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Sample records for creosote bush larrea

  1. Creosote Bush (Larrea tridentata) Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Reduces Plasma and Hepatic Lipids in Hamsters Fed a High Fat and Cholesterol Diet

    PubMed Central

    Del Vecchyo-Tenorio, Georgina; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Andrade-Cetto, Adolfo; Cárdenas-Vázquez, René

    2016-01-01

    Creosote bush, Larrea tridentata (Sesse y Moc. Ex DC, Zygophyllaceae) is a shrub found in the deserts of Northern Mexico and Southwestern United States. In traditional medicine, it is used to treat a variety of illnesses including type 2 diabetes. The present study aims to investigate the effects of creosote bush ethanolic extract on plasma and liver parameters associated with the metabolic syndrome in hamsters fed a high fat and cholesterol diet (HFD), comparing them with those induced by ezetimibe (EZ). Seven groups of six hamsters each were formed. Six groups were fed HFD for 2 weeks. The following 2 weeks, the HFD groups received: (1) only HFD, (2) HFD + 3 mg% EZ, (3) HFD + 0.2% creosote bush ethanolic extract, (4) only standard diet (Std Diet), (5) Std Diet + 3 mg% EZ, (6) Std Diet + 0.2% creosote bush ethanolic extract. The beneficial effects of creosote bush ethanolic extract in the HFD hamster model were a reduction of insulin resistance, associated with lower serum insulin and leptin, lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher liver antioxidant capacity. Plasma and liver lipids tended or were reduced to values closer to those of animals fed standard diet. A similar effect on lipids was induced by EZ, although with even lower hepatic cholesterol and total lipids concentrations. In general, the change from HFD to standard diet plus ethanolic extract induced the same but deeper changes, including a reduction in plasma glucose and an increase in the percentage of HDL cholesterol. Unlike creosote bush extract, EZ increased food consumption and neutral fecal steroids, with no significant effect on body weight, epididymal fat pads, liver peroxidation or antioxidant capacity. Also EZ did not modify serum insulin and leptin. However, insulin sensitivity improved to values similar to those induced by the extract. This suggests that the mechanism of action of creosote bush ethanolic extract is different to inhibition of cholesterol absorption or increase excretion

  2. Creosote Bush (Larrea tridentata) Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Reduces Plasma and Hepatic Lipids in Hamsters Fed a High Fat and Cholesterol Diet.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchyo-Tenorio, Georgina; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Andrade-Cetto, Adolfo; Cárdenas-Vázquez, René

    2016-01-01

    Creosote bush, Larrea tridentata (Sesse y Moc. Ex DC, Zygophyllaceae) is a shrub found in the deserts of Northern Mexico and Southwestern United States. In traditional medicine, it is used to treat a variety of illnesses including type 2 diabetes. The present study aims to investigate the effects of creosote bush ethanolic extract on plasma and liver parameters associated with the metabolic syndrome in hamsters fed a high fat and cholesterol diet (HFD), comparing them with those induced by ezetimibe (EZ). Seven groups of six hamsters each were formed. Six groups were fed HFD for 2 weeks. The following 2 weeks, the HFD groups received: (1) only HFD, (2) HFD + 3 mg% EZ, (3) HFD + 0.2% creosote bush ethanolic extract, (4) only standard diet (Std Diet), (5) Std Diet + 3 mg% EZ, (6) Std Diet + 0.2% creosote bush ethanolic extract. The beneficial effects of creosote bush ethanolic extract in the HFD hamster model were a reduction of insulin resistance, associated with lower serum insulin and leptin, lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher liver antioxidant capacity. Plasma and liver lipids tended or were reduced to values closer to those of animals fed standard diet. A similar effect on lipids was induced by EZ, although with even lower hepatic cholesterol and total lipids concentrations. In general, the change from HFD to standard diet plus ethanolic extract induced the same but deeper changes, including a reduction in plasma glucose and an increase in the percentage of HDL cholesterol. Unlike creosote bush extract, EZ increased food consumption and neutral fecal steroids, with no significant effect on body weight, epididymal fat pads, liver peroxidation or antioxidant capacity. Also EZ did not modify serum insulin and leptin. However, insulin sensitivity improved to values similar to those induced by the extract. This suggests that the mechanism of action of creosote bush ethanolic extract is different to inhibition of cholesterol absorption or increase excretion

  3. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria associated with ancient clones of creosote bush (Larrea tridentata).

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Milko A; Shaharoona, Baby; Nadeem, Sajid M; de la Luz Mora, María; Crowley, David E

    2012-11-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are common components of the rhizosphere, but their role in adaptation of plants to extreme environments is not yet understood. Here, we examined rhizobacteria associated with ancient clones of Larrea tridentata in the Mohave desert, including the 11,700-year-old King Clone, which is oldest known specimen of this species. Analysis of unculturable and culturable bacterial community by PCR-DGGE revealed taxa that have previously been described on agricultural plants. These taxa included species of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes that commonly carry traits associated with plant growth promotion, including genes encoding aminocyclopropane carboxylate deaminase and β-propeller phytase. The PGPR activities of three representative isolates from L. tridentata were further confirmed using cucumber plants to screen for plant growth promotion. This study provides an intriguing first view of the mutualistic bacteria that are associated with some of the world's oldest living plants and suggests that PGPR likely contribute to the adaptation of L. tridentata and other plant species to harsh environmental conditions in desert habitats.

  4. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid from Creosote Bush (Larrea tridentata) Mitigates 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate-Induced Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Responses of Tumor Promotion Cascade in Mouse Skin

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Shakilur; Ansari, Rizwan Ahmed; Rehman, Hasibur; Parvez, Suhel; Raisuddin, Sheikh

    2011-01-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a phenolic antioxidant found in the leaves and twigs of the evergreen desert shrub, Larrea tridentata (Sesse and Moc. ex DC) Coville (creosote bush). It has a long history of traditional medicinal use by the Native Americans and Mexicans. The modulatory effects of topically applied NDGA was studied on acute inflammatory and oxidative stress responses in mouse skin induced by stage I tumor promoting agent, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Double TPA treatment adversely altered many of the marker responses of stage I skin tumor promotion cascade. Pretreatment of NDGA in TPA-treated mice mitigated cutaneous lipid peroxidation and inhibited production of hydrogen peroxide. NDGA treatment also restored reduced glutathione level and activities of antioxidant enzymes. Elevated activities of myeloperoxidase, xanthine oxidase and skin edema formation in TPA-treated mice were also lowered by NDGA indicating a restrained inflammatory response. Furthermore, results of histological study demonstrated inhibitory effect of NDGA on cellular inflammatory responses. This study provides a direct evidence of antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of NDGA against TPA-induced cutaneous inflammation and oxidative stress corroborating its chemopreventive potential against skin cancer. PMID:19861506

  5. The floral hosts and distribution of a supposed creosote bush specialist, Colletes stepheni Timberlake (Hymenoptera: Colletidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Colletes stepheni Timberlake, previously thought to be a narrow oligolege of Larrea (creosote bush) of limited distribution in the Sonoran Desert, is found to be a much more widely distributed psammophile of the Sonoran, Mojave and Great Basin Deserts that utilizes two unrelated plant pollen sources...

  6. Creosote bush lignans for human disease treatment and prevention: Perspectives on combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gnabre, John; Bates, Robert; Huang, Ru Chih

    2015-01-01

    The medicinal properties of the most successful plant in the deserts of the western hemisphere, the creosote bush (Larrea tridentata), are evidenced by the long traditional usage of the plants by the Native Americans Indian tribes in Southwestern North America and the Amerindians from South America. The plant is rich in simple bisphenyl lignans and tricyclic lignans known as cyclolignans. These compounds are responsible for many of the pharmacological activities of extracts of the plants. Some of these activities, namely antiherpes, antioxidant, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory, were known a century ago. Only recently have further studies revealed other crucial activities of the same plant molecules as powerful agents against human immunodeficiency virus, human papillomavirus, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and symptoms of aging. Molecular mechanisms underlying the antiviral and anticancer activities have been elucidated and involve the inhibition of SP1 dependent gene transcription. This review summarizes the recent findings on creosote bush lignans. We introduce the concept of a cocktail of safe well-characterized natural products from the creosote bush that would represent a bridge between oriental herbal medicines and Western drug-based therapies. PMID:26151022

  7. "Pharm-ecology" of diet shifting: biotransformation of plant secondary compounds in creosote (Larrea tridentata) by a woodrat herbivore, Neotoma lepida.

    PubMed

    Haley, Shannon L; Lamb, John G; Franklin, Michael R; Constance, Jonathan E; Dearing, M Denise

    2008-01-01

    Diet switching in mammalian herbivores may necessitate a change in the biotransformation enzymes used to process plant secondary compounds (PSCs). We investigated differences in the biotransformation system in the mammalian herbivore, Neotoma lepida, after a radical shift in diet and secondary compound composition. Populations of N. lepida in the Mojave Desert have evolved over the past 10,000 years to feed on creosote (Larrea tridentata) from an ancestral state of consuming juniper (Juniperus osteosperma). This dietary shift represents a marked change in the dietary composition of PSCs in that creosote leaves are coated with phenolic resin, whereas juniper is high in terpenes but lacks phenolic resin. We quantified the enzyme activity of five major groups of biotransformation enzymes (cytochrome P450s, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase, glutathione conjugation, sulfation, and glucuronidation) recognized for their importance to mammalian biotransformation for the elimination of foreign compounds. Enzyme activities were compared between populations of Mojave and Great Basin woodrats fed control and creosote diets. In response to creosote, the Mojave population had greater levels of cytochrome P450s (CYP2B, CYP1A) and glutathione conjugation liver enzymes compared with the Great Basin population. Our results suggest that elevated levels of cytochrome P450s and glutathione conjugation enzymes in the Mojave population may be the underlying biotransformation mechanisms that facilitate feeding on creosote.

  8. Allyl/propenyl phenol synthases from the creosote bush and engineering production of specialty/commodity chemicals, eugenol/isoeugenol, in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Vassão, Daniel G; Moinuddin, Syed G A; Bedgar, Diana L; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2014-01-01

    The creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) harbors members of the monolignol acyltransferase, allylphenol synthase, and propenylphenol synthase gene families, whose products together are able to catalyze distinct regiospecific conversions of various monolignols into their corresponding allyl- and propenyl-phenols, respectively. In this study, co-expression of a monolignol acyltransferase with either substrate versatile allylphenol or propenylphenol synthases in Escherichia coli established that various monolignol substrates were efficiently converted into their corresponding allyl/propenyl phenols, as well as providing proof of concept for efficacious conversion in a bacterial platform. This capability thus potentially provides an alternate source to these important plant phytochemicals, whether for flavor/fragrance and fine chemicals, or ultimately as commodities, e.g., for renewable energy or other intermediate chemical purposes. Previous reports had indicated that specific and highly conserved amino acid residues 84 (Phe or Val) and 87 (Ile or Tyr) of two highly homologous allyl/propenyl phenol synthases (circa 96% identity) from a Clarkia species mainly dictate their distinct regiospecific catalyzed conversions to afford either allyl- or propenyl-phenols, respectively. However, several other allyl/propenyl phenol synthase homologs isolated by us have established that the two corresponding amino acid 84 and 87 residues are not, in fact, conserved.

  9. Genes encoding chavicol/eugenol synthase from the creosote bush Larrea tridentata

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Kim, Sung -Jin; Vassao, Daniel Giddings; Patten, Ann M.; Eichinger, Dietmar

    2015-09-15

    Particular aspects provide novel methods for redirecting carbon allocation in plants or cell culture from lignification to inherently more useful and tractable materials, and to facilitate the generation of, e.g., biofuels from the remaining plant ro culture biomass. Particular aspects provided novel methods for converting monolignols into allyl/propenyl phenols, and for chavicol/eugenol formation or production. Additional aspects relate to the discovery of novel chavicol/eugenol synthases that convert p-coumaryl/coniferyl alcohol esters into chavicol/eugenol, and to novel compositions (e.g., novel proteins and nucleic acids encoding same), and novel methods using same for producing or forming chavicol/eugenol and other derivatives in cell culture and/or genetically modified plants, and for re-engineering the composition of plant biomass. Particular aspects provide novel methods for generation in culture or in planta of liquid/combustible allyl/propenyl phenols, and these phenolic products are utilized for (non-ethanol) biofuel/bioenergy purposes, while the remaining plant biomass facilitates the generation of other biofuels.

  10. Creosote

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Creosote is a wood preservative pesticide used in outdoor settings such as in railroad ties and utility poles. It protects wood against termites, fungi, mites and other pests that can degrade or threaten the integrity of wood products.

  11. Creosote

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Creosote ; CASRN 8001 - 58 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  12. Determining copper and lead binding in Larrea tridentata through chemical modification and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Polette, L.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Chianelli, R.; Pickering, I.J.; George, G.N.

    1997-12-31

    Metal contamination in soils has become a widespread problem. Emerging technologies, such as phytoremediation, may offer low cost cleanup methods. The authors have identified a desert plant, Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), which naturally grows and uptakes copper and lead from a contaminated area near a smelting operation. They determined, through chemical modification of carboxyl groups with methanol, that these functional groups may be responsible for a portion of copper(II) binding. In contrast, lead binding was minimally affected by modification of carboxyl groups. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies conducted at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) further support copper binding to oxygen-coordinated ligands and also imply that the binding is not solely due to phytochelatins. The EXAFS data indicate the presence of both Cu-O and Cu-S back scatters, no short Cu-Cu interactions, but with significant Cu-Cu back scattering at 3.7 {angstrom} (unlike phytochelatins with predominantly Cu-S coordination and short Cu-Cu interactions at 2.7 {angstrom}). Cu EXAFS of roots and leaves also vary depending on the level of heavy metal contamination in the environment from which the various creosote samples were obtained. In contrast, Pb XANES data of roots and leaves of creosote collected from different contaminated sites indicate no difference in valence states or ligand coordination.

  13. Ploidy race distributions since the Last Glacial Maximum in the North American desert shrub, Larrea tridentata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, K.L.; Betancourt, J.L.; Riddle, B.R.; Van Devender, T. R.; Cole, K.L.; Geoffrey, Spaulding W.

    2000-01-01

    1 A classic biogeographic pattern is the alignment of diploid, tetraploid and hexaploid races of creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) across the Chihuahuan, Sonoran and Mohave Deserts of western North America. We used statistically robust differences in guard cell size of modern plants and fossil leaves from packrat middens to map current and past distributions of these ploidy races since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). 2 Glacial/early Holocene (26-10 14C kyr BP or thousands of radiocarbon years before present) populations included diploids along the lower Rio Grande of west Texas, 650 km removed from sympatric diploids and tetraploids in the lower Colorado River Basin of south-eastern California/south-western Arizona. Diploids migrated slowly from lower Rio Grande refugia with expansion into the northern Chihuahuan Desert sites forestalled until after ???4.0 14C kyr BP. Tetraploids expanded from the lower Colorado River Basin into the northern limits of the Sonoran Desert in central Arizona by 6.4 14C kyr BP. Hexaploids appeared by 8.5 14C kyr BP in the lower Colorado River Basin, reaching their northernmost limits (???37??N) in the Mohave Desert between 5.6 and 3.9 14C kyr BP. 3 Modern diploid isolates may have resulted from both vicariant and dispersal events. In central Baja California and the lower Colorado River Basin, modern diploids probably originated from relict populations near glacial refugia. Founder events in the middle and late Holocene established diploid outposts on isolated limestone outcrops in areas of central and southern Arizona dominated by tetraploid populations. 4 Geographic alignment of the three ploidy races along the modern gradient of increasingly drier and hotter summers is clearly a postglacial phenomenon, but evolution of both higher ploidy races must have happened before the Holocene. The exact timing and mechanism of polyploidy evolution in creosote bush remains a matter of conjecture. ?? 2001 Blackwell Science Ltd.

  14. Gallic acid and tannase accumulation during fungal solid state culture of a tannin-rich desert plant (Larrea tridentata Cov.).

    PubMed

    Treviño-Cueto, B; Luis, M; Contreras-Esquivel, J C; Rodríguez, R; Aguilera, A; Aguilar, C N

    2007-02-01

    Larrea tridentata (Sesse & Mocino ex DC.) Coville, also known as Larrea, gobernadora, chaparral, or creosote bush, is a shrubby plant which dominates some areas of the desert southwest in the United States and Northern Mexico and its use has not been exploited and standardized. In this study, gobernadora was studied to evaluate its potential use for support of solid state culture. Influence of two minimal media added with gobernadora powder as the sole carbon source and inducer of tannin-degrading enzymes was evaluated. Cultures were initially 70% moisture, had a pH of 5.5 and were inoculated with Aspergillus niger Aa-20 at 2 x 10(7) spores per gram of media. Analysis of pH, moisture, tannin uptake, gallic acid accumulation and tannase production were evaluated. Results indicated a high content of condensed (39.4%dm) and hydrolysable (22.8%dm) tannins. Invasion capacity of fungal growth was of 0.15 mmh(-1). Tannase production reached values of 1040 Ul(-1) at 43 h of culture. During the first 48 h of culture, the concentration of gallic acid accumulation was 0.33 gl(-1). Gobernadora is a potential source of gallic acid and tannase production by solid state culture; however, further optimization of the process is needed.

  15. AmeriFlux US-SRC Santa Rita Creosote

    SciTech Connect

    Kurc, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-SRC Santa Rita Creosote. Site Description - Part of the Santa Rita Experimental Range since 1901; Site vegetation has been dominated by Creosote bush since at least 1934

  16. [A historical review of the therapeutic use of wood creosote. Part II: Original plant source of crude drug wood creosote].

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Nobuaki; Sato, Akane; Shibata, Takashi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    Wood creosote is a medicine that has been listed in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia (JP) since the first edition published in 1886. Medicines containing wood creosote and other natural ingredients have been very popular in Japan and Southeast Asian countries. In Japan, one such medicine, named Seirogan, has been used for more than 100 years. In this paper, we report the results of our examination on the historical aspects of wood creosote. One finding was that creosote, called "kereosote" at that time, was imported to Japan for the first time to Nagasaki by Johann Erdewin Niemann, who was the Director of the Dutch Mercantile House, and prescribed by Johannes Lijdius Catharinus Pompe van Meerdervoort and Anthonius Franciscus Bauduin. From our findings, we concluded that wood creosote was one of the essential medicines for the successful introduction and progression of Western medicine in Japan. Furthermore, we found that Dutch physicians introduced wood creosote to Japanese physicians, including Taizen Sato, Dokai Hayashi, and Jun Matsumoto, and that wood creosote was subsequently popularized by Rintaro (Ogai) Mori during the Russo-Japanese war. In addition, we examined the original plant for wood creosote, and consequently confirmed that the 15th edition of the JP, Supplement Two, clarifying the original plant for wood creosote, matches the pharmaceutical and historical facts. We also provide drug information relating to distinguishing between wood creosote and the creosote bush.

  17. Exposure of Creosote-Naive and Creosote-Conditioned Limnoria tripunctata (Menzies) of Untreated and Creosote-Treated Wood.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-13

    20 AGSTRACT (Conflnuod) -5 A creosote-naive (never exposed to creosote) population of L . tripunciata exhibited 95% sur- vival and produced numerous...ENTA L D ESIG N .................................................................................................. 4 Exposure of Creosote-Naive...and ammoniacal -copper-arsenate) are effective, but wood treated with these preservatives tends to lose its mechanical strength 15,61, and treated

  18. New views on antidiarrheal effect of wood creosote: is wood creosote really a gastrointestinal antiseptic?

    PubMed

    Ataka, Koji; Ito, Masafumi; Shibata, Takashi

    2005-12-01

    Wood creosote, the principal ingredient in Seirogan, has a long history as a known gastrointestinal microbicidal agent. When administered orally, the intraluminal concentration of wood creosote is not sufficiently high to achieve this microbicidal effect. Through further animal tests, we have shown that antimotility and antisecretory actions are the principal antidiarrheal effects of wood creosote. Wood creosote inhibits intestinal secretion induced by enterotoxins by blocking the Cl(-) channel on the intestinal epithelium. Wood creosote also decreases intestinal motility accelerated by mechanical, chemical, or electrical stimulus by the inhibition of the Ca(2+) influx into the smooth muscle cells. In this overview, the antimotility and antisecretory effects of wood creosote are compared with those of loperamide. Wood creosote was observed to inhibit stimulated colonic motility, but not normal jejunal motility. Loperamide inhibits normal jejunal motility, but not stimulated colonic motility. Both wood creosote and loperamide inhibit intestinal secretion accelerated by acetylcholine. Wood creosote was found to have greater antisecretory effects in the colon than loperamide. Based upon these findings, we conclude that the antidiarrheal effects of wood creosote are due to both antisecretory activity in the intestine and antimotility in the colon, but not due to the microbicidal activity as previously thought. Wood creosote was found to have no effects on normal intestinal activity. These conclusions are supported by the results of a recent clinical study comparing wood creosote and loperamide, which concluded that wood creosote was more efficacious in relieving abdominal pain and comparable to loperamide in relieving diarrhea.

  19. Bush Canal Floodgate Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -0 9 -9 Bush Canal Floodgate Study Tate O. McAlpin, Rutherford C. Berger, and Amena M. Henville July 2009 C oa st...al a n d H yd ra u lic s La b or at or y Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC/CHL TR-09-9 July 2009 Bush Canal ...LA 70118-3651 Under Military Interdepartmental Purchase Request (MIPR) W42HEM60734548, “H&H Modeling of Bush Canal /Morganza to the Gulf” ERDC/CHL

  20. Genotoxic exposure of workers creosoting wood.

    PubMed

    Bos, R P; Hulshof, C T; Theuws, J L; Henderson, P T

    1984-05-01

    In a small wood preserving industry spot samples were taken from contaminated surfaces at several places and tested for mutagenicity. The results suggest that the application of a wipe test can give a first indication of occupational exposure to mutagenic and carcinogenic substances, particularly when exposure occurs more from skin contact than from inhalation. One of the pesticide chemicals used to preserve wood is the mutagenic creosote . It was found that mutagens appeared in the urine of rats after intraperitoneal administration of creosote . Despite these results, no increase in mutagenicity could be detected in the urine of creosote workers in relation to their work.

  1. Creosote production from beetle infested timber

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.F.; Maxwell, T.T.

    1982-01-01

    Wood-tar creosote accumulation in stove pipes and chimneys following burning of beetle-killed southern pine, green pine, seasoned hardwood totalled 6.21, 3.21, 4.27 and 3.73 lb/ton DM respectively. Tests showed that accumulation depends more on air supply to the stove than type or moisture content of wood burned. It is suggested that beetle-killed pine should not be rejected as a fuelwood on the basis of creosote production.

  2. Toxicity of water-soluble fractions derived from whole creosote and creosote-contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Padma, T.V.; Hale, R.C.; Roberts, M.H. Jr.

    1998-08-01

    Creosote, a complex mixture of aromatic compounds (ACs), contaminates numerous sites in the USA and elsewhere. In addition to pollution of the water column directly after a creosote spill, contaminated sediments can continue to act as source of pollution for many years, because natural and anthropogenic perturbations may redissolve or resuspend sediment-associated contaminants. A 48-h static renewal assay compared survival of the bay mysid, Mysidopsis bahia, exposed to water-soluble fractions (WSFs) generated from two different sources: whole creosote and creosote-contaminated sediment. Sediment was obtained from a Super Fund site located on the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River in Virginia, USA. Whole creosote, contaminated sediment, and WSFs derived from these source materials were characterized. Median lethal concentrations of WSFs generated from whole creosote and sediment (expressed as total identified ACs) were 180 {micro}g/L and 700 {micro}g/L, respectively. The creosote-derived WSF consisted of more than 70% low molecular weight nitrogen heterocyclics. These heterocyclics were below detectable limits in the sediment-generated WSF, suggesting that losses of these compounds had occurred via weathering. Nitrogen heterocyclics likely contributed to the acute toxicity of the whole creosote WSF.

  3. Bush Blitz Teachlive 2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaching Science, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an event that took place in February 2016, where five teachers (Jade Tinney, Louise Hoey, Mary-Anne Kefaloukos, Nicole Sadler, and Bruce Mills) from across Australia headed off into the chilly wilderness of South Bruny National Park, on Bruny Island, Tasmania, to participate in the "Bush Blitz TeachLive 2016"…

  4. Comparative spectroscopic analysis of urinary calculi inhibition by Larrea Tridentata infusion and NDGA chemical extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Felicia

    2012-10-01

    In the present comparative spectroscopic study we try to understand calcium oxalate kidney stone formation as well as its inhibition by using a traditional medicine approach with Larrea Tridentata (LT) herbal extracts and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), which is a chemical extract of the LT bush. The samples were synthesized without and with LT or NDGA using a simplified single diffusion gel growth technique. While the use of infusion from LT decreases the sizes of calcium oxalate crystals and also changes their structure from monohydrate for pure crystals to dihydrate for crystals grown with different amounts of inhibitor, both Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopic techniques, which are the methods of analysis employed in this work, reveal that NDGA is not responsible for the change in the morphology of calcium oxalate crystals and does not contribute significantly to the inhibition process. The presence of NDGA slightly affects the structure of the crystals by modifying the strength of the C-C bonds as seen in the Raman data. Also, the current infrared absorption results demonstrate the presence of NDGA in the samples through a vibrational line that corresponds to the double bond between carbon atoms of the ester group of NDGA.

  5. [Yeast diversity in Bulnesia retama and Larrea divaricata canopies and associated soils].

    PubMed

    Toro, M E; Oro, N P; Vega, A D; Maturano, Y P; Nally, M C; Fernandez, E; Pucheta, E; Vázquez, F

    2005-01-01

    Bush like vegetation dominates arid environments, and there is nutrients accumulation under shrub canopies and relatively unfertile soils between vegetal patches areas. Plants are one of the most common habitats for yeasts. There are many reports about yeasts inhabiting different plant components. Nevertheless, there are no reports about yeasts associated with Zygophyllaceae, an important shrub family of the Argentinean Province of Monte. The objective of this work was to analyzed yeast biodiversity of Bulnesia retama and Larrea divaricata canopies and associated soils, at Medanos Grandes of Caucete, San Juan, Argentina. Eighty seven (87) isolated yeasts were identified. From B. retama canopy and associated soil was observed a larger taxonomical diversity respect to L. divaricata. Nine (9) and ten (10) species were isolated from canopy and associated soil of B. retama, respectively. From L. divaricata canopy were 4 species and 3 species from its associated soil isolated. Identified genera were: Candida, Debaryomyces, Dekkera, Saccharomyces, Torulaspora, Sporidiobolus and Pichia. Fourteen (14) species were found at all microenvironments.

  6. Countering creosote and fumes in wood stoves

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-01

    As wood stoves can pollute the air and fires can be caused by creosote buildup, companies are making products which help to solve these problems. These firms include a company which makes a liquid catalyst spray which minimizes the emission of polluting particles while preventing creosote buildup and another whose product aids the combustion of soot and forms a shield on chimney and stove surfaces against corrosive combustion products. Some stove makers have their own method for reducing emissions by incorporating a catalytic combustor.

  7. Leaching behaviour of wood treated with creosote.

    PubMed

    Becker, L; Matuschek, G; Lenoir, D; Kettrup, A

    2001-01-01

    The results of a laboratory investigation on the leaching behaviour of wood treated with creosote and of untreated wood are reported. A special leaching test derived from the German standard method DEV S4 test (DIN 38414) has been developed. Samples were leached in deionized water, in a solution buffered at pH 4.7 and in a solution of humic substances. The organic fraction of the leachate was extracted using liquid-liquid extraction. The extracts were analysed qualitatively with GC/MSD and quantified with GC/FID. The results were compared with those of Soxhlet-extracts from creosote-treated wood.

  8. High voltage feedthrough bushing

    DOEpatents

    Brucker, John P.

    1993-01-01

    A feedthrough bushing for a high voltage diode provides for using compression sealing for all sealing surfaces. A diode assembly includes a central conductor extending through the bushing and a grading ring assembly circumferentially surrounding and coaxial with the central conductor. A flexible conductive plate extends between and compressively seals against the central conductor and the grading ring assembly, wherein the flexibility of the plate allows inner and outer portions of the plate to axially translate for compression sealing against the central conductor and the grading ring assembly, respectively. The inner portion of the plate is bolted to the central conductor for affecting sealing. A compression beam is also bolted to the central conductor and engages the outer portion of the plate to urge the outer portion toward the grading ring assembly to obtain compression sealing therebetween.

  9. Vannevar Bush Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The National Science Board (NSB) has announced that nominations for the Vannevar Bush Award are now being accepted. The award is given to a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to science and technology through public service activities. Nominations are due January 1, 1985. Information and guidelines are available from the National Science Board, 1800 G St., N.W., Washington, DC 20550.The award was established in 1980 by the Science Board in commemoration of the 30th anniversary of the National Science Foundation (NSF). Vannevar Bush, acting on advice from President Roosevelt, recommended in 1945 that a foundation be established to be a focal point for the federal government's activities in science and technology. NSF was created 5 years later by Congress.

  10. A bouquet for Bush

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, J. )

    1993-03-01

    George Bush left office on January 20 with his head held high. He did not brood for long over his devastating defeat on November 3. He refused to be immobilized by self-doubt. After a brief period of grieving over a botched election campaign, the former president returned to his first love, foreign policy, and produced significant accomplishments in his waning days of power.

  11. Community responses to liquid creosote and creosote-impregnated pilings witnessed in outdoor aquatic mesocosms

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M.L.; Robinson, R.; Shaw, E.A.; Bestari, K.; Solomon, K.; Day, K.

    1995-12-31

    Freshwater mesocosms were used to simulate the effects of creosote on aquatic ecosystems. Twenty-four ponds, each with a total volume of 12,000 L and a 5 cm layer of riverine sediment, were filled and circulated with pond water for at least three weeks to allow the natural colonization of benthic invertebrates, phytoplankton and zooplankton. Potted macrophytes and caged fish were also introduced prior to treatment with either liquid creosote or introduction of creosote-impregnated wood pilings. Dose-dependent changes in phytoplankton and zooplankton diversity and abundance were observed with both forms of treatment relative to controls. Comparatively, benthic invertebrate abundance was only affected by liquid creosote exposure. Although abundance of plankters recovered to pre-treatment values over two to seven weeks in all mesocosms, most parameter suggested the establishment of communities whose species compositions were proportionally altered form those sampled before dosing. In particular, phytoplankton communities in the ponds containing high concentrations of creosote became dominated by a few species of Chlamydomonas, while the equivalent dosed zooplankton communities were dominated by low diversity assemblages of Rotifera. The ramifications of these results for natural freshwater communities exposed to concentrated pulses or low level continuous inputs of creosote will be discussed. The ability to predict these community responses with several measured sub-organismal endpoints will also be evaluated.

  12. Antimitogenic effect of Larrea divaricata Cav.: participation in arachidonate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Anesini, C; Genaro, A; Cremaschi, G; Sterin Borda, L; Borda, E

    1999-02-01

    Aqueous extracts of the leaves of Larrea divaricata Cav. exert antimitogenic effects on tumor cells (BW 5147 murine immature T-lymphoma) and normal, stimulated lymphocytes. The effective concentration was four times smaller in the case of tumor cells than in the case of normal, stimulated lymphocytes. Inhibitor studies of arachidonate pathway suggest that the proliferative effect of the extract is due to the activation of lipoxygenase metabolism, while the inhibitory action could be a direct effect.

  13. The Bush Education Budget Legacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delisle, Jason; Luebchow, Lindsey; Rieman, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Next week, President George W. Bush will submit his eighth and final budget request to the Congress. How has he fared with respect to education budget proposals thus far? Answer: although President Bush made the No Child Left Behind Act, which deals with elementary and secondary education, the hallmark of his education policy, from a federal…

  14. SEALED INSULATOR BUSHING

    DOEpatents

    Carmichael, H.

    1952-11-11

    The manufacture of electrode insulators that are mechanically strong, shock-proof, vacuum tight, and are capable of withstanding gas pressures of many atmospheres under intense neutron bombardment, such as may be needed in an ionization chamber, is described. The ansulator comprises a bolt within a quartz tube, surrounded by a bushing held in place by two quartz rings, and tightened to a pressure of 1,000 pounds per square inch by a nut and washer. Quartz is the superior material to meet these conditions, however, to withstand this pressure the quartz must be fire polished, lapped to form smooth and parallel surfaces, and again fire polished to form an extremely smooth and fracture resistant mating surface.

  15. Vannevar Bush Visits Langley, October 21, 1938

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1938-01-01

    Dr. H.J.E. Reid, Langley Director; Vannevar Bush, NACA Chairman; and George Lewis at Langley, 1938. Vannevar Bush, Henry Reid, George W. Lewis: Vannevar Bush (center) visited Langley on October 21, 1938, just months before becoming the NACA chairman. Henry Reid stands to Bush's right; George Lewis is to his left.

  16. Remediation System Evaluation, American Creosote Works Site, Pensacola, Florida

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The American Creosote Works (ACW) site is located on 1800 Gimble Street on the abandoned AmericanCreosote Works wood preserving plant in Pensacola, Florida. The site is approximately 18 acres in area.The site is about 600 yards north of Pensacola Bay..

  17. Responses of wind erosion to disturbance in a desert scrub grassland: grass vs. bush cover, and a snapshot into recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddock, M.; Zobeck, T. M.; D'Odorico, P.; van Pelt, S.; Ravi, S.; Over, T. M.; Bhattachan, A.

    2010-12-01

    The mixture of grass and bush vegetation that typifies many desert scrublands is a distinctive feature of the northern Chihuahuan Desert, where it represents a change in land cover driven by shrub encroachment. In such environments, the redistribution of nutrients by aeolian transport has been recognized as an important biophysical process, with a role in sustaining shrub presence. Investigation of disturbances in these landscapes (e.g. fire and grazing) will enable better understanding of their dust emission behavior with changing climate, perturbance regime and management scenarios. Here we use a portable wind tunnel to investigate the impact of fire and animals on soil erodibilty and dust emissions from different vegetation types in the Sevilleta Wildlife Refuge, central New Mexico. Plots were selected that were a) predominantly creosote bush or b) predominantly grass covered. Dust emission was measured for these surfaces both before and after a prescribed burn was conducted. The grass plots were also clipped and artificially trampled to simulate grazing. PM10 concentrations and emission rates from the test surfaces are shown for initial blow-off experiments as the wind tunnel flow accelerates to a target velocity, plus the steady state emission flux produced under constant wind flow with an added abrader sand. An adjacent area burned 8 months previously also allowed investigation of the change in erodibility of the soil for a known time after fire. Our preliminary results indicate the extent that dust emission is changed by the introduced disturbances, and their differing effect on creosote bush and grass dominated covers.

  18. AMERICAN CREOSOTE SITE CASE STUDY: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF DIOXINS, PCP, AND CREOSOTE FOR $64 PER CUBIC YARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This case study describes the development of solidification/stabilization (S/S) formulas and their application to rededicate the American Creosote site in Jackson, Tennessee. During 1998 and 1999, 45,000 cubic yards of soil contaminated with Creosote, PCP, and Dioxins were treat...

  19. Effects of petroleum creosote on selected stages of embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    The prenatal toxicity of petroleum creosote, a complex mixture of chemicals, was investigated via an in vivo study and an in vitro embryo culture system. Additionally, the prenatal toxicity of naphthalene, one chemical component of petroleum creosote, was determined in the in vitro system. The purpose of the study was to provide specific data on the prenatal toxicity of petroleum creosote and demonstrate the value of the two techniques. In the in vivo study, petroleum creosote was not embryotoxic or teratogenic in ICR mice when administered on gestation days 5-9, at a dose of 4000 mg/kg body weight. In vitro, petroleum creosote becomes embryotoxic to ICR mouse blastocysts at some exposure level between 22 and 33 {mu}g/ml of media. Bioactivation plays a major role in embryotoxicity of naphthalene. Naphthalene without rodent liver microsomal enzymes added to the media was not embryotoxic at levels as high as 100 {mu}g/ml media, whereas naphthalene became embryotoxic at some level between 10 and 50 {mu}g/ml of media in the presence of microsomes. The data indicate that naphthalene is one of the embryotoxic components of petroleum creosote, and that exposure to sufficient levels of petroleum creosote during early pregnancy could result in embryonic loss.

  20. Cancer incidence among creosote-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Karlehagen, S; Andersen, A; Ohlson, C G

    1992-02-01

    Cancer incidence was studied among 922 creosote-exposed impregnators at 13 plants in Sweden and Norway. The subjects had been impregnating wood (eg, railroad cross-ties and telegraph poles), but no data on individual exposures were available. The study population was restricted to men employed during the period 1950-1975, and their cancer morbidity was checked through the cancer registries. The total cancer incidence was somewhat lower than expected, 129 cases versus 137 expected [standardized incidence ratio (SIR) 0.94]. Increased risks in both countries combined were observed for lip cancer (SIR 2.50, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.81-5.83), skin cancer (SIR 2.37, 95% CI 1.08-4.50), and malignant lymphoma (SIR 1.9, 95% CI 0.83-3.78). Exposure to sunlight may have contributed to the risk of lip and skin cancer. The small number of cancer cases does not permit valid conclusions. The findings indicate that impregnating wood with creosote in earlier decades increased the risk of skin cancer.

  1. Fungal bioremediation of creosote-treated wood: a laboratory scale study on creosote components degradation by Pleurotus ostreatus mycelium.

    PubMed

    Polcaro, C M; Brancaleoni, E; Donati, E; Frattoni, M; Galli, E; Migliore, L; Rapanà, P

    2008-08-01

    A bioremediation system for creosote-treated wood is proposed, based on the detoxifying capability of Pleurotus ostreatus, a ligninolythic fungus. Non-sterilized chipped contaminated wood was mixed at various ratios with wheat straw on which Pleurotus mycelia was grown. At 1:2 initial ratio contaminated wood:wheat straw, chemical analyses demonstrated an almost complete degradation of creosote oil components after 44 days, also confirmed by a significant reduction of ecotoxicity. Lower ratios, i.e. higher amount of contaminated wood, lower system efficiency, although a better creosote degradation was obtained by a stepped up wood addition.

  2. High voltage RF feedthrough bushing

    DOEpatents

    Grotz, Glenn F.

    1984-01-01

    Described is a multi-element, high voltage radio frequency bushing for trmitting RF energy to an antenna located in a vacuum container. The bushing includes a center conductor of complex geometrical shape, an outer coaxial shield conductor, and a thin-walled hollow truncated cone insulator disposed between central and outer conductors. The shape of the center conductor, which includes a reverse curvature portion formed of a radially inwardly directed shoulder and a convex portion, controls the uniformity of the axial surface gradient on the insulator cone. The outer shield has a first substantially cylindrical portion and a second radially inwardly extending truncated cone portion.

  3. T. J. Lee Greets President George Bush

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center Director T. J. Lee greets President George Bush upon arrival at the Redstone Arsenal Airfield, June 20, 1990. During his visit Bush toured Marshall facilities and addressed Center employees.

  4. Biological versus ambient exposure monitoring of creosote facility workers.

    PubMed

    Borak, Jonathan; Sirianni, Greg; Cohen, Howard; Chemerynski, Susan; Jongeneelen, Frans

    2002-04-01

    Traditional methods for monitoring occupational creosote exposure have focused on inhalation. However, there is evidence that dermal exposure contributes importantly to total systemic dose, as measured by biological monitoring methods. This study was conducted to further characterize the relationships between inhalation and dermal exposures to creosote, and to compare traditional ambient exposure monitoring versus biological monitoring in 36 creosote-exposed wood treatment workers. Full-shift personal air samples were obtained, along with post-shift and next-day urine measurements for 1-hydroxypyrene. There was little or no correlation between airborne measures and urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (r2 = 0.05 to 0.35). More than 90% of 1-hydroxypyrene could be attributed to dermal exposure. These data indicate that traditional monitoring methods may be inappropriate for creosote workers, raising concerns about the adequacy of methods currently mandated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

  5. 33 CFR 117.547 - Bush River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bush River. 117.547 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.547 Bush River. The draw of the Amtrak bridge... Superintendent at 301-291-4278 by an authorized representative of the Bush River Yacht Club by noon on the...

  6. 33 CFR 117.547 - Bush River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bush River. 117.547 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.547 Bush River. The draw of the Amtrak bridge... Superintendent at 301-291-4278 by an authorized representative of the Bush River Yacht Club by noon on the...

  7. 33 CFR 117.547 - Bush River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bush River. 117.547 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.547 Bush River. The draw of the Amtrak bridge... Superintendent at 301-291-4278 by an authorized representative of the Bush River Yacht Club by noon on the...

  8. 33 CFR 117.547 - Bush River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bush River. 117.547 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.547 Bush River. The draw of the Amtrak Bridge... the Bush River Yacht Club no later than noon on the Friday just preceding the day of opening or,...

  9. 33 CFR 117.547 - Bush River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bush River. 117.547 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.547 Bush River. The draw of the Amtrak bridge... Superintendent at 301-291-4278 by an authorized representative of the Bush River Yacht Club by noon on the...

  10. Enhanced biodegradation of creosote-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Carriere, P.P.E.; Mesania, F.A.

    1995-12-31

    Bioremediation, a viable option for treatment of creosote-contaminated soil, can be enhanced by the use of surfactant. A study was conducted to investigate the effect of a non-ionic surfactant, Triton X-100, on biodegradation of creosote-contaminated soil. Abiotic soil desorption experiments were performed to determine the kinetics of release of selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. Respirometric experiments were also conducted to evaluate the effect of nonionic surfactant on biodegradation. The N-Con system respirometer was used to monitor the oxygen uptake by the microorganisms. The abiotic experiments results indicated that the addition of surfactant to soil/water systems increased the desorption of PAH compounds. It was also observed that the desorption rate of PAH compounds depended on their molecular weight. The 3- and 4-ring PAH compounds showed higher and faster desorption rates than the 5- and 6-ring PAHs. The respirometric experiments indicated that an increase in soil contamination level from 112.5 to 771.8 mg/kg showed an increase in oxygen uptake. But for a soil contamination level of 1,102.5 mg/kg, the oxygen uptake was similar to the contamination level of 771.8 mg/kg. This might be due to toxicity by the surfactant or the solubilized PAHs at high concentration or interference with contaminant transport into the cell or to reversible physical-chemical interferences with the activity of enzymes involved in the PAH degradation. The increase in PAH availability to the microorganisms in the aqueous phase produced an increase in oxygen consumption that is proportional to the biodegradation of organic compounds.

  11. Q&A Steve Bush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Steve

    2016-08-01

    Steve Bush, curriculum leader for science at Sackville School in West Sussex, was awarded the 2016 RAS Patrick Moore Medal for his contribution to astronomy education. But, as he explains here, it was only chance that led him to astronomy.

  12. Vannevar Bush backs the bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary, G.P.

    1992-12-01

    This article deals with Vannevar Bush's role in controlling America's secret research on the atomic bomb from 1939 to 1942, concentrating on administrative/political/military aspects. This is one of a series of articles in this magazine commemorating the 50th anniversary of the first controlled chain reaction.

  13. Fluorescence induction as a bioindicator of creosote toxicity in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Marwood, C.A.; Solomon, K.R.; Greenberg, B.M.

    1995-12-31

    The use of chlorophyll fluorescence induction as a photosynthetic bioindicator was evaluated as part of a study to assess the effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on aquatic macrophytes. The wood preservative creosote was used as a mixed PAH source. Toxicity to aquatic plants was measured at the biomarker level using chlorophyll fluorescence induction and compared to effects at the population level in outdoor mesocosms. As well, the aquatic macrophytes Lemna gibba (G3) and Myriophyllum sp., and the green alga Selenastrum capricomutum were exposed to liquid creosote at nominal concentrations of 0.1 to 100 {micro}1/1 in static renewal 8-day toxicity bioassays. Plants were incubated in simulated solar radiation, which mimics the relative levels of UV in natural sunlight. Population-level endpoints (growth rate, cell numbers, chlorophyll content) were compared to results of the fluorescence induction assay. Growth rates of plants were significantly inhibited by creosote at concentrations above 3 {micro}l/l. However, inhibition of photosynthesis was detected by fluorescence induction at the lowest creosote concentration. Fluorescence induction assays of plants exposed to creosote in outdoor mesocosms also detected photosynthetic inhibition at lower creosote concentrations than growth assays, In addition, damage to the photosynthetic apparatus was detected by fluorescence induction after only a few hours of exposure to creosote. Chlorophyll fluorescence therefore appears to be a rapid and sensitive bioindicator for the toxicity of a PAH mixture. The fluorescence induction assay is also consistent with results from growth-based bioassays and is predictive of effects at population levels.

  14. Photosynthetic Acclimation to Temperature in the Desert Shrub, Larrea divaricata

    PubMed Central

    Armond, Paul A.; Schreiber, Ulrich; Björkman, Olle

    1978-01-01

    The response of photosynthetic electron transport and light-harvesting efficiency to high temperatures was studied in the desert shrub Larrea divaricata Cav. Plants were grown at day/night temperatures of 20/15, 32/25, or 45/33 C in rough approximation of natural seasonal temperature variations. The process of acclimation to high temperatures involves an enhancement of the stability of the interactions between the light-harvesting pigments and the photosystem reaction centers. As temperature is increased, the heat-induced dissociation of these complexes results in a decrease in the quantum yield of electron transport at limiting light intensity, followed by a loss of electron transport activity at rate-saturating light intensity. The decreased quantum yield can be attributed to a block of excitation energy transfer from chlorophyll b to chlorophyll a, and changes in the distribution of the excitation energy between photosystems II and I. The block of excitation energy transfer is characterized by a loss of the effectiveness of 480 nm light (absorbed primarily by chlorophyll b) to drive protochemical processes, as well as fluorescence emission by chlorophyll b. PMID:16660304

  15. Two-Site Comparison of Transpiration by Larrea Tridentata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanaugh, M. L.; Kurc, S. A.; Scott, R. L.; Bryant, R. B.

    2008-12-01

    As a result of landscape changes within the desert southwestern U.S. such as increased grazing, reduced wildfire frequency, and changes in atmospheric conditions, the native creosotebush (Larrea tridentata) has encroached upon historically grass-dominated ecosystems, expanding in range and land cover density. To understand how creosotebush influences the water budget of ecosystems, heat balance sap flow sensors were employed on creosotebush stems at both the Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER) and Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW). Additionally, both sites are equipped with eddy covariance towers, associated micrometeorological measurements, and profiles of water content reflectometers for soil moisture. The differences found between the two sites, including soil type and precipitation regime, are the basis of the following hypotheses. Firstly, we hypothesize that we will not see transpiration (T) responses following storms less than 5 mm at both sites. Secondly, we hypothesize that at both sites we will see a lagged response of T to large precipitation events, with evaporation being the dominate component in the partitioning of evapotranspiration (ET) for the first two days. Thirdly, we hypothesize that the ratio of plant transpiration to total evapotranspiration (T/ET) will be less at SRER due to the larger amount of bare soil exposed at this site. In this study, we show data from one summer at both sites and show how these relate to different precipitation events and soil moisture reservoirs.

  16. [A historical review of the therapeutic use of wood creosote based on its botanical origin].

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Nobuaki; Sato, Akane; Kimura, Masuo; Shibata, Takashi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2007-01-01

    After thoroughly studying the chronology of the therapeutic use of wood creosote, we obtained novel findings on its botanical origin. Furthermore, we could demonstrate the importance of differentiating between wood creosote and coal tar creosote, which is clearly stipulated by Japanese Pharmacopoeia.

  17. High voltage feed through bushing

    DOEpatents

    Brucker, J.P.

    1993-04-06

    A feed through bushing for a high voltage diode provides for using compression sealing for all sealing surfaces. A diode assembly includes a central conductor extending through the bushing and a grading ring assembly circumferentially surrounding and coaxial with the central conductor. A flexible conductive plate extends between and compressively seals against the central conductor and the grading ring assembly, wherein the flexibility of the plate allows inner and outer portions of the plate to axially translate for compression sealing against the central conductor and the grading ring assembly, respectively. The inner portion of the plate is bolted to the central conductor for affecting sealing. A compression beam is also bolted to the central conductor and engages the outer portion of the plate to urge the outer portion toward the grading ring assembly to obtain compression sealing therebetween.

  18. Washing studies for PCP and creosote-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Tobia, R.J.; Camacho, J.M.; Augustin, P.; Griffiths, R.A.; Frederick, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a series of bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to evaluate the feasibility of washing pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote from the soil at an abandoned wood-treatment Superfund site in Pensacola, FL. The high sand content and low silt/fines content of the soil made soil washing a promising alternative to incineration. The bench-scale tests confirmed the feasibility of washing the PCP and the carcinogenic creosote compounds from the soil using a nonionic surfactant at the pH of nine to ten and a water temperature of approximately 120 F. The target concentrations for total creosote were not achieved, but the results were sufficiently close to warrant further testing. The pilot-scale tests using the EPA's mobile Volume Reduction Unit produced residual PCP, carcinogenic creosote, and total creosote levels below the target levels. The tests also produced comparison data on the effects of surfactant concentration, pH, temperature, and liquid:solid ratio. (Copyright (c) 1994 Elsevier Science B.V.)

  19. Demonstration of antidiarrheal and antimotility effects of wood creosote.

    PubMed

    Ogata, N; Baba, T; Shibata, T

    1993-01-01

    Wood creosote administered to rats prevented castor-oil-induced diarrhea with an ED50 of 53 mg/kg p.o. This antidiarrheal effect was apparently produced by acceleration of net fluid absorption from the intestine, as shown by a 52% decrease (p < 0.001) of residual fluid volume in an intestinal loop, and partly by suppression of intestinal motility. Wood creosote also inhibited spontaneous longitudinal contractions of isolated ileal segments in rats (IC50 = 28 mg/l) and guinea pigs (IC50 = 17 mg/l). Contractions of the guinea pig ileum induced by electrical stimulation, bradykinin and acetylcholine were also inhibited dose-dependently. We conclude that wood creosote has an antidiarrheal activity and that this effect is exerted by inhibition of intestinal motility and by augmentation of net fluid absorption from the intestine.

  20. Exposure to mutagenic aromatic hydrocarbons of workers creosoting wood.

    PubMed

    Bos, R P; Jongeneelen, F J; Theuws, J L; Henderson, P T

    1984-01-01

    Creosote P1 is mutagenic in the Salmonella microsome assay towards strains TA1537, TA1538, TA98 and TA100 in the presence of S9 mix. The mutagenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons benzo[a]pyrene and benz[a]anthracene in this mixture are detected in concentrations of 0.18 and 1.1%, respectively. Spot samples taken from contaminated surfaces in several areas of a wood-preserving industry were tested for mutagenicity. The positive results suggest that a wipe test can give a first indication of occupational exposure to mutagenic substances, particularly when greater exposure occurs via skin contact than via inhalation. In urine of rats, mutagens appeared after treatment with creosote. However, no increase in mutagenicity could be detected in urine of creosote workers in relation to their work.

  1. Vannevar Bush: Fifty Years Later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1995-12-01

    It is ironic that the 50th anniversary year of Vannevar Bush's Report to President Truman entitled "Science the Endless Frontier", which put into motion the eminently successful current system of education of scientists in this country occurs at a time when serious questions are being asked about the usefulness of that very system. Bush viewed his proposal to establish a national research foundation (later to be called the National Science Foundation) as a "social compact." Judgment of scientific merit would be delegated to expert peers in return for scientific progress, which would ultimately benefit the nation in terms of scientific needs--military security, economic productivity, and enhanced quality of life. Bush wanted the funding of basic research intertwined with training, and preferred to use universities for this purpose rather than industrial or national labs. Bush viewed college and university scientists as teachers and investigators. He believed university-based research would uniquely encourage and engage the next generation of scientists as no other institutional arrangement could. Bush did not trust industry's commitment to basic research, an instinct that proved prophetic. The academic reserve of scientists (PhD's in training and postdoctoral students) that existed before World War II, and upon which the United States could draw for its needs, which were primarily associated with defense efforts, was probably one of the defining factors in Bush's suggested strategy. Currently, that reserve of talent has gotten so large that it is the obvious throttle in the pipeline slowing the continued development of the university research enterprise. Since 1977, the rate at which we have trained new scientists exceeds an average of 4% annually. Since 1987, the "science work force"--PhD's--has grown at three times the rate of the general labor supply. Temporary positions for postdoctoral scientists have grown even faster (over 5% per year since 1989). To compound

  2. Pseudomonas creosotenesis sp. n., a Creosote-tolerant Marine Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Thomas B.; Drisko, Richard W.; Hochman, Harry

    1961-01-01

    In a study of the marine biological environment in which creosoted pilings are located, a previously unreported species of bacteria was isolated. This species was detected on creosoted piling from 11 widely differing locations and was the predominant species of bacteria found on these piling. The new organism was identified as a gram-negative rod belonging to the genus Pseudomonas and has been named Pseudomonas creosotensis. It has been completely described by the standard morphological and biochemical tests. Images FIG. 1 PMID:14480909

  3. Control of Butterfly Bush with Postemergence Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butterfly bush (Buddleja davidii) is classified as invasive in several parts of the United States. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of four herbicides and two application methods on postemergence butterfly bush control. The four herbicides included: Roundup (glyphosate)...

  4. Bush Impact on Schools to Outlive Term

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2008-01-01

    George W. Bush entered the White House determined to change federal education policy. In his first year as the president, Bush forged a bipartisan consensus around the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), which he signed into law on January 8, 2002. For the first time, states receiving federal K-12 education funding would be required to hold districts…

  5. Bush Blitz TeachLive 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In July 2015, the Bush Blitz TeachLive expedition took place on the Olkola people's traditional lands on Cape York Peninsula in Queensland. Five teachers joined more than a dozen scientists and the Olkola Indigenous rangers to act as research assistants, as part of the eight-day Bush Blitz TeachLive experience. As a team, they discovered new…

  6. WASHING STUDIES FOR PCP AND CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a series of bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to evaluate the feasibility of washing pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote from the soil at an abandoned wood-treatment Superfund site in Pensacola, FL. The high sand content and lo...

  7. STEMFLOW CONTRIBUTION TO THE 'FERTILE ISLAND' EFFECT IN CREOSOTEBUSH, LARREA TRIDENTATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stemflow, throughfall and bulk precipitation were collected on six creosotebushes (Larrea tridentata) during 18 events in the summer rainy season in the northern Chihuahuan Desert. The average stemflow was 16.8 +-1.9%; throughfall average 64.7 +-3.2%. The concentration of all ion...

  8. [Possible carcinogenic risk associated with production and use of creosote-treated wood].

    PubMed

    Holme, J A; Refsnes, M; Dybing, E

    1999-08-10

    Creosote is a coal tar product which contains varying amounts of mutagenic and carcinogenic substances such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and benzene. Marketing and use of creosote and preparations containing creosote, as well as creosote-treated wood, are regulated by a EU Directive. According to the EU classification of such mixtures, inclusion of a warning against creosote as a carcinogen is not necessary if the contents of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and benzene are lower than 50 ppm (parts per million) and 1000 ppm, respectively. A recent well designed skin painting study in mice clearly indicates that the creosote preparations had a five-fold higher potency to induce skin cancer than the potency based on BaP content. Furthermore, it was estimated that creosote containing 50 ppm BaP would induce a significant incidence of skin cancer. Preliminary results from determination of concentrations of various carcinogens (BaP and benzene) in the air close to creosote impregnation plants as well as the crudely estimated exposure of children to dermal contact with creosote-treated wood, indicate that the life-time cancer risk from such exposures is in the order of one per 10,000. Despite the uncertainty related to such estimates, these risk levels give reasons for some concern. A further reduction in the content of PAH and benzene in creosote preparations should be considered.

  9. Spectroscopic study of the inhibition of calcium oxalate calculi by Larrea tridentata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinales, Luis Alonso

    The causes of urolithiasis include such influences as diet, metabolic disorders, and genetic factors which have been documented as sources that aggravate urinary calculi depositions and aggregations, and, implicitly, as causes of urolithiasis. This study endeavors to detail the scientific mechanisms involved in calcium oxalate calculi formation, and, more importantly, their inhibition under growth conditions imposed by the traditional medicinal approach using the herbal extract, Larrea tridentata. The calculi were synthesized without and with Larrea tridentata infusion by employing the single diffusion gel technique. A visible decrease in calcium oxalate crystal growth with increasing amounts of Larrea tridentata herbal infusion was observed in photomicrographs, as well as a color change from white-transparent for pure crystals to light orange-brown for crystals with inhibitor. Analysis of the samples, which includes Raman, infrared absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) techniques, demonstrate an overall transition in morphology of the crystals from monohydrate without herbal extract to dihydrate with inhibitor. Furthermore, the resulting data from Raman and infrared absorption support the possibilities of the influences, in this complex process, of NDGA and its derivative compounds from Larrea tridentata, and of the bonding of the magnesium of the inhibitor with the oxalate ion on the surface of the calculi crystals. This assumption corroborates well with the micrographs obtained under higher magnification, which show that the separated small crystallites consist of darker brownish cores, which we attribute to the dominance of growth inhibition by NDGA, surrounded by light transparent thin shells, which possibly correspond to passivation of the crystals by magnesium oxalate. The SEM results reveal the transformation from the dominant monoclinic structure of the calcium oxalate crystals grown alone to the tetragonal

  10. Monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and water-extractable phenols in creosotes and creosote-treated woods made and procurable in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ikarashi, Yoshiaki; Kaniwa, Masa-aki; Tsuchiya, Toshie

    2005-09-01

    The recycling of disused railway sleepers treated with wood preservatives such as creosote as exterior wood for use in gardens has recently become popular in Japan. Creosote contains high quantities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and can lead to skin irritation and disease. In this work we have determined the amount of PAHs and water-extractable phenols in creosote and creosote-treated wood products such as railway sleepers and stakes for agricultural use that are either made or are procurable in Japan. PAHs were extracted with dichloromethane and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Among carcinogenic PAHs, benz(a)anthracene was detected in the highest concentration, varying between 228 and 6328 microg/g in creosotes. Benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) were found in the range of 67-3541 microg/g. Almost all creosotes contained more than 50 microg/g of BaP, which is the upper limit level that is permitted in the European Union (EU). Creosote-impregnated wood products, such as brand-new or secondhand railway sleepers and foundations, contained large amounts of BaP (58-749 microg/g) and benz(a)anthracene (250-1282 microg/g). Concentrations of between 692 and 2489 microg/g of phenols were determined in the water extracts from creosotes, but the level was considerably less than the EU control value (3% by mass), and there was no correlation between the amount of water-extractable phenols and the amount of PAHs detected in each sample. The situation that consumers are free to use the creosotes containing a high concentration of carcinogens such as BaP may cause unacceptable damage to the health of persons handling these creosote products.

  11. VARIATION IN CREOSOTEBUSH (LARREA TRIDENTATA) CANOPY MORPHOLOGY IN RELATION TO HABITAT, SOIL FERTILITY AND ASSOCIATED ANNUAL PLANT COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differences in creosotebush (Larrea tridentata) crown morphology may reflect changes in the relative demand for water vs. nutrient resources, coinciding with shrub growth and development Creosotebushes with inverted cone-shaped crowns were more abundant in water-limited environme...

  12. Chlorophyll fluorescence from creosote-exposed plants in mesocosms: Validation of a bioindicator

    SciTech Connect

    Marwood, C.A.; Harris, M.L.; Day, K.E.; Greenberg, B.M.; Solomon, K.R.

    1995-12-31

    The chlorophyll fluorescence assay is a rapid, sensitive measure of photosynthetic competence in higher plants and algae that can be used to detect the impact of toxicants at many sites in the plant cell. Chlorophyll fluorescence was examined in plants exposed to PAHs as part of a study to validate chlorophyll fluorescence as a bioindicator by correlating effects on fluorescence with population-level effects in outdoor mesocosms. The wood preservative creosote was used as a mixed PAH source. Two species of aquatic plants, Lemna gibba and Myriophyllum sp., were exposed to 0.1--100 uL/L of creosote in 12,000 L artificial ponds. Creosote was introduced into the mesocosms using different dosing schemes to simulate leaching and spill events. The pulse amplitude modulated fluorescence technique was used to measure several parameters from plants in situ during a 60-day exposure. Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters were compared to creosote effects on population-level growth. Chlorophyll fluorescence was inhibited by creosote at concentrations above 3 uL/L, which also caused a similar inhibition of plant growth in the mesocosms. However, chlorophyll fluorescence was more sensitive than growth endpoints at low creosote concentrations. The chlorophyll fluorescence assay also detected damage to the photosynthetic apparatus in plants after only a few days exposure to creosote. Thus, chlorophyll fluorescence from plants exposed to creosote was well correlated with environmentally relevant endpoints at the population level. The effects of the different dosing schemes on creosote toxicity will also be discussed.

  13. Coal tar creosote abuse by vapour inhalation presenting with renal impairment and neurotoxicity: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra, Thomas F; Bellamy, Christopher Oc; Hughes, Jeremy H

    2007-09-24

    A 56 year old aromatherapist presented with advanced renal failure following chronic coal tar creosote vapour inhalation, and a chronic tubulo-interstitial nephritis was identified on renal biopsy. Following dialysis dependence occult inhalation continued, resulting in seizures, ataxia, cognitive impairment and marked generalised cerebral atrophy. We describe for the first time a case of creosote abuse by chronic vapour inhalation, resulting in significant morbidity. Use of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-containing wood preservative coal tar creosote is restricted by many countries due to concerns over environmental contamination and carcinogenicity. This case demonstrates additional toxicities not previously reported with coal tar creosote, and emphasizes the health risks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure.

  14. Population, community, and bioindicator responses to creosote in aquatic mesocosms

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, R.; Bestari, K.; Solomon, K.; Lewis, J.; McCann, J.; Marwood, C.; Munro, K.; Day, K.

    1995-12-31

    This presentation discusses the objectives, approach and preliminary results of a three year study focusing on the development and validation of bioindicators that are relevant to responses at the population and community level. The study focuses on creosote, a common wood preservative derived from coal tar distillate and containing approximately 85% mixed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), as a model stressor. The first year of the study documented the effects of creosote at the population and community level in aquatic mesocosms, and provided preliminary results for the selection of several bioindicators for use in further studies. Activities during the 1994 field season focused on the establishment of the aquatic ecosystems and a refinement of the methods to be used in the treatment and sampling of experimental mesocosms. Liquid creosote was applied to the mesocosms by subsurface injection at nominal concentrations of 0.3 to 300 ppm, and the effects of creosote on aquatic plants, invertebrates and fish were assessed by sampling during a six-week post-treatment phase. Parameters measured included: survival of caged fish (fathead minnows and goldfish), size-age class of juvenile fathead minnows: diversity and abundance of invertebrates (zooplankton and benthic invertebrates) and phytoplankton, and biomass of macrophytes. Work subsequent to the 1994 field component has focused on the selection of bioindicators based on known effects of PAHs on aquatic organisms and on examination of data generated in the first field season. These bioindicators include: oxidative stress and sex steroid hormones in fish; membrane permeability in plants, invertebrates and fish; stress proteins in invertebrates; and fluorescence induction in algae and macrophytes.

  15. Non-corrosive creosote and soot removing composition

    SciTech Connect

    Mackowiak, L.S.; Ellison, F.E.; Fidler, J.W.; Tucker, N.G.; Varma, G.M.N.

    1984-11-06

    A metallic chloride based creosote and soot removing composition including a phosphate corrosion inhibitor to reduce the corrosive attack on metal flue pipes is provided. The composition includes between about 15-60% metallic chloride, 20-60% trisodium phosphate dodecylhydrate, 15-60% anti-cake agents, such as non-swelling clay, sodium sulfate and tricalcium phosphate and 2-10% combustion initiator, such as wood flour.

  16. Mars Science Laboratory Rover Mobility Bushing Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggs, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    NASA s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Project will send a six-wheeled rover to Mars in 2009. The rover will carry a scientific payload designed to search for organic molecules on the Martian surface during its primary mission. This paper describes the development and testing of a bonded film lubricated bushing system to be used in the mobility system of the rover. The MSL Rover Mobility System contains several pivots that are tightly constrained with respect to mass and volume. These pivots are also exposed to relatively low temperatures (-135 C) during operation. The combination of these constraints led the mobility team to consider the use of solid film lubricated metallic bushings and dry running polymeric bushings in several flight pivot applications. A test program was developed to mitigate the risk associated with using these materials in critical pivots on the MSL vehicle. The program was designed to characterize bushing friction and wear performance over the expected operational temperature range (-135 C to +70 C). Seven different bushing material / lubricant combinations were evaluated to aid in the selection of the final flight pivot bushing material / lubricant combination.

  17. Ecological risk assessment for river sediments contaminated by creosote

    SciTech Connect

    Pastorok, R.A.; Sampson, J.R.; Jacobson, M.A. ); Peek, D.C. )

    1994-12-01

    An ecological risk assessment was conducted for sediments of the lower Willamette River near a wood-treatment (creosote) facility. Both surface ad subsurface sediments near the facility are contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Limited contamination of sediments by dioxins/furans, chlorinated phenols, and arsenic was also observed. Sediment bioassays based on amphipod (Hyalella azteca) mortality and Microtox[reg sign] (Photobacterium phosphoreum) bioluminescence showed toxicity within approximately 300 ft of the shoreline, with a highly toxic area (i.e., possible acute lethal effects in sedentary benthic species) near a dock used for creosote off-loading. The relatively low concentrations of contaminants measured in crayfish muscle tissue and the absence of serious lesions in livers of large-scale sucker collected near the site suggest that excess risk to mobile species from chronic contamination is low. Cursory observations indicate that acute toxic effects on crayfish may be associated with creosote seeps. There is no evidence of adverse biological effects throughout most of the main channel of the river. Evaluation of sediment chemistry data for PAHs relative to available sediment-quality criteria proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency supports this conclusion.

  18. The effects of diffusible creosote-derived compounds on development in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi).

    PubMed

    Vines, C A; Robbins, T; Griffin, F J; Cherr, G N

    2000-12-01

    The effects of diffusible creosote-derived compounds from weathered creosote-treated pilings on embryonic development in the Pacific herring were investigated. Parameters used to evaluate toxicity included embryonic development, cardiac function, embryo/larval activity (movement of developing embryos), hatching success, and larval morphology at hatch. For acute exposures, embryos were incubated in seawater containing either creosote-treated wood (creosote) or untreated wood (wood control), or seawater alone (control). All embryos adhering directly to creosote-treated wood and 40-50% of embryos not adhering to the creosote-treated wood failed to develop beyond the first few days of incubation. For surviving embryos, a 93% reduction in heart rate, and moderate to marked arrhythmia was observed. Surviving embryos also exhibited both an increase in frequency and an alteration in pattern of embryo/larval movement, with most embryos exhibiting tremors as compared with the vigorous movements of the control embryos. Cardiac function and embryo/larval movements of embryos exposed to untreated wood were not significantly different from controls. The hatching rate of embryos exposed to creosote was 90% lower than control embryos and 72.4% lower than embryos exposed to untreated wood, and the LC(50) for hatching success was 0.05 mg/l. Partial hatching (incomplete hatch) was observed in 15-20% of embryos exposed to creosote. All of the hatched larvae exposed as embryos to creosote exhibited morphological deformities, including scoliosis, pericardial edema and/or ascites. Similar effects were observed in embryos collected from creosoted pilings in San Francisco Bay, with a 72% decrease in hatching success compared with embryos collected from the Bay and severely deformed larvae. To investigate the combined effects of creosote and salinity on hatching success, larval morphology, and cardiac function, embryos were exposed to a sublethal concentration of creosote (0.003 mg/l) at

  19. Molecular mechanisms and clinical applications of nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) and its derivatives: An update

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Jian-Ming; Nurko, Jacobo; Weakley, Sarah M.; Jiang, Jun; Kougias, Panagiotis; Lin, Peter H.; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2010-01-01

    Summary Creosote bush, Larrea tridentata, is known as chaparral or greasewood in the United States and as gobernadora or hediondilla in Mexico. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), the main metabolite of the creosote bush, has been shown to have promising applications in the treatment of multiple diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders and cancers. Creosote bush is a promising agent of North American herbal medicine, and it has extensive pharmacological effects and specific mechanisms of actions. This review provides an update of recent in vitro and in vivo research about NDGA and describes experimental studies using NDGA as antioxidant. Also, potential medical uses based on the effects of NDGA on the cardiovascular, immune and neurological systems; cancer; tissue engineering; as well as pharmacokinetics and toxicity are discussed. PMID:20424564

  20. Variation in seedling freezing response is associated with climate in Larrea.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Juliana S; Marshall, Diane L; Maherali, Hafiz; Pockman, William T

    2012-05-01

    Variation in freezing severity is hypothesized to have influenced the distribution and evolution of the warm desert evergreen genus Larrea. If this hypothesis is correct, performance and survival of species and populations should vary predictably along gradients of freezing severity. If freezing environment changes in the future, the ability of Larrea to adapt will depend on the structure of variation for freezing resistance within populations. To test whether freezing responses vary among and within Larrea populations, we grew maternal families of seedlings from high and low latitude L. divaricata and high latitude L. tridentata populations in a common garden. We measured survival, projected plant area and dark-adapted chlorophyll fluorescence (F (v) /F (m)) before and after cold acclimation and for 2 weeks following a single freeze. We detected significant variation in freezing resistance among species and populations. Maternal family lines differed significantly in their responses to cold acclimation and/or freezing for two out of the three populations: among L. tridentata maternal families and among low latitude L. divaricata maternal families. There were no significant differences across maternal families of high latitude L. divaricata. Our results indicate that increased freezing resistance in high latitude populations likely facilitated historical population expansion of both species into colder climates, but this may have occurred to a greater extent for L. tridentata than for L. divaricata. Differences in the structure of variation for cold acclimation and freezing responses among populations suggest potential differences in their ability to evolve in response to future changes in freezing severity.

  1. Variation in seedling freezing response is associated with climate in Larrea

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Diane L.; Maherali, Hafiz; Pockman, William T.

    2013-01-01

    Variation in freezing severity is hypothesized to have influenced the distribution and evolution of the warm desert evergreen genus Larrea. If this hypothesis is correct, performance and survival of species and populations should vary predictably along gradients of freezing severity. If freezing environment changes in the future, the ability of Larrea to adapt will depend on the structure of variation for freezing resistance within populations. To test whether freezing responses vary among and within Larrea populations, we grew maternal families of seedlings from high and low latitude L. divaricata and high latitude L. tridentata populations in a common garden. We measured survival, projected plant area and dark-adapted chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm) before and after cold acclimation and for 2 weeks following a single freeze. We detected significant variation in freezing resistance among species and populations. Maternal family lines differed significantly in their responses to cold acclimation and/or freezing for two out of the three populations: among L. tridentata maternal families and among low latitude L. divaricata maternal families. There were no significant differences across maternal families of high latitude L. divaricata. Our results indicate that increased freezing resistance in high latitude populations likely facilitated historical population expansion of both species into colder climates, but this may have occurred to a greater extent for L. tridentata than for L. divaricata. Differences in the structure of variation for cold acclimation and freezing responses among populations suggest potential differences in their ability to evolve in response to future changes in freezing severity. PMID:22068319

  2. Technology Goes Bush: Using Mobile Technologies to Support Learning in a Bush Kinder Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Jennifer; Grogan, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    A "bush kinder" is the Australian equivalent of a European forest kindergarten. Although it is not usual for technology to be used in the type of program, the authors suggest that mobile technologies can be used creatively and sensitively to support learning in the bush kinder context. This paper describes an ethnographical case study…

  3. Wood creosote inhibits calcium mobilization in Guinea pig colonic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Morino, Hirofumi; Ataka, Koji; Ito, Masafumi; Kuge, Tomoo

    2004-07-01

    Wood creosote, a mixture of simple phenolic compounds, has long been used as an herbal antidiarrheal medicine. Previous studies have shown that wood creosote has antimotility activity on the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, although its mechanism of action is not completely understood. The in vitro efficacy of wood creosote on calcium mobilization in guinea pig colonic smooth muscle was evaluated using a digital video camera system mounted on an inverted fluorescence microscope. The effects of wood creosote on spontaneous periodic increases in the free cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), acetylcholine (ACh)-enhanced periodic increases in [Ca(2+)](i), and tetrodotoxin- or nifedipine-resistant spontaneous periodic increases in [Ca(2+)](i) were evaluated. Wood creosote decreased the amplitude of spontaneous (IC(50)=21 microg/ml) and ACh-enhanced (IC(50)=40 microg/ml) periodic increases in [Ca(2+)](i) in guinea pig colonic smooth muscle. Wood creosote also decreased the amplitude of both tetrodotoxin- and nifedipine-resistant spontaneous periodic increases in [Ca(2+)](i). These results suggest that antimotility activity through inhibition of Ca(2+) mobilization in the GI tract is at least partially responsible for the antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote. Wood creosote may exert its antimotility effect, at least in part, on network regions of interstitial cells of Cajal, which act as pacemaker cells and mediators of neurotransmission in the GI tract.

  4. The effect of creosote on membrane ion leakage in Myriophyllum spicatum L.

    PubMed

    McCann; Solomon

    2000-09-01

    Creosote is a complex chemical mixture used as a wood preservative that has the potential to contaminate aquatic systems via spills or leaching from treated wood structures. Aquatic macrophytes are important components of aquatic systems, which may be adversely affected by creosote contamination. Several chemicals that are constituents of creosote are known to affect cell membranes in various organisms. Therefore, the effect of creosote on the membrane permeability of the aquatic macrophyte Myriophyllum spicatum was investigated. Apical meristems from axenic Myriophyllum plants were exposed for 4 days to 8 creosote treatments (ranging from 0.1 to 92 mg creosote/l) plus controls. Following the exposure, the ion leakage from the cellular membranes was determined via conductivity measurements. The concentration of 15 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the growth medium and in the plant tissue was also determined. A significant increase in ion leakage was observed at all creosote concentrations, even those in which no biological effects were observed on plant growth. However, saturation of the growth medium with PAHs was observed, thus indicating that nominal creosote concentrations may over-estimate the actual exposure.

  5. Creosote released from railway-ties recycled and the sanitary risks.

    PubMed

    Zicari, Giuseppe; Allegro, Giuseppe; Russo, Domenico; Rivetti, Daniela; Soardo, Vincenzo; Cerrato, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Through the history of railways, wooden crossties impregnated with potentially hazardous creosote tar, have been used for years. There are six major classes of compounds in the creosote: aromatic hydrocarbons; tar acids/phenolics; tar bases/nitrogen-containing heterocycles; aromatic amines; sulfur-containing heterocycles; and oxygen-containing heterocycles. The creosote molecules applied in railway crossties can be released in the environment and they can bioaccumulate in animals and vegetables. Some constituents (benzo(a)pyrene and phenolics like benzene) are considered as being carcinogenic which renders the entire complex of creosote to be classified as potentially carcinogenic. After several decades of use the railway-ties are been recycled for varies uses like fences, stakes for agriculture and fruit production or bank protection. In this paper are examined some environmental and sanitary risks from wood impregnated with creosote reported in the literature.

  6. Survival, reproductive, and growth responses in fish to creosote exposure in aquatic mesocosms

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, K.A.; Solomon, K.R.; Bestari, K.T.; Robinson, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    Creosote is a coal tar distillate, consisting mainly of a mixture of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Its widespread use as a wood preservative presents a potential risk to aquatic ecosystems. The use of mesocosms (precolonized with zooplankton, phytoplankton, macroinvertebrates, and periphyton) enabled evaluation of the total impact of creosote exposure, resulting from both direct toxic effects and indirect community-level interactions. Two methods of creosote addition were used, resulting in two series of mesocosm exposures: sixteen ponds were dosed with liquid creosote (from 0 to 100 ppm), and eight were dosed using creosote impregnated pilings (0 to 6 pilings per pond). In addition to growth and survival in two species of fish, Carassius auratus and Pimephales promelas, a number of reproductive parameters were measured (reproductive hormones, egg production, hatching success, and weight/frequency distribution of juveniles).

  7. The toxicity of creosote-treated wood to Pacific herring embryos and characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons near creosoted pilings in Juneau, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Danielle L; Carls, Mark G; Rice, Stanley D; Stekoll, Michael S

    2016-10-14

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from creosote exposure in the laboratory resulted in deleterious effects in developing Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) embryos, and potentially toxic concentrations of PAHs were measured using passive water samplers at 1 of 3 harbor field sites in Juneau, Alaska, USA. Aqueous total PAH concentrations of 4.6 μg/L and 8.4 μg/L from creosote exposure resulted in skeletal defects and ineffective swimming in hatched larvae in the laboratory (10% effective concentrations) and were the most sensitive parameters measured. Hatch rates also suffered from creosote exposure in a dose-dependent manner: at exposures between 5 μg/L and 50 μg/L total PAH, 50% of the population failed to hatch. Comparisons between laboratory and field deployed passive samplers suggested that for at least 1 harbor in Juneau, concentrations sufficient to induce teratogenic effects were found directly on creosoted pilings, within 10 cm of them, and sometimes at a distance of 10 m. Total PAH concentrations generally decreased with distance from creosoted pilings. Creosote pilings contribute to the PAH load within a marina and can rise to PAH concentrations that are harmful to fish embryos, but at a scale that is localized in the environment. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;9999:1-9. © 2016 SETAC.

  8. Electrical bushing for a superconductor element

    DOEpatents

    Mirebeau, Pierre; Lallouet, Nicolas; Delplace, Sebastien; Lapierre, Regis

    2010-05-04

    The invention relates to an electrical bushing serving to make a connection at ambient temperature to a superconductor element situated in an enclosure at cryogenic temperature. The electrical bushing passes successively through an enclosure at intermediate temperature between ambient temperature and cryogenic temperature, and an enclosure at ambient temperature, and it comprises a central electrical conductor surrounded by an electrically insulating sheath. According to the invention, an electrically conductive screen connected to ground potential surrounds the insulating sheath over a section that extends from the end of the bushing that is in contact with the enclosure at cryogenic temperature at least as far as the junction between the enclosure at intermediate temperature and the enclosure at ambient temperature. The invention is more particularly applicable to making a connection to a superconductor cable.

  9. Parvovirus enteritis in vaccinated juvenile bush dogs.

    PubMed

    Janssen, D L; Bartz, C R; Bush, M; Marchwicki, R H; Grate, S J; Montali, R J

    1982-12-01

    Parvovirus enteritis developed in 10 of 17 vaccinated juvenile bush dogs (Speothos venaticus) from 4 litters in a 5-month period. Nine dogs died. The first outbreak involved 6 of 9 bush dogs from 2 litters. Each had been vaccinated with a killed feline-origin parvovirus vaccine at 11 and 14 weeks of age. The 6 affected dogs became ill at 29 weeks of age and died. The second outbreak involved a litter of 6 bush dogs. Each had been vaccinated every 2 weeks starting at 5 weeks of age. Two were isolated from the colony at 16 weeks of age for treatment of foot sores. Three of the 4 nonisolated dogs developed parvovirus enteritis at 20 weeks of age; 2 died at 6 and 8 days, respectively, after onset of signs. The 3rd outbreak involved a litter of 2 bush dogs. Both had been vaccinated every 2 to 3 weeks, starting at 6 weeks of age. One of these dogs became ill at 17 weeks and died 13 days later. A litter of 6 maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) and a litter of 3 bush dogs were isolated from their parent colonies at 13 and 15 weeks of age, respectively. Each animal had been vaccinated weekly, beginning at 8 weeks of age, using an inactivated canine-origin parvovirus vaccine. None of the isolated animals developed the disease. Serologic testing during isolation did not reveal protective titers (greater than or equal to 1:80) against canine parvovirus in the bush dogs until they were 23 weeks old, whereas protective titers developed in the maned wolves when they were 14 to 18 weeks old. One hand-raised bush dog was vaccinated weekly, beginning at 8 weeks of age, and a protective titer developed by 21 weeks of age. It was concluded that the juvenile bush dogs went through a period during which maternal antibodies interfered with immunization, yet did not protect against the disease. When the pups were isolated from the colony during this period, then vaccinated repeatedly until protective titers developed, the disease was prevented.

  10. [Wood creosote: a historical study and its preparation in combination with herbal drugs].

    PubMed

    Baba, T; Tani, T

    2001-01-01

    Two kinds of creosote have been found based on historical evidence of the medicinal uses and origins. One is wood creosote, and distillate of wood-tar containing guaiacol and creosol. The other type of creosote is coal-tar creosote, obtained from coal-tar, containing naphthalene and anthracene as the major constituents. Wood creosote was prepared for the first time in Germany in 1830 and was used for medicinal purposes. It had been listed officially in the German, American, and Japanese Pharmacopoeia as an antibacterial agent for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, diarrhea, and external injury. In recent days, it has been deleted from the Pharmacopoeia in Western countries and not officially used for medicinal purposes. However, wood creosote is still been listed in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia and is used for the treatment of diarrhea. Since the interest of common people in herbal medicines and self-medication has been increasing, the use of wood creosote has also been modified in combination with some herbal drugs, "Seiro-gan" especially is quite popular in Japan as a self-medication for digestive trouble, including food poisoning or diarrhea.

  11. Evaluation of fish population effects due to creosote exposure in aquatic mesocosms

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, K.A.; Bestari, K.T.; Robinson, R.D.; Gensemer, R.W.; Solomon, K.R.

    1995-12-31

    Creosote is a coal tar distillate, consisting primarily of a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Its widespread use as a wood preservative presents a potential risk to aquatic ecosystems. Studying fish responses in mesocosms enabled evaluation of the total impact of creosote exposure, resulting from both direct toxic effects and indirect community-level interactions. Two methods of creosote application were used: liquid creosote treatment and creosote-impregnated pilings treatment. Survival and egg production of adult Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were monitored for two successive 30-day periods (0--30 and 35--65 days posttreatment). In addition, juvenile Fatheads produced during these periods were harvested 90 days posttreatment, to determine impacts to population weight/frequency distributions. Results for both field seasons showed that higher creosote concentrations caused strong decreases in both adult and juvenile survival, as well as egg production. Bile fluorescence levels measured at intervals during the exposure period reflected changes in total aqueous PAH concentrations in the mesocosms. Effects of creosote exposure on survival of adult fish were markedly reduced for fish introduced to ponds 35 days posttreatment compared to those exposed in the initial 0--30 day period.

  12. The effect of creosote on growth and membrane integrity of the aquatic macrophyte, Myriophyllum sp.

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, J.; Day, K.; Solomon, K.; Greenberg, B.

    1995-12-31

    Creosote is a coal-tar distillate used as a wood preservative on railway ties and dock pilings. Its use in aquatic systems indicates a possible risk to the aquatic community through leaching of creosote components into the water column or sediment. A study has been initiated at the University of Guelph (Ontario, Canada) to determine bioindicators of exposure and effects of creosote on freshwater systems. A laboratory study was conducted to determine the effects of creosote exposure on the rooted, aquatic macrophyte Myriophyllum sp. Using an aseptic culture of Myriophyllum and 3 cm buds grown from single nodes, a growth assay was conducted during which Myriophyllum were exposed for 14 days to concentrations ranging from 0.16 mg/L to 200 mg/L creosote. Growth measurements included: shoot length; number of nodes, buds and roots; total shoot and root length; and growth curves over the exposure period. From the information gathered from the growth assay, 5 creosote concentrations were chosen and used for membrane integrity studies. Myriophyllum were exposed to creosote for either 4 or 12 day periods, after which membrane fluidity was determined by fluorescence depolarization, and electrolyte and K+ leakage were determined by conductivity and atomic absorption spectrophotometry, respectively. The results of both the growth and membrane assays will be discussed.

  13. The Invasive Buddleja Daviddi (Butterfly Bush)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Buddleja davidii Franchet (Synonym. Buddleia davidii; common name butterfly bush) is a perennial, semi-deciduous, multi-stemmed shrub that is resident in gardens and disturbed areas. Since its introduction to the United Kingdom from China in the late 1800s, B. davidii has become...

  14. Bush to Start NCLB Push in Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Making college more affordable, raising the minimum wage, and other domestic items were at the top of Democrats' agenda during their meeting at Capitol Hill. President Bush made clear that reauthorizing the No Child Left Behind Act is one of the priorities. To mark the fifth anniversary of his signing the measure into law on January 8, 2007, the…

  15. 2005 Budget Drops below Bush Request

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education will see its smallest budget increase in nearly a decade under the catchall spending plan approved by the Republican-controlled Congress in a lame-duck session. For the first time since President Bush entered office, the budget will fall short of his overall request for education funding. The final fiscal 2005…

  16. Democrats Aim to Resist Bush Budget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2008-01-01

    Democrats in Congress say they are prepared to resist President Bush's level-funding budget proposal for education until the next president--who they hope will be more inclined to raise spending--takes office. That means the outcome of this year's budget showdown could hinge on the November election, not on a compromise between the White House and…

  17. Obama Echoes Bush on Education Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2009-01-01

    President Barack Obama campaigned on a message of change, but when it comes to K-12 education, he appears to be walking in the policy footsteps of his recent predecessors, including George W. Bush. Obama is sounding themes of accountability based on standards and assessments. He is delivering tough talk on teacher quality, including a call for…

  18. ON-SITE TREATMENT OF CREOSOTE AND PENTACHLOROPHENOL SLUDGES AND CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Information is presented for quantitative evaluation of treatment potential for creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) wood treating contaminants in soil systems. The study was conducted in three phases: 1) characterization, (2) treatability screening and (3) field evaluation. Data...

  19. MICROBIAL ECOLOGY OF THE SUBSURFACE AT AN ABANDONED CREOSOTE WASTE SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microbial ecology of pristine, slightly contaminated, and heavily contaminated subsurface materials, and four subsurface materials on the periphery of the plume at an abandoned creosote waste site was investigated. Except for the unsaturated zone of the heavily contaminated m...

  20. Fluorescence induction as a biomarker of creosote phototoxicity to the aquatic macrophyte Lemna gibba

    SciTech Connect

    Gensemer, R.W.; Solomon, K.R.; Ren, L.; Greenberg, B.M.; Day, K.E. |

    1996-12-31

    Biomarkers of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) toxicity to aquatic plants were developed using the wood preservative creosote. The authors tested physiological indicators of photosynthetic performance in cultures of the floating aquatic macrophyte Lemna gibba (G3). Creosote was applied at concentrations ranging from 1--300 ppm, and plants were grown under laboratory lighting that mimics the relative levels of UV radiation found in natural sunlight (simulated solar radiation; SSR). Population growth bioassays demonstrated that similar to individual PAHs, creosote exhibited UV-enhanced phototoxicity. Chlorophyll content and chlorophyll fluorescence induction parameters were also diminished by creosote, and closely corresponded to functional responses of population growth by the end of each experiment. Fluorescence induction thus is a validated biomarker assay that is closely and functionally related to population growth inhibition in aquatic plants.

  1. LOW COST SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION TREATMENT FOR SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH DIOXIN, PCP, AND CREOSOTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory condcuted successful treatability tests of innovative solidification/stablization (S/S) formulations to treat soils contaminated with dioxins, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and creosote from four wood preserving sites. For one o...

  2. LOW COST SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION TREATMENT FOR SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH DIOXIN, PCP AND CREOSOTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's NRMRL conducted successful treatability tests of innovative solidification/stabilization (S/S) formulations to treat soils contaminated with dioxins, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and creosote from four wood preserving sites. Formulations developed during these studies wer...

  3. Suppression of enterotoxin-induced intestinal fluid secretion by wood creosote.

    PubMed

    Ataka, K; Ogata, N; Kuge, T; Shibata, T

    1996-08-01

    Wood creosote suppresses intestinal fluid secretion induced by heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). When rabbit jejunum is ligated into a 5-cm segment and LT is administered locally, it actively induces intestinal fluid secretion in a dose-dependent manner. Local administration of wood creosote together with a fixed dose of LT suppressed the LT-induced fluid secretion in a dose-dependent manner. At a 50-ng/segment dose of LT, 7.4 +/- 1.1 ml (n = 5) of fluid is secreted into an intestinal segment; coadministration of wood creosote (150 micrograms/segment) significantly (p < 0.01) suppressed the fluid secretion to 2.4 +/- 2.3 ml. Based on these results, we conclude that the antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote is attributable to its antisecretory or proabsorptive effect (or both) on the intestine.

  4. Coal tar creosote abuse by vapour inhalation presenting with renal impairment and neurotoxicity: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Thomas F; Bellamy, Christopher OC; Hughes, Jeremy H

    2007-01-01

    A 56 year old aromatherapist presented with advanced renal failure following chronic coal tar creosote vapour inhalation, and a chronic tubulo-interstitial nephritis was identified on renal biopsy. Following dialysis dependence occult inhalation continued, resulting in seizures, ataxia, cognitive impairment and marked generalised cerebral atrophy. We describe for the first time a case of creosote abuse by chronic vapour inhalation, resulting in significant morbidity. Use of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-containing wood preservative coal tar creosote is restricted by many countries due to concerns over environmental contamination and carcinogenicity. This case demonstrates additional toxicities not previously reported with coal tar creosote, and emphasizes the health risks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure. PMID:17892538

  5. Evidence for functional convergence in genes upregulated by herbivores ingesting plant secondary compounds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nearly 40 years ago, Freeland and Janzen predicted that liver biotransformation enzymes dictated diet selection by herbivores. Despite decades of research on model species and humans, little is known about the biotransformation mechanisms used by mammalian herbivores to metabolize plant secondary compounds (PSCs). We investigated the independent evolution of PSC biotransformation mechanisms by capitalizing on a dramatic diet change event—the dietary inclusion of creosote bush (Larrea tridentata)—that occurred in the recent evolutionary history of two species of woodrats (Neotoma lepida and N. bryanti). Results By comparing gene expression profiles of two populations of woodrats with evolutionary experience to creosote and one population naïve to creosote, we identified genes either induced by a diet containing creosote PSCs or constitutively higher in populations with evolutionary experience of creosote. Although only one detoxification gene (an aldo-keto reductase) was induced by both experienced populations, these populations converged upon functionally equivalent strategies to biotransform the PSCs of creosote bush by constitutively expressing aldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenases, Cytochromes P450s, methyltransferases, glutathione S-transferases and sulfotransferases. The response of the naïve woodrat population to creosote bush was indicative of extreme physiological stress. Conclusions The hepatic detoxification system of mammals is notoriously complex, with hundreds of known biotransformation enzymes. The comparison herein of woodrat taxa that differ in evolutionary and ecological experience with toxins in creosote bush reveals convergence in the overall strategies used by independent species after a historical shift in diet. In addition, remarkably few genes seemed to be important in this dietary shift. The research lays the requisite groundwork for future studies of specific biotransformation pathways used by woodrats to metabolize the

  6. Environmental assessment of creosote-treated pilings in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Butala, J.H.; Webb, D.A.; Jop, K.M.; Putt, A.E.

    1995-12-31

    A comprehensive ecological risk assessment was conducted to evaluate the environmental impact of creosote-treated pilings in the marine environment at Moss Landing Harbor, Moss Landing, California. Four areas of investigation comprising the risk assessment were (1) evaluation of environmental conditions around existing creosote-treated pilings (2) investigating effects related to restoration of pilings (3) assessing creosote migration into surrounding environment, one year after pile-driving and (4) confirmation of creosote toxicity in laboratory studies. Biological and chemical evaluation of the impact of creosote-treated pilings was conducted on surface sheen, water column and sediment samples collected at Moss Landing Harbor. Water samples (surface sheen, water column and sediment pore water) were evaluated using short-term chronic exposures with Mysidopsis bahia, while bulk sediment samples were evaluated with 10-day sediment toxicity tests with Ampelisca abdita. Samples of surface, column water and sediment were analyzed for the constituents of creosote by GC mass spectrometry. In addition, a sample of neat material used to preserve treated pilings represented a reference for the polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Verification of organism response and analyses of field collected samples was performed by conducting 10-day A. abdita sediment and 7-day M. bahia elutriate exposures with creosote applied to clean sediment collected at Moss Landing, Evaluations were also performed to determine the effects of photoinduced toxicity on test organisms exposed to PAHs. The biological and analytical results of the field and laboratory exposures are being used to evaluate and determine risk of creosote-treated pilings on the marine environment.

  7. Bioremediation as an efficient method to degrade creosote and improve groundwater quality

    SciTech Connect

    Newbern, V.A.

    1994-09-01

    A hydrogeologic monitoring evaluation was conducted to determine the efficiency of bioremediation on a site at which creosote is used for pressure treating and wood preservation. Initially, pentachlorophenol (PCP) and diesel fuel were incorporated with the creosote. The waste water generated from the process was disposed of in three unlined surface impoundments until 1982. Thirteen monitoring wells were installed between August 1981 and the first half of 1982 where both PCP and creosote releases were found and attributed to the impoundments. A groundwater quality assessment program was initiated in April 1986 and a subsequent pilot groundwater remediation program begun in February 1987. A Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been in operation since August 1987 and was designed to remediate groundwater from the uppermost water-bearing sand (Bentley sand), which was affected by the impoundment areas. With the CAP, a system of 21 recovery wells set in 4 lines were implemented to withdraw the groundwater. The groundwater was then treated in above-ground bioreactors where microorganisms were introduced to degrade the creosote compounds. Treated groundwater was then discharged to the public waste-water facility or injected to recharge the Bentley sands by the use of either of the two recharge trenches. Both nutrients and oxygen were added to the water prior to injection to increase the in-situ bioremediation of the creosote and PCP contaminants via two air sparging lines. The results demonstrate the reduction of creosote constituents from the groundwater with the use of bioremediation.

  8. Efficacious rat model displays non-toxic effect with Korean beechwood creosote: a possible antibiotic substitute.

    PubMed

    Quynh, Anh Nguyen Thai; Sharma, Neelesh; Cho, Kwang Keun; Yeo, Tae Jong; Kim, Ki Beom; Jeong, Chul Yon; Min, Tae Sun; Young, Kim Jae; Kim, Jin Nam; Jeong, Dong-Kee

    2014-05-04

    Wood creosote, an herbal anti-diarrheal and a mixture of major volatile compounds, was tested for its non-toxicological effects, using a rat model, with the objective to use the creosote as an antibiotic substitute. A total of 30 Sprague-Dawley rats were studied to form five groups with 6 rats each. Korea beechwood creosote was supplemented into three test groups with 0.03 g/kg, 0.07 g/kg and 0.1 g/kg body weight/day without antibiotic support, along with a positive control of Apramycin sulphate (at 0.5% of the daily feed) and a negative control. Korean beechwood creosote supplementation showed no negative effect on the body weight gain in comparison to the negative and the positive control groups and the feed conversion ratio was also comparable with that of the control groups. The clinical pathology parameters studied were also under the umbrella of normal range, including liver specific enzymes, blood glucose, total protein, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), which indicated no toxic effect of creosote at the given doses. The non-hepatotoxic effect was also confirmed using hepatic damage specific molecular markers like Tim-p1, Tim-p2 and Tgf-β1. The results suggested that Korean beechwood may be used as antibiotic substitute in weanling pigs feed without any toxic effect on the body. Although the antimicrobial properties of creosote were not absolutely similar to those of apramycin sulphate, they were comparable.

  9. Effects of herbal drugs prescribed in wood creosote pills on the dissolution profile of guaiacol.

    PubMed

    Baba, Tatsuya; Nishino, Takao; Tani, Tadato

    2003-02-01

    Wood creosote pills (P4) containing wood creosote and four herbal drugs, Gambir, Phellodendri Cortex, Glycyrrhizae Radix, and Citri Unshiu Pericarpium (CUP), have been used to treat food poisoning and diarrhea through self-medication in Japan. The mean dissolution time (MDT) of guaiacol, one of the active constituents of wood creosote, from P4 (138.3+/-3.3 min) was significantly longer than that (42.6+/-4.3 min) from pills (P0) containing only wood creosote. The MDT of the variant pills prepared from P4 without CUP (54.3+/-12.5 min) was found to be significantly shorter than that of P4. These findings suggest that CUP plays an important role in sustaining the dissolution of guaiacol from P4. The long MDT of guaiacol is considered one of the most important factors affecting the duration of efficacy after oral administration of wood creosote pills. The present findings are considered proof that CUP has been prescribed in traditional as well as new formulations of wood creosote pills.

  10. Tolerance to creosote oil of bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas isolated from the wood of coniferous trees.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, Julitta; Miszczyk, Anita; Markiewicz, Zdzisław

    2003-01-01

    A number of Pseudomonas sp. strains isolated from wood shavings not preserved with chemical agents were characterized by tolerance to concentrated creosote oil. Of eleven strains subjected to closer scrutiny, five showed good or very good growth in minimal medium with creosote oil as sole carbon and energy source. These isolates can be of potential use for the biodegradation of waste wood conserved with creosote oil.

  11. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 25, 1937 SMOKE HOUSE - Colonel John Young Kilpatrick House & Outbuildings, Bridgeport Road (County Road 37), Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  12. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 2, 1937 LOOKING NORTHWEST AT SMOKE HOUSE. - Dr. William Hughes House & Outbuildings, Hughes Creek vicinity, Aliceville, Pickens County, AL

  13. Soil microbial communities following bush removal in a Namibian savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyer, Jeffrey S.; Schmidt-Küntzel, Anne; Nghikembua, Matti; Maul, Jude E.; Marker, Laurie

    2016-03-01

    Savanna ecosystems are subject to desertification and bush encroachment, which reduce the carrying capacity for wildlife and livestock. Bush thinning is a management approach that can, at least temporarily, restore grasslands and raise the grazing value of the land. In this study we examined the soil microbial communities under bush and grass in Namibia. We analyzed the soil through a chronosequence where bush was thinned at 9, 5, or 3 years before sampling. Soil microbial biomass, the biomass of specific taxonomic groups, and overall microbial community structure was determined by phospholipid fatty acid analysis, while the community structure of Bacteria, Archaea, and fungi was determined by multiplex terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Soil under bush had higher pH, C, N, and microbial biomass than under grass, and the microbial community structure was also altered under bush compared to grass. A major disturbance to the ecosystem, bush thinning, resulted in an altered microbial community structure compared to control plots, but the magnitude of this perturbation gradually declined with time. Community structure was primarily driven by pH, C, and N, while vegetation type, bush thinning, and time since bush thinning were of secondary importance.

  14. Soil microbial communities following bush removal in a Namibian savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyer, J. S.; Schmidt-Küntzel, A.; Nghikembua, M.; Maul, J. E.; Marker, L.

    2015-12-01

    Savanna ecosystems are subject to desertification and bush encroachment, which reduce the carrying capacity for wildlife and livestock. Bush thinning is a management approach that can, at least temporarily, restore grasslands and raise the grazing value of the land. In this study we examined the soil microbial communities under bush and grass in Namibia. We analyzed the soil through a chronosequence where bush was thinned at 9, 5, or 3 years before sampling. Soil microbial biomass, the biomass of specific taxonomic groups, and overall microbial community structure was determined by phospholipid fatty acid analysis, while the community structure of Bacteria, Archaea, and fungi was determined by multiplex terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Soil under bush had higher pH, C, N, and microbial biomass than under grass, and the microbial community structure was also altered under bush compared to grass. A major disturbance to the ecosystem, bush thinning, resulted in an altered microbial community structure compared to control plots, but the magnitude of this perturbation gradually declined with time. Community structure was primarily driven by pH, C, and N, while vegetation type, bush thinning, and time since bush thinning were of secondary importance.

  15. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, 1937 INTERIOR VIEW OF FRONT ENTRANCE - Wilcox County Courthouse, Broad, Claiborne, Court & Water Streets, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  16. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, 1937 REAR (EAST) AND NORTH ELEVATION - Wilcox County Courthouse, Broad, Claiborne, Court & Water Streets, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  17. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 REAR ELEVATION. VIEW FROM SOUTH EAST - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  18. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 FRONT (NORTH) AND WEST ELEVATION - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. 46. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 15, 1935 LOOKING DOWN ON WALK AND DRIVE - University of Alabama, President's House, University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  20. Replace low-voltage bushings without draining transformer

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Low-voltage, draw-lead bushings that can be removed from the transformer without draining the tank are difficult to design because of the high current. That`s why most transformers are shipped with the low-voltage bushings in place. A new design of split-conductor bushing now makes it possible to have draw-lead bushings on both the high- and low-voltage sides. Keys to the new design are the two-part split conductor - which can be broken into two parts at a point close to the bushing`s mounting flange - and the multiple-spring electrical contact with the bushing`s top terminal. When a new transformer is shipped, only the bottom half of the split conductor is in place - connected to the transformer winding through an oil-immersed lead. In the field, the top conductor top is bolted into place and the bushing lowered over the full-length conductor. 6 figs.

  1. 31. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 16, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 16, 1935 FRONT VIEW OF BUILDING, FACES NORTH - University of Alabama, President's House, University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  2. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 15, 1936 DENNY'S TOWER, COMPANY F IN BACKGROUND - University of Alabama, Denny's Tower, University Avenue, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  3. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 15, 1936 WEST ELEVATION (REAR) - University of Alabama, Observatory, Stadium Drive & Fifth Street, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  4. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 31, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 31, 1936 NORTH WALL OF AUDITORIUM, SECOND FLOOR - Old Southern University, University Avenue (College Street), Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  5. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 30, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 30, 1936 GENERAL VIEW OF FRONT HALL, SECOND FLOOR - Southern University, Chancellor's House, College Street, Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  6. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 31, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 31, 1936 STAGE IN SOUTH END OF AUDITORIUM - Old Southern University, University Avenue (College Street), Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  7. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 30, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 30, 1936 SOUTH EAST ELEVATION (GENERAL VIEW) - Southern University, Chancellor's House, College Street, Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  8. Stress-induced breakdown of intestinal barrier function in the rat: reversal by wood creosote.

    PubMed

    Kuge, Tomoo; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2006-07-24

    Our previous studies demonstrated that wood creosote (Seirogan) inhibits intestinal secretion and normalizes the transport of electrolytes and water in rats subjected to restraint stress. The goal of the present study was to examine whether wood creosote has a protective effect against stress-induced breakdown of intestinal barrier function. F-344 rats were subjected to 90-min water avoidance stress (WAS) with wood creosote (30 mg/kg) or vehicle administered intragastrically 30 min prior to WAS. Sham stressed rats received wood creosote or vehicle treatment but did not experience the WAS. All rats were euthanized at the end of the WAS or sham-stress and the jejunum and colon were isolated. Epithelial transport was studied in modified Ussing chambers. Spontaneous secretion was assessed by electrophysiological measurement of the short circuit current (I(sc)) while electrical conductance (G) was calculated from the potential difference (PD) and I(sc) using Ohm's law. Intestinal permeability was defined by the mucosal-to-serosal flux of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). WAS significantly elevated basal I(sc) and G and increased epithelial permeability to HRP in the jejunum but not in the colon. Wood creosote resulted in a significant reduction of the stress-induced increase in I(sc), G and the mucosal-to-serosal flux of HRP compared to the vehicle-treated group. Wood creosote caused no significant effects in sham-stressed rats. The results suggest that oral administration of wood creosote may prevent stress-induced diarrhea by preventing aversive effects on small intestinal secretion and barrier function.

  9. Contact point of bush - sprocket tooth depending on pitch differences of bush chain transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velicu, R.; Saulescu, R.; Jurj, L.

    2016-08-01

    Chain transmissions have a large use in industrial applications. The study of kinematics and dynamics of this kind of transmissions has a lot of space to cover due to different type of chains, different geometries, standardized or not, or even different ISO and AGMA standards. This paper is referring to the bush chain transmission based on ISO standard for geometry and dimensions. The pitch of the chain is bigger than the pitch measured on the sprocket and the difference must be in a certain range. Depending on this difference, the contact point between bush and the tooth varies. It also varies depending on the position around the sprocket. All these are influencing the dynamic of the chain transmission and the friction losses. The paper analyses the kinematics of chain link depending on the rotation angle of the sprocket (θ), establishing the contact point between bush and tooth, for a given tooth profile dimension and pitch differences. An important result is the point of entering in contact between bush and sprocket tooth with an influence on the normal and transversal forces in the chain. The results of numerical simulations are the base of drawing conclusions and recommendations on the pitch differences considering criteria like minimum friction and minimizing the transversal vibration.

  10. Creosote accumulation as a function of moisture content, wood species, and fire intensity in an airtight stove, and chimney fire experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, J.W.

    1981-11-01

    Two basic aspects of creosote investigated were: creosote accumulation as a function of moisture content, wood species, and stove power output; and creosote combustion - that is, chimney fires. For the creosote accumulation studies, six identical stove systems were operated simultaneously for four months, during which power output, fuel species and fuel moisture content were systematically varied. Chimneys were weighed before and after each test series to determine creosote accumulation. For the simulated fireplace series, where the stove doors were left wide open, the conventional wisdom holds true - creosote accumulation increased with increasing moisture content. For closed combustion systems (airtight stoves), however, green wood produced less creosote than dry or medium wood under medium and high power conditions. Under low power conditions there was no significant effect of moisture content on creosote accumulation. How an appliance is operated can have a larger effect on creosote than either the fuel species or moisture content; up to 48 times more creosote was observed with a smoldering fire than a brightly burning fire. The chimney fires, induced in heavily creosoted chimneys in the laboratory, resulted in a maximum flue gas temperature of 1125/sup 0/C, as measured with unshielded thermocouples. The creosote fires typically lasted 3 to 15 minutes. Noncreosote chimney fires were also observed.

  11. Environmental assessment of the compounds from creosote-treated pilings in marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jop, K.M.; Butala, J.H.; Webb, D.A.; Wade, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    A comprehensive ecological risk assessment was conducted to evaluate the environmental impact of creosote-treated pilings in the marine environment at Moss Landing Harbor, Moss Landing, California. The chemical composition of creosote is critical to its fate and effects in the environment. Therefore, a multiple-stage methodology utilizing column gas chromatography with mass spectrometer detector was used for the identification and quantification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in neat creosote and environmental samples. The risk assessment of 46 PAHs (water soluble fraction) in the marine environment was based on bioaccumulation studies with caged mussels Mytilus californianus and a testing program with the surface sheen, water column, sediment elutriate, pore waters and bulk sediment. Water samples were evaluated using 7-day chronic exposures with Mysidopsis bahia, while bulk sediments were evaluated with 10-day tests with Ampelisca abdita. Testing program included exposure to normal and UV fluorescent lights. The results of this environmental assessment program allow to characterize the extent and magnitude of toxicity of PAHs released from creosote treated pilings and the risk associated with using creosote in marine environment.

  12. Americium/curium bushing melter drain tests

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.E.; Hardy, B.J.; Smith, M.E.

    1997-07-01

    Americium and curium were produced in the past at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for research, medical, and radiological applications. They have been stored in a nitric acid solution in an SRS reprocessing facility for a number of years. Vitrification of the americium/curium (Am/Cm) solution will allow the material to be safely stored or transported to the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation. Oak Ridge is responsible for marketing radionuclides for research and medical applications. The bushing melter technology being used in the Am/Cm vitrification research work is also under consideration for the stabilization of other actinides such as neptunium and plutonium. A series of melter drain tests were conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center to determine the relationship between the drain tube assembly operating variables and the resulting pour initiation times, glass flowrates, drain tube temperatures, and stop pour times. Performance criteria such as ability to start and stop pours in a controlled manner were also evaluated. The tests were also intended to provide support of oil modeling of drain tube performance predictions and thermal modeling of the drain tube and drain tube heater assembly. These drain tests were instrumental in the design of subsequent melter drain tube and drain tube heaters for the Am/Cm bushing melter, and therefore in the success of the Am/Cm vitrification and plutonium immobilization programs.

  13. Bush Keeps Math-Science Plan on Bunsen Burner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Michelle R.

    2006-01-01

    President Bush continued his campaign to get schools to focus more on mathematics and science education with a visit to a middle school in Rockville, Maryland, where students study robotics and work with NASA scientists. President Bush toured the school with Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings as part of his initiative to emphasize math and…

  14. Rhetorical and Linguistic Analysis of Bush's Second Inaugural Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sameer, Imad Hayif

    2017-01-01

    This study attempts to analyze Bush's second inaugural speech. It aims at investigating the use of linguistic strategies in it. It resorts to two models which are Aristotle's model while the second is that of Atkinson's (1984) to draw the attention towards linguistic strategies. The analysis shows that Bush's second inaugural speech is successful…

  15. Bush Has Own View of Promoting Civil Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Michelle R.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses President Bush's own view of promoting civil rights. Mr. Bush has sought to redefine the discussion of civil rights in education. Instead of focusing on racial integration in public schools, for instance, the president has emphasized the achievement gap between minority and white students. He has spoken of school choice as a…

  16. Soil microbial communities following bush removal in a Namibian savanna

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Savanna ecosystems are subject to desertification and bush encroachment, which reduce the grazing value of the land and hence the carrying capacity for wildlife and livestock. In this study we examined the soil microbial communities under bush and grass in Namibia. We analyzed the soil at a chronose...

  17. Emanuel Goldberg, Electronic Document Retrieval, and Vannevar Bush's Memex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckland, Michael K.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the concept of the Memex, an imaginary information retrieval machine proposed by Vannevar Bush in 1945. The technological background of the Memex and of other visions of that period are examined with special reference to Emanuel Goldberg, inventor of a microfilm selector using a photoelectric cell. Bush's work is reassessed in this…

  18. Bush's Legacy in Higher Education: A Matter of Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul; Field, Kelly; Hebel, Sara

    2008-01-01

    President Bush is leaving the White House with a mixed record on higher education. His administration catapulted conversations about holding colleges more accountable for their performance into the national spotlight, and it pressed for some increases in federal spending on student aid and research. At the same time, Mr. Bush faced criticism from…

  19. Innovation, Pragmaticism, and Technological Continuity: Vannevar Bush's Memex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyce, James M.; Kahn, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Examines published and unpublished writings of Vannevar Bush to better determine why he created the memex and what he hoped to accomplish with such a machine. The discussion covers the extent to which hypertext and modern technology have fulfilled Bush's predictions. (24 references) (CLB)

  20. Bush's School Agenda Will Get a 2nd Term

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.; Davis, Michelle R.

    2004-01-01

    This article deals with President Bush's plan to push for expanded accountability in high school. President Bush will enter his second term with a range of campaign plans on education, from expanded testing demands to new cash awards for effective teachers, only some of which are likely to become law. One thing is clear, the controversial No Child…

  1. Enhancement of bioremediation of a creosote-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Carriere, P.P.E.; Mesania, F.A.

    1995-12-31

    There is a growing concern in the US about the increasing number of industrial sites containing concentration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in their soil and waste sludge above background levels. PAHs, neutral and non-polar organic compounds, consist of two or more fused benzene rings which are generated from industrial activities such as creosote wood treating, gas manufacturing, coke making, coal tar refining, petroleum refining, and aluminum smelting. Low molecular weight PAHs are generally considered as extremely toxic compounds, whereas the higher molecular weight PAHs are carcinogenic in nature. Bioremediation, a viable option for treatment of PAHs contaminated soil, can be enhanced by the use of surfactant. In this study a nonionic surfactant Triton X-100, was investigated. Abiotic soil desorption experiments were performed to determine the kinetics of release of selected PAH compounds from the soil matrix to the aqueous phase. Respirometric experiments were also conducted to evaluate the effect of nonionic surfactant on biodegradation. The N-Con system respirometer was used to monitor the oxygen uptake by the microorganisms. The abiotic experiments results indicated that the addition of surfactant to soil/water systems increases the desorption of PAH compounds. The increase in PAHs availability to the microorganisms produced an increase in oxygen uptake.

  2. Enhanced biodegradation of creosote contaminated soil using a nonionic surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Carriere, P.E.; Mesania, F.A.

    1995-12-31

    There is a growing concern in the US about the increasing number of industrial sites containing concentration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in their soil and waste sludge above background levels. Low molecular weight PAHs are generally considered as extremely toxic compounds, whereas the higher molecular weight PAHs are carcinogenic in nature. The aqueous solubility and volatility of PAHs decrease with increasing molecular weight. Bioremediation, a viable option for treatment of PAH contaminated soils, can reduce PAH concentration to acceptable levels. It is primarily a water-based process influenced by sorption (absorption/desorption), diffusion and dissolution mechanisms which serve to control the accessibility of the organics to the bacteria that are present in water. In most cases, sorption is the rate limiting step controlling, both the rate and extent of biodegradation. The process of bioremediation can be enhanced by application of surfactant by increasing the availability of the organic compounds to the microorganisms. In previous bioremediation studies, the use of several kinds of surfactant was found to enhance the solubility of hydrophobic compounds. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a nonionic surfactant on biodegradation of creosote contaminated soil.

  3. Fluoranthene, a volatile mutagenic compound, present in creosote and coal tar.

    PubMed

    Bos, R P; Prinsen, W J; van Rooy, J G; Jongeneelen, F J; Theuws, J L; Henderson, P T

    1987-03-01

    Creosote, a coal-tar distillation product, contains mutagens which are volatile at 37 degrees C. After distillation of creosote we found that these volatile mutagens were present in the distillation fraction with the highest boiling range (greater than 360 degrees C). The "volatile mutagenic activity" was connected with the presence of fluoranthene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. Commercially available fluoranthene was positive in the so-called "taped-plate assay" (the test system used for the detection of volatile mutagens) towards the strains TA98 and TA100 in the presence of S9 mix. The tested creosote and coal tar contained fluoranthene in concentrations of 5.2 and 2.2%, respectively.

  4. In situ hydrothermal oxidative destruction of DNAPLS in a creosote contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Leif, R. N., LLNL

    1998-02-27

    Hydrous Pyrolysis / Oxidation (HPO) is an in situ thermal remediation technology that uses hot, oxygenated groundwater to completely mineralize a wide range of organic pollutants. A field demonstration of HPO was performed at a creosote contaminated site during the summer of 1997. The groundwater was heated by steam injections and oxygen was added by coinjection of compressed air. The remediation was monitored from multiple groundwater monitoring wells. Dissolved organic carbon levels increased in response to steam injections as a result of the enhanced dissolution and mobilization of the creosote into the heated groundwater. Elevated concentrations of partially oxidized organic compounds (i.e. phenols, benzoic acid, fluorenone, anthrone and 9,10- anthracenedione), decreased levels of dissolved oxygen and isotopic shifts in the dissolved inorganic pool were indicators of partial to complete oxidative destruction of the creosote in the heated aquifer as a result of the HPO process.

  5. Effect of wood creosote and loperamide on propulsive motility of mouse colon and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ogata, N; Ataka, K; Morino, H; Shibata, T

    1999-10-01

    To elucidate a mechanism of the antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote, its effect on the propulsive motility of mouse colon and small intestine was studied using a charcoal meal test and a colonic bead expulsion test. The effect was compared with that of loperamide. At an ordinary therapeutic dose, wood creosote inhibited the propulsive motility of colon, but not of small intestine. On the other hand, loperamide inhibited the propulsive motility of small intestine, but not of colon. The results indicate that at least a part of the antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote and loperamide is attributable to their antikinetic effect predominantly on colon of the former and predominantly on small intestine of the latter.

  6. Toxicity of creosote water-soluble fractions generated from contaminated sediments to the bay mysid.

    PubMed

    Padma, T V; Hale, R C; Roberts, M H; Lipcius, R N

    1999-02-01

    Creosote, a globally used wood preservative, is a complex mixture consisting primarily of aromatic organic compounds (ACs). Creosote-derived ACs can persist for decades in aquatic sediments. Natural and anthropogenic activities may result in dissolution and resuspension of sediment-associated ACs. These processes were mimicked by generating a water-soluble fraction (WSF) from creosote-contaminated sediment (ERS) collected from a polluted site. The epibenthic mysid Mysidopsis bahia was exposed to five sublethal concentrations of WSF for 7 days. The WSF significantly decreased dry weight gain and proportion of gravid females (EC50=15 microgram/liter total identified ACs). Chemical analysis indicated that high-molecular-weight ACs (more than three aromatic rings) dominated the ERS, but were undetected in the WSF. Low-molecular-weight ACs (fewer than three aromatic rings) dominated the WSF. Compositional differences can thus result from fractionation processes and affect environmental fate and toxicity of the mixture.

  7. Volatilization of selected organic compounds from a creosote-waste land-treatment facility. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, E.J.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the emissions of volatile and semi-volatile compounds which are constituents of a complex creosote waste from laboratory simulations of a land treatment system to assess the potential human exposure to hazardous compounds from this source. In addition, the Thibodeaux-Hwang Air Emission Release Rate (AERR) model was evaluated for its use in predicting emission rates of hazardous constituents of creosote wood preservative waste from land treatment facilities. A group of hazardous volatile and semi-volatile constituents present in the creosote waste was selected for evaluation in this study and included a variety of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA's), phenol, and chlorinated and substituted phenols.

  8. Oxidative stress modulation by Rosmarinus officinalis in creosote-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    El-Demerdash, Fatma M; Abbady, Ehab A; Baghdadi, Hoda H

    2016-01-01

    Coal tar is a significant product generated from coal pyrolysis. Coal tar can be utilized as raw materials for various industries. It is also a type of raw material from which phenols, naphthalenes, and anthracene can be extracted. The present study was designed to investigate the possibility of coal tar creosote to induce oxidative stress and biochemical perturbations in rat liver and the role of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) in ameliorating its toxic effects. Male Wister Albino rats were randomly divided into four groups of seven each, group I served as control; group II treated with rosemary (10 mL of water extract/kg BW for 21 days), group III received coal tar creosote (200 mg/4 mL olive oil/kg BW for 3 days), and group IV treated with both rosemary and coal tar creosote. The administration of coal tar creosote significantly caused elevation in lipid peroxidation (LPO) and reduction in the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione S-transferase (GST). A significant decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) content was also observed. Liver aminotransferases aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT)] and alkaline phosphatase (AlP) were significantly decreased while lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was increased. Rosemary pretreatment to coal tar creosote-treated rats decreased LPO level and normalized GPx, GR, SOD, CAT, and GST activities, while GSH content was increased. Also, liver AST, ALT, AlP, and LDH were maintained near normal level due to rosemary treatment. In conclusion, rosemary has beneficial effects and could be able to antagonize coal tar creosote toxicity.

  9. Efficacious rat model displays non-toxic effect with Korean beechwood creosote: a possible antibiotic substitute

    PubMed Central

    Quynh, Anh Nguyen Thai; Sharma, Neelesh; Cho, Kwang Keun; Yeo, Tae Jong; Kim, Ki Beom; Jeong, Chul Yon; Min, Tae Sun; Young, Kim Jae; Kim, Jin Nam; Jeong, Dong-Kee

    2014-01-01

    Wood creosote, an herbal anti-diarrheal and a mixture of major volatile compounds, was tested for its non-toxicological effects, using a rat model, with the objective to use the creosote as an antibiotic substitute. A total of 30 Sprague-Dawley rats were studied to form five groups with 6 rats each. Korea beechwood creosote was supplemented into three test groups with 0.03 g/kg, 0.07 g/kg and 0.1 g/kg body weight/day without antibiotic support, along with a positive control of Apramycin sulphate (at 0.5% of the daily feed) and a negative control. Korean beechwood creosote supplementation showed no negative effect on the body weight gain in comparison to the negative and the positive control groups and the feed conversion ratio was also comparable with that of the control groups. The clinical pathology parameters studied were also under the umbrella of normal range, including liver specific enzymes, blood glucose, total protein, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), which indicated no toxic effect of creosote at the given doses. The non-hepatotoxic effect was also confirmed using hepatic damage specific molecular markers like Tim-p1, Tim-p2 and Tgf-β1. The results suggested that Korean beechwood may be used as antibiotic substitute in weanling pigs feed without any toxic effect on the body. Although the antimicrobial properties of creosote were not absolutely similar to those of apramycin sulphate, they were comparable. PMID:26019530

  10. Assessing the Extent of Sediment Contamination Around Creosote-treated Pilings Through Chemical and Biological Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansson, E. S.

    2008-12-01

    Creosote is a common wood preservative used to treat marine structures, such as docks and bulkheads. Treated dock pilings continually leach polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other creosote compounds into the surrounding water and sediment. Over time, these compounds can accumulate in marine sediments, reaching much greater concentrations than those in seawater. The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of creosote contamination in sediments, at a series of distances from treated pilings. Three pilings were randomly selected from a railroad trestle in Fidalgo Bay, WA and sediment samples were collected at four distances from each: 0 meters, 0.5 meters, 1 meter, and 2 meters. Samples were used to conduct two bioassays: an amphipod bioassay (Rhepoxynius abronius) and a sand dollar embryo bioassay. Grain size and PAH content (using a fluorometric method) were also measured. Five samples in the amphipod bioassay showed significantly lower effective survival than the reference sediment. These consisted of samples closest to the piling at 0 and 0.5 meters. One 0 m sample in the sand dollar embryo bioassay also showed a significantly lower percentage of normal embryos than the reference sediment. Overall, results strongly suggest that creosote-contaminated sediments, particularly those closest to treated pilings, can negatively affect both amphipods and echinoderm embryos. Although chemical data were somewhat ambiguous, 0 m samples had the highest levels of PAHs, which corresponded to the lowest average survival in both bioassays. Relatively high levels of PAHs were found as far as 2 meters away from pilings. Therefore, we cannot say how far chemical contamination can spread from creosote-treated pilings, and at what distance this contamination can still affect marine organisms. These results, as well as future research, are essential to the success of proposed piling removal projects. In addition to creosote-treated pilings, contaminated sediments must

  11. Induction of cytochrome p-450-ia1 in juvenile fish by creosote-contaminated sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Schoor, W.P.; Williams, D.E.; Takahashi, N.

    1991-01-01

    Intact sediment cores, including their surface layers, were used in simulated field exposure tests of juvenile guppies (Poecilia reticulata) to creosote-contaminated sediments. Mixed-function oxygenase activity was induced in the fish after 43 days of exposure to environmentally realistic, sublethal concentrations of creosote-related compounds. An average 50-fold induction in the cytochrome P-450-IA1 was found in the liver in the absence of any histopathological lesions. The possibility that a threshold level for proliferative liver changes was not reached is discussed in the light of the observed biochemical activation.

  12. Mycelium growth and degradation of creosote-treated wood by basydiomycetes.

    PubMed

    Galli, E; Brancaleoni, E; Di Mario, F; Donati, E; Frattoni, M; Polcaro, C M; Rapanà, P

    2008-07-01

    Tolerance of wood decay fungi of the genera Agrocybe, Armillaria, Auricularia, Daedalea, Pleurotus, Trametes to the presence of various amounts of creosote-treated wood (CTW) in the growth medium was compared. In the case of the most tolerant strain, Pleurotus ostreatus SMR 684, extracellular laccase and peroxidase specific activities were monitored during growth in the presence of CTW. Degradation of various creosote-constituting polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by this strain was evaluated by GC-MS and the ecotoxicity of treated and untreated CTW was compared by Microtox test.

  13. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Lincoln Creosote Site, Bossier City, LA, November 26, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    The Lincoln Creosote Site (Site) is located in Bossier City, Louisiana, and consists of a 20-acre industrial area that includes the former location of a wood treatment plant. Wood products such as railroad ties and utility poles were pressure treated at the plant, using creosote, chromated copper-arsenate (CCA) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) as wood preservatives. The compounds used for wood treatment contained metals, a number of semi-volatile organic base-neutral extractable compounds such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs). EPA`s selected removal action called for excavation of residential soils containing concentrations of wood treatment product residuals.

  14. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of creosotes extracted from wooden sleepers installed in playgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Rotard, W.; Mailahn, W.

    1987-01-01

    In order to evaluate their hygienic risk, wood samples from sleepers (railroad cross ties) impregnated with coal tar creosote were taken from playgrounds and investigated for hazardous compounds. The samples were extracted with ether, and acid-base-neutral separations were made on the creosote extracts. Water-soluble compounds were also isolated. All the fractions were investigated by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Besides phenols in the acidic fractions and N-heterocyclic polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the basic fractions, high amounts of neutral PAH and also, in several samples high levels of carcinogenic and cocarcinogenic PAH were determined.

  15. Response of zooplankton and phytoplankton communities to creosote-impregnated Douglas fir pilings in freshwater microcosms.

    PubMed

    Sibley, P K; Harris, M L; Bestari, K T; Steele, T A; Robinson, R D; Gensemer, R W; Day, K E; Solomon, K R

    2004-07-01

    Creosote has been used extensively as an industrial wood preservative for the protection of marine pilings, railway ties, and utility poles and is a common source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into aquatic environments. At present, there is little information by which to judge the potential for creosote leached from impregnated pilings to cause toxicity to biota in aquatic environments. The objective of the current study was to assess the effects of creosote on zooplankton and phytoplankton populations in freshwater microcosms in relation to changes in the concentration and composition of PAHs leached from creosote-impregnated Douglas fir pilings during an 83-day exposure period. The study consisted of single microcosms containing one half, one, two, three, four, and six treated pilings. Two microcosms that received untreated pilings were used as controls. The total surface area of pilings in each microcosm was normalized by adding the appropriate number of untreated pilings. Samples were collected periodically between -14 and 83 days pre- and postexposure to determine aqueous concentrations of 15 priority PAHs and to assess the response of zooplankton and phytoplankton communities. Plankton community response to creosote was analyzed using principle responses curves. Peak aqueous concentrations of sigmaPAH occurred at day 7, ranging from 7.3 to 97.3 microg/L. Zooplankton abundance decreased in all microcosms after introduction of the impregnated pilings, with the magnitude of response varying as a function of aqueous creosote concentration. Using inverse regression, a no-observed-effect concentration for the zooplankton community of 11.1 microg/L was estimated. In contrast, algal abundance and diversity increased in all treatments between 7 and 21 days and attained levels up to twice that in control microcosms. This trend most likely reflected decreased grazing pressure because of the decrease in zooplankton populations, but it may also have reflected

  16. Drought increases freezing tolerance of both leaves and xylem of Larrea tridentata.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Juliana S; Pockman, William T

    2011-01-01

    Drought and freezing are both known to limit desert plant distributions, but the interaction of these stressors is poorly understood. Drought may increase freezing tolerance in leaves while decreasing it in the xylem, potentially creating a mismatch between water supply and demand. To test this hypothesis, we subjected Larrea tridentata juveniles grown in a greenhouse under well-watered or drought conditions to minimum temperatures ranging from -8 to -24 °C. We measured survival, leaf retention, gas exchange, cell death, freezing point depression and leaf-specific xylem hydraulic conductance (k₁). Drought-exposed plants exhibited smaller decreases in gas exchange after exposure to -8 °C compared to well-watered plants. Drought also conferred a significant positive effect on leaf, xylem and whole-plant function following exposure to -15 °C; drought-exposed plants exhibited less cell death, greater leaf retention, higher k₁ and higher rates of gas exchange than well-watered plants. Both drought-exposed and well-watered plants experienced 100% mortality following exposure to -24 °C. By documenting the combined effects of drought and freezing stress, our data provide insight into the mechanisms determining plant survival and performance following freezing and the potential for shifts in L. tridentata abundance and range in the face of changing temperature and precipitation regimes.

  17. Effects of Cecropia pachystachya and Larrea divaricata aqueous extracts in mice.

    PubMed

    Bigliani, M C; Grondona, E; Zunino, P M; Ponce, A A

    2010-07-01

    Our studies were performed to investigate the effects of the aqueous extracts of Cecropia pachystachya and Larrea divaricata. These plants are used in folkloric medicine in infusion and were administered orally (0.76 g/kg) to male Albino Swiss mice for 16 days, on drink intake, organ weight/body weight (OW/BW x 100) ratio, histology, broqueoalveolar fluid (BALF) and elevated plus-maze (EPM). Feeding as well as body weight were unaffected by the consumption of these extracts. There were no signs of toxicity in BALF, morbidity or mortality during the study. C. pachystachya caused an increase in relative kidney OW/BW (p

  18. Development of conical silicone rubber bushings to replace porcelain on SF{sub 6} circuit breakers

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, W.B.; Orbeck, T.; Moal, E.

    1994-12-31

    A unique design of a composite polymer bushing is introduced and evaluated. A comprehensive test program defined the mechanical and electrical performance of a conical silicone polymer composite bushing. This evaluation also included aging and pollution tests to assess the long-term stability of the new design. Results show that the composite bushing offers technical and safety benefits over conventional porcelain bushings.

  19. The effect of creosote on vitellogenin production in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherry, J.P.; Whyte, J.J.; Karrow, N.A.; Gamble, A.; Boerman, H.J.; Bol, N.C.; Dixon, D.G.; Solomon, K.R.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a broader investigation into the effects of creosote treatments on the aquatic biota in pond microcosms, we examined the possible implications for vitellogenin (Vtg) production in Oncorhynchus mykiss [rainbow trout (RT)]. Vtg is the precursor of egg yolk protein and has emerged as a useful biomarker of exposure to estrogenic substances. Our a priori intent was to assess the ability of the creosote treatments (nominal cresoste concentrations were 0, 3, and 10 ??l/L immediately after the last subsurface addition) to induce estrogenic responses in RT. The data showed no evidence of an estrogenic response in the treated fish. During the course of the experiment, however, the fish matured and began to produce Vtg, probably in response to endogenous estrogen. A posteriori analysis of the Vtg data from the maturing fish showed that after 28 days, the plasma Vtg concentrations were about 15-fold lower in fish from the creosote-treated microcosms compared with fish from the reference microcosm. Although the experiment design does not permit mechanistic insights, our observation suggests that exposure of female fish to PAH mixtures such as creosote can impair the production of Vtg with possible health implications for embryos and larvae. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  20. Inhibition of Acetoclastic Methanogenesis in Crude Oil- and Creosote-Contaminated Groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warren, E.; Bekins, B.A.; Godsy, E.M.; Smith, V.K.

    2003-01-01

    The inhibition of acetoclastic methanogenesis in crude oil- and creosote-contaminated groundwater was studied. The crude oil and water-soluble components of creosote contributed to the inhibition of acetoclastic methanogens. Acetoclastic methanogenesis was much more susceptible to the toxic inhibition of crude oil and creosote than either hydrogen- or formate-utilizing methanogenesis. The effect of this toxic inhibition was apparent in the population of the methanogenic trophic groups near nonaqueous crude oil at the Bemidji, MN, site. At a crude oil-contaminated site, numbers of acetoclastic methanogens found close to crude oil were 100 times fewer than those of hydrogen- and formate-utilizing methanogens. In laboratory toxicity assays, crude oil collected from the site inhibited methane production from acetate but not from formate or hydrogen. Toxicity assays with aqueous creosote extract completely inhibited acetate utilization over the range of tested dilutions but only mildly affected formate and hydrogen utilization. Wastewater reactor studies indicated that this toxicity would result in a decrease in the biodegradation rate of contaminants at sites where toxic compounds are present.

  1. Evaluation of emission sources from creosote wood-treatment operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vaught, C.C.; Nicholson, R.L.

    1989-06-01

    This document discusses each of the preservatives and the processes used to treat a variety of wood products, concentrating on the use of creosote for the treatment of crossties. Of particular concern are the emission sources associated with the release of odor and air toxics and the technologies currently in use to control them.

  2. FIELD EVALUATION OF THE LIGNIN-DEGRADING FUNGUS PHANEROCHAETE SORDIDA TO TREAT CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study to determine the ability of selected lignin-degrading fungi to remediate soil contaminated with creosote was performed at a wood-treating facility in south central Mississippi in the autumn of 1991. The effects of solid-phase bioremediation with Phanerochaete sordid...

  3. Delineation of creosote-based DNAPLs using CPT-deployed laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggery, D.A. Jr.; Misquitta, N.J; Coll, F.R..

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents a case study of the first commercial use of cone penetrometer testing (CPT)/deployed laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to address the following objectives at a creosote DNAPL site. The objectives of the investigation using CPT/LIF were to: quickly and cost effectively delineate the horizontal and vertical extent of creosote DNAPL in soil/groundwater; delineate/differentiate creosote DNAPL constituents within the extent of DNAPL; delineate dissolved-phase versus free phase DNAPL compounds in the subsurface. The complexity of investigating the extent of creosote DNAPL magnifies the time and cost of the application of conventional investigative techniques. The application of CPT/LIF at the subject site allowed a comparison between CPT/LIF and more conventional investigative techniques. If the objectives were achieved in a shorter time-frame, and at a lesser cost than traditional methods, then the CPT/LIF method would be confirmed as a viable, field-scale technology for investigating appropriate wood-treating sites.

  4. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): United Creosoting Company, Hilbig Road, Conroe, Texas, September 1986. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-30

    The United Creosoting site, Montgomery County, Texas, operated from 1946 to 1972, treating wood with creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP). During the summer of 1980, Montgomery County obtained soils from the United Creosoting site to be used in improving local roads in a nearby subdivision. Samples indicated that soils were contaminated with PCP, chlorinated dioxins (no tetrachlorinated dioxins), and dibenzofurans. EPA ordered Clark Distributing to undertake an Immediate Response Action within the area of the former waste ponds. Remedial actions were recommended and are included in the report.

  5. Plants and ventifacts delineate late Holocene wind vectors in the Coachella Valley, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffiths, P.G.; Webb, R.H.; Fisher, M.; Muth, A.

    2009-01-01

    Strong westerly winds that emanate from San Gorgonio Pass, the lowest point between Palm Springs and Los Angeles, California, dominate aeolian transport in the Coachella Valley of the western Sonoran Desert. These winds deposit sand in coppice dunes that are critical habitat for several species, including the state and federally listed threatened species Uma inornata, a lizard. Although wind directions are generally defined in this valley, the wind field has complex interactions with local topography and becomes more variable with distance from the pass. Local, dominant wind directions are preserved by growth patterns of Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), a shrub characteristic of the hot North American deserts, and ventifacts. Exceptionally long-lived, Larrea has the potential to preserve wind direction over centuries to millennia, shaped by the abrasive pruning of windward branches and the persistent training of leeward branches. Wind direction preserved in Larrea individuals and clones was mapped at 192 locations. Compared with wind data from three weather stations, Larrea vectors effectively reflect annual prevailing winds. Ventifacts measured at 24 locations record winds 10° more westerly than Larrea and appear to reflect the direction of the most erosive winds. Based on detailed mapping of local wind directions as preserved in Larrea, only the northern half of the Mission-Morongo Creek floodplain is likely to supply sand to protected U. inornata habitat in the Willow Hole ecological reserve.

  6. Plants and ventifacts delineate late Holocene wind vectors in the Coachella Valley, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Peter G.; Webb, Robert H.; Fisher, Mark; Muth, Allan

    Strong westerly winds that emanate from San Gorgonio Pass, the lowest point between Palm Springs and Los Angeles, California, dominate aeolian transport in the Coachella Valley of the western Sonoran Desert. These winds deposit sand in coppice dunes that are critical habitat for several species, including the state and federally listed threatened species Uma inornata, a lizard. Although wind directions are generally defined in this valley, the wind field has complex interactions with local topography and becomes more variable with distance from the pass. Local, dominant wind directions are preserved by growth patterns of Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), a shrub characteristic of the hot North American deserts, and ventifacts. Exceptionally long-lived, Larrea has the potential to preserve wind direction over centuries to millennia, shaped by the abrasive pruning of windward branches and the persistent training of leeward branches. Wind direction preserved in Larrea individuals and clones was mapped at 192 locations. Compared with wind data from three weather stations, Larrea vectors effectively reflect annual prevailing winds. Ventifacts measured at 24 locations record winds 10° more westerly than Larrea and appear to reflect the direction of the most erosive winds. Based on detailed mapping of local wind directions as preserved in Larrea, only the northern half of the Mission-Morongo Creek floodplain is likely to supply sand to protected U. inornata habitat in the Willow Hole ecological reserve.

  7. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 11, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 11, 1936 VIEW THROUGH LIVING ROOM DOOR ACROSS HALL INTO GUEST ROOM SHOWING BASE OF STAIR IN HALL - Oak Manor, State Road 28, Livingston, Sumter County, AL

  8. 15. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 LOOKING NORTH IN CROSS HALL, SECOND FLOOR - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  9. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 FRONT (EAST) AND SOUTH ELEVATION - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  10. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 VIEW IN FRONT OF MAIN HALL, SECOND FLOOR - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  11. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 GENERAL VIEW OF REAR OF MAIN HALL - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  12. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 MANTEL ON SOUTH WALL OF PARLOR - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  13. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 LOOKING SOUTH WEST AT OLD STABLE - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  14. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 VIEW INTO LIVING ROOM SHOWING MANTEL - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  15. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 CLOSE-UP OF MAIN ENTRANCE - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  16. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 MANTEL ON NORTH WALL OF DINING ROOM - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  17. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 FRONT OF ENTRANCE HALL (GENERAL VIEW) - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  18. 18. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 SERVANT'S HOUSE AND GARAGE - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  19. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 REAR (WEST) AND NORTH SIDE - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  20. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 CLOSE-UP OF FRONT ELEVATION FROM SOUTH SIDE - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  1. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 VIEW THROUGH DOUBLE SLIDING DOORS INTO DINING ROOM - Colonel Joseph R. Hawthorne House, Broad Street (County Road 59), Pine Apple, Wilcox County, AL

  2. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 2, 1936 MANTEL IN S. WALL OF S. E. FRONT ROOM, FIRST FLOOR - Rhea-Burleson-McEntire House, 120 Sycamore Street, Decatur, Morgan County, AL

  3. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 2, 1936 INTERIOR OF FRONT ENTRANCE IN HALL, 2nd FLOOR - Rhea-Burleson-McEntire House, 120 Sycamore Street, Decatur, Morgan County, AL

  4. 29. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, Feb. 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, Feb. 7, 1935 VIEW FROM HALL ON 2nd FLOOR SHOWING SUN PARLOR - Courtview, 505 North Court Street, University of North Alabama Campus, Florence, Lauderdale County, AL

  5. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 26, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 26, 1937 ENTRANCE FROM SUN PARLOR IN CROSS HALL, ALSO STAIRWAY - Governor Robert Lindsay House, U.S. Highway 72, Tuscumbia, Colbert County, AL

  6. 17. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, 1936 WINDOW IN N. WALL OF N. E. FRONT ROOM (PARLOR), FIRST FLOOR - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  7. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 29, 1936 WINDOW IN N. WALL OF N. W. FRONT ROOM (LIVING ROOM), FIRST FLOOR - Cunningham Plantation, Old Memphis Road (Gaines Trace Road), Cherokee, Colbert County, AL

  8. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Copied by Alex Bush, Photographer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Copied by Alex Bush, Photographer, March 15, 1935 OLD COLLEGE PAMPHLET. NOT COPYRIGHTED. FRONT AND SIDE VIEW S.E. (BEFORE ALTERATION). - Marion Female Seminary, Monroe & Centreville Streets, Marion, Perry County, AL

  9. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 28, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 28, 1934 ALLEN GLOVER MAUSOLEUM. EAST ENTRANCE GATE TO BURIAL LOT - Glover Family Mausoleum, Riverview Cemetery, Demopolis, Marengo County, AL

  10. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 14, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 14, 1937 CLOSE-UP DETAIL OF NORTH EAST CORNER - Doctor Wilkins House, State Highways 14 & 86 vicinity, Pickensville, Pickens County, AL

  11. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, September 12, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, September 12, 1935 OLD SLAVE HOUSE, SMOKE HOUSE IN REAR - Greenlawn, U.S. Highway 431 (Memorial Parkway), Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  12. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 25, 1935 FRONT (WEST) AND NORTH SIDE OF SMOKE HOUSE - J. O. Banks House & Smokehouse, Springfield Avenue & Pickens Street, Eutaw, Greene County, AL

  13. 24. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 9, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 9, 1937 INTERIOR VIEW OF N. W. CORNER SMOKE HOUSE - Kenworthy Hall, State Highway 14 (Greensboro Road), Marion, Perry County, AL

  14. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, February 20, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, February 20, 1936 LOOKING SOUTH AT PART OF OLD KITCHEN. SERVANT'S HOUSE ON LEFT, SMOKE HOUSE ON RIGHT - C. W. Dunlap House, 237 Wilson Avenue, Eutaw, Greene County, AL

  15. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 7, 1936 SMOKE HOUSE AND WELL AT REAR OF HOME - Samuel M. Peck House, Eighteenth Street & Thirtieth Avenue, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  16. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 25, 1937 SMOKE HOUSE. WEST (FRONT) AND NORTH SIDE - Sellers-Henderson House & Smokehouse, State Route 28, Millers Ferry, Wilcox County, AL

  17. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 2, 1937 LOOKING EAST AT SMOKE HOUSE AND COOK'S HOME. - Ingleside, House & Outbuildings, Second Street (State Highway 14), Aliceville, Pickens County, AL

  18. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, 1937 LOOKING NORTH EAST IN COURT ROOM - Wilcox County Courthouse, Broad, Claiborne, Court & Water Streets, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  19. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, 1937 VAULT DOOR IN SO. WALL BETWEEN PROBATE JUDGE AND CLARK'S OFFICE, FIRST FLOOR - Wilcox County Courthouse, Broad, Claiborne, Court & Water Streets, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  20. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, 1937 CLOSE-UP OF REAR (EAST), NORTH - Wilcox County Courthouse, Broad, Claiborne, Court & Water Streets, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  1. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, 1937 CLOSE-UP OF FRONT PORTICO FROM SOUTH SIDE - Wilcox County Courthouse, Broad, Claiborne, Court & Water Streets, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  2. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, 1937 MAIN ENTRANCE DOOR TO COURT ROOM, SECOND FLOOR - Wilcox County Courthouse, Broad, Claiborne, Court & Water Streets, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  3. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, 1937 CORNICE TREATMENT ON NORTH SIDE OF PORTICO - Wilcox County Courthouse, Broad, Claiborne, Court & Water Streets, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  4. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, 1937 MANTEL ON EAST WALL IN COURT ROOM, SECOND FLOOR - Wilcox County Courthouse, Broad, Claiborne, Court & Water Streets, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  5. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, 1937 WINDOW IN COURT ROOM, SECOND FLOOR - Wilcox County Courthouse, Broad, Claiborne, Court & Water Streets, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  6. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 31, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 31, 1936 MANTEL IN NORTH WALL OF NORTH WEST FRONT ROOM, SECOND FLOOR - Frank Tait House, County Road 19, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  7. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, 1937 MANTEL ON EAST WALL OF SHERRIF OFFICE, 1st FLOOR - Wilcox County Courthouse, Broad, Claiborne, Court & Water Streets, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  8. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, 1937 LOOKING DOWN ON STAIR LANDING ON NORTH SIDE OF PORTICO - Wilcox County Courthouse, Broad, Claiborne, Court & Water Streets, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  9. 17. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, 1937 FIREPLACE AND WINDOW IN CLERK'S OFFICE, 1st FLOOR - Wilcox County Courthouse, Broad, Claiborne, Court & Water Streets, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  10. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, 1937 STAIR ON NORTH END OF PORTICO - Wilcox County Courthouse, Broad, Claiborne, Court & Water Streets, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  11. 15. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, January 8, 1937 VAULT DOOR IN PROBATE JUDGE'S OFFICE, FIRST FLOOR - Wilcox County Courthouse, Broad, Claiborne, Court & Water Streets, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  12. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 MANTEL ON NORTH WALL OF N.E. ROOM, FIRST FLOOR - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  13. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 MANTEL ON EAST WALL OF N. E. ROOM - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  14. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 DOUBLE DOORS IN N.E. ROOM, FIRST FLOOR - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 WINDOW DETAIL ON SOUTH WALL OF FRONT PORCH - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 30, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 30, 1936 SOUTH END OF BACK PORCH SHOWING BLINDS AND STAIR RAIL, SECOND FLOOR - Burford House, County Road 33 vicinity, Camden, Wilcox County, AL

  17. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, July 15, 1935 MANTEL IN S. W. ROOM ON FIRST FLOOR, TAX OFFICE - Lawrence County Courthouse, Courthouse Square bounded by Main Street, Lawrence Street, Market Street & Court Street, Moulton, Lawrence County, AL

  18. 23. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 7, 1935 REAR VIEW, SHOWING SMALL OLD-TIME WINDOW OF SLAVE HOUSE - Forks of Cypress, Savannah Road (Jackson Road), Florence, Lauderdale County, AL

  19. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 4, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, June 4, 1937 OLD TIME TOOLS USED IN ANTI-BELLUM TIMES, TUSCUMBIA VICINITY. - Carl Rand House, 501 East Third Street, Tuscumbia, Colbert County, AL

  20. 28. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 17, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 17, 1935 OLD- TIME KITCHEN, WEST SIDE (NOW GARAGE), SLAVES CABIN No. 3 IN SHEETS, E SIDE OF YARD - University of Alabama, President's House, University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  1. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 8, 1936 MANTEL IN EAST WALL OF NORTH EAST FRONT ROOM, FIRST FLOOR - Judge W. E. Torbert House, 1101 South Street, Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  2. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 8, 1936 MANTEL AND WINDOW IN EAST WALL OF NORTH EAST ROOM, SECOND FLOOR - Judge W. E. Torbert House, 1101 South Street, Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  3. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 8, 1936 SOUTH WALL OF DINING ROOM SHOWING MANTEL AND DOORS - Judge W. E. Torbert House, 1101 South Street, Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  4. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, November 9, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, November 9, 1936 VIEW IN FRONT PORCH SHOWING ALL OF THE DETAILS - Collier-Whitt-Boone House, 905 Twenty-first Avenue, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  5. 23. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, February 2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, February 2, 1937 LOOKING EAST IN GIRL'S DORMITORY, FOURTH FLOOR - East Alabama Masonic Female Institute, 205 East South Street, Talladega, Talladega County, AL

  6. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 20, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 20, 1934. BRICK WALL, WAS ONCE USED AS A COW LOT - Jemison-van de Graaf-Burchfield House, 1305 Greensboro Avenue, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  7. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 9, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 9, 1935 OLD SLAVE QUARTERS, KITCHEN AND DRIVERS ROOM, FACES S. - Shackelford-McCrary-Otts House, 901 Centreville Street, Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  8. Insulation Characteristics of Bushing Shed at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, S. H.

    2014-05-01

    In the development of high-Tc superconducting(HTS) devices, the bushing for HTS devices (HTS bushing) is the core technology, the need to because of supply high voltage to the cable or the winding of the transformer. The lower part of the bushing is exposed to the liquid nitrogen (LN2), and it has many sheds. In particular, the insulation body with sheds and electrical insulation at cryogenic temperature have attracted a great deal of interest from the view point of the size, weight and efficiency of bushing. This study has mainly investigated the shed and insulation body by comparing glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) in LN2. We investigated the surface discharge characteristics according to insulating materials, width and height of the shed.

  9. Detail of original stepup transformer showing hightension bushing on top ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of original step-up transformer showing high-tension bushing on top of tank and oil tank to left, view to north-northwest - Morony Hydroelectric Facility, Dam and Powerhouse, Morony Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  10. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 29, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 29, 1935 CLOSE-UP OF PORCH TRIM - Courtview, 505 North Court Street, University of North Alabama Campus, Florence, Lauderdale County, AL

  11. 47. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 16, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 16, 1935 SLAVE CABIN #1 (WESTERNMOST) IN SHEETS, CABIN AT WEST SIDE OF PLOT, FACES EAST, GIRL'S DORMITORY IN REAR - University of Alabama, President's House, University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  12. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 LOOKING SOUTH EAST AT OLD STORE - Rosemary House & Plantation Store, State Route 28 vicinity, Millers Ferry, Wilcox County, AL

  13. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 SOUTH END OF HALL (GENERAL VIEW) - Rosemary House & Plantation Store, State Route 28 vicinity, Millers Ferry, Wilcox County, AL

  14. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 MANTEL AND WINDOWS ON EAST WALL OF N.E. FRONT ROOM - Rosemary House & Plantation Store, State Route 28 vicinity, Millers Ferry, Wilcox County, AL

  15. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 FRONT AND WEST ELEVATION FROM N. W. - Rosemary House & Plantation Store, State Route 28 vicinity, Millers Ferry, Wilcox County, AL

  16. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 MANTEL ON WEST WALL N.W. FRONT ROOM, FIRST FLOOR - Rosemary House & Plantation Store, State Route 28 vicinity, Millers Ferry, Wilcox County, AL

  17. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 24, 1937 CLOSE-UP OF FRONT ELEVATION - Rosemary House & Plantation Store, State Route 28 vicinity, Millers Ferry, Wilcox County, AL

  18. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, February 20, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, February 20, 1936 SOUTH ELEVATION (FRONT) OF OLD MUSIC BUILDING - Eutaw Female Academy, Main Street & Wilson Avenue (moved from original site), Eutaw, Greene County, AL

  19. 23. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, September 14, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, September 14, 1935 LOOKING UP AT CORNICE IN REAR PARLOR - MUSIC ROOM - Courtview, 505 North Court Street, University of North Alabama Campus, Florence, Lauderdale County, AL

  20. 22. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, Feb. 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, Feb. 7, 1935 CLOSE UP OF CORNICE IN REAR PARLOR (MUSIC ROOM), N. E. ROOM - Courtview, 505 North Court Street, University of North Alabama Campus, Florence, Lauderdale County, AL

  1. 21. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, September 14, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, September 14, 1935 CORNICE IN CORNER OF REAR PARLOR - MUSIC ROOM - Courtview, 505 North Court Street, University of North Alabama Campus, Florence, Lauderdale County, AL

  2. 15. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 12, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 12, 1936 PLAQUE (IN CHURCH) TO MEMORY OF WILLIAM C. THOMPSON AND WIFE - Methodist Church, State Highway 25, Dayton, Marengo County, AL

  3. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 14, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 14, 1936 STAIR ON SOUTH WALL IN CROSS-HALL - Martin-Randolph-Marlowe House, 816 Twenty-second Avenue, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  4. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 25, 1935 (COPIED) FRONT VIEW (REPRODUCTION) - FROM E.L. LOVE PHOTO - Old Madison County Court House, Court Square, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 25, 1935 (COPIED) FRONT AND SIDE VIEW (REPRODUCTION) - FROM E.L. LOVE PHOTO - Old Madison County Court House, Court Square, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  6. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 25, 1935 (COPIED) SIDE VIEW (REPRODUCTION) - FROM E.L. LOVE PHOTO - Old Madison County Court House, Court Square, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  7. 26. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 11, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 11, 1936 MANTEL, WINDOWS AND CORNICE TREATMENT ON SO. WALL OF PARLOR, FIRST FLOOR - Cedar Grove, Uniontown Road, Faunsdale, Marengo County, AL

  8. 21. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 11, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 11, 1936 DETAIL OF DINING ROOM DOOR IN WEST WALL (OPENS INTO HALL) - Cedar Grove, Uniontown Road, Faunsdale, Marengo County, AL

  9. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, November 14, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, November 14, 1936 LOOKING S. E. IN SOUTH CROSS HALL SHOWING STAIR AND DOOR ON EAST WALL AND ENTRANCE DOOR - Cedar Grove, Uniontown Road, Faunsdale, Marengo County, AL

  10. 27. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, November 14, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, November 14, 1936 MANTEL, WINDOW, AND CORNICE TREATMENT IN SO. WALL OF PARLOR, FIRST FLOOR - Cedar Grove, Uniontown Road, Faunsdale, Marengo County, AL

  11. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 11, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 11, 1936 LOOKING SOUTH FROM LIVING ROOM DOORWAY ACROSS HALL INTO PARLOR - Cedar Grove, Uniontown Road, Faunsdale, Marengo County, AL

  12. 23. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 11, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 11, 1936 VIEW IN FRONT HALL (N. AND E. WALLS) SHOWING DOORWAYS AND HEAD OF STAIR RAIL, 2nd FLOOR - Cedar Grove, Uniontown Road, Faunsdale, Marengo County, AL

  13. 22. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 11, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 11, 1936 MANTEL AND DOOR TREATMENT IN W. WALL OF BED ROOM, FIRST FLOOR - Cedar Grove, Uniontown Road, Faunsdale, Marengo County, AL

  14. 24. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 11, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 11, 1936 DETAIL OF MANTEL ON WEST WALL OF S. W. BED ROOM, SECOND FLOOR - Cedar Grove, Uniontown Road, Faunsdale, Marengo County, AL

  15. 30. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 11, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, December 11, 1936 VIEW OF SOUTH AND EAST WALLS IN HALL, SECOND FLOOR, SHOWING STAIR RAIL ON E. WALL - Cedar Grove, Uniontown Road, Faunsdale, Marengo County, AL

  16. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, November 9, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, November 9, 1936 NORTH WEST CORNER OF ROOM ON SECOND FLOOR SHOWING WINDOW AND MANTEL - Strawberry Hill Plantation, U.S. Route 43, Forkland, Greene County, AL

  17. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 1, 1936 MANTEL IN FRONT ROOM (ON LEFT), FIRST FLOOR - Gayle-Locke House, University Avenue (College Street), Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  18. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 8, 1935 VIEW FROM STAGE TOWARD NORTH, MAIN FLOOR - Old Southern University, University Avenue (College Street), Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  19. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 1, 1936 MANTEL IN N. WALL OF N. E. CORNER ROOM - Gayle-Locke House, University Avenue (College Street), Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  20. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 8, 1935 RIGHT STAIRS TOWARDS WEST IN EAST END OF HALL EAST OF MAIN HALLWAY - Old Southern University, University Avenue (College Street), Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  1. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 30, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 30, 1936 VIEW OF S. W. CORNER OF S. W. REAR ROOM, FIRST FLOOR - Southern University, Chancellor's House, College Street, Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  2. 15. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 8, 1935 FIREPLACE IN NORTH EAST ROOM ON SECOND FLOOR - Old Southern University, University Avenue (College Street), Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  3. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 8, 1935 MAIN HALL TOWARDS SOUTH FROM FRONT DOOR - Old Southern University, University Avenue (College Street), Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  4. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, April 8, 1935 VIEW SHOWING BALCONY OF AUDITORIUM (HAS 800 SEATS) - Old Southern University, University Avenue (College Street), Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  5. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 30, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 30, 1936 DETAIL OF N. AND E. WALLS IN LIVING ROOM, FIRST FLOOR - Southern University, Chancellor's House, College Street, Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  6. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 30, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, March 30, 1936 MANTEL AND WINDOW TREATMENT IN E. WALL OF LIVING ROOM - Southern University, Chancellor's House, College Street, Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  7. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 5, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, August 5, 1935 MANTEL IN N. W. ROOM, SECOND FLOOR - Judge William Harrison Walker House, 309 East Clinton Street, Athens, Limestone County, AL

  8. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 8, 1936 MANTEL ON WEST WALL OF NORTH WEST BEDROOM, SECOND FLOOR - Judge W. E. Torbert House, 1101 South Street, Greensboro, Hale County, AL

  9. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 25, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 25, 1935 WALL AROUND REAR YARD OF BANK (SERPENTINE WALL) - State Bank of Alabama, Decatur Branch, Bank Street & Wilson Avenue, Decatur, Morgan County, AL

  10. Detection of Cracks in Aluminum Structure Beneath Inconel Repair Bushings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    conductivity (i.e. Inconel 718 ) – Primary challenge then becomes detecting the weak eddy current field in the structure beyond the bushing wall...was able to be selected with inspectability as a goal. – Inconel 718 • low permeability (~μ0) • low conductivity (< 2% IACS) • Combined with...Detection of Cracks in Aluminum Structure beneath Inconel Repair Bushings Mr. Kenneth J. LaCivita (USAF) AFRL/RXSA Air Force Research Laboratory

  11. The Bush Doctrine Shifting Position and Closing the Stance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    http:www.brook.edu/comm./policybriefs/pb109.htm>. Internet. Accessed October 14, 2003. Dalby , Simon . “Geopolitics, The Bush Doctrine, and War on...J. and James A. Russell. “U.S. Policy on Preventive War and Preemption.” The Nonproliferation Review, (Spring 2003): 113 – 123. Woodward, Bob. “Bush at War.” New York: Simon and Schuster, 2002.

  12. Electrokinetically enhanced bioremediation of creosote-contaminated soil: laboratory and field studies.

    PubMed

    Suni, Sonja; Malinen, Essi; Kosonen, Jarmo; Silvennoinen, Hannu; Romantschuk, Martin

    2007-02-15

    Creosote is a toxic and carcinogenic substance used in wood impregnation. Approximately 1,200 sites in Finland are contaminated with creosote. This study examined the possibility of enhancing bioremediation of creosote-contaminated soil with a combination of electric heating and infiltration and electrokinetic introduction of oxygenated, nutrient-rich liquid. Preliminary tests were performed in the laboratory, and a pilot test was conducted in situ at a creosote-contaminated former wood impregnation plant in Eastern Finland. Wood preservation practices at the plant were discontinued in 1989, but the soil and the groundwater in the area are still highly contaminated. The laboratory tests were mainly performed as a methodological test aiming for upscaling. The soils used in these tests were a highly polluted soil from a marsh next to the impregnation plant and a less polluted soil near the base of the impregnation building. The laboratory test showed that the relative degradation was significantly higher in high initial contaminant concentrations than with low initial concentrations. During the first 7 weeks, PAH-concentrations decreased by 68% in the marsh soil compared with a 51% reduction in the building soil. The field test was performed to a ca. 100 m3 soil section next to the former impregnation building. Nutrient and oxygen levels in the soils were elevated by hydraulic and electrokinetic pumping of urea and phosphate amended, aerated water into the soil. The DC current introduced into the soil raised the temperature from the ambient ca. 6 degrees C up to between 16 and 50 degrees C. Total PAH concentrations decreased by 50-80% during 3 months of treatment while mineral oil concentrations decreased approximately 30%. Electrokinetically enhanced in situ - bioremediation, which also significantly raised the soil temperature, proved to be a promising method to remediate creosote-contaminated soils.

  13. Identifying multiple timescale rainfall controls on Mojave Desert ecohydrology using an integrated data and modeling approach for Larrea tridentata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ng, Gene-Hua Crystal; Bedford, David R.; Miller, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The perennial shrub Larrea tridentata is widely successful in North American warm deserts but is also susceptible to climatic perturbations. Understanding its response to rainfall variability requires consideration of multiple timescales. We examine intra-annual to multi-year relationships using model simulations of soil moisture and vegetation growth over 50 years in the Mojave National Preserve in southeastern California (USA). Ecohydrological model parameters are conditioned on field and remote sensing data using an ensemble Kalman filter. Although no specific periodicities were detected in the rainfall record, simulated leaf-area-index exhibits multi-year dynamics that are driven by multi-year (∼3-years) rains, but with up to a 1-year delay in peak response. Within a multi-year period, Larrea tridentata is more sensitive to winter rains than summer. In the most active part of the root zone (above ∼80 cm), >1-year average soil moisture drives vegetation growth, but monthly average soil moisture is controlled by root uptake. Moisture inputs reach the lower part of the root zone (below ∼80 cm) infrequently, but once there they can persist over a year to help sustain plant growth. Parameter estimates highlight efficient plant physiological properties facilitating persistent growth and high soil hydraulic conductivity allowing deep soil moisture stores. We show that soil moisture as an ecological indicator is complicated by bidirectional interactions with vegetation that depend on timescale and depth. Under changing climate, Larrea tridentata will likely be relatively resilient to shorter-term moisture variability but will exhibit higher sensitivity to shifts in seasonal to multi-year moisture inputs.

  14. Gut microbes of mammalian herbivores facilitate intake of plant toxins.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Kevin D; Weiss, Robert B; Cox, James; Dale, Colin; Dearing, M Denise

    2014-10-01

    The foraging ecology of mammalian herbivores is strongly shaped by plant secondary compounds (PSCs) that defend plants against herbivory. Conventional wisdom holds that gut microbes facilitate the ingestion of toxic plants; however, this notion lacks empirical evidence. We investigated the gut microbiota of desert woodrats (Neotoma lepida), some populations of which specialise on highly toxic creosote bush (Larrea tridentata). Here, we demonstrate that gut microbes are crucial in allowing herbivores to consume toxic plants. Creosote toxins altered the population structure of the gut microbiome to facilitate an increase in abundance of genes that metabolise toxic compounds. In addition, woodrats were unable to consume creosote toxins after the microbiota was disrupted with antibiotics. Last, ingestion of toxins by naïve hosts was increased through microbial transplants from experienced donors. These results demonstrate that microbes can enhance the ability of hosts to consume PSCs and therefore expand the dietary niche breadth of mammalian herbivores.

  15. Bioaccumulation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons by the clam, Rangia cuneata, in the vicinity of a creosote spill

    SciTech Connect

    DeLeon, I.R.; Ferrario, J.B.; Byrne, C.J.

    1988-12-01

    During 1980-81, as part of NOAA/US Coast Guard initiative, the authors participated in an environmental study of a creosote spill into Bayou Bonfouca at the American Creosote Works Plant (ACWP) site at Slidell, Louisiana. The objectives for the study were: (1) to determined the nature and extent of creosote contamination at the site and in the bayou, and (2) to evaluate through biomonitoring the bioavailability and human health implications of creosote derived PAHs in the bayou and the estuarine system into which Bayou Bonfouca flows. So dramatic were their findings that their data was used in part by state and federal agencies to bring about in 1982, the inclusion of the Bayou Bonfouca site on the National Priorities List of hazardous waste sites that pose a threat to public health and the environment. This is a report of their findings on the biomonitoring of their study.

  16. HEPATOBLASTOMAS IN THE MUMMICHOG, FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS (L.), FROM A CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED ENVIRONMENT: A HISTOLOGIC, ULTRASTRUCTURAL AND IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A detailed histologic and ultrastructural description of two cases of hepatoblastoma, a primitive liver cell neoplasm, is provided from mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus(L.), inhabiting a creosote-contaminated site in the Elizabeth River, Virginia, USA. Both neoplasms were multifo...

  17. Sacrifice, the Bush Way: From Self to Others.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Marc-Andre

    2016-01-01

    The Walker Bush dynasty has marked the last American century, promoting "corporate democracy" as a means to expand its wealth. As 43rd President of the United States, George Walker Bush's biography illustrates how the members of our powerful elite sacrifice the inner self of their own children for the sake of political success. In his case, the childrearing violence and emotional neglect he experienced created the psychological basis for his later re-enactments as commander-in-chief in the wake of 9/11. From that standpoint, his intergenerational legacy of trauma bears strong affinities with that of the nation as a whole. This paper examines George W. Bush's paternal inheritance, the problem of maternal abuse and its subsequent psychic wounds, as well as the impact of an unresolved grief after the loss of his younger sister, Robin. Restaging childhood traumas as a vengeful young adult at Yale, before getting involved in dirty politics, Bush supported unlawful hazing practices. Then, as Governor of Texas he promoted the death penalty and a zero-tolerance approach to juvenile offenders. Controversial decisions of the Bush administration regarding the Enhanced Interrogation Program, the Guantanamo Bay detention camp and many others are further scrutinized as collective re-enactments of abuse deeply engrained in American society.

  18. Time domain responses of hydraulic bushing with two flow passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Tan; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-02-01

    Hydraulic bushings are commonly employed in vehicle suspension and body sub-frame systems to control motion, vibration, and structure-borne noise. Since literature on this topic is sparse, a controlled bushing prototype which accommodates a combination of long and short flow passages and flow restriction elements is first designed, constructed and instrumented. Step-up and step-down responses of several typical fluid-filled bushing configurations are measured along with steady harmonic time histories of transmitted force and internal pressures. To analyze the experimental results and gain physical insights into the hydraulic bushing system, lumped system models of bushings with different design features are developed, and analytical expressions of transmitted force and internal pressure responses are derived by using the convolution method. Parametric studies are also conducted to examine the effect of hydraulic element parameters. System parameters are successfully estimated for both harmonic and step responses using theory and measurements, and the dynamic force measurements are analyzed using analytical predictions. Finally, some nonlinearities of the system are also observed, and the fluid resistance of flow passage is found to be the most nonlinear element.

  19. Insulation design of cryogenic bushing for superconducting electric power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, J. Y.; Lee, Y. J.; Shin, W. J.; Kim, Y. H.; Kim, J. T.; Lee, B. W.; Lee, S. H.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the superconductivity projects to develop commercial superconducting devices for extra high voltage transmission lines have been undergoing in many countries. One of the critical components to be developed for high voltage superconducting devices, including superconducting transformers, cables, and fault current limiters, is a high voltage bushing, to supply high current to devices without insulating difficulties, that is designed for cryogenic environments. Unfortunately, suitable bushings for HTS equipment were not fully developed for some cryogenic insulation issues. Such high voltage bushings would need to provide electrical insulation capabilities from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. In this paper, design factors of cryogenic bushings were discussed and test results of specimen were introduced in detail. First, the dielectric strength of three kinds of metals has been measured with uniform and non-uniform electrodes by withstand voltage of impulse and AC breakdown test in LN2. Second, puncture breakdown voltage of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRPs) plates has been analyzed with non-uniform electrodes. Finally, creepage discharge voltages were measured according to the configuration of non-uniform and uniform electrode on the FRP plate. From the test results, we obtained the basic design factors of extra high voltage condenser bushing, which could be used in cryogenic environment.

  20. Action of a fluoranthene-utilizing bacterial community on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon components of creosote

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.G.; Chapman, P.J.; Pritchard, P.H.

    1989-01-01

    Cultures enriched by serial transfer through a mineral salts medium containing fluoranthene were used to establish a stable, 7-membered bacterial community from a sandy soil highly contaminated with coal-tar creosote. This community exhibited an ability to utilize fluoranthene as sole carbon source for growth as demonstrated by increases in protein concentration and changes in absorption spectra when grown on fluoranthene in liquid culture. Biotransformation of other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were verified by demonstrating their disappearance from an artificial PAH mixture using capillary gas chromatography. When grown on fluoranthene as sole carbon source and subsequently exposed to fluoranthene plus 16 additional PAHs typical of those found in creosote, this community transformed all PAHs present in this defined mixture. Continued incubation resulted in extensive degradation of the remaining 4 compounds.

  1. Inhibition of acetoclastic methanogenesis in crude oil- and creosote-contaminated groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warren, E.; Bekins, B.A.; Godsy, E.M.; Smith, V.K.

    2004-01-01

    Results from a series of studies of methanogenic processes in crude oil- and creosote-contaminated aquifers indicated that acetoctastic methanogenesis is inhibited near non-aqueous sources. Acetoclastic methanogenesis was more susceptible to the toxic inhibition of crude oil and creosote than either hydrogen- or formate-utilizing methanogenesis. The effect of this toxic inhibition was apparent in the population of the methanogenic trophic groups near nonaqueous crude oil at the Bemidji, MN, site. At that site, acetoclastic methanogens were < 2/g within or near the oil where hydrogen- and formate-utilizing methanogens were 10-100/g. The geochemical effect of this toxic inhibition was the buildup of low molecular weight volatile acids, particularly acetate. Wastewater reactor studies indicated that this toxicity will result in a decrease in the biodegradation rate of contaminants at sites where toxic compounds are present.

  2. Biodegradation of creosote and pentachlorophenol using simulated land farming techniques. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, T.D.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this project was to evaluate five land farming treatments, to determine which would best remediate creosote and pentachlorophenol contamination at and around a wood preservation treatment facility, and to determine the feasibility of applying such a treatment. These treatments were: (i) addition of water, (ii) addition of white rot fungus (Phanaerochete chrysosponum) and water, (iii) addition of an inoculum of bacterial isolates and water, (iv) addition of a soil inoculum from a previously remediated facility and water, and (v) addition of sodium nitrate and water. The soil that was investigated came from a facility in Camilla, Georgia. This site had been used to impregnate a variety of wood products with creosote and (PCP). The soil was so highly contaminated that only a minimal number of microorganisms could be cultured from the samples that were on hand. It is likely that those organisms which were viable evolved some ability to metabolize these pollutants.

  3. Field evaluation of the lignin-degrading fungus 'phanerochaete sordida' to treat creosote-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.W.; Glaser, J.A.; Evans, J.W.; Lamar, R.T.

    1993-01-01

    A field study to determine the ability of selected lignin-degrading fungi to remediate soil contaminated with pentachlorophenol and creosote was performed at a wood treating facility in south central Mississippi in the Autumn of 1991. The study was designed to evaluate 7 fungal treatments and appropriate control treatments. Soil concentrations of 14 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) components of creosote were measured over time to determine treatment efficacies. Fungal treatments involved mixing fungal inocula and aspen chips into the contaminated soil and maintaining moisture by irrigation and aeration by tillage. PAHs of more than 4 rings persisted at their original concentrations during the 8 wk course of the study for all treatments and controls.

  4. Analysis of beechwood creosote by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ogata, N; Baba, T

    1989-12-01

    Compounds in beechwood creosote were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and 22 major constituents were identified. Of these, 19 were phenolic compounds, i. e., guaiacol, phenol, two cresol isomers, four methylguaiacol (creosol) isomers, six xylenol isomers, two trimethylphenol isomers, 4-ethylguaiacol, 4-ethyl-5-methylguaiacol, and 4-propylguaiacol. The remaining three were hitherto unpredicted five-membered ring compounds, i. e., 3-methyl-2-hydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one, 3,5-dimethyl-2-hydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one, and 3-ethyl-2-hydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one. The relative quantities of these compounds were also compared with those obtained by high-resolution high-performance liquid chromatography. This report probably represents the first extensive analysis of beechwood creosote.

  5. Creosote compounds in snails obtained from Pensacola Bay, Florida, near an onshore hazardous-waste site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Pereira, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Snails, Thais haemostoma, were collected from two areas offshore in Pensacola Bay, Florida, near an onshore hazardous-waste site. Tissue from the snails was extracted to isolate the lipophilic compounds and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Along with naturally occurring compounds, the snail tissue contained large concentrations of polycyclic aromatic compounds, such as phenanthrene, acridine, dibenzothiophene, dibenzofuran, and benzo[a]pyrene. Many of these compounds were characteristic of creosote contamination associated with the onshore hazardous-waste site.

  6. Can Pickering emulsion formation aid the removal of creosote DNAPL from porous media?

    PubMed

    Torres, Luis; Iturbe, Rosario; Snowden, M J; Chowdhry, Babur; Leharne, Stephen

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the proposition that creosote, emplaced in an initially water saturated porous system, can be removed from the system through Pickering emulsion formation. Pickering emulsions are dispersions of two immiscible fluids in which coalescence of the dispersed phase droplets is hindered by the presence of colloidal particles adsorbed at the interface between the two immiscible fluid phases. Particle trapping is strongly favoured when the wetting properties of the particles are intermediate between strong water wetting and strong oil wetting. In this investigation the necessary chemical conditions for the formation of physically stable creosote-in-water emulsions protected against coalescence by bentonite particles were examined. It was established that physically stable emulsions could be formed through the judicious addition of small amounts of sodium chloride and the surfactant cetyl-trimethylammonium bromide. The stability of the emulsions was initially established by visual inspection. However, experimental determinations of emulsion stability were also undertaken by use of oscillatory rheology. Measurements of the elastic and viscous responses to shear indicated that physically stable emulsions were obtained when the viscoelastic systems showed a predominantly elastic response to shearing. Once the conditions were established for the formation of physically stable emulsions a "proof-of-concept" chromatographic experiment was carried out which showed that creosote could be successfully removed from a saturated model porous system.

  7. Suppression of intestinal smooth muscle contraction by 4-ethylguaiacol, a constituent of wood creosote.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, M; Ogata, N; Shibata, T

    1993-11-01

    Wood creosote, a mixture of phenolic compounds, suppresses in vitro contractions of rat intestine. To identify a compound in wood creosote able to inhibit intestinal motility, we screened its constituent phenolic compounds and found 4-ethylguaiacol (4-EG) as an active compound. It suppressed the spontaneous phasic (IC50 = 513 +/- 48 mumol/l) as well as spasmogenic-agent-induced tonic longitudinal contractions of isolated rat ileum in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner. KCl-depolarization-induced tonic contraction, which was susceptible to a calcium channel blocking agent, was also suppressed by 4-EG with an IC50 of 433 +/- 41 mumol/l. Furthermore, calcium-ionophore-induced contraction, which was affected by an influx of extracellular calcium ion that bypassed calcium channels, was suppressed by 4-EG with an IC50 of 97 +/- 18 mumol/l. These results support the concept that the effect of wood creosote to suppress intestinal motility is attributable, partially or entirely, to its component 4-EG and that this effect of 4-EG on the intestinal muscle is produced at some stage(s) of the muscle contraction process after influx of extracellular calcium into the cytosol of smooth muscle.

  8. Critical evaluation of selected methods for the isolation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from wood stove creosote

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content of creosote samples from a conventional air tight residential wood burning stove and a Franklin type stove were analyzed. It was determined that these samples did contain most of those PAH identified by the Environmental Protection Agency as priority pollutants. Furthermore, it was evidenced that these compounds are present in creosote generated by the air tight stove at levels approximately twice those found in the Franklin type counterpart. The investigation also focused on the evaluation of different classical liquid, and planar chromatographic techniques as well as the introduction of a novel approach for the isolation of PAH material from creosote. It was found that adsorbents commonly employed were too difficult to standardize for routine use and that the cleanest PAH fractions were obtained by gradient elution, circular, thin layer chromatography. Finally, the potential for future applications of gradient elution, circular, thin layer chromatography was demonstrated by the separation of both polar and nonpolar components in a single chromatogram.

  9. Microbial metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in creosote contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, L.M.; Pfaender, F.K.

    1994-12-31

    Creosote contaminated sites are of environmental significance due to the high concentrations of toxic and/or mutagenic PAH usually found at these sites. Microbial degradation of PAH can be seen as a novel form of contaminant detoxification. This paper describes the microbial degradation of PAH in creosote contaminated soils using (9-{sup 14}C) phenanthrene as a model PAH. Microbial metabolism was assessed with a mass balance approach as well as identification of PAH metabolites by GC/MS/FTIR. The mass balance accounted for the amount portion of the added phenanthrene. To confirm the effectiveness of microbial degradation to decrease soil toxicity, the Microtox{reg_sign} and Mutatox{reg_sign} assays were used to monitor toxicity of the creosote soils throughout the experiments. Mass balance results indicated that phenanthrene was readily mineralized in the contaminated soils, while metabolite production accounted for only a minor portion of the added phenanthrene. Toxicity of contaminated soils increased slightly early in the incubation and then decreased over longer time periods. Mutagenicity of soils, however, did not decrease appreciably over a 3-month time period. The identity of metabolic products found in the soils will be discussed.

  10. High-voltage R-F feedthrough bushing

    DOEpatents

    Grotz, G.F.

    1982-09-03

    Described is a multi-element, high voltage radio frequency bushing for transmitting rf energy to an antenna located in a vacuum container. The bushing includes a center conductor of complex geometrical shape, an outer coaxial shield conductor, and a thin-walled hollow truncated cone insulator disposed between central and outer conductors. The shape of the center conductor, which includes a reverse curvature portion formed of a radially inwardly directed shoulder and a convex portion, controls the uniformity of the axial surface gradient on the insulator cone. The outer shield has a first substantially cylindrical portion and a second radially inwardly extending truncated cone portion.

  11. High voltage bushing having weathershed and surrounding stress relief collar

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.

    1981-01-01

    A high voltage electric bushing comprises a hollow elongated dielectric weathershed which encloses a high voltage conductor. A collar formed of high voltage dielectric material is positioned over the weathershed and is bonded thereto by an interface material which precludes moisture-like contaminants from entering between the bonded portions. The collar is substantially thicker than the adjacent weathershed which it surrounds, providing relief of the electric stresses which would otherwise appear on the outer surface of the weathershed. The collar may include a conductive ring or capacitive foil to further relieve electric stresses experienced by the bushing.

  12. Horizontal cryogenic bushing for the termination of a superconducting power-transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Minati, K.F.; Morgan, G.H.; McNerney, A.J.; Schauer, F.

    1982-07-29

    A termination for a superconducting power transmission line is disclosed which is comprised of a standard air entrance insulated vertical bushing with an elbow, a horizontal cryogenic bushing linking the pressurized cryogenic cable environment to the ambient temperature bushing and a stress cone which terminated the cable outer shield and transforms the large radial voltage gradient in the cable dielectric into a much lower radial voltage gradient in the high density helium coolant at the cold end of the cryogenic bushing.

  13. Termination for a superconducting power transmission line including a horizontal cryogenic bushing

    DOEpatents

    Minati, Kurt F.; Morgan, Gerry H.; McNerney, Andrew J.; Schauer, Felix

    1984-01-01

    A termination for a superconducting power transmission line is disclosed which is comprised of a standard air entrance insulated vertical bushing with an elbow, a horizontal cryogenic bushing linking the pressurized cryogenic cable environment to the ambient temperature bushing and a stress cone which terminates the cable outer shield and transforms the large radial voltage gradient in the cable dielectric into a much lower radial voltage gradient in the high density helium coolant at the cold end of the cryogenic bushing.

  14. Comparison of the antidiarrheal effects of wood creosote and loperamide in the rat jejunum and colon in vitro.

    PubMed

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, B; Tyler, K R; Venkova, K; Kuge, T

    2000-08-01

    Wood creosote, a mixture of guaiacol, creosol and related compounds, has long been used as an antidiarrheal agent. The goal of our study was to investigate the antisecretory effect of wood creosote and to compare it to the effect of loperamide, a synthetic opioid widely used in the treatment of diarrhea. Experiments were performed in rat jejunal and colonic mucosal sheets, mounted in modified Ussing chambers. Active electrogenic transport was monitored electrically as short circuit current (Isc) and hypersecretory responses were induced by acetylcholine (ACh). Neither loperamide nor wood creosote had any significant effect on basal lsc, when added to the serosal bathing solution at concentrations of 0.1-50microg/ml. In contrast, under hypersecretory conditions, both agents showed concentration-dependent (0.1--100microg/ml) antisecretory effects inhibiting ACh-induced responses in the jejunum and colon. However, the effects suggest regional differences, with loperamide being most potent in the jejunum, while wood creosote showed equal potency in both jejunum and colon. Based upon these in vitro findings, we conclude that like loperamide, the antidiarrheal action of wood creosote is due, at least in part, to its antisecretory activity.

  15. The Invasive Shrub, Buddleja davidii (Butterfl y Bush)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Buddleja davidii Franchet (Synonym. Buddleia davidii; common name Butterfly bush) is a perennial, semi-deciduous shrub or small multi-stemmed tree that is resident in gardens and disturbed areas in temperate locations worldwide. Since its introduction to the United Kingdom from c...

  16. 29. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 16, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, October 16, 1935 SMOKE HOUSE AND DAIRY, W SIDE AND S END (SLAVE CABIN No. 2 IN SHEETS, W SIDE OF YARD) - University of Alabama, President's House, University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  17. BUDDLEJA DAVIDII (BUTTERFLY BUSH): A GROWING THREAT TO RIPARIA?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Buddleja davidii, an Asian shrub or small tree (family Buddlejaceae; commonly referred to as Butterfly bush) is found in the United States, New Zealand, Australia, and Europe as a popular ornamental and an aggressive invasive that has become widespread in floodplains, riverbeds, ...

  18. Bush energy policy may fuel Democratic challenger in '92

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, B.

    1991-03-18

    This article describes President Bush's energy policy and the conflict with the Democrats. The plan calls for more domestic oil production from offshore oil drilling, from the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, and from new nuclear power plants. Little mention is made of increasing energy conservation. Democrats hope the issue will give them at least some indication of the mood of the electorate.

  19. Bush Plan Takes Security Out of Social Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Jeanne C.

    2005-01-01

    Social workers understand that assessing the implications of a policy for individual citizens like Veronica, a 51 year-old African American woman whose retirement will be jeopardized by President Bush's plan for social security, is often a good yardstick by which to measure the impact of a change. Moreover, social workers understand that policy…

  20. Jeb Bush's Impact Felt on K-12 Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2011-01-01

    Jeb Bush left the Florida governor's office in 2007 with a legacy of having brought sweeping changes to his state's education system, through hard-edged policies that gave parents and students more choices and demanded more of schools. Today, that legacy seems poised to grow--and well beyond Florida. In state capitals across the country, numerous…

  1. Networking the "Bush"--Is There Anyone out There?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Janice

    2013-01-01

    Local rural communities and individuals are increasingly disarmed by the socially transforming processes of post modern times including the globalisation of rural production systems and trade. There is a new climate "in the bush" that is imbued with a deep suspicion that globalisation processes will continue to threaten the…

  2. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 30, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alex Bush, Photographer, May 30, 1936 (WEST SIDE) VIEW LOOKING S.E. SHOWING 'DOG RUN' WALL EXPOSED AFTER REMOVAL OF WEST HALF OF HOUSE - Adam Weaver Log House, U.S. Highway 72, Rogersville, Lauderdale County, AL

  3. President Bush: A Friend of Higher Education after All?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul

    2008-01-01

    President Bush's proposals on such topics as toughening accreditation standards and limiting the use of human embryonic stem cells in research may not have made him popular in academe over his two terms. This article reports that the president's willingness to spend federal money on many of colleges' top priorities might improve the perception of…

  4. Bush Administration Looks to Congress to Proceed in Lender Bailout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The Bush administration has called off internal deliberations over a bailout plan for student-loan companies after concluding it did not have the authority to act on its own. Instead, it endorsed a Congressional proposal that would allow the education secretary to purchase loans from private lenders. The decision leaves Congress facing a ticking…

  5. The Bush Administration's Civic Agenda and National Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenkowsky, Leslie

    2003-01-01

    The Bush Administration believes that a modest investment in programs administered by the Corporation for National and Community Service will be an effective way to build the strength of the nonprofit sector and foster the ethic of good citizenship. The administration also believes that federal service programs must be designed to buttress, rather…

  6. Analysis of President Bush's Education Budget Request: Fiscal Year 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New America Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    President George W. Bush submitted his eighth and final budget request to the Congress on Monday. Under the proposal, fiscal year 2009 discretionary spending--spending subject to annual appropriations--would be at the same level as in the prior year for domestic programs and agencies not involved in homeland security efforts. The budget request…

  7. Bush's 2008 Budget: "Robbing Peter to Pay Pell"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    A few days before President Bush officially released his 2008 budget, administration officials announced that it would contain a historic increase in the maximum Pell Grant. The increase in Pell Grants would be paid for by cutting subsidies for student loans, a step that experts predicted could induce lenders to offer fewer benefits to borrowers.…

  8. Antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote: inhibition of muscle contraction and enterotoxin-induced fluid secretion in rabbit small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ogata, N; Shibata, T

    2001-01-01

    Wood creosote has long been used as an antidiarrheal agent, but its mechanism of action is not well understood. To elucidate the mechanism of its antidiarrheal activity, we have addressed questions whether it inhibits fluid secretion induced by Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) in rabbit jejunum in vivo, and whether it inhibits muscle contraction of isolated rabbit ileum ex vivo. Wood creosote (10-100 mg/l) instilled in a ligated loop of jejunum inhibited STa-induced fluid secretion (p < 0.05). It also inhibited the spontaneous phasic, acetylcholine-induced tonic and Ba2+-induced tonic contractions of longitudinal and circular muscles of ileum dose-dependently with IC(50) values of 130-530 mg/l. These data provide further evidence that the antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote is attributable to its antisecretory and antimotility effects.

  9. Comparative study of high voltage bushing designs suitable for apparatus containing cryogenic helium gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, H.; Graber, L.; Kwag, D. S.; Crook, D. G.; Trociewitz, B.

    2013-10-01

    The high voltage bushing forms a critical part of any termination on cables, transformers and other power system devices. Cryogenic entities such as superconducting cables or fault current limiters add more complexity to the design of the bushing. Even more complex are bushings designed for superconducting devices which are cooled by high pressure helium gas. When looking for a bushing suitable for dielectric cable tests in a helium gas cryostat no appropriate device could be found that fulfilled the criterion regarding partial discharge inception voltage level. Therefore we decided to design and manufacture a bushing in-house. In the present work we describe the dielectric tests and operational experience on three types of bushings: One was a modified commercially available ceramics feed through which we adopted for our special need. The second bushing was made of an epoxy resin, with an embedded copper squirrel cage arrangement at the flange, extending down about 30 cm into the cold end of the bushing. This feature reduced the electric field on the surface of the bushing to a negligible value. The third bushing was based on a hollow body consisting of glass fiber reinforced polymer and stainless steel filled with liquid nitrogen. The measurements showed that the dielectric quality of all three bushings exceeded the requirements for the intended purpose. The partial discharge (PD) data from these studies will be used for the design and fabrication of a cable termination for a specialized application on board a US Navy ship.

  10. In vitro effects of wood creosote on enterotoxin-induced secretion measured electrophysiologically in the rat jejunum and colon.

    PubMed

    Kuge, T; Venkova, K; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, B

    2001-06-01

    Secretory diarrhea occurs when the balance between intestinal absorption and secretion is disturbed by excessive secretion caused by enterotoxins produced by the pathogen. Wood creosote has long been used as a traditional antidiarrheal remedy. The goal of our study was to extend our knowledge about the antisecretory action of wood creosote against Escherichia coli enterotoxin-induced secretion in the small intestine and colon. Experiments were performed in mucosal sheets of rat jejunum and colon which were stripped of the external muscle layers to eliminate interactions with smooth muscle activity and local blood flow. Mucosal sheets were placed in modified Ussing chambers and hypersecretory conditions were induced by heat-labile (LT) or heat-stable (STa) E. coli enterotoxins added cumulatively (0.01-10 microg/ml) to the mucosal bathing solution. Intestinal secretion was monitored electrophysiologically as transmucosal short circuit current (Isc). LT induced a concentration-dependent increase in Isc in the rat jejunum, with no effect in the colon. In contrast, STa induced a significant increase in colonic Isc, without causing any change in Isc across the jejunum. In separate experiments the effects of increasing concentrations of wood creosote (0.1-50 microg/ml), added to the mucosal or serosal bathing solution, were examined against the secretory responses induced by LT or STa. In the small intestine the antisecretory activity of wood creosote against LT-induced secretion was more potent following serosal application, whereas in the colon wood creosote inhibited STa-induced secretion with equal potency following either serosal or mucosal addition. In summary, our findings demonstrate that wood creosote possesses antidiarrheal activity suppressing E. coli enterotoxin-induced secretion in both the small intestine and colon.

  11. Distribution and composition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons within experimental microcosms treated with creosote-impregnated Douglas fir pilings

    SciTech Connect

    Bestari, K.T.J.; Solomon, K.R.; Steele, T.S.; Sibley, P.K.; Robinson, R.D.; Day, K.E.

    1998-12-01

    Temporal changes in the concentration and relative composition of 15 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water, sediment, and polyvinylchloride (PVC) strips were assessed to evaluate the fate of creosote leached from impregnated wood pilings in aquatic environments. The study consisted of single microcosms containing one of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 6 creosote-impregnated pilings and two microcosms containing untreated pilings. Quantitative analyses of PAHs were performed using high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with a fluorescence detector. For each treatment, total PAHs ({Sigma} PAH) in water increased rapidly up to 7 d posttreatment yielding a clear dose-dependant concentration gradient ranging from 7.3 to 97.2 {micro}g/L. Total PAHs declined exponentially after 7 d and was reduced close to background concentrations by the end of the study. No increase in {Sigma} PAH was observed in sediments at any treatment, nor was there any relationship between sediment PAHs and distance from each piling cluster. However, a slight increase in PAHs was observed on PVC liner strips that exhibited a concentration gradient similar to that in water. The PVC-bound {Sigma} PAH ranged from 0.3 to 2.4 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} and 0.2 to 2.2 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} at 31 and 58 d posttreatment, respectively. Based on these data, the authors estimated a rate loss of creosote from the pilings of approximately 50 {micro}g/cm{sup 2}/d. The low concentration of PAHs on the PVC, along with the absence of accumulation of PAHs in sediments, suggests that creosote was lost primarily from water via degradative pathways such as photolysis and microbial decomposition and adsorption onto PVC. The rapid loss of creosote from water in conjunction with the slow rate of leaching from the pilings suggests that risks associated with the use of creosote-impregnated pilings in aquatic environments may be minimal.

  12. Wood treating sites: Analysis of PCP and creosote using on-site mobile high hazard laboratory. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Laboratory Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) methods are normally employed to determine pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote contaminant levels in soil samples from hazardous waste sites. Laboratory GC/MS methods can be modified for field (on-site) use to provide timely results while maintaining high data quality. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Response Team (U.S. EPA/ERT), through its Response Engineering and Analytical Contract (REAC), has developed field GC/MS methods to provide timely, reliable, and cost-effective PCP and creosote analyses needed by site managers to guide remediation and removal activities.

  13. Spatial patterns of microbial diversity and activity in an aged creosote-contaminated site

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shinjini; Juottonen, Heli; Siivonen, Pauli; Lloret Quesada, Cosme; Tuomi, Pirjo; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Yrjälä, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of polluted sites via in situ bioremediation relies heavily on the indigenous microbes and their activities. Spatial heterogeneity of microbial populations, contaminants and soil chemical parameters on such sites is a major hurdle in optimizing and implementing an appropriate bioremediation regime. We performed a grid-based sampling of an aged creosote-contaminated site followed by geostatistical modelling to illustrate the spatial patterns of microbial diversity and activity and to relate these patterns to the distribution of pollutants. Spatial distribution of bacterial groups unveiled patterns of niche differentiation regulated by patchy distribution of pollutants and an east-to-west pH gradient at the studied site. Proteobacteria clearly dominated in the hot spots of creosote pollution, whereas the abundance of Actinobacteria, TM7 and Planctomycetes was considerably reduced from the hot spots. The pH preferences of proteobacterial groups dominating in pollution could be recognized by examining the order and family-level responses. Acidobacterial classes came across as generalists in hydrocarbon pollution whose spatial distribution seemed to be regulated solely by the pH gradient. Although the community evenness decreased in the heavily polluted zones, basal respiration and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis rates were higher, indicating the adaptation of specific indigenous microbial populations to hydrocarbon pollution. Combining the information from the kriged maps of microbial and soil chemistry data provided a comprehensive understanding of the long-term impacts of creosote pollution on the subsurface microbial communities. This study also highlighted the prospect of interpreting taxa-specific spatial patterns and applying them as indicators or proxies for monitoring polluted sites. PMID:25105905

  14. Multiple myeloma and engine exhausts, fresh wood, and creosote: a case-referent study

    SciTech Connect

    Flodin, U.; Fredriksson, M.; Persson, B.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of potential risk factors for multiple myeloma was evaluated in a case-referent study encompassing 131 cases and 431 randomized referents, all alive. Information on exposure was obtained with questionnaires mailed to the subjects. An analysis of the material by means of the Miettinen confounder score technique resulted in a few rate ratios significantly exceeding unity--namely, occupational exposure to engine exhausts, creosote, and fresh wood. In view of other studies that suggest ionizing radiation as a risk factor, it was somewhat surprising that low-level gamma radiation from background exposure was less common among the cases than the referents.

  15. Multiple myeloma and engine exhausts, fresh wood, and creosote: a case-referent study.

    PubMed

    Flodin, U; Fredriksson, M; Persson, B

    1987-01-01

    The effect of potential risk factors for multiple myeloma was evaluated in a case-referent study encompassing 131 cases and 431 randomized referents, all alive. Information on exposure was obtained with questionnaires mailed to the subjects. An analysis of the material by means of the Miettinen confounder score technique resulted in a few rate ratios significantly exceeding unity--namely, occupational exposure to engine exhausts, creosote, and fresh wood. In view of other studies that suggest ionizing radiation as a risk factor, it was somewhat surprising that low-level gamma radiation from background exposure was less common among the cases than the referents.

  16. Recognizing the obvious bush should declare the ABM Treaty dead

    SciTech Connect

    1992-02-05

    In televised speech to the Russian people on January 29, Russia`s President Boris Yeltsin called for the United States and Russia to create and jointly operate a global defense system. One day earlier, in his State of the Union address, George Bush affirmed his own commitment to strategic defense, or SDI. Washington and Moscow now both are on record in favor of deploying defenses against missile attacks. Then late last week, Yeltsin at the United Nations reaffirmed his Moscow statement. The common Bush-Yeltsin view is not surprising. Both of their countries face a growing danger of accidental, unauthorized, or irrational attacks from an expanding number of states armed with ballistic missiles.

  17. High voltage insulation of bushing for HTS power equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo-Jin; Choi, Jae-Hyeong; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2012-12-01

    For the operation of high temperature superconducting (HTS) power equipments, it is necessary to develop insulating materials and high voltage (HV) insulation technology at cryogenic temperature of bushing. Liquid nitrogen (LN2) is an attractive dielectric liquid. Also, the polymer insulating materials are expected to be used as solid materials such as glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP), polytetra-fluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon), Silicon (Si) rubber, aromatic polyamide (Nomex), EPDM/Silicon alloy compound (EPDM/Si). In this paper, the surface flashover characteristics of various insulating materials in LN2 are studied. These results are studied at both AC and impulse voltage under a non-uniform field. The use of GFRP and Teflon as insulation body for HTS bushing should be much desirable. Especially, GFRP is excellent material not only surface flashover characteristics but also mechanical characteristics at cryogenic temperature. The surface flashover is most serious problem for the shed design in LN2 and operation of superconducting equipments.

  18. The Bush Doctrine: The Foreign Policy of Republican Empire

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    be other than they are (means). According to Aristotle , prudence is the virtue most characteristic of the statesman. In foreign affairs, prudence...the main issue—as is the case with foreign policy in general—is prudence, which Aristotle described as deliberating well about those things that can...is the rejection of ‘‘ moral equivalency’’ in international affairs. The Bush Doctrine unapologetically asserts the need for—and the possibility of

  19. Tool for installing and aligning camshaft bushings in internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohannesian, M.J.

    1986-10-28

    This patent describes a tool for installing and aligning camshaft bushings in internal combustion engines such that the oil supply bore extending through the wall of each camshaft bushing is aligned with a corresponding oil delivery passage in the engine block. The tool comprises: a shaft and a working head removably attached to one end of the shaft for holding a camshaft bushing. The working head is insertable into the central passage of a cylindrical camshaft bushing and includes positioning means for positioning and securing a camshaft bushing on the working head. The positioning means includes spring-loaded engaging means for engaging the oil supply bore of the camshaft bushing to position and rotationally orient the camshaft bushing on the working head, guide means slidably mounted on the shaft. The guide means includes a cylindrical part for closely fitting in a bushing receiving bore of an internal combustion engine, a positioning shoulder for limiting the penetration of the cylindrical part of the guide means into the bushing receiving bore, and spring-loaded engaging means on the guide means cylindrical part for engaging the oil delivery passage of the engine which extends through the engine block to the bushing receiving bore.

  20. Methanogenic biodegradation of creosote contaminants in natural and simulated ground-water ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godsy, E. Michael; Goerlitz, Donald; Grbic-Galic, Dunja

    1992-01-01

    Wastes from a wood preserving plant in Pensacola, Florida have contaminated the near-surface sand-and-gravel aquifer with creosote-derived compounds and pentachlorophenol. Contamination resulted from the discharge of plant waste waters to and subsequent seepage from unlined surface impoundments that were in direct hydraulic contact with the ground water. Two distinct phases resulted when the creosote and water mixed: a denser than water hydrocarbon phase that moved vertically downward, and an organic-rich aqueous phase that moved laterally with the ground-water flow. The aqueous phase is enriched in organic acids, phenolic compounds, single- and double-ring nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen containing compounds, and single- and double-ring aromatic hydrocarbons. The ground water is devoid of dissolved O2, is 60-70% saturated with CH4 and contains H2S. Field analyses document a greater decrease in concentration of organic fatty acids, benzoic acid, phenol, 2-, 3-, 4-methylphenol, quinoline, isoquinoline, 1(2H)-quinolinone, and 2(1H)-isoquinolinone during downgradient movement in the aquifer than could be explained by dilution and/or dispersion. Laboratory microcosm studies have shown that within the study region, this effect can be attributed to microbial degradation to CH4 and CO2. A small but active methanogenic population was found on sediment materials taken from highly contaminated parts of the aquifer.

  1. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): American Creosote Works, TN. (First Remedial Action), December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-05

    The American Creosote Works (ACW) site is located immediately southwest of Jackson, in central Madison County, Tennessee. ACW conducted wood-preserving operations using both creosote and PCP from the early 1930s until December 1981. Untreated process waste water and potential contaminated storm water runoff were discharged directly into Central Creek until 1973, at which time a levee was constructed to retain surface water runoff. The soil borrow pits used for the levee construction became sludge storage lagoons. A waste water treatment system was installed onsite during 1974 and 1975 and operated until 1981. The selected remedial action for the site includes consolidation and incineration of sludges in the vicinity of the buildings and tanks; on- or offsite incineration of the oils and sludges from the tanks; treatment of tanked process liquids onsite using a sand filter, filter press, and carbon adsorption unit, followed by discharge to a surface stream; decontamination and offsite disposal of site structures; construction of a flood-protection dike; deed restrictions and site fencing; and site stabilization including monitoring onsite water levels behind the dikes and pumping, treating (as needed), and discharging impounded water pending a final remedy.

  2. Creosote-treated wood poles and crossarms: Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, M.E. ); Holcombe, L.; Owens, J.B. )

    1992-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative database on leachable concentrations of cresols (i.e., m-, o- and p-cresol isomers) from a population of creosote-treated utility wood poles and crossarms by application of the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The TCLP was promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in March 1990 (55FR 11798). Data generated in this study indicate that creosote-treated utility poles and crossarms are non-hazardous. Measured concentrations of total cresols and other semi-volatile organic compounds, from wood subjected to TCLP analysis, were an order of magnitude or more below their current Toxicity Characteristic (TC) regulatory levels. The wood analyzed in this study consisted of 54 samples of wood poles and 6 crossarms. Subsamples, removed from full cross sectional slices of poles and crossarms, were prepared according to EPA procedures, subjected to the TCLP, and the resultant leachates analyzed for the presence of cresols and other semi-volatile compounds.

  3. Hepatic neoplasms in the mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus from a creosote-contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelbein, W.K.; Fournie, J.W.; Van Veld, P.A.; Huggett, R.J. )

    1990-09-15

    High prevalences of idiopathic hepatic lesions were found in mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, from a site in the southern branch of the Elizabeth River, VA, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Grossly visible hepatic lesions occurred in a total of 93% of the individuals from this site and 33% of these fish had hepatocellular carcinomas. Hepatic lesions were not detected in fish from two less contaminated sites. Lesions included foci of cellular alteration, hepatocellular adenoma, early and advanced hepatocellular carcinomas, and cholangiocellular proliferative lesions. Advanced carcinomas exhibited several distinct cellular patterns and some livers contained multiple neoplasms occupying up to 80% of the hepatic parenchyma. Sediments from the contaminated site contained extremely high concentrations (2200 mg/kg dry sediment) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are believed to originate from an adjacent wood treatment facility that has used creosote. Concentrations were 730- and 35-fold higher than those at the two other sites. These findings indicate a strong positive association between exposure to creosote-contaminated sediments and the high prevalence of hepatic neoplasms in a feral population of mummichog and support the putative role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fish hepatocarcinogenesis. Additionally, they suggest that the mummichog may be a useful indicator of exposure to carcinogens in aquatic environments.

  4. Creosote-treated wood poles and crossarms: Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, M.E.; Holcombe, L.; Owens, J.B.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative database on leachable concentrations of cresols (i.e., m-, o- and p-cresol isomers) from a population of creosote-treated utility wood poles and crossarms by application of the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The TCLP was promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in March 1990 (55FR 11798). Data generated in this study indicate that creosote-treated utility poles and crossarms are non-hazardous. Measured concentrations of total cresols and other semi-volatile organic compounds, from wood subjected to TCLP analysis, were an order of magnitude or more below their current Toxicity Characteristic (TC) regulatory levels. The wood analyzed in this study consisted of 54 samples of wood poles and 6 crossarms. Subsamples, removed from full cross sectional slices of poles and crossarms, were prepared according to EPA procedures, subjected to the TCLP, and the resultant leachates analyzed for the presence of cresols and other semi-volatile compounds.

  5. Hepatic neoplasms in the mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus from a creosote-contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Vogelbein, W K; Fournie, J W; Van Veld, P A; Huggett, R J

    1990-09-15

    High prevalences of idiopathic hepatic lesions were found in mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, from a site in the southern branch of the Elizabeth River, VA, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Grossly visible hepatic lesions occurred in a total of 93% of the individuals from this site and 33% of these fish had hepatocellular carcinomas. Hepatic lesions were not detected in fish from two less contaminated sites. Lesions included foci of cellular alteration, hepatocellular adenoma, early and advanced hepatocellular carcinomas, and cholangiocellular proliferative lesions. Advanced carcinomas exhibited several distinct cellular patterns and some livers contained multiple neoplasms occupying up to 80% of the hepatic parenchyma. Sediments from the contaminated site contained extremely high concentrations (2200 mg/kg dry sediment) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are believed to originate from an adjacent wood treatment facility that has used creosote. Concentrations were 730- and 35-fold higher than those at the two other sites. These findings indicate a strong positive association between exposure to creosote-contaminated sediments and the high prevalence of hepatic neoplasms in a feral population of mummichog and support the putative role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fish hepatocarcinogenesis. Additionally, they suggest that the mummichog may be a useful indicator of exposure to carcinogens in aquatic environments.

  6. Diversity of fungi in creosote-treated crosstie wastes and their resistance to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ji; Lee, Hwanhwi; Choi, Yong-Seok; Kim, Gyu-Hyeok; Huh, Na-Yoon; Lee, Sangjoon; Lim, Young Woon; Lee, Sung-Suk; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2010-05-01

    This study was conducted to generate information regarding the diversity of fungi inhabiting creosote-treated wood in a storage yard for crosstie wastes in Gwangmyeong, Korea. Additionally, the resistance to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of indigenous fungi that mainly occupy creosote-treated wood was evaluated. We isolated fungi from the surface and inner area of crosstie wastes and identified them using a combination of traditional methods and molecular techniques. Overall, 179 isolates including 47 different species were isolated from 240 sampling sites. The identified fungal species included 23 ascomycetes, 19 basidiomycetes, and 5 zygomycetes. Three species, Alternaria alternata, Irpex lacteus, and Rhizomucor variabilis, were the most frequently isolated ascomycetes, basidiomycetes, and zygomycetes, respectively. The results of this study showed that there was a large difference in the fungal diversity between the surface and the inner area. Additionally, zygomycetes and ascomycetes were found to have a greater tolerance to PAHs than basidiomycetes. However, two basidiomycetes, Heterobasidion annosum and Schizophyllum commune, showed very high resistance to PAHs, even in response to the highest concentration (1,000 ppm), which indicates that these species may play a role in the degradation of PAHs.

  7. Exposure to creosote in the impregnation and handling of impregnated wood.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, P R; Hämeilä, M; Pyy, L; Raunu, P

    1987-10-01

    The major components of vapors and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particulate matter were identified and quantified in two creosote impregnation plants and in the handling of treated wood. The vapors were collected on XAD-2 resin (recovery in the range of 82-102%) and analyzed by gas chromatography. Particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were collected on glass fiber filters and analyzed with high-pressure liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector. The main components of the vapors were naphthalene, methyl naphthalenes, indene, phenol, and its methyl homologues, benzothiophene, diphenyl, acenaphthene and fluorene. The exposure of the workers to vapors varied between 0.1 and 11 mg/m3. The concentrations of particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons varied between 0.2 and 46 micrograms/m3. The benzo(a)pyrene concentration was under 0.03 micrograms/m3, except in manual metal-arc welding and in the boring of railroad ties, where it was 0.24-0.89 micrograms/m3. In the measurement of creosote vapors, naphthalene could be used as an indicator agent.

  8. VOCs and PAHs emissions from creosote-treated wood in a field storage area.

    PubMed

    Gallego, E; Roca, F J; Perales, J F; Guardino, X; Berenguer, M J

    2008-08-25

    In this study, the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, in this case aromatic hydrocarbons containing one benzene ring and furans) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from wood recently treated with creosote are examined. The VOCs and PAHs were identified and quantified in the gas phase. Additionally, the PAHs were quantified in the particulate phase. Glass multi-sorbent tubes (Carbotrap, Carbopack X, Carboxen-569) were used to hold the VOCs. The analysis was performed using automatic thermal desorption (ATD) coupled with capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). PAHs vapours were collected on XAD-2 resin, and particulate matter was collected on glass fibre filters. The PAHs were analysed using GC/MS. The main components of the vapours released from the creosote-treated wood were naphthalene, toluene, m+p-xylene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene, isopropylbenzene, benzene and 2-methylnaphthalene. VOCs emission concentrations ranged from 35 mg m(-3) of air on the day of treatment to 5 mg m(-3) eight days later. PAHs emission concentrations ranged from 28 microg m(-3) of air on the day of treatment to 4 microg m(-3) eight days later. The air concentrations of PAHs in particulate matter were composed predominantly of benzo[b+j]fluoranthene, benzo[a]anthracene, chrysene, fluoranthene, benzo[e]pyrene and 1-methylnaphthalene. The emission concentrations of particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons varied between 0.2 and 43.5 ng m(-3). Finally, the emission factors of VOCs and PAHs were determined.

  9. Surfactant influence on PAH biodegradation in a creosote-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Deschenes, L.; Lafrance, P.; Villeneuve, J.P.; Samson, R.

    1995-12-31

    This study consisted of assessing the biodegradation of 13 of the 16 US Environmental Protection Agency priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a creosote-contaminated soil, using both biological and chemical surfactants. The assumption was that surfactants may enhance the mobilization of the hydrophobic PAHs, and possibly their biodegradation. The rhamnolipid biosurfactants were produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa UG2. The chemical surfactant was sodium dodecyl sulfate. Over a period of 45 weeks, PAHs were periodically extracted from soil and quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results showed that, at three studied concentrations, surfactant addition did not enhance PAH biodegradation in the creosote-contaminated soil. Furthermore, for the four-ring PAHs, surfactant presence seemed harmful to the biodegradation process, the residual concentrations of each studied PAH decreasing more slowly than those found in the untreated soil. Moreover, this effect increased as a function of surfactant concentration. The negative effect was less evident with biosurfactants than for the chemical surfactant. The high-molecular-weight PAHs were not degraded by the indigenous microorganisms. For the PAHs in general, the higher the molecular weight, the more recalcitrant was the contaminant. It is suggested that the surfactants were used as a preferential substrate by the indigenous microflora, which may have interfered with the biodegradation of the PAHs.

  10. DELTA-13C VALUES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAHS) COLLECTED FROM TWO CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groundwater samples were collected from the American Creosote Works (ACW) Superfund site in Pensacola, Florida in June and September 1994. Sampling wells were located along a transect leading away from the most contaminated area. PAHs were extracted from the groundwater samples w...

  11. Potentiation of 2,6-dinitrotoluene genotoxicity in Fischer 344 rats by pretreatment with coal tar creosote.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, R W; George, S E; Kohan, M J; Williams, R W; Allison, J C; Talley, D L; Hayes, Y O; Chang, J

    1995-03-01

    Pretreatment of male Fischer 344 rats for 5 wk with coal tar creosote, a coal distillation product that is widely used as a wood preservative, potentiated the excretion of urinary mutagens in 2,6-dinitrotoluene (DNT) treated rats. Creosote increased the bioactivation of DNT to significantly greater levels of urinary genotoxic metabolites and/or formed DNA adducts in the liver. A significant increase in the excretion of mutagenic DNT metabolites was observed after the first week of creosote treatment, peaked at wk 3, and then decreased by 33% after 5 wk of treatment. Nevertheless, there was a significant increase (66%) in the formation of DNT-derived DNA adducts in the livers of rats treated with DNT plus creosote at wk 5. Increased cecal beta-glucuronidase activity and reduced small intestinal nitroreductase activity may play roles in the bioactivation of DNT. The excretion of mutagenic DNT metabolites supplies useful information about the bioactivation of DNT; it does not provide a useful index of DNT-derived hepatic DNA adduct formation. Such interactions could be important to predictive risk assessment because the overall cancer risk of such chemical mixtures may exceed the sum of the component risks.

  12. Risks to human health and estuarine ecology posed by pulling out creosote-treated timber on oyster farms.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul T

    2008-01-31

    Five oyster farms in Port Stephens, Australia were studied to identify consequences of using creosote-treated posts and the risks posed by removing the posts. Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to measure polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and phenols in sediments, timber, water and oyster tissue. Before posts were removed, the total PAHs in surface sediment on farms was 24.1 mgkg(-1) dry weight. This increased to 45.5 mgkg(-1) dry weight after the posts were pulled out and remained significantly higher 6 months later at 59.7 mgkg(-1) dry weight. A similar increase was found in deeper sediments. The sediment attached to creosote-treated posts had a total concentration of PAHs of 484-2642 mgkg(-1) dry weight, while the corresponding value for the sediment on tar-treated posts was only 30.7 mgkg(-1) dry weight. The surface timber of creosote-treated posts had high levels of PAHs and an average post contained 43 g of PAHs. The total PAHs dispersed to the environment when a creosote-treated post was pulled out was at least 0.67 g. The main species were PAHs with low-molecular weights: fluoranthene, phenanthrene, pyrene, acenaphthylene and chrysene. Benzo(a)pyrene represented 1-10% of PAHs in most samples. Bioassays with creosote-contaminated sediment revealed that Sydney rock oysters (Saccostrea glomerate) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) accumulated PAHs at (mgkg(-1) wet tissue weight): 11.3-15.3 and 35.5-47.9, respectively, when exposed for 5 days to water with < 1 microgl(-1) PAHs. Wild oysters growing on creosote-treated posts had high levels of phenols (0.09-6.92 mgkg(-1) wet weight) and PAHs (0.59-1.01 mgkg(-1) wet weight). The dilemma posed by removing creosote-treated posts and dispersing carcinogenic, bioavailable contaminants needs to be managed in light of risks to human health and estuarine ecology.

  13. Loading capability of HVDC transformer bushings with restricted oil circulation for use in HVDC valve halls

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, L.; Magnuson, B. ); Riffon, P. )

    1993-07-01

    The loading capability of a 500 kV HVDC transformer bushing is calculated with some unusual conditions: the internal oil circulation in the bushing is blocked at the flange level and the ambient air temperature is raised to 60 C. The theoretical model was verified with a full-scale heat run test on a 7.8 m long bushing. A 220 m[sup 3] insulated test chamber was required to enclose the test set-up.

  14. Seismic isolation technique for extra tall bushing of GIS using a pendulum type counterweight

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Tomisawa, Masao; Murase, Seiichi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of the authors` investigation here is to adopt the seismic isolation technique by using a pendulum type counterweight as a new approach for seismic qualification of the extra tall bushing of Gas-Insulated-Substations. It has been definitely shown by the results of numerical simulation of this isolation type bushing that the stress of the lower end of bushing can be effectively reduced to about 50% as compared with non-isolated case.

  15. Ambient temperature influences tolerance to plant secondary compounds in a mammalian herbivore

    PubMed Central

    Kurnath, P.; Merz, N. D.; Dearing, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that plant secondary compounds (PSCs) ingested by mammals become more toxic at elevated ambient temperatures, a phenomenon known as temperature-dependent toxicity. We investigated temperature-dependent toxicity in the desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida), a herbivorous rodent that naturally encounters PSCs in creosote bush (Larrea tridentata), which is a major component of its diet. First, we determined the maximum dose of creosote resin ingested by woodrats at warm (28–29°C) or cool (21–22°C) temperatures. Second, we controlled the daily dose of creosote resin ingested at warm, cool and room (25°C) temperatures, and measured persistence in feeding trials. At the warm temperature, woodrats ingested significantly less creosote resin; their maximum dose was two-thirds that of animals at the cool temperature. Moreover, woodrats at warm and room temperatures could not persist on the same dose of creosote resin as woodrats at the cool temperature. Our findings demonstrate that warmer temperatures reduce PSC intake and tolerance in herbivorous rodents, highlighting the potentially adverse consequences of temperature-dependent toxicity. These results will advance the field of herbivore ecology and may hone predictions of mammalian responses to climate change. PMID:26763703

  16. Bushing retention system for thermal medium cooling delivery tubes in a gas turbine rotor

    DOEpatents

    Mashey, Thomas Charles

    2002-01-01

    Bushings are provided in counterbores for wheels and spacers for supporting thermal medium cooling tubes extending axially adjacent the rim of the gas turbine rotor. The retention system includes a retaining ring disposed in a groove adjacent an end face of the bushing and which retaining ring projects radially inwardly to prevent axial movement of the bushing in one direction. The retention ring has a plurality of circumferentially spaced tabs along its inner diameter whereby the ring is supported by the lands of the tube maintaining its bushing retention function, notwithstanding operation in high centrifugal fields and rotation of the ring in the groove into other circular orientations.

  17. Laboratory tests to evaluate HVDC wall bushing performance in wet weather

    SciTech Connect

    Lambeth, P.J.

    1990-10-01

    Two test methods have been developed to simulate the conditions causing flashover of DC wall bushings at working voltage. One is based on the clean fog pollution test. The other is a rain test, with part of the bushing unwetted. The effect of varying test parameters has been measured and five variants of the rain test have been adopted for measuring the performance of a wall bushing. Its performance compared unfavorably with that of an empty porcelain shell. Various numbers of booster sheds, (removable silicone-rubber cones fitted round the bushing) have been found to improve its performance substantially.

  18. Field Sampling and Modeling of Creosote-Derived Contamination in a Tdally Forced Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, C.

    2003-12-01

    We are investigating the fate and transport of a creosote-derived groundwater contaminant plume found in an aquifer adjacent to and beneath a large, tidally forced river. The site, located in Coquitlam, BC, is adjacent to the Fraser River, and has been an active wood preserving facility since the 1920's. In the on-shore source zone, creosote has penetrated into the aquifer and a dissolved-phase plume, composed primarily of naphthalene, flows in the site aquifer from the source zone towards and below the river, eventually discharging from the river bottom. A capture well has been operated since 1996 to contain and capture the contaminant source. Previous research at this site has documented that biodegradation of naphthalene takes place in the plume fringe in the region of the aquifer that is beneath the river, but not onshore. Abundant methane and ferrous iron in the aquifer suggests that iron reduction and methanogenesis are the dominant terminal electron accepting processes. High offshore naphthalene concentrations sampled in 1999 despite three years of source containment and degradation led to the hypothesis that the plume may be at steady state due to buffering of contaminant concentrations by desorption from aquifer sediments. Naphthalene concentrations sampled in this study show that the contaminant plume is not at steady state. Results of groundwater flow modelling and sorption data show that the continued presence of high concentrations of naphthalene offshore are likely due to incomplete source containment or to slow migration of contaminants from upgradient regions of the aqueous plume. Although naphthalene has been the focus of all previous investigations of the offshore plume at this site, recent sampling shows that two other components of creosote, indane and benzothiophene, become the dominant components of the aqueous phase plume as it approaches the discharge point. Significant concentrations of these contaminants are likely discharging to the river

  19. EPA Proposes to Add Washington Parish, LA, Creosote Site to National Priorities List of Superfund Sites, Two hazardous waste sites added, six proposed nationally

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (DALLAS - March 24, 2015) The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed to add the Colonial Creosote site in Washington Parish, LA, to the National Priorities List (NPL) of Superfund sites, a list of sites that pose risks to people's health and

  20. TREATMENT OF A PENTACHLOROPHENOL AND CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL USING THE LIGNIN-DEGRADING FUNGUS PHANERO- CHAETE SORDIDA: A FIELD DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of large-scale fungal bioaugmentation was evaluated by assessing the ability of the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete sordida to decrease the soil concentrations of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and 13 priority pollutant polynuclear aromatic (PNA) creosote component...

  1. The presence of the mutagenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons benzo[a]pyrene and benz[a]anthracene in creosote P1.

    PubMed

    Bos, R P; Theuws, J L; Leijdekkers, C M; Henderson, P T

    1984-06-01

    Several fractions of creosote P1 separated by TLC showed mutagenicity towards Salmonella typhimurium TA98. Thus mutagenicity is probably caused by the presence of mutagenic aromatic hydrocarbons. The mutagenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, benzo[a]pyrene and benz[a]anthracene, were detected in concentrations of 0.18 and 1.1% respectively. Because these compounds are probably not essential for the wood-preserving properties of creosote , a more selective composition of the product should be considered.

  2. Spatial uncoupling of biodegradation, soil respiration, and PAH concentration in a creosote contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Göran; Törneman, Niklas; Yang, Xiuhong

    2010-09-01

    Hotspots and coldspots of concentration and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) marginally overlapped at the 0.5-100 m scale in a creosote contaminated soil in southern Sweden, suggesting that concentration and biodegradation had little spatial co-variation. Biodegradation was substantial and its spatial variability considerable and highly irregular, but it had no spatial autocorrelation. The soil concentration of PAHs explained only 20-30% of the variance of their biodegradation. Soil respiration was spatially autocorrelated. The spatial uncoupling between biodegradation and soil respiration seemed to be governed by the aging of PAHs in the soil, since biodegradation of added 13C phenanthrene covaried with both soil respiration and microbial biomass. The latter two were also correlated with high concentrations of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) that are common in gram-negative bacteria. However, several of the hotspots of biodegradation coincided with hotspots for the distribution of a PLFA indicative of fungal biomass.

  3. Multiple-dose escalation, safety, and tolerability study of wood creosote, the principal active ingredient of seirogan, an herbal antidiarrheal medication, in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kuge, Tomoo; Shibata, Takashi; Willett, Michael S

    2003-03-01

    Seirogan, an herbal medicine containing wood creosote (CAS 8021-39-4), a mixture of simple phenolic compounds, has been marketed for the past century in Asia for the treatment of acute diarrhea and associated symptoms, such as abdominal discomfort and cramping. The present study was designed to assess the safety and tolerability of an anticipated acute antidiarrheal dosing regimen. Sixty healthy males were randomized into five groups of 12 subjects each (9 wood creosote; 3 placebo) to receive 45-, 90-, 135-, 180-, and 225-mg tablets every 2 hours for five doses. Serial sitting and standing vital signs, ECG rhythm strips, and continuous telemetry monitoring were obtained predose and for 24 hours after the first dose. Clinical laboratory tests and 12-lead resting ECGs were obtained predose and 24 hours postdose. Of the subjects, 27% (12/45) receiving wood creosote and 27% (4/15) receiving placebo reported adverse events. The most common adverse events were altered taste and somnolence, reported more often with 180- and 225-mg doses. Wood creosote had no clinically significant effects on vital signs, ECG intervals or interpretations, or clinical laboratory tests. No clinically significant or serious dysrhythmias were reported on continuous telemetry monitoring. It was concluded that oral doses of wood creosote 45 to 225 mg every 2 hours for up to five doses were safe and well tolerated in 45 healthy subjects. Wood creosote doses ranging from 45 to 135 mg per dose, which are commonly administered antidiarrheal doses in Asia, were associated with minimal side effects.

  4. Vibration monitoring via nano-composite piezoelectric foam bushings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Evan T.; Merrell, A. Jake; Anderson, Brady K.; Newton, Cory N.; Rosquist, Parker G.; Fullwood, David T.; Bowden, Anton E.; Seeley, Matthew K.

    2016-11-01

    Most mechanical systems produce vibrations as an inherent side effect of operation. Though some vibrations are acceptable in operation, others can cause damage or signal a machine’s imminent failure. These vibrations would optimally be monitored in real-time, without human supervision to prevent failure and excessive wear in machinery. This paper explores a new alternative to currently-used machine-monitoring equipment, namely a piezoelectric foam sensor system. These sensors are made of a silicone-based foam embedded with nano- and micro-scale conductive particles. Upon impact, they emit an electric response that is directly correlated with impact energy, with no electrical power input. In the present work, we investigated their utility as self-sensing bushings on machinery. These sensors were found to accurately detect both the amplitude and frequency of typical machine vibrations. The bushings could potentially save time and money over other vibration sensing mechanisms, while simultaneously providing a potential control input that could be utilized for correcting vibrational imbalance.

  5. Environmental geophysics, offshore Bush River Peninsula, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.F.; Kuecher, G.J.; Davies, B.E.

    1995-11-01

    Geophysical studies in shallow waters adjacent to the Bush River Peninsula, Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, have delineated the extent of waste disposal sites and established a hydrogeologic framework, which may control contaminant transport offshore. These studies indicate that during the Pleistocene Epoch, alternating stands of high and low sea levels resulted in a complex pattern of shallow channel-fill deposits around the Bush River Peninsula. Ground-penetrating radar studies reveal paleochannels greater than 50 ft deep. Some of the paleochannels are also imaged with marine seismic reflection. Conductivity highs measured with the EM-31 are also indicative of paleochannels. This paleochannel depositional system is environmentally significant because it may control the shallow groundwater flow regime beneath the peninsula. Magnetic, conductivity, and side-scan sonar anomalies outline anthropogenic anomalies in the study area. On the basis of geophysical data, underwater anthropogenic materials do exist in some isolated areas, but large-scale offshore dumping has not occurred in the area studied.

  6. Assessing the Debt: George W. Bush's Legacy and the Future of Public Education under Barack Obama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Means, Alex; Taylor, Kendall

    2010-01-01

    This article utilizes Gloria Ladson-Billings' notion of educational debt in order to explore the historical, economic, and cultural politics of education reform under George W. Bush and Barack Obama. It tracks the No Child Left Behind Act across a number of fields in order to claim that Bush's expansion of the educational debt should be understood…

  7. President Bush's Pre-War Rhetoric on Iraq: Paranoid Style in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolaev, Alexander G.; Porpora, Douglas V.

    2006-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the war rhetoric of the Bush administration as reflected in the speeches of President Bush. What was explored is how presidential speeches drew on a variety of rhetorical techniques, from role-taking and punctuation to the adoption of the paranoid style. The purpose of these techniques is to nullify voices of…

  8. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): American Creosote Works, Inc. , Pensacola, Florida, September 1985. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-30

    The American Creosote Works, Inc. (ACW) site occupies approximately 12 acres in a moderately dense, commercial and residential district of Pensacola, Florida. Wood-preserving operations were carried out at the ACW site from 1902 until December, 1981. Prior to 1950, creosote was exclusively used to treat poles. Use of pentachlorophenol (PCP) started in 1950 and steadily increased in the later years of the ACW operations. During its operations, liquid-process wastes were discharged into the two unlined, onsite surface impoundments. Prior to 1970, waste waters in these ponds were allowed to overflow through a spillway and follow a drainage course into Bayou Chico and Pensacola Bay. In subsequent years, waste waters were periodically drawn off the ponds and discharged into designated spillage areas on site. Additional discharges occurred during periods of heavy rainfall and flooding, when the ponds overflowed the containment dikes.

  9. Bioaccumulation of PAHs from creosote-contaminated sediment in a laboratory-exposed freshwater oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Hyötyläinen, Tarja; Oikari, Aimo

    2004-10-01

    The oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, was used for a bioaccumulation assay in the creosote-contaminated sediment of Lake Jämsänvesi in a 28-day experiment. The PAH concentrations of the whole body tissue of worms, sediments and water samples were determinated by GC-MS. Chemical analyses showed that benzo(k)fluoranthene, anthracene and fluorene were the main PAH compounds present in the tissue of oligochaetes, just as in the sediment. The biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) of the individual PAHs varied from 1.2 to 5.7. It is concluded that oligochaetes have a marked ability to accumulate and retain PAHs from creosote-contaminated sediment.

  10. Public health assessment for United Creosoting Company, Conroe, Montgomery County, Texas, Region 6. CERCLIS No. TXD980745574. Addendum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-17

    The United Creosoting National Priorities (NPL) list site is on Hilbig Road at Second Street, in Conroe, Montgomery County, Texas. The site was used for production of pressure treated creosoted wood products from 1946 until 1972. ATSDR completed a health assessment for the site in January 1986. The addendum to the health assessment evaluates the 1984 and 1985 environmental sampling data in more detail and also evaluates additional environmental sampling data collected in 1990. Contaminated soils and ground water have been detected both in industrial and residential portions of the original site vicinity. The primary contaminants of concern are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pentachlorophenol, and chlorinated dibenzo-dioxins/dibenzofurans (CDD/CDFs). The populations at greatest risk of exposure are workers involved with remediation activities and residents of Tanglewood East subdivision. Exposures to contaminated soil through skin contact and ingestion may have occurred in the past.

  11. Bush Encroachment Mapping for Africa - Multi-Scale Analysis with Remote Sensing and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graw, V. A. M.; Oldenburg, C.; Dubovyk, O.

    2015-12-01

    Bush encroachment describes a global problem which is especially facing the savanna ecosystem in Africa. Livestock is directly affected by decreasing grasslands and inedible invasive species which defines the process of bush encroachment. For many small scale farmers in developing countries livestock represents a type of insurance in times of crop failure or drought. Among that bush encroachment is also a problem for crop production. Studies on the mapping of bush encroachment so far focus on small scales using high-resolution data and rarely provide information beyond the national level. Therefore a process chain was developed using a multi-scale approach to detect bush encroachment for whole Africa. The bush encroachment map is calibrated with ground truth data provided by experts in Southern, Eastern and Western Africa. By up-scaling location specific information on different levels of remote sensing imagery - 30m with Landsat images and 250m with MODIS data - a map is created showing potential and actual areas of bush encroachment on the African continent and thereby provides an innovative approach to map bush encroachment on the regional scale. A classification approach links location data based on GPS information from experts to the respective pixel in the remote sensing imagery. Supervised classification is used while actual bush encroachment information represents the training samples for the up-scaling. The classification technique is based on Random Forests and regression trees, a machine learning classification approach. Working on multiple scales and with the help of field data an innovative approach can be presented showing areas affected by bush encroachment on the African continent. This information can help to prevent further grassland decrease and identify those regions where land management strategies are of high importance to sustain livestock keeping and thereby also secure livelihoods in rural areas.

  12. Performance monitoring of advanced technology wood stoves: Field testing for fuel savings, creosote buildup and emissions: Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    This report presents the results of a two-year study in Vermont and New York monitoring woodstove performance. The objective of the study was to determine the effectiveness of catalytic and non-catalytic low-emission woodstove technology in reducing wood use, creosote and particulate emissions. Measurements of wood use and creosote accumulation in chimney systems were made in a total of 68 homes over a period of two heating seasons. Forty-two of these homes were equipped with instrumentation to measure particulate emissions and directly-measured wood use. Catalytic woodstoves, catalytic add-on/retrofit devices and non-catalytic low-emission stoves were provided by various woodstove manufacturers for use by volunteer homeowners during the study period. Conventional technology stoves were also included to provide baseline data. Averaged results indicate that the low-emission non-catalytic stoves and catalytic stoves had lower creosote accumulation, wood use, and particulate emissions than the conventional technology stoves, although the range of values was quite large. The reductions in particulate emissions by the catalytic and low-emission stoves were not as great as could be expected based on laboratory testing. The large number of variables affecting stove performance in ''real world'' conditions make identifying causative factors difficult. Additional analysis of data and further testing are currently planned. 5 refs., 61 figs., 23 tabs.

  13. Development of a remote bushing for actinide vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, R.F.; Ramsey, W.G.; Johnson, F.M.

    1996-12-31

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) are combining their existing experience in handling highly radioactive, special nuclear materials with commercial glass fiberization technology in order to assemble a small vitrification system for radioactive actinide solutions. The vitrification system or {open_quotes}brushing{close_quotes}, is fabricated from platinum-rhodium alloy and is based on early marble remelt fiberization technology. Advantages of this unique system include its relatively small size, reliable operation, geometrical safety (nuclear criticality), and high temperature capability. The bushing design should be capable of vitrifying a number of the actinide nuclear materials, including solutions of americium/curium, neptunium, and possibly plutonium. State of the art, mathematical and oil model studies are being combined with basic engineering evaluations to verify and improve the thermal and mechanical design concepts.

  14. Big data integration shows Australian bush-fire frequency is increasing significantly.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Ritaban; Das, Aruneema; Aryal, Jagannath

    2016-02-01

    Increasing Australian bush-fire frequencies over the last decade has indicated a major climatic change in coming future. Understanding such climatic change for Australian bush-fire is limited and there is an urgent need of scientific research, which is capable enough to contribute to Australian society. Frequency of bush-fire carries information on spatial, temporal and climatic aspects of bush-fire events and provides contextual information to model various climate data for accurately predicting future bush-fire hot spots. In this study, we develop an ensemble method based on a two-layered machine learning model to establish relationship between fire incidence and climatic data. In a 336 week data trial, we demonstrate that the model provides highly accurate bush-fire incidence hot-spot estimation (91% global accuracy) from the weekly climatic surfaces. Our analysis also indicates that Australian weekly bush-fire frequencies increased by 40% over the last 5 years, particularly during summer months, implicating a serious climatic shift.

  15. Big data integration shows Australian bush-fire frequency is increasing significantly

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Ritaban; Das, Aruneema; Aryal, Jagannath

    2016-01-01

    Increasing Australian bush-fire frequencies over the last decade has indicated a major climatic change in coming future. Understanding such climatic change for Australian bush-fire is limited and there is an urgent need of scientific research, which is capable enough to contribute to Australian society. Frequency of bush-fire carries information on spatial, temporal and climatic aspects of bush-fire events and provides contextual information to model various climate data for accurately predicting future bush-fire hot spots. In this study, we develop an ensemble method based on a two-layered machine learning model to establish relationship between fire incidence and climatic data. In a 336 week data trial, we demonstrate that the model provides highly accurate bush-fire incidence hot-spot estimation (91% global accuracy) from the weekly climatic surfaces. Our analysis also indicates that Australian weekly bush-fire frequencies increased by 40% over the last 5 years, particularly during summer months, implicating a serious climatic shift. PMID:26998312

  16. Low-Cost Production of Composite Bushings for Jet Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of this research program were to reduce the manufacturing costs of variable stator vane bushings by 1) eliminating the expensive carbon fiber braiding operation, 2) replacing the batch mode impregnation, B-stage, and cutting operations with a continuous process, and 3) reducing the molding cycle and machining operations with injection molding to achieve near-net shapes. Braided bushings were successfully fabricated with both AMB-17XLD and AMB-TPD resin systems. The composite bushings achieved high glass transition temperature after post-cure (+300 C) and comparable weight loss to the PNM-15 bushings. ANM-17XLD bushings made with "batch-mode" molding compound (at 0.5 in. fiber length) achieved a +300 lb-force flange break strength which was superior to the continuous braided-fiber reinforced bushing. The non-MDA resin technology developed in this contract appears attractive for bushing applications that do not exceed a 300 C use temperature. Two thermoplastic polyimide resins were synthesized in order to generate injection molding compound powders. Excellent processing results were obtained at injection temperatures in excess of 300 C. Micro-tensile specimens were produced from each resin type and the Tg measurements (by TMA) for these samples were equivalent to AURUM(R). Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) conducted at 10 C/min showed that the non-MDA AMB-type polyimide thermoplastics had comparable weight loss to PMR-15 up to 500 C.

  17. Migration and natural fate of a coal tar creosote plume. 2. Mass balance and biodegradation indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Mark W. G.; Barker, James F.; Devlin, John F.; Butler, Barbara J.

    1999-10-01

    A source of coal tar creosote was emplaced below the water table at CFB Borden to investigate natural attenuation processes for complex biodegradable mixtures. A mass balance indicated that ongoing transformation occurred for seven study compounds. Phenol migrated as a discrete slug plume and almost completely disappeared after 2 years, after being completely leached from the source early in the study. The m-xylene plume migrated outward to a maximum distance at approximately 2 years, and then receded back towards the source as the rate of mass flux out of the source decreased to below the overall rate of plume transformation. Carbazole showed similar behaviour, although the reversal in plume development occurred more slowly. The dibenzofuran plume remained relatively constant in extent and mass over the last 2 years of monitoring, despite constant source input over this period, providing evidence that the dibenzofuran plume was at steady state. Meanwhile, the naphthalene and 1-methylnaphthalene plumes continued to advance and increase in mass over the observation period, although at a decreasing rate. The phenanthrene plume was also subject to transformation, although measurement of the rate was less conclusive due to the higher proportion of sorbed mass for this compound. Three lines of evidence are presented to evaluate whether the observed plume mass loss was due to microbial biodegradation. Measurement of redox-sensitive parameters in the vicinity of the plume showed the types of changes that would be expected to occur due to plume biodegradation: dissolved oxygen and SO 42- decreased in groundwater within the plume while significant increases were noted for Fe 2+, Mn 2+ and methane. Further evidence that plume mass loss was microbially-mediated was provided by the accumulation of aromatic acids within the plume. Measurements of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) in aquifer material indicated that microbial biomass and turnover rate were greater within the plume

  18. Digital Image Analysis of Flowering in the Repeat-Blooming Creosotebush (Larrea tridentata) in Relation to Climatic Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benton, L. M.; Kurc, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that phenology (seasonal timing of life cycle events) is an effective integrator of the impacts of climate change on natural systems. Thus, understanding the climate signals that activate plant phenological responses (e.g., flowering and leaf production) will allow for improved modeling efforts and more effective ecosystem management strategies to mitigate the effects of climate change. With warmer and drier weather patterns predicted for the Desert Southwest in the coming century it can be expected that plant phenological patterns will be altered as a result. The most dominant and widespread shrub species of the warm desert ecosystems of North America is the creosotebush (Larrea tridentata). Consequently, creosotebush has a major impact on the structure, functioning, and flow of resources (i.e., carbon, water, and energy) in these regions, and when in bloom serves as an abundant and reliable food source for hundreds of pollinating insects that synchronize their emergence with flowering time. In this study, we hypothesize that frequency, duration and abundance of flowers in the repeat-blooming creosotebush are regulated by (1) temperature during the spring and (2) soil moisture below the depth of atmospheric demand in the summer. We make use of daily digital images from three stations at the Santa Rita Experimental Range in southern Arizona. These stations are located within the footprint of an eddy covariance tower, where continuous records of precipitation, air temperature, soil temperature, soil moisture at various depths, and net radiation are also being collected. Unlike more discrete methods used to observe seasonal changes in vegetation, use of daily images results in a continuous record that can be directly compared to micrometeorological data, allowing us to evaluate the bloom-up response of creosotebush alongside (1) air temperature, (2) soil temperature, and (3) soil water content fluctuations across time. We show that this

  19. Rain and contamination tests on HVDC wall bushings with and without RTV coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, H.M. ); Hall, J.F. ); Nellis, C.L. ); Low, S.S. ); Lorden, D.J. )

    1991-07-01

    In this paper results of tests made to determine the ability of room temperature vulcanized (RTV) silicone rubber coatings to improve the performance of HVDC wall bushings are described. The behavior of uncoated full scale {plus minus} 500 kV wall bushings is first determined in wetting conditions consisting of nonuniform rain and fog with various amounts of pre-deposited surface contamination. Parameters affecting flashover performance, such as polarity, rain conductivity, and contamination severity are discussed. Results of nonuniform rain tests on an RTV coated wall bushing are reported.

  20. Further studies of anomalous phenomena in dielectric-loss measurements -- Transformer bushings model

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, R.; Manifase, S.

    1995-04-01

    The results of ac dielectric-loss measurements on bushings mounted in certain three-phase transformers, if not performed in accordance with the prescribed procedure, can deviate significantly from the correct values. An investigation of the incorrect procedure has shown that the capacitive couplings between adjacent windings and the lower portion of the bushings influenced the results such that dielectric losses were elevated to several times their normal values. Experience has shown that bushing test results on all three phases form a pattern in cases where this phenomena is evident. Results of investigative field measurements showing this phenomena are presented, and an explanation of its origin is given.

  1. A Study on the Body Insulators for the Bushing for HTS Devices at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. J.; Shin, H. S.; Kim, S. H.

    A bushing for high temperature superconducting devices (HTS bushing) is important because of applying high voltage to the cable or the winding of the transformer. It is cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2) and is insulated with various insulators. For the development of the HTS bushing, it is necessary to know the fundamental characteristics of various insulators at cryogenic temperature. The electrical characteristics of the breakdown were studied under AC and impulse voltages. Also, the mechanical characteristics such as tensile strength in air and LN2 were studied. It was confirmed that GFRP is excellent not only electrical characteristics but also mechanical characteristics in LN2.

  2. Comprehensive composition of Creosote using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOFMS).

    PubMed

    Gallacher, Christopher; Thomas, Russell; Taylor, Christopher; Lord, Richard; Kalin, Robert M

    2017-03-13

    Creosote is a distillation product of coal tar and is widely used as wood preservative for railway sleepers, utility poles and for other applications. Creosote can have potentially negative effects on the environment and many of the components are toxic. This study presents the analysis of a Creosote sample from a former wood impregnation plant located in the UK. The sample was analysed using two dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOFMS) and a database of compounds that could be detected was produced. The GCxGG-TOFMS was capable of detecting 1505 individual compounds, which is far more than previous estimates for the number of compounds present within Creosote. Post extraction derivatization using BTSFA with 1% TMCS was employed to increase the potential number of compounds detected with 255 derivatized compounds detected, 231 of which would not have been detected without prior derivatization. Selected derivatized compounds were quantified with limits of detection ranging from 0.6 mg/kg to 1.6 mg/kg from a concentrated dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). This work presents the first published full analysis of a Creosote using GCxGC-TOFMS combined with derivatization.

  3. Simultaneous biodegradation of creosote-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a pyrene-degrading Mycobacterium.

    PubMed

    López, Zaira; Vila, Joaquim; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio; Grifoll, Magdalena

    2008-02-01

    When incubated with a creosote-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) mixture, the pyrene-degrading strain Mycobacterium sp. AP1 acted on three- and four-ring components, causing the simultaneous depletion of 25% of the total PAHs in 30 days. The kinetics of disappearance of individual PAHs was consistent with differences in aqueous solubility. During the incubation, a number of acid metabolites indicative of distinctive reactions carried out by high-molecular-weight PAH-degrading mycobacteria accumulated in the medium. Most of these metabolites were dicarboxylic aromatic acids formed as a result of the utilization of growth substrates (phenanthrene, pyrene, or fluoranthene) by multibranched pathways including meta- and ortho-ring-cleavage reactions: phthalic acid, naphthalene-1,8-dicarboxylic acid, phenanthrene-4,5-dicarboxylic acid, diphenic acid, Z-9-carboxymethylenefluorene-1-carboxylic acid, and 6,6'-dihydroxy-2,2'-biphenyl dicarboxylic acid. Others were dead-end products resulting from cometabolic oxidations on nongrowth substrates (fluorene meta-cleavage product). These results contribute to the general knowledge of the biochemical processes that determine the fate of the individual components of PAH mixtures in polluted soils. The identification of the partially oxidized compounds will facilitate to develop analytical methods to determine their potential formation and accumulation in contaminated sites.

  4. Biosurfactant-enhanced bioremediation of aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in creosote contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Bezza, Fisseha Andualem; Chirwa, Evans M Nkhalambayausi

    2016-02-01

    The potential for biological treatment of an environment contaminated by complex petrochemical contaminants was evaluated using creosote contaminated soil in ex situ bio-slurry reactors. The efficacy of biosurfactant application and stimulation of in situ biosurfactant production was investigated. The biosurfactant produced was purified and characterised using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Biosurfactant enhanced degradation of PAHs was 86.5% (with addition of biosurfactant) and 57% in controls with no biosurfactant and nutrient amendments after incubation for 45 days. A slight decrease in degradation rate observed in the simultaneous biosurfactant and nutrient, NH4NO3 and KH2PO4, supplemented microcosm can be attributed to preferential microbial consumption of the biosurfactant supplemented. The overall removal of PAHs was determined to be mass transport limited since the dissolution rate caused by the biosurfactant enhanced the bioavailability of the PAHs to the microorganisms. The consortium culture was predominated by the aromatic ring-cleaving species Bacillus stratosphericus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus megaterium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of wood creosote: glucuronic acid and sulfate conjugation of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ogata, N; Matsushima, N; Shibata, T

    1995-09-01

    Wood creosote, principally a mixture of non-, alkyl- and/or alkoxy-substituted phenolic compounds, was orally administered to adult male volunteers to determine its metabolites and pharmacokinetic parameters. After a 133-mg single dose, its major constituents (i.e. phenol 15 mg, guaiacol 32 mg, p-cresol 18 mg and creosol 24 mg) were found in peripheral venous blood and urine, mostly as glucuronic acid and, except for creosol, as sulfate conjugates. Low concentrations of unconjugated phenols were also detected. The metabolites in the serum started to increase 15 min after the dose, and they reached their maximum concentrations 30 min after administration. The maximum concentrations of glucuronides were 0.18 +/- 0.07, 0.91 +/- 0.38, 0.33 +/- 0.18 and 0.47 +/- 0.23 mg/l; those of sulfates were 0.16 +/- 0.06, 0.22 +/- 0.09, 0.17 +/- 0.07 and < 0.04 mg/l for phenol, guaiacol, p-cresol and creosol, respectively. The 24-hour urinary recoveries of the sum of each compound and its metabolites were 75 +/- 35, 45 +/- 36, 103 +/- 51 and 74 +/- 36%, in the above order. The presence of guaiacol glucuronide in blood and urine was directly verified by its isolation and structure analyses.

  6. Fumigant effectiveness in creosote- and penta-treated southern pine poles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.J.K.; Terracina, F.C.; Zabel, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives were to evaluate the effectiveness of the fumigants, Vapam and chloropicrin, to arrest decay development in the groundline zone of southern pine poles, and to determine the types and prevalence of fungi reinvading the poles after fumigation. Fifty-one creosote- and penta-treated poles representing various service ages and decay conditions were fumigated with Vapam or chloropicrin. Cores were extracted from the groundline zone for fungus isolations and decay determinations, prior to fumigation and annually thereafter for 8 years. The reappearance of decay fungi was the major criterion used for judging fumigant effectiveness. Both Vapam and chloropicrin were effective disinfectants and killed all of the previously detected fungi in all poles. The protection periods of the fumigants from decay fungus reinvasions varied with pole age, prior decay condition, and preservative treatment. They ranged from less than 1 to 7 years and were least in older poles with prior decay. Soft-rot fungi were major decay agents which reinvaded the fumigated poles. The reinvading fungi were generally those tolerant to the preservatives or fumigants used in the study. Chloropicrin concentrations at 5, 6, and 7 years after fumigation were highly variable, and below toxic threshold levels in the outer core zones of most poles. 33 refs., 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. Microbial populations related to PAH biodegradation in an aged biostimulated creosote-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lladó, Salvador; Jiménez, Nuria; Viñas, Marc; Solanas, Anna Maria

    2009-09-01

    A previous bioremediation survey on a creosote-contaminated soil showed that aeration and optimal humidity promoted depletion of three-ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), but residual concentrations of four-ringed benzo(a)anthracene (B(a)A) and chrysene (Chry) remained. In order to explain the lack of further degradation of heavier PAHs such as four-ringed PAHs and to analyze the microbial population responsible for PAH biodegradation, a chemical and microbial molecular approach was used. Using a slurry incubation strategy, soil in liquid mineral medium with and without additional B(a)A and Chry was found to contain a powerful PAH-degrading microbial community that eliminated 89% and 53% of the added B(a)A and Chry, respectively. It is hypothesized that the lack of PAH bioavailability hampered their further biodegradation in the unspiked soil. According to the results of the culture-dependent and independent techniques Mycobacterium parmense, Pseudomonas mexicana, and Sphingobacterials group could control B(a)A and Chry degradation in combination with several microorganisms with secondary metabolic activity.

  8. Microbial ecology of a creosote-contaminated aquifer at St. Louis Park, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, G.G.; Godsy, E.M.; Goerlitz, D.F.; Hult, M.F.

    1983-01-01

    Bacterial populations were sampled in creosote-contaminated and undisturbed zones of the anaerobic, surficial Middle Drift aquifer at St. Louis Park, Minnesota. The densities of several types of bacteria including total aerobes, total anaerobes, nitrate-respirers, and iron-reducers were about the same in the contaminated and undisturbed zones. Chemical analyses suggested that nitrate-respiration and iron-reduction were occurring in the contaminated zone. Conversion of phenolic compounds to methane occurred in the contaminated zone. Methanogenic bacteria were found only in the contaminated zone. In laboratory culture, methane was evolved when contaminated groundwater was inoculated with bacteria from the contaminated zone. Obligate anaerobic bacteria isolated from laboratory reactors include: a methanosarcina; a short methanobacterium; and a longer, crooked methanobacterium. Pseudomonas stutzeri, a nitrate-respiring bacterium, was isolated from both the laboratory reactors and the contaminated zone of the aquifer. These Ps. stutzeri strains used phenol as an electron source for nitrate reduction. The methanogenic consortium found in the laboratory reactor appears similar to those described in other studies of the methanogenic fermentation of aromatic compounds. 21 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Parasabella Bush, 1905, replacement name for the polychaete genus Demonax Kinberg, 1867 (Annelida, Polychaeta, Sabellidae)

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Hernández, María Ana; Harris, Leslie H.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Parasabella Bush, 1905 is reintroduced as a replacement name for Demonax Kinberg, 1867 (Annelida: Polychaeta: Sabellidae) which is a junior homonym of Demonax Thomson, 1860 (Insecta: Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). PMID:21594198

  10. Complications of bush thoracotomy in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J; Tharion, J

    1995-03-01

    Bush thoracotomy is still practised in the South Western Highlands of Papua New Guinea, by traditional bush doctors. These bush thoracotomies are performed with the aim of letting out the 'bad blood' that is believed to have collected in the body cavities following injuries. During a 3 year period between 1989 and 1992, 183 patients with complications of bush thoracotomy were treated at the Sopas Hospital in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Of these patients, 55 had chest wall infections only, without any pleural involvement. Of the patients with empyemas, 14 were treated by decortication of the empyema with one death and all remaining patients were treated by drainage procedures with one death. We recommend early treatment by adequate drainage of the empyema and, where feasible, early decortication. Continuing education to eradicate the procedure, and provision of adequate surgical facilities for management of complications, should be the long-term aim for this continuing problem.

  11. Texas Hold'em: Secretary Spellings--the Ace in Bush's Hand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Michelle R.

    2007-01-01

    President Bush has one ace in his hand when it comes to the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB): Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings. Spellings, who has been working on education issues for Bush since the 1990s and his days as a Texas governor, is the person who from the very beginning has had to make NCLB work. She was a key architect of the…

  12. Wood creosote prevents CRF-induced motility via 5-HT3 receptors in proximal and 5-HT4 receptors in distal colon in rats.

    PubMed

    Ataka, Koji; Kuge, Tomoo; Fujino, Kazunori; Takahashi, Toku; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2007-05-30

    Wood creosote has been used as an herbal medicine against acute diarrhea caused by food poisoning and has an inhibitory effect on colonic motility and enterotoxin-induced ion secretion. Since no previous studies have examined the effects of wood creosote on stress-induced alteration of colonic motility, we examined the effects on the colonic motility altered by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), which is a key mediator in responses to stress. We recorded motor activity in proximal and distal colon of unrestrained conscious rats via two manometory catheters. The frequencies of phase III-like contraction and the % motor indices in both proximal and distal colon were measured. At the same time the number of fecal pellets excreted was counted. I.c.v. injection of CRF increased the motor activity in both proximal and distal colon, and these effects were completely antagonized by i.c.v. injection of a selective CRF type 1 antagonist but not by a CRF type 2 antagonist. Changes in colonic motility induced by CRF were reversed by intravenously administered wood creosote. Intraluminal administration of the 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist granisetron, or the 5-HT(4) receptor antagonist SB 204070 blocked the increase in colonic motility induced by i.c.v. injection of CRF. Wood creosote prevented the increase in colonic motility induced by the 5-HT(3) receptor agonist SR57227A in the proximal colon, while it prevented the increase in colonic motility induced by the 5-HT(4) receptor agonist RS67506 in the distal colon. These results indicate that wood creosote prevents the increase in colonic motility induced by CRF via 5-HT(3) receptors in the proximal colon, and via 5-HT(4) receptors in the distal colon, suggesting that wood creosote might be useful to treat stress-induced diarrhea.

  13. Component analysis report: Line shaft pump bushings, Warm Springs State Hospital, Warm Springs, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    McAlpin, Ron

    1981-03-01

    On 29 January 1981, the Failure Analysis Laboratory at Radian Corporation received two spider bushings from the State Hospital at Warm Springs, Montana, for metallurgical analysis. The bushings are from a 19 stage, 200 hp Worthington line shaft vertical turbine pump. The pump was set at 830 feet to test a low temperature geothermal well. One bushing was originally set near the top of the well; the other bushing had been set deep in the well. The bushings were reportedly manufactured from bronze sleeve-bearing material. After approximately 50 hours of intermittent operation, the pump began to experience severe vibration. The vibration appeared random in that it sometimes occurred immediately upon start up and other times occurred after several hours of operation. A Worthington service engineer tested the pump and made several recommendations to alleviate the problem. He concluded that excessive packing box friction, overloading, and shaft unscrewing caused the vibration. He also adjusted the vertical shaft and impeller clearances. The purposes of this analysis is to examine the shaft bushings for evidence of mechanical or corrosion damage that might have been related to the vibration problem.

  14. Fate and transport potential for dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from a shallow to a deep aquifer at the Madisonville Creosote works

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, R.W.; Tzhone, S.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The Remedy selected for a deep aquifer at the Madisonville Creosote Works, which have a potential threat of contamination from a nearby contaminated shallow aquifer is presented. The remedy includes monitoring, in consideration of the low permeability of the clay unit separating the two aquifers and the limited transport potential of the dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A computer model was used for predication of the potential fate and transport of contaminants to the deep drinking water supply aquifer. The model results show conservative breakthrough of naphthalene from the source creosote in the shallow water bearing zone at about 150 years.

  15. Lack of oncogenicity of wood creosote, the principal active ingredient of Seirogan, an herbal antidiarrheal medication, in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Kuge, T; Shibata, T; Willett, M S; Turck, P; Traul, K A

    2001-01-01

    Seirogan, an herbal medicine containing wood creosote (tablets, 10.0% w/w), has been developed and marketed for almost a century in various countries for the control of acute diarrhea and treatment of associated symptoms, such as abdominal cramping. Wood creosote (CAS no. 8021-39-4) is a mixture of simple phenolic compounds, including guaiacol and creosol and related compounds, and is chemically distinct from, and should not be confused with, coal tar creosote, a known carcinogen. In the current study, the oncogenic potential of wood creosote was assessed in a 96/103-week oral gavage study in Sprague-Dawley rats. Groups of 60 rats/sex received wood creosote at dose levels of 20, 50, or 200 mg/kg body weight [bw]/day. An additional group of rats received the vehicle, 0.5% carboxymethylcellulose in deionized, distilled water, at the same dose volume as the treatment groups (10 ml/kg) and served as the controls. Treatment-related decreases in survival, body weight, and food consumption, as well as increased incidences of clinical signs that included rales, decreased activity, and salivation, were noted at 200 mg/kg bw/day when compared with the control group. There was an increased incidence of reddened and edematous lungs in rats from the 200 mg/kg bw/day group that died during the study. The lung findings were suggestive of test article aspiration during dose administration or agonal aspiration preceding and possibly resulting in death, especially because these observations were not seen in animals that survived to scheduled sacrifice. Additionally, phenols are generally recognized as having corrosive properties. There were no changes in clinical pathology and no increases in neoplastic or non-neoplastic lesions, excluding the lung findings, related to treatment with wood creosote at any dose level. Although the results of this study indicate that the maximum tolerated dose of wood creosote was met or exceeded at 200 mg/kg bw/day, there was no evidence of

  16. Electrochemical degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in creosote solution using ruthenium oxide on titanium expanded mesh anode.

    PubMed

    Tran, Lan-Huong; Drogui, Patrick; Mercier, Guy; Blais, Jean-François

    2009-05-30

    In this study, expanded titanium (Ti) covered with ruthenium oxide (RuO(2)) electrode was used to anodically oxidize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in creosote solution. Synthetic creosote-oily solution (COS) was prepared with distilled water and a commercial creosote solution in the presence of an amphoteric surfactant; Cocamidopropylhydroxysultaine (CAS). Electrolysis was carried out using a parallelepipedic electrolytic 1.5-L cell containing five anodes (Ti/RuO(2)) and five cathodes (stainless steel, 316 L) alternated in the electrode pack. The effects of initial pH, temperature, retention time, supporting electrolyte, current density and initial PAH concentration on the process performance were examined. Experimental results revealed that a current density of 9.23 mA cm(-2) was beneficial for PAH oxidation. The sum of PAH concentrations for 16 PAHs could be optimally diminished up to 80-82% while imposing a residence time in the electrolysis cell of 90 min. There was not a significant effect of the electrolyte (Na(2)SO(4)) concentration on oxidation efficiency in the investigated range of 500-4000 mg/L. However, an addition of 500 mg Na(2)SO(4)L(-1) was required to reduce the energy consumption and the treatment cost. Besides, there was no effect of initial PAH concentration on oxidation efficiency in the investigated range of 270-540 mg PAHL(-1). Alkaline media was not favourable for PAH oxidation, whereas high performance of PAH degradation could be recorded without initial pH adjustment (original pH around 6.0). Likewise, under optimal conditions, 84% of petroleum hydrocarbon (C(10)-C(50)) was removed, whereas removal yields of 69% and 62% have been measured for O&G and COD, respectively. Microtox and Daphnia biotests showed that electrochemical oxidation using Ti/RuO(2) could be efficiently used to reduce more than 90% of the COS toxicity.

  17. Response of bush bean exposed to acid mist

    SciTech Connect

    Hindawi, I.J.; Rea, J.A.; Griffis, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    Bush bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris l. Cv. contender) were treated once a week for six weeks with simulated acid mist at five pH levels ranging from 5.5 to 2.0. Leaf injury developed on plants exposed to acid concentrations below pH 3 and many leaves developed a flecking symptom similar to that caused by ozone. An adaxial, interveinal bleached area resembling SO/sub 2/ injury also developed on some trifoliate leaves at the low pH treatments. Microscopic observation of injured trifoliates indicated that the pallisade cells were plasmolyzed and that the chloroplasts lost structural integrity. Reductions in plant weight and chlorophyll content were detected across the pH gradient. Seed and pod growth were reduced at some intermediate acid depositions even though no visible foliar injury developed. Foliar losses of nitrogen, calcium, magnesium and phosphorous increased with decreases in acid mist pH, whereas foliar potassium concentrations were unaffected by acid mist treatment.

  18. The influence of stream channels on distributions of Larrea tridentata and Ambrosia dumosa in the Mojave Desert, CA, USA: Patterns, mechanisms and effects of stream redistribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwinning, S.; Sandquist, D.R.; Miller, D.M.; Bedford, D.R.; Phillips, S.L.; Belnap, J.

    2011-01-01

    Drainage channels are among the most conspicuous surficial features of deserts, but little quantitative analysis of their influence on plant distributions is available. We analysed the effects of desert stream channels ('washes') on Larrea tridentata and Ambrosia dumosa density and cover on an alluvial piedmont in the Mojave Desert, based on a spatial analysis of transect data encompassing a total length of 2775 m surveyed in 5 cm increments. Significant deviations from average transect properties were identified by bootstrapping. Predictably, shrub cover and density were much reduced inside washes, and elevated above average levels adjacent to washes. Average Larrea and Ambrosia cover and density peaked 1??2-1??6 m and 0??5-1??0 m from wash edges, respectively. We compared wash effects in runon-depleted (-R) sections, where washes had been cut off from runon and were presumably inactive, with those in runon-supplemented (+R) sections downslope from railroad culverts to help identify mechanisms responsible for the facilitative effect of washes on adjacent shrubs. Shrub cover and density near washes peaked in both + R and - R sections, suggesting that improved water infiltration and storage alone can cause a facilitative effect on adjacent shrubs. However, washes of < 2 m width in + R sections had larger than average effects on peak cover, suggesting that plants also benefit from occasional resource supplementation. The data suggest that channel networks significantly contribute to structuring plant communities in the Mojave Desert and their disruption has notable effects on geomorphic and ecological processes far beyond the original disturbance sites. ?? 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. PS300 Tribomaterials Evaluated at 6500C by Bushing Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striebing, Donald R.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    A new facility has been developed to test the tribological behavior (friction and wear) of PS300 solid lubricant bushings at high temperatures. PS300 is a commercially available solid lubricant invented at the NASA Glenn Research Center. It can be prepared as a plasma spray coating or as a free-standing powder metallurgy component, designated PM300. PS300 and PM300 composites are designed to lubricate sliding components at temperatures above the capability of today's best oils, greases, and solid lubricants. One of the primary applications being pursued for PM300 is the development of bushings for use in high-temperature machinery. Examples include inlet guide vane bushings for gas turbines and conveyors, and bearings for industrial furnaces and ovens. Encouraging preliminary field trials indicate that PS300 and PM300 lubricant materials have been commercialized successfully in several industrial applications. However, the lack of laboratory performance data has hindered further commercialization especially for new applications that differ significantly from the established experience base. The purpose of the newly developed bushing test rig will be to determine the performance characteristics of PM300, and other materials, under conditions closely matching intended applications. The data will be used to determine engineering friction and wear rates and to estimate the life expectancy of bushings for new applications. In the new rig, the bushing is loaded against a rotating shaft inside a furnace enclosure (see the preceding photograph). Loads can vary from 5 to 200 N, speeds from 1 to 400 rpm, and temperatures from 25 to 800 C. Furnace temperature, bushing temperature, shaft speed, and torque are monitored during the test, and wear of both the bushing and the shaft is measured after testing is completed. Initially, PM300 bushings will be evaluated and compared with lower temperature, traditional bushing materials like graphite and porous bronze. The baseline PM304

  20. Nutrient-limited biodegradation of PAH in various soil strata at a creosote contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Breedveld, G D; Sparrevik, M

    2000-01-01

    The effects of nutrient addition on the in situ biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in creosote contaminated soil were studied in soil columns taken from various soil strata at a wood preserving plant in Norway. Three samples were used: one from the topsoil (0-0.5 m), one from an organic rich layer (2-2.5 m) and one from the sandy aquifer (4.5-5 m). The addition of inorganic nitrogen and phosphorous stimulated the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the top soil and the aquifer sand. These two soils, which differed strongly in contamination levels, responded similarly to nutrient addition with the corresponding degradation of 4-ring PAHs. The ratio between available nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) might explain the degree of degradation observed for the 4-ring PAHs. However, the degree of degradation of 3-ring PAHs did not significantly increase after nutrient addition. An increase in the respiration rate, after nutrient addition, could only be observed in the topsoil. In the aquifer sand, 4-ring PAH degradation was not accompanied by an increase in the respiration rate or the number of heterotrophic micro-organisms. PAH degradation in the organic layer did not respond to nutrient addition. This was probably due to the low availability of the contaminants for micro-organisms, as a result of sorption to the soil organic matter. Our data illustrate the need for a better understanding of the role of nutrients in the degradation of high molecular weight hydrocarbons for the successful application of bioremediation at PAH contaminated sites.

  1. Capping widespread creosote contamination in Eagle Harbor, WA: Problems, process, and prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, E.; Duncan, P.B.

    1995-12-31

    Eagle Harbor`s marine sediments are contaminated with creosote from a former wood-treatment facility and with mercury from a former shipyard. Under the Superfund remedial investigation process, areas requiring remediation were defined based on comparison to state of Washington sediment management standards for sediment chemistry and biological effects (bioassays for oyster larvae, amphipod). From a variety of cleanup alternatives, capping was selected for a heavily contaminated subtidal area as the most cost-effective way to provide clean benthic habitat, isolate the contamination, and prevent further contaminant migration. Sandy material for the cap was dredged the Snohomish River as part of a routine federal navigation project and, over a six-month period, was placed in Eagle Harbor using two methods. Within ferry navigation lanes, a split hull barge was opened slowly while under tow. In areas with softer bottom sediments, cap material was hosed off a flat-top barge. GPS and real-time mapping of tracklines allowed for even coverage. Monitoring during and after the construction included analysis of suspended sediments (sediment traps on cap periphery), measurements of cap thickness (bathymetry, subbottom profiling, sediment vertical profile photography, settlement plates), and diver observations of nearby eelgrass beds. Final measurements show that the 21.4 hectare cap ranges from 30 to 270 cm thick, but is at least 60 cm thick in more than 60% of the area. Although PAHs were measured in the sediment traps during capping, significant levels have not been found since. Videos indicate the rapid return of epibiota, and the eelgrass surveys indicated no capping impacts on shoot density. Periodic monitoring of the cap is planned, as well as capping of remaining contaminated subtidal areas.

  2. Black yeast diversity on creosoted railway sleepers changes with ambient climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gümral, Ramazan; Tümgör, Ayşegül; Saraçlı, Mehmet Ali; Yıldıran, Şinasi Taner; Ilkit, Macit; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2014-11-01

    The environmental isolation of opportunistic pathogenic black yeasts, which are responsible for a wide spectrum of human infections, is essential to understanding the ecology of clinical fungi. Extreme outdoor environments polluted with aromatic hydrocarbons support the growth of black yeasts in unlikely places, such as railway sleepers. However, there are limited data concerning the diversity of these fungi growing on polluted railway sleepers. In this investigation, we examined 845 railway sleeper samples, obtained from 11 Turkish cities representing altitudes from 25 to 1,893 m, and inoculated the samples onto mycological media for the isolation of black yeasts. Ninety-four samples (11.1 %) yielded positive results for black yeast, with creosoted oak sleepers having a significantly higher number of isolates than concrete sleepers (p < 0.05). Identification based on the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer region revealed the highest prevalence of Exophiala phaeomuriformis, followed by Exophiala dermatitidis, Exophiala heteromorpha, Exophiala xenobiotica, and Exophiala crusticola. This study revealed that railway sleepers harboring black yeasts were predominantly (>75 %) populated with thermophilic species. We observed that altitude might have a significant effect on species diversity. Briefly, E. phaeomuriformis exhibited growth over a wide altitude range, from 30 to 1,893 m. In contrast, E. dermatitidis had a remarkable aversion to low altitudes and exhibited maximum growth at 1,285 m. In conclusion, we speculate that one can predict what species will be found on railway sleepers and their probability and that species diversity primarily depends on sleeper type and altitude height. We believe that this study can contribute new insights into the ecology of black yeasts on railway sleepers and the railway factors that influence their diversity.

  3. Methanogenic biodegradation of creosote-derived contaminants in natural and simulated ground water ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Godsy, E.M.

    1993-12-31

    Wastes from an abandoned wood preserving plant in Pensacola, Florida have contaminated the near surface sand-and-gravel aquifer with creosote-derived compounds and pentachlorophenol. The contaminated ground water is enriched in organic fatty acids, benzoic acid, phenol, 2-, 3-, 4-methylphenol, indole, oxindole, quinoline, isoquinoline, 1(2H)-quinolinone, 2(1H)-isoquinolinone, benzothiophene, benzofuran, naphthalene, and indene. Evidence is presented that the methanogenic degradation of the compounds listed above and concomitant microbial growth in batch microcosms derived from contaminated aquifer material can be described using Monod kinetics. The K{sub s} values obtained for the biodegradation of the phenolic compounds in this study are much lower than published values, indicating that the aquifer microorganisms may have developed enzyme systems and transport mechanisms that are adapted to low nutrient conditions. The values for k{sub d} are much less than {mu}{sub max}, and can be neglected in the microcosm studies. The low Y values, approximately an order of magnitude lower than theoretical values, and the low numbers of microorganisms in the aquifer derived microcosms suggest that these organisms may use some unique strategies to survive in the subsurface environment. Studies of the degradation pathways of the homocyclic and heterocyclic aromatic compounds on the basis of intermediate compounds have revealed that the process consists of both a major and a minor pathway. The first transformation step of the major pathway consists of oxidation and cleavage of the heterocyclic ring. After cleavage of this ring, the substituent side chains and the remaining homocyclic ring are subjected to various reactions including oxidation, decarboxylation, desulfurylation or ammonification, and O-methylation. These reactions are followed by the reduction of the homocyclic ring, cleavage of this ring, {beta}-oxidation, and mineralization.

  4. Bioindicators of immune function in creosote-adapted estuarine killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Lee A; Van Veld, Peter A; Rice, Charles D

    2007-09-01

    Several populations of the estuarine killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, also known as the mummichog, exhibit characteristics of adaptation to priority pollutants. One such population of mummichog inhabits the Elizabeth River in Virginia at the Atlantic Wood site (AW), a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund site heavily contaminated with creosote containing a mixture of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although PAHs are known to be immunotoxic in experimental animals, resident AW mummichogs seem to thrive. Mummichogs from the AW site and a reference site were subsequently examined over a 2-yr period for total immunoglobin (IgM), as well as circulating antibody levels against 5 ubiquitous marine bacteria. Expression profiles of circulating and lymphoid lysozyme and lymphoid cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were also examined. Compared to relatively high total IgM and specific antibody responses in reference fish, AW mummichogs had lower circulating IgM and lower specific antibody levels against all bacteria examined, however they had higher levels of circulating lysozyme. Lymphoid cells in the AW mummichogs also expressed higher levels of lysozyme, as well as COX-2, which may indicate a state of macrophage activation. Elevated COX-2 levels may be associated with enhanced metabolism of PAHs through cooxidation-peroxidase pathways. Additional studies attempted to immunize AW mummichogs reared in uncontaminated water to compare their antibody responses to that of reference fish. AW mummichogs did not survive 40 d post culture, while reference fish thrived. Our findings suggest that the chemical environment at the AW site may be vicariously enhancing components of innate immunity, probably through oxidative stress pathways, in resident mummichogs, while actively suppressing humoral immune responses.

  5. Oxidation by Fenton's reagent combined with biological treatment applied to a creosote-comtaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, C; Alessandri, R; Aunola, T; Cortina, J L; Gamisans, X; Tuhkanen, T

    2009-07-30

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using Fenton oxidation to remove sorbed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aged soil samples with creosote oil from a wood preserving site. The optimal dosage of reagents was determined by a statistical method, the central composite rotatable experimental design. The maximum PAH removal was 80% with a molar ratio of oxidant/catalyst equal to 90:1. In general low molecular weight PAHs (3 rings) were degraded more efficiently than higher molecular weight PAHs (4 and 5 rings). The hydrogen peroxide decomposition kinetic was studied in the presence of KH(2)PO(4) as stabilizer. The kinetic data were fitted to a simple model, the pseudo-first-order which describes the hydrogen peroxide decomposition. The PAH kinetic degradation was also studied, and demonstrated that non-stabilized hydrogen peroxide was consumed in less than 30 min, whilst PAH removal continued for up to 24h. In a second part of the work, a combined chemical and biological treatment of the soil was carried out and shown to be dependent on the pre-oxidation step. Different reagent doses (H(2)O(2):Fe) were used (10, 20, 40, 60:1) in the pre-treatment step. An excess of hydrogen peroxide resulted in a poor biological removal, thus the optimal molar ratio of H(2)O(2):Fe for the combined process was 20:1. The combined treatment resulted in a maximum total PAH removal of 75% with a 30% increase in removal due to the biodegradation step. The sample with highest PAH removal in the pre-oxidation step led to no further increase in removal by biological treatment. This suggests that the more aggressive chemical pre-oxidation does not favour biological treatment. The physico-chemical properties of the pollutants were an important factor in the PAH removal as they influenced chemical, biological and combined treatments.

  6. Fish (Fundulus heteroclitus) populations with different exposure histories differ in tolerance of creosote-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Ownby, David R; Newman, Michael C; Mulvey, Margaret; Vogelbein, Wolfgang K; Unger, Michael A; Arzayus, L Felipe

    2002-09-01

    Prior studies suggest that field-collected fish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from a creosote-contaminated Superfund site (Atlantic Wood Industries site, Elizabeth River, VA, USA) have enhanced tolerance to local, contaminated sediments. This study was designed to test whether other populations in the Elizabeth River at less contaminated sites also show similar tolerance and whether this tolerance is heritable. To test this, F. heteroclitus populations were sampled from four sites within the Elizabeth River with varying sediment polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations (3.9-264 ng PAH/g dry wt 10(3)) and one reference site in a nearby, uncontaminated estuary (York River, VA, USA; 0.27 ng PAH/g dry wt x 10(3)). Embryo assays were performed to quantify population differences in teratogenic effects during contaminated sediment exposure. Atlantic Wood sediment was mixed with reference sediment to achieve a range of sediment concentrations. Minimal differences were observed in teratogenic effects among fish taken from sites within the Elizabeth River; however, embryos of fish collected from a nearby, uncontaminated York River site and exposed to contaminated sediments had a significantly higher proportion of embryos with cardiac abnormalities than those from the Elizabeth River sites. Embryos from wild-caught and laboratory-reared Elizabeth River F. heteroclitus were simultaneously exposed to contaminated sediments, and no significant tolerance differences were found between embryos from fish taken directly from the field and those reared for a generation in the lab. Differences between fish populations from the two estuaries were larger than differences within the Elizabeth River, and these differences in tolerance were heritable.

  7. Resilience of the spatial patterning of soil resources in creosote-encroached grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, J. B.; Ravi, S.; Collins, S. L.; Webb, R. H.

    2011-12-01

    Rangelands in arid and semi arid regions across the world are undergoing rapid vegetation shifts in response to complex interactions between climate and anthropogenic factors. These regions are also experiencing more frequent and intense disturbances such as fires and droughts. A comprehensive understanding of the changes in spatial patterning of soil resources accompanying these rapid vegetation changes and disturbances are needed to design sustainable management and conservation strategies. We investigated soil changes and vegetation structure along a shrub-grass transition zone at Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (NM, USA). We examined the extent to which fire promotes the redistribution of soil resources that might counter desertification induced by shrub encroachment. We specifically used high resolution digital elevation models of soil microtopography derived from terrestrial LiDAR to examine effects for treatments established 4 years previously in the creosote-encroached, blue and black grama grassland. Treatments were: 1) burned with prescribed fire, 2) unburned - vegetation removed, and 3) unburned - control. We additionally examined plots in adjacent grasslands that were not encroached by shrubs. Results suggest that surface roughness at cm-m length scales was lowest on the burned treatments, intermediate on the vegetation removal treatments, and greatest on the control treatments. Moreover, soil surface roughness had substantially differing spatial patterns in the homogeneous grasslands relative to the shrub-encroached grasslands. This work provides insight into the resilience (i.e., over 4 years of vegetation recovery) of the spatial patterning of soil resources in response to prescribed fire in the shrub-encroached grassland.

  8. Grow tubes change microclimate and bush architecture but have little effect on bush biomass allocation at the end of the establishment year in blueberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microclimate variables were integrated over a six-month period during which blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum cv. Liberty) bushes were grown in 51-cm high, 20-cm diameter round grow tubes (opaque or translucent) on a sawdust mulch-covered raised bed with the mulch incorporated into tilled soil. Grow t...

  9. Defrosting Polar Dunes--'They Look Like Bushes!'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    'They look like bushes!' That's what almost everyone says when they see the dark features found in pictures taken of sand dunes in the polar regions as they are beginning to defrost after a long, cold winter. It is hard to escape the fact that, at first glance, these images acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) over both polar regions during the spring and summer seasons, do indeed resemble aerial photographs of sand dune fields on Earth--complete with vegetation growing on and around them! Of course, this is not what the features are, as we describe below and in related picture captions. Still, don't they look like vegetation to you? Shown here are two views of the same MGS MOC image. On the left is the full scene, on the right is an expanded view of a portion of the scene on the left. The bright, smooth surfaces that are dotted with occasional, nearly triangular dark spots are sand dunes covered by winter frost.

    The MGS MOC has been used over the past several months (April-August 1999) to monitor dark spots as they form and evolve on polar dune surfaces. The dark spots typically appear first along the lower margins of a dune--similar to the position of bushes and tufts of grass that occur in and among some sand dunes on Earth.

    Because the martian air pressure is very low--100 times lower than at Sea Level on Earth--ice on Mars does not melt and become liquid when it warms up. Instead, ice sublimes--that is, it changes directly from solid to gas, just as 'dry ice' does on Earth. As polar dunes emerge from the months-long winter night, and first become exposed to sunlight, the bright winter frost and snow begins to sublime. This process is not uniform everywhere on a dune, but begins in small spots and then over several months it spreads until the entire dune is spotted like a leopard.

    The early stages of the defrosting process--as in the picture shown here--give the impression that something is 'growing' on the dunes

  10. Field scale testing of a hyperfiltration unit for removal of creosote and pentachlorophenol from ground water: Chemical and biological assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Middaugh, D.P.; Thomas, R.L.; Lantz, S.E.; Heard, C.S.; Mueller, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical analyses and biological response data were used to assess the efficacy of a field-scale hyperfiltration unit in the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other organic compounds from creosote- and pentachlorophenol (PCP)-contaminated ground water recovered from the former American Creosote Works in Escambia County, Pensacola, Florida. The hyperfiltration unit consisted of 4 modules containing porous stainless steel tubes which were coated with a formed-in-place zirconium hydrous oxide-polyacrylic acid (ZOPA) membrane. A 5-fold concentration of the feedwater (80% volume reduction) with up to 97% removal of high molecular weight PAHs was achieved during pre-demonstration and field-demonstration runs of the hyperfiltration unit. Toxicological and teratogenic data for embryonic inland silversides, Menidia beryllina, indicated that 100, 10 and 1% solutions of the ground water sample used in the pre-demonstration run caused statistically significant (p < or - 0.05) biological responses when compared to controls. Permeates from both runs, diluted to 1%, met the pre-condition of non-toxic responses in 48h tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia. Meeting this requirement allowed for discharge of diluted permeate into the county's sanitary sewerage collector system.

  11. Effect of the reduction of skin contamination on the internal dose of creosote workers exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Van Rooij, J G; Van Lieshout, E M; Bodelier-Bade, M M; Jongeneelen, F J

    1993-06-01

    Ten creosote-exposed workers of a wood impregnation plant participated in this study, which took place in two consecutive weeks on a Monday, after a weekend off. On one of the two days each worker wore Tyvek coveralls underneath his normal workclothes. Dermal contamination measurements (pyrene on exposure pads) and biological monitoring (urinary 1-OH-pyrene) were performed to measure the reduction of both the skin contamination and the internal dose. The total pyrene skin contamination of workers not wearing coveralls ranged between 47 and 1510 micrograms.d-1 (0.2-7.5 mumol.d-1). On the average, the coveralls reduced the pyrene contamination on the workers' skin by about 35 (SD 63)%. The excreted amount of 1-OH-pyrene in urine decreased significantly from 6.6 to 3.2 micrograms (30.2 to 14.7 nmol). Multiple regression analysis showed that skin contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is the main determinant of the internal exposure dose of creosote workers.

  12. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of azaarenes and their metabolites in groundwater affected by creosote wood preservatives.

    PubMed

    Ondrus, M G; Steinheimer, T R

    1990-06-01

    Polynuclear azaheterocyclic compounds (azaarenes) are nitrogen-containing analogs of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The nitrogen atom in the ring system causes these compounds to be slightly polar and considerably more water soluble than related PAHs. A method using a solid-surface sorption technique to extract and concentrate azaarenes and their principle metabolites present in groundwater that contains creosote waste is described. Analyte isolation and concentration is accomplished by solid-phase extraction on n-octadecyl cartridges followed by instrumental determination involving high-performance liquid chromatography. Separations and detection are achieved using flexible-walled, wide-bore columns with ultraviolet and fluorescence photometric detectors connected in series. Fluorescence detection alone is insufficient because the fluorescence response produced by two-ring azaarenes is limited. Short wavelength (229 nm) absorbance detection provides improved sensitivity for these compounds and peak rationing for more definitive identification. In this study, oxygen-containing metabolites of quinoline, isoquinoline, and acridine are detected in groundwater from hazardous waste sites in Pensacola, Florida and St. Louis Park, Minnesota. Concentrations ranging from mg/L to ng/L are measured. The dependence of measured octanol-water partition coefficients on pH is discussed in the context of the isolation chemistry. As a direct bacterial degradation product of acridine with a relatively long environmental persistence, 9-acridinone may serve as a biogenic marker signaling creosote contamination of groundwater.

  13. On-site treatment of creosote and pentachlorophenal sludges and contaminated soil. Research report, Jan 88-Apr 90

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, G.D.; Borazjani, H.; Pope, D.F.; Strobel, D.A.; McFarland, L.K.

    1991-05-01

    Information is presented for quantitative evaluation of treatment potential for creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) wood treating contaminants in soil systems. The study was conducted in three phases: (1) Characterization, (2) treatability screening and (3) field evaluation. Data generated in phases 1 and 2 were discussed in a previous EPA Report (EPA/-600/2-88-055). The report provides review of data generated during phases 1 and 2 plus discussion of data generated during the two-year field evaluation study. Results from the three-phase study indicated that creosote contaminants, i.e., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds, and PCP are subject to degradation in soil systems; loading rates and previous exposure of site soil to particular contaminants were identified as important factors in determining rates of transformation for a particular site. Although populations of PAH and PCP acclimated organisms increased markedly when these compounds were applied to test soils, no correlation was found between microbial population levels and transformation rates for specific compounds of concern. Migration of compounds of interest was negligible except in a highly sandy soil from one of the eight sites for which column leaching studies were conducted.

  14. Two cases of gastric Anisakiasis for which oral administration of a medicine containing wood creosote (Seirogan) was effective.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Nagano, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Taro; Katsu, Kenichi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    Anisakiasis is a disease characterized by an abrupt onset of sharp epigastric pain, which occurs typically a few hours after eating raw or undercooked seafood. Anisakiasis was a Japanese localized disease in the past, however has become an illness of concern in many countries where eating Japanese style raw or undercooked seafood has become popular. At present, the only effective treatment is an endoscopic removal of the nematode. Development of an effective medicine is expected. We report two cases of Anisakiasis, the symptoms of which were ameliorated after the administration of an over-the-counter (OTC) medicine containing wood creosote (Seirogan). Also, we examined the in vitro effect of the Seirogan on the viability of the nematode. In the two cases, the strong epigastric pain was subdued promptly after oral intake of the Seirogan. The exposure of Seirogan suppressed the viability of Anisakis Larva in vitro dose dependently. The oral administration of medicine containing wood creosote might be effective as a first aid to ameliorate the symptoms of Anisakiasis.

  15. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of azaarenes and their metabolites in groundwater affected by creosote wood preservatives

    SciTech Connect

    Ondrus, M.G.; Steinheimer, T.R. )

    1990-06-01

    Polynuclear azaheterocyclic compounds (azaarenes) are nitrogen-containing analogs of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The nitrogen atom in the ring system causes these compounds to be slightly polar and considerably more water soluble than related PAHs. A method using a solid-surface sorption technique to extract and concentrate azaarenes and their principle metabolites present in groundwater that contains creosote waste is described. Analyte isolation and concentration is accomplished by solid-phase extraction on n-octadecyl cartridges followed by instrumental determination involving high-performance liquid chromatography. Separations and detection are achieved using flexible-walled, wide-bore columns with ultraviolet and fluorescence photometric detectors connected in series. Fluorescence detection alone is insufficient because the fluorescence response produced by two-ring azaarenes is limited. Short wavelength (229 nm) absorbance detection provides improved sensitivity for these compounds and peak rationing for more definitive identification. In this study, oxygen-containing metabolites of quinoline, isoquinoline, and acridine are detected in groundwater from hazardous waste sites in Pensacola, Florida and St. Louis Park, Minnesota. Concentrations ranging from mg/L to ng/L are measured. The dependence of measured octanol-water partition coefficients on pH is discussed in the context of the isolation chemistry. As a direct bacterial degradation product of acridine with a relatively long environmental persistence, 9-acridinone may serve as a biogenic marker signaling creosote contamination of groundwater.

  16. Evaluation of aromatic pathway induction for creosote contaminated soils in slurried soil media designed to achieve environmentally acceptable treatment endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, J.; McCauley, P.; Potter, C.; Herrmann, R.; Dosani, M.

    1995-12-31

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbon contaminants (PAHs) are commonly associated with the use of creosote for wood preservation and the process residues left by municipal gas production. The biological treatment of this set of organic compounds has been found to be difficult since they have low water solubility and reactivity in soil systems. Liquid culture studies have shown that inducer chemicals may assist the biotreatment of PAH contaminated soils. A set of designed experimental treatments were conducted to evaluate the incorporation of potential inducer compounds. The inducers chosen for evaluation were 2-hydroxybenzoic acid and phthalic acid with treatment controls of 3-hydroxybenzoic acid and terephthalic acid at three concentrations in slurried creosote-contaminated soil. An abiotic treatment control of formaldehyde was used for contrast. The designed treatment evaluation used 250mL Erlenmeyer flask slurry reaction vessels. The flask study used an orbital shaker to maintain slurry suspension. At selected time points throughout the study individual flask reactors were sacrificed and the contents were analyzed for PAH concentration, nutrients, and biomass (FAME Analysis). Depletion of individual PAHs, total PAHs, 2 and 3-ring, and 4 and 6-ring PAHs was correlation with the biomass. The effect of selected surfactant addition was also evaluated. Rates of PAH depletion and applications to larger scale investigations will be discussed.

  17. Habitat invasibility and dominance by alien annual plants in the western Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Patterns of habitat invasibility and alien dominance, respectively measured as species richness and biomass of alien annual plants, were evaluated in association with four habitat factors at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area (DTNA) in the western Mojave Desert, USA. Habitat factors varied in levels of disturbance outside (high) and inside (low) the DTNA, and in levels of soil nutrients in washlet (high) and hummock (low) topographic positions, in Larrea-north (high), Larrea-south (medium), and interspace (low) microhabitats near creosote bushes (Larrea tridentata), and during 1995 when rainfall was 207% (high) and 1994 when rainfall was 52% (low) of the long-term average. Dominant alien plants included the annual grasses Bromus rubens, Bromus trinii, and Schismus spp., and the forb Erodium cicutarium. Species richness and dominance of alien annual plants were slightly higher where disturbance was high, and much higher where soil nutrients were high. B. rubens and B. trinii were most dominant in washlets and in the Larrea-north microhabitats during both years. These two species evolved in mesic ecosystems, and appeared to be particularly limited by soil nutrients at this site. Schismus spp. and E. cicutarium were also most dominant in washlets, but their dominance varied between interspaces in 1994 and the Larrea-south microhabitat in 1995. Monitoring to detect the invasion of new annual plants should focus on regions of high rainfall and nitrogen deposition and on washes and beneath-canopy microhabitats. The ecological range of each alien species should be evaluated separately, because their evolutionary origins may greatly affect their patterns of invasion and dominance in the Mojave Desert.

  18. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): United Creosoting Company, Conroe, Montgomery County, Texas (Second remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-29

    The 100-acre United Creosoting site is in Conroe, Montgomery County, Texas. The site currently is occupied by a distributing company, a construction company, and a residential subdivision. From 1946 to 1972, the United Creosoting Company operated a wood preserving facility at the site which used PCPs and creosote in the wood preservation process. PCP and creosote wastes were stored in two waste ponds on the property of the distributing company. In 1983, due to the contaminated stormwater runoff from the former waste pond areas, the property owner was directed under terms of an EPA Administrative Order to regrade contaminated soil, divert surface water drainage away from the residential portion of the site, and cap contaminated soil. The Record of Decision (ROD) specifies a final remedy for the contaminated soil and complements a 1986 ROD which determined that no action is necessary to remediate shallow ground water. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are organics including PAHs, PCPs, and dioxins. The selected remedial action for this site are included.

  19. Bush Encroachment and Soil Biochemistry: Controls and Feedbacks in Kalahari Rangelands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougill, A. J.; Thomas, A. D.

    2003-12-01

    In the Kalahari of Southern Africa the main ecological change following cattle-based agricultural intensification has been grass removal and bush encroachment, notably of Acacia mellifera. A conceptual 'state-and-transition' model has expressed changes to vegetation communities in Kalahari rangelands. However, many uncertainties remain as to the controls, processes and feedbacks leading to bush encroachment, due to previous inadequate spatial scales of data collection. The aim of integrated research from four sites across the Kalahari was to characterise the controls and feedbacks between ecological changes, soil properties and livestock grazing. Key research questions include: Do changes in soil water and nutrient cycling occur with, and/or cause, bush encroachment?; and, what mechanisms can explain the perceived resilience of Kalahari soils? Research includes process studies of nutrient leaching and mineralization; controlled plot studies examining the impacts of surface nutrient inputs and disturbance; local-scale analyses of spatial patterns of soil biochemistry and bush cover; and ranch-scale assessments of ecology and soil properties. The results demonstrate that bush encroachment has not been caused by, nor is it associated with, increased leaching of soil water and nutrients into the subsoil. Nutrient adsorption in the surface layer explains much of the resilience to soil chemical changes, together with the low mineralization rates that enable synchrony between nutrient availability and plant uptake by surface roots. The main encroaching bush species all have extensive surface rooting systems to enable their competitive dominance following intensive grazing. Bush encroachment is associated with increased spatial heterogeneity of surface nutrients with enhanced concentrations under bush canopies. This enrichment results from both plant canopy inputs, and the more extensive biological soil crust cover found in protected sub-canopy niches. As total nutrient

  20. Effects of hedgerows on bats and bush crickets at different spatial scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoeuilhe, Aurélie; Machon, Nathalie; Julien, Jean-François; Kerbiriou, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Biodiversity is threatened by the loss and fragmentation of habitats. The role of hedgerows in maintaining biodiversity is well established, but few studies have addressed the importance for biodiversity of the intrinsic characteristics of hedgerows and the quality of hedgerow networks along a spatial scale. We examined three quality indices providing information at different territorial levels: density in the landscape, structural diversity and wood production. We performed an acoustic survey in a grassland to estimate the species abundance and community composition of bats (9 taxa) and bush crickets (11 species). Using an approach based on species and traits, we assessed how hedgerow quality influenced the activity of these taxa at different spatial scales (from 50 to 1000 m) and focused on three types of traits: bush cricket mobility ability, bat foraging strategy and habitat specialization. In general, our results showed the importance of hedgerow quality for bats and bush crickets, but the strength of the association between taxa and hedgerows varied substantially among the species and the spatial scales. Although it depends on the taxa, the production, density and structural diversity of hedgerows each had an overall positive effect. Our results suggested that these effects were generally more important at large scales. The scale effect of the production index is the best predictor of activity for bat and bush cricket taxa and traits. Our results showed the importance of hedgerow quality for the ecology of bat and bush cricket communities and could be used to improve conservation management.

  1. Cryogenic lifetime tests on a commercial epoxy resin high voltage bushing

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenterly, S W; Pleva, Ed; Ha, Tam T

    2012-06-12

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) power devices operating in liquid nitrogen frequently require high-voltage bushings to carry the current leads from the superconducting windings to the room temperature grid connections. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is collaborating with Waukesha Electric Systems, SuperPower, and Southern California Edison to develop and demonstrate an HTS utility power transformer. Previous dielectric high voltage tests in support of this program have been carried out in test cryostats with commercial epoxy resin bushings from Electro Composites Inc. (ECI). Though the bushings performed well in these short-term tests, their long-term operation at high voltage in liquid nitrogen needs to be verified for use on the utility grid. Long-term tests are being carried out on a sample 28-kV-class ECI bushing. The bushing has a monolithic cast, cycloaliphatic resin body and is fire- and shatter-resistant. The test cryostat is located in an interlocked cage and is energized at 25 kVac around the clock. Liquid nitrogen (LN) is automatically refilled every 9.5 hours. Partial discharge, capacitance, and leakage resistance tests are periodically performed to check for deviations from factory values. At present, over 2400 hours have been accumulated with no changes in these parameters. The tests are scheduled to run for four to six months.

  2. Cryogenic lifetime tests on a commercial epoxy resin high voltage bushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenterly, S. W.; Pleva, E. F.; Ha, T. T.

    2012-06-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) power devices operating in liquid nitrogen frequently require high-voltage bushings to carry the current leads from the superconducting windings to the room temperature grid connections. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collaborating with Waukesha Electric Systems (WES), SuperPower (SP), and Southern California Edison (SCE) to develop and demonstrate an HTS utility power transformer. Previous dielectric high voltage tests in support of this program have been carried out in test cryostats with commercial epoxy resin bushings from Electro Composites Inc. (ECI). Though the bushings performed well in these short-term tests, their long-term operation at high voltage in liquid nitrogen (LN) needs to be verified for use on the utility grid. Long-term tests are being carried out on a sample 28-kV-rms-class ECI bushing. The bushing has a monolithic cast, cycloaliphatic resin body and is fire- and shatter-resistant. The test cryostat is located in an interlocked cage and is continuously energized at 25 kVac rms. LN is automatically refilled every 9.5 hours. Partial discharge, capacitance, and leakage resistance tests are periodically performed to check for deviations from factory values. At present, over 2400 hours have been accumulated with no changes in these parameters. The tests are scheduled to run for four to six months.

  3. Bacterial Community Dynamics and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degradation during Bioremediation of Heavily Creosote-Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Viñas, Marc; Sabaté, Jordi; Espuny, María José; Solanas, Anna M.

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial community dynamics and biodegradation processes were examined in a highly creosote-contaminated soil undergoing a range of laboratory-based bioremediation treatments. The dynamics of the eubacterial community, the number of heterotrophs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degraders, and the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) and PAH concentrations were monitored during the bioremediation process. TPH and PAHs were significantly degraded in all treatments (72 to 79% and 83 to 87%, respectively), and the biodegradation values were higher when nutrients were not added, especially for benzo(a)anthracene and chrysene. The moisture content and aeration were determined to be the key factors associated with PAH bioremediation. Neither biosurfactant addition, bioaugmentation, nor ferric octate addition led to differences in PAH or TPH biodegradation compared to biodegradation with nutrient treatment. All treatments resulted in a high first-order degradation rate during the first 45 days, which was markedly reduced after 90 days. A sharp increase in the size of the heterotrophic and PAH-degrading microbial populations was observed, which coincided with the highest rates of TPH and PAH biodegradation. At the end of the incubation period, PAH degraders were more prevalent in samples to which nutrients had not been added. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis and principal-component analysis confirmed that there was a remarkable shift in the composition of the bacterial community due to both the biodegradation process and the addition of nutrients. At early stages of biodegradation, the α-Proteobacteria group (genera Sphingomonas and Azospirillum) was the dominant group in all treatments. At later stages, the γ-Proteobacteria group (genus Xanthomonas), the α-Proteobacteria group (genus Sphingomonas), and the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides group (Bacteroidetes) were the dominant groups in the nonnutrient treatment, while the

  4. Evaluation of two polyimides and of an improved liner retention design for self-lubricating bushings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    Two different polyimide polymers were studied and the effectiveness of a design feature to improve retention of the self lubricating composite liners under high load was evaluated. The basic bearing design consisted of a molded layer of chopped graphite-fiber-reinforced-polyimide (GFRP) composite bonded to the bore of a steel bushing. The friction, wear, and load carrying ability of the bushings were determined in oscillating tests at 25, 260 and 315 C at radial unit loads up to 260 MPa. Friction coefficients were typically 0.15 to 0.25. Bushings with liners containing a new partially fluorinated polymer were functional, but had a lower load capacity and higher wear rate than those containing a more conventional, high temperature polyimide. The liner retention design feature reduced the tendency of the liners to crack and work out of the contact zone under high oscillating loads.

  5. Fatal aortic aneurysm and rupture in a neotropical bush dog (Speothos venaticus) caused by Spirocerca lupi.

    PubMed

    Rinas, Miguel A; Nesnek, Raquel; Kinsella, John M; DeMatteo, Karen E

    2009-10-14

    This report details the post-mortem discovery of a larva of Spirocerca lupi in the caudal thoracic aorta of a 2-year, male bush dog (Speothos venaticus). This individual presented no clinical symptoms of the parasite's presence prior to its sudden death. The cause of death was determined to be acute bleeding following the rupture of an aneurysm in the caudal thoracic aorta as a result of the parasite located there. This is the first report of S. lupi in a bush dog.

  6. The Reclamation of Theological Integrity: L. Russ Bush III and Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1989-1992

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duesing, Jason G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper seeks to argue that the life and work of L. Russ Bush III (1944-2008) made a significant contribution in the return of the Southern Baptist Convention to its theologically conservative heritage specifically in the early reformation of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary from theological liberalism. That is, through Bush's…

  7. George W. Bush's Post-September 11 Rhetoric of Covenant Renewal: Upholding the Faith of the Greatest Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bostdorff, Denise M.

    2003-01-01

    The appeal of Bush's post-September 11 discourse lies in its similarities with the Puritan rhetoric of covenant renewal by which ministers brought second- and third-generation Puritans into the church. Through this epideictic discourse, Bush implored younger Americans to uphold the national covenant of their "elders," the World War II generation,…

  8. Remembering the Future: Rhetorical Echoes of World War II and Vietnam in George Bush's Public Speech on the Gulf War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuckey, Mary E.

    1992-01-01

    Argues that, through his use of specific language choices, George Bush's Gulf War rhetoric embraced and supported the orientational metaphor of the World War II model, while simultaneously rejecting the Vietnam model. Concludes the use of the World War II model legitimated both the military action and Bush's leadership. (NH)

  9. Significance of dermal and respiratory uptake in creosote workers: exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and urinary excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene.

    PubMed Central

    Elovaara, E; Heikkilä, P; Pyy, L; Mutanen, P; Riihimäki, V

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate workers' exposure in a creosote impregnation plant by means of ambient and biological monitoring. METHODS--Naphthalene (vapour phase) and 10 large molecular polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (particulate phase) were measured in the breathing zone air during an entire working week. 1-Hydroxypyrene (1-HP) was measured in 24 hour urine as a metabolite of the pyrene found in neat (dermal exposure) and airborne creosote. RESULTS--Naphthalene (0.4-4.2 mg/m3) showed 1000 times higher concentrations in air than did the particulate PAHs. In total, the geometric mean (range) of three to six ring PAHs was 4.8 (1.2-13.7) micrograms/m3; pyrene 0.86 (0.23-2.1) micrograms/m3, and benzo(a)pyrene 0.012 (0.01-0.05) micrograms/m3. There was no correlation between pyrene and gaseous naphthalene. The correlations between pyrene and the other nine particulate PAHs were strong, and gave a PAH profile that was similar in all air samples: r = 0.83 (three to six ring PAHs); r = 0.81 (three ring PAHs); r = 0.78 (four to six ring PAHs). Dermal exposure was probably very high in all workers, because the daily output of urinary 1-HP exceeded the daily uptake of inhaled pyrene by < or = 50-fold. Urinary 1-HP concentrations were very high, even on Monday mornings, when they were at their lowest (4-22 mumol/mol creatinine). 1-HP seldom showed any net increase over a workshift (except on Monday) due to its high concentrations (16 to 120 mumol/mol creatinine) in the morning samples. 1-HP was always lower at the end of the shift (19 to 85 mumol/mol creatinine) than in the evening (27 to 122), and the mean (SD) change over the working week (47 (18)) was greater than the change over Monday (35 (32)). The timing of 1-HP sampling is therefore very important. CONCLUSIONS--Urinary 1-HP proved to be a good biomarker of exposure to three to six ring PAHs but not to airborne naphthalene. Hence, biomonitoring based on 1-HP has to be completed with exposure assessment for

  10. Out of the bush: the Asian bush mosquito Aedes japonicus japonicus (Theobald, 1901) (Diptera, Culicidae) becomes invasive.

    PubMed

    Kampen, Helge; Werner, Doreen

    2014-02-04

    The Asian bush or rock pool mosquito Aedes japonicus japonicus is one of the most expansive culicid species of the world. Being native to East Asia, this species was detected out of its original distribution range for the first time in the early 1990s in New Zealand where it could not establish, though. In 1998, established populations were reported from the eastern US, most likely as a result of introductions several years earlier. After a massive spread the mosquito is now widely distributed in eastern North America including Canada and two US states on the western coast. In the year 2000, it was demonstrated for the first time in Europe, continental France, but could be eliminated. A population that had appeared in Belgium in 2002 was not controlled until 2012 as it did not propagate. In 2008, immature developmental stages were discovered in a large area in northern Switzerland and bordering parts of Germany. Subsequent studies in Germany showed a wide distribution and several populations of the mosquito in various federal states. Also in 2011, the species was found in southeastern Austria (Styria) and neighbouring Slovenia. In 2013, a population was detected in the Central Netherlands, specimens were collected in southern Alsace, France, and the complete northeastern part of Slovenia was found colonized, with specimens also present across borders in adjacent Croatia. Apparently, at the end of 2013 a total of six populations occurred in Europe although it is not clear whether all of them are completely isolated. Similarly, it is not known whether these populations go back to the same number of introductions. While entry ports and long-distance continental migration routes are also obscure, it is likely that the international used tyre trade is the most important mode of intercontinental transportation of the mosquito. Aedes j. japonicus does not only display an aggressive biting behaviour but is suspected to be a vector of various disease agents and to displace

  11. Out of the bush: the Asian bush mosquito Aedes japonicus japonicus (Theobald, 1901) (Diptera, Culicidae) becomes invasive

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Asian bush or rock pool mosquito Aedes japonicus japonicus is one of the most expansive culicid species of the world. Being native to East Asia, this species was detected out of its original distribution range for the first time in the early 1990s in New Zealand where it could not establish, though. In 1998, established populations were reported from the eastern US, most likely as a result of introductions several years earlier. After a massive spread the mosquito is now widely distributed in eastern North America including Canada and two US states on the western coast. In the year 2000, it was demonstrated for the first time in Europe, continental France, but could be eliminated. A population that had appeared in Belgium in 2002 was not controlled until 2012 as it did not propagate. In 2008, immature developmental stages were discovered in a large area in northern Switzerland and bordering parts of Germany. Subsequent studies in Germany showed a wide distribution and several populations of the mosquito in various federal states. Also in 2011, the species was found in southeastern Austria (Styria) and neighbouring Slovenia. In 2013, a population was detected in the Central Netherlands, specimens were collected in southern Alsace, France, and the complete northeastern part of Slovenia was found colonized, with specimens also present across borders in adjacent Croatia. Apparently, at the end of 2013 a total of six populations occurred in Europe although it is not clear whether all of them are completely isolated. Similarly, it is not known whether these populations go back to the same number of introductions. While entry ports and long-distance continental migration routes are also obscure, it is likely that the international used tyre trade is the most important mode of intercontinental transportation of the mosquito. Aedes j. japonicus does not only display an aggressive biting behaviour but is suspected to be a vector of various disease agents and to displace

  12. Frequency domain properties of hydraulic bushing with long and short passages: System identification using theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Tan; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2015-05-01

    Fluid-filled bushings with tunable stiffness and damping properties are now employed in vehicles to improve ride characteristics and to reduce vibration and noise. Since scientific literature on this topic is sparse, a bushing prototype which can provide various combinations of long and short flow passages is designed and built. Several common fluid-filled bushing configurations are experimentally examined for their dynamic stiffness and pressure spectra. Linear time-invariant models (with lumped fluid elements) are proposed for a hydraulic bushing with two parallel flow passages. Next, a model with only a long capillary tube passage (an inertia track) is examined. Further, peak magnitude and loss angle frequencies are analytically found. Several methods for the identification of bushing parameters (up to 50 Hz) are suggested. The linear models are validated by comparing predictions with measured stiffness magnitude and loss angle spectra. Finally, the principal features of a practical device are diagnosed using analytical models and measurements for two excitation amplitudes.

  13. Mould and mycotoxin exposure assessment of melon and bush mango seeds, two common soup thickeners consumed in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ezekiel, Chibundu N; Sulyok, Michael; Somorin, Yinka; Odutayo, Foluke I; Nwabekee, Stella U; Balogun, Afeez T; Krska, Rudolf

    2016-11-21

    An examination of the mould and fungal metabolite pattern in melon and bush mango seeds locally produced in Nigeria was undertaken in order to understand the mycotoxicological risk posed to consumers of both of these important and commonly consumed soup thickeners. The variation in mycotoxin levels in graded categories of both foodstuffs were also determined. Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium, Mucorales and Trichoderma were the recovered fungi from the foodstuffs with Aspergillus species dominating (melon=97.8%; bush mango=89.9%). Among the Aspergillus species identified Aspergillus section Flavi dominated (melon: 72%; bush mango: 57%) and A. flavus, A. parasiticus, A. parvisclerotigenus and A. tamarii were the recovered species. About 56% and 73% of the A. flavus isolates from melon and bush mango seed samples, respectively were aflatoxigenic. Thirty-four and 59 metabolites including notable mycotoxins were found in the melon and bush mango seeds respectively. Mean aflatoxin levels (μg/kg) in melon (aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)=37.5 and total aflatoxins=142) and bush mango seeds (AFB1=68.1 and total aflatoxins=61.7) were higher than other mycotoxins, suggesting potential higher exposure for consumer populations. Significantly (p<0.05) higher levels of mycotoxins were found in hand-peeled melon and discoloured bush mango seeds than in machine-peeled melon and non-discoloured seeds except for HT-2 and T-2 toxins which occurred conversely. All melon and bush mango seeds exceeded the 2μg/kg AFB1 limit whereas all melon and 55% of bush mango seeds exceeded the 4μg/kg total aflatoxin EU limit adopted in Nigeria. This is the first report of (1) mycotoxin co-occurrence in bush mango seeds, (2) cyclopiazonic acid, HT-2 toxin, moniliformin, mycophenolic acid, T-2 toxin and tenuazonic acid occurrence, and (3) mycotoxin exposure assessment of both foodstuffs.

  14. Scanning ultraviolet two-step laser mass spectroscopy of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon distributions on creosote-contaminated soil particles.

    PubMed

    Fye, J L; Nelson, H H; Mowery, R L; Baronavski, A P; Callahan, J H

    2002-07-01

    The distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on creosote-contaminated soil has been examined with scanning ultraviolet two-step laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectroscopy (UV-L2MS). The instrument has been constructed in-house by modifying a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Two-dimensional chemical maps were accurately generated from model patterned PAH distributions. From examination of three-dimensional substrates, the depth of field of the experiment allows surfaces with roughness of up to 120 microm to be treated as a two-dimensional system and still achieve an accurate representation of the surface deposits. Soil was obtained from a former wood treatment facility. Individual particles of 100-1000 microm were mounted on indexed sample plates and examined by reflectance infrared microscopy, optical microscopy, and imaging UV-L2MS. The most intense PAH signals were associated with regions on the particles where clay/organic carbon deposits were found.

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content of soil and olives collected in areas contaminated with creosote released from old railway ties.

    PubMed

    Moret, Sabrina; Purcaro, Giorgia; Conte, Lanfranco S

    2007-11-01

    Simple sample preparation procedures involving sonication and solid phase extraction (SPE), followed by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and spectrofluorometric detection, were used to analyse polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil and olives collected in areas contaminated with creosote-treated railway ties. Very high PAH contents (with amounts ranging from 114.7 to 2157.2 and from 167.3 to 3121.8 microg kg(-1) dry weight for total light PAHs and total heavy PAHs, respectively) were found in soil sampled up to 1 m from the source of contamination. The PAH load decreased rapidly with the distance from the railway ties. High amounts of light PAHs, up to 6359.9 microg kg(-1), were also found in oil extracted from olives collected in a rural area where old railway ties were stored. No appreciable transfer of heavy PAHs and benzo[a]pyrene was observed in oil samples.

  16. Accumulation and bioconcentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a nearshore estuarine environment near a Pensacola (Florida) creosote contamination site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elder, J.F.; Dresler, P.V.

    1988-01-01

    Long-term accumulation of creosote wastes at a wood-preserving facility near Pensacola, Florida, has produced high levels of organic contamination of groundwaters near Pensacola Bay. Impacts of this contamination on the nearshore environment of the bay were examined by analysis of water, sediment and tissues of two mollusc species. One of the species (Thais haemastoma) was native to the study area. Individuals of the other test species (Crassostrea virginica) were placed in cages at the test sites for a 6-week period. Contamination at the nearshore estuarine sites was assessed by comparison to a control site in an uncontaminated area of the bay, as well as a small stream which forms a direct surface-water link between the creosote storage ponds and the bay. The study focused on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the primary components of creosote. Very little PAH in water or in the surface layer of estuarine sediments was detected, despite heavy pollution of the stream sediments. This is attributed to various degradation processes which attack the PAH compounds once they discharge into the estuary, and to the likelihood of intermittent and localised release of contaminants to the estuary. Examination of sediment cores and mollusc tissues, which provide a record integrated over time and space, revealed some accumulation of a few PAH, notably fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene and phenanthrene. In the sediments, the highest concentrations of these compounds appeared below the surface, within a depth range of 8-13 cm. Bioaccumulation of fluoranthene, pyrene and phenanthrene in both mollusc species was up to ten times greater at test sites than at the control site. This contrasts with naphthalene, the bioaccumulation of which was no greater at test sites than at the control site. These differences in bioaccumulation factors relate to structural chemistry of the compounds which control their solubility, bioavailability, susceptibility to degradation

  17. An Associative Index Model for the Results List Based on Vannevar Bush's Selection Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Charles; Julien, Charles-Antoine; Leide, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: We define the results list problem in information search and suggest the "associative index model", an ad-hoc, user-derived indexing solution based on Vannevar Bush's description of an associative indexing approach for his memex machine. We further define what selection means in indexing terms with reference to Charles…

  18. Broken Promises: How the Bush Administration is Failing America's Children [with] Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Defense Fund, Washington, DC.

    Asserting that President Bush's proposal to shift responsibility for Head Start to the states would allow the federal government to abandon its promise to truly give children a head start, this report, with accompanying executive summary, outlines what is known about children receiving Head Start services and how the program addresses their needs.…

  19. Bush's High School Plan off to Rocky Start: Influential Republican Expresses Doubts about Initiative's Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2005-01-01

    President Bush's plan to expand the No Child Left Behind Act's demands at the high school level--a top priority of his second-term domestic agenda--is "not likely" to move forward on Capitol Hill in 2005, a senior House Republican on education issues predicted. Representative Michael N. Castle, R-Delaware, the chairman of the House…

  20. New record of the bush cricket, Zvenella yunnana Gorochov (Orthoptera: Gryllidae: Podoscirtinae) from India.

    PubMed

    Mal, Jhabar; Nagar, Rajendra; Swaminathan, R

    2014-10-07

    The first record of a known species of bush cricket, Zvenella yunnana (Gryllidae: Podoscirtinae), collected from the North-eastern province, Meghalaya (India) is reported. Previously, the species was reported from Thailand and the Indo-China region (Gorochov, 1985, 1988). The other congeneric species reported is Zvenella geniculata (Chopard) from Thailand. The morphological characterization of Z. yunnana has been presented with suitable illustrations.

  1. Outdoor Education and Bush Adventure Therapy: A Socio-Ecological Approach to Health and Wellbeing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Anita; Carpenter, Cathryn; Townsend, Mardie

    2005-01-01

    Together, outdoor education and bush adventure therapy can be seen to constitute a population-wide health intervention strategy. Whether in educational or therapeutic settings, the intentional use of contact with nature, small groups, and adventure provides a unique approach in the promotion of health and wellbeing for the general population, and…

  2. A Rhetorical Analysis of the 1984 Bush-Ferraro Vice-Presidential Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellweg, Susan A.; Kugler, Drew B.

    A rhetorical analysis of the 1984 vice-presidential debate between George Bush and Geraldine Ferraro was conducted to determine argumentation tactics, argumentation flaws, reasoning strategies, and other rhetorical characteristics. The results indicated that the format of the debate allowed for little actual direct confrontation between…

  3. William Bennett and the "Good War" against Drugs: Doublespeak and the Bush Administration's Hidden Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Tom

    This paper contends that former Secretary of Education William Bennett's "war on drugs" (he now directs the government's campaign against drugs) is not being waged against those who sell and use drugs, but against the civil liberties of everyone. The paper maintains that under the guise of ridding society of what President Bush called…

  4. Southern Methodist's Bush-Library Deal Mollifies Some Critics, but Doubts Persist about Think Tank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, David

    2008-01-01

    Southern Methodist University has released the terms of its agreement with the George W. Bush Presidential Library Foundation to house the president's official library and museum. To some faculty members, the most troubling element of the project is a conservative policy institute that will be affiliated with the library and museum. Unlike similar…

  5. Lost Opportunities: The Civil Rights Record of the Bush Administration Mid-Term.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liss, Susan M., Ed.; Taylor, William L., Ed.

    This study of the civil rights policies and practices of the Bush Administration reviews the first 2 years of that administration's actions, presents recommendations for the future, and offers a series of working papers prepared by experts in the civil rights field. Part 1 of two major parts presents the actual report of the Citizen's Commission…

  6. The Bushing Test Facility: A new megavolt-class, meter-scale vacuum insulation test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, J.M.; Smith, J.D.; Honig, E.M.; Ingwersen, P.M.; Umphres, J.D.; Anderson, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    Construction of the Bushing Test Facility (BTF) was completed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in the fall of 1989. The BTF is a new megavolt-class, meter-scale vacuum insulation test facility built to meet two primary objectives: (1) to qualify high-voltage vacuum feedthrough bushings before their installation in the electron-beam diodes of the Aurora KrF laser amplifiers and (2) to investigate fundamental issues related to surface flashover and electrical breakdown in vacuum, thereby enabling us to improve the performance and reliability of high-voltage components for future laser systems. The BTF voltage source is a low-energy (<4.4-kJ), 1-MV Marx generator whose output pulse width is variable from 100 ns to a few microseconds. The large BTF test chamber (2.1 m in diameter and 1.5 m long) allows full-sized Aurora bushings or other large-scale vacuum insulators to be tested at background pressures down to about 10{sup {minus}7} torr. This paper will further describe the facility, its experimental checkout and first bushing tests, and the plans for future vacuum insulation research. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  7. George W. Bush at Goree Island: American Slavery and the Rhetoric of Redemption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medhurst, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    On July 8, 2003, at Goree Island, Senegal, George W. Bush delivered the most important speech on American slavery since Abraham Lincoln. As an example of rhetorical artistry, the speech is a masterpiece, putting the brutality of slavery into historical, political, and theological perspective. Although the speech had deliberative effects--it grew…

  8. A Comparative Verbal Analysis of the Two 1988 Bush-Dukakis Presidential Debates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellweg, Susan A.; Verhoye, Anna M.

    This study examined the verbal message strategies employed in the two 1988 presidential debates by Vice-President George Bush and Governor Michael Dukakis, independently and comparatively. A number of broad verbal categories were developed to code the messages of each candidate from videotapes and transcripts. Verbal characteristics under…

  9. "No Child Left Behind": Expanding the Promise. Guide to President Bush's FY 2006 Education Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Three years ago, President George W. Bush signed into law the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), which reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). The new law reflected an unprecedented, bipartisan commitment to ensuring that all students, regardless of background, have the opportunity to obtain a quality education and reach…

  10. Acoustic analysis reveals a new cryptic bush-cricket in the Carpathian Mountains (Orthoptera, Phaneropteridae).

    PubMed

    Iorgu, Ionuţ Ştefan

    2012-01-01

    A new morphologically cryptic species of phaneropterid bush-cricket from the genus Isophya is described from the Eastern Carpathian Mountains: Isophya dochiasp. n. Sound analysis and morphological details are discussed in the paper comparing the new species with several Isophya species having similar morphology and acoustic behavior.

  11. Access to College and Bush's Budget Top Agenda at Meeting of Higher-Education Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Richard; Field, Kelly

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the plan of Bush's administration to end the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant program and focus on the broader goal with increased access to college for underrepresented groups and not spend their time protecting inefficient programs. During the annual meeting of the American Council on Education, the new under…

  12. The Other Memex: The Tangled Career of Vannevar Bush's Information Machine, the Rapid Selector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Colin

    1992-01-01

    Presents an historical overview of Vannevar Bush's efforts to develop a machine for free-form indexing and computerized information retrieval. Descriptions of the Memex concept and two related machines--the Rapid Selector and the Comparator--are provided; and the shift in emphasis to a device for business or cryptanalytic purposes is discussed.…

  13. The End of the Bush-Obama Regulatory Approach to School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    At the turn of the century, the United States was trying to come to grips with a serious education crisis. The country was lagging behind its international peers, and a half-century effort to erode racial disparities in school achievement had made little headway. Many people expected action from the federal government. George W. Bush and Barack…

  14. Bigger Education Department Role Seen in Bush Foreign-Language Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01

    Foreign-language experts are praising the Department of Education for taking a larger role in promoting the teaching of other languages as part of a proposed Bush administration initiative to bolster national security and the economy. The departments of Defense and State have headed up efforts to increase the teaching of much-needed foreign…

  15. Bush Signs Education Spending Bill That Fails to Keep Pace with Inflation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burd, Stephen; Zook, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Fiscal 1993 appropriations for Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Labor, signed by President George Bush, include cuts in maximum Pell Grants, first in a decade, and little increase in funding for National Institutes of Health (NIH), among others. Requests and appropriations for student aid, institutional assistance,…

  16. I'm Not Sure What George Bush Has to Do with Hitler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pogorelskin, Alexis

    2005-01-01

    Alexis Pogorelskin, an associate professor at the University of Minnesota Duluth and chair of the History Department, recounts her experience in 2004 after making a controversial comment in her History of the Holocaust and 20th Century Russia class. Her comment was in reference to President Bush making no mention in the 2000 campaign about the…

  17. Polyphenol-Rich Fraction from Larrea divaricata and its Main Flavonoid Quercetin-3-Methyl Ether Induce Apoptosis in Lymphoma Cells Through Nitrosative Stress.

    PubMed

    Martino, Renzo; Arcos, María Laura Barreiro; Alonso, Rosario; Sülsen, Valeria; Cremaschi, Graciela; Anesini, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    Larrea divaricata is a plant with antiproliferative principles. We have previously identified the flavonoid quercetin-3-methyl ether (Q-3-ME) in an ethyl acetate fraction (EA). Both the extract and Q-3-ME were found to be effective against the EL-4 T lymphoma cell line. However, the mechanism underlying the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation remains to be elucidated. In this work, we analyzed the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the induction of apoptosis mediated by Q-3-ME and EA. Both treatments were able to induce apoptosis in a concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner. The western blot analysis revealed a sequential activation of caspases-9 and 3, followed by poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase cleavage. EA and Q-3-ME lowered the mitochondrial membrane potential, showing the activation of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Q-3-ME and EA increased NO production and inducible NO synthase expression in tumor cells. The involvement of NO in cell death was confirmed by the nitric oxide synthases inhibitor L-NAME. In addition, EA and Q-3-ME induced a cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. These drugs did not affect normal cell viability. This data suggested that EA and Q-3-ME induce an increase in NO production that would lead to the cell cycle arrest and the activation of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Argentinean Andean propolis associated with the medicinal plant Larrea nitida Cav. (Zygophyllaceae). HPLC-MS and GC-MS characterization and antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Agüero, María Belén; Svetaz, Laura; Sánchez, Marianela; Luna, Lorena; Lima, Beatriz; López, María Liza; Zacchino, Susana; Palermo, Jorge; Wunderlin, Daniel; Feresin, Gabriela Egly; Tapia, Alejandro

    2011-09-01

    The chemical profile and botanical origin of Andean Argentinian propolis were studied by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS and GC-MS techniques as well as the antifungal activity according to CLSI protocols. Dermatophytes and yeasts tested were strongly inhibited by propolis extracts (MICs between 31.25 and 125 μg/mL). The main antifungal compounds were: 3'methyl-nordihydroguaiaretic acid (MNDGA) 1, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) 2 and a NDGA derivative 3, showing strong activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. rubrum and Microsporum gypseum (MICs between 15.6 and 31.25 μg/mL). The lignans 1 and 2 showed activities against clinical isolates of Candidas spp., Cryptococcus spp., T. rubrum and T. mentagrophytes (MICs and MFCs between 31.25 and 62.5 μg/mL). The lignan and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) profiles from propolis matched with those of exudates of Larrea nitida providing strong evidences on its botanical origin. These results support that Argentinian Andean propolis are a valuable natural product with potential to improve human health. Six compounds (1-6) were isolated from propolis for the first time, while compounds 1 and 3-6 were reported for first time as constituents of L. nitida Cav.

  19. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): American Creosote Works, Inc. , Pensacola, Escambia County, FL (First remedial action), (amendment), September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-28

    The 18-acre American Creosote Works (Pensacola Plant) site, is in a dense moderately commercial and residential area of Pensacola, Florida, approximately 600 yards from Pensacola Bay and Bayou Chico. American Creosote Works, Inc. operated a wood preserving facility onsite from 1902 to 1981. EPA signed a Record of Decision (ROD) in 1985 requiring all onsite and offsite contaminated solids, sludge, and sediment to be placed in an onsite RCRA-permitted landfill. Because the State did concur with the selected remedy, no remedial action was taken. Consequently, a post remedial investigation was conducted in 1988 to characterize the extent of contamination. The ROD is the first of two planned operable units and addresses remediation of contaminated surface soil. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the surface soil are organics including dioxins, carcinogenic PAHs, and PCP.

  20. Health assessment for American Creosote Works, Incorporated, (Winnfield Plant), Winnfield, Winn Parish, Louisiana, Region 6. Cerclis No. LAD000239814. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-09

    The 34.21-acre American Creosote site is a former wood treating facility located in the city of Winnfield, Winn Parish, Louisiana. Contaminants of concern include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), benzene, pentachlorophenal (PCP), and dioxin (2,3,7,8, TCDD). Completed exposure to these chemicals on the site and at the Creosote branch probably have occurred via incidental ingestion and dermal contact with soil, sediment, surface water and inhalation of air. Because there are indications that people have been exposed to site contaminants and because of area residents concerns of possible site-related cancers, a health statistics review should be conducted on cancer data and any other available health outcome data.

  1. Public health assessment for McCormick and Baxter Creosoting Company, Stockton, San Joaquin County, California, Region 9. Cerclis No. CAD009106527. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-06

    In February 1992, the United State Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) proposed that the McCormick and Baster Creosoting Company in Stockton, California be listed on the National Priorities List (NPL) because of contamination resulting from a wood preserving plant that operated there from 1942 until 1990. Chemicals used in the preservative solutions included creosote, pentachlorophenol, arsenic, copper, and chromium. Contamination has been detected in the on-site surface soil, subsurface soil, on-site air when the site was in operation, nearby off-site surface, soil, on-sit groundwater, off-site groundwater to a small extent, and perhaps in the fish living in the Old Mormon Slough, New Mormon Slough, and the Port of Stockton.

  2. Public health assessment for McCormick and Baxter Creosoting Company (Portland), Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon, Region 10. Cerclis No. ORD009020603. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-13

    The McCormick and Baxter Creosoting site is located on the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon. ATSDR considers the site to have been a public health hazard for former plant workers because of past ingestion exposure to arsenic, creosote, pentachlorophenol, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, and dibenzofurans at levels of public health concern. The site also poses an ongoing and future public health hazard because people might encounter hazardous chemicals along the shoreline on or near the site at levels that can damage the skin, as was reported to have happened to two boys. Finally, dioxin levels would pose a public health hazard if people subsist on crayfish and suckers contaminated with polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

  3. Neotropical echinococcosis: second report of Echinococcus vogeli natural infection in its main definitive host, the bush dog (Speothos venaticus).

    PubMed

    do Carmo Pereira Soares, Manoel; Souza de Souza, Alex Junior; Pinheiro Malheiros, Andreza; Nunes, Heloisa Marceliano; Almeida Carneiro, Liliane; Alves, Max Moreira; Farias da Conceição, Bernardo; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; Marins Póvoa, Marinete

    2014-04-01

    The bush dog (Speothos venaticus) acts as the natural definitive host in the life cycle of Echinococcus vogeli, the causative agent of polycystic hydatid disease, a zoonotic neglected disease in the South America. We report a case of natural infection by Echinococcus vogeli in a bush dog from the Brazilian Amazon, confirmed by the morphological and morphometric examination of adult parasites and their hooks obtained from the small intestine of the canid. Additionally, mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis corroborated these findings. This is the second report of natural infection by E. vogeli in a bush dog.

  4. Movement and fate of creosote waste in ground water, Pensacola, Florida; U.S. Geological Survey toxic waste-ground-water contamination program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattraw, Harold C.; Franks, Bernard J.

    1986-01-01

    Ground- and surface-water contamination by pesticides used in the wood-preserving industry is widespread in the United States. Pine poles were treated with wood preservatives from 1902 to 1981 at a creosote works near Pensacola, Florida. Diesel fuel, creosote, and pentachlorophenol were discharged to two unlined impoundments that had a direct hydraulic connection to the sand-and-gravel aquifer. Evidence of wood-preserving waste contamination appears to be confined to the upper 30 meters of the aquifer. The waste plume extends downgradient approximately 300 meters south toward Pensacola Bay. In 1983, the creosote works site was selected by the U.S. Geological Survey's Office of Hazardous Waste Hydrology as a national research demonstration area to apply the latest techniques for characterizing hazardous waste problems. The multidisciplinary research effort is aimed at studying processes that affect the occurrence, transport, transformations, and fate of the toxic contaminants associated with wood preservatives in the environment. Clusters of two to five wells were constructed at different depths at nine sites to define the depth of contamination. Research studies are investigating sorption, dispersion, dilution, chemical reactions, bacterially mediated transformations, quality assurance, plume hydrodynamics, and the ultimate fate of these complex organic wastes.

  5. Modeling of Vertical Transport of Dissolved Naphthalene in Creosote From a Shallow to a Deep Aquifer at a Superfund Site as Support for the Remedy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. W.

    2001-12-01

    An EPA Superfund site that contains creosote poses a potential threat to a deep drinking-water aquifer where EPA's drinking-water standards must be maintained. Several pools of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) creosote are present in shallow sands at the Madisonville Creosote Works Superfund Site, St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana. Risk analyses indicated that the pools pose no significant environmental nor human health risk in the shallow sand and the remedy chosen by EPA will allow the pools to remain in place, in compliance with EPA's Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response. The remaining potential threat of contamination is to a deeper, drinking-water supply aquifer separated from the contaminated shallow aquifer by a thick clayey-silt layer (15 m). Presently, no contamination of solute polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exists in the deeper aquifer. In order for EPA to protect the deep aquifer resource, the remedy selected was monitoring, in consideration of the low permeability of the clay unit and the limited transport potential of PAHs. Support for this decision came from a computer model (BIOSCREEN) that predicted potential fate and transport of PAHs to the deep drinking-water supply aquifer. BIOSCREEN simulated vertical transport across the 15 m thick clayey-silt layer with simulations of 100 years, 150 years, and 1000 years to assess conservative fate and transport of the most soluble and thus most mobile PAH, naphthalene, from the shallow water-bearing zone to the deep, Upland Terrace Aquifer. Model results showed conservative breakthrough of naphthalene from the source creosote in the shallow water-bearing zone occurred at about 150 years. Modeling of biodegradation for naphthalene, at 0.1 times the rate reported from the literature, showed the naphthalene plume reaching equilibrium at about 6 m of the 15 m thick clayey-silt layer. Thus, little or no threat of contamination of the Upland Terrace Aquifer is likely to occur. Monitoring of the

  6. [Brood parasitism and egg mimicry on Brownish-flanked Bush Warbler (Cettia fortipes) by Lesser Cuckoo (Cuculus poliocephalus)].

    PubMed

    Yang, Can-Chao; Cai, Yan; Liang, Wei

    2010-10-01

    Nest fate of Brownish-flanked Bush Warbler (Cettia fortipes) was conducted in breeding seasons from 1999 to 2009 in Kuankuoshui Natural Reserve, Guizhou province. Predation rate, parasitism rate, hatching success, nesting success and reproductive success were surveyed and egg color was quantified using spectrophotometer. Principal component analysis, reflectance spectrum and Robinson Project were used to analyze the egg color of bush warbler and egg mimicry of Lesser Cuckoo (Cuculus poliocephalus) in parasitized nests. Our results indicated that the Brownish-flanked Bush Warbler suffered from high predation rate and relatively high parasitism rate of 49.26% and 9.18%, respectively. Reflectance analysis showed that the hue and chroma of Lesser Cuckoo eggs were highly mimetic but the egg brightness and ultraviolet reflectance were different from the bush warbler.

  7. Research on the electrical insulation design of a bushing for a 154 kV class HTS transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwag, D. S.; Cheon, H. G.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, S. H.

    2007-10-01

    The cryogenic high voltage bushing for a 154 kV/100 MVA high temperatures superconducting (HTS) transformer is described. The bushing is energized with the line-to-ground voltage between the coaxial center and outer surrounding conductors, in the axial direction there is a temperature difference between ambient and 77 K. Therefore, it has to endure for electrical insulation as well as the thermal contraction as well. In this research, the electrical insulation characteristics of GFRP to achieve high durability in the cryogenic environment were surveyed in the air and LN2. Moreover, the insulation constructions of the commercial condenser type bushing were studied. Based on these data, the electrical insulation design of the cryogenic condenser type bushing for a 154 kV class HTS transformer was performed.

  8. A Three-Dimensional Analytic Model for the Scattering of a Spherical Bush

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, Robert E.; Zhou, Liming; Tian, Yuhong; Liu, Qing; Lavergne, Thomas; Pinty, Bernard; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Knyazikhin, Yuri

    2008-01-01

    Advanced climate models require a more realistic description of canopy radiation with reasonable computational efficiency. This paper develops the mathematics of scattering from a spherical object conceptualized to be a spherical bush to provide a building block that helps to address this need of climate models. It is composed of a homogeneous distribution of individual smaller objects that scatter isotropically. In the limit of small optical depth, incident radiation will scatter isotropically as the sum of that scattered by all the individual scatterers, but at large optical depth the radiation leaving the spherical bush in a given direction is reduced by mutual shadowing of the smaller objects. In the single scattering limit, the scattering phase function and so the albedo are obtained by simple but accurate analytic expressions derived from analytic integration and numerical evaluation. Except in the limit of thin canopies, the scattering and hence albedos are qualitatively and quantitatively different than those derived from 1-D modeling.

  9. VIPs join Florida Governor Jeb Bush in the Firing Room after the STS-97 launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Firing Room, Launch Control Center, after a successful launch of STS-97, VIPs gather to congratulate the launch team. In the center of the photo is Florida Governor Jeb Bush. On his left is KSC Director of External Relations and Business Development JoAnn H. Morgan; on Bush's right is Joseph Rothenberg, associate administrator, Office of Space Flight; on the far right is Bill Readdy, manager at Johnson Space Center. Liftoff of Endeavour occurred at 10:06:01 p.m. EST. Endeavour and its five-member crew will deliver U.S. solar arrays to the International Space Station and be the first Shuttle crew to visit the Station's first resident crew. The 11-day mission includes three spacewalks. This marks the 101st mission in Space Shuttle history and the 25th night launch. Endeavour is expected to land at KSC Dec. 11 at 6:19 p.m. EST.

  10. Tribological Performance of PM300 Solid Lubricant Bushings for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striebing, Donald R.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Rossi, Anne M.

    2007-01-01

    PM300 is a high temperature solid lubricant material produced through conventional powder metallurgy processing. PM300 is a combination of metal binder (NiCr), hardener (Cr2O3) and lubricant (Ag and BaF2/CaF2) phases and is in commercial use in high temperature furnace conveyors. In this paper, the tribological characteristics of PM300 are evaluated using a newly developed bushing test rig in which PM300 bushings are loaded against rotating steel shafts at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The data shows that friction and wear are low to moderate and that the lubrication performance (friction) improves with increasing temperature. Several alternative PM300 compositions are evaluated which do not contain silver and are targeted at aircraft gas turbine applications in which environmental compatibility of silver is a concern. It is expected that the data resulting from this research will further the commercialization of this technology.

  11. Bush encroachment monitoring using multi-temporal Landsat data and random forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symeonakis, E.; Higginbottom, T.

    2014-11-01

    It is widely accepted that land degradation and desertification (LDD) are serious global threats to humans and the environment. Around a third of savannahs in Africa are affected by LDD processes that may lead to substantial declines in ecosystem functioning and services. Indirectly, LDD can be monitored using relevant indicators. The encroachment of woody plants into grasslands, and the subsequent conversion of savannahs and open woodlands into shrublands, has attracted a lot of attention over the last decades and has been identified as a potential indicator of LDD. Mapping bush encroachment over large areas can only effectively be done using Earth Observation (EO) data and techniques. However, the accurate assessment of large-scale savannah degradation through bush encroachment with satellite imagery remains a formidable task due to the fact that on the satellite data vegetation variability in response to highly variable rainfall patterns might obscure the underlying degradation processes. Here, we present a methodological framework for the monitoring of bush encroachment-related land degradation in a savannah environment in the Northwest Province of South Africa. We utilise multi-temporal Landsat TM and ETM+ (SLC-on) data from 1989 until 2009, mostly from the dry-season, and ancillary data in a GIS environment. We then use the machine learning classification approach of random forests to identify the extent of encroachment over the 20-year period. The results show that in the area of study, bush encroachment is as alarming as permanent vegetation loss. The classification of the year 2009 is validated yielding low commission and omission errors and high k-statistic values for the grasses and woody vegetation classes. Our approach is a step towards a rigorous and effective savannah degradation assessment.

  12. Why the Bush Administration Invaded Iraq. Making Strategy after 9/11

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Disarming Iraq (New York: Pantheon, 2004), 3. 15. Ibid., 156. 16. See Graham Allison , Nuclear Terrorism: The Ultimate Preventable Catastrophe...2004): 51–72. 42. Scott Sagan, “The Perils of Proliferation: Organization Theory, Deterrence Theory, and the Spread of Nuclear Weapons...Condoleezza Rice and the Creation of the Bush Legacy (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2007), 91. 47. Ibid., 98. 48. See Ivo H. Daalder and James M. Lindsay

  13. Design of 154 kV Extra-High-Voltage Prototype SF6 Bushing for Superconducting Electric Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Ja-yoon; Seong, Jae-gyu; Hwang, Jae-sang; Lee, Bang-wook; Lee, Sang-hwa

    2012-09-01

    One of the critical components to be developed for high-voltage superconducting devices, such as superconducting transformers, cables, and fault current limiters, is a high-voltage bushing to supply a high current to devices without insulation difficulties in cryogenic environments. Unfortunately, suitable bushings for high-temperature-superconductivity (HTS) equipment have not been fully developed to address cryogenic insulation issues. As a fundamental step towards developing the optimum design of the 154 kV prototype SF6 bushing of HTS devices, the puncture and creepage breakdown voltages of glass-fiber-reinforced-plastic (GFRP) were analyzed with a variety of configurations of electrodes and gap distances in the insulation material. And design factors of high-voltage cryogenic bushings were obtained from the result of tests. Finally, the withstand voltage tests of manufacturing a 154 kV extra-high-voltage (EHV) prototype bushing has been performed. Consequently, we verified the insulation level of the newly designed 154 kV EHV cryogenic prototype bushings for superconducting electric power applications.

  14. Effect of space charge on surface insulation of high-voltage direct-current bushings: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zaffanella, L.E.

    1987-10-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of a method to improve the contamination flashover performance of bushings for HVDC (High Voltage Direct Current) applications. Such a method, consisting of installing intense corona producing elements at the high voltage electrode of a bushing, had given some encouraging results in a laboratory application. A series of laboratory tests was performed to verify and quantify this improvement. It was found that intense corona caused some effect in the initial development of partial discharges on the bushing surface. Improvement in flashover voltage appears significant only when the bushing surface is relatively clean and moisture deposition occurs predominantly by impingement of water particles suspended in air. Thus, the technique of using intense corona at the high voltage electrode may be advantageous in laboratory applications in which the bushing surface can be maintained clean. In practical outdoor applications, however, where significant degrees of contamination and wetting of surfaces either by condensation or by rain or mist may occur, the effect of corona is likely to be negligible. The results of flashover tests performed during this project add to the knowledge of the behavior of HVDC insulation in contaminated conditions. The poor performance of wall bushing has been ascribed to their large diameter.

  15. Research of on-line monitoring method for insulation condition of power transformer bushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jiuyun; Qian, Zheng; Yu, Hao; Yao, Junda

    2016-01-01

    The power transformer is the key equipment of the power system; its insulation condition will directly influence the security and reliability of the power system. Thus, the on-line monitoring of power transformer is urgently required in order to guarantee the normal operation of the power system. Moreover, the dielectric loss factor is a significant parameter reflecting the condition of transformer bushing, so the on-line measurement of dielectric loss factor is really important. In this paper, the phase-to-phase comparison method is selected as the on-line monitoring method based on the overall analysis and discussion of the existing on-line monitoring methods. At first, the harmonic analysis method is utilized to calculate the dielectric loss of each phase of the three-phase transformer bushing, and then the differences of dielectric loss between every two phases are calculated and analyzed. So the insulation condition of each bushing could be achieved based on the careful analysis of different phase-to-phase dielectric loss. The simulation results of phase-to-phase comparison method are carried out in this paper, and the validity is verified. At last, this method is utilized in an actual equipment of on-line monitoring.

  16. The Use of Thermowell Bushes at the Triple Point of Water for Improving Repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E.; Machin, G.; Gray, J.; Veltcheva, R.

    2010-09-01

    Water triple point cells are essential for realization of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). There is some evidence that achieving the ultimate performance of water triple point cells may be restricted by the variation in the position of the platinum resistance thermometer at the bottom of the re-entrant well, and that the variation in position is not completely compensated for by correction to zero measurement sensing current. This comparative study focused on the use of quartz bushes (tubular sleeves around the thermometer) of two different lengths, to improve the thermal contact and to help locate the thermometer. It shows that an improvement in repeatability of the resistance readings was achieved. The experiments were conducted over a five-week period using a standard platinum resistance thermometer, a one water cell, and two different lengths of quartz bushes. The resistance measurements were performed using an Automatic Systems Laboratories F900 resistance bridge. A description of the experiment and results is given. Significant improvement in the repeatability of the measurement of resistance was observed (factor >2) when quartz bushes were used.

  17. Geometric modelling of the contact point between the bushing and sprocket in chain drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulescu, R.; Velicu, R.; Lates, M.

    2017-02-01

    An important problem of the bush chains dynamics is represented by the calculus of the normal and transversal forces on all the contacts; these forces are producing vibrations in the chain and due to this, the chain is affected by the wear. One aspect of that dynamics is referring directly on the sprockets geometry and on the bushing and sprocket contact. The paper presents a calculus method for the contact angle between the bushing and the sprocket; this angle is a variable one depending on the bushing’s number being in contact (i) and on the specific elongation of the chain (x) due to the functioning of it. Based on the presented calculus model, a comparative analysis is proposed for these factors by using sprockets with different teeth numbers and different specific elongations of the chain. The results of the numerical simulations allow the dissemination of recommendations regarding the contact angle’s evolution, from the beginning to the end of the contact and regarding the influence of the chain’s specific elongations on the out of use of it.

  18. Natural Attenuation Of Creosote Contamination In A Tidally Forced Anaerobic Aquifer: A Tracer Study Using C14-naphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchin, M.; Lesser, L.; Smith, L.; Barker, J. F.; Butler, B.; Aravena, R.; Beckie, R.

    Historic practices at a wood-preserving facility along a major river in the lower main- land of British Columbia have contaminated the underlying tidally forced anaerobic aquifer. Creosote from the source zone, found mostly as an immobile separate phase, is dissolving and forming an aqueous-phase plume, which is discharging from the aquifer at the river bottom. Previous studies could only explain the plume shape by invoking an attenuation process such as degradation or sorption. A careful study of the on-shore portion of the aquifer using in-situ and laboratory microcosms could not detect any measurable degradation. Similarly, sorption could not explain the plume shape. Here we present the results of a tracer study conducted in the off-shore portion of the aquifer. C14-labeled naphthalene, bromide and deuterated water were intro- duced into the portion of the aquifer beneath the river. Water samples were collected and analyzed for bromide, C-14 naphthalene and C14-labeled CO2, a likely degra- dation product. While C-14 CO2 has been detected, the levels are low, suggesting a very slow degradation process. The study is unique in several respects, including the methodologies used to sample the aquifer beneath the river and the use of a radio- labeled tracer in the field.

  19. Integrated funnel-and-gate/GZB product recovery technologies for in situ management of creosote NAPL-impacted aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.G.; Borchert, S.M.; Klingel, E.J.

    1997-12-31

    An in situ source management system was modeled and designed for the containment and recovery of creosote non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) at a former wood treating facility in Nashua, New Hampshire. The conceptual system was based on the integration of patented technologies for physical source containment and management (ie., funnel-and-gate technology) with patented in situ product recovery (i.e, GZB technology - described below). A funnel-and-gate physical barrier was proposed to mitigate the continued flow of NAPL into the Merrimack River. The purpose of the funnel was to divert groundwater (and potential NAPL) flow through two gate areas. Where required, an in situ system for product recovery was integrated. Mathematical modeling of the combined technologies led to the selection of a metal sheet pile barrier wall along 650 feet of the river`s shoreline with the wall anchored into an underlying zone of lesser permeability. Multiple GZB wells were placed strategically within the system. This combination of technologies promised to offer a more effective, cost-efficient approach for long-term management of environmental concerns at Nashua, and related sites.

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradation and microbial community shifts during co-composting of creosote-treated wood.

    PubMed

    Covino, Stefano; Fabianová, Tereza; Křesinová, Zdena; Čvančarová, Monika; Burianová, Eva; Filipová, Alena; Vořísková, Jana; Baldrian, Petr; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2016-01-15

    The feasibility of decontaminating creosote-treated wood (CTW) by co-composting with agricultural wastes was investigated using two bulking agents, grass cuttings (GC) and broiler litter (BL), each employed at a 1:1 ratio with the matrix. The initial concentration of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in CTW (26,500 mg kg(-1)) was reduced to 3 and 19% after 240 d in GC and BL compost, respectively. PAH degradation exceeded the predicted bioaccesible threshold, estimated through sequential supercritical CO2 extraction, together with significant detoxification, assessed by contact tests using Vibrio fisheri and Hordeum vulgare. GC composting was characterized by high microbial biomass growth in the early phases, as suggested by phospholipid fatty acid analyses. Based on the 454-pyrosequencing results, fungi (mostly Saccharomycetales) constituted an important portion of the microbial community, and bacteria were characterized by rapid shifts (from Firmicutes (Bacilli) and Actinobacteria to Proteobacteria). However, during BL composting, larger amounts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic PLFA markers were observed during the cooling and maturation phases, which were dominated by Proteobacteria and fungi belonging to the Ascomycota and those putatively related to the Glomeromycota. This work reports the first in-depth analysis of the chemical and microbiological processes that occur during the co-composting of a PAH-contaminated matrix.

  1. Genotoxicity of sediment extracts obtained in the vicinity of a creosote-treated wharf to rainbow trout hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Gagné, F; Trottier, S; Blaise, C; Sproull, J; Ernst, B

    1995-08-01

    Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity were evaluated in rainbow trout hepatocytes exposed to sediment extracts obtained in the vicinity of a creosote-treated wharf. Sediment cores were collected at the intertidal and subtidal sections of the wharf at distances of 1, 5, 40 and 50 m. Moreover, subsamples were also taken at different depths of the cores ranging from 2 to 10 cm below the sediment/water interface. Sediment samples were air-dried and extracted in dichloromethane followed with an exchange into dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Rainbow trout hepatocytes were exposed for 24 h at 15 degrees C to several concentrations of the sediment extract. Afterwards, the cells were collected, and cell viability was assayed along with genotoxicity using the nick translation and the alkaline precipitation assays. Results showed that the wharf contained high concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), displayed genotoxicity and cytotoxicity to hepatocytes. In addition, PAHs, cytotoxicity and sometimes genotoxicity were detected in all sediment samples and tended to decrease with distance. Chemical contamination and (geno)toxic effects were greater in sediment extracts from the intertidal section than from the subtidal section. However, no evident change in chemical or toxicological characteristics was noted between samples obtained at different depths. Spearman rank-correlation analysis revealed some trends between levels of some PAHs and (geno)toxicity in hepatocytes exposed to sediment extracts.

  2. Accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from creosote-contaminated soil in selected plants and the oligochaete worm Enchytraeus crypticus

    SciTech Connect

    Ann-Sofie Allard; Marianne Malmberg; Alasdair H. Neilson; Mikael Remberger

    2005-07-01

    The accumulation of PAHs from a creosote-contaminated soil was examined in laboratory experiments using English ryegrass (Lolium perenne), white clover (Trifolium repens) and radish (Raphanus sativus), and the oligochaete worm Enchytraeus crypticus. Toxicity to the plants and the worms was assessed, and a soil sample mixed with calcined sand was used for accumulation experiments to avoid interference from toxicity in the soil. Accumulation of potentially carcinogenic PAHs varied among the plants, and there was a linear relation between concentrations of PAHs in the soil and in the plants. Correlations between values of the biota-soil accumulation factors and octanol-water partition coefficients, or water solubility varied among the plants and were rather weak, so that lipophilic character or water solubility of the PAHs alone cannot explain PAH accumulation. Accumulation of carcinogenic PAHs from the soil, in the presence of the other PAHs was greatest for Trifolium repens. PAHs were accumulated in the oligochaete worm (Enchytraeus crypticus), and biota-soil accumulation factors exceeded those for the plants. It is suggested that site-specific evaluation of contaminated sites should include not only chemical analysis and evaluation of toxicity but also accumulation of contaminants into biota such as plants and worms.

  3. Colloid characterization and colloidal phase partitioning of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in two creosote-contaminated aquifers in Denmark

    SciTech Connect

    Villholth, K.G.

    1999-03-01

    Colloidal matter inherent in the subsurface may provide a favorable phase for contaminant partitioning and furthermore act as agents for facilitated contaminant transport. The objectives of the present study were to determine the abundance and properties of intrinsically mobile colloids in the anoxic groundwater from two creosote-contaminated aquifers and to determine the in situ distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) between the dissolved phase and two colloidal fractions. The experimental procedure comprising field sampling of bulk groundwater and a sequential laboratory fractionation scheme consisting of a centrifugation and an ultrafiltration step was designed and performed to maintain groundwater chemical and physical integrity. The colloids were identified as clay minerals, Fe-oxides, Fe-sulfides, and quartz particles containing significant amounts of organic carbon. The PAH partitioning to the coarse colloid fraction was linearly correlated with the corresponding PAH octanol-water partitioning coefficient, indicating a hydrophobic partitioning. The K{sub oc} values agreed with literature information of PAH sorption to soil organic matter.

  4. Functional genes reveal the intrinsic PAH biodegradation potential in creosote-contaminated groundwater following in situ biostimulation.

    PubMed

    Nyyssönen, Mari; Kapanen, Anu; Piskonen, Reetta; Lukkari, Tuomas; Itävaara, Merja

    2009-08-01

    A small-scale functional gene array containing 15 functional gene probes targeting aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation pathways was used to investigate the effect of a pilot-scale air sparging and nutrient infiltration treatment on hydrocarbon biodegradation in creosote-contaminated groundwater. Genes involved in the different phases of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) biodegradation were detected with the functional gene array in the contaminant plume, thus indicating the presence of intrinsic biodegradation potential. However, the low aerobic fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 16S rRNA genes closely similar to sulphate-reducing and denitrifying bacteria and the negligible decrease in contaminant concentrations showed that aerobic PAH biodegradation was limited in the anoxic groundwater. Increased abundance of PAH biodegradation genes was detected by functional gene array in the monitoring well located at the rear end of the biostimulated area, which indicated that air sparging and nutrient infiltration enhanced the intrinsic, aerobic PAH biodegradation. Furthermore, ten times higher naphthalene dioxygenase gene copy numbers were detected by real-time PCR in the biostimulated area, which was in good agreement with the functional gene array data. As a result, functional gene array analysis was demonstrated to provide a potential tool for evaluating the efficiency of the bioremediation treatment for enhancing hydrocarbon biodegradation in field-scale applications.

  5. Combination of biochar amendment and mycoremediation for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons immobilization and biodegradation in creosote-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    García-Delgado, Carlos; Alfaro-Barta, Irene; Eymar, Enrique

    2015-03-21

    Soils impregnated with creosote contain high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). To bioremediate these soils and avoid PAH spread, different bioremediation strategies were tested, based on natural attenuation, biochar application, wheat straw biostimulation, Pleurotus ostreatus mycoremediation, and the novel sequential application of biochar for 21 days and P. ostreatus 21 days more. Soil was sampled after 21 and 42 days after the remediation application. The efficiency and effectiveness of each remediation treatment were assessed according to PAH degradation and immobilization, fungal and bacterial development, soil eco-toxicity and legal considerations. Natural attenuation and biochar treatments did not achieve adequate PAH removal and soil eco-toxicity reduction. Biostimulation showed the highest bacterial development but low PAH degradation rate. Mycoremediation achieved the best PAH degradation rate and the lowest bioavailable fraction and soil eco-toxicity. This bioremediation strategy achieved PAH concentrations below Spanish legislation for contaminated soils (RD 9/2005). Sequential application of biochar and P. ostreatus was the second treatment most effective for PAH biodegradation and immobilization. However, the activity of P. ostreatus was increased by previous biochar application and PAH degradation efficiency was increased. Therefore, the combined strategy for PAH degradation have high potential to increase remediation efficiency.

  6. In vivo measurement, in vitro estimation and fugacity prediction of PAH bioavailability in post-remediated creosote-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Juhasz, Albert L; Weber, John; Stevenson, Gavin; Slee, Daniel; Gancarz, Dorota; Rofe, Allan; Smith, Euan

    2014-03-01

    In this study, PAH bioavailability was assessed in creosote-contaminated soil following bioremediation in order to determine potential human health exposure to residual PAHs from incidental soil ingestion. Following 1,000 days of enhanced natural attenuation (ENA), a residual PAH concentration of 871 ± 8 mg kg(-1) (∑16 USEPA priority PAHs in the <250 μm soil particle size fraction) was present in the soil. However, when bioavailability was assessed to elucidate potential human exposure using an in vivo mouse model, the upper-bound estimates of PAH absolute bioavailability were in excess of 65% irrespective of the molecular weight of the PAH. These results indicate that a significant proportion of the residual PAH fraction following ENA may be available for absorption following soil ingestion. In contrast, when PAH bioavailability was estimated/predicted using an in vitro surrogate assay (FOREhST assay) and fugacity modelling, PAH bioavailability was up to 2000 times lower compared to measured in vivo values depending on the methodology used.

  7. Boundary Layer Turbulence (BLT) Water Vapor Measurement Test: Summary of Current Results, September 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    smaller patches consisting of mesquite, creosote bush, and yucca. The largest plants are of the order of 2 m tall...patches of vegetation are primarily mesquite, with smaller patches consisting of mesquite, creosote bush, and yucca. The largest plants are of the...desert environment: mesquite, creosote bush, and various species of yucca. There are also smaller plants and grasses present on the test site

  8. Peak fire temperatures and effects on annual plants in the Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, Matthew L.

    2002-01-01

    Very little is known about the behavior and effects of fire in the Mojave Desert, because fire was historically uncommon. However, fire has become more frequent since the 1970s with increased dominance of the invasive annual grasses Bromus rubens and Schismus spp., and land managers are concerned about its ecological effect. In this paper, I describe patterns of peak fire temperature and their effect on annual plants in creosote bush scrub vegetation of the Mojave Desert. Temperatures were monitored among microhabitats and distances from the soil surface, and between spring and summer. Microhabitats ranged from high amounts of fuel beneath creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) canopies, to intermediate amounts at the canopy drip line, to low amounts in the interspaces between them. Distances from the soil surface were within the vertical range where most annual plant seeds occur (−2, 0, 5, and 10 cm). I also compare temperature patterns with postfire changes in soil properties and annual plant biomass and species richness to infer potential mechanisms by which fires affect annual plants.Peak fire temperatures were most affected by the microhabitat fuel gradient, and the effects of fire on annual plants varied among microhabitats. Beneath creosote bushes, lethal fire temperatures for annual plant seeds occurred above- and belowground, resulting in four postfire years of reduced annual plant biomass and species richness due most likely to seed mortality, especially of Bromus rubens and native forbs. At the canopy drip line, lethal fire temperatures occurred only aboveground, reducing annual plant biomass for 1 yr and species richness for 2 yr, and increasing biomass of Schismus sp., the alien forb Erodium cicutarium, and native annuals after 3 yr. Negligible changes were caused by fire in interspaces or between spring and summer.Fire effects models for creosote bush scrub vegetation must account for patterns of peak fire temperature along the shrub

  9. Biological degradation of selected hydrocarbons in an old PAH/creosote contaminated soil from a gas work site.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, M; Dalhammar, G; Borg-Karlson, A K

    2000-05-01

    An old PAH/creosote contaminated soil (total approximately 300 microg PAH/g soil) from a former gas work site in Stockholm, Sweden, has been treated at 20 degrees C with the addition of various nutrients and inoculated with bacteria (isolated from the soil) to enhance the degradation of selected hydrocarbons. Microcosm studies showed that the soil consisted of two contaminant fractions: one available, easily degraded fraction and a strongly sorbed, recalcitrant one. The bioavailable fraction, monitored by headspace solid phase microextraction, contained aromatics with up to three rings, and these were degraded within 20 days down to non-detectable levels (ng PAH/g soil) by both the indigenous bacteria and the externally inoculated samples. The nutrient additives were: a minimal medium (Bushnell-Haas), nitrate, nitrite, potting soil (Anglamark, Sweden), sterile water and aeration with Bushnell-Haas medium. After 30 days treatment most of the sorbed fractions were still present in the soil. Stirring or mechanical mixing of the soil slurries had the greatest effect on degradation, indicating that the substances were too strongly sorbed for the microorganisms. When stirring the choice of nutrient seemed less important. For the non-stirred samples the addition of nitrate with the bacterial inoculum showed the best degradation, compared to the other non-stirred samples. At the end of the experiments, accumulations of metabolites/degradation products, such as 9H-fluorenone, 4-hydroxy-9H-fluorenone, 9,10-phenanthrenedione and 4H-cyclopenta[def]phenanthrenone were detected. The metabolite 4-hydroxy-9H-fluorenone increased by several orders of magnitude during the biological treatments. Microbial activity in the soil was measured by oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production.

  10. Effect of the smell of Seirogan, a wood creosote, on dermal and intestinal mucosal immunity and allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Keiichi; Yamate, Yurika; Kobayashi, Hiromi; Ishii, Masamitsu; Miura, Takanori; Sato, Eisuke F; Inoue, Masayasu

    2012-09-01

    Seirogan, a wood creosote, has been used as an antidiarrhetic drug in Asian countries including Japan for many years. This antidiarrhetic has recently been used as a sugar-coated pill because Seirogan has a strong smell. The strong smell of the uncoated form of Seirogan may modulate the defense systems of animals because the sense of smell is important for the detection of toxic metabolites in foods contaminated with pathogens. This study examined the effect of the sugar-coated and uncoated forms of this antidiarrhetic on the immunological response and inflammatory reactions in mice that had been sensitized with either fluorescein isothiocyanate or oxazolone. The sensitization of mice with either FITC or oxazolone markedly increased the plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and mucosal IgA and elicited severe inflammation in the colon by a mechanism that could be suppressed by exposure of animals to the smell of uncoated Seirogan as effectively as the oral administration of the agent. Dermal inflammation in the FITC- and oxazolone-sensitized mice was also suppressed effectively either by the exposure to the smell or oral administration of the agent. Biochemical and histochemical analyses revealed that the elevated levels of plasma tumor necrosis factor-α and mucosal IgA were significantly decreased by exposure to the smell of uncoated Seirogan as well as by oral administration of the agent. Exposure of mice to the smell of Seirogan but not oral administration of the agent selectively increased plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol, particularly in the sensitized animals. These observations suggest that exposing the animals to the smell of Seirogan per se activated the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and systemically modulated immunological reactions to suppress the allergic reactions.

  11. Effect of the smell of Seirogan, a wood creosote, on dermal and intestinal mucosal immunity and allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hiramoto, Keiichi; Yamate, Yurika; Kobayashi, Hiromi; Ishii, Masamitsu; Miura, Takanori; Sato, Eisuke F.; Inoue, Masayasu

    2012-01-01

    Seirogan, a wood creosote, has been used as an antidiarrhetic drug in Asian countries including Japan for many years. This antidiarrhetic has recently been used as a sugar-coated pill because Seirogan has a strong smell. The strong smell of the uncoated form of Seirogan may modulate the defense systems of animals because the sense of smell is important for the detection of toxic metabolites in foods contaminated with pathogens. This study examined the effect of the sugar-coated and uncoated forms of this antidiarrhetic on the immunological response and inflammatory reactions in mice that had been sensitized with either fluorescein isothiocyanate or oxazolone. The sensitization of mice with either FITC or oxazolone markedly increased the plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and mucosal IgA and elicited severe inflammation in the colon by a mechanism that could be suppressed by exposure of animals to the smell of uncoated Seirogan as effectively as the oral administration of the agent. Dermal inflammation in the FITC- and oxazolone-sensitized mice was also suppressed effectively either by the exposure to the smell or oral administration of the agent. Biochemical and histochemical analyses revealed that the elevated levels of plasma tumor necrosis factor-α and mucosal IgA were significantly decreased by exposure to the smell of uncoated Seirogan as well as by oral administration of the agent. Exposure of mice to the smell of Seirogan but not oral administration of the agent selectively increased plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol, particularly in the sensitized animals. These observations suggest that exposing the animals to the smell of Seirogan per se activated the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and systemically modulated immunological reactions to suppress the allergic reactions. PMID:22962524

  12. Rose bush leaf and internode expansion dynamics: analysis and development of a model capturing interplant variability

    PubMed Central

    Demotes-Mainard, Sabine; Bertheloot, Jessica; Boumaza, Rachid; Huché-Thélier, Lydie; Guéritaine, Gaëlle; Guérin, Vincent; Andrieu, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Rose bush architecture, among other factors, such as plant health, determines plant visual quality. The commercial product is the individual plant and interplant variability may be high within a crop. Thus, both mean plant architecture and interplant variability should be studied. Expansion is an important feature of architecture, but it has been little studied at the level of individual organs in rose bushes. We investigated the expansion kinetics of primary shoot organs, to develop a model reproducing the organ expansion of real crops from non-destructive input variables. We took interplant variability in expansion kinetics and the model's ability to simulate this variability into account. Changes in leaflet and internode dimensions over thermal time were recorded for primary shoot expansion, on 83 plants from three crops grown in different climatic conditions and densities. An empirical model was developed, to reproduce organ expansion kinetics for individual plants of a real crop of rose bush primary shoots. Leaflet or internode length was simulated as a logistic function of thermal time. The model was evaluated by cross-validation. We found that differences in leaflet or internode expansion kinetics between phytomer positions and between plants at a given phytomer position were due mostly to large differences in time of organ expansion and expansion rate, rather than differences in expansion duration. Thus, in the model, the parameters linked to expansion duration were predicted by values common to all plants, whereas variability in final size and organ expansion time was captured by input data. The model accurately simulated leaflet and internode expansion for individual plants (RMSEP = 7.3 and 10.2% of final length, respectively). Thus, this study defines the measurements required to simulate expansion and provides the first model simulating organ expansion in rosebush to capture interplant variability. PMID:24167509

  13. Effects of Orocol TL (a corrosion inhibitor) on germination and growth of bush beans

    SciTech Connect

    Parr, P.D.

    1982-04-01

    As part of a continuing series of studies conducted to determine the environmental effects of hexavalent chromium from cooling tower drift on biological systems, the potential for germination and growth effects in bush beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Bush Blue Lake) from hexavelent chromium in Orocol TL (a proprietary chromated, zinc-phosphate compound added to DOE cooling water systems for corrosion inhibition) was investigated at low and high concentrations in the soil by adjusting soil pH and the percent of organic matter. Germination effects were determined in bean plants grown in soils adjusted to differing pH range (4-4.5, 5-5.5, 6.5-7), levels of organic matter (1.8%, 3%, 5%) and Orocol TL amendments (control of 0 ..mu..g/g, 10 ..mu..g/g chromium). Growth responses (effects) were determined from bush bean plants cultured in the same soil treatment combinations as described for the germination study. Plants were harvested when the plant died or at the end of eight weeks and partitioned into leaves, stems and roots. Following weight determinations, the leaves, stems and roots were analyzed for total chromium content, and the results compared using analysis of variance and multiple comparison procedures. High levels (500 ..mu..g/g) of hexavalent chromium in soil (as Orocol TL) affected germination and growth, while a high level of organic matter significantly reduced chromium toxicity on germination. At lower chromium concentrations there was significant uptake by all plant parts, with a corresponding reduction in biomass of leaves. Consequently, adjustments of soil pH from 4.0 to 7.0 appear to have no significant effect on chromium uptake in plants. Increasing the organic matter level to 5%, while decreasing the toxicity of high chromium levels to germinating seed, did not affect chromium uptake.

  14. Governor Bush makes first phone call to KSC using new area code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the videoconference room at Headquarters, key representatives of KSC contractors, along with KSC directorates, fill the room during an early morning phone call from Florida Governor Jeb Bush (seen on the video screen) in Tallahassee, Fla. The call is to inaugurate the change of KSC's area code from 407 to 321, effective today. Deputy Director for Business Operations Jim Jennings (fourth from right) received the call. Next to Jennings (at his right) is seated Robert Osband, Florida Space Institute, who suggested the 3-2-1 sequence to reflect the importance of the space industry to Florida's space coast.

  15. Modelling of the carburizing and quenching process applied to caterpillar track bushings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro, P.; Bonollo, F.

    2014-03-01

    The carburizing-quenching process applied to caterpillar track bushings was studied by means of experimental and numerical analyses. The numerical model was developed on the basis of the real cycle. The purpose of this work is to predict the carbon profiles, microstructural phase changes, hardness and residual stress that occur during quenching using finite element techniques. Good agreement was obtained between the experimental and numerical results in terms of carbon diffusion and hardness profiles. The Sysweld® numerical code was used to perform the simulations.

  16. Territory Tenure Increases with Repertoire Size in Brownish-Flanked Bush Warbler

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Canwei; Wei, Chentao; Zhang, Yanyun

    2015-01-01

    Song repertoire size is often cited as a classic example of a secondary sexual trait in birds. Models of sexual selection and empirical tests of their predictions have often related secondary sexual traits to longevity. However, the relationship between repertoire size and longevity is unclear. Using capture-mark-recapture studies in two populations of the brownish-flanked bush warbler Cettia fortipes, we found that males with a repertoire size of three maintained territory tenure for a longer duration than did males with a repertoire size of two. These results provide evidence that even a minimal difference in repertoire size can serve as a potential signal of territory tenure capability. PMID:25822524

  17. Neotropical Zoonotic Parasites in Bush Dogs (Speothos venaticus) from Upper Paraná Atlantic Forests in Misiones, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Vizcaychipi, Katherina A; Rinas, Miguel; Irazu, Lucia; Miyagi, Adriana; Argüelles, Carina F; DeMatteo, Karen E

    2016-10-01

    Wildlife remains an important source of zoonotic diseases for the most vulnerable groups of humans, primarily those living in rural areas or coexisting with forest. The Upper Paraná Atlantic forest of Misiones, Argentina is facing ongoing environmental and anthropogenic changes, which affect the local biodiversity, including the bush dog (Speothos venaticus), a small canid considered Near Threatened globally and Endangered locally. This project aimed to expand the knowledge of zoonotic parasites present in the bush dog and the potential implications for human health and conservation medicine. From May to August 2011, a detection dog located 34 scats that were genetically confirmed as bush dog and georeferenced to northern Misiones. Of these 34 scats, 27 had sufficient quantity that allowed processing for zoonotic parasites using morphological (sedimentation and flotation) and antigen (coproantigen technique) analyses. Within these 27 scats, we determined that the parasitic prevalence was 63.0% (n = 17) with 8 (47.1%) having mixed infections with 2-4 parasitic genera. No significant differences (p > 0.05) between sampling areas, sex, and parasite taxa were found. We were able to summarize the predominant nematodes (Ancylostoma caninum, Toxocara canis, and Lagochilascaris spp.), cestodes (Taenia spp. and Spirometra spp.), and apicomplexa (Cystoisospora caninum) found in these bush dogs. With the copro-ELISA technique, 14.8% (n = 4) of the samples were positive for Echinococcus spp. This study represents the first comprehensive study about parasitic fauna with zoonotic potential in the free-ranging bush dog. This information combined with the innovative set of techniques used to collect the samples constitute a valuable contribution that can be used in control programs, surveillance of zoonotic diseases, and wildlife conservation, both regionally and across the bush dog's broad distribution.

  18. Movement and fate of creosote waste in ground water, Pensacola, Florida; U.S. Geological Survey toxic waste--ground-water contamination program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattraw, H. C.; Franks, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    In 1983, the U.S. Geological Survey, Office of Hazardous Waste Hydrology, selected the former American Creosote Works site near Pensacola, Florida as a national research demonstration area. Seventy-nine years (1902-81) of seepage from unlined discharge impoundments had released creosote, diesel fuel, and pentachlorophenol (since 1950) wastes into the ground-water system. A cluster of from 2 to 5 wells constructed at different depths at 9 sites yielded water which revealed contamination 600 feet downgradient and to a depth of 100 feet below land surface near the site. The best cross-sectional representation of the contaminant plume was obtained from samples collected and analyzed for oxidation-reduction sensitive inorganic chemical constituents. Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence detected recently formed iron carbonate in soil samples from highly reducing ground-water zones. Approximately eighty specific organic contaminants were isolated from ground-water samples by gas-chromotography/mass spectrometry. Column studies indicate the dimethyl phenols are not sorbed or degraded by the sand-and-gravel aquifer materials. Five of nineteen individual phenolic and related compounds are biodegradable based on anaerobic digestor experiments with ACW site bacterial populations. The potential impacts in the nearby Pensacola Bay biotic community are being evaluated. (USGS)

  19. Public-health assessment for American Creosote Works Inc. , Pensacola, Escambia County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD008161994. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-29

    The American Creosote Works, Inc., National Priorities List (NPL) site, is near Pensacola Bay in Pensacola, Florida. American Creosote operated a wood preserving business from 1902 until 1981. Soils, buried sludge, ground water, sediments, and air are contaminated with numerous of chemicals including; pentachlorophenol, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and benzene. Children trespassing on the site are likely to be exposed to pentachlorophenol, PAHs, and PCDDs/PCDFs in the soil via incidental ingestion and may suffer chloracne, liver damage, and an increased risk of cancer. Incidental ingestion of off-site soil by children may also increase their risk of chloracne and liver damage, but actual health effects depend on the frequency and duration of the exposure. Inhalation of benzene in the on-site air may increase the lifetime risk of cancer for children and other site trespassers. The site is a public health hazard due to the risk of adverse health effects from long term exposure to hazardous chemicals in the air, soil, and ground water.

  20. Environmental geophysics at the Southern Bush River Peninsula, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.E.; Miller, S.F.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1995-05-01

    Geophysical studies have been conducted at five sites in the southern Bush River Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The goals of the studies were to identify areas containing buried metallic objects and to provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework of the site. These studies indicate that, during the Pleistocene Epoch, alternating stands of high and low sea level resulted in a complex pattern of channel-fill deposits. Paleochannels of various sizes and orientations have been mapped throughout the study area by means of ground-penetrating radar and EM-31 techniques. The EM-31 paleochannel signatures are represented onshore either by conductivity highs or lows, depending on the depths and facies of the fill sequences. A companion study shows the features as conductivity highs where they extend offshore. This erosional and depositional system is environmentally significant because of the role it plays in the shallow groundwater flow regime beneath the site. Magnetic and electromagnetic anomalies outline surficial and buried debris throughout the areas surveyed. On the basis of geophysical measurements, large-scale (i.e., tens of feet) landfilling has not been found in the southern Bush River Peninsula, though smaller-scale dumping of metallic debris and/or munitions cannot be ruled out.

  1. Biased dispersal of Metrioptera bicolor, a wing dimorphic bush-cricket.

    PubMed

    Heidinger, Ina Monika Margret; Hein, Silke; Feldhaar, Heike; Poethke, Hans-Joachim

    2016-10-24

    In the highly fragmented landscape of central Europe, dispersal is of particular importance as it determines the long-term survival of animal populations. Dispersal not only secures the recolonization of patches where populations went extinct, it may also rescue small populations and thus prevent local extinction events. As dispersal involves different individual fitness costs, the decision to disperse should not be random but context-dependent and often will be biased toward a certain group of individuals (e.g., sex- and wing morph-biased dispersal). Although biased dispersal has far-reaching consequences for animal populations, immediate studies of sex- and wing morph-biased dispersal in orthopterans are very rare. Here, we used a combined approach of morphological and genetic analyses to investigate biased dispersal of Metrioptera bicolor, a wing dimorphic bush-cricket. Our results clearly show wing morph-biased dispersal for both sexes of M. bicolor. In addition, we found sex-biased dispersal for macropterous individuals, but not for micropters. Both, morphological and genetic data, favor macropterous males as dispersal unit of this bush-cricket species. To get an idea of the flight ability of M. bicolor, we compared our morphological data with that of Locusta migratoria and Schistocerca gregaria, which are very good flyers. Based on our morphological data, we suggest a good flight ability for macropters of M. bicolor, although flying individuals of this species are seldom observed.

  2. Heterogeneous WSx/WO3 thorn-bush nanofiber electrodes for sodium-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Ryu, Won -Hee; Wilson, Hope; Sohn, Sungwoo; ...

    2016-01-25

    Heterogeneous electrode materials with hierarchical architectures promise to enable considerable improvement in future energy storage devices. In this study, we report on a tailored synthetic strategy used to create heterogeneous tungsten sulfide/oxide core–shell nanofiber materials with vertically and randomly aligned thorn-bush features, and we evaluate them as potential anode materials for high-performance Na-ion batteries. The WSx (2 ≤ x ≤ 3, amorphous WS3 and crystalline WS2) nanofiber is successfully prepared by electrospinning and subsequent calcination in a reducing atmosphere. To prevent capacity degradation of the WSx anodes originating from sulfur dissolution, a facile post-thermal treatment in air is applied tomore » form an oxide passivation surface. Interestingly, WO3 thorn bundles are randomly grown on the nanofiber stem, resulting from the surface conversion. We elucidate the evolving morphological and structural features of the nanofibers during post-thermal treatment. The heterogeneous thorn-bush nanofiber electrodes deliver a high second discharge capacity of 791 mAh g–1 and improved cycle performance for 100 cycles compared to the pristine WSx nanofiber. Lastly, we show that this hierarchical design is effective in reducing sulfur dissolution, as shown by cycling analysis with counter Na electrodes.« less

  3. Heterogeneous WSx/WO₃ Thorn-Bush Nanofiber Electrodes for Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Wilson, Hope; Sohn, Sungwoo; Li, Jinyang; Tong, Xiao; Shaulsky, Evyatar; Schroers, Jan; Elimelech, Menachem; Taylor, André D

    2016-03-22

    Heterogeneous electrode materials with hierarchical architectures promise to enable considerable improvement in future energy storage devices. In this study, we report on a tailored synthetic strategy used to create heterogeneous tungsten sulfide/oxide core-shell nanofiber materials with vertically and randomly aligned thorn-bush features, and we evaluate them as potential anode materials for high-performance Na-ion batteries. The WSx (2 ≤ x ≤ 3, amorphous WS3 and crystalline WS2) nanofiber is successfully prepared by electrospinning and subsequent calcination in a reducing atmosphere. To prevent capacity degradation of the WSx anodes originating from sulfur dissolution, a facile post-thermal treatment in air is applied to form an oxide passivation surface. Interestingly, WO3 thorn bundles are randomly grown on the nanofiber stem, resulting from the surface conversion. We elucidate the evolving morphological and structural features of the nanofibers during post-thermal treatment. The heterogeneous thorn-bush nanofiber electrodes deliver a high second discharge capacity of 791 mAh g(-1) and improved cycle performance for 100 cycles compared to the pristine WSx nanofiber. We show that this hierarchical design is effective in reducing sulfur dissolution, as shown by cycling analysis with counter Na electrodes.

  4. Glaciations, gradients, and geography: multiple drivers of diversification of bush frogs in the Western Ghats Escarpment.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, S P; Menezes, Riya C; Jayarajan, Aditi; Shanker, Kartik

    2016-08-17

    The historical processes underlying high diversity in tropical biodiversity hotspots like the Western Ghats of Peninsular India remain poorly understood. We sampled bush frogs on 13 massifs across the Western Ghats Escarpment and examined the relative influence of Quaternary glaciations, ecological gradients and geological processes on the spatial patterns of lineage and clade diversification. The results reveal a large in situ radiation (more than 60 lineages), exhibiting geographical structure and clade-level endemism, with two deeply divergent sister clades, North and South, highlighting the biogeographic significance of an ancient valley, the Palghat Gap. A majority of the bush frog sister lineages were isolated on adjacent massifs, and signatures of range stasis provide support for the dominance of geological processes in allopatric speciation. In situ diversification events within the montane zones (more than 1800 m) of the two highest massifs suggest a role for climate-mediated forest-grassland persistence. Independent transitions along elevational gradients among sub-clades during the Miocene point to diversification along the elevational gradient. The study highlights the evolutionary significance of massifs in the Western Ghats with the high elevations acting as centres of lineage diversification and the low- and mid-elevations of the southern regions, with deeply divergent lineages, serving as museums.

  5. Fluid technologies: The Bush Pump, the LifeStraw and microworlds of humanitarian design.

    PubMed

    Redfield, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Over the past decade, many ingenious, small-scale gadgets have appeared in response to problems of disaster and extreme poverty. Focusing on the LifeStraw, a water filtration device invented by the company Vestergaard Frandsen, I situate this wave of humanitarian design relative to Marianne de Laet and Annemarie Mol's classic article on the Zimbabwe Bush Pump. The LifeStraw shares the Bush Pump's principle of technical minimalism, as well as its ethical desire to improve the lives of communities. Unlike the pump, however, the straw defines itself through rather than against market logic, accepting the premise that one can 'do well while doing good'. Moreover, it does not share the assumed framework of de Laet and Mol's Zimbabwean socio-technical landscape: a postcolonial state happily en route to national self-definition. Nonetheless, it clearly embodies moral affect, if in the idiom of humanitarian concern rather than development. My aim is to open up three interrelated lines of inquiry for discussion. First, I consider aspects of a postcolonial condition at the micro-level of immediate needs, including assumptions about nation-state politics and markets. Second, I emphasize science and technology in the form of infrastructure, the material frontline of norms. Third, I return reflexively to love, and the complicated allure of engagement in academic work.

  6. Easy on the health care. Healthcare leaders and others were expecting to hear more from President Bush on the nation's healthcare concerns.

    PubMed

    DoBias, Matthew

    2006-02-06

    Many healthcare industry leaders said they were disappointed that healthcare seemed a mere footnote in President Bush's State of the Union speech. Others, like David Merritt, left, policy director of the Center for Health Transformation, said they felt that Bush appropriately addressed key healthcare issues such as HSAs and electronic medical records.

  7. Alternative and Complementary Therapies for Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... and should be avoided: Artemesia Atractylis gummifera Bush tea Callilepsis laureola Chapparal leaf (creosote bush, greasewood) Comfrey (Symphytum officinale) Crotalaria Germander Gordolobo herbal tea Heliotropium Jin-Bu-Huang Kava (Piper methysticum) Kombucha ...

  8. Automatic classification of Google Earth images for a larger scale monitoring of bush encroachment in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Annika; Meyer, Hanna; Nauss, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Bush encroachment of savannas and grasslands is a common form of land degradation in the rangelands of South Africa. To assess the carrying capacity of the land and to understand underlaying processes of bush encroachment, continuous monitoring of this phenomenon is needed. The aim of this study is to provide training sites for satellite-based monitoring of bush encroachment in South Africa on a medium spatial resolution satellite sensor (e.g. MODIS or Landsat) scale. Since field surveys are time consuming and of limited spatial extent, the satellite based creation of training sites using Google Earth images is intended. Training pixels for woody vegetation and non-woody land cover were manually digitized from 50 sample Google Earth images. A Random Forests model was trained to delineate woody from non-woody pixels. The results indicate a high performance of the model (AUC = 0.97). The model was applied to a further 500 Google Earth images with a spatial extent of 250 m × 250 m. The classified images form the database of training sites which can be used for larger scale monitoring of bush encroachment in South Africa.

  9. Odorants of the Flowers of Butterfly Bush, Buddleia davidii as Possible Attractants of Pest Species of Moths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flowers of the butterfly bush, Buddleia davidii Franch., are visited by butterflies and moths, as well as other insects. Moths captured in traps over flowers were 21 species of Geometridae, Noctuidae, Pyralidae, and Tortricidae. The most abundant moths trapped at these flowers were the cabbage loop...

  10. Voices from the Field: 30 Expert Opinions on America 2000, The Bush Administration Strategy To "Reinvent" America's Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Educational Leadership, Washington, DC.

    "America 2000," President Bush's national strategy for "Reinventing America's Schools" is evaluated by 30 invited experts in the following papers: "Bottom-up Reform From the Top Down" (John E. Chubb); "Would Choice + Competition Yield Quality Education?" (Richard F. Elmore); "The Federal Education Role…

  11. Things Are Crook in the Bush: Report on a Needs Analysis Survey on a Selected Region, the Central Western Queensland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seabrook, J.

    The rural Australian recession resulting from lower commodity prices and poor weather conditions raised concerns about how people were coping in the bush. A survey was distributed to all grazing properties in 10 shires of central western Queensland. Of 1,050 surveys distributed, 223 were returned representing 284 families and 914 individuals.…

  12. (Re)Enacting Frontier Justice: The Bush Administration's Tactical Narration of the Old West Fantasy after September 11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Mark; Carey, Chris

    2006-01-01

    The Bush administration's public discourse after September 11 weaves a new story embedded in the national myth of the Old West. Seen in its historical context of a frontier political mentality reaching back to the early 19th century, and in its broader communication context as the rhetorical narration of a defining cultural myth, the tactical…

  13. The bush-cricket Isophya kraussii (Orthoptera: Phaneropteridae): bioacoustics, distribution and description of a new subspecies from Romania.

    PubMed

    Iorgu, Ionuţ Ştefan; Heller, Klaus-Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Isophya kraussii Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1878, one of the widest spread bush-crickets within this genus, is confirmed to be present east of the Carpathian Mountains. Based on acoustic analysis and morphological characters, the populations from NE Romania are considered to belong to a different subspecies, I. kraussii moldavica ssp. n. A map with distribution of both subspecies is presented.

  14. Changes in Federal Aid to State and Local Governments, as Proposed in the Bush Administration FY2002 Budget. Briefing Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishel, Lawrence

    This report analyzes the effect of President George W. Bush's administration's budget proposal on federal discretionary grant-in-aid programs provided to state and local governments. These programs are projected to be cut by 6.9 percent in fiscal year (FY) 2002 and, by 2011, by 11.2 percent. The report provides data on proposed changes in spending…

  15. 76 FR 30393 - Bush Industries, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Express Employment Professionals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ..., 2011, applicable to workers of Bush Industries, Inc., including on-site leased workers from Express... Industries, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Express Employment Professionals and Labor Ready, Erie, PA; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance...

  16. Justice, Sacrifice, and the Universal Audience: George Bush's "Address to the Nation Announcing Allied Military Action in the Persian Gulf."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Kimber Charles; Fadely, Dean

    1992-01-01

    Analyzes the quasi-logical argumentative framework of George Bush's address in which he endeavored to gain compliance and justify his actions at the beginning of the Persian Gulf War. Identifies arguments of comparison and sacrifice within that framework and examines the role of justice in the speech. (TB)

  17. Habitat selection by juvenile Mojave Desert tortoises

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, Brian D; Halstead, Brian J.; Chiquoine, Lindsay P.; Peaden, J. Mark; Buhlmann, Kurt A.; Tuberville, Tracey D.; Nafus, Melia G.

    2016-01-01

    Growing pressure to develop public lands for renewable energy production places several protected species at increased risk of habitat loss. One example is the Mojave desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), a species often at the center of conflicts over public land development. For this species and others on public lands, a better understanding of their habitat needs can help minimize negative impacts and facilitate protection or restoration of habitat. We used radio-telemetry to track 46 neonate and juvenile tortoises in the Eastern Mojave Desert, California, USA, to quantify habitat at tortoise locations and paired random points to assess habitat selection. Tortoise locations near burrows were more likely to be under canopy cover and had greater coverage of perennial plants (especially creosote [Larrea tridentata]), more coverage by washes, a greater number of small-mammal burrows, and fewer white bursage (Ambrosia dumosa) than random points. Active tortoise locations away from burrows were closer to washes and perennial plants than were random points. Our results can help planners locate juvenile tortoises and avoid impacts to habitat critical for this life stage. Additionally, our results provide targets for habitat protection and restoration and suggest that diverse and abundant small-mammal populations and the availability of creosote bush are vital for juvenile desert tortoises in the Eastern Mojave Desert.

  18. Governor Bush makes first phone call to KSC using new area code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At 8 a.m. in the videoconference room at Headquarters, Deputy Director for Business Operations Jim Jennings (center) waits for a phone call from Florida Governor Jeb Bush and Center Director Roy Bridges in Tallahassee, Fla. The call is to inaugurate the change of KSC's area code from 407 to 321, effective today. Key representatives of KSC contractors, along with KSC directorates, fill the room where the phone call is being received. Seated next to Jennings are Robert Osband (left), Florida Space Institute, and Col. Stephan Duresky (right), vice commander, 45th Space Wing. Osband is the one who suggested the 3-2-1 sequence, to reflect the importance of the space industry to Florida's space coast.

  19. Governor Bush makes first phone call to KSC using new area code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At 8 a.m. in the videoconference room at Headquarters, Deputy Director for Business Operations Jim Jennings (center) makes the connection for a phone call from Florida Governor Jeb Bush and Center Director Roy Bridges in Tallahassee, Fla. The call is to inaugurate the change of KSC's area code from 407 to 321, effective today. Key representatives of KSC contractors, along with KSC directorates, fill the room where the phone call is being received. Seated next to Jennings are Robert Osband (left), Florida Space Institute, and Col. Stephan Duresky (right), vice commander, 45th Space Wing. Osband is the one who suggested the 3-2-1 sequence to reflect the importance of the space industry to Florida's space coast.

  20. Florida Governor Jeb Bush joins Daniel Goldin at KSC for STS-97 launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Florida's Governor Jeb Bush (center) joins NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (right) for the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-97. They viewed the launch from the Banana Creek VIP Site. Liftoff of Endeavour occurred on time at 10:06:01 p.m. EST with a crew of five. The sixth construction flight to the International Space Station, Endeavour is transporting the P6 Integrated Truss Structure that comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to provide power to the Space Station. The 11-day mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. Endeavour is expected to land Dec. 11 at 6:19 p.m. EST.