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Sample records for creep buckling behavior

  1. Buckling Analysis in Creep Conditions: Review and Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Turbat, Andre; Drubay, Bernard

    2002-07-01

    In the case of structures operating at high temperature in normal or accidental conditions, the influence of creep has to be considered at the design stage because this phenomenon may reduce the lifetime significantly. This is true in particular for buckling analysis: in creep conditions, the buckling sometimes occurs after a long period under a compressive load which is lower than the critical load assessed when considering an instantaneous buckling. The main reason is that creep deformations induce an amplification of the initial geometrical imperfections and consequently a reduction of the buckling load. Some Design Codes incorporate special rules and/or methods to take creep buckling into account. Creep buckling analysis methods aim at evaluating critical loading for a given hold period with creep or alternatively critical creep time for a given loading. The Codes where creep buckling is considered also define margins with respect to critical loading: it shall be demonstrated that creep instability will not occur during the whole lifetime when multiplying the specified loading by a coefficient (design factor) depending on the situation level. For the design of NPP, specific creep buckling rules exist in the US, France and Russia. In the US, ASME, Section III, Subsection NH, which is dedicated to high temperature components design, provides limits which are applicable to general geometrical configurations and loading conditions that may cause buckling due to creep behaviour of the material. For load-controlled time-dependent creep buckling, the design factors to apply to the specified loadings are 1.5 for levels A, B or C service loadings and 1.25 for level D service loadings. A design factor is not required in the case of purely strain-controlled buckling. No specific method is provided to obtain critical loading or critical time for creep instability. In France, creep buckling rules included in RCC-MR, Chapter RB or RC 3200 are similar to those of ASME

  2. Effects of state recovery on creep buckling under variable loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Arnold, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    Structural alloys embody internal mechanisms that allow recovery of state with varying stress and elevated temperature, i.e., they can return to a softer state following periods of hardening. Such material behavior is known to strongly influence structural response under some important thermomechanical loadings, for example, that involving thermal ratchetting. The influence of dynamic and thermal recovery on the creep buckling of a column under variable loading is investigated. The column is taken as the idealized (Shanley) sandwich column. The constitutive model, unlike the commonly employed Norton creep model, incorporates a representation of both dynamic and thermal (state) recovery. The material parameters of the constitutive model are chosen to characterize Narloy Z, a representative copper alloy used in thrust nozzle liners of reusable rocket engines. Variable loading histories include rapid cyclic unloading/reloading sequences and intermittent reductions of load for extended periods of time; these are superimposed on a constant load. The calculated results show that state recovery significantly affects creep buckling under variable loading.

  3. Effects of state recovery on creep buckling under variable loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Arnold, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    Structural alloys embody internal mechanisms that allow recovery of state with varying stress and elevated temperature, i.e., they can return to a softer state following periods of hardening. Such material behavior is known to strongly influence structural response under some important thermomechanical loadings, for example, that involving thermal ratchetting. The influence of dynamic and thermal recovery on the creep buckling of a column under variable loading is investigated. The column is taken as the idealized (Shanley) sandwich column. The constitutive model, unlike the commonly employed Norton creep model, incorporates a representation of both dynamic and thermal (state) recovery. The material parameters of the constitutive model are chosen to characterize Narloy Z, a representative copper alloy used in thrust nozzle liners of reusable rocket engines. Variable loading histories include rapid cyclic unloading/reloading sequences and intermittent reductions of load for extended periods of time; these are superimposed on a constant load. The calculated results show that state recovery significantly affects creep buckling under variable loading.

  4. Effects of state recovery on creep buckling under variable loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Arnold, S. M.

    1986-01-01

    Structural alloys embody internal mechanisms that allow recovery of state with varying stress and elevated temperature, i.e., they can return to a softer state following periods of hardening. Such material behavior is known to strongly influence structural response under some important thermomechanical loadings, for example, that involving thermal ratchetting. The influence of dynamic and thermal recovery on the creep buckling of a column under variable loading is investigated. The column is taken as the idealized (Shanley) sandwich column. The constitutive model, unlike the commonly employed Norton creep model, incorporates a representation of both dynamic and thermal (state) recovery. The material parameters of the constitutive model are chosen to characterize Narloy Z, a representative copper alloy used in thrust nozzle liners of reusable rocket engines. Variable loading histories include rapid cyclic unloading/reloading sequences and intermittent reductions of load for extended periods of time; these are superimposed on a constant load. The calculated results show that state recovery significantly affects creep buckling under variable loading. Structural alloys embody internal mechanisms that allow recovery of state with varying stress and time.

  5. Non-isothermal buckling behavior of viscoplastic shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riff, Richard; Simitses, G. J.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing the structural response of thin, metallic elasto-viscoplastic shell structures under large thermomechanical loads and their non-isothermal buckling behavior. Among the system responses associated with these loads and conditions are snap-through, buckling, thermal buckling, and creep buckling. This geometric and material nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and are considered in the model and the numerical treatment.

  6. Twist buckling behavior of arteries.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Justin R; Lamm, Shawn D; Han, Hai-Chao

    2013-10-01

    Arteries are often subjected to torsion due to body movement and surgical procedures. While it is essential that arteries remain stable and patent under twisting loads, the stability of arteries under torsion is poorly understood. The goal of this work was to experimentally investigate the buckling behavior of arteries under torsion and to determine the critical buckling torque, the critical buckling twist angle, and the buckling shape. Porcine common carotid arteries were slowly twisted in vitro until buckling occurred while subjected to a constant axial stretch ratio (1.1, 1.3, 1.5 (in vivo level) and 1.7) and lumen pressure (20, 40, 70 and 100 mmHg). Upon buckling, the arteries snapped to form a kink. For a group of six arteries, the axial stretch ratio significantly affected the critical buckling torque ([Formula: see text]) and the critical buckling twist angle ([Formula: see text]). Lumen pressure also significantly affected the critical buckling torque ([Formula: see text]) but had no significant effect on the critical twist angle ([Formula: see text]). Convex material constants for a Fung strain energy function were determined and fit well with the axial force, lumen pressure, and torque data measured pre-buckling. The material constants are valid for axial stretch ratios, lumen pressures, and rotation angles of 1.3-1.5, 20-100 mmHg, and 0-270[Formula: see text], respectively. The current study elucidates the buckling behavior of arteries under torsion and provides new insight into mechanical instability of blood vessels.

  7. Twist Buckling Behavior of Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Justin R.; Lamm, Shawn D.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2012-01-01

    Arteries are often subjected to torsion due to body movement and surgical procedures. While it is essential that arteries remain stable and patent under twisting loads, the stability of arteries under torsion is poorly understood. The goal of this work was to experimentally investigate the buckling behavior of arteries under torsion and to determine the critical buckling torque, the critical buckling twist angle, and the buckling shape. Porcine common carotid arteries were slowly twisted in vitro until buckling occurred while subjected to a constant axial stretch ratio (1.1, 1.3, 1.5 (in vivo level), and 1.7) and lumen pressure (20, 40, 70, and 100 mmHg). Upon buckling, the arteries snapped to form a kink. For a group of six arteries, the axial stretch ratio significantly affected the critical buckling torque (p < 0.002) and the critical buckling twist angle (p < 0.001). Lumen pressure also significantly affected the critical buckling torque (p < 0.001) but had no significant effect on the critical twist angle (p = 0.067). Convex material constants for a Fung strain energy function were determined and fit well with the axial force, lumen pressure, and torque data measured pre-buckling. The material constants are valid for axial stretch ratios, lumen pressures, and rotation angles of 1.3 – 1.5, 20 – 100 mmHg, and 0 – 270 degrees, respectively. The current study elucidates the buckling behavior of arteries under torsion and provides new insight into mechanical instability of blood vessels. PMID:23160845

  8. Dynamic Creep Buckling: Analysis of Shell Structures Subjected to Time-dependent Mechanical and Thermal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simitses, G. J.; Carlson, R. L.; Riff, R.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the present research is to develop a general mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing the structural response of thin, metallic shell structures under large transient, cyclic, or static thermomechanical loads. Among the system responses associated with these loads and conditions are thermal buckling, creep buckling, and ratcheting. Thus geometric and material nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and must be considered in developing the mathematical model. A complete, true ab-initio rate theory of kinematics and kinetics for continuum and curved thin structures, without any restriction on the magnitude of the strains or the deformations, was formulated. The time dependence and large strain behavior are incorporated through the introduction of the time rates of metric and curvature in two coordinate systems: fixed (spatial) and convected (material). The relations between the time derivative and the covariant derivative (gradient) were developed for curved space and motion, so the velocity components supply the connection between the equations of motion and the time rates of change of the metric and curvature tensors.

  9. Elastic, plastic, and creep buckling of imperfect cylinders under mechanical and thermal loading

    SciTech Connect

    Eslami, M.R.; Shariyat, M.

    1997-02-01

    Based on the concept of secant and tangent modulus, the nonlinear equilibrium and stability equations of thin cylindrical shells under axial compression, external pressure, or external fluid pressure are derived. The resulting equations are applicable to shells without length limitation as the rotations and transverse shears are included in the derivations. The reduction factors for plastic and creep buckling are then obtained. A procedure for determining secant and tangent modulus in the very general case of elastic, plastic, or creep stress in the presence of temperature gradient is proposed. Then, using Donnell`s nonlinear theory of shells, the effect of initial imperfection on the strength of the elastic shell is discussed. The foregoing results are extended to plastic and creep buckling of cylindrical shells of arbitrary length and temperature gradient. Some design curves are proposed using the obtained equations. Finally, the present results are compared with available results in the literature and the accuracy of the method is examined.

  10. Creep and creep-rupture behavior of Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C.R.; Booker, M.K.; Ding, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained from creep and creep-rupture tests conducted on 18 heats of Alloy 718 were used to formulate models for predicting high temperature time dependent behavior of this alloy. Creep tests were conducted on specimens taken from a number of commercial product forms including plate, bar, and forgoing material that had been procured and heat treated in accordance with ASTM specifications B-670 or B-637. Data were obtained over the temperature range of 427 to 760{degree}C ad at test times to about 87,000 h. Comparisons are given between experimental data and the analytical models. The analytical models for creep-rupture included one based on lot-centering regression analysis and two based on the Minimum Commitment Method. A master'' curve approach was used to develop and equation for estimating creep deformation up to the onset of tertiary creep. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  11. Stochastic behavior of nanoscale dielectric wall buckling

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Levin, Igor; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The random buckling patterns of nanoscale dielectric walls are analyzed using a nonlinear multi-scale stochastic method that combines experimental measurements with simulations. The dielectric walls, approximately 200 nm tall and 20 nm wide, consist of compliant, low dielectric constant (low-k) fins capped with stiff, compressively stressed TiN lines that provide the driving force for buckling. The deflections of the buckled lines exhibit sinusoidal pseudoperiodicity with amplitude fluctuation and phase decorrelation arising from stochastic variations in wall geometry, properties, and stress state at length scales shorter than the characteristic deflection wavelength of about 1000 nm. The buckling patterns are analyzed and modeled at two length scales: a longer scale (up to 5000 nm) that treats randomness as a longer-scale measurable quantity, and a shorter-scale (down to 20 nm) that treats buckling as a deterministic phenomenon. Statistical simulation is used to join the two length scales. Through this approach, the buckling model is validated and material properties and stress states are inferred. In particular, the stress state of TiN lines in three different systems is determined, along with the elastic moduli of low-k fins and the amplitudes of the small-scale random fluctuations in wall properties—all in the as-processed state. The important case of stochastic effects giving rise to buckling in a deterministically sub-critical buckling state is demonstrated. The nonlinear multiscale stochastic analysis provides guidance for design of low-k structures with acceptable buckling behavior and serves as a template for how randomness that is common to nanoscale phenomena might be measured and analyzed in other contexts. PMID:27330220

  12. Stochastic behavior of nanoscale dielectric wall buckling.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Lawrence H; Levin, Igor; Cook, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    The random buckling patterns of nanoscale dielectric walls are analyzed using a nonlinear multi-scale stochastic method that combines experimental measurements with simulations. The dielectric walls, approximately 200 nm tall and 20 nm wide, consist of compliant, low dielectric constant (low-k) fins capped with stiff, compressively stressed TiN lines that provide the driving force for buckling. The deflections of the buckled lines exhibit sinusoidal pseudoperiodicity with amplitude fluctuation and phase decorrelation arising from stochastic variations in wall geometry, properties, and stress state at length scales shorter than the characteristic deflection wavelength of about 1000 nm. The buckling patterns are analyzed and modeled at two length scales: a longer scale (up to 5000 nm) that treats randomness as a longer-scale measurable quantity, and a shorter-scale (down to 20 nm) that treats buckling as a deterministic phenomenon. Statistical simulation is used to join the two length scales. Through this approach, the buckling model is validated and material properties and stress states are inferred. In particular, the stress state of TiN lines in three different systems is determined, along with the elastic moduli of low-k fins and the amplitudes of the small-scale random fluctuations in wall properties-all in the as-processed state. The important case of stochastic effects giving rise to buckling in a deterministically sub-critical buckling state is demonstrated. The nonlinear multiscale stochastic analysis provides guidance for design of low-k structures with acceptable buckling behavior and serves as a template for how randomness that is common to nanoscale phenomena might be measured and analyzed in other contexts.

  13. Buckling behavior of individual and bundled microtubules.

    PubMed

    Soheilypour, Mohammad; Peyro, Mohaddeseh; Peter, Stephen J; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2015-04-07

    As the major structural constituent of the cytoskeleton, microtubules (MTs) serve a variety of biological functions that range from facilitating organelle transport to maintaining the mechanical integrity of the cell. Neuronal MTs exhibit a distinct configuration, hexagonally packed bundles of MT filaments, interconnected by MT-associated protein (MAP) tau. Building on our previous work on mechanical response of axonal MT bundles under uniaxial tension, this study is focused on exploring the compression scenarios. Intracellular MTs carry a large fraction of the compressive loads sensed by the cell and therefore, like any other column-like structure, are prone to substantial bending and buckling. Various biological activities, e.g., actomyosin contractility and many pathological conditions are driven or followed by bending, looping, and buckling of MT filaments. The coarse-grained model previously developed in our lab has been used to study the mechanical behavior of individual and bundled in vivo MT filaments under uniaxial compression. Both configurations show tip-localized, decaying, and short-wavelength buckling. This behavior highlights the role of the surrounding cytoplasm and MAP tau on MT buckling behavior, which allows MT filaments to bear much larger compressive forces. It is observed that MAP tau interconnections improve this effect by a factor of two. The enhanced ability of MT bundles to damp buckling waves relative to individual MT filaments, may be interpreted as a self-defense mechanism because it helps axonal MTs to endure harsher environments while maintaining their function. The results indicate that MT filaments in a bundle do not buckle simultaneously implying that the applied stress is not equally shared among the MT filaments, that is a consequence of the nonuniform distribution of MAP tau proteins along the bundle length. Furthermore, from a pathological perspective, it is observed that axonal MT bundles are more vulnerable to failure in

  14. Buckling Behavior of Individual and Bundled Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Soheilypour, Mohammad; Peyro, Mohaddeseh; Peter, Stephen J.; Mofrad, Mohammad R.K.

    2015-01-01

    As the major structural constituent of the cytoskeleton, microtubules (MTs) serve a variety of biological functions that range from facilitating organelle transport to maintaining the mechanical integrity of the cell. Neuronal MTs exhibit a distinct configuration, hexagonally packed bundles of MT filaments, interconnected by MT-associated protein (MAP) tau. Building on our previous work on mechanical response of axonal MT bundles under uniaxial tension, this study is focused on exploring the compression scenarios. Intracellular MTs carry a large fraction of the compressive loads sensed by the cell and therefore, like any other column-like structure, are prone to substantial bending and buckling. Various biological activities, e.g., actomyosin contractility and many pathological conditions are driven or followed by bending, looping, and buckling of MT filaments. The coarse-grained model previously developed in our lab has been used to study the mechanical behavior of individual and bundled in vivo MT filaments under uniaxial compression. Both configurations show tip-localized, decaying, and short-wavelength buckling. This behavior highlights the role of the surrounding cytoplasm and MAP tau on MT buckling behavior, which allows MT filaments to bear much larger compressive forces. It is observed that MAP tau interconnections improve this effect by a factor of two. The enhanced ability of MT bundles to damp buckling waves relative to individual MT filaments, may be interpreted as a self-defense mechanism because it helps axonal MTs to endure harsher environments while maintaining their function. The results indicate that MT filaments in a bundle do not buckle simultaneously implying that the applied stress is not equally shared among the MT filaments, that is a consequence of the nonuniform distribution of MAP tau proteins along the bundle length. Furthermore, from a pathological perspective, it is observed that axonal MT bundles are more vulnerable to failure in

  15. Dynamic buckling behavior of thin metal film lines from substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dan; Xie, Huimin; Wang, Heling; Zhang, Jie; Li, Chuanwei

    2014-10-01

    The dynamic buckling behavior of thin films from substrate is studied in this work. The experimental results show that the buckling morphology of the constantan film lines from the polymer substrate is inconsistent and non-sinusoidal, which is different from the sinusoidal form of the buckling morphology under static loads. The plastic deformation of the film lines results in the non-sinusoidal buckling morphology and residual deformation when unloaded. Finite element modeling results with regard to the plastic dissipation of the constantan film lines reveal that the plastic dissipation suppresses the buckling-driven delaminating under impact loads. This study will give some new perspectives on the buckling behavior of thin film from substrate.

  16. Creep behavior of niobium alloy PWC-11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Moore, T. J.; Grobstein, T. L.

    1987-01-01

    The high vacuum creep and creep-rupture behavior of a Nb-1Zr-.1C alloy (PWC 11) was investigated at 1350 and 1400 K with an applied stress of 40 MPa. The material was tested in the following four conditions: annealed (1 hr 1755 K/2 hr 1475 K); annealed plus EB welded; annealed plus aged for 1000 hr at 1350 or 1400 K; and annealed, welded, and aged. It was found that the material in the annealed state was the most creep-resistant condition tested, and that aging the alloy for 1000 hr without an applied stress greatly reduced that strength; however, it was still approximately three times as creep resistant as Nb-1Zr. Additionally, the EB weld region was stronger than the base metal in each condition tested, and phase extraction of the dispersed precipitate revealed the presence of a 70%ZrC-30%NbC cubic monocarbide phase.

  17. Theory of buckling and post-buckling behavior of elastic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budiansky, B.

    1974-01-01

    The present paper provides a unified, general presentation of the basic theory of the buckling and post-buckling behavior of elastic structures in a form suitable for application to a wide variety of special problems. The notation of functional analysis is used for this purpose. Before the general analysis, simple conceptual models are used to elucidate the basic concepts of bifurcation buckling, snap buckling, imperfection sensitivity, load-shortening relations, and stability. The energy approach, the virtual-work approach, and mode interaction are discussed. The derivations and results are applicable to continua and finite-dimensional systems. The virtual-work and energy approaches are given separate treatments, but their equivalence is made explicit. The basic concepts of stability occupy a secondary position in the present approach.

  18. Homogenized Creep Behavior of CFRP Laminates at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Kawai, M.

    In this study, creep behavior of a CFRP laminate subjected to a constant stress is analyzed based on the time-dependent homogenization theory developed by the present authors. The laminate is a unidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy laminate T800H/#3631 manufactured by Toray Industries, Inc. Two kinds of creep analyses are performed. First, 45° off-axis creep deformation of the laminate at high temperature (100°C) is analyzed with three kinds of creep stress levels, respectively. It is shown that the present theory accurately predicts macroscopic creep behavior of the unidirectional CFRP laminate observed in experiments. Then, high temperature creep deformations at a constant creep stress are simulated with seven kinds of off-axis angles, i.e., θ = 0°, 10°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, 90°. It is shown that the laminate has marked in-plane anisotropy with respect to the creep behavior.

  19. Creep behavior of uranium carbide-based alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, M. S.; Wright, T. R.; Moak, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The present work gives the results of experiments on the influence of zirconium carbide and tungsten on the creep properties of uranium carbide. The creep behavior of high-density UC samples follows the classical time-dependence pattern of (1) an instantaneous deformation, (2) a primary creep region, and (3) a period of steady-state creep. Creep rates for unalloyed UC-1.01 and UC-1.05 are several orders of magnitude greater than those measured for carbide alloys containing a Zr-C and/or W dispersoid. The difference in creep strength between alloyed and unalloyed materials varies with temperature and applied stress.

  20. The dynamic aspects of thermo-elasto-viscoplastic snap-through and creep buckling phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riff, R.; Simitses, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    Use of a mathematical model and solution methodology, to examine dynamic buckling and dynamic postbuckling behavior of shallow arches and spherical caps made of a realistic material and undergoing non-isothermal, elasto-viscoplastic deformation was examined. Thus, geometric as well as material type nonlinearities of higher order are included in this analysis. The dynamic stability problem is studied under impulsive loading and suddenly applied loading with loads of constant magnitude and infinite duration. A finite element model was derived directly from the incrementally formulated nonlinear shell equations, by using a tensor-oriented procedure. As an example of the results, the time history of the midspan displacement of a damped shallow circular arch is presented.

  1. Creep Behavior of Anisotropic Functionally Graded Rotating Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattan, Minto; Chamoli, Neeraj; Singh, Satya Bir; Gupta, Nishi

    2013-08-01

    The creep behavior of an anisotropic rotating disc of functionally gradient material (FGM) has been investigated in the present study using Hill's yield criteria and the creep behavior in this case is assumed to follow Sherby's constitutive model. The stress and strain rate distributions are calculated for disc having different types of anisotropy and the results obtained are compared graphically. It is concluded that the anisotropy of the material has a significant effect on the creep behavior of the FGM disc. It is also observed that the FGM disc shows better creep behavior than the non-FGM disc.

  2. Investigation of Buckling Behavior of Composite Shell Structures with Cutouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbelo, Mariano A.; Herrmann, Annemarie; Castro, Saullo G. P.; Khakimova, Regina; Zimmermann, Rolf; Degenhardt, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Thin-walled cylindrical composite shell structures can be applied in space applications, looking for lighter and cheaper launcher transport system. These structures are prone to buckling under axial compression and may exhibit sensitivity to geometrical imperfections. Today the design of such structures is based on NASA guidelines from the 1960's using a conservative lower bound curve generated from a database of experimental results. In this guideline the structural behavior of composite materials may not be appropriately considered since the imperfection sensitivity and the buckling load of shells made of such materials depend on the lay-up design. It is clear that with the evolution of the composite materials and fabrication processes this guideline must be updated and / or new design guidelines investigated. This need becomes even more relevant when cutouts are introduced to the structure, which are commonly necessary to account for access points and to provide clearance and attachment points for hydraulic and electric systems. Therefore, it is necessary to understand how a cutout with different dimensions affects the buckling load of a thin-walled cylindrical shell structure in combination with other initial geometric imperfections. In this context, this paper present some observations regarding the buckling load behavior vs. cutout size and radius over thickness ratio, of laminated composite curved panels and cylindrical shells, that could be applied in further recommendations, to allow identifying when the buckling of the structure is dominated by the presence of the cutout or by other initial imperfections.

  3. Nonlinear resonant behavior of microbeams over the buckled state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farokhi, Hamed; Ghayesh, Mergen H.; Amabili, Marco

    2013-11-01

    The present study investigates the nonlinear resonant behavior of a microbeam over its buckled (non-trivial) configuration. The system is assumed to be subjected to an axial load along with a distributed transverse harmonic load. The axial load is increased leading the system to lose the stability via a pitchfork bifurcation; the postbuckling configuration is obtained and the nonlinear resonant response of the system over the buckled state is examined. More specifically, the nonlinear equation of motion is obtained employing Hamilton’s principle along with the modified couple stress theory. The continuous system is truncated into a system with finite degrees of freedom; the Galerkin scheme is employed to discretize the nonlinear partial differential equation of motion into a set of ordinary differential equations. This set of equations is solved numerically employing the pseudo-arclength continuation technique; first a nonlinear static analysis is performed upon this set of equations so as to obtain the onset of buckling (supercritical pitchfork bifurcation) and the buckled configuration of the microbeam. The frequency-response and force-response curves of the system are then constructed over the buckled configurations. A comparison is made between the frequency-response curves obtained by means of the modified couple stress and the classical theories. The effect of different system parameters on the frequency-response and force-response curves is also examined.

  4. Tensile creep behavior of polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Tensile creep studies were conducted on polycrystalline Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Test conditions were temperatures from 800 to 1050 C and stresses from 60 to 1000 MPa. For both fibers, only a small primary creep portion occurred followed by steady-state creep. The stress exponents for steady-state creep of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP were found to be about 3 and 1, respectively. At lower temperatures, below 1000 C, the finer grained Nextel 610 had a much higher 0.2 percent creep strength for 100 hr than the Fiber FP; while at higher temperatures, Nextel 610 had a comparable creep strength to the Fiber FP. The stress and grain size dependencies suggest Nextel 610 and Fiber FP creep rates are due to grain boundary sliding controlled by interface reaction and Nabarro-Herring mechanisms, respectively.

  5. Buckling behavior of long anisotropic plates subjected to combined loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    A parametric study is presented of the buckling behavior of infinitely long symmetrically laminated anisotropic plates subjected to combined loads. The study focuses on the interaction of a subcritical (stable) secondary loading state of constant magnitude and a primary destabilizing load that is increased in magnitude until buckling occurs. The loads, considered in this report are uniform axial compression, pure in-plane bending, transverse tension and compression, and shear. Results are presented that were obtained by using a special purpose nondimensional analysis that is well suited for parametric studies of clamped and simply supported plates. In particular, results are presented for a +/- 45(sub S) graphite-epoxy laminate that is highly anisotropic and representative of a laminate used for spacecraft applications. In addition, generic buckling-design charts are presented for a wide range of nondimensional parameters that are applicable to a broad class of laminate constructions. These results show the general behavioral trends of specially orthotropic plates and the effects of flexural anisotropy on plates subjected to various combined loading conditions. An important finding of the present study is that the effects of flexural anisotropy on the buckling resistance of a plate can be significantly more important for plates subjected to combined loads than for plates subjected to single-component loads.

  6. Tensile creep and creep-recovery behavior of a SiC-fiber-Si3N4-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, John W.; Park, Yong H.; Jones, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The tensile creep and creep-recovery behavior of a hot-pressed unidirectional SiC-fiber/Si3N4-matrix composite was investigated at 1200 C in air, in order to determine how various sustained and cyclic creep loading histories would influence the creep rate, accumulated creep strain, and the amount of strain recovered upon specimen unloading. The data accumulated indicate that the fundamental damage mode for sustained tensile creep at stresses of 200 and 250 MPa was periodic fiber fracture and that the creep life and the failure mode at 250 MPa were strongly influenced by the rate at which the initial creep stress was applied. Cyclic loading significantly lowered the duration of primary creep and the overall creep-strain accumulation. The implications of the results for microstructural and component design are discussed.

  7. Computer program for predicting creep behavior of bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R.; Greenbaum, G.

    1971-01-01

    Computer program, CRAB, uses finite-element method to calculate creep behavior and predict steady-state stresses in an arbitrary body of revolution subjected to a time-dependent axisymmetric load. Creep strains follow a time hardening law and a Prandtl-Reuss stress-strain relationship.

  8. Torque-induced buckling behavior in stretched intertwined DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahmachari, Sumitabha; Marko, John F.

    Two intertwined DNA molecules (a DNA 'braid') is a common occurrence in the cell and is a relevant substrate for the study of topoisomerase and recombination enzymes. Single molecule experiments have observed the signature of a buckling transition in braids under tensile and torsional stress. We present a free energy model for braided DNA to investigate the mechanical properties of these structures. Our model is based on the semi-flexible polymer model for double helix DNA and is in quantitative accord with the experiments. We identify coexistence of a force-extended state with a plectonemically buckled state, which is reminiscent of single supercoiled DNA behavior. However, the absence of an intrinsic twist modulus in braided DNA results in unique mechanical properties such as non-linear torque in the extended state. At the buckling transition, we predict a jump in the braid extension due to the plectoneme end loop which acts as a nucleation barrier. We investigate the effect of salt concentration on the mechanical response of braids, e.g. we find that buckling starts at a lower linking number for lower salt concentration, the opposite of what is seen for single supercoiled DNAs. Also, concentrations less than 20 mM monovalent salt favor formation of multiple plectoneme domains. NSF Grant: DMR-9734178.

  9. Mechanical behavior of low porosity carbonate rock: from brittle creep to ductile creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical compaction and associated porosity reduction play an important role in the diagenesis of porous rocks. They may also affect reservoir rocks during hydrocarbon production, as the pore pressure field is modified. This inelastic compaction can lead to subsidence, cause casing failure, trigger earthquake, or change the fluid transport properties. In addition, inelastic deformation can be time - dependent. In particular, brittle creep phenomena have been deeply investigated since the 90s, especially in sandstones. However knowledge of carbonates behavior is still insufficient. In this experimental study, we focus on the mechanical behavior of a low porosity (9%) white Tavel (France) carbonate rock (>98% calcite) at P-Q conditions beyond the elastic domain. It has been shown that in sandstones composed of quartz, cracks are developing under these conditions. However, in carbonates, calcite minerals can meanwhile also exhibit microplasticity. The samples were deformed in the triaxial cell of the Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris at effective confining pressures ranging from 35 MPa to 85 MPa and room temperature. Experiments were carried on dry and water saturated samples to explore the role played by the pore fluids. Time dependency was investigated by a creep steps methodology: at each step, differential stress was increased rapidly and kept constant for at least 24h. During these steps elastic wave velocities (P and S) and permeability were measured continuously. Our results show two different creep behaviors: (1) brittle creep is observed at low confining pressures, whereas (2) ductile creep is observed at higher confining pressures. These two creep behaviors have a different signature in term of elastic wave velocities and permeability changes. Indeed, in the brittle domain, the primary creep is associated with a decrease of elastic wave velocities and an increase of permeability, and no secondary creep is observed. In the ductile domain, the primary creep

  10. A Comparison of the Irradiation Creep Behavior of Several Graphites

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Windes, Will

    2016-01-01

    Graphite creep strain data from the irradiation creep capsule Advanced Graphite Creep-1 (AGC-1) are reported. This capsule was the first (prototype) of a series of five or six capsules planned as part of the AGC experiment, which was designed to fully characterize the effects of neutron irradiation and the radiation creep behavior of current nuclear graphite. The creep strain data and analysis are reported for the six graphite grades incorporated in the capsule. The AGC-1 capsule was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at approximately 700 C and to a peak dose of 7 dpa (displacements per atom). The specimen s final dose, temperature, and stress conditions have been reported by INL and were used during this analysis. The derived creep coefficients (K) were calculated for each grade and were found to compare well to literature data for the creep coefficient, even under the wide range of AGC-1 specimen temperatures. Comparisons were made between AGC-1 data and historical grade data for creep coefficients.

  11. Creep and Environmental Effects on High Temperature Creep-Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617

    SciTech Connect

    L. J. Carroll; C. Cabet; R. Madland; R. Wright

    2011-06-01

    Alloy 617 is the leading candidate material for Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), expected to have an outlet temperature as high as 950 C. System start-ups and shut-downs as well as power transients will produce low cycle fatigue (LCF) loadings of components. Acceptance of Alloy 617 in Section III of the ASME Code for nuclear construction requires a detailed understanding of the creep-fatigue behavior in both air and impure helium, representative of the VHTR primary coolant. Strain controlled LCF tests including hold times at maximum tensile strain were conducted at total strain range of 0.3% in air at 950 C. Creep-fatigue testing was also performed in a simulated VHTR impure helium coolant for selected experimental conditions. The fatigue resistance decreased when a hold time was added at peak tensile stress, consistent with the observed change in fracture mode from transgranular to intergranular with introduction of a tensile hold. Increases in the tensile hold time, beyond 180 sec, was not detrimental to the creep-fatigue resistance. Grain boundary damage in the form of grain boundary cracking was present in the bulk of the creep-fatigue specimens. This bulk cracking was quantified and found to be similar for hold times of up to 1800 sec consistent with the saturation in failure lives and rapid stress relaxation observed during the creep portion of the creep-fatigue cycle.

  12. Effect of Topological Defects on Buckling Behavior of Single-walled Carbon Nanotube.

    PubMed

    Ranjbartoreh, Ali Reza; Wang, Guoxiu

    2011-12-01

    Molecular dynamic simulation method has been employed to consider the critical buckling force, pressure, and strain of pristine and defected single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) under axial compression. Effects of length, radius, chirality, Stone-Wales (SW) defect, and single vacancy (SV) defect on buckling behavior of SWCNTs have been studied. Obtained results indicate that axial stability of SWCNT reduces significantly due to topological defects. Critical buckling strain is more susceptible to defects than critical buckling force. Both SW and SV defects decrease the buckling mode of SWCNT. Comparative approach of this study leads to more reliable design of nanostructures.

  13. Buckling of structures; Proceedings of the Symposium, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., June 17-21, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budiansky, B.

    1976-01-01

    The papers deal with such topics as the buckling and post-buckling behavior of plates and shells; methods of calculating critical buckling and collapse loads; finite element representations for thin-shell instability analysis; theory and experiment in the creep buckling of plates and shells; creep instability of thick shell structures; analytical and numerical studies of the influence of initial imperfections on the elastic buckling of columns; mode interaction in stiffened panels under compression; imperfection-sensitivity in the interactive buckling of stiffened plates; buckling of stochastically imperfect structures; and the Liapunov stability of elastic dynamic systems. A special chapter is devoted to design problems, including the design of a Mars entry 'aeroshell', and buckling design in vehicle structures. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  14. Creep Behavior and Mechanism for CMCs with Continuous Ceramic Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chermant, Jean-Louis; Farizy, Gaëlle; Boitier, Guillaume; Darzens, Séverine; Vicens, Jean; Sangleboeuf, Jean-Christophe

    This paper gives an overview on the creep behavior and mechanism of some CMCs, with a SiC ceramic matrix, such as Cf-SiC, SiCf-SiC and SiCf-SiBC. Tensile creep tests were conducted under argon and air in order to have the influence of the environmental conditions on the macroscopical mechanical response. Nevertheless, multi-scale and multi-technique approaches were required to identify and quantify mechanism(s) which is (are) involved in the creep behavior. The initiation and propagation of damages which are occurring under high stress and temperature conditions were investigated at mesoscopic, microscopic and nanoscopic scales using SEM, TEM and HREM, in order to identify the mechanism(s) involved at each scale. Automatic image analysis was used in order to quantify the evolution of some damage morphological parameters. The macroscopical creep behavior has been investigated through a damage mechanics approach which seems to be the most promising route. A good correlation was found between the kinetics of the damage mechanisms and the creep behavior. For such ceramic matrix composites, the governing mechanism is a damage-creep one, with an additional delay effect due to formation of a glass when tests are performed under air.

  15. Tensile creep and creep rupture behavior of monolithic and SiC-whisker-reinforced silicon nitride ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ohji, Tatsuki; Yamauchi, Yukihiko )

    1993-12-01

    The tensile creep and creep rupture behavior of silicon nitride was investigated at 1,200 to 1,350 C using hot-pressed materials with and without SiC whiskers. Stable steady-state creep was observed under low applied stresses at 1,200 C. Accelerated creep regimes, which were absent below 1,300 C, were identified above that temperature. The appearance of accelerated creep at the higher temperatures attributable to formation of microcracks throughout a specimen. The whisker-reinforced material exhibited better creep resistance than the monolith at 1,200 C. Considerably high values 3 to 5, were obtained for the creep exponent in the overall temperature range. The exponent tended to decrease with decreasing applied stress at 1,200 C. The primary creep mechanism was considered cavitation-enhanced creep. Specimen lifetimes followed the Monkman-Grant relationship except for fractures with large accelerated creep regimes. The creep rupture behavior is discussed in association with cavity formation and crack adolescence.

  16. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, Toni L.

    1992-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  17. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, T. L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared on a strength to density basis. The effect of fiber orientation on the creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending on the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  18. Threshold Stress Creep Behavior of Alloy 617 at Intermediate Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Benz; L.J. Carroll; J.K. Wright; R.N. Wright; T. Lillo

    2014-06-01

    Creep of Alloy 617, a solid solution Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, was studied in the temperature range of 1023 K to 1273 K (750 °C to 1000 °C). Typical power-law creep behavior with a stress exponent of approximately 5 is observed at temperatures from 1073 K to 1273 K (800 °C to 1000 °C). Creep at 1023 K (750 °C), however, exhibits threshold stress behavior coinciding with the temperature at which a low volume fraction of ordered coherent y' precipitates forms. The threshold stress is determined experimentally to be around 70 MPa at 1023 K (750 °C) and is verified to be near zero at 1173 K (900 °C)—temperatures directly correlating to the formation and dissolution of y' precipitates, respectively. The y' precipitates provide an obstacle to continued dislocation motion and result in the presence of a threshold stress. TEM analysis of specimens crept at 1023 K (750 °C) to various strains, and modeling of stresses necessary for y' precipitate dislocation bypass, suggests that the climb of dislocations around the y' precipitates is the controlling factor for continued deformation at the end of primary creep and into the tertiary creep regime. As creep deformation proceeds at an applied stress of 121 MPa and the precipitates coarsen, the stress required for Orowan bowing is reached and this mechanism becomes active. At the minimum creep rate at an applied stress of 145 MPa, the finer precipitate size results in higher Orowan bowing stresses and the creep deformation is dominated by the climb of dislocations around the y' precipitates.

  19. Understanding the nanoscale local buckling behavior of vertically aligned MWCNT arrays with van der Waals interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yupeng; Kim, Hyung-ick; Wei, Bingqing; Kang, Junmo; Choi, Jae-boong; Nam, Jae-Do; Suhr, Jonghwan

    2015-09-14

    The local buckling behavior of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) has been investigated and interpreted in the view of a collective nanotube response by taking van der Waals interactions into account. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the case of collective VACNT behavior regarding van der Waals force among nanotubes as a lateral support effect during the buckling process. The local buckling propagation and development of VACNTs were experimentally observed and theoretically analyzed by employing finite element modeling with lateral support from van der Waals interactions among nanotubes. Both experimental and theoretical analyses show that VACNTs buckled in the bottom region with many short waves and almost identical wavelengths, indicating a high mode buckling. Furthermore, the propagation and development mechanism of buckling waves follow the wave damping effect.

  20. Understanding the nanoscale local buckling behavior of vertically aligned MWCNT arrays with van der Waals interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yupeng; Kim, Hyung-Ick; Wei, Bingqing; Kang, Junmo; Choi, Jae-Boong; Nam, Jae-Do; Suhr, Jonghwan

    2015-08-01

    The local buckling behavior of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) has been investigated and interpreted in the view of a collective nanotube response by taking van der Waals interactions into account. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the case of collective VACNT behavior regarding van der Waals force among nanotubes as a lateral support effect during the buckling process. The local buckling propagation and development of VACNTs were experimentally observed and theoretically analyzed by employing finite element modeling with lateral support from van der Waals interactions among nanotubes. Both experimental and theoretical analyses show that VACNTs buckled in the bottom region with many short waves and almost identical wavelengths, indicating a high mode buckling. Furthermore, the propagation and development mechanism of buckling waves follow the wave damping effect.The local buckling behavior of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) has been investigated and interpreted in the view of a collective nanotube response by taking van der Waals interactions into account. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the case of collective VACNT behavior regarding van der Waals force among nanotubes as a lateral support effect during the buckling process. The local buckling propagation and development of VACNTs were experimentally observed and theoretically analyzed by employing finite element modeling with lateral support from van der Waals interactions among nanotubes. Both experimental and theoretical analyses show that VACNTs buckled in the bottom region with many short waves and almost identical wavelengths, indicating a high mode buckling. Furthermore, the propagation and development mechanism of buckling waves follow the wave damping effect. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03581c

  1. Effect of misalignment on mechanical behavior of metals in creep. [computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H. C.

    1979-01-01

    Application of the endochronic theory of viscoplasticity to creep, creep recovery, and stress relaxation at the small strain and short time range produced the following results: (1) The governing constitutive equations for constant-strain-rate stress-strain behavior, creep, creep recovery, and stress relaxation were derived by imposing appropriate constraints on the general constitutive equation of the endochronic theory. (2) A set of material constants was found which correlate strain-hardening, creep, creep recovery, and stress relaxation. (3) The theory predicts with reasonable accuracy the creep and creep recovery behaviors at short time. (4) The initial strain history prior to the creep stage affects the subsequent creep significantly. (5) A critical stress was established for creep recovery. A computer program, written for the misalignment problem is reported.

  2. Creep rupture behavior of Stirling engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Scheuerman, C. M.; Stephens, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, being investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternate to the internal combustion engine, uses high-pressure hydrogen as the working fluid. The long-term effects of hydrogen on the high temperature strength properties of materials is relatively unknown. This is especially true for the newly developed low-cost iron base alloy NASAUT 4G-A1. This iron-base alloy when tested in air has creep-rupture strengths in the directionally solidified condition comparable to the cobalt base alloy HS-31. The equiaxed (investment cast) NASAUT 4G-A1 has superior creep-rupture to the equiaxed iron-base alloy XF-818 both in air and 15 MPa hydrogen.

  3. Transient creep and semibrittle behavior of crystalline rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, N.L.; Kirby, S.H.

    1978-01-01

    We review transient creep and semibrittle behavior of crystalline solids. The results are expected to be pertinent to crystalline rocks undergoing deformation in the depth range 5 to 20 km, corresponding to depths of focus of many major earthquakes. Transient creep data for crystalline rocks at elevated temperatures are analyzed but are poorly understood because of lack of information on the deformation processes which, at low to moderate pressure, are likely to be semibrittle in nature. Activation energies for transient creep at high effective confining pressure are much higher than those found for atmospheric pressure tests in which thermally-activated microfracturing probably dominates the creep rate. Empirical transient creep equations are extrapolated at 200?? to 600??C, stresses from 0.1 to 1.0 kbar, to times ranging from 3.17??102 to 3.17??108 years. At the higher temperatures, appreciable transient creep strains may take place but the physical significance of the results is in question because the flow mechanisms have not been determined. The purpose of this paper is to stimulate careful research on this important topic. ?? 1978 Birkha??user Verlag.

  4. The high temperature creep behavior of oxides and oxide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Linda E.; Tressler, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A thorough review of the literature was conducted on the high-temperature creep behavior of single and polycrystalline oxides which potentially could serve as fiber reinforcements in ceramics or metal matrix applications. Sapphire when oriented with the basal plane perpendicular to the fiber axis (c-axis oriented) is highly creep resistant at temperatures in excess of 1600 C and applied loads of 100 MPa and higher. Pyramidal slip is preferentially activated in sapphire under these conditions and steady-state creep rates in the range of 10(exp -7) to 10 (exp -8)/s were reported. Data on the creep resistance of polycrystalline beryllia suggest that C-axiz oriented single crystal beryllia may be a viable candidate as a fiber reinforcement material; however, the issure of fabricability and moisture sensitivity must be addressed for this material. Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) also appears to be a fiber candidate material having a high resistance to creep which is due to it's complex crystal structure and high Peierl resistance. The high creep resistance of garnet suggests that there may be other complex ternary oxides such as single crystal mullite which may also be candidate materials for fiber reinforcements. Finally, CVD and single crystal SiC, although not oxides, do possess a high resistance to creep in the temperature range between 1550 and 1850 C and under stresses of 110 to 220 MPa. From a review of the literature, it appears that for high creep resistant applications sapphire, silicon carbide, yttrium aluminum garnet, mullite, and beryllia are desirable candidate materials which require further investigation.

  5. Bending and buckling behavior analysis of foamed metal circular plate.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jian Ling; Ma, Lian Sheng; Zhang, Lu; De Su, Hou

    2016-07-04

    This paper establishes a density gradient model along the thickness direction of a circular plate made of foamed material. Based on the first shear deformation plate theory, the result is deduced that the foamed metal circular plate with graded density along thickness direction yields axisymmetric bending problem under the action of uniformly distributed load, and the analytical solution is obtained by solving the governing equation directly. The analyses on two constraint conditions of edge radial clamping and simply supported show that the density gradient index and external load may affect the axisymmetric bending behavior of the plate. Then, based on the classical plate theory, the paper analyzes the behavior of axisymmetric buckling under radial pressure applied on the circular plate. Shooting method is used to obtain the critical load, and the effects of gradient nature of material properties and boundary conditions on the critical load of the plate are analyzed.

  6. Creep and recovery behavior analysis of space mesh structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yaqiong; Li, Tuanjie; Ma, Xiaofei

    2016-11-01

    The Schapery's nonlinear viscoelastic theory and nonlinear force-density method have been investigated to analyze the creep and recovery behaviors of space deployable mesh reflectors in this paper. Based on Schapery's nonlinear viscoelastic theory, we establish the creep and recovery constitutive model for cables whose pretensions were applied stepwise in time. This constitutive model has been further used for adjustment of cables' elongation rigidity. In addition, the time-dependent tangent stiffness matrix is calculated by the partial differentiation of the corresponding load vector with respect to the nodal coordinate vector obtained by the nonlinear force-density method. An incremental-iterative solution based on the Newton-Raphson method is adopted for solving the time-dependent nonlinear statics equations. Finally, a hoop truss reflector antenna is presented as a numerical example to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed method for the creep and recovery behavior analysis of space deployable mesh structures.

  7. Creep Behavior and Durability of Cracked CMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Fox, Dennis; Smith, Craig

    2015-01-01

    To understand failure mechanisms and durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), Melt Infiltration (MI) SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-iBN fibers and full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-ion bombarded BN (iBN) and Hi-Nicalon -S fibers were pre-cracked between 150 to 200 megapascal and then creep and Sustained Peak Low Cycle Fatigue (SPLCF) tested at 13150 C at stress levels from 35 to 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace and burner rig conditions. In addition creep testing was also conducted on pre-cracked full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites at 14500 C between 35 and 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace conditions. If the specimens survived the 200 hour durability tests, then they were tensile tested at room temperature to determine their residual tensile properties. The failed specimens were examined by Scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine the failure modes and mechanisms. The influence of crack healing matrix, fiber types, crack density, testing modes and interface oxidation on durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be discussed.

  8. Creep and creep-rupture behavior of a continuous strand, swirl mat reinforced polymer composite in automotive environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, W.; Brinkman, C.R.

    1998-12-31

    Creep and creep-rupture behavior of an isocyanurate based polyurethane matrix with a continuous strand, swirl mat E-glass reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications. The material under stress was exposed to various automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on its creep and creep-rupture properties. Proposed design guide lines and stress reduction factors were developed for various automotive environments. These composites are considered candidate structural materials for light weight and fuel efficient automobiles of the future.

  9. A nonlocal elastic anisotropic shell model for microtubule buckling behaviors in cytoplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuanwen; An, Le

    2010-07-01

    The buckling behaviors of microtubules (MTs) in a living cell have been studied based on the nonlocal anisotropic shell theory and Stokes flow theory. The analytical expressions for the buckling load and the growth rate of the buckling are obtained and discussed. In addition, the pressure on MTs, resulting from cytosol motion, is derived on the basis of the Stokes flow theory. The influences of filament network elasticity and the shear modulus of MTs, especially the cytosol viscosity and MT small scale effects on MT buckling behaviors, are investigated. The analytical results show that the MT buckling growth rate increases with the MT small scale parameter, while decreases as the filament network elastic modulus, the MT shear modulus and cytoplasm viscosity increase. Although the cytosol viscosity has a significant influence on the value of the growth rate, it shows little effects on the range of the axial wave number of buckling as well as the critical axial wave number that corresponds to the maximal growth rate. Finally, the MT buckling growth rates have been calculated using the beam model, the isotropic shell model, and the anisotropic shell model. The results indicate that using the anisotropy shell theory to model the buckling behavior of MTs is necessary.

  10. Creep behavior of refractory concretes. First annual report, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, T.D.

    1982-12-01

    Objectives are to evaluate the creep of alumina refractory concretes, determine differential transient creep strain of pristine specimens, develop a mathematical model for the creep behavior of refractory concretes, investigate the creep of commercial refractory concretes, and determine the effect of fiber reinforcements on the creep of concretes. After a summary of the first four years' progress, the technical progress during the fourth year is described in detail. 97 figures. (DLC)

  11. Creep behavior of Fe-bearing olivine under hydrous conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, Miki; Zimmerman, Mark E.; Kohlstedt, David L.

    2015-09-01

    To understand the effect of iron content on the creep behavior of olivine, (MgxFe(1 - x))2SiO4, under hydrous conditions, we have conducted tri-axial compressive creep experiments on samples of polycrystalline olivine with Mg contents of x = 0.53, 0.77, 0.90, and 1. Samples were deformed at stresses of 25 to 320 MPa, temperatures of 1050° to 1200°C, a confining pressure of 300 MPa, and a water fugacity of 300 MPa using a gas-medium high-pressure apparatus. Under hydrous conditions, our results yield the following expression for strain rate as a function of iron content for 0.53 ≤ x ≤ 0.90 in the dislocation creep regime: ɛ˙=ɛ˙0.90((1-x/0.1))1/2exp[226×1030.9-x/RT]. In this equation, the strain rate of San Carlos olivine, ɛ˙0.90, is a function of T, σ, and fH2O. As previously shown for anhydrous conditions, an increase in iron content directly increases creep rate. In addition, an increase in iron content increases hydrogen solubility and therefore indirectly increases creep rate. This flow law allows us to extrapolate our results to a wide range of mantle conditions, not only for Earth's mantle but also for the mantle of Mars.

  12. Algorithms for elasto-plastic-creep postbuckling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Tovichakchaikul, S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper considers the development of an improved constrained time stepping scheme which can efficiently and stably handle the pre-post-buckling behavior of general structure subject to high temperature environments. Due to the generality of the scheme, the combined influence of elastic-plastic behavior can be handled in addition to time dependent creep effects. This includes structural problems exhibiting indefinite tangent properties. To illustrate the capability of the procedure, several benchmark problems employing finite element analyses are presented. These demonstrate the numerical efficiency and stability of the scheme. Additionally, the potential influence of complex creep histories on the buckling characteristics is considered.

  13. Mechanical Behavior of Low Porosity Carbonate Rock: From Brittle Creep to Ductile Creep.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical compaction and associated porosity reduction play an important role in the diagenesis of porous rocks. They may also affect reservoir rocks during hydrocarbon production, as the pore pressure field is modified. This inelastic compaction can lead to subsidence, cause casing failure, trigger earthquake, or change the fluid transport properties. In addition, inelastic deformation can be time - dependent. In particular, brittle creep phenomena have been deeply investigated since the 90s, especially in sandstones. However knowledge of carbonates behavior is still insufficient. In this study, we focus on the mechanical behavior of a 14.7% porosity white Tavel (France) carbonate rock (>98% calcite). The samples were deformed in a triaxial cell at effective confining pressures ranging from 0 MPa to 85 MPa at room temperature and 70°C. Experiments were carried under dry and water saturated conditions in order to explore the role played by the pore fluids. Two types of experiments have been carried out: (1) a first series in order to investigate the rupture envelopes, and (2) a second series with creep experiments. During the experiments, elastic wave velocities (P and S) were measured to infer crack density evolution. Permeability was also measured during creep experiments. Our results show two different mechanical behaviors: (1) brittle behavior is observed at low confining pressures, whereas (2) ductile behavior is observed at higher confining pressures. During creep experiments, these two behaviors have a different signature in term of elastic wave velocities and permeability changes, due to two different mechanisms: development of micro-cracks at low confining pressures and competition between cracks and microplasticity at high confining pressure. The attached figure is a summary of 20 triaxial experiments performed on Tavel limestone under different conditions. Stress states C',C* and C*' and brittle strength are shown in the P-Q space: (a) 20°C and dry

  14. Assessment of Tungsten Content on Tertiary Creep Deformation Behavior of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, Kinkar

    2015-10-01

    Tertiary creep deformation behavior of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels having different tungsten contents has been assessed. Creep tests were carried out at 823 K (550 °C) over a stress range of 180 to 260 MPa on three heats of the RAFM steel (9Cr-W-0.06Ta-0.22V) with tungsten content of 1, 1.4, and 2.0 wt pct. With creep exposure, the steels exhibited minimum in creep rate followed by progressive increase in creep rate until fracture. The minimum creep rate decreased, rupture life increased, and the onset of tertiary stage of creep deformation delayed with the increase in tungsten content. The tertiary creep behavior has been assessed based on the relationship, , considering minimum creep rate () instead of steady-state creep rate. The increase in tungsten content was found to decrease the rate of acceleration of tertiary parameter ` p.' The relationships between (1) tertiary parameter `p' with minimum creep rate and time spent in tertiary creep deformation and (2) the final creep rate with minimum creep rate revealed that the same first-order reaction rate theory prevailed in the minimum creep rate as well as throughout the tertiary creep deformation behavior of the steel. A master tertiary creep curve of the steels has been developed. Scanning electron microscopic investigation revealed enhanced coarsening resistance of carbides in the steel on creep exposure with increase in tungsten content. The decrease in tertiary parameter ` p' with tungsten content with the consequent decrease in minimum creep rate and increase in rupture life has been attributed to the enhanced microstructural stability of the steel.

  15. Thermal buckling behavior of defective CNTs under pre-load: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Mehralian, Fahimeh; Tadi Beni, Yaghoub; Kiani, Yaser

    2017-05-01

    Current study is concentrated on the extraordinary properties of defective carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The role of vacancy defects in thermal buckling response of precompressed CNTs is explored via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Defective CNTs are initially compressed at a certain ratio of their critical buckling strain and then undergo a uniform temperature rise. Comprehensive study is implemented on both armchair and zigzag CNTs with different vacancy defects including monovacancy, symmetric bivacancy and asymmetric bivacancy. The results reveal that defects have a pronounced impact on the buckling behavior of CNTs; interestingly, defective CNTs under compressive pre-load show higher resistance to thermal buckling than pristine ones. In the following, the buckling response of defective CNTs is shown to be dependent on the vacancy defects, location of defects and chirality.

  16. Buckling and postbuckling behavior of compression-loaded isotropic plates with cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study of the buckling and postbuckling behavior of square and rectangular compression loaded aluminum plates with centrally located circular, square, and elliptical cutouts is presented. Experimental results indicate that the plates exhibit overall trends of increasing buckling strain and decreasing initial postbuckling stiffness with increasing cutout width. Corresponding plates with circular and square cutouts of the same width buckle at approximately the same strain level, and exhibit approximately the same initial postbuckling stiffness. Results show that the reduction in initial postbuckling stiffness due to a cutout generally decreases as the plate aspect ratio increases. Other results presented indicate that square plates with elliptical cutouts having a large cutout-width-to-plate-width ratio generally lose prebuckling and initial postbuckling stiffness as the cutout height increases. However, the plates buckle at essentially the same strain level. Results also indicate that postbuckling stiffness is more sensitive to changes in elliptical cutout height than are prebuckling stiffness and buckling strain.

  17. Prediction of compressive post-buckling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes in thermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Gholami, R.; Sahmani, S.

    2013-10-01

    In the present investigation, the axial buckling and post-buckling configurations of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are studied including the thermal environment effect. For this purpose, Eringen's nonlocal elasticity continuum theory is implemented into the classical Euler-Bernoulli beam theory to represent the SWCNTs as a nonlocal elastic beam model. A closed-form analytical solution is carried out to analyze the static response of SWCNTs in their post-buckling state in which the axial buckling load is assumed to be beyond the critical axial buckling load. Common sets of boundary conditions, named simply supported-simply supported (SS-SS), clamped-clamped (C-C), and clamped-simply supported (C-SS), are considered in the investigation. Selected numerical results are given to represent the variation of the carbon nanotube's mid-span deflection with the applied axial load corresponding to various nonlocal parameters, length-to-diameter aspect ratios, temperature changes, and end supports. Moreover, a comparison between the post-buckling behaviors of SWCNTs at low- and high-temperature environments is presented. It is found that the size effect leads to a decrease of the axial buckling load especially for SWCNTs with C-C boundary conditions. Also, it is revealed that the value of the temperature change plays different roles in the post-buckling response of SWCNTs at low- and high-temperature environments.

  18. Thermal Behavior of Cylindrical Buckling Restrained Braces at Elevated Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Elnaz; Tahir, Mahmood Md.; Yasreen, Airil

    2014-01-01

    The primary focus of this investigation was to analyze sequentially coupled nonlinear thermal stress, using a three-dimensional model. It was meant to shed light on the behavior of Buckling Restraint Brace (BRB) elements with circular cross section, at elevated temperature. Such bracing systems were comprised of a cylindrical steel core encased in a strong concrete-filled steel hollow casing. A debonding agent was rubbed on the core's surface to avoid shear stress transition to the restraining system. The numerical model was verified by the analytical solutions developed by the other researchers. Performance of BRB system under seismic loading at ambient temperature has been well documented. However, its performance in case of fire has yet to be explored. This study showed that the failure of brace may be attributed to material strength reduction and high compressive forces, both due to temperature rise. Furthermore, limiting temperatures in the linear behavior of steel casing and concrete in BRB element for both numerical and analytical simulations were about 196°C and 225°C, respectively. Finally it is concluded that the performance of BRB at elevated temperatures was the same as that seen at room temperature; that is, the steel core yields prior to the restraining system. PMID:24526915

  19. On The Creep Behavior Of Niobium-Modified Zirconium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Charit, I.; Murty, K.L.

    2006-07-01

    Zr alloys remain the main cladding materials in most water reactors. Historically, a series of Zircaloys were developed, and two versions, Zircaloy-2 and -4, are still employed in many reactors. The recent trend is to use the Nb-modified zirconium alloys where it has been shown that Nb addition improves cladding performance in various ways, most significant being superior long-term corrosion resistance. Hence, new alloys with Nb additions have recently been developed, such as Zirlo{sup TM(i)} and M5TM{sup (ii)}. Although it is known that creep properties improve, there have been very few data available to precisely evaluate the creep characteristics of new commercial alloys. However, the creep behavior of many Nb-modified zirconium alloys has been studied in several occasions. In this study, we have collected the creep data of these Nb-modified alloys from the open literature as well as our own study over a wide range of stresses and temperatures. The data have been compared with those of conventional Zr and Zircaloys to determine the exact role Nb plays. It has been argued that Nb-modified zirconium alloys would behave as a Class-A alloy (stress exponent of 3) with the Nb atoms forming solute atmospheres around dislocations and thus, impeding dislocation glide under suitable conditions. On the other hand, zirconium and Zircaloys behave as Class-M alloys with a stress exponent of {>=} 4, attesting to the dislocation climb-controlled deformation mode. (authors)

  20. Microstructural Evaluation and Thermal Creep Behavior of Zr-Excel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmmed, Kazi Foyez

    Dual phase (alpha-beta) Zr-Excel Pressure Tube (PT) material has been heat treated in the (alpha+beta) or beta-phase regime to generate variable microstructures. These heat-treated microstructures revealed significant modification in the inital microstructure. The microstructural changes by heat-treatment will have a profound influence on their deformation behavior; characterizing those properties is the main goal of this study. In this dissertation, the experimental results are presented in a manuscript format, which is divided in three technical chapters. Chapter 3 discusses the effect of heat treatment on texture modification; where, as received (ASR) PT materials were heated to a range of temperatures and cooled either in water or in air. It has been observed that due to the orientation relationship between alpha and beta-phase, the ASR microstructure has been significantly altered during heating and cooling. The extent of this alteration strongly depends on the solution temperature and cooling rate. Although, variant selection is observed during texture modification, significant randomization is noticed in the room temperature texture. In Chapter 4, line profile analysis technique has been used to quantitatively analyze the microstructural details of the heat-treated materials. Diffraction pattern analyses demonstrated significant peak broadening in the heat-treated material; which is attributed due to the increase of volume fraction of martensitic alpha and alteration in the dislocation structures. Line profile analyses also revealed that primary alpha consists with large sub-grains and correlated dislocations but the martensitic alpha are highly dislocated. Finally in Chapter 5, thermal creep behavior of the heat treated materials has been studied. Microstructural analyses were also conducted in the pre- and post-creep materials to understand the creep mechanism. Creep anisotropy of the heat treated materials has been investigated by correlating the

  1. The creep behavior of acrylic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Sadiku, E R; Biotidara, F O

    1996-01-01

    The creep behavior of acrylic dental base resins, at room temperature and at different loading conditions, has been examined. The behaviors of these resins are similar to that of "commercial perspex" at room temperature over a period of 1000 seconds. The pseudo-elastic moduli of the blends of PMMA VC show a significant increase compared with PMMA alone. The addition of the PVC powder to the heat-cured acrylic resin increased the time-dependent elastic modulus. This increase in elastic modulus is advantageous in the production of denture based resins of improv mechanical properties.

  2. Creep behavior of tungsten/niobium and tungsten/niobium-1 percent zirconium composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, Donald W.; Titran, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    The creep behavior and microstructural stability of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium and niobium 1 percent zirconium was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in order to assess the potential of this material for use in advanced space power systems. The creep behavior of the composite materials could be described by a power law creep equation. A linear relationship was found to exist between the minimum creep rate of the composite and the inverse of the composite creep rupture life. The composite materials had an order of magnitude increase in stress to achieve 1 percent creep strain and in rupture strength at test temperatures of 1400 and 1500 K compared to unreinforced material. The composite materials were also stronger than the unreinforced materials by an order of magnitude when density was taken into consideration. Results obtained on the creep behavior and microstructural stability of the composites show significant potential improvement in high temperature properties and mass reduction for space power system components.

  3. Time-Dependent Behavior of Diabase and a Nonlinear Creep Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wendong; Zhang, Qiangyong; Li, Shucai; Wang, Shugang

    2014-07-01

    Triaxial creep tests were performed on diabase specimens from the dam foundation of the Dagangshan hydropower station, and the typical characteristics of creep curves were analyzed. Based on the test results under different stress levels, a new nonlinear visco-elasto-plastic creep model with creep threshold and long-term strength was proposed by connecting an instantaneous elastic Hooke body, a visco-elasto-plastic Schiffman body, and a nonlinear visco-plastic body in series mode. By introducing the nonlinear visco-plastic component, this creep model can describe the typical creep behavior, which includes the primary creep stage, the secondary creep stage, and the tertiary creep stage. Three-dimensional creep equations under constant stress conditions were deduced. The yield approach index (YAI) was used as the criterion for the piecewise creep function to resolve the difficulty in determining the creep threshold value and the long-term strength. The expression of the visco-plastic component was derived in detail and the three-dimensional central difference form was given. An example was used to verify the credibility of the model. The creep parameters were identified, and the calculated curves were in good agreement with the experimental curves, indicating that the model is capable of replicating the physical processes.

  4. Creep and Stress-strain Behavior After Creep from Sic Fiber Reinforced, Melt-infiltrated Sic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pujar, Vijay

    2004-01-01

    Silicon carbide fiber (Hi-Nicalon Type S, Nippon Carbon) reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites containing melt-infiltrated Si were subjected to creep at 1315 C for a number of different stress conditions, This study is aimed at understanding the time-dependent creep behavior of CMCs for desired use-conditions, and also more importantly, how the stress-strain response changes as a result of the time-temperature-stress history of the crept material. For the specimens that did not rupture, fast fracture experiments were performed at 1315 C or at room temperature immediately following tensile creep. In many cases, the stress-strain response and the resulting matrix cracking stress of the composite change due to stress-redistribution between composite constituents during tensile creep. The paper will discuss these results and its implications on applications of these materials for turbine engine components.

  5. Creep-rupture behavior of candidate Stirling engine iron supperalloys in high-pressure hydrogen. Volume 2: Hydrogen creep-rupture behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.; Hales, C.

    1984-01-01

    The creep rupture behavior of nine iron base and one cobalt base candidate Stirling engine alloys is evaluated. Rupture life, minimum creep rate, and time to 1% strain data are analyzed. The 3500 h rupture life stress and stress to obtain 1% strain in 3500 h are also estimated.

  6. Creep of Refractory Fibers and Modeling of Metal and Ceramic Matrix Composite Creep Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S.N.

    1995-01-01

    Our concentration during this research was on the following subprograms. (1) Ultra high vacuum creep tests on 218, ST300 and WHfC tungsten and MoHfC molybdenum alloy wires, temperature range from 1100 K to 1500 K, creep time of 1 to 500 hours. (2) High temperature vacuum tensile tests on 218, ST300 and WHfC tungsten and MoHfC molybdenum alloy wires. (3) Air and vacuum tensile creep tests on polycrystalline and single crystal alumina fibers, such as alumina-mullite Nextel fiber, yttrium aluminum ganet (YAG) and Saphikon, temperature range from 1150 K to 1470 K, creep time of 2 to 200 hours. (4) Microstructural evaluation of crept fibers, TEM study on the crept metal wires, SEM study on the fracture surface of ceramic fibers. (5) Metal Matrix Composite creep models, based on the fiber creep properties and fiber-matrix interface zone formation.

  7. Creep crack growth behavior of several structural alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadananda, K.; Shahinian, P.

    1983-07-01

    Creep crack growth behavior of several high temperature alloys, Inconel 600, Inconel 625, Inconel X-750, Hastelloy X, Nimonic PE-16, Incoloy 800, and Haynes 25 (HS-25) was examined at 540, 650, 760, and 870 °C. Crack growth rates were analyzed in terms of both linear elastic stress intensity factor and J*-integral parameter. Among the alloys Inconel 600 and Hastelloy X did not show any observable crack growth. Instead, they deformed at a rapid rate resulting in severe blunting of the crack tip. The other alloys, Inconel 625, Inconel X-750, Incoloy 800, HS-25, and PE-16 showed crack growth at one or two temperatures and deformed continuously at other temperatures. Crack growth rates of the above alloys in terms ofJ* parameter were compared with the growth rates of other alloys published in the literature. Alloys such as Inconel X-750, Alloy 718, and IN-100 show very high growth rates as a result of their sensitivity to an air environment. Based on detailed fracture surface analysis, it is proposed that creep crack growth occurs by the nucleation and growth of wedge-type cracks at triple point junctions due to grain boundary sliding or by the formation and growth of cavities at the boundaries. Crack growth in the above alloys occurs only in some critical range of strain rates or temperatures. Since the service conditions for these alloys usually fall within this critical range, knowledge and understanding of creep crack growth behavior of the structural alloys are important.

  8. Buckling Behavior of Long Symmetrically Laminated Plates Subjected to Shear and Linearly Varying Axial Edge Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1997-01-01

    A parametric study of the buckling behavior of infinitely long symmetrically laminated anisotropic plates that are subjected to linearly varying edge loads, uniform shear loads, or combinations of these loads is presented. The study focuses on the effects of the shape of linearly varying edge load distribution, plate orthotropy, and plate flexural anisotropy on plate buckling behavior. In addition, the study exmines the interaction of linearly varying edge loads and uniform shear loads with plate flexural anisotropy and orthotropy. Results obtained by using a special purpose nondimensional analysis that is well suited for parametric studies of clamped and simply supported plates are presented for [+/- theta](sub s), thin graphite-epoxy laminates that are representative of spacecraft structural components. Also, numerous generic buckling-design charts are presented for a wide range of nondimensional parameters that are applicable to a broad class of laminate constructions. These charts show explicitly the effects of flexural orthotropy and flexural anisotropy on plate buckling behavior for linearly varying edge loads, uniform shear loads, or combinations of these loads. The most important finding of the present study is that specially orthotropic and flexurally anisotropic plates that are subjected to an axial edge load distribution that is tension dominated can support shear loads that are larger in magnitude than the shear buckling load.

  9. Creep Behavior of Organic-Rich Shales - Evidences of Microscale Strain Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, H.; Morales, L. F. G.; Dresen, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Laboratory creep experiments conducted using organic-rich shales show that these rocks exhibit some ductility under sustained loading conditions although they may appear to be elastic and brittle (Young's modulus 15-80 GPa) at shorter time scales. At room-temperature and in-situ pressure conditions, creep strain observed after 3 hours of sustained loading reach strains on the order of 10-5per megapascal of applied differential stress. The creep behavior is highly anisotropic such that creep occurs more in the direction perpendicular to the bedding plane than in the direction parallel to the bedding plane. In general, we find that the creep behavior is largely controlled by the amount of clay mineral and organic content. This is also supported by evidences of elastic stiffening and sample volume reduction during creep which imply that the creep is accommodated by localized compaction occurring within clay-aggregates and/or organic materials, the relatively porous members in the rock. We also find that the tendency to creep has a unique relation with the Young's modulus regardless of the loading direction or the mineral composition. Sone and Zoback (2013) explained this correlation by appealing to the stress partitioning behavior that occurs between the relatively stiff and soft components of the rock, and also by assuming that creep only occurs within the soft components, namely the clay and organic contents, with a specific local 3-hour creep compliance value of 10-4 MPa-1. In order to confirm that such strain-partitioning occurs during creep deformation, we also performed creep experiments under a scanning electron microscope using a deformation stage setup. Such experiments allow us to directly observe the deformation and quantify the strain-partitioning occurring between the different mineral constituents with the aid of digital image correlation analysis. Results suggest that strain-partitioning do occur during creep deformation and inferred creep properties of

  10. Creep and recovery behaviors of magnetorheological elastomer based on polyurethane/epoxy resin IPNs matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, S.; Yu, M.; Fu, J.; Li, P. D.; Zhu, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper mainly investigated the creep and recovery behaviors of magnetorheological elastomers (MRE) based on polyurethane/epoxy resin (EP) graft interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs). The influences of constant stress level, content of EP, particle distribution, magnetic field and temperature on the creep and recovery behaviors were systematically investigated. As expected, results suggested that the presence of IPNs leads to a significant improvement of creep resistance of MRE, and creep and recovery behaviors of MRE were highly dependent on magnetic field and temperature. To further understand its deformation mechanism, several models (i.e., Findley’s power law model, Burgers model, and Weibull distribution equation) were used to fit the measured creep and recovery data. Results showed that the modeling of creep and recovery of samples was satisfactorily conducted by using these models. The influences of content of EP and magnetic field on fitting parameters were discussed, and relevant physical mechanism was proposed to explain it qualitatively.

  11. Buckling and Postbuckling Behavior of Laminated Composite Plates With a Cutout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses the effects of a cutout on the buckling and postbuckling behavior of rectangular plates made of advanced composite materials. An overview of past research is presented, and several key findings and behavioral characteristics are discussed. These findings include the effects of cutout size, shape, eccentricity, and orientation; plate aspect and slenderness ratios; loading and boundary conditions; and plate orthotropy and anisotropy. Some overall important findings of these studies are that plates that have a cutout can buckle at loads higher than the buckling loads for corresponding plates without a cutout and can exhibit substantial postbuckling load-carrying capability. In addition, laminate construction, coupled with cutout geometry, offers a viable means for tailoring structural response.

  12. Magnetic field effects on buckling behavior of smart size-dependent graded nanoscale beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Reza Barati, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    In this article, buckling behavior of nonlocal magneto-electro-elastic functionally graded (MEE-FG) beams is investigated based on a higher-order beam model. Material properties of smart nanobeam are supposed to change continuously throughout the thickness based on the power-law model. Eringen's nonlocal elasticity theory is adopted to capture the small size effects. Nonlocal governing equations of MEE-FG nanobeam are obtained employing Hamilton's principle and they are solved using the Navier solution. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effects of magnetic potential, electric voltage, nonlocal parameter and material composition on buckling behavior of MEE-FG nanobeams. Therefore, the present study makes the first attempt in analyzing the buckling responses of higher-order shear deformable (HOSD) MEE-FG nanobeams.

  13. Transient Creep Behavior of a Plain Woven SiC Fiber/SiC Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessho, Takayuki; Ogasawara, Toshio; Aoki, Takuya; Ishikawa, Takashi; Ochi, Yasuo

    The present work investigates the transient creep behavior of a plain woven Tyranno™ Lox-M (Si-Ti-C-O) fiber/SiC matrix composite at 1473K in air. Tensile creep tests were carried out under a constant load between 80 and 160MPa. A creep strain rate is generally represented by ɛ∝ σn with a constant stress exponent, however the stress exponent decreased with time for this composite material. Monotonic tensile tests were also conducted for loading rates of 0.03, 0.3, and 3kN/min in order to investigate the effect of creep strain on tensile stress/strain behavior. Based on the empirical transient creep equation and creep-hardening model, stress/strain curves under monotonic tensile loading were predicted. A good correlation was obtained between the predicted and measured composite stress/strain curves using strain-hardening model.

  14. Estimation of long-term creep behavior of salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, R.C.

    1980-08-01

    A computer routine for both primary and secondary creep laws has been developed using a modified strain hardening law. The computations reveal that results from Heard's steady-state creep law and Lomenick and Bradshaw's primary creep law can differ from each other by a factor of thirty after about 6 hours of creep deformation, but the difference diminishes as time becomes large. The belief that these two creep laws may yield long-term results that are orders of magnitude apart is shown to be unfounded.

  15. Fundamental Studies on Ambient Temperature Creep Deformation Behavior of Alpha and Alpha-Beta Titanium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-31

    is preferred at high temperatures where large grain sizes are preferred for high creep resistance . In addition, these results suggest that, when...was to be able to predict creep behavior based on the microstructure and composition of an alloy and recommend ways to improve its creep resistance ...technologically important. Titanium has a high strength to weight ratio, excellent resistance to corrosion, good weldability and it is biocompatible, making

  16. Nanoindentation Creep Behavior of an Al0.3CoCrFeNi High-Entropy Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijun; Yu, Pengfei; Cheng, Hu; Zhang, Huan; Diao, Haoyan; Shi, Yunzhu; Chen, Bilin; Chen, Peiyong; Feng, Rui; Bai, Jie; Jing, Qin; Ma, Mingzhen; Liaw, P. K.; Li, Gong; Liu, Riping

    2016-12-01

    Nanoindentation creep behavior was studied on a coarse-grained Al0.3CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy with a single face-centered cubic structure. The effects of the indentation size and loading rate on creep behavior were investigated. The experimental results show that the hardness, creep depth, creep strain rate, and stress exponent are all dependent on the holding load and loading rate. The creep behavior shows a remarkable indentation size effect at different maximum indentation loads. The dominant creep mechanism is dislocation creep at high indentation loads and self-diffusion at low indentation loads. An obvious loading rate sensitivity of creep behavior is found under different loading rates for the alloy. A high loading rate can lead to a high strain gradient, and numerous dislocations emerge and entangle together. Then during the holding time, a large creep deformation characteristic with a high stress exponent will happen.

  17. Buckling Behavior of Long Anisotropic Plates Subjected to Fully Restrained Thermal Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    An approach for synthesizing buckling results and behavior for thin balanced and unbalanced symmetric laminates that are subjected to uniform heating or cooling and fully restrained against thermal expansion or contraction is presented. This approach uses a nondimensional analysis for infinitely long, flexurally anisotropic plates that are subjected to combined mechanical loads and is based on useful nondimensional parameters. In addition, stiffness-weighted laminate thermal-expansion parameters are derived that are used to determine critical temperatures in terms of physically intuitive mechanical buckling coefficients, and the effects of membrane orthotropy and membrane anisotropy are included. Many results are presented for some common laminates that are intended to facilitate a structural designer's transition to the use of the generic buckling design curves that are presented in the paper. Several generic buckling design curves are presented that provide physical insight into the buckling response in addition to providing useful design data. Examples are presented that demonstrate the use of the generic design curves. The analysis approach and generic results indicate the effects and characteristics of laminate thermal expansion, membrane orthotropy and anisotropy, and flexural orthotropy and anisotropy in a very general and unifying manner.

  18. Buckling Behavior of Long Anisotropic Plates Subjected to Fully Restrained Thermal Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2003-01-01

    An approach for synthesizing buckling results and behavior for thin, balanced and unbalanced symmetric laminates that are subjected to uniform heating or cooling and which are fully-restrained against thermal expansion or contraction is presented. This approach uses a nondimensional analysis for infinitely long, flexurally anisotropic plates that are subjected to combined mechanical loads and is based on useful nondimensional parameters. In addition, stiffness-weighted laminate thermal-expansion parameters are derived and used to determine critical temperature changes in terms of physically intuitive mechanical buckling coefficients. The effects of membrane orthotropy and anisotropy are included. Many results are presented for some common laminates that are intended to facilitate a structural designer's transition to the use of the generic buckling design curves that are presented in the paper. Several generic buckling design curves are presented that provide physical insight into buckling response and provide useful design data. Examples are presented that demonstrate the use of generic design curves. The analysis approach and generic results indicate the effects and characteristics of laminate thermal expansion, membrane orthotropy and anisotropy, and flexural orthotropy and anisotropy in a very general, unifying manner.

  19. Buckling behavior of long symmetrically laminated plates subjected to combined loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1992-01-01

    A parametric study of the buckling behavior of infinitely long symmetrically laminated anisotropic plates subjected to combined loadings is presented. The loading conditions considered are axial tension and compression, transverse tension and compression, and shear. Results obtained using a special purpose analysis, well suited for parametric studies are presented for clamped and simply supported plates. Moreover, results are presented for some common laminate constructions, and generic buckling design charts are presented for a wide range of parameters. The generic design charts are presented in terms of useful nondimensional parameters, and dependence of the nondimensional parameters on laminate fiber orientation, stacking sequence, and material properties is discussed. An important finding of the study is that the effects of anisotropy are much more pronounced in shear-loaded plates than in compression loaded plates. In addition, the effects of anisotropy on plates subjected to combined loadings are generally manifested as a phase shift of self-similar buckling interaction curves. A practical application of this phase shift is the buckling resistance of long plates can be improved by applying a shear loading with a specific orientation. In all cases considered, it is found that the buckling coefficients of infinitely long plates are independent of the bending stiffness ratio (D sub 11/D sub 22) sup 1/4.

  20. Creep Crack Initiation and Growth Behavior for Ni-Base Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagumo, Yoshiko; Yokobori, A. Toshimitsu, Jr.; Sugiura, Ryuji; Ozeki, Go; Matsuzaki, Takashi

    The structural components which are used in high temperature gas turbines have various shapes which may cause the notch effect. Moreover, the site of stress concentration might have the heterogeneous microstructural distribution. Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the creep fracture mechanism for these materials in order to predict the life of creep fracture with high degree of accuracy. In this study, the creep crack growth tests were performed using in-situ observational testing machine with microscope to observe the creep damage formation and creep crack growth behavior. The materials used are polycrystalline Ni-base superalloy IN100 and directionally solidified Ni-base superalloy CM247LC which were developed for jet engine turbine blades and gas turbine blades in electric power plants, respectively. The microstructural observation of the test specimens was also conducted using FE-SEM/EBSD. Additionally, the analyses of two-dimensional elastic-plastic creep finite element using designed methods were conducted to understand the effect of microstructural distribution on creep damage formation. The experimental and analytical results showed that it is important to determine the creep crack initiation and early crack growth to predict the life of creep fracture and it is indicated that the highly accurate prediction of creep fracture life could be realized by measuring notch opening displacement proposed as the RNOD characteristic.

  1. Mechanisms Governing the Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Vijay; Carroll, Laura; Sham, Sam

    2015-04-06

    This research project, which includes collaborators from INL and ORNL, focuses on the study of alloy 617 and alloy 800H that are candidates for applications as intermediate heat exchangers in GEN IV nuclear reactors, with an emphasis on the effects of grain size, grain boundaries and second phases on the creep properties; the mechanisms of dislocation creep, diffusional creep and cavitation; the onset of tertiary creep; and theoretical modeling for long-term predictions of materials behavior and for high temperature alloy design.

  2. The effect of aluminium on the creep behavior of titanium aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nandy, T.K.; Mishra, R.S.; Gogia, A.K.; Banerjee, D.

    1995-03-15

    Small increases in the Al content of Ti{sub 3}Al-Nb alloys are known to improve creep resistance at the expense of the room temperature ductility. Though considerable work has been done on the creep behavior of titanium aluminide alloys, a systematic investigation involving the role of Al on the creep of aluminides is lacking. In the present study the authors have therefore carried out a complete investigation on stress and temperature effects on two alloys with differing Al contents, Ti-24Al-15Nb and Ti-26Al-15Nb (nominal composition in at%) in order to understand the effect of Al in terms of power law creep behavior. The following conclusions are made: (1) A strong Al effect on the creep resistance of O phase alloys in the Ti-Al-Nb systems has been confirmed, through a study of stress and temperature effects on the creep behavior of the Ti-24Al-15Nb and the Ti-26Al-15Nb compositions. (2) It has been shown, however, that the small differences in Al do not affect either the activation energies for creep ({approximately}370 kJ/mole) or the creep mechanism (climb controlled creep with a stress exponent of 4). The activation energies and stress exponents are similar to that observed in single phase O alloys. (3) It is suggested that Al influences creep strength through an intrinsic effect on the pre-exponential term AD{sub o} in the power law creep equation. It is possible that this effect is related to a higher ordering energy of the O phase with increasing Al content.

  3. High-Temperature Creep Behavior Of Fiber-Reinforced Niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, Donald W.; Titran, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    Study conducted to determine feasibility of using composite materials in advanced space power systems, described in 22-page report. Tungsten fibers reduce creep and mass in advanced power systems. Reinforcing niobium alloys with tungsten fibers increases their resistances to creep by factors of as much as 10.

  4. Out-of-pile creep behavior of uranium carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, T. R.; Seltzer, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    Compression creep tests were investigated on various UC-based fuel materials having a variation in both density and composition. Specimens were prepared by casting and by hot pressing. Steady-state creep rates were measured under vacuum at 1400 to 1800 C in the stress range 500-4000 psi.

  5. Creep behavior of MoSi{sub 2}-SiC composites

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, D.P.; Maloy, S.A.; Kung, H.; Korzekwa, D.A.; Petrovic, J.J.

    1993-12-31

    Using a cylindrical indenter, indentation creep behavior of hot pressed and HIPed MoSi{sub 2}-SiC composites containing 0--40% SiC by volume, was characterized at 1000--1200C, 258--362 MPa. Addition of SiC affects the creep behavior of MoSi{sub 2} in a complex manner by pinning grain boundaries during pressing, thus leading to smaller MoSi{sub 2} grains; by obstructing or altering both dislocation motion and grain boundary sliding; and by increasing the overall yield stress of the material. Comparisons are made between indentation and compressive creep studies. It is shown that under certain conditions, compressive creep and indentation creep measurements yield comparable results after correcting for effective stresses and strain rates beneath the indenter.

  6. Long-time creep behavior of the niobium alloy C-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Klopp, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    The creep behavior of C-103 was studied as a function of stress, temperature, and grain size for test times to 19000 hr. Over the temperature range 827 to 1204 C and the stress range 6.89 to 138 MPa, only tertiary (accelerating) creep was observed. The creep strain epsilon can be related to time t by an exponential relation epsilon = epsilon(0) + K e raised to power (st) - 1), where epsilon (0) is initial creep strain, K is the tertiary creep strain parameter, and s is the tertiary creep rate parameter. The observed stress exponent 2.87 is similar to the three power law generally observed for secondary (linear) creep of Class I solid solutions. The apparent activation energy 374 kj/g mol is close to that observed for self diffusion of pure niobium. The initial tertiary creep rate was slightly faster for fine grained than for coarse-grained material. The strain parameter K can be expressed as a combination of power functions of stress and grain size and an exponential function of temperature. Strain time curves generated by using calculated values for K and s showed reasonable agreement with observed curves to strains of at least 4 percent. The time to 1 percent strain was related to stress, temperature, and grain size in a similar manner as the initial tertiary creep rate.

  7. Buckling Behavior of Long Anisotropic Plates Subjected to Elastically Restrained Thermal Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    An approach for synthesizing buckling results for, and behavior of, thin balanced and unbalanced symmetric laminates that are subjected to uniform heating or cooling and elastically restrained against thermal expansion or contraction is presented. This approach uses a nondimensional analysis for infinitely long, flexurally anisotropic plates that are subjected to combined mechanical loads and is based on useful nondimensional parameters. In addition, stiffness-weighted laminate thermal-expansion parameters and compliance coefficients are derived that are used to determine critical temperatures in terms of physically intuitive mechanical-buckling coefficients. The effects of membrane orthotropy and membrane anisotropy are included in the general formulation. Many results are presented for some common laminates that are intended to facilitate a structural designer's transition to the use of generic buckling design curves. Several curves that illustrate the fundamental parameters used in the analysis are presented, for nine contemporary material systems, that provide physical insight into the buckling response in addition to providing useful design data. Examples are presented that demonstrate the use of generic design curves. The analysis approach and generic results indicate the effects and characteristics of elastically restrained laminate thermal expansion or contraction, membrane orthotropy and anisotropy, and flexural orthotropy and anisotropy in a very general and unifying manner.

  8. Creep-rupture behavior of 6 candidate stirling engine iron-base superalloys in high pressure hydrogen. Volume 1: Air creep-rupture behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    1982-01-01

    Four wrought alloys (A-286, IN 800H, N-155, and 19-9DL) and two cast alloys (CRM-6D and XF-818) were tested to determine their creep-rupture behavior. The wrought alloys were used in the form of sheets of 0.89 mm (0.035 in.) average thickness. The cast alloy specimens were investment cast and machined to 6.35 mm (0.250 in.) gage diameter. All specimens were tested to rupture in air at different times up to 3000 h over the temperature range of 650 C to 925 C (1200 F to 1700 F). Rupture life, minimum creep rate, and time to 1% creep strain were statistically analyzed as a function of stress at different temperatures. Temperature-compensated analysis was also performed to obtain the activation energies for rupture life, time to 1% creep strain, and the minimum creep rate. Microstructural and fracture analyses were also performed. Based on statistical analyses, estimates were made for stress levels at different temperatures to obtain 3500 h rupture life and time to 1% creep strain. Test results are to be compared with similar data being obtained for these alloys under 15 MPa (2175 psi) hydrogen.

  9. Creep Behavior of Solid Solution Strengthened Y3Al5O12

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    DATES COVERED Final Technical Report 15 Feb 97 to 29 Aug 97 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Creep Behavior of Solid Solution Strengthened Y3A15012 6...Final Report Title: Creep Behavior of Solid Solution Strengthened Y3AI5012 Award Number: F49620-97-1-0097 For the period of: 2/14/97-8/31/97...been investigated at present in these oxides is through the formation of solid solution alloys. For the case of oxides two different possible solid

  10. Creep behavior of pack cementation aluminide coatings on Grade 91 ferritic martensitic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Brian; Zhang, Ying; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Pint, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    The creep behavior of various pack cementation aluminide coatings on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel was investigated at 650 C in laboratory air. The coatings were fabricated in two temperature regimes, i.e., 650 or 700 C (low temperature) and 1050 C(high temperature), and consisted of a range of Al levels and thicknesses. For comparison, uncoated specimens heat-treated at 1050 C to simulate the high temperature coating cycle also were included in the creep test. All coated specimens showed a reduction in creep resistance, with 16 51% decrease in rupture life compared to the as-received bare substrate alloy. However, the specimens heat-treated at 1050 C exhibited the lowest creep resistance among all tested samples, with a surprisingly short rupture time of < 25 h, much shorter than the specimen coated at 1050 C. Factors responsible for the reduction in creep resistance of both coated and heat-treated specimens were discussed.

  11. Seismic effects and buckling behavior of pipelines in the central and eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.E.; Nyman, D.J.; Hammond, C.R.

    1992-04-01

    The status of knowledge on the seismic effects and buckling behavior of pipelines in the central and eastern United States is reviewed. Types of ground response to earthquake motions that result in pipeline failure and pipeline response to such motions are discussed. The primary focus is on oil and gas transmission lines constructed of welded steel pipe. Results of vulnerability studies, the need for better determination of the potential for existing pipeline failures, and design procedures for new pipelines are presented.

  12. Creep behavior of 6 micrometer linear low density polyethylene film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. M.; Schur, W. W.

    1993-01-01

    Creep tests were performed to provide material characteristics for a 6.4-micron polyethylene film used to construct high altitude balloons. Results suggest simple power law relationships are adequate for stresses below about 4.83 MPa.

  13. Creep deformation behavior in eutectic Sn-Ag solder joints using a novel mapping technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, J.P.; Guo, F.; McDougall, J.; Bieler, T.R.; Subramanian, K.N.; Park, J.K.

    1999-11-01

    Creep deformation behavior was measured for 60--100 {micro}m thick solder joints. The solder joints investigated consisted of: (1) non-composite solder joints made with eutectic Sn-Ag solder, and (2) composite solder joints with eutectic Sn-Ag solder containing 20 vol.%, 5 {micro}m diameter in-situ Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic reinforcements. All creep testing in this study was carried out at room temperature. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of creep deformation was characterized on the solder joints. Creep deformation was analyzed using a novel mapping technique where a geometrical-regular line pattern was etched over the entire solder joint using excimer laser ablation. During creep, the laser-ablation (LA) pattern becomes distorted due to deformation in the solder joint. By imaging the distortion of laser-ablation patterns using the SEM, actual deformation mapping for the entire solder joint is revealed. The technique involves sequential optical/digital imaging of the deformation versus time history during creep. By tracing and recording the deformation of the LA patterns on the solder over intervals of time, local creep data are obtained in many locations in the joint. This analysis enables global and localized creep shear strains and strain rate to be determined.

  14. Creep behavior for advanced polycrystalline SiC fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Kohyama, Akira

    1997-08-01

    A bend stress relaxation (BSR) test is planned to examine irradiation enhanced creep in polycrystalline SiC fibers which are under development for use as fiber reinforcement in SiC/SiC composite. Baseline 1 hr and 100 hr BSR thermal creep {open_quotes}m{close_quotes} curves have been obtained for five selected advanced SiC fiber types and for standard Nicalon CG fiber. The transition temperature, that temperature where the S-shaped m-curve has a value 0.5, is a measure of fiber creep resistance. In order of decreasing thermal creep resistance, with the 100 hr BSR transition temperature given in parenthesis, the fibers ranked: Sylramic (1261{degrees}C), Nicalon S (1256{degrees}C), annealed Hi Nicalon (1215{degrees}C), Hi Nicalon (1078{degrees}C), Nicalon CG (1003{degrees}C) and Tyranno E (932{degrees}C). The thermal creep for Sylramic, Nicalon S, Hi Nicalon and Nicalon CG fibers in a 5000 hr irradiation creep BSR test is projected from the temperature dependence of the m-curves determined during 1 and 100 hr BSR control tests.

  15. Tensile and compressive creep behavior of extruded Mg–10Gd–3Y–0.5Zr (wt.%) alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Wang, Q.D.; Boehlert, C.J.; Yin, D.D.; Yuan, J.

    2015-01-15

    The tensile and compressive creep behavior of an extruded Mg–10Gd–3Y–0.5Zr (wt.%) alloy was investigated at temperatures ranging from 200 °C to 300 °C and under stresses ranging from 30 MPa to 120 MPa. There existed an asymmetry in the tensile and compressive creep properties. The minimum creep rate of the alloy was slightly greater in tension than in compression. The measured values of the transient strain and initial creep rate in compression were greater than those in tension. The creep stress exponent was approximately 2.5 at low temperatures (T < 250 °C) and 3.4 at higher temperatures both in tension and in compression. The compression creep activation energy at low temperatures and high temperatures was 83.4 and 184.3 kJ/mol respectively, while one activation energy (184 kJ/mol) represented the tensile–creep behavior over the temperature range examined. Dislocation creep was suggested to be the main mechanism in tensile creep and in the high-temperature regime in compressive creep, while grain boundary sliding was suggested to dominate in the low-temperature regime in compressive creep. Precipitate free zones were observed near grain boundaries perpendicular to the loading direction in tension and parallel to the loading direction in compression. Electron backscattered diffraction analysis revealed that the texture changed slightly during creep. Non-basal slip was suggested to contribute to the deformation after basal slip was introduced. In the tensile–creep ruptured specimens, intergranular cracks were mainly observed at general high-angle boundaries. - Highlights: • Creep behavior of an extruded Mg–RE alloy was characterized by EBSD. • T5 aging treatment enhanced the tension–compression creep asymmetry. • The grains grew slightly during tensile creep, but not for compressive creep. • Precipitate free zones (PFZs) were observed at specific grain boundaries. • Intergranular fracture was dominant and cracks mainly originated at

  16. Behavior of a plate strip under shear and compressive stresses beyond the buckling limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kromm, A; Marguerre, K

    1938-01-01

    The present report is an extension of previous theoretical investigations on the elastic behavior of a plate under compression and shear in the region above the critical. The main object is the clarification of the behavior immediately above the buckling limit since no theoretical expressions for this range have thus far been found and since experimentally, too, any degree of regularity in the behavior of the plate in the range between the critical load and about three to four times the critical, is discernible only with difficulty.

  17. Effect of temperature and stress on creep behavior of ultrafine grained nanocrystalline Ni-3 at% Zr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meraj, Md.; Pal, Snehanshu

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based study of creep behavior for nanocrystalline (NC) Ni-3 at% Zr alloy having grain size 6 nm has been performed using embedded atom method (EAM) potential to study the influence of variation of temperature (1220-1450 K) as well as change in stress (0.5-1.5 GPa) on creep behavior. All the simulated creep curves for this ultra-fine grained NC Ni-Zr alloy has extensive tertiary creep regime. Primary creep regime is very short and steady state creep part is almost absent. The effect of temperatures and stress is prominent on the nature of the simulated creep curves and corresponding atomic configurations. Additionally, mean square displacement calculation has been performed at 1220 K, 1250 K, 1350 K, and 1450 K temperatures to correlate the activation energy of atomic diffusion and creep. The activation energy of creep process found to be less compared to activation energies of self-diffusion for Ni and Zr in NC Ni-3 at% Zr alloy. Formation of martensite is identified during creep process by common neighbour analysis. Presence of dislocations is observed only in primary regime of creep curve up till 20 ps, as evident from calculated dislocation density through MD simulations. Coble creep is found to be main operative mechanism for creep deformation of ultrafine grained NC Ni-3 at% Zr alloy.

  18. The effect of temperature and stress on creep behavior of ultrafine grained nanocrystalline Ni-3 at% Zr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meraj, Md.; Pal, Snehanshu

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based study of creep behavior for nanocrystalline (NC) Ni-3 at% Zr alloy having grain size 6 nm has been performed using embedded atom method (EAM) potential to study the influence of variation of temperature (1220-1450 K) as well as change in stress (0.5-1.5 GPa) on creep behavior. All the simulated creep curves for this ultra-fine grained NC Ni-Zr alloy has extensive tertiary creep regime. Primary creep regime is very short and steady state creep part is almost absent. The effect of temperatures and stress is prominent on the nature of the simulated creep curves and corresponding atomic configurations. Additionally, mean square displacement calculation has been performed at 1220 K, 1250 K, 1350 K, and 1450 K temperatures to correlate the activation energy of atomic diffusion and creep. The activation energy of creep process found to be less compared to activation energies of self-diffusion for Ni and Zr in NC Ni-3 at% Zr alloy. Formation of martensite is identified during creep process by common neighbour analysis. Presence of dislocations is observed only in primary regime of creep curve up till 20 ps, as evident from calculated dislocation density through MD simulations. Coble creep is found to be main operative mechanism for creep deformation of ultrafine grained NC Ni-3 at% Zr alloy.

  19. Thermal and Irradiation Creep Behavior of a Titanium Aluminide in Advanced Nuclear Plant Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, Per; Chen, Jiachao; Hoffelner, Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Titanium aluminides are well-accepted elevated temperature materials. In conventional applications, their poor oxidation resistance limits the maximum operating temperature. Advanced reactors operate in nonoxidizing environments. This could enlarge the applicability of these materials to higher temperatures. The behavior of a cast gamma-alpha-2 TiAl was investigated under thermal and irradiation conditions. Irradiation creep was studied in beam using helium implantation. Dog-bone samples of dimensions 10 × 2 × 0.2 mm3 were investigated in a temperature range of 300 °C to 500 °C under irradiation, and significant creep strains were detected. At temperatures above 500 °C, thermal creep becomes the predominant mechanism. Thermal creep was investigated at temperatures up to 900 °C without irradiation with samples of the same geometry. The results are compared with other materials considered for advanced fission applications. These are a ferritic oxide-dispersion-strengthened material (PM2000) and the nickel-base superalloy IN617. A better thermal creep behavior than IN617 was found in the entire temperature range. Up to 900 °C, the expected 104 hour stress rupture properties exceeded even those of the ODS alloy. The irradiation creep performance of the titanium aluminide was comparable with the ODS steels. For IN617, no irradiation creep experiments were performed due to the expected low irradiation resistance (swelling, helium embrittlement) of nickel-base alloys.

  20. Microstructure and Creep Behavior of High-Pressure Die-Cast Magnesium Alloy AE44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, S. M.; Nie, J. F.; Gibson, M. A.; Easton, M. A.; Bakke, P.

    2012-11-01

    The microstructure and creep behavior of a high-pressure die-cast AE44 (Mg-4Al-4RE) alloy have been studied. The creep properties were evaluated at 423 K and 448 K (150 °C and 175 °C) under stresses in the range 90 to 110 MPa. The microstructures before and after creep were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After creep, AE44 exhibits anomalously high stress exponents ( n = 67 at 423 K [150 °C] and n = 41 at 448 K [175 °C]) and stress-dependant activation energies ranging from 221 to 286 kJ/mol. The dislocation substructure developed during creep is characterized by extensive nonbasal slip and isolated but well-defined subgrain boundaries. It is shown that the anomalously high stress exponents cannot be rationalized by the threshold stress approach that is commonly adopted in analyzing the creep behavior of dispersion-strengthened alloys or metal matrix composites. A comparison in creep resistance is also made between AE44 and AE42 (Mg-4Al-2RE).

  1. Linear thermoelastic buckling and free vibration behavior of functionally graded truncated conical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhangale, Rajesh K.; Ganesan, N.; Padmanabhan, Chandramouli

    2006-04-01

    In recent years, structures made up of functionally graded materials (FGMs) have received considerable attention for use in high-temperature applications. In this article, a finite element formulation based on First-Order Shear Deformation Theory (FSDT) is used to study the thermal buckling and vibration behavior of truncated FGM conical shells in a high-temperature environment. A Fourier series expansion for the displacement variable in the circumferential direction is used to model the FGM conical shell. The material properties of the truncated FGM conical shells are functionally graded in the thickness direction according to a volume fraction power law distribution. Temperature-dependent material properties are considered to carry out a linear thermal buckling and free vibration analysis. The conical shell is assumed to be clamped-clamped and has a high temperature specified on the inner surface while the outer surface is at ambient temperature. The one-dimensional heat conduction equation is used across the thickness of the conical shell to determine the temperature distribution and thereby the material properties. In addition, the influence of initial stresses on the frequency behavior of FGM shells has also been investigated. Numerical studies involving the understanding of the role of power law index, r/h ratios, and semi-vertex angle on the thermal buckling temperature as well as on vibration have been carried out.

  2. Mechanical properties and buckling behaviors of condensed double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingyan; Wang, Chien Ming; Tan, Vincent Beng Chye

    2009-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed on condensed double-walled carbon nanotubes (CDWCNTs) to investigate the effects of compressed interwall spacings on their mechanical properties, in particular their buckling behavior under axial compression, torsion and bending. In CDWCNTs, the inner and outer nanotubes have diameters that are closer to each other than the nanotubes of conventional double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs). This leads to a smaller interwall spacing. The mechanical properties of the CDWCNTs, such as Young's modulus, interwall shear modulus, and the buckling strain under axial compression, torsion and bending are found to be greatly enhanced when compared with those of conventional DWCNTs. The enhancement is found to be inversely proportional to the interwall spacing.

  3. Optical measurement on dynamic buckling behavior of stiffened composite panels under in-plane shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhenkun; Bai, Ruixiang; Tao, Wang; Wei, Xiao; Leng, Ruijiao

    2016-12-01

    The buckling behavior and failure mode of a composite panel stiffened by I-shaped stringers under in-plane shear is studied using digital fringe projection profilometry. The basic principles of the dynamic phase-shifting technique, multi-frequency phase-unwrapping technique and inverse-phase technique for nonlinear error compensation are introduced. Multi-frequency fringe projection profilometry was used to monitor and measure the change in the morphology of a discontinuous surface of the stiffened composite panel during in-plane shearing. Meanwhile, the strain history of multiple points on the skin was obtained using strain rosettes. The buckling mode and deflection of the panel at different moments were analyzed and compared with those obtained using the finite element method. The experimental results validated the FEM analysis.

  4. Creep behavior of tungsten/niobium and tungsten/niobium-1 percent zirconium composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Titran, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility of using tungsten fiber reinforced niobium or niobium-1 percent zirconium matrix composites to meet the anticipated increased temperature and creep resistance requirements imposed by advanced space power systems. The results obtained on the short time tensile properties indicated that W/Nb composites showed significant improvements in high temperature strength and offer significant mass reductions for high temperature space power systems. The prime material requirement for space power systems applications is long time creep resistance. A study was conducted to determine the effect of high temperature exposure on the properties of these composites, with emphasis upon their creep behavior at elevated temperatures.

  5. Matrix cracking and creep behavior of monolithic zircon and zircon silicon carbide fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandakumar, Umashankar

    In this study, the first matrix cracking behavior and creep behavior of zircon matrix silicon carbide fiber composites were studied, together with the fracture and creep behavior of the monolithic zircon. These behaviors are of engineering and scientific importance, and the study was aimed at understanding the deformation mechanisms at elevated temperatures. The first matrix cracking behavior of zircon matrix uniaxially reinforced with silicon carbide fiber (SCS-6) composites and failure behavior of monolithic zircon were studied as a function of temperature (25°C, 500°C, and 1200°C) and crack length in three point bending mode. A modified vicker's indentation technique was used to vary the initial crack length in monolithic and composite samples. The interfacial shear strength was measured at these temperatures from matrix crack saturation spacing. The composites exhibited steady state and non steady state behaviors at the three different temperatures as predicted by theoretical models, while the failure stress of zircon decreased with increasing stress. The intrinsic properties of the composites were used to numerically determine the results predicted by three different matrix cracking models based on a fracture mechanics approach. The analysis showed that the model based on crack bridging analysis was valid at 25°C and 500°C, while a model based on statistical fiber failure was valid at 1200°C. Microstructural studies showed that fiber failure in the crack wake occurred at or below the matrix cracking stress at 1200°C, and no fiber failure occurred at the other two temperatures, which validated the results predicted by the theoretical models. Also, it was shown that the interfacial shear stress corresponding to debonding determined the matrix cracking stress, and not the frictional shear stress. This study showed for the first time, the steady state and non-steady state matrix cracking behavior at elevated temperatures, the difference in behavior between

  6. The development of methods for the prediction of primary creep behavior in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerwekh, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    The applicability of a thermodynamic constitutive theory of deformation to the prediction of primary creep and creep strain relaxation behavior in metals is examined. Constitutive equations derived from the theory are subjected to a parametric analysis in order to determine the influence of several parameters on the curve forms generated by the equations. A computer program is developed which enables the solution of a generalized constitutive equation using experimental data as input. Several metals were tested to form a data base of primary creep and relaxation behavior. The extent to which these materials conformed to the constitutive equation showed wide variability, with the alloy Ti-6Al-4V exhibiting the most consistent results. Accordingly, most of the analysis is concentrated upon data from that alloy, although creep and relaxation data from all the materials tested are presented. Experimental methods are outlined as well as some variations in methods of analysis. Various theoretical and practical implications of the work are discussed.

  7. Creep behavior for advanced polycrystalline SiC fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Kohyama, Akira

    1997-04-01

    A bend stress relaxation (BSR) test has been utilized to examine irradiation enhanced creep in polycrystalline SiC fibers which are under development for use as fiber reinforcement in SiC/SiC composite. Qualitative, S-shaped 1hr BSR curves were compared for three selected advanced SiC fiber types and standard Nicalon CG fiber. The temperature corresponding to the middle of the S-curve (where the BSR parameter m = 0.5) is a measure of a fiber`s thermal stability as well as it creep resistance. In order of decreasing thermal creep resistance, the measured transition temperatures were Nicalon S (1450{degrees}C), Sylramic (1420{degrees}C), Hi-Nicalon (1230{degrees}C) and Nicalon CG (1110{degrees}C).

  8. Investigation of buckling behavior of carbon nanotube/shape memory polymer composite shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guanghui; Yang, Qingsheng; Zhang, Qiang

    2012-04-01

    Shape memory polymer(SMP) is a class of smart materials used in intelligent biomedical devices and industrial application as sensors or actuators for their ability to change shape under a predetermined stimulus. Carbon nanotube (CNT)/shape memory polymer (SMP) composites demonstrate good mechanical properties and shape memory effect. In this work, a model of CNT/SMP composite shell with a vaulted cross-section was established. This composite shell structure could further elevate the recovery stress of CNT/SMP composites. The folding properties of CNT/SMP composite shell structure were analyzed by finite element method and the influence of structural parameters on the buckling behavior of the shell was studied using the energy conservation principle. The results indicate that vaulted cross-section shell had unique mechanical properties. The structural parameters, such as the vaulted radius and the total length have a great impact on buckling moment of the shell. This shell structure is expected to achieve effective control of buckling and deploying process, relying on the special shape memory property of SMP and high elastic modulus CNTs. Moreover, it could also largely avoid the vibration problem during the deploying process.

  9. Investigation of buckling behavior of carbon nanotube/shape memory polymer composite shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guanghui; Yang, Qingsheng; Zhang, Qiang

    2011-11-01

    Shape memory polymer(SMP) is a class of smart materials used in intelligent biomedical devices and industrial application as sensors or actuators for their ability to change shape under a predetermined stimulus. Carbon nanotube (CNT)/shape memory polymer (SMP) composites demonstrate good mechanical properties and shape memory effect. In this work, a model of CNT/SMP composite shell with a vaulted cross-section was established. This composite shell structure could further elevate the recovery stress of CNT/SMP composites. The folding properties of CNT/SMP composite shell structure were analyzed by finite element method and the influence of structural parameters on the buckling behavior of the shell was studied using the energy conservation principle. The results indicate that vaulted cross-section shell had unique mechanical properties. The structural parameters, such as the vaulted radius and the total length have a great impact on buckling moment of the shell. This shell structure is expected to achieve effective control of buckling and deploying process, relying on the special shape memory property of SMP and high elastic modulus CNTs. Moreover, it could also largely avoid the vibration problem during the deploying process.

  10. Nonlinear and Buckling Behavior of Curved Panels Subjected to Combined Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The results of an analytical study of the nonlinear and buckling response characteristics of curved panels subjected to combined loads are presented. Aluminum and laminated composite panels are considered in the study and a flat and shallow curved panel configurations are considered as well. The panels are subjected to combined axial compression and transverse tension or compression loads or combined axial compression and inplane shear loads. Results illustrating the effects of various combined load states on the buckling response of the panels are presented. In addition, results illustrating the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy and panel curvature on the panel response are presented. The results indicate that panel curvature can have a significant effect on the nonlinear and buckling behavior of the panels subjected to combined loads. Results are included that show that geometrically perfect panels do not exhibit bifurcation points for some combined loads. Results are also presented that show the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy on the interaction of combined loads.

  11. Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xingshuo

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is one of the leading concepts of the Generation IV nuclear reactor development, which is the core component of Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The major challenge in the research and development of NGNP is the performance and reliability of structure materials at high temperature. Alloy 617, with an exceptional combination of high temperature strength and oxidation resistance, has been selected as a primary candidate material for structural use, particularly in Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) which has an outlet temperature in the range of 850 to 950°C and an inner pressure from 5 to 20MPa. In order to qualify the material to be used at the operation condition for a designed service life of 60 years, a comprehensive scientific understanding of creep behavior at high temperature and low stress regime is necessary. In addition, the creep mechanism and the impact factors such as precipitates, grain size, and grain boundary characters need to be evaluated for the purpose of alloy design and development. In this study, thermomechanically processed specimens of alloy 617 with different grain sizes were fabricated, and creep tests with a systematic test matrix covering the temperatures of 850 to 1050°C and stress levels from 5 to 100MPa were conducted. Creep data was analyzed, and the creep curves were found to be unconventional without a well-defined steady-state creep. Very good linear relationships were determined for minimum creep rate versus stress levels with the stress exponents determined around 3-5 depending on the grain size and test condition. Activation energies were also calculated for different stress levels, and the values are close to 400kJ/mol, which is higher than that for self-diffusion in nickel. Power law dislocation climb-glide mechanism was proposed as the dominant creep mechanism in the test condition regime. Dynamic recrystallization happening at high strain range enhanced dislocation climb and

  12. Buckling and postbuckling behavior of square compression-loaded graphite-epoxy plates with circular cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1990-01-01

    affects the buckling behavior. Some of the plates with cutouts and eccentricity exhibited a snap-through type of buckling behavior.

  13. Creep Behavior of Glass/Ceramic Sealant Used in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Koeppel, Brian J.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-01-02

    High operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells require that sealant must function at high temperature between 600o and 900oC and in the oxidizing and reducing environments of fuel and air. It should be noted that creep deformation becomes relevant for a material when the operating temperature is near or exceeds half of its melting temperature (in degrees of Kelvin). The operating temperatures for most of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under development in the SECA program are around 800oC, which exceeds the glass transition temperature Tg for most glass ceramic materials. The goal of the study is to develop a creep model to capture the creep behavior of glass ceramic materials at high temperature and to investigate the effect of creep of glass ceramic sealant materials on stresses in glass seal and on the various interfaces of glass seal with other layers. The self-consistent creep models were incorporated into SOFC-MP and Mentat FC, and finite element analyses were performed to quantify the stresses in various parts. The stress in glass seals were released due to its creep behavior during the operating environments.

  14. Creep behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened 8Cr-2WVTa and 8Cr-1W steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozuka, K.; Tamura, M.; Esaka, H.; Shiba, K.; Nakamura, K.

    2009-01-01

    Microstructures and creep behavior of two martensitic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels 8%Cr-2%W-0.2%V-0.1%Ta (J1) and 8%Cr-1%W (J2) with finely dispersed Y 2Ti 2O 7 have been investigated. Creep tests have been carried out at 670, 700 and 730 °C. Creep strength of J1 is stronger than that of any other ODS martensitic steels and the hoop strength of the ferritic ODS steel cladding. At the beginning of creep test, shrinkage was frequently observed for J1. This is one of the reasons for high creep strength of J1. The δ-ferrite, which is untransformed to austenite at hot isostatic press and hot rolling temperatures, was elongated along the rolling direction, and volume fraction of δ-ferrite in J1 is larger than J2. Although the elongated δ-ferrite affects the anisotropy of creep behavior, the extent of anisotropy in J1 is not so large as that of the ferritic ODS steel.

  15. A Modified Theta Projection Model for Creep Behavior of Metals and Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manish; Singh, I. V.; Mishra, B. K.; Ahmad, S.; Venugopal Rao, A.; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a modified theta projection model is proposed for the constitutive modeling of creep behavior of metals and alloys. In the conventional theta projection model, strain hardening exponent is a function of time and theta, whereas in the modified theta projection model, the exponent is taken as a function of time, theta, and applied stress. The results obtained by the modified theta projection model for Al 2124 T851 alloy at constant uniaxial tensile stress are compared with the experimental results and with the predictions of the conventional theta projection method. The creep behavior of Al 7075 T651 alloy is also predicted using modified and conventional theta projection model and compared with the available experimental data. It is observed that the modified theta projection model captures the creep behavior more accurately as compared to the conventional theta projection model. The modified theta projection model can be used to predict the creep strain of pure metals and class M alloys (similar creep behavior to pure metals) for intermediate range of stress and temperature.

  16. Stability and Post-Buckling Behavior of Orthotropic Cylindrical Shells With Local Deflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenyuk, N. P.; Zhukova, N. B.

    2016-05-01

    A procedure for analytical solution of the problem of the stability and post-buckling behavior of orthotropic cylindrical shells under external pressure or axial compression with allowance for transverse shears is developed. The shells are geometrically imperfect due to the presence of a local deflection. The problem is solved by analyzing the interaction of the modes that represent the critical loads of the perfect shell and using the Byskov-Hutchinson method. Equilibrium curves for both shells are plotted using the method of continuous loading

  17. Microstructural effects on the creep and crack propagation behaviors of {gamma}-Ti aluminide alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lupinc, V.; Onofrio, G.; Nazmy, M.; Staubli, M.

    1999-07-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides class of materials possess several unique physical and mechanical properties. These characteristics can be attractive for specific industrial applications. By applying different heat treatment schedules one can change the microstructural features of this class of materials. In the present investigation, two heat treatment schedules were used to produce two different microstructures, duplex (D) and nearly lamellar (NL) in the cast and HIP'ed Ti-47Al-2W-0.5Si alloy. The tensile strength and creep behavior, in the 700--850 C temperature range, of this alloy have been determined and correlated to the corresponding microstructures. In addition, the fatigue crack propagation behavior in this alloy has been studied at different temperatures. The results on the creep behavior showed that the alloy with nearly lamellar microstructure has a strongly improved creep strength as compared with that of the duplex microstructure.

  18. Steady state creep behavior of particulate-reinforced titanium matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganath, S.; Mishra, R.S.

    1996-03-01

    The steady state creep behavior of unreinforced Ti, Ti-Ti{sub 2}C and Ti-TiB-Ti{sub 2}C composites has been examined in the temperature range 823--923 K. It is shown that the creep deformation of unreinforced Ti is governed by climb-controlled creep mechanism for which the stress exponent is between 4.1 and 4.3 and the activation energy is 236 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}. For composites, the stress exponents are between 6 and 7 at 823 K but are similar to unreinforced Ti at 923 K. The measured steady state creep rate of composites is found to be 2--3 orders of magnitude lower than unreinforced Ti in the investigated temperature range. It is then established that the origin of creep strengthening at 823--923 K is due to the combined effects of increased modulus of composites and the refined microstructure. It is further shown that the change of stress exponent of composites at 823 K is because of the change in creep mechanism from lattice-diffusion controlled dislocation climb to pipe-diffusion controlled dislocation climb. By analyzing the creep data, a modification in the dimensionless constant, A = 3.2 {times} 10{sup 5} exp({minus}24.2V{sub r}) for lattice-diffusion regime and A = 9.4 {times} 10{sup 5} exp({minus}28.1V{sub r}) for pipe-diffusion regime, where V{sub r} is the volume fraction of reinforcements, is suggested to account for the influence of reinforcements on creep kinetics.

  19. Study of the rope nonlinear creep behaviors and its influencing factors in the assembly of sheave drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chun Tian; Li, Jian Guang; Yao, Ying Xue; Du, Jin Guang; Ding, Jian; Fang, Hong Gen

    2015-08-01

    From three aspects of the stress, temperature, and time, rope creep research is often carried out based on its own ontology without various operation conditions. Thus, it is difficult to accurately reflect its creep behavior in real working conditions. The rope creep, caused by the preload for a long time, will affect the assembly and working synchronous accuracy of sheave drives in the assembly of docking mechanisms. However, it is quite difficult to analyze the rope creep behavior only with simple creep phenomenon, and the experiments still play an important role in obtaining uncertain creep information. In this paper, to study the rope creep behavior of sheave drives in assembling the docking mechanisms, a creep constitutive model is built based on the experimental creep data by the modified Norton-Bailey equation. Also, the rope creep strain laws, affected by the operating conditions, are analyzed. This lays a foundation for improving the assembly efficiency and precision compensation of the serial sheave drives. Experiments validated the effectiveness of the model.

  20. Phase Transformation and Creep Behavior in Ti50Pd30Ni20 High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy in Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Parikshith K.; Desai, Uri; Monroe, James; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Karaman, Ibrahim; Noebe, Ron; Bigelow, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    The creep behavior and the phase transformation of Ti50Pd30Ni20 High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy (HTSMA) is investigated by standard creep tests and thermomechanical tests. Ingots of the alloy are induction melted, extruded at high temperature, from which cylindrical specimens are cut and surface polished. A custom high temperature test setup is assembled to conduct the thermomechanical tests. Following preliminary monotonic tests, standard creep tests and thermally induced phase transformation tests are conducted on the specimen. The creep test results suggest that over the operating temperatures and stresses of this alloy, the microstructural mechanisms responsible for creep change. At lower stresses and temperatures, the primary creep mechanism is a mixture of dislocation glide and dislocation creep. As the stress and temperature increase, the mechanism shifts to predominantly dislocation creep. If the operational stress or temperature is raised even further, the mechanism shifts to diffusion creep. The thermally induced phase transformation tests show that actuator performance can be affected by rate independent irrecoverable strain (transformation induced plasticity + retained martensite) as well as creep. The rate of heating and cooling can adversely impact the actuators performance. While the rate independent irrecoverable strain is readily apparent early in the actuators life, viscoplastic strain continues to accumulate over the lifespan of the HTSMA. Thus, in order to get full actuation out of the HTSMA, the heating and cooling rates must be sufficiently high enough to avoid creep.

  1. Creep behavior of an AZ91 magnesium alloy reinforced with alumina fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Langdon, Terence G.

    1999-08-01

    Creep tests were conducted at elevated temperatures on an AZ91 alloy reinforced with 20 vol pct Al2O3 fibers. When the creep data are interpreted by incorporating a threshold stress into the analysis, it is shown that the true stress exponent, n, is ˜3 at the lower stress levels and increases to >3 at the higher stresses. The true activation energy for creep is close to the value anticipated for interdiffusion of aluminum in magnesium. This behavior is interpreted in terms of a viscous glide process with n =3 and a breakaway of the dislocations from their solute atom atmospheres at the higher stress levels. The threshold stresses in this composite appear to arise from an attractive interaction between mobile dislocations in the matrix alloy and Mg17Al12 precipitates. The experimental results reveal several important similarities between the creep behavior of this magnesium-based composite and the well-documented creep properties of aluminum-based composites.

  2. Elastic properties and buckling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with diethyltoluenediamines using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Ajori, S.; Rouhi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) modification processes are of great importance for good dispersion of CNTs and load transfer issues in nanocomposites. Among these processes, polymer covalent functionalization is found to be an effective way to alter the mechanical properties and behavior of pristine CNTs. Therefore, the mechanical properties and buckling behavior of diethyltoluenediamines (DETDA) functionalized CNTs are investigated employing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results demonstrate that as the polymer weight percentage increases, Young's modulus and critical buckling load increase almost linearly for both regular and random polymer distributions, whereas critical strain decreases with different trends depending on the type of polymer distribution. Finally, the buckling mode shapes of the presented models are illustrated and it was revealed that there are some differences between the mode shapes of functionalized CNTs and those of pristine CNTs.

  3. Laminate Analyses, Micromechanical Creep Response, and Fatigue Behavior of Polymer Matrix Composite Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    FATIGUE BEHAVIOR of POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE MATERIALS , 4 " .’* .. . . ". ... .. ... . . ~December 1982 41 .. FINAL REPORT .Army Research Office I I...DEPARTMENT REPORT UWME-DR-201-108-1 LAMINATE ANALYSES, MICROMECHANICAL CREEP RESPONSE, AND FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE MATERIALS...Behavior of Polymer Matrix Composite 16 Sept. 1979 - 30 Nov. 1982 Materials 6 PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER UWME-DR-201-108-1 7. AUTHOR(.) S. CONTRACT

  4. Behavior of Repeating Earthquake Sequences in Central California and the Implications for Subsurface Fault Creep

    SciTech Connect

    Templeton, D C; Nadeau, R; Burgmann, R

    2007-07-09

    Repeating earthquakes (REs) are sequences of events that have nearly identical waveforms and are interpreted to represent fault asperities driven to failure by loading from aseismic creep on the surrounding fault surface at depth. We investigate the occurrence of these REs along faults in central California to determine which faults exhibit creep and the spatio-temporal distribution of this creep. At the juncture of the San Andreas and southern Calaveras-Paicines faults, both faults as well as a smaller secondary fault, the Quien Sabe fault, are observed to produce REs over the observation period of March 1984-May 2005. REs in this area reflect a heterogeneous creep distribution along the fault plane with significant variations in time. Cumulative slip over the observation period at individual sequence locations is determined to range from 5.5-58.2 cm on the San Andreas fault, 4.8-14.1 cm on the southern Calaveras-Paicines fault, and 4.9-24.8 cm on the Quien Sabe fault. Creep at depth appears to mimic the behaviors seen of creep on the surface in that evidence of steady slip, triggered slip, and episodic slip phenomena are also observed in the RE sequences. For comparison, we investigate the occurrence of REs west of the San Andreas fault within the southern Coast Range. Events within these RE sequences only occurred minutes to weeks apart from each other and then did not repeat again over the observation period, suggesting that REs in this area are not produced by steady aseismic creep of the surrounding fault surface.

  5. Elastic buckling, stability, and vibration of linear and geometrically nonlinear behavior of structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sabir, A.B.

    1995-09-01

    The present paper explores the physical and fundamental way of obtaining buckling loads of structures as well as their natural frequencies. The resulting mathematical formulations are shown, in both cases, to lead to the determination of the eigenvalues and vectors for similar transcendental equations. The analysis of a axially loaded straight member is first considered to show that when the axial load is tensile the corresponding natural frequencies are larger than when their is no applied axial load. Conversely when the axial load is compressive a decrease in the natural frequencies will take place and in the limit the natural frequencies become zero when the applied axial load is equal to the buckling load of the member. The paper will also present the results for a finite element analysis for the large deflection geometrically non-linear behavior of arches. The resulting complex relationships between load and deflection are discussed in terms of instability and snap through phenomena. The large-amplitude vibration of arches are then considered and the relationship between frequency and amplitude is discussed by inferring to the previously obtained statical loading cases.

  6. Effect of local buckling on hysteretic behavior of beam-column with circular cross-section

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yukio; Murakawa, Hidekazu; Shaker, R.E.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, the hysteretic behavior of beam-column member having circular cross-section under simultaneously acting constant compressive axial load and cyclic lateral load is investigated. Elasto-plastic large deformation analysis by means of Finite Element Method (FEM) is utilized in this research. An emphasis is placed on the effect of the axial compressive load and geometrical parameters on the deterioration of the ultimate strength, the stiffness and the energy-dissipation capacity. Also, effect of the tangent modulus in the strain hardening region and different hardening rules are discussed. From this study, it is found that, in the absence of the axial compressive load, no deterioration in the strength, the stiffness and the absorbed energy are observed in all investigated members having different geometries. Meanwhile, in the case of the presence of axial load, local buckling (locally accumulated deflection under cyclic loading) may be induced depending on the geometrical parameters, namely, diameter-to-thickness ratio D/t and slenderness parameter {lambda} as well as the value of axial load ratio. Such local buckling reduces the ultimate strength and the stiffness of the member. The strength and the stiffness of the member are improved with smaller values of D/t and {lambda} and larger tangent modulus in the strain hardening region of the material.

  7. Buckling and postbuckling behavior of square compression-loaded graphite-epoxy plates with circular cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study of the postbuckling behavior of square compression-loaded graphite-epoxy plates and isotropic plates with a central circular cutout is presented. Results are presented for unidirectional (0 sub 10)s and (90 sub 10)s plates, (0/90 sub 5)s plates, and for aluminum plates. Results are also presented for (+ or - O sub 6)s angle-ply plates for values of O = 30, 46, and 60 degrees. The experimental results indicate that the change in axial stiffness of a plate at buckling is strongly dependent upon cutout size and plate orthotropy. The presence of a cutout gives rise to an internal load distribution that changes, sometimes dramtically, as a function of cutout size coupled with the plate orthotropy. In the buckled state, the role of orthotropy becomes more significant since bending in addition to membrane orthotropy is present. Most of the plates with cutouts exhibited less postbuckling stiffness than the corresponding plate without a cutout, and the postbuckling stiffness decreased with increasing cutout size. However, some of the highly orthotropic plates with cutouts exhibited more postbuckling stiffness than the corresponding plate without a cutout.

  8. Effect of Nanoclay on the Flexural Creep Behavior of Wood/Plastic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kord, B.; Sheykholeslami, A.; Najafi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of nanoclay on the short-term flexural creep behavior of polypropylene/wood flour composites was investigated. The results obtained showed that the flexural strength and modulus increased with contentt of nanoclay up to 3 phc and then decreased. The fractional deflection and relative creep decreased with increasing content of nanoclay. X-ray diffraction patterns and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the nanocomposites formed were intercalated. Morphological findings testified that the samples containing 3 phc of nanoclay had the highest degree of intercalation and dispersion.

  9. Low Cycle Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617 at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Cabet, Celine; Carroll, Laura; Wright, Richard

    2013-10-01

    Alloy 617 is the leading candidate material for an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) application of the Very High Temperature Nuclear Reactor (VHTR), expected to have an outlet temperature as high as 950 degrees C. Acceptance of Alloy 617 in Section III of the ASME Code for nuclear construction requires a detailed understanding of the creep-fatigue behavior. Initial creep-fatigue work on Alloy 617 suggests a more dominant role of environment with increasing temperature and/or hold times evidenced through changes in creep-fatigue crack growth mechanism/s and failure life. Continuous cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue testing of Alloy 617 was conducted at 950 degrees C and 0.3% and 0.6% total strain in air to simulate damage modes expected in a VHTR application. Continuous cycle specimens exhibited transgranular cracking. Intergranular cracking was observed in the creep-fatigue specimens, although evidence of grain boundary cavitation was not observed. Despite the absence of grain boundary cavitation to accelerate crack propagation, the addition of a hold time at peak tensile strain was detrimental to cycle life. This suggests that creepfatigue interaction may occur by a different mechanism or that the environment may be partially responsible for accelerating failure.

  10. Tensile and Creep Behavior of Extruded AA6063/SiC{sub p} Al MMCs

    SciTech Connect

    Khalifa, Tarek A.; Mahmoud, Tamer S.

    2010-03-01

    Composites of AA6063 Al alloy reinforced with SiC particles (SiC{sub p}) were prepared by the vortex method. Hot extrusion was carried out for the as cast composites with a reduction in area of 25%. Tensile and creep behavior of as-cast and extruded composites were studied at elevated temperatures. Tensile tests carried out at room temperature showed that for the as-cast composites, the addition of SiC{sub p} up to 10% by weight improves the strength but reduces ductility. Further addition of SiC{sub p} reduces the strength and ductility of the composites. At 150 and 300 deg. C the matrix alloy exhibits higher strength than the composites. Extrusion generally raised the strength of the composites at both room and elevated temperatures. Time rupture creep tests carried out at 300 deg. C showed that the composites exhibit higher creep resistance as compared to the matrix alloy except at relatively low stresses where the matrix has a better creep resistance. Extrusion improved the resistance of composites to creep rupture.

  11. Strength Behavior, Creep Failure and Permeability Change of a Tight Marble Under Triaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zaobao; Shao, Jianfu

    2017-03-01

    The coupled hydro-mechanical behaviors of a tight marble are investigated by a series of laboratory tests with continuous gas injection during the hydrostatic compression, triaxial compression and compressive creep tests. Hydrostatic compression tests are firstly carried out in three steps to identify the viscous effect of hydrostatic stress on deformation and permeability of the marble. Coupled triaxial tests are then conducted at a constant axial strain rate under five different confining pressures ( P c) with continuous gas injection. Coupled creep behaviors of the marble are also characterized by a constant deviatoric stress test under P c = 30 MPa with gas flowing at a constant injection pressure. The high-stress unloading failure behavior of the marble is finally investigated by an unloading test with a previous multi-step creep phase to realize a high-stress state as well as to investigate the time-dependent deformation of marble under different deviatoric stresses. Experimental results reveal that gas permeability of the marble shows an evident rate-dependent effect in hydrostatic compression. Mechanical behaviors of the tight marble are closely depended on the applied P c in triaxial tests, and its permeability exhibits a decrease phase at initial deviatoric loading and turns to increase at a critical stress corresponding to the initial yield stress. Marble can withstand more important plastic deformation under high P c than under lower ones. Gas flow seems to be more sensitive than the strains to characterize the creep behaviors of the marble. No time-dependent strains are observed when deviatoric creep stress is lower than 50% of its peak strength under P c = 30 MPa.

  12. Investigation of Asphalt Mixture Creep Behavior Using Thin Beam Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Zofka, Adam; Marasteanu, Mihai; Turos, Mugur

    2008-02-15

    The asphalt pavement layer consists of two or more lifts of compacted asphalt mixture; the top of the layer is also exposed to aging, a factor that significantly affects the mixture properties. The current testing specifications use rather thick specimens that cannot be used to investigate the gradual change in properties with pavement depth. This paper investigates the feasibility of using the 3-point bending test with thin asphalt mixture beams (127x12.7x6.35 mm) to determine the low-temperature creep compliance of the mixtures. Several theoretical and semi-empirical models, from the theory of composites, are reviewed and evaluated using numerical and experimental data. Preliminary results show that this method can be used for low-temperature mixture characterization but several crucial factors need further inspection and interpretation.

  13. Effects of processing variables on the creep behavior of investment cast Ti-48Al-2Nb-2Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, M.M.; Jones, P.E.; Porter, W.J. III; Eylon, D.

    1995-12-31

    Intermetallics based on ordered {gamma}-TiAl are being considered for the replacement of steels and nickel-based superalloys for high temperature aerospace and automotive applications. This study investigates the creep behavior of investment cast Ti-48Al-2Nb-2Cr with microstructures ranging from duplex to nearly lamellar. Constant load creep tests were conducted in air at temperatures of 650 C and 760 C and at stress levels of 104MPa, 155MPa, and 207MPa. The effects of cooling rates during casting, aluminum content, oxygen level, and microstructure on creep properties are discussed. The activation energy for creep and stress exponent are also reported.

  14. Buckling behavior of Rene 41 tubular panels for a hypersonic aircraft wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.; Fields, R. A.; Shideler, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The buckling characteristics of Rene 41 tubular panels for a hypersonic aircraft wing were investigated. The panels were repeatedly tested for buckling characteristics using a hypersonic wing test structure and a universal tension/compression testing machine. The nondestructive buckling tests were carried out under different combined load conditions and in different temperature environments. The force/stiffness technique was used to determine the buckling loads of the panels. In spite of some data scattering resulting from large extrapolations of the data-fitting curve (because of the termination of applied loads at relatively low percentages of the buckling loads), the overall test data correlate fairly well with theoretically predicted buckling interaction curves. Also, the structural efficiency of the tubular panels was found to be slightly higher than that of beaded panels.

  15. Buckling behavior of Rene 41 tubular panels for a hypersonic aircraft wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.; Shideler, J. L.; Fields, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The buckling characteristics of Rene 41 tubular panels for a hypersonic aircraft wing were investigated. The panels were repeatedly tested for buckling characteristics using a hypersonic wing test structure and a universal tension/compression testing machine. The nondestructive buckling tests were carried out under different combined load conditions and in different temperature environments. The force/stiffness technique was used to determine the buckling loads of the panel. In spite of some data scattering, resulting from large extrapolations of the data fitting curve (because of the termination of applied loads at relatively low percentages of the buckling loads), the overall test data correlate fairly well with theoretically predicted buckling interaction curves. Also, the structural efficiency of the tubular panels was found to be slightly higher than that of beaded panels.

  16. Tensile and creep rupture behavior of P/M processed Nb-base alloy, WC-3009

    SciTech Connect

    Hebsur, M.G.; Titran, R.H.

    1988-09-01

    Due to its high strength at temperatures up to 1600 K, fabrication of niobium base alloy WC-3009 (Nb30Hf9W) by traditional methods is difficult. Powder metallurgy (P/M) processing offers an attractive fabrication alternative for this high strength alloy. Spherical powders of WC-3009 produced by electron beam atomizing (EBA) process were successfully consolidated into a one inch diameter rod by vacuum hot pressing and swaging techniques. Tensile strength of the fully dense P/M material at 300-1590 K were similar to the arc-melted material. Creep rupture tests in vacuum indicated that WC-3009 exhibits a class 1 solid solution (glide controlled) creep behavior in the 1480 to 1590 K temperature range and stress range of 14 to 70 MPa. The creep behavior was correlated with temperature and stress using a power law relationship. The calculated stress exponent n, was about 3.2 and the apparent activation energy, Q, was about 270 kJ/mol. The large creep ductility exhibited by WC-3009 was attributed to its high strain rate sensitivity.

  17. Tensile and creep rupture behavior of P/M processed Nb-base alloy, WC-3009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.; Titran, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    Due to its high strength at temperatures up to 1600 K, fabrication of niobium base alloy WC-3009 (Nb30Hf9W) by traditional methods is difficult. Powder metallurgy (P/M) processing offers an attractive fabrication alternative for this high strength alloy. Spherical powders of WC-3009 produced by electron beam atomizing (EBA) process were successfully consolidated into a one inch diameter rod by vacuum hot pressing and swaging techniques. Tensile strength of the fully dense P/M material at 300-1590 K were similar to the arc-melted material. Creep rupture tests in vacuum indicated that WC-3009 exhibits a class 1 solid solution (glide controlled) creep behavior in the 1480 to 1590 K temperature range and stress range of 14 to 70 MPa. The creep behavior was correlated with temperature and stress using a power law relationship. The calculated stress exponent n, was about 3.2 and the apparent activation energy, Q, was about 270 kJ/mol. The large creep ductility exhibited by WC-3009 was attributed to its high strain rate sensitivity.

  18. Creep Deformation and Rupture Behavior of Single- and Dual-Pass 316LN Stainless-Steel-Activated TIG Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Vasudevan, M.; Ganesan, V.; Parameswaran, P.; Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Creep deformation and rupture behavior of single-pass and dual-pass 316LN stainless steel (SS) weld joints fabricated by an autogenous activated tungsten inert gas welding process have been assessed by performing metallography, hardness, and conventional and impression creep tests. The fusion zone of the single-pass joint consisted of columnar zones adjacent to base metals with a central equiaxed zone, which have been modified extensively by the thermal cycle of the second pass in the dual-pass joint. The equiaxed zone in the single-pass joint, as well as in the second pass of the dual-pass joint, displayed the lowest hardness in the joints. In the dual-pass joint, the equiaxed zone of the first pass had hardness comparable to the columnar zone. The hardness variations in the joints influenced the creep deformation. The equiaxed and columnar zone in the first pass of the dual-pass joint was more creep resistant than that of the second pass. Both joints possessed lower creep rupture life than the base metal. However, the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint was about twofolds more than that of the single-pass joint. Creep failure in the single-pass joint occurred in the central equiaxed fusion zone, whereas creep cavitation that originated in the second pass was blocked at the weld pass interface. The additional interface and strength variation between two passes in the dual-pass joint provides more restraint to creep deformation and crack propagation in the fusion zone, resulting in an increase in the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint. Furthermore, the differences in content, morphology, and distribution of delta ferrite in the fusion zone of the joints favors more creep cavitation resistance in the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint with the enhancement of creep rupture life.

  19. Geotechnical simulation of tertiary creep behavior of landslides induced by extreme rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dok, Atitkagna; Fukuoka, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    Rainstorm indirectly provokes landslides because of its ability to level up the groundwater table after certain hours dropping. This process causes excess pore water pressure generation and soil liquefaction at the sliding surface and determines the behavior of landslides triggered by extreme rainfall. Creep deformations are commonly observed in a slope before sliding down. Creep behavior, in particular tertiary creep behavior, is therefore the main focus in predicting the final failure time of a slope. Progressive failure/tertiary creep deformation is the stage when strain rate exponentially increases just before final collapse. This study aims at simulating geotechnical model of tertiary creep behavior in soils, which was empirically discovered by Saito (1965) and Fukuzono (1985) to help issue warning of rainfall-induced landslides in developing countries where there is no implemented methodology for issuing effective warming of landslides yet. Tertiary creep to failure is reproduced by pore-pressure-controlled test in ring shear apparatus, through which obvious relationship of A and α (alpha) values was obtained, following consistent range with those found in previous studies under slightly deviated trend due to different test condition: pore-pressure-controlled and shear stress development tests. Constant shear speed test under shear speed of v=1cm/s was conducted in the ring shear apparatus to obtain the relation curve of shear resistance and shear displacement, from which exponential expression of creep behavior is originated. The model formula is governed by two constants: m and γ (gamma) whose relation with constants A and alpha was examined. Geotechnical simulation of creep behavior is then constructed by assuming that shear strength of soil increases and remains constant after reaching its maximum value in residual condition. This is to quantify normally consolidated condition of soils in natural slope. Shear resistance diminishes, while pore pressure

  20. Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Teactor Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Potirniche, Gabriel; Barlow, Fred D.; Charit, Indrajit; Rink, Karl

    2013-11-26

    A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions; Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process; Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens; Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds; Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life; Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates; Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses; Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage; Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength; Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads; and Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

  1. A Comparison of Tension and Compression Creep in a Polymeric Composite and the Effects of Physical Aging on Creep Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Veazie, David R.; Brinson, L. Catherine

    1996-01-01

    Experimental and analytical methods were used to investigate the similarities and differences of the effects of physical aging on creep compliance of IM7/K3B composite loaded in tension and compression. Two matrix dominated loading modes, shear and transverse, were investigated for two load cases, tension and compression. The tests, run over a range of sub-glass transition temperatures, provided material constants, material master curves and aging related parameters. Comparing results from the short-term data indicated that although trends in the data with respect to aging time and aging temperature are similar, differences exist due to load direction and mode. The analytical model used for predicting long-term behavior using short-term data as input worked equally as well for the tension or compression loaded cases. Comparison of the loading modes indicated that the predictive model provided more accurate long term predictions for the shear mode as compared to the transverse mode. Parametric studies showed the usefulness of the predictive model as a tool for investigating long-term performance and compliance acceleration due to temperature.

  2. Effect of Microstructure on Creep Crack Growth Behavior of a Near- α Titanium Alloy IMI-834

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, D. V. V.; Omprakash, C. M.; Sridhar, T.; Kumar, Vikas

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of microstructure ( i.e., α + β and transformed β) on creep crack growth (CCG) behavior of a near-alpha (IMI 834) titanium alloy has been explored at temperatures 550 °C and 600 °C. For characterizing the CCG behavior of the alloy, both stress intensity factor ( K) and energy integral parameter ( C t ) were used in the present investigation. The use of stress intensity factor ( K) as crack-tip parameter is not appropriate in the present study as no unique correlation between crack growth rate and K could be obtained from the observed trend due to transients in the creep crack rate data. On the other hand, C t parameter for both microstructural conditions consolidates CCG data into a single trend. The alloy with fully transformed β microstructure exhibits better CCG resistance as compared to bimodal ( α + β) microstructure. This is consistent with the fact that the transformed β structure offers superior creep resistance as compared to α + β microstructure. Microstructural examination has revealed that CCG for both microstructural conditions is accompanied by formation of damage zone in the form of numerous environmental-assisted secondary surface cracks (perpendicular to the stress axis) ahead of the main crack tip. For α + β microstructure of the alloy, the surface creep cracks were formed by growth and coalescence of microcracks nucleated by fracture of primary α particles. While in the interior of the specimens, CCG occurred by growth and coalescence of microvoids nucleated at primary α/transformed β (matrix) interfaces. For β microstructure of the alloy, while the surface creep cracks formed by growth and coalescence of microvoids nucleated at titanium enriched surface oxide particles, in the interior CCG occurred by nucleation of intergranular cavities.

  3. Debonding and buckling of a thin short-fiber nonwoven bonded to a rigid surface and its application to the creeping process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhaohui

    In this dissertation, debonding of a thin surface film from a rigid surface with debonded portion of the thin film undergoing buckling and postbuckling was studied both analytically and experimentally. The research is motivated from the creping process in tissue paper manufacturing, and it is turned out to be a general failure problem of thin surface films. The study is consisted of five parts: an experimental study with a laboratory creping simulator; a stress analysis of the thin film-adhesive-rigid surface structure; buckling and postbuckling analysis of the debonded film under unilateral constraint; an analytical model of debonding and buckling of a thin surface film; and a finite element simulation through ABAQUS. The laboratory creping simulator described by Ramasubramanian et al (2000) was employed in the experimental study and was improved through introducing an adhesive coating mechanism. The Young's modulus and tensile strength of the creped paper, together the creping wavelength and creping force were examined to measure the creped paper qualities under different conditions. A stress analysis was then presented in which the adhesive was modeled as an elastic layer. A simplified analytical model to the debonding problem was obtained by using the Euler buckling criterion of the debonded portion of film. Numerical study showed that the model could grasp most of the main features of the process, however ignoring the unilateral constraint for the film buckling brought about some unsatisfactory predictions. A buckling and postbuckling analysis was then conducted. Numerical results showed that the debonded film undergoes a contact and snap-through buckling sequence, and under the rigid unilateral constraint, the buckling force can be four times as large as the one when the constraint is released. Once the structure snaps through, the buckling force drops greatly, therefore cease of debonding propagation can be expected. An improved analytical model of the thin

  4. Endochronic theory of transient creep and creep recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H. C.; Chen, L.

    1979-01-01

    Short time creep and creep recovery were investigated by means of the endochronic theory of viscoplasticity. It is shown that the constitutive equations for constant-strain-rate stress-strain behavior, creep, creep recovery, and stress relaxation can all ber derived from the general constitutive equation by imposing appropriate constraints. In this unified approach, the effect of strain-hardening is naturally accounted for when describing creep and creep recovery. The theory predicts with reasonable accuracy the creep and creep recovery behaviors for Aluminum 1100-0 at 150 C. It was found that the strain-rate history at prestraining stage affects the subsequent creep. A critical stress was also established for creep recovery. The theory predicts a forward creep for creep recovery stress greater than the critical stress. For creep recovery stress less than the critical stress, the theory then predicts a normal strain recovery.

  5. Creep Behavior in Interlaminar Shear of a SiC/SiC Ceramic Composite with a Self-healing Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles-Wrenn, M. B.; Pope, M. T.

    2014-02-01

    Creep behavior in interlaminar shear of a non-oxide ceramic composite with a multilayered matrix was investigated at 1,200 °C in laboratory air and in steam environment. The composite was produced via chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). The composite had an oxidation inhibited matrix, which consisted of alternating layers of silicon carbide and boron carbide and was reinforced with laminated Hi-Nicalon™ fibers woven in a five-harness-satin weave. Fiber preforms had pyrolytic carbon fiber coating with boron carbide overlay applied. The interlaminar shear properties were measured. The creep behavior was examined for interlaminar shear stresses in the 16-22 MPa range. Primary and secondary creep regimes were observed in all tests conducted in air and in steam. In air and in steam, creep run-out defined as 100 h at creep stress was achieved at 16 MPa. Larger creep strains were accumulated in steam. However, creep strain rates and creep lifetimes were only moderately affected by the presence of steam. The retained properties of all specimens that achieved run-out were characterized. Composite microstructure, as well as damage and failure mechanisms were investigated.

  6. Geometry and Material Constraint Effects on Creep Crack Growth Behavior in Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Wang, G. Z.; Xuan, F. Z.; Tu, S. T.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the geometry and material constraint effects on creep crack growth (CCG) and behavior in welded joints were investigated. The CCG paths and rates of two kinds of specimen geometry (C(T) and M(T)) with initial cracks located at soft HAZ (heat-affected zone with lower creep strength) and different material mismatches were simulated. The effect of constraint on creep crack initiation (CCI) time was discussed. The results show that there exists interaction between geometry and material constraints in terms of their effects on CCG rate and CCI time of welded joints. Under the condition of low geometry constraint, the effect of material constraint on CCG rate and CCI time becomes more obvious. Higher material constraint can promote CCG due to the formation of higher stress triaxiality around crack tip. Higher geometry constraint can increase CCG rate and reduce CCI time of welded joints. Both geometry and material constraints should be considered in creep life assessment and design for high-temperature welded components.

  7. Progress toward analytical description of the creep strain-time behavior of engineering alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    Elevated-temperature design methods in the United States often require a comprehensive description of the properties of the construction materials. These descriptions include representations for creep strain-time behavior as a function of stress, temperature, and material variability. Work conducted at this laboratory in the past five years toward the development of analytical techniques to derive such representations is summarized. Results for several common elevated-temperature structural materials are presented to illustrate the techniques.

  8. Creep Behavior of an Oxide/Oxide Composite with Monazite Coating at Elevated Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    research composite of that nature was the General Electric Gen-IV. Results from Zawada et al (37) show fairly poor creep resistance of the N610 fiber...A: Applied Science and Manufacturing: 1005-1013 (1995). 36. Zawada , Larry P., Randall S. Hay, Shin S. Lee, and James Staehler. “Characterization...and High-Temperature Mechanical Behavior of an Oxide/Oxide Composite,” Journal of the American Ceramic Society, 86 [6]: 981-90 (2003). 37. Zawada

  9. Creep-rupture behavior of iron superalloys in high pressure hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    1981-01-01

    Two cast alloys (CRM-6D and XF-818) and four sheet alloys (A-26, Incoloy 800H, N-155, and 19-9DL) in the thickness range of 0.79 to 0.99 mm were evaluated for use in the Stirling engine. The creep rupture behavior of these iron base high temperature alloys is being determined in air for 10 hr to 3,00 hr, and in 20.7 MPa (3,000 psi) H2 for 10 to 300 hr at temperatures of 650 deg to 925 deg. Material procurement, preparation and air creep rupture testing are described and existing data is analyzed. Systems for the high pressure hydrogen testing are discussed. Statistical analysis of temperature-compensated rupture data for each alloy is included.

  10. Creep-Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617 at 850 and 950°C, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, L.; Carroll, M.

    2015-05-01

    Alloy 617 is the leading candidate material for an Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). To evaluate the behavior of this material in the expected service conditions, strain-controlled cyclic tests including hold times up to 9000 s at maximum tensile strain were conducted at 850 and 950 degrees C. At both temperatures, the fatigue resistance decreased when a hold time was added at peak tensile strain. The magnitude of this effect depended on the specific mechanisms and whether they resulted in a change in fracture mode from transgranular in pure fatigue to intergranular in creep-fatigue for a particular temperature and strain range combination. Increases in the tensile hold duration beyond an initial value were not detrimental to the creep-fatigue resistance at 950 degrees C but did continue to degrade the lifetimes at 850 degrees C.

  11. Effect of Environment on Creep Behavior of an Oxide/Oxide CFCC with 45 deg. Fiber Orientation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    high creep rates generally correspond to a short creep life. However, Zawada et al [8:457] reported that the ±45° cross-ply exhibited higher...stress-strain curves reported by Zawada [8] for the N720/AS CMC (see Figure 32). 44 Figure 31. N720/A stress-strain curves for N720/A ceramic...Materials, West Conshohocken PA (2000). 8. Buchanan, Dennis J., Reji John, and Larry P. Zawada . “Creep Rupture Behavior of ±45° Oxide/Oxide

  12. Creep deformation and rupture behavior of CLAM steel at 823 K and 873 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Boyu; Huang, Bo; Li, Chunjing; Liu, Shaojun; Xu, Gang; Zhao, Yanyun; Huang, Qunying

    2014-12-01

    China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel is selected as the candidate structural material in Fusion Design Study (FDS) series fusion reactor conceptual designs. The creep property of CLAM steel has been studied in this paper. Creep tests have been carried out at 823 K and 873 K over a stress range of 150-230 MPa. The creep curves showed three creep regimes, primary creep, steady-state creep and tertiary creep. The relationship between minimum creep rate (ε˙min) and the applied stress (σ) could be described by Norton power law, and the stress exponent n was decreased with the increase of the creep temperature. The creep mechanism was analyzed with the fractographes of the rupture specimens which were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The coarsening of precipitates observed with transmission electron microscope (TEM) indicated the microstructural degradation after creep test.

  13. Creep deformation behavior of Sn-3.5Ag solder/Cu couple at small length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, M.; Chawla, N

    2004-09-06

    In order to adequately characterize the behavior of solder balls in electronic devices, the mechanical behavior of solder joints needs to be studied at small length scales. The creep behavior of single solder ball Sn-Ag/Cu solder joints was studied in shear, at 25, 60, 95, and 130 deg. C, using a microforce testing system. A change in the creep stress exponent with increasing stress was observed and explained in terms of a threshold stress for bypass of Ag{sub 3}Sn particles by dislocations. The stress exponent was also temperature dependent, exhibiting an increase in exponent of two from lower to higher temperature. The activation energy for creep was found to be temperature dependant, correlating with self-diffusion of pure Sn at high temperatures, and dislocation core diffusion of pure Sn at lower temperatures. Normalizing the creep rate for activation energy and the temperature-dependence of shear modulus allowed for unification of the creep data. Microstructure characterization, including preliminary TEM analysis, and fractographic analysis were conducted in order to fully describe the creep behavior of the material.

  14. Buckling Behavior of Long Anisotropic Plates Subjected to Elastically Restrained Thermal Expansion and Contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    An approach for synthesizing buckling results for thin balanced and unbalanced symmetric laminates that are subjected to uniform heating or cooling and elastically restrained against thermal expansion or contraction is presented. This approach uses a nondimensional analysis for infinitely long, flexural anisotropic plates that are subjected to combined mechanical loads. In addition, stiffness-weighted laminate thermal-expansion parameters and compliance coefficients are derived that are used to determine critical temperatures in terms of physically intuitive mechanical-buckling coefficients. Many results are presented for some common laminates that are intended to facilitate a structural designer s transition to the use of the generic buckling design curves. Several curves that illustrate the fundamental parameters used in the analysis are presented, for nine contemporary material systems, that provide physical insight into the buckling response in addition to providing useful design data. Examples are presented that demonstrate the use of the generic design curves.

  15. Effect of minor carbon additions on the high-temperature creep behavior of a single-crystal nickel-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. Wang, D.; Liu, T.; Li, X.W.; Jiang, W.G.; Zhang, G.; Lou, L.H.

    2015-06-15

    Different amounts of carbon were added to a single-crystal nickel-based superalloy. The microstructural evolution of these alloys before and after high-temperature creep tests was investigated by employing scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Upon increasing the carbon contents, the volume fraction and diameter of the carbides increased gradually: however, the creep lives of the alloys increased slightly at first and subsequently decreased. The formation of second-phase particles, such as the nano-sized M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, blocky and needle-shaped μ phase, was observed in the creep samples, which was closely related to the high-temperature creep behaviors. - Highlights: • Creep behaviors of alloys with different amounts of carbon were investigated. • The creep rupture lives increased and later decreased with more carbon. • Second-phase particles were responsible for the different creep behaviors.

  16. Creep-fatigue criteria and inelastic behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at elevated temperatures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, M.B.; Ogata, T.

    1994-02-01

    The ever increasing demand for safety requires that stringent and conservative methodology be developed for design and analysis of reactor components. At present modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is a candidate material for construction of steam generators in fast breeder reactors. Therefore high-temperature material properties and extensive insight into deformation behavior and creep-fatigue life are required to develop design guidelines for use of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel in actual plant components. However, existing information on creep-fatigue and deformation response of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is insufficient, and further experimental and modeling efforts are needed. A joint effort between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in the United States and the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) in Japan was started in 1991 to investigate the inelastic behavior of and to develop creep-fatigue criteria for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at elevated temperatures. The current program focuses on uniaxial and biaxial fatigue, creep, and creep-fatigue tests. Results of this effort are presented in this report. Section 2 introduces the test material and experimental arrangement. Uniaxial exploratory deformation tests and unified constitutive equations for inelastic analysis of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel are presented in Sections 3 and 4, respectively. Axial fatigue and creep-fatigue test results are discussed in Section 5. Section 6 is devoted to constant stress creep tests. Biaxial fatigue and creep-fatigue tests are described in Section 7. Progress in creep-fatigue life evaluation is reported in Section 8.

  17. Influence of Hold Time on Creep-Fatigue Behavior of an Advanced Austenitic Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Carroll; Laura Carroll

    2011-09-01

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened), is a candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS provides improved creep resistance through a composition based on 316 stainless steel (SS) with additions of Ti and Nb to form nano-scale MC precipitates in the austenitic matrix. The low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of a HT-UPS alloy has been investigated at 650 C, 1.0% total strain, and an R ratio of -1 with hold times as long as 9000 sec at peak tensile strain. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is compared to that of 316 SS. The cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and the deformed microstructures. Cracking in both alloys is transgranular (initiation and propagation) in the case of continuous cycle fatigue, while the primary cracks also propagate transgranularly during creep-fatigue cycling. Internal grain boundary damage as a result of the tensile hold is present in the form of fine cracks for hold times of 3600 sec and longer and substantially more internal cracks are visible in 316 SS than HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material are different. An equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas tangles of dislocations are present at the nanoscale MC precipitates in HT-UPS and no cellular substructure is observed.

  18. Propagating episodic creep and the aseismic slip behavior of the Calaveras fault north of Hollister, California

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K.F.; Burford, R.O.; King, G.C.P.

    1981-05-10

    A detailed kinematic study of fault slip occurring from the surface to a depth of about 7 km on the Calaveras fault north of Hollister was conducted during the summer of 1977. The observations coincided with a period of propagating episodic fault creep activity sensed along the fault trace. Data used in the investigation consist of creepmeter records, near-field strainmeter observations, and high-resolution geodetic measurements, all collected contemporaneously over a period of 4 months. Detailed descriptions and analyses of the creepmeter and geodetic data have been presented elsewhere. The near-field strain measurements are here reported in detail, and their analysis draws upon the previous two data sets for support. The strainmeter observations are most sensitive to slip occurring in the upper 2 km; hence the emphasis of the paper is placed upon the role of propagating episode creep in the broad-scale behavior of the fault. The results suggest that propagating episodic fault creep as sensed along the fault trace is confined to the upper kilometer or so of the crust and represents the response of the surface layers to a longer-term form of episode aseismic slip occurring below. The mean form of the advancing rupture front within the upper kilometer is ostensibly the same as that indicated by records from the surface creepmeters. Evidence is presented, however, which suggests that propagating creep events may not always break the surface and may propagate at velocities much slower and at amplitudes significantly larger than those generally observed at the surface.

  19. PROCESSING, MICROSTRUCTURE AND CREEP BEHAVIOR OF Mo-Si-B-BASED INTERMETALLIC ALLOYS FOR VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vijay K. Vasudevan

    2005-12-21

    This research project is concerned with developing a fundamental understanding of the effects of processing and microstructure on the creep behavior of refractory intermetallic alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system. During this year, the compressive creep behavior of a Mo-3Si-1B (in wt.%) alloy at 1100 and 1200 C were studied and related to the deformation mechanisms through electron microscopy observations of microstructural changes and deformation structures. The microstructure of this alloy was three-phase, being composed of {alpha}-Mo, Mo{sub 3}Si and T2-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} phases. Results of compressive creep tests at 1200 and 1100 C showed that the creep rates were quite high at stress levels between 250 and 500 MPa, Two minima in the creep strain rate versus strain data were noted, one at small strain values and the second at much larger strains. A stress exponent of 4.26 was obtained upon plotting the strain rate corresponding to the first minima versus stress, which suggests that dislocation climb and glide dominate the creep process in the early stages. On the other hand, the large strain, minimum creep rate versus stress data gave a stress exponent of {approx}1.18, which indicates diffusional mechanisms and recrystallization dominate the later stages of the creep process. At 1100 C, a stress exponent of 2.26 was obtained, which suggests that both diffusional and dislocation mechanisms contribute to the creep strain. Based on the minimum creep rate data at 1100 C and 1200 C, the activation energy for creep was determined to be 525 kJ/mole, which is somewhat higher than that reported for self diffusion in {alpha}-Mo. Microstructural observations of post-crept samples indicated the presence of many voids in the {alpha}-Mo grains and few cracks in the intermetallic particles and along their interfaces with the {alpha}-Mo matrix. In addition, TEM observations revealed the presence of recrystallized grains and sub-grain boundaries composed of dislocation arrays

  20. Effects of Steam Environment on Creep Behavior of Nextel™610/Monazite/Alumina Composite at 1,100°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles-Wrenn, Marina B.; Yeleser, Tufan; Fair, Geoff E.; Davis, Janet B.

    2009-12-01

    The tensile creep behavior of a N610™/LaPO4/Al2O3 composite was investigated at 1,100°C in laboratory air and in steam. The composite consists of a porous alumina matrix reinforced with Nextel 610 fibers woven in an eight-harness satin weave fabric and coated with monazite. The tensile stress-strain behavior was investigated and the tensile properties measured at 1,100°C. The addition of monazite coating resulted in ~33% improvement in ultimate tensile strength (UTS) at 1,100°C. Tensile creep behavior was examined for creep stresses in the 32-72 MPa range. Primary and secondary creep regimes were observed in all tests. Minimum creep rate was reached in all tests. In air, creep strains remained below 0.8% and creep strain rates approached 2 × 10-8 s-1. Creep run-out defined as 100 h at creep stress was achieved in all tests conducted in air. The presence of steam accelerated creep rates and significantly reduced creep lifetimes. In steam, creep strain reached 2.25%, and creep strain rate approached 2.6 × 10-6 s-1. In steam, creep run-out was not achieved. The retained strength and modulus of all specimens that achieved run-out were characterized. Comparison with results obtained for N610™/Al2O3 (control) specimens revealed that the use of the monazite coating resulted in considerable improvement in creep resistance at 1,100°C both in air and in steam. Composite microstructure, as well as damage and failure mechanisms were investigated.

  1. Compressive creep behavior of alloys based on B2 FeAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantravadi, N.; Vedula, K.; Gaydosh, D.; Titran, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Alloys based on FeAl are attractive alternate materials for environmental resistance at intermediate temperatures. Addition of small amounts of Nb, Hf, Ta, Mo, Zr, and B were shown to improve the compressive creep of this alloy at 1100 K. Boron, in particular, was found to have a synergistic effect along with Zr in providing properties substantially better than the binary alloy. This improvement seems to be related to the higher activation energy found for this alloy, suggesting a modification in the diffusion behavior due to the alloying additions.

  2. Compressive creep behavior of alloys based on B2 FeAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantravadi, N.; Vedula, K.; Gaydosh, D.; Titran, R. H.

    1987-01-01

    Alloys based on FeAl are attractive alternative materials for environmental resistance at intermediate temperatures. Addition of small amounts of Nb, Hf, Ta, Mo, Zr, and B were shown to improve the compressive creep of this alloy at 1100 K. Boron, in particular, was found to have a synergistic effect along with Zr in providing properties substantially better than the binary alloy. This improvement seems to be related to the higher activation energy found for this alloy, suggesting a modification in the diffusion behavior due to the alloying additions.

  3. On the behavior of dissipative systems in contact with a heat bath: Application to Andrade creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, T.; Koslowski, M.; Theil, F.; Ortiz, M.

    2009-07-01

    We develop a theory of statistical mechanics for dissipative systems governed by equations of evolution that assigns probabilities to individual trajectories of the system. The theory is made mathematically rigorous and leads to precise predictions regarding the behavior of dissipative systems at finite temperature. Such predictions include the effect of temperature on yield phenomena and rheological time exponents. The particular case of an ensemble of dislocations moving in a slip plane through a random array of obstacles is studied numerically in detail. The numerical results bear out the analytical predictions regarding the mean response of the system, which exhibits Andrade creep.

  4. Buckling Behavior of Compression-Loaded Composite Cylindrical Shells with Reinforced Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Results from a numerical study of the response of thin-wall compression-loaded quasi-isotropic laminated composite cylindrical shells with reinforced and unreinforced square cutouts are presented. The effects of cutout reinforcement orthotropy, size, and thickness on the nonlinear response of the shells are described. A high-fidelity nonlinear analysis procedure has been used to predict the nonlinear response of the shells. The analysis procedure includes a nonlinear static analysis that predicts stable response characteristics of the shells and a nonlinear transient analysis that predicts unstable dynamic buckling response characteristics. The results illustrate how a compression-loaded shell with an unreinforced cutout can exhibit a complex nonlinear response. In particular, a local buckling response occurs in the shell near the cutout and is caused by a complex nonlinear coupling between local shell-wall deformations and in-plane destabilizing compression stresses near the cutout. In general, the addition of reinforcement around a cutout in a compression-loaded shell can retard or eliminate the local buckling response near the cutout and increase the buckling load of the shell, as expected. However, results are presented that show how certain reinforcement configurations can actually cause an unexpected increase in the magnitude of local deformations and stresses in the shell and cause a reduction in the buckling load. Specific cases are presented that suggest that the orthotropy, thickness, and size of a cutout reinforcement in a shell can be tailored to achieve improved response characteristics.

  5. Buckling Behavior of Compression-Loaded Composite Cylindrical Shells With Reinforced Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Sarnes, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Results from a numerical study of the response of thin-walled compression-loaded quasi-isotropic laminated composite cylindrical shells with unreinforced and reinforced square cutouts are presented. The effects of cutout reinforcement orthotropy, size, and thickness on the nonlinear response of the shells are described. A nonlinear analysis procedure has been used to predict the nonlinear response of the shells. The results indicate that a local buckling response occurs in the shell near the cutout when subjected to load and is caused by a nonlinear coupling between local shell-wall deformations and in-plane destabilizing compression stresses near the cutout. In general, reinforcement around a cutout in a compression-loaded shell is shown to retard or eliminate the local buckling response near the cutout and increase the buckling load of the shell. However, some results show that certain reinforcement configurations can cause an unexpected increase in the magnitude of local deformations and stresses in the shell and cause a reduction in the buckling load. Specific cases are presented that suggest that the orthotropy, thickness, and size of a cutout reinforcement in a shell can be tailored to achieve improved buckling response characteristics.

  6. Effect of helium on irradiation creep behavior of B-doped F82H irradiated in HFIR

    DOE PAGES

    Ando, M.; Nozawa, Takashi; Hirose, Takanori; ...

    2015-07-30

    The diameter of pressurized tubes of F82H and B-doped F82H irradiated up to similar to 6 dpa have been measured by a non-contacting laser profilometer. The irradiation creep strains of F82H irradiated at 573 and 673K were almost linearly dependent on the effective stress level for stresses below 260 MPa and 170 MPa, respectively. The creep strain of (BN)-B-10-F82H was similar to that of F82H IEA at each effective stress level except 294 MPa at 573K irradiation. For 673K irradiation, the creep strain of some (BN)-B-10-F82H tubes was larger than that of F82H tubes. However, the generation of similar tomore » 300 appm He did not cause a large difference in the irradiation creep behavior at 6 dpa.« less

  7. Effect of helium on irradiation creep behavior of B-doped F82H irradiated in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, M.; Nozawa, Takashi; Hirose, Takanori; Tanigawa, H.; Wakai, E.; Stoller, Roger E; Myers, Janie

    2015-07-30

    The diameter of pressurized tubes of F82H and B-doped F82H irradiated up to similar to 6 dpa have been measured by a non-contacting laser profilometer. The irradiation creep strains of F82H irradiated at 573 and 673K were almost linearly dependent on the effective stress level for stresses below 260 MPa and 170 MPa, respectively. The creep strain of (BN)-B-10-F82H was similar to that of F82H IEA at each effective stress level except 294 MPa at 573K irradiation. For 673K irradiation, the creep strain of some (BN)-B-10-F82H tubes was larger than that of F82H tubes. However, the generation of similar to 300 appm He did not cause a large difference in the irradiation creep behavior at 6 dpa.

  8. Creep behavior of a {beta}{prime}(NiAl) precipitation strengthened ferritic Fe-Cr-Ni-Al alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, S.M.; Tjong, S.C.; Lai, J.K.L.

    1998-05-22

    Creep in precipitation-strengthened alloys usually exhibits a pronounced transition in the stress vs creep rate relationship due to dislocations bypassing of particles by climb at low stresses. In the present study, a single-slope behavior is observed in creep of {beta}{prime}(NiAl) strengthened ferritic Fe-19Cr-4Ni-2Al alloy in the temperature range 873--923 K. The alloy exhibits anomalously high values of apparent stress exponent and activation energy (980 kJ/mol). Transmission electron microscopy examination of the deformation microstructure reveals the occurrence of attractive dislocation/particle interaction, a feature which is usually observed in dispersion-strengthened alloys. Such an attractive dislocation particle interaction makes the local climb of dislocations over particles a realistic configuration at low stresses. The creep data are analyzed by the back-stress approach and by the recent dislocation-climb theories based on attractive interaction between dislocations and particles. By considering a back stress, all data can be rationalized by a power-law with a stress exponent of 4 and a creep activation energy close to the self-diffusion energy of the matrix lattice. Local climb together with the attractive but not strong interactions between the dislocations and particles is suggested to be the operative deformation mechanism at low stresses and to account for the single-slope behavior in the stress/creep rate relationship of this alloy.

  9. Creep behavior of a rapidly solidified Al-5Cr-2Zr alloy between room temperature and 823 K

    SciTech Connect

    Brahmi, A.; Gerique, T.; Lieblich, M.; Torralba, M.

    1996-12-15

    Rapidly solidified (RS) Al-Cr-Zr alloys are established contenders for applications in the aircraft industry where lower cost, lightweight substitutes for titanium alloys are being sought for use in the temperature range of 473 to 723 K. Creep resistance is one of the critical properties of any material intended for high temperature applications. Therefore, a precise knowledge of creep behavior and a clear understanding of the mechanisms controlling creep in these materials are of great importance. The good thermal stability exhibited by the RS Al-5Cr-2Zr (wt.%) alloy makes it a good candidate for applications where high creep resistance is needed. This paper presents the results of creep behavior over a wide range of temperatures (0.32 to 0.88 Tm, where Tm = 933 K is the melt temperature of pure aluminum) of an Al-5Cr-2Zr alloy processed by gas atomization and extrusion and includes a brief discussion on the creep mechanisms that may be involved.

  10. Creep behavior of tantalum alloy T-222 at 1365 to 1700 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    High vacuum creep tests on the tantalum T-222 alloy at 0.42 to 0.52 T sub m show that the major portion of the creep curves, up to at least 1 percent strain, can be best described by an increasing creep rate, with strain varying linearly with time. Correlation and extrapolation of the creep curves on the basis of increasing creep rates results in more accurate engineering design data than would use of approximated linear rates. Based on increasing creep rates, the stress for 1 percent strain in 10,000 hours for T-222 is about four times greater than for the Ta-10W alloy. Increasing the grain size results in increased creep strength. Thermal aging prior to testing caused precipitation of the hexagonal close packed (Hf,Ta) sub 2 C, which initially increased creep strength. However, this dimetal carbide was converted during creep testing to face-centered cubic (Hf,Ta)C.

  11. Effects of Thermal Treatment on Tensile Creep and Stress-Rupture Behavior of Hi-Nicalon SiC Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.; Dicarlo, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Tensile creep and stress-rupture studies were conducted on Hi-Nicalon SiC fibers at 1200 and 1400 C in argon and air. Examined were as-received fibers as well as fibers annealed from 1400 to 1800 C for 1 hour in argon before testing. The creep and rupture results for these annealed fibers were compared to those of the as-received fibers to determine the effects of annealing temperature, test temperature, and test environment. Argon anneals up to 1500 C degrade room temperature strength of Hi-Nicalon fibers, but improve fiber creep resistance in argon or air by as much as 100% with no significant degradation in rupture strength. Argon anneals above 1500 C continue to improve fiber creep resistance when tested in argon, but significantly degrade creep resistance and rupture strength when tested in air. Decrease in creep resistance in air is greater at 1200 C than at 1400 C. Mechanisms are suggested for the observed behavior.

  12. Nonlocal and surface effects on the buckling behavior of functionally graded nanoplates: An isogeometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Norouzzadeh, A.

    2016-10-01

    The size-dependent static buckling responses of circular, elliptical and skew nanoplates made of functionally graded materials (FGMs) are investigated in this article based on an isogeometric model. The Eringen nonlocal continuum theory is implemented to capture nonlocal effects. According to the Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity theory, surface energy influences are also taken into account by the consideration of two thin surface layers at the top and bottom of nanoplate. The material properties vary in the thickness direction and are evaluated using the Mori-Tanaka homogenization scheme. The governing equations of buckled nanoplate are achieved by the minimum total potential energy principle. To perform the isogeometric analysis as a solution methodology, a novel matrix-vector form of formulation is presented. Numerical examples are given to study the effects of surface stress as well as other important parameters on the critical buckling loads of functionally graded nanoplates. It is found that the buckling configuration of nanoplates at small scales is significantly affected by the surface free energy.

  13. Creep-Rupture and Fatigue Behaviors of Notched Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composite at Elevated Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Larry P. Zawada . “Creep-Rupture Behavior of ±45° Oxide/Oxide Nextel 720/AS Composite,” Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, 24[4], 451-458...2000). 7. Buchanan, Dennis J., Victoria A. Kramb, Reji John and Larry P. Zawada . “Effect of Small Effusion Holes on Creep Rupture Behavior of Oxide...www.pr.afrl.af.mil/divisions/prt/ihptet/ihptet_brochure.pdf. (Feb 2005). 87 22. John, Reji, Dennis J. Buchanan, Victoria A. Kramb and Larry P. Zawada

  14. Analysis of behavior of simply supported flat plates compressed beyond the buckling load into the plastic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayers, J; Budiansky, Bernard

    1955-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the postbuckling behavior of a simply supported square flat plate with straight edges compressed beyond the buckling load into the plastic range. The method of analysis involves the application of a variational principle of the deformation theory of plasticity in conjunction with computations carried out on a high-speed calculating machine. Numerical results are obtained for several plate proportions and for one material. The results indicate plate strengths greater than those that have been found experimentally on plates that do not satisfy straight-edge conditions. (author)

  15. Creep behavior of thin laminates of iron-cobalt alloys for use in switched reluctance motors and generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingers, Richard Todd

    The United States Air Force is in the process of developing magnetic bearings as well as an aircraft Integrated Power Unit and an Internal Starter/Generator for main propulsion engines. These developments are the driving force behind a new emphasis on high temperature, high strength magnetic materials for power applications. Analytical work, utilizing elasticity theory, in conjunction with design requirements, indicates a need for magnetic materials to have strengths in excess of 80 ksi up to about 1000sp°F. It is this combination of desired material characteristics that is the motivation for this effort to measure, model, and predict the creep behavior of such advanced magnetic materials. Hipercosp°ler Alloy 50HS, manufactured by Carpenter Technology Corporation, is one of the leading candidates for application and is studied in this effort by subjecting mechanical test specimens to a battery of tensile and creep tests. The tensile tests provide stress versus strain behaviors that clearly indicate: a yield point, a heterogeneous deformation described as Luders elongation, the Portevin-LeChatelier effect at elevated temperatures, and, most often, a section of homogeneous deformation that concluded with necking and fracture. Creep testing indicated two distinct types of behavior. The first was a traditional response with primary, secondary and tertiary stages, while the second type could be characterized by an abrupt increase in strain rate that acted as a transition from one steady state behavior to another. This second linear region was then followed by the tertiary stage. The relationship between the tensile response and the creep responses is discussed. Analyses of the mechanical behavior includes double linear regression of empirically modeled data, scanning electron microscopy for microstructural investigations, isochronous stress-strain relations, and constant strain rate testing to relate the tensile and creep test parameters. Also, elastic and creep

  16. The role of proteoglycans in the nanoindentation creep behavior of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Bertassoni, Luiz E; Kury, Matheus; Rathsam, Catherine; Little, Christopher B; Swain, Michael V

    2015-03-01

    Attempts to understand the mechanical behavior of dentin and other mineralized tissues have been primarily focused on the role of their more abundant matrix components, such as collagen and hydroxyapatite. The structural mechanisms endowing these biological materials with outstanding load bearing properties, however, remain elusive to date. Furthermore, while their response to deformation has been extensively studied, mechanisms contributing to their recovery from induced deformation remain poorly described in the literature. Here, we offer novel insights into the participation of proteoglycans (PG) and glycosaminoglycans (GAG) in regulating the nanoindentation creep deformation and recovery of mineralized and demineralized dentin. Accordingly, after the enzymatic digestion of either PGs and associated GAGs or only GAGs, the nanoindentation creep deformation of dentin increased significantly, while the relative recovery of both the mineralized and demineralized dentin dropped by 40-70%. In summary, our results suggest that PGs and GAGs may participate in a nanoscale mechanism that contributes significantly to the outstanding durability of dentin and possibly other mineralized tissues of similar composition.

  17. Effects of Zr Additions on the Microstructure and Impression Creep Behavior of AZ91 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabirian, F.; Mahmudi, R.

    2010-12-01

    The effects of 0.2, 0.6, and 1.0 wt pct Zr additions on the microstructure and creep behavior of AZ91 Mg alloy were investigated by impression tests carried out under constant punching stress ( σ imp) in the range 100 to 650 MPa, corresponding to the modulus-compensated stress levels of {{0.007 le σ_{{imp}} } {G le 0.044}} , at temperatures in the range 425 K to 570 K (152 °C to 297 °C). The alloy containing 0.6 wt pct Zr showed the best creep resistance mainly due to the favorable formation of Al3Zr2 and Al2Zr intermetallic compounds, reduction in the volume fraction of the eutectic β-Mg17Al12 phase, and solid solution hardening effects of Al in the Mg matrix. Based on the obtained stress exponents of 4.2 to 6.5 and activation energies of 90.7 to 127.1 kJ/mol, it is proposed that two parallel mechanisms of lattice and pipe-diffusion-controlled dislocation climb compete. Dislocation climb controlled by dislocation pipe diffusion prevails at high stresses, whereas climb of edge dislocations is the controlling mechanism at low stresses.

  18. Creep-Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617 at 850°C

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Laura

    2015-05-01

    Creep-fatigue deformation is expected to be a significant contributor to the potential factors that limit the useful life of the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) nuclear system.[1] The IHX of a high temperature gas reactor will be subjected to a limited number of transient cycles due to start-up and shut-down operations imparting high local stresses on the component. This cycling introduces a creep-fatigue type of interaction as dwell times occur intermittently. The leading candidate alloy for the IHX is a nickel-base solid solution strengthened alloy, Alloy 617, which must safely operate near the expected reactor outlet temperature of up to 950 °C.[1] This solid solution strengthened nickel-base alloy provides an interesting creep-fatigue deformation case study because it has characteristics of two different alloy systems for which the cyclic behavior has been extensively investigated. Compositionally, it resembles nickel-base superalloys, such as Waspalloy, IN100, and IN718, with the exception of its lower levels of Al. At temperatures above 800 °C, the microstructure of Alloy 617, however, does not contain the ordered ?’ or ?’’ phases. Thus microstructurally, it is more similar to an austenitic stainless steel, such as 316 or 304, or Alloy 800H comprised of a predominantly solid solution strengthened matrix phase with a dispersion of inter- and intragranular carbides. Previous studies of the creep-fatigue behavior of Alloy 617 at 950 °C indicate that the fatigue life is reduced when a constant strain dwell is added at peak tensile strain.[2-5] This results from the combination of faster crack initiation occurring at surface-connected grain boundaries due to oxidation from the air environment along with faster, and intergranular, crack propagation resulting from the linking of extensive interior grain boundary cracking.[3] Saturation, defined as the point at which further increases in the strain

  19. Improved tensile and buckling behavior of defected carbon nanotubes utilizing boron nitride coating - A molecular dynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badjian, H.; Setoodeh, A. R.

    2017-02-01

    Synthesizing inorganic nanostructures such as boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have led to immense studies due to their many interesting functional features such as piezoelectricity, high temperature resistance to oxygen, electrical insulation, high thermal conductivity and very long lengths as physical features. In order to utilize the superior properties of pristine and defected carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a hybrid nanotube is proposed in this study by forming BNNTs surface coating on the CNTs. The benefits of such coating on the tensile and buckling behavior of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are illustrated through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the resulted nanostructures during the deformation. The AIREBO and Tersoff-Brenner potentials are employed to model the interatomic forces between the carbon and boron nitride atoms, respectively. The effects of chiral indices, aspect ratio, presence of mono-vacancy defects and coating dimension on coated/non-coated CNTs are examined. It is demonstrated that the coated defective CNTs exhibit remarkably enhanced ultimate strength, buckling load capacity and Young's modulus. The proposed coating not only enhances the mechanical properties of the resulted nanostructure, but also conceals it from few external factors impacting the behavior of the CNT such as humidity and high temperature.

  20. Buckling Behavior of Compression-Loaded Quasi-Isotropic Curved Panels with a Circular Cutout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Britt, Vicki O.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    1999-01-01

    Results from a numerical and experimental study of the response of compression-loaded quasi-isotropic curved panels with a centrally located circular cutout are presented. The numerical results were obtained by using a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis code. The effects of cutout size, panel curvature and initial geo- metric imperfections on the overall response of compression-loaded panels are described. In addition, results are presented from a numerical parametric study that indicate the effects of elastic circumferential edge restraints on the prebuckling and buckling response of a selected panel and these numerical results are compared to experimentally measured results. These restraints are used to identify the effects of circumferential edge restraints that are introduced by the test fixture that was used in the present study. It is shown that circumferential edge restraints can introduce substantial nonlinear prebuckling deformations into shallow compression-loaded curved panels that can results in a significant increase in buckling load.

  1. Effect of nitrogen high temperature plasma based ion implantation on the creep behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. C.; Oliveira, R. M.; Reis, D. A. P.; Carreri, F. C.

    2014-08-01

    Nitrogen high temperature plasma based ion implantation (HTPBII) performed on Ti-6Al-4V significantly improved the creep behavior of the alloy. Treatments were performed for 1 h at a working pressure of 4 mbar and negative high voltage pulses of 7.5 kV, 30 μs and 500 Hz were applied on the specimens heated at 800 °C and 900 °C, respectively. Microstructural characterization of the treated samples revealed the formation of nitrided layers, with simultaneous formation of TiN and Ti2N. The most intense peaks of these compounds were obtained at higher treatment temperature, probably due to the diffusion of nitrogen into titanium. The presence of nitrides caused surface hardening up to three times higher in comparison with untreated alloy. Constant load creep tests were conducted on a standard creep machine in air atmosphere, at stress level of 319 MPa at 600 °C. Significant reductions of the steady-state creep rates (ɛ) were measured for martensitic Ti-6Al-4V treated by nitrogen HTPBII, reaching minimum creep rates of 0.0318 h-1 in comparison with 0.1938 h-1 for untreated sample. The improvement of the creep resistance seems to be associated with the formation of a thick nitrided layer, which acts as a barrier to oxygen diffusion into the material. In addition, the increase of the grain size generated by the heating of the substrate during the treatment can affect some creep mechanisms, leading to a significant reduction of ɛ.

  2. Creep to inertia dominated stick-slip behavior in sliding friction modulated by tilted non-uniform loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Pengyi; Tao, Dashuai; Yin, Wei; Zhang, Xiangjun; Meng, Yonggang; Tian, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Comprehension of stick-slip motion is very important for understanding tribological principles. The transition from creep-dominated to inertia-dominated stick-slip as the increase of sliding velocity has been described by researchers. However, the associated micro-contact behavior during this transition has not been fully disclosed yet. In this study, we investigated the stick-slip behaviors of two polymethyl methacrylate blocks actively modulated from the creep-dominated to inertia-dominated dynamics through a non-uniform loading along the interface by slightly tilting the angle of the two blocks. Increasing the tilt angle increases the critical transition velocity from creep-dominated to inertia-dominated stick-slip behaviors. Results from finite element simulation disclosed that a positive tilt angle led to a higher normal stress and a higher temperature on blocks at the opposite side of the crack initiating edge, which enhanced the creep of asperities during sliding friction. Acoustic emission (AE) during the stick-slip has also been measured, which is closely related to the different rupture modes regulated by the distribution of the ratio of shear to normal stress along the sliding interface. This study provided a more comprehensive understanding of the effect of tilted non-uniform loading on the local stress ratio, the local temperature, and the stick-slip behaviors.

  3. Creep to inertia dominated stick-slip behavior in sliding friction modulated by tilted non-uniform loading

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Pengyi; Tao, Dashuai; Yin, Wei; Zhang, Xiangjun; Meng, Yonggang; Tian, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Comprehension of stick-slip motion is very important for understanding tribological principles. The transition from creep-dominated to inertia-dominated stick-slip as the increase of sliding velocity has been described by researchers. However, the associated micro-contact behavior during this transition has not been fully disclosed yet. In this study, we investigated the stick-slip behaviors of two polymethyl methacrylate blocks actively modulated from the creep-dominated to inertia-dominated dynamics through a non-uniform loading along the interface by slightly tilting the angle of the two blocks. Increasing the tilt angle increases the critical transition velocity from creep-dominated to inertia-dominated stick-slip behaviors. Results from finite element simulation disclosed that a positive tilt angle led to a higher normal stress and a higher temperature on blocks at the opposite side of the crack initiating edge, which enhanced the creep of asperities during sliding friction. Acoustic emission (AE) during the stick-slip has also been measured, which is closely related to the different rupture modes regulated by the distribution of the ratio of shear to normal stress along the sliding interface. This study provided a more comprehensive understanding of the effect of tilted non-uniform loading on the local stress ratio, the local temperature, and the stick-slip behaviors. PMID:27641908

  4. Influence of thermal aging on tensile and creep behavior of thermoplastic polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubakri, A.; Haddar, N.; Elleuch, K.; Bienvenu, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Changes in mechanical and physical properties of polyurethane thermoplastic during aging at 70 °C and 90 °C were investigated. The loss weight response was analyzed by gravimetric measurements under these temperatures. Changes in appearance and morphology of TPU after thermal aging were revealed by optical microscopy. The prolongation of the thermal exposure time, up to 270 days, leads to a progressive increase in tensile strength. In fact, elastic modulus and stress at 200% of strain were increased with thermal exposure time. These results can be explained by the increase of thermal stability due to the increase of material rigidity and the decrease in chain mobility. The evolution of the mechanical properties from tensile tests seems to be well correlated to the creep behavior. Finally, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) revealed the modification of TPU morphology fracture surface after thermal aging.

  5. The Influence of Geometrical Parameters on the Buckling Behavior of Conical Shell by the Single Perturbation Load Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pasqua, Maria Francesca; Khakimova, Regina; Castro, Saullo G. P.; Arbelo, Mariano A.; Riccio, Aniello; Degenhardt, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Since the development of the first theories to predict the buckling induced by axial compression in shells sensitive to imperfections, a significant discrepancy between theoretical and experimental results has been observed. Donnell and Koiter are among the first authors demonstrating, for these structures, the relevant influence of the geometrical imperfections on the reduction of the buckling load. Currently, the preliminary design of imperfections sensitive shell structures used in space applications is carried out according to the NASA SP-8007guideline. However, several studies have proven that this guideline leads to over-conservative design configurations when considering the geometrical and material imperfections existing in real cones. Since the pioneer work of Arbocz, alternative methods have been investigated to overcome this issue. Among the different approaches, in this paper, the Single Perturbation Load Approach (SPLA), originally developed byHühne as a deterministic way to calculate the knock-down factor of imperfection sensitive shells, is further studied. Indeed, a numerical investigation about the application of the SPLA to the simulation of the mechanical behavior of imperfection sensitive composite conical structures under axial compression is presented. This study is related to part of the work performed in the frame of the European Union (EU) project DESICOS.

  6. Type IV Creep Damage Behavior in Gr.91 Steel Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongo, Hiromichi; Tabuchi, Masaaki; Watanabe, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (ASME Grade 91 steel) is used as a key structural material for boiler components in ultra-supercritical (USC) thermal power plants at approximately 873 K (600 °C). The creep strength of welded joints of this steel decreases as a result of Type IV creep cracking that forms in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) under long-term use at high temperatures. The current article aims to elucidate the damage processes and microstructural degradations that take place in the HAZ of these welded joints. Long-term creep tests for base metal, simulated HAZ, and welded joints were conducted at 823 K, 873 K, and 923 K (550 °C, 600 °C, and 650 °C). Furthermore, creep tests of thick welded joint specimens were interrupted at several time steps at 873 K (600 °C) and 90 MPa, after which the distribution and evolution of creep damage inside the plates were measured quantitatively. It was found that creep voids are initiated in the early stages (0.2 of life) of creep rupture life, which coalesce to form a crack at a later stage (0.8 of life). In a fine-grained HAZ, creep damage is concentrated chiefly in an area approximately 20 pct below the surface of the plate. The experimental creep damage distributions coincide closely with the computed results obtained by damage mechanics analysis using the creep properties of a simulated fine-grained HAZ. Both the concentration of creep strain and the high multiaxial stress conditions in the fine-grained HAZ influence the distribution of Type IV creep damage.

  7. Creep-Rupture Behavior of a Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite at Elevated Temperatures in a Humid Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    284-291 (1999) 4. LaRochelle, K. J . Tensile Stress Rupture Behavior of a Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite in Humid Environments at Intermediate...Composites,” Journal of the. American Ceramic. Society, 78 [8]: 2097-100 (1995). 13. Musil , S.S. Characterization of Creep Behavior of Oxide/Oxide...1989). 17. Filipuzzi, L., G. Camus, R. Naslain, and J . Thebault. “ Oxidation Mechanisms and Kinetics of 1D-SiC/C/SiC Composite Materials: I, An

  8. Tensile and creep behavior of a silicon carbide fiber-reinforced aluminosilicate composite

    SciTech Connect

    Khobaib, M.; Zawada, L.

    1991-08-01

    Tensile and tensile creep tests were conducted with a Nicalon/aluminosilicate (Si-C-O/1723) glass composite. Tensile tests were conducted at room temperature, and the creep tests were conducted at 600, 700, and 750 C. Room temperature tensile test failure features exhibited a tortuous crack path and extensive fiber pull-out. The failure features in creep were characterized by flat fracture and little fiber pull-out. The environment appeared to play a significant role in creep failure of this composite system. 6 refs.

  9. A molecular dynamics investigation into the size-dependent buckling behavior of a novel three-dimensional metallic carbon nanostructure (T6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Ajori, S.; Hassani, R.

    2016-09-01

    The buckling behavior of a novel three-dimensional metallic carbon nanostructure known as T6 is investigated herein employing the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The models are prepared on the basis of two beam- and plate-like structures to study the effects of size and geometry on the critical buckling force and critical strain. It is observed that the range of critical force for the beam-like and plate-like T6 with different geometrical parameters is approximately identical. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the critical buckling force decreases and increases by increasing the length and the width of T6, respectively. Moreover, it is shown that critical strain of beam-like T6 decreases by increasing the length, whereas, in the case of plate-like T6, the critical strain only fluctuates around 2% by increasing the width. It is further found that the buckling parameters of T6 are not comparable with those of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene with a relatively similar dimension. The critical buckling force and critical strain of T6 are considerably smaller than those of SWCNT and larger than those of graphene.

  10. Development of a steady state creep behavior model of polycrystalline tungsten for bimodal space reactor application

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, A.; Hanan, N.A.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Gruber, E.E.

    1995-02-01

    The fuel element for one of the many reactor concepts being currently evaluated for bimodal applications in space consists of spherical fuel particles clad with tungsten or alloys of tungsten. The fuel itself consists of stabilized UO{sub 2}. One of the life limiting phenomena for the fuel element is failure of the cladding because of creep deformation. This report summarizes the information available in literature regarding the creep deformation of tungsten and its alloys and proposes a relation to be used for calculating the creep strains for elevated temperatures in the low stress region ({sigma} {le} 20 MPa). Also, results of the application of this creep relation to one of the reactor design concepts (NEBA-3) are discussed. Based on the traditional definition of creep deformation, the temperatures of 1500 K to 2900 K for tungsten and its alloys are considered to be in the {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} temperature range. In this temperature range, the rate controlling mechanisms for creep deformation are believed to be non-conservative motion of screw dislocations and short circuit diffusional paths. Extensive theoretical work on creep and in particular for creep of tungsten and its alloys have been reported in the literature. These theoretical efforts have produced complex mathematical models that require detailed materials properties. These relations, however, are not presently suitable for the creep analysis because of lack of consistent material properties required for their use. Variations in material chemistry and thermomechanical pre-treatment of tungsten have significant effects on creep and the mechanical properties. Analysis of the theoretical models and limited data indicates that the following empirical relation originally proposed by M. Jacox of INEL and the Air Force Phillips Laboratory, for calculating creep deformation of tungsten cladding, can be used for the downselection of preliminary bimodal reactor design concepts.

  11. The effects of molecular weight on the single lap shear creep and constant strain rate behavior of thermoplastic polyimidesulfone adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dembosky, Stanley K.; Sancaktar, Erol

    1985-01-01

    The bonded shear creep and constant strain rate behaviors of zero, one, and three percent endcapped thermoplastic polyimidesulfone adhesive were examined at room and elevated temperatures. Endcapping was accomplished by the addition of phthalic anhydrides. The primary objective was to determine the effects of molecular weight on the mechanical properties of the adhesive. Viscoelastic and nonlinear elastic constitutive equations were utilized to model the adhesive. Ludwik's and Crochet's relations were used to describe the experimental failure data. The effects of molecular weight changes on the above mentioned mechanical behavior were assessed. The viscoelastic Chase-Goldsmith and elastic nonlinear relations gave a good fit to the experimental stress strain behavior. Crochet's relations based on Maxwell and Chase-Goldsmith models were fit to delayed failure data. Ludwik's equations revealed negligible rate dependence. Ultimate stress levels and the safe levels for creep stresses were found to decrease as molecular weight was reduced.

  12. Mechanical Behavior of Polymer Gels for RDCs and RCSAs Collection: NMR Imaging Study of Buckling Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Hellemann, Erich; Teles, Rubens R; Hallwass, Fernando; Barros, W; Navarro-Vázquez, Armando; Gil, Roberto R

    2016-11-07

    Anisotropic NMR parameters, such as residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), residual chemical shift anisotropies (RCSAs) and residual quadrupolar couplings (RQCs or ΔνQ ), appear in solution-state NMR when the molecules under study are subjected to a degree of order. The tunable alignment by reversible compression/relaxation of gels (PMMA and p-HEMA) is an easy, user-friendly, and very affordable method to measure them. When using this method, a fraction of isotropic NMR signals is observed in the NMR spectra, even at a maximum degree of compression. To explain the origin of these isotropic signals we decided to investigate their physical location inside the NMR tube using deuterium 1D imaging and MRI micro-imaging experiments. It was observed that after a certain degree of compression the gels start to buckle and they generate pockets of isotropic solvent, which are never eliminated. The amount of buckling depends on the amount of cross-linker and the length of the gel.

  13. Preliminary Development of a Unified Viscoplastic Constitutive Model for Alloy 617 with Special Reference to Long Term Creep Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Sam; Walker, Kevin P.

    2008-01-01

    The expected service life of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant is 60 years. Structural analyses of the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) will require the development of unified viscoplastic constitutive models that address the material behavior of Alloy 617, a construction material of choice, over a wide range of strain rates. Many unified constitutive models employ a yield stress state variable which is used to account for cyclic hardening and softening of the material. For low stress values below the yield stress state variable these constitutive models predict that no inelastic deformation takes place which is contrary to experimental results. The ability to model creep deformation at low stresses for the IHX application is very important as the IHX operational stresses are restricted to very small values due to the low creep strengths at elevated temperatures and long design lifetime. This paper presents some preliminary work in modeling the unified viscoplastic constitutive behavior of Alloy 617 which accounts for the long term, low stress, creep behavior and the hysteretic behavior of the material at elevated temperatures. The preliminary model is presented in one-dimensional form for ease of understanding, but the intent of the present work is to produce a three-dimensional model suitable for inclusion in the user subroutines UMAT and USERPL of the ABAQUS and ANSYS nonlinear finite element codes. Further experiments and constitutive modeling efforts are planned to model the material behavior of Alloy 617 in more detail.

  14. Creep behavior in SiC whisker-reinforced alumina composite

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.T.; Becher, P.F.

    1994-10-01

    Grain boundary sliding (often accompanied by cavitation) is a major contributor to compressive and tensile creep deformation in fine-grained aluminas, both with and without whisker-reinforcement. Studies indicate that the creep response of alumina composites reinforced with SiC whiskers can be tailored by controlling the composite microstructure and composition. The addition of SiC whiskers (< 30 vol%) significantly increases the creep resistance of fine-grained (1--2 {mu}m) alumina in air at temperatures of 1,200 and 1,300 C. However, at higher whisker contents (30 and 50 vol%), the creep resistance is degraded due to enhanced surface oxidation reactions accompanied by extensive creep cavitation. Densification aids (i.e., Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which facilitate silica glass formation and thus liquid phase densification of the composites, can also result in degradation of creep resistance. On the other hand, increasing the matrix grain size or decreasing the whisker aspect ratio (increased whisker number density) results in raising the creep resistance of the composites. These observations not only explain the variability in the creep response of various SiC whisker-reinforced alumina composites but also indicate factors that can be used to enhance the elevated temperature performance.

  15. Effects of Microstructure and Processing Methods on Creep Behavior of AZ91 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbeigi Roodposhti, Peiman; Sarkar, Apu; Murty, Korukonda L.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    2016-09-01

    This review sheds light on the creep properties of AZ91 magnesium alloys with a major emphasis on the influence of microstructure on the creep resistance and underlying creep deformation mechanism based on stress exponent and activation energy. Effects of processing routes such as steel mold casting, die casting, and thixoforming are considered. Roles of a wide range of additional alloying elements such as Si, Sb, Bi, Ca, Sn, REs, and combined addition of them on the microstructure modification were investigated. The reaction between these elements and the Mg or Al in the matrix develops some thermally stable intermetallic phases which improves the creep resistance at elevated temperatures, however does not influence the creep mechanism.

  16. Development of constitutive models for cyclic plasticity and creep behavior of super alloys at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisler, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    An uncoupled constitutive model for predicting the transient response of thermal and rate dependent, inelastic material behavior was developed. The uncoupled model assumes that there is a temperature below which the total strain consists essentially of elastic and rate insensitive inelastic strains only. Above this temperature, the rate dependent inelastic strain (creep) dominates. The rate insensitive inelastic strain component is modelled in an incremental form with a yield function, blow rule and hardening law. Revisions to the hardening rule permit the model to predict temperature-dependent kinematic-isotropic hardening behavior, cyclic saturation, asymmetric stress-strain response upon stress reversal, and variable Bauschinger effect. The rate dependent inelastic strain component is modelled using a rate equation in terms of back stress, drag stress and exponent n as functions of temperature and strain. A sequence of hysteresis loops and relaxation tests are utilized to define the rate dependent inelastic strain rate. Evaluation of the model has been performed by comparison with experiments involving various thermal and mechanical load histories on 5086 aluminum alloy, 304 stainless steel and Hastelloy X.

  17. Creep Behavior and Degradation of Subgrain Structures Pinned by Nanoscale Precipitates in Strength-Enhanced 5 to 12 Pct Cr Ferritic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi Armaki, Hassan; Chen, Ruiping; Maruyama, Kouichi; Igarashi, Masaaki

    2011-10-01

    Creep behavior and degradation of subgrain structures and precipitates of Gr. 122 type xCr-2W-0.4Mo-1Cu-VNb ( x = 5, 7, 9, 10.5, and 12 pct) steels were evaluated during short-term and long-term static aging and creep with regard to the Cr content of steel. Creep rupture life increased from 5 to 12 pct Cr in the short-term creep region, whereas in the long-term creep region, it increased up to 9 pct Cr and then decreased with the addition of Cr from 9 to 12 pct. Behavior of creep rupture life was attributed to the size of elongated subgrains. In the short-term creep region, subgrain size decreased from 5 to 12 pct Cr, corresponding to the longer creep strength. However, in the long-term creep region after 104 hours, subgrain size increased up to 9 pct Cr and then decreased from 9 to 12 pct, corresponding to the behavior of creep rupture life. M23C6 and MX precipitates had the highest number fraction among all of the precipitates present in the studied steels. Cr concentration dependence of spacing of M23C6 and MX precipitates exhibited a V-like shape during short-term as well as long-term aging at 923 K (650 °C), and the minimum spacing of precipitates belonged to 9 pct Cr steel, corresponding to the lowest recovery speed of subgrain structures. In the short-term creep region, subgrain coarsening during creep was controlled by strain and proceeded slower with the addition of Cr, whereas in long-term creep region, subgrain coarsening was controlled by the stability of precipitates rather than due to the creep plastic deformation and took place faster from 9 to 12 pct and 9 to 5 pct Cr. However, M23C6 precipitates played a more important role than MX precipitates in the control of subgrain coarsening, and there was a closer correlation between spacing of M23C6 precipitates and subgrain size during static aging and long-term creep region.

  18. Prediction and verification of creep behavior in metallic materials and components, for the space shuttle thermal protection system. Volume 1, phase 1: Cyclic materials creep predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. W.; Cramer, B. A.

    1974-01-01

    Cyclic creep response was investigated and design methods applicable to thermal protection system structures were developed. The steady-state (constant temperature and load) and cyclic creep response characteristics of four alloys were studied. Steady-state creep data were gathered through a literature survey to establish reference data bases. These data bases were used to develop empirical equations describing creep as a function of time, temperature, and stress and as a basis of comparison for test data. Steady-state creep tests and tensile cyclic tests were conducted. The following factors were investigated: material thickness and rolling direction; material cyclic creep response under varying loads and temperatures; constant stress and temperature cycles representing flight conditions; changing stresses present in a creeping beam as a result of stress redistribution; and complex stress and temperature profiles representative of space shuttle orbiter trajectories. A computer program was written, applying creep hardening theories and empirical equations for creep, to aid in analysis of test data. Results are considered applicable to a variety of structures which are cyclicly exposed to creep producing thermal environments.

  19. Creep and Fracture Behavior of Peak-Aged Mg-11Y-5Gd-2Zn-0.5Zr (wt pct)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, D. D.; Wang, Q. D.; Boehlert, C. J.; Janik, V.

    2012-09-01

    The tensile-creep and creep-fracture behavior of peak-aged Mg-11Y-5Gd-2Zn-0.5Zr (wt pct) (WGZ1152) was investigated at temperatures between 523 K (250 °C) to 598 K (325 °C) (0.58 to 0.66 T m) and stresses between 30 MPa to 140 MPa. The minimum creep rate of the alloy was almost two orders of magnitude lower than that for WE54-T6 and was similar to that for HZ32-T5. The creep behavior exhibited an extended tertiary creep stage, which was believed to be associated with precipitate coarsening. The creep stress exponent value was 4.5, suggesting that dislocation creep was the rate-controlling mechanism during secondary creep. At T = 573 K (300 °C), basal slip was the dominant deformation mode. The activation energy for creep ( Q avg = 221 ± 20 kJ/mol) was higher than that for self-diffusion in magnesium and was believed to be associated with the presence of second-phase particles as well as the activation of nonbasal slip and cross slip. This finding was consistent with the slip-trace analysis and surface deformation observations, which revealed that the nonbasal slip was active. The minimum creep rate and time-to-fracture followed the original and modified Monkman-Grant relationships. The microcracks and cavities nucleated preferentially at grain boundaries and at the interface between the matrix phase and the second phase. In-situ creep experiments highlighted the intergranular cracking evolution.

  20. Osmotic buckling of spherical capsules.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Sebastian; Kierfeld, Jan

    2014-11-07

    We study the buckling of elastic spherical shells under osmotic pressure with the osmolyte concentration of the exterior solution as a control parameter. We compare our results for the bifurcation behavior with results for buckling under mechanical pressure control, that is, with an empty capsule interior. We find striking differences for the buckling states between osmotic and mechanical buckling. Mechanical pressure control always leads to fully collapsed states with opposite sides in contact, whereas uncollapsed states with a single finite dimple are generic for osmotic pressure control. For sufficiently large interior osmolyte concentrations, osmotic pressure control is qualitatively similar to buckling under volume control with the volume prescribed by the osmolyte concentrations inside and outside the shell. We present a quantitative theory which also captures the influence of shell elasticity on the relationship between osmotic pressure and volume. These findings are relevant for the control of buckled shapes in applications. We show how the osmolyte concentration can be used to control the volume of buckled shells. An accurate analytical formula is derived for the relationship between the osmotic pressure, the elastic moduli and the volume of buckled capsules. This also allows use of elastic capsules as osmotic pressure sensors or deduction of elastic properties and the internal osmolyte concentration from shape changes in response to osmotic pressure changes. We apply our findings to published experimental data on polyelectrolyte capsules.

  1. Creep Crack Growth Behavior of Alloys 617 and 800H in Air and Impure Helium Environments at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grierson, D. S.; Cao, G.; Brooks, P.; Pezzi, P.; Glaudell, A.; Kuettel, D.; Fischer, G.; Allen, T.; Sridharan, K.; Crone, W. C.

    2017-03-01

    The environmental degradation of intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) materials in impure helium has been identified as an area with major ramifications on the design of very high-temperature reactors (VHTR). It has been reported that in some helium environments, non-ductile failure is a significant failure mode for Alloy 617 with long-term elevated-temperature service. Non-ductile failure of intermediate exchangers can result in catastrophic consequences; unfortunately, the knowledge of creep crack initiation and creep crack growth (CCG) in candidate alloys is limited. Current codes and code cases for the candidate alloys do not provide specific guidelines for effects of impure helium on the high-temperature behavior. The work reported here explores creep crack growth characterization of Alloy 617 and Alloy 800H at elevated temperatures in air and in impure helium environments, providing information on the reliability of these alloys in VHTR for long-term service. Alloy 617 was found to exhibit superior CCG resistance compared to Alloy 800H. For Alloy 617 tested at 973 K (700 °C), a notable increase in the resistance to crack growth was measured in air compared to that measured in the helium environment; CCG results for Alloy 800H suggest that air and helium environments produce similar behavior. Testing of grain boundary-engineered (GBE) Alloy 617 samples revealed that, although the technique produces superior mechanical properties in many respects, the GBE samples exhibited inferior resistance to creep crack growth compared to the other Alloy 617 samples tested under similar conditions. Grain size is noted as a confounding factor in creep crack growth resistance.

  2. Creep Crack Growth Behavior of Alloys 617 and 800H in Air and Impure Helium Environments at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grierson, D. S.; Cao, G.; Brooks, P.; Pezzi, P.; Glaudell, A.; Kuettel, D.; Fischer, G.; Allen, T.; Sridharan, K.; Crone, W. C.

    2016-11-01

    The environmental degradation of intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) materials in impure helium has been identified as an area with major ramifications on the design of very high-temperature reactors (VHTR). It has been reported that in some helium environments, non-ductile failure is a significant failure mode for Alloy 617 with long-term elevated-temperature service. Non-ductile failure of intermediate exchangers can result in catastrophic consequences; unfortunately, the knowledge of creep crack initiation and creep crack growth (CCG) in candidate alloys is limited. Current codes and code cases for the candidate alloys do not provide specific guidelines for effects of impure helium on the high-temperature behavior. The work reported here explores creep crack growth characterization of Alloy 617 and Alloy 800H at elevated temperatures in air and in impure helium environments, providing information on the reliability of these alloys in VHTR for long-term service. Alloy 617 was found to exhibit superior CCG resistance compared to Alloy 800H. For Alloy 617 tested at 973 K (700 °C), a notable increase in the resistance to crack growth was measured in air compared to that measured in the helium environment; CCG results for Alloy 800H suggest that air and helium environments produce similar behavior. Testing of grain boundary-engineered (GBE) Alloy 617 samples revealed that, although the technique produces superior mechanical properties in many respects, the GBE samples exhibited inferior resistance to creep crack growth compared to the other Alloy 617 samples tested under similar conditions. Grain size is noted as a confounding factor in creep crack growth resistance.

  3. Dependence of Precipitation Behavior and Creep Strength on Cr Content in High Cr Ferritic Heat Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Yoshinori; Yamashita, Koji; Morinaga, Masahiko; Hara, Toru; Miki, Kazuhiro; Azuma, Tsukasa; Ishiguro, Toru; Hashizume, Ryokichi

    It is known that high temperature tensile strength increases with increasing Cr content in Cr containing heat resistant steels. Recently, however, it was found that long-term creep strength decreased with increasing Cr content in the heat resistant steels containing 8.5-12%Cr. In this study, precipitation behavior of M23C6 carbide and the Z phase after creep tests was investigated using two kinds of high Cr ferritic steels (9Cr and 10.5Cr). As a result, 10.5Cr steel exhibited larger average particle size of M23C6 than 9Cr steel irrespective of creep stress levels, but the amount of M23C6 carbide was almost the same in both steels. On the other hand, the amount of the Z phase became large in 10.5Cr steel compared with 9Cr steel. These experimental results indicate that high level of Cr content accelerates precipitation and coalescence rate of both M23C6 carbide and the Z phase, resulting in degradation of long term creep strength in 10.5 Cr steel compared to 9Cr steel.

  4. Coupling between creep and redox behavior in nickel - yttria stabilized zirconia observed in-situ by monochromatic neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowska, Malgorzata Grazyna; Kuhn, Luise Theil; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Lauridsen, Erik Mejdal; De Angelis, Salvatore; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Morgano, Manuel; Trtik, Pavel; Strobl, Markus

    2017-02-01

    Ni-YSZ (nickel - yttria stabilized zirconia) is a material widely used for electrodes and supports in solid oxide electrochemical cells. The mechanical and electrochemical performance of these layers, and thus the whole cell, depends on their microstructure. During the initial operation of a cell, NiO is reduced to Ni. When this process is conducted under external load, like also present in a stack assembly, significant deformations of NiO/Ni-YSZ composite samples are observed. The observed creep is orders of magnitude larger than the one observed after reduction during operation. This phenomenon is referred to as accelerated creep and is expected to have a significant influence on the microstructure development and stress field present in the Ni-YSZ in solid oxide electrochemical cells (SOCs), which is highly important for the durability of the SOC. In this work we present energy selective neutron imaging studies of the accelerated creep phenomenon in Ni/NiO-YSZ composite during reduction and also during oxidation. This approach allowed us to observe the phase transition and the creep behavior simultaneously in-situ under SOC operation-like conditions.

  5. Effect of fiber-matrix adhesion on the creep behavior of CF/PPS composites: temperature and physical aging characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta Dias, M. H.; Jansen, K. M. B.; Luinge, J. W.; Bersee, H. E. N.; Benedictus, R.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of fiber-matrix adhesion on the linear viscoelastic creep behavior of `as received' and `surface modified' carbon fibers (AR-CF and SM-CF, respectively) reinforced polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) composite materials was investigated. Short-term tensile creep tests were performed on ±45° specimens under six different isothermal conditions, 40, 50, 60, 65, 70 and 75 °C. Physical aging effects were evaluated on both systems using the short-term test method established by Struik. The results showed that the shapes of the curves were affected neither by physical aging nor by the test temperature, allowing then superposition to be made. A unified model was proposed with a single physical aging and temperature-dependent shift factor, a_{T,te}. It was suggested that the surface treatment carried out in SM-CF/PPS had two major effects on the creep response of CF/PPS composites at a reference temperature of 40 °C: a lowering of the initial compliance of about 25 % and a slowing down of the creep response of about 1.1 decade.

  6. Influence of local fiber undulations on the global buckling behavior of filament-wound cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, D. W.; Pai, S. P.

    1993-01-01

    The predicted compressive stiffness and buckling strength of filament-wound cylinders using classical lamination theory is significantly higher than those observed experimentally. This discrepancy is partially influenced by the variation of mechanical properties in the region of fiber undulations. These regions are localized geometric defects intrinsic to the filament-winding, weaving, and braiding processes. In the present work, the average mechanical properties of the fiber undulation region are quantified using modified models of woven-fabric composites to account for the 3-dimensional effects. The mechanical properties thus determined can be incorporated as local element properties into global finite-element models. Preliminary results from large-displacement analyses of filament-wound cylinders are relatively more accurate when fiber undulations are accounted for.

  7. Stick-slip and creep behavior in lubricated granular material: Insights into the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, Jacqueline E.; Hayman, Nicholas W.; Lavier, Luc L.

    2014-05-01

    Crustal deformation can occur via stick-slip events, viscous creep, or strain transients at variable rates. Here we explore such strain transients with physical experiments comprising a quasi-two-dimensional shear zone with elastic, acrylic discs and interstitial viscous silicone. Experiments of solely elastic discs produce stick-slip events and an overall (constant volume) strengthening. The addition of the viscous silicone enhances localization but does not greatly change the overall pattern of strengthening. It does, however, damp the stick-slip events, leading to transient, creep-like behavior that approaches the behavior of a Maxwell body. There is no gradual transition from frictional to viscous deformation with increasing amounts of silicone, suggesting that the mixed rheology is in effect as soon as an interstitial fluid is present. Our experiments support the hypothesis that a possible cause for strain transients in nature is an interstitial viscous phase in shear zones.

  8. Creep Behavior of Hafnia and Ytterbium Silicate Environmental Barrier Coating Systems on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Harder, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings will play a crucial role in future advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to significantly extend the temperature capability and stability of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) engine components, thus improving the engine performance. In order to develop high performance, robust coating systems for engine components, appropriate test approaches simulating operating temperature gradient and stress environments for evaluating the critical coating properties must be established. In this paper, thermal gradient mechanical testing approaches for evaluating creep and fatigue behavior of environmental barrier coated SiC/SiC CMC systems will be described. The creep and fatigue behavior of Hafnia and ytterbium silicate environmental barrier coatings on SiC/SiC CMC systems will be reported in simulated environmental exposure conditions. The coating failure mechanisms will also be discussed under the heat flux and stress conditions.

  9. Microstructural Evolution and Creep-Rupture Behavior of Fusion Welds Involving Alloys for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechetti, Daniel H., Jr.

    Projections for large increases in the global demand for electric power produced by the burning of fossil fuels, in combination with growing environmental concerns surrounding these fuel sources, have sparked initiatives in the United States, Europe, and Asia aimed at developing a new generation of coal fired power plant, termed Advanced Ultrasupercritical (A-USC). These plants are slated to operate at higher steam temperatures and pressures than current generation plants, and in so doing will offer increased process cycle efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Several gamma' precipitation strengthened Ni-based superalloys have been identified as candidates for the hottest sections of these plants, but the microstructural instability and poor creep behavior (compared to wrought products) of fusion welds involving these alloys present significant hurdles to their implementation and a gap in knowledge that must be addressed. In this work, creep testing and in-depth microstructural characterization have been used to provide insight into the long-term performance of these alloys. First, an investigation of the weld metal microstructural evolution as it relates to creep strength reductions in A-USC alloys INCONELRTM 740, NIMONICRTM 263 (INCONEL and NIMONIC are registered trademarks of Special Metals Corporation), and HaynesRTM 282RTM (Haynes and 282 are registered trademarks of Haynes International) was performed. gamma'-precipitate free zones were identified in two of these three alloys, and their development was linked to the evolution of phases that precipitate at the expense of gamma'. Alloy 282 was shown to avoid precipitate free zone formation because the precipitates that form during long term aging in this alloy are poor in the gamma'-forming elements. Next, the microstructural evolution of INCONELRTM 740H (a compositional variant of alloy 740) during creep was investigated. Gleeble-based interrupted creep and creep-rupture testing was used to

  10. Creep-rupture behavior of iron superalloys in high-pressure hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.

    1984-01-01

    The creep-rupture properties of five iron-base and one cobalt-base high temperature alloys were investigated to assess the feasibility of using the alloys as construction materials in a Stirling engine. The alloys were heat treated and hardness measurements were taken. Typical microstructures of the alloys are shown. The creep-rupture properties of the alloys were determined at 760 and 815 C in 15.0 MPa H2 for 200 to 1000 hours. Plots of rupture life versus stress for the six superalloys are presented along with creep strain-time plots.

  11. Antiskid control of railway train braking based on adhesion creep behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Jianyong; Chen, Zhongkai

    2012-05-01

    In modern trains wheelset skidding leads to the deterioration of braking behavior, the degradation of comfort, as well as a boost in system hazards. Because of the nonlinearity and unknown characteristics of wheelset adhesion, simplifications are widely adopted in the modeling process of conventional antiskid controllers. Therefore, conventional antiskid controllers usually cannot perform satisfactorily. In this paper, systematic computer simulation and field tests for railway antiskid control system are introduced. The operating principal of antiskid control system is explained, which is fundamental to the simulation of antiskid brakes, and the simulation model is introduced, which incorporates both the adhesion creep curve and a pneumatic submodel of antiskid control system. In addition, the characteristics of adhesion curves and the simulation target are also provided. Using DHSplus, the pneumatic submodel is created to analyze the performance of the different control strategies of antiskid valves. Then the system simulation is realized by combining the kinematical characteristics of railway trains and the pneumatic submodel. The simulation is performed iteratively to obtain the optimized design of the antiskid control system. The design result is incorporated in the hardware design of the antiskid control system and is evaluated in the field tests in Shanghai Subway Line 1. Judging by the antiskid efficiency, the antiskid braking performance observed in the field tests shows the superiority of the optimized design. Therefore, the proposed simulation method, especially in view of its ease of application, appears to be a useful one for designing railway antiskid control systems.

  12. Creep Effects in Pultruded FRP Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscato, G.; Casalegno, C.; Russo, S.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents results of two creep tests on pultruded open-section GFRP beams aimed to evaluate the long-term deformations, the residual deflection after unloading, and the influence of creep strains on the flexuraltorsional buckling phenomenon. Two beams were subjected to a constant load for about one year. Then one of the beams was unloaded to evaluate its residual deflection. For the other beam, the load was increased up to failure, and the residual buckling strength was compared with that of a similar beam tested up to failure. The parameters of the Findley power law are evaluated, and the experimental results are compared with those of numerical analyses and with available formulations for prediction of the time-dependent properties of composite beams. Results of the investigation testify, in particular, to a noninsignificant time-dependent increment in deflections of the beams and to a significant reduction in their buckling strength due to creep deformations.

  13. Effect of Double Aging Heat Treatment on the Short-Term Creep Behavior of the Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliari, Felipe Rocha; Candioto, Kátia Cristiane Gandolpho; Couto, Antônio Augusto; Nunes, Carlos Ângelo; Reis, Danieli Aparecida Pereira

    2016-06-01

    This research studies the effect of double aging heat treatment on the short-term creep behavior of the superalloy Inconel 718. The superalloy, received in the solution treated state, was subjected to an aging treatment which comprises a solid solution at 1095 °C for 1 h, a first aging step of 955 °C for 1 h, then aged at 720 and 620 °C, 8 h each step. Creep tests at constant load mode, under temperatures of 650, 675, 700 °C and stress of 510, 625 and 700 MPa, were performed before and after heat treatment. The results indicate that after the double aging heat treatment creep resistance is increased, influenced by the presence of precipitates γ' and γ″ and its interaction with the dislocations, by grain size growth (from 8.20 to 7.23 ASTM) and the increase of hardness by approximately 98%. Creep parameters of primary and secondary stages have been determined. There is a breakdown relationship between dot{\\upvarepsilon }_{{s}} and stress at 650 °C of Inconel 718 as received, around 600 MPa. By considering the internal stress values, effective stress exponent, effective activation energy, and TEM images of Inconel 718 double aged, it is suggested that the creep mechanism is controlled by the interaction of dislocations with precipitates. The fracture mechanism of Inconel 718 as received is transgranular (coalescence of dimples) and mixed (transgranular-intergranular), whereas the Inconel 718 double aged condition crept surfaces evidenced the intergranular fracture mechanism.

  14. Buckling of cylindrical panels under axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, L. H.; Weller, T.; Agarwal, B. L.

    1976-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of boundary conditions and panel width on the axially compressive buckling behavior of unstiffened, isotropic, circular cylindrical panels. Numerical results are presented for eight different sets of boundary conditions along the straight edges of the panels. For all sets of boundary conditions except one (SS1), the results show that the panel buckling loads monotonically approach the complete cylinder buckling load from above as the panel width is increased. Low buckling loads, sometimes less than half the complete cylinder buckling load, are found for simply supported panels with free in-plane edge displacements (SS1). It is observed that the prevention of circumferential edge displacement is the most important in-plane boundary condition from the point of view of increasing the buckling load; and that the prevention of edge rotation in the circumferential direction also significantly increases the buckling load.

  15. Mechanisms of high-temperature, solid-state flow in minerals and ceramics and their bearing on the creep behavior of the mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.H.; Raleigh, C.B.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of applying laboratory silicate-flow data to the mantle, where conditions can be vastly different, is approached through a critical review of high-temperature flow mechanisms in ceramics and their relation to empirical flow laws. The intimate association of solid-state diffusion and high-temperature creep in pure metals is found to apply to ceramics as well. It is shown that in ceramics of moderate grain size, compared on the basis of self-diffusivity and elastic modulus, normalized creep rates compare remarkably well. This comparison is paralleled by the near universal occurrence of similar creep-induced structures, and it is thought that the derived empirical flow laws can be associated with dislocation creep. Creep data in fine-grained ceramics, on the other hand, are found to compare poorly with theories involving the stress-directed diffusion of point defects and have not been successfully correlated by self-diffusion rates. We conclude that these fine-grained materials creep primarily by a quasi-viscous grain-boundary sliding mechanism which is unlikely to predominate in the earth's deep interior. Creep predictions for the mantle reveal that under most conditions the empirical dislocation creep behavior predominates over the mechanisms involving the stress-directed diffusion of point defects. The probable role of polymorphic transformations in the transition zone is also discussed. ?? 1973.

  16. A Physics-Based Crystallographic Modeling Framework for Describing the Thermal Creep Behavior of Fe-Cr Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, W.; Capolungo, L.; Patra, A.; Tomé, C. N.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a physics-based thermal creep model is developed based on the understanding of the microstructure in Fe-Cr alloys. This model is associated with a transition state theory-based framework that considers the distribution of internal stresses at sub-material point level. The thermally activated dislocation glide and climb mechanisms are coupled in the obstacle-bypass processes for both dislocation and precipitate-type barriers. A kinetic law is proposed to track the dislocation densities evolution in the subgrain interior and in the cell wall. The predicted results show that this model, embedded in the visco-plastic self-consistent framework, captures well the creep behaviors for primary and steady-state stages under various loading conditions. The roles of the mechanisms involved are also discussed.

  17. Computerized Buckling Analysis of Shells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    bl block nurmber) Shells Composites Buckl ing Stiffened Numerical Methods Elastic-Plastic Nonlinear Survey 20 AES’RACT (Con’inue on re, ense Ride If...Contract F33615-76-C-3105. The work was completed under Task 2307NI, "Basic Research in Behavior of Metallic and Composite Components of Airframe Struc...and Internal Pressure ....... ................. ... 134 Stiffened Cylindrical Shells Under Combined Loading .... ........ 136 - Buckling of Composite

  18. The Effect of Thermomechanical Processing on the Tensile, Fatigue, and Creep Behavior of Magnesium Alloy AM60

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhe; Huang, J; Decker, R; Lebeau, S; Walker, Larry R; Cavin, Odis Burl; Watkins, Thomas R; Boehlert, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Tensile, fatigue, fracture toughness, and creep experiments were performed on a commercially available magnesium-aluminum alloy (AM60) after three processing treatments: (1) as-THIXOMOLDED (as-molded), (2) THIXOMOLDED then thermomechanically processed (TTMP), and (3) THIXOMOLDED then TTMP then annealed (annealed). The TTMP procedure resulted in a significantly reduced grain size and a tensile yield strength greater than twice that of the as-molded material without a debit in elongation to failure ({epsilon}{sub f}). The as-molded material exhibited the lowest strength, while the annealed material exhibited an intermediate strength but the highest {epsilon}{sub f} (>1 pct). The TTMP and annealed materials exhibited fracture toughness values almost twice that of the as-molded material. The as-molded material exhibited the lowest fatigue threshold values and the lowest fatigue resistance. The annealed material exhibited the greatest fatigue resistance, and this was suggested to be related to its balance of tensile strength and ductility. The fatigue lives of each material were similar at both room temperature (RT) and 423 K (150 C). The tensile-creep behavior was evaluated for applied stresses ranging between 20 and 75 MPa and temperatures between 373 and 473 K (100 and 200 C). During both the fatigue and creep experiments, cracking preferentially occurred at grain boundaries. Overall, the results indicate that thermomechanical processing of AM60 dramatically improves the tensile, fracture toughness, and fatigue behavior, making this alloy attractive for structural applications. The reduced creep resistance after thermomechanical processing offers an opportunity for further research and development.

  19. Redesigning of a Canard Control Surface of an Advanced Fighter Aircraft: Effect on Buckling and Aerodynamic Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Sachin; Mohite, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    A redesign of canard control-surface of an advanced all-metallic fighter aircraft was carried out by using carbon fibre composite (CFC) for ribs and panels. In this study ply-orientations of CFC structure are optimized using a Genetic-Algorithm (GA) with an objective function to have minimum failure index (FI) according to Tsai-Wu failure criterion. The redesigned CFC structure was sufficiently strong to withstand aerodynamic loads from stress and deflection points of view. Now, in the present work CFC canard structure has been studied for its buckling strength in comparison to existing metallic design. In this study, the existing metallic design was found to be weak in buckling. Upon a detailed investigation, it was revealed that there are reported failures in the vicinity of zones where initial buckling modes are excited as predicted by the finite element based buckling analysis. In view of buckling failures, the redesigned CFC structure is sufficiently reinforced with stringers at specific locations. After providing reinforcements against buckling, the twist and the camber variations of the airfoil are checked and compared with existing structure data. Finally, the modal analysis has been carried out to compare the variation in excitation frequency due to material change. The CFC structure thus redesigned is safe from buckling and aerodynamic aspects as well.

  20. Creep-Rupture Behavior and Recrystallization in Cold-Bent Boiler Tubing for USC Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shingledecker, John P

    2008-01-01

    Creep-rupture experiments were conducted on candidate Ultrasupercritical (USC) alloy tubes to evaluate the effects of cold-work and recrystallization during high-temperature service. These creep tests were performed by internally pressurizing cold-bent boiler tubes at 775 C for times up to 8000 hours. The bends were fabricated with cold-work levels beyond the current ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (ASME B&PV) Code Section I limits for austenitic stainless steels. Destructive metallographic evaluation of the crept tube bends was used to determine the effects of cold-work and the degree of recrystallization. The metallographic analysis combined with an evaluation of the creep and rupture data suggest that solid-solution strengthened nickel-based alloys can be fabricated for high-temperature service at USC conditions utilizing levels of cold-work higher than the current allowed levels for austenitic stainless steels.

  1. Interim analysis of long time creep behavior of columbium C-103 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopp, W. D.; Titran, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of 16 long time creep tests on columbium C-103 alloy (Cb-10Hf-1Ti-0.7Zr) indicates that the calculated stresses to give 1 percent creep strain in 100,000 hours at 1,255 K (1800 F) are 7.93 and 8.96 MPa (1,150 and 1,300 psi) for fine grained and course grained materials, respectively. The apparent activation energy and stress dependence for creep of this alloy are approximately 315 KJ/gmol (75,300 cal/gmol) and 2.51, respectively, based on Dorn-Sherby types of relations. However, the 90 percent confidence limits on these values are wide because of the limited data currently available.

  2. Investigation of Three Analytical Hypothesis for Determining Material Creep Behavior under Varied Loads, with an Application to 2024-T3 Aluminum-Alloy Sheet in Tension at 400 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkovits, Avraham

    1961-01-01

    Three existing hypotheses are formulated mathematically to estimate tensile creep strain under varied loads and constant temperature from creep data obtained under constant load and constant temperature. hypotheses investigated include the time-hardening, strain-hardening, and life-fraction rules. Predicted creep behavior is compared with data obtained from tensile creep tests of 2024-T3 aluminum-alloy sheet at 400 F under cyclic-load conditions. creep strain under varied loads is presented on the basis of an equivalent stress, derived from the life-fraction rule, which reduces the varied-load case to a constant-load problem. Creep strain in the region of interest for structural design and rupture times, determined from the hypotheses investigated, are in fair agreement with data in most cases, although calculated values of creep strain are generally greater than the experimental values because creep recovery is neglected in the calculations.

  3. Deterministic Multiaxial Creep and Creep Rupture Enhancements for CARES/Creep Integrated Design Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama M.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature and long duration applications of monolithic ceramics can place their failure mode in the creep rupture regime. A previous model advanced by the authors described a methodology by which the creep rupture life of a loaded component can be predicted. That model was based on the life fraction damage accumulation rule in association with the modified Monkman-Grant creep rupture criterion. However, that model did not take into account the deteriorating state of the material due to creep damage (e.g., cavitation) as time elapsed. In addition, the material creep parameters used in that life prediction methodology, were based on uniaxial creep curves displaying primary and secondary creep behavior, with no tertiary regime. The objective of this paper is to present a creep life prediction methodology based on a modified form of the Kachanov-Rabotnov continuum damage mechanics (CDM) theory. In this theory, the uniaxial creep rate is described in terms of sum, temperature, time, and the current state of material damage. This scalar damage state parameter is basically an abstract measure of the current state of material damage due to creep deformation. The damage rate is assumed to vary with stress, temperature, time, and the current state of damage itself. Multiaxial creep and creep rupture formulations of the CDM approach are presented in this paper. Parameter estimation methodologies based on nonlinear regression analysis are also described for both, isothermal constant stress states and anisothermal variable stress conditions This creep life prediction methodology was preliminarily added to the integrated design code CARES/Creep (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Creep), which is a postprocessor program to commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) packages. Two examples, showing comparisons between experimental and predicted creep lives of ceramic specimens, are used to demonstrate the viability of Ns methodology and the

  4. An analysis of helical buckling of tubulars subjected to axial and torsional loading in inclined wellbores

    SciTech Connect

    Miska, S.; Cunha, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes new theoretical results for prediction of buckling behavior of tubulars in inclined wellbores. Using conservation of energy and the principle of virtual work improved equations for buckling and post-buckling conditions are derived. The effect of torque on the buckling process is considered. Practical examples are provided showing the influence of torque on the critical buckling force. The equations for critical buckling force reduce to those previously derived when torque is set to zero and weightless strings are considered.

  5. Creep behavior and in-depth microstructural characterization of dissimilar joints

    PubMed Central

    Kauffmann, F; Klein, T; Klenk, A; Maile, K

    2013-01-01

    The 700 °C power plants currently under development will utilize Ni-base alloys such as alloy 617 for components to be operated at temperatures >650 °C. Due to economic reasons for components or parts of components which are subjected to temperatures <650 °C, 2% Cr or 9–12% Cr steels is used, depending on the required mechanical properties. This makes the dissimilar joining of Ni-base alloys and Cr steels a necessity in these plants. Experimental investigations show that these joints have to be identified as weak points with regard to damage development under creep and creep-fatigue loading. The present investigation focuses on welds between the alloy 617 and 2% Cr steel. Under creep load the fracture occurs near the fusion line between the 2% Cr steel base metal and alloy 617 weld metal. To explain the reasons for this fracture location, the microstructure of this fusion line was investigated using TEM and FIB techniques after welding and after creep loading. The TEM investigations have shown a small zone in the weld metal near the fusion line exhibiting chromium depletion and clearly reduced amounts of chromium carbides, leading to a weakening of this zone. PMID:27877551

  6. Creep behavior and in-depth microstructural characterization of dissimilar joints.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, F; Klein, T; Klenk, A; Maile, K

    2013-02-01

    The 700 °C power plants currently under development will utilize Ni-base alloys such as alloy 617 for components to be operated at temperatures >650 °C. Due to economic reasons for components or parts of components which are subjected to temperatures <650 °C, 2% Cr or 9-12% Cr steels is used, depending on the required mechanical properties. This makes the dissimilar joining of Ni-base alloys and Cr steels a necessity in these plants. Experimental investigations show that these joints have to be identified as weak points with regard to damage development under creep and creep-fatigue loading. The present investigation focuses on welds between the alloy 617 and 2% Cr steel. Under creep load the fracture occurs near the fusion line between the 2% Cr steel base metal and alloy 617 weld metal. To explain the reasons for this fracture location, the microstructure of this fusion line was investigated using TEM and FIB techniques after welding and after creep loading. The TEM investigations have shown a small zone in the weld metal near the fusion line exhibiting chromium depletion and clearly reduced amounts of chromium carbides, leading to a weakening of this zone.

  7. Creep behavior and in-depth microstructural characterization of dissimilar joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, F.; Klein, T.; Klenk, A.; Maile, K.

    2013-02-01

    The 700 °C power plants currently under development will utilize Ni-base alloys such as alloy 617 for components to be operated at temperatures >650 °C. Due to economic reasons for components or parts of components which are subjected to temperatures <650 °C, 2% Cr or 9-12% Cr steels is used, depending on the required mechanical properties. This makes the dissimilar joining of Ni-base alloys and Cr steels a necessity in these plants. Experimental investigations show that these joints have to be identified as weak points with regard to damage development under creep and creep-fatigue loading. The present investigation focuses on welds between the alloy 617 and 2% Cr steel. Under creep load the fracture occurs near the fusion line between the 2% Cr steel base metal and alloy 617 weld metal. To explain the reasons for this fracture location, the microstructure of this fusion line was investigated using TEM and FIB techniques after welding and after creep loading. The TEM investigations have shown a small zone in the weld metal near the fusion line exhibiting chromium depletion and clearly reduced amounts of chromium carbides, leading to a weakening of this zone.

  8. Studies on Creep Deformation and Rupture Behavior of 316LN SS Multi-Pass Weld Joints Fabricated with Two Different Electrode Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Kumar, J. Ganesh; Parida, P. K.; Ganesan, V.; Laha, K.

    2017-02-01

    Effect of electrode size on creep deformation and rupture behavior has been assessed by carrying out creep tests at 923 K (650 °C) over the stress range 140 to 225 MPa on 316LN stainless steel weld joints fabricated employing 2.5 and 4 mm diameter electrodes. The multi-pass welding technique not only changes the morphology of delta ferrite from vermicular to globular in the previous weld bead region near to the weld bead interface, but also subjects the region to thermo-mechanical heat treatment to generate appreciable strength gradient. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis revealed significant localized strain gradients in regions adjoining the weld pass interface for the joint fabricated with large electrode size. Larger electrode diameter joint exhibited higher creep rupture strength than the smaller diameter electrode joint. However, both the joints had lower creep rupture strength than the base metal. Failure in the joints was associated with microstructural instability in the fusion zone, and the vermicular delta ferrite zone was more prone to creep cavitation. Larger electrode diameter joint was found to be more resistant to failure caused by creep cavitation than the smaller diameter electrode joint. This has been attributed to the larger strength gradient between the beads and significant separation between the cavity prone vermicular delta ferrite zones which hindered the cavity growth. Close proximity of cavitated zones in smaller electrode joint facilitated their faster coalescence leading to more reduction in creep rupture strength. Failure location in the joints was found to depend on the electrode size and applied stress. The change in failure location has been assessed on performing finite element analysis of stress distribution across the joint on incorporating tensile and creep strengths of different constituents of joints, estimated by ball indentation and impression creep testing techniques.

  9. Evaluation of hoop creep behaviors in long-term dry storage condition of pre-hydrided and high burn-up nuclear fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun-Ki; Bang, J.G.; Kim, D.H.; Yang, Y.S.

    2007-07-01

    Related to the degradation of the mechanical properties of Zr-based nuclear fuel cladding tubes under long term dry storage condition, the mechanical tests which can simulate the degradation of the mechanical properties properly are needed. Especially, the degradation of the mechanical properties by creep mechanism seems to be dominant under long term dry storage condition. Accordingly, in this paper, ring creep tests were performed in order to evaluate the creep behaviors of high burn-up fuel cladding under a hoop loading condition in a hot cell. The tests are performed with Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding whose burn-up is approximately {approx}60,000 MWd/tU in the temperature range from 350 deg. to 550 deg.. The tests are also performed with pre-hydrided Zircaloy-4 and ZIRLO up to 1,000 ppm. First of all, the hoop loading grip for the ring creep test was designed in order that a constant curvature of the specimen was maintained during the creep deformation, and the graphite lubricant was used to minimize the friction between the outer surface of the die insert and the inner surface of the ring specimen. The specimen for the ring creep test was designed to limit the deformation within the gauge section and to maximize the uniformity of the strain distribution. It was confirmed that the mechanical properties under a hoop loading condition can be correctly evaluated by using this test technique. In this paper, secondary creep rate with increasing hydrogen content are drawn, and then kinetic data such as pre-exponential factor and activation energy for creep process are also drawn. In addition, creep life are predicted by obtaining LMP (Larson-Miller parameter) correlation in the function of hydrogen content and applied stress to yield stress ratio. (authors)

  10. Microstructural Evolution and Creep-Rupture Behavior of A-USC Alloy Fusion Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechetti, Daniel H.; DuPont, John N.; Siefert, John A.; Shingledecker, John P.

    2016-09-01

    Characterization of the microstructural evolution of fusion welds in alloys slated for use in advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) boilers during creep has been performed. Creep-rupture specimens involving INCONEL® 740, NIMONIC® 263 (INCONEL and NIMONIC are registered trademarks of Special Metals Corporation), and Haynes® 282® (Haynes and 282 are registered trademarks of Haynes International) have been analyzed via light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermodynamic and kinetic modeling. Focus has been given to the microstructures that develop along the grain boundaries in these alloys during creep at temperatures relevant to the A-USC process cycle, and particular attention has been paid to any evidence of the formation of local γ'-denuded or γ'-free zones. This work has been performed in an effort to understand the microstructural changes that lead to a weld strength reduction factor (WSRF) in these alloys as compared to solution annealed and aged alloy 740 base metal. γ' precipitate-free zones have been identified in alloy 740 base metal, solution annealed alloy 740 weld metal, and alloy 263 weld metal after creep. Their development during long-term thermal exposure is correlated with the stabilization of phases that are rich in γ'-forming elements ( e.g., η and G) and is suppressed by precipitation of phases that do not contain the γ' formers ( e.g., M23C6 and μ). The location of failure and creep performance in terms of rupture life and WSRF for each welded joint is presented and discussed.

  11. Stress rupture and creep behavior of a low pressure plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY coating alloy in air and vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, M. G.; Miner, R. V.

    1987-01-01

    The creep behavior of a NiCoCrAlY coating alloy in air and vacuum at 660 and 850 C is studied. The microstructure of the coating alloy is described. Analysis of the creep curves reveal that the secondary creep rates, the transition from secondary to tertiary creep, and the strain-to-failure are affected by the environment, preexposure, stress, and temperature. It is observed that the rupture lives of the NiCoCrAlY alloy at 660 and 850 C are greater in air than in vacuum. Several mechanisms that may explain the lack of crack growth from surface-connected pores during tests in air are proposed.

  12. Effect of Tungsten on Long-Term Microstructural Evolution and Impression Creep Behavior of 9Cr Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Vijayanand, V. D.; Sudha, C.; Saroja, S.

    2017-01-01

    The present study describes the changes in the creep properties associated with microstructural evolution during thermal exposures to near service temperatures in indigenously developed reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels with varying tungsten (1 and 1.4 wt pct W) contents. The creep behavior has been studied employing impression creep (IC) test, and the changes in impression creep behavior with tungsten content have been correlated with the observed microstructures. The results of IC test showed that an increase in 0.4 pct W decreases the creep rate to nearly half the value. Creep strength of 1.4 pct W steel showed an increase in steels aged for short durations which decreased as aging time increased. The microstructural changes include coarsening of precipitates, reduction in dislocation density, changes in microchemistry, and formation of new phases. The formation of various phases and their volume fractions have been predicted using the JMatPro software for the two steels and validated by experimental methods. Detailed transmission electron microscopy analysis shows coarsening of precipitates and formation of a discontinuous network of Laves phase in 1.4 W steel aged for 10,000 hours at 823 K (550 °C) which is in agreement with the JMatPro simulation results.

  13. Tubing and casing buckling in horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.C.; Lin, Y.H.; Cheatham, J.B. )

    1990-02-01

    This paper describes new theoretical results for predicting the buckling behavior of pipe in horizontal holes. Pipe buckling in horizontal holes occurs initially in a sinusoidal mode along the low side of the hole; at higher axial compression a helix is formed. Equations are given for computing the forces required to initiate these different buckling modes. Simple experimental laboratory results confirm the theory. Results presented in this paper apply to friction modeling of buckled tubulars to help predict when pipe can be forced to move along a long section of a horizontal well.

  14. A New Local Debonding Model with Application to the Transverse Tensile and Creep Behavior of Continuously Reinforced Titanium Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    A new, widely applicable model for local interfacial debonding in composite materials is presented. Unlike its direct predecessors, the new model allows debonding to progress via unloading of interfacial stresses even as global loading of the composite continues. Previous debonding models employed for analysis of titanium matrix composites are surpassed by the accuracy, simplicity, and efficiency demonstrated by the new model. The new model was designed to operate seamlessly within NASA Glenn's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), which was employed to simulate the time- and rate-dependent (viscoplastic) transverse tensile and creep behavior of SiC/Ti composites. MAC/GMC's ability to simulate the transverse behavior of titanium matrix composites has been significantly improved by the new debonding model. Further, results indicate the need for a more accurate constitutive representation of the titanium matrix behavior in order to enable predictions of the composite transverse response, without resorting to recalibration of the debonding model parameters.

  15. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  16. Estimation of shelf life of natural rubber latex exam-gloves based on creep behavior.

    PubMed

    Das, Srilekha Sarkar; Schroeder, Leroy W

    2008-05-01

    Samples of full-length glove-fingers cut from chlorinated and nonchlorinated latex medical examination gloves were aged for various times at several fixed temperatures and 25% relative humidity. Creep testing was performed using an applied stress of 50 kPa on rectangular specimens (10 mm x 8 mm) of aged and unaged glove fingers as an assessment of glove loosening during usage. Variations in creep curves obtained were compared to determine the threshold aging time when the amount of creep became larger than the initial value. These times were then used in various models to estimate shelf lives at lower temperatures. Several different methods of extrapolation were used for shelf-life estimation and comparison. Neither Q-factor nor Arrhenius activation energies, as calculated from 10 degrees C interval shift factors, were constant over the temperature range; in fact, both decreased at lower temperatures. Values of Q-factor and activation energies predicted up to 5 years of shelf life. Predictions are more sensitive to values of activation energy as the storage temperature departs from the experimental aging data. Averaging techniques for prediction of average activation energy predicted the longest shelf life as the curvature is reduced.

  17. Precipitate Evolution and Creep Behavior of a W-Free Co-based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qinyuan; Coakley, James; Seidman, David N.; Dunand, David C.

    2016-12-01

    The morphological and temporal evolution of γ ^' } (L1_2)-precipitates is studied in a polycrystalline Co-based superalloy (Co-30Ni-9.9Al-5.1Mo-1.9Nb at. pct) free of tungsten, aged at 1173 K (900 °C). Over a 1000 {{{hours}}} heat-treatment, the γ ^' } morphology evolves due to precipitate coalescence. The particles grow in size and the volume fraction decreases, while there is no significant change in the microhardness value. Compressional creep tests at 1123 K (850 °C) on a specimen aged at 1173 K (900 °C) demonstrate that the creep resistance is comparable to the original, W-containing, higher-density Co-based superalloy (Co-9Al-9.8W at. pct). This represents the first creep study of the Co-Al-Mo-Nb-based superalloy system. The W-free alloy exhibits directional coarsening of the γ ^' } precipitates in the direction perpendicular to the applied compressive stress, which indicates a positive misfit. This is consistent with neutron diffraction results.

  18. Buckling resistant graphene nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, M. A.; Rafiee, J.; Yu, Z.-Z.; Koratkar, N.

    2009-11-01

    An experimental study on buckling of graphene/epoxy nanocomposite beam structures is presented. Significant increase (up to 52%) in critical buckling load is observed with addition of only 0.1% weight fraction of graphene platelets into the epoxy matrix. Based on the classical Euler-buckling model, the buckling load is predicted to increase by ˜32%. The over 50% increase in buckling load observed in our testing suggests a significant enhancement in load transfer effectiveness between the matrix and the graphene platelets under compressive load. Such nanocomposites with high buckling stability show potential as lightweight and buckling-resistant structural elements in aeronautical and space applications.

  19. Creep and Oxidation Behavior of Modified CF8C-Plus with W, Cu, Ni, and Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unocic, Kinga A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2016-04-01

    The microstructures of modified CF8C-Plus (Fe-19Cr-12Ni-0.4W-3.8Mn-0.2Mo-0.6Nb-0.5Si-0.9C) with W and Cu (CF8CPWCu) and CF8CPWCu enhanced with 21Cr + 15Ni or 22Cr + 17.5Ni were characterized in the as-cast condition and after creep testing. When imaged at lower magnifications, the as-cast microstructure was similar among all three alloys as they all contained a Nb-rich interdendritic phase and Mn-based inclusions. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed the presence of nanoscale Cu-rich nanoprecipitates distributed uniformly throughout the matrix of CF8CPWCu, whereas in CF8CPWCu22/17, Cu precipitates were found primarily at the grain boundaries. The presence of these nanoscale Cu-rich particles, in addition to W-rich Cr23C6, nanoscale Nb carbides, and Z-phase (Nb2Cr2N2), improved the creep strength of the CF8CPWCu steel. Modification of CF8CPWCu with Cr and Ni contents slightly decreased the creep strength but significantly improved the oxidation behavior at 1073 K (800 °C). In particular, the addition of 22Cr and 17.5Ni strongly enhanced the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel resulting in a 100 degrees or greater temperature improvement, and this composition provided the best balance between improving both mechanical properties and oxidation resistance.

  20. Creep and oxidation behavior of modified CF8C-plus with W, Cu, Ni, and Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Kinga A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2016-02-01

    Here, the microstructures of modified CF8C-Plus (Fe-19Cr-12Ni-0.4W-3.8Mn-0.2Mo-0.6Nb-0.5Si-0.9C) with W and Cu (CF8CPWCu) and CF8CPWCu enhanced with 21Cr + 15Ni or 22Cr + 17.5Ni were characterized in the as-cast condition and after creep testing. When imaged at lower magnifications, the as-cast microstructure was similar among all three alloys as they all contained a Nb-rich interdendritic phase and Mn-based inclusions. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed the presence of nanoscale Cu-rich nanoprecipitates distributed uniformly throughout the matrix of CF8CPWCu, whereas in CF8CPWCu22/17, Cu precipitates were found primarily at the grain boundaries. The presence of these nanoscale Cu-rich particles, in addition to W-rich Cr23C6, nanoscale Nb carbides, and Z-phase (Nb2Cr2N2), improved the creep strength of the CF8CPWCu steel. Modification of CF8CPWCu with Cr and Ni contents slightly decreased the creep strength but significantly improved the oxidation behavior at 1073 K (800 °C). In particular, the addition of 22Cr and 17.5Ni strongly enhanced the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel resulting in a 100 degrees or greater temperature improvement, and this composition provided the best balance between improving both mechanical properties and oxidation resistance.

  1. Creep and oxidation behavior of modified CF8C-plus with W, Cu, Ni, and Cr

    DOE PAGES

    Unocic, Kinga A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; ...

    2016-02-01

    Here, the microstructures of modified CF8C-Plus (Fe-19Cr-12Ni-0.4W-3.8Mn-0.2Mo-0.6Nb-0.5Si-0.9C) with W and Cu (CF8CPWCu) and CF8CPWCu enhanced with 21Cr + 15Ni or 22Cr + 17.5Ni were characterized in the as-cast condition and after creep testing. When imaged at lower magnifications, the as-cast microstructure was similar among all three alloys as they all contained a Nb-rich interdendritic phase and Mn-based inclusions. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed the presence of nanoscale Cu-rich nanoprecipitates distributed uniformly throughout the matrix of CF8CPWCu, whereas in CF8CPWCu22/17, Cu precipitates were found primarily at the grain boundaries. The presence of these nanoscale Cu-rich particles, in addition to W-richmore » Cr23C6, nanoscale Nb carbides, and Z-phase (Nb2Cr2N2), improved the creep strength of the CF8CPWCu steel. Modification of CF8CPWCu with Cr and Ni contents slightly decreased the creep strength but significantly improved the oxidation behavior at 1073 K (800 °C). In particular, the addition of 22Cr and 17.5Ni strongly enhanced the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel resulting in a 100 degrees or greater temperature improvement, and this composition provided the best balance between improving both mechanical properties and oxidation resistance.« less

  2. Crack growth behavior under creep-fatigue conditions using compact and double edge notch tension-compression specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimha Chary, Santosh Balaji

    inspection of fatigue surfaces, it has been found that that better alignment control procedures are needed to ensure symmetric crack fronts for the DEN(T-C) specimen. Creep-fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on 9Cr-1Mo (P91) steels at 625°C with various hold times. These tests were conducted using C(T) specimens under constant load amplitude conditions (tension-tension) and DEN(T-C) specimens under displacement like conditions (tension-compression). Crack growth data generated under creep-fatigue conditions using standard C(T) specimens correlated well with crack growth data generated using DEN(T-C) specimens. The crack growth rates per cycle increased significantly with increase in hold time when crack growth data were plotted with the cyclic stress intensity parameter, Delta-K. A transient behavior in the initial portion of da/dN versus Delta-K plots were observed for the hold time tests, as reported previously by several other researchers. It is shown for the C(T) specimens that the creep-fatigue interactions during crack growth for various hold times are represented better by the (Ct)avg parameter implying that the P91 steel behaves in a creep-ductile manner. Significant differences (factors of 2 to 5) were observed between the calculated values of (Ct)avg and those based on measured values of force-line deflection. It is also shown that there is a high risk of obtaining invalid data in longer hold time tests under force-control conditions. The usefulness of DEN(T-C) specimens for crack growth studies under displacement controlled conditions to combat ratcheting problems in tests conducted under load conditions is established. The tests conditions for the round-robin program on creep-fatigue crack growth testing in support of ASTM E-2760 are finalized. Further developments needed in creep-fatigue crack growth testing are also presented.

  3. Effects of fuel particle size and fission-fragment-enhanced irradiation creep on the in-pile behavior in CERCER composite pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunmei; Ding, Shurong; Zhang, Xunchao; Wang, Canglong; Yang, Lei

    2016-12-01

    The micro-scale finite element models for CERCER pellets with different-sized fuel particles are developed. With consideration of a grain-scale mechanistic irradiation swelling model in the fuel particles and the irradiation creep in the matrix, numerical simulations are performed to explore the effects of the particle size and the fission-fragment-enhanced irradiation creep on the thermo-mechanical behavior of CERCER pellets. The enhanced irradiation creep effect is applied in the 10 μm-thick fission fragment damage matrix layer surrounding the fuel particles. The obtained results indicate that (1) lower maximum temperature occurs in the cases with smaller-sized particles, and the effects of particle size on the mechanical behavior in pellets are intricate; (2) the first principal stress and radial axial stress remain compressive in the fission fragment damage layer at higher burnup, thus the mechanism of radial cracking found in the experiment can be better explained.

  4. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  5. Effect of Notches on Creep-Fatigue Behavior of a P/M Nickel-Based Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, Jack; Gabb, Timothy P.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Gayda, John, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A study was performed to determine and model the effect of high temperature dwells on notched low cycle fatigue (NLCF) and notch stress rupture behavior of a fine grain LSHR powder metallurgy (PM) nickel-based superalloy. It was shown that a 90 second dwell applied at the minimum stress (min dwell) was considerably more detrimental to the NLCF lives than similar dwell applied at the maximum stress (max dwell). The short min dwell NLCF lives were shown to be caused by growth of small oxide blisters which caused preferential cracking when coupled with high concentrated notch root stresses. The cyclic max dwell notch tests failed mostly by a creep accumulation, not by fatigue, with the crack origin shifting internally to a substantial distance away from the notch root. The classical von Mises plastic flow model was unable to match the experimental results while the hydrostatic stress profile generated using the Drucker-Prager plasticity flow model was consistent with the experimental findings. The max dwell NLCF and notch stress rupture tests exhibited substantial creep notch strengthening. The triaxial Bridgman effective stress parameter was able to account for the notch strengthening by collapsing the notched and uniform gage geometry test data into a singular grouping.

  6. Effect of particle size and temperature on rheology and creep behavior of barley β-d-glucan concentrate dough.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Jasim

    2014-10-13

    Concentrated β-D-glucan has been added in the formulation of food products development that attributing human health. The purpose of this study is to assess the role of particle size (74, 105, 149, 297 and 595 μm) of barley β-D-glucan concentrate (BGC) on two fundamental rheological properties namely oscillatory rheology and creep in a dough system (sample to water = 1:2). The water holding capacity, sediment volume fraction and protein content increased with an increase in particle size from 74 μm to 595 μm, which directly influences the mechanical strength and visco-elasticity of the dough. The dough exhibited predominating solid-like behavior (elastic modulus, G'>viscous modulus, G"). The G' decreased systematically with increasing temperature from 25 to 85 °C at the frequency range of 0.1-10 Hz except for the dough having particle size of 105 μm, which could be associated with increase in protein content in the fraction. A discrete retardation spectrum is employed to the creep data to obtain retardation time and compliance parameters which varied significantly with particle size and the process temperature. All those information could be helpful to identify the particle size range of BGC that could be useful to produce a β-D-glucan enriched designed food.

  7. Prediction and verification of creep behavior in metallic materials and components for the space shuttle thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. W.; Cramer, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    A method of analysis was developed for predicting permanent cyclic creep deflections in stiffened panel structures. This method uses creep equations based on cyclic tensile creep tests and a computer program to predict panel deflections as a function of mission cycle. Four materials were investigated - a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), a cobalt alloy (L605), and two nickel alloys (Rene'41 and TDNiCr). Steady-state and cyclic creep response data were obtained by testing tensile specimens fabricated from thin gage sheet (0.025 and 0.63 cm nominal). Steady-state and cyclic creep equations were developed which describe creep as a function of time, temperature and load. Tests were also performed on subsize (6.35 x 30.5 cm) rib and corrugation stiffened panels. These tests were used to correlate creep responses between elemental specimens and panels. The panel response was analyzed by use of a specially written computer program.

  8. Sintering and Creep Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconia and Hafnia Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The sintering and creep of plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings under high temperature conditions are complex phenomena. Changes in thermomechanical and thermophysical properties and in the stress response of these coating systems as a result of the sintering and creep processes are detrimental to coating thermal fatigue resistance and performance. In this paper, the sintering characteristics of ZrO2-8wt%y2O3, ZrO2-25wt%CeO2-2.5wt%Y2O3, ZrO2-6w%NiO- 9wt%Y2O3, ZrO2-6wt%Sc2O3-2wt%y2O3 and HfO2-27wt%y2O3 coating materials were investigated using dilatometry. It was found that the HfO2-Y2O3 and baseline ZrO2-Y2O3 exhibited the best sintering resistance, while the NiO-doped ZrO2-Y2O3 showed the highest shrinkage strain rates during the tests. Higher shrinkage strain rates of the coating materials were also observed when the specimens were tested in Ar+5%H2 as compared to in air. This phenomenon was attributed to an enhanced metal cation interstitial diffusion mechanism under the reducing conditions. It is proposed that increased chemical stability of coating materials will improve the material sintering resistance.

  9. Buckling and post-buckling of composite plates and shells subjected to elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Birman, V.; Bert, C.W. Oklahoma Univ., Norman )

    1993-06-01

    Effects of temperature on buckling and post-buckling behavior of reinforced and unstiffened composite plates or cylindrical shells are considered. First, equilibrium equations are formulated for a shell subjected to the simultaneous action of a thermal field and an axial loading. These equations are used to predict a general form of the algebraic equations describing the post-buckling response of a shell. Conditions for the snap-through of a shell subjected to thermomechanical loading are formulated. As an example, the theory is applied to prediction of post-buckling response of flat large-aspect-ratio panels reinforced in the direction of their short edges. 19 refs.

  10. Buckling tests of aluminium columns at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Langhelle, N.K.; Amdahl, J.; Eberg, E.; Lundberg, S.

    1996-12-31

    Accidental fires are events with severe catastrophe potential for all offshore structures, and in particular for aluminium structures. Due to aluminium`s rapid strength degradation at elevated temperatures, this is particular true for aluminium structures. Accurate prediction of fire resistance is therefore essential. Experimental tests are needed to evaluate current design rules and state-of-the-art material models for aluminium under elevated temperatures. An experimental investigation was undertaken in order to study the behavior of AA 6082 alloy aluminium columns at elevated temperatures. Some of the tests were carried out at constant load with increasing temperature. Other tests experienced constant temperature and increasing load. Buckling tests at ambient temperature were also conducted. Particular emphasis was put on high temperature creep effects. The purpose of the tests was to provide data for verification of the material model implemented in the computer program USFOS, for analysis of progressive collapse analyses of space frame structures. The performance of the tempers T4 and T6 as well as columns with transversal welds are compared internally as well as to column buckling curves given in current design codes.

  11. Creep-rupture behavior of candidate Stirling engine alloys after long-term aging at 760/sup 0/C in low-pressure hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Titran, R.H.

    1984-05-01

    Nine candidate Stirling automotive engine alloys were aged at 760/sup 0/C for 3500 h in low pressure hydrogen or argon to determine the resulting effects on mechanical behavior. Candidate heater head tube alloys were CG-27, W545, 12RN72, INCONEL-718, and HS-188 while candidate cast cylinder-regenerator housing alloys were SA-F11, CRM-6D, XF-818, and HS-31. Aging per se is detrimental to the creep-rupture and tensile strengths of the iron-base alloys. The presence of hydrogen does not significantly contribute to strength degradation. Based on current MOD 1A Stirling engine design criteria of a 55% urban - 45% highway driving cycle; CG-27 has adequate 3500 h - 87/sup 0/C creep-rupture strength and SA-F11, CRM-6D, and XF-818 have adequate 3500 h - 775/sup 0/C creep-rupture strength.

  12. Creep-rupture behavior of candidate Stirling engine alloys after long-term aging at 760 deg C in low-pressure hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Nine candidate Stirling automotive engine alloys were aged at 760 C for 3500 hr in low pressure hydrogen or argon to determine the resulting effects on mechanical behavior. Candidate heater head tube alloys were CG-27, W545, 12RN72, INCONEL-718, and HS-188 while candidate cast cylinder-regenerator housing alloys were SA-F11, CRM-6D, XF-818, and HS-31. Aging per se is detrimental to the creep rupture and tensile strengths of the iron base alloys. The presence of hydrogen does not significantly contribute to strength degradation. Based percent highway driving cycle; CG-27 has adequate 3500 hr - 870 C creep rupture strength and SA-Fll, CRM-6D, and XF-818 have adequate 3500 hr - 775 C creep rupture strength.

  13. Buckling of circular cylindrical shells under dynamically applied axial loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulk, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was made of the buckling characteristics of perfect and imperfect circular cylindrical shells subjected to dynamic axial loading. Experimental data included dynamic buckling loads (124 data points), high speed photographs of buckling mode shapes and observations of the dynamic stability of shells subjected to rapidly applied sub-critical loads. A mathematical model was developed to describe the dynamic behavior of perfect and imperfect shells. This model was based on the Donnell-Von Karman compatibility and equilibrium equations and had a wall deflection function incorporating five separate modes of deflection. Close agreement between theory and experiment was found for both dynamic buckling strength and buckling mode shapes.

  14. On The Creep Behavior and Deformation Mechanisms Found in an Advanced Polycrystalline Nickel-Base Superalloy at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutchman, Hallee Zox

    Polycrystalline Ni-base superalloys are used as turbine disks in the hot section in jet engines, placing them in a high temperature and stress environment. As operating temperatures increase in search of better fuel efficiency, it becomes important to understand how these higher temperatures are affecting mechanical behavior and active deformation mechanisms in the substructure. Not only are operating temperatures increasing, but there is a drive to design next generation alloys in shorter time periods using predictive modeling capabilities. This dissertation focuses on mechanical behavior and active deformation mechanisms found in two different advanced polycrystalline alloy systems, information which will then be used to build advanced predictive models to design the next generation of alloys. The first part of this dissertation discusses the creep behavior and identifying active deformation mechanisms in an advanced polycrystalline Ni-based superalloy (ME3) that is currently in operation, but at higher temperatures and stresses than are experienced in current engines. Monotonic creep tests were run at 700°C and between 655-793MPa at 34MPa increments, on two microstructures (called M1 and M2) produced by different heat treatments. All tests were crept to 0.5% plastic strain. Transient temperature and transient stress tests were used determine activation energy and stress exponents of the M1 microstructure. Constant strain rate tests (at 10-4s-1) were performed on both microstructures as well. Following creep testing, both M1 and M2 microstructures were fully characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for basic microstructure information, and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) to determine active deformation mechanism. It was found that in the M1 microstructure, reorder mediated activity (such as discontinuous faulting and microtwinning) is dominant at low stresses (655-724 MPa). Dislocations in the gamma matrix, and overall planar

  15. Effect of Thermal Cycling on Creep Behavior of Powder-Metallurgy-Processed and Hot-Rolled Al and Al-SiC Particulate Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sharmilee; Bhanuprasad, V. V.; Mitra, R.; Ray, K. K.

    2009-12-01

    The tensile creep behavior of powder metallurgy (P/M)-processed and hot-rolled commercially pure Al and Al-5 or Al-10 vol pct SiC particulate composites has been evaluated after subjecting to 0, 2, and 8 thermal cycles between 500 °C and 0 °C with rapid quenching. The images of microstructures obtained using scanning and transmission electron microscopy as well as changes in the electrical resistivity, Young’s modulus, and microhardness have been examined in the samples subjected to thermal cycling, in order to compare the effects of structural damage and strengthening by dislocation generation. The damage is caused by voids formed by vacancy coalescence, and is more severe in pure Al than in Al-SiCp composites, because the particle-matrix interfaces in the composites act as effective sinks for vacancies. Creep tests have shown that the application of 2 thermal cycles lowers the creep strain rates in both pure Al and Al-SiCp composites. However, the creep resistance of pure Al gets significantly deteriorated, unlike the mild deterioration in the Al-5 SiCp composite, while the time to rupture for the Al-10 SiCp composite is increased. The dislocation structure and subgrain sizes in the Al and in the matrices of the Al-SiCp composites in the as-rolled condition, after thermal cycling, and after creep tests, have been compared and related to the creep behavior. The dimple sizes of the crept fracture surfaces appear to be dependent on the void density, tertiary component of strain, and time to rupture.

  16. Creeping eruption

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Creeping eruption is a human infection with dog or cat hookworm larvae (immature worms). Causes Hookworm eggs are found in the stool of infected dogs and cats. When the eggs hatch, the larvae ...

  17. Oxidation and creep behavior of Mo*5*Si*3* based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Mitch

    1995-06-19

    Mo5Si3 shows promise as a high temperature creep resistant material. The high temperature oxidation resistance of Mo5Si3 has been found to be poor, however, limiting its use in oxidizing atmospheres. Undoped Mo5Si3 exhibits mass loss in the temperature range 800°-1200°C due to volatilization of molybdenum oxide, indicating that the silica scale does not provide a passivating layer. The addition of boron results in protective scale formation and parabolic oxidation kinetics in the temperature range of 1050{degrees}-1300°C. The oxidation rate of Mo5Si3 was decreased by 5 orders of magnitude at 1200°C by doping with less than two weight percent boron. Boron doping eliminates catastrophic "pest" oxidation at 800°C. The mechanism for improved oxidation resistance of boron doped Mo5Si3 is due to scale modification by boron.

  18. Creep rupture behavior of polypropylene suture material and its applications as a time-release mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Kusy, R.P.; Whitley, J.Q.

    1983-05-01

    The controlled failure of polypropylene (PP) sutures is studied via creep rupture tests. From plots of log time (tB) vs. stress (sigma), linear relationships are generated over the failure times of 1-1000 h. Results show that as a function of stress, the time dependence varies with irradiation dose (15, 20, 25, and 50 Mrad), irradiation atmosphere (air and vacuum), suture diameter (7-0, 6-0, 5-0, and 4-0), and test temperature (26 and 37 degrees C). For a given stress, the time to failure is least for the greatest dose in the presence of air and at the highest temperature. When suture loops are wrapped around a small wire sheave, however, failure occurs in the largest suture as much as two decades sooner than the smallest suture studied. Within the limitations stated herein, they are independent of test method, loop diameter, aging, and humidity. Consequently, after irradiation in vacuum and postirradiation heat treatment, the processed material may be stored at room temperature for at least 1 month. Such materials are advocated when the time release of a dental or medical device is required, for example, in the self-activating cleft palate appliance.

  19. Buckling instability of circular double-layered graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Natsuki, Toshiaki; Shi, Jin-Xing; Ni, Qing-Qing

    2012-04-04

    In this paper, we study the buckling properties of circular double-layered graphene sheets (DLGSs), using plate theory. The two graphene layers are modeled as two individual sheets whose interactions are determined by the Lennard-Jones potential of the carbon-carbon bond. An analytical solution of coupled governing equations is proposed for predicting the buckling properties of circular DLGSs. Using the present theoretical approach, the influences of boundary conditions, plate sizes, and buckling-mode shapes on the buckling behaviors are investigated in detail. The buckling stability is significantly affected by the buckling-mode shapes. As a result of van der Waals interactions, the buckling stress of circular DLGSs is much larger for the anti-phase mode than for the in-phase mode.

  20. Deterministic and Probabilistic Creep and Creep Rupture Enhancement to CARES/Creep: Multiaxial Creep Life Prediction of Ceramic Structures Using Continuum Damage Mechanics and the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama M.; Powers, Lynn M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature and long duration applications of monolithic ceramics can place their failure mode in the creep rupture regime. A previous model advanced by the authors described a methodology by which the creep rupture life of a loaded component can be predicted. That model was based on the life fraction damage accumulation rule in association with the modified Monkman-Grant creep ripture criterion However, that model did not take into account the deteriorating state of the material due to creep damage (e.g., cavitation) as time elapsed. In addition, the material creep parameters used in that life prediction methodology, were based on uniaxial creep curves displaying primary and secondary creep behavior, with no tertiary regime. The objective of this paper is to present a creep life prediction methodology based on a modified form of the Kachanov-Rabotnov continuum damage mechanics (CDM) theory. In this theory, the uniaxial creep rate is described in terms of stress, temperature, time, and the current state of material damage. This scalar damage state parameter is basically an abstract measure of the current state of material damage due to creep deformation. The damage rate is assumed to vary with stress, temperature, time, and the current state of damage itself. Multiaxial creep and creep rupture formulations of the CDM approach are presented in this paper. Parameter estimation methodologies based on nonlinear regression analysis are also described for both, isothermal constant stress states and anisothermal variable stress conditions This creep life prediction methodology was preliminarily added to the integrated design code CARES/Creep (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Creep), which is a postprocessor program to commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) packages. Two examples, showing comparisons between experimental and predicted creep lives of ceramic specimens, are used to demonstrate the viability of this methodology and

  1. Development of an accurate molecular mechanics model for buckling behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under axial compression.

    PubMed

    Safaei, B; Naseradinmousavi, P; Rahmani, A

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper, an analytical solution based on a molecular mechanics model is developed to evaluate the elastic critical axial buckling strain of chiral multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). To this end, the total potential energy of the system is calculated with the consideration of the both bond stretching and bond angular variations. Density functional theory (DFT) in the form of generalized gradient approximation (GGA) is implemented to evaluate force constants used in the molecular mechanics model. After that, based on the principle of molecular mechanics, explicit expressions are proposed to obtain elastic surface Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of the single-walled carbon nanotubes corresponding to different types of chirality. Selected numerical results are presented to indicate the influence of the type of chirality, tube diameter, and number of tube walls in detailed. An excellent agreement is found between the present numerical results and those found in the literature which confirms the validity as well as the accuracy of the present closed-form solution. It is found that the value of critical axial buckling strain exhibit significant dependency on the type of chirality and number of tube walls.

  2. Interactive buckling of an inflated envelope under mechanical and thermal loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. G.; Liu, M. X.; Tan, H. F.

    2017-02-01

    This paper elucidates the interactive buckling behaviors of an inflated envelope under coupled mechanical and thermal loads, especially the longitudinal wrinkling bifurcation and hoop ovalization buckling. The longitudinal bending buckling process of the inflated envelope can be divided into three continuous stages, which are global buckling, interactive global-local buckling, and kink. A variety of hoop ovalization buckling modes are observed under coupled mechanical-thermal load. Unlike the mechanical case, thermal load leads to a hoop negative ovalization buckling. In addition, it can accelerate the longitudinal coupled bifurcation and resist the hoop coupled ovalization buckling. Moreover, the bending resistance of the inflated envelope will be improved when the length of the structure is increased, resulting in the difficulty of it to become wrinkled. These results provide a new insight into the buckling behaviors of an inflated envelope under coupled external loads, and give a reference for the design of the inflated envelope.

  3. Relationships between sliding behavior and internal geometry of laboratory fault zones and some creeping and locked strike-slip faults of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Byerlee, J.

    1992-01-01

    Moore, D.E. and Byerlee, J., 1992. Relationships between sliding behavior and internal geometry of laboratory fault zones and some creeping and locked strike-slip faults of California. In: T. Mikumo, K. Aki, M. Ohnaka, L.J. Ruff and P.K.P. Spudich (Editors), Earthquake Source Physics and Earthquake Precursors. Tectonophysics, 211: 305-316. In order to relate fault geometries to sliding behavior, maps of recently active breaks within the Hayward fault of central California, which is characterized by fault creep, have been examined and compared to maps of the San Andreas fault. The patterns of recent breaks of the Hayward fault are consistent with those found within the creeping section of the San Andreas, and they appear to have plausible physical explanations in the findings of laboratory experiments. The distinguishing geometric features of the examined locked and creeping faults are: (1) P-type second-order traces predominate over R(Riedel)-type traces in creeping sections; and (2) R-type second-order traces make smaller angles to the local fault strike in creeping sections than they do in locked sections. Two different maps of the Hayward fault gave similar results, supporting the inference that the patterns identified are basic characteristics of the fault rather than artifacts of a particular mapping procedure. P shears predominate over R shears under laboratory conditions that allow dilation within the fault zone. In our own experiments, P-shear development was favored by the generation of excess pore-fluid pressures. We propose that creep in California faults also is the result of fluid overpressures that are maintained in a low-permeability gouge zone and that significantly lower effective stresses, thus helping to stabilize slip and producing high values of the ratio P/R. Small R-trace angles may also be an indicator of low effective stresses, but the evidence for this is not conclusive because other factors can also affect the size of the angles. ?? 1992.

  4. Micromechanics of collective buckling in CNT turfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi, Hamid; Radhakrishnan, Harish; Mesarovic, Sinisa Dj.

    2014-12-01

    Complex structures consisting of intertwined, nominally vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are called turfs. Under uniform compression experiments, CNT turfs exhibit irreversible collective buckling of a layer preceded by reorientation of CNT segments. Experimentally observed independence of the buckling stress and the buckling wavelength on the turf width suggests the existence of an intrinsic material length. To investigate the relationship the macroscopic material properties and the statistical parameters describing the nano-scale geometry of the turf (tortuosity, density and connectivity) we develop a nano-scale computational model, based on the representation of CNT segments as elastica finite elements with van der Waals interactions. The virtual turfs are generated by means of a constrained random walk algorithm and subsequent relaxation. The resulting computational model is robust and is capable of modeling the collective behavior of CNTs. We first establish the dependence of statistical parameters on the computational parameters used for turf generation, then establish relationships between post-buckling stress, initial elastic modulus and buckling wavelength on statistical turf parameters. Finally, we analyze the reorientation of buckling planes of individual CNTs during the collective buckling process.

  5. The influence of Mg on creep properties and fracture behaviors of Mar-M247 superalloy under 1255 K/200 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bor, H. Y.; Ma, C. Y.; Chao, C. G.

    2000-05-01

    The effects of Mg microadditions on the high-temperature/low stress (1255 K/200 MPa) creep properties and fracture behavior of a Mar-M247 superalloy were investigated in this study. The results of quantitative statistical analyses showed that when Mg microadditions up to 50 ppm were made, the MC carbides located at grain boundaries (designated GB MC) were significantly refined and spheroidized and the number of MC carbides decreased. In addition, the M23C6 carbides present on GBs dramatically increased with increasing Mg contents up to 50 ppm, and the creep resistance was enhanced under the test condition of 1255 K/200 MPa. However, the creep performance of a Mar-M247 superalloy containing 80 ppm Mg deteriorated due to the formation of an extremely large amount of MC carbide and a decrease in the number of M23C6 carbides at GBs. The cracks mainly initiated and propagated along GBs in both the Mg-free and Mg-containing Mar-M247 superalloys under 1255 K/200 MPa, and the finial rupture was caused by intergranular fracture. Under the present creep condition, the optimal Mg microaddition to a Mar-M247 superalloy should be 30 to 50 ppm.

  6. Compressive Creep Behavior of NEXTEL(TradeMark) 720/Alumina Ceramic Matrix Composite at 1200 Degrees C in Air and in Steam Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-17

    Zawada . “Creep Rupture Behavior of ±45° Oxide/Oxide NextelTM720/AS Composite,” in 25th Annual Conference on Composites Advanced Ceramics Materials...oxide composites,” Aerospace Science and Technology, 7: 211-221 (2003). 54. Parthasarathy, T.A., Zawada , L.P., John, R., Cinibulk, M. K...Stephan T. Gonczy, Edgar Lara- Curzio, Noel E. Ashbaugh, and Larry P. Zawada , Eds., American Society for Testing and Materials (1997). 58

  7. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-06-30

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C-S-H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C-S-H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate ( approximately 1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years.

  8. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C–S–H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C–S–H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate (≈1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years. PMID:19541652

  9. Oscillatory rheology and creep behavior of barley β-D-glucan concentrate dough: effect of particle size, temperature, and water content.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Jasim; Thomas, Linu; Al-Attar, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Small amplitude oscillatory rheology and creep behavior of β-glucan concentrate (BGC) dough were studied as function of particle size (74, 105, 149, 297, and 595 μm), BGC particle-to-water ratio (1:4, 1:5, and 1:6), and temperature (25, 40, 55, 70, and 85 °C). The color intensity and protein content increased with decreasing particle size by creating more surface areas. The water holding capacity (WHC) and sediment volume fraction increased with increasing particle size from 74 to 595 μm, which directly influences the mechanical rigidity and viscoelasticity of the dough. The dough exhibited predominating solid-like behavior (elastic modulus, G' > viscous modulus, G″). A discrete retardation spectrum is employed to the creep data to obtain retardation time and compliance parameters, which varied significantly with particle size and the process temperature. Creep tests exhibited more pronounced effect on dough behavior compared to oscillatory measurement. The protein denaturation temperature was insignificantly increased with particle fractions from 107 to 110 °C. All those information could be helpful to identify the particle size range and WHC of BGC that could be useful to produce a β-d-glucan enriched designed food.

  10. The microstructures and creep and attenuation behaviors of ice-iodine and ice/hydrate eutectic aggregates at planetary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Christine

    2009-12-01

    The solidification behavior, microstructure and mechanical response of several two-phase aggregates of ice-I + salt hydrates were experimentally and theoretically studied; the binary systems explored were selected based on their potential application to the study of tectonics and heat flow on the Jovian moon Europa. Eutectic solidification of systems H2O-Na 2SO4, H2O-MgSO4, H2O-Na 2CO3, and H2O-H2SO4 was analyzed from a theromodynamic and kinetic perspective and the resulting microstructures by cryogenic scanning electron microscope. Classical eutectic microstructures---fine (mum)-scale intergrowths of ice and hydrate arranged in colonies---are formed in each system, the intergrowth morphology of which can be predicted from the volume fraction of the phase having the highest partial molar entropy of solution and from the magnitude of that entropy. The mechanical testing of ice-I and MgSO4·11H2O ("MS11"; chosen because it has been suggested as a better fit to the near-infrared spectral data of Europa) has shown that the microstructure of the eutectic---in particular the high volume of phase and colony boundaries---endows the aggregate with mechanical properties distinctly different from that of pure ice. In creep, the finely dispersed hydrate, which is distinctly stronger than ice, suppresses significantly the glide of dislocations; the result is a material both stronger and more brittle than pure ice. The eutectic rheology thus opens the possibility for semi-brittle flow in a two-phase, hydrate-ice planetary shell, affecting the tectonic responses. Attenuation in pure polycrystalline ice is effected by diffusional dissipation on low-angle (subgrain) boundaries augmented by non-linear losses wrought by glide of lattice dislocations. Grain boundaries can become significant in the attenuation response under dynamic conditions where a dislocation rheology dictates creep dynamics and the grain size is approximately equal to the subgrain size. In the absence of cracking

  11. Creep Deformation of Allvac 718Plus

    DOE PAGES

    Hayes, Robert W.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Nasrollahzadeh, Maryam

    2014-11-11

    The creep deformation behavior of Allvac 718Plus was studied over the temperature range 650° to 732°C at initial applied stress levels ranging from 517 to 655 MPa. Over the entire experimental temperature stress regime this alloy exhibits Class M type creep behavior with all creep curves exhibiting a decelerating strain rate with strain or time throughout primary creep. However, unlike pure metals or simple solid solution alloys this gamma prime strengthened superalloy does not exhibit steady state creep. Rather, primary creep is instantly followed by a long duration of accelerating strain rate with strain or time. These creep characteristics aremore » common amongst the gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Allvac 718Plus also exhibits a very high temperature dependence of creep rate. Detailed TEM examination of the deformation structures of selected creep samples reveals dislocation mechanisms similar to those found in high volume fraction gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Strong evidence of microtwinning is found in several of the deformation structures. The presence of microtwinning may account for the strong temperature dependence of creep rate observed in this alloy. In addition, due to the presence of Nb and thus, grain boundary delta phase, matrix dislocation activity which is not present in non Nb bearing superalloys occurs in this alloy. The creep characteristics and dislocation mechanisms are presented and discussed in detail.« less

  12. Creep Deformation of Allvac 718Plus

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Robert W.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Nasrollahzadeh, Maryam

    2014-11-11

    The creep deformation behavior of Allvac 718Plus was studied over the temperature range 650° to 732°C at initial applied stress levels ranging from 517 to 655 MPa. Over the entire experimental temperature stress regime this alloy exhibits Class M type creep behavior with all creep curves exhibiting a decelerating strain rate with strain or time throughout primary creep. However, unlike pure metals or simple solid solution alloys this gamma prime strengthened superalloy does not exhibit steady state creep. Rather, primary creep is instantly followed by a long duration of accelerating strain rate with strain or time. These creep characteristics are common amongst the gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Allvac 718Plus also exhibits a very high temperature dependence of creep rate. Detailed TEM examination of the deformation structures of selected creep samples reveals dislocation mechanisms similar to those found in high volume fraction gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Strong evidence of microtwinning is found in several of the deformation structures. The presence of microtwinning may account for the strong temperature dependence of creep rate observed in this alloy. In addition, due to the presence of Nb and thus, grain boundary delta phase, matrix dislocation activity which is not present in non Nb bearing superalloys occurs in this alloy. The creep characteristics and dislocation mechanisms are presented and discussed in detail.

  13. Creep Deformation of Allvac 718Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Robert W.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Nasrollahzadeh, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    The creep deformation behavior of Allvac 718Plus was studied over the temperature range of 923 K to 1005 K (650 °C to 732 °C) at initial applied stress levels ranging from 517 to 655 MPa. Over the entire experimental temperature-stress regime this alloy exhibits Class M-type creep behavior with all creep curves exhibiting a decelerating strain rate with strain or time throughout primary creep. However, unlike pure metals or simple solid solution alloys, this gamma prime strengthened superalloy does not exhibit steady-state creep. Rather, primary creep is instantly followed by a long duration of accelerating strain rate with strain or time. These creep characteristics are common among the gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Allvac 718Plus also exhibits a very high temperature dependence of creep rate. Detailed TEM examination of the deformation structures of selected creep samples reveals dislocation mechanisms similar to those found in high volume fraction gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Strong evidence of microtwinning is found in several of the deformation structures. The presence of microtwinning may account for the strong temperature dependence of creep rate observed in this alloy. In addition, due to the presence of Nb and thus, grain boundary delta phase, matrix dislocation activity which is not present in non-Nb-bearing superalloys occurs in this alloy. The creep characteristics and dislocation mechanisms are presented and discussed in detail.

  14. Investigation on the Flexural Creep Stiffness Behavior of PC-ABS Material Processed by Fused Deposition Modeling Using Response Surface Definitive Screening Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Omar Ahmed; Masood, Syed Hasan; Bhowmik, Jahar Lal

    2017-03-01

    The resistance of polymeric materials to time-dependent plastic deformation is an important requirement of the fused deposition modeling (FDM) design process, its processed products, and their application for long-term loading, durability, and reliability. The creep performance of the material and part processed by FDM is the fundamental criterion for many applications with strict dimensional stability requirements, including medical implants, electrical and electronic products, and various automotive applications. Herein, the effect of FDM fabrication conditions on the flexural creep stiffness behavior of polycarbonate-acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene processed parts was investigated. A relatively new class of experimental design called "definitive screening design" was adopted for this investigation. The effects of process variables on flexural creep stiffness behavior were monitored, and the best suited quadratic polynomial model with high coefficient of determination ( R 2) value was developed. This study highlights the value of response surface definitive screening design in optimizing properties for the products and materials, and it demonstrates its role and potential application in material processing and additive manufacturing.

  15. Buckling prediction of panels using the vibration correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramovich, H.; Govich, D.; Grunwald, A.

    2015-10-01

    The Vibration Correlation Technique (VCT) for experimentally nondestructive determination of buckling loads of thin-walled structures is applied to stringer stiffened curved panels manufactured both from aluminum and laminated composite material. The modal behavior of the panels is investigated by exciting the structures using the modal hammer method. Natural frequencies of the panels are recorded as a function of the applied axial compression load. Unlike shell structures which present a non-stable post-buckling behavior, the stringer stiffened panels show a stable post-buckling behavior, enabling the measurement of the natural frequencies up to the actual experimental buckling load. The modal behavior of compressed panels is compared for reference to shells, yielding areas of applicability for VCT to predict efficiently the buckling loads of thin-walled structures. Guidelines are then formulated for the application of the VCT.

  16. Creep Behavior of P92 Steel in the Steam Environment at 600 °C Using Miniature Three-Point Bend Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuhui; Xuan, Fu-Zhen

    2016-12-01

    A miniature three-point bend test system with steam-circulating device was introduced in order to study the interaction behavior between steam oxidation and tensile, compressive creep of P92 steel at 600 °C. It was observed that the formation of oxidation scale accelerated creep deformation which induced by reducing the effective stress on underlying metal. The oxidation mechanisms as well as oxidation kinetics on tensile and compressive surface were examined by scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectrometer. It can be revealed that applied tensile and compressive loading had strong influence on oxidation rate rather than on oxidation mechanism. Furthermore, a mechanical model coupled with oxidation scale growth was proposed to predict the deformation rate of the miniature three-point specimen which could agree well with the experimental results.

  17. Creep fracture during solute-drag creep and superplastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Taleff, E.M.; Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.; Henshall, G.A.

    1996-10-01

    Creep fracture behavior has been studied in Al-Mg and Al-Mg-Mn alloys undergoing solute-drag creep and in microduplex stainless steel undergoing both solute-drag creep and superplastic deformation. Failure in these materials is found to be controlled by two mechanisms, neck formation and cavitation. The mechanism of creep fracture during solute-drag creep in Al-Mg is found to change from necking-controlled fracture to cavitation-controlled fracture as Mn content is increased. Binary Al-Mg material fails by neck formation during solute-drag creep, and cavities are formed primarily in the neck region due to high hydrostatic stresses. Ternary alloys of Al-Mg- Mn containing 0.25 and 0.50 wt % Mn exhibit more uniform cavitation, with the 0.50 Mn alloy clearly failing by cavity interlinkage. Failure in the microduplex stainless steel is dominated by neck formation during solute-drag creep deformation but is controlled by cavity growth and interlinkage during superplastic deformation. Cavitation was measured at several strains, and found to increase as an exponential function of strain. An important aspect of cavity growth in the stainless steel is the long latency time before significant cavitation occurs. For a short latency period, cavitation acts to significantly reduce ductility below that allowed by neck growth alone. This effect is most pronounced in materials with a high strain-rate sensitivity, for which neck growth occurs very slowly.

  18. Low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of Ni-based alloy 230 at 850 C

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Yang, Zhiqing; Sokolov, Mikhail A; ERDMAN III, DONALD L; Mo, Kun; Stubbins, James

    2013-01-01

    Strain-controlled low cycle fatigue (LCF) and creep-fatigue testing of Ni-based alloy 230 were carried out at 850 C. The material creep-fatigue life decreased compared with its low cycle fatigue life at the same total strain range. Longer hold time at peak tensile strain further reduced the material creep-fatigue life. Based on the electron backscatter diffraction, a novel material deformation characterization method was applied, which revealed that in low cycle fatigue testing as the total strain range increased, the deformation was segregated to grain boundaries since the test temperature was higher than the material equicohesive temperature and grain boundaries became weaker regions compared with grains. Creep-fatigue tests enhanced the localized deformation, resulting in material interior intergranular cracking, and accelerated material damage. Precipitation in alloy 230 helped slip dispersion, favorable for fatigue property, but grain boundary cellular precipitates formed after material exposure to the elevated temperature had a deleterious effect on the material low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue property.

  19. Biomechanical analysis of motor vehicle seat belt buckles.

    PubMed

    Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam; Clarke, Richard; Renfroe, David; Herbst, Brian; Pozzi, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Various studies have reported that inertially sensitive buckles are susceptible to impact unlatching. The present work synthesizes the results from various experimental studies conducted over the years to study the mechanical behavior of buckles and subsequent injuries to occupants. First, the side press button seat buckle due to impact a lateral impact from an adjacent child restraint seat component indicated that the side button RCF-67 buckle released at a speed of 2.2 m/sec with a force range of 264 to 440 N and acceleration range of 100 to 175 G. In contrast, the top button Autoliv Lockarm buckles did not release up to 1300 vertical G's. Second, side release RCF-67 buckles when loaded with the webbing required approximately three times more force to open than top press buckles. Inverted occupants in a three-point belt could not release the RCF-67 buckle. Third, a side sled impact on the drivers side of a production vehicle buck with a three-point belt and a RCF-67 buckle was done at 7 m/s to 8 m/s. A convertible child seat with a dummy in the passenger seat moved inboard toward the buckle and unlatched it. Fourth, an intact vehicle drop study at 0.3 m showed that the accelerations on a JDC buckle on a metal stalk are large compared to acceleration of the floor pan. The present study provides comprehensive data to evaluate the mechanical behavior of seat buckles under various motor vehicle crash conditions.

  20. Orientation dependent size effects in thermal buckling and post-buckling of nanoplates with cubic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadi, Abbas; Salehi, Manouchehr; Akhlaghi, Mehdi

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a continuum model is presented for size and orientation dependent thermal buckling and post-buckling of anisotropic nanoplates considering surface and bulk residual stresses. The model with von-Karman nonlinear strains and material cubic anisotropy of single crystals contains two parameters that reflect the orientation effects. Using Ritz method, closed form solutions are given for buckling temperature and post-buckling deflections. Regarding self-instability states of nanoplates and their recovering at higher temperatures, an experiment is discussed based on low pressurized membranes to verify the predictions. For simply supported nanoplates, the size effects are lowest when they are aligned in [100] direction. When the edges get clamped, the orientation dependence is ignorable and the behavior becomes symmetric about [510] axis. The surface residual stress makes drastic increase in buckling temperature of thinner nanoplates for which a minimum thickness is pointed to stay far from material softening at higher temperatures. Deflection of [100]-oriented buckled nanoplates is higher than [110] ones but this reverses at higher temperatures. The results for long nanoplates show that the buckling mode numbers are changed by orientation which is verified by FEM.

  1. Creep behavior of alloys based on TiAl containing TiB sub 2 and TiN particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.L.; Carter, D.H.; Aikin, R.M. Sr. ); Aikin, R.M. Jr.; Christodoulou, L. )

    1990-01-01

    Ordered alloys based on the L1{sub 0} crystal structure compound TiAl were tested in constant stress creep. The alloys ranged from 45 to 47 at. % Al with and without V substitutions. The ingot processing, utilizing the XD{trademark} technique, incorporated 1 to 5 {mu}m diameter particles of boride or nitride compounds. Emphasis was placed on characterizing the initial stages of creep using digital data acquisition and analysis in the range 70 to 280 MPa stress and 760 to 850{degrees}C temperature. When TiN (converting to Ti{sub 2}AlN in processing) and TiB{sub 2} are both added to the matrix, the creep properties are significantly improved. Fine particles were observed to decorate dislocations and to have nucleated homogeneously within the TiAl grains. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Finite-element analysis of pipeline upheaval buckling

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, P.K.; Bomba, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    It is well known that pipelines may buckle under axial compressive force created by severe temperature change and internal pressure loading conditions. Extensive work has been conducted in the past to understand the beam mode buckling behavior of the pipeline, its impact on pipeline design and, ultimately, the integrity of the pipeline. To fully describe this localized buckling behavior, both the upward and axial displacements of the pipeline need to be considered. This paper presents a large deflection finite-element analysis method with nonlinear material behavior to examine the pipeline response under upheaval buckling condition. The axial displacement caused by thermal expansion and the geometric change of the pipeline due to upheaval motion are examined to better define the pipeline buckling response. By combining both the nonlinear geometry and material effects, it is possible to characterize the extreme responses to determine potential severe damages. A pipeline with a potential for upheaval buckling from a recent North Sea field development was analyzed using the method to evaluate the buckling potential and the pipeline behavior beyond buckling.

  3. Effects of thermomechanical processing on tensile and long-time creep behavior of Nb-1 percent Zr-0.1 percent C sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, Robert H.; Uz, Mehmet

    1994-01-01

    Effects of thermomechanical processing on the mechanical properties of Nb-1 wt. percent Zr-0.1 wt. percent C, a candidate alloy for use in advanced space power systems, were investigated. Sheet bars were cold rolled into 1-mm thick sheets following single, double, or triple extrusion operations at 1900 K. All the creep and tensile specimens were given a two-step heat treatment 1 hr at 1755 K + 2 hr 1475 K prior to testing. Tensile properties were determined at 300 as well as at 1350 K. Microhardness measurements were made on cold rolled, heat treated, and crept samples. Creep tests were carried out at 1350 K and 34.5 MPa for times of about 10,000 to 19,000 hr. The results show that the number of extrusions had some effects on both the microhardness and tensile properties. However, the long-time creep behavior of the samples were comparable, and all were found to have adequate properties to meet the design requirements of advanced power systems regardless of thermomechanical history. The results are discussed in correlation with processing and microstructure, and further compared to the results obtained from the testing of Nb-1 wt. percent Zr and Nb-1 wt. percent Zr-0.06 wt. percent C alloys.

  4. Simultaneous observations of reaction kinetics, creep behavior, and AE activities during syndeformational antigorite dehydration at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, T.; Iwasato, T.; Higo, Y.; Kato, T.; Kaneshima, S.; Uehara, S.; Koizumi, S.; Imamura, M.; Tange, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Intermediate-depth earthquakes are seismic activities in Wadati-Benioff zone at depths from 60 km to 300 km, where subducting plates deform plastically rather than brittle failure. Although it has been reported that unstable faulting occurred during antigorite dehydration even at higher pressures than ~2 GPa (e.g., Jung et al., 2009), the recent study by Chernak and Hirth (2011) revealed that the syndefromational antigorite dehydration does not produces stick-slip instabilities but stable fault slip. In the present study, we newly developed an AE monitoring system for high-pressure reaction-deformation processes combined with D-DIA and synchrotron monochromatic X-ray to observe reaction kinetics, creep behaviors, and AE activities simultaneously. We applied this technique to investigate shear instability during syndeformational antigorite dehydration. High-pressure deformation experiments were conducted up to ~8 GPa, ~1050 K, and strain rates of 3.4-9.2 x 10-5 s-1 in compression using a D-DIA type apparatus installed at BL-04B1, SPring-8. 50 keV mono X-ray were used to measure reaction kinetics and stress-strain data. To monitor shear instabilities by detecting AEs, six piezoelectric devices were positioned between first and second stage anvils of MA 6-6 type system. We used three kinds of starting materials of polycrystalline antigorite, fine-grained forsterite polycrystal, and two-phase mixtures of antigorite and San Carlos olivine (10%, 30%, and 50%atg). Clear contrasts were observed in AE activities between forsterite and antigorite samples. AE activities detected within the forsterite polycrystal suggested (semi) brittle behaviors at low pressures during the cold compression stage.
Almost no AEs were detected within the antigorite samples during any stages of cold compression, ramping, deformation, and syndeformational dehydration although localized deformation textures were observed in recovered samples. Instead, we detected some AEs outside the sample

  5. Creep of dry clinopyroxene aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystricky, Misha; Mackwell, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    We have determined diffusional and dislocation creep rheologies for clinopyroxenite Ca1.0Mg0.8Fe0.2Si2O6 under dry conditions by deforming natural and hot-pressed samples at confining pressures of 300-430 MPa and temperatures of 1100°-1250°C with the oxygen fugacity buffered by either nickel-nickel oxide or iron-wüstite powders. The coarse-grained natural Sleaford Bay clinopyroxenite yielded a stress exponent of n = 4.7 ± 0.2 and an activation energy for creep of Q = 760 ± 40 kJ mol-1, consistent with deformation in the dislocation creep regime. The strength of the natural clinopyroxenite is consistent with previous high-temperature measurements of dislocation creep behavior of Sleaford Bay clinopyroxenite by Kirby and Kronenberg [1984] and Boland and Tullis [1986]. Fine-grained clinopyroxenite was prepared from ground powders of the natural clinopyroxenite. Hot-pressed samples were deformed under similar conditions to the natural samples. Mixed-mode deformation behavior was observed, with diffusional creep (n = 1) at lower differential stresses and dislocation creep (with n and Q similar to those of the natural samples) at higher differential stresses. Within the dislocation creep field the predried hot-pressed samples generally yielded creep rates that were about an order of magnitude faster than the natural samples. Thus, even at the highest differential stresses, a component of strain accommodation by grain boundary diffusion was present in the hot-pressed samples. Optical and electron microscope investigations of the deformation microstructures of the natural and hot-pressed samples show evidence for mechanical twinning and activation of dislocation slip systems. When extrapolated to geological conditions expected in the deep crust and upper mantle on Earth and other terrestrial planets, the strength of dry single-phase clinopyroxene aggregates is very high, exceeding that of dry olivine-rich rocks.

  6. Buckling instability in arteries.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Rebecca M

    2015-04-21

    Arteries can become tortuous in response to abnormal growth stimuli, genetic defects and aging. It is suggested that a buckling instability is a mechanism that might lead to artery tortuosity. Here, the buckling instability in arteries is studied by examining asymmetric modes of bifurcation of two-layer cylindrical structures that are residually stressed. These structures are loaded by an axial force, internal pressure and have nonlinear, anisotropic, hyperelastic responses to stresses. Strain-softening and reduced opening angle are shown to lower the critical internal pressure leading to buckling. In addition, the ratio of the media thickness to the adventitia thickness is shown to have a dramatic impact on arterial instability.

  7. Micromechanics of Amorphous Metal/Polymer Hybrid Structures with 3D Cellular Architectures: Size Effects, Buckling Behavior, and Energy Absorption Capability.

    PubMed

    Mieszala, Maxime; Hasegawa, Madoka; Guillonneau, Gaylord; Bauer, Jens; Raghavan, Rejin; Frantz, Cédric; Kraft, Oliver; Mischler, Stefano; Michler, Johann; Philippe, Laetitia

    2017-02-01

    By designing advantageous cellular geometries and combining the material size effects at the nanometer scale, lightweight hybrid microarchitectured materials with tailored structural properties are achieved. Prior studies reported the mechanical properties of high strength cellular ceramic composites, obtained by atomic layer deposition. However, few studies have examined the properties of similar structures with metal coatings. To determine the mechanical performance of polymer cellular structures reinforced with a metal coating, 3D laser lithography and electroless deposition of an amorphous layer of nickel-boron (NiB) is used for the first time to produce metal/polymer hybrid structures. In this work, the mechanical response of microarchitectured structures is investigated with an emphasis on the effects of the architecture and the amorphous NiB thickness on their deformation mechanisms and energy absorption capability. Microcompression experiments show an enhancement of the mechanical properties with the NiB thickness, suggesting that the deformation mechanism and the buckling behavior are controlled by the brittle-to-ductile transition in the NiB layer. In addition, the energy absorption properties demonstrate the possibility of tuning the energy absorption efficiency with adequate designs. These findings suggest that microarchitectured metal/polymer hybrid structures are effective in producing materials with unique property combinations.

  8. Effect of Cross-linking Density on Creep and Recovery Behavior in Epoxy-Based Shape Memory Polymers (SMEPs) for Structural Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Kavitha V.; Ananthapadmanabha, G. S.; Dayananda, G. N.

    2016-12-01

    Epoxy-based shape memory polymers (SMEPs) are gaining importance in the area of aerospace structures due to their high strength and stiffness which is a primary requirement for an SMEP in structural applications. The understanding of viscoelastic behavior of SMEPs is very essential to assess their shape memory effect. In the present work, three types of SMEPs with varying cross-linking densities were developed by curing an aromatic epoxy resin with aliphatic amines. Glass transition temperature ( T g) was measured for these SMEPs using advanced rheometric expansion system, and from the T g measurements, a range of temperatures from glassy to rubbery regimes were chosen. At selected temperatures, creep-recovery tests were performed in order to evaluate the viscoelastic behavior of SMEPs and also to investigate the effect of temperature on creep-recovery. Further, a three-parameter viscoelastic model (Zener) was used to fit the data obtained from experiments. Model parameters like moduli of the springs and viscosity of the dashpot were evaluated by curve fitting. Results revealed that Zener model was well suited to describe the viscoelastic behavior of SMEPs as a function of test temperatures.

  9. Creep Deformation of B2 Alumindes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.

    1991-01-01

    The creep resistance and elevated temperature deformation mechanisms in CoAl, FeAl, and NiAl are reviewed. The stress and temperature dependencies of the steady state creep rate, the primary creep behavior, the dislocation substructure, and the response during transient tests are used as the main indicators of the deformation processes. In single phase intermetallics, the influence of grain size, stoichiometry, and solid solution hardening have been examined. In addition, the effect of adding dispersoids, precipitates, and other types of reinforcements to improve creep strength are compared.

  10. Creep deformation of B2 aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.

    1992-01-01

    The creep resistance and elevated temperature deformation mechanisms in CoAl, FeAl, and NiAl are reviewed. The stress and temperature dependencies of the steady state creep rate, the primary creep behavior, the dislocation substructure, and the response during transient tests are used as the main indicators of the deformation processes. In single phase intermetallics, the influence of grain size, stoichiometry, and solid solution hardening have been examined. In addition, the effect of adding dispersoids, precipitates, and other types of reinforcements to improve creep strength are compared.

  11. Steady State Creep of Zirconium at High and Intermediate Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, R.S.; Hayes, T.A.

    2000-04-08

    Creep of zirconium and zirconium alloys has been labeled ''anomalous.'' Researchers often report that zirconium and its alloys never reach true steady state creep and have stress exponents that continuously change with stress and temperature. Many varied interpretations have been offered explaining the creep behavior of zirconium. Some have suggested that creep is diffusion controlled, while others maintain that creep is dislocation glide controlled. Cumulative zirconium creep data will be presented based on an extensive literature review. An interpretation of results will be presented and compared to previous interpretations.

  12. Flexural creep behaviour of jute polypropylene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandekar, Harichandra; Chaudhari, Vikas

    2016-09-01

    Present study is about the flexural creep behaviour of jute fabric reinforced polypropylene (Jute-PP) composites. The PP sheet and alkali treated jute fabric is stacked alternately and hot pressed in compression molding machine to get Jute-PP composite laminate. The flexural creep study is carried out on dynamic mechanical analyzer. The creep behaviour of the composite is modeled using four-parameter Burgers model. Short-term accelerated creep testing is conducted which is later used to predict long term creep behaviour. The feasibility of the construction of a master curve using the time-temperature superposition (TTS) principle to predict long term creep behavior of unreinforced PP and Jute-PP composite is investigated.

  13. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, Lisa Anne

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  14. Electrospun Buckling Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; Reneker, Darrell

    2009-03-01

    Electrospinning offers a useful way to produce fibers with micron and nanometer scale diameter. The present work deals with the buckling phenomenon characteristic of a jet impinging upon the surface of collector. A viscous jet may have either tensile or compressive forces along its axis. The periodic buckling that is often observed is attributed to the occurrence of compressive forces as the jet decelerates at the collector. With the increase of axial compressive stresses along the jet, a jet with circular cross sections first buckles by formation of sharp folds, and then by formation of coils. The resulting buckling patterns include zigzag patterns and coils that which can be controlled by changing parameters, such as density, viscosity, conductivity, voltage, polymer concentration, distance and volumetric flow rate. Uniformly buckled polymer fibers can be made at a rate of one turn per microsecond. An experimental apparatus was built to continuously collect buckling coils of nylon 6, from a water surface, into a multilayer sheet. These small ``springs'' and sheets will be tested for mechanical properties needed in biomedical applications.

  15. Experimental and mathematical analysis of buckling of tubulars subjected to axial and torsional loading in inclined and horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, J.C.S. |

    1996-09-01

    This article presents an analysis of the existing models for buckling and post-buckling behavior of tubulars confined by the wellbore. The expressions for critical buckling loads are analyzed and the influence of torque is discussed. Results of experimental verification with and without application of torque are presented and compared with the theoretical models. Conclusions comparing the results predicted by the models with the behavior presented by the pipe during buckling experiments are presented at the end of the paper.

  16. Buckling of carbon nanotubes at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y Y; Wang, C M; Tan, V B C

    2009-05-27

    Presented herein is an investigation into the buckling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) subjected to axial compression and torsion at high temperatures. This study is carried out by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at both room temperature and extremely high temperatures. It is observed that the SWCNT becomes more susceptible to buckling in a higher temperature environment, especially when the SWCNT is subject to axial compression. The high thermal energy enhances the vibration of carbon atoms in the SWCNT significantly, which leads to bond breaking and the formation of sp(3) bonds as well as Stone-Wales (SW) defects in the postbuckling stage.

  17. Thermal buckling of laminated composite shells

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaratnam, R.K.; Palaninathan, R.; Ramachandran, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The linear buckling analysis of laminated composite cylindrical and conical shells under thermal load using the finite element method is reported here. Critical temperatures are presented for various cases of cross-ply and angly-ply laminated shells. The effects of radius/thickness ratio, number of layers, ratio of coefficients of thermal expansion, and the angle of fiber orientation have been studied. The results indicate that the buckling behavior of laminated shell under thermal load is different from that of mechanically loaded shell with respect to the angle of fiber orientation. 6 refs.

  18. Buckling tests of light-metal tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, August

    1929-01-01

    I will attempt to determine mathematically the buckling-strength curves of various centrally loaded light-metal tubes which exhibit conspicuous differences of behavior under compressive loads. For this purpose I will employ Von Karman's method, after adapting it to special conditions.

  19. Cylindrical shell buckling through strain hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Xu, J.; Shteyngart, S.; Gupta, D.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, the authors published results of plastic buckling analysis of cylindrical shells. Ideal elastic-plastic material behavior was used for the analysis. Subsequently, the buckling analysis program was continued with the realistic stress-strain relationship of a stainless steel alloy which does not exhibit a clear yield point. The plastic buckling analysis was carried out through the initial stages of strain hardening for various internal pressure values. The computer program BOSOR5 was used for this purpose. Results were compared with those obtained from the idealized elastic-plastic relationship using the offset stress level at 0.2% strain as the yield stress. For moderate hoop stress values, the realistic stress-grain case shows a slight reduction of the buckling strength. But, a substantial gain in the buckling strength is observed as the hoop stress approaches the yield strength. Most importantly, the shell retains a residual strength to carry a small amount of axial compressive load even when the hoop stress has exceeded the offset yield strength.

  20. Buckling of Chemical Wave Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Michael C.; Morris, Stephen W.

    2004-03-01

    Chemical wave fronts are found in many autocatalytic chemical reactions, such as the iodate oxidation of arsenous acid. In vertical capillary tubes, ascending chemical wave fronts show convective behavior when a dimensionless driving parameter S exceeds a critical value Sc ˜ 100. S ∝ a^3, where a is the radius of the tube. In the iodate arsenous-acid reaction, the density jump that drives convection is created by both the partial molal density decrease of the product solution and by thermal expansion due to the slight exothermicity of the reaction. We observed strongly supercritical ascending chemical wave plumes in vertical tubes with S 10^7. We report on the motion of these plumes in experiments where both the viscosity and the temperature of the reactant fluid are control parameters. We find experimentally that the background temperature of the reactant fluid has a significant influence on the behavior of the plumes. Above a critical temperature, plumes rise straight up the tube, whereas below this temperature, plumes go through an initial stage of buckling before they surrender to straight rising motion. The flow induced by the chemical plumes can be visualized using tracer particles. The buckling behavior of the plumes may arise from the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, as in the case of a fluid jet descending through stratified surroundings [Pesci et al., Phys. Rev. E, 68, 056305 (2003)].

  1. Buckling Of Shells Of Revolution /BOSOR/ with various wall constructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almroth, B. O.; Bushnell, D.; Sobel, L. H.

    1969-01-01

    Computer program, using numerical integration and finite difference techniques, solves almost any buckling problem for shells exhibiting orthotropic behavior. Stability analyses can be performed with reasonable accuracy and without unduly restrictive approximations.

  2. Creep deformation of TD-nickel chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted of the mechanical behavioral characteristics of thoria-dispersed (TD) NiCr materials at elevated temperatures. The experimental procedure used is discussed along with the significance of the obtained results. Attention is given to basic creep behavior and creep thermal activation parameter measurements. It is found that the overall creep behavior of TD-NiCr can be explained on the basis of the relative contributions of two parallel-concurrent deformation mechanisms, including diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding and dislocation motion.

  3. Creep characterization of solder bumps using nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yingjie; Liu, Xiao Hu; Fu, Boshen; Shaw, Thomas M.; Lu, Minhua; Wassick, Thomas A.; Bonilla, Griselda; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-10-01

    Current nanoindentation techniques for the measurement of creep properties are applicable to viscoplastic materials with negligible elastic deformations. A new technique for characterization of creep behavior is needed for situations where the elastic deformation plays a significant role. In this paper, the effect of elastic deformation on the determination of creep parameters using nanoindentation with a self-similar nanoindenter tip is evaluated using finite element analysis (FEA). It is found that the creep exponent measured from nanoindentation without taking into account of the contribution of elastic deformation tends to be higher than the actual value. An effective correction method is developed to consider the elastic deformation in the calculation of creep parameters. FEA shows that this method provides accurate creep exponent. The creep parameters, namely the creep exponent and activation energy, were measured for three types of reflowed solder bumps using the nanoindentation method. The measured parameters were verified using FEA. The results show that the new correction approach allows extraction of creep parameters with precision from nanoindentation data.

  4. Creep Measurement Video Extensometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaster, Mark; Vickerman, Mary; Padula, Santo, II; Juhas, John

    2011-01-01

    Understanding material behavior under load is critical to the efficient and accurate design of advanced aircraft and spacecraft. Technologies such as the one disclosed here allow accurate creep measurements to be taken automatically, reducing error. The goal was to develop a non-contact, automated system capable of capturing images that could subsequently be processed to obtain the strain characteristics of these materials during deformation, while maintaining adequate resolution to capture the true deformation response of the material. The measurement system comprises a high-resolution digital camera, computer, and software that work collectively to interpret the image.

  5. Material behavior under complex loading

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, H.J.; Raule, G.; Rodig, M.

    1984-09-01

    Studies of material behavior under complex loading form a bridge between standard material testing methods and the stress analysis calculations for reactor components at high temperatures. The aim of these studies is to determine the influence of typical load change sequences on material properties, to derive the equations required for stress analyses, to carry out tests under multiaxial conditions, and to investigate the structural deformation mechanisms of creep buckling and ratcheting. The present state of the investigations within the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor materials program is described, with emphasis on the experimental apparatus, the scope of the program, and the initial results obtained.

  6. A New Creep Constitutive Model for 7075 Aluminum Alloy Under Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. C.; Jiang, Yu-Qiang; Zhou, Hua-Min; Liu, Guan

    2014-12-01

    Exposure of aluminum alloy to an elastic loading, during "creep-aging forming" or other manufacturing processes at relatively high temperature, may lead to the lasting creep deformation. The creep behaviors of 7075 aluminum alloy are investigated by uniaxial tensile creep experiments over wide ranges of temperature and external stress. The results show that the creep behaviors of the studied aluminum alloy strongly depend on the creep temperature, external stress, and creep time. With the increase of creep temperature and external stress, the creep strain increases quickly. In order to overcome the shortcomings of the Bailey-Norton law and θ projection method, a new constitutive model is proposed to describe the variations of creep strain with time for the studied aluminum alloy. In the proposed model, the dependences of creep strain on the creep temperature, external stress, and creep time are well taken into account. A good agreement between the predicted and measured creep strains shows that the established creep constitutive model can give an accurate description of the creep behaviors of 7075 aluminum alloy. Meanwhile, the obtained stress exponent indicates that the creep process is controlled by the dislocation glide, which is verified by the microstructural observations.

  7. Experimental Study on the Mechanical, Creep, and Viscoelastic Behavior of TiO2/Glass/Epoxy Hybrid Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, H. R.; Salehi, M.

    2016-11-01

    The mechanical and viscoelastic properties of hybrid glass/epoxy nanocomposites whose matrix was doped with 0.25, 0.5, and 1 vol.% of TiO2 nanoparticles were investigated in tension and bending. The nanoparticles were found to increase the strength of the composites by 20-30% and their stiffness by 10-20%. In addition, their creep resistance also grew. A SEM analysis of microstructure of the composites revealed that these improvements were caused by an increased adhesion between fibers and the matrix and enhanced properties of the matrix itself.

  8. Buckling-Induced Kirigami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Bertoldi, Katia

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the mechanical response of thin sheets perforated with a square array of mutually orthogonal cuts, which leaves a network of squares connected by small ligaments. Our combined analytical, experimental and numerical results indicate that under uniaxial tension the ligaments buckle out of plane, inducing the formation of 3D patterns whose morphology is controlled by the load direction. We also find that by largely stretching the buckled perforated sheets, plastic strains develop in the ligaments. This gives rise to the formation of kirigami sheets comprising periodic distribution of cuts and permanent folds. As such, the proposed buckling-induced pop-up strategy points to a simple route for manufacturing complex morphable structures out of flat perforated sheets.

  9. Buckling-Induced Kirigami.

    PubMed

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Bertoldi, Katia

    2017-02-24

    We investigate the mechanical response of thin sheets perforated with a square array of mutually orthogonal cuts, which leaves a network of squares connected by small ligaments. Our combined analytical, experimental and numerical results indicate that under uniaxial tension the ligaments buckle out of plane, inducing the formation of 3D patterns whose morphology is controlled by the load direction. We also find that by largely stretching the buckled perforated sheets, plastic strains develop in the ligaments. This gives rise to the formation of kirigami sheets comprising periodic distribution of cuts and permanent folds. As such, the proposed buckling-induced pop-up strategy points to a simple route for manufacturing complex morphable structures out of flat perforated sheets.

  10. The Effect of Stabilization Heat Treatments on the Tensile and Creep Behavior of an Advanced Nickel-Based Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2003-01-01

    As part of NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology Program, a study of stabilization heat treatment options for an advanced nickel-base disk alloy, ME 209, was performed. Using a simple, physically based approach, the effect of stabilization heat treatments on tensile and creep properties was analyzed in this paper. Solutions temperature, solution cooling rate, and stabilization temperature/time were found to have a significant impact on tensile and creep properties. These effects were readily quantified using the following methodology. First, the effect of solution cooling rate was assessed to determine its impact on a given property. The as-cooled property was then modified by using two multiplicative factors which assess the impact of solution temperature and stabilization parameters. Comparison of experimental data with predicted values showed this physically based analysis produced good results that rivaled the statistical analysis employed, which required numerous changes in the form of the regression equation depending on the property and temperature in question. As this physically based analysis uses the data for input, it should be noted that predictions which attempt to extrapolate beyond the bounds of the data must be viewed with skepticism. Future work aimed at expanding the range of the stabilization/aging parameters explored in this study would be highly desirable, especially at the higher solution cooling rates.

  11. Optical manifestation of buckled configurations in graphene-like materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemlou, V.; Phirouznia, A.; Jamshidi-Ghaleh, K.

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, the effects of the configuration buckling on dielectric function of silicene, germanene and stanene are investigated. The behavior of the optical absorption spectrum and the refractive index dispersion are studied using the density functional theory in terms of incident photon energy at different buckling heights. The results show that for a fixed bond length, increasing the unit cell buckling height, increases the absorption and the refractive index in silicene and germanene but decreases in stanene. In addition, the absorption peaks shift toward the longer wavelengths (red shift) in the case of silicene and germanene by increasing the buckling height. For clear understanding of the mentioned results, the behavior of the optical absorption spectrum and refractive index dispersion at different buckling heights are studied within the present work. In the case of the silicene and germanene reduction of the band gap with increasing the buckling height could be regarded as the origin of this red shift. Meanwhile unlike the silicene and germanene, band-structure reshaping in stanene could explain the stanene blue shift as a result of the buckling height increment.

  12. Buckling of Microtubules on a 2D Elastic Medium.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Arif Md Rashedul; Inoue, Daisuke; Afrin, Tanjina; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Sada, Kazuki; Kakugo, Akira

    2015-11-24

    We have demonstrated compression stress induced mechanical deformation of microtubules (MTs) on a two-dimensional elastic medium and investigated the role of compression strain, strain rate, and a MT-associated protein in the deformation of MTs. We show that MTs, supported on a two-dimensional substrate by a MT-associated protein kinesin, undergo buckling when they are subjected to compression stress. Compression strain strongly affects the extent of buckling, although compression rate has no substantial effect on the buckling of MTs. Most importantly, the density of kinesin is found to play the key role in determining the buckling mode of MTs. We have made a comparison between our experimental results and the 'elastic foundation model' that theoretically predicts the buckling behavior of MTs and its connection to MT-associated proteins. Taking into consideration the role of kinesin in altering the mechanical property of MTs, we are able to explain the buckling behavior of MTs by the elastic foundation model. This work will help understand the buckling mechanism of MTs and its connection to MT-associated proteins or surrounding medium, and consequently will aid in obtaining a meticulous scenario of the compression stress induced deformation of MTs in cells.

  13. Buckling of Microtubules on a 2D Elastic Medium

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Inoue, Daisuke; Afrin, Tanjina; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Sada, Kazuki; Kakugo, Akira

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated compression stress induced mechanical deformation of microtubules (MTs) on a two-dimensional elastic medium and investigated the role of compression strain, strain rate, and a MT-associated protein in the deformation of MTs. We show that MTs, supported on a two-dimensional substrate by a MT-associated protein kinesin, undergo buckling when they are subjected to compression stress. Compression strain strongly affects the extent of buckling, although compression rate has no substantial effect on the buckling of MTs. Most importantly, the density of kinesin is found to play the key role in determining the buckling mode of MTs. We have made a comparison between our experimental results and the ‘elastic foundation model’ that theoretically predicts the buckling behavior of MTs and its connection to MT-associated proteins. Taking into consideration the role of kinesin in altering the mechanical property of MTs, we are able to explain the buckling behavior of MTs by the elastic foundation model. This work will help understand the buckling mechanism of MTs and its connection to MT-associated proteins or surrounding medium, and consequently will aid in obtaining a meticulous scenario of the compression stress induced deformation of MTs in cells. PMID:26596905

  14. Creep substructure formation in sodium chloride single crystals in the power law and exponential creep regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Pharr, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Creep tests conducted on NaCl single crystals in the temperature range from 373 to 1023 K show that true steady state creep is obtained only above 873 K when the ratio of the applied stress to the shear modulus is less than or equal to 0.0001. Under other stress and temperature conditions, corresponding to both power law and exponential creep, the creep rate decreases monotonically with increasing strain. The transition from power law to exponential creep is shown to be associated with increases in the dislocation density, the cell boundary width, and the aspect ratio of the subgrains along the primary slip planes. The relation between dislocation structure and creep behavior is also assessed.

  15. Critical buckling pressure in mouse carotid arteries with altered elastic fibers.

    PubMed

    Luetkemeyer, Callan M; James, Rhys H; Devarakonda, Siva Teja; Le, Victoria P; Liu, Qin; Han, Hai-Chao; Wagenseil, Jessica E

    2015-06-01

    Arteries can buckle axially under applied critical buckling pressure due to a mechanical instability. Buckling can cause arterial tortuosity leading to flow irregularities and stroke. Genetic mutations in elastic fiber proteins are associated with arterial tortuosity in humans and mice, and may be the result of alterations in critical buckling pressure. Hence, the objective of this study is to investigate how genetic defects in elastic fibers affect buckling pressure. We use mouse models of human disease with reduced amounts of elastin (Eln+/-) and with defects in elastic fiber assembly due to the absence of fibulin-5 (Fbln5-/-). We find that Eln+/- arteries have reduced buckling pressure compared to their wild-type controls. Fbln5-/- arteries have similar buckling pressure to wild-type at low axial stretch, but increased buckling pressure at high stretch. We fit material parameters to mechanical test data for Eln+/-, Fbln5-/- and wild-type arteries using Fung and four-fiber strain energy functions. Fitted parameters are used to predict theoretical buckling pressure based on equilibrium of an inflated, buckled, thick-walled cylinder. In general, the theoretical predictions underestimate the buckling pressure at low axial stretch and overestimate the buckling pressure at high stretch. The theoretical predictions with both models replicate the increased buckling pressure at high stretch for Fbln5-/- arteries, but the four-fiber model predictions best match the experimental trends in buckling pressure changes with axial stretch. This study provides experimental and theoretical methods for further investigating the influence of genetic mutations in elastic fibers on buckling behavior and the development of arterial tortuosity.

  16. Critical Buckling Pressure in Mouse Carotid Arteries with Altered Elastic Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Luetkemeyer, Callan M.; James, Rhys H.; Devarakonda, Siva Teja; Le, Victoria P.; Liu, Qin; Han, Hai-Chao; Wagenseil, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    Arteries can buckle axially under applied critical buckling pressure due to a mechanical instability. Buckling can cause arterial tortuosity leading to flow irregularities and stroke. Genetic mutations in elastic fiber proteins are associated with arterial tortuosity in humans and mice, and may be the result of alterations in critical buckling pressure. Hence, the objective of this study is to investigate how genetic defects in elastic fibers affect buckling pressure. We use mouse models of human disease with reduced amounts of elastin (Eln+/−) and with defects in elastic fiber assembly due to the absence of fibulin-5 (Fbln5−/−). We find that Eln+/− arteries have reduced buckling pressure compared to their wild-type controls. Fbln5−/− arteries have similar buckling pressure to wild-type at low axial stretch, but increased buckling pressure at high stretch. We fit material parameters to mechanical test data for Eln+/−, Fbln5−/− and wild-type arteries using Fung and four-fiber strain energy functions. Fitted parameters are used to predict theoretical buckling pressure based on equilibrium of an inflated, buckled, thick-walled cylinder. In general, the theoretical predictions underestimate the buckling pressure at low axial stretch and overestimate the buckling pressure at high stretch. The theoretical predictions with both models replicate the increased buckling pressure at high stretch for Fbln5−/− arteries, but the four-fiber model predictions best match the experimental trends in buckling pressure changes with axial stretch. This study provides experimental and theoretical methods for further investigating the influence of genetic mutations in elastic fibers on buckling behavior and the development of arterial tortuosity. PMID:25771258

  17. Creep, Fatigue and Fracture Behavior of Environmental Barrier Coating and SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Systems: The Role of Environment Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems for low emission SiCSiC CMC combustors and turbine airfoils have been developed to meet next generation engine emission and performance goals. This presentation will highlight the developments of NASAs current EBC system technologies for SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composite combustors and turbine airfoils, their performance evaluation and modeling progress towards improving the engine SiCSiC component temperature capability and long-term durability. Our emphasis has also been placed on the fundamental aspects of the EBC-CMC creep and fatigue behaviors, and their interactions with turbine engine oxidizing and moisture environments. The EBC-CMC environmental degradation and failure modes, under various simulated engine testing environments, in particular involving high heat flux, high pressure, high velocity combustion conditions, will be discussed aiming at quantifying the protective coating functions, performance and durability, and in conjunction with damage mechanics and fracture mechanics approaches.

  18. Scleral Buckling with Chandelier Illumination.

    PubMed

    Seider, Michael I; Nomides, Riikka E K; Hahn, Paul; Mruthyunjaya, Prithvi; Mahmoud, Tamer H

    2016-01-01

    Scleral buckling is a highly successful technique for the repair of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment that requires intra-operative examination of the retina and treatment of retinal breaks via indirect ophthalmoscopy. Data suggest that scleral buckling likely results in improved outcomes for many patients but is declining in popularity, perhaps because of significant advances in vitrectomy instrumentation and visualization systems. Emerging data suggest that chandelier-assisted scleral buckling is safe and has many potential advantages over traditional buckling techniques. By combining traditional scleral buckling with contemporary vitreoretinal visualization techniques, chandelier-assistance may increase the popularity of scleral buckling to treat primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment for surgeons of the next generation, maintaining buckling as an option for appropriate patients in the future.

  19. Scleral Buckling with Chandelier Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Seider, Michael I.; Nomides, Riikka E. K.; Hahn, Paul; Mruthyunjaya, Prithvi; Mahmoud, Tamer H.

    2016-01-01

    Scleral buckling is a highly successful technique for the repair of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment that requires intra-operative examination of the retina and treatment of retinal breaks via indirect ophthalmoscopy. Data suggest that scleral buckling likely results in improved outcomes for many patients but is declining in popularity, perhaps because of significant advances in vitrectomy instrumentation and visualization systems. Emerging data suggest that chandelier-assisted scleral buckling is safe and has many potential advantages over traditional buckling techniques. By combining traditional scleral buckling with contemporary vitreoretinal visualization techniques, chandelier-assistance may increase the popularity of scleral buckling to treat primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment for surgeons of the next generation, maintaining buckling as an option for appropriate patients in the future. PMID:27621789

  20. Buckling of spherical shells revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, John W.

    2016-11-01

    A study is presented of the post-buckling behaviour and imperfection sensitivity of complete spherical shells subject to uniform external pressure. The study builds on and extends the major contribution to spherical shell buckling by Koiter in the 1960s. Numerical results are presented for the axisymmetric large deflection behaviour of perfect spheres followed by an extensive analysis of the role axisymmetric imperfections play in reducing the buckling pressure. Several types of middle surface imperfections are considered including dimple-shaped undulations and sinusoidal-shaped equatorial undulations. Buckling occurs either as the attainment of a maximum pressure in the axisymmetric state or as a non-axisymmetric bifurcation from the axisymmetric state. Several new findings emerge: the abrupt mode localization that occurs immediately after the onset of buckling, the existence of an apparent lower limit to the buckling pressure for realistically large imperfections, and comparable reductions of the buckling pressure for dimple and sinusoidal equatorial imperfections.

  1. Chemical controls on fault behavior: weakening of serpentinite sheared against quartz-bearing rocks and its significance for fault creep in the San Andreas system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The serpentinized ultramafic rocks found in many plate-tectonic settings commonly are juxtaposed against crustal rocks along faults, and the chemical contrast between the rock types potentially could influence the mechanical behavior of such faults. To investigate this possibility, we conducted triaxial experiments under hydrothermal conditions (200-350°C), shearing serpentinite gouge between forcing blocks of granite or quartzite. In an ultramafic chemical environment, the coefficient of friction, µ, of lizardite and antigorite serpentinite is 0.5-0.6, and µ increases with increasing temperature over the tested range. However, when either lizardite or antigorite serpentinite is sheared against granite or quartzite, strength is reduced to µ ~ 0.3, with the greatest strength reductions at the highest temperatures (temperature weakening) and slowest shearing rates (velocity strengthening). The weakening is attributed to a solution-transfer process that is promoted by the enhanced solubility of serpentine in pore fluids whose chemistry has been modified by interaction with the quartzose wall rocks. The operation of this process will promote aseismic slip (creep) along serpentinite-bearing crustal faults at otherwise seismogenic depths. During short-term experiments serpentine minerals reprecipitate in low-stress areas, whereas in longer experiments new Mg-rich phyllosilicates crystallize in response to metasomatic exchanges across the serpentinite-crustal rock contact. Long-term shear of serpentinite against crustal rocks will cause the metasomatic mineral assemblages, which may include extremely weak minerals such as saponite or talc, to play an increasingly important role in the mechanical behavior of the fault. Our results may explain the distribution of creep on faults in the San Andreas system.

  2. Orthotropic elastic shell model for buckling of microtubules.

    PubMed

    Wang, C Y; Ru, C Q; Mioduchowski, A

    2006-11-01

    In view of the fact that microtubules exhibit strong anisotropic elastic properties, an orthotropic elastic shell model for microtubules is developed to study buckling behavior of microtubules. The predicted critical pressure is found to agree well with recent unexplained experimental data on pressure-induced buckling of microtubules [Needleman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 198104 (2004); Biophys. J. 89, 3410 (2005)] which are lower than that predicted by the isotropic shell model by four orders of magnitude. General buckling behavior of microtubules under axial compression or radial pressure is studied. The results show that the isotropic shell model greatly overestimates the bucking loads of microtubules, except columnlike axially compressed buckling of long microtubules (of length-to-diameter ratio larger than, say, 150). In particular, the present results also offer a plausible explanation for the length dependency of flexibility of microtubules reported in the literature.

  3. Creep and Creep-Fatigue of Alloy 617 Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jill K.; Carroll, Laura J.; Wright, Richard N.

    2014-08-01

    Alloy 617 is the primary candidate material for the heat exchanger of a very high temperature gas cooled reactor intended to operate up to 950°C. While this alloy is currently qualified in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for non-nuclear construction, it is not currently allowed for use in nuclear designs. A draft Code Case to qualify Alloy 617 for nuclear pressure boundary applications was submitted in 1992, but was withdrawn prior to approval. Prior to withdrawal of the draft, comments were received indicating that there was insufficient knowledge of the creep and creep-fatigue behavior of Alloy 617 welds. In this report the results of recent experiments and analysis of the creep-rupture behavior of Alloy 617 welds prepared using the gas tungsten arc process with Alloy 617 filler wire. Low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue properties of weldments are also discussed. The experiments cover a range of temperatures from 750 to 1000°C to support development of a new Code Case to qualify the material for elevated temperature nuclear design. Properties of the welded material are compared to results of extensive characterization of solution annealed plate base metal.

  4. The electromechanical response of silicon nanowires to buckling mode transitions.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chee Chung; Reboud, Julien; Neuzil, Pavel; Soon, Jeffrey; Agarwal, Ajay; Balasubramanian, Naranayan; Liao, Kin

    2010-10-08

    Here we show how the electromechanical properties of silicon nanowires (NWs) are modified when they are subjected to extreme mechanical deformations (buckling and buckling mode transitions), such as those appearing in flexible devices. Flexible devices are prone to frequent dynamic stress variations, especially buckling, while the small size of NWs could give them an advantage as ultra-sensitive electromechanical stress sensors embedded in such devices. We evaluated the NWs post-buckling behavior and the effects of buckling mode transition on their piezoresistive gauge factor (GF). Polycrystalline silicon NWs were embedded in SiO(2) microbridges to facilitate concurrent monitoring of their electrical resistance without problematic interference, while an external stylus performed controlled deformations of the microbridges. At points of instability, the abrupt change in the buckling configuration of the microbridge corresponded to a sharp resistance change in the embedded NWs, without altering the NWs' GF. These results also highlight the importance of strategically positioning the NW in the devices, since electrical monitoring of buckling mode transitions is feasible when the deformations impact a region where the NW is placed. The highly flexible NWs also exhibited unusually large fracture strength, sustaining tensile strains up to 5.6%; this will prove valuable in demanding flexible sensors.

  5. Artery buckling affects the mechanical stress in atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Tortuous arteries are often seen in patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis. While the mechanical stress in atherosclerotic plaque under lumen pressure has been studied extensively, the mechanical stability of atherosclerotic arteries and subsequent effect on the plaque stress remain unknown. To this end, we investigated the buckling and post-buckling behavior of model stenotic coronary arteries with symmetric and asymmetric plaque. Methods Buckling analysis for a model coronary artery with symmetric and asymmetric plaque was conducted using finite element analysis based on the dimensions and nonlinear anisotropic materials properties reported in the literature. Results Artery with asymmetric plaque had lower critical buckling pressure compared to the artery with symmetric plaque and control artery. Buckling increased the peak stress in the plaque and led to the development of a high stress concentration in artery with asymmetric plaque. Stiffer calcified tissue and severe stenosis increased the critical buckling pressure of the artery with asymmetric plaque. Conclusions Arteries with atherosclerotic plaques are prone to mechanical buckling which leads to a high stress concentration in the plaques that can possibly make the plaques prone to rupture. PMID:25603490

  6. Creep Behavior of Oxide/Oxide Composites with Monazite Fiber Coating at 1100 deg C in Air and in Steam Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    noticeably degraded in steam. The presence of steam accelerated creep rates and significantly reduced creep lifetimes. In air, creep run-out, defined as...environmentally stable ox- ide constituents [23, 26, 27, 31, 35, 36, 45, 46, 48]. Oxide/Oxide CMCs were developed to combat the environmental degradation ...thermal shock tolerance until last several decades [37]. Most metallic alloys ex- hibit significant deformation in tension prior to failure. Ceramics

  7. Buckling-induced retraction of spherical shells: A study on the shape of aperture.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sen; Xie, Yi Min; Li, Qing; Huang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Shiwei

    2015-06-22

    Buckling of soft matter is ubiquitous in nature and has attracted increasing interest recently. This paper studies the retractile behaviors of a spherical shell perforated by sophisticated apertures, attributed to the buckling-induced large deformation. The buckling patterns observed in experiments were reproduced in computational modeling by imposing velocity-controlled loads and eigenmode-affine geometric imperfection. It was found that the buckling behaviors were topologically sensitive with respect to the shape of dimple (aperture). The shell with rounded-square apertures had the maximal volume retraction ratio as well as the lowest energy consumption. An effective experimental procedure was established and the simulation results were validated in this study.

  8. Interfacial Control of Creep Deformation in Ultrafine Lamellar TiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L M

    2002-11-26

    Solute effect on the creep resistance of two-phase lamellar TiAl with an ultrafine microstructure creep-deformed in a low-stress (LS) creep regime [where a linear creep behavior was observed] has been investigated. The resulted deformation substructure and in-situ TEM experiment revealed that interface sliding by the motion of pre-existing interfacial dislocations is the predominant deformation mechanism in LS creep regime. Solute segregation at lamellar interfaces and interfacial precipitation caused by the solute segregation result in a beneficial effect on the creep resistance of ultrafine lamellar TiAl in LS creep regime.

  9. Low Temperature Creep of Hot-Extruded Near-Stoichiometric NiTi Shape Memory Alloy. Part I; Isothermal Creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Noebe, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    This two-part paper is the first published report on the long term, low temperature creep of hot-extruded near-stoichiometric NiTi. Constant load tensile creep tests were conducted on hot-extruded near-stoichiometric NiTi at 300, 373 and 473 K under initial applied stresses varying between 200 and 350 MPa as long as 15 months. These temperatures corresponded to the martensitic, two-phase and austenitic phase regions, respectively. Normal primary creep lasting several months was observed under all conditions indicating dislocation activity. Although steady-state creep was not observed under these conditions, the estimated creep rates varied between 10(exp -10) and 10(exp -9)/s. The creep behavior of the two phases showed significant differences. The martensitic phase exhibited a large strain on loading followed by a primary creep region accumulating a small amount of strain over a period of several months. The loading strain was attributed to the detwinning of the martensitic phase whereas the subsequent strain accumulation was attributed to dislocation glide-controlled creep. An "incubation period" was observed before the occurrence of detwinning. In contrast, the austenitic phase exhibited a relatively smaller loading strain followed by a primary creep region, where the creep strain continued to increase over several months. It is concluded that the creep of the austenitic phase occurs by a dislocation glide-controlled creep mechanism as well as by the nucleation and growth of deformation twins.

  10. Buckle Driven Delamination in Thin Hard Film Compliant Substrate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, N. R.; Reedy, E. D.; Corona, E.; Adams, D. P.; Kennedy, M. S.; Cordill, M. J.; Bahr, D. F.

    2010-06-01

    Deformation and fracture of thin films on compliant substrates are key factors constraining the performance of emerging flexible substrate devices. [1-3] These systems often contain layers of thin polymer, ceramic and metallic films and stretchable interconnects where differing properties induce high normal and shear stresses. [4] As long as the films remain bonded to the substrates, they may deform far beyond their freestanding form. Once debonded, substrate constraint disappears leading to film failure. [3] Experimentally it is very difficult to measure properties in these systems at sub-micron and nanoscales. Theoretically it is very difficult to determine the contributions from the films, interfaces, and substrates. As a result our understanding of deformation and fracture behavior in compliant substrate systems is limited. This motivated a study of buckle driven delamination of thin hard tungsten films on pure PMMA substrates. The films were sputter deposited to thicknesses of 100 nm, 200 nm, and 400 nm with a residual compressive stress of 1.7 GPa. An aluminum oxide interlayer was added on several samples to alter interfacial composition. Buckles formed spontaneously on the PMMA substrates following film deposition. On films without the aluminum oxide interlayer, an extensive network of small telephone cord buckles formed following deposition, interspersed with regions of larger telephone cord buckles. (Figure 1) On films with an aluminum oxide interlayer, telephone cord buckles formed creating a uniform widely spaced pattern. Through-substrate optical observations revealed matching buckle patterns along the film-substrate interface indicating that delamination occurred for large and small buckles with and without an interlayer. The coexistence of large and small buckles on the same substrate led to two distinct behaviors as shown in Figure 2 where normalized buckle heights are plotted against normalized film stress. The behaviors deviate significantly from

  11. Buckling of a holey column.

    PubMed

    Pihler-Puzović, D; Hazel, A L; Mullin, T

    2016-09-14

    We report the results from a combined experimental and numerical investigation of buckling in a novel variant of an elastic column under axial load. We find that including a regular line of centred holes in the column can prevent conventional, global, lateral buckling. Instead, the local microstructure introduced by the holes allows the column to buckle in an entirely different, internal, mode in which the holes are compressed in alternate directions, but the column maintains the lateral reflection symmetry about its centreline. The internal buckling mode can be accommodated within a smaller external space than the global one; and it is the preferred buckling mode over an intermediate range of column lengths for sufficiently large holes. For very short or sufficiently long columns a modification of the classical, global, lateral buckling is dominant.

  12. On Buckling Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Celeste M

    2016-02-01

    Cell-generated mechanical forces drive many of the tissue movements and rearrangements that are required to transform simple populations of cells into the complex three-dimensional geometries of mature organs. However, mechanical forces do not need to arise from active cellular movements. Recent studies have illuminated the roles of passive forces that result from mechanical instabilities between epithelial tissues and their surroundings. These mechanical instabilities cause essentially one-dimensional epithelial tubes and two-dimensional epithelial sheets to buckle or wrinkle into complex topologies containing loops, folds, and undulations in organs as diverse as the brain, the intestine, and the lung. Here, I highlight examples of buckling and wrinkling morphogenesis, and suggest that this morphogenetic mechanism may be broadly responsible for sculpting organ form.

  13. On Buckling Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Celeste M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-generated mechanical forces drive many of the tissue movements and rearrangements that are required to transform simple populations of cells into the complex three-dimensional geometries of mature organs. However, mechanical forces do not need to arise from active cellular movements. Recent studies have illuminated the roles of passive forces that result from mechanical instabilities between epithelial tissues and their surroundings. These mechanical instabilities cause essentially one-dimensional epithelial tubes and two-dimensional epithelial sheets to buckle or wrinkle into complex topologies containing loops, folds, and undulations in organs as diverse as the brain, the intestine, and the lung. Here, I highlight examples of buckling and wrinkling morphogenesis, and suggest that this morphogenetic mechanism may be broadly responsible for sculpting organ form. PMID:26632268

  14. Plastic buckling of a rectangular plate under edge thrusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handelman, G H; Prager, W

    1949-01-01

    The fundamental equations for the plastic buckling of a rectangular plate under edge thrusts are developed on the basis of a new set of stress-strain relations for the behavior of a metal in the plastic range. These relations are derived for buckling from a state of uniform compression. The fundamental equation for the buckling of a simply compressed plate together with typical boundary conditions is then developed and the results are applied to calculating the buckling loads of a thin strip, a simply supported plate, and a cruciform section. Comparisons with the theories of Timoshenko and Ilyushin are made. Finally, an energy method is given which can be used for finding approximate values of the critical load.

  15. Enhancement of Buckling Load with the Use of Active Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, active buckling control of a beam using piezoelectric materials is investigated. Under small deformation, mathematical models are developed to describe the behavior of the beams subjected to an axial compressive load with geometric imperfections and load eccentricities under piezoelectric force. Two types of supports, simply supported and clamped, of the beam with a partially bonded piezoelectric actuator are used to illustrate the concept. For the beam with load eccentricities and initial geometric imperfections, the load- carrying capacity can be significantly enhanced by counteracting moments from the piezoelectric actuator. For the single piezoelectric actuator, using static feedback closed-loop control, the first buckling load can be eliminated. In the case of initially straight beams, analytical solutions of the enhanced first critical buckling load due to the increase of bending stiffness by piezoelectric actuators are derived based on linearized buckling analysis.

  16. Buckling analysis of a ring stiffened hybrid composite cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potluri, Rakesh; Eswara Kumar, A.; Navuri, Karteek; Nagaraju, M.; Mojeswara Rao, Duduku

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to understand the response of the ring stiffened cylinders made up of hybrid composites subjected to buckling loads by using the concepts of Design of Experiments (DOE) and optimization by using Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation software Ansys workbench V15. Carbon epoxy and E-glass epoxy composites were used in the hybrid composite. This hybrid composite was analyzed by using different layup angles. Central composite design (CCD) was used to perform design of experiments (D.O.E) and kriging method was used to generate a response surface. The response surface optimization (RSO) was performed by using the method of the multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA). After optimization, the best candidate was chosen and applied to the ring stiffened cylinder and eigenvalue buckling analysis was performed to understand the buckling behavior. Best laminate candidates with high buckling strength have been identified. A generalized procedure of the laminate optimization and analysis have been shown.

  17. Dynamic buckling of actin within filopodia

    PubMed Central

    Leijnse, Natascha; Oddershede, Lene B; Bendix, Poul M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Filopodia are active tubular structures protruding from the cell surface which allow the cell to sense and interact with the surrounding environment through repetitive elongation-retraction cycles. The mechanical behavior of filopodia has been studied by measuring the traction forces exerted on external substrates.1 These studies have revealed that internal actin flow can transduce a force across the cell surface through transmembrane linkers like integrins. In addition to the elongation-retraction behavior filopodia also exhibit a buckling and rotational behavior. Filopodial buckling in conjunction with rotation enables the cell to explore a much larger 3-dimensional space and allows for more complex, and possibly stronger, interactions with the external environment.2 Here we focus on how bending of the filopodial actin dynamically correlates with pulling on an optically trapped microsphere which acts like an external substrate attached to the filopodial tip. There is a clear correlation between presence of actin near the tip and exertion of a traction force, thus demonstrating that the traction force is transduced along the actin shaft inside the filopodium. By extending a filopodium and holding it while measuring the cellular response, we also monitor and analyze the waiting times for the first buckle observed in the fluorescently labeled actin shaft. PMID:26479403

  18. Buckling of dislocation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yin; Wang, Shaofeng; Bai, Jianhui; Wang, Rui

    2016-10-01

    The buckling of dislocation in graphene is discussed through the lattice theory of dislocation and elastic theory. The approximate solution of the buckling is obtained based on the inner stress distribution caused by different structure of dislocations and is proved to be suitable by the simulation. The position of the highest buckling is predicted to be at the vertex of the pentagon far away from the heptagon. The buckling is strongly influenced by the internal stress and the distance between the extrusive area and stretching area, as well as the critical stress σc. The SW defect is proved to be unbuckled due to its strong interaction between extrusion and stretching.

  19. Effect of unloading time on interrupted creep in copper

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, H.D. . School of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    The effect of unloading time on the interrupted creep behavior of polycrystalline copper specimens was investigated over the temperature range 298--773 K. Up to 553 K, cyclic creep acceleration could be explained in terms of deformation and hardening using a dislocation glide model with recovery during unloading being due to dislocation climb. At higher temperatures, recrystallization effects probably influence behavior.

  20. The secondary buckling transition: wrinkling of buckled spherical shells.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Sebastian; Kierfeld, Jan

    2014-07-01

    We theoretically explain the complete sequence of shapes of deflated spherical shells. Decreasing the volume, the shell remains spherical initially, then undergoes the classical buckling instability, where an axisymmetric dimple appears, and, finally, loses its axisymmetry by wrinkles developing in the vicinity of the dimple edge in a secondary buckling transition. We describe the first axisymmetric buckling transition by numerical integration of the complete set of shape equations and an approximate analytic model due to Pogorelov. In the buckled shape, both approaches exhibit a locally compressive hoop stress in a region where experiments and simulations show the development of polygonal wrinkles, along the dimple edge. In a simplified model based on the stability equations of shallow shells, a critical value for the compressive hoop stress is derived, for which the compressed circumferential fibres will buckle out of their circular shape in order to release the compression. By applying this wrinkling criterion to the solutions of the axisymmetric models, we can calculate the critical volume for the secondary buckling transition. Using the Pogorelov approach, we also obtain an analytical expression for the critical volume at the secondary buckling transition: The critical volume difference scales linearly with the bending stiffness, whereas the critical volume reduction at the classical axisymmetric buckling transition scales with the square root of the bending stiffness. These results are confirmed by another stability analysis in the framework of Donnel, Mushtari and Vlasov (DMV) shell theory, and by numerical simulations available in the literature.

  1. Creep-characteristics of a tropical wood-polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, L. H. L.; Teoh, S. H.; Boey, F. Y. C.

    Wood polymer composite (WPC) specimens were produced by impregnating a tropical wood with methyl methacrylate and subsequently polymerised by γ-irradiation. Beam specimens of varying weight percentages of polymer were then subjected to a three point bend creep test under a constant load condition, for 250, 300 and 350 N. A Norton-Bailey (power law) mathematical model was used to describe the creep behavior, with the creep components determined by a nonlinear regression analysis. Significant creep improvements were obtained from the composite specimens as compared to the untreated wood specimens. Results indicated that maximum creep resistance is obtained when the amount of polymer loading exceeded 30%. An interfacial interaction between the polymer and the wood cell wall was used to account for the behavior of the increase in the creep resistance.

  2. Buckle up for Interesting Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Miles

    2011-01-01

    Those who are involved in the current Common Core Standards should buckle up for a rocky ride. Some of the same issues that churned within the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) during the standards movement of the 1990s (1989-1997) are here once again. The author's buckle is pulled tight, having already had his standards report…

  3. Artery buckling analysis using a four-fiber wall model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Wen, Qi; Mottahedi, Mohammad; Han, Hai-Chao

    2014-08-22

    Artery bent buckling has been suggested as a possible mechanism that leads to artery tortuosity, which is associated with aging, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and other pathological conditions. It is necessary to understand the relationship between microscopic wall structural changes and macroscopic artery buckling behavior. To this end, the objectives of this study were to develop arterial buckling equations using a microstructure-based 4-fiber reinforced wall model, and to simulate the effects of vessel wall microstructural changes on artery buckling. Our results showed that the critical pressure increased nonlinearly with the axial stretch ratio, and the 4-fiber model predicted higher critical buckling pressures than what the Fung model predicted. The buckling equation using the 4-fiber model captured the experimentally observed reduction of critical pressure induced by elastin degradation and collagen fiber orientation changes in the arterial wall. These results improve our understanding of arterial stability and its relationship to microscopic wall remodeling, and the model provides a useful tool for further studies.

  4. Artery buckling analysis using a four-fiber wall model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qin; Wen, Qi; Mottahedi, Mohammad; Han, Hai-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Artery bent buckling has been suggested as a possible mechanism that leads to artery tortuosity, which is associated with aging, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and other pathological conditions. It is necessary to understand the relationship between microscopic wall structural changes and macroscopic artery buckling behavior. To this end, the objectives of this study were to develop arterial buckling equations using a microstructure-based 4-fiber reinforced wall model, and to simulate the effects of vessel wall microstructural changes on artery buckling. Our results showed that the critical pressure increased nonlinearly with the axial stretch ratio, and the 4-fiber model predicted higher critical buckling pressures than what the Fung model predicted. The buckling equation using the 4-fiber model captures the experimentally observed reduction of critical pressure induced by elastin degradation and collagen fiber orientation changes in the arterial wall. These results improve our understanding of arterial stability and its relationship to microscopic wall remodeling, and the model provides a useful tool for further studies. PMID:24972920

  5. Probabilistic progressive buckling of trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    A three-bay, space, cantilever truss is probabilistically evaluated to describe progressive buckling and truss collapse in view of the numerous uncertainties associated with the structural, material, and load variables (primitive variables) that describe the truss. Initially, the truss is deterministically analyzed for member forces, and member(s) in which the axial force exceeds the Euler buckling load are identified. These member(s) are then discretized with several intermediate nodes and a probabilistic buckling analysis is performed on the truss to obtain its probabilistic buckling loads and respective mode shapes. Furthermore, sensitivities associated with the uncertainties in the primitive variables are investigated, margin of safety values for the truss are determined, and truss end node displacements are noted. These steps are repeated by sequentially removing the buckled member(s) until onset of truss collapse is reached. Results show that this procedure yields an optimum truss configuration for a given loading and for a specified reliability.

  6. Probabilistic progressive buckling of trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1994-01-01

    A three-bay, space, cantilever truss is probabilistically evaluated to describe progressive buckling and truss collapse in view of the numerous uncertainties associated with the structural, material, and load variables that describe the truss. Initially, the truss is deterministically analyzed for member forces, and members in which the axial force exceeds the Euler buckling load are identified. These members are then discretized with several intermediate nodes, and a probabilistic buckling analysis is performed on the truss to obtain its probabilistic buckling loads and the respective mode shapes. Furthermore, sensitivities associated with the uncertainties in the primitive variables are investigated, margin of safety values for the truss are determined, and truss end node displacements are noted. These steps are repeated by sequentially removing buckled members until onset of truss collapse is reached. Results show that this procedure yields an optimum truss configuration for a given loading and for a specified reliability.

  7. Dynamic buckling of subducting slabs reconciles geological and geophysical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changyeol; King, Scott D.

    2011-12-01

    Ever since the early days of the development of plate tectonic theory, subduction zones have been engrained in geological thinking as the place where steady, linear slabs descend into the mantle at a constant, uniform dip angle beneath volcanic arcs. However, growing evidence from geological and geophysical observations as well as analog and numerical modeling indicates that subducting slabs buckle in a time-dependent manner, in contrast to the steady-state, linear cartoons that dominate the literature. To evaluate the implication of time-dependent slab buckling of geological events, we conduct a series of 2-D numerical dynamic/kinematic subduction experiments by varying the viscosity increase across the 660 km discontinuity and the strength of the subducting slab. Our results show that slab buckling is a universal figure in all the experiments when rate of the trench migration ( Vtrench) is relatively slow ( Vtrench| < 2 cm/a) and viscosity increases across the 660 km discontinuity are greater than a factor of 30. Slab buckling is expressed as alternate shallowing and steepening dip of the subducting slab (from ~ 40 to ~ 100°) which is correlated with increasing and decreasing convergent rate of the incoming oceanic plate toward the trench. Further, the slab buckling in our experiments is consistent with the previously developed scaling laws for slab buckling; using reasonable parameters from subducted slabs the buckling amplitude and period are ~ 400 km and ~ 25 Myr, respectively. The slab buckling behavior in our experiments explains a variety of puzzling geological and geophysical observations. First, the period of slab buckling is consistent with short periodic variations (~ 25 Myr) in the motions of the oceanic plates that are anchored by subduction zones. Second, the scattered distributions of slab dips (from ~ 20 to ~ 90°) in the upper mantle are snapshots of time-dependent slab dip. Third, the current compressional and extensional stress environments in

  8. Buckling failures in insect exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Parle, Eoin; Herbaj, Simona; Sheils, Fiona; Larmon, Hannah; Taylor, David

    2015-12-17

    Thin walled tubes are often used for load-bearing structures, in nature and in engineering, because they offer good resistance to bending and torsion at relatively low weight. However, when loaded in bending they are prone to failure by buckling. It is difficult to predict the loading conditions which cause buckling, especially for tubes whose cross sections are not simple shapes. Insights into buckling prevention might be gained by studying this phenomenon in the exoskeletons of insects and other arthropods. We investigated the leg segments (tibiae) of five different insects: the locust (Schistocerca gergaria), American cockroach (Periplaneta americana), death's head cockroach (Blaberus discoidalis), stick insect (Parapachymorpha zomproi) and bumblebee (Bombus terrestris audax). These were tested to failure in cantilever bending and modelled using finite element analysis (FEA). The tibiae of the locust and the cockroaches were found to be approximately circular in shape. Their buckling loads were well predicted by linear elastic FEA, and also by one of the analytical solutions available in the literature for elastic buckling. The legs of the stick insect are also circular in cross section but have several prominent longitudinal ridges. We hypothesised that these ridges might protect the legs against buckling but we found that this was not the case: the loads necessary for elastic buckling were not reached in practice because yield occurred in the material, causing plastic buckling. The legs of bees have a non-circular cross section due to a pollen-carrying feature (the corbicula). We found that this did not significantly affect their resistance to buckling. Our results imply that buckling is the dominant failure mode in the tibia of insects; it likely to be a significant consideration for other arthropods and any organisms with stiff exoskeletons. The interactions displayed here between material properties and cross sectional geometry may provide insights for the

  9. Creep Analysis for a Wide Stress Range Based on Stress Relaxation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenbach, Holm; Naumenko, Konstantin; Gorash, Yevgen

    Many materials exhibit a stress range dependent creep behavior. The power-law creep observed for a certain stress range changes to the viscous type creep if the stress value decreases. Recently published experimental data for advanced heat resistant steels indicates that the high creep exponent (in the range 5-12 for the power-law behavior) may decrease to the low value of approximately 1 within the stress range relevant for engineering structures. The aim of this paper is to confirm the stress range dependence of creep behavior based on the experimental data of stress relaxation. An extended constitutive model for the minimum creep rate is introduced to consider both the linear and the power law creep ranges. To take into account the primary creep behavior a strain hardening function is introduced. The material constants are identified for published experimental data of creep and relaxation tests for a 12%Cr steel bolting material at 500°C. The data for the minimum creep rate are well-defined only for moderate and high stress levels. To reconstruct creep rates for the low stress range the data of the stress relaxation test are applied. The results show a gradual decrease of the creep exponent with the decreasing stress level. Furthermore, they illustrate that the proposed constitutive model well describes the creep rates for a wide stress range.

  10. Creep-Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Pb-Containing and Pb-Free Solders at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakpan, Kittichai; Otsuka, Yuichi; Mutoh, Yoshiharu; Inoue, Shunsuke; Nagata, Kohsoku; Kodani, Kazuya

    2012-09-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests of lead-containing (Sn-37Pb) and lead-free (Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu) solders were conducted at frequencies ranging from 0.1 Hz to 10 Hz at stress ratio of 0.1, at room temperature and at 70°C. The J-integral range (Δ J) and the modified J-integral ( C *) were used in assessing the cycle-dependent and time-dependent crack growth behavior for both solders. The experimental results showed that the crack growth behavior of both solders at the lower frequency and higher temperature was predominantly time dependent, whereas the crack growth behavior of both solders at the higher frequency and lower temperature was predominantly cycle dependent, with the transition in fatigue crack growth behavior from cycle dependent to time dependent expressed as f + 6500exp(1/ T) = 6520. In both the cycle-dependent and time-dependent regions, the crack growth resistance of the lead-free solder was higher than that of lead-containing solder. Fracture surface observations showed that, as the frequency decreased and/or the temperature increased, the fracture path changed from transgranular to intergranular for Sn-37Pb solder, and from transgranular to mixed transgranular-intergranular for Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder.

  11. Better understanding of tubular helical buckling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.

    1996-09-01

    Tubular buckling is a significant problem within the oil industry. Although it has been studied for many years, methods to analyze tubular helical buckling continues to appear in the literature. Several criteria have been derived and presented leading to confusion in understanding and correctly predicting tubular helical buckling. The prediction of tubular helical buckling is complicated by the fact that the tubular is confined within the wellbore. The tubular initially buckles sinusoidally, and then changes into the shape of a helix (helical buckling) as the axial load increases. Different approaches in modeling the helical buckling process and the use of energy methods resulted in those different helical buckling criteria. Helical buckling criteria proposed in the literature, as well as their derivations are discussed in this paper, to help better understand and effectively predict tubular helical buckling in engineering operations.

  12. Buckling analysis of laminated thin shells in a hot environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Guptil, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of parametric studies to assess the effects of various parameters on the buckling behavior of angle-ply, laminated thin shells in a hot environment. These results were obtained by using a three-dimensional finite element analysis. An angle-ply, laminated thin shell with fiber orientation of (theta/-theta)(sub 2) was subjected to compressive mechanical loads. The laminated thin shell had a cylindrical geometry. The laminate contained T300 graphite fibers embedded in an intermediate-modulus, high-strength (IMHS) matrix. The fiber volume fraction was 55 percent and the moisture content was 2 percent. The residual stresses induced into the laminate structure during the curing were taken into account. Parametric studies were performed to examine the effect on the critical buckling load of the following parameters: cylinder length and thickness, internal hydrostatic pressure, different ply thicknesses, different temperature profiles through the thickness of the structure, and different lay up configurations and fiber volume fractions. In conjunction with these parameters the ply orientation was varied from 0 deg to 90 deg. Seven ply angles were examined: 0 deg, 15 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, 60 deg, 75 deg, and 90 deg. The results show that the ply angle theta and the laminate thickness had significant effects on the critical buckling load. The fiber volume fraction, the fiber orientations, and the internal hydrostatic pressure had important effects on the critical buckling load. The cylinder length had a moderate influence on the buckling load. The thin shell with (theta/-theta)(sub 2) or (theta/-theta)(sub s) angle-ply laminate had better buckling-load performance than the thin shell with (theta)(sub 4) angle-ply laminate. The temperature profiles through the laminate thickness and various laminates with the different ply thicknesses has insignificant effects on the buckling behavior of the thin shells.

  13. Analyses of Buckling and Stable Tearing in Thin-Sheet Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, B. R.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    This paper was to verify the STAGS (general shell, geometric and material nonlinear) code and the critical crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion for predicting stable tearing in cracked panels that fail with severe out of plane buckling. Materials considered ranged from brittle to ductile behavior. Test data used in this study are reported elsewhere. The STAGS code was used to model stable tearing using a critical CTOA value that was determined from a cracked panel that was 'restrained' from buckling. ne analysis methodology was then used to predict the influence of buckling on stable tearing and failure loads. Parameters like crack length to specimen width ratio, crack configuration, thickness, and material tensile properties had a significant influence on the buckling behavior of cracked thin sheet materials. Experimental and predicted results showed a varied buckling response for different crack length to sheet thickness ratios because different buckling modes were activated. Effects of material tensile properties and fracture toughness on buckling response were presented. The STAGS code and the CTOA fracture criterion were able to predict the influence of buckling on stable tearing behavior and failure loads on a variety of materials and crack configurations.

  14. Thermo-mechanical buckling analysis of FGM plate using generalized plate theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Kanishk; Kumar, Dinesh; Gite, Anil

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the thermo-mechanical buckling behavior of simply-supported FGM plate under the framework of generalized plate theory (GPT), which includes classical plate theory (CPT), first order shear deformation theory (FSDT) and higher order shear deformation theory (HSDT) as special cases. The governing equations for FGM plate under thermal and mechanical loading conditions are derived from the principle of virtual displacements and Navier-type solution is assumed for simply supported boundary condition. The efficiency and applicability of presented methodology is illustrated by considering various examples of thermal and mechanical buckling of FGM plates. The closed form solutions in the form of critical thermal and mechanical buckling loads, predicted by CPT, FSDT and HSDT are compared for different side-to-thickness of FGM plate. Subsequently, the effect of material gradation profile on critical buckling parameters is examined by evaluating the buckling response for a range of power law indexes. The effect of geometrical parameters on mechanical buckling of FGM plate under uni-axial and bi-axial loading conditions are also illustrated by calculating the critical load for various values of slenderness ratios. Furthermore a comparative analysis of critical thermal buckling loads of FGM plate for different temperature profiles is also presented. It is identified that all plate theories predicted approximately same critical buckling loads and critical buckling temperatures for thin FGM plate, however for thick FGM plates, CPT overestimates the critical buckling parameters. Moreover the critical buckling loads and critical buckling temperatures of FGM plate are found to be significantly lower than the corresponding homogenous isotropic ceramic plate (n=0).

  15. Creep rupture behavior due to molybdenum rich M{sub 6}C carbide in 1.0Cr-1.0Mo-0.25V bainitic steel weldment

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Y.K.; Kim, G.S.; Indacochea, J.E.

    1999-06-04

    Some reports show that Cr-Mo-V steel structures fabricated by welding has a high percent of failures in the microstructurally altered and inhomogeneous heat affected zone (HAZ). The failure usually takes place either at the coarse grain HAZ (CGHAZ) or intercritical HAZ (ICHAZ). Failure at creep condition is related to either cracking at grain boundary triple junctions or the formation of cavities (or voids) on grain boundaries that are approximately normal to the applied stress. Cavities are normally formed by grain boundary sliding causing stress concentrations at precipitates in the grain boundaries. Cavities will then develop at the precipitates whenever plastic flow or diffusion is not fast enough to prevent it. The precipitates that provide cavity nucleation sites are mostly sulfides and carbides. The carbides that provide cavity sites are usually M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and M{sub 6}C. Although considerable researchers have been carried out in the carbides that provide cavitation, the mechanism governs creep behavior during welding remains uncertain. Therefore, the objective of this study is to correlate carbide morphology and its effect on creep rupture behavior in 1.0 Cr-1.0Mo-0.25V bainitic steel weldment.

  16. Creep of Nearly Lamellar TiAl Alloy Containing W

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, A M; Hsiung, L M; Nieh, T

    2004-04-08

    Effects of W on the creep resistance of two nearly fully lamellar TiAl alloys with 1.0 and 2.0 at.%W have been investigated. In the low stress regime (LS) a nearly quadratic (1.5creep behavior was observed. It is found that the addition of W can improve the creep resistance; however, the addition of excess W can result in the formation of {beta} phase, which produces an adverse effect on the creep strength.

  17. Pure climb creep mechanism drives flow in Earth's lower mantle.

    PubMed

    Boioli, Francesca; Carrez, Philippe; Cordier, Patrick; Devincre, Benoit; Gouriet, Karine; Hirel, Pierre; Kraych, Antoine; Ritterbex, Sebastian

    2017-03-01

    At high pressure prevailing in the lower mantle, lattice friction opposed to dislocation glide becomes very high, as reported in recent experimental and theoretical studies. We examine the consequences of this high resistance to plastic shear exhibited by ringwoodite and bridgmanite on creep mechanisms under mantle conditions. To evaluate the consequences of this effect, we model dislocation creep by dislocation dynamics. The calculation yields to an original dominant creep behavior for lower mantle silicates where strain is produced by dislocation climb, which is very different from what can be activated under high stresses under laboratory conditions. This mechanism, named pure climb creep, is grain-size-insensitive and produces no crystal preferred orientation. In comparison to the previous considered diffusion creep mechanism, it is also a more efficient strain-producing mechanism for grain sizes larger than ca. 0.1 mm. The specificities of pure climb creep well match the seismic anisotropy observed of Earth's lower mantle.

  18. Aspects of circumferential waves in determining buckling capacity of cylindrical shells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Bandyopadhyay, K.K.

    1996-12-01

    In an effort to quantify the failure behavior of a cylindrical shell when geometric imperfections are present and is subjected to a combination of axial load and internal pressure, the authors have carried out a series of analyses to investigate the effects of various load combinations and material behavior on the shell`s buckling capacity. To complete the characterization of buckling behavior of cylindrical shells, an evaluation was performed to examine the deformation modes in terms of circumferential waves in relation to the shell`s buckling capacity. This paper presents the results of the investigation.

  19. Effects of Geometric Variations on the Buckling of Arteries.

    PubMed

    Datir, Parag; Lee, Avione Y; Lamm, Shawn D; Han, Hai-Chao

    2011-10-05

    Arteries often demonstrate geometric variations such as elliptic and eccentric cross sections, stenosis, and tapering along the longitudinal axis. Effects of these variations on the mechanical stability of the arterial wall have not been investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the buckling behavior of arteries with elliptic, eccentric, stenotic, and tapered cross sections. The arterial wall was modeled as a homogenous anisotropic nonlinear material. Finite element analysis was used to simulate the buckling process of these arteries under lumen pressure and axial stretch. Our results demonstrated that arteries with an oval cross section buckled in the short axis direction at lower critical pressures compared to circular arteries. Eccentric cross-sections, stenosis, and tapering also decreased the critical pressure. Stenosis led to dramatic pressure variations along the vessel and reduced the buckling pressure. In addition, tapering shifted the buckling deformation profile of the artery towards the distal end. We conclude that geometric variations reduce the critical pressure of arteries and thus make the arteries more prone to mechanical instability than circular cylindrical arteries. These results improve our understanding of the mechanical behavior of arteries.

  20. Viscous Creep in Dry Unconsolidated Gulf of Mexico Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Zoback, M. D.

    2002-12-01

    We conducted laboratory experiments to investigate creep characteristics of dry unconsolidated shale recovered from the pathfinder well, Gulf of Mexico (GOM). We subjected jacketed cylindrical specimens (25.4 mm diameter) to hydrostatic pressure that increased from 10 to 50 MPa in steps of 5 MPa. We kept the pressure constant in each step for at least 6 hours and measured axial and lateral strains (provided by LVDTs) and ultrasonic velocities (provided by seismic-wave transducers). The dry shale exhibited pronounced creep strain at all pressure levels, indicating that the dry frame of the shale possesses an intrinsic viscous property. Interestingly, the creep behavior of the shale is different above and below 30 MPa confining pressure. Above 30 MPa, the amount of creep strain in 6 hours is nearly constant with equal pressurization steps, indicating a linear viscous rheology. Below 30 MPa, the amount of creep increases linearly as pressure is raised in constant incremental steps, suggesting that the creep deformation accelerates as pressure increases within this pressure range. Thus, the general creep behavior of the GOM shale is characterized by a bilinear dependence on pressure magnitude. This creep characteristic is quite different from that observed in unconsolidated reservoir sands (Hagin and Zoback, 2002), which exhibited nearly constant amount of creep regardless of the pressure magnitude for equal increasing steps of pressure. The shale exhibits a lack of creep (and nearly negligible strain recovery) when unloaded, suggesting that the creep strain is irrecoverable and can be considered viscoplastic deformation. SEM observations show that the major mechanism of compaction of the dry shale appears to be packing of clay and a progressive collapse of pore (void) spaces. Creep compaction is considerably more significant than compaction that occurs instantaneously, indicating that the process of shale compaction is largely time-dependent.

  1. Compression creep of filamentary composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graesser, D. L.; Tuttle, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Axial and transverse strain fields induced in composite laminates subjected to compressive creep loading were compared for several types of laminate layups. Unidirectional graphite/epoxy as well as multi-directional graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK layups were studied. Specimens with and without holes were tested. The specimens were subjected to compressive creep loading for a 10-hour period. In-plane displacements were measured using moire interferometry. A computer based data reduction scheme was developed which reduces the whole-field displacement fields obtained using moire to whole-field strain contour maps. Only slight viscoelastic response was observed in matrix-dominated laminates, except for one test in which catastrophic specimen failure occurred after a 16-hour period. In this case the specimen response was a complex combination of both viscoelastic and fracture mechanisms. No viscoelastic effects were observed for fiber-dominated laminates over the 10-hour creep time used. The experimental results for specimens with holes were compared with results obtained using a finite-element analysis. The comparison between experiment and theory was generally good. Overall strain distributions were very well predicted. The finite element analysis typically predicted slightly higher strain values at the edge of the hole, and slightly lower strain values at positions removed from the hole, than were observed experimentally. It is hypothesized that these discrepancies are due to nonlinear material behavior at the hole edge, which were not accounted for during the finite-element analysis.

  2. Deformation Microstructures and Creep Mechanisms in Advanced ZR-Based Cladding Under Biazal Loading

    SciTech Connect

    K. Linga Murty

    2008-08-11

    Investigate creep behavior of Zr-based cladding tubes with attention to basic creep mechanisms and transitions in them at low stresses and/or temperatures and study the dislocation microstructures of deformed samples for correlation with the underlying micromechanism of creep

  3. Anomalous Buckling Characteristics of Laminated Metal-Matrix Composite Plates with Central Square Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1998-01-01

    Compressive buckling analysis was performed on metal-matrix composite (MMC) plates with central square holes. The MMC plates have varying aspect ratios and hole sizes and are supported under different boundary conditions. The finite-element structural analysis method was used to study the effects of plate boundary conditions, plate aspect ratio, hole size, and the composite stacking sequence on the compressive buckling strengths of the perforated MMC plates. Studies show that by increasing the hole sizes, compressive buckling strengths of the perforated MMC plates could be considerably increased under certain boundary conditions and aspect ratios ("anomalous" buckling behavior); and that the plate buckling mode could be symmetrical or antisymmetrical, depending on the plate boundary conditions, aspect ratio, and the hole size. For same-sized plates with same-sized holes, the compressive buckling strengths of the perforated MMC plates with [90/0/0/90]2 lamination could be as much as 10 percent higher or lower than those of the [45/- 45/- 45/45]2 laminations, depending on the plate boundary conditions, plate aspect ratios, and the hole size. Clamping the plate edges induces far stronger "anomalous" buckling behavior (enhancing compressive buckling strengths at increasing hole sizes) of the perforated MMC plates than simply supporting the plate edges.

  4. Irradiation creep of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide at low neutron fluences

    SciTech Connect

    Koyanagi, Takaaki; Shimoda, Kazuya; Kondo, Sosuke; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Ozawa, Kazumi; Katoh, Yutai

    2014-12-01

    The irradiation creep behavior of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide was investigated using the bend stress relaxation method under neutron irradiation up to 1.9 dpa. The creep deformation was observed at all temperatures ranging from 380 to 1180 °C mainly from the irradiation creep but with the increasing contributions from the thermal creep at higher temperatures. Microstructural observation and data analysis were performed.

  5. Improved Creep Behavior of a High Nitrogen Nb-Stabilized 15Cr-15Ni Austenitic Stainless Steel Strengthened by Multiple Nanoprecipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Vu The; Jung, Woo Sang; Suh, Jin Yoo

    2011-11-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are expected to be a major material for boiler tubes and steam turbines in future ultra-supercritical (USC) fossil power plants. It is of great interest to maximize the creep strength of the materials without increasing the cost. Precipitation strengthening was found to be the best and cheapest way for increasing the creep strength of such steels. This study is concerned with improving creep properties of a high nitrogen Nb-stabilized 15Cr-15Ni austenitic alloy through introducing a high number of nanosized particles into the austenitic matrix. The addition of around 4 wt pct Mn and 0.236 wt pct N into the 15Cr-15Ni-0.46Si-0.7Nb-1.25Mo-3Cu-Al-B-C matrix in combination with a special multicycled aging-quenching heat treatment resulted in the fine dispersion of abundant quantities of thermally stable (Nb,Cr,Fe)(C,N) precipitates with sizes of 10 to 20 nm. Apart from the carbonitrides, it was found that a high number of coherent copper precipitates with size 40 to 60 nm exist in the microstructure. Results of creep tests at 973 K and 1023 K (700 °C and 750 °C) showed that the creep properties of the investigated steel are superior compared to that of the commercial NF709 alloy. The improved creep properties are attributed to the improved morphology and thermal stability of the carbonitrides as well as to the presence of the coherent copper precipitates inside the austenitic matrix.

  6. Creep behavior of modified 9% CrMo cast steel for application in coal-fired steam power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, K.H.; Koenig, H.

    1995-02-01

    Laboratory creep studies of modified 9% CrMo cast ferritic steel indicate that its performance will be very similar to that of the popular ASME P-91 9% Cr wrought ferritic steel. This report includes an investigation of the physical parameters and properties of modified 9% CrMo cast ferritic steel, including castability and weldability; thermal, low-cycle fatigue, corrosion, and creep strength; and long-term toughness in tests of up to 50,000 hours on large components and specimens.

  7. Scleral buckling surgery using multiple radial buckles: A valid option?

    PubMed Central

    Sudhalkar, Aditya; Sudhalkar, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether radial buckling surgery using two or more radial buckles with or without circumferential silicone tires is still a treatment option for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) in the current scenario. Methods Retrospective chart review. Patients with RRD with two or more horse-shoe tears with/without proliferative vitreoretinopathy up to grade C1 who underwent buckling surgery using at least two radial buckle segments without encircling bands or drainage and with at least a 3 year follow up were included in the study. Data collected included demographics, corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) at baseline and final follow up, details of the examination, surgical procedure(s) and complications noted, if any. Appropriate statistical analysis was done. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Outcome measures Proportion of patients who had an attached retina at final follow up, improvement in CDVA and complications. Results 25 patients (25 eyes; 12 males and 13 females; 9 pseudophakic) were included. Median age 35.15 ± 8.32 years. Median baseline CDVA: 1.97 ± 1.12 log MAR. Median final CDVA: 0.65 ± 0.37 log MAR (significant improvement). Most common presenting complaint was decreased vision (87.5%). Number of radial buckle segments placed varied between 2 and 4 per eye. One patient required vitrectomy for persistent retinal detachment. One required buckle removal for infection 5 years after the primary procedure. One patient required strabismus surgery. Median follow up 12.25 years ± 2.14 years. None of the other patients had any complications. Conclusion Radial buckling surgery (two or more segments) is a reasonably safe and valid alternative to vitrectomy for RDs with multiple breaks in different planes. PMID:26155077

  8. Molecular dynamics analysis on buckling of defective carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kulathunga, D D T K; Ang, K K; Reddy, J N

    2010-09-01

    Owing to their remarkable mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been employed in many diverse areas of applications. However, similar to any of the many man-made materials used today, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are also susceptible to various kinds of defects. Understanding the effect of defects on the mechanical properties and behavior of CNTs is essential in the design of nanotube-based devices and composites. It has been found in various past studies that these defects can considerably affect the tensile strength and fracture of CNTs. Comprehensive studies on the effect of defects on the buckling and vibration of nanotubes is however lacking in the literature. In this paper, the effects of various configurations of atomic vacancy defects, on axial buckling of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), in different thermal environments, is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), based on a COMPASS force field. Our findings revealed that even a single missing atom can cause a significant reduction in the critical buckling strain and load of SWCNTs. In general, increasing the number of missing atoms, asymmetry of vacancy configurations and asymmetric distribution of vacancy clusters seemed to lead to higher deterioration in buckling properties. Further, SWCNTs with a single vacancy cluster, compared to SWCNTs with two or more vacancy clusters having the same number of missing atoms, appeared to cause higher deterioration of buckling properties. However, exceptions from the above mentioned trends could be expected due to chemical instabilities of defects. Temperature appeared to have less effect on defective CNTs compared to pristine CNTs.

  9. Column buckling of magnetically affected stocky nanowires carrying electric current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Keivan

    2015-08-01

    Axial load-bearing capacity of current carrying nanowires (CCNWs) acted upon by a longitudinal magnetic field is of high interest. By adopting Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity theory, the governing equations of the nanostructure are constructed based on the Timoshenko and higher-order beam models. To solve these equations for critical compressive load, a meshfree approach is exploited and the weak formulations for the proposed models are obtained. The predicted buckling loads are compared with those of assume mode method and a remarkable confirmation is reported. The role of influential factors on buckling load of the nanostructure is carefully addressed and discussed. The obtained results reveal that the surface energy effect becomes important in buckling behavior of slender CCNWs, particularly for high electric currents and magnetic field strengths. For higher electric currents, relative discrepancies between the results of Timoshenko and higher-order beam models increase with a higher rate as the slenderness ratio magnifies. A magnetically affected current-carrying nanowire acted upon by an axial force. Axial buckling of stocky current-carrying nanowires in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field is of particular interest. Using Timoshenko and higher-order beam theories accounting for surface energy effect, the governing equations are derived and a meshfree methodology is applied to evaluate the buckling load.

  10. Buckling and postbuckling behaviour of imperfect laminated shallow spherical shells under external pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muc, A.

    The paper deals with the static buckling and postbuckling behavior of clamped elastic imperfect laminated shallow spherical shells subjected to uniform external pressure. Three types of initial geometrical imperfections are analyzed: two local described by a convex or a concave curve, and one global in the form of the Legendre polynomial. Applying the Rayleigh-Ritz procedure to Marguerre's equations combined with the precise prebuckling numerical analysis, reasonably accurate solutions are obtained for upper and lower buckling pressures. The effects of fiber orientations on pre- and postbuckling behavior, imperfection sensitivity, buckling loads, and modes are considered. The results for composite shells are compared with those calculated for quasi-isotropic ones.

  11. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  12. Computer program analyzes Buckling Of Shells Of Revolution with various wall construction, BOSOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almroth, B. O.; Bushnell, D.; Sobel, L. H.

    1968-01-01

    Computer program performs stability analyses for a wide class of shells without unduly restrictive approximations. The program uses numerical integration, finite difference of finite element techniques to solve with reasonable accuracy almost any buckling problem for shells exhibiting orthotropic behavior.

  13. Compressive buckling analysis of hat-stiffened panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1991-01-01

    Buckling analysis was performed on a hat-stiffened panel subjected to uniaxial compression. Both local buckling and global buckling were analyzed. It was found that the global buckling load was several times higher than the buckling load. The predicted local buckling loads compared favorably with both experimental data and finite-element analysis.

  14. The role of cobalt on the creep of Waspaloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Chin, L.; Tien, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Cobalt was systematically replaced with nickel in Waspaloy (which normally contains 13% Co) to determine the effects of cobalt on the creep behavior of this alloy. Effects of cobalt were found to be minimal on tensile strengths and microstructure. The creep resistance and the stress rupture resistance determined in the range from 704 to 760 C (1300 to 1400 C) were found to decrease as cobalt was removed from the standard alloy at all stresses and temperatures. Roughly a ten-fold drop in rupture life and a corresponding increase in minimum creep rate were found under all test conditions. Both the apparent creep activation energy and the matrix contribution to creep resistance were found to increase with cobalt. These creep effects are attributed to cobalt lowering the stacking fault energy of the alloy matrix. The creep resistance loss due to the removal of cobalt is shown to be restored by slightly increasing the gamma' volume fraction. Results are compared to a previous study on Udimet 700, a higher strength, higher gamma' volume fraction alloy with similar phase chemistry, in which cobalt did not affect creep resistance. An explanation for this difference in behavior based on interparticle spacing and cross-slip is presented.

  15. Suprachoroidal Buckling: Technique and Indications

    PubMed Central

    El Rayes, Ehab N; Elborgy, Ebrahim

    2013-01-01

    The authors herein report the feasibility of suprachoroidal buckling (SCB) procedure as a new approach for treating different forms of retinal detachment (RD) by creating suprachoroidal indentation (buckling effect). With this technique, specially designed devices, i.e. a catheter or cannula, are guided in the suprachoroidal space to reach the target area. Then, a suprachoroidal filler (long lasting hyaluronic acid) is injected to indent the choroid creating SCB, thereby closing retinal tears and supporting the overlying retina. This procedure was performed to treat both myopic tractional maculopathy (MTM), including myopic macular holes, as well as peripheral retinal breaks. SCB may be used alone or in conjunction with vitrectomy. In myopic patients, restoration of retinal layers was achieved in all eyes with myopic foveoschisis. Most eyes with macular hole detachments demonstrated closure of the holes. All peripheral retinal breaks were adequately buckled and closed in a single procedure. The buckling effect was long enough in duration to seal the tears and promote adequate chorioretinal scarring. The procedure was safe and relatively simple in terms of reaching the treatment area and injecting the filler. SCB adds to our surgical options for treating selected cases of peripheral retinal tears and rhegmatogenous RD, and avoids potential problems of episcleral buckles. Moreover it may avoid vitrectomy in selected cases of rhegmatogenous RD. PMID:24653830

  16. Molecular dynamics study on the thermal buckling of carbon nanotubes in the presence of pre-load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehralian, Fahimeh; Tadi Beni, Yaghoub; Kiani, Yaser

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a molecular dynamics (MD) study on the thermally induced buckling of pre-compressed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using AIREBO interatomic potential. CNTs are compressed at a certain ratio of their critical buckling strain and then undergo a uniform temperature rise. In order to evaluate the chirality effects, armchair and zigzag CNTs are investigated. The results demonstrate that critical buckling temperature depends strongly on the geometrical parameters such as chirality, diameter and aspect ratio. The armchair CNTs, due to their bond configuration, show higher resistance to thermal buckling than zigzag ones. Moreover, the buckling mechanism is strongly affected by the length of CNTs. At small aspect ratios, radial limit load shell buckling occurs while by increase in aspect ratio above the critical one different behaviors emerge. Due to the strong thermal oscillation of carbon atoms, increase in temperature changes perfect nanotubes to defective ones.

  17. Fluctuations and Scaling in Creep Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosti, Jari; Koivisto, Juha; Laurson, Lasse; Alava, Mikko J.

    2010-09-01

    The spatial fluctuations of deformation are studied in the creep in Andrade’s power law and the logarithmic phases, using paper samples. Measurements by the digital image correlation technique show that the relative strength of the strain rate fluctuations increases with time, in both creep regimes. In the Andrade creep phase characterized by a power-law decay of the strain rate γt˜t-θ, with θ≈0.7, the fluctuations obey Δγt˜t-γ, with γ≈0.5. The local deformation follows a data collapse appropriate for a phase transition. Similar behavior is found in a crystal plasticity model, with a jamming or yielding transition.

  18. Buckling failure of the axially pre-compressed cylindrical shell irradiated by CW CO2 laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuze; Li, Sizhong

    1993-07-01

    The experimental study on the buckling failure of lateral surface of the axially pre-compressed cylindrical aluminum shell irradiated by CW CO2 laser beam is described in this paper. It has been shown from its results that the heat softening of the surface material will induce buckling failure of the pre-compressed cylindrical shell, the critical buckling load decreases with increase of incident laser energy and the persistent axial compression loading. The behavior of the post buckling may cause catastrophic collapse of the shell.

  19. Creep Behavior of Frozen Sand.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    Potash feldspar was the most abundant feldspar species. The clay minerals present were mica, illite, vermiculite and chlorite with considerable...5000X; a) Mica, b) Feldspar , c) Quartz -9- Page Fig. 111-5 Compaction - Freezing Mold 104 111-6 Cooling Curve for Partially Saturated MFS 105 111-7...aetween 74 and 250im size. The specific gravity of the sand was 2.67g/cm 3 . The mineralogy of the sand material was predominantly quartz and feldspars

  20. Creep-rupture reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta-Duran, A.; Wirsching, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A probabilistic approach to the correlation and extrapolation of creep-rupture data is presented. Time temperature parameters (TTP) are used to correlate the data, and an analytical expression for the master curve is developed. The expression provides a simple model for the statistical distribution of strength and fits neatly into a probabilistic design format. The analysis focuses on the Larson-Miller and on the Manson-Haferd parameters, but it can be applied to any of the TTP's. A method is developed for evaluating material dependent constants for TTP's. It is shown that optimized constants can provide a significant improvement in the correlation of the data, thereby reducing modelling error. Attempts were made to quantify the performance of the proposed method in predicting long term behavior. Uncertainty in predicting long term behavior from short term tests was derived for several sets of data. Examples are presented which illustrate the theory and demonstrate the application of state of the art reliability methods to the design of components under creep.

  1. Circular Functions Based Comprehensive Analysis of Plastic Creep Deformations in the Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfared, Vahid

    2016-12-01

    Analytically based model is presented for behavioral analysis of the plastic deformations in the reinforced materials using the circular (trigonometric) functions. The analytical method is proposed to predict creep behavior of the fibrous composites based on basic and constitutive equations under a tensile axial stress. New insight of the work is to predict some important behaviors of the creeping matrix. In the present model, the prediction of the behaviors is simpler than the available methods. Principal creep strain rate behaviors are very noteworthy for designing the fibrous composites in the creeping composites. Analysis of the mentioned parameter behavior in the reinforced materials is necessary to analyze failure, fracture, and fatigue studies in the creep of the short fiber composites. Shuttles, spaceships, turbine blades and discs, and nozzle guide vanes are commonly subjected to the creep effects. Also, predicting the creep behavior is significant to design the optoelectronic and photonic advanced composites with optical fibers. As a result, the uniform behavior with constant gradient is seen in the principal creep strain rate behavior, and also creep rupture may happen at the fiber end. Finally, good agreements are found through comparing the obtained analytical and FEM results.

  2. Minimum strain rate and primary transient creep analysis of a fine structure orthorhombic titanium aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, R.W.

    1996-03-15

    The purpose of the present paper is to present a preliminary analysis of the primary transient creep behavior of an orthorhombic titanium aluminide having a very fine microstructure. In order to analyze and understand the creep behavior within the primary transient regime it is necessary to understand the mechanisms controlling deformation within the minimum strain rate region. Therefore an analysis of the minimum strain rate behavior is also presented. It will be shown that the primary transient creep behavior is dependent upon whether creep in the minimum strain rate region is controlled by a viscous flow mechanism or a dislocation mechanism.

  3. Plastic buckling of cylindrical shells

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Xu, J.; Shteyngart, S.; Eckert, H.

    1994-05-01

    Cylindrical shells exhibit buckling under axial loads at stresses much less than the respective theoretical critical stresses. This is due primarily to the presence of geometrical imperfections even through such imperfections could be very small (e.g., comparable to thickness). Under internal pressure, the shell regains some of its buckling strength. For a relatively large radius-to-tickness ratio and low internal pressure, the effect can be reasonably estimated by an elastic analysis. However, for low radius-to-thickness ratios and greater pressures, the elastic-plastic collapse controls the failure load. In order to quantify the elastic-plastic buckling capacity of cylindrical shells, an analysis program was carried out by use of the computer code BOSOR5 developed by Bushnell of Lockheed Missiles and Space company. The analysis was performed for various radius-to- thickness ratios and imperfection amplitudes. The analysis results are presented in this paper.

  4. ORNL irradiation creep facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reiley, T.C.; Auble, R.L.; Beckers, R.M.; Bloom, E.E.; Duncan, M.G.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    A machine was developed at ORNL to measure the rates of elongation observed under irradiation in stressed materials. The source of radiation is a beam of 60 MeV alpha particles from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). This choice allows experiments to be performed which simulate the effects of fast neutrons. A brief review of irradiation creep and experimental constraints associated with each measurement technique is given. Factors are presented which lead to the experimental choices made for the Irradiation Creep Facility (ICF). The ICF consists of a helium-filled chamber which houses a high-precision mechanical testing device. The specimen to be tested must be thermally stabilized with respect to the temperature fluctuations imposed by the particle beam which passes through the specimen. Electrical resistance of the specimen is the temperature control parameter chosen. Very high precision in length measurement and temperature control are required to detect the small elongation rates relevant to irradiation creep in the test periods available (approx. 1 day). The apparatus components and features required for the above are presented in some detail, along with the experimental procedures. The damage processes associated with light ions are discussed and displacement rates are calculated. Recent irradiation creep results are given, demonstrating the suitability of the apparatus for high resolution experiments. Also discussed is the suitability of the ICF for making high precision thermal creep measurements.

  5. Creep of two-phase microstructures for microelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Heidi Linch

    The mechanical properties of low-melting temperature alloys are highly influenced by their creep behavior. This study investigates the dominant mechanisms that control creep behavior of two-phase, low-melting temperature alloys as a function of microstructure. The alloy systems selected for study were In-Ag and Sn-Bi because their eutectic compositions represent distinctly different microstructures. The In-Ag eutectic contains a discontinuous phase while the Sn-Bi eutectic consists of two continuous phases. In addition, this work generates useful engineering data on Pb-free alloys with a joint specimen geometry that simulates microstructures found in microelectronic applications. The use of joint test specimens allows for observations regarding the practical attainability of superplastic microstructures in real solder joints by varying the cooling rate. Steady-state creep properties of In-Ag eutectic, Sn-Bi eutectic, Sn-xBi solid-solution and pure Bi joints have been measured using constant load tests at temperatures ranging from 0°C to 90°C. Constitutive equations are derived to describe the steady-state creep behavior for In-Ag eutectic solder joints and Sn-xBi solid-solution joints. The data are well represented by an equation of the form proposed by Dorn: a power-law equation applies to each independent creep mechanism. Rate-controlling creep mechanisms, as a function of applied shear stress, test temperature, and joint microstructure, are discussed. Literature data on the steady-state creep properties of Sn-Bi eutectic are reviewed and compared with the Sn-xBi solid-solution and pure Bi joint data measured in the current study. The role of constituent phases in controlling eutectic creep behavior is discussed for both alloy systems. In general, for continuous, two-phase microstructures, where each phase exhibits significantly different creep behavior, the harder or more creep resistant phase will dominate the creep behavior in a lamellar microstructure. If a

  6. Creep of Two-Phase Microstructures for Microelectronic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Heidi Linch

    1998-12-01

    The mechanical properties of low-melting temperature alloys are highly influenced by their creep behavior. This study investigates the dominant mechanisms that control creep behavior of two-phase, low-melting temperature alloys as a function of microstructure. The alloy systems selected for study were In-Ag and Sn-Bi because their eutectic compositions represent distinctly different microstructure.” The In-Ag eutectic contains a discontinuous phase while the Sn-Bi eutectic consists of two continuous phases. In addition, this work generates useful engineering data on Pb-free alloys with a joint specimen geometry that simulates microstructure found in microelectronic applications. The use of joint test specimens allows for observations regarding the practical attainability of superplastic microstructure in real solder joints by varying the cooling rate. Steady-state creep properties of In-Ag eutectic, Sn-Bi eutectic, Sn-xBi solid-solution and pure Bi joints have been measured using constant load tests at temperatures ranging from O°C to 90°C. Constitutive equations are derived to describe the steady-state creep behavior for In-Ageutectic solder joints and Sn-xBi solid-solution joints. The data are well represented by an equation of the form proposed by Dom: a power-law equation applies to each independent creep mechanism. Rate-controlling creep mechanisms, as a function of applied shear stress, test temperature, and joint microstructure, are discussed. Literature data on the steady-state creep properties of Sn-Bi eutectic are reviewed and compared with the Sn-xBi solid-solution and pure Bi joint data measured in the current study. The role of constituent phases in controlling eutectic creep behavior is discussed for both alloy systems. In general, for continuous, two-phase microstructure, where each phase exhibits significantly different creep behavior, the harder or more creep resistant phase will dominate the creep behavior in a lamellar microstructure. If a

  7. Relation between creep compliance and elastic modulus in organic-rich shales observed through laboratory experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Hiroki; Zoback, Mark

    2013-04-01

    We studied the ductile creep behavior of organic-rich shales from shale gas reservoirs in North America through laboratory triaxial experiments to better understand controls on the physical behavior of these rocks over time and the effect of creep on other rock properties. Laboratory experiments conducted at room-temperature conditions show that creep deformation observed at in-situ differential stress conditions is approximately linear with the applied differential pressure. The creep behavior is also anisotropic such that creep occurs more in the bedding-perpendicular direction than in the bedding-parallel direction. The reduction in sample volume during creep suggests that the creep is accommodated by a small amount of pore compaction occurring in the clay-aggregates and/or the relatively porous kerogen in the rock. Thus, the tendency to creep (creep compliance) is generally observed to increases with clay and kerogen volume. However, the strongest correlation is found between creep compliance and Young's modulus. A strong negative correlation between creep compliance and elastic Young's modulus exists regardless of the sample orientation and despite the wide range of sample mineralogy (5-50% clay, 5-60% quartz-feldspar-pyrite, 0-80% carbonates). This correlation is quite interesting as inelastic creep and elastic stiffness depend on somewhat different physical attributes. We attempt to quantitatively explain the correlation between creep behavior and elastic stiffness by appealing to a stress-partitioning that occurs between the soft components (clay and kerogen) and stiff components (quartz, feldspar, pyrite, carbonates) of the shale rock. First, the stress-partitioning occurring within the soft and stiff components is quantified based on the rock composition, elastic properties of the individual components, and the overall average Young's modulus of the rock. By combining the stress-partitioning behavior with knowledge that the creep behavior is linear

  8. On the plastic buckling paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Blachut, J.; Galletly, G.D.; James, S.

    1995-12-31

    Previous investigations, at various laboratories, have raised doubts about the accuracy of flow theory predictions in some plastic plate and shell buckling problems. The present series of buckling experiments on near-perfect, machined, mild steel, cylindrical shell models under biaxial loading (axial tension plus external pressure) was designed to provide additional data for the evaluation of (the J{sub 2}) plasticity theories. Numerical calculations were carried out with the Bosor5 shell buckling program, using the J{sub 2} deformation and flow theories, and these were compared with the test results. Thirty-one cylinders, about 0.05 m in diameter with length to diameter ratio (L/D) of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 and diameter to thickness ratio (D/t) of 50 were tested in the programme. The steel was BS 970 grade 070 M20 and came in the form of a 3 m long x 0.070 m dia bar. Each cylinder had an integral flange of 0.013m. A rotating probe was employed to monitor the pre-buckling and buckling deformations. The tests were similar to that of Giezen, Babcock and Singer (1991). However, the current tests were on machined models and the axial tension was applied in a different manner. The tests, by Giezen et al, were on drawn aluminum alloy tubes from stock One of our objectives was to see if reducing the initial geometric imperfections had any significant effect on results. All tests have been carried out by now and computations are near completion. The main conclusion appears to be that for this combined loading plastic buckling problem, the deformation theory predictions are confirmed by the experiment.

  9. Calculation of Centrally Loaded Thin-Walled Columns Above the Buckling Limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinitzhuber, F.

    1945-01-01

    When thin-walled columns formed from flanged sheet, such as used in airplane construction, are subjected to axial load, their behavior at failure varies according to the slenderness ratio. On long columns the axis deflects laterally while the cross section form is maintained; buckling results. The respective breaking load in the elastic range is computed by Euler's formula and for the plastic range by the Engesser- Karman formula. Its magnitude is essentially dependent upon the length. On intermediate length columns, especially where open sections are concerned, the cross section is distorted while the cross section form is preserved; twisting failure results. The buckling load in twisting is calculated according to Wagner and Kappus. On short columns the straight walls of low-bending resistance that form the column are deflected at the same time that the cross section form changes - buckling occurs without immediate failure. Then the buckling load of the total section computable from the buckling loads of the section walls is not the ultimate load; quite often, especially on thin-walled sections, it lies considerably higher and is secured by tests. Both loads, the buckling and the ultimate load are only in a small measure dependent upon length. The present report is an attempt to theoretically investigate the behavior of such short, thin-walled columns above the buckling load with the conventional calculating methods.

  10. Buckling of microtubules on elastic media via breakable bonds.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Tanjina; Kabir, Arif Md Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Kakugo, Akira; Nitta, Takahiro

    2016-11-04

    Buckling of microtubules observed in cells has been reconstructed on a two-dimensional elastic medium consisting of kinesins grafted over compressible substrates, enabling precise control of experimental conditions and quantitative analysis. However, interpretations of the observations have ambiguities due to inevitable experimental difficulties. In this study, with computer simulations, we investigated importance of the mode of interaction of microtubule with elastic medium in the buckling behavior of microtubule. By taking into consideration of forced-induced detachments of kinesins from microtubules, our simulations reproduced the previous experimental results, and showed deviations from predictions of the elastic foundation model. On the other hand, with hypothetical linkers permanently bound to microtubules, our simulation reproduced the predictions of the elastic foundation model. By analyzing the results of the simulations, we investigated as to why the difference arose. These findings indicate the importance of the mode of interaction of microtubule with the medium in the buckling behavior of microtubule. Our findings would bring new insights on buckling of microtubules in living cells.

  11. Artery Buckling: New Phenotypes, Models, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hai-Chao; Chesnutt, Jennifer K. W.; Garcia, Justin R.; Liu, Qin; Wen, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Arteries are under significant mechanical loads from blood pressure, flow, tissue tethering, and body movement. It is critical that arteries remain patent and stable under these loads. This review summarizes the common forms of buckling that occur in blood vessels including cross-sectional collapse, longitudinal twist buckling, and bent buckling. The phenomena, model analyses, experimental measurements, effects on blood flow, and clinical relevance are discussed. It is concluded that mechanical buckling is an important issue for vasculature, in addition to wall stiffness and strength, and requires further studies to address the challenges. Studies of vessel buckling not only enrich vascular biomechanics but also have important clinical applications. PMID:23192265

  12. Timoshenko beam model for buckling of piezoelectric nanowires with surface effects.

    PubMed

    Samaei, Arash Tourki; Bakhtiari, Majid; Wang, Gang-Feng

    2012-03-27

    This paper investigates the buckling behavior of piezoelectric nanowires under distributed transverse loading, within the framework of the Timoshenko beam theory, and in the presence of surface effects. Analytical relations are given for the critical force of axial buckling of nanowires by accounting for the effects of surface elasticity, residual surface tension, and transverse shear deformation. Through an example, it is shown that the critical electric potential of buckling depends on both the surface stresses and piezoelectricity. This study may be helpful in the characterization of the mechanical properties of nanowires and in the calibration of the nanowire-based force sensors.

  13. Timoshenko beam model for buckling of piezoelectric nanowires with surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaei, Arash Tourki; Bakhtiari, Majid; Wang, Gang-Feng

    2012-03-01

    This paper investigates the buckling behavior of piezoelectric nanowires under distributed transverse loading, within the framework of the Timoshenko beam theory, and in the presence of surface effects. Analytical relations are given for the critical force of axial buckling of nanowires by accounting for the effects of surface elasticity, residual surface tension, and transverse shear deformation. Through an example, it is shown that the critical electric potential of buckling depends on both the surface stresses and piezoelectricity. This study may be helpful in the characterization of the mechanical properties of nanowires and in the calibration of the nanowire-based force sensors.

  14. Mechanical buckling of arterioles in collateral development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Han, Hai-Chao

    2013-01-07

    Collateral arterioles enlarge in both diameter and length, and develop corkscrew-like tortuous patterns during remodeling. Recent studies showed that artery buckling could lead to tortuosity. The objective of this study was to determine arteriole critical buckling pressure and buckling pattern during arteriole remodeling. Arterioles were modeled as elastic cylindrical vessels with an elastic matrix support and underwent axial and radial growth. Our results demonstrated that arteriole critical buckling pressure decreased with increasing axial growth ratio and radius growth ratio, but increased with increasing wall thickness. Arteriole buckling mode number increased (wavelength decreased) with increasing axial growth ratio, but decreased with increasing radius growth ratio and wall thickness. Our study suggests that axial growth in arterioles makes them prone to buckling and that buckling leads to tortuous collaterals. These results shed light on the mechanism of collateral arteriole tortuosity.

  15. Mechanical Buckling of Arterioles in Collateral Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qin; Han, Hai-Chao

    2012-01-01

    Collateral arterioles enlarge in both diameter and length, and develop corkscrew-like tortuous patterns during remodeling. Recent studies showed that artery buckling could lead to tortuosity. The objective of this study was to determine arteriole critical buckling pressure and buckling pattern during arteriole remodeling. Arterioles were modeled as elastic cylindrical vessels with an elastic matrix support and underwent axial and radial growth. Our results demonstrated that arteriole critical buckling pressure decreased with increasing axial growth ratio and radius growth ratio, but increased with increasing wall thickness. Arteriole buckling mode number increased (wave length decreased) with increasing axial growth ratio, but decreased with increasing radius growth ratio and wall thickness. Our study suggests that axial growth in arterioles makes them prone to buckling and that buckling leads to tortuous collaterals. These results shed light on the mechanism of collateral arteriole tortuosity. PMID:23034307

  16. Structure of twisted and buckled bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sandeep K.; Juričić, Vladimir; Barkema, Gerard T.

    2017-03-01

    We study the atomic structure of twisted bilayer graphene, with very small mismatch angles (θ ∼ {0.28}0), a topic of intense recent interest. We use simulations, in which we combine a recently presented semi-empirical potential for single-layer graphene, with a new term for out-of-plane deformations, (Jain et al 2015 J. Phys. Chem. C 119 9646) and an often-used interlayer potential (Kolmogorov et al 2005 Phys. Rev. B 71 235415). This combination of potentials is computationally cheap but accurate and precise at the same time, allowing us to study very large samples, which is necessary to reach very small mismatch angles in periodic samples. By performing large scale atomistic simulations, we show that the vortices appearing in the Moiré pattern in the twisted bilayer graphene samples converge to a constant size in the thermodynamic limit. Furthermore, the well known sinusoidal behavior of energy no longer persists once the misorientation angle becomes very small (θ \\lt {1}0). We also show that there is a significant buckling after the relaxation in the samples, with the buckling height proportional to the system size. These structural properties have direct consequences on the electronic and optical properties of bilayer graphene.

  17. Buckling modes in pantographic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgio, Ivan; Della Corte, Alessandro; dell'Isola, Francesco; Steigmann, David J.

    2016-07-01

    We study buckling patterns in pantographic sheets, regarded as two-dimensional continua consisting of lattices of continuously distributed fibers. The fibers are modeled as beams endowed with elastic resistance to stretching, shearing, bending and twist. Included in the theory is a non-standard elasticity due to geodesic bending of the fibers relative to the lattice surface. xml:lang="fr"

  18. Size-dependent thermal buckling of heated nanowires with ends axially restrained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Zhi-Qiao; Lv, Jian-Guo

    2014-02-01

    Nanowires (NWs) are being actively explored for applications as nanoscale building blocks of sensors, actuators and nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Temperature changes can induce an axial force within NWs due to the thermal expansion and may lead to buckling. The thermal buckling behaviors of ends-axially-restrained nanowires, subjected to a uniform temperature rise, are studied based on Bernoulli-Euler beam theory including the surface thermoelastic effects. Besides the surface elastic modulus, the influences of surface thermal expansion coefficient are incorporated into the model presented herein to describe size-dependent thermoelastic behaviors of nanowires. The results show that the critical buckling temperature and postbuckling deflection are significantly affected by surface thermoelastic effects and the influences become more prominent as the thickness of nanowire decreases. The corresponding influences of the slenderness ratio are also discussed. This research is helpful not only in understanding the thermal buckling properties of nanowires but also in designing the nanowire-based sensor and thermal actuator.

  19. Buckling and Failure of Compression-Loaded Composite Laminated Shells With Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.

    2007-01-01

    Results from a numerical and experimental study that illustrate the effects of laminate orthotropy on the buckling and failure response of compression-loaded composite cylindrical shells with a cutout are presented. The effects of orthotropy on the overall response of compression-loaded shells is described. In general, preliminary numerical results appear to accurately predict the buckling and failure characteristics of the shell considered herein. In particular, some of the shells exhibit stable post-local-buckling behavior accompanied by interlaminar material failures near the free edges of the cutout. In contrast another shell with a different laminate stacking sequence appears to exhibit catastrophic interlaminar material failure at the onset of local buckling near the cutout and this behavior correlates well with corresponding experimental results.

  20. Buckling-induced retraction of spherical shells: A study on the shape of aperture

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sen; Xie, Yi Min; Li, Qing; Huang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Shiwei

    2015-01-01

    Buckling of soft matter is ubiquitous in nature and has attracted increasing interest recently. This paper studies the retractile behaviors of a spherical shell perforated by sophisticated apertures, attributed to the buckling-induced large deformation. The buckling patterns observed in experiments were reproduced in computational modeling by imposing velocity-controlled loads and eigenmode-affine geometric imperfection. It was found that the buckling behaviors were topologically sensitive with respect to the shape of dimple (aperture). The shell with rounded-square apertures had the maximal volume retraction ratio as well as the lowest energy consumption. An effective experimental procedure was established and the simulation results were validated in this study. PMID:26096171

  1. Artery buckling analysis using a two-layered wall model with collagen dispersion.

    PubMed

    Mottahedi, Mohammad; Han, Hai-Chao

    2016-07-01

    Artery buckling has been proposed as a possible cause for artery tortuosity associated with various vascular diseases. Since microstructure of arterial wall changes with aging and diseases, it is essential to establish the relationship between microscopic wall structure and artery buckling behavior. The objective of this study was to developed arterial buckling equations to incorporate the two-layered wall structure with dispersed collagen fiber distribution. Seven porcine carotid arteries were tested for buckling to determine their critical buckling pressures at different axial stretch ratios. The mechanical properties of these intact arteries and their intima-media layer were determined via pressurized inflation test. Collagen alignment was measured from histological sections and modeled by a modified von-Mises distribution. Buckling equations were developed accordingly using microstructure-motivated strain energy function. Our results demonstrated that collagen fibers disperse around two mean orientations symmetrically to the circumferential direction (39.02°±3.04°) in the adventitia layer; while aligning closely in the circumferential direction (2.06°±3.88°) in the media layer. The microstructure based two-layered model with collagen fiber dispersion described the buckling behavior of arteries well with the model predicted critical pressures match well with the experimental measurement. Parametric studies showed that with increasing fiber dispersion parameter, the predicted critical buckling pressure increases. These results validate the microstructure-based model equations for artery buckling and set a base for further studies to predict the stability of arteries due to microstructural changes associated with vascular diseases and aging.

  2. Thermal and Mechanical Buckling Analysis of Hypersonic Aircraft Hat-Stiffened Panels With Varying Face Sheet Geometry and Fiber Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1996-01-01

    Mechanical and thermal buckling behavior of monolithic and metal-matrix composite hat-stiffened panels were investigated. The panels have three types of face-sheet geometry: Flat face sheet, microdented face sheet, and microbulged face sheet. The metal-matrix composite panels have three types of face-sheet layups, each of which is combined with various types of hat composite layups. Finite-element method was used in the eigenvalue extractions for both mechanical and thermal buckling. The thermal buckling analysis required both eigenvalue and material property iterations. Graphical methods of the dual iterations are shown. The mechanical and thermal buckling strengths of the hat-stiffened panels with different face-sheet geometry are compared. It was found that by just microdenting or microbulging of the face sheet, the axial, shear, and thermal buckling strengths of both types of hat-stiffened panels could be enhanced considerably. This effect is more conspicuous for the monolithic panels. For the metal-matrix composite panels, the effect of fiber orientations on the panel buckling strengths was investigated in great detail, and various composite layup combinations offering, high panel buckling strengths are presented. The axial buckling strength of the metal-matrix panel was sensitive to the change of hat fiber orientation. However, the lateral, shear, and thermal buckling strengths were insensitive to the change of hat fiber orientation.

  3. Bend stress relaxation and tensile primary creep of a polycrystalline alpha-SiC fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hee Man, Yun; Goldsby, Jon C.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the thermomechanical behavior (creep and stress relaxation) of ceramic fibers is of both practical and basic interest. On the practical level, ceramic fibers are the reinforcement for ceramic matrix composites which are being developed for use in high temperature applications. It is important to understand and model the total creep of fibers at low strain levels where creep is predominantly in the primary stage. In addition, there are many applications where the component will only be subjected to thermal strains. Therefore, the stress relaxation of composite consituents in such circumstances will be an important factor in composite design and performance. The objective of this paper is to compare and analyze bend stress relaxation and tensile creep data for alpha-SiC fibers produced by the Carborundum Co. (Niagara Falls, NY). This fiber is of current technical interest and is similar in composition to bulk alpha-SiC which has been studied under compressive creep conditions. The temperature, time, and stress dependences will be discussed for the stress relaxation and creep results. In addition, some creep and relaxation recovery experiments were performed in order to understand the complete viscoelastic behavior, i.e. both recoverable and nonrecoverable creep components of these materials. The data will be presented in order to model the deformation behavior and compare relaxation and/or creep behavior for relatively low deformation strain conditions of practical concern. Where applicable, the tensile creep results will be compared to bend stress relaxation data.

  4. Strain rate sensitivity of nanoindentation creep in an AlCoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Wu, R. F.; Qiao, J. W.

    2016-09-01

    Creep behaviors of an AlCoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy with the body-centered cubic structure were investigated by nanoindentation. The enhanced strain gradient induced by higher strain rate leads to decreased strain rate sensitivity during creep process. The present alloy exhibits excellent creep resistance, mainly due to its large entropy of mixing and highly distorted lattice structure.

  5. The Effects of Boundary Conditions and Friction on the Helical Buckling of Coiled Tubing in an Inclined Wellbore.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yinchun; Ai, Zhijiu; Sun, Xu; Fu, Biwei

    2016-01-01

    Analytical buckling models are important for down-hole operations to ensure the structural integrity of the drill string. A literature survey shows that most published analytical buckling models do not address the effects of inclination angle, boundary conditions or friction. The objective of this paper is to study the effects of boundary conditions, friction and angular inclination on the helical buckling of coiled tubing in an inclined wellbore. In this paper, a new theoretical model is established to describe the buckling behavior of coiled tubing. The buckling equations are derived by applying the principles of virtual work and minimum potential energy. The proper solution for the post-buckling configuration is determined based on geometric and natural boundary conditions. The effects of angular inclination and boundary conditions on the helical buckling of coiled tubing are considered. Many significant conclusions are obtained from this study. When the dimensionless length of the coiled tubing is greater than 40, the effects of the boundary conditions can be ignored. The critical load required for helical buckling increases as the angle of inclination and the friction coefficient increase. The post-buckling behavior of coiled tubing in different configurations and for different axial loads is determined using the proposed analytical method. Practical examples are provided that illustrate the influence of the angular inclination on the axial force. The rate of change of the axial force decreases with increasing angular inclination. Moreover, the total axial friction also decreases with an increasing inclination angle. These results will help researchers to better understand helical buckling in coiled tubing. Using this knowledge, measures can be taken to prevent buckling in coiled tubing during down-hole operations.

  6. The Effects of Boundary Conditions and Friction on the Helical Buckling of Coiled Tubing in an Inclined Wellbore

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Zhijiu; Sun, Xu; Fu, Biwei

    2016-01-01

    Analytical buckling models are important for down-hole operations to ensure the structural integrity of the drill string. A literature survey shows that most published analytical buckling models do not address the effects of inclination angle, boundary conditions or friction. The objective of this paper is to study the effects of boundary conditions, friction and angular inclination on the helical buckling of coiled tubing in an inclined wellbore. In this paper, a new theoretical model is established to describe the buckling behavior of coiled tubing. The buckling equations are derived by applying the principles of virtual work and minimum potential energy. The proper solution for the post-buckling configuration is determined based on geometric and natural boundary conditions. The effects of angular inclination and boundary conditions on the helical buckling of coiled tubing are considered. Many significant conclusions are obtained from this study. When the dimensionless length of the coiled tubing is greater than 40, the effects of the boundary conditions can be ignored. The critical load required for helical buckling increases as the angle of inclination and the friction coefficient increase. The post-buckling behavior of coiled tubing in different configurations and for different axial loads is determined using the proposed analytical method. Practical examples are provided that illustrate the influence of the angular inclination on the axial force. The rate of change of the axial force decreases with increasing angular inclination. Moreover, the total axial friction also decreases with an increasing inclination angle. These results will help researchers to better understand helical buckling in coiled tubing. Using this knowledge, measures can be taken to prevent buckling in coiled tubing during down-hole operations. PMID:27649535

  7. Limit Load and Buckling Analysis for Assessing Hanford Single-Shell Tank Dome Structural Integrity - 12278

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Ken I.; Deibler, John E.; Karri, Naveen K.; Pilli, Siva P.; Julyk, Larry J.

    2012-07-01

    dome, so the penetration does reduce the concentrated limit load somewhat. However, the safety factors comparing the limit loads to the maximum allowable applied loads remain well above the required value of 3.0. The buckling analysis method accounts for the geometric imperfections, concrete creep, cracking and reinforcements, and concrete plasticity in determining the allowable buckling load limits. The method was demonstrated in this paper for the evaluation of a tank before and after a penetration is added in the dome center. Finite element buckling models were used to accurately calculate the linear critical buckling loads. The models showed that adding the penetration reduces the linear critical buckling load by only 2.5%. Bounding cases also showed that the possible range of soil support on the walls does not significantly affect the dome buckling loads. Buckling models of the full 360 deg. dome also showed that the dome is more resistant to buckling when the load is offset than when it is positioned over the center. These limit load and buckling analysis methods are being used at the Hanford site to assess the tank loads that can be safely applied during future waste retrieval activities. (authors)

  8. Creep behaviour and creep mechanisms of normal and healing ligaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Gail Marilyn

    Patients with knee ligament injuries often undergo ligament reconstructions to restore joint stability and, potentially, abate osteoarthritis. Careful literature review suggests that in 10% to 40% of these patients the graft tissue "stretches out". Some graft elongation is likely due to creep (increased elongation of tissue under repeated or sustained load). Quantifying creep behaviour and identifying creep mechanisms in both normal and healing ligaments is important for finding clinically relevant means to prevent creep. Ligament creep was accurately predicted using a novel yet simple structural model that incorporated both collagen fibre recruitment and fibre creep. Using the inverse stress relaxation function to model fibre creep in conjunction with fibre recruitment produced a superior prediction of ligament creep than that obtained from the inverse stress relaxation function alone. This implied mechanistic role of fibre recruitment during creep was supported using a new approach to quantify crimp patterns at stresses in the toe region (increasing stiffness) and linear region (constant stiffness) of the stress-strain curve. Ligament creep was relatively insensitive to increases in stress in the toe region; however, creep strain increased significantly when tested at the linear region stress. Concomitantly, fibre recruitment was evident at the toe region stresses; however, recruitment was limited at the linear region stress. Elevating the water content of normal ligament using phosphate buffered saline increased the creep response. Therefore, both water content and fibre recruitment are important mechanistic factors involved in creep of normal ligaments. Ligament scars had inferior creep behaviour compared to normal ligaments even after 14 weeks. In addition to inferior collagen properties affecting fibre recruitment and increased water content, increased glycosaminoglycan content and flaws in scar tissue were implicated as potential mechanisms of scar creep

  9. Creep-rupture behavior of seven iron-base alloys after long term aging at 760 deg in low pressure hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzke, W. R.; Stephens, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Seven candidate iron-base alloys for heater tube application in the Stirling automotive engine were aged for 3500 hours at 760 C in argon and hydrogen. Aging degraded the tensile and creep-rupture properties. The presence of hydrogen during aging caused additional degradiation of the rupture strength in fine grain alloys. Based on current design criteria for the Mod 1 Stirling engine, N-155 and 19-9DL are considered the only alloys in this study with strengths adequate for heater tube service at 760 C.

  10. Creep of oxide dispersion strengthened materials (with special reference to TD nichrome)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, J.; Sherby, O. D.

    1978-01-01

    It was shown that the creep behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys is controlled principally by the creep properties of the matrix of the alloy devoid of particles. Thus, diffusion controlled slip process determine the rate controlling step in such materials. The role of the particles is to stabilize a fine substructure which is invariant with the creep stress over a wide range of stress. This characteristic leads to negligible strain hardening during creep and suggests that creep relations developed for pure metals and many solid solution alloys at constant structure should be used to describe the creep of ODS alloys. A second characteristics of the ODS alloys is that a stress may exist below which creep will not occur (threshold stress).

  11. Modeling the Role of Dislocation Substructure During Class M and Exponential Creep. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Iskovitz, Ilana Seiden; Freed, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    The different substructures that form in the power-law and exponential creep regimes for single phase crystalline materials under various conditions of stress, temperature and strain are reviewed. The microstructure is correlated both qualitatively and quantitatively with power-law and exponential creep as well as with steady state and non-steady state deformation behavior. These observations suggest that creep is influenced by a complex interaction between several elements of the microstructure, such as dislocations, cells and subgrains. The stability of the creep substructure is examined in both of these creep regimes during stress and temperature change experiments. These observations are rationalized on the basis of a phenomenological model, where normal primary creep is interpreted as a series of constant structure exponential creep rate-stress relationships. The implications of this viewpoint on the magnitude of the stress exponent and steady state behavior are discussed. A theory is developed to predict the macroscopic creep behavior of a single phase material using quantitative microstructural data. In this technique the thermally activated deformation mechanisms proposed by dislocation physics are interlinked with a previously developed multiphase, three-dimensional. dislocation substructure creep model. This procedure leads to several coupled differential equations interrelating macroscopic creep plasticity with microstructural evolution.

  12. Buckling of particle-laden interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassuga, Theo; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2012-11-01

    Particle-laden interfaces have been shown to have very interesting physical behavior, such as being able to resist compressive and shear stresses, and helping stabilize emulsions and foams. In this work, we study the buckling of an oil-water interface populated by micron-sized latex particles using a Langmuir trough. We extend pre-existing results to the micron-sized range with different density ratio and show that the existing theoretical framework still applies as a prediction of the dominant wrinkle wavelength. However, histograms show that the wavelength distribution has two peaks, which indicates that there occurs a cascading phenomenon similar to that observed in thin solid sheets. We can characterize this by tracking the position within the particle raft where cascading occurs, the wavelength of the resulting wrinkles, and their width along the crest.

  13. Analyses of Transient and Tertiary Small Punch Creep Deformation of 316LN Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh Kumar, J.; Ganesan, V.; Laha, K.

    2016-09-01

    Creep deformation behavior of 316LN stainless steel (SS) under small punch creep (SPC) and uniaxial creep test has been assessed and compared at 923 K (650 °C). The transient and tertiary creep deformation behaviors have been analyzed according to the equation proposed for SPC deflection, δ = δ0 + δ_{{T}} \\cdot (1 - {{e}}^{ - κ \\cdot t} ) + dot{δ }_{{s}} t + δ3 {{e}}^{{[ {φ ( {t - t_{{r}} } )} ]}} on the basis of Dobes and Cadek equation for uniaxial creep strain. Trends in the variations of (i) rate of exhaustion of transient creep ( κ) with steady-state deflection rate ( dot{δ }_{{s}} ) (ii) ` κ' with time to attain steady-state deflection rate, and (iii) initial creep deflection rate with steady-state deflection rate implied that transient SPC deformation obeyed first-order reaction rate theory. The rate of exhaustion of transient creep ( r') values that were determined from uniaxial creep tests were correlated with those obtained from SPC tests. Master curves representing transient creep deformation in both SPC and uniaxial creep tests have been derived and their near coincidence brings unique equivalence between both the test techniques. The relationships between (i) rate of acceleration of tertiary creep ( φ) and steady-state deflection rate, (ii) ` φ' and time spent in tertiary stage, and (iii) final creep deflection rate and steady-state deflection rate revealed that first-order reaction rate theory governed SPC deformation throughout the tertiary region also. Interrelationship between the transient, secondary, and tertiary creep parameters indicated that the same mechanism prevailed throughout the SPC deformation.

  14. Creep properties of Pb-free solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Song, H.G.; Morris Jr., J.W.; Hua, F.

    2002-04-01

    Describes the creep behavior of three Sn-rich solders that have become candidates for use in Pb-free solder joints: Sn-3.5Ag, Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu and Sn-0.7Cu. The three solders show the same general behavior when tested in thin joints between Cu and Ni/Au metallized pads at temperatures between 60 and 130 C. Their steady-state creep rates are separated into two regimes with different stress exponents(n). The low-stress exponents range from {approx}3-6, while the high-stress exponents are anomalously high (7-12). Strikingly, the high-stress exponent has a strong temperature dependence near room temperature, increasing significantly as the temperature drops from 95 to 60 C. The anomalous creep behavior of the solders appears to be due to the dominant Sn constituent. Joints of pure Sn have stress exponents, n, that change with stress and temperature almost exactly like those of the Sn-rich solder joints. Research on creep in bulk samples of pure Sn suggests that the anomalous temperature dependence of the stress exponent may show a change in the dominant mechanism of creep. Whatever its source, it has the consequence that conventional constitutive relations for steady-state creep must be used with caution in treating Sn-rich solder joints, and qualification tests that are intended to verify performance should be carefully designed.

  15. Casing buckling studies lower cementing costs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.N.; Perkins, T.K.; Striegler, J.H.

    1980-09-01

    Fluid withdrawal, permafrost thaw, or large changes in pipe temperature can induce severe axial stresses on a well's casing, which often results in buckling. To minimize the cost of stabilizing the casing via cementing, engineers have developed new design criteria for preventing buckling; even for severe conditions, the resulting formulations cost less to use than those derived from previous criteria. Theoretical studies suggest that for a laterally supported pipe, the axial buckling force approaches a minimum asymptotic limit as the pipe length increases; thus the buckling equation for an infinitely long pipe can serve as a simple yet conservative design criterion for avoiding elastic axial buckling of any laterally supported casing. According to calculations, axial buckling can be prevented, even in a very long pipe, by surrounding the pipe with an elastic medium having a sufficiently high modulus.

  16. Tailored Buckling Microlattices as Reusable Light-Weight Shock Absorbers.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Tobias; Findeisen, Claudio; Kadic, Muamer; Gumbsch, Peter; Wegener, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Structures and materials absorbing mechanical (shock) energy commonly exploit either viscoelasticity or destructive modifications. Based on a class of uniaxial light-weight geometrically nonlinear mechanical microlattices and using buckling of inner elements, either a sequence of snap-ins followed by irreversible hysteretic - yet repeatable - self-recovery or multistability is achieved, enabling programmable behavior. Proof-of-principle experiments on three-dimensional polymer microstructures are presented.

  17. Controlled localized buckling responses of orthodontic arch wires.

    PubMed

    Nikolai, R J; Chung, A Y

    1999-09-01

    The orthodontic arch wire is often activated locally, in transverse bending and/or longitudinal torsion, to engage an individual malaligned tooth. Arch wires with substantial flexibilities and elastic ranges in bending are available. Several clinical reports of distal displacements of molars with appliances activated by locally buckling the arch wire have appeared in the recent published literature. This article contains an explanation of buckling or "column" action and the postbuckling response of a wire, and a report of the results of a controlled, in-vitro study of a sample of 256 wire segments subjected to activation-deactivation, buckling-postbuckling-unbuckling cycles. Continuous force-displacement diagrams were obtained from mechanical tests run at oral temperature. Four orthodontics-relevant, mechanical characteristics were quantified from each diagram, and each specimen was subjected to posttest evaluation for inelastic behavior. Although the deformation of the buckled wire is, in fact, bending, the force-displacement diagrams obtained differed substantially from their familiar counterparts generated in transverse bending. Judging from the force magnitudes induced as the deactivation half-cycles commenced as well as the deactivation rates, not all of the 8 wires seem to be clinically suitable for activation initiated by buckling. Magnitudes of springback were substantial from activations as large as 6 mm, and only 2 of the 8 wires exhibited full deactivations less than 80% of their activating displacements. This relatively new mode of arch wire activation that enables delivery to the dentition of mesiodistal pushing forces has substantial potential for clinical application from several biomechanical standpoints.

  18. Examination of Experimental Data for Irradiation - Creep in Nuclear Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasheran, Amir Sassan

    The objective of this dissertation was to establish credibility and confidence levels of the observed behavior of nuclear graphite in neutron irradiation environment. Available experimental data associated with the OC-series irradiation -induced creep experiments performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were examined. Pre- and postirradiation measurement data were studied considering "linear" and "nonlinear" creep models. The nonlinear creep model considers the creep coefficient to vary with neutron fluence due to the densification of graphite with neutron irradiation. Within the range of neutron fluence involved (up to 0.53 times 10^{26} neutrons/m ^2, E > 50 KeV), both models were capable of explaining about 96% and 80% of the variation of the irradiation-induced creep strain with neutron fluence at temperatures of 600^circC and 900^circC, respectively. Temperature and reactor power data were analyzed to determine the best estimates for the actual irradiation temperatures. It was determined according to thermocouple readouts that the best estimate values for the irradiation temperatures were well within +/-10 ^circC of the design temperatures of 600^circC and 900 ^circC. The dependence of the secondary creep coefficients (for both linear and nonlinear models) on irradiation temperature was determined assuming that the variation of creep coefficient with temperature, in the temperature range studied, is reasonably linear. It was concluded that the variability in estimate of the creep coefficients is definitely not the results of temperature fluctuations in the experiment. The coefficients for the constitutive equation describing the overall growth of grade H-451 graphite were also studied. It was revealed that the modulus of elasticity and the shear modulus are not affected by creep and that the electrical resistivity is slightly (less than 5%) changed by creep. However, the coefficient of thermal expansion does change with creep. The consistency of

  19. A creep apparatus to explore the quenching and ageing phenomena of PVC films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. H. D.; Mcgarry, F. J.

    1991-01-01

    A creep apparatus has been constructed for an in situ determination of length and length change. Using this apparatus, the creep behavior of PVC thin films associated with quenching and aging was studied. The more severe the quench through the glass transition temperature, the greater is the instantaneous elastic deformation and the subsequent creep behavior. As aging proceeds, the quenched films gradually lose the ductility incurred by quenching. These results agree well with the well-known phenomena of physical aging. Thus, the changes reflecting molecular mobilities due to quenching and aging can be properly monitored by such a creep apparatus.

  20. Development of a constitutive model for creep and life prediction of advanced silicon nitride ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.L.; Liu, K.C.; Brinkman, C.R.

    1992-12-31

    A constitutive model capable of describing deformation and predicting rupture life was developed for high temperature ceramic materials under general thermal-mechanical loading conditions. The model was developed based on the deformation and fracture behavior observed from a systematic experimental study on an advanced silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic material. Validity of the model was evaluated with reference to creep and creep rupture data obtained under constant and stepwise-varied loading conditions, including the effects of annealing on creep and creep rupture behavior.

  1. Thermal-structural panel buckling tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Randolph C.; Richards, W. Lance

    1991-01-01

    The buckling characteristics of a titanium matrix composite hat-stiffened panel were experimentally examined for various combinations of thermal and mechanical loads. Panel failure was prevented by maintaining the applied loads below real-time critical buckling predictions. The test techniques used to apply the loads, minimize boundary were shown to compare well with a finite-element buckling analysis for previous panels. Comparisons between test predictions and analysis for this panel are ongoing.

  2. Buckling in a topological metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeussen, Anne; Paulose, Jayson; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the nonlinear response of mechanical metamaterials paves the way toward designing materials with adaptive and tunable mechanical properties. Buckling, a change in load-bearing state from axial compression to off-axis deformation, is a ubiquitous nonlinear instability that is often exploited to change the local or global mechanical response in metamaterials composed of slender elements. We create localized buckling regions in cellular metamaterials by engineering states of self-stress, regions where the response is dominated by stretching or compression of the constituent beams rather than bending at the stiff hinges connecting them. Unique to our approach is the use of topological states of self-stress, which originate in a topological invariant that characterizes the vibrational spectrum of the repeating unit cell. Unlike typical states of self-stress which result from additional geometric constraints induced by excess beams in a region, these topological states do not change the number of beams at each hinge. We demonstrate the phenomenon through numerical calculations of the linear response of the proposed metamaterial, and through experiments probing the nonlinear regime including localized buckling at specific regions.

  3. Elevated temperature tensile and creep behavior of a SiC fiber-reinforced titanium metal matrix composite. Final Report, 22 Dec. 1994 M.S. Thesis, 7 May 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, Rita J.

    1995-01-01

    In this research program, the tensile properties and creep behavior in air of (0)(sub 4), (0/90)(sub s) and (90)(sub 4) SCS-9/Beta 21S composite layups with 0.24 volume fraction fiber were evaluated. Monotonic tensile tests at 23, 482, 650 and 815 C yielded the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus, proportional limit, ultimate tensile strength and total strain at failure. At 650 C, the UTS of the (0)(sub 4) and (0/90)(sub s) layups decreases by almost 50 percent from the room temperature values, indicating that operating temperatures should be less than 650 C to take advantage of the specific tensile properties of these composites.

  4. Simplified dynamic buckling assessment of steel containments

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffey, T.A.; Renick, D.H.

    1993-02-01

    A simplified, three-degree-of-freedom analytical procedure for performing a response spectrum buckling analysis of a thin containment shell is developed. Two numerical examples with R/t values which bound many existing steel containments are used to illustrate the procedure. The role of damping on incipient buckling acceleration level is evaluated for a regulatory seismic spectrum using the two numerical examples. The zero-period acceleration level that causes incipient buckling in either of the two containments increases 31% when damping is increased from 1% to 4% of critical. Comparisons with finite element results on incipient buckling levels are favorable.

  5. Buckling of conical shell with local imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, P. A.; Dexter, C. B.

    1974-01-01

    Small geometric imperfections in thin-walled shell structures can cause large reductions in buckling strength. Most imperfections found in structures are neither axisymmetric nor have the shape of buckling modes but rather occur locally. This report presents the results of a study of the effect of local imperfections on the critical buckling load of a specific axially compressed thin-walled conical shell. The buckling calculations were performed by using a two-dimensional shell analysis program referred to as the STAGS (Structural Analysis of General Shells) computer code, which has no axisymmetry restrictions. Results show that the buckling load found from a bifurcation buckling analysis is highly dependent on the circumferential arc length of the imperfection type studied. As the circumferential arc length of the imperfection is increased, a reduction of up to 50 percent of the critical load of the perfect shell can occur. The buckling load of the cone with an axisymmetric imperfections is nearly equal to the buckling load of imperfections which extended 60 deg or more around the circumference, but would give a highly conservative estimate of the buckling load of a shell with an imperfection of a more local nature.

  6. Discontinuous Buckling of Wide Beams and Metabeams.

    PubMed

    Coulais, Corentin; Overvelde, Johannes T B; Lubbers, Luuk A; Bertoldi, Katia; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-07-24

    We uncover how nonlinearities dramatically alter the buckling of elastic beams. First, we show experimentally that sufficiently wide ordinary elastic beams and specifically designed metabeams-beams made from a mechanical metamaterial-exhibit discontinuous buckling, an unstable form of buckling where the postbuckling stiffness is negative. Then we use simulations to uncover the crucial role of nonlinearities, and show that beams made from increasingly nonlinear materials exhibit an increasingly negative postbuckling slope. Finally, we demonstrate that for sufficiently strong nonlinearity, we can observe discontinuous buckling for metabeams as slender as 1% numerically and 5% experimentally.

  7. Investigation of the rate-controlling mechanism(s) for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting by use of high pressure as a variable

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Using high pressure as a variable, the rate-controlling mechanism for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting is investigated for silicon and nickel. An apparatus is used in which the samples are heated to melting point and subjected to 1 to 3 GigaPascal pressure. The stress behavior of the materials are then studied.

  8. Shear buckling analysis of a hat-stiffened panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1994-01-01

    A buckling analysis was performed on a hat-stiffened panel subjected to shear loading. Both local buckling and global buckling were analyzed. The global shear buckling load was found to be several times higher than the local shear buckling load. The classical shear buckling theory for a flat plate was found to be useful in predicting the local shear buckling load of the hat-stiffened panel, and the predicted local shear buckling loads thus obtained compare favorably with the results of finite element analysis.

  9. Compression Buckling Behavior of Large-Scale Friction Stir Welded and Riveted 2090-T83 Al-Li Alloy Skin-Stiffener Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Hafley, Robert A.; Wagner, John A.; Jegley, Dawn C.; Pecquet, Robert W.; Blum, Celia M.; Arbegast, William J.

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the potential of friction stir welding (FSW) as a replacement for traditional rivet fastening for launch vehicle dry bay construction, a large-scale friction stir welded 2090-T83 aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy skin-stiffener panel was designed and fabricated by Lockheed-Martin Space Systems Company - Michoud Operations (LMSS) as part of NASA Space Act Agreement (SAA) 446. The friction stir welded panel and a conventional riveted panel were tested to failure in compression at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The present paper describes the compression test results, stress analysis, and associated failure behavior of these panels. The test results provide useful data to support future optimization of FSW processes and structural design configurations for launch vehicle dry bay structures.

  10. Creep-fatigue analysis by strain-range partitioning.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. S.; Halford, G. R.; Hirschberg, M. H.

    1971-01-01

    The framework of a new method is outlined for treating creep-fatigue behavior of metals. Inelastic strain-ranges are partitioned into the components of (1) completely reversed plasticity, (2) tensile plasticity reversed by compressive creep, or tensile creep reversed by compressive plasticity, and (3) completely reversed creep. Each of these components is shown to be related to cyclic life by a Manson-Coffin type power-law equation. A linear life fraction rule is used to combine the damaging effects of the individual components enabling the prediction of life. Test results are presented for a 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel as well as limited information for a Type 316 stainless steel.

  11. Effects of Elastic Edge Restraints and Initial Prestress on the Buckling Response of Compression-Loaded Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Riddick, Jaret C.; Thornburgh, Robert P.

    2004-01-01

    A parametric study of the effects of test-fixture-induced initial prestress and elastic edge restraints on the prebuckling and buckling responses of a compression-loaded, quasi-isotropic curved panel is presented. The numerical results were obtained by using a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis code with high-fidelity models. The results presented show that a wide range of prebuckling and buckling behavior can be obtained by varying parameters that represent circumferential loaded-edge restraint and rotational unloaded-edge restraint provided by a test fixture and that represent the mismatch in specimen and test-fixture radii of curvature. For a certain range of parameters, the panels exhibit substantial nonlinear prebuckling deformations that yield buckling loads nearly twice the corresponding buckling load predicted by a traditional linear bifurcation buckling analysis for shallow curved panels. In contrast, the results show another range of parameters exist for which the nonlinear prebuckling deformations either do not exist or are relatively benign, and the panels exhibit buckling loads that are nearly equal to the corresponding linear bifurcation buckling load. Overall, the results should also be of particular interest to scientists, engineers, and designers involved in simulating flight-hardware boundary conditions in structural verification and certification tests, involved in validating structural analysis tools, and interested in tailoring buckling performance.

  12. Effect of Specimen Thickness on the Creep Response of a Single Crystal Superalloy (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    termed the thickness debit effect. To investigate the mechanism of thickness debit effect, isothermal, constant nominal stress creep tests at two test...758MPa failed predominantly due to cleavage and were less damage tolerant as compared to thick specimen. 15. SUBJECT TERMS c eep, creep ...behavior. This is termed the thickness debit effect. To investigate the mechanism of thickness debit effect, isothermal, constant nominal stress creep

  13. Study on Buckling of Stiff Thin Films on Soft Substrates as Functional Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Teng

    In engineering, buckling is mechanical instability of walls or columns under compression and usually is a problem that engineers try to prevent. In everyday life buckles (wrinkles) on different substrates are ubiquitous -- from human skin to a rotten apple they are a commonly observed phenomenon. It seems that buckles with macroscopic wavelengths are not technologically useful; over the past decade or so, however, thanks to the widespread availability of soft polymers and silicone materials micro-buckles with wavelengths in submicron to micron scale have received increasing attention because it is useful for generating well-ordered periodic microstructures spontaneously without conventional lithographic techniques. This thesis investigates the buckling behavior of thin stiff films on soft polymeric substrates and explores a variety of applications, ranging from optical gratings, optical masks, energy harvest to energy storage. A laser scanning technique is proposed to detect micro-strain induced by thermomechanical loads and a periodic buckling microstructure is employed as a diffraction grating with broad wavelength tunability, which is spontaneously generated from a metallic thin film on polymer substrates. A mechanical strategy is also presented for quantitatively buckling nanoribbons of piezoelectric material on polymer substrates involving the combined use of lithographically patterning surface adhesion sites and transfer printing technique. The precisely engineered buckling configurations provide a route to energy harvesters with extremely high levels of stretchability. This stiff-thin-film/polymer hybrid structure is further employed into electrochemical field to circumvent the electrochemically-driven stress issue in silicon-anode-based lithium ion batteries. It shows that the initial flat silicon-nanoribbon-anode on a polymer substrate tends to buckle to mitigate the lithiation-induced stress so as to avoid the pulverization of silicon anode. Spontaneously

  14. Creep and fracture of dispersion-strengthened materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V.

    1991-01-01

    The creep and fracture of dispersion strengthened materials is reviewed. A compilation of creep data on several alloys showed that the reported values of the stress exponent for creep varied between 3.5 and 100. The activation energy for creep exceeded that for lattice self diffusion in the matrix in the case of some materials and a threshold stress behavior was generally reported in these instances. The threshold stress is shown to be dependent on the interparticle spacing and it is significantly affected by the initial microstructure. The effect of particle size and the nature of the dispersoid on the threshold stress is not well understood at the present time. In general, most studies indicate that the microstructure after creep is similar to that before testing and very few dislocations are usually observed. It is shown that the stress acting on a dispersoid due to a rapidly moving dislocation can exceed the particle yield strength of the G sub p/1000, where G sub p is the shear modulus of the dispersoid. The case when the particle deforms is examined and it is suggested that the dislocation creep threshold stress of the alloy is equal to the yield strength of the dispersoid under these conditions. These results indicate that the possibility that the dispersoid creep threshold stress is determined by either the particle yield strength or the stress required to detach a dislocation from the dispersoid matrix interface. The conditions under which the threshold stress is influenced by one or the other mechanism are discussed and it is shown that the particle yield strength is important until the extent of dislocation core relaxation at the dispersoid matrix interface exceeds about 25 pct. depending on the nature of the particle matrix combination. Finally, the effect of grain boundaries and grain morphology on the creep and fracture behavior of dispersoid strengthened alloys is examined.

  15. Irradiation creep and creep rupture of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels and their dependence on cold work level

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L. ); Eiholzer, C.R. ); Toloczko, M.B. ); Kumar, A.S. )

    1991-11-01

    A titanium-modified austenitic type stainless steel was tested at three cold work levels to determine its creep and creep rupture properties under both thermal aging and neutron irradiation conditions. Both the thermal and irradiation creep behavior exhibit a complex non-monotonic relationship with cold work level that reflects the competition between a number of stress-sensitive and temperature-dependent microstructural processes. Increasing the degree of cold work to 30% from the conventional 20% level was detrimental to its performance, especially for applications above 550{degrees}c. The 20% cold work level is preferable to the 10% level, in terms of both in-reactor creep rupture response and initial strength.

  16. Influence of cold work level on the irradiation creep and creep rupture of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L. ); Eiholzer, C.R. ); Toloczko, M.B. ); Kumar, A.S. )

    1992-06-01

    A titanium-modified austenitic type stainless steel was tested at three cold work levels to determine its creep and creep rupture properties under both thermal aging and neutron irradiation conditions. Both the thermal and irradiation creep behavior exhibit a complex non-monotonic relationship with cold work level that reflects the competition between a number of stress-sensitive and temperature-dependent microstructural processes. Increasing the degree of cold work to 30% form the conventional 20% level was detrimental to its performance, especially for applications above 550{degrees}C. The 20% cold work level is preferable to the 10% level, in terms of both in- reactor creep rapture response and initial strength.

  17. Prediction and verification of creep behavior in metallic materials and components for the space shuttle thermal protection system. Volume 3, phase 3: Full size heat shield data correlation and design criteria. [reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, B. A.; Davis, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Analysis methods for predicting cyclic creep deflection in stiffened metal panel structures, were applied to full size panels. Results were compared with measured deflections from cyclic tests of thin gage L605, Rene' 41, and TDNiCr full size corrugation stiffened panels. A design criteria was then formulated for metallic thermal protection panels subjected to creep. A computer program was developed to calculate creep deflections.

  18. On the post-buckling of elastic beams on gradient foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challamel, Noël

    2011-06-01

    The post-buckling of an axially loaded elastic beam resting on linearly elastic medium is investigated in this paper from a geometrically exact analysis. It is known that the elastic foundation increases the bifurcation limit, but it may have a destabilizing effect on the post-buckling behavior associated to imperfection sensitivity. This unstable nature of the post-buckling behavior may lead to drastic softening phenomena, as already investigated for plasticity or Continuum Damage Mechanics media. It is suggested in this paper to study the influence of gradient terms in the interaction foundation model on the post-buckling behavior of this structural system. The gradient elasticity foundation model of Pasternak is used and introduced by variational arguments in a geometrically exact framework. A general nonlinear fourth-order differential equation is obtained, and numerically solved with a nonlinear boundary value solver. The post-buckling behavior is analyzed from an asymptotic method. The gradient elasticity constitutive law significantly affects the post-localization process.

  19. Investigation of adatom adsorption on single layer buckled germanium selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkın, H.; Aktürk, E.

    2016-12-01

    A recent study of Hu et al. [1] predicted that 2D single layer of asymmetric washboard germanium selenide is found to be stable and display semiconducting properties. Motivating from this study, we have shown that another phase, which is 2D buckled honeycomb germanium selenide, is also stable. This phase exhibits semiconducting behavior with a band gap of 2.29 eV. Furthermore, on the basis of the first principles, spin-polarized density functional calculations, we investigate the effect of selected adatoms adsorption on the b-GeSe single layer. The adatoms Se, Ge, S, Si, C, Br and P are chemisorbed with significant binding energy where this effects modify the electronic structure of the single layer buckled GeSe locally by tuning the band gap. Net integer magnetic moment can be achieved and b-GeSe attains half metallicity through the adsorption of Si, Ge, P and Br.

  20. Magneto-electro-elastic buckling analysis of nonlocal curved nanobeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Reza Barati, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a size-dependent curved beam model is developed to take into account the effects of nonlocal stresses on the buckling behavior of curved magneto-electro-elastic FG nanobeams for the first time. The governing differential equations are derived based on the principle of virtual work and Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. The power-law function is employed to describe the spatially graded magneto-electro-elastic properties. By extending the radius of the curved nanobeam to infinity, the results of straight nonlocal FG beams can be rendered. The effects of magnetic potential, electric voltage, opening angle, nonlocal parameter, power-law index and slenderness ratio on buckling loads of curved MEE-FG nanobeams are studied.

  1. Failure of bacterial streamers in creeping flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Ishita; Ghosh, Ranajay; Sadrzadeh, Mohtada; Kumar, Aloke

    2016-11-01

    In the recent years, the dynamical response of filamentous bacterial aggregates called bacterial streamer in creeping flows has attracted attention. We report the observation of 'necking-type' instability leading to failure in bacterial (Pseudomonas fluorescens) streamers formed in creeping flows. Quantification of the failure process was made possible through the use of 200 nm red fluorescent polystyrene tracer particles embedded in the bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The nonlinear failure behavior shows distinct phases of deformation with mutually different characteristic times, which end with a distinct localized failure of the streamer. We also develop a simplified analytical model to describe the experimental observations of the failure phenomena. The theoretical power law relationship between critical stretch ratio and the fluid velocity scale matches closely experimental observations.

  2. Creep, fatigue and creep-fatigue interactions in modified 9% Chromium - 1% Molybdenum (P91) steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyanasundaram, Valliappa

    Grade P91 steel, from the class of advanced high-chrome ferritic steels, is one of the preferred materials for many elevated temperature structural components. Creep-fatigue (C-F) interactions, along with oxidation, can accelerate the kinetics of damage accumulation and consequently reduce such components' life. Hence, reliable C-F test data is required for meticulous consideration of C-F interactions and oxidation, which in turn is vital for sound design practices. It is also imperative to develop analytical constitutive models that can simulate and predict material response under various long-term in-service conditions using experimental data from short-term laboratory experiments. Consequently, the major objectives of the proposed research are to characterize the creep, fatigue and C-F behavior of grade P91 steels at 625 C and develop robust constitutive models for simulating/predicting their microstructural response under different loading conditions. This work will utilize experimental data from 16 laboratories worldwide that conducted tests (creep, fatigue and C-F) on grade P91 steel at 625°C in a round-robin (RR) program. Along with 7 creep deformation and rupture tests, 32 pure fatigue and 46 C-F tests from the RR are considered in this work. A phenomenological constitutive model formulated in this work needs just five fitting parameters to simulate/predict the monotonic, pure fatigue and C-F behavior of grade P91 at 625 C. A modified version of an existing constitutive model is also presented for particularly simulating its isothermal creep deformation and rupture behavior. Experimental results indicate that specimen C-F lives, as measured by the 2% load drop criterion, seem to decrease with increasing strain ranges and increasing hold times at 625°C. Metallographic assessment of the tested specimens shows that the damage mode in both pure fatigue and 600 seconds hold time cyclic tests is predominantly transgranular fatigue with some presence of

  3. Mechanical buckling of artery under pulsatile pressure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Han, Hai-Chao

    2012-04-30

    Tortuosity that often occurs in carotid and other arteries has been shown to be associated with high blood pressure, atherosclerosis, and other diseases. However the mechanisms of tortuosity development are not clear. Our previous studies have suggested that arteries buckling could be a possible mechanism for the initiation of tortuous shape but artery buckling under pulsatile flow condition has not been fully studied. The objectives of this study were to determine the artery critical buckling pressure under pulsatile pressure both experimentally and theoretically, and to elucidate the relationship of critical pressures under pulsatile flow, steady flow, and static pressure. We first tested the buckling pressures of porcine carotid arteries under these loading conditions, and then proposed a nonlinear elastic artery model to examine the buckling pressures under pulsatile pressure conditions. Experimental results showed that under pulsatile pressure arteries buckled when the peak pressures were approximately equal to the critical buckling pressures under static pressure. This was also confirmed by model simulations at low pulse frequencies. Our results provide an effective tool to predict artery buckling pressure under pulsatile pressure.

  4. Probabilistic Dynamic Buckling of Smart Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2007-01-01

    A computational simulation method is presented to evaluate the deterministic and nondeterministic dynamic buckling of smart composite shells. The combined use of intraply hybrid composite mechanics, finite element computer codes, and probabilistic analysis enable the effective assessment of the dynamic buckling load of smart composite shells. A universal plot is generated to estimate the dynamic buckling load of composite shells at various load rates and probabilities. The shell structure is also evaluated with smart fibers embedded in the plies right next to the outer plies. The results show that, on the average, the use of smart fibers improved the shell buckling resistance by about 10% at different probabilities and delayed the buckling occurrence time. The probabilistic sensitivities results indicate that uncertainties in the fiber volume ratio and ply thickness have major effects on the buckling load while uncertainties in the electric field strength and smart material volume fraction have moderate effects. For the specific shell considered in this evaluation, the use of smart composite material is not recommended because the shell buckling resistance can be improved by simply re-arranging the orientation of the outer plies, as shown in the dynamic buckling analysis results presented in this report.

  5. Probabilistic Dynamic Buckling of Smart Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2003-01-01

    A computational simulation method is presented to evaluate the deterministic and nondeterministic dynamic buckling of smart composite shells. The combined use of composite mechanics, finite element computer codes, and probabilistic analysis enable the effective assessment of the dynamic buckling load of smart composite shells. A universal plot is generated to estimate the dynamic buckling load of composite shells at various load rates and probabilities. The shell structure is also evaluated with smart fibers embedded in the plies right below the outer plies. The results show that, on the average, the use of smart fibers improved the shell buckling resistance by about 10 percent at different probabilities and delayed the buckling occurrence time. The probabilistic sensitivities results indicate that uncertainties in the fiber volume ratio and ply thickness have major effects on the buckling load while uncertainties in the electric field strength and smart material volume fraction have moderate effects. For the specific shell considered in this evaluation, the use of smart composite material is not recommended because the shell buckling resistance can be improved by simply re-arranging the orientation of the outer plies, as shown in the dynamic buckling analysis results presented in this report.

  6. [Buckling Surgery: Old Fashioned or Cutting Edge?

    PubMed

    Feltgen, N; Hoerauf, H

    2017-01-13

    For many decades, scleral buckling surgery was the only reasonable surgical procedure in eyes with primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. In recent years, primary vitrectomy has apparently become the treatment of choice, although evidence from comparative clinical trials is missing. In this article, data from clinical trials and indications for buckling surgery are presented.

  7. Buckling of prismatic structures under biaxial loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour, H. A.; Sobel, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    A one term analysis is presented for the elastic buckling of prismatic structures with either classical simple support or completely clamped boundary conditions on the transverse ends. Results suggest that a one term solution based on an appropriate choice of coordinate functions may lead to satisfactory buckling loads for other prismatic structures with completely clamped and other end conditions.

  8. A multilevel approach for minimum weight structural design including local and system buckling constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, L. A., Jr.; Ramanathan, R. K.

    1977-01-01

    A rational multilevel approach for minimum weight structural design of truss and wing structures including local and system buckling constraints is presented. Overall proportioning of the structure is achieved at the system level subject to strength, displacement and system buckling constraints, while the detailed component designs are carried out separately at the component level satisfying local buckling constraints. Total structural weight is taken to be the objective function at the system level while employing the change in the equivalent system stiffness of the component as the component level objective function. Finite element analysis is used to predict static response while system buckling behavior is handled by incorporating a geometric stiffness matrix capability. Buckling load factors and the corresponding mode shapes are obtained by solving the eigenvalue problem associated with the assembled elastic stiffness and geometric stiffness matrices for the structural system. At the component level various local buckling failure modes are guarded against using semi-empirical formulas. Mathematical programming techniques are employed at both the system and component level.

  9. Bounds on Flexural Properties and Buckling Response for Symmetrically Laminated Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Paul M.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    2007-01-01

    Nondimensional parameters and equations governing the buckling behavior of rectangular symmetrically laminated plates are presented that can be used to represent the buckling resistance, for plates made of all known structural materials, in a very general, insightful, and encompassing manner. In addition, these parameters can be used to assess the degree of plate orthotropy, to assess the importance of anisotropy that couples bending and twisting deformations, and to characterize quasi-isotropic laminates quantitatively. Bounds for these nondimensional parameters are also presented that are based on thermodynamics and practical laminate construction considerations. These bounds provides insight into potential gains in buckling resistance through laminate tailoring and composite-material development. As an illustration of this point, upper bounds on the buckling resistance of long rectangular orthotropic plates with simply supported or clamped edges and subjected to uniform axial compression, uniform shear, or pure inplane bending loads are presented. The results indicate that the maximum gain in buckling resistance for tailored orthotropic laminates, with respect to the corresponding isotropic plate, is in the range of 26-36% for plates with simply supported edges, irrespective of the loading conditions. For the plates with clamped edges, the corresponding gains in buckling resistance are in the range of 9-12% for plates subjected to compression or pure inplane bending loads and potentially up to 30% for plates subjected to shear loads.

  10. An Approximate Solution and Master Curves for Buckling of Symmetrically Laminated Composite Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Nondimensional linear-bifurcation buckling equations for balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders with negligible shell-wall anisotropies and subjected to uniform axial compression loads are presented. These equations are solved exactly for the practical case of simply supported ends. Nondimensional quantities are used to characterize the buckling behavior that consist of a stiffness-weighted length-to-radius parameter, a stiffness-weighted shell-thinness parameter, a shell-wall nonhomogeneity parameter, two orthotropy parameters, and a nondimensional buckling load. Ranges for the nondimensional parameters are established that encompass a wide range of laminated-wall constructions and numerous generic plots of nondimensional buckling load versus a stiffness-weighted length-to-radius ratio are presented for various combinations of the other parameters. These plots are expected to include many practical cases of interest to designers. Additionally, these plots show how the parameter values affect the distribution and size of the festoons forming each response curve and how they affect the attenuation of each response curve to the corresponding solution for an infinitely long cylinder. To aid in preliminary design studies, approximate formulas for the nondimensional buckling load are derived, and validated against the corresponding exact solution, that give the attenuated buckling response of an infinitely long cylinder in terms of the nondimensional parameters presented herein. A relatively small number of "master curves" are identified that give a nondimensional measure of the buckling load of an infinitely long cylinder as a function of the orthotropy and wall inhomogeneity parameters. These curves reduce greatly the complexity of the design-variable space as compared to representations that use dimensional quantities as design variables. As a result of their inherent simplicity, these master curves are anticipated to be useful in the ongoing development of

  11. Sequential buckling of an elastic wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bico, Jose; Bense, Hadrien; Keiser, Ludovic; Roman, Benoit; Melo, Francisco; Abkarian, Manouk

    A beam under quasistatic compression classically buckles beyond a critical threshold. In the case of a free beam, the lowest buckling mode is selected. We investigate the case of a long ``wall'' grounded of a compliant base and compressed in the axial compression. In the case of a wall of slender rectangular cross section, the selected buckling mode adopts a nearly fixed wavelength proportional to the height of the wall. Higher compressive loads only increase the amplitude of the buckle. However if the cross section has a sharp shape (such as an Eiffel tower profile), we observe successive buckling modes of increasing wavelength. We interpret this unusual evolution in terms of scaling arguments. At small scales, this variable periodicity might be used to develop tunable optical devices. We thank ECOS C12E07, CNRS-CONICYT, and Fondecyt Grant No. N1130922 for partially funding this work.

  12. Liquid buckling in a practical situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sumana; Das, Gargi; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Buckling of an oil filament is observed during the core annular flow of high viscous oil and water, when it encountered a sudden expansion in its flow path. Suitable mathematical equations have been suggested to predict the distance of initiation of buckling from the plane of area change and other characteristics of the deformed oil core. It is proposed that the initiation of buckling depends on the balance of inertial and viscous forces. The model predicts that as the oil flow rate increases, the fluid jet has to travel a larger distance from the plane of area change to initiate buckling. Frequency and radius of the buckled oil filament are also predicted from the model.

  13. Creep-Fatigue Interaction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue fives in metals are nominally time independent below 0.5 T(sub Melt). At higher temperatures, fatigue lives are altered due to time-dependent, thermally activated creep. Conversely, creep rates are altered by super. imposed fatigue loading. Creep and fatigue generally interact synergistically to reduce material lifetime. Their interaction, therefore, is of importance to structural durability of high-temperature structures such as nuclear reactors, reusable rocket engines, gas turbine engines, terrestrial steam turbines, pressure vessel and piping components, casting dies, molds for plastics, and pollution control devices. Safety and lifecycle costs force designers to quantify these interactions. Analytical and experimental approaches to creep-fatigue began in the era following World War II. In this article experimental and life prediction approaches are reviewed for assessing creep-fatigue interactions of metallic materials. Mechanistic models are also discussed briefly.

  14. A constitutive model for representing coupled creep, fracture, and healing in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; Munson, D.E.; Fossum, A.F.

    1996-03-01

    The development of a constitutive model for representing inelastic flow due to coupled creep, damage, and healing in rock salt is present in this paper. This model, referred to as Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture model, has been formulated by considering individual mechanisms that include dislocation creep, shear damage, tensile damage, and damage healing. Applications of the model to representing the inelastic flow and fracture behavior of WIPP salt subjected to creep, quasi-static loading, and damage healing conditions are illustrated with comparisons of model calculations against experimental creep curves, stress-strain curves, strain recovery curves, time-to-rupture data, and fracture mechanism maps.

  15. Review of data on irradiation creep of monolithic SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Youngblood, G.E.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1996-04-01

    An effort is now underway to design an irradiation creep experiment involving SiC composites to SiC fibers. In order to successfully design such an experiment, it is necessary to review and assess the available data for monolithic SiC to establish the possible bounds of creep behavior for the composite. The data available show that monolithic SiC will indeed creep at a higher rate under irradiation compared to that of thermal creep, and surprisingly, it will do so in a temperature-dependant manner that is typical of metals.

  16. Pure climb creep mechanism drives flow in Earth’s lower mantle

    PubMed Central

    Boioli, Francesca; Carrez, Philippe; Cordier, Patrick; Devincre, Benoit; Gouriet, Karine; Hirel, Pierre; Kraych, Antoine; Ritterbex, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    At high pressure prevailing in the lower mantle, lattice friction opposed to dislocation glide becomes very high, as reported in recent experimental and theoretical studies. We examine the consequences of this high resistance to plastic shear exhibited by ringwoodite and bridgmanite on creep mechanisms under mantle conditions. To evaluate the consequences of this effect, we model dislocation creep by dislocation dynamics. The calculation yields to an original dominant creep behavior for lower mantle silicates where strain is produced by dislocation climb, which is very different from what can be activated under high stresses under laboratory conditions. This mechanism, named pure climb creep, is grain-size–insensitive and produces no crystal preferred orientation. In comparison to the previous considered diffusion creep mechanism, it is also a more efficient strain-producing mechanism for grain sizes larger than ca. 0.1 mm. The specificities of pure climb creep well match the seismic anisotropy observed of Earth’s lower mantle. PMID:28345037

  17. Investigation of creep by use of closed loop servo-hydraulic test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H. C.; Yao, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Creep tests were conducted by means of a closed loop servo-controlled materials test system. These tests are different from the conventional creep tests in that the strain history prior to creep may be carefully monitored. Tests were performed for aluminum alloy 6061-0 at 150 C and monitored by a PDP 11/04 minicomputer at a preset constant plastic-strain rate prehistory. The results show that the plastic-strain rate prior to creep plays a significant role in creep behavior. The endochronic theory of viscoplasticity was applied to describe the observed creep curves. The concepts of intrinsic time and strain rate sensitivity function are employed and modified according to the present observation.

  18. Thermal Creep Mechanisms in V-4Cr-4Ti Pressurized Tube Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, David S.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2007-08-01

    Pressurized thermal creep tubes of V-4Cr-4Ti have been examined following testing in the range 650 to 800°C for tests lasting ~104 h to provide comparison with tests on similar tubes following irradiation. It is found in all cases that creep results from dislocation motion. But the mechanism changes with increasing temperature and lower stress from one controlled by the climb and interaction of individual dislocations, to one controlled by sub-grain boundary structure that is created by relaxation of the interacting dislocations to lower energy planar arrays. This change in mechanism corresponds to a change from power law creep to Newtonian creep such that the stress exponent drops from ~4 to ~1. Although it is possible to explain the Newtonian response as Nabarro-Herring or Coble creep, it appears more likely that behavior is due to Harper-Dorn creep, in which case the change in response occurs at the Peierls stress.

  19. The activation energy for creep of columbium /niobium/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M. J.; Gulden, M. E.

    1973-01-01

    The activation energy for creep of nominally pure columbium (niobium) was determined in the temperature range from 0.4 to 0.75 T sub M by measuring strain rate changes induced by temperature shifts at constant stress. A peak in the activation energy vs temperature curve was found with a maximum value of 160 kcal/mole. A pretest heat treatment of 3000 F for 30 min resulted in even higher values of activation energy (greater than 600 kcal/mole) in this temperature range. The activation energy for the heat-treated columbium (Nb) could not be determined near 0.5 T sub M because of unusual creep curves involving negligible steady-state creep rates and failure at less than 5% creep strain. It is suggested that the anomalous activation energy values and the unusual creep behavior in this temperature range are caused by dynamic strain aging involving substitutional atom impurities and that this type of strain aging may be in part responsible for the scatter in previously reported values of activation energy for creep of columbium (Nb) near 0.5 T sub M.

  20. Developing Process of Positive Creeping Discharge along Aerial Insulated Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Toshiyuki; Hanaoka, Ryoichi; Takata, Shinzo

    In high voltage aerial distribution systems, the insulated wires are supported by the insulator with the binding wire at the electric light pole. When a lightning strike happened in the neighborhood of the aerial insulated wire in a power distribution system, the inductive lightning surges invade to the central line of the wire. Then, the creeping discharges develop along the wire surface from the binding wire tip in the same time as the flashover of the insulator at a supporting point of the wire. If the wire insulator has weak points such as the pin-holes, the disaster near the wire supporting point may occur with a melting of wire due to the punch-through breakdown. To prevent such accidents, it is important to clarify the mechanism of the creeping discharge along the insulated wire which caused by the lightning strike. The polarity of creeping discharges is decided by the polarity of inductive lightning surges, and the developing length and aspect of the discharge are greatly different by the discharge polarity. The developing of these creeping discharges is attributed to complicated behaviors of the positive and negative electric charges. In the present study, we examined in detail the developing process of positive creeping discharge along the wire surface by using a high speed image converter camera. This paper describes the developing mechanism of positive creeping discharge based on the experimental results.

  1. Helical buckling of pipes in extended reach and horizontal wells -- Part 1: Preventing helical buckling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C.; Lu, R. . Petroleum Engineering Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    This paper studies the helical buckling of pipes (drillstring and tubing) in extended reach and horizontal wells, theoretically and experimentally, resulting in new equations to correctly predict and effectively prevent the helical buckling of pipes in such wells. The theoretically study shows that the so-called helical buckling load that appears in the current literature is only the average axial load in the helical buckling development process. The laboratory experiments confirm the theoretical analysis. The new helical buckling load equations are formulated by combining the theoretical analysis and the experimental results, thereby resolving the existing assumption-and-result inconsistency in the current literature. The new equation predicts the true helical buckling load to be about 1.3 times the so-called helical buckling load in the current literature, and about 1.8 times the critical buckling load that predicts the onset of sinusoidal buckling. Consequently, larger bit weights or packer setting loads can be applied to increase the drilling rate or to ensure a proper seal, before the helical buckling of the pipes can occur.

  2. Correlation of creep rate with microstructural changes during high temperature creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. T.; Sommers, B. R.; Lytton, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Creep tests were conducted on Haynes 188 cobalt-base alloy and alpha titanium. The tests on Haynes 188 were conducted at 1600 F and 1800 F for stresses from 3 to 20 ksi, and the as-received, mill-annealed results were compared to specimens given 5%, 10%, and 15% room temperature prestrains and then annealed one hour at 1800 F. The tests on alpha titanium were performed at 7,250 and 10,000 psi at 500 C. One creep test was done at 527 C and 10,000 psi to provide information on kinetics. Results for annealed titanium were compared to specimens given 10% and 20% room temperature prestrains followed by 100 hours recovery at 550 C. Electron microscopy was used to relate dislocation and precipitate structure to the creep behavior of the two materials. The results on Haynes 188 alloy reveal that the time to reach 0.5% creep strain at 1600 F increases with increasing prestrain for exposure times less than 1,000 hours, the increase at 15% prestrain being more than a factor of ten.

  3. Variations in creep rate along the Hayward Fault, California, interpreted as changes in depth of creep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.W.; Lienkaemper, J.J.; Galehouse, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    Variations ill surface creep rate along the Hayward fault are modeled as changes in locking depth using 3D boundary elements. Model creep is driven by screw dislocations at 12 km depth under the Hayward and other regional faults. Inferred depth to locking varies along strike from 4-12 km. (12 km implies no locking.) Our models require locked patches under the central Hayward fault, consistent with a M6.8 earthquake in 1868, but the geometry and extent of locking under the north and south ends depend critically on assumptions regarding continuity and creep behavior of the fault at its ends. For the northern onshore part of the fault, our models contain 1.4-1.7 times more stored moment than the model of Bu??rgmann et al. [2000]; 45-57% of this stored moment resides in creeping areas. It is important for seismic hazard estimation to know how much of this moment is released coseismically or as aseismic afterslip.

  4. Creep strength of niobium alloys, Nb-1%Zr and PWC-11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    A study is being conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center to determine the feasibility of using a carbide particle strengthened Nb-1 percent Zr base alloy to meet the anticipated temperature and creep resistance requirements of proposed near term space power systems. In order to provide information to aid in the determination of the suitability of the PWC-11 alloy as an alternative to Nb-1 percent Zr in space power systems this study investigated: (1) the long-time high-vacuum creep behavior of the PWC-11 material and the Nb-1 percent Zr alloy, (2) the effect of prior stress-free thermal aging on this creep behavior, (3) the effect of electron beam (EB) welding on this creep behavior, and (4) the stability of creep strengthening carbide particles.

  5. Investigation of the effect of aggregates' morphology on concrete creep properties by numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lavergne, F.; Sab, K.; Sanahuja, J.; Bornert, M.; Toulemonde, C.

    2015-05-15

    Prestress losses due to creep of concrete is a matter of interest for long-term operations of nuclear power plants containment buildings. Experimental studies by Granger (1995) have shown that concretes with similar formulations have different creep behaviors. The aim of this paper is to numerically investigate the effect of size distribution and shape of elastic inclusions on the long-term creep of concrete. Several microstructures with prescribed size distribution and spherical or polyhedral shape of inclusions are generated. By using the 3D numerical homogenization procedure for viscoelastic microstructures proposed by Šmilauer and Bažant (2010), it is shown that the size distribution and shape of inclusions have no measurable influence on the overall creep behavior. Moreover, a mean-field estimate provides close predictions. An Interfacial Transition Zone was introduced according to the model of Nadeau (2003). It is shown that this feature of concrete's microstructure can explain differences between creep behaviors.

  6. Rationalization of Creep Data of Creep-Resistant Steels on the Basis of the New Power Law Creep Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Yang, M.; Song, X. L.; Jia, J.; Xiang, Z. D.

    2016-07-01

    The conventional power law creep equation (Norton equation) relating the minimum creep rate to creep stress and temperature cannot be used to predict the long-term creep strengths of creep-resistant steels if its parameters are determined only from short-term measurements. This is because the stress exponent and activation energy of creep determined on the basis of this equation depend on creep temperature and stress and these dependences cannot be predicted using this equation. In this work, it is shown that these problems associated with the conventional power law creep equation can be resolved if the new power law equation is used to rationalize the creep data. The new power law creep equation takes a form similar to the conventional power law creep equation but has a radically different capability not only in rationalizing creep data but also in predicting the long-term creep strengths from short-term test data. These capabilities of the new power law creep equation are demonstrated using the tensile strength and creep test data measured for both pipe and tube grades of the creep-resistant steel 9Cr-1.8W-0.5Mo-V-Nb-B (P92 and T92).

  7. Prediction of creep-rupture life of unidirectional titanium matrix composites subjected to transverse loading

    SciTech Connect

    John, R.; Khobaib, M.; Smith, P.R.

    1996-10-01

    Titanium matrix composites (TMCs) incorporating unidirectional fiber reinforcement are considered as enabling materials technology for advanced engines which require high specific strength and elevated temperature capability. The resistance of unidirectional TMCs to deformation under longitudinally applied sustained loading at elevated temperatures has been well documented. Many investigators have shown that the primary weakness of the unidirectional TMC is its susceptibility to failure under very low transverse loads, especially under sustained loading. Hence, a reliable model is required to predict the creep-rupture life of TMCs subjected to different transverse stress levels over a wide range of temperatures. In this article, the authors propose a model to predict the creep-rupture life of unidirectional TMC subjected to transverse loading based on the creep-rupture life of unidirectional TMC subjected to transverse loading based on the creep-rupture behavior of the corresponding fiberless matrix. The model assumes that during transverse loading, the effective load-carrying matrix ligament along a row of fibers controls the creep-rupture strength and the fibers do not contribute to the creep resistance of the composite. The proposed model was verified using data obtained from different TMC fabricated using three matrix compositions, which exhibited distinctly different types of creep behavior. The results show that the creep-rupture life of the transverse TMC decreases linearly with increasing ratio of the fiber diameter to the ply thickness. The creep-rupture life is also predicted to be independent of fiber spacing along the length of the specimen.

  8. Observation of optomechanical buckling transitions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H.; Kemiktarak, U.; Fan, J.; Ragole, S.; Lawall, J.; Taylor, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Correlated phases of matter provide long-term stability for systems as diverse as solids, magnets and potential exotic quantum materials. Mechanical systems, such as buckling transition spring switches, can have engineered, stable configurations whose dependence on a control variable is reminiscent of non-equilibrium phase transitions. In hybrid optomechanical systems, light and matter are strongly coupled, allowing engineering of rapid changes in the force landscape, storing and processing information, and ultimately probing and controlling behaviour at the quantum level. Here we report the observation of first- and second-order buckling transitions between stable mechanical states in an optomechanical system, in which full control of the nature of the transition is obtained by means of the laser power and detuning. The underlying multiwell confining potential we create is highly tunable, with a sub-nanometre distance between potential wells. Our results enable new applications in photonics and information technology, and may enable explorations of quantum phase transitions and macroscopic quantum tunnelling in mechanical systems. PMID:28248293

  9. Observation of optomechanical buckling transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Kemiktarak, U.; Fan, J.; Ragole, S.; Lawall, J.; Taylor, J. M.

    2017-03-01

    Correlated phases of matter provide long-term stability for systems as diverse as solids, magnets and potential exotic quantum materials. Mechanical systems, such as buckling transition spring switches, can have engineered, stable configurations whose dependence on a control variable is reminiscent of non-equilibrium phase transitions. In hybrid optomechanical systems, light and matter are strongly coupled, allowing engineering of rapid changes in the force landscape, storing and processing information, and ultimately probing and controlling behaviour at the quantum level. Here we report the observation of first- and second-order buckling transitions between stable mechanical states in an optomechanical system, in which full control of the nature of the transition is obtained by means of the laser power and detuning. The underlying multiwell confining potential we create is highly tunable, with a sub-nanometre distance between potential wells. Our results enable new applications in photonics and information technology, and may enable explorations of quantum phase transitions and macroscopic quantum tunnelling in mechanical systems.

  10. Observation of optomechanical buckling transitions.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Kemiktarak, U; Fan, J; Ragole, S; Lawall, J; Taylor, J M

    2017-03-01

    Correlated phases of matter provide long-term stability for systems as diverse as solids, magnets and potential exotic quantum materials. Mechanical systems, such as buckling transition spring switches, can have engineered, stable configurations whose dependence on a control variable is reminiscent of non-equilibrium phase transitions. In hybrid optomechanical systems, light and matter are strongly coupled, allowing engineering of rapid changes in the force landscape, storing and processing information, and ultimately probing and controlling behaviour at the quantum level. Here we report the observation of first- and second-order buckling transitions between stable mechanical states in an optomechanical system, in which full control of the nature of the transition is obtained by means of the laser power and detuning. The underlying multiwell confining potential we create is highly tunable, with a sub-nanometre distance between potential wells. Our results enable new applications in photonics and information technology, and may enable explorations of quantum phase transitions and macroscopic quantum tunnelling in mechanical systems.

  11. Creep recovery and stress relaxation tests of 6061-0 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H. C.; Yao, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    The investigation of creep recovery and stress relaxation in aluminum using a closed loop servo-hydraulic test system is described. The practicality of a computer controlled test system for constant plastic strain rate tension tests is demonstrated. The plastic strain rate and the magnitude of the initial strain are shown to have a noticeable effect on subsequent creep behavior of aluminum.

  12. A variational theorem for creep with applications to plates and columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, J Lyell, Jr; Mccomb, Harvey G , Jr; Schlechte, Floyd R

    1958-01-01

    A variational theorem is presented for a body undergoing creep. Solutions to problems of the creep behavior of plates, columns, beams, and shells can be obtained by means of the direct methods of the calculus of variations in conjunction with the stated theorem. The application of the theorem is illustrated for plates and columns by the solution of two sample problems.

  13. Generation of long time creep data on refractory alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.; Ebert, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Four separate studies of various aspects of the vacuum creep behavior of two tantalum alloys (T-111 and ASTAR 811C) and of pure CVD tungsten are reported. The first part of the program involved a study of the influence of high temperature pre-exposure to vacuum or to liquid lithium on the subsequent creep behavior T-111 alloy. Results of this study revealed significant effects of pre-exposure on the 1% creep life of T-111, with life reductions of about 3 orders of magnitude being observed in extreme cases. The second part of this study involved an investigation of the creep behavior of T-111 under conditions of continuously increasing stress and decreasing temperature which simulated the conditions anticipated in radioisotope capsule service. Results of this study showed that such test conditions produced a creep curve having a very unusual shape, and led to the identification of a new creep design parameter for this type of service. The third area of investigation was a study of the influence of heat treatment on the microstructure and creep behavior of ASTAR 811C. The fourth part of the program was directed toward a preliminary characterization of the 1% creep life of CVD tungsten as obtained from two different sources.

  14. Finite Element Prediction of Creep-Plastic Ratchetting and Low Cycle Creep-Fatigue for a Large SPF Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, A. A.; Leen, S. B.; Hyde, T. H.

    2010-06-01

    Industrial experience shows that large superplastic forming (SPF) tools suffer from distortion due to thermal cycling, which apparently causes high temperature creep and plasticity. In addition to distortion, thermomechanical fatigue and fatigue-creep interaction can lead to cracking. The aim of this study is to predict the life-limiting thermomechanical behavior of a large SPF tool under realistic forming conditions using elastic-plastic-creep FE analyses. Nonlinear time-dependent, sequentially coupled FE analyses are performed using temperature-dependent monotonic and cyclic material data for a high-nickel, high-chromium tool material, XN40F (40% Ni and 20% Cr). The effect of monotonic and cyclic material data is compared vis-à-vis the anisothermal, elastic-plastic-stress response of the SPF tool. An uncoupled cyclic plasticity-creep material model is employed. Progressive deformation (ratchetting) is predicted locally, transverse to the predominant direction of the creep-fatigue cycling, but at the same spatial location, due to creep and cyclic plasticity, during the so-called minor cycles, which correspond to comparatively small-amplitude temperature changes associated with opening of the press doors during part loading and unloading operations.

  15. Creep cavitation in 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I.W.; Argon, A.S.

    1981-01-01

    Creep cavitation in 304 stainless steel at 0.5 T/sub m/ was investigated. Two specially developed techniques were used to study the nucleation and growth of grain-boundary cavities. It was found that cavities nucleated heterogeneously throughout the creep history and those observed were well in their growth stage. Comparison of these observations with the theory for cavity nucleation requires that a high interfacial stress be present. Experiments suggest that such stress concentrations are present in the early stages of boundary sliding, and in additional transients associated with intermittent sliding of boundaries throughout the creep life. It was found that microstructural variations such as those caused by twins which strongly affect initial particle densities on boundaries can alter cavitation behavior drastically. Our results also show that wedge cracks are the result of accelerated linking of growing cavities in the triple point region of stress concentration and are not a separate phenomenon. Furthermore, at higher strain rates growth of cavities can be accelerated by grain boundary sliding. Lastly, evidence is given to support the view that in engineering alloys which contain complex phas constitutents particularly along grain-boundaries, cavitation in long term service is likely to be caused by cavities nucleated in connection with a prior cold forming operation. 15 figures.

  16. Buckling of a beam extruded into highly viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, F. P.; Neetzow, P.; Paak, M.

    2014-11-01

    Inspired by microscopic Paramecia which use trichocyst extrusion to propel themselves away from thermal aggression, we propose a macroscopic experiment to study the stability of a slender beam extruded in a highly viscous fluid. Piano wires were extruded axially at constant speed in a tank filled with corn syrup. The force necessary to extrude the wire was measured to increase linearly at first until the compressive viscous force causes the wire to buckle. A numerical model, coupling a lengthening elastica formulation with resistive-force theory, predicts a similar behavior. The model is used to study the dynamics at large time when the beam is highly deformed. It is found that at large time, a large deformation regime exists in which the force necessary to extrude the beam at constant speed becomes constant and length independent. With a proper dimensional analysis, the beam can be shown to buckle at a critical length based on the extrusion speed, the bending rigidity, and the dynamic viscosity of the fluid. Hypothesizing that the trichocysts of Paramecia must be sized to maximize their thrust per unit volume as well as avoid buckling instabilities, we predict that their bending rigidity must be about 3 ×10-9N μ m2 . The verification of this prediction is left for future work.

  17. Nitinol stent design - understanding axial buckling.

    PubMed

    McGrath, D J; O'Brien, B; Bruzzi, M; McHugh, P E

    2014-12-01

    Nitinol׳s superelastic properties permit self-expanding stents to be crimped without plastic deformation, but its nonlinear properties can contribute towards stent buckling. This study investigates the axial buckling of a prototype tracheobronchial nitinol stent design during crimping, with the objective of eliminating buckling from the design. To capture the stent buckling mechanism a computational model of a radial force test is simulated, where small geometric defects are introduced to remove symmetry and allow buckling to occur. With the buckling mechanism ascertained, a sensitivity study is carried out to examine the effect that the transitional plateau region of the nitinol loading curve has on stent stability. Results of this analysis are then used to redesign the stent and remove buckling. It is found that the transitional plateau region can have a significant effect on the stability of a stent during crimping, and by reducing the amount of transitional material within the stent hinges during loading the stability of a nitinol stent can be increased.

  18. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarovic, Sinisa Dj.

    2016-04-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro-Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro-Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate.

  19. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro–Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro–Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate. PMID:27274696

  20. Modeling Creep Processes in Aging Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olali, N. V.; Voitovich, L. V.; Zazimko, N. N.; Malezhik, M. P.

    2016-03-01

    The photoelastic method is generalized to creep in hereditary aging materials. Optical-creep curves and mechanical-creep or optical-relaxation curves are used to interpret fringe patterns. For materials with constant Poisson's ratio, it is sufficient to use mechanical- or optical-creep curves for this purpose

  1. Buckling in serpentine microstructures and applications in elastomer-supported ultra-stretchable electronics with high areal coverage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihui; Xu, Sheng; Fu, Haoran; Lee, Juhwan; Su, Jessica; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Rogers, John A; Huang, Yonggang

    2013-01-01

    Lithographically defined electrical interconnects with thin, filamentary serpentine layouts have been widely explored for use in stretchable electronics supported by elastomeric substrates. We present a systematic and thorough study of buckling physics in such stretchable serpentine microstructures, and a strategic design of serpentine layout for ultra-stretchable electrode, via analytical models, finite element method (FEM) computations, and quantitative experiments. Both the onset of buckling and the postbuckling behaviors are examined, to determine scaling laws for the critical buckling strain and the limits of elastic behavior. Two buckling modes, namely the symmetric and anti-symmetric modes, are identified and analyzed, with experimental images and numerical results that show remarkable levels of agreement for the associated postbuckling processes. Based on these studies and an optimization in design layout, we demonstrate routes for application of serpentine interconnects in an ultra-stretchable electrode that offer, simultaneously, an areal coverage as high as 81%, and a biaxial stretchability as large as ~170%.

  2. Buckling in serpentine microstructures and applications in elastomer-supported ultra-stretchable electronics with high areal coverage

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yihui; Xu, Sheng; Fu, Haoran; Lee, Juhwan; Su, Jessica; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Rogers, John A.; Huang, Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    Lithographically defined electrical interconnects with thin, filamentary serpentine layouts have been widely explored for use in stretchable electronics supported by elastomeric substrates. We present a systematic and thorough study of buckling physics in such stretchable serpentine microstructures, and a strategic design of serpentine layout for ultra-stretchable electrode, via analytical models, finite element method (FEM) computations, and quantitative experiments. Both the onset of buckling and the postbuckling behaviors are examined, to determine scaling laws for the critical buckling strain and the limits of elastic behavior. Two buckling modes, namely the symmetric and anti-symmetric modes, are identified and analyzed, with experimental images and numerical results that show remarkable levels of agreement for the associated postbuckling processes. Based on these studies and an optimization in design layout, we demonstrate routes for application of serpentine interconnects in an ultra-stretchable electrode that offer, simultaneously, an areal coverage as high as 81%, and a biaxial stretchability as large as ~170%. PMID:25309616

  3. Post-Buckling and Ultimate Strength Analysis of Stiffened Composite Panel Base on Progressive Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guofan; Sun, Xiasheng; Sun, Zhonglei

    Stiffened composite panel is the typical thin wall structure applied in aerospace industry, and its main failure mode is buckling subjected to compressive loading. In this paper, the development of an analysis approach using Finite Element Method on post-buckling behavior of stiffened composite structures under compression was presented. Then, the numerical results of stiffened panel are obtained by FE simulations. A thorough comparison were accomplished by comparing the load carrying capacity and key position strains of the specimen with test. The comparison indicates that the FEM results which adopted developed methodology could meet the demand of engineering application in predicting the post-buckling behavior of intact stiffened structures in aircraft design stage.

  4. Multifunctional Polymer-Based Graphene Foams with Buckled Structure and Negative Poisson’s Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhaohe; Weng, Chuanxin; Liu, Luqi; Hou, Yuan; Zhao, Xuanliang; Kuang, Jun; Shi, Jidong; Wei, Yueguang; Lou, Jun; Zhang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the polymer-based graphene foams through combination of bottom-up assembly and simple triaxially buckled structure design. The resulting polymer-based graphene foams not only effectively transfer the functional properties of graphene, but also exhibit novel negative Poisson’s ratio (NPR) behaviors due to the presence of buckled structure. Our results show that after the introduction of buckled structure, improvement in stretchability, toughness, flexibility, energy absorbing ability, hydrophobicity, conductivity, piezoresistive sensitivity and crack resistance could be achieved simultaneously. The combination of mechanical properties, multifunctional performance and unusual deformation behavior would lead to the use of our polymer-based graphene foams for a variety of novel applications in future such as stretchable capacitors or conductors, sensors and oil/water separators and so on. PMID:27608928

  5. Multifunctional Polymer-Based Graphene Foams with Buckled Structure and Negative Poisson’s Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zhaohe; Weng, Chuanxin; Liu, Luqi; Hou, Yuan; Zhao, Xuanliang; Kuang, Jun; Shi, Jidong; Wei, Yueguang; Lou, Jun; Zhang, Zhong

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we report the polymer-based graphene foams through combination of bottom-up assembly and simple triaxially buckled structure design. The resulting polymer-based graphene foams not only effectively transfer the functional properties of graphene, but also exhibit novel negative Poisson’s ratio (NPR) behaviors due to the presence of buckled structure. Our results show that after the introduction of buckled structure, improvement in stretchability, toughness, flexibility, energy absorbing ability, hydrophobicity, conductivity, piezoresistive sensitivity and crack resistance could be achieved simultaneously. The combination of mechanical properties, multifunctional performance and unusual deformation behavior would lead to the use of our polymer-based graphene foams for a variety of novel applications in future such as stretchable capacitors or conductors, sensors and oil/water separators and so on.

  6. Creep in electronic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  7. Creep Burst Testing of a Woven Inflatable Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selig, Molly M.; Valle, Gerard D.; James, George H.; Oliveras, Ovidio M.; Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.

    2015-01-01

    A woven Vectran inflatable module 88 inches in diameter and 10 feet long was tested at the NASA Johnson Space Center until failure from creep. The module was pressurized pneumatically to an internal pressure of 145 psig, and was held at pressure until burst. The external environment remained at standard atmospheric temperature and pressure. The module burst occurred after 49 minutes at the target pressure. The test article pressure and temperature were monitored, and video footage of the burst was captured at 60 FPS. Photogrammetry was used to obtain strain measurements of some of the webbing. Accelerometers on the test article measured the dynamic response. This paper discusses the test article, test setup, predictions, observations, photogrammetry technique and strain results, structural dynamics methods and quick-look results, and a comparison of the module level creep behavior to the strap level creep behavior.

  8. Localized buckling of a floating elastica.

    PubMed

    Audoly, B

    2011-07-01

    We study the buckling of a two-dimensional elastica floating on a bath of dense fluid, subjected to axial compression. The sinusoidal pattern predicted by the analysis of linear stability is shown to become localized above the buckling threshold. A nonlinear amplitude equation is derived for the envelope of the pattern. These results provide a simple interpretation to the wrinkle-to-fold transition reported by Pocivavsek et al. [Science 320, 912 (2008)]. An analogy with the classical problem of the localized buckling of a strut on a nonlinear elastic foundation is presented.

  9. Conservative spatial chaos of buckled elastic linkages.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Attila; Károlyi, György

    2006-09-01

    Buckling of an elastic linkage under general loading is investigated. We show that buckling is related to an initial value problem, which is always a conservative, area-preserving mapping, even if the original static problem is nonconservative. In some special cases, we construct the global bifurcation diagrams, and argue that their complicated structure is a consequence of spatial chaos. We characterize spatial chaos by the associated initial value problem's topological entropy, which turns out to be related to the number of buckled configurations.

  10. How vein sealing boosts fracture widening rates - The buckling-enhanced aperture growth mechanism for syn-tectonic veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nüchter, Jens-Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The paper introduces the mechanism of buckling-enhanced aperture growth for syn-tectonic veins that formed in simple-shear dominated kinematic frameworks in the middle or lower crust. Apart from the well understood concepts of fracture widening driven by effective tensile stresses, buckling-enhanced fracture aperture growth relates widening to active outward buckling of more viscous incipient cement layers precipitated as hydrothermal minerals for the pore fluid on the walls of juvenile syn-tectonic veins, driven by fracture-parallel compressive creep strain in the host rocks. Thus, the mechanism proposed here follows similar principles as tectonic folding, although important differences exist. Inspired by the structural record of low-aspect ratio veins exposed in HP/LT metamorphic rocks cropping out on south Evia island, Greece, generic numerical models are calculated to study development of buckling instabilities in such incompletely cemented veins and their impact on aperture growth rates. The models indicate (1) that aperture growth rates increase with increasing viscosity contrast between the host rocks and the cement layers, (2) an increase in the thickness of the cement layers cause acceleration of aperture growth, (3) that support of restraining forces at the vein tips offered by the host rocks against buckling of the cement layers cause fully compressive states of stress ahead the fracture tips, and (4) that fracture aperture growth is possible against fully compressive fracture-normal stresses. The buckling-enhanced vein aperture growth mechanism yields important implications for the maintenance and decay of fracture-bound permeability and for the mechanical state of the middle and lower crust in seismically active regions.

  11. Creep constitutive equation of dual phase 9Cr-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakasegawa, Hideo; Ukai, Shigeharu; Tamura, Manabu; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Ogiwara, Hiroyuki; Kohyama, Akira; Fujiwara, Masayuki

    2008-02-01

    9Cr-ODS (oxide dispersion strengthened) steels developed by JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) have superior creep properties compared with conventional heat resistant steels. The ODS steels can enormously contribute to practical applications of fast breeder reactors and more attractive fusion reactors. Key issues are developments of material processing procedures for mass production and creep life prediction methods in present R&D. In this study, formulation of creep constitutive equation was performed against the backdrop. The 9Cr-ODS steel displaying an excellent creep property is a dual phase steel. The ODS steel is strengthened by the δ ferrite which has a finer dispersion of oxide particles and shows a higher hardness than the α' martensite. The δ ferrite functions as a reinforcement in the dual phase 9Cr-ODS steel. Its creep behavior is very unique and cannot be interpreted by conventional theories of heat resistant steels. Alternative qualitative model of creep mechanism was formulated at the start of this study using the results of microstructural observations. Based on the alternative creep mechanism model, a novel creep constitutive equation was formulated using the exponential type creep equation extended by a law of mixture.

  12. Use of quadratic components for buckling calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Segalman, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    A buckling calculation procedure based on the method of quadratic components is presented. Recently developed for simulating the motion of rotating flexible structures, the method of quadratic components is shown to be applicable to buckling problems with either conservative or nonconservative loads. For conservative loads, stability follows from the positive definiteness of the system`s stiffness matrix. For nonconservative loads, stability is determined by solving a nonsymmetric eigenvalue problem, which depends on both the stiffness and mass distribution of the system. Buckling calculations presented for a cantilevered beam are shown to compare favorably with classical results. Although the example problem is fairly simple and well-understood, the procedure can be used in conjunction with a general-purpose finite element code for buckling calculations of more complex systems.

  13. Buckling optimisation of sandwich cylindrical panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouhamzeh, M.; Sadighi, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the buckling load optimisation is performed on sandwich cylindrical panels. A finite element program is developed in MATLAB to solve the governing differential equations of the global buckling of the structure. In order to find the optimal solution, the genetic algorithm Toolbox in MATLAB is implemented. Verifications are made for both the buckling finite element code and also the results from the genetic algorithm by comparisons to the results available in literature. Sandwich cylindrical panels are optimised for the buckling strength with isotropic or orthotropic cores with different boundary conditions. Results are presented in terms of stacking sequence of fibers in the face sheets and core to face sheet thickness ratio.

  14. Study of irradiation creep of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-08-01

    Thin-wall tubing was produced from the 832665 (500 kg) heat of V-4 wt.% Cr-4 wt.% Ti to study its irradiation creep behavior. The specimens, in the form of pressurized capsules, were irradiated in Advanced Test Reactor and High Flux Isotope Reactor experiments (ATR-A1 and HFIR RB-12J, respectively). The ATR-A1 irradiation has been completed and specimens from it will soon be available for postirradiation examination. The RB-12J irradiation is not yet complete.

  15. Calculating Buckling And Vibrations Of Lattice Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. S.; Durling, B. J.; Herstrom, C. L.; Williams, F. W.; Banerjee, J. R.; Kennedy, D.; Warnaar, D. B.

    1989-01-01

    BUNVIS-RG computer program designed to calculate vibration frequencies or buckling loads of prestressed lattice structures used in outer space. For buckling and vibration problems, BUNVIS-RG calculates deadload axial forces caused in members by any combination of externally-applied static point forces and moments at nodes, axial preload or prestrain in members, and such acceleration loads as those due to gravity. BUNVIS-RG is FORTRAN 77 computer program implemented on CDC CYBER and VAX computer.

  16. Optimal design of structures with buckling constraints.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiusalaas, J.

    1973-01-01

    The paper presents an iterative, finite element method for minimum weight design of structures with respect to buckling constraints. The redesign equation is derived from the optimality criterion, as opposed to a numerical search procedure, and can handle problems that are characterized by the existence of two fundamental buckling modes at the optimal design. Application of the method is illustrated by beam and orthogonal frame design problems.

  17. Comprehensive Creep and Thermophysical Performance of Refractory Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ferber, M.K.; Wereszczak, A.; Hemrick, J.A.

    2006-06-29

    Furnace designers and refractory engineers recognize that optimized furnace superstructure design and refractory selection are needed as glass production furnaces are continually striving toward greater output and efficiencies. Harsher operating conditions test refractories to the limit, while changing production technology (such as the conversion to oxy-fuel from traditional air-fuel firing) can alter the way the materials perform [1-3]. Refractories for both oxy- and air-fuel fired furnace superstructures (see Fig. 1) are subjected to high temperatures that may cause them to creep excessively or subside during service if the refractory material is not creep resistant, or if it is subjected to high stress, or both. Furnace designers can ensure that superstructure structural integrity is maintained if the creep behavior of the refractory material is well understood and well represented by appropriate engineering creep models. Several issues limit the abilities of furnace designers to (1) choose the optimum refractory for their applications, (2) optimize the engineering design, or (3) predict the service mechanical integrity of their furnace superstructures. Published engineering creep data are essentially nonexistent for almost all commercially available refractories used for glass furnace superstructures. The limited data that do exist are supplied by the various refractory suppliers. Unfortunately, the suppliers generally have different ways of conducting their mechanical testing, and they interpret and report their data differently. This inconsistency makes it hard for furnace designers to draw fair comparisons between competing grades of candidate refractories. Furthermore, the refractory suppliers' data are often not available in a form that can be readily used for furnace design or for the prediction and design of long-term structural integrity of furnace superstructures. As a consequence, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Industrial Technology Program (ITP

  18. Creep Properties of Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu Lead-Free Solder with Ni Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, F. X.; Zhu, W. H.; Poh, Edith S. W.; Zhang, X. R.; Zhang, Xiaowu; Chai, T. C.; Gao, S.

    2011-03-01

    In this work, tensile creep tests for Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu-0.02Ni solder have been conducted at various temperatures and stress levels to determine its creep properties. The effects of stress level and temperature on creep strain rate were investigated. Creep constitutive models (such as the simple power-law model, hyperbolic sine model, double power-law model, and exponential model) have been reviewed, and the material constants of each model have been determined based on experimental results. The stress exponent and creep activation energy have been studied and compared with other researchers' results. These four creep constitutive models established in this paper were then implemented into a user-defined subroutine in the ANSYS™ finite-element analysis software to investigate the creep behavior of Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu-0.02Ni solder joints of thin fine-pitch ball grid array (TFBGA) packages for the purpose of model comparison and application. Similar simulation results of creep strain and creep strain energy density were achieved when using the different creep constitutive models, indicating that the creep models are consistent and accurate.

  19. The effect of wellbore curvature on tubular buckling and lockup

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C.

    1995-09-01

    This paper studies tubular buckling in curved wellbores (such as the build section of horizontal wells) and its effect on tubular ``lockup`` in horizontal or extended-reach wells. New buckling load equations are derived to properly predict tubular sinusoidal and helical buckling in such wellbores. The results show that the buckling loads to initiate sinusoidal and helical buckling to tubulars in curved wellbores are usually much larger than those in straight wellbores. This is because the curved wellbore tends to hold the axially compressed tubular against the outer-curve side of the wellbore. The tubular becomes less easy to buckle until higher axial compressive loads are applied. Less tubular lockup risk is then predicted for tubulars in horizontal or extended-reach wells by using the new buckling load equations. The new buckling loads in curved wellbores agree with those in straight wellbores when wellbore curvature approaches zero. Small-scale laboratory experiments also confirmed these theoretically derived buckling loads.

  20. Observation and Spectrum of Mesoscopic Buckling Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Stephen; Lawrence, Walter; Wybourne, Martin

    2004-03-01

    Classical Euler buckling of a rod or beam is a familiar phenomenon. For clamped-clamped boundary conditions the expected eigenfunction has a single antinode midway between the endpoints [1]. Recently we have observed stable higher-order buckling modes of suspended mesoscopic SiO2 beams [2], where the beam dimensions are approximately 200 nm x 500 nm in cross-section and 5 um to 60 um in length. Starting with a silicon wafer with 500 nm of thermal oxide, the suspended structures are fabricated by e-beam lithography and plasma etching. During the plasma etching of the underlying silicon, the structures buckle due to the residual strain from the thermal oxide growth. We have analyzed the observed elastic buckling spectrum in terms of clamped eigenfunctions with mode numbers n=1 through n=6 using image processing of the SEM micrographs. The observed spectrum exhibits several interesting features, including significant mode-mode interaction and the appearance of a geometrical constraint involving a sum over all modes. Ideal Euler buckling theory cannot account for the stability and interaction of the higher-order modes. We are investigating the applicability of a mulitmode Ginzburg-Landau description which includes ideal Euler buckling as a limiting case [3]. [1] S.M. Carr and M.N. Wybourne, Applied Physics Letters 82 709 (2003). [2] S.M. Carr, W.E. Lawrence, and M.N. Wybourne, submitted (2003). [3] W.E. Lawrence, APS March Meeting Bulletin (2004).