed in the brown-midrib-3 (bm3) mutant, which is disrupted in the caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene. Results Expression of cell wall related genes was investigated in basal and ear internodes of normal, COMT antisens (AS225), and bm3 maize plants of the INRA F2 line. A cell wall macro-array was developed with 651 gene specific tags of genes specifically involved in cell wall biogenesis. When comparing basal (older lignifying) and ear (younger lignifying) internodes of the normal line, all genes known to be involved in constitutive monolignol biosynthesis had a higher expression in younger ear internodes. The expression of the COMT gene was heavily reduced, especially in the younger lignifying tissues of the ear internode. Despite the fact that AS225 transgene expression was driven only in sclerenchyma tissues, COMT expression was also heavily reduced in AS225 ear and basal internodes. COMT disruption or down-regulation led to differential expressions of a few lignin pathway genes, which were all over-expressed, except for a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene. More unexpectedly, several transcription factor genes, cell signaling genes, transport and detoxification genes, genes involved in cell wall carbohydrate metabolism and genes encoding cell wall proteins, were differentially expressed, and mostly over-expressed, in COMT-deficient plants. Conclusion Differential gene expressions in COMT-deficient plants highlighted a probable disturbance in cell wall assembly. In addition, the gene expressions suggested modified chronology of the different events leading

  9. Nicotinamide ameliorates palmitate-induced ER stress in hepatocytes via cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway-dependent Sirt1 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaxin; Dou, Xiaobing; Li, Songtao; Zhang, Ximei; Zeng, Yong; Song, Zhenyuan

    2015-11-01

    Nicotinamide (NAM) is the amide of nicotinic acid and a predominant precursor for NAD(+) biosynthesis via the salvage pathway. Sirt1 is a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, playing an important role in regulating cellular functions. Although hepatoprotective effect of NAM has been reported, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. ER stress, induced by saturated fatty acids, in specific palmitate, plays a pathological role in the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. This study aims to determine the effect of NAM on palmitate-induced ER stress in hepatocytes and to elucidate molecular mechanisms behind. Both HepG2 cells and primary mouse hepatocytes were exposed to palmitate (conjugated to BSA at a 2:1 M ratio), NAM, or their combination for different durations. Cellular NAD(+) level, Sirt1 expression/activity, ER stress, as well as cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway activation were determined. NAM increased Sirt1 expression and enzymatic activity, which contributes to the ameliorative effect of NAM on palmitate-triggered ER stress. NAM increased intracellular NAD(+) level in hepatocytes, however, blocking the salvage pathway, a pathway for NAD(+) synthesis from NAM, only partially prevented NAM-induced Sirt1 upregulation while completely prevented NAD+ increase in response to NAM. Further mechanistic investigations revealed that NAM elevated intracellular cAMP level via suppressing PDE activity, leading to downstream PKA and CREB activation. Importantly, cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway blockade abolished not only NAM-induced Sirt1 upregulation, but also its protective effect against ER stress. Our results demonstrate that NAM protects hepatocytes against palmitate-induced ER stress in hepatocytes via upregulating Sirt1. Activation of the cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway plays a key role in NAM-induced Sirt1 upregulation. PMID:26352206

  10. Sweet Dream Liquid Chinese Medicine Ameliorates Learning and Memory Deficit in a Rat Model of Paradoxical Sleep Deprivation through the ERK/CREB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Xinyun; Wang, Chunhua; Wang, Xiuhua; Han, Fang; Lv, Changjun; Zhang, Xiuli

    2016-05-01

    Sweet dream oral liquid (SDOL), a traditional Chinese herbal compound contains 17 traditional Chinese medicines. It has various pharmacological effects, such as improving brain dysfunction and increasing sleeping quality. This study investigated the neuroprotective effect and the underlying mechanisms of SDOL-impaired hippocampus learning and memory-induced paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) in rats. Sixty Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups. Before PSD, SDOL treatment group rats were intragastrically administered SDOL for 25 days at dose of 2.1, 4.2, and 8.4 mL/kg body weight per day. Normal control group, large platform control group, and PSD groups were treated with normal saline instead of SDOL. After 25 days treatment, PSD and SDOL groups were deprived of paradoxical sleep for 72 h. Then two behavioral studies were conducted to test the spatial learning and memory ability using the open field test and Morris water maze test. Expression of the c-fos, c-jun, cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK)/ERK kinase (MEK), and p-CREB, p-ERK, and p-MEK in the hippocampus were also assayed by western blot. In this study, PSD decreased the levels of p-CREB, p-ERK, p-MEK, c-fos, and c-jun. However, SDOL treatment increased expressions of these proteins. Our results showed that SDOL improved 72-h PSD-induced cognitive impairment. These affects may be mediated by increasing the contents of c-fos, c-jun, and p-CREB/ERK signaling. PMID:26870900

  11. Basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common form of skin cancer, predominantly affecting the head and neck, and can be diagnosed clinically in most cases. Metastasis of BCC is rare, but localised tissue invasion and destruction can lead to morbidity. Incidence of BCC increases markedly after the age of 40 years, but incidence in younger people is rising, possibly as a result of increased sun exposure. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions on treatment response/recurrence (within 1 year of therapy) in people with basal cell carcinoma? What are the effects of interventions on long-term recurrence (a minimum of 2 years after treatment) in people with basal cell carcinoma? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to December 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 16 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: cryotherapy/cryosurgery, curettage and cautery/electrodesiccation, fluorouracil, imiquimod 5% cream, photodynamic therapy, and surgery (conventional or Mohs' micrographic surgery). PMID:21718567

  12. Perianal Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bulur, Isil; Boyuk, Emine; Saracoglu, Zeynep Nurhan; Arik, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common non-melanoma skin cancer. Exposure to ultraviolet light is an important risk factor for BCC development and the disorder therefore develops commonly on body areas that are more exposed to sunlight, such as the face and neck. It is uncommon in the closed area of the body and quite rare in the perianal and genital regions. Herein, we report a 34-year-old patient with perianal BCC who had no additional risk factors. PMID:25848349

  13. Cortical Basal Ganglionic Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Chin, Steven S.; Marder, Karen

    2011-01-01

    In this case study, we describe the symptoms, neuropsychological testing, and brain pathology of a retired mason's assistant with cortical basal ganglionic degeneration (CBGD). CBGD is an extremely rare neurodegenerative disease that is categorized under both Parkinsonian syndromes and frontal lobe dementias. It affects men and women nearly equally, and the age of onset is usually in the sixth decade of life. CBGD is characterized by Parkinson's-like motor symptoms and by deficits of movement and cognition, indicating focal brain pathology. Neuronal cell loss is ultimately responsible for the neurological symptoms. PMID:14602941

  14. Transcriptional regulation of the human cystathionine beta-synthase -1b basal promoter: synergistic transactivation by transcription factors NF-Y and Sp1/Sp3.

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Y; Konrad, M A; Matherly, L H; Taub, J W

    2001-01-01

    Cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) catalyses the condensation of serine and homocysteine to form cystathionine, an intermediate step in the synthesis of cysteine. Human CBS encodes five distinct 5' non-coding exons, the most frequent termed CBS -1a and CBS -1b, each transcribed from its own unique GC-rich TATA-less promoter. The minimal transcriptional region (-3792 to -3667) of the CBS -1b promoter was defined by 5'- and 3'-deletions, and transient transfections of reporter gene constructs in HepG2 cells, characterized by CBS transcription exclusively from the -1b promoter. Included in this 125 bp region are 3 GC-boxes (termed GC-a, GC-b and GC-c), an inverted CAAT-box and an E-box. By gel-shift and supershift assays, binding of specificity protein (Sp)1 and Sp3 to the GC-box elements, upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF-1) to the E-box, and both nuclear factor (NF)-Y and an NF-1-like factor to the CAAT box could be demonstrated. By transient trans fections and reporter gene assays in HepG2 and Drosophila SL2 cells, a functional interplay was indicated between NF-Y binding to the CAAT-box, or between USF-1 binding to the E-box, and Sp1/Sp3 binding to the GC-box elements. In SL2 cells, NF-Y and Sp1/Sp3 were synergistic. Furthermore, both Sp1 and the long Sp3 isoform transactivated the CBS -1b minimal promoter; however, the short Sp3 isoforms were potent repressors. These results may explain the cell- or tissue-specific regulation of CBS transcription, and clarify the bases for alterations in CBS gene expression in human disease and Down's syndrome. PMID:11415440

  15. Effects of A-CREB, a dominant negative inhibitor of CREB, on the expression of c-fos and other immediate early genes in the rat SON during hyperosmotic stimulation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lubelski, Daniel; Ponzio, Todd A.; Gainer, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Intraperitoneal administration of hypertonic saline to the rat supraoptic nucleus (SON) increases the expression of several immediate early genes (IEG) and the vasopressin gene. These increases have usually been attributed to action of the cyclic-AMP Response Element Binding Protein (CREB). In this paper, we study the role of CREB in these events in vivo by delivering a potent dominant-negative form of CREB, known as A-CREB, to the rat SON through the use of an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector. Preliminary experiments on HEK 293 cells in vitro showed that the A-CREB vector that we used completely eliminated CREB-induced c-fos expression. We stereotaxically injected this AAV-A-CREB into one SON and a control AAV into the contralateral SON of the same rat. Two weeks following these injections we injected hypertonic saline intraperitoneally into the rat. Using this paradigm, we could measure the relative effects of inhibiting CREB on the induced expression of c-fos, ngfi-a, ngfi-b, and vasopressin genes in the A-CREB AAV injected SON versus the control AAV injected SON in the same rat. We found only a small (20%) decrease of c-fos expression and a 30% decrease of ngfi-b expression in the presence of the A-CREB. There were no significant changes in expression found in the other IEGs nor in vasopressin that were produced by the A-CREB. This suggests that CREB may play only a minor role in the expression of IEGs and vasopressin in the osmotically activated SON in vivo. PMID:22079318

  16. Genetics Home Reference: familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification

    MedlinePlus

    ... in regulating phosphate levels within the body (phosphate homeostasis) by transporting phosphate across cell membranes. The SLC20A2 ... link familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification with phosphate homeostasis. Nat Genet. 2012 Feb 12;44(3):254- ...

  17. JAB1/CSN5 inhibits the activity of Luman/CREB3 by promoting its degradation

    PubMed Central

    DenBoer, Lisa M.; Iyer, Aarti; McCluggage, Adam R.R.; Li, Yu; Martyn, Amanda C.; Lu, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Luman/CREB3 (also called LZIP) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound transcription factor that has been implicated in the ER stress response. In this study, we used the region of Luman containing the basic DNA-binding domain as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen and identified the Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) or the COP9 signalosome complex unit 5 (CSN5) as an interacting protein. We confirmed their direct binding by glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays, and verified the existence of such interaction in the cellular environment by mammalian two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Deletion mapping studies revealed that the MPN domain in JAB1 was essential and sufficient for the binding. JAB1 also colocalized with Luman in transfected cells. More interestingly, the nuclear form of Luman was shown to promote the translocation of JAB1 into the nucleus. We found that overexpression of JAB1 shortened the half-life of Luman by 67%, and repressed its transactivation function on GAL4 and unfolded protein response element (UPRE)-containing promoters. We therefore propose that JAB1 is a novel binding partner of Luman, which negatively regulates the activity of Luman by promoting its degradation. PMID:23583719

  18. Histone Acetylation and CREB Binding Protein Are Required for Neuronal Resistance against Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Ferah; Ji, Shengbo; Kronenberg, Golo; Barco, Angel; Olivares, Roman; Benito, Eva; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Gertz, Karen; Endres, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic transcriptional regulation by histone acetylation depends on the balance between histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and deacetylase activities (HDAC). Inhibition of HDAC activity provides neuroprotection, indicating that the outcome of cerebral ischemia depends crucially on the acetylation status of histones. In the present study, we characterized the changes in histone acetylation levels in ischemia models of focal cerebral ischemia and identified cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB)–binding protein (CBP) as a crucial factor in the susceptibility of neurons to ischemic stress. Both neuron-specific RNA interference and neurons derived from CBP heterozygous knockout mice showed increased damage after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ischemic preconditioning by a short (5 min) subthreshold occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), followed 24 h afterwards by a 30 min occlusion of the MCA, increased histone acetylation levels in vivo. Ischemic preconditioning enhanced CBP recruitment and histone acetylation at the promoter of the neuroprotective gene gelsolin leading to increased gelsolin expression in neurons. Inhibition of CBP's HAT activity attenuated neuronal ischemic preconditioning. Taken together, our findings suggest that the levels of CBP and histone acetylation determine stroke outcome and are crucially associated with the induction of an ischemia-resistant state in neurons. PMID:24748101

  19. Enhanced activity of the CREB co-activator Crtc1 in LKB1 null lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Komiya, T; Coxon, A; Park, Y; Chen, W-D; Zajac-Kaye, M; Meltzer, P; Karpova, T; Kaye, F J

    2010-03-18

    Activation of Crtc1 (also known as Mect1/Torc1) by a t(11;19) chromosomal rearrangement underlies the etiology of malignant salivary gland tumors. As LKB1 is a target for mutational inactivation in lung cancer and was recently shown to regulate hepatic Crtc2/CREB transcriptional activity in mice, we now present evidence suggesting disruption of an LKB1/Crtc pathway in cancer. Although Crtc1 is preferentially expressed in adult brain tissues, we observed elevated levels of steady-state Crtc1 in thoracic tumors. In addition, we show that somatic loss of LKB1 is associated with underphosphorylation of endogenous Crtc1, enhanced Crtc1 nuclear localization and enhanced expression of the Crtc prototypic target gene, NR4A2/Nurr1. Inhibition of NR4A2 was associated with growth suppression of LKB1 null tumors, but showed little effect on LKB1-wildtype cells. These data strengthen the role of dysregulated Crtc as a bona fide cancer gene, present a new element to the complex LKB1 tumorigenic axis, and suggest that Crtc genes may be aberrantly activated in a wider range of common adult malignancies.

  20. Paramecium tetraurelia basal body structure.

    PubMed

    Tassin, Anne-Marie; Lemullois, Michel; Aubusson-Fleury, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium is a free-living unicellular organism, easy to cultivate, featuring ca. 4000 motile cilia emanating from longitudinal rows of basal bodies anchored in the plasma membrane. The basal body circumferential polarity is marked by the asymmetrical organization of its associated appendages. The complex basal body plus its associated rootlets forms the kinetid. Kinetids are precisely oriented within a row in correlation with the cell polarity. Basal bodies also display a proximo-distal polarity with microtubule triplets at their proximal ends, surrounding a permanent cartwheel, and microtubule doublets at the transition zone located between the basal body and the cilium. Basal bodies remain anchored at the cell surface during the whole cell cycle. On the opposite to metazoan, there is no centriolar stage and new basal bodies develop anteriorly and at right angle from the base of the docked ones. Ciliogenesis follows a specific temporal pattern during the cell cycle and both unciliated and ciliated docked basal bodies can be observed in the same cell. The transition zone is particularly well organized with three distinct plates and a maturation of its structure is observed during the growth of the cilium. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses have been performed in different organisms including Paramecium to understand the ciliogenesis process. The data have incremented a multi-organism database, dedicated to proteins involved in the biogenesis, composition and function of centrosomes, basal bodies or cilia. Thanks to its thousands of basal bodies and the well-known choreography of their duplication during the cell cycle, Paramecium has allowed pioneer studies focusing on the structural and functional processes underlying basal body duplication. Proteins involved in basal body anchoring are sequentially recruited to assemble the transition zone thus indicating that the anchoring process parallels the structural differentiation of the transition zone. This feature

  1. Interactions between the Class II Transactivator and CREB Binding Protein Increase Transcription of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Genes

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Joseph D.; Kanazawa, Satoshi; Jean, Dickson; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1999-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (class II) genes are regulated in a B-cell-specific and gamma interferon-inducible fashion. The master switch for the expression of these genes is the class II transactivator (CIITA). In this report, we demonstrate that one of the functions of CIITA is to recruit the CREB binding protein (CBP) to class II promoters. Not only functional but also specific binding interactions between CIITA and CBP were demonstrated. Moreover, a dominant negative form of CBP decreased the activity of class II promoters and levels of class II determinants on the surface of cells. Finally, the inhibition of class II gene expression by the glucocorticoid hormone could be attributed to the squelching of CBP by the glucocorticoid receptor. We conclude that CBP, a histone acetyltransferase, plays an important role in the transcription of class II genes. PMID:9858618

  2. Basal bodies exhibit polarized positioning in zebrafish cone photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Michelle; Perkins, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    The asymmetric positioning of basal bodies, and therefore cilia, is often critical for proper cilia function. This planar polarity is critical for motile cilia function but has not been extensively investigated for non-motile cilia or for sensory cilia such as vertebrate photoreceptors. Zebrafish photoreceptors form an organized mosaic ideal for investigating cilia positioning. We report that in the adult retina, the basal bodies of red, green-, and blue-sensitive cone photoreceptors localized asymmetrically on the cell edge nearest to the optic nerve. In contrast, no patterning was seen in the basal bodies of ultraviolet-sensitive cones or in rod photoreceptors. The asymmetric localization of basal bodies was consistent in all regions of the adult retina. Basal body patterning was unaffected in the cones of the XOPS-mCFP transgenic line, which lacks rod photoreceptors. Finally, the adult pattern was not seen in 7 day post fertilization (dpf) larvae as basal bodies were randomly distributed in all the photoreceptor subtypes. These results establish the asymmetrical localization of basal bodies in red-, green-, and blue-sensitive cones in adult zebrafish retinas but not in larvae. This pattern suggests an active cellular mechanism regulated the positioning of basal bodies after the transition to the adult mosaic and that rods do not seem to be necessary for the patterning of cone basal bodies. PMID:23171982

  3. Multiple protein kinase A-regulated events are required for transcriptional induction by cAMP.

    PubMed Central

    Brindle, P; Nakajima, T; Montminy, M

    1995-01-01

    The second messenger cAMP stimulates the expression of numerous genes via the protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) at Ser-133. Ser-133 phosphorylation, in turn, appears to induce target gene expression by promoting interaction between CREB and CBP, a 265-kDa nuclear phospho-CREB-binding protein. It is unclear, however, whether Ser-133 phosphorylation per se is sufficient for CREB-CBP complex formation and for target gene induction in vivo. Here we examine CREB activity in Jurkat T cells after stimulation of the T-cell receptor (TCR), an event that leads to calcium entry and diacylglycerol production. Triggering of the TCR stimulated Ser-133 phosphorylation of CREB with high stoichiometry, but TCR activation did not promote CREB-CBP complex formation or target gene induction unless suboptimal doses of cAMP agonist were provided as a costimulus. Our results demonstrate that, in addition to mediating Ser-133 phosphorylation of CREB, protein kinase A regulates additional proteins that are required for recruitment of the transcriptional apparatus to cAMP-responsive genes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7479832

  4. A Composite Element that Binds Basic Helix Loop Helix and Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors Is Important for Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Regulation of the Follicle-Stimulating Hormone β Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Nick A.; Lacza, Charlemagne T.; Hou, Melody Y.; Gregory, Susan J.; Kam, Kyung-Yoon; Xu, Shuyun; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2008-01-01

    Although FSH plays an essential role in controlling gametogenesis, the biology of FSHβ transcription remains poorly understood, but is known to involve the complex interplay of multiple endocrine factors including GnRH. We have identified a GnRH-responsive element within the rat FSHβ promoter containing an E-box and partial cAMP response element site that are bound by the basic helix loop helix transcription factor family members, upstream stimulating factor (USF)-1/USF-2, and the basic leucine zipper member, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), respectively. Expression studies with CREB, USF-1/USF-2, and activating protein-1 demonstrated that the USF transcription factors increased basal transcription, an effect not observed if the cognate binding site was mutated. Conversely, expression of a dominant negative CREB mutant or CREB knockdown attenuated induction by GnRH, whereas dominant negative Fos or USF had no effect on the GnRH response. GnRH stimulation specifically induced an increase in phosphorylated CREB occupation of the FSHβ promoter, leading to the recruitment of CREB-binding protein to enhance gene transcription. In conclusion, a composite element bound by both USF and CREB serves to integrate signals for basal and GnRH-stimulated transcription of the rat FSHβ gene. PMID:18550775

  5. CREB1 gene polymorphisms combined with environmental risk factors increase susceptibility to major depressive disorder (MDD)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Yanjie; Yang, Xiuxian; Qiu, Xiaohui; Qiao, Zhengxue; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Sui, Hong; Ma, Jingsong

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most severe psychiatric disorders. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of CREB1 gene polymorphisms on risk of developing MDD and the joint effects of gene-environment interactions. Genotyping was performed by Taqman allelic discrimination assay among 586 patients and 586 healthy controls. A significant impact on rs6740584 genotype distribution was found for childhood trauma (P = 0.015). We did not find an association of CREB1 polymorphisms with MDD susceptibility. However, we found a significantly increased risk associated with the interactions of CREB1 polymorphisms and drinking (OR = 11.67, 95% CI = 2.52-54.18; OR = 11.52, 95% CI = 2.55-51.95 for rs11904814; OR = 4.18, 95% CI = 1.87-9.38; OR = 5.02, 95% CI = 2.27-11.14 for rs6740584; OR = 7.58, 95% CI = 2.05-27.98; OR = 7.59, 95% CI = 2.12-27.14 for rs2553206; OR = 8.37, 95% CI = 3.02-23.23; OR = 7.84, 95% CI = 2.93-20.98 for rs2551941). We also noted that CREB polymorphisms combined with family harmony and childhood trauma conferred increased susceptibility for MDD. In conclusion, polymorphisms in the CREB gene may not be independently associated with MDD risk, but they are likely to confer increased susceptibility by interacting with environmental risk factors in the Chinese population. PMID:25755794

  6. Oxytocin is involved in the proconvulsant effects of Sildenafil: Possible role of CREB.

    PubMed

    Khoshneviszadeh, Mahsima; Rahimian, Reza; Fakhfouri, Gohar; Payandemehr, Borna; Khodagholi, Fariba; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-08-10

    Sildenafil is a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor mainly used for male erectile dysfunction. One of rare yet serious adverse effects of Sildenafil is its potential to decrease seizure threshold. Ample evidence suggests that Sildenafil exerts central effects through induction of Oxytocin (OT) secretion and CREB phosphorylation. The aim of the present study is to evaluate potential roles of OT and CREB in the proconvulsant effects of Sildenafil. The Pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure was used as a standard convulsion model in this study. OT release and pCREB expression were evaluated in the hippocampus of mice using ELISA and western blot assays, respectively. Our results showed that Sildenafil at the dose of 10mgkg(-1) or higher, significantly decreased seizure threshold. Pretreatment with a non-effective dose of OT, potentiated while OT receptor antagonist, Atosiban, reversed fully the proconvulsant effects of Sildenafil (5mgkg(-1)). At biochemical inspection, Sildenafil markedly increased CREB which was attenuated by coadministration of Atosiban. The present study shows for the first time that OT release and the subsequent CREB phosphorylation are involved in the proconvulsant effects of acute Sildenafil treatment in an experimental model of seizure. PMID:27220266

  7. Bidirectional regulation of the cAMP response element binding protein encodes spatial map alignment in prism-adapting barn owls.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Grant S; DeBello, William M

    2008-10-01

    The barn owl midbrain contains mutually aligned maps of auditory and visual space. Throughout life, map alignment is maintained through the actions of an instructive signal that encodes the magnitude of auditory-visual mismatch. The intracellular signaling pathways activated by this signal are unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) provides a cell-specific readout of instructive information. Owls were fitted with prismatic or control spectacles and provided rich auditory-visual experience: hunting live mice. CREB activation was analyzed within 30 min of hunting using phosphorylation state-specific CREB (pCREB) and CREB antibodies, confocal imaging, and immunofluorescence measurements at individual cell nuclei. In control owls or prism-adapted owls, which experience small instructive signals, the frequency distributions of pCREB/CREB values obtained for cell nuclei within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX) were unimodal. In contrast, in owls adapting to prisms or readapting to normal conditions, the distributions were bimodal: certain cells had received a signal that positively regulated CREB and, by extension, transcription of CREB-dependent genes, whereas others received a signal that negatively regulated it. These changes were restricted to the subregion of the inferior colliculus that received optically displaced input, the rostral ICX, and were not evident in the caudal ICX or central nucleus. Finally, the topographic pattern of CREB regulation was patchy, not continuous, as expected from the actions of a topographically precise signal encoding discrete events. These results support a model in which the magnitude of CREB activation within individual cells provides a readout of the instructive signal that guides plasticity and learning. PMID:18829948

  8. Report Card on Basal Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Kenneth S.; And Others

    This report examines the nature of the modern basal reader, its economics, and use. First, the report provides a history showing how the confluence of business principles, positivistic science, and behavioral psychology led to the transformation of reading textbooks into basal readers. Next, the report examines objectives and subjective factors…

  9. Neuropsychiatry of the basal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Ring, H; Serra-Mestres, J

    2002-01-01

    This review aims to relate recent findings describing the role and neural connectivity of the basal ganglia to the clinical neuropsychiatry of basal ganglia movement disorders and to the role of basal ganglia disturbances in "psychiatric"' states. Articles relating to the relevant topics were initially collected through MEDLINE and papers relating to the clinical conditions discussed were also reviewed. The anatomy and connections of the basal ganglia indicate that these structures are important links between parts of the brain that have classically been considered to be related to emotional functioning and brain regions previously considered to have largely motor functions. The basal ganglia have a role in the development and integration of psychomotor behaviours, involving motor functions, memory and attentional mechanisms, and reward processes. PMID:11784818

  10. Basal Autophagy Is Required for Herpes simplex Virus-2 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yakoub, Abraam M.; Shukla, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process of the cell, which plays an important role in regulating plethora of infections. The role of autophagy in Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection is unknown. Here, we found that HSV-2 does not allow induction of an autophagic response to infection, but maintains basal autophagy levels mostly unchanged during productive infection. Thus, we investigated the importance of basal autophagy for HSV-2 infection, using pharmacological autophagy suppression or cells genetically deficient in an autophagy-essential gene (ATG5). Interference with basal autophagy flux in cells significantly reduced viral replication and diminished the infection. These results indicate that basal autophagy plays an indispensable role required for a productive infection. Importantly, this study draws a sharp distinction between induced and basal autophagy, where the former acts as a viral clearance mechanism abrogating infection, while the latter supports infection. PMID:26248741

  11. Selective inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl-hydroxylase 1 mediates neuroprotection against normoxic oxidative death via HIF- and CREB-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Siddiq, Ambreena; Aminova, Leila R; Troy, Carol M; Suh, Kyungsun; Messer, Zachary; Semenza, Gregg L; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2009-07-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to tissue injury in conditions ranging from cardiovascular disease to stroke, spinal cord injury, neurodegeneration, and perhaps even aging. Yet the efficacy of antioxidants in human disease has been mixed at best. We need a better understanding of the mechanisms by which established antioxidants combat oxidative stress. Iron chelators are well established inhibitors of oxidative death in both neural and non-neural tissues, but their precise mechanism of action remains elusive. The prevailing but not completely substantiated view is that iron chelators prevent oxidative injury by suppressing Fenton chemistry and the formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. Here, we show that iron chelation protects, rather unexpectedly, by inhibiting the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl 4-hydroxylase isoform 1 (PHD1), an iron and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase. PHD1 and its isoforms 2 and 3 are best known for stabilizing transcriptional regulators involved in hypoxic adaptation, such as HIF-1alpha and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Yet we find that global hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-PHD inhibition protects neurons even when HIF-1alpha and CREB are directly suppressed. Moreover, two global HIF-PHD inhibitors continued to be neuroprotective even in the presence of diminished HIF-2alpha levels, which itself increases neuronal susceptibility to oxidative stress. Finally, RNA interference to PHD1 but not isoforms PHD2 or PHD3 prevents oxidative death, independent of HIF activation. Together, these studies suggest that iron chelators can prevent normoxic oxidative neuronal death through selective inhibition of PHD1 but independent of HIF-1alpha and CREB; and that HIF-2alpha, not HIF-1alpha, regulates susceptibility to normoxic oxidative neuronal death. PMID:19587290

  12. Spatio-Temporal in vivo Recording of dCREB2 Dynamics in Drosophila Long-Term Memory Processing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiabin; Tanenhaus, Anne K.; Davis, John C.; Hanlon, Bret M.; Yin, Jerry C. P.

    2014-01-01

    CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) is an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor, playing key roles in synaptic plasticity, intrinsic excitability and long-term memory (LTM) formation. The Drosophila homologue of mammalian CREB, dCREB2, is also important for LTM. However, the spatio-temporal nature of dCREB2 activity during memory consolidation is poorly understood. Using an in vivo reporter system, we examined dCREB2 activity continuously in specific brain regions during LTM processing. Two brain regions that have been shown to be important for Drosophila LTM are the ellipsoid body (EB) and the mushroom body (MB). We found that dCREB2 reporter activity is persistently elevated in EB R2/R4m neurons, but not neighboring R3/R4d neurons, following LTM-inducing training. In multiple subsets of MB neurons, dCREB2 reporter activity is suppressed immediately following LTM-specific training, and elevated during late windows. In addition, we observed heterogeneous responses across different subsets of neurons in MB αβ lobe during LTM processing. All of these changes suggest that dCREB2 functions in both the EB and MB for LTM formation, and that this activity contributes to the process of systems consolidation. PMID:25460038

  13. NMDA receptor-dependent CREB activation in survival of cerebellar granule cells during in vivo and in vitro development.

    PubMed

    Monti, Barbara; Marri, Lucia; Contestabile, Antonio

    2002-10-01

    During both in vivo and in vitro development, cerebellar granule cells depend on the activity of the NMDA glutamate receptor subtype for survival and full differentiation. With the present results, we demonstrate that CREB activation, downstream of the NMDA receptor, is a necessary step to ensure survival of these neurons. The levels of CREB expression and activity increase progressively during the second week of postnatal cerebellar development and the phosphorylated form of CREB is localized selectively to cerebellar granule cells during the critical developmental stages examined. Chronically blocking the NMDA receptor through systemic administration of the competitive antagonist, CGP 39551, during the in vivo critical developmental period, between 7-11 postnatal days, results in increased apoptotic elimination of differentiating granule neurons in the cerebellum [Monti & Contestabile, Eur. J. Neurosci., 12, 3117-3123 (2000)]. We report here that this event is accompanied by a significant decrease of CREB phosphorylation in the cerebellum of treated rat pups. When cerebellar granule neurons are explanted and maintained in dissociated cultures, the levels of CREB phosphorylation increase with differentiation, similar to that which happens during in vivo development. When granule cells are kept in non-trophic conditions, their viability is affected and both CREB phosphorylation and transcriptional activity are decreased significantly. The neuronal viability and the deficiency of CREB activity, are both rescued by the pharmacological activation of the NMDA receptor. These results provide good circumstantial evidence for a functional link between the NMDA receptor and CREB activity in promoting neuronal survival during development.

  14. Upregulation of adenylate cyclase 3 (ADCY3) increases the tumorigenic potential of cells by activating the CREB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Jin; Hwang, Jung-Ah; Lee, Jieun; Choi, Il-Ju; Seo, Hyehyun; Park, Jong-Hoon; Suzuki, Hiromu; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Kim, In-Hoo; Jeong, Jin Sook; Ju, Mi Ha; Lee, Dong-Hee; Lee, Yeon-Su

    2013-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase 3 (ADCY3) is a widely expressed membrane-associated protein in human tissues, which catalyzes the formation of cyclic adenosine-3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP). However, our transcriptome analysis of gastric cancer tissue samples (NCBI GEO GSE30727) revealed that ADCY3 expression was specifically altered in cancer samples. Here we investigated the tumor-promoting effects of ADCY3 overexpression and confirmed a significant correlation between the upregulation of ADCY3 and Lauren's intestinal-type gastric cancers. ADCY3 overexpression increased cell migration, invasion, proliferation, and clonogenicity in HEK293 cells; conversely, silencing ADCY3 expression in SNU-216 cells reduced these phenotypes. Interestingly, ADCY3 overexpression increased both the mRNA level and activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9 by increasing the levels of cAMP and phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). Consistent with these findings, treatment with a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor decreased MMP2 and MMP9 expression levels in ADCY3-overexpressing cells. Knockdown of ADCY3 expression by stable shRNA in human gastric cancer cells suppressed tumor growth in a tumor xenograft model. Thus, ADCY3 overexpression may exert its tumor-promoting effects via the cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway. Additionally, bisulfite sequencing of the ADCY3 promoter region revealed that gene expression was reduced by hypermethylation of CpG sites, and increased by 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC)-induced demethylation. Our study is the first to report an association of ADCY3 with gastric cancer as well as its tumorigenic potentials. In addition, we demonstrate that the expression of ADCY3 is regulated through an epigenetic mechanism. Further study on the mechanism of ADCY3 in tumorigenesis will provide the basis as a new molecular target of gastric cancer. PMID:24113161

  15. Differences in long-term memory stability and AmCREB level between forward and backward conditioned honeybees (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Felsenberg, Johannes; Dyck, Yan; Feige, Janina; Ludwig, Jenny; Plath, Jenny Aino; Froese, Anja; Karrenbrock, Melanie; Nölle, Anna; Heufelder, Karin; Eisenhardt, Dorothea

    2015-01-01

    In classical conditioning a predictive relationship between a neutral stimulus (conditioned stimulus; CS) and a meaningful stimulus (unconditioned stimulus; US) is learned when the CS precedes the US. In backward conditioning the sequence of the stimuli is reversed. In this situation animals might learn that the CS signals the end or the absence of the US. In honeybees 30 min and 24 h following backward conditioning a memory for the excitatory and inhibitory properties of the CS could be retrieved, but it remains unclear whether a late long-term memory is formed that can be retrieved 72 h following backward conditioning. Here we examine this question by studying late long-term memory formation in forward and backward conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER). We report a difference in the stability of memory formed upon forward and backward conditioning with the same number of conditioning trials. We demonstrate a transcription-dependent memory 72 h after forward conditioning but do not observe a 72 h memory after backward conditioning. Moreover we find that protein degradation is differentially involved in memory formation following these two conditioning protocols. We report differences in the level of a transcription factor, the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) known to induce transcription underlying long-term memory formation, following forward and backward conditioning. Our results suggest that these alterations in CREB levels might be regulated by the proteasome. We propose that the differences observed are due to the sequence of stimulus presentation between forward and backward conditioning and not to differences in the strength of the association of both stimuli. PMID:25964749

  16. Spatial Memory in the Morris Water Maze and Activation of Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding (CREB) Protein within the Mouse Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porte, Yves; Buhot, Marie Christine; Mons, Nicole E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the spatio-temporal dynamics of learning-induced cAMP response element-binding protein activation/phosphorylation (pCREB) in mice trained in a spatial reference memory task in the water maze. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined pCREB immunoreactivity (pCREB-ir) in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 and related brain structures. During the…

  17. Brain expression of pCREB in rats exposed to consummatory successive negative contrast.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Amanda C; Dennis, Torry S; Perrotti, Linda I; Torres, Carmen; Papini, Mauricio R

    2015-02-01

    A 32-to-4% sucrose devaluation leads to suppression of consummatory behavior relative to unshifted 4% sucrose controls. This is accompanied by an emotional response inducing memory consolidation. Expression levels of phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (pCREB, a marker of synaptic plasticity) were higher after the first devaluation session than after the second in prelimbic cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and dorso-medial striatum. The central nucleus of the amygdala showed a tendency to differential pCREB expression. This evidence contributes to identifying the brain circuit for one form of traumatic memory involving reward loss. PMID:25529194

  18. Expression patterns of CREB binding protein (CREBBP) and its methylated species during zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Batut, Julie; Duboé, Carine; Vandel, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Proper embryonic development requires a fine-tuned control of gene expression, which is achieved in part through the activity of transcription coactivators or corepressors. The nuclear coactivator cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) binding protein (CREBBP or CBP) interacts with numerous transcription factors and thereby plays a key role in various signaling pathways. Interestingly, in cell-based studies CREBBP activity is modulated by post-translational modifications such as methylation on arginine residues which is catalyzed by coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1). However, whether and where CREBBP, and in particular its methylated forms, are expressed during development in vertebrates has not been addressed so far. Here, we analyzed the expression of the two crebbp genes (crebbpa & crebbpb) during zebrafish development using both RT-qPCR and in situ hybridization. We found that while crebbpa expression is higher in posterior, caudal nascent somites during somitogenesis, crebbpb accumulates in anterior, rostral, and more mature somites. In addition, crebbpa mRNA is enriched in the central myotome at 24 hpf indicating that its expression is spatially and temporally controlled. We next characterized the expression of CREBBP protein from blastula to gastrula stages by immunohistochemistry. We found that while CREBBP is clearly cytoplasmic in the early blastula, it becomes both cytoplasmic and nuclear at 30% epiboly before turning mainly nuclear during gastrulation. Of interest, CREBBP methylated species appear to be mainly nuclear from 30% epiboly to 6-somite stage. This suggests that methylation may regulate CREBBP import to the nucleus during zebrafish development and could therefore participate in the control of early developmental processes.

  19. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... radiation. Exposure to radiation can lead to skin cancers. ... DG, Farndon PA. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. 2002 Jun 20 ... al. eds. Cancer of the Skin. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  20. The intraoral basal cell adenoma.

    PubMed

    Pogrel, M A

    1987-12-01

    The histological and clinical behaviour of nine intraoral salivary basal cell adenomas is described. Despite problems in classification, this study confirms the impression that these are all benign salivary gland tumours which respond well to localized excision only.

  1. [Anti-basal ganglia antibody].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaharu

    2013-04-01

    Sydenham's chorea (SC) is a major manifestation of rheumatic fever, and the production of anti-basal ganglia antibodies (ABGA) has been proposed in SC. The pathogenesis is hypothesized as autoimmune targeting of the basal ganglia via molecular mimicry, triggered by streptococcal infection. The spectrum of diseases in which ABGA may be involved has been broadened to include other extrapyramidal movement disorders, such as tics, dystonia, and Parkinsonism, as well as other psychiatric disorders. The autoimmune hypothesis in the presence and absence of ABGA has been suggested in Tourette's syndrome (TS), early onset obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD), and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Recently, the relationship between ABGA and dopamine neurons in the basal ganglia has been examined, and autoantibodies against dopamine receptors were detected in the sera from patients with basal ganglia encephalitis. In Japan, the occurrence of subacute encephalitis, where patients suffer from episodes of altered behavior and involuntary movements, has increased. Immune-modulating treatments are effective, indicating the involvement of an autoimmune mechanism. We aimed to detect the anti-neuronal autoantibodies in such encephalitis, using immunohistochemical assessment of patient sera. The sera from patients showing involuntary movements had immunoreactivity for basal ganglia neurons. Further epitopes for ABGA will be investigated in basal ganglia disorders other than SC, TS, OCD, and PANDAS. PMID:23568985

  2. Astaxanthin Inhibits Acetaldehyde-Induced Cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells by Modulating Akt/CREB and p38MAPK/ERK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tingting; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xia; Lin, Xiaotong

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction. Acetaldehyde, the most toxic metabolite of ethanol, mediates the brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction induced by chronic excessive alcohol consumption. In this study, the effect of astaxanthin, a marine bioactive compound, on acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity was investigated in SH-SY5Y cells. It was found that astaxanthin protected cells from apoptosis by ameliorating the effect of acetaldehyde on the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins, preventing the reduction of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and the increase of pro-apoptotic protein Bak induced by acetaldehyde. Further analyses showed that astaxanthin treatment inhibited acetaldehyde-induced reduction of the levels of activated Akt and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). Astaxanthin treatment also prevented acetaldehyde-induced increase of the level of activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and decrease of the level of activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs). Activation of Akt/CREB pathway promotes cell survival and is involved in the upregulation of Bcl-2 gene. P38MAPK plays a critical role in apoptotic events while ERKs mediates the inhibition of apoptosis. Thus, astaxanthin may inhibit acetaldehyde-induced apoptosis through promoting the activation of Akt/CREB and ERKs and blocking the activation of p38MAPK. In addition, astaxanthin treatment suppressed the oxidative stress induced by acetaldehyde and restored the antioxidative capacity of SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, astaxanthin may protect cells against acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity through maintaining redox balance and modulating apoptotic and survival signals. The results suggest that astaxanthin treatment may be beneficial for preventing neurotoxicity associated with acetaldehyde and excessive alcohol consumption. PMID:26978376

  3. Modulation of opiate-related signaling molecules in morphine-dependent conditioned behavior: conditioned place preference to morphine induces CREB phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Morón, José A; Gullapalli, Srinivas; Taylor, Chirisse; Gupta, Achla; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2010-03-01

    Opiate addiction is a chronic, relapsing behavioral disorder where learned associations that develop between the abused opiate and the environment in which it is consumed are brought about through Pavlovian (classical) conditioning processes. However, the signaling mechanisms/pathways regulating the mechanisms that underlie the responses to opiate-associated cues or the development of sensitization as a consequence of repeated context-independent administration of opiates are unknown. In this study we examined the phosphorylation levels of various classic signaling molecules in brain regions implicated in addictive behaviors after acute and repeated morphine administration. An unbiased place conditioning protocol was used to examine changes in phosphorylation that are associated with (1) the expression of the rewarding effects of morphine and (2) the sensitization that develops to this effect. We also examined the effects of a delta-receptor antagonist on morphine-induced conditioned behavior and on the phosphorylation of classic signaling molecules in view of data showing that blockade of delta-opioid receptor (deltaOR) prevents the development of sensitization to the rewarding effects of morphine. We find that CREB phosphorylation is specifically induced upon the expression of a sensitized response to morphine-induced conditioned behavior in brain areas related to memory consolidation, such as the hippocampus and cortex. A similar effect is also observed, albeit to a lesser extent, in the case of the GluR1 subunit of AMPA glutamate receptor. These increases in the phosphorylation levels of CREB and pGluR1 are significantly blocked by pretreatment with a deltaOR antagonist. These results indicate a critical role for phospho-CREB, AMPA, and deltaOR activities in mediating the expression of a sensitized response to morphine-dependent conditioned behavior. PMID:19956087

  4. Rapid Forgetting of Social Transmission of Food Preferences in Aged Rats: Relationship to Hippocampal CREB Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Countryman, Renee A.; Gold, Paul E.

    2007-01-01

    A major characteristic of age-related changes in memory in rodents is an increase in the rate of forgetting of new information, even when tests given soon after training reveal intact memory. Interference with CREB functions similarly results in rapid decay of memory. Using quantitative immunocytochemistry, the present experiment examined the…

  5. Intra-Amygdala Injections of CREB Antisense Impair Inhibitory Avoidance Memory: Role of Norepinephrine and Acetylcholine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Infusions of CREB antisense into the amygdala prior to training impair memory for aversive tasks, suggesting that the antisense may interfere with CRE-mediated gene transcription and protein synthesis important for the formation of new memories within the amygdala. However, the amygdala also appears to modulate memory formation in distributed…

  6. Cardiovascular effects of basal insulins.

    PubMed

    Mannucci, Edoardo; Giannini, Stefano; Dicembrini, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Basal insulin is an important component of treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. One of the principal aims of treatment in patients with diabetes is the prevention of diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease. There is some evidence, although controversial, that attainment of good glycemic control reduces long-term cardiovascular risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the potential cardiovascular safety of the different available preparations of basal insulin. Current basal insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], or isophane) and basal insulin analogs (glargine, detemir, and the more recent degludec) differ essentially by various measures of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in the bloodstream, presence and persistence of peak action, and within-subject variability in the glucose-lowering response. The currently available data show that basal insulin analogs have a lower risk of hypoglycemia than NPH human insulin, in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, then excluding additional harmful effects on the cardiovascular system mediated by activation of the adrenergic system. Given that no biological rationale for a possible difference in cardiovascular effect of basal insulins has been proposed so far, available meta-analyses of publicly disclosed randomized controlled trials do not show any signal of increased risk of major cardiovascular events between the different basal insulin analogs. However, the number of available cardiovascular events in these trials is very small, preventing any clear-cut conclusion. The results of an ongoing clinical trial comparing glargine and degludec with regard to cardiovascular safety will provide definitive evidence. PMID:26203281

  7. Cardiovascular effects of basal insulins

    PubMed Central

    Mannucci, Edoardo; Giannini, Stefano; Dicembrini, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Basal insulin is an important component of treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. One of the principal aims of treatment in patients with diabetes is the prevention of diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease. There is some evidence, although controversial, that attainment of good glycemic control reduces long-term cardiovascular risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the potential cardiovascular safety of the different available preparations of basal insulin. Current basal insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], or isophane) and basal insulin analogs (glargine, detemir, and the more recent degludec) differ essentially by various measures of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in the bloodstream, presence and persistence of peak action, and within-subject variability in the glucose-lowering response. The currently available data show that basal insulin analogs have a lower risk of hypoglycemia than NPH human insulin, in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, then excluding additional harmful effects on the cardiovascular system mediated by activation of the adrenergic system. Given that no biological rationale for a possible difference in cardiovascular effect of basal insulins has been proposed so far, available meta-analyses of publicly disclosed randomized controlled trials do not show any signal of increased risk of major cardiovascular events between the different basal insulin analogs. However, the number of available cardiovascular events in these trials is very small, preventing any clear-cut conclusion. The results of an ongoing clinical trial comparing glargine and degludec with regard to cardiovascular safety will provide definitive evidence. PMID:26203281

  8. RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates.

    PubMed

    Osugi, Tomohiro; Son, You Lee; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Satake, Honoo; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Since a peptide with a C-terminal Arg-Phe-NH2 (RFamide peptide) was first identified in the ganglia of the venus clam in 1977, RFamide peptides have been found in the nervous system of both invertebrates and vertebrates. In vertebrates, the RFamide peptide family includes gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), neuropeptide FF (NPFF), prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide/26RFamide peptide (QRFP/26RFa), and kisspeptins (kiss1 and kiss2). They are involved in important functions such as the release of hormones, regulation of sexual or social behavior, pain transmission, reproduction, and feeding. In contrast to tetrapods and jawed fish, the information available on RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates is limited, thus preventing further insights into the evolution of RFamide peptides in vertebrates. In this review, we focus on the previous research and recent advances in the studies on RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates. In agnathans, the genes encoding GnIH, NPFF, and PrRP precursors and the mature peptides have been identified in lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and hagfish (Paramyxine atami). Putative kiss1 and kiss2 genes have also been found in the genome database of lamprey. In basal chordates, namely, in amphioxus (Branchiostoma japonicum), a common ancestral form of GnIH and NPFF genes and their mature peptides, as well as the ortholog of the QRFP gene have been identified. The studies revealed that the number of orthologs of vertebrate RFamide peptides present in agnathans and basal chordates is greater than expected, suggesting that the vertebrate RFamide peptides might have emerged and expanded at an early stage of chordate evolution.

  9. Involvement of PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a and PKA/CREB Signaling Pathways in the Protective Effect of Fluoxetine Against Corticosterone-Induced Cytotoxicity in PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bingqing; Li, Yiwen; Niu, Bo; Wang, Xinyi; Cheng, Yufang; Zhou, Zhongzhen; You, Tingting; Liu, Yonggang; Wang, Haitao; Xu, Jiangping

    2016-08-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine is neuroprotective in several brain injury models. It is commonly used to treat major depressive disorder and related conditions, but its mechanism of action remains incompletely understood. Activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B/forkhead box O3a (PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a) and protein kinase A/cAMP-response element binding protein (PKA/CREB) signaling pathways has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of depression and might be the downstream target of fluoxetine. Here, we used PC12 cells exposed to corticosterone (CORT) to study the neuroprotective effects of fluoxetine and the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a and PKA/CREB signaling pathways. Our results show that CORT reduced PC12 cells viability by 70 %, and that fluoxetine showed a concentration-dependent neuroprotective effect. Neuroprotective effects of fluoxetine were abolished by inhibition of PI3K, Akt, and PKA using LY294002, KRX-0401, and H89, respectively. Treatment of PC12 cells with fluoxetine resulted in increased phosphorylation of Akt, FoxO3a, and CREB. Fluoxetine also dose-dependently rescued the phosphorylation levels of Akt, FoxO3a, and CREB, following administration of CORT (from 99 to 110, 56 to 170, 80 to 170 %, respectively). In addition, inhibition of PKA and PI3K/Akt resulted in decreased levels of p-CREB, p-Akt, and p-FoxO3a in the presence of fluoxetine. Furthermore, fluoxetine reversed CORT-induced upregulation of p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (Puma) and Bcl-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) via the PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a signaling pathway. H89 treatment reversed the effect of fluoxetine on the mRNA level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which was decreased in the presence of CORT. Our data indicate that fluoxetine elicited neuroprotection toward CORT-induced cell death that involves dual regulation from PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a and PKA/CREB pathways. PMID:27412469

  10. Model Predicts That MKP1 and TAB1 Regulate p38α Nuclear Pulse and Its Basal Activity through Positive and Negative Feedback Loops in Response to IL-1

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raghvendra

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-1 mediates inflammation and stress response through nuclear activity of p38α. Although IL-1 receptor is not degraded, p38α activation is transient. IL-1 also causes cell migration and EMT by modulating cell-cell junctions. Although molecules involved in p38 activation are known, mechanism of the transient nuclear response and its basal activity remains unknown. By mathematical modeling of IL1/p38 signaling network, we show that IL-1 induces robust p38α activation both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm/membrane. While nuclear response consists of an acute phase, membrane response resembles a step change. Following stimulation, p38α activity returns to a basal level in absence of receptor degradation. While nuclear pulse is controlled by MKP1 through a negative feedback to pp38, its basal activity is controlled by both TAB1 and MKP1 through a positive feedback loop. Our model provides insight into the mechanism of p38α activation, reason for its transient nuclear response, and explanation of the basal activity of MKK3/6 and p38α, which has been experimentally observed by other groups. PMID:27314954

  11. Pedunculopontine nucleus and basal ganglia: distant relatives or part of the same family?

    PubMed

    Mena-Segovia, Juan; Bolam, J Paul; Magill, Peter J

    2004-10-01

    The basal ganglia are more highly interconnected with the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPN) than with any other brain region. Regulation and relay of basal ganglia activity are two key functions of the PPN. The PPN provides an interface for the basal ganglia to influence sleep and waking, and the two structures are similarly implicated in learning, reward and other cognitive functions. Perturbations of basal ganglia activity have consequences for the PPN and vice versa, exemplified by their interdependencies in motor function and Parkinson's disease. Thus, close anatomical and physiological links between the PPN and basal ganglia make it increasingly difficult to consider the two as separate functional entities. PMID:15374668

  12. High fat diet promotes prostatic basal-to-luminal differentiation and accelerates initiation of prostate epithelial hyperplasia originated from basal cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh-Joon; Zhang, Boyu; Zhang, Li; Xin, Li

    2016-05-01

    Recent lineage tracing studies showed that the prostate basal and luminal cells in adult mice are two independent lineages under the physiological condition, but basal cells are capable of generating luminal progenies during bacterial infection-induced prostatitis. Because acute bacterial infection in human prostate tissues is relatively rare, the disease relevance of the bacterial infection-induced basal-to-luminal differentiation is uncertain. Herein we employ a high fat diet-induced sterile prostate inflammation model to determine whether basal-to-luminal differentiation can be induced by inflammation irrespective of the underlying etiologies. A K14-CreER model and a fluorescent report line are utilized to specifically label basal cells with the green fluorescent protein. We show that high fat diet promotes immune cell infiltration into the prostate tissues and basal-to-luminal differentiation. Increased cell proliferation accompanies basal-to-luminal differentiation, suggesting a concurrent regulation of basal cell proliferation and differentiation. This study demonstrates that basal-to-luminal differentiation can be induced by different types of prostate inflammation evolved with distinct etiologies. Finally, high fat diet also accelerates initiation and progression of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia that are originated from basal cells with loss-of-function of the tumor suppressor Pten. Because prostate cancer originated from basal cells tends to be invasive, our study also provides an alternative explanation for the association between obesity and aggressive prostate cancer.

  13. Cognitive-motor interactions of the basal ganglia in development

    PubMed Central

    Leisman, Gerry; Braun-Benjamin, Orit; Melillo, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Neural circuits linking activity in anatomically segregated populations of neurons in subcortical structures and the neocortex throughout the human brain regulate complex behaviors such as walking, talking, language comprehension, and other cognitive functions associated with frontal lobes. The basal ganglia, which regulate motor control, are also crucial elements in the circuits that confer human reasoning and adaptive function. The basal ganglia are key elements in the control of reward-based learning, sequencing, discrete elements that constitute a complete motor act, and cognitive function. Imaging studies of intact human subjects and electrophysiologic and tracer studies of the brains and behavior of other species confirm these findings. We know that the relation between the basal ganglia and the cerebral cortical region allows for connections organized into discrete circuits. Rather than serving as a means for widespread cortical areas to gain access to the motor system, these loops reciprocally interconnect a large and diverse set of cerebral cortical areas with the basal ganglia. Neuronal activity within the basal ganglia associated with motor areas of the cerebral cortex is highly correlated with parameters of movement. Neuronal activity within the basal ganglia and cerebellar loops associated with the prefrontal cortex is related to the aspects of cognitive function. Thus, individual loops appear to be involved in distinct behavioral functions. Damage to the basal ganglia of circuits with motor areas of the cortex leads to motor symptoms, whereas damage to the subcortical components of circuits with non-motor areas of the cortex causes higher-order deficits. In this report, we review some of the anatomic, physiologic, and behavioral findings that have contributed to a reappraisal of function concerning the basal ganglia and cerebellar loops with the cerebral cortex and apply it in clinical applications to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD

  14. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karthiga, Kannan S; Sivapatha Sundharam, B; Manikandan, R

    2006-01-01

    Binkley and Johnson first reported this syndrome in 1951. But it was in 1960, Gorlin-Goltz established the association of basal cell epithelioma, jaw cyst and bifid ribs, a combination which is now frequently known as Gorlin-Goltz syndrome as well as Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS). NBCCS is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance and variable expressivity. NBCCS is characterized by variety of cutaneous, dental, osseous, opthalmic, neurologic and sexual abnormalities. One such case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is reported here with good illustrations.

  15. Mild hypothermia protects against early brain injury in rats following subarachnoid hemorrhage via the TrkB/ERK/CREB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lv, Ou; Zhou, Fenggang; Zheng, Yongri; Li, Qingsong; Wang, Jianjiao; Zhu, Yulan

    2016-10-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a severe neurological disease, which is associated with a significant number of cases of premature mortality and disability worldwide. Mild hypothermia (MH) has been proposed as a potential therapeutic strategy to reduce neuronal injury following SAH. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of MH's protective role in the process of SAH. The present study demonstrated that MH was able to protect against early brain injury in a rat model of SAH. Treating SAH rats with MH reduced the release of reactive oxygen species and prevented activation of apoptotic cascades. Furthermore, the protective effects of MH were shown to be mediated by enhanced activity of the tropomyosin receptor kinase B/extracellular signal‑regulated kinases/cAMP response element binding protein (TrkB/ERK/CREB) pathway. Inhibition of TrkB/ERK/CREB activity using a small molecule inhibitor largely abolished the beneficial effects of MH in SAH rats. These results outline an endogenous mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effects of MH in SAH. PMID:27600366

  16. Tissue Kallikrein Alleviates Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Activating the B2R-ERK1/2-CREB-Bcl-2 Signaling Pathway in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kunxiong; Hu, Bin; Sang, Hongfei; Xie, Yi; Xu, Lili; Cao, Qinqin; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Lingling; Liu, Xinfeng; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Renliang

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) substantially increases the risk of ischemic stroke and reduces the tolerance to ischemic insults. Tissue kallikrein (TK) has been demonstrated to protect neurons from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in orthoglycemic model by activating the bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R). Considering the differential effects of B2R or bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R) on cardioprotection and neuroprotection in I/R with or without diabetes, this study was designed to investigate the role of TK during cerebral I/R injury in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Intravenous injection of TK inhibited apoptosis in neurons, alleviated edema and inflammatory reactions after focal cerebral I/R, significantly reduced the infarct volume, and improved functional recovery. These beneficial effects were accompanied by activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), cAMP response element-binding (CREB), and Bcl-2 signal proteins. Inhibition of the B2R or ERK1/2 pathway abated the effects of TK, whereas an antagonist of B1R enhanced the effects. These findings reveal that the neuroprotective effect of TK against cerebral I/R injury in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats mainly involves the enhancement of B2R and ERK1/2-CREB-Bcl-2 signaling pathway activity. PMID:27446506

  17. Dioscin Derived from Solanum melongena L. "Usukawamarunasu" Attenuates α-MSH-Induced Melanogenesis in B16 Murine Melanoma Cells via Downregulation of Phospho-CREB and MITF.

    PubMed

    Nishina, Atsuyoshi; Ebina, Kodai; Ukiya, Motohiko; Fukatsu, Makoto; Koketsu, Mamoru; Ninomiya, Masayuki; Sato, Daisuke; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to chemically isolate and explore an antimelanogenesis inducer in extracts of Solanum melongena L. "Usukawamarunasu" eggplant. We successfully identified dioscin ([25R]-Spirost-5-en-3β-yl) 2-O-(6-deoxy-α-L-mannopyranosyl) - 4-O-(6-deoxy-α-L-mannopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside] in the plant, and examined the effects of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced melanogenesis in B16 murine melanoma cells by this plant-derived dioscin. Immunoblot analysis suggested that dioscin reduced the expression of tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), and TRP-2, resulting in inhibition of intracellular production of melanin. In addition, dioscin caused reduction of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding protein 1 transcription factors (CREB), which led to a reduction of microphthalmia-related transcription factor (MITF) in α-MSH-stimulated cells, but did not affect phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Furthermore, dioscin significantly downregulated the expression of tyrosinase, TRP-1, and TRP-2, which led to the reduction of α-MSH-induced melanogenesis in B16 cells. These results suggest that dioscin may decrease the level of MITF via inhibition of phosphorylation of CREB in α-MSH-induced melanogenesis in B16 cells. PMID:26352003

  18. The activation of melanogenesis by p-CREB and MITF signaling with extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on B16F10 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Mi; Cho, Sang-Eun; Seo, Young-Kwon

    2016-10-01

    Melanin in the skin determines the skin color, and decreased melanin causes many hypopigmentation disorders and increased damage to skin by ultraviolet B (UVB) light irradiation. Here, we stimulate melanogenesis in B16F10 melanoma cells by using specific frequencies of ELF-EMFs. In this study, we focus on the melanogenesis of EMF-ELFs and find that 60-75Hz ELF-EMFs upregulate melanin synthesis by stimulated expression of tyrosinase and TRP-1 through inhibition of phosphorylation ERK, activation of CREB, and MITF up-regulation in B16F10 melanoma cells. The results show that 60-75Hz ELF-EMFs significantly increase secreted melanin, cellular melanin content, and tyrosinase activity, and the cell mitochondria activity, cell viability, and cell membrane condition are unchanged. Furthermore, the protein expression level of MITF and p-CREB signaling pathway are significantly increased. Moreover, 60Hz ELF-EMFs reduce the phosphorylate of ERK in B16F10 melanoma cells. These findings indicate that stimulation of melanogenesis by using ELF-EMFs has therapeutic potential for treating hypopigmentation disorders such as vitiligo. PMID:27543340

  19. Tissue Kallikrein Alleviates Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Activating the B2R-ERK1/2-CREB-Bcl-2 Signaling Pathway in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kunxiong; Hu, Bin; Sang, Hongfei; Xie, Yi; Xu, Lili; Cao, Qinqin; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Lingling; Liu, Xinfeng; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Renliang

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) substantially increases the risk of ischemic stroke and reduces the tolerance to ischemic insults. Tissue kallikrein (TK) has been demonstrated to protect neurons from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in orthoglycemic model by activating the bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R). Considering the differential effects of B2R or bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R) on cardioprotection and neuroprotection in I/R with or without diabetes, this study was designed to investigate the role of TK during cerebral I/R injury in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Intravenous injection of TK inhibited apoptosis in neurons, alleviated edema and inflammatory reactions after focal cerebral I/R, significantly reduced the infarct volume, and improved functional recovery. These beneficial effects were accompanied by activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), cAMP response element-binding (CREB), and Bcl-2 signal proteins. Inhibition of the B2R or ERK1/2 pathway abated the effects of TK, whereas an antagonist of B1R enhanced the effects. These findings reveal that the neuroprotective effect of TK against cerebral I/R injury in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats mainly involves the enhancement of B2R and ERK1/2-CREB-Bcl-2 signaling pathway activity.

  20. Dioscin Derived from Solanum melongena L. "Usukawamarunasu" Attenuates α-MSH-Induced Melanogenesis in B16 Murine Melanoma Cells via Downregulation of Phospho-CREB and MITF.

    PubMed

    Nishina, Atsuyoshi; Ebina, Kodai; Ukiya, Motohiko; Fukatsu, Makoto; Koketsu, Mamoru; Ninomiya, Masayuki; Sato, Daisuke; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to chemically isolate and explore an antimelanogenesis inducer in extracts of Solanum melongena L. "Usukawamarunasu" eggplant. We successfully identified dioscin ([25R]-Spirost-5-en-3β-yl) 2-O-(6-deoxy-α-L-mannopyranosyl) - 4-O-(6-deoxy-α-L-mannopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside] in the plant, and examined the effects of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced melanogenesis in B16 murine melanoma cells by this plant-derived dioscin. Immunoblot analysis suggested that dioscin reduced the expression of tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), and TRP-2, resulting in inhibition of intracellular production of melanin. In addition, dioscin caused reduction of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding protein 1 transcription factors (CREB), which led to a reduction of microphthalmia-related transcription factor (MITF) in α-MSH-stimulated cells, but did not affect phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Furthermore, dioscin significantly downregulated the expression of tyrosinase, TRP-1, and TRP-2, which led to the reduction of α-MSH-induced melanogenesis in B16 cells. These results suggest that dioscin may decrease the level of MITF via inhibition of phosphorylation of CREB in α-MSH-induced melanogenesis in B16 cells.

  1. The transcription factor Mesp1 interacts with cAMP-responsive element binding protein 1 (Creb1) and coactivates Ets variant 2 (Etv2) gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaozhong; Zirbes, Katie M; Rasmussen, Tara L; Ferdous, Anwarul; Garry, Mary G; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Garry, Daniel J

    2015-04-10

    Mesoderm posterior 1 (Mesp1) is well recognized for its role in cardiac development, although it is expressed broadly in mesodermal lineages. We have previously demonstrated important roles for Mesp1 and Ets variant 2 (Etv2) during lineage specification, but their relationship has not been defined. This study reveals that Mesp1 binds to the proximal promoter and transactivates Etv2 gene expression via the CRE motif. We also demonstrate the protein-protein interaction between Mesp1 and cAMP-responsive element binding protein 1 (Creb1) in vitro and in vivo. Utilizing transgenesis, lineage tracing, flow cytometry, and immunostaining technologies, we define the lineage relationship between Mesp1- and Etv2-expressing cell populations. We observe that the majority of Etv2-EYFP(+) cells are derived from Mesp1-Cre(+) cells in both the embryo and yolk sac. Furthermore, we observe that the conditional deletion of Etv2, using a Mesp1-Cre transgenic strategy, results in vascular and hematopoietic defects similar to those observed in the global deletion of Etv2 and that it has embryonic lethality by embryonic day 9.5. In summary, our study supports the hypothesis that Mesp1 is a direct upstream transactivator of Etv2 during embryogenesis and that Creb1 is an important cofactor of Mesp1 in the transcriptional regulation of Etv2 gene expression. PMID:25694434

  2. Evolution of basal deuterostome nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Holland, Linda Z

    2015-02-15

    Understanding the evolution of deuterostome nervous systems has been complicated by the by the ambiguous phylogenetic position of the Xenocoelomorpha (Xenoturbellids, acoel flat worms, nemertodermatids), which has been placed either as basal bilaterians, basal deuterostomes or as a sister group to the hemichordate/echinoderm clade (Ambulacraria), which is a sister group of the Chordata. None of these groups has a single longitudinal nerve cord and a brain. A further complication is that echinoderm nerve cords are not likely to be evolutionarily related to the chordate central nervous system. For hemichordates, opinion is divided as to whether either one or none of the two nerve cords is homologous to the chordate nerve cord. In chordates, opposition by two secreted signaling proteins, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Nodal, regulates partitioning of the ectoderm into central and peripheral nervous systems. Similarly, in echinoderm larvae, opposition between BMP and Nodal positions the ciliary band and regulates its extent. The apparent loss of this opposition in hemichordates is, therefore, compatible with the scenario, suggested by Dawydoff over 65 years ago, that a true centralized nervous system was lost in hemichordates.

  3. DNA Hypermethylation of CREB3L1 and Bcl-2 Associated with the Mitochondrial-Mediated Apoptosis via PI3K/Akt Pathway in Human BEAS-2B Cells Exposure to Silica Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yang; Li, Qiuling; Jiang, Lizhen; Guo, Caixia; Li, Yanbo; Yu, Yang; Li, Yang; Duan, Junchao; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    The toxic effects of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) are raising concerns due to its widely applications in biomedicine. However, current information about the epigenetic toxicity of SiNPs is insufficient. In this study, the epigenetic regulation of low-dose exposure to SiNPs was evaluated in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells over 30 passages. Cell viability was decreased in a dose- and passage-dependent manner. The apoptotic rate, the expression of caspase-9 and caspase-3, were significantly increased induced by SiNPs. HumanMethylation450 BeadChip analysis identified that the PI3K/Akt as the primary apoptosis-related pathway among the 25 significant altered processes. The differentially methylated sites of PI3K/Akt pathway involved 32 differential genes promoters, in which the CREB3L1 and Bcl-2 were significant hypermethylated. The methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza, further verified that the DNA hypermethylation status of CREB3L1 and Bcl-2 were associated with downregulation of their mRNA levels. In addition, mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis was triggered by SiNPs via the downregulation of PI3K/Akt/CREB/Bcl-2 signaling pathway. Our findings suggest that long-term low-dose exposure to SiNPs could lead to epigenetic alterations. PMID:27362941

  4. MnTE-2-PyP reduces prostate cancer growth and metastasis by suppressing p300 activity and p300/HIF-1/CREB binding to the promoter region of the PAI-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qiang; Weaver, Michael R; Kosmacek, Elizabeth A; O'Connor, Brian P; Harmacek, Laura; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E

    2016-05-01

    To improve radiation therapy-induced quality of life impairments for prostate cancer patients, the development of radio-protectors is needed. Our previous work has demonstrated that MnTE-2-PyP significantly protects urogenital tissues from radiation-induced damage. So, in order for MnTE-2-PyP to be used clinically as a radio-protector, it is fully necessary to explore the effect of MnTE-2-PyP on human prostate cancer progression. MnTE-2-PyP inhibited prostate cancer growth in the presence and absence of radiation and also inhibited prostate cancer migration and invasion. MnTE-2-PyP altered p300 DNA binding, which resulted in the inhibition of HIF-1β and CREB signaling pathways. Accordingly, we also found that MnTE-2-PyP reduced the expression of three genes regulated by HIF-1β and/or CREB: TGF-β2, FGF-1 and PAI-1. Specifically, MnTE-2-PyP decreased p300 complex binding to a specific HRE motif within the PAI-1 gene promoter region, suppressed H3K9 acetylation, and consequently, repressed PAI-1 expression. Mechanistically, less p300 transcriptional complex binding is not due to the reduction of binding between p300 and HIF-1/CREB transcription factors, but through inhibiting the binding of HIF-1/CREB transcription factors to DNA. Our data provide an in depth mechanism by which MnTE-2-PyP reduces prostate cancer growth and metastasis, which validates the clinical use of MnTE-2-PyP as a radio-protector to enhance treatment outcomes in prostate cancer radiotherapy. PMID:26944191

  5. A stimulus-specific role for CREB-binding protein (CBP) in T cell receptor-activated tumor necrosis factor gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falvo, James V.; Brinkman, Brigitta M. N.; Tsytsykova, Alla V.; Tsai, Eunice Y.; Yao, Tso-Pang; Kung, Andrew L.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2000-04-01

    The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)/p300 family of coactivator proteins regulates gene transcription through the integration of multiple signal transduction pathways. Here, we show that induction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-) gene expression in T cells stimulated by engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR) or by virus infection requires CBP/p300. Strikingly, in mice lacking one copy of the CBP gene, TNF- gene induction by TCR activation is inhibited, whereas virus induction of the TNF- gene is not affected. Consistent with these findings, the transcriptional activity of CBP is strongly potentiated by TCR activation but not by virus infection of T cells. Thus, CBP gene dosage and transcriptional activity are critical in TCR-dependent TNF-α gene expression, demonstrating a stimulus-specific requirement for CBP in the regulation of a specific gene.

  6. Teachers Reflect Standards in Basals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Dozens of teachers and literacy specialists from across the country hunkered down in Baltimore at round tables, with laptops, pens, and paper, intent on rewriting the collections that wield tremendous influence over the way millions of U.S. children learn literacy skills: the big-name basal readers. Hailing from 18 school districts in 11 states,…

  7. Children's Literature in the Basals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Maureen A.

    Three basal reading series, levels kindergarten through grade three, were studied to categorize the types of literature each contained. The following series were analyzed: "The Headway Program" (Open Court Publishing Company), "Series r Macmillan Reading," and "Basics in Reading" (Scott, Foresman and Company). It was hypothesized that basal…

  8. The Mitochondrial Uncoupler DNP Triggers Brain Cell mTOR Signaling Network Reprogramming and CREB Pathway Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Yongqing; Gharavi, Robert; Park, Hee Ra; Lee, Jaewon; Siddiqui, Sana; Telljohann, Richard; Nassar, Matthew R.; Cutler, Roy G.; Becker, Kevin G.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is highly responsive to nutrient availability and ongoing activity in neuronal circuits. The molecular mechanisms by which brain cells respond to an increase in cellular energy expenditure are largely unknown. Mild mitochondrial uncoupling enhances cellular energy expenditure in mitochondria and can be induced with 2, 4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a proton ionophore previously used for weight loss. We found that DNP treatment reduces mitochondrial membrane potential, increases intracellular Ca2+ levels and reduces oxidative stress in cerebral cortical neurons. Gene expression profiling of the cerebral cortex of DNP-treated mice revealed reprogramming of signaling cascades that included suppression of the mTOR and insulin – PI3K – MAPK pathways, and up-regulation of tuberous sclerosis complex 2, a negative regulator of mTOR. Genes encoding proteins involved in autophagy processes were up-regulated in response to DNP. CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) signaling, Arc and BDNF, which play important roles in synaptic plasticity and adaptive cellular stress responses, were up-regulated in response to DNP, and DNP-treated mice exhibited improved performance in a test of learning and memory. Immunoblot analysis verified that key DNP-induced changes in gene expression resulted in corresponding changes at the protein level. Our findings suggest that mild mitochondrial uncoupling triggers an integrated signaling response in brain cells characterized by reprogramming of mTOR and insulin signaling, and up-regulation of pathways involved in adaptive stress responses, molecular waste disposal and synaptic plasticity. PMID:26010875

  9. Apathy and the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Levy, Richard; Czernecki, Virginie

    2006-12-01

    We should like to emphasize the following points: 1. Apathy is defined here as a quantified and observable behavioral syndrome consisting in a quantitative reduction of voluntary (or goal-directed) behaviors; 2. Therefore, apathy occurs when the systems that generate and control voluntary actions are altered; 3. These systems are mostly represented by the different subregions embedded in the Prefrontal cortex (PFC) and in the basal ganglia regions that are closely connected with the PFC; 4. In consequence, clinically, apathy is a prefrontal syndrome either due to direct lesions of the PFC or to lesions of basal ganglia areas that are closely related to the PFC; 5. Apathy is not a single entity but rather heterogeneous. Several different mechanisms may lead to apathy; Because there are several anatomical-functional prefrontal-basal ganglia circuits, the underlying mechanisms responsible for apathy may differ according to which prefrontal-basal ganglia circuit is affected; 6. In this context, apathy is the macroscopic results of the disruption of one or several elementary steps necessary for goal-directed behavior that are subserved by different prefrontal-basal ganglia circuits; 7. Intense apathy is related to caudate nucleus and GPi, disrupting associative and limbic pathways from/to the PFC; 8. in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and focal lesions (caudate nuclei, GPi), apathy may be due to a loss of PFC activation; 9. In Parkinson's disease (PD), apathy may be due to a loss of signal focalization; 10. More globally, we propose that apathy may be explained by the impact of lesions or dysfunctions of the BG, because these lesions or dysfunctions lead to a loss of amplification of the relevant signal and/or to a loss of temporal and spatial focalization, both of which result in a diminished extraction of the relevant signal within the frontal cortex, thereby inhibiting the capacity of the frontal cortex to select, initiate, maintain and shift programs of action.

  10. Calcium-sensing receptor-dependent activation of CREB phosphorylation in HEK293 cells and human parathyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Avlani, Vimesh A; Ma, Wenting; Mun, Hee-Chang; Leach, Katie; Delbridge, Leigh; Christopoulos, Arthur; Conigrave, Arthur D

    2013-05-15

    In addition to its acute effects on hormone secretion, epithelial transport, and shape change, the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) modulates the expression of genes that control cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation as well as the synthesis of peptide hormones and enzymes. In the present study, we investigated the impacts of a CaSR agonist and several CaSR modulators on phosphorylation of transcription factor CREB residue Ser(133) in CaSR-expressing HEK293 (HEK-CaSR) cells and human adenomatous parathyroid cells. Elevated Ca(2+)o concentration had no effect on CREB phosphorylation (p-CREB) in control HEK293 cells but stimulated p-CREB in both HEK-CaSR cells and human parathyroid cells. In addition, p-CREB was stimulated by the positive modulator cinacalcet and inhibited by the negative modulator NPS 2143 in both CaSR-expressing cell types. Two positive modulators that bind in the receptor's Venus Fly Trap domain, l-phenylalanine and S-methylglutathione, had no effect on p-CREB in HEK-CaSR cells, demonstrating the existence of pronounced signaling bias. Analysis of the signaling pathways using specific inhibitors demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C and conventional protein kinase C isoforms make major contributions to Ca(2+)o-induced p-CREB in both cell-types, suggesting key roles for Gq/11. In addition, in parathyroid cells but not HEK-CaSR cells, activation of p-CREB was dependent on Gi/o, demonstrating the existence of cell type-specific signaling.

  11. The cooperation of CREB and NFAT is required for PTHrP-induced RANKL expression in mouse osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Baek, Kyunghwa; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Kim, Hyung-Ryong

    2015-03-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is known to induce the expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in stromal cells/osteoblasts. However, the signaling pathways involved remain controversial. In the present study, we investigated the role of cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) and calcineurin/NFAT pathways in PTHrP-induced RANKL expression in C2C12 and primary cultured mouse calvarial cells. PTHrP-mediated induction of RANKL expression was significantly inhibited by H89 and FK506, an inhibitor of PKA and calcineurin, respectively. PTHrP upregulated CREB phosphorylation and the transcriptional activity of NFAT. Knockdown of CREB or NFATc1 blocked PTHrP-induced RANKL expression. PTHrP increased the activity of the RANKL promoter reporter that contains approximately 2 kb mouse RANKL promoter DNA sequences. Insertions of mutations in CRE-like element or in NFAT-binding element abrogated PTHrP-induced RANKL promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that PTHrP increased the binding of CREB and NFATc1/NFATc3 to their cognate binding elements in the RANKL promoter. Inhibition of cAMP/PKA and its downstream ERK activity suppressed PTHrP-induced expression and transcriptional activity of NFATc1. CREB knockdown prevented PTHrP induction of NFATc1 expression. Furthermore, NFATc1 and CREB were co-immunoprecipitated. Mutations in CRE-like element completely blocked NFATc1-induced transactivation of the RANKL promoter reporter; however, mutations in NFAT-binding element partially suppressed CREB-induced RANKL promoter activity. Overexpression of CREB increased NFATc1 binding to the RANKL promoter and vice versa. These results suggest that PTHrP-induced RANKL expression depends on the activation of both cAMP/PKA and calcineurin/NFAT pathways, and subsequently, CREB and NFAT cooperate to transactivate the mouse RANKL gene.

  12. Identification of a Potent Inhibitor of CREB-Mediated Gene Transcription with Efficacious in Vivo Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that nuclear transcription factor cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) is overexpressed in many different types of cancers. Therefore, CREB has been pursued as a novel cancer therapeutic target. Naphthol AS-E and its closely related derivatives have been shown to inhibit CREB-mediated gene transcription and cancer cell growth. Previously, we identified naphthamide 3a as a different chemotype to inhibit CREB’s transcription activity. In a continuing effort to discover more potent CREB inhibitors, a series of structural congeners of 3a was designed and synthesized. Biological evaluations of these compounds uncovered compound 3i (666-15) as a potent and selective inhibitor of CREB-mediated gene transcription (IC50 = 0.081 ± 0.04 μM). 666-15 also potently inhibited cancer cell growth without harming normal cells. In an in vivo MDA-MB-468 xenograft model, 666-15 completely suppressed the tumor growth without overt toxicity. These results further support the potential of CREB as a valuable cancer drug target. PMID:26023867

  13. Methoxychlor inhibits brain mitochondrial respiration and increases hydrogen peroxide production and CREB phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Rosemary A; Kristián, Tibor; Gupta, Rupesh K; Flaws, Jodi A; Fiskum, Gary

    2005-12-01

    The organochlorine insecticide methoxychlor (mxc) is an established reproductive toxicant that affects other systems including the central nervous system (CNS), possibly by mechanisms involving oxidative stress. This study tested the hypothesis that mxc inhibits brain mitochondrial respiration, resulting in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxygen electrode measurements of mitochondrial respiration and Amplex Red measurements of H(2)O(2) production were performed with rat brain mitochondria exposed in vitro to mxc (0-10 microg/ml) and with brain mitochondria from mice chronically exposed in vivo to mxc (0-64 mg/kg/day) for 20 days by intraperitoneal injection. In vitro mxc exposure inhibited ADP-dependent respiration (state 3) using both complex I- and II-supported substrates. Similarly, state 3 respiration was inhibited following in vivo mxc exposure using complex I substrates. H(2)O(2) production was stimulated after in vitro mxc treatment in the presence of complex I substrates, but not in mitochondria isolated from in vivo mxc-treated mice. Because previous studies demonstrated a relationship between oxidative stress and CREB phosphorylation, we also tested the hypothesis that mxc elevates phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) in mitochondria. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measurements demonstrated that pCREB immunoreactivity was elevated by in vitro mxc exposure in the presence or absence of respiratory substrates, indicating that stimulation of H(2)O(2) production is not necessary for this effect. These multiple effects of mxc on mitochondria may play an important role in its toxicity, particularly in the CNS.

  14. Exercise Prevents Memory Impairment Induced by Arsenic Exposure in Mice: Implication of Hippocampal BDNF and CREB.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-Fei; Wang, Qing-Qing; Yu, Zi-Jiang; Yu, Yan; Xiao, Chao-Lun; Kang, Chao-Sheng; Ge, Guo; Linghu, Yan; Zhu, Jun-De; Li, Yu-Mei; Li, Qiang-Ming; Luo, Shi-Peng; Yang, Dang; Li, Lin; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Tian, Guang

    2015-01-01

    High concentrations of arsenic, which can be occasionally found in drinking water, have been recognized as a global health problem. Exposure to arsenic can disrupt spatial memory; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether exercise could interfere with the effect of arsenic exposure on the long-term memory (LTM) of object recognition in mice. Arsenic (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/ kg, i.g.) was administered daily for 12 weeks. We found that arsenic at dosages of 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg decreased body weight and increased the arsenic content in the brain. The object recognition LTM (tested 24 h after training) was disrupted by 3 mg/ kg and 10 mg/ kg, but not 1 mg/ kg arsenic exposure. Swimming exercise also prevented LTM impairment induced by 3 mg/ kg, but not with 10 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cAMP-response element binding protein (pCREB) in the CA1 and dentate gyrus areas (DG) of the dorsal hippocampus were decreased by 3 mg/ kg and 10 mg/ kg, but not by 1 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure. The decrease in BDNF and pCREB in the CA1 and DG induced by 3 mg/ kg, but not 10 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure were prevented by swimming exercise. Arsenic exposure did not affect the total CREB expression in the CA1 or DG. Taken together, these results indicated that swimming exercise prevented the impairment of object recognition LTM induced by arsenic exposure, which may be mediated by BDNF and CREB in the dorsal hippocampus.

  15. Exercise Prevents Memory Impairment Induced by Arsenic Exposure in Mice: Implication of Hippocampal BDNF and CREB

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zi-Jiang; Yu, Yan; Xiao, Chao-Lun; Kang, Chao-Sheng; Ge, Guo; Linghu, Yan; Zhu, Jun-De; Li, Yu-Mei; Li, Qiang-Ming; Luo, Shi-Peng; Yang, Dang; Li, Lin; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Tian, Guang

    2015-01-01

    High concentrations of arsenic, which can be occasionally found in drinking water, have been recognized as a global health problem. Exposure to arsenic can disrupt spatial memory; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether exercise could interfere with the effect of arsenic exposure on the long-term memory (LTM) of object recognition in mice. Arsenic (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/ kg, i.g.) was administered daily for 12 weeks. We found that arsenic at dosages of 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg decreased body weight and increased the arsenic content in the brain. The object recognition LTM (tested 24 h after training) was disrupted by 3 mg/ kg and 10 mg/ kg, but not 1 mg/ kg arsenic exposure. Swimming exercise also prevented LTM impairment induced by 3 mg/ kg, but not with 10 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cAMP-response element binding protein (pCREB) in the CA1 and dentate gyrus areas (DG) of the dorsal hippocampus were decreased by 3 mg/ kg and 10 mg/ kg, but not by 1 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure. The decrease in BDNF and pCREB in the CA1 and DG induced by 3 mg/ kg, but not 10 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure were prevented by swimming exercise. Arsenic exposure did not affect the total CREB expression in the CA1 or DG. Taken together, these results indicated that swimming exercise prevented the impairment of object recognition LTM induced by arsenic exposure, which may be mediated by BDNF and CREB in the dorsal hippocampus. PMID:26368803

  16. Roles of Nucleus Accumbens CREB and Dynorphin in Dysregulation of Motivation

    PubMed Central

    Muschamp, John W.; Carlezon, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Psychostimulants such as amphetamine and cocaine are believed to produce dependence by causing rapid, supraphysiological elevations in synaptic dopamine (DA) within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) (Volkow et al. 2009, Neuropharmacology 56: 3–8). These changes in forebrain DA transmission are similar to those evoked by natural reinforcers (Louilot et al. 1991, Brain Res 553: 313–317; Roitman et al. 2004, J Neurosci 24: 1265–1271), but are of greater magnitude and longer duration. Repeated drug exposure causes compensatory neuroadaptations in neurons of the NAc, some of which may modulate excess DA in a homeostatic fashion. One such adaptation is the activation of the transcription factor CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) within neurons of the NAc. Although elevated levels of transcriptionally active CREB appear to attenuate DA transmission by increasing expression of the endogenous κ opioid receptor (KOR) ligand dynorphin, increased dynorphin transmission may ultimately have undesirable effects that contribute to drug withdrawal states as well as comorbid psychiatric illnesses such as depression. This state may prompt a return to drug use to mitigate the adverse effects of withdrawal. This article summarizes our current understanding of how CREB and dynorphin contribute to the dysregulation of motivation and describes novel therapeutic strategies that derive from preclinical research in this area. PMID:23293139

  17. Senescent-induced dysregulation of cAMP/CREB signaling and correlations with cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Rolf T.; Zhang, Han-Ting

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that alongside senescence there is a gradual decline in cognitive ability, most noticeably certain kinds of memory such as working, episodic, spatial, and long term memory. However, until recently, not much has been known regarding the specific mechanisms responsible for the decline in cognitive ability with age. Over the past decades, researchers have become more interested in cAMP signaling, and its downstream transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the context of senescence. However, there is still a lack of understanding on what ultimately causes the cognitive deficits observed with senescence. This review will focus on the changes in intracellular signaling in the brain, more specifically, alterations in cAMP/CREB signaling in aging. In addition, the downstream effects of altered cAMP signaling on cognitive ability with age will be further discussed. Overall, understanding the senescent-related changes that occur in cAMP/CREB signaling could be important for the development of novel drug targets for both healthy aging, and pathological aging such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23623816

  18. CREB binding protein (CBP) activation is required for luteinizing hormone beta expression and normal fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ryan S; Wolfe, Andrew; He, Ling; Radovick, Sally; Wondisford, Fredric E

    2012-07-01

    Normal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is dependent on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH)-stimulated synthesis and secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) from the pituitary gonadotroph. While the transcriptional coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP) is known to interact with Egr-1, the major mediator of GNRH action on the Lhb gene, the role of CBP in Lhb gene expression has yet to be characterized. We show that in the LβT2 gonadotroph cell line, overexpression of CBP augmented the response to GNRH and that knockdown of CBP eliminated GNRH responsiveness. While GNRH-mediated phosphorylation of CBP at Ser436 increased the interaction with Egr-1 on the Lhb promoter, loss of this phosphorylation site eliminated GNRH-mediated Lhb expression in LβT2 cells. In vivo, loss of CBP phosphorylation at Ser436 rendered female mice subfertile. S436A knock-in mice had disrupted estrous cyclicity and reduced responsiveness to GNRH. Our results show that GNRH-mediated phosphorylation of CBP at Ser436 is required for Egr-1 to activate Lhb expression and is a requirement for normal fertility in female mice. As CBP can be phosphorylated by other factors, such as insulin, our studies suggest that CBP may act as a key regulator of Lhb expression in the gonadotroph by integrating homeostatic information with GNRH signaling.

  19. Lack of kinase-independent activity of PI3Kγ in locus coeruleus induces ADHD symptoms through increased CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Ivana; Fardella, Valentina; Fardella, Stefania; Pallante, Fabio; Ghigo, Alessandra; Iacobucci, Roberta; Maffei, Angelo; Hirsch, Emilio; Lembo, Giuseppe; Carnevale, Daniela

    2015-04-16

    Although PI3Kγ has been extensively investigated in inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases, the exploration of its functions in the brain is just at dawning. It is known that PI3Kγ is present in neurons and that the lack of PI3Kγ in mice leads to impaired synaptic plasticity, suggestive of a role in behavioral flexibility. Several neuropsychiatric disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), involve an impairment of behavioral flexibility. Here, we found a previously unreported expression of PI3Kγ throughout the noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus (LC) in the brainstem, serving as a mechanism that regulates its activity of control on attention, locomotion and sociality. In particular, we show an unprecedented phenotype of PI3Kγ KO mice resembling ADHD symptoms. PI3Kγ KO mice exhibit deficits in the attentive and mnemonic domains, typical hyperactivity, as well as social dysfunctions. Moreover, we demonstrate that the ADHD phenotype depends on a dysregulation of CREB signaling exerted by a kinase-independent PI3Kγ-PDE4D interaction in the noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus, thus uncovering new tools for mechanistic and therapeutic research in ADHD.

  20. Basal body structure in Trichonympha.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Paul; Gönczy, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Trichonympha is a symbiotic flagellate of many species of termites and of the wood-feeding cockroach. Remarkably, this unicellular organism harbors up to over ten thousand flagella on its surface, which serve to propel it through the viscous environment of the host hindgut. In the 1960s, analysis of resin-embedded Trichonympha samples by electron microscopy revealed that the basal bodies that give rise to these flagella are exceptionally long, with a proximal, cartwheel-bearing, region some 50 times longer than that of regular centrioles. In recent years, this salient feature has prompted the analysis of the 3D architecture of Trichonympha basal bodies in the native state using cryo-electron tomography. The resulting ~40 Å resolution map of the basal body proximal region revealed a number of novel features that may be conserved in centrioles of other systems. These include proximal-distal polarity of the pinhead structure that links the cartwheel to centriolar microtubules, as well as of the linker between the A and the C microtubules. Moreover, this work demonstrated that the cartwheel is made of stacked ring-like structures that likely each comprise 18 molecules of SAS-6 proteins. PMID:26937279

  1. Antidepressant Effect of Crocus sativus Aqueous Extract and its Effect on CREB, BDNF, and VGF Transcript and Protein Levels in Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, T; Abnous, K; Vahdati, F; Mehri, S; Razavi, B M; Hosseinzadeh, H

    2015-07-01

    Crocus sativus L., commonly known as saffron, is a perennial stemless herb in Iridaceae family. It has been used in traditional medicine as well as in modern pharmacological studies for variety of conditions including depression. Recent studies have suggested brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), VGF Neuropeptide, Cyclic-AMP Response Element Binding Protein (CREB) and phospho-CREB (p-CREB) may play roles in depression. In this research the molecular mechanism of antidepressant effect of aqueous extract of saffron and its effect on the levels of BDNF, VGF, CREB and p-CREB in rat hippocampus, were investigated. The aqueous extract of saffron (40, 80 and 160 mg/kg/day) and imipramine 10 mg/kg/day were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) for 21 days to rats. The FST (forced swimming test) was performed on the days 1(st) and 21(st). The protein expression and transcript levels of BDNF, VGF CREB and phospho-CREB in rat hippocampus, were evaluated using western blot and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The results of FST showed that saffron reduced the immobility time. The protein levels of BDNF, CREB and p-CREB were significantly increased in saffron treated rats. VGF protein expression was also increased, but not significantly. The transcript levels of BDNF significantly increased. No significant changes in CREB and VGF transcript levels were observed. It was concluded that aqueous extract of saffron has antidepressant effects and the mechanism of its antidepressant effect may be due to increasing the levels of BDNF, VGF, CREB and P-CREB in rat hippocampus.

  2. YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Tang, Ming-Chi; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Chang, Wen-De; Chung, Pei-Jen; Chang, Ya-Wen; Fang, Yao-Ching

    2012-04-15

    Alveolar macrophages play significant roles in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory lung diseases. Increases in exhaled nitric oxide (NO) are well documented to reflect disease severity in the airway. In this study, we investigated the effect of 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1), a known activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, on prostaglandin (PG)E{sub 1} (a stable PGE{sub 2} analogue) and forskolin (a adenylate cyclase activator) induced NO production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383). YC-1 did not directly cause NO production or iNOS expression, but drastically potentiated PGE{sub 1}- or forskolin-induced NO production and iNOS expression in NR8383 alveolar macrophages. Combination treatment with YC-1 and PGE{sub 1} significantly increased phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), but not nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The combined effect on NO production, iNOS expression, and CREB phosphorylation was reversed by a protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor (H89), suggesting that the potentiating functions were mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Consistent with this, cAMP analogues, but not the cGMP analogue, caused NO release, iNOS expression, and CREB activation. YC-1 treatment induced an increase in PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP formation, which occurred through the inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. Furthermore, the combination of rolipram (an inhibitor of PDE4), but not milronone (an inhibitor of PDE3), and PGE{sub 1} also triggered NO production and iNOS expression. In summary, YC-1 potentiates PGE{sub 1}-induced NO production and iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages through inhibition of cAMP PDE activity and activation of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. Highlights: ► YC-1 potentiated PGE1-induced iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages. ► The combination of YC-1 and PGE1 increased CREB but not NFκB activation.

  3. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II regulates renin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Sandra; Roeser, Marc; Lachmann, Peter; Ishii, Sumiyashi; Suh, Jae Mi; Harlander, Sabine; Desch, Michael; Brunssen, Coy; Morawietz, Henning; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2012-07-13

    This study aimed to investigate the possible involvement of the orphan nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) in the regulation of renin gene expression. COUP-TFII colocalized with renin in the juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, which are the main source of renin in vivo. Protein-DNA binding studies demonstrated that COUP-TFII binds to an imperfect direct repeat COUP-TFII recognition sequence (termed hereafter proxDR) in the proximal renin promoter. Because cAMP signaling plays a central role in the control of the renin gene expression, we suggested that COUP-TFII may modulate this cAMP effect. Accordingly, knockdown of COUP-TFII in the clonal renin-producing cell lines As4.1 and Calu-6 diminished the stimulation of the renin mRNA expression by cAMP agonists. In addition, the mutation of the proxDR element in renin promoter reporter gene constructs abrogated the inducibility by cAMP. The proxDR sequence was found to be necessary for the function of a proximal renin promoter cAMP-response element (CRE). Knockdown of COUP-TFII or cAMP-binding protein (CREB), which is the archetypal transcription factor binding to CRE, decreased the basal renin gene expression. However, the deficiency of COUP-TFII did not further diminish the renin expression when CREB was knocked down. In agreement with the cell culture studies, mutant mice deficient in COUP-TFII have lower renin expression than their control strain. Altogether our data show that COUP-TFII is involved in the control of renin gene expression.

  4. Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter Transcription Factor II Regulates Renin Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Sandra; Roeser, Marc; Lachmann, Peter; Ishii, Sumiyashi; Suh, Jae Mi; Harlander, Sabine; Desch, Michael; Brunssen, Coy; Morawietz, Henning; Tsai, Sophia Y.; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Todorov, Vladimir T.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible involvement of the orphan nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) in the regulation of renin gene expression. COUP-TFII colocalized with renin in the juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, which are the main source of renin in vivo. Protein-DNA binding studies demonstrated that COUP-TFII binds to an imperfect direct repeat COUP-TFII recognition sequence (termed hereafter proxDR) in the proximal renin promoter. Because cAMP signaling plays a central role in the control of the renin gene expression, we suggested that COUP-TFII may modulate this cAMP effect. Accordingly, knockdown of COUP-TFII in the clonal renin-producing cell lines As4.1 and Calu-6 diminished the stimulation of the renin mRNA expression by cAMP agonists. In addition, the mutation of the proxDR element in renin promoter reporter gene constructs abrogated the inducibility by cAMP. The proxDR sequence was found to be necessary for the function of a proximal renin promoter cAMP-response element (CRE). Knockdown of COUP-TFII or cAMP-binding protein (CREB), which is the archetypal transcription factor binding to CRE, decreased the basal renin gene expression. However, the deficiency of COUP-TFII did not further diminish the renin expression when CREB was knocked down. In agreement with the cell culture studies, mutant mice deficient in COUP-TFII have lower renin expression than their control strain. Altogether our data show that COUP-TFII is involved in the control of renin gene expression. PMID:22645148

  5. Ferulic Acid Administered at Various Time Points Protects against Cerebral Infarction by Activating p38 MAPK/p90RSK/CREB/Bcl-2 Anti-Apoptotic Signaling in the Subacute Phase of Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chin-Yi; Tang, Nou-Ying; Kao, Shung-Te; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the effects of ferulic acid (FA) administered at various time points before or after 30 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) followed by 7 d of reperfusion and to examine the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in the cortical penumbra. Methods FA was intravenously administered to rats at a dose of 100 mg/kg 24 h before ischemia (B-FA), 2 h before ischemia (P-FA), immediately after ischemic insult (I-FA), 2 h after reperfusion (R-FA), or 24 h after reperfusion (D-FA). Results Our study results indicated that P-FA, I-FA, and R-FA effectively reduced cerebral infarct areas and neurological deficits. P-FA, I-FA, and R-FA significantly downregulated glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), mitochondrial Bax, cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase-3 expression, and effectively restored the phospho-p38 MAPK (p-p38 MAPK)/p38 MAPK ratio, phospho-90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p-p90RSK) expression, phospho-Bad (p-Bad) expression, the phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB)/CREB ratio, the cytosolic and mitochondrial Bcl-2/Bax ratios, and the cytosolic Bcl-xL/Bax ratio in the cortical penumbra 7 d after reperfusion. SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK, administered 30 min prior to ischemia abrogated the downregulating effects of I-FA on cerebral infarction, and mitochondrial Bax and cleaved caspase-3 expression, and the upregulating effects of I-FA on the p-p38 MAPK/p38 MAPK ratio, p-p90RSK expression, p-Bad expression, and the p-CREB/CREB, and cytosolic and mitochondrial Bcl-2/Bax ratios. Conclusions Our study results thus indicate that P-FA, I-FA, and R-FA effectively suppress reactive astrocytosis and exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral infarction by activating p38 MAPK signaling. The regulating effects of P-FA, I-FA, and R-FA on Bax-induced apoptosis result from activation of the p38 MAPK/p90RSK/CREB/Bcl-2 signaling pathway, and eventually contribute to

  6. [Spontaneous oscillations in basal blood insulin].

    PubMed

    Bellisle, F

    1987-02-01

    Many studies show that basal insulinemia is not stable over time, but oscillates significantly. The period and amplitude of oscillations appear species-specific. Studies on living animals have established that neither central autonomic command nor liver-pancreas feedback play a determining role on these cycles. Work on the isolated, perfused, canine pancreas has demonstrated the existence of an intrinsic pancreatic oscillator. Studies on human subjects confirm and complete animal data. The amplitude of insulinemia cycles is less in humans than in animals. In obese humans, insulin cycles are normal. In non-insulin-dependent diabetics, insulin oscillations are very irregular; after partial pancreatectomy (removal of the head of the pancreas), the normal insulin cycles disappear. The insulinemia cycles thus seem to reflect the behavior of an intrinsic pancreatic oscillator which synchronizes the activity of beta cells. Spontaneous oscillations in plasma insulin could play a role in the regulation of receptor affinity in target-tissues.

  7. Adipocyte iron regulates leptin and food intake

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Li, Zhonggang; Gabrielsen, J. Scott; Simcox, Judith A.; Lee, Soh-hyun; Jones, Deborah; Cooksey, Bob; Stoddard, Gregory; Cefalu, William T.; McClain, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary iron supplementation is associated with increased appetite. Here, we investigated the effect of iron on the hormone leptin, which regulates food intake and energy homeostasis. Serum ferritin was negatively associated with serum leptin in a cohort of patients with metabolic syndrome. Moreover, the same inverse correlation was observed in mice fed a high-iron diet. Adipocyte-specific loss of the iron exporter ferroportin resulted in iron loading and decreased leptin, while decreased levels of hepcidin in a murine hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) model increased adipocyte ferroportin expression, decreased adipocyte iron, and increased leptin. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with iron decreased leptin mRNA in a dose-dependent manner. We found that iron negatively regulates leptin transcription via cAMP-responsive element binding protein activation (CREB activation) and identified 2 potential CREB-binding sites in the mouse leptin promoter region. Mutation of both sites completely blocked the effect of iron on promoter activity. ChIP analysis revealed that binding of phosphorylated CREB is enriched at these two sites in iron-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes compared with untreated cells. Consistent with the changes in leptin, dietary iron content was also directly related to food intake, independently of weight. These findings indicate that levels of dietary iron play an important role in regulation of appetite and metabolism through CREB-dependent modulation of leptin expression. PMID:26301810

  8. CREB and CREB-binding proteins play an important role in the IE2 86-kilodalton protein-mediated transactivation of the human cytomegalovirus 2.2-kilobase RNA promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, R; Helmich, B; Spector, D H

    1996-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediate-early region 2 86-kDa protein (IE2 86) is the major transactivator of the promoter for the 2.2-kb class of early RNAs (open reading frame UL 112-113). Previously, we reported that a DNA segment on this promoter between nucleotides (nt) -113 and -59 was critical for activation by IE2 86 in vivo and could be bound by IE2 86 in vitro (R. Schwartz, M. H. Sommer, A. Scully, and D. H. Spector, J. Virol. 68:5613-5622, 1994). With a set of site-specific mutations within nt -84 to -61, we have localized the essential cis-acting sequences to nt -72 to -61, which contain an ATF/CREB-binding site. The IE2 86-binding site between nt -113 and -85 is not essential for activation of the promoter by IE2 86 in transient-expression assays, but its presence can enhance the level of activation mediated through the sequences located between nt -84 and -59. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with a segment containing nt -84 to -59 and nuclear extracts from human cells permissive for the HCMV infection revealed a complex band pattern. However, by supershift analysis with specific antibodies, we were able to identify CREB as the major ATF/CREB family member in the protein-DNA complexes. Further evidence that CREB is a target for IE2 86-mediated induction, is provided by the finding that IE2 86 activates the somatostatin promoter to high levels. Although the binding of IE2 86 to nonphosphorylated full-length CREB or deltaCREB is minimal, IE2 86 does form complexes with p300 and the CREB-binding protein (CBP), which in turn bind to CREB and can serve as adaptor proteins for CREB function. In addition, the in vivo functional relevance of the interaction between IE2 86 and CBP is indicated by the ability of IE2 86 to enhance transcriptional activation mediated by a GAL4-CBP fusion protein brought to a promoter by GAL4-binding sites. PMID:8794339

  9. Discourse Types in Canadian Basal Reading Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Sharon

    This study examined the authorship and discourse types of Canadian basal anthologies to determine whether the lingering centrality of the basal anthology in Canadian programs controls students and teachers by controlling language and reading. Each selection within five Canadian basal series (Gage Expressways II, Ginn Journeys, Holt Impressions,…

  10. "Basal Cell Blanche": A Diagnostic Maneuver to Increase Early Detection of Basal Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Quach, Olivia Leigh; Barry, Megan; Roberts Cruse, Allison; Wilson, Barbara B

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas represent one of the most common skin cancers and often present initially in the primary care setting. Subtle basal cell carcinomas may be difficult to detect, and early detection of these carcinomas remains important in limiting patient morbidity. In this article, we present a simple diagnostic maneuver, "basal cell blanche," to increase early detection of basal cell carcinomas. PMID:27170799

  11. Migraine attacks the Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With time, episodes of migraine headache afflict patients with increased frequency, longer duration and more intense pain. While episodic migraine may be defined as 1-14 attacks per month, there are no clear-cut phases defined, and those patients with low frequency may progress to high frequency episodic migraine and the latter may progress into chronic daily headache (> 15 attacks per month). The pathophysiology of this progression is completely unknown. Attempting to unravel this phenomenon, we used high field (human) brain imaging to compare functional responses, functional connectivity and brain morphology in patients whose migraine episodes did not progress (LF) to a matched (gender, age, age of onset and type of medication) group of patients whose migraine episodes progressed (HF). Results In comparison to LF patients, responses to pain in HF patients were significantly lower in the caudate, putamen and pallidum. Paradoxically, associated with these lower responses in HF patients, gray matter volume of the right and left caudate nuclei were significantly larger than in the LF patients. Functional connectivity analysis revealed additional differences between the two groups in regard to response to pain. Conclusions Supported by current understanding of basal ganglia role in pain processing, the findings suggest a significant role of the basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of the episodic migraine. PMID:21936901

  12. The basal bodies of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Dutcher, Susan K; O'Toole, Eileen T

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, is a biflagellated cell that can swim or glide. C. reinhardtii cells are amenable to genetic, biochemical, proteomic, and microscopic analysis of its basal bodies. The basal bodies contain triplet microtubules and a well-ordered transition zone. Both the mother and daughter basal bodies assemble flagella. Many of the proteins found in other basal body-containing organisms are present in the Chlamydomonas genome, and mutants in these genes affect the assembly of basal bodies. Electron microscopic analysis shows that basal body duplication is site-specific and this may be important for the proper duplication and spatial organization of these organelles. Chlamydomonas is an excellent model for the study of basal bodies as well as the transition zone. PMID:27252853

  13. Elevation of BDNF exon I-specific transcripts in the frontal cortex and midbrain of rat during spontaneous morphine withdrawal is accompanied by enhanced pCreb1 occupancy at the corresponding promoter.

    PubMed

    Peregud, Danil I; Panchenko, Leonid F; Gulyaeva, Natalia V

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is believed to play a crucial role in the mechanisms underlying opiate dependence; however, little is known about specific features and mechanisms regulating its expression in the brain under these conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute morphine intoxication and withdrawal from chronic intoxication on expression of BDNF exon I-, II-, IV-, VI- and IX-containing transcripts in the rat frontal cortex and midbrain. We also have studied whether alterations of BDNF exon-specific transcripts are accompanied by changes in association of well-known transcriptional regulators of BDNF gene-phosphorylated (active form) cAMP response element binding protein (pCreb1) and methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) with corresponding regulatory regions of the BDNF gene. Acute morphine intoxication did not affect levels of BDNF exons in brain regions, while spontaneous morphine withdrawal in dependent rats was accompanied by an elevation of the BDNF exon I-containing mRNAs both in the frontal cortex and midbrain. During spontaneous morphine withdrawal, increased associations of pCreb1 were found with promoter of exon I in the frontal cortex and promoters of exon I, IV and VI in the midbrain. The association of MeCP2 with BDNF promoters during spontaneous morphine withdrawal did not change. Thus, BDNF exon-specific transcripts are differentially expressed in brain regions during spontaneous morphine withdrawal in dependent rats and pCreb1 may be at least partially responsible for these alterations.

  14. CYCLIC AMP-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE INDUCTION BY POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) STIMULATES CREB PHOSPHORYLATION VIA A CALCIUM-DEPENDENT, PKC-INDEPENDENT PATHWAY IN CORTICAL NEURONS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously demonstrated that the PCB mixture, Aroclor 1254 (A1254), increases the phosphorylated form of CREB (pCREB), the cAMP-responsive element binding protein. This transcription factor is important in nervous system development and plasticity. Phosphorylation
    of C...

  15. Calcium release by ryanodine receptors mediates hydrogen peroxide-induced activation of ERK and CREB phosphorylation in N2a cells and hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kemmerling, Ulrike; Muñoz, Pablo; Müller, Marioly; Sánchez, Gina; Aylwin, María L; Klann, Eric; Carrasco, M Angélica; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2007-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide, which stimulates ERK phosphorylation and synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons, has also been shown to stimulate calcium release in muscle cells by promoting ryanodine receptor redox modification (S-glutathionylation). We report here that exposure of N2a cells or rat hippocampal neurons in culture to 200 microM H2O2 elicited calcium signals, increased ryanodine receptor S-glutathionylation, and enhanced both ERK and CREB phosphorylation. In mouse hippocampal slices, H2O2 (1 microM) also stimulated ERK and CREB phosphorylation. Preincubation with ryanodine (50 microM) largely prevented the effects of H2O2 on calcium signals and ERK/CREB phosphorylation. In N2a cells, the ERK kinase inhibitor U0126 suppressed ERK phosphorylation and abolished the stimulation of CREB phosphorylation produced by H2O2, suggesting that H2O2 enhanced CREB phosphorylation via ERK activation. In N2a cells in calcium-free media, 200 microM H2O2 stimulated ERK and CREB phosphorylation, while preincubation with thapsigargin prevented these enhancements. These combined results strongly suggest that H2O2 promotes ryanodine receptors redox modification; the resulting calcium release signals, by enhancing ERK activity, would increase CREB phosphorylation. We propose that ryanodine receptor stimulation by activity-generated redox species produces calcium release signals that may contribute significantly to hippocampal synaptic plasticity, including plasticity that requires long-lasting ERK-dependent CREB phosphorylation. PMID:17074386

  16. Dynamic signaling in the Hog1 MAPK pathway relies on high basal signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Macia, Javier; Regot, Sergi; Peeters, Tom; Conde, Núria; Solé, Ricard; Posas, Francesc

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate regulation of the Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is essential for cells to survive osmotic stress. Here, we show that the two sensing mechanisms upstream of Hog1 display different signaling properties. The Sho1 branch is an inducible nonbasal system, whereas the Sln1 branch shows high basal signaling that is restricted by a MAPK-mediated feedback mechanism. A two-dimensional mathematical model of the Snl1 branch, including high basal signaling and a Hog1-regulated negative feedback, shows that a system with basal signaling exhibits higher efficiency, with faster response times and higher sensitivity to variations in external signals, than would systems without basal signaling. Analysis of two other yeast MAPK pathways, the Fus3 and Kss1 signaling pathways, indicates that high intrinsic basal signaling may be a general property of MAPK pathways allowing rapid and sensitive responses to environmental changes. PMID:19318625

  17. Focus on Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Samarasinghe, Venura; Madan, Vishal; Lear, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs), which include basal and squamous cell cancers are the most common human cancers. BCCs have a relatively low metastatic rate and slow growth and are frequently underreported. Whilst there is a definite role of sunexposure in the pathogenesis of BCC, several additional complex genotypic, phenotypic and environmental factors are contributory. The high prevalence and the frequent occurrence of multiple primary BCC in affected individuals make them an important public health problem. This has led to a substantial increase in search for newer noninvasive treatments for BCC. Surgical excision with predetermined margins remains the mainstay treatment for most BCC. Of the newer non-invasive treatments only photodynamic therapy and topical imiquimod have become established in the treatment of certain BCC subtypes, while the search for other more effective and tissue salvaging therapies continues. This paper focuses on the pathogenesis and management of BCC. PMID:21152128

  18. Allicin inhibits oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis by promoting PI3K/AKT and CREB/ERK signaling in osteoblast cells

    PubMed Central

    DING, GUOLIANG; ZHAO, JIANQUAN; JIANG, DIANMING

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a disease of the skeleton that is characterized by the loss of bone mass and degeneration of bone microstructure, resulting in an increased risk of fracture. Oxidative stress, which is known to promote oxidative damage to mitochondrial function and also cell apoptosis, has been recently indicated to be implicated in osteoporosis. However, there are few agents that counteract oxidative stress in osteoporosis. In the present study, the protective effects of allicin against the oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis were investigated in murine osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. The results demonstrated that allicin counteracted the reduction of cell viability and induction of apoptosis caused by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure. The inhibition of apoptosis by allicin was confirmed by the inhibition of H2O2-induced cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. Moreover, the inhibition of apoptosis by allicin was identified to be associated with the counteraction of H2O2-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, allicin was demonstrated to be able to significantly ameliorate the repressed phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB)/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways by H2O2, which may also be associated with the anti-oxidative stress effects of allicin. In conclusion, allicin protects osteoblasts from H2O2-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in MC3T3-E1 cells by improving mitochondrial function and the activation of PI3K/AKT and CREB/ERK signaling. The present study implies a promising role of allicin in oxidative stress-associated osteoporosis. PMID:27284348

  19. Downregulation of miR-199b is associated with distant metastasis in colorectal cancer via activation of SIRT1 and inhibition of CREB/KISS1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ke-wei; Ye, Chun-xiang; Cheng, Cheng; Yan, Yi-chao; Zhang, Ji-zhun; Yang, Yang; Gao, Zhi-dong; Ye, Ying-jiang; Wang, Shan

    2016-01-01

    The progression of distant metastasis cascade is a multistep and complicated process, frequently leading to a poor prognosis in cancer patients. Recently, growing evidence has indicated that deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) contributes to tumorigenesis and tumor progression in colorectal cancer (CRC). In the present study, by comparing the miRNA expression profiles of CRC tissues and corresponding hepatic metastasis tissues, we established the downregulation of miR-199b in CRC metastasis tissues. The decrease in miR-199b expression was significantly correlated to late TNM stage and distant metastasis. Moreover, Kaplan–Meier curves showed that CRC patients with high expression level of miR-199b had a longer median survival. Functional assays results indicated that the restoration of miR-199b considerably reduced cell invasion and migration in vitro and in vivo, and increased the sensitivity to 5-FU and oxaliplatin. Further dual-luciferase reporter gene assays revealed that SIRT1 was the direct target of miR-199b in CRC. The expression of miR-199b was inversely correlated with SIRT1 in CRC specimens. SIRT1 knockdown produced effects on biological behavior that were similar to those of miR-199b overexpression. Furthermore, through Human Tumor Metastasis PCR Array we discovered KISS1 was one of the downstream targets of SIRT1. Silencing of SIRT1 upregulated KISS1 expression by enhancing the acetylation of the transcription factor CREB. The latter was further activated via binding to the promoter of KISS1 to induce transcription. Thus, we concluded that miR-199b regulates SIRT1/CREB/KISS1 signaling pathway and might serve as a prognosis marker or a novel therapeutic target for patients with CRC. PMID:27145368

  20. NF-κB Inhibition Resolves Cognitive Deficits in Experimental Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus through CREB and Glutamate/GABA Neurotransmitters Pathway.

    PubMed

    Datusalia, Ashok Kumar; Sharma, Shyam Sunder

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with deficits in memory and cognitive functions and sustained inflammation. Recently, involvement of NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) has been postulated in many cognitive functions, immune system and inflammation. Despite of role of NF-κB in inflammation, a large gap remains in understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of NF-κB activation in the central nervous system.In this study, we have evaluated the effects of NF-κB activation inhibitor on memory function, neurotransmitter levels changes and brain inflammatory cytokines in type-2 diabetic rats. BAY 11-7082 (BAY) was used as a pharmacological inhibitor of IκBα (inhibitor of kappa B alpha) phosphorylation to block NF-κB activation. Type-2 diabetic rats showed significant memory impairment at 15(th) week. Three weeks BAY treatment produced significant increase in Morris water maze test learning and memory performance. Diabetic animals also showed improved performance in passive avoidance and Y-maze test paradigm following treatment with NF-κB inhibitor BAY. BAY treatment did not show any significant effect on blood glucose and insulin levels. NF-κB inhibition significantly reduced neuroinflammation as evidenced by decrease in IL-6 and TNF-α levels. BAY treatment in diabetic rats also increased the phosphorylation of CREB which indicates that the NF-κB activation inhibitor engage a CREB regulated mechanism in-vivo. Moreover, BAY also reversed the alterations in brain glutamate and GABA levels in diabetic rats. These findings corroborate that NF-κB inhibition may be an effective treatment strategy in diabetes associated cognitive deficits. PMID:26517200

  1. Neuritogenic Monoglyceride Derived from the Constituent of a Marine Fish for Activating the PI3K/ERK/CREB Signalling Pathways in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Luo, Yan; Tang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Hui; Ye, Ying; Xiang, Lan; Qi, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    A neuritogenic monoglyceride, 1-O-(myristoyl) glycerol (MG), was isolated from the head of Ilisha elongate using a PC12 cell bioassay system, and its chemical structure was elucidated using spectroscopic methods. MG significantly induced 42% of the neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells at a concentration of 10 μM. To study the structure-activity relationships of MG, a series of monoglycerides was designed and synthesised. Bioassay results indicated that the alkyl chain length plays a key role in the neuritogenic activity of the monoglycerides. The groups that link the propane-1,2-diol and alkyl chain were also investigated. An ester linkage, rather than an amido one, was found to be optimal for neuritogenic activity. Therefore, 1-O-(stearoyl) glycerol (SG), which induces 57% of the neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells at 10 μM, was determined to be a lead compound for neuritogenic activity. We then investigated the mechanism of action of neurite outgrowth induced by SG on PC12 cells using protein specific inhibitors and Western blot analysis. The mitogen-activated kinase/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126 and the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 significantly decreased neurite outgrowth. At the same time, SG increased phosphorylation of CREB in protein level. Thus, SG-induced neuritogenic activity depends on the activation of the extracellular-regulated protein kinase (ERK), cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) and PI3K signalling pathways in PC12 cells. PMID:24351811

  2. NF-κB Inhibition Resolves Cognitive Deficits in Experimental Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus through CREB and Glutamate/GABA Neurotransmitters Pathway.

    PubMed

    Datusalia, Ashok Kumar; Sharma, Shyam Sunder

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with deficits in memory and cognitive functions and sustained inflammation. Recently, involvement of NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) has been postulated in many cognitive functions, immune system and inflammation. Despite of role of NF-κB in inflammation, a large gap remains in understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of NF-κB activation in the central nervous system.In this study, we have evaluated the effects of NF-κB activation inhibitor on memory function, neurotransmitter levels changes and brain inflammatory cytokines in type-2 diabetic rats. BAY 11-7082 (BAY) was used as a pharmacological inhibitor of IκBα (inhibitor of kappa B alpha) phosphorylation to block NF-κB activation. Type-2 diabetic rats showed significant memory impairment at 15(th) week. Three weeks BAY treatment produced significant increase in Morris water maze test learning and memory performance. Diabetic animals also showed improved performance in passive avoidance and Y-maze test paradigm following treatment with NF-κB inhibitor BAY. BAY treatment did not show any significant effect on blood glucose and insulin levels. NF-κB inhibition significantly reduced neuroinflammation as evidenced by decrease in IL-6 and TNF-α levels. BAY treatment in diabetic rats also increased the phosphorylation of CREB which indicates that the NF-κB activation inhibitor engage a CREB regulated mechanism in-vivo. Moreover, BAY also reversed the alterations in brain glutamate and GABA levels in diabetic rats. These findings corroborate that NF-κB inhibition may be an effective treatment strategy in diabetes associated cognitive deficits.

  3. Enhancement of Behavioral Sensitization, Anxiety-Like Behavior, and Hippocampal and Frontal Cortical CREB Levels Following Cocaine Abstinence in Mice Exposed to Cocaine during Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Valzachi, Maria Cristina; Teodorov, Elizabeth; Marcourakis, Tania; Bailey, Alexis; Camarini, Rosana

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence has been linked to greater risk-taking and novelty-seeking behavior and a higher prevalence of drug abuse and risk of relapse. Decreases in cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) have been reported after repeated cocaine administration in animal models. We compared the behavioral effects of cocaine and abstinence in adolescent and adult mice and investigated possible age-related differences in CREB and pCREB levels. Adolescent and adult male Swiss mice received one daily injection of saline or cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) for 8 days. On day 9, the mice received a saline injection to evaluate possible environmental conditioning. After 9 days of withdrawal, the mice were tested in the elevated plus maze to evaluate anxiety-like behavior. Twelve days after the last saline/cocaine injection, the mice received a challenge injection of either cocaine or saline, and locomotor activity was assessed. One hour after the last injection, the brains were extracted, and CREB and pCREB levels were evaluated using Western blot in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus. The cocaine-pretreated mice during adolescence exhibited a greater magnitude of the expression of behavioral sensitization and greater cocaine withdrawal-induced anxiety-like behavior compared with the control group. Significant increases in CREB levels in the PFC and hippocampus and pCREB in the hippocampus were observed in cocaine-abstinent animals compared with the animals treated with cocaine in adulthood. Interestingly, significant negative correlations were observed between cocaine sensitization and CREB levels in both regions. These results suggest that the behavioral and neurochemical consequences of psychoactive substances in a still-developing nervous system can be more severe than in an already mature nervous system. PMID:24205196

  4. Photodynamic therapy for basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fargnoli, Maria Concetta; Peris, Ketty

    2015-11-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy is an effective and safe noninvasive treatment for low-risk basal cell carcinoma, with the advantage of an excellent cosmetic outcome. Efficacy of photodynamic therapy in basal cell carcinoma is supported by substantial research and clinical trials. In this article, we review the procedure, indications and clinical evidences for the use of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

  5. UVB Stimulates the Expression of Endothelin B Receptor in Human Melanocytes via a Sequential Activation of the p38/MSK1/CREB/MITF Pathway Which Can Be Interrupted by a French Maritime Pine Bark Extract through a Direct Inactivation of MSK1.

    PubMed

    Tagashira, Hideki; Miyamoto, Aki; Kitamura, Sei-Ichi; Tsubata, Masahito; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Takagaki, Kinya; Imokawa, Genji

    2015-01-01

    Melanogenesis is the physiological process by which melanin is synthesized to protect the skin from UV damage. While paracrine interactions between keratinocytes and melanocytes are crucial for regulating epidermal pigmentation, the endothelin (EDN)-endothelin B-receptor (EDNRB) interaction is one of the key linkages. In this study, we found that a single exposure of normal human melanocytes (NHMs) with UVB stimulates the expression of EDNRB and its upstream transcription factor microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) at the transcriptional and translational levels. That stimulation can be abrogated by post-irradiation treatment with a French maritime pine bark extract (PBE). UVB stimulated the phosphorylation of p38 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), but not ERK, followed by the increased phosphorylation of MSK1 and CREB. The post-irradiation treatment with PBE did not affect the increased phosphorylation of p38 and JNK, but distinctly abrogated the phosphorylation of MSK1 and CREB. Post-irradiation treatment with the MSK1 inhibitor H89 significantly down-regulated the increased gene expression of MITF and EDNRB in UVB-exposed NHMs. Our findings indicate for the first time that the increased expression of MITF that leads to the up-regulation of melanocyte-specific proteins in UVB-exposed NHMs is mediated via activation of the p38/MSK1/CREB pathway but not the ERK/RSK/CREB pathway. The mode of action by PBE demonstrates that interrupting MSK1 activation is a new target for antioxidants including PBE which can serve as anti-pigmenting agents in a reactive oxygen species-depletion-independent manner. PMID:26030901

  6. UVB Stimulates the Expression of Endothelin B Receptor in Human Melanocytes via a Sequential Activation of the p38/MSK1/CREB/MITF Pathway Which Can Be Interrupted by a French Maritime Pine Bark Extract through a Direct Inactivation of MSK1.

    PubMed

    Tagashira, Hideki; Miyamoto, Aki; Kitamura, Sei-Ichi; Tsubata, Masahito; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Takagaki, Kinya; Imokawa, Genji

    2015-01-01

    Melanogenesis is the physiological process by which melanin is synthesized to protect the skin from UV damage. While paracrine interactions between keratinocytes and melanocytes are crucial for regulating epidermal pigmentation, the endothelin (EDN)-endothelin B-receptor (EDNRB) interaction is one of the key linkages. In this study, we found that a single exposure of normal human melanocytes (NHMs) with UVB stimulates the expression of EDNRB and its upstream transcription factor microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) at the transcriptional and translational levels. That stimulation can be abrogated by post-irradiation treatment with a French maritime pine bark extract (PBE). UVB stimulated the phosphorylation of p38 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), but not ERK, followed by the increased phosphorylation of MSK1 and CREB. The post-irradiation treatment with PBE did not affect the increased phosphorylation of p38 and JNK, but distinctly abrogated the phosphorylation of MSK1 and CREB. Post-irradiation treatment with the MSK1 inhibitor H89 significantly down-regulated the increased gene expression of MITF and EDNRB in UVB-exposed NHMs. Our findings indicate for the first time that the increased expression of MITF that leads to the up-regulation of melanocyte-specific proteins in UVB-exposed NHMs is mediated via activation of the p38/MSK1/CREB pathway but not the ERK/RSK/CREB pathway. The mode of action by PBE demonstrates that interrupting MSK1 activation is a new target for antioxidants including PBE which can serve as anti-pigmenting agents in a reactive oxygen species-depletion-independent manner.

  7. UVB Stimulates the Expression of Endothelin B Receptor in Human Melanocytes via a Sequential Activation of the p38/MSK1/CREB/MITF Pathway Which Can Be Interrupted by a French Maritime Pine Bark Extract through a Direct Inactivation of MSK1

    PubMed Central

    Tagashira, Hideki; Miyamoto, Aki; Kitamura, Sei-ichi; Tsubata, Masahito; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Takagaki, Kinya; Imokawa, Genji

    2015-01-01

    Melanogenesis is the physiological process by which melanin is synthesized to protect the skin from UV damage. While paracrine interactions between keratinocytes and melanocytes are crucial for regulating epidermal pigmentation, the endothelin (EDN)-endothelin B-receptor (EDNRB) interaction is one of the key linkages. In this study, we found that a single exposure of normal human melanocytes (NHMs) with UVB stimulates the expression of EDNRB and its upstream transcription factor microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) at the transcriptional and translational levels. That stimulation can be abrogated by post-irradiation treatment with a French maritime pine bark extract (PBE). UVB stimulated the phosphorylation of p38 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), but not ERK, followed by the increased phosphorylation of MSK1 and CREB. The post-irradiation treatment with PBE did not affect the increased phosphorylation of p38 and JNK, but distinctly abrogated the phosphorylation of MSK1 and CREB. Post-irradiation treatment with the MSK1 inhibitor H89 significantly down-regulated the increased gene expression of MITF and EDNRB in UVB-exposed NHMs. Our findings indicate for the first time that the increased expression of MITF that leads to the up-regulation of melanocyte-specific proteins in UVB-exposed NHMs is mediated via activation of the p38/MSK1/CREB pathway but not the ERK/RSK/CREB pathway. The mode of action by PBE demonstrates that interrupting MSK1 activation is a new target for antioxidants including PBE which can serve as anti-pigmenting agents in a reactive oxygen species-depletion-independent manner. PMID:26030901

  8. Melatonin synthesis in retina: cAMP-dependent transcriptional regulation of chicken arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase by a CRE-like sequence and a TTATT repeat motif in the proximal promoter.

    PubMed

    Haque, Rashidul; Chong, Nelson W; Ali, Fatima; Chaurasia, Shyam S; Sengupta, Trisha; Chun, Eugene; Howell, Jennifer C; Klein, David C; Iuvone, P Michael

    2011-10-01

    Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) is the key regulatory enzyme controlling the daily rhythm of melatonin biosynthesis. In chicken retinal photoreceptor cells, Aanat transcription and AANAT activity are regulated in part by cAMP-dependent mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to identify regulatory elements within the chicken Aanat promoter responsible for cAMP-dependent induction. Photoreceptor-enriched retinal cell cultures were transfected with a luciferase reporter construct containing up to 4 kb of 5'-flanking region and the first exon of Aanat. Forskolin treatment stimulated luciferase activity driven by the ∼4 kb promoter construct and by all 5'-deletion constructs except the smallest, Aanat (-217 to +120)luc. Maximal basal and forskolin-stimulated expression levels were generated by the Aanat (-484 to +120)luc construct. This construct lacks a canonical cyclic AMP-response element (CRE), but contains two other potentially important elements in its sequence: an eight times TTATT repeat (TTATT₈) and a CRE-like sequence. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, luciferase reporter assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and siRNA experiments provide evidence that these elements bind c-Fos, JunD, and CREB to enhance basal and forskolin-stimulated Aanat transcription. We propose that the CRE-like sequence and TTATT₈ elements in the 484 bp proximal promoter interact to mediate cAMP-dependent transcriptional regulation of Aanat.

  9. Recognition of the disordered p53 transactivation domain by the transcriptional adapter zinc finger domains of CREB-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Krois, Alexander S; Ferreon, Josephine C; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2016-03-29

    An important component of the activity of p53 as a tumor suppressor is its interaction with the transcriptional coactivators cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) and p300, which activate transcription of p53-regulated stress response genes and stabilize p53 against ubiquitin-mediated degradation. The highest affinity interactions are between the intrinsically disordered N-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of p53 and the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains of CBP/p300. The NMR spectra of simple binary complexes of the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains with the p53TAD suffer from exchange broadening, but innovations in construct design and isotopic labeling have enabled us to obtain high-resolution structures using fusion proteins, uniformly labeled in the case of the TAZ2-p53TAD fusion and segmentally labeled through transintein splicing for the TAZ1-p53TAD fusion. The p53TAD is bipartite, with two interaction motifs, termed AD1 and AD2, which fold to form short amphipathic helices upon binding to TAZ1 and TAZ2 whereas intervening regions of the p53TAD remain flexible. Both the AD1 and AD2 motifs bind to hydrophobic surfaces of the TAZ domains, with AD2 making more extensive hydrophobic contacts consistent with its greater contribution to the binding affinity. Binding of AD1 and AD2 is synergistic, and structural studies performed with isolated motifs can be misleading. The present structures of the full-length p53TAD complexes demonstrate the versatility of the interactions available to an intrinsically disordered domain containing bipartite interaction motifs and provide valuable insights into the structural basis of the affinity changes that occur upon stress-related posttranslational modification. PMID:26976603

  10. Recognition of the disordered p53 transactivation domain by the transcriptional adapter zinc finger domains of CREB-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Krois, Alexander S.; Ferreon, Josephine C.; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A.; Wright, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    An important component of the activity of p53 as a tumor suppressor is its interaction with the transcriptional coactivators cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) and p300, which activate transcription of p53-regulated stress response genes and stabilize p53 against ubiquitin-mediated degradation. The highest affinity interactions are between the intrinsically disordered N-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of p53 and the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains of CBP/p300. The NMR spectra of simple binary complexes of the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains with the p53TAD suffer from exchange broadening, but innovations in construct design and isotopic labeling have enabled us to obtain high-resolution structures using fusion proteins, uniformly labeled in the case of the TAZ2–p53TAD fusion and segmentally labeled through transintein splicing for the TAZ1–p53TAD fusion. The p53TAD is bipartite, with two interaction motifs, termed AD1 and AD2, which fold to form short amphipathic helices upon binding to TAZ1 and TAZ2 whereas intervening regions of the p53TAD remain flexible. Both the AD1 and AD2 motifs bind to hydrophobic surfaces of the TAZ domains, with AD2 making more extensive hydrophobic contacts consistent with its greater contribution to the binding affinity. Binding of AD1 and AD2 is synergistic, and structural studies performed with isolated motifs can be misleading. The present structures of the full-length p53TAD complexes demonstrate the versatility of the interactions available to an intrinsically disordered domain containing bipartite interaction motifs and provide valuable insights into the structural basis of the affinity changes that occur upon stress-related posttranslational modification. PMID:26976603

  11. CREB-BDNF Pathway Influences Alcohol Cue-Elicited Hyperactivation in Drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiayu; Hutchison, Kent E.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Claus, Eric; Turner, Jessica A.; Sui, Jing; Liu, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) is suggested to have polygenic risk factors and also exhibits neurological complications, strongly encouraging a translational study to explore the associations between aggregates of genetic variants and brain function alterations related to alcohol use. In this study, we used a semiblind multivariate approach, parallel independent component analysis with multiple references (pICA-MR) to investigate relationships of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with alcohol cue elicited brain activations in 326 healthy drinkers. The genetic component derived from the CREB-BDNF pathway reference was significantly associated (r = −0.36, p = 2.98×10−11) with an imaging component reflecting hyperactivation in precuneus, superior parietal lobule, and posterior cingulate for drinkers with more severe AD scores. The highlighted brain regions participate in many cognitive processes and have been robustly implicated in craving-related studies. The genetic factor highlighted the CREB and BDNF references, as well as other genes including GRM5, GRM7, GRID1, GRIN2A, PRKCA and PRKCB. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that the genetic component was enriched in synaptic plasticity, GABA and protein kinase A signaling. In summary, our findings suggest genetic variations in various neural plasticity and signaling pathways partially explain the variance of precuneus reactivity to alcohol cue which appears to be associated with AD severity. PMID:25939814

  12. The CREB/CRTC2 Pathway Modulates Autoimmune Disease by Promoting Th17 Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Jeniffer B.; Chang, Christina; LeBlanc, Mathias; Grimm, David; Le Lay, John; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Zheng, Ye; Montminy, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Following their activation in response to inflammatory signals, innate immune cells secrete T cell polarizing cytokines that promote the differentiation of naïve CD4 T cells into T helper (Th) cell subsets. Amongst these, Th17 cells play a prominent role in the development of a number of autoimmune diseases. Although regarded primarily as an immunosuppressant signal, cAMP has been found to mediate pro-inflammatory effects of macrophage-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on Th17 cells. Here we show that PGE2 enhances Th17 cell differentiation via the activation of the CREB co-activator CRTC2. Following its dephosphorylation, CRTC2 stimulates the expression of the cytokines IL-17A and IL-17F by binding to CREB over both promoters. CRTC2 mutant mice have decreased Th17 cell numbers, and they are protected from experimental autoimmune encephalitis, a model for multiple sclerosis. Our results suggest that small molecule inhibitors of CRTC2 may provide therapeutic benefit to individuals with autoimmune disease. PMID:26031354

  13. Automatic basal slice detection for cardiac analysis.

    PubMed

    Paknezhad, Mahsa; Marchesseau, Stephanie; Brown, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Identification of the basal slice in cardiac imaging is a key step to measuring the ejection fraction of the left ventricle. Despite all the effort placed on automatic cardiac segmentation, basal slice identification is routinely performed manually. Manual identification, however, suffers from high interobserver variability. As a result, an automatic algorithm for basal slice identification is required. Guidelines published in 2013 identify the basal slice based on the percentage of myocardium surrounding the blood cavity in the short-axis view. Existing methods, however, assume that the basal slice is the first short-axis view slice below the mitral valve and are consequently at times identifying the incorrect short-axis slice. Correct identification of the basal slice under the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines is challenging due to the poor image quality and blood movement during image acquisition. This paper proposes an automatic tool that utilizes the two-chamber view to determine the basal slice while following the guidelines. To this end, an active shape model is trained to segment the two-chamber view and create temporal binary profiles from which the basal slice is identified. From the 51 tested cases, our method obtains 92% and 84% accurate basal slice detection for the end-systole and the end-diastole, respectively. PMID:27660805

  14. GABA-cAMP response element-binding protein signaling regulates maturation and survival of newly generated neurons in the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Jagasia, Ravi; Steib, Kathrin; Englberger, Elisabeth; Herold, Sabine; Faus-Kessler, Theresa; Saxe, Michael; Gage, Fred H; Song, Hongjun; Lie, D Chichung

    2009-06-24

    Survival and integration of new neurons in the hippocampal circuit are rate-limiting steps in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Neuronal network activity is a major regulator of these processes, yet little is known about the respective downstream signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the role of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) signaling in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. CREB is activated in new granule neurons during a distinct developmental period. Loss of CREB function in a cell-autonomous manner impairs dendritic development, decreases the expression of the neurogenic transcription factor NeuroD and of the neuronal microtubule-associated protein, doublecortin (DCX), and compromises the survival of newborn neurons. In addition, GABA-mediated excitation regulates CREB activation at early developmental stages. Importantly, developmental defects after loss of GABA-mediated excitation can be compensated by enhanced CREB signaling. These results indicate that CREB signaling is a central pathway in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, regulating the development and survival of new hippocampal neurons downstream of GABA-mediated excitation.

  15. Acute sleep deprivation enhances avoidance learning and spatial memory and induces delayed alterations in neurochemical expression of GR, TH, DRD1, pCREB and Ki67 in rats.

    PubMed

    Azogu, Idu; de la Tremblaye, Patricia Barra; Dunbar, Megan; Lebreton, Marianne; LeMarec, Nathalie; Plamondon, Hélène

    2015-02-15

    The current study investigated the effects of acute versus repeated periods of sleep deprivation on avoidance learning and spatial memory and on the expression of discrete biochemical brain signals involved in stress regulation, motivation and brain plasticity. Male Long-Evans rats were sleep deprived using the platform-over-water method for a single 4 h period (ASD) or for daily 4h RSD period on five consecutive days (CSD). The Y maze passive avoidance task (YM-PAT) and the Morris water maze (MWM) were used to determine learning and memory 1h following the last SD period. Region-specific changes in glucocorticoid receptors (GR), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine 1 receptors (DRD1), phospho-CREB (pCREB) and Ki-67 expression were assessed in the hippocampal formation, hypothalamus and mesolimbic regions 72 h following RSD. Behaviorally, our findings revealed increased latency to re-enter the aversive arm in the YM-PAT and reduced distance traveled and latency to reach the platform in the MWM in ASD rats compared to all other groups, indicative of improved avoidance learning and spatial memory, respectively. Acute SD enhanced TH expression in the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens and A11 neurons of the hypothalamus and DRD1 expression in the lateral hypothalamus. Cell proliferation in the subventricular zone and pCREB expression in the dentate gyrus and CA3 regions was also enhanced following acute SD. In contrast, repeated SD significantly elevated GR-ir at the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and CA1 and CA3 layers of the hippocampus compared to all other groups. Our study supports that a brief 4h sleep deprivation period is sufficient to induce delayed neurochemical changes. PMID:25433096

  16. Ice Sheet Stratigraphy Can Constrain Basal Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolovick, M.; Creyts, T. T.; Buck, W. R.; Bell, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    Basal slip is an important component of ice sheet mass flux and dynamics. Basal slip varies over time due to variations in basal temperature, water pressure, and sediment cover. All of these factors can create coherent patterns of basal slip that migrate over time. Our knowledge of the spatial variability in basal slip comes from inversions of driving stress, ice thickness, and surface velocity, but these inversions contain no information about temporal variability. We do not know if the patterns in slip revealed by those inversions move over time. While englacial stratigraphy has classically been used to constrain surface accumulation and geothermal flux, it is also sensitive to horizontal gradients in basal slip. Here we show that englacial stratigraphy can constrain the velocity of basal slip patterns. Englacial stratigraphy responds strongly to patterns of basal slip that move downstream over time close to the ice sheet velocity. In previous work, we used a thermomechanical model to discover that thermally controlled slip patterns migrate downstream and create stratigraphic structures, but we were unable to directly control the pattern velocity, as that arose naturally out of the model physics. Here, we use a kinematic flowline model that allows us to directly control pattern velocity, and thus is applicable to a wide variety of slip mechanisms in addition to basal temperature. We find that the largest and most intricate stratigraphic structures develop when the pattern moves at the column-average ice velocity. Patterns that move slower than the column-average ice velocity produce overturned stratigraphy in the lower part of the ice sheet, while patterns moving at the column-average eventually cause the entire ice sheet to overturn if they persist long enough. Based on these forward models, we develop an interpretive guide for deducing moving patterns in basal slip from ice sheet internal layers. Ice sheet internal stratigraphy represents a potentially vast

  17. Increases in cAMP, MAPK Activity and CREB Phosphorylation during REM Sleep: Implications for REM Sleep and Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jie; Phan, Trongha X.; Yang, Yimei; Garelick, Michael G.; Storm, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcriptional pathway is required for consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory. In mice, this pathway undergoes a circadian oscillation required for memory persistence that reaches a peak during the daytime. Since mice exhibit polyphasic sleep patterns during the day, this suggested the interesting possibility that cAMP, MAPK activity and CREB phosphorylation may be elevated during sleep. Here, we report that cAMP, phospho-p44/42 MAPK and phospho-CREB are higher in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep compared to awake mice but are not elevated in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. This peak of activity during REM sleep does not occur in mice lacking calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclases, a mouse strain that learns but cannot consolidate hippocampus-dependent memory. We conclude that a preferential increase in cAMP, MAPK activity and CREB phosphorylation during REM sleep may contribute to hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation. PMID:23575844

  18. Increases in cAMP, MAPK activity, and CREB phosphorylation during REM sleep: implications for REM sleep and memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Phan, Trongha X; Yang, Yimei; Garelick, Michael G; Storm, Daniel R

    2013-04-10

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcriptional pathway is required for consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory. In mice, this pathway undergoes a circadian oscillation required for memory persistence that reaches a peak during the daytime. Because mice exhibit polyphasic sleep patterns during the day, this suggested the interesting possibility that cAMP, MAPK activity, and CREB phosphorylation may be elevated during sleep. Here, we report that cAMP, phospho-p44/42 MAPK, and phospho-CREB are higher in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep compared with awake mice but are not elevated in non-REM sleep. This peak of activity during REM sleep does not occur in mice lacking calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclases, a mouse strain that learns but cannot consolidate hippocampus-dependent memory. We conclude that a preferential increase in cAMP, MAPK activity, and CREB phosphorylation during REM sleep may contribute to hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation. PMID:23575844

  19. GABPα Binding to Overlapping ETS and CRE DNA Motifs Is Enhanced by CREB1: Custom DNA Microarrays.

    PubMed

    He, Ximiao; Syed, Khund Sayeed; Tillo, Desiree; Mann, Ishminder; Weirauch, Matthew T; Vinson, Charles

    2015-07-16

    To achieve proper spatiotemporal control of gene expression, transcription factors cooperatively assemble onto specific DNA sequences. The ETS domain protein monomer of GABPα and the B-ZIP domain protein dimer of CREB1 cooperatively bind DNA only when the ETS ((C)/GCGGAA GT: ) and CRE ( GT: GACGTCAC) motifs overlap precisely, producing the ETS↔CRE motif ((C)/GCGGAA GT: GACGTCAC). We designed a Protein Binding Microarray (PBM) with 60-bp DNAs containing four identical sectors, each with 177,440 features that explore the cooperative interactions between GABPα and CREB1 upon binding the ETS↔CRE motif. The DNA sequences include all 15-mers of the form (C)/GCGGA--CG-, the ETS↔CRE motif, and all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and occurrences in the human and mouse genomes. CREB1 enhanced GABPα binding to the canonical ETS↔CRE motif CCGGAAGT two-fold, and up to 23-fold for several SNPs at the beginning and end of the ETS motif, which is suggestive of two separate and distinct allosteric mechanisms of cooperative binding. We show that the ETS-CRE array data can be used to identify regions likely cooperatively bound by GABPα and CREB1 in vivo, and demonstrate their ability to identify human genetic variants that might inhibit cooperative binding.

  20. Not all stress is equal: CREB is not necessary for restraint stress reinstatement of cocaine-conditioned reward

    PubMed Central

    Briand, Lisa A.; Blendy, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Stress elicits relapse to cocaine seeking in humans and in animal models. Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) is required for swim stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine conditioned place preference. However, the role of CREB in other stress-induced reinstatement models has not been examined. To determine whether CREB is required across different stressors we examined the ability of restraint to elicit reinstatement of cocaine-conditioned place preference in wild type and CREBαΔ mutant mice. In contrast to previously published differences in swim stress-induced reinstatement, both wildtype and CREBαΔ mutant mice demonstrated restraint stress elicited reinstatement of cocaine-conditioned reward. While CREB is necessary for swim stress-elicited zif268 expression within the nucleus accubmens (NAc) shell & prelimbic cortex (PrL), restraint-stress-elicited comparable increases in zif268 expression within these regions in both wildtype and CREBαΔ mutant mice. Our findings suggest that not all stressors engage the same circuits or molecular mechanisms to elicit reinstatement behavior. PMID:23458740

  1. The basal ganglia communicate with the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Andreea C; Dum, Richard P; Strick, Peter L

    2010-05-01

    The basal ganglia and cerebellum are major subcortical structures that influence not only movement, but putatively also cognition and affect. Both structures receive input from and send output to the cerebral cortex. Thus, the basal ganglia and cerebellum form multisynaptic loops with the cerebral cortex. Basal ganglia and cerebellar loops have been assumed to be anatomically separate and to perform distinct functional operations. We investigated whether there is any direct route for basal ganglia output to influence cerebellar function that is independent of the cerebral cortex. We injected rabies virus (RV) into selected regions of the cerebellar cortex in cebus monkeys and used retrograde transneuronal transport of the virus to determine the origin of multisynaptic inputs to the injection sites. We found that the subthalamic nucleus of the basal ganglia has a substantial disynaptic projection to the cerebellar cortex. This pathway provides a means for both normal and abnormal signals from the basal ganglia to influence cerebellar function. We previously showed that the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum has a disynaptic projection to an input stage of basal ganglia processing, the striatum. Taken together these results provide the anatomical substrate for substantial two-way communication between the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Thus, the two subcortical structures may be linked together to form an integrated functional network. PMID:20404184

  2. Modern basal insulin analogs: An incomplete story

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Gangopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The currently available basal insulin does not completely mimic the endogenous insulin secretion. This has continued to promote the search for ideal basal insulin. The newer basal insulin have primarily focused on increasing the duration of action, reducing variability, and reducing the incidence of hypoglycemia, particularly nocturnal. However, the changing criteria of hypoglycemia within a short span of a few years along with the surprising introduction of major cardiac events as another outcome measure has not only clouded the assessment of basal insulin but has also polarized opinion worldwide about the utility of the newer basal insulin. A critical review of both the pre and post FDA analysis of all the basal insulin in this article attempts to clear some of the confusion surrounding the issues of hypoglycemia and glycemic control. This article also discusses all the trials and meta-analysis done on all the current basal insulin available along with their head-to-head comparison with particular attention to glycemic control and hypoglycemic events including severe and nocturnal hypoglycemia. This in-depth analysis hopes to provide a clear interpretation of the various analyses available in literature at this point of time thereby acting as an excellent guide to the readers in choosing the most appropriate basal insulin for their patient. PMID:25364672

  3. Functional interaction between the human cytomegalovirus 86-kilodalton IE2 protein and the cellular transcription factor CREB.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, D; Gebert, S; Arlt, H; Stamminger, T

    1995-01-01

    The 86-kDa IE2 protein (IE86) of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has been described as a promiscuous transactivator of viral, as well as cellular, gene expression. Investigation of the mechanism used by IE86 to activate gene expression from the early UL112/113 promoter of HCMV revealed the existence of three binding sites for IE86 located between nucleotides -290 and -120 relative to the transcriptional start site (H. Arlt, D. Lang, S. Gebert, and T. Stamminger, J. Virol. 68:4117-4125, 1994). As shown previously, deletion of these target sites resulted in a reduction of IE86-mediated transactivation by approximately 70%. The remaining promoter, however, could still be stimulated about 40-fold, indicating the presence of an additional responsive element within these sequences. Here, we provide evidence that a binding site for the cellular transcription factor CREB can also act as a target for IE86 transactivation. By DNase I protection analysis, a binding sequence for CREB could be detected between nucleotides -78 and -56 within the respective promoter region. After in vitro mutagenesis of this CREB-binding site within the context of the entire UL112/113 promoter, a marked reduction in transactivation levels was evident. Moreover, when individual CREB-binding sites were positioned upstream of a minimal, TATA box-containing UL112/113 promoter, they were able to confer strong IE86 responsiveness, whereas a mutated sequence did not exert any effect. In far Western blot and pull-down experiments, a direct interaction of IE86 with the cellular transcription factor CREB could be observed. The in vivo relevance of this in vitro interaction was confirmed by using various GAL4 fusion proteins in the presence or absence of IE86 which revealed a strong activation only in the presence of both a GAL4-CREB fusion and IE86. This shows that at least one specific member of the ATF/CREB family of transcription factors is involved in mediating transactivation by the HCMV IE86 protein

  4. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy. PMID:26971503

  5. Input to the lateral habenula from the basal ganglia is excitatory, aversive, and suppressed by serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Shabel, Steven J.; Proulx, Christophe D.; Trias, Anthony; Murphy, Ryan T.; Malinow, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Summary The lateral habenula (LHb) has recently been identified as a key regulator of the reward system by driving inhibition onto dopaminergic neurons. However, the nature and potential modulation of the major input to the LHb originating from the basal ganglia are poorly understood. Although the output of the basal ganglia is thought to be primarily inhibitory, here we show that transmission from the basal ganglia to the LHb is excitatory, glutamatergic and suppressed by serotonin. Behaviorally, activation of this pathway is aversive, consistent with its role as an ‘anti-reward’ signal. Our demonstration of an excitatory projection from the basal ganglia to the LHb explains how LHb-projecting basal ganglia neurons can have similar encoding properties as LHb neurons themselves. Our results also provide a link between ‘anti-reward’ excitatory synapses and serotonin, a neuromodulator implicated in depression. PMID:22578499

  6. Input to the lateral habenula from the basal ganglia is excitatory, aversive, and suppressed by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Shabel, Steven J; Proulx, Christophe D; Trias, Anthony; Murphy, Ryan T; Malinow, Roberto

    2012-05-10

    The lateral habenula (LHb) has recently been identified as a key regulator of the reward system by driving inhibition onto dopaminergic neurons. However, the nature and potential modulation of the major input to the LHb originating from the basal ganglia are poorly understood. Although the output of the basal ganglia is thought to be primarily inhibitory, here we show that transmission from the basal ganglia to the LHb is excitatory, glutamatergic, and suppressed by serotonin. Behaviorally, activation of this pathway is aversive, consistent with its role as an "antireward" signal. Our demonstration of an excitatory projection from the basal ganglia to the LHb explains how LHb-projecting basal ganglia neurons can have similar encoding properties as LHb neurons themselves. Our results also provide a link between antireward excitatory synapses and serotonin, a neuromodulator implicated in depression.

  7. Input to the lateral habenula from the basal ganglia is excitatory, aversive, and suppressed by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Shabel, Steven J; Proulx, Christophe D; Trias, Anthony; Murphy, Ryan T; Malinow, Roberto

    2012-05-10

    The lateral habenula (LHb) has recently been identified as a key regulator of the reward system by driving inhibition onto dopaminergic neurons. However, the nature and potential modulation of the major input to the LHb originating from the basal ganglia are poorly understood. Although the output of the basal ganglia is thought to be primarily inhibitory, here we show that transmission from the basal ganglia to the LHb is excitatory, glutamatergic, and suppressed by serotonin. Behaviorally, activation of this pathway is aversive, consistent with its role as an "antireward" signal. Our demonstration of an excitatory projection from the basal ganglia to the LHb explains how LHb-projecting basal ganglia neurons can have similar encoding properties as LHb neurons themselves. Our results also provide a link between antireward excitatory synapses and serotonin, a neuromodulator implicated in depression. PMID:22578499

  8. p38 MAPK regulates steroidogenesis through transcriptional repression of STAR gene.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Syed Kashif; Shen, Wen-Jun; Bittner, Stefanie; Bittner, Alex; McLean, Mark P; Han, Jiahuai; Davis, Roger J; Kraemer, Fredric B; Azhar, Salman

    2014-08-01

    STAR/StarD1, part of a protein complex, mediates the transport of cholesterol from the outer to inner mitochondrial membrane, which is the rate-limiting step for steroidogenesis, and where steroid hormone synthesis begins. Herein, we examined the role of oxidant-sensitive p38 MAPKs in the regulation of STAR gene transcription, using model steroidogenic cell lines. Our data indicate that oxidant activation of p38 MAPK exhibits a negative regulatory role in the induction of functional expression of STAR, as evidenced by enhanced induction of STAR (mRNA/protein) expression and increased steroidogenesis during pharmacological inhibition of p38 MAPK or in cells with increased transient overexpression of a dominant-negative (dn) form of p38 MAPKα or p38 MAPKβ. Studies with rat Star-promoter demonstrated that overexpression of p38 MAPKα-wt, -β, or -γ significantly reduced both basal and cAMP-sensitive promoter activity. In contrast, overexpression of p38 MAPKα-dn, -β, or -γ enhanced the Star promoter activity under basal conditions and in response to cAMP stimulation. Use of various constitutively active and dn constructs and designer knock-out cell lines demonstrated that MKK3 and MKK6, the upstream activators of p38 MAPKs, play a role in p38 MAPKα-mediated inhibition of Star promoter activity. In addition, our studies raised the possibility of CREB being a potential target of the p38 MAPK inhibitory effect on Star promoter activity. Collectively, these data provide novel mechanistic information about how oxidant-sensitive p38 MAPKs, particularly p38 MAPKα, contribute to the negative regulation of Star gene expression and inhibit steroidogenesis.

  9. The Basal Ganglia-Circa 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehler, William R.

    1981-01-01

    Our review has shown that recent studies with the new anterograde and retrograde axon transport methods have confirmed and extended our knowledge of the projection of the basal ganglia and clarified their sites of origin. They have thrown new light on certain topographic connectional relationships and revealed several new reciprocal connections between constituent nuclei of the basal ganglia. Similarly, attention has been drawn to the fact that there have also been many new histochemical techniques introduced in recent years that are now providing regional biochemical overlays for connectional maps of the central nervous system, especially regions in, or interconnecting with, the basal ganglia. However, although these new morphological biochemical maps are very complex and technically highly advanced, our understanding of the function controlled by the basal ganglia still remains primitive. The reader who is interested in some new ideas of the functional aspects of the basal ganglia is directed to Nauta's proposed conceptual reorganization of the basal ganglia telencephalon and to Marsden's more clinically orientated appraisal of the unsolved mysteries of the basal ganglia participation in the control of movement.

  10. Somatic Cell Fusions Reveal Extensive Heterogeneity in Basal-like Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Su, Ying; Subedee, Ashim; Bloushtain-Qimron, Noga; Savova, Virginia; Krzystanek, Marcin; Li, Lewyn; Marusyk, Andriy; Tabassum, Doris P; Zak, Alexander; Flacker, Mary Jo; Li, Mei; Lin, Jessica J; Sukumar, Saraswati; Suzuki, Hiromu; Long, Henry; Szallasi, Zoltan; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Maruyama, Reo; Polyak, Kornelia

    2015-06-16

    Basal-like and luminal breast tumors have distinct clinical behavior and molecular profiles, yet the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. To interrogate processes that determine these distinct phenotypes and their inheritance pattern, we generated somatic cell fusions and performed integrated genetic and epigenetic (DNA methylation and chromatin) profiling. We found that the basal-like trait is generally dominant and is largely defined by epigenetic repression of luminal transcription factors. Definition of super-enhancers highlighted a core program common in luminal cells but a high degree of heterogeneity in basal-like breast cancers that correlates with clinical outcome. We also found that protein extracts of basal-like cells are sufficient to induce a luminal-to-basal phenotypic switch, implying a trigger of basal-like autoregulatory circuits. We determined that KDM6A might be required for luminal-basal fusions, and we identified EN1, TBX18, and TCF4 as candidate transcriptional regulators of the luminal-to-basal switch. Our findings highlight the remarkable epigenetic plasticity of breast cancer cells. PMID:26051943

  11. Morphological elucidation of basal ganglia circuits contributing reward prediction

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyama, Fumino; Takahashi, Susumu; Karube, Fuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies in monkeys have shown that dopaminergic neurons respond to the reward prediction error. In addition, striatal neurons alter their responsiveness to cortical or thalamic inputs in response to the dopamine signal, via the mechanism of dopamine-regulated synaptic plasticity. These findings have led to the hypothesis that the striatum exhibits synaptic plasticity under the influence of the reward prediction error and conduct reinforcement learning throughout the basal ganglia circuits. The reinforcement learning model is useful; however, the mechanism by which such a process emerges in the basal ganglia needs to be anatomically explained. The actor–critic model has been previously proposed and extended by the existence of role sharing within the striatum, focusing on the striosome/matrix compartments. However, this hypothesis has been difficult to confirm morphologically, partly because of the complex structure of the striosome/matrix compartments. Here, we review recent morphological studies that elucidate the input/output organization of the striatal compartments. PMID:25698913

  12. Morphological elucidation of basal ganglia circuits contributing reward prediction.

    PubMed

    Fujiyama, Fumino; Takahashi, Susumu; Karube, Fuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies in monkeys have shown that dopaminergic neurons respond to the reward prediction error. In addition, striatal neurons alter their responsiveness to cortical or thalamic inputs in response to the dopamine signal, via the mechanism of dopamine-regulated synaptic plasticity. These findings have led to the hypothesis that the striatum exhibits synaptic plasticity under the influence of the reward prediction error and conduct reinforcement learning throughout the basal ganglia circuits. The reinforcement learning model is useful; however, the mechanism by which such a process emerges in the basal ganglia needs to be anatomically explained. The actor-critic model has been previously proposed and extended by the existence of role sharing within the striatum, focusing on the striosome/matrix compartments. However, this hypothesis has been difficult to confirm morphologically, partly because of the complex structure of the striosome/matrix compartments. Here, we review recent morphological studies that elucidate the input/output organization of the striatal compartments. PMID:25698913

  13. [Morphological Re-evaluation of the Basal Ganglia Network].

    PubMed

    Fujiyama, Fumino

    2016-07-01

    Electrophysiological studies in monkeys have shown that dopaminergic neurons respond to the reward prediction error. In addition, striatal neurons alter their responsiveness to cortical or thalamic inputs in response to dopamine signals, via dopamine-regulated synaptic plasticity. These findings have led to the hypothesis that the striatum exhibits synaptic plasticity under the influence of reward prediction error and conducts reinforcement learning throughout the basal ganglia circuits. The reinforcement learning model is useful; however, the mechanism by which such a process emerges in the basal ganglia needs to be anatomically explained. The actor-critic model has been previously proposed and extended by the existence of role sharing within the striatum, with particular focus on the striosome and matrix compartments. However, this hypothesis has been difficult to confirm morphologically, partly because of the complex structure of the striosome and matrix compartments. Here, we review recent morphological studies that elucidate the input/output organization of the striatal compartments. PMID:27395470

  14. CREB-BDNF pathway influences alcohol cue-elicited activation in drinkers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiayu; Hutchison, Kent E; Calhoun, Vince D; Claus, Eric D; Turner, Jessica A; Sui, Jing; Liu, Jingyu

    2015-08-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is suggested to have polygenic risk factors and also exhibits neurological complications, strongly encouraging a translational study to explore the associations between aggregates of genetic variants and brain function alterations related to alcohol use. In this study, we used a semiblind multivariate approach, parallel independent component analysis with multiple references (pICA-MR) to investigate relationships of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms with alcohol cue-elicited brain activations in 315 heavy drinkers, where pICA-MR assesses multiple reference genes for their architecture and functional influences on neurobiological conditions. The genetic component derived from the cAMP-response element-binding protein and -brain derived neurotrophic factor (CREB-BDNF) pathway reference was significantly associated (r = -0.38, P = 3.98 × 10(-12) ) with an imaging component reflecting hyperactivation in precuneus, superior parietal lobule, and posterior cingulate for drinkers with more severe alcohol dependence symptoms. The highlighted brain regions participate in many cognitive processes and have been robustly implicated in craving-related studies. The genetic factor highlighted the CREB and BDNF references, as well as other genes including GRM5, GRM7, GRID1, GRIN2A, PRKCA, and PRKCB. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that the genetic component was enriched in synaptic plasticity, GABA, and protein kinase A signaling. Collectively, our findings suggest that genetic variations in various neural plasticity and signaling pathways partially explain the variance of precuneus reactivity to alcohol cues which appears to be associated with AUD severity. PMID:25939814

  15. Preliminary evaluation of the basal sandstone in Tennessee for receiving injected wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulderink, Dolores; Bradley, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    The EPA is authorized, under the Safe Drinking Water Act, to administer the Underground Injection Control program. This program allows for the regulation of deep-well disposal of wastes and establishes criteria to protect underground sources of drinking water from contamination. The basal sandstone in Tennessee occurs west of the Valley and Ridge province at depths of 5,000 to 9,000 ft below land surface. The basal sandstone consists of about 30 to 750 ft of Cambrian sandstone overlying the crystalline basement complex. The basal sandstone is overlain and confined by shale and carbonate rocks of the Middle and Upper Cambrian Conasauga Group. Hydrologic data for the basal sandstone, available from only three sites (four wells) in Tennessee, indicate that the basal sandstone generally has low porosity and permeability with a few zones having enough permeability to accept injected fluids. Limited water quality data indicate the basal sandstone contains water with dissolved solids concentrations exceeding 10,000 mg/L. Since the dissolved-solids concentrations exceed 10,000 mg/L, the basal sandstone is not classified as an underground source of drinking water according to EPA regulations. (Author 's abstract)

  16. Thermodynamic significance of human basal metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cuncheng

    1993-06-01

    The human basal state, a non-equilibrium steady state, is analysed in this paper in the light of the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics whereby the thermodynamic significance of the basal metabolic rate and its distinction to the dissipation function and exergy loss are identified. The analysis demonstrates the correct expression of the effects of the blood flow on the heat balance in a human-body bio-heat model and the relationship between the basal metabolic rate and the blood perfusion.

  17. Inhibition of GSK3 differentially modulates NF-{kappa}B, CREB, AP-1 and {beta}-catenin signaling in hepatocytes, but fails to promote TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Goetschel, Frank; Kern, Claudia; Lang, Simona; Sparna, Titus; Markmann, Cordula; Schwager, Joseph; McNelly, Sabine; Weizsaecker, Fritz von; Laufer, Stefan; Hecht, Andreas Merfort, Irmgard

    2008-04-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is known to modulate cell survival and apoptosis through multiple intracellular signaling pathways. However, its hepatoprotective function and its role in activation of NF-{kappa}B and anti-apoptotic factors are poorly understood and remain controversial. Here we investigated whether inhibition of GSK-3 could induce apoptosis in the presence of TNF-{alpha} in primary mouse hepatocytes. We show that pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 in primary mouse hepatocytes does not lead to TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis despite reduced NF-{kappa}B activity. Enhanced stability of I{kappa}B-{alpha} appears to be responsible for lower levels of nuclear NF-{kappa}B and hence reduced transactivation. Additionally, inhibition of GSK-3 was accompanied by marked upregulation of {beta}-catenin, AP-1, and CREB transcription factors. Stimulation of canonical Wnt signaling and CREB activity led to elevated levels of anti-apoptotic factors. Hence, survival of primary mouse hepatocytes may be caused by the activation and/or upregulation of other key regulators of liver homeostasis and regeneration. These signaling molecules may compensate for the compromised anti-apoptotic function of NF-{kappa}B and allow survival of hepatocytes in the presence of TNF-{alpha} and GSK-3 inhibition.

  18. Distinct regions of ATF/CREB proteins Atf1 and Pcr1 control recombination hotspot ade6–M26 and the osmotic stress response

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Davidson, Mari K.; Wahls, Wayne P.

    2008-01-01

    The Atf1 protein of Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains a bZIP (DNA-binding/protein dimerization) domain characteristic of ATF/CREB proteins, but no other functional domains or clear homologs have been reported. Atf1-containing, bZIP protein dimers bind to CRE-like DNA sites, regulate numerous stress responses, and activate meiotic recombination at hotspots like ade6–M26. We defined systematically the organization of Atf1 and its heterodimer partner Pcr1, which is required for a subset of Atf1-dependent functions. Surprisingly, only the bZIP domain of Pcr1 is required for hotspot activity and tethering of Atf1 to ade6 promotes recombination in the absence of its bZIP domain and the Pcr1 protein. Therefore the recombination–activation domain of Atf1-Pcr1 heterodimer resides exclusively in Atf1, and Pcr1 confers DNA-binding site specificity in vivo. Atf1 has a modular organization in which distinct regions affect differentially the osmotic stress response (OSA) and meiotic recombination (HRA, HRR). The HRA and HRR regions are necessary and sufficient to activate and repress recombination, respectively. Moreover, Atf1 defines a family of conserved proteins with discrete sequence motifs in the functional domains (OSA, HRA, HRR, bZIP). These findings reveal the functional organization of Atf1 and Pcr1, and illustrate several mechanisms by which bZIP proteins can regulate multiple, seemingly disparate activities. PMID:18375981

  19. Distinct regions of ATF/CREB proteins Atf1 and Pcr1 control recombination hotspot ade6-M26 and the osmotic stress response.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Davidson, Mari K; Wahls, Wayne P

    2008-05-01

    The Atf1 protein of Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains a bZIP (DNA-binding/protein dimerization) domain characteristic of ATF/CREB proteins, but no other functional domains or clear homologs have been reported. Atf1-containing, bZIP protein dimers bind to CRE-like DNA sites, regulate numerous stress responses, and activate meiotic recombination at hotspots like ade6-M26. We defined systematically the organization of Atf1 and its heterodimer partner Pcr1, which is required for a subset of Atf1-dependent functions. Surprisingly, only the bZIP domain of Pcr1 is required for hotspot activity and tethering of Atf1 to ade6 promotes recombination in the absence of its bZIP domain and the Pcr1 protein. Therefore the recombination-activation domain of Atf1-Pcr1 heterodimer resides exclusively in Atf1, and Pcr1 confers DNA-binding site specificity in vivo. Atf1 has a modular organization in which distinct regions affect differentially the osmotic stress response (OSA) and meiotic recombination (HRA, HRR). The HRA and HRR regions are necessary and sufficient to activate and repress recombination, respectively. Moreover, Atf1 defines a family of conserved proteins with discrete sequence motifs in the functional domains (OSA, HRA, HRR, bZIP). These findings reveal the functional organization of Atf1 and Pcr1, and illustrate several mechanisms by which bZIP proteins can regulate multiple, seemingly disparate activities. PMID:18375981

  20. High mobility group Box-1 inhibits cancer cell motility and metastasis by suppressing activation of transcription factor CREB and nWASP expression.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhenghong; Che, Xun; Wang, Yulei; Li, Bowen; Li, Jingxia; Dai, Wei; Lin, Charles P; Huang, Chuanshu

    2014-09-15

    The ability to metastasize is a hallmark of malignant tumors, and metastasis is the principal cause of death of cancer patients. The High Mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB1) is a multifunction protein that serves as both a chromatin protein and an extracellular signaling molecule. Our current study demonstrated a novel mechanism of HMGB1 in the regulation of cancer cell actin polymerization, cell skeleton formation, cancer cell motility and metastasis. We found that knockdown of HMGB1 in human lung cancer A549 cells significantly increased cell β-actin polymerization, cell skeleton formation, cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro, as well as metastasis in vivo. And this increase could be inhibited by treatment of HMGB1 knockdown cells with recombinant human HMGB1. Further studies discovered that HMGB1 suppressed phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and activation of CREB, by inhibiting nuclear translocation of PKA catalytic subunit. This reduces nWASP mRNA transcription and expression, further impairing cancer cell motility. Our findings on the novel mechanism underlying the HMGB1 anti-metastatic effect on cancer provides significant insight into the understanding of the nature of HMGB1 in cancer invasion and metastasis, further serving as key information for utilization of HMGB1 and its regulated downstream components as new targets for cancer therapy. PMID:25277185

  1. Participation of microRNA 124-CREB pathway: a parallel memory enhancing mechanism of standardised extract of Bacopa monniera (BESEB CDRI-08).

    PubMed

    Preethi, Jayakumar; Singh, Hemant K; Charles, Prisila Dulcy; Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel

    2012-10-01

    Bacosides, the effective component of standardised leaf extract of Bacopa monniera (BESEB CDRI-08) has been reported to have memory enhancing effect. Our previous reports suggested that BESEB CDRI-08 (BME) improves memory in postnatal rats by enhancing serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] metabolism, its transportation and subsequently activates 5-HT(3A) receptor during hippocampus-dependent learning. In this study, we examine whether the up-regulated 5-HT(3A) receptor activity by BME modulate microRNA 124-CREB pathway to enhance synaptic plasticity. Wistar rat pups received single dose of vehicle solution (0.5 % gum acacia + 0.9 % saline)/BME (80 mg/kg)/mCPBG (10 mg/kg)/BME + mCPBG during the postnatal days (PND) 15-29. On PND 30, individuals were trained at brightness discrimination task and 24 h later, they were tested on the task. The BME treated group exhibited significantly lower percentage of errors during retention than acquisition. In addition, pre-miR-124 expression in hippocampus was significantly down-regulated in the BME and mCPBG + BME treated groups combined with a significant increase in the plasticity related genes, cAMP response element-binding protein, its phosphorylation and postsynaptic density protein 95. Our results suggest that this may be one of the mechanisms of bacosides present in BME for the memory enhancement.

  2. Participation of microRNA 124-CREB pathway: a parallel memory enhancing mechanism of standardised extract of Bacopa monniera (BESEB CDRI-08).

    PubMed

    Preethi, Jayakumar; Singh, Hemant K; Charles, Prisila Dulcy; Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel

    2012-10-01

    Bacosides, the effective component of standardised leaf extract of Bacopa monniera (BESEB CDRI-08) has been reported to have memory enhancing effect. Our previous reports suggested that BESEB CDRI-08 (BME) improves memory in postnatal rats by enhancing serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] metabolism, its transportation and subsequently activates 5-HT(3A) receptor during hippocampus-dependent learning. In this study, we examine whether the up-regulated 5-HT(3A) receptor activity by BME modulate microRNA 124-CREB pathway to enhance synaptic plasticity. Wistar rat pups received single dose of vehicle solution (0.5 % gum acacia + 0.9 % saline)/BME (80 mg/kg)/mCPBG (10 mg/kg)/BME + mCPBG during the postnatal days (PND) 15-29. On PND 30, individuals were trained at brightness discrimination task and 24 h later, they were tested on the task. The BME treated group exhibited significantly lower percentage of errors during retention than acquisition. In addition, pre-miR-124 expression in hippocampus was significantly down-regulated in the BME and mCPBG + BME treated groups combined with a significant increase in the plasticity related genes, cAMP response element-binding protein, its phosphorylation and postsynaptic density protein 95. Our results suggest that this may be one of the mechanisms of bacosides present in BME for the memory enhancement. PMID:22837048

  3. Stimulation of StAR expression by cAMP is controlled by inhibition of highly inducible SIK1 via CRTC2, a co-activator of CREB.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwoo; Tong, Tiegang; Takemori, Hiroshi; Jefcoate, Colin

    2015-06-15

    In mouse steroidogenic cells the activation of cholesterol metabolism is mediated by steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Here, we visualized a coordinated regulation of StAR transcription, splicing and post-transcriptional processing, which are synchronized by salt inducible kinase (SIK1) and CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC2). To detect primary RNA (pRNA), spliced primary RNA (Sp-RNA) and mRNA in single cells, we generated probe sets by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These methods allowed us to address the nature of StAR gene expression and to visualize protein-nucleic acid interactions through direct detection. We show that SIK1 represses StAR expression in Y1 adrenal and MA10 testis cells through inhibition of processing mediated by CRTC2. Digital image analysis matches qPCR analyses of the total cell culture. Evidence is presented for spatially separate accumulation of StAR pRNA and Sp-RNA at the gene loci in the nucleus. These findings establish that cAMP, SIK and CRTC mediate StAR expression through activation of individual StAR gene loci.

  4. Phosphorylation-Independent Regulation of Atf1-Promoted Meiotic Recombination by Stress-Activated, p38 Kinase Spc1 of Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Davidson, Mari K.; Wahls, Wayne P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Stress-activated protein kinases regulate multiple cellular responses to a wide variety of intracellular and extracellular conditions. The conserved, multifunctional, ATF/CREB protein Atf1 (Mts1, Gad7) of fission yeast binds to CRE-like (M26) DNA sites. Atf1 is phosphorylated by the conserved, p38-family kinase Spc1 (Sty1, Phh1) and is required for many Spc1-dependent stress responses, efficient sexual differentiation, and activation of Rec12 (Spo11)-dependent meiotic recombination hotspots like ade6-M26. Methodology/Principal Findings We sought to define mechanisms by which Spc1 regulates Atf1 function at the ade6-M26 hotspot. The Spc1 kinase was essential for hotspot activity, but dispensable for basal recombination. Unexpectedly, a protein lacking all eleven MAPK phospho-acceptor sites and detectable phosphorylation (Atf1-11M) was fully proficient for hotspot recombination. Furthermore, tethering of Atf1 to ade6 in the chromosome by a heterologous DNA binding domain bypassed the requirement for Spc1 in promoting recombination. Conclusions/Significance The Spc1 protein kinase regulates the pathway of Atf1-promoted recombination at or before the point where Atf1 binds to chromosomes, and this pathway regulation is independent of the phosphorylation status of Atf1. Since basal recombination is Spc1-independent, the principal function of the Spc1 kinase in meiotic recombination is to correctly position Atf1-promoted recombination at hotspots along chromosomes. We also propose new hypotheses on regulatory mechanisms for shared (e.g., DNA binding) and distinct (e.g., osmoregulatory vs. recombinogenic) activities of multifunctional, stress-activated protein Atf1. PMID:19436749

  5. Action, time and the basal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Henry H.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to control the speed of movement is compromised in neurological disorders involving the basal ganglia, a set of subcortical cerebral nuclei that receive prominent dopaminergic projections from the midbrain. For example, bradykinesia, slowness of movement, is a major symptom of Parkinson's disease, whereas rapid tics are observed in patients with Tourette syndrome. Recent experimental work has also implicated dopamine (DA) and the basal ganglia in action timing. Here, I advance the hypothesis that the basal ganglia control the rate of change in kinaesthetic perceptual variables. In particular, the sensorimotor cortico-basal ganglia network implements a feedback circuit for the control of movement velocity. By modulating activity in this network, DA can change the gain of velocity reference signals. The lack of DA thus reduces the output of the velocity control system which specifies the rate of change in body configurations, slowing the transition from one body configuration to another. PMID:24446506

  6. The Basal NPO crh Fluctuation is Sustained Under Compromised Glucocorticoid Signaling in Diurnal Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chen-Min

    2015-01-01

    The circadian activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal/interrenal (HPA/I) axis is crucial for maintaining vertebrate homeostasis. In mammals, both the principle regulator, corticotropin-releasing hormone (crh) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the final effector, the glucocorticoids show daily rhythmic patterns. While glucocorticoids are the main negative regulator of PVN crh under stress, whether they modulate the PVN crh rhythm under basal condition is unclear in diurnal animals. Using zebrafish larvae, a recently-established diurnal model organism suited for the HPA/I axis and homeostasis research, we ask if glucocorticoid changes are required to maintain the daily variation of PVN crh. We first characterized the development of the HPI axis overtime and showed that the basal activity of the HPI axis is robust and tightly regulated by circadian cue in 6-day old larvae. We demonstrated a negative correlation between the basal cortisol and neurosecretory preoptic area (NPO) crh variations. To test if cortisol drives NPO crh variation, we analyzed the NPO crh levels in glucorcorticoid antagonist-treated larvae and mutants lacking circadian cortisol variations. We showed that NPO crh basal fluctuation is sustained although the level was decreased without proper cortisol signaling in zebrafish. Our data indicates that glucocorticoids do not modulate the basal NPO crh variations but may be required for maintaining overall NPO crh levels. This further suggests that under basal and stress conditions the HPA/I axis activity is modulated differently by glucocorticoids. PMID:26696807

  7. Automatic basal slice detection for cardiac analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paknezhad, Mahsa; Marchesseau, Stephanie; Brown, Michael S.

    2016-03-01

    Identification of the basal slice in cardiac imaging is a key step to measuring the ejection fraction (EF) of the left ventricle (LV). Despite research on cardiac segmentation, basal slice identification is routinely performed manually. Manual identification, however, has been shown to have high inter-observer variability, with a variation of the EF by up to 8%. Therefore, an automatic way of identifying the basal slice is still required. Prior published methods operate by automatically tracking the mitral valve points from the long-axis view of the LV. These approaches assumed that the basal slice is the first short-axis slice below the mitral valve. However, guidelines published in 2013 by the society for cardiovascular magnetic resonance indicate that the basal slice is the uppermost short-axis slice with more than 50% myocardium surrounding the blood cavity. Consequently, these existing methods are at times identifying the incorrect short-axis slice. Correct identification of the basal slice under these guidelines is challenging due to the poor image quality and blood movement during image acquisition. This paper proposes an automatic tool that focuses on the two-chamber slice to find the basal slice. To this end, an active shape model is trained to automatically segment the two-chamber view for 51 samples using the leave-one-out strategy. The basal slice was detected using temporal binary profiles created for each short-axis slice from the segmented two-chamber slice. From the 51 successfully tested samples, 92% and 84% of detection results were accurate at the end-systolic and the end-diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle, respectively.

  8. From tyrosine to melanin: Signaling pathways and factors regulating melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rzepka, Zuzanna; Buszman, Ewa; Beberok, Artur; Wrześniok, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Melanins are natural pigments of skin, hair and eyes and can be classified into two main types: brown to black eumelanin and yellow to reddish-brown pheomelanin. Biosynthesis of melanins takes place in melanosomes, which are specialized cytoplasmic organelles of melanocytes - dendritic cells located in the basal layer of the epidermis, uveal tract of the eye, hair follicles, as well as in the inner ear, central nervous system and heart. Melanogenesis is a multistep process and begins with the conversion of amino acid L-tyrosine to DOPAquinone. The addition of cysteine or glutathione to DOPAquinone leads to the intermediates formation, followed by subsequent transformations and polymerization to the final product, pheomelanin. In the absence of thiol compounds DOPAquinone undergoes an intramolecular cyclization and oxidation to form DOPAchrome, which is then converted to 5,6-dihydroksyindole (DHI) or 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). Eumelanin is formed by polymerization of DHI and DHICA and their quinones. Regulation of melanogenesis is achieved by physical and biochemical factors. The article presents the intracellular signaling pathways: cAMP/PKA/CREB/MITF cascade, MAP kinases cascade, PLC/DAG/PKCβ cascade and NO/cGMP/PKG cascade, which are involved in the regulation of expression and activity of the melanogenesis-related proteins by ultraviolet radiation and endogenous agents (cytokines, hormones). Activity of the key melanogenic enzyme, tyrosinase, is also affected by pH and temperature. Many pharmacologically active substances are able to inhibit or stimulate melanin biosynthesis, as evidenced by in vitro studies on cultured pigment cells. PMID:27356601

  9. The pancreatic cancer secreted REG4 promotes macrophage polarization to M2 through EGFR/AKT/CREB pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiuying; Wu, Deqing; Zhou, Shu; Wan, Feng; Liu, Hua; Xu, Xiaorong; Xu, Xuanfu; Zhao, Yan; Tang, Maochun

    2016-01-01

    In the periphery of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), high accumulation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), which exhibit M2 phenotype, has been shown to be correlated with extra-pancreatic invasion, lymph vessel invasion, lymph node involvement and shortened survival time. However, mechanisms by which tumor cells educate and reprogram TAMs remain largely unclear. The phenotype of TAMs in PDAC tissues was confirmed by immunofluoresence and confocal microscopy. Human CD14+ monocytes were incubated with recombinant human REG4 (rREG4) before being stimulated with LPS and IL-10 and IL-6 were measured with ELISA. A panel of M1 and M2 genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Panc1, AsPC1 and BxPC3 cells were cultured in the conditioned medium (CM) and treated with REG4. The macrophages were infected with CREB shRNA or cultured by the CM of Panc1 cells infected with REG4 shRNA. The expression of CD163, CD206 and REG4 and the phosphorylation levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), AKT and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in cells were assessed with western blotting. Cell proliferation and invasiveness were also assessed. The rREG4 or the conditioned medium of Panc1 cells which secreted REG4 induced the polarization macrophages to M2 phenotype. Treatment of human macrophages with REG4 resulted in phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT and CREB. The latter was responsible for REG4-mediated macrophage polarization to M2. The conditioned medium of macrophages treated with rREG4 promoted the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cell lines. REG4, overexpressed in PDAC and secreted by cancer cells, promoted macrophage polarization to M2, through at least in part, activation of ERK1/2 and CREB and changed the microenvironment to facilitate cancer growth and metastasis.

  10. Epinephrine and glucose modulate training-related CREB phosphorylation in old rats: relationships to age-related memory impairments.

    PubMed

    Morris, Ken A; Gold, Paul E

    2013-02-01

    Epinephrine enhances memory in young adult rats, in part, by increasing blood glucose levels needed to modulate memory. In old rats, epinephrine is deficient at raising blood glucose levels and thus is only moderately effective at enhancing memory. In contrast, systemic glucose injections improve memory in old rats, with resulting memory performance equal to that of young rats. The diminished response of glucose to training in old rats may blunt downstream neurochemical and molecular mechanisms needed to upregulate memory processes. In the first experiment, young adult and old rats were trained on an inhibitory avoidance task with immediate post-training injections of aCSF or glucose into the dorsal hippocampus. Old rats had significant memory impairments compared to young rats 7 days after training. Intrahippocampal injections of glucose reversed age-related deficits, improving memory scores in old rats to values seen in young rats. A second experiment examined age-related changes in activation of the transcription factor CREB, which is widely implicated in memory formation and may act downstream of hormonal and metabolic signals. Activation was assessed in response to training with systemic injections of epinephrine and glucose at doses known to enhance memory. Young adult and old rats were trained on inhibitory avoidance with immediate post-training systemic injections of saline, epinephrine, or glucose. After training, old rats had significant impairments in CREB phosphorylation in area CA1 and the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus, and in the basolateral and lateral amygdala. Epinephrine and glucose attenuated age-related deficits in CREB phosphorylation, but were more effective in the amygdala and hippocampus, respectively. Together, these results support the view that age-related changes in blood glucose responses to epinephrine contribute to memory impairments, which may be related to alterations in regional patterns of CREB phosphorylation.

  11. Broad-spectrum efficacy across cognitive domains by alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonism correlates with activation of ERK1/2 and CREB phosphorylation pathways.

    PubMed

    Bitner, Robert S; Bunnelle, William H; Anderson, David J; Briggs, Clark A; Buccafusco, Jerry; Curzon, Peter; Decker, Michael W; Frost, Jennifer M; Gronlien, Jens Halvard; Gubbins, Earl; Li, Jinhe; Malysz, John; Markosyan, Stella; Marsh, Kennan; Meyer, Michael D; Nikkel, Arthur L; Radek, Richard J; Robb, Holly M; Timmermann, Daniel; Sullivan, James P; Gopalakrishnan, Murali

    2007-09-26

    The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) plays an important role in cognitive processes and may represent a drug target for treating cognitive deficits in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In the present study, we used a novel alpha7 nAChR-selective agonist, 2-methyl-5-(6-phenyl-pyridazin-3-yl)-octahydro-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (A-582941) to interrogate cognitive efficacy, as well as examine potential cellular mechanisms of cognition. Exhibiting high affinity to native rat (Ki = 10.8 nM) and human (Ki = 16.7 nM) alpha7 nAChRs, A-582941 enhanced cognitive performance in behavioral assays including the monkey delayed matching-to-sample, rat social recognition, and mouse inhibitory avoidance models that capture domains of working memory, short-term recognition memory, and long-term memory consolidation, respectively. In addition, A-582941 normalized sensory gating deficits induced by the alpha7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine in rats, and in DBA/2 mice that exhibit a natural sensory gating deficit. Examination of signaling pathways known to be involved in cognitive function revealed that alpha7 nAChR agonism increased extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in PC12 cells. Furthermore, increases in ERK1/2 and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation were observed in mouse cingulate cortex and/or hippocampus after acute A-582941 administration producing plasma concentrations in the range of alpha7 binding affinities and behavioral efficacious doses. The MEK inhibitor SL327 completely blocked alpha7 agonist-evoked ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate that alpha7 nAChR agonism can lead to broad-spectrum efficacy in animal models at doses that enhance ERK1/2 and CREB phosphorylation/activation and may represent a mechanism that offers potential to improve cognitive deficits associated with neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. PMID:17898229

  12. Broad-spectrum efficacy across cognitive domains by alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonism correlates with activation of ERK1/2 and CREB phosphorylation pathways.

    PubMed

    Bitner, Robert S; Bunnelle, William H; Anderson, David J; Briggs, Clark A; Buccafusco, Jerry; Curzon, Peter; Decker, Michael W; Frost, Jennifer M; Gronlien, Jens Halvard; Gubbins, Earl; Li, Jinhe; Malysz, John; Markosyan, Stella; Marsh, Kennan; Meyer, Michael D; Nikkel, Arthur L; Radek, Richard J; Robb, Holly M; Timmermann, Daniel; Sullivan, James P; Gopalakrishnan, Murali

    2007-09-26

    The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) plays an important role in cognitive processes and may represent a drug target for treating cognitive deficits in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In the present study, we used a novel alpha7 nAChR-selective agonist, 2-methyl-5-(6-phenyl-pyridazin-3-yl)-octahydro-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (A-582941) to interrogate cognitive efficacy, as well as examine potential cellular mechanisms of cognition. Exhibiting high affinity to native rat (Ki = 10.8 nM) and human (Ki = 16.7 nM) alpha7 nAChRs, A-582941 enhanced cognitive performance in behavioral assays including the monkey delayed matching-to-sample, rat social recognition, and mouse inhibitory avoidance models that capture domains of working memory, short-term recognition memory, and long-term memory consolidation, respectively. In addition, A-582941 normalized sensory gating deficits induced by the alpha7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine in rats, and in DBA/2 mice that exhibit a natural sensory gating deficit. Examination of signaling pathways known to be involved in cognitive function revealed that alpha7 nAChR agonism increased extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in PC12 cells. Furthermore, increases in ERK1/2 and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation were observed in mouse cingulate cortex and/or hippocampus after acute A-582941 administration producing plasma concentrations in the range of alpha7 binding affinities and behavioral efficacious doses. The MEK inhibitor SL327 completely blocked alpha7 agonist-evoked ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate that alpha7 nAChR agonism can lead to broad-spectrum efficacy in animal models at doses that enhance ERK1/2 and CREB phosphorylation/activation and may represent a mechanism that offers potential to improve cognitive deficits associated with neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia.

  13. Autocrine activation of neuronal NMDA receptors by aspartate mediates dopamine- and cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luis E F; Murray, Peter D; Zielke, H Ronald; Roby, Clinton D; Kingsbury, Tami J; Krueger, Bruce K

    2009-10-01

    cAMP can stimulate the transcription of many activity-dependent genes via activation of the transcription factor, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). However, in mouse cortical neuron cultures, prior to synaptogenesis, neither cAMP nor dopamine, which acts via cAMP, stimulated CREB-dependent gene transcription when NR2B-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs) were blocked. Stimulation of transcription by cAMP was potentiated by inhibitors of excitatory amino acid uptake, suggesting a role for extracellular glutamate or aspartate in cAMP-induced transcription. Aspartate was identified as the extracellular messenger: enzymatic scavenging of l-aspartate, but not glutamate, blocked stimulation of CREB-dependent gene transcription by cAMP; moreover, cAMP induced aspartate but not glutamate release. Together, these results suggest that cAMP acts via an autocrine or paracrine pathway to release aspartate, which activates NR2B-containing NMDARs, leading to Ca(2+) entry and activation of transcription. This cAMP/aspartate/NMDAR signaling pathway may mediate the effects of transmitters such as dopamine on axon growth and synaptogenesis in developing neurons or on synaptic plasticity in mature neural networks.

  14. The Transcription Factor CREB Enhances Interleukin-17A Production and Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kotla, Sivareddy; Singh, Nikhlesh K.; Heckle, Mark R.; Tigyi, Gabor J.; Rao, Gadiparthi N.

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO) plays a role in atherogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms were unclear. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to explore the mechanisms of 15-LO role in atherogenesis. 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid [15(S)-HETE], the major 15-LO-dependent metabolite of arachidonic acid (AA), stimulated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by monocytes through the xanthine oxidase–mediated activation of NADPH oxidase, which led to the Syk-, Pyk2-, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)–, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element–binding protein (CREB)–dependent production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-17A (IL-17A). In addition, this pathway was required for the 15(S)-HETE–dependent migration and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells. Consistent with these observations, we found that peritoneal macrophages from ApoE−/− mice fed a high-fat diet (a mouse model of atherosclerosis) exhibited increased xanthine oxidase and NADPH oxidase activities, ROS production, phosphorylation of Syk, Pyk2, MAPK, and CREB, and enhanced IL-17A production compared to those from ApoE−/−:12/15-LO−/− mice. These events correlated with increased lipid deposits and numbers of monocytes and macrophages in the aortic arches of these mice, which resulted in atherosclerotic plaque formation. Together, these observations suggest that 15(S)-HETE exacerbates atherogenesis by enhancing CREB-dependent IL-17A production. PMID:24045154

  15. The histone acetyltransferase domains of CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300/CBP-associated factor are not necessary for cooperativity with the class II transactivator.

    PubMed

    Harton, J A; Zika, E; Ting, J P

    2001-10-19

    The class II transactivator (CIITA) is a transcriptional co-activator regulating the constitutive and interferon-gamma-inducible expression of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and related genes. Promoter remodeling occurs following CIITA induction, suggesting the involvement of chromatin remodeling factors. Transcription of numerous genes requires the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activities of CREB-binding protein (CBP), p300, and/or p300/CBP-associated factor (pCAF). These co-activators cooperate with CIITA and are hypothesized to promote class II major histocompatibility complex transcription through their HAT activity. To directly test this, we used HAT-defective CBP and pCAF. We demonstrate that cooperation between CIITA and CBP is independent of CBP HAT activity. Further, although pCAF enhances CIITA-mediated transcription, pCAF HAT domain dependence appears contingent upon the concentration of available CIITA. When HAT-defective CBP and pCAF are both present, cooperativity with CIITA is maintained. Consistent with a recent report, we show that nuclear localization of CIITA is enhanced by lysine 144, an in vitro target of pCAF-mediated HAT. Yet we find that neither mutation of lysine 144 nor deletion of residues 132-209 affects transcriptional cooperation with CBP or pCAF. Thus, acetylation of this residue may not be the primary mechanism for pCAF/CBP cooperation with CIITA. In conclusion, the HAT activities of the co-activators are not necessary for cooperation with CIITA.

  16. ATG12-ATG3 connects basal autophagy and late endosome function.

    PubMed

    Murrow, Lyndsay; Debnath, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    In addition to supporting cell survival in response to starvation or stress, autophagy promotes basal protein and organelle turnover. Compared to our understanding of stress-induced autophagy, little is known about how basal autophagy is regulated and how its activity is coordinated with other cellular processes. We recently identified a novel interaction between the ATG12-ATG3 conjugate and the ESCRT-associated protein PDCD6IP/Alix that promotes basal autophagy and endolysosomal trafficking. Moreover, ATG12-ATG3 is required for diverse PDCD6IP-mediated functions including late endosome distribution, exosome secretion, and viral budding. Our results highlight the importance of late endosomes for basal autophagic flux and reveal distinct roles for the core autophagy proteins ATG12 and ATG3 in controlling late endosome function.

  17. The basal ganglia: anatomy, physiology, and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Tisch, Stephen; Silberstein, Paul; Limousin-Dowsey, Patricia; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2004-12-01

    The basal ganglia are perceived as important nodes in cortico-subcortical networks involved in the transfer, convergence, and processing of information in motor, cognitive, and limbic domains. How this integration might occur remains a matter of some debate, particularly given the consistent finding in anatomic and physiologic studies of functional segregation in cortico-subcortical loops. More recent theories, however, have raised the notion that modality-specific information might be integrated not spatially, but rather temporally, by coincident processing in discrete neuronal populations. Basal ganglia neurotransmitters, given their diverse roles in motor performance, learning, working memory, and reward-related activity are also likely to play an important role in the integration of cerebral activity. Further work will elucidate this to a greater extent, but for now, it is clear that the basal ganglia form an important nexus in the binding of cognitive, limbic, and motor information into thought and action. PMID:15550292

  18. Shaping Action Sequences in Basal Ganglia Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Costa, Rui M

    2015-01-01

    Many behaviors necessary for organism survival are learned anew and become organized as complex sequences of actions. Recent studies suggest that cortico-basal ganglia circuits are important for chunking isolated movements into precise and robust action sequences that permit the achievement of particular goals. During sequence learning many neurons in the basal ganglia develop sequence-related activity - related to the initiation, execution, and termination of sequences - suggesting that action sequences are processed as action units. Corticostriatal plasticity is critical for the crystallization of action sequences, and for the development of sequence-related neural activity. Furthermore, this sequence-related activity is differentially expressed in direct and indirect basal ganglia pathways. These findings have implications for understanding the symptoms associated with movement and psychiatric disorders. PMID:26189204

  19. [Basal cell adenomas of the salivary glands].

    PubMed

    Kozlovskiĭ, O M

    1975-01-01

    The author presents data on morphology and clinical features of basal-cell adenomas of the salivary gland (10 cases). Singling out this neoplasm into independent onconosological group seems reasonable since basal-cell adenoma not infrequently is erroneously diagnosed as cylindroma or mixed tumour of the salivary gland, which may lead to a wrong clinical prognosis and inadequate therapeutic measures. The clinical course of this tumour is benign. The main morphological feature of the tumour is a monomorphic character of cell elements, their palisade-like distribution over the periphery of individual tumour structures and a clear-cut delimination of the parenchyma from the stroma.

  20. cAMP/PKA/CREB/GLT1 signaling involved in the antidepressant-like effects of phosphodiesterase 4D inhibitor (GEBR-7b) in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Guo, Haibiao; Sayed, Mohammad Daud SOM; Lu, Yang; Yang, Ting; Zhou, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhongming; Wang, Haitao; Wang, Chuang; Xu, Jiangping

    2016-01-01

    Objectives GEBR-7b, a potential phosphodiesterase 4D inhibitor, has been shown to have memory-enhancing effects in rodents. However, it is still unknown whether GEBR-7b also has the antidepressant-like effects in rats. Herein, we examined the potential of GEBR-7b to attenuate depression-like behaviors in the rat model of depression induced by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS). Next, we also investigated the alterations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit (PKAca), cAMP response element-binding (CREB), and glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1) levels produced by GEBR-7b in the rats model of depression. Methods Effects of GEBR-7b on CUS (35 days)-induced depression-like behaviors were examined by measuring immobility time in the forced swimming test (FST). Hippocampal cAMP levels were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas PKAca, phosphorylation of CREB (pCREB), CREB, and GLT1 in the hippocampus of rats were subjected to Western blot analysis. Results CUS exposure caused a depression-like behavior evidenced by the increased immobility time in FST. Depression-like behavior induced by CUS was accompanied by a significant increased GLT, decreased cAMP, PKAca, pCREB activities in hippocampus. However, repeated GEBR-7b administration significantly reversed CUS-induced depression-like behavior and changes of cAMP/PKA/CREB/GLT1 signaling. No alteration was observed in locomotor activity in open field test. Conclusion These findings indicate that GEBR-7b reversed the depression-like behaviors induced by CUS in rats, which is at least in part mediated by modulating cAMP, PKAca, pCREB, and GLT1 levels in the hippocampus of rats, supporting its neuroprotective potential against behavioral and biochemical dysfunctions induced by CUS. PMID:26855578

  1. Adenosine inhibits glutamatergic input to basal forebrain cholinergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hawryluk, J. M.; Ferrari, L. L.; Keating, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine has been proposed as an endogenous homeostatic sleep factor that accumulates during waking and inhibits wake-active neurons to promote sleep. It has been specifically hypothesized that adenosine decreases wakefulness and promotes sleep recovery by directly inhibiting wake-active neurons of the basal forebrain (BF), particularly BF cholinergic neurons. We previously showed that adenosine directly inhibits BF cholinergic neurons. Here, we investigated 1) how adenosine modulates glutamatergic input to BF cholinergic neurons and 2) how adenosine uptake and adenosine metabolism are involved in regulating extracellular levels of adenosine. Our experiments were conducted using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices. We found that in BF cholinergic neurons, adenosine reduced the amplitude of AMPA-mediated evoked glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and decreased the frequency of spontaneous and miniature EPSCs through presynaptic A1 receptors. Thus we have demonstrated that in addition to directly inhibiting BF cholinergic neurons, adenosine depresses excitatory inputs to these neurons. It is therefore possible that both direct and indirect inhibition may synergistically contribute to the sleep-promoting effects of adenosine in the BF. We also found that blocking the influx of adenosine through the equilibrative nucleoside transporters or inhibiting adenosine kinase and adenosine deaminase increased endogenous adenosine inhibitory tone, suggesting a possible mechanism through which adenosine extracellular levels in the basal forebrain are regulated. PMID:22357797

  2. Basal plasma immunoreactive calcitonin in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Chesnut, C H; Baylink, D J; Sisom, K; Nelp, W B; Roos, B A

    1980-06-01

    Calcitonin (CT) deficiency has been suggested as an etiologic factor in postmenopausal osteoporosis (PM-OP). Basal immunoreactive calcitonin (iCT) was measured with a sensitive radioimmunoassay (RIA) in 62 PM-OP women with compression fractures (CF) and in 28 normal age-matched women. Mean iCT values in the two groups were not significantly different (43.5 and 45.1 pg/ml, p greater than 0.10). In the 62 PM-OP females, no significant correlation was noted between basal plasma iCT levels and (1) age; (2) severity of disease as assessed by number of CF; (3) serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and immunoreactive parathyroid hormone; and (4) total bone mass as assessed by neutron activation analysis determinations of total body calcium (TBC). In 20 PM-OP patients treated for 24 mo with 100 Medical Research Council (MRC) units daily of synthetic salmon CT, no correlation was observed between basal plasma iCT and response of bone mass (TBC) to therapy. These data suggest that basal CT is not decreased in women with PM-OP, and that the level of circulating CT does not influence therapeutic changes in bone mass during CT therapy. CT is probably not a major etiologic or pathogenetic factor in PM-OP.

  3. Teaching Social Studies Using Basal Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Jesus; Logan, John W.

    1983-01-01

    A lesson, "Harriet Tubman: A Most Successful Conductor," illustrates how to employ a basal reader in social studies instruction in the elementary grades. This approach offers students a relevant curriculum, greater opportunities for concept development, practice in skills areas, and activities that offer greater opportunity to master social…

  4. Basal ganglia orient eyes to reward.

    PubMed

    Hikosaka, Okihide; Nakamura, Kae; Nakahara, Hiroyuki

    2006-02-01

    Expectation of reward motivates our behaviors and influences our decisions. Indeed, neuronal activity in many brain areas is modulated by expected reward. However, it is still unclear where and how the reward-dependent modulation of neuronal activity occurs and how the reward-modulated signal is transformed into motor outputs. Recent studies suggest an important role of the basal ganglia. Sensorimotor/cognitive activities of neurons in the basal ganglia are strongly modulated by expected reward. Through their abundant outputs to the brain stem motor areas and the thalamocortical circuits, the basal ganglia appear capable of producing body movements based on expected reward. A good behavioral measure to test this hypothesis is saccadic eye movement because its brain stem mechanism has been extensively studied. Studies from our laboratory suggest that the basal ganglia play a key role in guiding the gaze to the location where reward is available. Neurons in the caudate nucleus and the substantia nigra pars reticulata are extremely sensitive to the positional difference in expected reward, which leads to a bias in excitability between the superior colliculi such that the saccade to the to-be-rewarded position occurs more quickly. It is suggested that the reward modulation occurs in the caudate where cortical inputs carrying spatial signals and dopaminergic inputs carrying reward-related signals are integrated. These data support a specific form of reinforcement learning theories, but also suggest further refinement of the theory.

  5. Treatment of Gender in Basal Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Maxwell W.; Chick, Kay A.

    2005-01-01

    Nominal level gender and gender-related information in four, well-known basal reading series was gathered and analyzed. For each of 746 stories, the number of male and female main characters in text and illustrations was determined. Employment status, job title and estimated yearly salary were obtained for employed adult, human, main characters.…

  6. Reward functions of the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-07-01

    Besides their fundamental movement function evidenced by Parkinsonian deficits, the basal ganglia are involved in processing closely linked non-motor, cognitive and reward information. This review describes the reward functions of three brain structures that are major components of the basal ganglia or are closely associated with the basal ganglia, namely midbrain dopamine neurons, pedunculopontine nucleus, and striatum (caudate nucleus, putamen, nucleus accumbens). Rewards are involved in learning (positive reinforcement), approach behavior, economic choices and positive emotions. The response of dopamine neurons to rewards consists of an early detection component and a subsequent reward component that reflects a prediction error in economic utility, but is unrelated to movement. Dopamine activations to non-rewarded or aversive stimuli reflect physical impact, but not punishment. Neurons in pedunculopontine nucleus project their axons to dopamine neurons and process sensory stimuli, movements and rewards and reward-predicting stimuli without coding outright reward prediction errors. Neurons in striatum, besides their pronounced movement relationships, process rewards irrespective of sensory and motor aspects, integrate reward information into movement activity, code the reward value of individual actions, change their reward-related activity during learning, and code own reward in social situations depending on whose action produces the reward. These data demonstrate a variety of well-characterized reward processes in specific basal ganglia nuclei consistent with an important function in non-motor aspects of motivated behavior. PMID:26838982

  7. Basal ganglia germinoma with progressive cerebral hemiatrophy.

    PubMed

    Liu, E; Robertson, R L; du Plessis, A; Pomeroy, S L

    1999-04-01

    The authors describe a 7-year-old Chinese-American female with a germinoma of the basal ganglia who presented with progressive hemiparesis and cerebral hemiatrophy. The additional finding of markedly elevated antiphospholipid antibodies suggests the possibility of an autoimmune pathogenesis for the progressive cerebral atrophy, as well as the later development of cognitive decline, tics, and obsessive-compulsive behaviors. PMID:10328283

  8. TEMPORAL VARIABILITY IN BASAL ISOPRENE EMISSION FACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal variability in basal isoprene emission factor (micrograms C /g hr or nmol/ m2 sec, leaf temperature at 30 degrees C and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) at 1000 micromol/ m2 sec) was studied during the 1998 growing season at Duke Forest in the North Carolina Pie...

  9. DuOx2 Promoter Regulation by Hormones, Transcriptional Factors and the Coactivator TAZ.

    PubMed

    Cardoso-Weide, L C; Cardoso-Penha, R C; Costa, M W; Ferreira, A C F; Carvalho, D P; Santisteban, P S

    2015-03-01

    The production of H2O2, which is essential to thyroid hormone synthesis, involves two NADPH oxidases: dual oxidases 1 and 2 (DuOx1 and DuOx2). A functional study with human DuOx genes and their 5'-flanking regions showed that DuOx1 and -2 promoters are different from thyroid-specific gene promoters. Furthermore, their transcriptional activities are not restricted to thyroid cells. While regulation of Tg (thyroglobulin) and TPO (thyroperoxidase) expression have been extensively studied, DuOx2 promoter regulation by hormones and transcriptional factors need to be more explored. Herein we investigated the role of TSH, insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), as well as the cAMP effect on DuOx2 promoter (ptx41) activity in transfected rat thyroid cell lines (PCCL3). We also assessed DuOx2 promoter activity in the presence of transcriptional factors crucial to thyroid development such as TTF-1 (thyroid transcription factor 1), PAX8, CREB, DREAM, Nkx2.5 and the coactivator TAZ in HeLa and HEK 293T-transfected cells. Our results show that TSH and forskolin, which increase cAMP in thyroid cells, stimulated DuOx2 promoter activity. IGF-1 led to pronounced stimulation, while insulin induction was not statistically different from DuOx2 promoter basal activity. All transcriptional factors selected for this work and coactivator TAZ, except DREAM, stimulated DuOx2 promoter activity. Moreover, Nkx2.5 and TAZ synergistically increased DuOx2 promoter activity. In conclusion, we show that DuOx2 expression is regulated by hormones and transcription factors involved in thyroid organogenesis and carcinogenesis, reinforcing the importance of the control of H2O2 generation in the thyroid. PMID:25960956

  10. Screening of the Human Kinome Identifies MSK1/2-CREB1 as an Essential Pathway Mediating Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Replication during Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Fan; Sawant, Tanvee Vinod; Lan, Ke; Lu, Chun; Jung, Jae U.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses often hijack cellular pathways to facilitate infection and replication. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic gammaherpesvirus etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, a vascular tumor of endothelial cells. Despite intensive studies, cellular pathways mediating KSHV infection and replication are still not well defined. Using an antibody array approach, we examined cellular proteins phosphorylated during primary KSHV infection of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Enrichment analysis identified integrin/mitogen-activated protein kinase (integrin/MAPK), insulin/epidermal growth factor receptor (insulin/EGFR), and JAK/STAT as the activated networks during primary KSHV infection. The transcriptional factor CREB1 (cyclic AMP [cAMP]-responsive element-binding protein 1) had the strongest increase in phosphorylation. While knockdown of CREB1 had no effect on KSHV entry and trafficking, it drastically reduced the expression of lytic transcripts and proteins and the production of infectious virions. Chemical activation of CREB1 significantly enhanced viral lytic replication. In contrast, CREB1 neither influenced the expression of the latent gene LANA nor affected KSHV infectivity. Mechanistically, CREB1 was not activated through the classic cAMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway or via the AKT, MK2, and RSK pathways. Rather, CREB1 was activated by the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases 1 and 2 (MSK1/2). Consequently, chemical inhibition or knockdown of MSKs significantly inhibited the KSHV lytic replication program; however, it had a minimal effect on LANA expression and KSHV infectivity. Together, these results identify the MSK1/2-CREB1 proteins as novel essential effectors of KSHV lytic replication during primary infection. The differential effect of the MSK1/2-CREB1 pathway on the expression of viral latent and lytic genes might control the robustness of viral lytic replication, and therefore the

  11. Metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli creB and arcA mutants reveals shared control of carbon catabolism under microaerobic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Nikel, Pablo I; Zhu, Jiangfeng; San, Ka-Yiu; Méndez, Beatriz S; Bennett, George N

    2009-09-01

    Escherichia coli has several elaborate sensing mechanisms for response to availability of oxygen and other electron acceptors, as well as the carbon source in the surrounding environment. Among them, the CreBC and ArcAB two-component signal transduction systems are responsible for regulation of carbon source utilization and redox control in response to oxygen availability, respectively. We assessed the role of CreBC and ArcAB in regulating the central carbon metabolism of E. coli under microaerobic conditions by means of (13)C-labeling experiments in chemostat cultures of a wild-type strain, DeltacreB and DeltaarcA single mutants, and a DeltacreB DeltaarcA double mutant. Continuous cultures were conducted at D = 0.1 h(-1) under carbon-limited conditions with restricted oxygen supply. Although all experimental strains metabolized glucose mainly through the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, mutant strains had significantly lower fluxes in both the oxidative and the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathways. Significant differences were also found at the pyruvate branching point. Both pyruvate-formate lyase and the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex contributed to acetyl-coenzyme A synthesis from pyruvate, and their activity seemed to be modulated by both ArcAB and CreBC. Strains carrying the creB deletion showed a higher biomass yield on glucose compared to the wild-type strain and its DeltaarcA derivative, which also correlated with higher fluxes from building blocks to biomass. Glyoxylate shunt and lactate dehydrogenase were active mainly in the DeltaarcA strain. Finally, it was observed that the tricarboxylic acid cycle reactions operated in a rather cyclic fashion under our experimental conditions, with reduced activity in the mutant strains.

  12. Enrichment of Conserved Synaptic Activity-Responsive Element in Neuronal Genes Predicts a Coordinated Response of MEF2, CREB and SRF

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tornos, Fernanda M.; San Aniceto, Iñigo; Cubelos, Beatriz; Nieto, Marta

    2013-01-01

    A unique synaptic activity-responsive element (SARE) sequence, composed of the consensus binding sites for SRF, MEF2 and CREB, is necessary for control of transcriptional upregulation of the Arc gene in response to synaptic activity. We hypothesize that this sequence is a broad mechanism that regulates gene expression in response to synaptic activation and during plasticity; and that analysis of SARE-containing genes could identify molecular mechanisms involved in brain disorders. To search for conserved SARE sequences in the mammalian genome, we used the SynoR in silico tool, and found the SARE cluster predominantly in the regulatory regions of genes expressed specifically in the nervous system; most were related to neural development and homeostatic maintenance. Two of these SARE sequences were tested in luciferase assays and proved to promote transcription in response to neuronal activation. Supporting the predictive capacity of our candidate list, up-regulation of several SARE containing genes in response to neuronal activity was validated using external data and also experimentally using primary cortical neurons and quantitative real time RT-PCR. The list of SARE-containing genes includes several linked to mental retardation and cognitive disorders, and is significantly enriched in genes that encode mRNA targeted by FMRP (fragile X mental retardation protein). Our study thus supports the idea that SARE sequences are relevant transcriptional regulatory elements that participate in plasticity. In addition, it offers a comprehensive view of how activity-responsive transcription factors coordinate their actions and increase the selectivity of their targets. Our data suggest that analysis of SARE-containing genes will reveal yet-undescribed pathways of synaptic plasticity and additional candidate genes disrupted in mental disease. PMID:23382855

  13. CREB-binding protein, p300, butyrate, and Wnt signaling in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bordonaro, Michael; Lazarova, Darina L

    2015-07-21

    This paper reviews the distinctive roles played by the transcriptional coactivators CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and cell physiology in colorectal cancer (CRC). Specifically, we focus on the effects of CBP- and p300-mediated Wnt activity on (1) neoplastic progression; (2) the activities of butyrate, a breakdown product of dietary fiber, on cell signaling and colonic cell physiology; (3) the development of resistance to histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis), including butyrate and synthetic HDACis, in colonic cells; and (4) the physiology and number of cancer stem cells. Mutations of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway initiate the majority of CRC cases, and we have shown that hyperactivation of this pathway by butyrate and other HDACis promotes CRC cell apoptosis. This activity by butyrate may in part explain the preventive action of fiber against CRC. However, individuals with a high-fiber diet may still develop neoplasia; therefore, resistance to the chemopreventive action of butyrate likely contributes to CRC. CBP or p300 may modify the ability of butyrate to influence colonic cell physiology since the two transcriptional coactivators affect Wnt signaling, and likely, its hyperactivation by butyrate. Also, CBP and p300 likely affect colonic tumorigenesis, as well as stem cell pluripotency. Improvement of CRC prevention and therapy requires a better understanding of the alterations in Wnt signaling and gene expression that underlie neoplastic progression, stem cell fate, and the development of resistance to butyrate and clinically relevant HDACis. Detailed knowledge of how CBP- and p300 modulate colonic cell physiology may lead to new approaches for anti-CRC prevention and therapeutics, particularly with respect to combinatorial therapy of CBP/p300 inhibitors with HDACis.

  14. The CREB binding protein inhibitor ICG-001 suppresses pancreatic cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Arensman, Michael D.; Telesca, Donatello; Lay, Anna R.; Kershaw, Kathleen M.; Wu, Nanping; Donahue, Timothy R.; Dawson, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly lethal cancer due in part to a lack of highly robust cytotoxic or molecular-based therapies. Recent studies investigating ligand-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling have highlighted its importance in pancreatic cancer initiation and progression, as well as its potential as a therapeutic target in PDAC. The small molecule ICG-001 binds CREB-binding protein (CBP) to disrupt its interaction with β-catenin and inhibit CBP function as a co-activator of Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription. Given its ability to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription in vitro and in vivo, as well as its efficacy in preclinical models of colorectal cancer and other Wnt-driven diseases, we examined ICG-001 and its potential role as a therapeutic in PDAC. ICG-001 alone significantly inhibited anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of multiple PDAC lines, and augmented in vitro growth inhibition when used in combination with gemcitabine. ICG-001 had only variable modest effects on PDAC apoptosis and instead mediated PDAC growth inhibition primarily through robust induction of G1 cell cycle arrest. These effects, however, appeared decoupled from its inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription. DNA microarrays performed on PDAC cells in the context of ICG-001 treatment revealed ICG-001 altered the expression of several genes with well-established roles in DNA replication and cell cycle progression, including direct actions on SKP2 and CDKN1A. ICG-001 also significantly prolonged survival in an in vivo orthotopic xenograft model of PDAC, indicating ICG-001 or derived compounds that disrupt CBP activity are potentially useful small molecule therapeutics for pancreatic cancer. PMID:25082960

  15. Bidirectional Plasticity in Striatonigral Synapses: A Switch to Balance Direct and Indirect Basal Ganglia Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aceves, Jose J.; Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E.; Hernandez-Martinez, Ricardo; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, Jose

    2011-01-01

    There is no hypothesis to explain how direct and indirect basal ganglia (BG) pathways interact to reach a balance during the learning of motor procedures. Both pathways converge in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) carrying the result of striatal processing. Unfortunately, the mechanisms that regulate synaptic plasticity in striatonigral…

  16. The evolution of basal progenitors in the developing non-mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Tadashi; Ohtaka-Maruyama, Chiaki; Yamashita, Wataru; Wakamatsu, Yoshio; Murakami, Yasunori; Calegari, Federico; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The amplification of distinct neural stem/progenitor cell subtypes during embryogenesis is essential for the intricate brain structures present in various vertebrate species. For example, in both mammals and birds, proliferative neuronal progenitors transiently appear on the basal side of the ventricular zone of the telencephalon (basal progenitors), where they contribute to the enlargement of the neocortex and its homologous structures. In placental mammals, this proliferative cell population can be subdivided into several groups that include Tbr2+ intermediate progenitors and basal radial glial cells (bRGs). Here, we report that basal progenitors in the developing avian pallium show unique morphological and molecular characteristics that resemble the characteristics of bRGs, a progenitor population that is abundant in gyrencephalic mammalian neocortex. Manipulation of LGN (Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched protein) and Cdk4/cyclin D1, both essential regulators of neural progenitor dynamics, revealed that basal progenitors and Tbr2+ cells are distinct cell lineages in the developing avian telencephalon. Furthermore, we identified a small population of subapical mitotic cells in the developing brains of a wide variety of amniotes and amphibians. Our results suggest that unique progenitor subtypes are amplified in mammalian and avian lineages by modifying common mechanisms of neural stem/progenitor regulation during amniote brain evolution. PMID:26732839

  17. The evolution of basal progenitors in the developing non-mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Tadashi; Ohtaka-Maruyama, Chiaki; Yamashita, Wataru; Wakamatsu, Yoshio; Murakami, Yasunori; Calegari, Federico; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The amplification of distinct neural stem/progenitor cell subtypes during embryogenesis is essential for the intricate brain structures present in various vertebrate species. For example, in both mammals and birds, proliferative neuronal progenitors transiently appear on the basal side of the ventricular zone of th