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Sample records for cretaceous source rocks

  1. Cretaceous source rocks in Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Kari, I.B. )

    1993-02-01

    Pakistan is located at the converging boundaries of the Indian, Arabian, and Eurasian plates. Evolution of this tectonic setting has provided an array of environmental habitats for deposition of petroleum source rocks and development of structural forms. The potential Cretaceous source rocks in Central and South Indus Basin are spread over an area of about 300,000 km[sup 2]. With 2% cutoff on Total Organic Carbon, the average source rock thickness is 30-50 m, which is estimated to have generated more than 200 billion bbl of oil equivalent. To date, production of more than 30,000 bbl of oil and about 1200 million ft[sup 3] of gas per day can be directly attributed to Cretaceous source. This basin was an area of extensional tectonics during the Lower to Middle Cretaceous associated with slightly restricted circulation of the sea waters at the north-western margin of Indian Plate. Lower Cretaceous source rocks (Sembar Formation) were deposited while the basin was opening up and anoxia was prevailing. Similarly Middle to Upper Cretaceous clastics were deposited in setting favorable for preservation of organic matter. The time and depth of burial of the Cretaceous source material and optimum thermal regime have provided the requisite maturation level for generation of hydrocarbons in the basin. Central Indus basin is characterized by Cretaceous source rocks mature for gas generation. However, in South Indus Basin Cretaceous source rocks lie within the oil window in some parts and have gone past it in others.

  2. New depositional models for Cretaceous source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, E.G.; Villamil, T. )

    1993-02-01

    The Cretaceous marks one of the greatest periods of source rock development in geologic history, especially in coastal and epi-continental marine basins where the number, duration, and geographic extent of Corg-rich intervals exceeds that of oceanic basins. Large-scale factors regulating Cretaceous source rocks include sealevel, sedimentation rate/type, paleoclimate and marine thermal gradients, paleoceanography (circulation, stratification, chemistry, upwelling, nutrient supply), and surface water productivity. Marine dispositional settings favored as models for Corg concentration include silled and tectonically depressed basins, intersection of OMZ's with shallow continental seas, coastal upwelling, highly stratified shallow seas, and oceanic anoxic events (OAE's). All of these settings are thought to be characterized by stagnant, anoxic/highly dysoxic water masses above the sediment-water interface, and highly stressed benthic environments. This seemingly supported by fine lamination, spare bioturbation, high pyrite and Corg content of most source rocks. But high-resolution (cm-scale) sedimentologic, paleobiologic, and geochemical analyses of Jurassic-Cretaceous source rocks reveal, instead, dynamic benthic environments with active currents, episodically crowded with diverse life in event communities, and persistently characterized by longer term, low diversity resident benthic communities. These characteristics indicate rapidly fluctuating, predominantly dysoxic to oxic waters at and above the sediment-water interface for most Corg-rich black shales. A new model for source rock generation is proposed which retains the redox boundary at or near the sediment-water interface over large areas of seafloor, in part aided by extensive development of benthic microbial mats which may contribute up to 30% of the Corg to marine source rocks.

  3. Source rock potential of middle Cretaceous rocks in southwestern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Dyman, T.S.; Palacas, J.G.; Tysdal, R.G.; Perry, W.J. Jr.; Pawlewicz, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    The middle Cretaceous in southwestern Montana is composed of a marine and nonmarine succession of predominantly clastic rocks that were deposited along the western margin of the Western Interior Seaway. In places, middle Cretaceous rocks contain appreciable total organic carbon (TOC), such as 5.59% for the Mowry Shale and 8.11% for the Frontier Formation in the Madison Range. Most samples, however, exhibit less than 1.0% TOC. The genetic or hydrocarbon potential (S{sub 1}+S{sub 2}) of all the samples analyzed, except one, yield less than 1 mg HC/g rock, strongly indicating poor potential for generating commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. Out of 51 samples analyzed, only one (a Thermopolis Shale sample from the Snowcrest Range) showed a moderate petroleum potential of 3.1 mg HC/g rock. Most of the middle Cretaceous samples are thermally immature to marginally mature, with vitrinite reflectance ranging from about 0.4 to 0.6% R{sub o}. Maturity is high in the Pioneer Mountains, where vitrinite reflectance averages 3.4% R{sub o}, and at Big Sky, Montana, where vitrinite reflectance averages 2.5% R{sub o}. At both localities, high R{sub o} values are due to local heat sources, such as the Pioneer batholith in the Pioneer Mountains.

  4. Source rock potential of middle cretaceous rocks in Southwestern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Palacas, J.G.; Tysdal, R.G.; Perry, W.J.; Pawlewicz, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    The middle Cretaceous in southwestern Montana is composed of a marine and nonmarine succession of predominantly clastic rocks that were deposited along the western margin of the Western Interior Seaway. In places, middle Cretaceous rocks contain appreciable total organic carbon (TOC), such as 5.59% for the Mowry Shale and 8.11% for the Frontier Formation in the Madison Range. Most samples, however, exhibit less than 1.0% TOC. The genetic or hydrocarbon potential (S1+S2) of all the samples analyzed, except one, yield less than 1 mg HC/g rock, strongly indicating poor potential for generating commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. Out of 51 samples analyzed, only one (a Thermopolis Shale sample from the Snowcrest Range) showed a moderate petroleum potential of 3.1 mg HC/g rock. Most of the middle Cretaceous samples are thermally immature to marginally mature, with vitrinite reflectance ranging from about 0.4 to 0.6% Ro. Maturity is high in the Pioneer Mountains, where vitrinite reflectance averages 3.4% Ro, and at Big Sky Montana, where vitrinite reflectance averages 2.5% Ro. At both localities, high Ro values are due to local heat sources, such as the Pioneer batholith in the Pioneer Mountains.

  5. Source rock evaluation of Cretaceous and Tertiary series in Tunisia

    SciTech Connect

    Oudin, J. )

    1988-08-01

    Tunisia represents a mature hydrocarbon province with a long exploration history. In the Sfax-Kerkennah and Gabes Gulf areas, the hydrocarbon accumulations are located in series of Cretaceous and Tertiary age. To estimate the petroleum potential of this region, an evaluation of the source rock quality of the Cretaceous and Tertiary series was undertaken. In the Sfax-Kerkennak area, most of the wells studied indicate that, in the Tertiary, Ypresian and lower Lutetian show good organic content but, taking into account the potential productivity, only the Ypresian can be considered as a potential source rock. In the Cretaceous, mainly studies in the offshore area of the Gabes Gulf, the amount of organic matter is fair and it is chiefly located in Albian and Cenomanian. The Vraconian with its quite good potential is a valuable source rock. Due to the difference in the environment of deposition for these two possible source rocks - the Ypresian with its lagoon facies being carbonate and the Vraconian shaly - variations in the type of organic matter can be noted, although both are of marine origin. The hydrocarbons generated from these source rocks reflect these variations and permit them to correlate the different crude oils found in this area with their original source beds.

  6. Controls on the distribution of Cretaceous source rocks in South America

    SciTech Connect

    Vear, A. )

    1993-02-01

    More than thirty South American basins, exhibiting a variety of structural styles, contain petroleum source rocks of Cretaceous age. However, the presence of truly [open quote]world-class[close quote] source rocks, capable of supplying multi-billion barrel oil provinces, is restricted to relatively few basins and appears to be primarily a function of large scale Cretaceous tectonic setting. In Early Cretaceous times the best source rocks were preserved in both a southern ocean and in the rift between South America and Africa. By the Late Cretaceous, these southern and eastern continental limits had become narrow passive margins. In contrast, on the northern continental margin a wide shelf to a restricted tropical sea was developing at this time. Periodic upwelling enhanced surface productivity on this shelf, which led to development of some of the world's richest source rocks. On the tectonically active western margin moderate quality source rocks were forming in a series of back-arc basins, whilst further west, in the Pacific fore-arc, organic-rich intervals were rarely deposited. This article documents what is known about each of the explored basins (including the volume and character of discovered petroleums), it investigates the geologic factors which governed the richness and quality of petroleum source rocks and it assesses how continued tectonic activity has modified or even destroyed primary source quality. Finally it predicts which of the as yet underexplored basins should contain good quality source rocks and could become prolific petroleum provinces of the future.

  7. Source rock in the lower Tertiary and Cretaceous, deep-water Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, B.E.; Sofer, Z.; Claxton, B.L.

    1994-12-31

    The MC-84 (King) well was drilled in the deep-water Gulf of Mexico in 1993, in Mississippi Canyon Block 84 in a water depth of 5,149 ft. This well drilled an anticlinal feature. The well penetrated an Upper Cretaceous section and crossed Middle Cretaceous Unconformity with final total depth in the Lower Cenomanian. Numerous sidewall cores were taken throughout the Lower Tertiary and Cretaceous. Six of the sidewall cores (from 14,230 to 15,170 ft subsea) are organic rich and contain Type II oil-prone kerogen (TOC values from 2.6 to 5.2% and hydrogen indices from 360 to 543 ppm). The Lower Tertiary through Lower Cenomianian section is thermally immature for oil generation, on the basis of biomarker ratios and vitrinite reflectance measurements. Organic extracts from cores in the Cretaceous section had biomarker characteristics similar to oil recovered from the Miocene in the MC-84 well. The oil was generated from a similar but more mature source rock, probably of Early Cretaceous age. Results of thermal modeling indicate that the only section thermally mature for oil generation is in the lower portion of the Lower Cretaceous, below the total depth of the well. The model also indicates that the organic-rich section equivalent to that penetrated by the MC-84 well could be mature farther to the north, where water depths are shallower, overburden thickness is greater, and heat flow is higher. Late Tertiary sediment loading in this area, primarily during the Miocene, is probably the driving mechanism for hydrocarbon generation from the Cretaceous (and possibly the Lower Tertiary) potential source rocks. This offers a favorable geological setting for capturing hydrocarbons because reservoirs and traps associated with Miocene deposition and subsequent loading-induced salt movement had formed prior to the onset of oil generation and migration.

  8. Source terrains and diagenetic imprints of Cretaceous marine rocks of the Cordillera Oriental, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, M.P.; Allen, R.B. ); Rubiano, J.; Sarmiento, L. )

    1993-02-01

    Cretaceous marine rocks of the western Cordillera Oriental of Colombia are exposed in stratigraphic sections which reveal multiple source terrains and variable diagenetic histories that were imposed by later thrusting XRD and petrographic analyses indicate that earliest Cretaceous rocks were derived from a nearly plutonic source (Triassic-Jurassic Ibague Batholith of the Cordillera Central) which provided feldspathic lithic fragments and clay-sized illite. High smectite concentrations in the overlying Hauterivian-Barremian strata reflect contemporaneous volcanism, possibly in the Cordillera Central. This signal decreased upsection to the upper Aptian, where detrital clays (kaolinite, chlorite, feldspar, amphibole) indicate a shift to a cratonic source, probably the Guayana Shield. Cratonic detrital input continues into the Turonian-Coniacian and is accompanies by high concentrations of smectite representing another period of volcanic activity. Later tectonic activity divided the area into two regions, each with unique diagenetic signatures. Three primary clastic sources are inferred for the section east of the thrust belt, however, the mineral assemblage is masked by later diagenesis. Sediments within the thrust belt show greater variability in the relative abundance of mineral assemblages and more poorly crystallized illite than occurs to the east of the thrust section. The preservation of much of the original mineralogic components within the thrust section indicates that these sediments have experienced only limited diagenetic overprinting as a result of a relatively short burial history. These contrasting signatures have important implications for hydrocarbon maturation within Cretaceous source rocks in a structurally complex region.

  9. A plate tectonic-paleoceanographic hypothesis for Cretaceous source rocks and cherts of northern South America

    SciTech Connect

    Villamil, T.; Arango, C.

    1996-12-31

    New paleocontinental reconstructions show a northern migration of the South American Plate with respect to the paleoequator from the Jurassic to the Late Cretaceous. This movement caused the northern margin of South America to migrate from a position south to a position north of the paleoequator. Ekman transport generated net surface water movement towards the south during times when northern South America was south of the paleoequator. This situation favored downwelling and prevented Jurassic and earliest Cretaceous marine source rocks from being deposited. When northern South America was north of the paleoequator Ekman transport forced net water movement to the north favoring upwelling, paleoproductivity, and the deposition of one of the best marine source rocks known (the La Luna, Villeta, and equivalents). This plate tectonic paleoceanographic hypothesis explains the origin of hydrocarbons in northern South America. The stratigraphic record reflects this increase in paleoproductivity through time. This can be observed in facies (non-calcareous shales to calcareous shales to siliceous shales and finally to bedded cherts) and in changing planktic communities which were initially dominated by healthy calcareous foraminifer assemblages, followed by stressed foraminifer populations and finally by radiolarians. Total organic carbon and source rock quality were affected by this long term increase in paleoproductivity but also, and more markedly, by a punctuated sequence stratigraphic record dominated by low- frequency changes in relative sea level. The magnitude of transgressive episodes caused by rise in sea level determined the extent of source rock intervals and indirectly the content of organic carbon.

  10. A plate tectonic-paleoceanographic hypothesis for Cretaceous source rocks and cherts of northern South America

    SciTech Connect

    Villamil, T.; Arango, C. )

    1996-01-01

    New paleocontinental reconstructions show a northern migration of the South American Plate with respect to the paleoequator from the Jurassic to the Late Cretaceous. This movement caused the northern margin of South America to migrate from a position south to a position north of the paleoequator. Ekman transport generated net surface water movement towards the south during times when northern South America was south of the paleoequator. This situation favored downwelling and prevented Jurassic and earliest Cretaceous marine source rocks from being deposited. When northern South America was north of the paleoequator Ekman transport forced net water movement to the north favoring upwelling, paleoproductivity, and the deposition of one of the best marine source rocks known (the La Luna, Villeta, and equivalents). This plate tectonic paleoceanographic hypothesis explains the origin of hydrocarbons in northern South America. The stratigraphic record reflects this increase in paleoproductivity through time. This can be observed in facies (non-calcareous shales to calcareous shales to siliceous shales and finally to bedded cherts) and in changing planktic communities which were initially dominated by healthy calcareous foraminifer assemblages, followed by stressed foraminifer populations and finally by radiolarians. Total organic carbon and source rock quality were affected by this long term increase in paleoproductivity but also, and more markedly, by a punctuated sequence stratigraphic record dominated by low- frequency changes in relative sea level. The magnitude of transgressive episodes caused by rise in sea level determined the extent of source rock intervals and indirectly the content of organic carbon.

  11. Thermochronology of lower Cretaceous source rocks in the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Burtner, R.L.; Nigrini, A.; Donelick, R.A.

    1994-10-01

    Lower Cretaceous organic-rich source rocks that are thermally mature to postmature crop out on the Absaroka, Darby, and Prospect plates in linear belts that run parallel to the trace of the thrusts in the Idaho-Wyoming portion of the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah thrust belt. Although the common assumption is that burial by thrust plates and the synorogenic sediments derived from them have been responsible for thermal maturation of the organic-rich strata, commercial amounts of hydrocarbons have not been found in structural traps in this portion of the thrust belt. In a companion paper, Burtner and Nigrini demonstrated that gravity-driven fluid flow in the Idaho-Wyoming portion of the thrust belt was responsible for moving large amounts of heat from the depths of the Early Cretaceous foreland basin eastward toward the stable platform. In this paper we demonstrate, through the application of organic maturation indicators and a new refinement of the apatite fission track technique, that this process heated Lower Cretaceous organic-rich source rocks to temperatures sufficient to generate hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbon generation and migration occurred prior to the development of the thrusts that are often assumed to have played a major role in the generation and entrapment of hydrocarbons in this portion of the thrust belt.

  12. Source rock in the Lower Tertiary and Cretaceous, deep-water Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, B.E.; Sofer, Z.; Claxton, B.L.

    1994-09-01

    Amoco drilled three wells in the deep-water Gulf of Mexico in 1993. One well, in Mississippi Canyon Block 84 (W.D. 5200 ft), drilled a structural feature. The well penetrated Cretaceous section and crossed the middle Cenomanian unconformity. Six sidewall cores from 14,230-15,200 ft (subsea) contained TOC values from 2.6 to 5.2% with hydrogen indices front 360 to 543 ppm in lower Tertiary and Cretaceous shales. All six cores were thermally immature, for oil generation, based on biomarker ratios and vitrinite reflectance measurements. Organic extracts from cores in the Cretaceous had biomarker characteristics similar to oil reservoired in the Miocene. The oil was probably generated from a similar, but more mature, source rock. The high structural position of the well prevented the lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous section from entering the oil window at this location. There are over 2000 ft of structural relief and an additional 6000-8000 ft of Lower Cretaceous section below the level penetrated by the well. It is probable that an equivalent section off structure is in the oil window. Prior to drilling, estimates of expected thermal maturities and temperatures were made using {sub BASINMOD}, a hydrocarbon generation/expulsion modeling package. The model predicted higher well temperatures (e,g., 225{degrees}F vs. 192{degrees}F) and lower vitrinite maturity (0.44% vs. 0.64%) than encountered in the well. Vitrinite reflectance equivalents of 0.41% and 0.43% were calculated from biomarker ratios of the Cretaceous core extracts, matching the {sub BASINMOD} predicted value of 0.44%.

  13. Cretaceous source rock characterization of the Atlantic Continental margin of Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Jabour, H. )

    1993-02-01

    Characterization of the petroleum potential for the Atlantic margin of Morocco has been based primarily on limited, antiently acquired organic geochemical data. These indicate the area of drilling behind the paleoshelf edge to be only fair in organic carbon and C15+ extract values with predominantly terrestrial kerogen types. Recently acquired geochemical data obtained from relatively recent drilling both behind and beyond the paleoshelf edge indicate 4 depositional facies containing hydrogen rich amorphous kerogen assemblages. These are: (1) Lower to Mid Jurassic inner shelf facies probably deposited in algal rich lagoon-like, (2) Lower Cretaceous non marine coaly facies probably deposited in algal rich swamplike environments, (3) Middle Cretaceous facies characterized by restrited anoxic environment with sediments rich in marine kerogen types deposited under sluggish wather circulation, (4) Upper Cretaceous to Tertiary outer-shelf to Upper slope facies probably deposited under algal-rich upwelling systems. Of these, the Cretaceous facies is the most widespread and represents the best source rock potential characteristics. Correlation of these facies to recently acquired good quality seismic packages allows for extrapolation of probable organic facies distribution throughout the continental margin. This should enhance the hydrocarbon potential of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments both landward and seaward of the paleoshelf edge and thus permits refinement of strategies for hydrocarbon exploration in the area.

  14. Source rock contributions to the Lower Cretaceous heavy oil accumulations in Alberta: a basin modeling study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berbesi, Luiyin Alejandro; di Primio, Rolando; Anka, Zahie; Horsfield, Brian; Higley, Debra K.

    2012-01-01

    The origin of the immense oil sand deposits in Lower Cretaceous reservoirs of the Western Canada sedimentary basin is still a matter of debate, specifically with respect to the original in-place volumes and contributing source rocks. In this study, the contributions from the main source rocks were addressed using a three-dimensional petroleum system model calibrated to well data. A sensitivity analysis of source rock definition was performed in the case of the two main contributors, which are the Lower Jurassic Gordondale Member of the Fernie Group and the Upper Devonian–Lower Mississippian Exshaw Formation. This sensitivity analysis included variations of assigned total organic carbon and hydrogen index for both source intervals, and in the case of the Exshaw Formation, variations of thickness in areas beneath the Rocky Mountains were also considered. All of the modeled source rocks reached the early or main oil generation stages by 60 Ma, before the onset of the Laramide orogeny. Reconstructed oil accumulations were initially modest because of limited trapping efficiency. This was improved by defining lateral stratigraphic seals within the carrier system. An additional sealing effect by biodegraded oil may have hindered the migration of petroleum in the northern areas, but not to the east of Athabasca. In the latter case, the main trapping controls are dominantly stratigraphic and structural. Our model, based on available data, identifies the Gordondale source rock as the contributor of more than 54% of the oil in the Athabasca and Peace River accumulations, followed by minor amounts from Exshaw (15%) and other Devonian to Lower Jurassic source rocks. The proposed strong contribution of petroleum from the Exshaw Formation source rock to the Athabasca oil sands is only reproduced by assuming 25 m (82 ft) of mature Exshaw in the kitchen areas, with original total organic carbon of 9% or more.

  15. Origin of crude oil in eastern Gulf Coast: Upper Jurassic, Upper Cretaceous, and lower Tertiary source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, R.

    1988-02-01

    Analysis of rock and crude oil samples suggests that three source rocks have given rise to most crude oil in reservoirs of the eastern Gulf Coast. Carbonate source rocks of the Jurassic Smackover Formation are characterized by algal-derived kerogen preserved in an anoxic and hypersaline environment, resulting in crude oils with distinct compositions. Migration commenced during the Cretaceous, explaining the emplacement of Smackover-derived crude oil in Jurassic and in some Cretaceous reservoirs. Upper Cretaceous clastic and carbonate source rocks are also present. Much crude oil in Upper Cretaceous reservoirs has been derived from organic-rich marine shales of the Tuscaloosa Formation. These shales are characterized by algal and higher plant kerogen, resulting in distinct crude oil compositions. Migration commenced during the Tertiary, but was mostly focused to Upper Cretaceous reservoirs. Lower Tertiary shales, including those of the Wilcox Formation, are quite organic-rich and include downdip marine facies characterized by both algal and higher plant kerogen. Crude oils in lower Tertiary reservoirs are dissimilar to crude oils from deeper and older source rocks. Migration from lower Tertiary shales commenced during the late Tertiary and charged Tertiary reservoirs. Although most crude oil in the eastern Gulf Coast has been emplaced by short-range migration, often with a strong vertical component, some long-range lateral migration (> 100 km) has occurred along lower Tertiary sands. The framework of crude oil generation and migration onshore has important implications with respect to origin of crude oil in the Gulf of Mexico.

  16. Petroleum geochemistry of oil and gas from Barbados: Implications for distribution of Cretaceous source rocks and regional petroleum prospectivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, R.J.; Schenk, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Petroleum produced from the Barbados accretionary prism (at Woodbourne Field on Barbados) is interpreted as generated from Cretaceous marine shale deposited under normal salinity and dysoxic conditions rather than from a Tertiary source rock as previously proposed. Barbados oils correlate with some oils from eastern Venezuela and Trinidad that are positively correlated to extracts from Upper Cretaceous La Luna-like source rocks. Three distinct groups of Barbados oils are recognized based on thermal maturity, suggesting petroleum generation occurred at multiple levels within the Barbados accretionary prism. Biodegradation is the most significant process affecting Barbados oils resulting in increased sulfur content and decreased API gravity. Barbados gases are interpreted as thermogenic, having been co-generated with oil, and show mixing with biogenic gas is limited. Gas biodegradation occurred in two samples collected from shallow reservoirs at the Woodbourne Field. The presence of Cretaceous source rocks within the Barbados accretionary prism suggests that greater petroleum potential exists regionally, and perhaps further southeast along the passive margin of South America. Likewise, confirmation of a Cretaceous source rock indicates petroleum potential exists within the Barbados accretionary prism in reservoirs that are deeper than those from Woodbourne Field.

  17. Lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous source rocks in Louisiana and Mississippi: Implications to Gulf of Mexico crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, R. )

    1990-06-01

    The Lower Tertiary Sparta Formation, Wilcox Group, and the Midway Group in southern Louisiana include organic-rich source facies that generate crude oil at relatively high thermal maturities. The Wilcox Group is an important source of Wilcox crude oil, and regional kerogen variations explain two crude oil subfamilies. Wilcox crude oils in downdip areas of southern Louisiana migrated short distances, but long-range lateral migration (about 150 km) best explains Wilcox crude oils far updip from mature source rocks. Crude oils in Oligocene and younger reservoirs in southern Louisiana migrated vertically from deep lower Tertiary source rocks. Some crude oils in Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa reservoirs were emplaced by long-range lateral migration from Tuscaloosa source rocks. Given little evidence of upper Tertiary source rocks and the overmaturity problems of Mesozoic source rocks, most crude oils in upper Tertiary and Pleistocene reservoirs of the Gulf continental shelf are best explained by vertical migration from deep lower Tertiary source rocks. Even so, it is simplistic to assume an exclusive lower Tertiary origin. Many Tertiary and Pleistocene crude oils of this study probably include an overprint of high-maturity hydrocarbons from Mesozoic sources. 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. High resolution study of petroleum source rock variation, Lower Cretaceous (Hauterivian and Barremian) of Mikkelsen Bay, North Slope, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keller, Margaret A.; Macquaker, Joe H.S.; Lillis, Paul G.

    2001-01-01

    Open File Report 01-480 was designed as a large format poster for the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists and the Society for Sedimentary Geology in Denver Colorado in June 2001. It is reproduced here in digital format to make widely available some unique images of mudstones. The images include description, interpretation, and Rock-Eval data that resulted from a high-resolution study of petroleum source rock variation of the Lower Cretaceous succession of the Mobil-Phillips Mikkelsen Bay State #1 well on the North Slope of Alaska. Our mudstone samples with Rock-Eval data plus color images are significant because they come from one of the few continuously cored and complete intervals of the Lower Cretaceous succession on the North Slope. This succession, which is rarely preserved in outcrop and very rarely cored in the subsurface, is considered to include important petroleum source rocks that have not previously been described nor explained Another reason these images are unique is that the lithofacies variability within mudstone dominated successions is relatively poorly known in comparison with that observed in coarser clastic and carbonate successions. They are also among the first published scans of thin sections of mudstone, and are of excellent quality because the sections are well made, cut perpendicular to bedding, and unusually thin, 20 microns. For each of 15 samples, we show a thin section scan (cm scale) and an optical photomicrograph (mm scale) that illustrates the variability present. Several backscattered SEM images are also shown. Rock-Eval data for the samples can be compared with the textures and mineralogy present by correlating sample numbers and core depth.

  19. Cretaceous source rock sedimentation and its relation to transgressive peaks and geodynamic events for the Central Tethys

    SciTech Connect

    Flexer, A. ); Honigstein, A.; Rosenfeld, A. ); Lipson, S. ); Tarnenbaum, E. )

    1993-02-01

    The reconstruction of the Mesozoic continents shows a wide triangle-shaped Tethys (or Neotethys) between Africa and Eurasia. The Arabian Craton comprised the central part of its southern margins. The Cretaceous period started with extension, volcanism, continued by accelerated divergence during Aptian-Turonian and terminated by convergence and folding. The sea level stand, after a major fall at the commencement, is characterized by a steady stepwise rise with some minor retreats. The global oceanic anoxic events correspond to large-extent transgressions and associated with organic rich sedimentation. The accelerated building up of mid-oceanic ridges is possibly connected to a mantle plume, active around 120-80 Ma. Sea level rise and sea floor spreading is felt mainly at these times in the passive southern margins of the central Tethys. The Senonian compressive tectonic regime transforms them into active margins (destruction of oceanic crust, obduction and thrusting); sea level highstands control dysoxic sedimentation. Dysoxic sediments were observed in the Gevaram shales (Tithonian-Hauterivian). Talme Yafe marls (Late Aptian-Albian), Daliyya Formation (latest Cenomanian-Turonian) and the Mount Scopus Group (Santonian-Maastrichtian). The organic matter in the Gevaram shales is mixed marine and terrestrial (2.6% TOC) and in the Daliyya marls mostly marine (2.5% TOC). Both units have source rock possibilities and yield petroleum upon appropriate burial. The Senonian bituminous rocks (oil shales) are rich in marine organic matter (20% TOC) and are excellent source rocks in the Dead Sea area.

  20. Nonmarine upper cretaceous rocks, Cook Inlet, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Magoon, L.B.; Griesbach, F.B.; Egbert, R.M.

    1980-08-01

    A section of Upper Cretaceous (Maestrichtian) nonmarine sandstone, conglomerate, and siltstone with associated coal is exposed near Saddle mountain on the northwest flank of Cook Inlet basin, the only known surface exposure of nonmarine Upper Cretaceous rocks in the Cook Inlet area. The section, at least 83.3 m thick, unconformably overlies the Upper Jurassic Naknek Formation and is unconformably overlain by the lower Tertiary West Foreland Formation. These upper Cretaceous rocks correlate lithologically with the second or deeper interval of nonmarine Upper Cretaceous rocks penetrated in the lower Cook Inlet COST 1 well.

  1. Warm Eocene climate enhanced petroleum generation from Cretaceous source rocks: A potential climate feedback mechanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, K. F.; Funnell, R. H.

    2012-02-01

    Earth surface temperatures, including in the deep sea increased by 5-10°C from the late Paleocene ca. 58 Myr ago to the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) centered at about 51 Myr ago. A large (˜2.5‰) drop in δ13C of carbonate spans much of this interval. This suggests a long-term increase in the net flux of 13C-depleted carbon to the ocean and atmosphere that is difficult to explain by changes in surficial carbon cycling alone. We reveal a relationship between surface temperature increase and increased petroleum generation in sedimentary basins operating on 100 kyr to Myr time scales. We propose that early Eocene warming has led to a synchronization of periods of maximum petroleum generation and enhanced generation in otherwise unproductive basins through extension of the volume of source rock within the oil and gas window across hundreds of sedimentary basins globally. Modelling the thermal evolution of four sedimentary basins in the southwest Pacific predicted an up to 50% increase in petroleum generation that would have significantly increased leakage of light hydrocarbons and oil degeneration products into the atmosphere. Extrapolating our modelling results to hundreds of sedimentary basins worldwide suggests that globally increased leakage could have caused a climate feedback effect, driving or enhancing early Eocene climate warming.

  2. Lead isotope compositions of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous rocks and sulfide minerals in Arizona: Implications for the sources of plutons and metals in porphyry copper deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouse, R.M.; Ruiz, J.; Titley, S.R.; Tosdal, R.M.; Wooden, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Porphyry copper deposits in Arizona are genetically associated with Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous complexes that consist of older intermediate volcanic rocks and younger intermediate to felsic intrusions. The igneous complexes and their associated porphyry copper deposits were emplaced into an Early Proterozoic basement characterized by different rocks, geologic histories, and isotopic compositions. Lead isotope compositions of the Proterozoic basement rocks define, from northwest to southeast, the Mojave, central Arizona, and southeastern Arizona provinces. Porphyry copper deposits are present in each Pb isotope province. Lead isotope compositions of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary plutons, together with those of sulfide minerals in porphyry copper deposits and of Proterozoic country rocks, place important constraints on genesis of the magmatic suites and the porphyry copper deposits themselves. The range of age-corrected Pb isotope compositions of plutons in 12 Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous complexes is 206Pb/204Pb = 17.34 to 22.66, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.43 to 15.96, and 208Pb/204Pb = 37.19 to 40.33. These Pb isotope compositions and calculated model Th/U are similar to those of the Proterozoic rocks in which the plutons were emplaced, thereby indicating that Pb in the younger rocks and ore deposits was inherited from the basement rocks and their sources. No Pb isotope differences distinguish Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous complexes that contain large economic porphyry copper deposits from less rich or smaller deposits that have not been considered economic for mining. Lead isotope compositions of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary plutons and sulfide minerals from 30 metallic mineral districts, furthermore, require that the southeastern Arizona Pb province be divided into two subprovinces. The northern subprovince has generally lower 206Pb/204Pb and higher model Th/U, and the southern subprovince has higher 206Pb/204Pb and

  3. Depositional environment and distribution of Late Cretaceous [open quotes]source rocks[close quotes] from Costa Rica to West Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, R.N.; Sofer, Z. ); Pratt, L.M. ); Palmer, S.E. )

    1993-02-01

    Late Cretaceous [open quotes]source rocks[close quotes] from Costa Rica, western and eastern Venezuela, and Trinidad were studied using organic and inorganic geochemistry, biostratigraphy, and sedimentology in order to determine their depositional environments. Bulk mineralogy and major element geochemistry for 304 samples were combined with Rock Eval data and extract biomaker analysis to infer the types and distributions of the various Late Cretaceous productivity systems represented in the dataset. When data from this study are combined with published and proprietary data from offshore West Africa, Guyana/Suriname, and the central Caribbean, they show that these Late Cretaceous units can be correlated by their biogeochemical characteristics to establish their temporal and spatial relationships. Paleogeographic maps constructed for the early to late Cenomanian, Turonian, Coniacian to middle Santonian, and late Santonian to latest Campanian show that upwelling and excessive fluvial runoff were probably the dominant sources of nutrient supply to the coastal productivity systems. The late Santonian to Maastrichtian rocks examined in this study indicate that organic material was poorly preserved after deposition, even though biologic productivity remained constant or changed only slightly. A rapid influx of oxygenated bottom water may have occurred following the opening of a deep water connection between the North and South Atlantic oceans, and/or separation of India from Africa and the establishment of an Antarctic oceanic connection. This study suggests that the most important factors that controlled source rock quality in northern South America were productivity, preservation, degree of clastic dilution, and subsurface diagenesis.

  4. Isotopic evidence for the sources of Cretaceous and tertiary granitic rocks, east-central Alaska: Implications for the tectonic evolution of the Yukon-Tanana terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Farmer, G.L.; Rye, R.O.; Nokleberg, W.J.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetotelluric traverses across the southern Yukon-Tanana terrane (YTT) reveal the presence of a thick conductive layer (or layers) beneath Paleozoic crystalline rocks. These rocks have been interpreted to be flysch of probable Mesozoic age, on the basis of the occurrence of Jurassic-Cretaceous flysch in the Kahiltna assemblage and Gravina-Nutzotin belt flanking the YTT to the southwest and southeast, respectively. The Pb, Nd, Sr, and O isotopes in Cretaceous and Tertiary granitic rocks that crop out throughout the YTT were measured to determine if these rocks do in fact contain a component of flysch. Previous limited analyses indicated that the Pb isotopes of the granitic rocks could be a mixture of radiogenic Pb derived from Paleozoic crystalline rocks of the YTT with an increasing component of relatively nonradiogenic Pb with decreasing age. Our Nd, Sr, and O data, along with additional Pb isotope data, eliminate flysch as a likely source and strongly suggest that the nonradiogenic end-member was derived from mafic rocks, either directly from mantle magma or by melting of mafic crust. The lack of a sedimentary component in the granitic plutons suggests either that the plutons did not incorporate significant amounts of flysch during intrusion or that the conductive layer beneath the YTT crystalline rocks is not flysch.

  5. Source rock potential in Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, H.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Pakistan contains two sedimentary basins: Indus in the east and Balochistan in the west. The Indus basin has received sediments from precambrian until Recent, albeit with breaks. It has been producing hydrocarbons since 1914 from three main producing regions, namely, the Potwar, Sulaisman, and Kirthar. In the Potwar, oil has been discovered in Cambrian, Permian, Jurassic, and Tertiary rocks. Potential source rocks are identified in Infra-Cambrian, Permian, Paleocene, and Eocene successions, but Paleocene/Eocene Patala Formation seems to be the main source of most of the oil. In the Sulaiman, gas has been found in Cretaceous and Tertiary; condensate in Cretaceous rocks. Potential source rocks are indicated in Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Eocene successions. The Sembar Formation of Early Cretaceous age appears to be the source of gas. In the Kirthar, oil and gas have been discovered in Cretaceous and gas has been discovered in paleocene and Eocene rocks. Potential source rocks are identified in Kirthar and Ghazij formations of Eocene age in the western part. However, in the easter oil- and gas-producing Badin platform area, Union Texas has recognized the Sembar Formation of Early Cretaceous age as the only source of Cretaceous oil and gas. The Balochistan basin is part of an Early Tertiary arc-trench system. The basin is inadequately explored, and there is no oil or gas discovery so far. However, potential source rocks have been identified in Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene, and Pliocene successions based on geochemical analysis of surface samples. Mud volcanoes are present.

  6. Marine and nonmarine gas-bearing rocks in Upper Cretaceous Blackhawk and Neslen Formations, eastern Uinta Basin, Utah: sedimentology, diagenesis, and source rock potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitman, J.K.; Franczyk, K.J.; Anders, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Thermogenic gas was generated from interbedded humic-rich source rocks. The geometry and distribution of hydrocarbon source and reservoir rocks are controlled by depositional environment. The rate of hydrocarbon generation decreased from the late Miocene to the present, owing to widespread cooling that occurred in response to regional uplift and erosion associated with the development of the Colorado Plateau. -from Authors

  7. Distribution of organic carbon and petroleum source rock potential of Cretaceous and lower Tertiary carbonates, South Florida Basin: preliminary results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palacas, James George

    1978-01-01

    Analyses of 134 core samples from the South Florida Basin show that the carbonates of Comanchean age are relatively richer in average organic carbon (0.41 percent) than those of Coahuilan age (0.28 percent), Gulfian age (0.18 percent) and Paleocene age (0.20 percent). They are also nearly twice as rich as the average world, wide carbonate (average 0.24 percent). The majority of carbonates have organic carbons less than 0.30 percent but the presence of many relatively organic rich beds composed of highly bituminous, argillaceous, highly stylolitic, and algal-bearing limestones and dolomites accounts for the higher percentage of organic carbon in some of the stratigraphic units. Carbonate rocks that contain greater than 0.4 percent organic carbon and that might be considered as possible petroleum sources were noted in almost each subdivision of the Coahuilan and Comanchean Series but particularly the units of Fredericksburg 'B', Trinity 'A', Trinity 'F', and Upper Sunniland. Possible source rocks have been ascribed by others to the Lower Sunniland, but lack of sufficient samples precluded any firm assessment in this initial report. In the shallower section of the basin, organic-rich carbonates containing as much as 3.2 percent organic carbon were observed in the lowermost part of the Gulfian Series and carbonate rocks with oil staining or 'dead' and 'live oil' were noted by others in the uppermost Gulfian and upper Cedar Keys Formation. It is questionable whether these shallower rocks are of sufficient thermal maturity to have generated commercial oil. The South Florida basin is still sparsely drilled and produces only from the Sunniland Limestone at an average depth of 11,500 feet (3500 m). Because the Sunniland contains good reservoir rocks and apparently adequate source rocks, and because the success rate of new oil field discoveries has increased in recent years, the chances of finding additional oil reserves in the Sunniland are promising. Furthermore, the

  8. Sedimentary environments for the massive formation of the lacustrine organic rich petroleum source rocks of late Cretaceous from Songliao Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhiguang, S.

    2009-12-01

    Songliao Basin is the major oil-bearing and production basin in China and containing two major sets of excellent organic matter rich source rocks developed during the two related short periods of later Cretaceous time. For a long time, these source rocks were considered unquestionably being formed under fresh or brackish lacustrine environment. However, increasing evidence and studies suggest that this may be not the case anymore, as possible marine transgression and much high salinity lacustrine environment has been suggested or implied from a number of recent studies for Songliao Basin. Here, we show our recent extensive organic geochemical studies carried out on the core samples of Nenjiang formation from a newly drilled scientific exploration well of No. 1 in Songliao Basin. The overall evidence of organic matter and biomarkers suggest that: 1) the main source rocks were likely formed under a much saline(even mesosaline) lacustrine environment, as the existence of a number high saline related biomarkers and their ratios such Pr/Ph, MTTCI, α-MTTC/δ-MTTC, α-MTTC /γ-MTTC, Gammacerane/C30hop are in favor of a mesosaline to saline environments; 2) during the major source rocks formation periods, a photic zone oxygen depletion and stratified water column was suggested by the strong occurrence of a series of aryl isoprenoids and Isorenieratane; 3) a general mild to strong reduced sedimentary environments were concluded from the consistent of a number of index. Fig 1 Correlation between MTTCI vs Pr/Ph ratios with indication of salinity fields (after SCHWARK et al., 1998)

  9. Organic facies variations, source rock potential, and sea level changes in Cretaceous black shales of the Quebrada Ocal, upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, U.; Stein, R.

    1997-04-01

    A 290-m-thick middle Cretaceous black shale sequence in the upper Magdalena Valley, a present-day intramontane basin located between the Central and Eastern cordilleras of Colombia, was investigated with organic-geochemical and microscopic analyses. As a result of the investigation, we were able to (1) differentiate four organic facies types, (2) estimate their source rock potential, and (3) integrated these facies into a sequence stratigraphic framework. The four organic facies types were type C, BC, B, and D. Type C contains a district terrigenous organic matter component in lowstand or highstand deposits. Organic facies type BC is characterized by an increase and a better preservation of marine organic matter. BC belongs to the lower part of the transgressive systems tract. Sediments of organic facies type B have the highest amount of marine organic matter due to excellent preservation under anoxic conditions. The absence of bioturbation and the enrichment of trace metals are further implications for deposition under anoxic conditions. Facies type B is found in the upper part of the transgressive systems tract and contains the best petroleum source rock potential. Facies B occurrence coincides with sea level highstand and correlates especially with a maximum flooding in northern South America during the Turonian. Organic facies type D is also related to highstand deposits, but shows a high rate of reworking and degradation of organic matter.

  10. Groundwater from Lower Cretaceous rocks in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keene, Katherine M.; Bayne, Charles Knight

    1976-01-01

    Sandstones in Lower Cretaceous rocks contain supplies, of water that may be adequate to meet increasing present and future demands for supplemental municipal and domestic use in central and western Kansas. An estimated 70 to 80 million acre-feet (86,000 to 99,000 cubic hectometers) of water containing less than 1,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids may be acceptable for use at the present (1976). An additional 10 to 15 million acre-feet (12,000 to 18,000 cubic hectometers) containing 1,000 to 3,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids is estimated to be available for use in the future with appropriate desalinization. Lower Cretaceous rocks crop out from Washington County on the north to Comanche County on-the south. The rocks dip from a structural high in the southwest part of the State to structural lows in the northwest and north-central part. Depth below land surface increases generally northwestward to about 2,600 feet (790 meters); thickness of the rocks increases westward, nearly zero to about 850 feet (260 meters). The rocks consist chiefly of marine to nonmarine shale and silt- stone interbedded with coastal to deltaic sandstone. The interbedded sandstone, which composes about one-third of the rocks, consists of one or more lenses that thicken westward to about 400 feet (120 meters) in the central part of western Kansas. The yield of water to individual wells is related to areal extent, thickness, and interconnection of the sand lenses and to grain size and cementation of the sand. Large amounts of water may be pumped by wells where loosely cemented sand lenses are interconnected. Wells commonly yield adequate supplies for domestic and stock use; reported yields from municipal and irrigation wells range from about 100 to 2,000 gallons per minute (6 to 125 liters per second). Recharge to the Lower Cretaceous-rocks occurs in the area of outcrop and from hydraulically connected saturated Cenozoic rocks, especially in the southern part of the State

  11. Source rock potential of upper cretaceous marine shales in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming: Chapter 8 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas resources in the Wind River Basin Province, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Thomas M.

    2007-01-01

    /S3 ratios indicate that it is capable of generating both oil and gas. Maps showing the distribution of kerogen types and organic richness for the lower shaly member of the Cody Shale are similar to the Mowry and show that lower shaly member of the Cody is more organic rich and more oil-prone in the eastern part of the basin. Analyses of samples of the upper sandy member of the Cody Shale indicate that it has little or no potential as a source rock. Thermal maturity mapping based on vitrinite reflectance measurements in the coal-bearing post-Cody Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene rocks shows that Upper Cretaceous marine shales in the deeper parts of the Wind River Basin are thermally mature to overmature with respect to hydrocarbon generation.

  12. Well-log signatures of alluvial-lacustrine reservoirs and source rocks, Lagoa-Feia Formations, Lower Cretaceous, Campos Basin, offshore Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahao, D.; Warme, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Campos basin is situated in offshore southeastern Brazil. The Lagoa Feia is the basal formation in the stratigraphic sequence of the basin, and was deposited during rifting in an evolving complex of lakes of different sizes and chemical characteristics, overlying and closely associated with rift volcanism. The stratigraphic sequence is dominated by lacustrine limestones and shales (some of them organic-rich), and volcaniclastic conglomerates deposited on alluvial fans. The sequence is capped by marine evaporites. In the Lagoa Feia Formation, complex lithologies make reservoirs and source rocks unsuitable for conventional well-log interpretation. To solve this problem, cores were studied and the observed characteristics related to log responses. The results have been extended through the entire basin for other wells where those facies were not cored. The reservoir facies in the Lagoa Feia Formation are restricted to levels of pure pelecypod shells (''coquinas''). Resistivity, sonic, neutron, density, and gamma-ray logs were used in this work to show how petrophysical properties are derived for the unconventional reservoirs existing in this formation. The same suite of logs was used to develop methods to define geochemical characteristics where source rock data are sparse in the organic-rich lacustrine shales of the Lagoa Feia Formation. These shales are the main source rocks for all the oil discovered to date in the Campos basin.

  13. Two Distinct Sets of Magma Sources in Cretaceous Rocks From Magnet Cove, Prairie Creek, and Other Igneous Centers of the Arkansas Alkaline Province, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, G. I.; Carlson, R. W.; Eby, G. N.

    2008-12-01

    Two distinct sets of magma sources from the Arkansas alkaline province (~106-89 Ma) are revealed by Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions of olivine lamproites vs. other alkalic rock types, including carbonatite, ijolite, lamprophyres, tephrite, malignite, jacupirangite, phonolite, trachyte, and latite. Isotopic compositions of diamond-bearing olivine lamproites from Prairie Creek and Dare Mine Knob point to Proterozoic lithosphere as an important source, and previous Re-Os isotopic data indicate derivation from subcontinental mantle lithosphere. Both sources were probably involved in lamproite generation. Magnet Cove carbonatites and other alkalic magmas were likely derived from an asthenospheric source. Lamproite samples are isotopically quite different from other rock types in Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic space. Although three lamproite samples from Prairie Creek have a large range of SiO2 contents (40-60 wt %), initial values of ɛNd (-10 to -13), 206Pb/204Pb (16.61-16.81), 207Pb/204Pb (15.34-15.36), and 208Pb/204Pb (36.57-36.76) are low and similar. Only 87Sr/86Sr(i) displays a wide range in the Prairie Creek lamproites (0.70627-0.70829). A fourth lamproite from Dare Mine Knob has the most negative ɛNd(i) of -19. Lamproite isotope values show a significant crustal component and isotopically overlap subalkalic rhyolites from the Black Hills (SD), which assimilated Proterozoic crust. Six samples of carbonatite, ijolite, and jacupirangite from Magnet Cove and Potash Sulphur Springs exhibit the most depleted Sr-Nd isotopic signatures of all samples. For these rock types, 87Sr/86Sr(i) is 0.70352 - 0.70396, and ɛNd(i) is +3.8 - +4.3. Eight other rock types have a narrow range of ɛNd(i) (+1.9 - +3.7), but a wide range of 87Sr/86Sr(i) (0.70424 - 0.70629). These 14 samples comprise a fairly tight cluster of Pb isotopic values: 206Pb/204Pb (18.22-19.23), 207Pb/204Pb (15.54-15.62), and 208Pb/204Pb (38.38-38.94), suggesting very little crustal assimilation. They are most similar to EM-2

  14. Assessment of Coalbed Gas Resources in Cretaceous and Tertiary Rocks on the North Slope, Alaska, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Steve; Barker, Charles E.; Bird, Kenneth J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy; Houseknecht, David W.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    The North Slope of Alaska is a vast area of land north of the Brooks Range, extending from the Chukchi Sea eastward to the Canadian border. This Arctic region is known to contain extensive coal deposits; hypothetical coal resource estimates indicate that nearly 4 trillion short tons of coal are in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks. Because of the large volume of coal, other studies have indicated that this region might also have potential for significant coalbed gas resources. The present study represents the first detailed assessment of undiscovered coalbed gas resources beneath the North Slope by the USGS. The assessment is based on the total petroleum system (TPS) concept. Geologic elements within a TPS relate to hydrocarbon source rocks (maturity, hydrocarbon generation, migration), the characteristics of reservoir rocks, and trap and seal formation. In the case of coalbed gas, the coal beds serve as both source rock and reservoir. The Brookian Coalbed Gas Composite TPS includes coal-bearing rocks in Cretaceous and Tertiary strata underlying the North Slope and adjacent Alaska State waters. Assessment units (AUs) within the TPS (from oldest to youngest) include the Nanushuk Formation Coalbed Gas AU, the Prince Creek and Tuluvak Formations Coalbed Gas AU, and the Sagavanirktok Formation Coalbed Gas AU.

  15. Paleointensity of the geomagnetic field in the Cretaceous (from Cretaceous rocks of Mongolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakova, V. V.; Kovalenko, D. V.; Shcherbakov, V. P.; Zhidkov, G. V.

    2011-09-01

    A representative collection of Cretaceous rocks of Mongolia is used for the study of the magnetic properties of the rocks and for determination of the paleodirections and paleointensities H anc of the geomagnetic field. The characteristic NRM component in the samples is recognized in the temperature interval from 200 to 620-660°C. The values of H anc are determined by the Thellier-Coe method with observance of all present-day requirements regarding the reliability of such kind of results. Comparison of data in the literature on paleointensity in the Cretaceous superchron and in the Miocene supports the hypothesis of the inverse correlation between the average intensity of the paleofield and the frequency of geomagnetic reversals. The increase in the average intensities is accompanied by an appreciable increase in the variance of the virtual dipole moment (VDM). We suggest that the visible increase in the average VDM value in the superchron is due to the greater variability of VDM in this period compared to the Miocene.

  16. Aquifers in Cretaceous rocks of the central Coastal Plain of North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winner, M.D.; Lyke, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    Aquifers in rocks of Cretaceous age are the major source of groundwater for public supplies in the central Coastal Plain. These aquifers consist of sand, gravel, and limestone beds of the Peedee, Black Creek, and the upper and lower Cape Fear aquifers, each separated by a confining unit composed of clay and silt beds. The aquifers and confining units (1) rest upon crystalline basement rocks; (2) dip and thicken to the east-southeast; and (3) are overlain by younger aquifers and confining units in deposits of Quaternary and Tertiary age. The top of the uppermost aquifer, the Peedee, ranges from 122 ft above to 595 ft below sea level. The maximum thickness of all aquifers and confining units in Cretaceous rocks is more than 1,600 ft. Aquifers and confining units were defined and correlated for this report using 125 geophysical logs and accompanying drillers ' logs, water level data, and water quality information regarding chloride concentrations in water. This analysis allowed the construction of seven hydrogeologic cross sections that depict the continuity of all the aquifers and confining units. These cross sections also show water levels and chloride concentrations in water from various test intervals and describe where chloride concentration in water exceeds 250 mg/L within each aquifer. Detailed maps of each Cretaceous aquifer show altitude of its top, thickness, areas of selected sand percentages, transition zones from fresh to saltwater, and the thickness of the confining unit.

  17. Marine source rocks of New Zeland

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.P.; Norgate, C.; Summons, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    Exploration in New Zealand is moving beyond the Taranaki Basin with its mainly terrestrial source rocks. Good to excellent quality marine source rocks exist and have generated oil in the Northland, East Coast W North Taranaki Basins. These high quality source rocks are Wespread throughout the late Cretaceous - Paleocene passive margin sequence in these basins as well in offshore Canterbury and the Great South Basin. This paper details the character, distribution, generative capacity and maturation behavior of the two main source units and shows how they can be correlated to the numerous seeps and oil impregnations found in the East Coast and Northland Basins. As well as being useful in basin modelling, kinetic maturation parameters for these two source rock facies help to explain differences in the biomarker and isotopic composition of seep oils and also explain trends in Rock Eval Tmax which are unrelated to maturity. In the East Coast Basin alone, the raw oil potential of the Waipawa Black Shale approaches 80 billion barrels. An understanding of the marine source rocks described here is crucial to evaluating the hydrocarbon prospectivity of New Zealand away from the Taranaki Basin.

  18. Marine source rocks of New Zeland

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.P.; Norgate, C.; Summons, R.E. )

    1996-01-01

    Exploration in New Zealand is moving beyond the Taranaki Basin with its mainly terrestrial source rocks. Good to excellent quality marine source rocks exist and have generated oil in the Northland, East Coast W North Taranaki Basins. These high quality source rocks are Wespread throughout the late Cretaceous - Paleocene passive margin sequence in these basins as well in offshore Canterbury and the Great South Basin. This paper details the character, distribution, generative capacity and maturation behavior of the two main source units and shows how they can be correlated to the numerous seeps and oil impregnations found in the East Coast and Northland Basins. As well as being useful in basin modelling, kinetic maturation parameters for these two source rock facies help to explain differences in the biomarker and isotopic composition of seep oils and also explain trends in Rock Eval Tmax which are unrelated to maturity. In the East Coast Basin alone, the raw oil potential of the Waipawa Black Shale approaches 80 billion barrels. An understanding of the marine source rocks described here is crucial to evaluating the hydrocarbon prospectivity of New Zealand away from the Taranaki Basin.

  19. Stratigraphic relationships of Cretaceous and early Tertiary rocks of a part of northwestern San Juan basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baltz, Elmer Harold

    1953-01-01

    The Bridge Timber Mountain area in south-central La Plata County, southwestern Colorado lies mostly in the northwestern part of the Central San Juan Basin but contains a segment of the bounding Hogback 'monocline' and Four-Corners platform. The area contains rocks of late Cretaceous through early Eocene age, as well as Pliocene, Pleistocene, and Recent terrace and pediment gravels. The Pictured Cliffs sandstone of late Montana age is the latest marine formation present. Retreat of the Cretaceous seas from the area marked the beginning of Laramide orogenic activity and the earliest stages of deformation which produced the modern San Juan Basin. The Fruitland formation and Kirtland shale were deposited in brackish water and on coastal plains left by the retreating Cretaceous sea. Beds of the Farmington sandstone member and upper shale member of the Kirtland shale show evidence of a new source of sediments to the north or northeast distinct from the southwestern source area of older Cretaceous rocks. The McDermott 'formation', composed mainly of volcanic debris, is considered to be a local lower member of the Animas formation. Beds of the upper member of the Animas formation of Cretaceous and Paleocene age are considered to extend entirely across the area and into New Mexico. Overstep of higher sandstone and shale beds of the upper member across lower conglomeratic beds shows that folding on the Hogback 'monocline' began during deposition of the upper member. Beds of the upper member of the Animas formation grade laterally southward into Paleocene beds of the Nacimiento formation, but upper Nacimiento beds overstep folded beds of the Animas formation on the Hogback 'monocline' at the north end of Bridge Timber Mountain. The San Jose formation of Paleocene and Eocene age is conformable with the Nacimiento formation except at the north end of Bridge Timber Mountain where upper San Jose beds overstep all older tilted beds down to the Fruitland formation. The heavy

  20. Lacustrine petroleum source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fleet, A.J.; Kelts, K.; Talbot, M.

    1988-01-01

    This book is a proceedings volume from a 1985 symposium sponsored by the Geological Society of London and the International Geological Correlation Program Project No. 219 (Comparative lacustrine sedimentology in space and time). That meeting set the tone for subsequent IGCP No. 219 symposia, where sedimentary, petroleum, and structural geologists, as well as geochemists and paleontologists, have grappled with important problems in lake geology. The 1985 meeting on lacustrine source rocks considered the following questions: (1) How can we develop more refined methods for interpreting depositional environments from lake deposits and fossils , (2) What limnologic, sedimentologic, and tectonic conditions are most conducive to the production and accumulation of organic matter in lakes , (3) What diagenetic changes affect organic-rich sediments after deposition , and (4) How can questions 2 and 3 be best evaluated from the stratigraphic record As a group, lakes are extremely productive ecosystems. Marine environments that would be ranked as high productivity systems are only moderately productive by lacustrine standards. Even with energy transfer rates of less than a few percent from the primary producers to the sediment, lacustrine mudrocks can be extremely rich in organic matter. The major limitations of lacustrine source rocks are not lithologic but limitations of scale (both spatial and temporal). How, in the middle of a continent, do you get a hole in the ground that is both big enough and long-lasting enough to generate significant quantities of hydrocarbons

  1. Paleomagnetic study of some Cretaceous and Tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Klamath Mountains province, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, E.A.; Irwin, W.P.

    1982-01-01

    Paleomagnetic investigation of Cretaceous outliers and Tertiary sedimentary strata of the Klamath Mountains province, and of onlapping Cretaceous strata, has shown the rocks to be largely remagnetized. Samples studied are from the Upper Jurassic to Upper Cretaceous Great Valley sequence, Upper Cretaceous Hornbrook Formation, Eocene Montgomery Creek Formation, and Oligocene(?) Weaverville Formation. Cretaceous samples that survived the remagnetization have a mean remanence direction that is very close to the expected direction of the Cretaceous magnetic field at the locality of the Klamath Mountains. Data from both primary and remanetized samples suggest the possiblity of 11.5o+ or -15.8o of post-Cretaceous clockwise rotation of the Klamath Mountains province. -Authors

  2. Late Cretaceous intraplate silicic volcanic rocks from the Lake Chad region: An extension of the Cameroon volcanic line?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. G.; Lee, T.-Y.; Torng, P.-K.; Yang, C.-C.; Lee, Y.-H.

    2016-07-01

    Silicic volcanic rocks at Hadjer el Khamis, near Lake Chad, are considered to be an extension of the Cameroon volcanic line (CVL) but their petrogenetic association is uncertain. The silicic rocks are divided into peraluminous and peralkaline groups with both rock types chemically similar to within-plate granitoids. In situ U/Pb zircon dating yielded a mean 206Pb/238U age of 74.4 ± 1.3 Ma indicating the magmas erupted ˜10 million years before the next oldest CVL rocks (i.e., ˜66 Ma). The Sr isotopes (i.e., ISr = 0.7021-0.7037) show a relatively wide range but the Nd isotopes (i.e., 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51268-0.51271) are uniform and indicate that the rocks were derived from a moderately depleted mantle source. Thermodynamic modeling shows that the silicic rocks likely formed by fractional crystallization of a mafic parental magma but that the peraluminous rocks were affected by low temperature alteration processes. The silicic rocks are more isotopically similar to Late Cretaceous basalts identified within the Late Cretaceous basins (i.e., 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51245-0.51285) of Chad than the uncontaminated CVL rocks (i.e., 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51270-0.51300). The age and isotopic compositions suggest the silicic volcanic rocks of the Lake Chad region are related to Late Cretaceous extensional volcanism in the Termit basin. It is unlikely that the silicic volcanic rocks are petrogenetically related to the CVL but it is possible that magmatism was structurally controlled by suture zones that formed during the opening of the Central Atlantic Ocean and/or the Pan-African Orogeny.

  3. Coal and coalbed methane resources of Cretaceous rocks of the Black Mesa Basin, northeastern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Nations, J.D.; Haven, H.W.; Swift, R.L.

    1995-06-01

    Cretaceous rocks of the Black Mesa basin of northeastern Arizona were deposited from Late Cenomanian to Santonian time near the western depositional limit of the transgressive-regressive Greenhorn and Niobrara cyclothems. Coal-bearing rocks of the sequence (including the Dakota Formation, Toreva Formation and Wepo Formation) are preserved in the Black Mesa structural basin of Laramide age. These rocks of the Black Mesa basin are the object of an NSF-sponsored research project to evaluate their coal resources and potential for coalbed methane occurrence. Forty-five measured sections and descriptions of Cretaceous rocks around the eastern margin of the basin have been incorporated into a data base in the software program LOGGER, and have been used to construct a series of stratigraphic cross-sections across the basin using the software program MacSection. These include coal beds and carbonaceous shales that are potential sources of methane as well as reservoirs, and sandstone bodies that are potential secondary reservoirs of methane (and possibly petroleum hydrocarbons from the Mancos Shale). In order to trace the facies changes between measured sections, aerial videography and 35 mm slides have been taken along the entire eastern margin of Black Mesa, a distance of 70 miles. These were digitized to provide detailed lithofacies analyses of the stratigraphic sections along the north-trending cliff line. Trends of thickness variations within these facies are interpreted from isopach maps and known shoreline trends, in order to predict the areas of greatest probability of coalbed methane generation and accumulation. These predictions are also based on the locations of anticlinal and monoclinal fold axes where they cross the thickest coal trends, due to likely enhancement of permeability by cleat and butt fractures in the coal and shale reservoir rocks.

  4. Volcanological, petrographical and geochemical characteristics of Late Cretaceous volcanic rocks around Borçka-Artvin region (NE Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baser, Rasim; Aydin, Faruk; Oguz, Simge

    2015-04-01

    This study presents volcanological, petrographical and geochemical data for late Cretaceous volcanic rocks from the Borçka-Artvin region (NE Turkey) in order to investigate their origin and magmatic evolution. Based on the previous ages and recent field studies, the late Cretaceous time in the study area is characterized by two different bimodal volcanic periods. The first bimodal period of the late Cretaceous volcanism is mainly represented by mafic rock series (basaltic-basaltic andesitic pillow lavas and hyaloclastites) in the lower part, and felsic rock series (dacitic lavas, hyaloclastites, and pyrite-bearing tuffs) in the upper part. The second bimodal period of the late Cretaceous volcanism begins with mafic rock suites (basaltic-andesitic lavas and dikes-sills) and grades upward into felsic rock suites (biotite-bearing rhyolitic lavas and hyaloclastites), which are intercalated with hyaloclastites and red pelagic limestones. All volcano-sedimentary units are covered by Late Campanian-Paleocene clayey limestones and biomicrites with lesser calciturbidites. The mafic volcanic series of the study area, which comprise basaltic and andesitic rocks, generally show amygdaloidal and aphyric to porphyritic texture with phenocrysts of calcic to sodic plagioclase and augite in a hyalopilitic matrix of plag+cpx+mag. Zircon and magnetite are sometimes observed as accessory minerals, whereas chlorite, epidote and calcite are typical alteration products. On the other hand, the felsic volcanic series consisting of dacitic and rhyolitic rocks mostly display porphyritic and glomeroporphyritic textures with predominant feldspar, quartz and some biotite phenocrysts. The microgranular to felsophyric groundmass is mainly composed of aphanitic plagioclase, K-feldspar and quartz. Accessory minerals such as zircon, apatite and magnetite are common. Typical alteration products are sericite and clay minerals. Late Cretaceous Artvin-Borçka bimodal rock series generally display a

  5. Depositional controls, distribution, and effectiveness of world's petroleum source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Klemme, H.D.; Ulmishek, G.F.

    1989-03-01

    Six stratigraphic intervals representing one-third of Phanerozoic time contain source rocks that have provided more than 90% of the world's discovered oil and gas reserves (in barrels of oil equivalent). The six intervals include (1) Silurian (generated 9% of the world's reserves); (2) Upper Devonian-Tournaisian (8% of reserves); (3) Pennsylvanian-Lower Permian (8% of reserves); (4) Upper Jurassic (25% of reserves); (5) middle Cretaceous (29% of reserves); and (6) Oligocene-Miocene (12.5% of reserves). This uneven distribution of source rocks in time has no immediately obvious cyclicity, nor are the intervals exactly repeatable in the commonality of factors that controlled the formation of source rocks. In this study, source rocks of the six intervals have been mapped worldwide together with oil and gas reserves generated by these rocks. Analysis of the maps shows that the main factors affecting deposition of these source rocks and their spatial distribution and effectiveness in generating hydrocarbon reserves are geologic age, global and regional tectonics, paleogeography, climate, and biologic evolution. The effect of each of the factors on geologic setting and quality of source rocks has been analyzed. Compilation of data on maturation time for these source rocks demonstrated that the majority of discovered oil and gas is very young, more than 80% of the world's oil and gas reserves have been generated since Aptian time, and nearly half of the world's hydrocarbons have been generated and trapped since the Oligocene.

  6. Volcanostratigraphy, petrography and petrochemistry of Late Cretaceous volcanic rocks from the Görele area (Giresun, NE Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguz, Simge; Aydin, Faruk; Baser, Rasim

    2015-04-01

    dacite but those of the second period have biotite-bearing rhyolite. The basalts and basaltic andesites exhibit subaphyric to porphyritic texture with phenocrysts of calcic plagioclase and augite in a fine-grained to microcrystalline groundmass, consisting of plag+cpx+mag. Andesite samples display a porphyritic texture with phenocrysts of calcic to sodic plagioclase and augite in a hyalopilitic matrix of plag+cpx±amph+mag. Zircon and magnetite are common accessory minerals, whereas chlorite, epidote and calcite are typical alteration products. On the other hand, the dacitic and rhyolitic rocks commonly show a porphyritic texture with predominant feldspar, quartz and some biotite phenocrysts. The microgranular to felsophyric groundmass is mainly composed of aphanitic plagioclase, K-feldspar and quartz. Accessory minerals include zircon, apatite and magnetite. Typical alteration minerals include late-formed sericite, albite and clay minerals. Late Cretaceous mafic and felsic volcanic rocks have a largely sub-alkaline character with typical arc geochemical signatures. N-MORB-normalised multi-element patterns show that all rock samples are enriched in LILEs (e.g. Rb, Ba, Th) but depleted in Nb and Ti. The chondrite-normalized REE patterns are concave shapes with low to medium enrichment, suggesting a common mantle source for the studied bimodal rock series. All geochemical data reflecting typical characteristics of subduction-related magmas are commonly attributed to a depleted mantle source, which has been previously enriched by fluids or sediments. Acknowledgments This work was supported by the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK, grant 112Y365)

  7. Petrology and geochemistry of late Cretaceous lamprophyric rocks from North Anatolian Ophiolitic Melange-Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülmez, Fatma; Genç, Can; Prelevic, Dejan

    2014-05-01

    The late Cretaceous lamprophyric rocks from Amasya and Kalecik region occur as dykes, stocks and lava flows intruding volcanoclastic sequence of North Anatolian Ophiolitic Melange. Their major and trace element compositions are very similar and it is not possible to discriminate them as two subgroups according to their geochemical features. The Al2O3 contents are variable, but relatively high (10.66-18.77 wt.%) typical for the ultrapotassic rocks from active orogenic belts. K2O contents (wt.% 1.22-8.39) are variable and Mg numbers (41-60) indicate that they were crystallized from evolved melts. LILE enrichments relative to HFSE, depletions of Nb-Ta and Ti elements are the characteristic features on N-MORB-normalized spider diagrams and this pattern represent the addition of subducted sediment/melt to the source area . The main mineralogic composition of samples from each two regions is clinopyroxene + mica ± feldspar ± olivine ± amphibole ± leucite + opaque minerals. The significant difference is the presence of plagioclase (An47-65) and K-feldspar as matrix in Amasya samples. Also some of the samples from Kalecik contain minor leucite. Based on the mineral paragenesis, Amasya lampropyres are classified as minette-vogesite and Kalecik samples are classified as kersantite-vogesite. Clinopyroxenes are mainly diopsite, salite and fassaitic in composition (Wo 45-50En 26-43 Fs 10-16) for the Kalecik region and displays diopsitic-salitic composition (Wo 44-48En 38-47 Fs 6-16) in Amasya region. The pressure-temperature calculations reveal significant differences for the lamprophyres from Amasya and Kalecik regions. The pressure conditions of the clinopyroxene crystallization for Amasya samples are between 16-24 kbar corresponds to 48-72 Km depth while the crystallization depth of the clinopyroxene from Kalecik lamprophyres is restricted between 12-36 Km. Although ultrapotassic rocks in Turkéy are the products of extension related volcanism in a post

  8. Source rocks of the Sub-Andean basins

    SciTech Connect

    Raedeke, L.D. )

    1993-02-01

    Seven source rock systems were mapped using a consistent methodology to allow basin comparison from Trinidad to southern Chile. Silurian and Devonian systems, deposited in passive margin and intracratonic settings, have fair-good original oil/gas potential from central and northern Bolivia to southern Peru. Kerogens range from mature in the foreland to overmature in the thrust belt. Permian to Carboniferous deposition in local restricted basins formed organic-rich shales and carbonates with very good original oil/gas potential, principally in northern Bolivia and southern Peru. Late Triassic to early Jurassic marine shales and limestones, deposited in deep, narrow, basins from Ecuador to north-central maturity. Locally, in the Cuyo rift basin of northern Argentina, a Triassic lacustrine unit is a very good, mature oil source. Early Cretaceous to Jurassic marine incursions into the back-arc basins of Chile-Argentina deposited shales and limestones. Although time transgressive (younging to the south), this system is the principal source in southern back-arc basins, with best potential in Neuquen, where three intervals are stacked A late Cretaceous marine transgressive shale is the most important source in northern South America. The unit includes the La Luna and equivalents extending from Trinidad through Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, and into northern Peru. Elsewhere in South America upper Cretaceous marine-lacustrine rocks are a possible source in the Altiplano and Northwest basins of Bolivia and Argentina. Middle Miocene to Oligocene source system includes shallow marine, deltaic, and lacustrine sediments from Trinidad to northern Peru.

  9. Relative contribution of Precambrian metamorphic rocks and Cretaceous-Tertiary igneous rocks to Oligocene and Holocene fluvial sands and the unroofing of a magmatic arc

    SciTech Connect

    Molinaroli, E.; Basu, A. )

    1991-03-01

    Oligocene and Holocene fluvial sands were deposited in small extensional basins in a magmatic arc in southwestern Montana under relatively humid and semi-arid conditions, respectively. The source rocks are roof-pendants and thrust-slices of Precambrian metamorphic rocks (PCM) and Cretaceous-Tertiary igneous rocks (KTI) that make up the arc. The authors have surveyed 143,607 heavy mineral grains (HMGs) in polished thin sections of 55 samples collected from adjacent but discrete geomorphologic units. In the Holocene sands, of 5440 HMGs 519 are garnets and of 97,667 HMGs 395 are zircons. In the Oligocene sandstones, of 6397 HMGs 998 are garnets, and of 45,940 HMGs 331 are zircons. Garnets are absent in the igneous rocks and zircons are extremely rare in the metamorphic rocks. Garnets ar estimated to be about 100 times as abundant in the metamorphic rocks as the zircons are in the igneous rocks. Mass balance calculations show that the proportion of PCM/(PCM+KTI) ranges from 0 to 21% in Oligocene sandstones, and from 3 to 76% in Holocene sands in different local units. However, the overall PCM/(PCM+KTI) proportions in the Holocene and the Oligocene sands in southwestern Montana are 19% and 18%, respectively. This suggests that the roof pendants, thrust slices, and magmatic arc rocks have been unroofed in constant proportions since the Oligocene although locally the proportions have been different.

  10. Characterization of the source horizons within the Late Cretaceous transgressive sequence of northeast Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, V. ); Engel, M. )

    1991-03-01

    Source rocks were deposited in northeastern Africa during a major Late Cretaceous transgression. The preserved stratigraphic sequence begins with a series of fluvio-deltaic sands and progresses up into a thick marine carbonate section. These deposits represent ever increasing water depths and isolation from the continental landmass. Across northeast Africa and portions of Arabia, oil-prone source facies were deposited along the mid to outer shelf during the initial phases of this Late Cretaceous transgression. Within the source sequence itself, variations in the organic matter record the changing influences of coastal upwelling, development of anoxia, and terrigenous input. In Egypt, the transgression deposited sediments found today in the upper portion of the Nubian through Thebes formations. The source facies found within this sequence include portions of the Duwi and Dakhla formations. Both the Duwi and Dakhla record changes in salinity, depth of the water column, and oxygen concentration, which are depicted in the organic matter content, quality, and type. The variability observed in the source sequence in Egypt can be related to the Late Cretaceous source facies preserved across northeast Africa.

  11. Depositional history and seismic stratigraphy of Lower Cretaceous rocks, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect

    Molenaar, C.M.

    1985-04-01

    Knowledge of depositional history of Lower Cretaceous rocks in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska is necessary for predicting the occurrence of potential sandstone reservoirs. These rocks range in thickness from 7000+ m along the Colville basin axis to about 1200 m on the Barrow arch. Lower Neocomian strata on the north flank of the basin consist of southward-prograding marine shelf and slope deposits of shale and minor sandstone units. Uplife, erosion,and subsequent transgression on the northernmost flank of the basin resulted in deposition of the pebble shale unit in late Neocomian time and termination of the northern provenance. Following this, the basin was downwarped, and little deposition occurred on the north flank until distal, deep-water deposits of the Torok Formation onlapped and downlapped the south-dipping flank of the basin resulted in deposition of the pebble shale unit in late Neocomian time and termination of the northern provenance. Following this, the basin was downwarped, and little deposition occurred on the north flank until distal, deep-water deposits of the Torok Formation onlapped and downlapped the south-dipping flank of the basin in middle or late Albian time. On the south flank of the basin, southern-source turbidities of the Okpikruak Formation (early Neocomian) accumulated in a subsiding foredeep and were suybsequently thrust northward in late Neocomian or Aptian time. The fortress Mountain Formation (early Albian), which consists of as much as 3000 m of mainly deep-water deposits, unconformably overlies the Okpikruak and older rocks on the southernmost flank of the basin. Filling of the Colville basin occurred in middle to late Albian time as thick prodeltaic and deltaic deposits of the Torok Formation and Nanushuk Group, respectively, prograded across the basin from the south side of the basin, but prograded princially from the west-southwest of most of the basin.

  12. Structural controls on source rock distribution and maturation in southeast Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.D.; Ottensman, V.V.; Cushing, G.W. ); Aytuna, S. )

    1990-05-01

    Production from the western part of the Zagros fold and thrust belt southeastern Turkey is characterized by high-sulfur (2-3%) oils from middle Cretaceous Mardin Formation. The oils are generated from two carbonate sources, one from the middle Cretaceous passive margin sequence and one deposited as a part of the Upper Cretaceous foreland basin sequence. Both sources are associated with transgressive events coincident with two recognized Cretaceous oceanic anoxic events in Cenomanian-Turonian and Coniacian-Santonian. Geochemical markers in the oils substantiate the restricted, anoxic conditions characteristic of their source rock deposition. During the Upper Cretaceous compressional event, horsts formed buttresses to advancing oceanic thrust sheets. The oceanic thrust sheets consisted of the Karadut and Kocali formations, oceanic equivalents of the Mesozoic shelf. The middle and Upper Cretaceous source facies were rapidly and deeply buried by the tectonically thickened thrust sheets adjacent to the buttresses. Thick burial by the oceanic rocks was critical for thermal maturation of the sources. Geohistory modeling shows generation occurred during the Tertiary coincidental with tectonic activity that probably allowed oil migration to occur along new or reactivated Cretaceous faults.

  13. Composition and provenance of placer deposits in McCourt Tongue of Rock Springs Formation (Upper Cretaceous), Rock Springs uplift area, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, G.B.

    1986-08-01

    Heavy minerals from placer sandstones were studied from samples collected at five widely spaced outcrops of the McCourt Tongue on the southeastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift and on the northern flank of the Uinta Mountains. The placers were deposited along a northeast-trending, strand-plain shoreline of the Cretaceous Interior seaway. Heavy minerals from the five localities occur in very fine-grained sandstone and are composed of about 85% opaque iron and titanium minerals, including magnetite, hematite, and ilmenite. About 15% consist of nonopaque minerals, which are mostly zircon, garnet, tourmaline, and rutile with minor amounts of sphene, hornblende, and apatite. The cementing material is mostly hematite. The nonopaque suite is as much as 96% zircon grains, with 3/sup 0/ of roundness and five color varieties. The heavy minerals are from both plutonic and volcanic source areas. The plutonic minerals suggest a westerly source in Precambrian rocks of Utah and Idaho. The volcanic minerals were probably derived from areas of volcanic activity in Alberta and Montana. The composition, distribution, and provenance of the deposits help establish a framework for regressive Upper Cretaceous shorelines in the central Rocky Mountain area.

  14. SHRIMP U-Pb dating and geochemistry of the Cretaceous plutonic rocks in the Korean Peninsula: A new tectonic model of the Cretaceous Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Won; Kwon, Sanghoon; Park, Seung-Ik; Lee, Changyeol; Cho, Deung-Lyong; Lee, Hong-Jin; Ko, Kyoungtae; Kim, Sook Ju

    2016-10-01

    The Cretaceous tectonomagmatism of the Korean Peninsula was examined based on geochemical and geochronological data of the Cretaceous plutonic rocks, along with distribution of volcano-sedimentary nonmarine N- to NE-trending fault bounded sedimentary basins. We conducted sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) zircon U-Pb ages and whole-rock geochemical compositions of 21 Cretaceous plutonic rocks, together with previously published data, from the central to southern Korean Peninsula. Four age groups of plutonic rocks were identified: Group I (ca. 119-106 Ma) in the northern to central area, Group II (ca. 99-87 Ma) in the central southern area, Group III (ca. 85-82 Ma) in the central to southern area, and Group IV (ca. 76-67 Ma) in the southernmost area. These results indicate a sporadic trenchward-younging trend of the Cretaceous magmatism in the Korean Peninsula. The Group I, II, and III rocks are dominated by high-K calc-alkaline I-type rocks with rift-related A-type granitoids. In contrast, the Group IV rocks are high-K calc-alkaline I-type plutonic rocks with no A-type rocks. The geochemical signatures of the entire groups indicated LREEs (light rare earth elements) enrichments and negative Nb, Ta, and Ti anomalies, indicating normal arc magmatism. A new tectonic model of the Cretaceous Korean Peninsula was proposed based on temporal and spatial distribution of the Cretaceous plutons represented by four age groups; 1) magmatic quiescence throughout the Korean Peninsula from ca. 160 to 120 Ma, 2) intrusions of the I- and A-type granitoids in the northern and central Korean Peninsula (Group I plutonic rocks from ca. 120 to 100 Ma) resulted from the partial melting of the lower continental crust due to the rollback of the Izanagi plate expressed as the conversion from flat-lying subduction to normal subduction. The Gyeongsang nonmarine sedimentary rift basin in the Korean Peninsula and adakite magmatism preserved in the present-day Japanese Islands

  15. Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous(?) synorogenic sedimentary rocks in the southern Spring Mountains, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Michael D.

    1980-08-01

    A newly recognized sequence of Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous(?) terrigenous rocks in the Good-springs district, Nevada, was deposited during the emplacement of the Contact thrust plate. Two facies are recognized: (1) interbedded conglomerate and sandstone derived from Mesozoic igneous and terrigenous platform rocks and (2) interbedded carbonate and sandstone-clast conglomerate, quartz sandstone, and red shale. No igneous detritus occurs in the facies with carbonate-clast conglomerate. Carbonate clasts could only have been derived from the Paleozoic carbonate sequence, which was exposed in the area by latest Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous thrusting. The age of rocks from a volcanic unit within the synorogenic sequence was determined radiometrically to be 150 ± 10 m.y. (K-Ar on biotite). The sequence was deposited disconformably on deeply eroded rocks of the early Mesozoic platform and ultimately overridden from the west by the Contact thrust plate. Information from the sequence corroborates previously reported regional data regarding the timing and nature of the Contact-Red Springs thrust event. *Present address: U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, California 94025

  16. Hydrogeology of aquifers in Cretaceous and younger rocks in the vicinity of Onslow and southern Jones counties, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyke, W.L.; Winner, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    Unconsolidated sediments in Onslow and Jones Counties, North Carolina overlie crystalline basement rocks and range in thickness from about 700 ft to more than 1,800 ft, thickening toward the east. This material is composed of permeable sand and limestone interlayered with relatively impermeable clay and silt beds. Sediments are divided into two groups: aquifers in Quaternary-, and Tertiary-aged rocks and aquifers in Cretaceous-aged rocks. Aquifers in the Cretaceous rocks provide most of the groundwater for public supplies and are the focus of this report. The aquifers in Cretaceous rocks are the Peedee, Black Creek, upper Cape Fear, and lower Cape Fear aquifers, which are composed of beds or groups of beds of sand and gravel. Each aquifer is overlain by a clay and silt bed, that impedes the flow of water between aquifers. The thickness of Cretaceous hydrogeologic units ranges from about 700 ft to more than 1, 300 ft. Hydrogeologic units are correlated using 60 geophysical logs and accompanying drillers ' logs along with water level and water quality data. Three hydrogeologic sections demonstrate the continuity of the aquifers and confining units, show water levels and chloride concentration in water from test intervals, and delineate where chloride concentration in water exceeds 250 mg/L within each aquifer. Maps of each aquifer in Cretaceous rocks show altitude of its top, thickness, sand percentage, and the transition from freshwater to saltwater. Maps of the confining units show thickness and sand percentage of each.

  17. Hydrocarbon transfer pathways from Smackover source rocks to younger reservoir traps in the Monroe gas field, NE Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.K. )

    1993-09-01

    The Monroe gas field contained more than 7 tcf of gas in its virgin state. Much of the original gas reserves have been produced through wells penetrating the Upper Cretaceous Monroe Gas Rock Formation reservoir. Other secondary reservoirs in the field area are Eocene Wilcox, the Upper Cretaceous Arkadelphia, Nacatoch, Ozan, Lower Cretaceous, Hosston, Jurassic Schuler, and Smackover. As producing zones, these secondary producing zones reservoirs have contributed an insignificant amount gas to the field. The source of much of this gas appears to have been in the lower part of the Jurassic Smackover Formation. Maturation and migration of the hydrocarbons from a Smackover source into Upper Cretaceous traps was enhanced and helped by igneous activity, and wrench faults/unconformity conduits, respectively. are present in the pre-Paleocene section. Hydrocarbon transfer pathways appear to be more vertically direct in the Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous section than the complex pattern present in the Upper Cretaceous section.

  18. Depth and thickness of selected units in Upper Permian, Upper Jurassic, and Lower Cretaceous rocks in southwestern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kume, Jack; Spinazola, Joseph M.

    1984-01-01

    As ground-water reserves decline in the Ogallala aquifer in an area of about 17,400 square miles in 26 counties of southwestern Kansas, sandstone aquifers in underlying Upper Jurassic and Lower and Upper Cretaceous rocks may be developed to supplement or replace the Ogallala as a source of water for some uses. Maps show that depths from land surface to Upper Permian rocks range from 0 at the outcrop to over 2,100 feet, depths to Upper Jurassic rocks ran from 0 at the outcrop to about 2,000 feet, depths to the Cheyenne Sandstone range from about 150 to about 1 ,950 feet, and depths to the Dakota Formation range from 0 at the outcrop to about 1,650 feet. Additional maps show that the thickness of Upper Jurassic rocks, where present, ranges from less than 50 feet to about 250 feet, the thickness of the Cheyenne Sandstone, where present, ranges from about 20 feet to about 250 feet, and the thickness of the Dakota Formation, where present, ranges from about 60 feet to about 460 feet. (USGS)

  19. Paleomagnetism of Permo-Triassic and Cretaceous rocks from the Antofagasta region, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narea, K.; Peña, M.; Bascuñán, S.; Becerra, J.; Gómez, I.; Deckart, K.; Munizaga, F.; Maksaev, V.; Arriagada, C.; Roperch, P.

    2015-12-01

    New paleomagnetic data from Permo-Triassic and Late Cretaceous rocks yield a consistent trend of vertical-axis-tectonic-rotations which are consistent with the Central Andean Rotation Pattern (CARP). However, three sites in the Tuina Formation and one site in the Purilactis Group record large rotations (80°). These mayor rotations are probably due to dextral-transpressive deformation occurring in close relation with the Incaic tectonic phase. Consequently, it is possible to infer that previous tectonic phases Peruvian and K-T would not have produced significant tectonic rotations in the area.

  20. Stratigraphic framework of Lower and Upper Cretaceous rocks in central and eastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Condon, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    This study shows the lithology, thickness, distribution, and correlation of Lower and Upper Cretaceous rocks in central and eastern Montana. The described stratigraphic units range from the Aptian Kootenai Formation (oldest) to the Maastrichtian Hell Creek Formation (youngest). An included text report describes the units, and most formations or members are also represented by isopach maps. Structure contour maps of three horizons are also included. Correlations across the study area are shown on a series of cross sections. All text and illustrations are included as Adobe PDF files.

  1. Source-rock distribution model of the periadriatic region

    SciTech Connect

    Zappaterra, E. )

    1994-03-01

    The Periadriatic area is a mosaic of geological provinces comprised of spatially and temporally similar tectonic-sedimentary cycles. Tectonic evolution progressed from a Triassic-Early Jurassic (Liassic) continental rifting stage on the northern edge of the African craton, through an Early Jurassic (Middle Liassic)-Late Cretaceous/Eocene oceanic rifting stage and passive margin formation, to a final continental collision and active margin deformation stage in the Late Cretaceous/Eocene to Holocene. Extensive shallow-water carbonate platform deposits covered large parts of the Periadriatic region in the Late Triassic. Platform breakup and development of a platform-to-basin carbonate shelf morphology began in the Late Triassic and extended through the Cretaceous. On the basis of this paleogeographic evolution, the regional geology of the Periadriatic region can be expressed in terms of three main Upper Triassic-Paleogene sedimentary sequences: (A), the platform sequence; (B), the platform to basin sequence; and (C), the basin sequence. These sequences developed during the initial rifting and subsequent passive-margin formation tectonic stages. The principal Triassic source basins and most of the surface hydrocarbon indications and economically important oil fields of the Periadriatic region are associated with sequence B areas. No major hydrocarbon accumulations can be directly attributed to the Jurassic-Cretaceous epioceanic and intraplatform source rock sequences. The third episode of source bed deposition characterizes the final active margin deformation stage and is represented by Upper Tertiary organic-rich terrigenous units, mostly gas-prone. These are essentially associated with turbiditic and flysch sequences of foredeep basins and have generated the greater part of the commercial biogenic gases of the Periadriatic region. 82 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Paleomagnetic study of Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks from the Mixteca terrane (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhnel, Harald

    1999-11-01

    Three sites from Cretaceous limestone and Jurassic sandstone in northern Oaxaca, Mexico, were studied paleomagnetically. Thermal demagnetization isolated site-mean remanence directions which differ significantly from the recent geomagnetic field. The paleopole for the Albian-Cenomanian Morelos formation is indistinguishable from the corresponding reference pole for stable North America, indicating tectonic stability of the Mixteca terrane since the Cretaceous. Rock magnetic properties and a positive reversal test for the Bajocian Tecomazuchil sandstone suggest that the remanence could be of primary origin, although no fold test could be applied. The Tecomazuchil paleopole is rotated 10°±5° clockwise and displaced 24°±5° towards the study area, with respect to the reference pole for stable North America. Similar values were found for the Toarcien-Aalenian Rosario Formation, with 35°±6° clockwise rotation and 33°±6° latitudinal translation. These data support a post-Bajocian southward translation of the Mixteca terrane by around 25°, which was completed in mid-Cretaceous time.

  3. Cretaceous plutonic rocks in the Donner Lake-Cisco Grove area, northern Sierra Nevada, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulow, Matthew J.; Hanson, Richard E.; Girty, Gary H.; Girty, Melissa S.; Harwood, David S.

    1998-01-01

    The northernmost occurrences of extensive, glaciated exposures of the Sierra Nevada batholith occur in the Donner Lake-Cisco Grove area of the northern Sierra Nevada. The plutonic rocks in this area, which are termed here the Castle Valley plutonic assemblage, crop out over an area of 225 km2 and for the most part are shown as a single undifferentiated mass on previously published geological maps. In the present work, the plutonic assemblage is divided into eight separate intrusive units or lithodemes, two of which each consist of two separate plutons. Compositions are dominantly granodiorite and tonalite, but diorite and granite form small plutons in places. Spectacular examples of comb layering and orbicular texture occur in the diorites. U-Pb zircon ages have been obtained for all but one of the main units and range from ~120 to 114 Ma, indicating that the entire assemblage was emplaced in a narrow time frame in the Early Cretaceous. This is consistent with abundant field evidence that many of the individual phases were intruded penecontemporaneously. The timing of emplacement correlates with onset of major Cretaceous plutonism in the main part of the Sierra Nevada batholith farther south. The emplacement ages also are similar to isotopic ages for gold-quartz mineralization in the Sierran foothills west of the study area, suggesting a direct genetic relationship between the voluminous Early Cretaceous plutonism and hydrothermal gold mineralization.

  4. West-east lithostratigraphic cross section of Cretaceous rocks from central Utah to western Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anna, Lawrence O.

    2012-01-01

    A west-east lithostratigraphic cross section of the Cretaceous rocks from central Utah to western Kansas was prepared as part of the former Western Interior Cretaceous (WIK) project, which was part of the Global Sedimentary Geology Program started in 1989. This transect is similar to that published by Dyman and others (1994) as a summary paper of the WIK project but extends further east and is more detailed. Stratigraphic control was provided by 32 geophysical logs and measured sections tied to ammonite and Inoceramus faunal zones. A variable datum was used, including the base of the Castlegate Sandstone for the western part of the section, and the fossil ammonite zone Baculites obtusus for the middle and eastern section. Lower Cretaceous units and the Frontier Formation and Mowry Shale are shown as undifferentiated units. Cretaceous strata along the transect range in thickness from more than 7,000 ft in the structural foredeep of the western overthrust belt in central Utah, to about 11,000 ft near the Colorado-Utah border as a result of considerable thickening of the Mesaverde Group, to less than 3,500 ft in the eastern Denver Basin, Kansas resulting in a condensed section. The basal Mancos Shale rises stepwise across the transect becoming progressively younger to the west as the Western Interior Seaway transgressed westward. The section illustrates large scale stratigraphic relations for most of the area covered by the seaway, from central Utah, Colorado, to west-central Kansas. These strata are predominantly continental and shoreline deposits near the Sevier thrust belt in Utah, prograding and regressive shorelines to the east with associated flooding surfaces, downlapping mudstones, and transgressive parasequences (shoreface) that correlate to condensed zones across the seaway in central Colorado and eastern Denver Basin.

  5. Selected plant microfossil records of the terminal Cretaceous event in terrestrial rocks, western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    Terrestrial or nonmarine rocks of western North America preserve a record of major disruption and permanent alteration of plant communities precisely at the K-T boundary - in the same rocks that preserve geochemical and mineralogical evidence of the terminal Cretaceous impact event. Plant microfossil records from many localities show abrupt disappearance of pollen species (= plant extinctions) closely associated with impact ejecta deposits containing iridium and shocked quartz. Localities discussed in detail in this review are Starkville South, Clear Creek North, Old Raton Pass, and Sugarite in the Raton Basin of Colorado and New Mexico; West Bijou in the Denver Basin, Colorado; Sussex in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming; and Pyramid Butte and Mud Buttes in the Williston Basin, North Dakota. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction: A lethal mechanism involving anhydrite target rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brett, R.

    1992-01-01

    The Chicxulub Crater, Yucatan, Mexico, is a leading contender as the site for the impact event that caused the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) extinctions. A considerable thickness of anhydrite (CaSO4) forms part of the target rock. High temperatures resulting from impact would drive SO2 off from the anhydrite. Hundreds of billions of tonnes of sulfuric acid aerosol would thus enter the stratosphere and cause considerable cooling of the Earth's surface, decrease photosynthesis by orders of magnitude, deplete the ozone layer, and permit increased UV radiation to reach the Earth's surface. Finally, the aerosol would fall back to Earth as acid rain and devastate land and some lacustrine biota and near-surface marine creatures. The presence of anhydrite in the Chicxulub target rock may thus help explain the many extinctions observed at the K-T boundary. ?? 1992.

  7. Palaeointensity and palaeomagnetic study of Cretaceous and Palaeocene rocks from Western Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakova, V. V.; Bakhmutov, V. G.; Shcherbakov, V. P.; Zhidkov, G. V.; Shpyra, V. V.

    2012-04-01

    A combined palaeodirectional and palaeointensity study of a representative collection of plutonic rocks from the Antarctic Peninsula batholith from the western part of the Antarctic Peninsula, near the Ukrainian Antarctic base 'Academik Vernadsky' were carried out. Petrographically, the collection includes gabbros, diorites and quartz diorites, tonalities, granodiorites and granites. The ages of igneous complex emplacement vary from 50 to 117 Ma with most of the rocks belonging to the Cretaceous Normal Superchron. The characteristic remanent magnetizations were isolated by stepwise thermal demagnetization over the temperature interval 440-590°C and their intensities amount to 95 per cent of the NRM. The geographic positions of palaeopoles do not contradict the 'key poles' of the Antarctic Peninsula between 90 and 60 Ma. A significant part of the collection was subjected to Coe-modified Thellier palaeointensity experiments with the pTRM checks, which yielded seven reliable palaeointensity determinations for seven different locations. The obtained VDMs are relatively low for all sites, being on average about half of the present day VDM. The analysis of available palaeointensity data for the Cretaceous, Miocene and Middle Jurassic indicates the existence of strong correlations between the mean VDM and VDM scatter versus the rate of reversals. However, due to the shortage of data, the correlations are not significant at the 5 per cent significance level.

  8. Reservoir, seal, and source rock distribution in Essaouira Rift Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ait Salem, A. )

    1994-07-01

    The Essaouira onshore basin is an important hydrocarbon generating basin, which is situated in western Morocco. There are seven oil and gas-with-condensate fields; six are from Jurassic reservoirs and one from a Triassic reservoir. As a segment of the Atlantic passive continental margin, the Essaouira basin was subjected to several post-Hercynian basin deformation phases, which resulted in distribution, in space and time, of reservoir, seal, and source rock. These basin deformations are synsedimentary infilling of major half grabens with continental red buds and evaporite associated with the rifting phase, emplacement of a thick postrifting Jurassic and Cretaceous sedimentary wedge during thermal subsidence, salt movements, and structural deformations in relation to the Atlas mergence. The widely extending lower Oxfordian shales are the only Jurassic shale beds penetrated and recognized as potential and mature source rocks. However, facies analysis and mapping suggested the presence of untested source rocks in Dogger marine shales and Triassic to Liassic lacustrine shales. Rocks with adequate reservoir characteristics were encountered in Triassic/Liassic fluvial sands, upper Liassic dolomites, and upper Oxfordian sandy dolomites. The seals are provided by Liassic salt for the lower reservoirs and Middle to Upper Jurassic anhydrite for the upper reservoirs. Recent exploration studies demonstrate that many prospective structure reserves remain untested.

  9. Paleomagnetism of Cretaceous and Paleocene sedimentary rocks across the Castle Mountain Fault, south central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatakos, John A.; Kodama, K. P.; Vittorio, L. F.; Pavlis, T. L.

    Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic analyses on 217 samples from 13 sites in the Paleocene Chickaloon Formation south of the Castle Mountain Fault and 111 samples from 9 sites in the coeval, but lithologically distinct, Arkose Ridge Formation north of this fault indicate that these rocks contain a pre-folding magnetization carried by fine grained (<1.0μm) single domain magnetite. Secondary magnetizations are common, possibly as the result of the presence of authigenic or hydrothermal pyrrhotite. Although characteristic magnetizations were isolated for the Chickaloon and Arkose Ridge rocks, the best results were obtained from demagnetization plane analysis which estimates the location of the paleomagnetic pole for the Chickaloon Formation at 50.5°N, 277.2°E, δm = 12.2°, δP = 7.77deg;, and a paleomagnetic pole for the Arkose Ridge Formation at 60.4°N, 138.6°E, δm = 11.6°, δp = 6.4°. These results suggest that there is no paleomagnetically discernible latitudinal offset across the Castle Mountain Fault since Paleocene time, but that both the Chickaloon and Arkose Ridge rocks, as part of the Peninsular terrane, originated approximately 1600±1200 km south of their present position with respect to North America. One possible explanation of these data is that the Peninsular terrane was accreted to North America at mid-latitudes in the Cretaceous and was subsequently translated northward by right-lateral strike-slip faulting parallel to the North American margin. Hence, the Arkose Ridge and Chickaloon results may be indicative of the cumulative right-hand displacement occurring on these faults since Paleocene time. However, a calculation using the pole to the small circle fit of the present-day curvature of the Tintina-Northern Rocky Mountain Trench and Denali fault systems, and the maximum amount of structurally estimated offset across these fault systems, indicates that motion on these faults can account for no more than half of the paleomagnetically observed

  10. Petrogenesis of the early Cretaceous volcanic rocks in the North Huaiyang tectono-magmatic unit of the Dabie Orogen, eastern China: Implications for crust-mantle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin-Yu; Zhao, Tai-Ping; Zhao, Jun-Hong

    2016-03-01

    New elemental and isotopic data are presented for the early Cretaceous felsic to mafic volcanic rocks in the North Huaiyang tectono-magmatic unit (NHY) of the Dabie Orogen, in order to investigate their petrogenesis and provide insights into the nature of the late Mesozoic lithosphere mantle beneath the region and its tectonic relationship with neighboring blocks. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating reveals that volcanic rocks of the Jingangtai Formation erupted in a quite short interval about 5 Mys during the Early Cretaceous (128-123 Ma). The rocks have wide ranges of SiO2 (48-68 wt.%) and MgO (0.6-5.6 wt.%) contents. They are enriched in large-ion-lithophile-elements (LILE) (e.g. Rb, Ba) and light rare-earth-elements (LREE), and depleted in high field strength elements (e.g. Nb, Ta and Ti) with weak negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu∗ = 0.71-0.94). Meanwhile, the rocks show relatively high whole-rock initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7074-0.7094), strong negative εNd(t) (-19.1 to -15.8) and zircon εHf values (-20.7 to -14.1). Such typical "continental" geochemical characteristics did not result from crustal contamination during magma ascent, but from an enriched mantle source modified by materials from the subducted Yangtze Craton during the Triassic continental collision. We propose that the petrogenesis of the large-scale contemporaneous magmatism of Dabie Orogen including felsic to mafic volcanic rocks in the NHY reflects an intensive lithospheric thinning and extension during the early Cretaceous as a tectonic response to the change of plate motion of westward subducted Pacific Plate beneath the Eurasian continent.

  11. Reverse Polarity Magnetized Melt Rocks from the Cretaceous/Tertiary Chicxulub Structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Marin, Luis; Sharpton, Virgil L.

    1994-01-01

    We report paleomagnetic results for core samples of the breccia and andesitic rocks recovered from the Yucatan-6 Petrolcos Mexicanos exploratory well within the Chicxulub structure (about 60 km SSW from its center), northern Yucatan, Mexico. A previous study has shown that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts and an Ar/Ar date of 65.2 +/- 0.4 Ma. Andesitic rocks are characterized by stable single-component magnetizations with a mean inclination of -42.6 deg +/- 2.4 deg. Breccias present a complex paleomagnetic record characterized by multivectorial magnetizations with widely different initial NRM inclinations. However, after alternating field demagnetization, well defined characteristic components with upward inclinations are defined. IRM acquisition experiments, comparison of IRM and NRM coercivity spectra and the single component magnetization of the andesitic rocks indicate the occurrence of iron-rich titanomagnetites of single or pseudo-single domain states as the dominant magnetic carriers. Mean inclinations from the andesitic rocks and most of the breccia samples give a mean inclination of about -40 deg to -45 deg, indicating a reverse polarity for the characteristic magnetization that is consistent with geomagnetic chron 29R, which spans the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary. The inclination is also consistent with the expected value (and corresponding paleolatitude) for the site estimated from the reference polar wander curve for North America. We suggest that the characteristic magnetizations for the andesitic and breccia rocks are the result of shock heating at the time of formation of the impact structure and that the age, polarity and pateolatitude are consistent with a time at the K/T boundary.

  12. Timing and petroleum sources for the Lower Cretaceous Mannville Group oil sands of northern Alberta based on 4-D modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, D.K.; Lewan, M.D.; Roberts, L.N.R.; Henry, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Mannville Group oil sands of northern Alberta have an estimated 270.3 billion m3 (BCM) (1700 billion bbl) of in-place heavy oil and tar. Our study area includes oil sand accumulations and downdip areas that partially extend into the deformation zone in western Alberta. The oil sands are composed of highly biodegraded oil and tar, collectively referred to as bitumen, whose source remains controversial. This is addressed in our study with a four-dimensional (4-D) petroleum system model. The modeled primary trap for generated and migrated oil is subtle structures. A probable seal for the oil sands was a gradual updip removal of the lighter hydrocarbon fractions as migrated oil was progressively biodegraded. This is hypothetical because the modeling software did not include seals resulting from the biodegradation of oil. Although the 4-D model shows that source rocks ranging from the Devonian-Mississippian Exshaw Formation to the Lower Cretaceous Mannville Group coals and Ostracode-zone-contributed oil to Mannville Group reservoirs, source rocks in the Jurassic Fernie Group (Gordondale Member and Poker Chip A shale) were the initial and major contributors. Kinetics associated with the type IIS kerogen in Fernie Group source rocks resulted in the early generation and expulsion of oil, as early as 85 Ma and prior to the generation from the type II kerogen of deeper and older source rocks. The modeled 50% peak transformation to oil was reached about 75 Ma for the Gordondale Member and Poker Chip A shale near the west margin of the study area, and prior to onset about 65 Ma from other source rocks. This early petroleum generation from the Fernie Group source rocks resulted in large volumes of generated oil, and prior to the Laramide uplift and onset of erosion (???58 Ma), which curtailed oil generation from all source rocks. Oil generation from all source rocks ended by 40 Ma. Although the modeled study area did not include possible western

  13. Paleomagnetism of Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks bounding the Santa Marta massif - NW corner of Colombia, South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayona, G.; Jimenez, G.; Silva, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Santa Marta massif (SMM) is a complex terrain located in the NW margin of South America, bounded by the left-lateral Santa Marta fault to the west and the right-lateral Oca fault to the north. The SMM is cored by Precambrian metamorphic and Jurassic intrusive rocks, whereas along the SE flank crop out Jurassic volcanic rocks overlying unconformably by Limestones of Cretaceous age. Paleomagnetic analysis of 30 sites in the Jurassic and Cretaceous units in the SE region uncovered two principal magnetic components. The component "a", isolated in low coercivity and temperatures, has declinations to the north and moderate positive inclinations representing the actual field direction (n=11, D=347.6 I=23 K=30.77, a95=8.4). The component "c", with high coercivity and temperatures, has two orientations. After two-step tilt corrections, the first has northward declination and positive, low inclination (n=9, D=12, I=3, K=18.99, a95=12.1); this direction was uncovered in Cretaceous and some Jurassic rocks near to the Santa Marta fault, and we consider it as a Cretaceous component. The second direction was uncovered only in Jurassic rocks and has NNE declinations with negative-low inclinations (n=9, D=11.3 I=-14.3 K=12.36, a95=15.2); this direction represents a Jurassic component. Jurassic and Cretaceous directions isolated in areas faraway of the Santa Marta Fault suggest slight clockwise vertical-axes rotation. The Jurassic component suggests northward translation of the SMM from Paleolatitude -7.3, to near the magnetic equador in the Cretaceous, and to northern latitudes in the Cenozoic.

  14. Index to selected machine-readable geohydrologic data for Precambrian through Cretaceous rocks in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spinazola, J.M.; Hansen, C.V.; Underwood, E.J.; Kenny, J.F.; Wolf, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Machine-readable geohydrologic data for Precambrian through Cretaceous rocks in Kansas were compiled as part of the USGS Central Midwest Regional Aquifer System Analysis. The geohydrologic data include log, water quality, water level, hydraulics, and water use information. The log data consist of depths to the top of selected geologic formations determined from about 275 sites with geophysical logs and formation lithologies from about 190 sites with lithologic logs. The water quality data consist of about 10,800 analyses, of which about 1 ,200 are proprietary. The water level data consist of about 4 ,480 measured water levels and about 4,175 equivalent freshwater hydraulic heads, of which about 3,745 are proprietary. The hydraulics data consist of results from about 30 specific capacity tests and about 20 aquifer tests, and interpretations of about 285 drill stem tests (of which about 60 are proprietary) and about 75 core-sample analyses. The water use data consist of estimates of freshwater withdrawals from Precambrian through Cretaceous geohydrologic units for each of the 105 counties in Kansas. Average yearly withdrawals were estimated for each decade from 1940 to 1980. All the log and water use data and the nonproprietary parts of the water quality , water level, and hydraulics data are available on magnetic tape from the USGS office in Lawrence, Kansas. (Author 's abstract)

  15. Middle Jurassic to early Cretaceous igneous rocks along eastern North American continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Jansa, L.F.; Pe-Piper, G.

    1988-03-01

    Late Middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous mafic dikes, sills, flows, and local volcaniclastic sediments are intercalated within continental shelf sediments from the Baltimore Canyon Trough northward to the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. The igneous rocks on the eastern North American margin are mainly alkali basalts of intraplate affinity. The late Middle Jurassic igneous activity was of short duration, at about 140 Ma, and was restricted to Georges Bank where it led to construction of several volcanic cones. The main period of igneous activity was concentrated at about 120 Ma in the Aptian/Berremian. The activity consists of dike swarms in Baltimore Canyon, occasional dikes on the Scotian Shelf, and the growth of stratovolcanoes on the Scotian Shelf and Grand Banks. Younger dikes (approx. 95 Ma) also are present on the Grand Banks. With regard to oil exploration on the continental margin, care must be taken to properly identify igneous and volcaniclastic rocks on mechanical logs, drill cuttings, and cores. Reflection seismic profiles can be used to map the areal extent of sills, flows, and low-angle dikes, which commonly show distinctive seismic responses. However, steeply dipping dikes generally produce little, if any, seismic response. Isotopic-age determinations of igneous rocks, combined with biostratigraphic-age determinations of adjacent strata, are invaluable for stratigraphic correlation, establishing chronology of seismic sequences, and analysis of basin sedimentation and tectonic history. 9 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Petrophysical properties of carbonate rocks: example from the cretaceous Jandaira Formation, Potiguar basin - Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Francisco; Soares, José; Bezerra, Francisco; Cavalcanti, Bruno; Cazarin, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Carbonate sediments are prone to rapid and pervasive diagenetic alterations that change the mineralogy and pore structure within carbonate units. In particular, cementation and dissolution processes continuously modify the pore structure to create or destroy porosity. In extreme cases these modifications can completely change the mineralogy from calcite to dolomite, in the properties of rock for soil (Caliche), or reverse the pore distribution whereby original grains are dissolved to produce pores as the original pore space is filled with cement to form the rock. These processes are common in fractured carbonate units. All these modifications alter the elastic properties of the rock and, therefore, the sonic velocity. This study presents the result of relationship among diagenesis, porosity, grain density, and sonic velocity, in limestones, dolomites and caliche samples from the Jandaíra Formation, Potiguar basin, Brasil. This stratigraphic unit have been subjected to fracturing since the late Cretaceous. The rock and soil samples were collected in outcrops, prepared as plugs, and analyzed at ambient temperature. The porosity and grain density analysis were performed under ambient pressure, while elastic properties analyses were conducted with samples under confining pressure between 5 and 40 MPa. The result is a wide range of sonic velocity in carbonates, in which compressional-wave velocity (VP) ranges from 3507 to 6119 m/s and shear-wave velocity (VS) range from 2114 to 3451 m/s. The ratio VS1/VS2 indicate a level of anisotropy equal to 2%, without any clear relationship with porosity. The elastics properties are affected by rock alteration process or by modification of mineral composition, due to the presence of clay minerals and organic matter, The porosity and grain density values range from 3.2 to 21.5%, and 2.7 to 2.8 (g/cm3), respectively. The grain density analysis in the carbonate rocks indicate the existence of two groups: the first group of calcareous

  17. World petroleum systems with Jurassic source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Klemme, H.D. )

    1993-11-08

    Fourteen petroleum systems with Upper Jurassic source rocks contain one quarter of the world's discovered oil and gas. Eleven other systems with Lower and Middle Jurassic source rocks presently have a minor but significant amount of discovered oil and gas. The purpose of this article is to review the systems geologically, describe their location in space and time on a continental scale, estimate their relative petroleum system recovery efficiencies, and outline the effect their essential elements and processes have on their petroleum plumbing.

  18. A detailed paleomagnetic investigation of Cretaceous igneous rocks: New contributions from Colombia and Paraguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapper, Lisa; Calvo-Rathert, Manuel; Cejudo Ruiz, Ruben; Sanchez Bettucci, Leda; Irurzun, Alicia; Carrancho, Ángel; Gogichaishvili, Avto; Morales, Juan; Sinito, Ana; Mejia, Victoria; Nivia Guevara, Alvaro

    2016-04-01

    We present rock magnetic results, paleodirections and -intensities from Cretaceous samples from two locations from South America. On the one hand we report paleomagnetic results from the Western Cordillera of Colombia from 15 sites north of Cali. These volcanic rock samples were related to age determinations from close localities of 92.5 ± 1.1 Ma on average, occuring during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (CNS). On the other hand we show results from an alkaline dike swarm in the Asunción Rift, Eastern Paraguay. Previous investigations suggest that these dikes extruded in a rather short period of 126-127 Ma, during normal and reversed polarity field configuration, right before the onset of the CNS. Rock magnetic measurements of both sites show that the main magnetic component is a low-coercivity mineral, e.g., (titanium)magnetite, with a large range of grain sizes from multi- to single domain, or mixtures of several grain sizes in a sample. For the Colombian site we obtained an average Virtual Geomagnetic Pole (VGP), whose latitude compares well with those for South and North America of Besse and Courtillot (2002) with a similar age. For the determination of the Virtual Dipole Moments (VDMs) the Thellier-Coe method did not give successful results, probably due to minerals in the range of multidomain grain size. Therefore, we applied the multispecimen protocol on ten specimens. Six successful determinations produced an average VDM of 2.3 x 10‑22 Am2. This value is rather low, but in good agreement with other data from the same time period. Directional investigation of the Eastern Paraguayan dike swarm show highly clustered promising results with six out of 22 sites having an α95 ≤ 10.0° . Most of these sites show a reversed polarity; however, one intermediate polarity site has a very reliable direction as well. This and the occurrence of normal polarity sites suggest that the dikes may have not appeared at the same time but rather during the transition from

  19. A detailed paleomagnetic investigation of Cretaceous igneous rocks: New contributions from Colombia and Paraguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapper, Lisa; Calvo-Rathert, Manuel; Cejudo Ruiz, Ruben; Sanchez Bettucci, Leda; Irurzun, Alicia; Carrancho, Ángel; Gogichaishvili, Avto; Morales, Juan; Sinito, Ana; Mejia, Victoria; Nivia Guevara, Alvaro

    2016-04-01

    We present rock magnetic results, paleodirections and -intensities from Cretaceous samples from two locations from South America. On the one hand we report paleomagnetic results from the Western Cordillera of Colombia from 15 sites north of Cali. These volcanic rock samples were related to age determinations from close localities of 92.5 ± 1.1 Ma on average, occuring during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (CNS). On the other hand we show results from an alkaline dike swarm in the Asunción Rift, Eastern Paraguay. Previous investigations suggest that these dikes extruded in a rather short period of 126-127 Ma, during normal and reversed polarity field configuration, right before the onset of the CNS. Rock magnetic measurements of both sites show that the main magnetic component is a low-coercivity mineral, e.g., (titanium)magnetite, with a large range of grain sizes from multi- to single domain, or mixtures of several grain sizes in a sample. For the Colombian site we obtained an average Virtual Geomagnetic Pole (VGP), whose latitude compares well with those for South and North America of Besse and Courtillot (2002) with a similar age. For the determination of the Virtual Dipole Moments (VDMs) the Thellier-Coe method did not give successful results, probably due to minerals in the range of multidomain grain size. Therefore, we applied the multispecimen protocol on ten specimens. Six successful determinations produced an average VDM of 2.3 x 10-22 Am2. This value is rather low, but in good agreement with other data from the same time period. Directional investigation of the Eastern Paraguayan dike swarm show highly clustered promising results with six out of 22 sites having an α95 ≤ 10.0° . Most of these sites show a reversed polarity; however, one intermediate polarity site has a very reliable direction as well. This and the occurrence of normal polarity sites suggest that the dikes may have not appeared at the same time but rather during the transition from

  20. North Slope, Alaska: Source rock distribution, richness, thermal maturity, and petroleum charge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, K.E.; Magoon, L.B.; Bird, K.J.; Valin, Z.C.; Keller, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Four key marine petroleum source rock units were identified, characterized, and mapped in the subsurface to better understand the origin and distribution of petroleum on the North Slope of Alaska. These marine source rocks, from oldest to youngest, include four intervals: (1) Middle-Upper Triassic Shublik Formation, (2) basal condensed section in the Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Kingak Shale, (3) Cretaceous pebble shale unit, and (4) Cretaceous Hue Shale. Well logs for more than 60 wells and total organic carbon (TOC) and Rock-Eval pyrolysis analyses for 1183 samples in 125 well penetrations of the source rocks were used to map the present-day thickness of each source rock and the quantity (TOC), quality (hydrogen index), and thermal maturity (Tmax) of the organic matter. Based on assumptions related to carbon mass balance and regional distributions of TOC, the present-day source rock quantity and quality maps were used to determine the extent of fractional conversion of the kerogen to petroleum and to map the original TOC (TOCo) and the original hydrogen index (HIo) prior to thermal maturation. The quantity and quality of oil-prone organic matter in Shublik Formation source rock generally exceeded that of the other units prior to thermal maturation (commonly TOCo > 4 wt.% and HIo > 600 mg hydrocarbon/g TOC), although all are likely sources for at least some petroleum on the North Slope. We used Rock-Eval and hydrous pyrolysis methods to calculate expulsion factors and petroleum charge for each of the four source rocks in the study area. Without attempting to identify the correct methods, we conclude that calculations based on Rock-Eval pyrolysis overestimate expulsion factors and petroleum charge because low pressure and rapid removal of thermally cracked products by the carrier gas retards cross-linking and pyrobitumen formation that is otherwise favored by natural burial maturation. Expulsion factors and petroleum charge based on hydrous pyrolysis may also be high

  1. The Late Cretaceous igneous rocks of Romania (Apuseni Mountains and Banat): the possible role of amphibole versus plagioclase deep fractionation in two different crustal terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Auwera, Jacqueline; Berza, Tudor; Gesels, Julie; Dupont, Alain

    2016-04-01

    We provide new whole-rock major and trace elements as well as 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd isotopic data of a suite of samples collected in the Late Cretaceous volcanic and plutonic bodies of the Apuseni Mts. (Romania) that belong to the Banatitic Magmatic and Metallogenic Belt, also called the Apuseni-Banat-Timok-Srednogorie belt. The samples define a medium- to high-K calc-alkaline differentiation trend that can be predicted by a three-step fractional crystallization process which probably took place in upper crustal magma chambers. Published experimental data indicate that the parent magma (Mg# = 0.47) of the Apuseni Mts. trend could have been produced by the lower crustal differentiation of a primary (in equilibrium with a mantle source) magma. The Late Cretaceous magmatic rocks of the Apuseni Mts. and Banat display overlapping major and trace element trends except that Sr is slightly lower and Ga is higher in the Apuseni Mts. parent magma. This difference can be accounted for by fractionating plagioclase-bearing (Apuseni Mts.) or amphibole-bearing (Banat) cumulates during the lower crustal differentiation of the primary magma to the composition of the parent magma of both trends. This, together with results obtained on the Late Cretaceous igneous rocks from the Timok area in Eastern Serbia, further suggests variation of the water content of the primary magma along and across the belt. The Apuseni Mts. versus the Banat samples display different isotopic compositions that likely resulted from the assimilation of two distinct crustal contaminants, in agreement with their emplacement in two separate mega-units of Alpine Europe.

  2. Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey`s Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

  3. Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey's Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

  4. Paleontologic and stratigraphic relations of phosphate beds in Upper Cretaceous rocks of the Cordillera Oriental, Colombia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maughan, Edwin K.; Zambrano O., Francisco; Mojica G., Pedro; Abozaglo M., Jacob; Pachon P., Fernando; Duran R., Raul

    1979-01-01

    Phosphorite crops out in the Cordillera Oriental of the Colombian Andes in rocks of Late Cretaceous age as strata composed mostly of pelletal carbonate fluorapatite. One stratum of Santonian age near the base of the Galembo Member of the La Luna Formation crops out at many places in the Departments of Santander and Norte de Santander and may be of commercial grade. This stratum is more than one meter thick at several places near Lebrija and near Sardinata, farther south it is locally one meter thick or more near the base of the Guadalupe Formation in the Department of Boyaca. Other phosphorite beds are found at higher stratigraphic levels in the Galembo Member and the Guadalupe Formation, and at some places these may be commercial also. A stratigraphically lower phosphorite occurs below the Galembo Member in the Capacho Formation (Cenomanian age) in at least one area near the town of San Andres, Santander. A phosphorite or pebbly phosphate conglomerate derived from erosion of the Galembo Member forms the base of the Umir Shale and the equivalent Colon Shale at many places. Deposition of the apatite took place upon the continental shelf in marine water of presumed moderate depth between the Andean geosyncline and near-shore detrital deposits adjacent to the Guayana shield. Preliminary calculations indicate phosphorite reserves of approximately 315 million metric tons in 9 areas, determined from measurements of thickness, length of the outcrop, and by projecting the reserves to a maximum of 1,000 meters down the dip of the strata into the subsurface. Two mines were producing phosphate rock in 1969; one near Turmeque, Boyaca, and the other near Tesalia, Huila.

  5. Plesiosaur-bearing rocks from the Late Cretaceous Tahora Fm, Mangahouanga, New Zealand - a palaeoenvironmental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajda, Vivi; Raine, J. Ian

    2010-05-01

    Mangahouanga Stream, Hawkes Bay, New Zealand is world-famous for its high southern latitude vertebrate fossils including plesiosaurs, mosasaurs and more rarely, dinosaurs. The fossils are preserved in the conglomeratic facies of the Maungataniwha Sandstone Member of the Tahora Formation. A palynological investigation of sediments from the boulders hosting vertebrate fossils reveals well-preserved palynological assemblages dominated by pollen and spores from land plants but also including marine dinoflagellate cysts in one sample. The palynofacies is strongly dominated by wood fragments including charcoal, and the sample taken from a boulder hosting plesiosaur vertebrae is entirely terrestrially derived, suggesting a fresh-water habitat for at least some of these plesiosaurs. The key-pollen taxa Nothofagidites senectus and Tricolpites lilliei, together with the dinocyst Isabelidinium pellucidum and the megaspore Grapnelispora evansii, strongly indicate an early Maastrichtian age for the host rock. The terrestrial palynoflora reflects a mixed vegetation dominated by podocarp conifers and angiosperms with a significant tree-fern subcanopy component. The presence of taxa with modern temperate distributions such as Nothofagus (southern beech), Proteaceae and Cyatheaceae (tree-ferns), indicates a mild-temperate climate and lack of severe winter freezing during the latest Cretaceous, providing an ecosystem which most probably made it possible for polar dinosaurs to overwinter. The paper is dedicated to Mrs Joan Wiffen who with her great persistence, enthusiasm and courage put Mangahouanga on the world map, becoming a role model for many young scientists.

  6. Mantle Source of Cretaceous Seafloor in the Nova-Canton Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, D. G.; Mahoney, J. J.

    2006-12-01

    The Nova-Canton Trough (NCT) is an 8-km-deep abyss that merges with the far western trace of the Clipperton Fracture Zone north-northwest of the Manihiki Plateau. Ocean crust in this region formed during Cretaceous long magnetic normal Chron 34. Larson (Geology, 25, 779) argued that the NCT is part of an aborted rift system that formed between the Ontong Java and Manihiki plume heads, and terminated plateau construction around 120 Ma via drain-off of plume mantle to the region of rifting. Taylor (EPSL, 241, 372) instead proposed the two plateaus formed as one short-lived mega-plateau that broke apart, and that the NCT is part of the post-breakup transform system that separated a series of short spreading segments. Recently, the R.V. Kilo Moana dredged four sites along the prominent north-facing escarpment of the NCT between 168° 06' W and 168° 42' W at ~1° 24' S, and retrieved basalt, diabase, gabbro, pyroxenite, peridotite, serpentinite, breccias and sedimentary rocks. The diversity of rock types recovered demonstrates that a large cross-section through Cretaceous seafloor is exposed. The MgO content of the basalt and diabase samples varies from 8.9-4.3 wt.%. Incompatible element patterns display relative depletions in alteration- resistant large-ion lithophile elements, and most samples have a distinctive hump-shaped REE pattern, with chondrite-normalized (Sm/Yb)n >1.3 and (La/Sm)n <0.75, suggesting generation by high pressure, relatively low-degree melting of a MORB-type mantle source. One sample is less light-REE- depleted, with (La/Sm)n= 0.96. Age-adjusted (to 120 Ma) Nd-Pb isotope ratios plot within the high- 206Pb/204Pb portion of the Pacific MORB field at ɛNd values between +8.2 and +7.5. In contrast, data for the Ontong Java and Manihiki plateaus fall well below the Pacific MORB field at lower 206Pb/204Pb and ɛNd < +6.6. Thus, our data provide no evidence for Ontong Java or Manihiki mantle components in the NCT source.

  7. Effective petroleum source rocks of the world: Stratigraphic distribution and controlling depositional factors

    SciTech Connect

    Klemme, H.D. ); Ulmishek, G.F. )

    1991-12-01

    Six stratigraphic intervals, representing one-third of Phanerozoic time, contain petroleum source rocks that have provided more than 90% of the world's discovered original reserves of oil and gas (in barrels of oil equivalent). The six intervals are (1) Silurian (generated 9% of the world's reserves), (2) Upper Devonian-Tournaisian (8% of reserves), (3) Pennsylvanian-Lower Permian (8% of reserves), (4) Upper Jurassic (25% of reserves), (5) middle Cretaceous (29% of reserves), and (6) Oligocene-Miocene (12.5% of reserves). This uneven distribution of source rocks vary from interval to interval. Maps that show facies, structural forms, and petroleum source rocks were prepared for this study. Analysis of the maps indicates that several primary factors controlled the areal distribution of source rocks, their geochemical type, and their effectiveness (i.e., the amounts of discovered original conventionally recoverable reserves of oil and gas generated by these rocks). These factors are geologic age, paleolatitude of the depositional areas, structural forms in which the deposition of source rocks occurred, and the evolution of biota. The maturation time of these source rocks demonstrates that majority of discovered oil and gas is very young; almost 70% of the world's original reserves of oil and gas has been generated since the Coniacian, and nearly 50% of the world's petroleum{sup 4} has been generated and trapped since the Oligocene.

  8. Middle Triassic source rocks in north Lombardy

    SciTech Connect

    Gnaccolini, M.; Gaetani, M.; Mattavelli, L.; Leoni, C.; Poliani, G.; Riva, A.

    1988-08-01

    Using molecular geochemistry techniques, we established that the Perledo-Verenna and Meride Formations (Middle Triassic, southern Alps) represent the source rocks of the Gaggiano and Villafortuna deep oil fields discovered 40 km northwest of Milan. To find the geological factors which control the areal extent thickness and organic matter distribution relative to these sequences, a sedimentological and geochemical study was undertaken.

  9. Depletion of 13C in Cretaceous marine organic matter: Source, diagenetic, or environmental sigal?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.; Arthur, M.A.; Claypool, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Geochemical studies of Cretaceous strata rich in organic carbon (OC) from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) sites and several land sections reveal several consistent relationships among amount of OC, hydrocarbon generating potential of kerogen (measured by pyrolysis as the hydrogen index, HI), and the isotopic composition of the OC. First, there is a positive correlation between HI and OC in strata that contain more than about 1% OC. Second, percent OC and HI often are negatively correlated with carbon isotopic composition (?? 13C) of kerogen. The relationship between HI and OC indicates that as the amount of organic matter increases, this organic matter tends to be more lipid rich reflecting the marine source of the organic matter. Cretaceous samples that contain predominantly marine organic matter tend to be isotopically lighter than those that contain predominantly terrestrial organic matter. Average ?? 13C values for organic matter from most Cretaceous sites are between -26 and -28???, and values heavier than about -25??? occur at very few sites. Most of the ?? 13C values of Miocene to Holocene OC-rich strata and modern marine plankton are between -16 to -23???. Values of ??13C of modern terrestrial organic matter are mostly between -23 and -33???. The depletion of terrestial OC in 13C relative to marine planktonic OC is the basis for numerous statements in the literature that isotopically light Cretaceous organic matter is of terrestrial origin, even though other organic geochemical and(or) optical indicators show that the organic matter is mainly of marine origin. A difference of about 5??? in ?? 13C between modern and Cretaceous OC-rich marine strata suggests either that Cretaceous marine planktonic organic matter had the same isotopic signature as modern marine plankton and that signature has been changed by diagenesis, or that OC derived from Cretaceous marine plankton was isotopically lighter by about 5??? relative to modern plankton OC. Diagenesis does

  10. Geochronology and geochemistry of Cretaceous Nanshanping alkaline rocks from the Zijinshan district in Fujian Province, South China: Implications for crust-mantle interaction and lithospheric extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Jiang, Shao-Yong

    2014-10-01

    In situ zircon U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic data, major and trace elements, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions are reported for Nanshanping alkaline rocks from the Zijingshan district in southwestern Fujian Province (the Interior or Western Cathaysia Block) of South China. The Nanshanping alkaline rocks, which consist of porphyritic quartz monzonite, porphyritic syenite, and syenite, revealed a Late Cretaceous age of 100-93 Ma. All of the rocks show high SiO2, K2O + Na2O, and LREE but low CaO, Fe2O3T, MgO, and HFSE (Nb, Ta, P, and Ti) concentrations. These rocks also exhibit uniform initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7078 to 0.7087 and εNd(t) values of -4.1 to -7.2, thus falling within the compositional field of Cretaceous basalts and mafic dikes occurring in the Cathaysia Block. Additionally, these rocks display initial Pb isotopic compositions with a 206Pb/204Pbi ratio of 18.25 to 18.45, a 207Pb/204Pbi ratio of 15.63 to 15.67, and a 208Pb/204Pbi ratio of 38.45 to 38.88. Combined with the zircon Hf isotopic compositions (εHf(t) = -11.7 to -3.2), which are different from those of the basement rocks, we suggest that Nanshanping alkaline rocks were primarily derived from a subduction-related enriched mantle source. High Rb/Sr (0.29-0.65) and Zr/Hf (37.5-49.2) but relatively low Ba/Rb (4.4-8.1) ratios suggest that the parental magmas of these rocks were most likely formed via partial melting of a phlogopite-bearing mantle source with carbonate metasomatism. The relatively high SiO2 (62.35-70.79 wt.%) and low Nb/Ta (10.0-15.3) ratios, positive correlation between SiO2 and (87Sr/86Sr)I, and negative correlation between SiO2 and εNd(t) of these rocks suggest that the crustal materials were also involved in formation of the Nanshanping alkaline rocks. Combined with geochemical and isotopic features, we infer magmatic processes similar to AFC (assimilation and fractional crystallization) involving early fractionation of clinopyroxene and olivine and subsequent fractionation of

  11. Intrusive rocks in the ophiolitic mélange of Crete - Witnesses to a Late Cretaceous thermal event of enigmatic geological position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langosch, Alexander; Seidel, Eberhard; Stosch, Heinz-Günter; Okrusch, Martin

    The ophiolitic mélange in the uppermost tectonic unit of the Cretan nappe pile contains crystalline slices which consist of a low-pressure/high-temperature metamorphic sequence and synmetamorphic intrusions, ranging in composition from diorite to granite. The plutonic rocks conform to two different igneous suites, dominated by diorites in eastern, and granites in central Crete, displaying I-type and A-type characters, respectively. Some of the granites from central Crete are classified as transitional I/S-type. They are closely associated with migmatitic paragneisses. Based on major and trace element, REE, Sr- and Nd-isotope geochemistry, the mafic members of both suites are derived from a depleted mantle source. The higher concentrations of P and Ti in the mafic members of the igneous suite in central Crete and the deviant trend of the whole suite may be explained by a different mantle source or a lower degree of partial melting. In both suites, magmatic evolution was governed by fractional crystallization of amphibole/clinopyroxene, plagioclase and minor phases. In addition, mixing or mingling of compositionally different magmas is indicated for the intrusive suite of eastern Crete whereas in central Crete the magma composition was at least partially modified through assimilation of (meta)pelites. The geochemical results suggest that the plutonic rocks formed in a supra-subduction zone setting. However, a formation during continental lithospheric extension cannot be ruled out. Published and new Rb-Sr and K-Ar dates on amphiboles and biotites from intrusive rocks and their metamorphic country rocks show that the peak of the low-P/high-T metamorphism and the intrusion of the two igneous suites testify to the same thermal event of Late Cretaceous age. A similar Late Cretaceous association of metamorphic and plutonic rocks has been described from the uppermost tectonic unit in the Attic-Cycladic Crystalline Complex. Together with the Cretan occurrences, they form a

  12. Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered, Technically Recoverable Coalbed-Gas Resources in Cretaceous and Tertiary Rocks, North Slope and Adjacent State Waters, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment is to develop geology-based hypotheses regarding the potential for additions to oil and gas reserves in priority areas of the United States, focusing on the distribution, quantity, and availability of oil and natural gas resources. The USGS has completed an assessment of the undiscovered, technically recoverable coalbed-gas resources in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks underlying the North Slope and adjacent State waters of Alaska (USGS Northern Alaska Province 5001). The province is a priority Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) province for the National Assessment because of its potential for oil and gas resources. The assessment of this province is based on geologic principles and uses the total petroleum system concept. The geologic elements of a total petroleum system include hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (stratigraphy, sedimentology, petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). In the Northern Alaska Province, the USGS used this geologic framework to define one composite coalbed gas total petroleum system and three coalbed gas assessment units within the petroleum system, and quantitatively estimated the undiscovered coalbed-gas resources within each assessment unit.

  13. Magma sources during Gondwana breakup: chemistry and chronology of Cretaceous magmatism in Westland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Quinten H. A.; Waight, Tod E.; Scott, James M.

    2013-04-01

    Cretaceous-Paleogene rifting of the Eastern Gondwana margin thinned the continental crust of Zealandia and culminated in the opening of the Tasman Sea between Australia and New Zealand and the Southern Ocean, separating both from Antarctica. The Western Province of New Zealand consists of a succession of metasedimentary rocks intruded by Palaeozoic and Mesozoic granitoids that formed in an active margin setting through the Phanerozoic. Upon cessation of subduction, the earliest stages of extension (~110-100 Ma) were expressed in the formation of metamorphic core complexes, followed by emplacement of granitoid plutons, the deposition of terrestrial Pororari Group sediments in extensional half-grabens across on- and offshore Westland, and the intrusion of mafic dikes from ~90 Ma. These dikes are concentrated in the swarms of the Paparoa and Hohonu Ranges and were intruded prior to and simultaneous with volumetrically minor A-type plutonism at 82 Ma. The emplacement of mafic dikes and A-type plutonism at ~82 Ma is significant as it coincides with the age of the oldest seafloor in the Tasman Sea, therefore it represents magmatism coincident with the initiation of seafloor spreading which continued until ~53 Ma. New 40Ar-39Ar ages indicate that the intrusion of mafic dikes in basement lithologies both preceded and continued after the initial opening of the Tasman Sea, including an additional population of ages at ~70 Ma. This indicates either a prolonged period of extension-related magmatism that continued >10 Ma after initial breakup, or two discrete episodes of magmatism during Tasman Sea spreading. Volumetrically minor Cenozoic within-plate magmatism continued sporadically throughout the South Island and bears a characteristic HIMU (high time integrated U/Pb) signature. A detailed geochemistry and chronological study of Cretaceous mafic and felsic magmatism is currently in progress and aims to better understand the transition of magma sources from a long lived active

  14. Factors limiting potential of evaporites as hydrocarbon source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, B.J.; Bissada, K.K.; Wood, J.W.

    1987-05-01

    It is well established that evaporite-bearing sequences account for a substantial proportion of petroleum occurrences. Examples can be cited from the Mesozoic of the Middle East, the Cretaceous of Latin America, and many others. An examination of effective source rocks within these provinces reveals that carbonate facies generate the bulk of the hydrocarbons. The higher evaporites (gypsum, anhydrate, halite, etc) seldom contribute to the resource base. Geochemical analyses of the higher evaporites reveal low organic carbon contents and imperceptible pyrolysis yields. These observations are not consistent with many of the current concepts of organic matter accumulation in evaporite environments, which suggests that hypersalinity should be especially favorable because abundant nutrient supply enhances primary productivity and elevated salt content enhances preservation efficiency. Their recent studies on oxidation of labile phytoplankton remains and relative sedimentation rates of organic and inorganic constituents in hypersaline brines suggest that three factors contribute to the observed low concentrations of hydrogen-enriched organic matter in the higher evaporites: (1) the density contrast between hypersaline brines and suspended organic matter retards the settling rate of the organic matter and prolongs its exposure to oxidative processes; (2) high concentrations of sulfates, and possibly nitrates, provide a secondary oxidizer for labile phytoplankton remains; and (3) high precipitation rates of the evaporite minerals dilute any organic matter which reaches the sediment-water interface. This paper will examine these factors in the modern and ancient record and discuss their influence on source-bed distribution through time and space.

  15. Stratigraphy of Blair formation, an Upper Cretaceous slope and basin deposit, eastern flank of the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, L.T.

    1985-05-01

    The Blair Formation (Upper Cretaceous) is the lowermost unit of the Mesaverde Group in southwestern Wyoming. Outcrop study of the Blair exposures on the east flank of the Rock Springs uplift reveals 1,100 ft (330 m) of sandstone, siltstone, and shale. The formation has a sharp conformable to locally erosional basal contact and contains intraformational channeling, syndepositional slumping, and high-energy sedimentary structures. Facies relationships indicate the Blair represents a slope and basinal deposit laterally equivalent to the shelf and delta complex of the lower Rock Springs Formation to the north. Overall stratification types, textures, and southeast paleotransport directions recorded within the Blair, which are normal to the southwest-trending Rock Springs shoreline, support this interpretation. High sedimentation rates in excess of subsidence rates during the early Campanian, possibly related to early movement on the Absaroka thrust and a eustatic lowering of sea level approximately 81 Ma, caused rapid shoreline progradation and favored the development of a narrow shelf. These conditions enabled sand-sized material to bypass the shelf and be deposited in slope and basin environments. A present-day example of these relationships is the modern Mississippi delta located near the shelfslope break of the Gulf of Mexico. Recognition of a narrow shelf in southwestern Wyoming during the early Campanian requires a modification of Late Cretaceous paleogeography to incorporate the concept of depositional topography. The occurrence of slope and basin sandstones in the Blair suggests that new interpretations may be needed to explain sandstone distribution for other stratigraphic intervals within the Cretaceous of the Western Interior.

  16. Depositional history and seismic stratigraphy of Lower Cretaceous rocks in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect

    Molenaar, C.M.

    1989-01-01

    Lower Cretaceous rocks, which are widespread throughout the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) and adjacent areas north of the Brooks Range, make up the major part of the thick sedimentary fill of the Colville basin. Much seismic and well information obtained since 1974 has aided considerably in understanding these rocks. These data include about 20,000 km of seismic lines, covering much of the NPRA with a grid spacing of 10-20 km, and 28 exploratory wells that bring the total to more than 50 wells in and adjacent to the NPRA. The purpose of this chapter is to interpret the depositional history of Lower Cretaceous rocks in the NPRA and adjacent areas on the basis of the latest seismic and well data and well data and on information from outcrops in the southern part of the Colville basin. The basin geometry and depositional history described in earlier reports are repeated here in the context of the overall Lower Cretaceous depositional history. Well data (including paleontology) and seismic data are used almost exclusively to interpret relations in the northern foothills and coastal plain areas. Surface data and some well data are used in the southern parts of the northern foothills, and surface data are used exclusively to interpret the depositional history in the southern foothills and Brooks Range. The quality of seismic data is fair to good in most of the coastal plain, where the structure is simple. In the northern foothills, tracing seismic reflections is more difficult, especially in the shallower part of the section because of structural complications in the thrust-faulted anticlines. The quality of seismic data across the structurally complex southern foothills area is inadequate to correlate stratigraphic units of the outcrop area of the southern foothills with subsurface units to the north.

  17. PTt path in metamorphic rocks of the Khoy region (northwest Iran) and their tectonic significance for Cretaceous Tertiary continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, H.; Moinevaziri, H.; Mohajjel, M.; Yagobpoor, A.

    2006-06-01

    Metamorphic rocks in the Khoy region are exposed between obducted ophiolites to the southwest and sedimentary rocks of Precambrian-Paleozoic age to the northeast. The Qom formation (Oligocene-Miocene) with a basal conglomerate transgressively overlies all of these rocks. The metamorphic rocks consist of both metasediments and metabasites. The metasediments are micaschist, garnet-staurolite schist and garnet-staurolite sillimanite schist with some meta-arkose, marble and quartzite. The metabasites are metamorphosed to greenschist and amphibolite facies from a basaltic and gabbroic protolith of tholeiitic and calc-alkaline rocks. Geothermobarometry based on the equivalence of minerals stability and their paragenesis in these rocks and microprobe analyses by several different methods indicate that metamorphism occurred in a temperature range between 450 and 680 °C at 5.5 and 7.5 kb pressure. Rims of minerals reveal a considerable decrease of pressure (<2 kb) and insignificant decrease of temperature. The PTt path of this metamorphism is normal. The MFG line passes above the triple junction of Al 2SiO 5 polymorphs, and the average geothermal gradient during metamorphism was from 27 to 37 °C/km, which is more concordant with the temperature regime of collision zones. We infer that crustal thickening during post-Cretaceous (possibly Eocene) collision of the Arabian plate and the Azerbaijan-Albourz block was the main factor that caused the metamorphism in the studied area.

  18. A regional appraisal of source rocks north and west of Britain and Ireland

    SciTech Connect

    Scotchman, I.C.; Dore, A.G.

    1995-08-01

    Potential source rocks in the string of basins on the Atlantic Margin north and west of Britain and Ireland range in age from Devonian to Tertiary, although the Jurassic appears to have been effective. In the Palaeozoic, thick developments of lacustrine Type I kerogen rich shales occur in the Lower and Middle Devonian of the Orcadian Basin in northeast Scotland while Carboniferous coals and coaly shales are known from well and outcrop in basins flanking the Rockall Trough. The Jurassic contains major source rock developments, the Lias Portree and Pabba and the Upper Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation shales which have been correlated to oil shows in the Slyne Trough, and oil discoveries in the West of Shetlands respectively. Anoxic black shales are also tentatively developed in the early Cretaceous. In the younger section, developments of gas-prone, organic poor basinal shales are known in the Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene while coals provide a minor gas source in the topmost Palaeocene and Eocene. Regionally, effective source rocks appear to be concentrated in the Jurassic rift basins extending known trends from the Jeanne D`Arc basin through East Greenland to the North Sea/Mid-Norway through the largely unexplored Atlantic Margin area NW of Britain and Ireland.

  19. Effects of sources and diagenesis on the isotopic and chemical composition of carbon and sulfur in cretaceous shales

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, S.G.; Kyser, T.K. )

    1990-10-01

    The Cretaceous Lea Park Formation of south-central Saskatchewan contains organic matter from marine and terrestrial sources in proportions that vary as a result of deposition during the Campanian Claggett transgressive-regressive cycle in the Western Interior seaway of North America. The relative proportions of organic matter from these sources were determined using a terrestrial index (TI) that compares n-alkanes considered to be of terrestrial origin, n-C{sub 25} to n-C{sub 29}, to those considered to be of marine origin, n-C{sub 15} to n-C{sub 22}. The C isotopic composition of Cretaceous marine organic matter is found to be near {minus}32{per thousand} while terrestrial organic matter is near {minus}24{per thousand}. The lower {delta}{sup 13}C values of marine organic matter from the Lea Park Formation, as compared with those of Recent marine organic matter, are similar to the relation observed in other Cretaceous rocks; {delta}{sup 13}C values of terrestrial organic matter, however, are similar to those of the present. Pyrite formation in the Lea Park mudstones was limited by the availability of metabolizable organic matter, with the great amount of pyrite typically associated with organic matter having the lowest TI values. {delta}{sup 34}Spy values range nearly 30{per thousand} and vary directly with the composition of associated organic matter. Variations in the supply of metabolizable organic matter were more important than differences in sedimentation rate in producing the range of {delta}{sup 34}Spy values. {Delta}{sup 34}S values vary with the composition of organic matter and become larger when associated with more metabolizable organic matter.

  20. Implications for the Upper Cycladic Unit: petrological, mineralogical and structural study of intrusive rocks from the Late-Cretaceous volcanic-arc in Anafi Island, Cyclades, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsovitis, P.; Soukis, K.; Lozios, S.

    2012-04-01

    /Yb ratios, are strong indications for involvement of subduction related processes. All rocks plot in the volcanic-arc granites fields[3]. Compositional variations between the studied rocks are most likely attributed to differentiation processes of a common magma, probably with amphibole and plagioclase fractionation, as indicated from their subparallel normalized patterns, their negative Eu anomalies and by the decrease of MgO, FeO, CaO, TiO2 and Cr along with increase of SiO2. Conclusively, the intrusive rocks of Anafi Island were formed in a volcanic-arc setting during the Late-Cretaceous. The involvement of subduction processes is clearly suggested from the geochemical data and from the presence of hydrous mineral phases, such as magmatic hornblendes and biotite. The fact that both intermediate and felsic intrusives derived from the same magma source, despite being found within different subunits, strongly suggests that these subunits were in close association during the intrusion. Furthermore, this supports the assumption that at least the two upper subunits observed on Anafi Island, are part of the Upper Unit of the Attic-Cycladic complex.

  1. Hydrocarbon migration and accumulation in the Upper Cretaceous Qingshankou Formation, Changling Sag, southern Songliao Basin: Insights from integrated analyses of fluid inclusion, oil source correlation and basin modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Tian; He, Sheng; Wang, Dexi; Hou, Yuguang

    2014-08-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Qingshankou Formation acts as both the source and reservoir sequence in the Changling Sag, situated in the southern end of the Songliao Basin, northeast China. An integrated approach involving determination of hydrocarbon charging history, oil source correlation and hydrocarbon generation dynamic modeling was used to investigate hydrocarbon migration processes and further predict the favorable targets of hydrocarbon accumulations in the Qingshankou Formation. The hydrocarbon generation and charge history was investigated using fluid inclusion analysis, in combination with stratigraphic burial and thermal modeling. The source rocks began to generate hydrocarbons at around 82 Ma and the hydrocarbon charge event occurred from approximately 78 Ma to the end of Cretaceous (65.5 Ma) when a large tectonic uplift took place. Correlation of stable carbon isotopes of oils and extracts of source rocks indicates that oil was generated mainly from the first member of Qingshankou Formation (K2qn1), suggesting that hydrocarbon may have migrated vertically. Three dimensional (3D) petroleum system modeling was used to evaluate the processes of secondary hydrocarbon migration in the Qingshankou Formation since the latest Cretaceous. During the Late Cretaceous, hydrocarbon, mainly originated from the Qianan depression, migrated laterally to adjacent structural highs. Subsequent tectonic inversion, defined as the late Yanshan Orogeny, significantly changed hydrocarbon migration patterns, probably causing redistribution of primary hydrocarbon reservoirs. In the Tertiary, the Heidimiao depression was buried much deeper than the Qianan depression and became the main source kitchen. Hydrocarbon migration was primarily controlled by fluid potential and generally migrated from relatively high potential areas to low potential areas. Structural highs and lithologic transitions are potential traps for current oil and gas exploration. Finally, several preferred hydrocarbon

  2. Central graben (Norway) - Hydrocarbon distribution related to source rock maturation and pressure regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarelli, A.; Issard, F. )

    1990-05-01

    This study of the Central graben was limited to the north by 57{degree}25'N, to the west by 4{degree}30', and to the east and south by the borders of the United Kingdom and Denmark, respectively. Several fields have been discovered within the Upper Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Jurassic strata for which the source rocks are Jurassic age. The amount and types of hydrocarbons generated from the source rocks have been estimated by accounting for their thickness, their initial potential, and their degree of maturation. The possibilities for hydrocarbon migration have been interpreted through an integration of the structural history and the hydrodynamic framework within the Central graben region. The hydrodynamic framework which appears to be a very important parameter in the study area, has been reconstructed from pressure measurements in the reservoirs, compaction profiles, and numerical modeling. It appears that vertical migration from the Jurassic source rocks toward the Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene reservoirs was mainly dependent on tectonics, salt diapirism and geopressuring. In the Central graben region the understanding of areal distribution and nature of hydrocarbons formed has been greatly improved by the integration of geochemistry and hydrodynamics. This conclusion could be extended to many other sedimentary basins in the world.

  3. Geochemical modelling of the principal source rocks of the Barinas and Maracaibo basins, western Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Tocco, R.; Gallango, O.; Parnaud, F.

    1996-08-01

    This study presents a geochemical modelling of the principal source rocks in the western Venezuelan Basins. The area covers more than 100,000 km{sup 2}, and includes Lake Maracaibo and Barinas Basins. The geochemical modelling recognizes three source rocks: (1) A principal, K3-K4-K5 Cretaceous sequences, represented by La Luna, Capacho and Navay formations, (2) a secondary, corresponding to the T4 Oligocene sequence, represent by the Carbonera Formation, and (3) an accessory source rock, K7-K8 Paleocene sequences, represented by the carbonaceous shales and coals of the Orocue Group and Marcelina Formation. Three periods of hydrocarbon expulsion were defined for La Luna Formation (Early Eocene-Late Eocene, Middle Miocene-Early Miocene and Early Miocene-Holocene) and a principal period of hydrocarbon expulsion for Orocue Group and Carbonera Formation (Plio-Pleistocene and Middle Miocene Plio-Pleistocene). The 90% of hydrocarbons generated correspond to the principal source rock La Luna Formation, and the 10% to Tertiary source rocks (Carbonera Formation and Orocue Group). Five petroleum systems were identified: Lake Maracaibo, southwest of the Lake Maracaibo Basin, the Lara nappes, the extensive basins of eastern Zulia and the Barinas subbasin.

  4. Updated paleomagnetic pole from Cretaceous plutonic rocks of the Sierra Nevada, California: Tectonic displacement of the Sierra Nevada block

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, J.W.; Gromme, S.

    2011-01-01

    We report remanent magnetization measurements from 13 sites in Cretaceous plutonic rocks in the northern Sierra Nevada (38??N-39.5??N). By increasing the number of available paleomagnetic sites, the new data tighten constraints on the displacement history of the Sierra Nevada block and its pre-extensional position relative to interior North America. We collected samples in freshly exposed outcrops along four highway transects. The rocks include diorite, granodiorite, and tonalite with potassium-argon ages (hornblende) ranging from 100 Ma to 83 Ma. By combining our results with previous paleomagnetic determinations from the central and southern Sierra Nevada (excluding sites from the rotated southern tip east of the White Wolf-Kern Canyon fault system), we find a mean paleomagnetic pole of 70.5??N, 188.2??E, A95 = 2.6?? (N = 26, Fisher concentration parameter, K = 118). Thermal demagnetization indicates that the characteristic remanence is generally unblocked in a narrow range within 35 ??C of the Curie temperature of pure magnetite. Small apparent polar wander during the Cretaceous normal-polarity superchron, plus prolonged acquisition of remanence at the site level, may account for the low dispersion of virtual geomagnetic poles and relatively large K value. Tilt estimates based on overlapping sediments, stream gradients, and thermochronology of the Sierra Nevada plutons vary from 0?? to 3?? down to the southwest. Without tilt correction, the mean paleomagnetic pole for the Sierra Nevada is essentially coincident with the North American reference pole during the Cretaceous stillstand (125 Ma to 80 Ma). At 95% confidence, the apparent latitude shift is 1.1?? ?? 3.0?? (positive northward), and the apparent rotation is negligible, 0.0?? ?? 4.7??. Correcting for each degree of tilt, which is limited to 3?? on geologic evidence, increases the rotation anomaly 2.2?? counterclockwise, while the apparent latitude shift remains unchanged. ?? 2011 Geological Society of

  5. Coeval 40Ar/39Ar Ages of 65.0 Million Years Ago from Chicxulub Crater Melt Rock and Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary Tektites.

    PubMed

    Swisher, C C; Grajales-Nishimura, J M; Montanari, A; Margolis, S V; Claeys, P; Alvarez, W; Renne, P; Cedillo-Pardoa, E; Maurrasse, F J; Curtis, G H; Smit, J; McWilliams, M O

    1992-08-14

    (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating of drill core samples of a glassy melt rock recovered from beneath a massive impact breccia contained within the 180-kilometer subsurface Chicxulub crater in Yucatán, Mexico, has yielded well-behaved incremental heating spectra with a mean plateau age of 64.98 +/- 0.05 million years ago (Ma). The glassy melt rock of andesitic composition was obtained from core 9 (1390 to 1393 meters) in the Chicxulub 1 well. The age of the melt rock is virtually indistinguishable from (40)Ar/(39)Ar ages obtained on tektite glass from Beloc, Haiti, and Arroyo el Mimbral, northeastern Mexico, of 65.01 +/- 0.08 Ma (mean plateau age for Beloc) and 65.07 +/- 0.10 Ma (mean total fusion age for both sites). The (40)Ar/(39)Ar ages, in conjunction with geochemical and petrological similarities, strengthen the recent suggestion that the Chicxulub structure is the source for the Haitian and Mexican tektites and is a viable candidate for the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary impact site.

  6. Coeval Ar-40/Ar-39 ages of 65.0 million years ago from Chicxulub crater melt rock and Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary tektites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swisher, Carl C., III; Grajales-Nishimura, Jose M.; Montanari, Alessandro; Margolis, Stanley V.; Claeys, Philippe; Alvarez, Walter; Renne, Paul; Cedillo-Pardo, Esteban; Maurrasse, Florentin J.-M. R.; Curtis, Garniss H.

    1992-01-01

    Ar-40/Ar-39 dating of drill-core samples of a glassy melt rock recovered from beneath a massive impact breccia contained with the 180-kilometer subsurface Chicxulub crater yields well-behaved incremental heating spectra with a mean plateau age of 64.98 +/- 0.05 million years ago (Ma). The glassy melt rock of andesitic composition was obtained from core 9 (1390 to 1393 meters) in the Chicxulub 1 well. The age of the melt rock is virtually indistinguishable from Ar-40/Ar-39 ages obtained on tektite glass from Beloc, Haiti, and Arroyo el Mimbral, northeastern Mexico, of 65.01 +/- 0.08 Ma (mean plateau age for Beloc) and 65.07 +/- 0.10 Ma (mean total fusion age for both sites). The Ar-40/Ar-39 ages, in conjunction with geochemical and petrological similarities, strengthen the suggestion that the Chicxulub structure is the source for the Haitian and Mexican tektites and is a viable candidate for the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary impact site.

  7. Coeval 40Ar/39Ar Ages of 65.0 Million Years Ago from Chicxulub Crater Melt Rock and Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary Tektites.

    PubMed

    Swisher, C C; Grajales-Nishimura, J M; Montanari, A; Margolis, S V; Claeys, P; Alvarez, W; Renne, P; Cedillo-Pardoa, E; Maurrasse, F J; Curtis, G H; Smit, J; McWilliams, M O

    1992-08-14

    (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating of drill core samples of a glassy melt rock recovered from beneath a massive impact breccia contained within the 180-kilometer subsurface Chicxulub crater in Yucatán, Mexico, has yielded well-behaved incremental heating spectra with a mean plateau age of 64.98 +/- 0.05 million years ago (Ma). The glassy melt rock of andesitic composition was obtained from core 9 (1390 to 1393 meters) in the Chicxulub 1 well. The age of the melt rock is virtually indistinguishable from (40)Ar/(39)Ar ages obtained on tektite glass from Beloc, Haiti, and Arroyo el Mimbral, northeastern Mexico, of 65.01 +/- 0.08 Ma (mean plateau age for Beloc) and 65.07 +/- 0.10 Ma (mean total fusion age for both sites). The (40)Ar/(39)Ar ages, in conjunction with geochemical and petrological similarities, strengthen the recent suggestion that the Chicxulub structure is the source for the Haitian and Mexican tektites and is a viable candidate for the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary impact site. PMID:17789640

  8. Stratigraphy of the Cretaceous-Tertiary and Paleocene-Eocene transition rocks of Big Bend National Park, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Schiebout, J.A.; Rigsby, C.A.; Rapp, S.D.; Hartnell, J.A.; Standhardt, B.R.

    1987-05-01

    The marine to terrestrial transition in the Big Bend area falls within the Late Cretaceous Aguja Formation, and, in light of new biostratigraphic data resulting from screening for small vertebrates and magneto-stratigraphic data, the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary falls within the Javelina Formation, which includes the first red banding produced by oxidation of overbank fluvial mudstones. No record of a catastrophic event is apparent in the Javelina Formation. The Javelina, Black Peaks, and Hannold Hill Formations and the Big Yellow Sandstone Member of the Canoe Formation record increasing uplift in the region, culminating in uplift and volcanism in the Chisos mountains, the source for upper Canoe Formation sediments. The sequence of changes produced by this trend and by unroofing in source highlands to the west is sufficiently gradual that the Javelina through Black Peaks units are not lithostratigraphically distinct at the formation level and therefore are reduced to member status, and placed, along with the Big Yellow Sandstone Member, within the redefined Tornillo Formation. The Aguja Formation and the Tornillo Formation are united in the Chilicotal Group (new), which spans the deposits from the first significant influxes of terrestrial sediments, formed as the Cretaceous sea retreated, up to the beginning of local volcanism in the Chisos. The volcanic strata of the upper Canoe Formation are reassigned to the Chisos Formation. 46 references.

  9. Simulation of ground-water flow in aquifers in Cretaceous rocks in the central Coastal Plain, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eimers, J.L.; Lyke, W.L.; Brockman, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    The principal sources of water-supply in Cretaceous rocks in the central Coastal Plain of North Carolina are the Peedee, Black Creek, and upper Cape Fear aquifers. Ground-water withdrawals from these aquifers have increased from about 0.25 million gallons per day in 1910 to over 29 million gallons per day in 1986, causing water-level declines as much as 160 feet. The maximum rate of water-level decline in 1986 is about 11 feet per year in the Black Creek aquifer. A quasi-three dimensional ground-water flow model was constructed and calibrated for the period 1900 to 1986 to simulate past water-level declines and to estimate the effects of future pumpage. Comparisons of 1,867 observed and model-computed heads were made at 323 well sites. The average difference between computed and observed water levels is -1 foot. About 68 percent of all the differences between computed and observed water levels falls in the range from -21.0 to 21.0 feet. Simulation indicates that the 29 million gallons per day of pumpage in 1986 was supplied by (1) increased recharge (net discharge of 2 million gallons per day in 1900 changed to net recharge of 18 million gallons per day in 1986), (2) increased lateral inflow to the aquifers of about 8 million gallons per day, and (3) depletion of ground-water storage of about 1 million gallons per day. Two pumping scenarios simulated head changes through 1991 and were based on (1) constant pumpage at the 1986 rates in each aquifer, and (2) continuing increases in pumping rates from 1986 through 1991 and rates varying from 10 to 19 percent per year for the three pumped aquifers. For scenario 1, water-level declines exceeded 5 feet locally; however, water-level rises of about 1 foot occurred in two areas. For scenario 2, water-level declines ranged from 1 foot to 30 feet in some pumping centers.

  10. Paleotectonic controls on deposition of Niobrara formation, Eagle sandstone, and equivalent rocks (Upper Cretaceous), Montana and South Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Shurr, G.W.; Rice, D.D.

    1985-05-01

    The deposition of the Niobrara Formation, Eagle Sandstone, and equivalent Upper Cretaceous rocks was controlled by paleotectonic activity on lineament-bound basement blocks in Montana and South Dakota. Linear features observed on Landsat images provide an interpretation of lineament geometry that is independent of stratigraphic data. Paleotectonism on lineament-bound blocks is documented in three areas that were located in distinctly different depositional environments. In central Montana, coastal and inner-shelf sandstones and nonmarine coastal-plain and wave-dominated delta deposits reflect paleotectonic control by lineaments trending north-south, east-west, northwest, and northeast. In the northern Black Hills, chalks and outer-shelf sandstones reflect control by lineaments trending north-south, northwest, and north-east. In central South Dakota, erosion and deposition of chalk and calcareous shale on a west-sloping carbonate ramp were controlled by lineaments that generally trend northeast and northwest. Paleotectonism on lineament-bound blocks characterized four tectonic zones located in the Late Cretaceous seaway; the western foredeep, the west-median trough, the east-median hinge, and the eastern platform. The regional geometry of all four tectonic zones appears to be related to the geometry of the convergent plate margin on the west. Paleotectonic activity on lineament-bound blocks may have been the result of horizontal forces related to the convergent margin and to vertical forces related to the movement of the North American plate.

  11. 70 million years of coastal upwelling in California; source rocks and paleoceanography

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, C.

    1996-12-31

    The Late Mesozoic-Cenozoic marine sequence of California displays a unique record of coastal upwelling and productivity in the form of distinctive diatomaceous and organic-rich deposits including the upper Cretaceous-lower Paleocene Moreno Formation, the Eocene Kreyenhagen Formation and the Miocene Monterey Formation. Unique sedimentological characteristics of these ancient upwelling systems include (a) Finely laminated biosiliceous-rich shales (>30% biogenic silica content), (b) Distinctive laminae composed by monospecific diatom resting spores, (c) Good source rock quality (>300 mg HC/mg org C), and (d) High accumulation rates in mid water anoxic conditions. Detailed study of individual laminae in sediments of these formations revealed concentration of monospecific diatom resting spores and an abundance of Stephanopyxis sp. and Coscinodiscus sp. Like Recent upwelling systems, preserved laminations of monospecific resting spores reflect strong seasonal upwelling that lead to high organic matter production and enhancement of anoxia. The presence of spores in the ancient and modern upwelling systems is evidence that diatoms have adapted and successfully competed in the highly productive California Margin since the Late Cretaceous. The Moreno, the Kreyenhagen and the Monterey Formation account for a significant portion of major petroleum source beds in California and contain an important record of coastal upwelling and paleoceanographic change in the northeastern Pacific Ocean over the past 70 million years. It is suggested that potential Late Maestrichtian source rocks could have been deposited along other favorable upwelling areas of the Eastern Pacific Rim.

  12. Implications of Late Cretaceous U-Pb zircon ages of granitic intrusions cutting ophiolitic and volcanogenic rocks for the assembly of the Tauride allochthon in SE Anatolia (Helete area, Kahramanmaraş Region, SE Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurlu, Nusret; Parlak, Osman; Robertson, Alastair; von Quadt, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    An assemblage of NE-SW-trending, imbricate thrust slices (c. 26 km E-W long × 6.3 km N-S) of granitic rocks, basic-felsic volcanogenic rocks (Helete volcanics), ophiolitic rocks (Meydan ophiolite) and melange (Meydan melange) is exposed near the Tauride thrust front in SE Anatolia. The volcanogenic rocks were previously assumed to be Eocene because of associated Nummulitic limestones. However, ion probe U-Pb dating of zircons extracted from the intrusive granitic rocks yielded ages of 92.9 ± 2.2-83.1 ± 1.5 Ma (Cenomanian-Campanian). The Helete volcanic unit and the overlying Meydan ophiolitic rocks both are intruded by granitic rocks of similar age and composition. Structurally underlying ophiolite-related melange includes similar-aged, but fragmented granitic intrusions. Major, trace element and rare earth element analyses coupled with electron microprobe analysis of the granitic rocks show that they are metaluminus to peraluminus and calc-alkaline in composition. A magmatic arc setting is inferred from a combination of tectonomagmatic discrimination, ocean ridge granite-normalized multi-element patterns and biotite geochemistry. Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data further suggest that the granitoid rocks were derived from variably mixed mantle and crustal sources. Granitic rocks cutting the intrusive rocks are inferred to have crystallized at ~5-16 km depth. The volcanogenic rocks and granitic rocks originated in a supra-subduction zone setting that was widely developed throughout SE Anatolia. Initial tectonic assembly took place during the Late Cretaceous probably related to northward subduction and accretion beneath the Tauride continent (Keban and Malatya platforms). Initial tectonic assembly was followed by exhumation and then transgression by shelf-depth Nummulitic limestones during Mid-Eocene, as documented in several key outcrops. Final emplacement onto the Arabian continental margin took place during the Early Miocene.

  13. Mineral chemical compositions of late Cretaceous volcanic rocks in the Giresun area, NE Turkey: Implications for the crystallization conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oǧuz, Simge; Aydin, Faruk; Uysal, İbrahim; Şen, Cüneyt

    2016-04-01

    This contribution contains phenocryst assemblages and mineral chemical data of late Cretaceous volcanic (LCV) rocks from the south of Görele and Tirebolu areas (Giresun, NE Turkey) in order to investigate their crystallization conditions. The LCV rocks in the study area occur in two different periods (Coniasiyen-Early Santonian and Early-Middle Campanian), which generally consist of alternation of mafic-intermediate (basaltic to andesitic) and felsic rock series (dacitic and rhyolitic) within each period. The basaltic and andesitic rocks in both periods generally exhibit porphyritic to hyalo-microlitic porphyritic texture, and contain phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxene, whereas the dacitic and rhyolitic rocks of the volcanic sequence usually show a vitrophyric texture with predominant plagioclase, K-feldspar, quartz and lesser amphibole-biotite phenocrysts. Zoned plagioclase crystals of the mafic and felsic rocks in different volcanic periods are basically different in composition. The compositions of plagioclase in the first-stage mafic rocks range from An52 to An78 whereas those of plagioclase from the first-stage felsic rocks have lower An content varying from An38 to An50. Rim to core profile for the zoned plagioclase of the first-stage mafic rocks show quite abrupt and notable compositional variations whereas that of the first-stage felsic rocks show slight compositional variation, although some of the grains may display reverse zoning. On the other hand, although no zoned plagioclase phenocryst observed in the second-stage mafic rocks, the compositions of microlitic plagioclase show wide range of compositional variation (An45-80). The compositions of zoned plagioclase in the second-stage felsic rocks are more calcic (An65-81) than those of the first-stage felsic rocks, and their rim to core profile display considerable oscillatory zoning. The compositions of pyroxenes in the first- and second-stage mafic-intermediate rocks vary over a wide range from

  14. Mineral chemical compositions of late Cretaceous volcanic rocks in the Giresun area, NE Turkey: Implications for the crystallization conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oǧuz, Simge; Aydin, Faruk; Uysal, İbrahim; Şen, Cüneyt

    2016-04-01

    This contribution contains phenocryst assemblages and mineral chemical data of late Cretaceous volcanic (LCV) rocks from the south of Görele and Tirebolu areas (Giresun, NE Turkey) in order to investigate their crystallization conditions. The LCV rocks in the study area occur in two different periods (Coniasiyen-Early Santonian and Early-Middle Campanian), which generally consist of alternation of mafic-intermediate (basaltic to andesitic) and felsic rock series (dacitic and rhyolitic) within each period. The basaltic and andesitic rocks in both periods generally exhibit porphyritic to hyalo-microlitic porphyritic texture, and contain phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxene, whereas the dacitic and rhyolitic rocks of the volcanic sequence usually show a vitrophyric texture with predominant plagioclase, K-feldspar, quartz and lesser amphibole-biotite phenocrysts. Zoned plagioclase crystals of the mafic and felsic rocks in different volcanic periods are basically different in composition. The compositions of plagioclase in the first-stage mafic rocks range from An52 to An78 whereas those of plagioclase from the first-stage felsic rocks have lower An content varying from An38 to An50. Rim to core profile for the zoned plagioclase of the first-stage mafic rocks show quite abrupt and notable compositional variations whereas that of the first-stage felsic rocks show slight compositional variation, although some of the grains may display reverse zoning. On the other hand, although no zoned plagioclase phenocryst observed in the second-stage mafic rocks, the compositions of microlitic plagioclase show wide range of compositional variation (An45‑80). The compositions of zoned plagioclase in the second-stage felsic rocks are more calcic (An65‑81) than those of the first-stage felsic rocks, and their rim to core profile display considerable oscillatory zoning. The compositions of pyroxenes in the first- and second-stage mafic-intermediate rocks vary over a wide range

  15. Hydrocarbon potential of hydrocarbon source rocks of the New Siberian Islands, Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaedicke, Christoph; Sobolev, Peter; Franke, Dieter; Piepjohn, Karsten; Brandes, Christian; Kus, Jolanta; Scheeder, Georg

    2016-04-01

    The New Siberian Islands are bridging the Laptev Sea with the East Siberian Sea. The Laptev and East Siberian Seas cover large areas of the continental margin of northeastern Arctic Russia. The East Siberian Shelf encompassing an area of 935.000 km2 is still virtually unexplored and most of the geological models for this shelf are extrapolations of the geology of the New Siberian Islands, the Wrangel Island and the northeast Siberian landmass. Apart from few seismic reflection lines, airborne magnetic data were the primary means of deciphering the structural pattern of the East Siberian Shelf. The Laptev Shelf covers an area of about 66.000 km2 and occupies a shelf region, where the active mid-oceanic spreading ridge of the Eurasian Basin hits the slope of the continental margin. During the joint VSEGEI/BGR field expedition CASE 13 (Circum Arctic Structural Events) in summer 2011 we sampled outcrops from the New Siberian Archipelago including the De Long Islands. 102 samples were collected and the Upper Palaeozoic to Lower Cenozoic units are found to be punctuated by several organic-rich intervals. Lithology varies from continental dominated clastic sedimentary rocks with coal seams to shallow marine carbonates and deep marine black shales. Rock-Eval pyrolysis, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and organic petrography studies were performed to estimate organic matter contents, composition, source, and thermal maturity. According to the results of our analyses, samples from several intervals may be regarded as potential petroleum source rocks. The Lower Devonian shales have the highest source rock potential of all Paleozoic units. Triassic samples have a good natural gas potential. Cretaceous and Cenozoic low-rank coals, lignites, and coal-bearing sandstones display some gas potential. The kerogen of type III (humic, gas-prone) dominates. Most of the samples (except some of Cretaceous and Paleogene age) reached the oil generation window.

  16. An overview on source rocks and the petroleum system of the central Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böcker, Johannes; Littke, Ralf; Forster, Astrid

    2016-05-01

    activation energies. These sediments are considered as most important source rocks of numerous high wax oils (oil family B) in addition to the coaly source rocks from the (Lower) Pechelbronn-Schichten (Late Eocene). Migration pathways are significantly influenced by the early graben evolution. A major erosion period occurred during the latest Cretaceous. The uplift center was located in the northern URG area, resulting in SSE dipping Mesozoic strata in the central URG. During Middle Eocene times a second uplift center in the Eifel area resulted in SW-NE-directed shore lines in the central URG and contemporaneous south-southeastern depocenters during marine transgression from the south. This structural setting resulted in a major NNW-NW-directed and topography-driven migration pattern for expelled Liassic oil in the fractured Mesozoic subcrop below sealing Dogger α clays and basal Tertiary marls.

  17. Stratigraphic controls on the source rock distribution, Llanos Orientales Basin, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Ramon, J.C.; Fajardo, A.; Rubiano, J.; Reyes, A.

    1996-12-31

    All available rock and oil geochemistry analyses were tied to a high-resolution stratigraphic framework for more than 50 wells in the Central Llanos Orientates Basin. New Tertiary generation input is proposed. The best source rock intervals are at the base and top of the Gacheta Formation (Upper Cretaceous) and in the middle of the Barco-Cuervos (Paleocene) and Mirador (Eocene) formations. These organic-rich zones contain type II and III kerogen. TOC contents range from about 1% up to 15%. The four source rock intervals occur within marine shales near condensed sections, at the position maximum accommodation/sediment-supply (A/S) ratios. The development of conditions that allow accumulation and preservation of anomalously high fractions of organic matter might be explained by two mechanisms. Increased A/S ratio results in retention of more sediment in the coastal plain, thus reducing the tendency for siliciclastic sediment to dilute the organic matter accumulating on the shelf. Also, deeper water might restrict circulation, enhancing bottom anoxic conditions. In the more transitional and continental sequences, increased A/S ratio is associated with higher phreatic water level. A high ground water table enhances preservation of coaly intervals. The sea-level rise brings marine water into valleys and low-gradient coastal plains. The resulting embayments, marsh and swampy areas are organic-prone, contributing to the source rock potential of strata associated with high conditions and base-level rise-to-fall turnaround positions.

  18. Geology of the upper cretaceous and tertiary-coal-bearing rocks in the western part of the Wind River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hickling, N.L.; Warlow, R.C.; Windolph, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses coal-bearing rocks of the Frontier Formation which record the earliest peat accumulations in swamps overlying linear shoreline and delta lobe sand bodies formed during marine regressive cycles. Similarly, Mesaverde Formation coals formed above sandstones related to distributary channels, barrier bars, and prograding delta systems. In contrast, thick coal in the Meeteetse Formation formed in a subsiding intermontane basin. Tonsteins in these Upper Cretaceous coals and in tuff beds of the lower Eocene Indian Meadows Formation record repeated volcanism during the Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary.

  19. Provenance and paleogeography of the Late Cretaceous Mengyejing Formation, Simao Basin, southeastern Tibetan Plateau: Whole-rock geochemistry, U-Pb geochronology, and Hf isotopic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Licheng; Liu, Chenglin; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Hua

    2014-05-01

    The Late Cretaceous Mengyejing Formation, which contains the only pre-Quaternary potash salt deposit in the Simao Basin, southeastern Tibet, is thought to be genetically related to the Maha Sarakham Formation in the Khorat Basin. The provenance and paleogeography of these two basins have been under debate, although little diagnostic evidence has been previously published. A combined analysis of whole rock geochemistry, zircon U-Pb chronology, and Hf isotopic compositions was performed to characterize the provenance of the Mengyejing Formation. These formation's sandstones are characterized by moderate chemical index of alteration (CIA) values. These values, together with plots of the Th/U-Th ratios, suggest that certain samples have undergone moderate weathering and sedimentary recycling. The major and trace elements (La/Th-Hf, Th/Sc-Zr/Sc, Eu/Eu*-Th/Sc, TiO2-Fe2O3T + MgO, Al2O3/SiO2-Fe2O3T + MgO, K2O/Na2O-SiO2) indicate that the sedimentary sources were felsic rocks from an active continental margin or continental arc with a minor amount of recycled sediment from a passive continental margin. The Mengyejing Formation contains detrital zircons primarily with U-Pb ages of 2.45-2.57 Ga, 1.8-1.9 Ga, 740-880 Ma, 410-470 Ma, and 215-300 Ma. The results reveal that the pre-Devonian zircons are derived from the recycled sediments of the Yangtze block originating in the Qinling Orogenic Belt, and they share this provenance with the coeval sediments in the Khorat Basin. The magmatic rocks of the Ailaoshan and Lincang areas are responsible for supplying the Devonian to Triassic detrital zircons. These provenance data combined with published paleocurrent results suggest that the Simao Basin was situated on the western margin of the Khorat Basin during the Late Cretaceous. The basins were connected when marine incursion occurred. We propose that pre-Devonian materials from the southwestern Sichuan Basin first supplied detritus to the Simao Basin and subsequently to the Khorat

  20. Rock avalanches caused by earthquakes: Source characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keefer, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    Study of a worldwide sample of historical earthquakes showed that slopes most susceptible to catastrophic rock avalanches were higher than 150 meters and steeper than 25 degrees. The slopes were undercut by fluvial or glacial erosion, were composed ofintensely fractured rock, and exhibited at least one other indicator of low strength or potential instability.

  1. Rock avalanches caused by earthquakes: source characteristics.

    PubMed

    Keefer, D K

    1984-03-23

    Study of a worldwide sample of historical earthquakes showed that slopes most susceptible to catastrophic rock avalanches were higher than 150 meters and steeper than 25 degrees. The slopes were undercut by fluvial or glacial erosion, were composed of intensely fractured rock, and exhibited at least one other indicator of low strength or potential instability.

  2. Lithofacies and palynostratigraphy of some Cretaceous and Paleocene rocks, Surghar and Salt Range coal fields, northern Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warwick, Peter D.; Javed, Shahid; Mashhadi, S. Tahir A.; Shakoor, Tariq; Khan, Asrar M.; Khan, A. Latif

    1995-01-01

    The stratigraphic relation between the Cretaceous generally non-coal-bearing Lumshiwal Formation (64 to 150 m thick) and the Paleocene coal-bearing Hangu Formation (5 to 50 m thick) in the Surghar Range of north-central Pakistan is complex. Both formations contain remarkably similar lithofacies: one or two types of sandstone lithofacies; a combined lithofacies of mudstone, claystone, carbonaceous shale, and coal beds; and a rare carbonate lithofacies. An analysis of pollen data from rock samples collected from various stratigraphic positions indicates that the formations are separated by a disconformity and that the age of the Lumshiwal Formation is Early Cretaceous and the age of the Hangu is Paleocene. Previous workers had suggested that the age of the Lumshiwal is Late Cretaceous. An analysis of sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and paleontologic data indicates that both the Lumshiwal and Hangu Formations probably were deposited in shallow-marine and deltaic environments. The rocks of the Lumshiwal become more terrestrial in origin upward, whereas the rocks of the Hangu become more marine in origin upward. The contact between the two formations is associated with a laterally discontinuous lateritic paleosol (assigned to the Hangu Formation) that is commonly overlain by the economically important Makarwal coal bed. This coal bed averages 1.2 m in thickness. No other coal beds in the Surghar Range are as thick or as laterally continuous as the Makarwal coal bed. Analytical data from the Makarwal and one other Hangu coal bed indicate that Surghar Range coal beds range from high-volatile B to high-volatile C bituminous in apparent rank. Averaged, as-received results of proximate and ultimate analyses of coal samples are (1) moisture content, 5.4 percent; (2) ash yield, 12.5 percent; (3) total sulfur content, 5 percent; and (4) calorific value, 11034 Btu/lb (British thermal units per pound). Minor- and trace-element analyses indicate that these coals contain relatively

  3. Extraction of whole versus ground source rocks: Fundamental petroleum geochemical implications including oil-source rock correlation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, L.C.; Clayton, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    In petroleum geochemistry, extractable hydrocarbons (HCs) in source rocks have typically been studied by grinding the rock to a fine powder (???100 mesh) and then extracting the HCs from the rock with a solvent. This procedure carries the implicit assumption that the HCs are homogeneously distributed throughout the rock. However, sequential Soxhlet extractions of whole (unpowdered) source rocks have shown that progressive extracts from the same rock can be quite different and may not even correlate with each other. A crude oil-like material clearly has been fractionated from indigenous bitumen in these rocks, has moved to cracks and parting laminae in the rocks, is ready for expulsion from the rocks, and is thus most accessible to the first extracting solvents. This process, which we believe is largely due to HC gases and carbon dioxide generated over all maturation ranks in source rocks, carries petroleum geochemical implications of a fundamental nature for oil-source rock correlations and gives insight into primary migration mechanisms, origin of oil deposits, and use of maturity and organic-facies indices. ?? 1992.

  4. Basin richness and source rock disruption - a fundamental relationship

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, L.C.

    1994-01-01

    Primary petroleum migration (expulsion from source rocks) remains the least understood parameter controlling the genesis of oil deposits. It is hypothesised that source rocks must be physically disrupted before meaningful expulsion can occur. Faulting, with accompanying significant fracturing, would appear to be the optimum naturally-occurring process for physical disruption of source rocks. If these hypotheses are valid, intensity of faulting in deeply-buried HC "kitchens' containing mature source rocks should strongly correlate with increasing basin richness. This possible relationship is examined in this paper; it is found that there is a strong correlation of increasing basin richness with increasing structural intensity over and adjacent to basin depocentres. This correlation thus supports the hypothesis that physical disruption of mature source rocks is a necessary, and previously unappreciated, controlling parameter for oil expulsion. -from Author

  5. Lagoonal deposits in the Upper Cretaceous Rock Springs Formation (Mesaverde Group), southwest Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirschbaum, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Most paleogeographic reconstructions of the Rock Springs Formation show shorelines having lobate to arcuate deltas. These shorelines are oriented NE-SW, with the sea to the southeast. Brackish-water bodies are usually shown in interdistributary areas or associated with abandoned delta lobes, and are open to the sea. In this study, a sedimentary sequence 30-50 m thick is interpreted as interdeltaic deposits. Brackish-water deposits within the sequence are interpreted as interdeltaic lagoons rather than interdistributary bays. Three facies associations (units) are recognized in nine measured sections of the study interval. Unit A consists of interbedded sandstone, mudrock and coal which occur in both fining- and coarsening-upward sequences less than 10 m thick. Fining-upward sequences decrease in thickness and frequency upwards in unit A and are interpreted as distributary channels. Coarsening-upward sequences associated with the channels are interpreted as crevasse splays that filled lakes or interdistributary bays. In the upper part of the unit where only minor channels are present, the coarsening-upward sequences are interpreted as bay deltas. Unit B consists of fossiliferous silty shale and bioturbated sandy siltstone. A low-diversity fauna of bivalves, gastropods, ostracods and foraminifers indicates that brackish-water conditions existed. Unit B intertongues with unit A to the northwest and with unit C to the southeast, and is interpreted as lagoonal deposits. Unit C consists of crossbedded and burrowed sandstone in beds 0.5-9 m thick. Sandstones are laterally continuous in the southeast but become tabular bodies enclosed within unit B to the northwest. Laterally continuous sandstones are interpreted as shoreface deposits on the basis of multidirectional crossbeds, marine trace fossils and continuity. Tabular sandstones are interpreted as flood-tidal deltas on the basis of NW-oriented crossbeds, pinchouts to the northwest and enclosure within unit B. Scoured

  6. Stratigraphic framework and regional subsurface geology of upper Cretaceous through lower Eocene rocks in Wind River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hogle, D.G.; Jones, R.W.

    1989-03-01

    A detailed stratigraphic study of over 6000 m of Upper Cretaceous through lower Eocene sedimentary rocks in the Wind River basin. Wyoming, has refined and expanded previous work and conclusions. A much larger data base than previously available was assembled to include a correlation net of 325 geophysical well logs, 36 drill holes with palynological age dates, lithology logs of drill hoes, and limited surface exposures. The most significant results and conclusions from this study are summarized below. (1) The lower part of the Mesaverde Formation intertongues with marine sandstones and shales of the upper Cody Shale to the east and with marine sandstones of the lower Mesaverde Formation in the Big Horn basin to the north. (2) An unconformity between the Mesaverde and Fort Union Formations in the southwestern part of the basin can be traced into the subsurface. (3) During the latest Cretaceous and Paleocene, over 2100 m of Lance Formation and over 2700 m of Fort Union Formation were deposited in the northeastern part of the basin. Ponding during the Paleocene is demonstrated by correlation and subsurface mapping of over 900 m of shale and siltstone in the Waltman Shale Member of the Fort Union Formation. (4) The Lance and Fort Union Formations can be mapped in the subsurface throughout much of the basin. The Lance Formation pinches out in the western part of the basin. (5) Coal beds can be traced for short distances in the subsurface; coal bed occurrence is documented for the Mesaverde, lower Fort Union, and Meeteetse Formations in the southwestern, northern and central, and northwestern parts of the basin, respectively.

  7. Petroleum source rock potential of Mesozoic condensed section deposits in southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A; Tew, B.H.; Mink, R.M. )

    1991-03-01

    Because condensed section deposits in carbonates and siliclastics are generally fine-grained lithologies often containing relatively high concentrations of organic matter, these sediments have the potential to be petroleum source rocks if buried under conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation. In the Mesozoic deposits of southwestern Alabama, only the Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonate mudstones of the condensed section of the LZAGC-4.1 cycle have realized their potential as hydrocarbon source rocks. These carbonate mudstones contain organic carbon concentrations of algal and amorphous kerogen of up to 1.7% and have thermal alteration indices of 2- to 3+. The Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa marine claystones of the condensed section of the UZAGC-2.5 cycle are rich (up to 2.9%) in herbaceous and amorphous organic matter but have not been subjected to burial conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation. The Jurassic Pine Hill/Norphlet black shales of the condensed section of the LZAGC-3.1 cycle and the Upper Jurassic Haynesville carbonate mudstones of the condensed section of the LZAGC-4.2 cycle are low (0.1%) in organic carbon. Although condensed sections within depositional sequences should have the highest source rock potential, specific environmental, preservational, and/or burial history conditions within a particular basin will dictate whether or not the potential is realized as evidenced by the condensed sections of the Mesozoic depositional sequences in southwestern Alabama. Therefore, petroleum geologists can use sequence stratigraphy to identify potential source rocks; however, only through geochemical analyses can the quality of these potential source rocks be determined.

  8. Zircon U-Pb dating, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic characteristics of the Jintonghu monzonitic rocks in western Fujian Province, South China: Implication for Cretaceous crust-mantle interactions and lithospheric extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Lu, An-Huai; Zhao, Hai-Xiang; Yang, Tang-Li; Hou, Ming-Lan

    2016-09-01

    Comprehensive petrological, in situ zircon U-Pb dating, Ti-in-zircon temperature and Hf isotopic compositions, whole rock geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic data are reported for the Jintonghu monzonitic intrusions in the western Fujian Province (Interior Cathaysia Block), South China. The Jintonghu monzonitic intrusions were intruded at 95-96 Ma. Their Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions are similar to the coeval and nearby enriched lithospheric mantle-derived mafic and syenitic rocks, indicating that the Jintonghu monzonitic rocks were likely derived from partial melting of the enriched mantle sources. Their high Nb/Ta ratios (average 21.6) suggest that the metasomatically enriched mantle components were involved, which was attributed to the modification of slab-derived fluid and melt by the subduction of the paleo-Pacific Plate. The presence of mafic xenoliths, together with geochemical and isotopic features indicates a mafic-felsic magma mixing. Furthermore, the Jintonghu intrusions may have experienced orthopyroxene-, biotite- and plagioclase-dominated crystallization. Crust-mantle interaction can be identified as two stages, including that the Early Cretaceous mantle metasomatism and lithospheric extension resulted from the paleo-Pacific slab subduction coupled with slab rollback, and the Late Cretaceous crustal activation and enhanced extension induced by dip-angle subduction and the underplating of mantle-derived mafic magma.

  9. Paleotemperatures and paleodepths of the Upper Cretaceous rocks in El Qusaima, Northeastern Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orabi, O. H.; Zahran, E.

    2014-03-01

    The planktonic foraminiferal morphogroups and planktonic quantitative analysis as well as the lithological variations across the Coniacian to Maastrichtian sediments of El Qusaima section (Northeastern Sinai, Egypt) are studied in detail in order to detect the prevailing paleoecological conditions along these sediments. At the studied area of El Qusaima section there is a gradual cooling started at the base of Globotruncana elevata Zone (early-middle Campanian) of the lower part of the Markha Member and continued till Globotruncana aegyptiaca Zone (Late Campanian) of the upper part of the Markha Member. This trend corresponds to the onset of a global cooling that began at about 73 Ma (Late Campanian) and ended the Cretaceous greenhouse climate mode. At El Qusaima section, a gradual warming started at the base of Pseudogumbelina palpebra Zone (Late Maastrichtian) and continued till Plummerita hantkeninoides Zone (latest Maastrichtian) due to the high abundance of Plummerita hantkeninoides and Plummeritareicheli, which have been flourishing in warm waters. So this warming near the end of the Maastrichtian is a global event as shown by many authors.

  10. Early Cretaceous low-Mg# adakitic rocks in the southern margin of the central North China Craton: Partial melting of thickened lower continental crust and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports new whole-rock geochemical, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic, and zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic data for Early Cretaceous intrusive rocks in the Sanmenxia-Houma area of central China, and uses these data to constrain the petrogenesis of low-Mg adakitic rocks (LMAR) and the spatial extent of the influence of the deeply subducted Yangtze slab during the Triassic evolution of this region. New zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb data indicate that the early- and late-stage southern Quli, Qiligou, and Gaomiao porphyritic quartz diorites, the Canfang granodiorite, and the northern Wangmao porphyritic quartz monzodiorite were emplaced during the Early Cretaceous (~130 Ma) and the late Early Cretaceous (116 Ma). These rocks are characterized by high Na2O/K2O, Sr/Y, and (La/Yb)n ratios as well as high Sr concentrations, low Mg# values, and low heavy rare earth element and Y concentrations, all of which indicate an LMAR affinity. The samples have relatively high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7054-0.7095), and low eNd(t) (-11.90 to -22.20) and eHf(t) (-16.7 to -32.7) values, indicative of a lower continental crust origin. The presence of Neoproterozoic (754-542 Ma) and inherited Late Triassic (220 Ma) metamorphic zircons within the late Early Cretaceous LMAR and the relatively high 206Pb/204Pb ratios of these rocks suggest that they formed from primary magmas derived from partial melting of Yangtze Craton (YC) basement material that had undergone ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism. In contrast, the presence of Paleoproterozoic and Archean inherited zircons within early Early Cretaceous LMAR in this area and the relatively low 206Pb/204Pb ratios of these rocks are indicative of derivation from primary magmas generated by partial melting of the thickened lower continental crust of the North China Craton (NCC). These rocks may have formed in an extensional environment associated with the upwelling of asthenospheric mantle material. The presence of YC basement material within the NCC in the

  11. Preliminary results on the characterization of Cretaceous and lower Tertiary low-permeability (tight) gas-bearing rocks in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Fouch, T.D.; Keefer, W.R.; Finn, T.M.

    1993-12-31

    The Wind River Basin is a structural and sedimentary basin in central Wyoming (Figure 1) that was created during the Laramide orogeny from Late Cretaceous through Eocene time. The objectives of the Wind River Basin tight gas sandstone project are to define the limits of the tight gas accumulation in the basin and to estimate in-place and recoverable gas resources. The approximate limits of the tight gas accumulation are defined from available drillhole information. Geologic parameters, which controlled the development of the accumulation, are studied in order to better understand the origins of tight gas accumulations, and to predict the limits of the accumulation in areas where little drillhole information is available. The architecture of sandstone reservoirs are studied in outcrop to predict production characteristics of similar reservoirs within the tight gas accumulation. Core and cuttings are used to determine thermal maturities, quality of source rocks, and diagenetic histories. Our work thus far has concentrated in the Wind River Indian Reservation in the western part of the basin.

  12. Geohydrology and chemical quality of water in Middle and Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous rocks, western Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kume, Jack

    1984-01-01

    Fresh and saline water occur in Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous rocks in western Kansas. The maximum thickness of the Jurassic aquifer is about 50 feet. During 1981, water levels ranged from 255 to 1,160 feet below land surface; the static heads ranged from about 2,400 to 3,100 feet above sea level and the hydraulic gradient ranged from 16 feet per mile toward the northeast to 40 feet per mile toward the north. The water is moderately saline, very hard, a sodium sulfate or sodium chloride type, and unsuitable for drinking and irrigation. The maximum thickness of the Cheyenne aquifer is about 190 feet. During 1981, water levels ranged from 267 to 375 feet below land surface; the static heads varied from less than 2,300 to more than 3,200 feet above sea level; and the hydraulic gradient was 8 feet per mile toward the east. The water is fresh to moderately saline, soft to very hard, a sodium sulfate or sodium , bicarbonate type, and suitable to unsuitable for drinking and irrigation. The maximum thickness of the Dakota aquifer is about 150 feet. During 1982, water levels ranged from 24 to 604 feet below land surface; the static heads ranged from about 2,100 to 3,200 feet above sea level; and the hydraulic gradient was 11 feet per mile toward the east and northeast. The water is fresh to slightly saline, soft to very hard, and suitable to unsuitable for drinking and irrigation. (USGS)

  13. Burial History, Thermal Maturity, and Oil and Gas Generation History of Source Rocks in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Laura N.R.; Finn, Thomas M.; Lewan, Michael D.; Kirschbaum, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Burial history, thermal maturity, and timing of oil and gas generation were modeled for seven key source-rock units at eight well locations throughout the Bighorn Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Also modeled was the timing of cracking to gas of Phosphoria Formation-sourced oil in the Permian Park City Formation reservoirs at two well locations. Within the basin boundary, the Phosphoria is thin and only locally rich in organic carbon; it is thought that the Phosphoria oil produced from Park City and other reservoirs migrated from the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt. Other petroleum source rocks include the Cretaceous Thermopolis Shale, Mowry Shale, Frontier Formation, Cody Shale, Mesaverde and Meeteetse Formations, and the Tertiary (Paleocene) Fort Union Formation. Locations (wells) selected for burial history reconstructions include three in the deepest parts of the Bighorn Basin (Emblem Bench, Red Point/Husky, and Sellers Draw), three at intermediate depths (Amoco BN 1, Santa Fe Tatman, and McCulloch Peak), and two at relatively shallow locations (Dobie Creek and Doctor Ditch). The thermal maturity of source rocks is greatest in the deep central part of the basin and decreases to the south, east, and north toward the basin margins. The Thermopolis and Mowry Shales are predominantly gas-prone source rocks, containing a mix of Type-III and Type-II kerogens. The Frontier, Cody, Mesaverde, Meeteetse, and Fort Union Formations are gas-prone source rocks containing Type-III kerogen. Modeling results indicate that in the deepest areas, (1) the onset of petroleum generation from Cretaceous rocks occurred from early Paleocene through early Eocene time, (2) peak petroleum generation from Cretaceous rocks occurred during Eocene time, and (3) onset of gas generation from the Fort Union Formation occurred during early Eocene time and peak generation occurred from late Eocene to early Miocene time. Only in the deepest part of the basin did the oil generated from the Thermopolis and

  14. Using high-resolution aeromagnetic data to recognise and map intra-sedimentary volcanic rocks and geological structures across the Cretaceous middle Benue Trough, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anudu, Goodluck K.; Stephenson, Randell A.; Macdonald, David I. M.

    2014-11-01

    Recently acquired high-resolution aeromagnetic data over the Cretaceous middle Benue Trough of Nigeria have been analysed employing various edge-enhancement (magnetic derivative) methods: vertical derivatives, total horizontal derivative, analytic signal, and total horizontal derivative of tilt derivative. The study was aimed at mapping intra-sedimentary volcanic rocks and their areal extents/distribution as well as delineating geological structures, their structural trends and tectonic implications. The magnetic derivative anomaly maps produced in this project greatly enhanced the high amplitude, short-wavelength (high wavenumber) anomalies associated with the surface/near-surface intra-sedimentary volcanic rocks and associated geological structures. The maps show that volcanic rocks of Late Cretaceous to Palaeocene age are much more widespread than implied by surface geological mapping, with an areal extent of greater than 12,000 km2 in the relatively shallow subsurface. The results also highlight some known and several previously unknown geological lineaments. Rose (azimuth-frequency) plots of orientations of geological structures show trends being predominantly NE-SW, NW-SE and ESE-WNW with minor ENE-WSW and N-S trends. These main groups of structural trends are associated with the Brasiliano/Pan-African orogeny (600 ± 200 Ma) and likely predate rifting of the Gondwana supercontinent. They may have been enhanced during continental break-up in Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous.

  15. The Bolivian source rocks: Sub Andean Zone-Madre de Dios-Chaco

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, I.; Montemurro, G.; Aguilera, E.; Perez, M.; Martinez, E.Diaz

    1996-08-01

    A complete study of source rocks has been carried out in the Bolivian foothills and foreland (Sub Andean Zone, Chaco and Madre de Dios) in order to quantify the petroleum potential of the area. Besides the classical mid-Devonian source rocks (Tequeje Formation in the north, Limoncito Formation in the center and Los Monos Formation in the south), others are important: the Tomachi Formation (late Devonian) in the north and the Copacabana Formation (Upper Carboniferous-lower Permian) in the northern Sub Andean Zone. Both show an excellent potential with S{sub 2} over 50 mg HC/g and average values higher than 10 mg HC/g over few hundred meters. The Latest Cretaceous Flora Formation present locally a high potential but is very thin. Almost all the source rocks matured during the Neogene due to the subsidence in the Andean foreland and in the piggyback basins, and are thus involved on the current petroleum system. Silurian and Lower Paleozoic units also contain thick shale beds, but these source rocks were mature before the Jurassic in the south of the country. In the center, the Silurian is not nowadays overmature and may play an important role. The different zones are compared based on their Source Potential Index which indicates that the richest areas are the northern Sub Andean Zone and the Madre de Dios basin with SPI greater than 10 t/m{sup 2}. Since these two areas remain almost unexplored, these results allow us to be optimistic about the possibilities for future exploration.

  16. Configuration of the base of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system and hydrogeology of the underlying pre-Cretaceous rocks, west-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Rene A.; Ardis, Ann F.

    1992-01-01

    The most permeable pre-Cretaceous rocks are in the eastern half of the study area where they compose the Hickory aquifer (in Upper Cambrian rocks), Ellenburger-San Saba aquifer (Upper Cambrian- Lower Ordovician), and Marble Falls aquifer (Lower Pennsylvanian). These aquifers are hydraulically connected to the northeastern fringe of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, as their up-turned margins crop out around the flanks of the breached Llano uplift. The Rustler aquifer in rocks of Late Permian age underlies parts of the Trans-Pecos region, where it yields small amounts of greatly mineralized water for industrial and agricultural purposes. The Dockum aquifer in rocks of Late Triassic age directly underlies the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system in western parts of the study area, and locally increases the saturated thickness of the ground-water-flow system by an average of about 200 feet. Despite these notable exceptions, the collective effect of the pre-Cretaceous rocks is that 01 a barrier to ground-water flow, which limits the exchange of water across the base of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system.

  17. Tectonic control in source rock maturation and oil migration in Trinidad

    SciTech Connect

    Persad, K.M.; Talukdar, S.C.; Dow, W.G. )

    1993-02-01

    Oil accumulation in Trinidad were sourced by the Upper Cretaceous calcareous shales deposited along the Cretaceous passive margin of northern South America. Maturation of these source rocks, oil generation, migration and re-migration occurred in a foreland basin setting that resulted from interaction between Caribbean and South American plates during Late Oligocene to recent times. During Middle Miocene-Recent times, the foreland basin experienced strong compressional events, which controlled generation, migration, and accumulation of oil in Trinidad. A series of mature source rock kitchens formed in Late Miocene-Recent times in the Southern and Colombus Basins to the east-southeast of the Central Range Thrust. This thrust and associated fratured developed around 12 m.y.b.p. and served as vertical migration paths for the oil generated in Late Miocene time. This oil migrated into submarine fans deposited in the foreland basin axis and older reservoirs deformed into structural traps. Further generation and migration of oil, and re-migration of earlier oil took place during Pliocene-Holocene times, when later thrusting and wrench faulting served as vertical migration paths. Extremely high sedimentation rates in Pliocene-Pleistocene time, concurrent with active faulting, was responsible for very rapid generation of oil and gas. Vertically migrating gas often mixed with earlier migrated oil in overlying reservoirs. This caused depletion of oil in light hydrocarbons with accompanied fractionation among hydrocarbon types resulting in heavier oil in lower reservoirs, enrichment of light hydrocarbons and accumulation of gas-condensates in upper reservoirs. This process led to an oil-gravity stratification within about 10,000 ft of section.

  18. Andesitic crustal growth via mélange partial melting: Evidence from Early Cretaceous arc dioritic/andesitic rocks in southern Qiangtang, central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lu-Lu; Wang, Qiang; Wyman, Derek A.; Ou, Quan; Dan, Wei; Jiang, Zi-Qi; Yang, Jin-Hui; Li, Jie; Long, Xiao-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Deciphering the petrogenesis of andesitic/dioritic rocks is fundamental to understanding the formation of the continental crust. Here we present detailed petrology, geochronology, major and trace element, Sr-Nd-Hf-O isotope data for the Early Cretaceous (˜122 Ma) dioritic rocks in the Bizha area in southern Qiangtang, Tibet. The dioritic rocks are characterized by large ion lithophile elements, Pb, and light rare earth elements but depletion of high field strength elements with slightly enriched and variable ɛNd(t) values of -0.01 to -3.31 and initial 87Sr/86Sr isotopic ratios of 0.7053-0.7062. They also have variable magmatic zircon Hf-O isotope compositions (ɛHf(t) = -5.3 to +3.6 and δ18O = +7.3 to +9.5 ‰). Combined with contemporary andesitic lavas in southern Qiangtang, we suggest that the intermediate magmatic rocks in this area were most probably derived by partial melting of a subduction mélange, which is a mixture of mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORBs), sediments, and mantle wedge peridotites, formed along the interface between the subducted slab and the overlying mantle wedge in a subduction channel before ˜124 Ma. The mélange diapir melting was triggered by the asthenospheric upwelling and hot corner flow caused by roll-back of the northward subducted Bangong-Nujiang oceanic slab during the Early Cretaceous. The Early Cretaceous intermediate magmatic rocks in southern Qiangtang have an overall continental crust-like andesitic composition. Therefore, partial melting of mélange provides an important support for the generation of andesitic magmas in continental arcs and the "andesite model" for crustal growth.

  19. Mesozoic non-marine petroleum source rocks determined by palynomorphs in the Tarim Basin, Xinjiang, northwestern China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiang, D.-X.; Wang, Y.-D.; Robbins, E.I.; Wei, J.; Tian, N.

    2008-01-01

    The Tarim Basin in Northwest China hosts petroleum reservoirs of Cambrian, Ordovician, Carboniferous, Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary ages. The sedimentary thickness in the basin reaches about 15 km and with an area of 560000 km2, the basin is expected to contain giant oil and gas fields. It is therefore important to determine the ages and depositional environments of the petroleum source rocks. For prospective evaluation and exploration of petroleum, palynological investigations were carried out on 38 crude oil samples collected from 22 petroleum reservoirs in the Tarim Basin and on additionally 56 potential source rock samples from the same basin. In total, 173 species of spores and pollen referred to 80 genera, and 27 species of algae and fungi referred to 16 genera were identified from the non-marine Mesozoic sources. By correlating the palynormorph assemblages in the crude oil samples with those in the potential source rocks, the Triassic and Jurassic petroleum source rocks were identified. Furthermore, the palynofloras in the petroleum provide evidence for interpretation of the depositional environments of the petroleum source rocks. The affinity of the miospores indicates that the petroleum source rocks were formed in swamps in brackish to lacustrine depositional environments under warm and humid climatic conditions. The palynomorphs in the crude oils provide further information about passage and route of petroleum migration, which is significant for interpreting petroleum migration mechanisms. Additionally, the thermal alternation index (TAI) based on miospores indicates that the Triassic and Jurassic deposits in the Tarim Basin are mature petroleum source rocks. ?? Cambridge University Press 2008.

  20. West-east stratigraphic cross section of Cretaceous rocks, central Rocky Mountains to east-central Great Plains, Utah, Colorado, and Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Fouch, T.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Cretaceous sedimentary strata varies in thickness from nearly 3,050 m adjacent to the western thrust belt at the westernmost end of the Uinta basin, Utah, to 1,700 m near the Colorado-Utah boundary east of the basin axis. They thicken locally to more than 2,800 m near local Late Cretaceous Laramide uplifts in the region between the Piceance and the western Denver basins, Colorado, and then to less than 600 m in the eastern Denver basin and Kansas. Depositional environments represented by the rocks include coarse-grained alluvial facies deposited directly adjacent to the western thrust belt, and finer grained fluvial-deltaic and marine facies of the basin's depositional and structural axis (generally within 50-100 km of the thrust belt). Entirely fine-grained marine siliciclastic and carbonate rocks were formed in more slowly subsiding distal parts of the basin that are as much as 1,000 km east of the depositional axis. Some thick sections represent deposition in lows created by sediment and thrust loading adjacent to local Laramide thick-skin thrusts within the limits of the overall Western interior Cretaceous basin. Depositional and geometric asymmetry of the preserved sedimentary system are the result of varied rates of regional and local subsidence due to tectonic and sediment loading. They also result from fluctuations in sea level and concomitant erosion associated with falls and from relative sediment starving of the parts of this depositional system that were far from sediment.

  1. Oil-source rock correlation using carbon isotope data and biological marker compounds, Cook Inlet-Alaska Peninsula, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Magoon, L.B. ); Anders, D.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Rock and oil samples from the Cook Inlet-Alaska Peninsula area were analyzed to determine the source of the commercial hydrocarbons produced in the Cook Inlet basin from lower Tertiary nonmarine sandstone reservoirs. Rock-Eval (hydrogen index) analysis and organic carbon content were used to identify the most favorable rock samples for solvent extraction and carbon isotope, gas-chromatographic (GC), and gas-chromatrographic/mass-spectrometric (GCMS) analyses. On the basis of organic-matter richness, five nonmarine Tertiary coal and shale samples and 12 marine Mesozoic (Upper Triassic and Middle Jurassic) shale samples were selected. A total of 28 oil and condensate samples from producing wells, oil-stem tests, field separators, and seeps were used for oil-oil and oil-source rock correlation. On the basis of biomarker and carbon isotope data, four of the shallower oils and condensates are from nonmarine source rocks, and 24 of the deeper oils are sourced from marine shales. Geochemical and regional geologic considerations indicate the following conclusions. The upper Tertiary nonmarine oils and condensates associated with commercial microbial gas accumulations are geochemically similar to the immature organic matter in the Tertiary nonmarine rocks. In the upper Cook Inlet, marine oils in lower Tertiary nonmarine reservoirs originated from Middle Jurassic rocks that matured during the Pliocene to Holocene; in the lower Cook Inlet-Alaska Peninsula area, oils migrated from both Upper Triassic and Middle Jurassic source rocks during the Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary. Although three petroleum systems are identified, this study on the petroleum potential in a convergent-margin setting indicates that only one of these three systems was responsible for the 1.2 billion bbl of recoverable oil in the lower Tertiary nonmarine reservoirs.

  2. Thermal maturity patterns of Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks, San Juan Basin, Colorado and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.

    1992-01-01

    Horizontal and vertical thermal maturity patterns and time-temperature modeling indicate that the high levels of thermal maturity in the northern part of the basin are due to either: 1) convective heat transfer associated with a deeply buried heat source located directly below the northern part of the basin or 2) the circulation of relatively hot fluids into the basin from a heat source north of the basin located near the San Juan Mountains. Time-temperature and kinetic modeling of nonlinear Rm profiles indicates that present-day heat flow is insufficient to account for the measured levels of thermal maturity. Furthermore, in order to match nonlinear Rm profiles, it is necessary to assign artifically high thermal-conductivity values to some of the stratigraphic units. These unrealistically high thermal conductivities are interpreted as evidence of convective heat transfer. -from Author

  3. Compositions of biotite from granitoids of the Sierra Nevada batholith: constraints on magmatic source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Ague, J.J.; Brimhall, G.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two compositional types of biotite from the Cretaceous Sierra Nevada batholith occur in a systematic regional pattern which reflects magmatic source material and correlates with tungsten mineralization. Biotite from each group may be characterized in terms of F/OH and Mg/Fe as follows. Type I biotites generally coexist with hornblende and magnetite + sphene. Type II biotites coexist with ilmenite +/- magnetite, but hornblende only occurs at contacts with Type I intrusives. Intrusives with Type IA biotite occur as a continuous belt along the entire western margin of the exposed batholith. Type IB biotite is found to the east of this belt, and Type IC biotite is confined to the eastern side of the Sierra. Type II biotite is present in the eastern and south-western portions of the Sierra, and sporadically in the metamorphic foothills belt. The two intrusive groups, here characterized by biotite compositions, correspond to two of the source rock and porphyry mineralization models of Burnham (1981). Type I rocks (Cu deposits) are derived from mafic amphiobolites whereas Type II (Sn-W deposits) form from relatively reduced muscovite-rich metasediments. The biotite compositions indicate that the majority of the batholith formed from amphibolite sources. Type II intrusives and W deposits occur in areas underlain by Precambrian crust as defined by radiogenic isotope studies.

  4. The Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) impact: One or more source craters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeberl, Christian

    The Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary is marked by signs of a worldwide catastrophe, marking the demise of more than 50 percent of all living species. Ever since Alvarez et al. found an enrichment of IR and other siderophile elements in rocks marking the K/T boundary and interpreted it as the mark of a giant asteroid (or comet) impact, scientists have tried to understand the complexities of the K/T boundary event. The impact theory received a critical boost by the discovery of shocked minerals that have so far been found only in association with impact craters. One of the problems of the K/T impact theory was, and still is, the lack of an adequate large crater that is close to the maximum abundance of shocked grains in K/T boundary sections, which was found to occur in sections in Northern America. The recent discovery of impact glasses from a K/T section in Haiti has been crucial in establishing a connection with documented impact processes. The location of the impact-glass findings and the continental nature of detritus found in all K/T sections supports at least one impact site near the North American continent. The Manson Impact Structure is the largest recognized in the United States, 35 km in diameter, and has a radiometric age indistinguishable from that of the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary. Although the Manson structure may be too small, it may be considered at least one element of the events that led to the catastrophic loss of life and extinction of many species at that time. A second candidate for the K/T boundary crater is the Chicxulub structure, which was first suggested to be an impact crater more than a decade ago. Only recently, geophysical studies and petrological (as well as limited chemical) analyses have indicated that this buried structure may in fact be of impact origin. At present we can conclude that the Manson crater is the only confirmed crater of K/T age, but Chicxulub is becoming a strong contender; however, detailed geochemical

  5. The Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) impact: One or more source craters?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeberl, Christian

    1992-01-01

    The Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary is marked by signs of a worldwide catastrophe, marking the demise of more than 50 percent of all living species. Ever since Alvarez et al. found an enrichment of IR and other siderophile elements in rocks marking the K/T boundary and interpreted it as the mark of a giant asteroid (or comet) impact, scientists have tried to understand the complexities of the K/T boundary event. The impact theory received a critical boost by the discovery of shocked minerals that have so far been found only in association with impact craters. One of the problems of the K/T impact theory was, and still is, the lack of an adequate large crater that is close to the maximum abundance of shocked grains in K/T boundary sections, which was found to occur in sections in Northern America. The recent discovery of impact glasses from a K/T section in Haiti has been crucial in establishing a connection with documented impact processes. The location of the impact-glass findings and the continental nature of detritus found in all K/T sections supports at least one impact site near the North American continent. The Manson Impact Structure is the largest recognized in the United States, 35 km in diameter, and has a radiometric age indistinguishable from that of the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary. Although the Manson structure may be too small, it may be considered at least one element of the events that led to the catastrophic loss of life and extinction of many species at that time. A second candidate for the K/T boundary crater is the Chicxulub structure, which was first suggested to be an impact crater more than a decade ago. Only recently, geophysical studies and petrological (as well as limited chemical) analyses have indicated that this buried structure may in fact be of impact origin. At present we can conclude that the Manson crater is the only confirmed crater of K/T age, but Chicxulub is becoming a strong contender; however, detailed geochemical

  6. Geochronology, geochemistry, and deformation history of Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous intrusive rocks in the Erguna Massif, NE China: Constraints on the late Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the Mongol-Okhotsk orogenic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jie; Xu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Shuo; Li, Yu

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents new zircon and sphene U-Pb ages, biotite and hornblende 40Ar/39Ar ages, Hf isotopic data, and geochemical data for five Mesozoic plutons in the Erguna Massif of NE China. These data are used to constrain the late Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the Mongol-Okhotsk orogenic belt. This new dating, when combined with previously published ages, indicates that the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous (J3-K1) intrusive rocks can be subdivided into three stages that represent periods of magmatism during the Late Jurassic (~ 155 Ma), early Early Cretaceous (~ 137 Ma), and late Early Cretaceous (~ 123 Ma). In addition, the rocks have undergone later deformation recorded by peak ages of ~ 137 and ~ 123 Ma. The Late Jurassic and early Early Cretaceous intrusive rocks in the study area are dominantly syenogranites and are either A-type granites or are classified as alkaline series, suggesting that they formed in an extensional environment. The late Early Cretaceous intrusive rocks in this area are generally monzogranitic and were emplaced as dikes in an extensional environment, along with coeval bimodal volcanics. These data, combined with the presence of regional unconformities in the northern part of Hebei Province and western part of Liaoning Province, and the spatial distribution of coeval volcanic rocks in NE China, suggest the Late Jurassic and early Early Cretaceous magmatisms and the early Early Cretaceous deformation in this area occurred in an extensional environment related to the delamination of a thickened part of the crust after closure of the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean. In comparison, the late Early Cretaceous deformation and magmatism occurred in an extensional environment related to either delamination of the previously thickened crust related to the Mongol-Okhotsk tectonic regime or the subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate, or the combined influence of these two tectonic regimes.

  7. Age and petrogenesis of Na-rich felsic rocks in western Iran: Evidence for closure of the southern branch of the Neo-Tethys in the Late Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Fatemeh; Azizi, Hossein; Golonka, Jan; Asahara, Yoshihiro; Orihashi, Yuji; Yamamoto, Koshi; Tsuboi, Motohiro; Anma, Ryo

    2016-03-01

    Intermediate to felsic volcanic and granitic rocks with high Na2O concentrations (5.2-9.1 wt.%) are widely distributed in the Harsin area along the Zagros thrust zone in western Iran. Most of these rocks are classified as low-potassium tholeiite, display affinity with oceanic plagiogranite and contain somewhat high Na content and low concentrations of K2O, Al2O3, Rb, Sr and Ca. Thus, we prefer to apply the term Na-rich felsic rocks to this complex. U-Pb dating yielded ages of 94.6 ± 2.7 Ma (2σ) from baddeleyite and 95.0 ± 2.4 Ma (2σ) from zircon grains, indicating that the complex crystallized in the Late Cretaceous. Based on the mineral compositions, the crystallization occurred at low pressures (mostly < 2 kbar) and low temperatures (< 750 °C). High initial ratios of 143Nd/144Nd (0.51288-0.51304) and positive values of ɛNd(t) (+ 7.0 to + 11.5) are consistent with those of mid-oceanic ridge basalt (MORB). During collision of the Arabian plate and Biston-Avoraman block in the Late Cretaceous, an increasing geothermal gradient was responsible for partial melting of altered mafic rocks and for producing the Na-rich felsic rocks in the Harsin area. The presence of these types of rocks along the main Zagros fault indicates local collisions. These collisions were caused by southwestward subduction under the Arabian plate in the southern branch of the Neo-Tethys. This event was the first stage of the Zagros collision, which was followed by collision of the Arabian and Iranian plates during the Eocene through Neogene.

  8. The Kingak shale of northern Alaska-regional variations in organic geochemical properties and petroleum source rock quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magoon, L.B.; Claypool, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Kingak Shale, a thick widespread rock unit in northern Alaska that ranges in age from Early Jurassic through Early Cretaceous, has adequate to good oil source rock potential. This lenticular-shaped rock unit is as much as 1200 m thick near the Jurassic shelf edge, where its present-day burial depth is about 5000 m. Kingak sediment, transported in a southerly direction, was deposited on the then marine continental shelf. The rock unit is predominantly dark gray Shale with some interbeds of thick sandstone and siltstone. The thermal maturity of organic matter in the Kingak Shale ranges from immature (2.0%R0) in the Colville basin toward the south. Its organic carbon and hydrogen contents are highest in the eastern part of northern Alaska south of and around the Kuparuk and Prudhoe Bay oil fields. Carbon isotope data of oils and rock extracts indicate that the Kingak Shale is a source of some North Slope oil, but is probably not the major source. ?? 1984.

  9. Partial melting of subducted paleo-Pacific plate during the early Cretaceous: Constraint from adakitic rocks in the Shaxi porphyry Cu-Au deposit, Lower Yangtze River Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jianghong; Yang, Xiaoyong; Li, Shuang; Gu, Huangling; Mastoi, Abdul Shakoor; Sun, Weidong

    2016-10-01

    A large porphyry Cu-Au deposit associated with early Cretaceous intrusive rocks has been discovered and explored in the Shaxi area, Lower Yangtze River Belt (LYRB), eastern China. We studied two types of intrusive rocks in the Shaxi area: Cu-Au mineralization related diorites and quartz-diorites (adakitic rocks), and newly found high Sr/Y ratio biotite-gabbros. They were formed almost simultaneously with crystallization ages of ca. 130 to 129 Ma, younger than the early stage shoshonitic rocks (Longmenyuan, Zhuanqiao and Shuangmiao Fm.) in the Luzong volcanic basin, ~ 10 km south of the Shaxi area. These intrusive rocks show similar distribution patterns of trace elements (enriched in LILEs and depleted in HFSEs) and REEs (enriched in LREEs and depleted in HREEs, no Eu negative anomaly, flat HREE patterns). The diorites and quartz-diorites are adakitic rocks with calc-alkaline affinity, distinguished from other adakitic rocks in the LYRB which are high-K calc-alkaline series. The biotite-gabbros are not adakitic rocks, although they are characterized by high Sr/Y ratios. Shaxi adakitic rocks show positive zircon εHf(t) values, which may be attributed to the contribution of subducted oceanic crust, while the εHf(t) values of the biotite-gabbros are mostly negative, indicating the involvement of old crustal materials. Although Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes of Shaxi adakitic rocks are more depleted than those of other adakitic rocks in the LYRB, they are still slightly enriched, similar to continental arc adakites in the Andean Austral Volcanic Zone. The Shaxi adakitic rocks are characterized by high Sr contents and Sr/Y ratios, medium (La/Yb)N, MgO contents and Mg#, and low K2O/Na2O ratios, decoupling of Sr/Y and (La/Yb)N, low Th/U values, exhibiting characteristics of slab-derived adakitic rocks. They were not produced by fractional crystallization of basaltic magmas like adakitic rocks in Edong-Jiurui and Tongling but originally generated from partial melting of subducted

  10. Biological marker characteristics of oils and asphalts from carbonate source rocks in a rapidly subsiding graben, Dead Sea, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rullkötter, Jürgen; Spiro, Baruch; Nissenbaum, Arie

    1985-06-01

    A detailed GC/MS study of biological marker compounds in the saturated and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of oils and asphalts from the Dead Sea area, Israel, provided decisive information to the solution of a long-lasting controversy by showing that the asphalts are products of early generation in an immature stage from the same type of carbonate source rock which generated more mature oils. The asphalts are not biodegraded residues of the oils. Oils from six different wells, and asphalts from wells, outcrops, and a floating block from the Dead Sea all have very similar sterane and triterpane patterns. They all lack rearranged steranes (diasteranes) indicating a carbonate source matrix and compare reasonably well with a sample of Upper Cretaceous bituminous chalk from Nebi Musa. The main difference between the oils and the asphalts is a significantly higher triaromatic to mono- plus triaromatic steroid hydrocarbon ratio in the former. This is explained as a result of rapid subsidence and heating of their source rock close to the deep parts of the Dead Sea graben. The oils thus were generated in the more deeply buried source rock blocks under the graben fill, whereas the asphalts either originate from an immature source rock section closer to the graben rims or represent an earlier phase of generation and expulsion. This study also provides general information on the evolution of biological markers in carbonate source rocks. Low-activation-energy processes, like isomerisation of steranes, appear to occur much faster at low temperatures than in shales. The high sulfur content and less cross-linking of the biogenic organic matter into a complex kerogen structure are suggested to be responsible for this. Care should be taken when using only sterane isomerisation to assess the maturity of hydrocarbons from carbonate rocks and of carbonate-derived oils.

  11. Cretaceous mafic conglomerate near Gualala offset 350 miles by San Andreas fault from oceanic crustal source near Eagle Rest Peak, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, Donald C.; Wentworth, Carl M.; McKee, Edwin D.

    1973-01-01

    Upper Cretaceous mafic conglomerate and quartz-plagioclase arkose that crop out on the southwest side of the San Andreas fault near Gualala, Calif., may have been eroded from a gabbroic terrane that now lies about 350 miles to the southeast, on the opposite side of the San Andreas fault. The plagioclase arkose near Gualala contains little or no K-feldspar, and the conglomerate is characterized by quartz-bearing mafic rocks that lack K-feldspar volcanic rocks, diabase, and diorite to gabbro. Hornblendes from these clasts yield K/Ar ages of 141±4,175±7, and 186±7 m.y. The arkose and conglomerate appear to have been eroded from a chert-poor ophiolite (oceanic crust) sequence that, according to paleocurrent evidence, lay east of the present San Andreas fault. Near Eagle Rest Peak, 350 milessoutheast of Gualala, similar mafic quartz-bearing volcanic rocks, diabase, and gabbro are exposed in a small structurally isolated areathat abuts the San Andreas fault on the southwest. These rocks yield hornblende K/Ar ages of 134±4, 165±4, and 207±10 m.y. They mayalso be the source of two small fault slivers of similar mafic rocks, which yield hornblende K/Ar ages between 144 and 172 m.y. Theseslivers now lie 100 and 200 miles to the northwest along the San Andreas fault at Gold Hill and Logan.

  12. New oil source rocks cut in Greek Ionian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Karakitsios, V.; Rigakis, N.

    1996-02-12

    The Ionian zone of Northwest Greece (Epirus region) constitutes part of the most external zones of the Hellenides (Paxos zone, Ionian zone, Gavrovo Tripolitza zone). The rocks of the Ionian zone range from Triassic evaporites and associated breccias through a varied series of Jurassic through Upper Eocene carbonates and lesser cherts and shales followed by Oligocene flysch. The surface occurrences of petroleum in the Ionian zone are mainly attributed to Toarcian Lower Posidonia beds source rocks and lesser to late Callovian-Tithonian Upper Posidonia beds and to the Albian-Cenomanian Upper Siliceous zone or Vigla shales of the Vigla limestones. Oil that could not be attributed to the above source rocks is believed to have an origin from Triassic formations that contain potential source rocks in Albania and Italy. However, several samples of the shales of Triassic breccias from outcrops and drillholes were analyzed in the past, but the analytical results were not so promising since their hydrocarbon potential was low. In this article, the authors will present their analytical results of the Ioannina-1 well, where for the first time they identified some very rich source beds in the Triassic breccias formation of Northwest Greece.

  13. Geochronology and geochemistry of Cretaceous magmatic rocks of Arctic Chukotka: An update of GEOCHRON2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinin, V. V.; Miller, E. L.; Gottlieb, E.; Polzunenkov, G.

    2012-04-01

    Field work near and along the Arctic cost of Chukotka (Pevek to Cape Schmidt) contributes new data on the geology of this remote area which belongs to Arctic Alaska-Chukotka terrane or microcontinent which lies to the south of the vast and unexplored East Siberian Shelf, providing better constraints on basement ages and the magmatic and tectonic evolution of this part of the circum Arctic. U-Pb SHRIMP RG zircon ages from eight largest granitoid plutonic complexes intruded across this region are: Velitkinay (105-100 Ma), Kuvet (104±1 Ma), Pegtymel (108±2 Ma), Lootaypin (107±1 Ma), Inroginay (109-104 Ma), Pevek (108-105 Ma), Severny (88±1 Ma), Pyrkanay (92±1 Ma). Two last plutonic complexes are coeval with calc-alkaline volcanic rocks of the suprasubduction Okhotsk-Chukotka volcanic belt (Arctic Chukotka segment). Earlier plutons have extension-related geochemical signatures (monzonite trend and medium negative Nb-Ta anomalies) and Nd model ages of 1.0-1.8 Ga. The Velitkinay migmatite-granite complex, south of Cape Billings extends 150 km in a NW-SE direction. Along the southwest flank of the Velitkinay complex, poorly fossiliferous, metamorphosed Devonian (?), Carboniferous, Permian and Triassic strata are involved in regional W-NW-E-SE trending folds with steep axial planes. Country rocks to the plutonic complex dip steeply to gently SW and are intruded by variably deformed K-spar megacrystic biotite granites (102-106 Ma) in turn intruded by variably deformed medium- grained sphene and biotite bearing granites (~100 Ma, with zircon-core inheritance of 600-630 Ma) related to the migmatitic core of the complex. Precise U-Pb and Ar-Ar dates such as those above have been collected across North East Russia in the last decade and allow more modern regional synthesis of the age of main magmatic events in order to correlate them with the evolution of the Arctic Ocean basins. Our updated GEOCHRON data base documents important Jura-Cretaceous magmatic provinces and

  14. Hydrogen in rocks: an energy source for deep microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Freund, Friedemann; Dickinson, J Thomas; Cash, Michele

    2002-01-01

    To survive in deep subsurface environments, lithotrophic microbial communities require a sustainable energy source such as hydrogen. Though H2 can be produced when water reacts with fresh mineral surfaces and oxidizes ferrous iron, this reaction is unreliable since it depends upon the exposure of fresh rock surfaces via the episodic opening of cracks and fissures. A more reliable and potentially more voluminous H2 source exists in nominally anhydrous minerals of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Our experimental results indicate that H2 molecules can be derived from small amounts of H2O dissolved in minerals in the form of hydroxyl, OH- or O3Si-OH, whenever such minerals crystallized in an H2O-laden environment. Two types of experiments were conducted. Single crystal fracture experiments indicated that hydroxyl pairs undergo an in situ redox conversion to H2 molecules plus peroxy links, O3Si/OO\\SiO3. While the peroxy links become part of the mineral structure, the H2 molecules diffused out of the freshly fractured mineral surfaces. If such a mechanism occurred in natural settings, the entire rock column would become a volume source of H2. Crushing experiments to facilitate the outdiffusion of H2 were conducted with common crustal igneous rocks such as granite, andesite, and labradorite. At least 70 nmol of H2/g diffused out of coarsely crushed andesite, equivalent at standard pressure and temperature to 5,000 cm3 of H2/m3 of rock. In the water-saturated, biologically relevant upper portion of the rock column, the diffusion of H2 out of the minerals will be buffered by H2 saturation of the intergranular water film.

  15. Hydrogen in rocks: an energy source for deep microbial communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann; Dickinson, J. Thomas; Cash, Michele

    2002-01-01

    To survive in deep subsurface environments, lithotrophic microbial communities require a sustainable energy source such as hydrogen. Though H2 can be produced when water reacts with fresh mineral surfaces and oxidizes ferrous iron, this reaction is unreliable since it depends upon the exposure of fresh rock surfaces via the episodic opening of cracks and fissures. A more reliable and potentially more voluminous H2 source exists in nominally anhydrous minerals of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Our experimental results indicate that H2 molecules can be derived from small amounts of H2O dissolved in minerals in the form of hydroxyl, OH- or O3Si-OH, whenever such minerals crystallized in an H2O-laden environment. Two types of experiments were conducted. Single crystal fracture experiments indicated that hydroxyl pairs undergo an in situ redox conversion to H2 molecules plus peroxy links, O3Si/OO\\SiO3. While the peroxy links become part of the mineral structure, the H2 molecules diffused out of the freshly fractured mineral surfaces. If such a mechanism occurred in natural settings, the entire rock column would become a volume source of H2. Crushing experiments to facilitate the outdiffusion of H2 were conducted with common crustal igneous rocks such as granite, andesite, and labradorite. At least 70 nmol of H2/g diffused out of coarsely crushed andesite, equivalent at standard pressure and temperature to 5,000 cm3 of H2/m3 of rock. In the water-saturated, biologically relevant upper portion of the rock column, the diffusion of H2 out of the minerals will be buffered by H2 saturation of the intergranular water film.

  16. Hydrogen in rocks: an energy source for deep microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Freund, Friedemann; Dickinson, J Thomas; Cash, Michele

    2002-01-01

    To survive in deep subsurface environments, lithotrophic microbial communities require a sustainable energy source such as hydrogen. Though H2 can be produced when water reacts with fresh mineral surfaces and oxidizes ferrous iron, this reaction is unreliable since it depends upon the exposure of fresh rock surfaces via the episodic opening of cracks and fissures. A more reliable and potentially more voluminous H2 source exists in nominally anhydrous minerals of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Our experimental results indicate that H2 molecules can be derived from small amounts of H2O dissolved in minerals in the form of hydroxyl, OH- or O3Si-OH, whenever such minerals crystallized in an H2O-laden environment. Two types of experiments were conducted. Single crystal fracture experiments indicated that hydroxyl pairs undergo an in situ redox conversion to H2 molecules plus peroxy links, O3Si/OO\\SiO3. While the peroxy links become part of the mineral structure, the H2 molecules diffused out of the freshly fractured mineral surfaces. If such a mechanism occurred in natural settings, the entire rock column would become a volume source of H2. Crushing experiments to facilitate the outdiffusion of H2 were conducted with common crustal igneous rocks such as granite, andesite, and labradorite. At least 70 nmol of H2/g diffused out of coarsely crushed andesite, equivalent at standard pressure and temperature to 5,000 cm3 of H2/m3 of rock. In the water-saturated, biologically relevant upper portion of the rock column, the diffusion of H2 out of the minerals will be buffered by H2 saturation of the intergranular water film. PMID:12449857

  17. Late Cretaceous (85--80 Ma), syn-arc cleavage development in metamorphic rocks of the Ritter Range, central Sierra Nevada California

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.D.; Renne, P.R. . Geochronology Center); Tobisch, O. . Earth Sciences Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Extensive, high quality exposures make the Ritter Range an appropriate place to investigate the deformation field in wallrocks of the Late Cretaceous Sierran magmatic arc. Faulting, tilting, cleavage development and shearing above affected pre-batholithic strata of upper Paleozoic to mid-Cretaceous age. The authors present Ar/Ar data for metamorphic amphibole, white mica and biotite from upper Paleozoic and Early to Middle Jurassic rocks of the section. These data re interpreted in light of temperatures of metamorphism and microstructural analysis of each sample. Syn- to post-kinematic amphibole from a foliated and lineated mafic amphibolite yields an age of 85 Ma for amphibole-derived gas. Peak metamorphic temperature was under 500 C. at this locality, so negligible Ar loss in the amphibole is expected. The authors interpret 85 Ma as the age of amphibole growth and cleavage development in this sample. Syn- to post-kinematic white mica and four biotites from five samples yield ages clustering at about 80 Ma. Since the micas probably grew above their Ar closure temperatures, the ages of the post-kinematic micas are minima for their fabrics. These data indicate that the dominant cleavage in the upper Paleozoic to Middle Jurassic rocks of the Ritter Range formed penecontemporaneously with emplacement of the adjacent Mono Pass and Tuolumne intrusive series, and suggests that the heat of these granitoids was instrumental in catalyzing widespread deformation in their wallrocks.

  18. Geologic framework of the ground-water system in Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks in the Northern Great Plains in parts of Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Anna, L.O.

    1986-01-01

    Energy development in the Northern Great Plains will place new and increased demands on ground-water development. Water from Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks might supply part of the needed water. Geologic framework of the ground-water flow system in the Northern Great Plains is divided into two parts: structural and stratigraphic. Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks are divided into six chronostratigraphic intervals. Thickness and sedimentological variations of each interval show distinct patterns or lineaments. These lineaments may reflect paleogeographic and paleostructural trends. The tectonic and sedimentation model most appropriate for the lineaments and the orientations of these lineaments can be explained best by a horizontal stress system. This system created the structural configuration of grabens, half-grabens, and horsts, initiated in Precambrian time, that influenced the position of depositional environments, subsequently influenced the lateral and vertical distribution of sediments, and was enhanced by eustatic changes in sea level. Orientation of tensional and compressional structural features and lineaments is predictable under this stress system. Tensional features, oriented east-west and northeast-southwest, enhance secondary porosity or permeability; thus, they become partial conduits for ground-water flow. Compressional features, oriented generally north-south and northwest-southeast, decrease porosity or permeability and become barriers or partial barriers to ground-water flow.

  19. Source rock potential of shallow-water evaporitic settings

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.K.

    1986-05-01

    In the major evaporitic environments on the world's surface today, most organic matter accumulates in shallow subaqueous to seasonally subaerially exposed, algal-mat sediments. Given the present depositional setting, this organic matter probably could not be preserved to form source rocks. However, if the authors place such evaporite deposition into a geologic context, source rocks could have formed in shallow-water settings in the past. Such settings were characterized by hydrologic conditions that allowed the retention of hypersaline, anoxic pore water to depths where the organic material was buried deep enough to generate hydrocarbons. When deep-basin, shallow-water, evaporite successions were laid down in basins such as the Mediterranean during the late Miocene, the Michigan basin during the Silurian, and in other large saline giants, conditions were right for source rocks to form within shallow-water and salt-flat evaporitic environments. The evaporites in these saline giants were deposited under conditions of relatively shallow water (< 50 m); the basin never appears to have dried out, but water levels changed quickly (approx. 10,000 years) from shallow to deep. Continual water saturation coupled with saline pore fluids prevented the inflow of fresh, oxidizing ground water into the basin center of shallow-water organic-rich evaporites. Immature hydrocarbons derived from such rocks today drip from the 5.5-m.y. old evaporites of Sicily in active salt and sulfur mines. Organic-rich sediments could also be preserved to generate hydrocarbons in rapidly subsiding rift basins. In such basins, rapid burial has prevented the entrance of fresher oxygenated waters and the associated degradation and destruction of the organic matter. The early continental rift stage generates the source rocks; the ephemeral streams, wadis, and dune fields become the reservoirs, and the subsequent evaporite stage seals the reservoir.

  20. Bulk densities and porosities of Cenozoic and Cretaceous basin-filling strata and Cretaceous and older basement rocks, Los Angeles Basin, California, determined from measurements of core samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, L.A.; McCulloh, T.H.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes and provides a digital data file of selected bulk properties of subsurface rocks sampled in and around Los Angeles basin, California. Selected properties include measured dry bulk density (range 0.78 to 3.01 g/cm3), measured or estimated grain (matrix) density, calculated water saturated bulk density (range 1.47 to 3.01 g/cm3), calculated total porosity (range 0 to 69 porosity percent), geologic age, and lithology. Most of the rocks are conventional core samples taken from wells drilled by the petroleum industry. A small percentage of the core samples are from shallow borings. Rocks studied range in age from pre-Cambrian (?) to Recent and include sedimentary (98.8%), and volcanic, metamorphic and intrusive (1.2%) samples. Core samples studied were taken from measured drillhole depths that range from 35 to 20,234 ft (11 to 6,167 m). Version 1.0 of the data base (dated June 1998) contains information for 7378 samples from 234 wells, including two redrilled wells. This report/data base can be accessed on U. S. Geological Survey servers at http://geopubs.wr.usgs.gov/open-file/of98-788. Periodic additions to the on-line data base will be provided as new data is gathered.

  1. Composition, age, and petrogenesis of Late Cretaceous intrusive rocks in the central Big Belt Mountains, Broadwater and Meagher counties, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Bray, E.A.; Snee, L.W.

    2002-01-01

    Cretaceous intrusions hosted by the Proterozoic Newland Formation. The northern intrusion, centered on Boulder Baldy, consists of outer, intermediate, and core zones composed of aegirine-augite quartz monzonite, hornblende quartz monzodiorite, and biotite granodiorite, respectively. The southern intrusion, north of Mount Edith, is compositionally indistinguishable from the intermediate zone of the northern intrusion.

  2. Source and magma mixing processes in continental subduction factory: Geochemical evidence from postcollisional mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Li-Qun; Zhao, Zi-Fu; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Zhang, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Postcollisional mafic igneous rocks commonly exhibit petrological and geochemical heterogeneities, but their origin still remains enigmatic. While source mixing is substantial due to the crust-mantle interaction during continental collision, magma mixing is also significant during postcollisional magmatism. The two processes are illustrated by Early Cretaceous mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie orogen. These mafic rocks show arc-like trace element distribution patterns and enriched Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions, indicating their origination from enriched mantle sources. They have variable whole-rock ɛNd(t) values of -17.6 to -5.2 and zircon ɛHf(t) values of -29.0 to -7.7, pointing to source heterogeneities. Such whole-rock geochemical features are interpreted by the source mixing through melt-peridotite reaction in the continental subduction channel. Clinopyroxene and plagioclase megacrystals show complex textural and compositional variations, recording three stages of mineral crystallization during magma evolution. Cpx-1 core has low Cr and Ni but high Ba, Rb and K, indicating its crystallization from a mafic melt (Melt 1) derived from partial melting of hydrous peridotite rich in phlogopite. Cpx-1 mantle and Cpx-2 exhibit significantly high Cr, Ni and Al2O3 but low Rb and Ba, suggesting their crystallization from pyroxenite-derived mafic melt (Melt 2). Whole-rock initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of gabbro lies between those of Pl-1core (crystallized from Melt 1) and Pl-1 mantle and Pl-2 core (crystallized from Melt 2), providing isotopic evidence for magma mixing between Melt 1 and Melt 2. Taken together, a heterogeneously enriched mantle source would be generated by the source mixing due to reaction of the overlying subcontinental lithospheric mantle wedge peridotite with felsic melts derived from partial melting of different rocks of the deeply subducted continental crust during the continental collision. The magma mixing would occur between mafic melts that were

  3. Oxygen isotope geochemistry of the silicic volcanic rocks of the Etendeka-Parana province: Source constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, C.; Milner, S.C.; Armstrong, R.A. ); Whittingham, A.M. )

    1990-11-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios of pyroxene phenocrysts in the silicic volcanic rocks from the Cretaceous Etendeka-Parana flood basalt province (Namibia, South America) are believed to reflect the {delta}{sup 18}O values of the original magmas. The authors recognize a high {delta}{sup 18}O value type ({delta}{sup 18}O pyroxene {approximately} +10{per thousand}) found in the south of both regions, and a low {delta}{sup 18}O value type ({delta}{sup 18}O pyroxene {approximately} +6.5{per thousand}) found in the north. Other differences between thee two rhyolite types include higher concentrations of incompatible elements and lower initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios in the low {delta}{sup 18}O value type. The authors suggest that the regional distribution of rhyolite types reflects differences in source composition, which can best be explained if the sources are lower crustal, Late Proterozoic mobile belt material (high {delta}{sup 18}O) and Archean lower crust (low {delta}{sup 18}O).

  4. Geologic framework of pre-Cretaceous rocks in the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and adjacent areas, southwestern Colorado and northwestern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Condon, Steven M.

    1992-01-01

    This report is a discussion and summary of Jurassic and older rocks in the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and adjacent areas, southwestern Colorado and northwestern New Mexico, and is based on analysis of geophysical logs and observations of outcrops. The Reservation, which is located in the northern San Juan Basin, has been the site of deposition of sediments for much of the Phanerozoic. Geologic times represented on the Reservation are the Precambrian, Cambrian, Devonian, Mississippian, Pennsylvanian, Permian, Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary. Rocks of Ordovician and Silurian age have not been reported in this region. Thicknesses of pre-Cretaceous sedimentary rocks range from about 750 feet (229 meters) on the Archuleta arch, east of the Reservation, to more than 8,300 feet (2,530 meters) just northwest of the Reservation. About 5,500 feet (1,676 meters) of pre-Cretaceous sedimentary rocks occur in the central part of the Reservation, near Ignacio. At Ignacio the top of the Jurassic lies at a depth of 7,600 feet (2,316 meters) below the surface, which is composed of Tertiary rocks. As much as 2,500 feet (762 meters) of Tertiary rocks occur in the area. More than 10,000 feet (3,048 meters) of Cretaceous and younger rocks, and 15,600 feet (4,755 meters) of all Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks occur in the vicinity of the Reservation. In the early Paleozoic the area that includes the Southern Ute Reservation was on the stable western shelf of the craton. During this time sediments that compose the following shallow-marine clastic and carbonate rocks were deposited: the Upper Cambrian Ignacio Quartzite (0-150 feet; 0-46 meters), Upper Devonian Elbert Formation (50-200 feet; 15-61 meters), Upper Devonian Ouray Limestone (10-75 feet; 3-23 meters), and Mississippian Leadville Limestone (0-250 feet; 0-76 meters). Mixed carbonate and clastic deposition, which was punctuated by a unique episode of deposition of evaporite sediments, continued through

  5. Cretaceous crust-mantle interaction and tectonic evolution of Cathaysia Block in South China: Evidence from pulsed mafic rocks and related magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Hai-Xiang; Zhao, Kui-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Cretaceous tectono-magmatic evolution of the Cathaysia Block in South China is important but their mechanism and geodynamics remain highly disputed. In this study we carried out a detailed geochemical study on the recently found Kuokeng mafic dikes in the western Fujian Province (the Interior Cathaysia Block) to reveal the petrogenesis and geodynamics of the Cretaceous magmatism. Kuokeng mafic dikes were emplaced in three principal episodes: ~ 129 Ma (monzogabbro), ~ 107 Ma (monzodiorite), and ~ 97 Ma (gabbro). Geochemical characteristics indicate that the monzogabbros were derived from the unmodified mantle source, while gabbros were likely derived from metasomatized mantle by subducted slab (fluids and sediments). Sr-Nd isotope compositions indicate that the parental magmas of the monzodiorites were generated by mixing of enriched, mantle-derived, mafic magmas and felsic melts produced by partial melting of crustal materials. Until the Early Cretaceous (~ 123 Ma), the dominant ancient Interior Cathaysia lithospheric mantle exhibited insignificant subduction signature, indicating the melting of asthenospheric mantle and the consequent back-arc extension, producing large-scale partial melting of the crustal materials under the forward subduction regime of the paleo-Pacific plate. The monzodiorites and gabbros appear to be associated with northwestward subduction of Pacific plate under an enhanced lithospheric extensional setting, accompanying with mantle modification, which triggered shallower subduction-related metasomatically enriched lithospheric mantle to melt partially. After ca. 110 Ma, the coastal magmatic belts formed due to a retreat and rollback of the subducting Pacific Plate underneath SE China in the continental margin arc system.

  6. Geochronological and geochemical constraints on the petrogenesis of late Cretaceous volcanic rock series from the eastern Sakarya zone, NE Anatolia-Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Faruk; Oǧuz, Simge; Şen, Cüneyt; Uysal, İbrahim; Başer, Rasim

    2016-04-01

    New SHRIMP zircon U-Pb ages and whole-rock geochemical data as well as Sr-Nd-Pb and δ18O isotopes of late Cretaceous volcanic rock series from the Giresun and Artvin areas (NE Anatolia, Turkey) in the northern part of the eastern Sakarya zone (ESZ) provide important evidence for northward subduction of the Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere along the southern border of the ESZ. In particular, tectonic setting and petrogenesis of these subduction-related volcanites play a critical role in determining the nature of the lower continental crust and mantle dynamics during late Mesozoic orogenic processes in this region. The late Cretaceous time in the ESZ is represented by intensive volcanic activities that occurred in two different periods, which generally consist of alternation of mafic-intermediate (basaltic to andesitic) and felsic rock series (dacitic to rhyolitic) within each period. Although there is no geochronological data for the lower mafic-intermediate rock series of the first volcanic period, U-Pb zircon dating from the first cycle of felsic rocks yielded ages ranging from 88.6±1.8 to 85.0±1.3 Ma (i.e. Coniacian-Early Santonian). The first volcanic period in the region is generally overlain by reddish biomicrite-rich sedimentary rocks of Santonian-Early Campanian. U-Pb zircon dating for the second cycle of mafic-intermediate and felsic rocks yielded ages varying from 84.9±1.7 to 80.8±1.5Ma (i.e. Early to Middle Campanian). The studied volcanic rocks have mostly transitional geochemical character changing from tholeiitic to calc-alkaline with typical arc signatures. N-MORB-normalised multi-element and chondrite-normalised rare earth element (REE) patterns show that all rocks are enriched in LILEs (e.g. Rb, Ba, Th) and LREEs (e.g. La, Ce) but depleted in Nb and Ti. In particular, the felsic samples are characterised by distinct negative Eu anomalies. The samples are characterized by a wide range of Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions (initial ɛNd values from -7

  7. Methane and carbon at equilibrium in source rocks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Methane in source rocks may not exist exclusively as free gas. It could exist in equilibrium with carbon and higher hydrocarbons: CH4 + C < = > Hydrocarbon. Three lines of evidence support this possibility. 1) Shales ingest gas in amounts and selectivities consistent with gas-carbon equilibrium. There is a 50% increase in solid hydrocarbon mass when Fayetteville Shale is exposed to methane (450 psi) under moderate conditions (100°C): Rock-Eval S2 (mg g-1) 8.5 = > 12.5. All light hydrocarbons are ingested, but with high selectivity, consistent with competitive addition to receptor sites in a growing polymer. Mowry Shale ingests butane vigorously from argon, for example, but not from methane under the same conditions. 2) Production data for a well producing from Fayetteville Shale declines along the theoretical curve for withdrawing gas from higher hydrocarbons in equilibrium with carbon. 3) A new general gas-solid equilibrium model accounts for natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium, and C6-C7 hydrocarbons constrained to invariant compositions. The results make a strong case for methane in equilibrium with carbon and higher hydrocarbons. If correct, the higher hydrocarbons in source rocks are gas reservoirs, raising the possibility of substantially more gas in shales than analytically apparent, and far more gas in shale deposits than currently recognized. PMID:24330266

  8. Methane and carbon at equilibrium in source rocks.

    PubMed

    Mango, Frank D

    2013-01-01

    Methane in source rocks may not exist exclusively as free gas. It could exist in equilibrium with carbon and higher hydrocarbons: CH4 + C < = > Hydrocarbon. Three lines of evidence support this possibility. 1) Shales ingest gas in amounts and selectivities consistent with gas-carbon equilibrium. There is a 50% increase in solid hydrocarbon mass when Fayetteville Shale is exposed to methane (450 psi) under moderate conditions (100°C): Rock-Eval S2 (mg g-1) 8.5 = > 12.5. All light hydrocarbons are ingested, but with high selectivity, consistent with competitive addition to receptor sites in a growing polymer. Mowry Shale ingests butane vigorously from argon, for example, but not from methane under the same conditions. 2) Production data for a well producing from Fayetteville Shale declines along the theoretical curve for withdrawing gas from higher hydrocarbons in equilibrium with carbon. 3) A new general gas-solid equilibrium model accounts for natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium, and C6-C7 hydrocarbons constrained to invariant compositions. The results make a strong case for methane in equilibrium with carbon and higher hydrocarbons. If correct, the higher hydrocarbons in source rocks are gas reservoirs, raising the possibility of substantially more gas in shales than analytically apparent, and far more gas in shale deposits than currently recognized. PMID:24330266

  9. Source-rock evaluation of the Dakhla Formation black shale in Gebel Duwi, Quseir area, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kammar, M. M.

    2015-04-01

    A relatively thick Upper Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary sedimentary succession is exposed in Gebel Duwi, Red Sea area, through an almost horizontal tunnel cutting the NE dipping strata from Quseir to Thebes formations. The black shale belonging to Dakhla Formation represents a real potential for future energy resource for Egypt. Dakhla Formation consists mainly of organic-rich calcareous shale to argillaceous limestone that can be considered as a good to excellent source rock potential. The total organic carbon (TOC) content ranges from 2.04% to 12.08%, and the Hydrogen Index (HI) values range from 382 to 1024 mg HC/g TOC. Samples of the Dakhla Formation contain mostly kerogen of types I and II that prone oil and oil-gas, indicating marine organic matter derived mainly from algae and phytoplankton organisms and proposing typical oil source kerogen. The average of the potential index (PI) value is 0.02 mg HC/g rock, which indicates the beginning of a considerable amount of oil generation from the Dakhla Formation. The Tmax values range from 427 to 435 °C. Based on the Tmax data and PI values, the studied black shale samples are immature to early mature for hydrocarbon generation in the Duwi area. The data reduction suggests four main factors covering about 91% of the total variances. The average of the calorific value (459 kcal/kg) indicates unworkable efficiency of such black shale for direct combustion use in power stations. However, selective operation of specific horizons having the highest calorific values may provide viable resources.

  10. Potential cretaceous play in the Rharb basin of northern Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Jobidon, G.P. )

    1993-09-01

    The autochthonous Cretaceous in the Rharb basin of northern Morocco is located underneath a cover of neogene sediments and of the Prerif nappe olistostrome, which was emplaced during the Tortonian 7 m.y. The presence of infranappe Cretaceous sediments is documented in a few onshore wells in the Rharb basin and in the adjacent Prerif Rides area, as well as in the Rif Mountains. Their presence in the deeper portion of the Rharb basin is difficult to detail because of poor seismic resolution data beneath dispersive prerif nappe. A recent study of offshore seismic data acquired by PCIAC in 1987 indicates that the infranappe interval can be more than 1500 m thick in some of the offshore Kenitra area. These sediments have seismic signatures that would correspond to Middle Cretaceous transgressions, culminating with a Turonian highstand. Their deposition systems were located on the northern and western flanks of the Meseta and were followed by a hiatus lasting until the Miocene. Regional studies of gravity and magnetic data provide and additional understanding of the Rif province, its evolution, and the possible presence of autochthonous Cretaceous sediments below the prerif nappe cover. The infranappe of Rharb basin has a good potential to develop into a major hydrocarbon play with the presence of middle Cretaceous reservoir rocks, Turonian-Cenomanian black shale source rocks, as well as the timely combination of trap formation, source rock maturation, and hydrocarbon migration.

  11. Expelling of hydrocarbon in undercompacted oil-source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Guojun ); Chen, Fajing )

    1994-08-01

    The clay of source rocks below a certain depth is generally undercompacted. Historical analysis of undercompacted EK2 mudstone in the Huang Hua depression, North China basin, has shown that the peak of the undercompacted zone decreases under a certain depth, mainly due to development of a microfracture caused by abnormally high pressure. Based on the compaction history of mudstones and the hydraulic fracturing condition in this area, the depth of the microfracture developed in the EK2 undercompacted zone is calculated at 2900 m, which is also verified by fluorescence data. Geochemical evidence has also shown that many hydrocarbons are expelled under 2900 m.

  12. Early Cretaceous shelf-edge deltas of the Baltimore Canyon Trough: principal sources for sediment gravity deposits of the northern Hatteras Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie; Swift, B. Ann; Schlee, John S.; Ball, Mahlon M.; Sheetz, Linda L.

    1990-01-01

    We present evidence that the principal sources for Early Cretaceous (Berriasian-Valanginian) gravity-flow deposits of the northern Hatteras Basin were three large shelf-edge deltas located along the outer margin of the Baltimore Canyon Trough, ∼ 100 km southeast of Cape Charles, Virginia, Ocean City, Maryland, and Long Branch, New Jersey. Sedimentary detritus from the central Appalachian highlands and the Maryland-Virginia coastal plain was transported across the Early Cretaceous continental shelf to form the Cape Charles and Ocean City deltas, whereas deposits of the Long Branch delta came chiefly from the Adirondack and New England highlands. Each delta supplied sediment gravity flows to large slope aprons and submarine-fan complexes on the Early Cretaceous continental slope and rise. The most conspicuous distributary of sediment on the Early Cretaceous continental rise extends 500 km basinward from the Ocean City delta, where its distal deposits were cored at Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 603.

  13. Study of extrabasinal-sourced rock clasts in Mesozoic and Cenozoic conglomerates and stream terrace gravels from the Colorado River Basin upstream from the Grand Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffer, P. W.; Dearaujo, J.; Li, A.; Adam, H.; White, L.

    2008-12-01

    Far-travelled durable, extrabasinal pebbles occur in Mesozoic and Tertiary conglomerate-bearing rock formations and in unconsolidated stream terrace gravels and mesa-capping gravel deposits of Late Tertiary and Quaternary age throughout the Colorado Plateau. Pebble collections were made from each of the major modern tributaries of the Colorado River for possible correlation of remnant gravel deposits remaining from the ancestral regional drainage system that existed prior to the formation of the Grand Canyon. Pebble collecting and sorting techniques were used to make representative collections with both representative and eye-catching lithologies that can be most useful for correlation. Pebbles found in the conglomerate and younger gravel deposits were evaluated to determine general sediment source areas based on unique lithologies, pebble-shape characteristics, and fossils. Chert pebbles derived from source areas in the Great Basin region during the Mesozoic are perhaps the most common, and many of these display evidence of tectonic fracturing during deep burial sometime during their geologic journey. Unique chert pebble lithologies correlate to specific rock units including chert-bearing horizons within the Triassic Shinarump Formation, the Jurassic Morrison and Navajo Formations, and the Cretaceous Mancos Shale. Quartzite, metaconglomerate, and granitic rocks derived from Precambrian rocks of the Rocky Mountain region are also common. Reworked rounded and flattened quartzite cobbles probably derived from shingled beaches along the western shoreline of the Late Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway are also common along the Green River drainage. Xenolith-bearing volcanic rocks, fossil wood, and shell fossils preserved in concretion matrix can be linked to other unique source areas and stratigraphic units across the region. By correlating the pebbles with their sources we gain insight into the erosional history of the Colorado Plateau and the evolution of the

  14. Anthropogenic sources stimulate resonance of a natural rock bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Thorne, Michael S.; Koper, Keith D.; Wood, John R.; Goddard, Kyler; Burlacu, Relu; Doyle, Sarah; Stanfield, Erik; White, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    The natural modes of vibration of bedrock landforms, as well as the sources and effects of stimulated resonance remain poorly understood. Here we show that seismic energy created by an induced earthquake and an artificial reservoir has spectral content coincident with the natural modes of vibration of a prominent rock bridge. We measured the resonant frequencies of Rainbow Bridge, Utah using data from two broadband seismometers placed on the span, and identified eight distinct vibrational modes between 1 and 6 Hz. A distant, induced earthquake produced local ground motion rich in 1 Hz energy, stimulating a 20 dB increase in measured power at the bridge's fundamental mode. Moreover, we establish that wave action on Lake Powell, an artificial reservoir, generates microseismic energy with peak power ~1 Hz, also exciting resonance of Rainbow Bridge. These anthropogenic sources represent relatively new energy input for the bridge with unknown consequences for structural fatigue.

  15. Eclogite-, amphibolite- and blueschist-facies rocks from Diego de Almagro Island (Patagonia): Episodic accretion and thermal evolution of the Chilean subduction interface during the Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyppolito, Thais; Angiboust, Samuel; Juliani, Caetano; Glodny, Johannes; Garcia-Casco, Antonio; Calderón, Mauricio; Chopin, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Few localities in the Patagonian Andes expose remnants of the Mesozoic Chilean paleo-accretionary complex. We focus on the Diego de Almagro Island high-pressure/low-temperature (HP/LT) Complex, a pluri-kilometer thick sequence comprising metavolcanic rocks with oceanic affinities and metasedimentary rocks. In this study, the deepest segments of the Chilean subduction interface in Patagonia are characterized for the first time. Despite its apparent homogeneity, the complex is actually composed of two tectonic units with distinct ages of metamorphism and thermal evolution: the garnet amphibolite (GA) and the underlying blueschist (BS) units. The GA unit mafic rocks exhibit epidote, phengite, titanite, rutile, chloritoid and paragonite inclusions in prograde garnet I, diopside + albite intergrows replacing omphacite inclusions in garnet II, and relict omphacite (XJd45) included in edenitic-pargasitic amphiboles. Thermobarometric results show that these rocks were buried along a relatively cold prograde path (c. 11 °C/km) and reached eclogite-facies near peak pressure conditions (c. 550-600 °C, 1.6 GPa). The GA unit underwent a pervasive stage of amphibolitization during decompression at c. 1.3 GPa. Field and petrological observations, together with multi-mineral Rb-Sr dating, indicate that amphibolitization of the GA unit took place along the subduction interface at c. 120 Ma in a slightly warmer subduction regime (c. 13-14 °C/km), in agreeement with the formation of coetanoeus amphibolites at c. 35 km. The underlying BS unit (i) yields four consistent Rb-Sr deformation ages of c. 80 Ma, i.e. 40 Ma younger than the overlying rocks from the GA unit; (ii) exhibits slightly cooler peak metamorphic conditions (c. 520-550 °C, 1.6 GPa) indicating burial along a prograde path of c. 10 °C/km (iii) does not show amphibolite-facies overprint as seen in the GA unit. After a long residence time under amphibolite-facies conditions, the amphibolitized rocks of the GA unit

  16. Stratigraphic Analysis of Upper Cretaceous Rocks in the Mahajanga Basin, Northwestern Madagascar: Implications for Ancient and Modern Faunas.

    PubMed

    Rogers; Hartman; Krause

    2000-05-01

    Upper Cretaceous strata of the Mahajanga Basin, northwestern Madagascar, yield some of the most significant and exquisitely preserved vertebrate fossils known from Gondwana. The sedimentology of these strata and their stratigraphic relations have been the focus of renewed geological investigations during the course of five expeditions since 1993. We here designate stratotypes and formalize the terrestrial Maevarano Formation, with three new members (Masorobe, Anembalemba, Miadana), and the overlying marine Berivotra Formation. The Maevarano Formation accumulated on a broad, semiarid alluvial plain bounded to the southeast by crystalline highlands and to the northwest by the Mozambique Channel. The Berivotra Formation was deposited in an open marine setting that evolved from a clastic- to a carbonate-dominated shelf, resulting in deposition of the overlying Betsiboka limestone of Danian age. New stratigraphic data clearly indicate that the Maevarano Formation correlates, at least in part, with the Maastrichtian Berivotra Formation, and this in turn indicates that the most fossiliferous portions of the Maevarano Formation are Maastrichtian in age, rather than Campanian as previously reported. This revised age for the Maevarano vertebrate assemblage indicates that it is approximately contemporaneous with the vertebrate fauna recovered from the Deccan basalt volcano-sedimentary sequence of India. The comparable age of these two faunas is significant because the faunas appear to be more similar to one another than either is to those from any other major Gondwanan landmass. The revised age of the Maevarano Formation, when considered in the light of our recent fossil discoveries, further indicates that the ancestral stocks of Madagascar's overwhelmingly endemic modern vertebrate fauna arrived on the island in post-Mesozoic times. The basal stocks of the modern vertebrate fauna are conspicuously absent in the Maevarano Formation. Finally, the revised age of the Maevarano

  17. Stratigraphic Analysis of Upper Cretaceous Rocks in the Mahajanga Basin, Northwestern Madagascar: Implications for Ancient and Modern Faunas.

    PubMed

    Rogers; Hartman; Krause

    2000-05-01

    Upper Cretaceous strata of the Mahajanga Basin, northwestern Madagascar, yield some of the most significant and exquisitely preserved vertebrate fossils known from Gondwana. The sedimentology of these strata and their stratigraphic relations have been the focus of renewed geological investigations during the course of five expeditions since 1993. We here designate stratotypes and formalize the terrestrial Maevarano Formation, with three new members (Masorobe, Anembalemba, Miadana), and the overlying marine Berivotra Formation. The Maevarano Formation accumulated on a broad, semiarid alluvial plain bounded to the southeast by crystalline highlands and to the northwest by the Mozambique Channel. The Berivotra Formation was deposited in an open marine setting that evolved from a clastic- to a carbonate-dominated shelf, resulting in deposition of the overlying Betsiboka limestone of Danian age. New stratigraphic data clearly indicate that the Maevarano Formation correlates, at least in part, with the Maastrichtian Berivotra Formation, and this in turn indicates that the most fossiliferous portions of the Maevarano Formation are Maastrichtian in age, rather than Campanian as previously reported. This revised age for the Maevarano vertebrate assemblage indicates that it is approximately contemporaneous with the vertebrate fauna recovered from the Deccan basalt volcano-sedimentary sequence of India. The comparable age of these two faunas is significant because the faunas appear to be more similar to one another than either is to those from any other major Gondwanan landmass. The revised age of the Maevarano Formation, when considered in the light of our recent fossil discoveries, further indicates that the ancestral stocks of Madagascar's overwhelmingly endemic modern vertebrate fauna arrived on the island in post-Mesozoic times. The basal stocks of the modern vertebrate fauna are conspicuously absent in the Maevarano Formation. Finally, the revised age of the Maevarano

  18. Geochemical Evidence of a Near Surface History for the Source Rocks of the Central Coast Mountains Batholith, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stremtan, C. C.; Wetmore, P. H.; Ducea, M. N.

    2009-04-01

    magmatic garnet in the samples from Eocene intrusives, that the source rocks for the samples on the east side of the CSZ were, at least partially, mafic rocks with a strong basaltic component buried to a depth of more than 30 km. This component makes up at least 45% (mass) of the Cretaceous through Eocene batholith in the studied area. The remainder of the source materials making up the CMB had to be new additions from the mantle wedge. A prolonged period of contractional deformation beginning with the Early Cretaceous collisional accretion of the Insular superterrane is inferred to have been responsible for underthrusting the high δ18O into the lower crust. We suggest that rocks of the Insular superterrane (e.g. Alexander-Wrangellia) are of ideal composition, and were accreted to and overthrust by what would become the CMB just prior to initiation of magmatism in that region.

  19. Whole-Rock Geochemistry and Zircon U-Pb Isotopes of the Late Cretaceous Granitoids of the Eastern Taurus (turkey): Implications for Petrogenesis and Geodynamic Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyarslan, Melahat; Lin, Yu-Chin; Chung, Sun-Lin; Feyzi Bingol, Ahmet; Yildirim, Esra

    2015-04-01

    The granitoid plutons out crop largely in the Eastern Taurus, in Turkey. New data, including a combination of field relation, U-Pb zircon geochronology and rock geochemistry on the granitoids in the Eastern Taurus of the Tethyan orogen in Turkey, come from four plutons ( Pertek, Baskil, Göksun and Şifrin). Pertek, Baskil and Göksun plutons consist mainly of diorite, quartz-diorites, tonalite, granodiorites and granites of I-type, with minor monzonite, the Şifrin pluton consists of syenogranite, syenite, monzogranite, monzonite. U-Pb zircon geochronology of four samples of diorite and granite from Pertek and Baskil plutons indicate ages of 86±2 - 79 ± 1Ma. U-Pb zircon geochronology of four samples from the Şifrin granitoid yield ages 77±1-72±1 Ma. Considering these ages, emplacement of the plutons took place during Late Cretaceous (Santonian-Campanian), from 86 to 72 Ma. Although the SiO2 of rocks forming granitoids varies in wide range ( 46.792- 74.092 wt%), they show arc and syn-collision geochemical affinity, with enrichment of LILE (K, Rb, Sr and Ba) and depletion of HFSE (Nb, Ta and Ti) and P. Geochemical data indice that the diorite, tonalite and granodiorite are low-K tholeiite, monzodiorite, monzogranite, granite and K-granite are calc-alkaline and high-K calc-alkaline and monzonite, syenomonzonite and syenite of Şifrin pluton and some samples of the Pertek pluton are shoshonitic. The Eastern Taurus granitoids would be formed by partial melting of possible juvenile arc-derived rocks during subduction of the South Branch of the Neo-Tethyan oceanic crust and subsequent arc-continent collision.

  20. Crustal source of the Late Cretaceous Satansarı monzonite stock (central Anatolia - Turkey) and its significance for the Alpine geodynamic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köksal, Serhat; Toksoy-Köksal, Fatma; Göncüoğlu, M. Cemal; Möller, Andreas; Gerdes, Axel; Frei, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    The Late Cretaceous granitic rocks within central Anatolia (Turkey) not only date and show the magmatic aspects of the Alpine realm, but also give clues about its geodynamic character. Among them, the Satansarı monzonite stock (SMS), part of the Terlemez pluton (Aksaray), characterizing the inception of an extensional tectonic regime in central Anatolia, has a subalkaline, metaluminous and magnesian geochemical nature with depletion in Ba, Nb, P and Ti, and with enrichment of Th, U, K and Pb relative to primitive mantle. The SMS has LREE enriched patterns ([La/Yb]N = 18.45-21.21) with moderately negative Eu-anomalies ([Eu/Eu*]N = 0.65-0.73). The geochemical data infer a crustal source with an inherited subduction-related component, and fractionation of plagioclase and amphibole. A crustal signature for the SMS is also inferred from high 87Sr/86Sr(t) ratios (0.70826-0.70917), and low ɛNd(t) values (-6.9 to -7.6). Zircon crystals from the SMS typically have magmatic rims overgrowing inherited cores that are reworked, resorbed and overgrown. Completely new zircon crystals grown in a single magmatic episode have also been identified. Laser ablation ICP-MS U-Pb zircon analyses yield a mean 206Pb/238U age of 74.4 ± 0.6 Ma (2σ) for the intrusion of the SMS. Rare discordant analyses range from the Devonian to the Proterozoic (i.e., 207Pb/206Pb ages between 364 Ma and 1263 Ma). In situ zircon Hf isotope analyses reveal low 176Lu/177Hf ratios and negative ɛHf(t) values, which is consistent with a predominantly crustal source of the SMS. We suggest that the water-rich magmas were generated in a hot zone within the crust produced by residual melts from basalt crystallization and partial melts of pre-existing metamorphic and igneous rocks within the lower crust of central Anatolia. The SMS likely formed by episodic injections of these hybrid monzonite melts by adiabatic ascent to shallow crust where they crystallized. This interpretation may be useful in interpreting the

  1. Red Sea/Gulf of Aden source rock geochemical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Ducreux, C.; Mathurin, G.; Latreille, M. )

    1991-08-01

    The potential of hydrogen generation in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden was studied by geochemical analyses of 2,271 samples from 23 wells drilled in 6 countries within the area. Selection of candidate source beds was primarily a function of the sedimentary column penetrated by drilling (i.e., whereas sub-Tertiary sediments are accessible in Somalia and Yemen in the Gulf of Aden, sampling below the thick Neogene evaporitic sequence in the Red Sea could not be achieved due to a general lack of penetration to such levels). Organic matter content and type, maturity levels, petroleum potential of the rock analyzed, and its capacity to have generated liquid or gaseous hydrocarbons are the basic results provided by the analyses. Geochemical well correlations within and between subbasins are presented using the two most representative parameters: total organic carbon (TOC) and Petroleum Potential (PP = S{sub 1} + S{sub 2}), expressed in kilograms of hydrocarbons per ton of rock. In general, results obtained in the two rift basins, with sampling mostly in Neogene sediments in the Red Sea and in sub-Tertiary and Tertiary sediments in the Gulf of Aden, indicate the presence of favorable sources preferentially in this sub-Tertiary succession. It is stressed that geochemical analysis results are from wells whose locations are generally on structural highs and, therefore, are not representative (especially in terms of maturation) of conditions in adjacent depressions, particularly where the difference in structural level is great. Sound simulation modeling makes possible the reconstruction regional thermal and burial history and, thus, identification of maturation kitchens.

  2. Permian, Jurassic and Early Cretaceous palynofloral assemblages from subsurface sedimentary rocks in Chuperbhita Coalfield, Rajmahal Basin, India.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, A

    2001-04-01

    The results of a palynological analysis of the sedimentary sequence of Borehole RCH-151, Chuperbhita Coalfield, Rajmahal Basin, Bihar are presented here. The borehole penetrated the Rajmahal Formation (comprising two traps sandwiching an intertrappean bed), the thinly represented Dubrajpur Formation and in its lower part, the Coal Measures. The coal-bearing interval is associated with Scheuringipollenites barakarensis, Faunipollenites varius, Densipollenites indicus, Gondisporites raniganjensis and Densipollenites magnicorpus Assemblage Zones. The presence of these biostratigraphic units indicates correlation with the Barakar Formation (Early Permian) and the Barren Measures and Raniganj Formations (both Late Permian). This is the first record, in the Chuperbhita Coalfield, of Late Permian strata, which appear to represent a condensed sequence. Prior to the present study, the Permian succession was thought to have been associated entirely with the Barakar Formation. The overlying Dubrajpur Formation yielded a distinct spore-pollen assemblage (in association with the first report of dinoflagellate, Phallocysta), which is assigned to the newly identified Callialasporites turbatus palynozone of latest Early to early Middle Jurassic age. The diverse spore-pollen flora of the intertrappean bed (Rajmahal Formation) incorporates several age marker taxa, viz. Undulatisporites, Leptolepidites, Klukisporites, Ruffordiaspora, and Coptospora. The assemblages from intertrappean beds are correlated with the Ruffordiaspora australiensis palynozone of Australia. Thus the palynodating indicates Permian, latest Early to early Mid-Jurassic and Early Cretaceous age for the strata studied. This is the first record of definite Jurassic microfossils from the non-marine sequence of Rajmahal Basin, India.

  3. Lacustrine anoxic event 1 (LAE1) recorded by rock magnetism of Unit 1 of Qingshankou Formation, Late Cretaceous Songliao Basin in Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, K.; Wu, H.; Yang, T.

    2011-12-01

    Songliao Basin, located in northeastern China, is one of the biggest cretaceous lakes in Asia, with most completely developed cretaceous stratigraphy. Therefore, it is a key area to study cretaceous palaeontology evolution and paleoenvironmental changes. Especially, anoxic events and marine transgressional events have been the research focuses for a long time. The lacustrine anoxic event 1 (LAE1) has been reported to happen in Songliao Basin during the deposition of unit 1 of Qingshankou Formation (K2qn1). In this study, K2qn1 was sampled from China Cretaceous Continental Scientific Drilling-Songke Ι (CCSD-SK-Ι) south borehole. The K2qn1, from 1700 m to 1782.8 m in the well log, mainly consists black shale and mudstone. LAE1 is the section from 1750 m to 1775 m. Detailed rock magnetic measurements were conducted, including magnetic susceptibility (χ) and susceptibility of anhysteretic remanence (χARM), saturation isothermal remanence (SIRM), S-ratio (IRM-100mT/SIRM), medial destroyed field of ARM (MDFARM), and temperature-dependence of magnetic susceptibilities (χ/T curves), acquiring curves and reverse demagnetic curves of IRM and thermal demagnetization of ARM and SIRM and Lowrie experiment for selected samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was also carried out for selected samples. The acquiring curves and reverse demagnetic curves of typical specimens and the thermal demagnetization of ARM and SIRM and the Lowrie experiment confirm that the major remanence-carrier is soft magnetite. Results of χ/T curves indicate that: for some specimens, pyrite exists (Li and Zhang, 2005); for most specimens, their χ decreases slowly during heating, suggesting a dominant contribution from paramagnetic minerals. Results of XRD suggest that these paramagnetic minerals may be feldspar, kaolinite and pyrite. So paramagnetic clay minerals control χ of K2qn1; and more clay minerals may induce higher natural gamma ray (GR). Therefore, χ and GR should be positive. On the contrary

  4. Improve exploration success using new source rock analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Espitalie, J.; Marquis, F.; Lafargue, E.; Antonas, R.

    1996-04-01

    Exploration success often depends on the analysis of the petroleum system of a given area. Such an analysis will look at potential source rocks, evaluating their maturity, kinetic parameters and extension. While this process has been used routinely for about 15 years, it has continued to evolve. Subsequent applications have been in production (determining API gravity, detecting tar mat levels) and environmental situations (quantifying soil contamination). The most recent additions to the technology are the measurement of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and high temperature analyses. These improvements are included in the latest version of the system, called Rock-Eval 6, which is marketed by Vinci Technologies of Rueil-Malmaison, France. The enhanced system has had its original electronic microprocessors updated to a PC based platform running dedicated software. Other deficiencies of the earlier version that have been rectified include: the oxygen index, derived from the CO{sub 2} released by cracking the kerogen, and trapped on molecular sieves between 300 and 400 C; residual organic carbon determined from the CO and CO{sub 2} released by the isothermal combustion of organic matter remaining after initial pyrolysis at 600 C; an accurate monitoring of the heating temperature, this should be obtainable without a time-consuming calibration procedure to properly assess kinetic parameters. The analytical equipment comprises two micro-ovens that can be heated to 850 C (vs. 650 in earlier versions), which are controlled by a thermocouple in contact with the sample. Two on-line cells are available for measuring Co and CO{sub 2} quantities generated during pyrolysis and oxygenation of samples. The integrated software (Rocksix) monitors and interprets data with interactive user functions. Diagnostic functions (flow measurement, detection failures) also have been added.

  5. Tektites in Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary rocks on Haiti and their bearing on the Alvarez impact extinction hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izett, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    Relic tektites are associated with a Pt-group metal abundance anomaly and shocked minerals in a thin marl bed that marks the K-T boundary on Haiti. The presence of these three impact-produced materials at the precise K-T boundary enormously strengthens the Alvarez impact extinction hypothesis. The Haitian tektites are the first datable impact products in K-T boundary rocks, and 40Ar-39Ar ages of the glass show that the K-T boundary and impact event are coeval at 64.5 ?? 0.1 Ma. -from Author

  6. Source-rock geochemistry of the San Joaquin Basin Province, California: Chapter 11 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Kenneth E.; Magoon, Leslie B.; Valin, Zenon C.; Lillis, Paul G.

    2007-01-01

    Source-rock thickness and organic richness are important input parameters required for numerical modeling of the geohistory of petroleum systems. Present-day depth and thickness maps for the upper Miocene Monterey Formation, Eocene Tumey formation of Atwill (1935), Eocene Kreyenhagen Formation, and Cretaceous-Paleocene Moreno Formation source rocks in the San Joaquin Basin were determined using formation tops data from 266 wells. Rock-Eval pyrolysis and total organic carbon data (Rock-Eval/TOC) were collected for 1,505 rock samples from these source rocks in 70 wells. Averages of these data for each well penetration were used to construct contour plots of original total organic carbon (TOCo) and original hydrogen index (HIo) in the source rock prior to thermal maturation resulting from burial. Sufficient data were available to construct plots of TOCo and HIo for all source-rock units except the Tumey formation of Atwill (1935). Thick, organic-rich, oil-prone shales of the upper Miocene Monterey Formation occur in the Tejon depocenter in the southern part of the basin with somewhat less favorable occurrence in the Southern Buttonwillow depocenter to the north. Shales of the upper Miocene Monterey Formation generated most of the petroleum in the San Joaquin Basin. Thick, organic-rich, oil-prone Kreyenhagen Formation source rock occurs in the Buttonwillow depocenters, but it is thin or absent in the Tejon depocenter. Moreno Formation source rock is absent from the Tejon and Southern Buttonwillow depocenters, but thick, organic-rich, oil-prone Moreno Formation source rock occurs northwest of the Northern Buttonwillow depocenter adjacent to the southern edge of Coalinga field.

  7. Basin center - fractured source rock plays within tectonically segmented foreland (back-arc) basins: Targets for future exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, R.J.

    1994-09-01

    Production from fractured reservoirs has long been an industry target, but interest in this type play has increased recently because of new concepts and technology, especially horizontal drilling. Early petroleum exploration programs searched for fractured reservoirs from shale, tight sandstones, carbonates, or basement in anticlinal or fault traps, without particular attention to source rocks. Foreland basins are some of the best oil-generating basins in the world because of their rich source rocks. Examples are the Persian Gulf basin, the Alberta basin and Athabasca tar sands, and the eastern Venezuela basin and Orinoco tar sands. Examples of Cretaceous producers are the wrench-faulted La Paz-Mara anticlinal fields, Maracaibo basin, Venezuela; the active Austin Chalk play in an extensional area on the north flank of the Gulf of Mexico continental margin basin; and the Niobrara Chalk and Pierre Shale plays of the central Rocky Mountains, United States. These latter plays are characteristic of a foreland basin fragmented into intermontane basins by the Laramide orogeny. The Florence field, Colorado, discovered in 1862, and the Silo field, Wyoming, discovered in 1980, are used as models for current prospecting and will be described in detail. The technologies applied to fracture-source rock plays are refined surface and subsurface mapping from new log suites, including resistivity mapping; 3D-3C seismic, gravity, and aeromagnetic mapping; borehole path seismic mapping associated with horizontal drilling; fracture mapping with the Formation MicroScanner and other logging tools; measurements while drilling and other drilling and completion techniques; surface geochemistry to locate microseeps; and local and regional lineament discrimination.

  8. Subduction-related High- to Ultrahigh-Potassic Rocks of the Ankara-Erzincan Suture Belt of Turkey: a geochemical and isotopic approach to source and petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genc, S. Can; Gulmez, Fatma; Karacik, Zekiye; Tuysuz, Okan; Prelevic, Dejan; Roden, Michael F.; Hames, Willis E.; Zeki Billor, M.

    2014-05-01

    that the magmatic rock suites of LCVS had different crystallization history. REE melting modelings suggest a common mantle source, which contains variable amount of spinel lerzolite and garnet lerzolitic proportions. Considering the presence of some phlogopite-bearing clinopyroxenite xenolits in the lamprophyre and the leucite-bearing rocks, we propose that the LCVS ultrapotassic rocks were possibly derived from the low degree partial melting of veined SCLM. Keywords: High- to Ultrahigh-K, Isotope, Ar-Ar, Cretaceous, Turkey, Veined SCLM Lustrino, M., Wilson, M., 2007. ESR 81, 1-65. Peccerillo, A., 1995. Springer-Verlag. 365pp.

  9. Characteristics of the Middle Jurassic marine source rocks and prediction of favorable source rock kitchens in the Qiangtang Basin of Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wenlong; Wan, Huan; Zhang, Yeqian; Han, Guangzhi

    2013-04-01

    We have evaluated the hydrocarbon-bearing potential of Middle Jurassic marine source rocks in the Qiangtang Basin, Tibet, through a comprehensive study of samples from a large number of surface outcrops in different structural units, and from the Qiang-D2 Well in the southern Qiangtang Depression. Data that were acquired, including the depositional environment, thickness of sedimentary units, and organic geochemistry, are used to identify the principal controlling factors and predict the location of favorable hydrocarbon kitchens. The source rocks are mainly platform limestone of the Middle Jurassic Buqu Formation. This formation comprises a suite of intra-platform sag marls, micrites, and black shales that were deposited in a deep-water and restricted depositional environment. The marls form hydrocarbon-rich source rocks with organic matter that is mainly type II and in the mature to highly mature stage. In the Dongco-Hulu Lake and Tupoco-Baitan Lake deep sags, limestone also forms a medium-level source rock. In the Qiangtang Basin, limestone is the favorable source rock kitchen and is more significant in this regard than mudstone. The results provide important constraints on evaluating the hydrocarbon potential of Jurassic marine source rocks and for locating petroleum resources in the Qiangtang Basin.

  10. Reconnaissance studies of potential petroleum source rocks in the Middle Jurassic Tuxedni Group near Red Glacier, eastern slope of Iliamna Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Richard G.; Herriott, Trystan M.; LePain, David L.; Helmold, Kenneth P.; Peterson, C. Shaun

    2013-01-01

    Previous geological and organic geochemical studies have concluded that organic-rich marine shale in the Middle Jurassic Tuxedni Group is the principal source rock of oil and associated gas in Cook Inlet (Magoon and Anders, 1992; Magoon, 1994; Lillis and Stanley, 2011; LePain and others, 2012; LePain and others, submitted). During May 2009 helicopter-assisted field studies, 19 samples of dark-colored, fine-grained rocks were collected from exposures of the Red Glacier Formation of the Tuxedni Group near Red Glacier, about 70 km west of Ninilchik on the eastern flank of Iliamna Volcano (figs. 1 and 3). The rock samples were submitted to a commercial laboratory for analysis by Rock-Eval pyrolysis and to the U.S. Geological Survey organic geochemical laboratory in Denver, Colorado, for analysis of vitrinite reflectance. The results show that values of vitrinite reflectance (percent Ro) in our samples average about 2 percent, much higher than the oil window range of 0.6–1.3 percent (Johnsson and others, 1993). The high vitrinite reflectance values indicate that the rock samples experienced significant heating and furthermore suggest that these rocks may have generated oil and gas in the past but no longer have any hydrocarbon source potential. The high thermal maturity of the rock samples may have resulted from (1) the thermaleffects of igneous activity (including intrusion by igneous rocks), (2) deep burial beneath Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary strata that were subsequently removed by uplift and erosion, or (3) the combined effects of igneous activity and burial.

  11. Rock Magnetic Cyclostratigraphy of the Mid-Cretaceous Greenhorn Limestone, South-Central Colorado---Influence of Orbitally Induced Climate Variability for Chornostratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, T.; Geissman, J. W.; Jackson, J.

    2015-12-01

    We are testing the hypothesis that depositional processes of the mid-Cretaceous Greenhorn Limestone were influenced by orbitally-driven climate variations using rock magnetic data. Correlation of the data, including anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM), magnetic susceptibility, isothermal remanent magnetization in different DC fields to saturation, and hysteresis properties, from three continuously exposed sections of the full Greenhorn Limestone provides detailed spatial distribution for the depositional processes and magnetic mineral climate encoding. The Greenhorn Limestone includes the Lincoln Limestone, Hartland Shale, and the Bridge Creek Limestone members and consists of calcareous shales and limestones representing near maximum depths in the Cretaceous interior seaway. The sections, each about 30 m thick, extend from the upper Graneros Shale, through the Greenhorn Formation, to the lower Carlisle Shale, with samples collected at a two to five cm interval and are located at Badito, CO; north of Redwing, CO; and at the Global boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) at Lake Pueblo, CO. Our over 1000 samples were hand crushed to granule size pieces and packed into 7cc IODP boxes. Bulk magnetic susceptibility, anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) intensity at different peak AF levels, and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) intensity record variations in magnetic mineral concentration and are proxies to determine orbital scale cycles and precise stratigraphic correlation between sections. ARM intensities in a peak field of 100 mT at both sites range between 1.2 x 10-3 and 1.3 x 10-4 A/m and better define periodic variation within the Greenhorn Limestone displaying differences in ferromagnetic mineral content of detrital origin. Magnetic susceptibility, which ranges from 3.5 x 10-2 to 2.86 x 10-3, also shows periodic variation with a strong correlation among the three sections. Saturation IRM at 100 mT ranges from 3.2 x 10-1 to 1.1x 10-2 A

  12. Thermal maturation and petroleum source rocks in Forest City and Salina basins, mid-continent, U. S. A

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, K.D.; Watney, W.L.; Hatch, J.R.; Xiaozhong, G.

    1986-05-01

    Shales in the Middle Ordovician Simpson Group are probably the source rocks for a geochemically distinct group of lower pristane and low phytane oils produced along the axis of the Forest City basin, a shallow cratonic Paleozoic basin. These oils, termed Ordovician-type oils, occur in some fields in the southern portion of the adjacent Salina basin. Maturation modeling by time-temperature index (TTI) calculations indicate that maturation of both basins was minimal during the early Paleozoic. The rate of maturation significantly increased during the Pennsylvanian because of rapid regional subsidence in response to the downwarping of the nearby Anadarko basin. When estimated thicknesses of eroded Pennsylvanian, Permian, and Cretaceous strata are considered, both basins remain relatively shallow, with maximum basement burial probably not exceeding 2 km. According to maturation modeling and regional structure mapping, the axes of both basins should contain Simpson rocks in the early stages of oil generation. The probability of finding commercial accumulations of Ordovician-type oil along the northwest-southeast trending axis of the Salina basin will decrease in a northwestward direction because of (1) westward thinning of the Simpson Group, and (2) lesser maturation due to lower geothermal gradients and shallower paleoburial depths. The optimum localities for finding fields of Ordovician-type oil in the southern Salina basin will be in down-plunge closures on anticlines that have drainage areas near the basin axis.

  13. Partial melting of the mélange for the growth of andesitic crust indicated by the Early Cretaceous arc dioritic/andesitic rocks in southern Qiangtang, central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, LuLu; Wang, Qiang; Wyman, Derek; Ou, Quan; Dan, Wei; Jiang, ZiQi; Yang, JinHui; Long, XiaoPing; Li, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Deciphering the petrogenesis of andesitic/dioritic rocks is fundamental to understanding the formation of the continental crust. Here we present the detailed petrology, geochronology, major and trace element, Sr-Nd-Hf-O isotope data for the Early Cretaceous (ca. 122 Ma) dioritic rocks in the Bizha area in southern Qiangtang, Tibet. The dioritic rocks are characterized by large ion lithophile elements, Pb and light rare earth elements but depletion of high field strength elements with slightly enriched and variable ɛNd(t) values of -0.01 to -3.31 and initial 87Sr/86Sr isotopic ratios of 0.7053 to 0.7062. They also have variable magmatic zircon Hf-O isotope compositions (ɛHf(t) = -5.3 to +3.6 and δ18O = 7.3 to 9.5 ‰). Combined with contemporary andesitic lavas in southern Qiangtang, we suggest that the intermediate magmatic rocks in this area were most probably derived by partial melting of the mélange, which is a mixture of the middle oceanic ridge basalts (MORBs), sediments and mantle wedge peridotites, formed along the interface between the subducted slab and the overlying mantle wedge in a subduction channel before ~ 124 Ma. The mélange diapir melting was triggered by the asthenospheric upwelling and hot corner flow caused by roll-back of the northward subducted Bangong-Nujiang oceanic slab during the Early Cretaceous. The Early Cretaceous intermediate magmatic rocks in southern Qiangtang have an overall continental crust-like andesitic composition. Therefore, partial melting of the mélange provides an important support for the generation of andesitic magmas in continental arcs and the "andesite model" for crustal growth.

  14. Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    This science unit is designed for limited- and non-English speaking students in a Chinese bilingual education program. The unit covers rock material, classification, characteristics of types of rocks, and rock cycles. It is written in Chinese and simple English. At the end of the unit there is a list of main terms in both English and Chinese, and…

  15. Petroleum source potential of rocks dredged from the continental slope in the eastern Gulf of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plafker, George; Claypool, George Edwin

    1979-01-01

    A bedrock dredging program by the R/V Sea Sounder in 1977 and 1978 along the continental slope in the eastern Gulf of Alaska revealed a previously unknown Eocene sedimentary sequence that includes argillaceous rocks with favorable petroleum source rock characteristics. Seven of 36 dredge hauls that sampled outcrop contain argillaceous rocks with more than l percent and as much as 1.64 percent organic carbon. Some of the rocks in samples of probable early Eocene age have undergone a thermal history that has resulted in generation of hydrocarbons. The organic matter appears to be hydrogen deficient, however, which could indicate that the rocks are more likely to be a source of gas rather than liquid hydrocarbon, unless the hydrogen loss is due to weathering. The Eocene rocks are associated with sandstone and conglomerate on the continental slope. They dip northward beneath younger Tertiary strata in the outer continental shelf where they could be an important petroleum source and exploratory target.

  16. Modified method for estimating petroleum source-rock potential using wireline logs, with application to the Kingak Shale, Alaska North Slope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rouse, William A.; Houseknecht, David W.

    2016-02-11

    In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey completed an assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and gas resources in three source rocks of the Alaska North Slope, including the lower part of the Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Kingak Shale. In order to identify organic shale potential in the absence of a robust geochemical dataset from the lower Kingak Shale, we introduce two quantitative parameters, $\\Delta DT_\\bar{x}$ and $\\Delta DT_z$, estimated from wireline logs from exploration wells and based in part on the commonly used delta-log resistivity ($\\Delta \\text{ }log\\text{ }R$) technique. Calculation of $\\Delta DT_\\bar{x}$ and $\\Delta DT_z$ is intended to produce objective parameters that may be proportional to the quality and volume, respectively, of potential source rocks penetrated by a well and can be used as mapping parameters to convey the spatial distribution of source-rock potential. Both the $\\Delta DT_\\bar{x}$ and $\\Delta DT_z$ mapping parameters show increased source-rock potential from north to south across the North Slope, with the largest values at the toe of clinoforms in the lower Kingak Shale. Because thermal maturity is not considered in the calculation of $\\Delta DT_\\bar{x}$ or $\\Delta DT_z$, total organic carbon values for individual wells cannot be calculated on the basis of $\\Delta DT_\\bar{x}$ or $\\Delta DT_z$ alone. Therefore, the $\\Delta DT_\\bar{x}$ and $\\Delta DT_z$ mapping parameters should be viewed as first-step reconnaissance tools for identifying source-rock potential.

  17. Subsurface stratigraphic cross sections of cretaceous and lower tertiary rocks in the Wind River Basin, central Wyoming: Chapter 9 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas resources in the Wind River Basin Province, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Thomas M.

    2007-01-01

    The stratigraphic cross sections presented in this report were constructed as part of a project conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey to characterize and evaluate the undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Wind River Basin (WRB) in central Wyoming. The primary purpose of the cross sections is to show the stratigraphic framework and facies relations of Cretaceous and lower Tertiary rocks in this large, intermontane structural and sedimentary basin, which formed in the Rocky Mountain foreland during the Laramide orogeny (Late Cretaceous through early Eocene time). The WRB is nearly 200 miles (mi) long, 70 mi wide, and encompasses about 7,400 square miles (mi2) (fig. 1). The basin is structurally bounded by the Owl Creek and Bighorn Mountains on the north, the Casper arch on the east, the Granite Mountains on the south, and the Wind River Range on the west.

  18. Acid rock drainage and rock weathering in Antarctica: important sources for iron cycling in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Dold, B; Gonzalez-Toril, E; Aguilera, A; Lopez-Pamo, E; Cisternas, M E; Bucchi, F; Amils, R

    2013-06-18

    Here we describe biogeochemical processes that lead to the generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) and rock weathering on the Antarctic landmass and describe why they are important sources of iron into the Antarctic Ocean. During three expeditions, 2009-2011, we examined three sites on the South Shetland Islands in Antarctica. Two of them displayed intensive sulfide mineralization and generated acidic (pH 3.2-4.5), iron-rich drainage waters (up to 1.78 mM Fe), which infiltrated as groundwater (as Fe(2+)) and as superficial runoff (as Fe(3+)) into the sea, the latter with the formation of schwertmannite in the sea-ice. The formation of ARD in the Antarctic was catalyzed by acid mine drainage microorganisms found in cold climates, including Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans and Thiobacillus plumbophilus. The dissolved iron (DFe) flux from rock weathering (nonmineralized control site) was calculated to be 0.45 × 10(9) g DFe yr(-1) for the nowadays 5468 km of ice-free Antarctic rock coastline which is of the same order of magnitude as glacial or aeolian input to the Southern Ocean. Additionally, the two ARD sites alone liberate 0.026 and 0.057 × 10(9) g DFe yr(-1) as point sources to the sea. The increased iron input correlates with increased phytoplankton production close to the source. This might even be enhanced in the future by a global warming scenario, and could be a process counterbalancing global warming. PMID:23682976

  19. Acid rock drainage and rock weathering in Antarctica: important sources for iron cycling in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Dold, B; Gonzalez-Toril, E; Aguilera, A; Lopez-Pamo, E; Cisternas, M E; Bucchi, F; Amils, R

    2013-06-18

    Here we describe biogeochemical processes that lead to the generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) and rock weathering on the Antarctic landmass and describe why they are important sources of iron into the Antarctic Ocean. During three expeditions, 2009-2011, we examined three sites on the South Shetland Islands in Antarctica. Two of them displayed intensive sulfide mineralization and generated acidic (pH 3.2-4.5), iron-rich drainage waters (up to 1.78 mM Fe), which infiltrated as groundwater (as Fe(2+)) and as superficial runoff (as Fe(3+)) into the sea, the latter with the formation of schwertmannite in the sea-ice. The formation of ARD in the Antarctic was catalyzed by acid mine drainage microorganisms found in cold climates, including Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans and Thiobacillus plumbophilus. The dissolved iron (DFe) flux from rock weathering (nonmineralized control site) was calculated to be 0.45 × 10(9) g DFe yr(-1) for the nowadays 5468 km of ice-free Antarctic rock coastline which is of the same order of magnitude as glacial or aeolian input to the Southern Ocean. Additionally, the two ARD sites alone liberate 0.026 and 0.057 × 10(9) g DFe yr(-1) as point sources to the sea. The increased iron input correlates with increased phytoplankton production close to the source. This might even be enhanced in the future by a global warming scenario, and could be a process counterbalancing global warming.

  20. Petroleum source rocks of the Junggar, Tarim, and Turpan basins, northwest China

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, S.A.; Brassell, S.; Carroll, A.R.; McKnight, C.L.; Chu, J.; Hendrix, M.S. ); Xiao, X. ); Demaison, G. ); Liang, Y. )

    1990-05-01

    The sedimentary basins of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China, are poorly explored for petroleum. Volumetric adequacy of petroleum source rocks is a critical exploration risk in these basins, particularly because source rock data are limited. However, recent studies provide new source rock data and permit speculative assessment of source rock potential of Xinjiang basins. The Junggar basin, best explored of Xinjiang basins and containing a giant oil field, is underlain over much of its extent by an Upper Permian lacustrine oil-shale sequence that is known for its organic richness and oil source quality. Depending on position in the basin, the Permian section ranges from immature to overmature and is inferred to be the principal source of oil in the basin. Upper Triassic-Middle Jurassic coal measures, including lacustrine rocks, constitute a secondary source rock sequence in the Junggar basin. The smaller intermontane Turpan basin contains a very similar Upper Triassic-Middle Jurassic sequence, which, where sufficiently deeply buried, probably comprises the only significant oil source sequence in the basin. The vast Tarim basin offers the greatest potential variety of petroleum source rocks of all Xinjiang basins, but remains the least well documented. From limited, but geologically planned and focused sampling, Cambrian, Carboniferous, and Permian strata are considered unlikely to be major oil source contributors in the dominantly shallow-marine Paleozoic section of the northern Tarim basin. Only Ordovician black shales appear to have significant oil source potential, and a lower Paleozoic source is confirmed for some Tarim oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The Upper Triassic-Middle Jurassic sequence of northern Tarim basin, similar to that of the Junggar and Turpan basins in comprising a section rich in coal and lacustrine shale, constitutes another, potentially significant oil source.

  1. Geochemistry of the Jurassic and Upper Cretaceous shales from the Molango Region, Hidalgo, eastern Mexico: Implications for source-area weathering, provenance, and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong-Altrin, John S.; Nagarajan, Ramasamy; Madhavaraju, Jayagopal; Rosalez-Hoz, Leticia; Lee, Yong Il; Balaram, Vysetti; Cruz-Martínez, Adriana; Avila-Ramírez, Gladis

    2013-04-01

    This study focuses on the Jurassic (Huayacocotla and Pimienta Formations) and Upper Cretaceous (Méndez Formation) shales from the Molango Region, Hidalgo, Mexico. In this article, we discuss the mineralogy, major, and trace element geochemistry of the Mesozoic shales of Mexico. The goal of this study is to constrain the provenance of the shales, which belong to two different periods of the Mesozoic Era and to understand the weathering conditions and tectonic environments of the source region.

  2. Maps showing thermal maturity of Upper Cretaceous marine shales in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Thomas M.; Pawlewicz, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    The Wind River Basin is a large Laramide (Late Cretaceous through Eocene) structural and sedimentary basin that encompasses about 7,400 square miles in central Wyoming. The basin is bounded by the Washakie Range, Owl Creek, and southern Bighorn Mountains on the north, the Casper arch on the east and northeast, the Granite Mountains on the south, and the Wind River Range on the west. Important conventional and unconventional oil and gas resources have been discovered and produced from reservoirs ranging in age from Mississippian through Tertiary. It has been suggested that various Upper Cretaceous marine shales are the principal hydrocarbon source rocks for many of these accumulations. Numerous source rock studies of various Upper Cretaceous marine shales throughout the Rocky Mountain region have led to the conclusion that these rocks have generated, or are capable of generating, oil and (or) gas. With recent advances and success in horizontal drilling and multistage fracture stimulation there has been an increase in exploration and completion of wells in these marine shales in other Rocky Mountain Laramide basins that were traditionally thought of only as hydrocarbon source rocks. Important parameters that control hydrocarbon production from shales include: reservoir thickness, amount and type of organic matter, and thermal maturity. The purpose of this report is to present maps and a structural cross section showing levels of thermal maturity, based on vitrinite reflectance (Ro), for Upper Cretaceous marine shales in the Wind River Basin.

  3. The search for a source rock for the giant Tar Sand triangle accumulation, southeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huntoon, J.E.; Hansley, P.L.; Naeser, N.D.

    1999-01-01

    A large proportion (about 36%) of the world's oil resource is contained in accumulations of heavy oil or tar. In these large deposits of degraded oil, the oil in place represents only a fraction of what was present at the time of accumulation. In many of these deposits, the source of the oil is unknown, and the oil is thought to have migrated over long distances to the reservoirs. The Tar Sand triangle in southeastern Utah contains the largest tar sand accumulation in the United States, with 6.3 billion bbl of heavy oil estimated to be in place. The deposit is thought to have originally contained 13-16 billion bbl prior to the biodegradation, water washing, and erosion that have taken place since the middle - late Tertiary. The source of the oil is unknown. The tar is primarily contained within the Lower Permian White Rim Sandstone, but extends into permeable parts of overlying and underlying beds. Oil is interpreted to have migrated into the White Rim sometime during the Tertiary when the formation was at a depth of approximately 3500 m. This conclusion is based on integration of fluid inclusion analysis, time-temperature reconstruction, and apatite fission-track modeling for the White Rim Sandstone. Homogenization temperatures cluster around 85-90??C for primary fluid inclusions in authigenic, nonferroan dolomite in the White Rim. The fluid inclusions are associated with fluorescent oil-bearing inclusions, indicating that dolomite precipitation was coeval with oil migration. Burial reconstruction suggests that the White Rim Sandstone reached its maximum burial depth from 60 to 24 Ma, and that maximum burial was followed by unroofing from 24 to 0 Ma. Time-temperature modeling indicates that the formation experienced temperatures of 85-90??C from about 35 to 40 Ma during maximum burial. Maximum formation temperatures of about 105-110??C were reached at about 24 Ma, just prior to unroofing. Thermal modeling is used to examine the history of potential source rocks

  4. Petroleum potentialities of central Tunisia as deduced from identification and characterization of oil source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Saidi, M.; Acheche, M.H.; Inoubli, H. ); Belayouni, H. )

    1991-08-01

    Many potential oil source rocks occur within the Tunisian stratigraphic column, including Silurian-Devonian shales, Albian and upper Albian-Vraconian carbonates, Cenomanian-Turonian black shales and lower Eocene carbonates. This focuses on the inventory of potential oil source rocks in central Tunisia ranging from middle Jurassic to Turonian. The emphasis is on determining their genetic potential and whether they could have generated oil and gas. Geochemical data obtained from the analysis of at least 2,147 samples show this region to be of significant interest as a petroleum prospective area. The main source rocks identified are Toarcian shales, upper Albian-Vraconian carbonates and Cenomanian-Turonian black shales. They contain predominantly type 2 organic matter (oil and gas prone) and are at the low maturity limit of the oil window. The occurrence of those source rocks close to numerous potential reservoir facies supports the conclusion that central Tunisia is a very interesting area for petroleum exploration.

  5. Extensional tectonic influence on lower and upper cretaceous stratigraphy and reservoirs, southern Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.C.; Rogers, M.H.

    1993-04-01

    The southern Powder River basin has been influenced significantly by an extensional system affecting Lower Cretaceous, Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary units. The system is composed of small throw, nearly vertical normal faults which are identified in the Cretaceous marine shales and that we believe are basement derived. Resultant fractures were present at erosional/depositional surfaces, both marine and nonmarine, that, in part, controlled erosion and subsequent deposition of Lower and Upper Cretaceous rocks. The normal faults also affected coal deposition in the Tertiary, now exposed at the surface. The erosion and resultant deposition formed extensive stratigraphic traps in Cretaceous units in both conventional and unconventional reservoirs. These reservoirs are interbedded with mature source rocks that have generated and expelled large amounts of hydrocarbons. Resulting overpressuring in the Fall River through the Niobrara formations has kept fractures open and has preserved primary porosity in the reservoirs. The normal faults offset thin sandstone reservoirs forming permeability barriers. Associated fractures may have provided vertical pathways for organic acids that assisted development of secondary porosity in Upper Cretaceous sandstones. These normal...faults and fractures provide significant potential for the use of horizontal drilling techniques to evaluate fractured, overpressured conventional and unconventional reservoirs.

  6. Geochemistry of Eagle Ford group source rocks and oils from the first shot field area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edman, Janell D.; Pitman, Janet K.; Hammes, Ursula

    2010-01-01

    Total organic carbon, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, and vitrinite reflectance analyses performed on Eagle Ford Group core and cuttings samples from the First Shot field area, Texas demonstrate these samples have sufficient quantity, quality, and maturity of organic matter to have generated oil. Furthermore, gas chromatography and biomarker analyses performed on Eagle Ford Group oils and source rock extracts as well as weight percent sulfur analyses on the oils indicate the source rock facies for most of the oils are fairly similar. Specifically, these source rock facies vary in lithology from shales to marls, contain elevated levels of sulfur, and were deposited in a marine environment under anoxic conditions. It is these First Shot Eagle Ford source facies that have generated the oils in the First Shot Field. However, in contrast to the generally similar source rock facies and organic matter, maturity varies from early oil window to late oil window in the study area, and these maturity variations have a pronounced effect on both the source rock and oil characteristics. Finally, most of the oils appear to have been generated locally and have not experienced long distance migration. 

  7. Strontium isotopic evidence for an enriched source for post-subduction volcanic rocks, Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Wertz, W.K.; Perfit, M.R.; Shuster, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Later Cenozoic volcanic rocks from the eastern Las Cuevas region (ELCR), Dominican Republic are dominantly shoshonitic and are associated with a series of east-west trending faults. The ELCR rocks are highly enriched in Sr, Ba, and light REE, but contain relatively low amounts of Rb and HFS ions. Several basalts appear to be unfractionated and have Mg-numbers of >75. These transitional to alkalic volcanic rocks are atypical of Caribbean igneous rocks and are more similar to alkaline centers associated with late-stage, island arc volcanism in other regions. Elevated /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios (0.7041-0.7048) are high in comparison to most other igneous rocks from the Caribbean region and indicate that they were derived from a source relatively enriched in LIL and REE in comparison to the sources which gave rise to the majority of Caribbean igneous rocks. /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr values increase linearly with increasing Sr contents, suggesting mixing of sources with relatively low Sr contents and depleted /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr with material that is highly enriched in Sr and with /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr values around 0.706. This enriched component may be a fluid derived from melting/dehydrating subducted oceanic crust and sediment which metasomatically veined the sub-arc mantle. Small degrees of partial melting (<7%) of this source may be responsible for the unusual and enriched chemical composition of the ELCR volcanic rocks.

  8. Soils, slopes and source rocks: Application of a soil chemistry model to nutrient delivery to rift lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Nicholas B.; Tucker, Gregory E.

    2015-06-01

    The topographic evolution of rift basins may be critical to the deposition of lacustrine source rocks such as the organic-rich Lower Cretaceous shales of the South Atlantic margin. Soils have been proposed as a key link between topography and source rock deposition by providing nutrients for the algae growth in rift lakes. Decreasing topographic relief from active rift to late rift has several effects on soils: soils become thicker and finer, erosion of dead surface and soil organic matter decreases, and the fractionation of precipitation between runoff and infiltration may favor increased infiltration. This hypothesis is tested by application of CENTURY, a complex box model that simulates transfer of nutrients within soil pools. The model is first applied to a rainforest soil, with several parameters individually varied. Infiltration experiments show that the concentrations of C, N and P in groundwater decrease rapidly as infiltration decreases, whether due to increased slope or to decreased precipitation. Increased erosion of surface plant litter and topsoil results in substantially decreased nutrient concentrations in groundwater. Increased sand content in soil causes an increase in nutrient concentration. We integrate these variables in analyzing topographic swathes from the Rio Grande Rift, comparing the southern part of the rift, where topography is relatively old and reduced, to the northern rift. C and P concentrations in groundwater increase as slope gradient decreases, resulting in substantially larger C and P concentrations in groundwater in the southern rift than the northern rift. Nitrogen concentrations in groundwater depends on whether infiltration varies as a function of slope gradient; in experiments where the fraction of infiltrated precipitation decreased with increasing slope, N concentrations was also substantially higher in the southern rift; but in experiments where that fraction was held constant, N concentrations was lower in the southern

  9. Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes of the intrusive rocks in the Cretaceous Xigaze ophiolite, southern Tibet: Constraints on its formation setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang-Liang; Liu, Chuan-Zhou; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Zhang, Chang; Ji, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Jian-Gang

    2016-08-01

    The Cretaceous Xigaze ophiolite is best exposed at the central part of the Yarlung-Zangbo Suture Zone, Tibet Plateau. It consists of a thick section of mantle peridotites, but a relatively thin mafic sequence. This study presents geochronological and geochemical data for intrusive dykes (both mafic and felsic) and basalts to revisit the formation setting of the Xigaze ophiolite. The rodingites are characterized by high CaO and low Na2O contents relative to mafic dykes and show big variations in trace element compositions. Both gabbros and diabases have similar geochemical compositions, with MgO contents of 6.42-11.48 wt% and Mg# of 0.56-0.71. They display REE patterns similar to N-MORB and are variably enriched in large ion lithophile elements. Basalts have fractionated compositions and display LREE-depleted patterns very similar to N-MORB. They do not show obvious enrichment in LILE and depletion in high-field-strength elements, but a negative Nb anomaly is present. The studied plagiogranites have compositions of trondhjemite to tonalite, with high Na2O and low K2O contents. They have low TiO2 contents less than 1 wt%, consistent with melts formed by anatexis of gabbros rather than by differentiation of basalts. Zircons from seven samples, including three rodingites, three plagiogranites, and one gabbro, have been dated and yielded U-Pb ages of 124.6 ~ 130.5 Ma, indicating the Xigaze ophiolite was formed during the Early Cretaceous. They have mantle-like δ18O values of + 4.92 ~ + 5.26‰ and very positive εHf(t) values of + 16 ~ + 13.3. Ages of the rodingites and less altered gabbros indicate that serpentinization was occurred at ~ 125 Ma. Occurrence of both gabbroic and diabase dykes within the serpentinites suggests that the mantle lithosphere of the Xigaze ophiolite was rapidly exhumed. Both mafic and felsic dykes have slightly more radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr ratios relative to MORB, but depleted Hf-Nd isotpe compositions. They have a limited range of ε

  10. Preliminary petroleum source rock assessment of upper Proterozoic Chuar group, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Palacas, J.G.; Reynolds, M.W.

    1989-03-01

    Strata in the Chuar Group, Grand Canyon, Arizona, are potential petroleum source rocks. This group, divided into the Galeros Formation below and the Kwagunt Formaton above, consists predominantly of very fine-grained siliciclastic rocks and thin sequences of sandstones and stromatolites and cryptalgal carbonate rocks. Over half the succession consists of organic-rich, gray to black mudstone and siltstone. Geochemical analyses indicate that the 281-m thick Walcott Member, the uppermost unit of the Kwagunt, has good to excellent petroleum source rock potential. The lower half of the Walcott is characterized by total organic carbon (TOC) contents as much as 7.0% (average /approximately/ 3.0%), hydrogen indices as much as 204 mg HC/g TOC (average 135 mg HC/g TOC), genetic potentials (S/sub 1/ + S/sub 2/) of nearly 16,000 ppm (average /approximately/ 6000 ppm), and extractable organic matter (EOM) as much as 4000 ppm. Data for the upper Walcott are incomplete but suggest that these rocks are as rich or richer than the lower Walcott. Maturity assessment indicates that source rocks of the Walcott are within the oil generation window. Strata of the thermally mature underlying Awatubi Member of the Kwagunt and the thermally mature to overmature Galeros Formation are, in general, rated as poor oil sources with genetic potentials generally less than 1000 ppm, but they are possible gas sources. Several thin sequences in these units, however, display good oil source characteristics, with EOM nearly 2000 ppm and genetic potentials nearly 7000 ppm. Chuar Group strata may be potential sources for economical accumulations of petroleum in upper Proterozoic or lower Paleozoic reservoir rocks in northwest Arizona and southwest Utah.

  11. From Source to Sink: Exhumation of the North America Cordillera Revealed by Multi-dating of Detrital Minerals from Upper Jurassic-Upper Cretaceous Sevier Foreland Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, C. S.; Carrapa, B.; DeCelles, P. G.; Gehrels, G. E.; Thomson, S. N.

    2013-12-01

    We sampled twenty-two Late Jurassic to Late Cretaceous syn-orogenic conglomerate clasts in proximal units in the Sevier fold-thrust belt and their distal sandstone equivalents up to 300 km east of the thrust front, in Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, and South Dakota. To better constrain depositional ages, these samples were analyzed using detrital zircon U-Pb (DZ U-Pb) geochronology. To identify a thermochronometer that measures source exhumation in the North America Cordillera, both zircon (U-Th)/He and apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronology was utilized, on both the conglomerate cobbles and sandstone (detrital) samples. Eleven samples were analyzed with zircon (U-Th)/He; however, discordant ages in the conglomerate cobble samples suggest that this system was not fully reset and never experienced T> ~180 °C in the source stratigraphy during the Sevier orogeny. Eleven other samples are analyzed using apatite fission track thermochronology (AFT); AFT ages are generally similar or older than depositional ages indicating that the detrital ages record source exhumation signals, and that exhumation depth corresponds to T>~120 °C. In order to test whether or not the youngest cooling AFT age population represents a source exhumation signal or a co-magmatic signal we here performed double dating of the detrital AFT samples using apatite U-Pb thermochronology. Maximum depositional ages using DZ U-Pb match existing age controls on basin stratigraphy. Our study shows that AFT is an effective thermochronometer to detect source exhumation for Cretaceous foreland stratigraphy in the western U.S.A. Lag-times (i.e. the difference between the source exhumation age and depositional age) are ~0 to 5 Myr with relatively steady-state to slightly increasing exhumation rates suggesting orogenic growth at this time. The very short lag times also indicate limited to no storage time between source and sink. The AFT lag time of the Early Cretaceous Kelvin Formation is ~5 Myr and represents

  12. Major element variation and possible source materials of apollo 12 crystalline rocks.

    PubMed

    Kushiro, I; Haramura, H

    1971-03-26

    Nine different crystalline rocks of the Apollo 12 samples have been analyzed with conventional chemical rock analysis methods. Five of the rocks have normative quartz, whereas the others have normative olivine and hypersthene. The rocks show a wide range in the ratio of iron to magnesium, and their compositions fall on relatively smooth curves in the oxide variation diagram. It is suggested that these rocks, with one exception, represent different parts of a differentiated magmatic body, in which magmatic differentiation by crystallization and settling of olivine was most effective. The source material of the original magma may be peridotite with or without minor amounts of plagioclase or spinel or garnet, with the presence or absence of these minerals dependent on the depth of magma generation. PMID:17742570

  13. Major element variation and possible source materials of apollo 12 crystalline rocks.

    PubMed

    Kushiro, I; Haramura, H

    1971-03-26

    Nine different crystalline rocks of the Apollo 12 samples have been analyzed with conventional chemical rock analysis methods. Five of the rocks have normative quartz, whereas the others have normative olivine and hypersthene. The rocks show a wide range in the ratio of iron to magnesium, and their compositions fall on relatively smooth curves in the oxide variation diagram. It is suggested that these rocks, with one exception, represent different parts of a differentiated magmatic body, in which magmatic differentiation by crystallization and settling of olivine was most effective. The source material of the original magma may be peridotite with or without minor amounts of plagioclase or spinel or garnet, with the presence or absence of these minerals dependent on the depth of magma generation.

  14. Paleozoic source and reservoir rocks in unbreached thrust ramp anticlines, Millard County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, P.B.; Larsen, B.R. )

    1991-03-01

    Surface geology, source rock geochemistry, and seismic data indicate that substantial hydrocarbon reserves may occur beneath a regional detachment fault underlying Tule Valley and the Confusion Range in northern Millard County, west-central Utah. Paleozoic hydrocarbon source and reservoir rocks in Millard County are laterally equivalent to highly productive rocks in Railroad Valley, Nevada, oil fields. However, the volume of hydrocarbons trapped in thrust ramp duplex anticlines beneath a regional detachment fault is potentially much greater than that in established Nevada fields. The Devonian Guilmette Formation, which consists of interstratified brown, sucrosic dolomite and gray limestone, and the Mississippian Chainman Shale are exposed in the folded and thrusted Confusion Range. Regional geochemical analysis confirms that the Chainman Shale contains enough total organic carbon (TOC) to serve as an effective hydrocarbon source rock. Some surface samples exceed 3% TOC; average TOC is in excess of 1.5%. Thermal maturity of these source rock surface samples indicates that these rocks were subjected to deep burial during their geologic history and that they have generated the maximum amount of hydrocarbons. In addition, thermal maturity of these samples is consistent with hydrocarbon preservation at the 'floor' of the oil window and within the area of peak wet gas generation. Petrographic examination of potential reservoir facies in the Guilmette Formation confirms that liquid hydrocarbons were contained in porous, permeable dolomite. Petrographic examination of kerogen from these same facies also confirms the presence of solid bitumen (dead oil) in the surface samples.

  15. Masirah Graben, Oman: A hidden Cretaceous rift basin

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, W.H.; Ries, A.C.; Coward, M.P.

    1995-06-01

    Reflection seismic data, well data, geochemical data, and surface geology suggest that a Cretaceous rift basin exists beneath the thrusted allochthonous sedimentary sequence of the Masirah graben, Oman. The Masirah graben is located east of the Huqf uplift, parallel to the southern coast of Oman. The eastern side of the northeast-trending Huqf anticlinorium is bounded by an extensional fault system that is downthrown to the southeast, forming the western edge of the Masirah graben. This graben is limited to the east by a large wedge of sea floor sediments and oceanic crust, that is stacked as imbricate thrusts. These sediments/ophiolites were obducted onto the southern margin of the Arabian plate during the collision of the Indian/Afghan plates at the end of the Cretaceous. Most of the Masirah graben is covered by an allochthonous sedimentary sequence, which is complexly folded and deformed above a detachment. This complexly deformed sequence contrasts sharply with what is believed to be a rift sequence below the ophiolites. The sedimentary sequence in the Masirah graben was stable until further rifting of the Arabian Sea/Gulf of Aden in the late Tertiary, resulting in reactivation of earlier rift-associated faults. Wells drilled in the Masirah graben in the south penetrated reservoir quality rocks in the Lower Cretaceous Natih and Shuaiba carbonates. Analyses of oil extracted from Infracambrian sedimentary rocks penetrated by these wells suggest an origin from a Mesozoic source rock.

  16. Source area and depositional controls on diagenesis in the deep lower Tuscaloosa Formation (Upper Cretaceous), Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Weedman, S.D.; Brantley, S.L. . Geosciences Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Sandstone cores from two widely separated gas fields within the deep lower Tuscaloosa Formation were sampled and examined with optical, cathodoluminescent, and scanning electron microscopy. Diagenetic differences between the two areas (the Moore-Sams/Morganza (MS/M) and Rigolets (R) fields) can be explained by different source areas and depositional environments. The coarsening-upward reservoir sandstones of the MS/M fields were deposited along a prograding delta front, where sand/shale ratios of at least 4:1 indicate extensive sandstone connectivity. Sandstone isolith maps suggest a source area to the north including areas of contemporaneous (Cenomanian) alkaline volcanic activity in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Arkansas. The sandstones have extremely high porosity, interpreted as secondary, despite burial depths. Porosity is preserved where compaction is inhibited by relict cements and overpressures. Additionally, pores are lined with an iron-rich chlorite, which inhibits late quartz cement. Sedimentary structures and sand/shale ratios in lower Tuscaloosa sandstones of the R field suggest more distal, shale-dominated depositional environments. Sandstone isolith maps indicate a source area to the northeast, to sandstones of the MS/M fields, R field sandstones are richer in feldspar, pore-filling kaolinite and calcite, and lack recognizable volcanic rock fragments. Secondary porosity and chlorite in these sandstones are rare.

  17. [The evaluation of hydrocarbon potential generation for source rocks by near-infrared diffuse reflection spectra].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Jia; Xu, Xiao-Xuan; Song, Ning; Wu, Zhong-Chen; Zhou, Xiang; Chen, Jin; Cao, Xue-Wei; Wang, Bin

    2011-04-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) diffuse reflection spectra were compared and evaluated for hydrocarbon potential generation of source rocks. Near-infrared diffuse reflectance often exhibits significant differences in the spectra due to the non-homogeneous distribution of the particles, so the signal-to-noise ratio of NIR is much lower than MIR It is too difficult to get accurate results by NIR without using a strong spectral preprocessing method to remove systematic noise such as base-line variation and multiplicative scatter effects. In the present paper, orthogonal signal correction (OSC) and an improved algorithm of it, i.e. direct orthogonal signal correction (DOSC), are used as different methods to preprocess both the NIR and MIR spectra of the hydrocarbon source rocks. Another algorithm, wavelet multi-scale direct orthogonal signal correction (WMDOSC), which is a combination of discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and DOSC, is also used as a preprocessing method. Then, the calibration model of hydrocarbon source rocks before and after pretreatment was established by interval partial least square (iPLS). The experimental results show that WMDOSC is more successfully applied to preprocess the NIR spectra data of the hydrocarbon source rocks than other two algorithms, and NIR performed as good as MIR in the analysis of hydrocarbon potential generation of source rocks with WMDOSC-iPLS pretreatment calibration model.

  18. The oil and gas potential of southern Bolivia: Contributions from a dual source rock system

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorn, K.G.

    1996-08-01

    The southern Sub-Andean and Chaco basins of Bolivia produce oil, gas and condensate from reservoirs ranging from Devonian to Tertiary in age. Geochemical evidence points to contributions from two Paleozoic source rocks: the Devonian Los Monos Formation and the Silurian Kirusillas Formation. Rock-Eval pyrolysis, biomarker data, microscopic kerogen analysis, and burial history modeling are used to assess the quality, distribution, and maturity of both source rock systems. The geochemical results are then integrated with the structural model for the area in order to determine the most likely pathways for migration of oil and gas in the thrust belt and its foreland. Geochemical analysis and modeling show that the primary source rock, shales of the Devonian Los Monos Formation, entered the oil window during the initial phase of thrusting in the sub-Andean belt. This provides ideal timing for oil accumulation in younger reservoirs of the thrust belt. The secondary source rock, although richer, consumed most of its oil generating capacity prior to the development of the thrust related structures. Depending on burial depth and location, however, the Silurian source still contributes gas, and some oil, to traps in the region.

  19. Palaeoenvironment and its control on the formation of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin, northern South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhao; Zhang, Zhihuan; Wang, Weiming; Lu, Shuangfang; Li, Youchuan; Fu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The main factors of the developmental environment of marine source rocks in continental margin basins have their specificality. This realization, in return, has led to the recognition that the developmental environment and pattern of marine source rocks, especially for the source rocks in continental margin basins, are still controversial or poorly understood. Through the analysis of the trace elements and maceral data, the developmental environment of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin is reconstructed, and the developmental patterns of the Miocene marine source rocks are established. This paper attempts to reveal the hydrocarbon potential of the Miocene marine source rocks in different environment and speculate the quality of source rocks in bathyal region of the continental slope without exploratory well. Our results highlight the palaeoenvironment and its control on the formation of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin of the northern South China Sea and speculate the hydrocarbon potential of the source rocks in the bathyal region. This study provides a window for better understanding the main factors influencing the marine source rocks in the continental margin basins, including productivity, preservation conditions, and the input of terrestrial organic matter.

  20. Palaeoenvironment and Its Control on the Formation of Miocene Marine Source Rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin, Northern South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenhao; Zhang, Zhihuan; Wang, Weiming; Lu, Shuangfang; Li, Youchuan; Fu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The main factors of the developmental environment of marine source rocks in continental margin basins have their specificality. This realization, in return, has led to the recognition that the developmental environment and pattern of marine source rocks, especially for the source rocks in continental margin basins, are still controversial or poorly understood. Through the analysis of the trace elements and maceral data, the developmental environment of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin is reconstructed, and the developmental patterns of the Miocene marine source rocks are established. This paper attempts to reveal the hydrocarbon potential of the Miocene marine source rocks in different environment and speculate the quality of source rocks in bathyal region of the continental slope without exploratory well. Our results highlight the palaeoenvironment and its control on the formation of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin of the northern South China Sea and speculate the hydrocarbon potential of the source rocks in the bathyal region. This study provides a window for better understanding the main factors influencing the marine source rocks in the continental margin basins, including productivity, preservation conditions, and the input of terrestrial organic matter. PMID:25401132

  1. Source rock potential analysis using rock physics approach and 2D seismic data inversion: case study of Great Australian Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulakova, V.

    2015-12-01

    The quantity of total organic carbon (TOC) and its type determine the ability of source rocks to generate hydrocarbons. Thus, the quantification of TOC content is an essential part of any reservoir characterisation project. Traditionally TOC is estimated from geochemical analysis of core samples. In this case the results are limited spatially by a well location as well as vertically by a number of tested samples. At the same time TOC vertical variability might be very high, changing every 1-3 m. The several methods have been deployed to estimate TOC from well-log data which provides continuous vertical profile estimations. The basin wide information might be provided by the utilization of seismic surveys. The methodology of mapping source rocks based on seismic data has been lately reported to be successful for the thick source rocks (>20 m) with relatively high TOC values up to 3-4% (Løseth et al., 2011). We employ the described approach and demonstrate our findings for a case study from Ceduna Basin (Great Australian Bight, Australia). The reported TOC values estimated from the cores go up to only 1.3%. The organic matter is contained in thin layers of claystones interlayered with sandstones. The workflow included TOC estimation from the well-log data and then seismic data inversion performed in JasonTM software. The inverted acoustic impedance decreases nonlinearly with increasing TOC content. The obtained results comprises 2D section of TOC distribution. The calculated TOC values are in a good agreement with the results of laboratory measurements. The results of this study show that TOC can be successfully estimated from seismic data inversion even in the case of low organic matter values. Further work has to be done to understand whether this approach works for different types of organic matter and stages of its maturation. Løseth H., Wensaas L., Gading M., Duffaut K., Springer M. 2001. Can hydrocarbon source rocks be identified on seismic data? Geology 39/12.

  2. Mineralogy and petrology of the Cretaceous- Tertiary boundary clay bed and adjacent clay-rich rocks, Raton Basin, New Mexico and Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollastro, R.M.; Pillmore, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    The K-T boundary occurs at the top of a kaolinitic claystone layer, commonly referred to as the 'boundary clay layer', in an interval of coal and carbonaceous shale. The boundary is defined by the disappearance of certain fossil-pollen taxa. The boundary clay layer also contains shocked quartz grains and abundance anomalies of iridium, chromium, and other elements. Each of these characteristics support the hypothesis of an asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous. -from Authors

  3. Cyclic deposits and hummocky cross-stratification of probable storm origins in Upper Cretaceous rocks of the Cape Sebastian area, southwestern Oregon.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, R.E.; Clifton, H.

    1982-01-01

    Cyclic deposits containing hummocky cross-stratification occur in the upper part of the Cape Sebastian Sandstone, a shallow marine transgressive sandstone of Late Cretaceous age on the southern Oregon coast. The cycles consist, where complete, of a lower hummocky cross-stratified sandstone, a middle planar- and ripple-bedded sandstone with a shale bed in its middle part, and an upper bioturbated sandstone. Depositional conditions are interpreted from the characteristics of these cycles. -from Authors

  4. New petrofacies in upper Cretaceous section of southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Colburn, I.P.; Oliver, D.

    1986-04-01

    A distinctive sandstone-conglomerate petrofacies is recognized throughout the Late Cretaceous (Maestrichtian-late Campanian) Chatsworth Formation in the Simi Hills. It is named the Woolsey Canyon petrofacies after the district where it was first recognized. The petrofacies is also recognized in the Late Cretaceous (late Campanian and possibly early Maestrichtian) Tuna Canyon Formation of the central Santa Monica Mountains. The conglomerates in the petrofacies are composed predominantly of angular pebble-size clasts of argillite, quartz-rich rocks (orthoquartzarenite, metaorthoquartzarenite, mice quartz schist) and leucocratic plutoniate (granite-granodiorite). The conglomerate texture and composition are mirrored in the sandstone. The uniformly angular character of the conglomerate clasts and the survival of argillite clasts indicate that the detritus underwent no more than 5 mi of subaerial transport before it entered the deep marine realm. Foraminifers collected from mudstones interbedded with the conglomerates indicate upper bathyal water depth at the site of deposition. A source terrane of low to moderate relief is indicated by the absence of cobbles and boulders. Bed forms, sedimentary structures, and textural features indicate the detritus moved north from its source terrane to be deposited by turbidity currents, debris flows, and grain flows on the Chatsworth Submarine Fan. The detritus of the Woolsey Canyon petrofacies was derived from basement rocks, now largely buried beneath the Los Angeles basin, that were being eroded during the formation of the Cretaceous Los Angeles erosion surface. The detritus came from the Los Angeles arch of that surface.

  5. Development of Paleogene depressions and deposition of Lacustrine source rocks in the Pearl River Mouth basin, northern margin of the South China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chunxiu; Sun, Yuxiao

    1994-11-01

    A more accurate, integrated chronostratigraphic framework is applied to the analysis of the development of Paleogene depressions in the Pearl River Mouth basin. The results of our study show that the development of these depressions was characterized by at least three rifting or basin-forming phases occurring during these periods: late Paleocene (Late Cretaceous?)-middle Eocene, late Eocene-early Oligocene, and middle-Oligocene-late Oligocene. The transition from rifting stage to postrifting stage in the basin is about 10 m.y. later than the initial spreading of the South China Sea. The prologue of the spreading of the South China Sea began as early as the end of the middle Eocene. Lacustrine source rocks deposited during the basin`s first rifting phase are thick and of good quality; source rocks deposited during the last two phases, which had a sharp increase in sedimentation rate, are of lesser quality, with the exception being those areas where deposits were out of reach of sediment from the northern mainland.

  6. Factors affecting the pore space transformation during hydrocarbon generation in source rock (shales): laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giliazetdinova, D. R.; Korost, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    Oil and gas generation is a set of processes which taking place in the interior, the processes can't be observable in nature. In the process of dumping the source rock, organic matter is transformed into a complex of high-molecular compounds - precursors of oil and gas (kerogen). Entering of a source column for specific thermobaric conditions, triggers the formation of low molecular weight hydrocarbon compounds. Generation of sufficient quantities of hydrocarbons leads to the primary fluid migration within the source rock. For the experiment were selected mainly siliceous-carbonate composition rocks from Domanic horizon South-Tatar arch. The main aim of experiment was heating the rocks in the pyrolyzer to temperatures which correspond katagenes stages. For monitoring changes in the morphology of the pore space X-ray microtomography method was used. As a result, when was made a study of the composition of mineral and organic content of the rocks, as well as textural and structural features, have been identified that the majority of the rock samples within the selected collection are identical. However, characteristics such as organic content and texture of rocks are different. Thus, the experiment was divided into two parts: 1) the study of the influence of organic matter content on the morphology of the rock in the process of thermal effects; 2) study the effect of texture on the primary migration processes for the same values of organic matter. Also, an additional experiment was conducted to study the dynamics of changes in the structure of the pore space. At each stage of the experiment morphology of altered rocks characterized by the formation of new pores and channels connecting the primary voids. However, it was noted that the samples with a relatively low content of the organic matter had less changes in pore space morphology, in contrast to rocks with a high organic content. At the second stage of the research also revealed that the conversion of the pore

  7. Maps showing thermal maturity of Upper Cretaceous marine shales in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Thomas M.; Pawlewicz, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    The Bighorn Basin is one of many structural and sedimentary basins that formed in the Rocky Mountain foreland during the Laramide orogeny, a period of crustal instability and compressional tectonics that began in latest Cretaceous time and ended in the Eocene. The basin is nearly 180 mi long, 100 mi wide, and encompasses about 10,400 mi2 in north-central Wyoming and south-central Montana. The basin is bounded on the northeast by the Pryor Mountains, on the east by the Bighorn Mountains, and on the south by the Owl Creek Mountains). The north boundary includes a zone of faulting and folding referred to as the Nye-Bowler lineament. The northwest and west margins are formed by the Beartooth Mountains and Absaroka Range, respectively. Important conventional oil and gas resources have been discovered and produced from reservoirs ranging in age from Cambrian through Tertiary. In addition, a potential unconventional basin-centered gas accumulation may be present in Cretaceous reservoirs in the deeper parts of the basin. It has been suggested by numerous authors that various Cretaceous marine shales are the principal source rock for these accumulations. Numerous studies of various Upper Cretaceous marine shales in the Rocky Mountain region have led to the general conclusion that these rocks have generated or are capable of generating oil and (or) gas. In recent years, advances in horizontal drilling and multistage fracture stimulation have resulted in increased exploration and completion of wells in Cretaceous marine shales in other Rocky Mountain Laramide basins that were previously thought of only as hydrocarbon source rocks. Important parameters controlling hydrocarbon production from these shale reservoirs include: reservoir thickness, amount and type of organic matter, and thermal maturity. The purpose of this report is to present maps and a cross section showing levels of thermal maturity, based on vitrinite reflectance (Ro), for selected Upper Cretaceous marine

  8. Ordovician petroleum source rocks and aspects of hydrocarbon generation in Canadian portion of Williston basin

    SciTech Connect

    Osadetz, K.G.; Snowdon, L.R.

    1988-07-01

    Accumulation of rich petroleum source rocks - starved bituminous mudrocks in both the Winnipeg Formation (Middle Ordovician) and Bighorn Group (Upper Ordovician) - is controlled by cyclical deepening events with a frequency of approximately 2 m.y. Tectonics control both this frequency and the location of starved subbasins of source rock accumulation. Deepening cycles initiated starvation of offshore portions of the inner detrital and medial carbonate facies belts. Persistence of starved offshore settings was aided by marginal onlap and strandline migration in the inner detrital facies belt, and by low carbonate productivity in the medial carbonate facies belt. Low carbonate productivity was accompanied by high rates of planktonic productivity. Periodic anoxia, as a consequence of high rates of planktonic organic productivity accompanying wind-driven equatorial upwellings, is the preferred mechanism for suppressing carbonate productivity within the epeiric sea. The planktonic, although problematic, form Gloecapsamorpha prisca Zalesskey 1917 is the main contributing organism to source rock alginites. A long-ranging alga (Cambrian to Silurian), it forms kukersites in Middle and Upper Ordovician rocks of the Williston basin as a consequence of environmental controls - starvation and periodic anoxia. Source rocks composed of this organic matter type generate oils of distinctive composition at relatively high levels of thermal maturity (transformation ratio = 10% at 0.78% R/sub o/). In the Canadian portion of the Williston basin, such levels of thermal maturity occur at present depths greater than 2950 m within a region of geothermal gradient anomalies associated with the Nesson anticline. Approximately 193 million bbl (30.7 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/) of oil has been expelled into secondary migration pathways from thermally mature source rocks in the Canadian portion of the basin.

  9. Neocomian source and reservoir rocks in the western Brooks Range and Arctic Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Mull, C.G.; Reifenstuhl, R.R.; Harris, E.E.; Crowder, R.K.

    1995-04-01

    Detailed (1:63,360) mapping of the Tingmerkpuk sandstone and associated rocks in the Misheguk Mountain and DeLong Mountains guadrangles of the western Brooks Range thrust belt documents potential hydrocarbon source and reservoir rocks in the northern foothills of the western Delong Mountains and adjacent Colville basin of northwest Alaska. Neocomian (?) to Albian micaceous shale, litharenite, and graywacke that overlies the Tingmerkpuk represents the onset of deposition of orogenic sediments derived from the Brooks Range to the south, and the merging of northern and southern sediment sources in the Colville basin. Both the proximal and distal Tingmerkpuk facies contain clay shale interbeds and overlie the Upper Jurassic to Neocomian Kingak Shale. Preliminary geochemical data show that in the thrust belt, these shales are thermally overmature (Ro 1.4-1.6), but are good source rocks with total organic content (TOC) that ranges from 1.2 to 1.8 percent. Shale in the overlying Brookian rocks is also thermally overmature (Ro 1.2-1.5 percent), but contains up to 1.8 percent TOC from a dominantly terrigenous source, and has generated gas. In outcrops at Surprise Creek, in the foothills north of the thrust belt, the Kingak (1.9 percent TOC) and underlying Triassic Shublik Formation (4.6 percent TOC) are excellent oil source rocks with thermal maturity close to peak oil generation stage (Ro0.75-0.9 percent). These rocks have lower thermal maturity values than expected for their stratigraphic position within the deeper parts of the Colville basin and indicate anomalous burial and uplift history in parts of the basin. Preliminary apatite fission-track (AFTA) data from the thrust belt indicate a stage of rapid uplift and cooling at about 53.61 Ma.

  10. Assessment of hydrocarbon source rock potential of Polish bituminous coals and carbonaceous shales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kotarba, M.J.; Clayton, J.L.; Rice, D.D.; Wagner, M.

    2002-01-01

    We analyzed 40 coal samples and 45 carbonaceous shale samples of varying thermal maturity (vitrinite reflectance 0.59% to 4.28%) from the Upper Carboniferous coal-bearing strata of the Upper Silesian, Lower Silesian, and Lublin basins, Poland, to evaluate their potential for generation and expulsion of gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons. We evaluated source rock potential based on Rock-Eval pyrolysis yield, elemental composition (atomic H/C and O/C), and solvent extraction yields of bitumen. An attempt was made to relate maceral composition to these source rock parameters and to composition of the organic matter and likely biological precursors. A few carbonaceous shale samples contain sufficient generation potential (pyrolysis assay and elemental composition) to be considered potential source rocks, although the extractable hydrocarbon and bitumen yields are lower than those reported in previous studies for effective Type III source rocks. Most samples analysed contain insufficient capacity for generation of hydrocarbons to reach thresholds required for expulsion (primary migration) to occur. In view of these findings, it is improbable that any of the coals or carbonaceous shales at the sites sampled in our study would be capable of expelling commercial amounts of oil. Inasmuch as a few samples contained sufficient generation capacity to be considered potential source rocks, it is possible that some locations or stratigraphic zones within the coals and shales could have favourable potential, but could not be clearly delimited with the number of samples analysed in our study. Because of their high heteroatomic content and high amount of asphaltenes, the bitumens contained in the coals are less capable of generating hydrocarbons even under optimal thermal conditions than their counterpart bitumens in the shales which have a lower heteroatomic content. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  11. The origin of oil in the Cretaceous succession from the South Pars Oil Layer of the Persian Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Omeid; Aali, Jafar; Junin, Radzuan; Mohseni, Hassan; Padmanabhan, Eswaran; Azdarpour, Amin; Zarza, Sahar; Moayyed, Mohsen; Ghazanfari, Parviz

    2013-07-01

    The origin of the oil in Barremian-Hauterivian and Albian age source rock samples from two oil wells (SPO-2 and SPO-3) in the South Pars oil field has been investigated by analyzing the quantity of total organic carbon (TOC) and thermal maturity of organic matter (OM). The source rocks were found in the interval 1,000-1,044 m for the Kazhdumi Formation (Albian) and 1,157-1,230 m for the Gadvan Formation (Barremian-Hauterivian). Elemental analysis was carried out on 36 samples from the source rock candidates (Gadvan and Kazhdumi formations) of the Cretaceous succession of the South Pars Oil Layer (SPOL). This analysis indicated that the OM of the Barremian-Hauterivian and Albian samples in the SPOL was composed of kerogen Types II and II-III, respectively. The average TOC of analyzed samples is less than 1 wt%, suggesting that the Cretaceous source rocks are poor hydrocarbon (HC) producers. Thermal maturity and Ro values revealed that more than 90 % of oil samples are immature. The source of the analyzed samples taken from Gadvan and Kazhdumi formations most likely contained a content high in mixed plant and marine algal OM deposited under oxic to suboxic bottom water conditions. The Pristane/nC17 versus Phytane/nC18 diagram showed Type II-III kerogen of mixture environments for source rock samples from the SPOL. Burial history modeling indicates that at the end of the Cretaceous time, pre-Permian sediments remained immature in the Qatar Arch. Therefore, lateral migration of HC from the nearby Cretaceous source rock kitchens toward the north and south of the Qatar Arch is the most probable origin for the significant oils in the SPOL.

  12. Hydrochemistry of aquifer systems and relation to regional flow patterns in Cretaceous and older rocks underlying Kansas, Nebraska, and parts of Arkansas, Colorado, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Claud H.; Leonard, Robert B.

    1995-01-01

    Aquifer systems in Cretaceous and older rocks of the Central Midwest are divided on the basis of hydrochemistry and ground-water flow patterns in the Plains subregion, the Western Interior Plains aquifer system contains sodium chloride type water with large concentrations of dissolved solids. Ion ratios suggest that the water was derived from seawater by concentration and by depletion of calcium and sulfate ions. In the overlying Western Interior Plains confining system, concentrations of depositional sea water and dissolution of extensive evaporite deposits have resulted in sodium chloride type water with large concentrations of dissolved solids and sodium. Overlying this confining system in the northwest part of the study area, the Great Plains aquifer system yields water that generally is less mineralized and more variable in water type than the underlying systems. Recharge of meteoric water, concentration of brackish water in which the rocks were deposited, and dissolution of underlying evaporite deposits have contributed to the observed water chemistry. The Great Plains confining system restricts the exchange of water between the underlying Great Plains aquifer system and the overlying unconfined aquifers. In the Ozark subregion, geological units equivalent to the Western Interior Plains aquifer system comprise the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system. Units of this aquifer system are exposed at the land surface, and fresh meteoric water moves rapidly through fractures and solution openings. Water chemistry in this system reflects primarily the dissolution of the predominately carbonate rocks.

  13. Distribution, richness, quality, and thermal maturity of source rock units on the North Slope of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, K.E.; Bird, K.J.; Keller, M.A.; Lillis, P.G.; Magoon, L.B.

    2003-01-01

    Four source rock units on the North Slope were identified, characterized, and mapped to better understand the origin of petroleum in the area: Hue-gamma ray zone (Hue-GRZ), pebble shale unit, Kingak Shale, and Shublik Formation. Rock-Eval pyrolysis, total organic carbon analysis, and well logs were used to map the present-day thickness, organic quantity (TOC), quality (hydrogen index, HI), and thermal maturity (Tmax) of each unit. To map these units, we screened all available geochemical data for wells in the study area and assumed that the top and bottom of the oil window occur at Tmax of ~440° and 470°C, respectively. Based on several assumptions related to carbon mass balance and regional distributions of TOC, the present-day source rock quantity and quality maps were used to determine the extent of fractional conversion of the kerogen to petroleum and to map the original organic richness prior to thermal maturation.

  14. Cretaceous to Eocene passive margin sedimentation in Northeastern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Erikson, J.P. )

    1993-02-01

    Twenty two palinspastic paleogeographic maps are presented for the Cretaceous to Eocene strata of the Serrania del Interior of northeastern Venezuela. The mapped lithologies, environmental conditions, and evolving depositional systems record [approximately]90 m.y. of dominantly marine sedimentation on the only observable Mesozoic passive margin in the Western Hemisphere. The depositional systems of the passive margin are heterogeneous at lateral (i.e., along-margin) length scales greater than [approximately]40 km. The primary lateral heterogeneity is caused by a major Lower Cretaceous deltaic system that emanated southwest of the Serrania del Interior. All important intervals, such as the laterally variable Aptian-Albian El Cantil platform limestone and the hydrocarbon source rocks of the Upper Cretaceous Querecual and San Antonio formations, are related to probable causal mechanisms and environmental conditions. Stratigraphic events have been interpreted as of either local or regional extent; based on a combination of outcrop sedimentologic analyses and regional depositional systems interpretation. The 3-dimensional distribution of depositional systems and systems tracts reveals 4-6 regional sequence boundaries separated by 4-20 m.y. Subsidence analyses support the facies interpretation of a passive margin by showing continuous, thermally dominated subsidence during the Cretaceous to Eocene interval. Subsidence and accumulation rates increased and facies changed significantly in the Oligocene, indicating the end of passive margin sedimentation and the initiation of foredeep subsidence and accumulation associated with overthrusting the eastward-advancing Caribbean Plate.

  15. Restoration of Circum-Arctic Upper Jurassic source rock paleolatitude based on crude oil geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, K.E.; Ramos, L.S.; Zumberge, J.E.; Valin, Z.C.; Scotese, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Tectonic geochemical paleolatitude (TGP) models were developed to predict the paleolatitude of petroleum source rock from the geochemical composition of crude oil. The results validate studies designed to reconstruct ancient source rock depositional environments using oil chemistry and tectonic reconstruction of paleogeography from coordinates of the present day collection site. TGP models can also be used to corroborate tectonic paleolatitude in cases where the predicted paleogeography conflicts with the depositional setting predicted by the oil chemistry, or to predict paleolatitude when the present day collection locality is far removed from the source rock, as might occur due to long distance subsurface migration or transport of tarballs by ocean currents. Biomarker and stable carbon isotope ratios were measured for 496 crude oil samples inferred to originate from Upper Jurassic source rock in West Siberia, the North Sea and offshore Labrador. First, a unique, multi-tiered chemometric (multivariate statistics) decision tree was used to classify these samples into seven oil families and infer the type of organic matter, lithology and depositional environment of each organofacies of source rock [Peters, K.E., Ramos, L.S., Zumberge, J.E., Valin, Z.C., Scotese, C.R., Gautier, D.L., 2007. Circum-Arctic petroleum systems identified using decision-tree chemometrics. American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin 91, 877-913]. Second, present day geographic locations for each sample were used to restore the tectonic paleolatitude of the source rock during Late Jurassic time (???150 Ma). Third, partial least squares regression (PLSR) was used to construct linear TGP models that relate tectonic and geochemical paleolatitude, where the latter is based on 19 source-related biomarker and isotope ratios for each oil family. The TGP models were calibrated using 70% of the samples in each family and the remaining 30% of samples were used for model validation. Positive

  16. Rock glaciers as a source of nitrate to alpine streams, Green Lakes Valley, Colorado, USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauf, M.; Williams, M. W.; Caine, N.

    2003-12-01

    An ongoing concern in alpine areas of the western United States is the high concentrations of nitrate in surface waters. A number of research scientists have shown that talus areas are one source of this elevated nitrate (Williams et al., 1997; Campbell et al., 2002). Here we evaluate the potential contribution of nitrate to surface waters from a previously overlooked source: rock glaciers. Water draining from the Green Lake 5 rock glacier in the Colorado Front Range has been sampled for nitrate and ammonium since 1998 as part of the Niwot Ridge LTER program. The mean concentration of nitrate in stream waters in the Green Lakes Valley is 16.12 ueq/L, and for talus streams is 20 ueq/L. In comparison, the stream draining the rock glacier has an average nitrate concentration of 54 ueq/L. Moreover, nitrate values from the stream draining the rock glacier peak in the late summer at over 100 ueq/L. The sources of these high nitrate values from the rock glacier are unknown at this time; we evaluate several hypotheses. Increased nitrate could be a result of dry deposition on the rock glacier that is flushed during snowmelt and rain events. Another hypothesis is that microbial processes within the rock glacier have contribute to higher nitrate concentrations. Here we evaluate the sources and fate of nitrate in waters draining the Green Lake 5 rock glacier in 2003 using a combination of stable (delta O18) and radiogenic (tritium) water isotopes, fractionation of dissolved organic matter, fluorescence index of dissolved organic matter, and mineralization experiments. These site-specific results are then placed in a regional context through a synoptic sampling of streams draining rock glaciers throughout the Rocky Mountain region. Works Cited Williams, M. W., T. Davinroy, and P. D. Brooks. 1997. Organic and inorganic nitrogen pools in talus soils and water, Green Lakes Valley, Colorado Front Range, Hydrologic Processes, 11(13): 1747-1760. Campbell, Donald H., Carol Kendall

  17. Hydrocarbon Source Rocks in the Deep River and Dan River Triassic Basins, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Jeffrey C.; Milici, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents an interpretation of the hydrocarbon source rock potential of the Triassic sedimentary rocks of the Deep River and Dan River basins, North Carolina, based on previously unpublished organic geochemistry data. The organic geochemical data, 87 samples from 28 drill holes, are from the Sanford sub-basin (Cumnock Formation) of the Deep River basin, and from the Dan River basin (Cow Branch Formation). The available organic geochemical data are biased, however, because many of the samples collected for analyses by industry were from drill holes that contained intrusive diabase dikes, sills, and sheets of early Mesozoic age. These intrusive rocks heated and metamorphosed the surrounding sediments and organic matter in the black shale and coal bed source rocks and, thus, masked the source rock potential that they would have had in an unaltered state. In places, heat from the intrusives generated over-mature vitrinite reflectance (%Ro) profiles and metamorphosed the coals to semi-anthracite, anthracite, and coke. The maximum burial depth of these coal beds is unknown, and depth of burial may also have contributed to elevated thermal maturation profiles. The organic geochemistry data show that potential source rocks exist in the Sanford sub-basin and Dan River basin and that the sediments are gas prone rather than oil prone, although both types of hydrocarbons were generated. Total organic carbon (TOC) data for 56 of the samples are greater than the conservative 1.4% TOC threshold necessary for hydrocarbon expulsion. Both the Cow Branch Formation (Dan River basin) and the Cumnock Formation (Deep River basin, Sanford sub-basin) contain potential source rocks for oil, but they are more likely to have yielded natural gas. The organic material in these formations was derived primarily from terrestrial Type III woody (coaly) material and secondarily from lacustrine Type I (algal) material. Both the thermal alteration index (TAI) and vitrinite reflectance data

  18. Sedimentology and origin of source rocks in the Tertiary Niger delta

    SciTech Connect

    Bustin, R.M.

    1988-08-01

    Organic matter in Tertiary strata of the Niger delta is mainly a mixture of types II and III, has a high pristane/phytane ratio (> 1.0), and is composed of the macerals vitrinite and minor liptinite. The main palynofacies are structured woody material, cuticles, pollen, spores, and opaque and minor amorphous organic matter. The distribution and abundance of the organic matter reflects the age and sedimentology of the strata. There is a progressive decline in mean total organic carbon (TOC) content from upper Eocene (2.2% TOC) to Pliocene strata (0.90% TOC) and an associated general decrease in hydrogen index (HI) and pristane/phytane ratio. The decrease in TOC and HI in younger strata mainly reflects increased dilution of a nearly constant supply of terrestrial organic matter associated with the generally higher sedimentation rates of younger strata. The low pristane/phytane ratio of younger strata may reflect less oxidizing depositional conditions. No rich source rocks occur in the Niger delta and, as conventionally measured, the strata have little or no oil generating potential. The poor quality of the source rocks has been compensated for by their greater volume and excellent migration routes. The Niger delta type of source rock - although an end member in terms of general source rock composition - appears to be relatively typical of Tertiary deltas.

  19. Source-rock evaluation of outcrop samples from Vanuatu (Malakula, Espiritu Santo, Maewo, and Pentecost)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchbinder, Binyamin; Halley, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    The samples collected for the present study represent only a portion of the sedimentary column in the various sedimentary basins of Vanuatu.  The characterize only the outer margins of the sedimentary basins and do not necessarily reflect the source-rock potential of the deeper (offshore) parts of the basins.

  20. Assessment of potential oil and gas resources in source rocks of the Alaska North Slope, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houseknecht, David W.; Rouse, William A.; Garrity, Christopher P.; Whidden, Katherine J.; Dumoulin, Julie A.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Kirschbaum, Mark A.; Pollastro, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey estimated potential, technically recoverable oil and gas resources for source rocks of the Alaska North Slope. Estimates (95-percent to 5-percent probability) range from zero to 2 billion barrels of oil and from zero to nearly 80 trillion cubic feet of gas.

  1. Depositional environment and organic geochemistry of the Upper Permian Ravenfjeld Formation source rock in East Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, F.G.; Piasecki, S.; Stemmerik, L. ); Telnaes, N. )

    1993-09-01

    The Upper Permian Ravnefjeld Formation in East Greenland is composed of shales that laterally pass into carbonate buildups and platforms of the Wegener Halvo Formation. The Ravnefjeld Formation is subdivided into five units that can be traced throughout the Upper Permian depositional basin. Two of the units are laminated and organic rich and were deposited under anoxic conditions. They are considered good to excellent source rocks for liquid hydrocarbons with initial average TOC (total organic carbon) values between 4 and 5% and HI (hydrogen index) between 300 and 400. The cumulative source rocks are separated and enclosed by three units of bioturbated siltstone with a TOC of less than 0.5% and an HI of less than 100. These siltstones were deposited under relatively oxic conditions. The organic geochemistry of the source rocks is typical for marine source rocks with some features normally associated with carbonate/evaporite environments [low Pr/Ph (pristane/phytane), low CPI (carbon preference index), distribution of tricyclic and pentacyclic terpanes]. The establishment of anoxic conditions and subsequent source rock deposition was controlled by eustatic sea level changes. The subenvironment (paleogeographic setting, influx of carbonate material, water depth, salinity) has some influence on a number of bulk parameters [TOC-HI relations, TOC-TS (total sulfur) relations] and, in particular, biomarker parameters such as Pr/Ph and terpane ratios. All the basal shales or shales in the vicinity of carbonate buildups of platforms are characterized by low Pr/Ph, high C[sub 23] tricyclic terpanes, and high C[sub 35] and C[sub 33] hopanes. 52 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Cretaceous shallow drilling, US Western Interior: Core research

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, M.A.

    1993-02-17

    This project is a continuing multidisciplinary study of middle to Upper Cretaceous marine carbonate and clastic rocks in the Utah-Colorado-Kansas corridor of the old Cretaceous seaway that extended from the Gulf Coast to the Arctic during maximum Cretaceous transgressions. It is collaborative between in the US Geological Survey (W.E. Dean, P.I.) and University researchers led by The Pennsylvania State University(M.A. Arthur, P.I.) and funded by DOE and the USGS, in part. Research focusses on the Greenhom, Niobrara and lower Pierre Shale units and their equivalents, combining biostratigraphic/paleoecologic studies, inorganic, organic and stable isotopic geochemical studies, mineralogical investigations and high-resolution geophysical logging. This research requires unweathered samples and continuous smooth exposures'' in the form of cores from at least 4 relatively shallow reference holes (i.e. < 1000m) in transect from east to west across the basin. The major initial effort was recovery in Year 1 of the project of continuous cores from each site in the transect. This drilling provided samples and logs of strata ranging from pelagic sequences that contain organic-carbon-rich marine source rocks to nearshore coal-bearing units. This transect also will provide information on the extent of thermal maturation and migration of hydrocarbons in organic-carbon-rich strata along a burial gradient.

  3. Organic geochemistry and correlation of Paleozoic source rocks and Trenton crude oils, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, J. )

    1989-08-01

    Shale samples from four cores of the New Albany and Antrim Shales (Devonian) and from six cores of the Maquoketa Group (Ordovician), representing a broad geographic area of Indiana, have been analyzed for total organic carbon, total sulfur, pyrolysis yield (Rock-Eval), bitumen content, and illite crystallinity data. These data indicate that the New Albany, Antrim, and Maquoketa shales contain a sufficient quantity and quality of organic matter to be good petroleum source rocks. Bitumen ratios, Rock-Eval yields, gas chromatography of saturated hydrocarbons, and illite crystallinity data show that the Maquoketa shales have reached a higher level of thermal maturity than the New Albany and Antrim shales. The level of thermal maturity of the Maquoketa shales suggested a maximum burial depth considerably greater than the present depth.

  4. Volga-Ural basin, U. S. S. R. : Rich petroleum systems with a single source rock

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmishek, G.F. )

    1991-03-01

    The Volga-Ural basin has produced about 40 billion barrels of oil and still produces a billion barrels annually. The productive Middle Devonian-Lower Permian sequence is composed of various carbonate rocks (including reefs) with clastic intervals in the Middle Devonian-lower Frasnian, middle-upper Visean, and Middle Carboniferous. A single source-rock unit, the Frasnian Domanik Formation, 30-60 m thick, is responsible for productivity of the entire sedimentary section. The three clastic intervals and underlying carbonate strata contain the bulk of the hydrocarbon reserves. Widespread upward and downward vertical migration in this structurally simple basin is explained by imperfect regional seals. Imperfection of the seals has also resulted in a predominance of oil over gas. The best seal is the overpressured Domanik Formation itself; it separates the sedimentary section into two petroleum systems: one in underlying Middle Devonian-lower Frasnian clastics and the other in overlying clastic and carbonate rocks.

  5. Adakite-like geochemical signature produced by amphibole-dominated fractionation of arc magmas: An example from the Late Cretaceous magmatism in Gangdese belt, south Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wang-Chun; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Luo, Bi-ji; Guo, Liang; Yang, He

    2015-09-01

    Late Cretaceous (~ 106-76 Ma) adakite-like intrusive rocks in the middle-eastern Gangdese belt occur in an E-W trending belt paralleling the Indus-Yarlung suture, south Tibet. Their petrogenesis and geodynamic processes have been a subject of debate. We report here U-Pb zircon ages, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic data for adakite-like intrusive rocks as well as the normal arc rocks (gabbros and gabbroic diorites) in the middle Gangdese belt. LA-ICPMS U-Pb zircon analyses yielded an identical age of ~ 88 Ma for two adakite-like rocks, which are slightly younger than the gabbro and gabbroic diorite (ca. 94-90 Ma). Both the adakite-like rocks and the normal arc rocks have similar whole-rock Sr-Nd and zircon Hf isotope compositions, indicating that they have been derived from a common source. Similarly, the adakite-like and normal arc intrusive rocks in the eastern Gangdese belt also show similar Sr-Nd-Hf isotope compositions. In the middle-eastern Gangdese belt, the > 85 Ma Late Cretaceous intrusive rocks consist of a magma series from gabbro to granodiorite, including both normal arc rocks and adakite-like rocks. These rocks overlap in space and time that conform to a normal arc differentiation trend. In terms of major and trace elements, they also show a clear evolution from the normal arc magmatic into adakitic field. Thus, we suggest that these > 85 Ma Late Cretaceous intrusive rocks were ultimately derived from melting of the hydrated mantle wedge and the adakite-like rocks can be generated in normal arc magmas by amphibole-dominated fractionation. Taking into accounting for the spatial and temporal distribution of the Cretaceous magmatic rocks in the Lhasa terrane, we prefer a model of early Late Cretaceous rollback following Early Cretaceous low-angle oceanic slab subduction. At intermediate pressure and H2O-rich conditions, fractionation of amphibole changes the major and trace element compositions of arc magmas, and will efficiently drives basaltic

  6. Geochemistry and source waters of rock glacier outflow, Colorado Front Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, M.W.; Knauf, M.; Caine, N.; Liu, F.; Verplanck, P.L.

    2006-01-01

    We characterize the seasonal variation in the geochemical and isotopic content of the outflow of the Green Lake 5 rock glacier (RG5), located in the Green Lakes Valley of the Colorado Front Range, USA. Between June and August, the geochemical content of rock glacier outflow does not appear to differ substantially from that of other surface waters in the Green Lakes Valley. Thus, for this alpine ecosystem at this time of year there does not appear to be large differences in water quality among rock glacier outflow, glacier and blockslope discharge, and discharge from small alpine catchments. However, in September concentrations of Mg2+ in the outflow of the rock glacier increased to more than 900 ??eq L-1 compared to values of less than 40 ??eq L-1 at all the other sites, concentrations of Ca2+ were greater than 4,000 ??eq L-1 compared to maximum values of less than 200 ??eq L-1 at all other sites, and concentrations of SO42- reached 7,000 ??eq L-1, compared to maximum concentrations below 120 ??eq L-1 at the other sites. Inverse geochemical modelling suggests that dissolution of pyrite, epidote, chlorite and minor calcite as well as the precipitation of silica and goethite best explain these elevated concentrations of solutes in the outflow of the rock glacier. Three component hydrograph separation using end-member mixing analysis shows that melted snow comprised an average of 30% of RG5 outflow, soil water 32%, and base flow 38%. Snow was the dominant source water in June, soil water was the dominant water source in July, and base flow was the dominant source in September. Enrichment of ?? 18O from - 10??? in the outflow of the rock glacier compared to -20??? in snow and enrichment of deuterium excess from +17.5??? in rock glacier outflow compared to +11??? in snow, suggests that melt of internal ice that had undergone multiple melt/freeze episodes was the dominant source of base flow. Copyright ?? 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Geochemical evidence for a Cretaceous oil sand (Bima oil sand) in the Chad Basin, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bata, Timothy; Parnell, John; Samaila, Nuhu K.; Abubakar, M. B.; Maigari, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Paleogeographic studies have shown that Earth was covered with more water during the Cretaceous than it is today, as the global sea level was significantly higher. The Cretaceous witnessed one of the greatest marine transgressions in Earth's history, represented by widespread deposition of sands directly on underlying basement. These sand bodies hold much of the world's heavy oil. Here, we present for the first time, geochemical evidence of a Cretaceous oil sand (Bima oil sand) in the Chad Basin, Nigeria. Bima oil sand is similar to other Cretaceous oil sands, predominantly occurring at shallow depths on basin flanks and generally lacking a seal cover, making the oil susceptible to biodegradation. The bulk properties and distribution of molecular features in oils from the Bima oil sand suggest that they are biodegraded. Sterane maturity parameters and the trisnorhopane thermal indicator for the oils suggest thermal maturities consistent with oils generated as conventional light oils, which later degraded into heavy oils. These oils also show no evidence of 25-norhopane, strongly suggesting that biodegradation occurred at shallow depths, consistent with the shallow depth of occurrence of the Bima Formation at the study locality. Low diasterane/sterane ratios and C29H/C30H ratios greater than 1 suggest a carbonate source rock for the studied oil. The Sterane distribution further suggests that the oils were sourced from marine carbonate rocks. The C32 homohopane isomerization ratios for the Bima oil sand are 0.59-0.60, implying that the source rock has surpassed the main oil generation phase, consistent with burial depths of the Fika and Gongila Formations, which are both possible petroleum source rocks in the basin.

  8. Pore-space alteration in source rock (shales) during hydrocarbons generation: laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giliazetdinova, D. R.; Korost, D. V.; Nadezhkin, D. V.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbons (HC) are generated from solid organic matter (kerogen) due to thermocatalytic reactions. The rate of such reactions shows direct correlation with temperature and depends on the depth of source rock burial. Burial of sedimentary rock is also inevitably accompanied by its structural alteration owing to compaction, dehydration and re-crystallization. Processes of HC generation, primary migration and structural changes are inaccessible for direct observation in nature, but they can be studied in laboratory experiments. Experiment was carried out with a clayey-carbonate rock sample of the Domanik Horizon taken from boreholes drilled in the northeastern part of the south Tatar arch. The rock chosen fits the very essential requirements - high organic matter content and its low metamorphic grade. Our work aimed at laboratory modeling of HC generation in an undisturbed rock sample by its heating in nitrogen atmosphere based on a specified temperature regime and monitoring alterations in the pore space structure. Observations were carried out with a SkyScan-1172 X-ray microtomography scanner (resulting scan resolution of 1 μm). A cylinder, 44 mm in diameter, was prepared from the rock sample for the pyrolitic and microtomographic analyses. Scanning procedures were carried out in 5 runs. Temperature interval for each run had to match the most important stage of HC generation in the source rock, namely: (1) original structure; (2) 100-300°C - discharge of free and adsorbed HC and water; (3) 300-400°C - initial stage of HC formation owing to high-temperature pyrolysis of the solid organic matter and discharge of the chemically bound water; (4) 400-470°C - temperature interval fitting the most intense stage of HC formation; (5) 470-510°C - final stage of HC formation. Maximum sample heating in the experiment was determined as temperature of the onset of active decomposition of carbonates, i.e., in essence, irreversible metamorphism of the rock. Additional

  9. A Procedure to Determine the Optimal Sensor Positions for Locating AE Sources in Rock Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duca, S.; Occhiena, C.; Sambuelli, L.

    2015-03-01

    Within a research work aimed to better understand frost weathering mechanisms of rocks, laboratory tests have been designed to specifically assess a theoretical model of crack propagation due to ice segregation process in water-saturated and thermally microcracked cubic samples of Arolla gneiss. As the formation and growth of microcracks during freezing tests on rock material is accompanied by a sudden release of stored elastic energy, the propagation of elastic waves can be detected, at the laboratory scale, by acoustic emission (AE) sensors. The AE receiver array geometry is a sensitive factor influencing source location errors, for it can greatly amplify the effect of small measurement errors. Despite the large literature on the AE source location, little attention, to our knowledge, has been paid to the description of the experimental design phase. As a consequence, the criteria for sensor positioning are often not declared and not related to location accuracy. In the present paper, a tool for the identification of the optimal sensor position on a cubic shape rock specimen is presented. The optimal receiver configuration is chosen by studying the condition numbers of each of the kernel matrices, used for inverting the arrival time and finding the source location, and obtained for properly selected combinations between sensors and sources positions.

  10. The Lower Cretaceous Chinkeh Formation: A frontier-type play in the Liard basin of western Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Leckie, D.A. ); Potocki, D.J. ); Visser, K. )

    1991-08-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Liard basin in western Canada covers an area of 9,500 km{sup 2} (3,668 mi{sup 2}) but is relatively unexplored despite its size. The present-day expression of the basin, which formed during the latest Cretaceous to early Tertiary, trends north-south and is delineated by the outcrop of the coarse-clastic Upper Cretaceous Dunvegan Formation. The lowermost Cretaceous unit, herein named the Chinkeh Formation, is up to 32 m (105 ft) thick and unconformably overlies older Paleozoic strata. The Chinkeh Formation contains four major lithotypes: (1) conglomeratic breccia interpreted as debris-flow or talus deposits, (2) interbedded coal, carbonaceous as nonmarine valley fill or channel deposits, (3) conglomeratic lag related to marine deposits, (3) conglomeratic lag related to marine transgression, and (4) upward-coarsening sandstone interpreted as abandoned shoreline deposits. Cretaceous strata in the Liard basin have gave petroleum source-rock and reservoir potential, and hydrocarbons may be present in sandstone of the Chinkeh Formation. Potential play types include stratigraphic traps formed by incised-valley deposits and shallow-marine sandstone pinching out laterally into marine shales of the Garbutt Formation. A potential structural play may occur along the Bovie fault zone where reservoirs may abut against a shale seal on the eastern side of the fault. Potential source rocks include the lowermost Garbutt Formation and underlying Triassic Toad Garbutt formations. The Chinkeh Formation sandstone has porosity values of 8-18%.

  11. Cretaceous polar climates

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, A.M.; Horrell, M.A.; Lottes, A.L.; Gierlowski, T.C.

    1988-02-01

    The Cretaceous, like most Phanerozoic periods, was characterized by ice-free poles. Some still argue that the glaciers and sea ice were there, and that the tillites, etc, have been eroded or remain undiscovered. However, diverse floras, dense forests, and coal-forming cypress swamps, and dinosaurs, crocodilians, and lungfish are known from areas that were certainly at 75/degree/-80/degree/ north and south paleolatitude in the Cretaceous, implying that the coastal basins did not experience hard freezes. No deep marine connections to the North Pole existed in the Cretaceous, so oceanic polar heat transport can be discounted. However, the five north-south trending epeiric or rift-related seaways that connected or nearly connected the Tethys to the Arctic would have dampened the seasonal temperature cycle, bring maritime climates deep into the North American and Eurasian continents and, more importantly, would have served as an energy source and channel for winter storms, much as the Gulf Stream does today. Cyclones have a natural tendency to move poleward, because of the increase in the Coriolis Parameter, and they transport both sensible and latent heat. The coastal regions of the relatively warm polar ocean in the Cretaceous would have received continuous precipitation during the winter because cyclones would be entering from as many as five directions. Coastal rainfall would also have been abundant in the summer but for a different reason; the land-sea temperature profile would reverse, with the warm land surface drawing in moisture, while clear ice-free conditions over the ocean would allow for solar warming.

  12. Cretaceous polar climates

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, A.M.; Horrell, M.A.; Lottes, A.L.; Gierlowski, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Cretaceous, like most Phanerozooic periods, was characterized by ice-free poles. Some still argue that the glacier and sea ice were there, and that the tillites, etc, have been eroded or remain undiscovered. However, diverse floras, dense forests, coal-forming cypress swamps, and dinosaurs, crocodilians, and lungfish are known from areas that were certainly at 75/sup 0/-80/sup 0/ north and south paleolatitude in the Cretaceous, implying that the coastal basins did not experience hard freezes. No deep marine connections to the North Pole existed in the Cretaceous, so oceanic polar heat transport can be discounted. However, the five north-south trending epeiric or rift-related seaways that connected or nearly connected the Tethys to the Arctic would have dampened the seasonal temperature cycle, bringing maritime climates deep into the North American and Eurasian continents and, more importantly, would have served as an energy source and channel for winter storms, much as the Gulf Stream does today. Cyclones have a natural tendency to move poleward, because of the increase in the Coriolis Paramteter, and they transport both sensible and latent heat. The coastal regions of the relatively warm polar ocean in the Cretaceous would have received continuous precipitation during the winter because cyclones would be entering from as many as five directions. Coastal rainfall would also have been abundant in the summer but for a different reason; the land-sea temperature profile would reverse, with the warm land surface drawing in moisture, while clear ice-free conditions over the ocean would allow for solar warming.

  13. A quasi-linear structure of the southern margin of Eurasia prior to the India-Asia collision: First paleomagnetic constraints from Upper Cretaceous volcanic rocks near the western syntaxis of Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhiyu; Huang, Baochun; Yang, Liekun; Tang, Xiangde; Yan, Yonggang; Qiao, Qingqing; Zhao, Jie; Chen, Liwei

    2015-07-01

    We report the first combined geochronologic and paleomagnetic study of volcanic rocks from the Shiquanhe and Yare Basins at the westernmost Lhasa Terrane, which aims to provide an accurate constraint on the shape and paleoposition of the southern margin of Asia prior to the India-Asia collision. Three new 40Ar/39Ar ages of 92.5 ± 2.9 Ma, 92.4 ± 0.9 Ma, and 79.6 ± 0.7 Ma determined by fresh matrix or feldspar from lava flows suggest a Late Cretaceous age for the investigated units. Characteristic remanent magnetizations have been successfully isolated from 38 sites which pass positive fold and/or reversal, conglomerate tests and are hence interpreted as primary in origin. The two paleopoles obtained from Yare and Shiquanhe yield consistent paleolatitudes of 13.6°N ± 9.6°N and 14.2°N ± 2.7°N, respectively (for a reference site of 31.5°N, 80°E), indicating that the southern margin of Asia near the western syntaxis was located far south during the Late Cretaceous time. A reconstruction of the Lhasa Terrane in the frame of Eurasia with paleomagnetic data obtained from its western and eastern parts indicates that the southern margin of Eurasia probably had a quasi-linear orientation prior to the collision formerly trending approximately 315°E. This is compatible with the shape of the Neo-Tethys slab observed from seismic tomographic studies. Our findings provide a solid basis for evaluating Cenozoic crustal shortening in the Asian interior and the size of Greater India near the western syntaxis.

  14. Organic facies and systems tracts: Implications for source rock preservation and prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Kosters, E.C.; Vanderzwaan, F.J.; Gijsbert, J. )

    1993-09-01

    Sequence stratigraphy is concerned with making predictions about reservoirs ahead of the drill, however, little attention has been paid to the configuration of organic-rich facies of source rock quality. We suggest that preservation of source rock type facies in clastic systems is mutually exclusive and time successive. The main database is a collection of cores and other samples through the Holocene Rhone delta. The early Holocene Transgressive Systems Tract (TST) contains five levels of channelization. The most significant peat bed is located immediately landward of the shoreline of maximum transgression (SMT). The Highstand Systems Tract (HST) consists of two parasequences, containing mostly laterally continuous strandplain complexes without peat. In addition to sufficient accommodation space, an important control on formation of fresh-water peats and organic-rich shelf muds is availability of river-induced nutrients. Peat quality, however, is best without riverine clastics. In a delta plain, a balance between these two controls may be reached when river-fed nutrients are trapped there indirectly. The potential for such a condition arises in a TST setting. On the shelf, eutrophication of marine habitats is also controlled by river-fed nutrients, but excess river clastics are detrimental to marine source rock quality. A balance between these two controls may be reached in HST settings where fine-grained riverine clastics are forced onto the shelf rather than in the delta plain. In this case, nutrient supply to the shelf results in large quantities of marine biomass. This biomass becomes sufficiently concentrated due to moderate fine-grained riverine sedimentation which guarantees burial and preservation. Thus, varying river-water and nutrient supply in TST and HST settings seems to control large-scale preservation patterns of both continental and marine organics. This hypothesis suggests further potential for using sequence stratigraphy for source rock occurrence.

  15. Characterizing the hypersiliceous rocks of Belgium used in (pre-)history: a case study on sourcing sedimentary quartzites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldeman, Isis; Baele, Jean-Marc; Goemaere, Eric; Deceukelaire, Marleen; Dusar, Michiel; De Doncker, H. W. J. A.

    2012-08-01

    Tracking raw material back to its extraction source is a crucial step for archaeologists when trying to deduce migration patterns and trade contacts in (pre-)history. Regarding stone artefacts, the main rock types encountered in the archaeological record of Belgium are hypersiliceous rocks. This is a newly introduced category of rock types comprising those rocks made of at least 90% silica. These are strongly silicified quartz sands or sedimentary quartzites, siliceous rocks of chemical and biochemical origin (e.g. flint), very pure metamorphic quartzites and siliceous volcanic rocks (e.g. obsidian). To be able to distinguish between different extraction sources, ongoing research was started to locate possible extraction sources of hypersiliceous rocks and to characterize rocks collected from these sources. Characterization of these hypersiliceous rocks is executed with the aid of optical polarizing microscopy, optical cold cathodoluminescence and scanning-electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry and with back-scatter electron imaging. In this paper, we focus on various sedimentary quartzites of Paleogene stratigraphical level.

  16. Diagenesis, dewatering, and source rock potential of Ordovician shales from the High Atlas, Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, I.J.

    1988-08-01

    The Ordovician shales of the High Atlas are interpreted as shelf sediments. They contain uncommon thin, wave-rippled, fine sandstone layers which record rare high-energy event and are attributed to winter storm action. The shales coarsen upward and the sandstone horizons become more common toward the top of the sequence, reflecting increasing proximality up the sequence from an outer to a mid-shelf setting. In places the shales contain large ferroan carbonate concretions. These have been analyzed together with the shales to determine the diagenetic and dewatering history of the sequence. Comparison of the chemistry of the noncarbonate fraction within the concretions with that of the host shales has led to quantitative mass-transfer models for the system. These suggest the sequence was an important source of cementing components (e.g., Ca, Si) for adjacent potential reservoir rocks. Other elements (e.g., Al, Mg, K) have not moved out of the system; the shales were not therefore a source for authigenic aluminosilicates as is often supposed. The major transport/dewatering pathways were the interbedded storm-sandstone horizons. These are now extensively quartz cemented. Local synsedimentary faults were probably also important conduits. These results have important implications regarding the relationship between shale and sandstone diagenesis. The shales presently contain up to 1% TOC. In the study area, however, they are thermally postmature with respect to hydrocarbon generation. Equivalent rocks which have experienced less burial should be considered potential source rocks.

  17. Marine source rock prediction using a GCM - A look at the Paleozoic

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, V.D.; Katz, B.J.; Kilgore, L.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Numerous investigators have examined the potential use of numeric climate models and paleogeographic reconstructions to predict the deposition and preservation of organic-rich sediments, which may ultimately develop into hydrocarbon source rocks. These studies have concentrated on the Mesozoic and Cenozoic eras. Although geologic conditions during these periods were different than that of today, they do have many similarities. In contrast, the boundary conditions associated with the Paleozoic are dramatically different. For example, no significant land plant cover is assumed in pre-Devonian simulations. In addition, for many of the simulations the bulk of the land mass was situated in the southern hemisphere at high latitudes. This compares with the Mesozoic and Cenozoic distributions that exhibit nearly coequal land-sea distributions in the two hemispheres. An examination of the results of paleoclimate simulations for time slices in the Paleozoic reveal significant changes in spatial distribution of marine conditions that would favor high levels of organic productivity and organic preservation through time. The authors study of the stratigraphic record, though incomplete, has revealed a favorable correlation between organic-rich black shales, capable of acting as hydrocarbon source rocks, and those regions that had both high preservation efficiencies and elevated levels of organic productivity. These results suggest that numeric climate models can be effectively used to predict source rock distribution throughout the Phanerozoic.

  18. Characterization and evolution of Paleozoic source rock organic matter in Algerian Central Sahara

    SciTech Connect

    Takherist, D.; Arezki, A.; Mouaici, R.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of the proposed poster is to provide a knowledge of the evolution history of organic matter in an intracratonic basin. The Paleozoic source rocks (Ordovician - Silurian - Upper Devonian and Carboniferous) of the Algerian Central Sahara (Ahnet and Timimoun basins) experienced severe conditions of maturation during the geological history, therefore, the source rocks intervals are presently mature to overmature and only dry gas has been descovered throughout this zone. The several geochemical models (Genex, Basimod, Matoil) in addition to Afta and Zafta Data show that regionaly significant heating event occured with maximum palaeo-temperature and maximum gas generation at 300 +/- 30 My. However, high palaeotemperatures can not be explained only by the significant burial. An important anomalous heat flow is needed to explain the geothermal history. In this case, there has been no significant petroleum from the Paleozoic source rocks in this zone since this age; but following some assumptions, a certain hypothesis about a recent generation (-60 to -30 My) is now in discussion.

  19. Cathodoluminescence of shocked quartz at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Michael R.; Anders, Mark H.

    1988-01-01

    Empirical studies have documented an association between rock type and the cathodoluminescence color of constituent quartz grains. Quartz from extrusive igneous sources luminesces uniform pale blue. Quartz from intrusive igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks generally luminesces darker purple-blue, whereas quartz recrystallized under low-grade metamorphic conditions luminesces reddish-brown. Quartz grains in most sandstones luminesce a heterogeneous mixture of these colors because the grains were derived from a variety of ultimate source rocks. If shocked quartz found at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary is volcanic in origin, its cathodoluminescence should be predominantly pale blue. Alternatively, quartz grains derived from bolide impact upon, and ejection of, mixed igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks should luminesce a variety of colors. Grain mounts of sand collected at the K-T boundary horizon from the Clear Creek North site in the Raton Basin, Colorado were examined. Shocked quartz luminesced a variety of colors and very few grains luminesced the pale blue color that is typical of volcanic quartz. It was concluded that the shocked quartz was derived from a petrologically diverse source region without substantial volcanic contribution. Most shocked grains apparently were derived from low-grade metamorphic rocks, with a slightly smaller contribution from high-grade metamorphic and intrusive igneous rocks. Rare quartz grains with brown-luminescing rims reflect a minor addition from detrital sedimentary sources. The apparent relative abundances of intrusive (and rare extrusive) igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary ultimate source rocks suggested by CL colors of shock-deformed quartz at the K-T boundary is consistent with a crustal/supracrustal origin for the grains.

  20. Hydrocarbon potential evaluation of the source rocks from the Abu Gabra Formation in the Sufyan Sag, Muglad Basin, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jinqi; Liu, Luofu; An, Fuli; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Ying; Wu, Kangjun; Zhao, Yuanyuan

    2016-06-01

    The Sufyan Sag is one of the low-exploration areas in the Muglad Basin (Sudan), and hydrocarbon potential evaluation of source rocks is the basis for its further exploration. The Abu Gabra Formation consisting of three members (AG3, AG2 and AG1 from bottom to top) was thought to be the main source rock formation, but detailed studies on its petroleum geology and geochemical characteristics are still insufficient. Through systematic analysis on distribution, organic matter abundance, organic matter type, organic matter maturity and characteristics of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion of the source rocks from the Abu Gabra Formation, the main source rock members were determined and the petroleum resource extent was estimated in the study area. The results show that dark mudstones are the thickest in the AG2 member while the thinnest in the AG1 member, and the thickness of the AG3 dark mudstone is not small either. The AG3 member have developed good-excellent source rock mainly with Type I kerogen. In the Southern Sub-sag, the AG3 source rock began to generate hydrocarbons in the middle period of Bentiu. In the early period of Darfur, it reached the hydrocarbon generation and expulsion peak. It is in late mature stage currently. The AG2 member developed good-excellent source rock mainly with Types II1 and I kerogen, and has lower organic matter abundance than the AG3 member. In the Southern Sub-sag, the AG2 source rock began to generate hydrocarbons in the late period of Bentiu. In the late period of Darfur, it reached the peak of hydrocarbon generation and its expulsion. It is in middle mature stage currently. The AG1 member developed fair-good source rock mainly with Types II and III kerogen. Throughout the geological evolution history, the AG1 source rock has no effective hydrocarbon generation or expulsion processes. Combined with basin modeling results, we have concluded that the AG3 and AG2 members are the main source rock layers and the Southern Sub-sag is

  1. Hydrocarbon source-rock evaluation - Solor Church Formation (middle Proterozoic, Keweenawan Supergroup), southeastern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, J.R.; Morey, G.B.

    1984-01-01

    In the type section (Lonsdale 65-1 core, Rice County, Minnesota) the Solor Church Formation (Middle Proterozoic, Keweenawan Supergroup) consists primarily of reddish-brown mudstone and siltstone and pale reddish-brown sandstone. The sandstone and siltstone are texturally and mineralogically immature. Hydrocarbon source-rock evaluation of bluish-gray, greenish-gray and medium-dark-gray to grayish-black beds, which primarily occur in the lower 104 m (340 ft) of this core, shows: (1) the rocks have low organic carbon contents (<0.5 percent for 22 of 25 samples); (2) the organic matter is thermally very mature (Tmax = 494°C, sample 19) and is probably near the transition between the wet gas phase of catagenesis and metagenesis (dry gas zone); and (3) the rocks have minimal potential for producing additional hydrocarbons (genetic potential <0.30 mgHC/gm rock). Although no direct evidence exists from which to determine maximum depths of burial, the observed thermal maturity of the organic matter requires significantly greater depths of burial and(or) higher geothermal gradients. It is likely, at least on the St. Croix horst, that thermal alteration of the organic matter in the Solor Church took place relatively early, and that any hydrocarbons generated during this early thermal alteration were probably lost prior to deposition of the overlying Fond du Lac Formation (Middle Proterozoic, Keweenawan Supergroup).

  2. Occurrences of Chert in Jurassic-Cretaceous Calciturbidites (SW Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gül, Murat

    2015-10-01

    The Lycian Nappes, containing ophiolite and sedimentary rocks sequences, crop out in the southwest Turkey. The Tavas Nappe is a part of the Lycian Nappes. It includes the Lower Jurassic-Upper Cretaceous calciturbidites. Chert occurrences were observed in the lower part of this calciturbidite. These cherts can be classified on the basis of length, internal structure and host rock. Chert bands are 3.20-35.0min length and 7.0-35.0 cm thick. Chert lenses are 5.0-175.0 cm in length and 1.0-33.0 cm thick. According to its internal structure, granular chert (bladedlarge equitant quartz minerals replaced the big calcite mineral of fossil shell) and porcelanious chert (microcrystalline silica replaced micrite) have been separated. Cherts are generally associated with calcarenite-calcirudite, the others with calcilutite. Micritic calcite patches of cherts point out an uncompleted silicification. The source of silica was dominantly quartz-rich, older, basal rocks and to a lesser extent radiolarians. The coarse-grained calciturbidites act as a way for silica transportation. Some calcite veins (formed during transportation and emplacement of nappes) cut both calciturbidites and cherts. Thus, chert occurrences evolved before emplacement of nappes (the latest Cretaceous-Late Miocene period) during the epigenetic phase.

  3. Late Cretaceous intraplate silicic volcanism in the Lake Chad region: incipient continental rift volcanism vs. Cameroon Line volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, G.; Lee, T. Y.; Torng, P. K.; Yang, C. C.

    2015-12-01

    The crustal evolution of west-central Africa during the Cretaceous was directly related to plate motion associated with the opening of the central Atlantic Ocean. Late Cretaceous (~66 Ma) to recent magmatism related to the Cameroon Line stretches from Northern Cameroon (i.e. Golda Zuelva) to the Gulf of Guinea (i.e. Pagalu) and is considered to be due to mantle-crust interaction. The volcanic rocks at Hadjer el Khamis, west-central Chad, are considered to be amongst the oldest volcanic rocks of the Cameroon Line but their relationship is uncertain because they erupted during a period of a regional extension associated with the opening of the Late Cretaceous (~75 Ma) Termit basin. The silicic volcanic rocks can be divided into a peraluminous group and a peralkaline group with both rock types having similar chemical characteristics as within-plate granitoids. In situ U/Pb zircon dating yielded a mean 206Pb/238U age of 74.4 ± 1.3 Ma and indicates the rocks erupted ~10 million years before the next oldest eruption attributed to the Cameroon Line. The Sr isotopes (i.e. ISr = 0.7050 to 0.7143) show a wide range but the Nd isotopes (i.e. 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51268 to 0.51271) are more uniform and indicate that the rocks were derived from a moderately depleted mantle source. Major and trace elemental modeling show that the silicic rocks likely formed by shallow fractionation of a mafic parental magma where the peraluminous rocks experienced crustal contamination and the peralkaline rocks did not. The silicic rocks are more isotopically similar to Late Cretaceous basalts in the Doba and Bongor basins (i.e. ISr = 0.7040 to 0.7060; 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51267 to 0.51277) of southern Chad than to rocks of the Cameroon Line (i.e. ISr = 0.7026 to 0.7038; 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51270 to 0.51300). Given the age and isotopic compositions, it is likely that the silicic volcanic rocks of the Lake Chad area are related to Late Cretaceous extensional tectonics rather than to Cameroon Line magmatism.

  4. Sensitivity of the close-in seismic source function to rock properties. Los Alamos Source Region Program

    SciTech Connect

    App, F.N.

    1993-05-01

    The objective of this investigation is to determine and evaluate how rock properties near the origin of an explosion influence the close-in seismic source function. This is work in progress that represents one step in the systematic investigation of parameters important in the remote identification of underground nuclear tests. In this study, the `overshoot`` and ``steady state value`` of the reduced displacement potential, and the ``corner frequency`` and ``rolloff`` of the reduced velocity potential spectrum are the properties of the source function used as principal measures of effect. A series of one-dimensional, spherically symmetric calculations are made with the computational mesh divided into six phenomenological regions. Material properties are modified in selected regions to evaluate source function sensitivities.

  5. Uranium-Lead Zircon Ages and Sr, Nd, and Pb Isotope Geochemistry of Selected Plutonic Rocks from Western Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Unruh, Daniel M.; Lund, Karen; Kuntz, Mel A.; Snee, Lawrence W.

    2008-01-01

    Across the Salmon River suture in western Idaho, where allochthonous Permian to Cretaceous oceanic rocks are juxtaposed against Proterozoic North American rocks, a wide variety of plutonic rocks are exposed. Available data indicate much variation in composition, source, and structural state of these plutons. The plutonic rocks were long described as the western border zone of the Cretaceous Idaho batholith but limited pre-existing age data indicate more complicated origins. Because the affinity and age of the plutonic rocks cannot be reliably determined from field relations, TIMS U-Pb dating in conjunction with Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic studies of selected plutons across the suture in western Idaho were undertaken. The data indicate three general groups of plutons including (1) those that intruded the island arc terranes during the Triassic and Jurassic, those that intruded near the western edge of oceanic rocks along the suture in the Early Cretaceous, and the plutons of the Idaho batholith that intruded Proterozoic North American rocks in the Late Cretaceous. Plutons that intruded Proterozoic North American rocks commonly include xenocrystic zircons and in several cases, ages could not be determined. The least radiogenic Sr and most radiogenic Nd are found among the Blue Mountains superterrane island arc samples. Suture-zone plutons have isotopic characteristics that span the range between Idaho batholith and island arc samples but mostly follow island arc signatures. Plutons of the Idaho batholith have the most radiogenic initial Pb and Sr ratios and the least radiogenic Nd of the samples analyzed.

  6. Depositional features and source and reservoir rocks of Tertiary age in northern part of South China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.

    1986-07-01

    The northern part of the South China Sea covers an area of about 400,000 km/sup 2/. Tertiary deposits more than 10,000 m in thickness are widely distributed there. The area has sedimentary rocks more than 1000 m thick covers more than 300,000 km/sup 2/. Five sedimentary basins have been established in this area: Beibu Bay, Yinggehai, Southeastern Qiong, Pearl River Mouth, and Southwestern Taiwann basins. The primary source and reservoir rocks for oil and gas prospects are of Tertiary age. Tertiary rocks underwent three stages of development, each forming a specific sedimentation system: (1) a system of fluviolacustrine deposits in rift depressions from the Paleocene to early Oligocene; (2) a system of semiclosed-sea deposits from the late Oligocene to early Miocene; and (3) a system of deltaic open-sea deposits from the middle Miocene to Pliocene. These three sedimentation systems resulted in three suites of source rocks, three suites of reservoir rocks, and three groups of independent oil pools, complete with source, reservoir, and cap rocks. The three suites of source rocks are as follows: (1) the Eocene Liushagang Formation in the Beibu Bay basin, which is believed to be the best source rock discovered in the area; (2) the Oligocene Zhuhai Formation in the Pearl River Mouth basin; and (3) the lower Miocene series in the Pearl River Mouth basin. The Eocene formation is probably the principal source rock of regional scale in the northern part of the South China Sea. The three suites of reservoir rocks are as follows: (1) the fluviolacustrine sandstone bodies in the Liushagang Formation; (2) the fluviolacustrine sand bodies and shallow-sea sandstone bodies in the Zhuhai Formation and Lingshu Formation; (3) the deltaic, littoral, and shallow-sea sand bodies and bioherms of Neogene age, with the middle Miocene sandstone reservoirs having the best physical properties.

  7. Petrogenetic evaluation of the Laohutai basalts from North China Craton: Melting of a two-component source during lithospheric thinning in the late Cretaceous-early Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Y. S.; Wei, X.; Hong, L. B.; Ma, J. L.; Pang, C. J.; Zhong, Y. T.; Zhao, J.-X.; Xu, Y.-G.

    2012-12-01

    While the consensus has been reached as to the lithospheric thinning beneath the North China Craton, the timing of this event remains controversial. Whether it took place during the Early Cretaceous or it extended over a period from late Triassic to early Cenozoic is a matter of hot debate. With aims of contributing to this issue, we performed geochronological and geochemical analyses on basalts of the Laohutai Formation which were emplaced in the Fushun basin at 60-70 Ma. The Laohutai Formation consists of Ne- or Hy-normative alkali basalts in the lower part and Q-normative tholeiitic basalts in the upper part. The tholeiites are characterized by positive Eu and Sr anomalies and show higher ɛNd(t) (3.2-5.3) than the co-existing alkali basalts (1.8-2.4), opposite to the common observation made in other occurrences. Depletion of highly incompatible elements, positive Nbsbnd Ta and negative Pb anomalies in the Laohutai basalts are indicative of oceanic crustal components (likely in form of pyroxenite/eclogite) in their magma source. Since Eu and Sr anomalies are not related to magmatic differentiation, the negative correlation between 87Sr/86Sri and Eu/Eu* suggests that the melting process and sampling of source heterogeneity are intrinsically related. We propose a differential melting of a two-component source in association with lithospheric thinning to account for the temporal variation of the Laohutai basalts. Specifically, earlier alkali basalts were formed by low degree of melting of a source at a greater depth, modified by melts derived from a hydrothermally altered, upper oceanic crust; whereas the later tholeiitic basalts were generated by high degree of melting of a gabbroic lower oceanic crust and minor peridotite at a shallower depth. When the lithospheric lid effect is applied, this petrogenetic model suggests the late Cretaceous-early Cenozoic as an important period of lithospheric thinning, therefore leaning support to the idea of the protracted

  8. A review of applications of U-Th-Pb isotope systematics to investigations of uranium source rocks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    U, Th and Pb concentrations and the isotopic composition of Pb can be used to evaluate crystalline rocks as a source for U in sedimentary deposits. Under favourable geologic circumstances, the technique can yield information on both the timing and the amount of U released to the sedimentary environment. The technique is best suited to the study of Archean rocks that have high U/Pb, a known common Pb composition, and a simple two-stage history. Less ideal rock units can also be evaluated, but conclusions reached for rocks of Phanerozoic age or younger will generally be qualitative at best.-Author

  9. Calcium isotope analytical technique for mafic rocks and its applications on constraining the source of Cenozoic ultra-potassic rocks in the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Xu, J.

    2013-12-01

    Ca isotope analytical technique for mafic rocks has been recently developed and set up at our lab. About mg level of a mafic rock sample was digested, and then a sub portion of the solution contains about 100ug Ca was spiked with a 42Ca-43Ca double spike and went through the column chemistry. Generally the Ca recovery is almost 100% and the procedure blank is about 50-150ng. Finally, about 5-10ug of the collected Ca cut was measured on our Triton TIMS. The precision of the data was around 0.1 per mil and the data we collected for standards are consistent with those reported by previous studies. There are two groups of Cenozoic ultra-potassic rocks that are widespread in Tibetan Plateau: a northern group in Songpan-Ganzi and Qiangtang Terranes and a southern group in Lhasa Terrane. Previous petrology evidence, such as a relative enrichment in large ion lithophile element (LILE); negative Ta,Nb and Ti anomalies and high LREE/HREE ratio, support that those rocks are both derived from sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM). However, differences between these two groups of rocks do exist: the southern group has higher K2O, Rb, Zr, Th, contents and a higher Rb/Ba, coupled with lower Al2O3, CaO, Na2O, Sr; the southern 87Sr/86Sr ratios are higher while the 143Nd/144Nd ratios are lower, etc. These suggest that the rocks could be derived from different mantle sources or produced by different geological processes. Ca isotope is chosen in this study to better understand the source of the ultra-potassic rocks because Ca isotope has been a great tracer of different geological reservoirs and the isotopic compositions of Ca may represent different genesic processes. We propose that the ultra-potassic rocks in the Tibet should have significant 40Ca enrichments due to the decay from 40K to 40Ca, therefore the variation of Ca isotopic compositions among these ultra-potassic rocks could be obvious. We believe that based on our calcium data together with earlier Sr, Nd, Pb data

  10. Rock Valley Source Physics Experiment Preparation: Earthquake Relocation and Attenuation Structure Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, M. L.; Walter, W. R.; Myers, S.; Pasyanos, M. E.; Smith, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    The science of nuclear test monitoring relies on seismic methods to distinguish explosion from earthquakes sources. Unfortunately, the physics behind how an explosion generates seismic waves, particularly shear waves, remains incompletely understood. The Source Physics Experiments (SPE) are an ongoing series of chemical explosions designed to address this problem and advance explosion monitoring physics and associated simulation codes. The current series of explosions are located in the Climax Stock granite on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). A future candidate for the SPEs would allow us to make a direct comparison of earthquake and explosion sources by detonating an explosion at a well constrained earthquake hypocenter and recording the resulting signals from each source at common receivers. This possibility arises from an area of unusually shallow seismicity in the Rock Valley area of the southern NNSS. While most tectonic earthquakes occur at depths greater than 5 km, a sequence of unusually shallow earthquakes with depths of 1-2 km occurred in Rock Valley in May of 1993. The main shock had a magnitude of approximately 3.7 and 11 more events in the sequence had magnitudes over 2. The shallow depths of these events were well constrained by temporary stations deployed at the time by the University of Nevada-Reno (UNR). As part of a feasibility study for a future Rock Valley SPE, LLNL, UNR and NSTec are working to re-instrument and improve our understanding of the Rock Valley region. Rock Valley is a complex set of left oblique-slip segmented fault blocks; it is a regular source region for small magnitude shallow earthquakes. A dense seismic network was operated in the southern NNSS through the Yucca Mountain project (1992-2010). Although much of the older network has been removed, six new Rock Valley telemetered seismic stations located at both original 1993 sites and additional sites, have been installed and operating since early 2011. In order to

  11. Petrography of volcaniclastic rocks in intra-arc volcano-bounded to fault-bounded basins of the Rosario segment of the Lower Cretaceous Alisitos oceanic arc, Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsaglia, K. M.; Barone, M.; Critelli, S.; Busby, C.; Fackler-Adams, B.

    2016-05-01

    The Rosario segment of the Early Cretaceous Alisitos oceanic magmatic arc in Baja California displays a record of arc-axis sedimentation and volcanism that is well preserved in outcrops within a southern volcano-bounded and a northern fault-bounded basin that flanked an intervening subaerial edifice. This record includes volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks that range from felsic to mafic in composition. Volcaniclastic/tuffaceous sandstone samples from two previously published measured sections are mainly composed of volcanic clasts with moderate plagioclase content. Locally quartz and/or potassium feldspar are present in trace to moderate amounts. The proportions of volcanic lithic types exhibiting vitric, microlitic, lathwork, and felsitic textures are highly variable with no distinct stratigraphic trends, likely as a function of the mixed styles of eruption and magma compositions that produced pyroclasts, as well as erosion-produced epiclastic debris. The volcaniclastic fill of the basins is consistent with an oceanic arc setting, except for the relatively high felsitic volcanic lithic content, likely associated with subaerial, as opposed to the more common submarine felsic magmatism associated with arc extension in oceanic settings. There are no major differences in compositional modes of tuff and sandstone between the fault-bounded and volcano-bounded basin strata, even though they exhibit distinctly different volcaniclastic facies. This suggests that proximal arc-axis basins of varying types around a single major subaerial edifice provide a faithful record of volcanic trends in the arc segment, regardless of variation in transport and depositional processes.

  12. Cretaceous ongonites (topaz-bearing albite-rich microleucogranites) from Ongon Khairkhan, Central Mongolia: Products of extreme magmatic fractionation and pervasive metasomatic fluid: rock interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostal, Jaroslav; Kontak, Daniel J.; Gerel, Ochir; Gregory Shellnutt, J.; Fayek, Mostafa

    2015-11-01

    Ongonites were defined at their type locality at Ongon Khairkhan, central Mongolia, as pristine magmatic topaz-bearing albite-quartz-keratophyres with up to 4 wt. % F and containing phenocrysts of albite, K-feldspar, quartz and rare mica and topaz hosted in a groundmass composed of the same minerals. However, detailed petrographic and SEM-EDS studies indicate that these rocks underwent considerable subsolidus exchange with deuteric fluids, as evidenced by the presence of albitic plagioclase (Ab~ 100) and end-member orthoclase (Or~ 100), secondary Li-Fe-rich mica (zinnwaldite) enriched in rare metals (Sn, W, Ta, Nb), pitted feldspars containing fluid inclusions, and disseminated fluorite. The ~ 120 Ma old dyke rocks, emplaced at a high structural level in the crust, are strongly peraluminous leucogranites characterized by high Al and alkalis that are also enriched in Rb, Cs, Ga and Ta, depleted in Mg, Ca, Zr, Ba, Sr and Eu, and have anomalous K/Rb, Rb/Sr, Zr/Hf and Nb/Ta ratios compared to the average continental crust. However, the suite has Nd isotopic ratios (ɛNd(120) ~- 1) similar to those of contemporaneous A-type granites of the Mongolian-Transbaikalian igneous province of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. The inferred primary δ18O (~+ 6 to + 7‰) and Pb isotopic values are consistent with a granitic parent magma and interaction with orthomagmatic fluids. The ongonites and constituent minerals record (1) an extensive and protracted crystal fractionation history, in part due to the presence of volatiles (particularly F) which depressed the solidus temperature of the felsic rocks and extended its duration of crystallization and (2) subsolidus exchange with fluids which includes late flux of heated meteoric water as indicated by modified whole rock δ18O values (+ 0.5 to +2.7‰). The interaction of the ongonites with internally derived orthomagmatic fluids is considered to result in enrichment and/or redistribution of several incompatible elements, but not to

  13. Analysis and occurrence of C 26-steranes in petroleum and source rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldowan, J. Michael; Lee, Cathy Y.; Watt, David S.; Jeganathan, Alwarsamy; Slougui, Nacer-Eddine; Gallegos, Emilio J.

    1991-04-01

    The C 26-steranes previously reported in oils and source rocks (MOLDOWAN et al., 1985) have been identified as 21-, 24-, and 27-norcholestanes (1A, 1B, and 1C). Various 24-norcholesterols or stanols, possible precursors for the 24-norcholestanes, occur widely at low levels in marine invertebrates and some algae, and 24-norcholestanes occur in marine petroleums of Tertiary through Paleozoic age. There are reports of 27-norcholesterols and stanols in recent sediments, but the precursor organisms have not been identified. The natural occurrence of the 21-norcholestane structure is unprecedented. Unlike 24- and 27-norcholestane, 21-norcholestane is in low concentration or absent in immature rocks and increases substantially relative to the other C 26-steranes in thermally mature rocks, oils, and condensates. This suggests an origin involving thermal degradation of a higher molecular weight steroid. The ratio of 21-norcholestane to the total C 26-steranes is shown to be an effective maturity parameter in a series of Wyoming (Phosphoria source) and California (Monterey source) oils. Molecular mechanics MM2 steric energy calculations indicate a relative stability order of 21 ≫ 27 > 24- norcholestane for the major stereoisomers. Authentic 21-, 24-, and 27-nor-5α-cholestanes and 24- and 27-nor-5β-cholestanes were synthesized and subjected to catalytic isomerization over Pd/C to yield the full suite of stereoisomers for each. In immature rocks the 5α,14α,17α(H),20R isomers predominate. Mixtures of 24- and 27-norcholestane in oils and mature rocks show a familiar elution pattern of four major peaks presumed to be 14α,17α(H),20S, 14β,17β(H),20R, 14β,17β(H),20S, and 14α,17α(H),20R in order of elution, as well as putative 20S and 20R rearranged steranes [13β,17α(H)-diasteranes]. However, the 21-norcholestanes are represented by a single peak in mature sediments under normal GC conditions, which is shown to consist of a major 14β,17α(H) peak and a minor 14α,17

  14. Total petroleum systems of the Pelagian Province, Tunisia, Libya, Italy, and Malta; the Bou Dabbous, Tertiary and Jurassic-Cretaceous composite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.

    2001-01-01

    Undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources were assessed within total petroleum systems of the Pelagian Province (2048) as part of the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000. The Pelagian Province is located mainly in eastern Tunisia and northwestern Libya. Small portions of the province extend into Malta and offshore Italy. Although several petroleum systems may exist, only two ?composite? total petroleum systems were identified. Each total petroleum system comprises a single assessment unit. These total petroleum systems are called the Bou Dabbous?Tertiary and Jurassic-Cretaceous Composite, named after the source-rock intervals and reservoir-rock ages. The main source rocks include mudstone of the Eocene Bou Dabbous Formation; Cretaceous Bahloul, Lower Fahdene, and M?Cherga Formations; and Jurassic Nara Formation. Known reservoirs are in carbonate rocks and sandstone intervals throughout the Upper Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary sections. Traps for known accumulations include fault blocks, low-amplitude anticlines, high-amplitude anticlines associated with reverse faults, wrench fault structures, and stratigraphic traps. The estimated means of the undiscovered conventional petroleum volumes in total petroleum systems of the Pelagian Province are as follows: [MMBO, million barrels of oil; BCFG, billion cubic feet of gas; MMBNGL, million barrels of natural gas liquids] Total Petroleum System MMBO BCFG MMBNGL Bou Dabbous?Tertiary 667 2,746 64 Jurassic-Cretaceous Composite 403 2,280 27

  15. Possible New Well-Logging Tool Using Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy to Detect TOC in Source Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Casey; Quarles, C. A.; Breyer, J. A.

    2001-10-01

    Possible New Well-Logging Tool Using Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy to Detect Total Organic Carbon (TOC) in Source Rocks PATTERSON, C., Department of Geology, Department of Physics, Texas Christian University, QUARLES, C.A., Department of Physics, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas, BREYER, J.A., Department of Geology, Texas Christian University, Fort, Worth, Texas. The positron produces two gamma rays upon annihilation with an electron. Depending on the momentum of the electron, the two resulting photons are shifted from the initial electron rest mass energy by the Doppler effect. We measure the distribution of gamma ray energies produced by annihilation on a petroleum source rock core. Core from the Mitchell Energy well T.P. Sims 2 of the Barnett Shale located in Wise County, Texas, is under study. Apparatus for the experiment consists of an Ortec Ge detector. The source used for the experiment is Ge68, which undergoes beta decay and produces the positrons that penetrate the core. It is placed on the middle of the core and covered with a small, annealed NiCu plate to prevent unnecessary background from the positrons annihilating with electrons other than in the core. Distance between the source and the detector is fixed at 6.75 inches. Measurements were made in specific locations at 2 inch increments for approximately an hour and a half where the predetermined Total Organic Carbon (TOC) values were made. Future studies involve an overall correlation of the core between experimental readings and TOC, including corrections for changes in grain size and lithology. Additional research has shown no distinct correlation between grain size and distribution of energies across the targeted spectrum. Additional corrections should be made for the decay in activity of the source. Future research also includes the determination for optimum time and distance for the source from the core. A long-term goal for the experiment is to develop an effective down

  16. Characterization of coal-derived hydrocarbons and source-rock potential of coal beds, San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, D.D.; Clayton, J.L.; Pawlewicz, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Coal beds are considered to be a major source of nonassociated gas in the Rocky Mountain basins of the United States. In the San Juan basin of northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado, significant quantities of natural gas are being produced from coal beds of the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation and from adjacent sandstone reservoirs. Analysis of gas samples from the various gas-producing intervals provided a means of determining their origin and of evaluating coal beds as source rocks. The rank of coal beds in the Fruitland Formation in the central part of the San Juan basin, where major gas production occurs, increases to the northeast and ranges from high-volatile B bituminous coal to medium-volatile bituminous coal (Rm values range from 0.70 to 1.45%). On the basis of chemical, isotopic and coal-rank data, the gases are interpreted to be thermogenic. Gases from the coal beds show little isotopic variation (??13C1 values range -43.6 to -40.5 ppt), are chemically dry (C1/C1-5 values are > 0.99), and contain significant amounts of CO2 (as much as 6%). These gases are interpreted to have resulted from devolatilization of the humic-type bituminous coal that is composed mainly of vitrinite. The primary products of this process are CH4, CO2 and H2O. The coal-generated, methane-rich gas is usually contained in the coal beds of the Fruitland Formation, and has not been expelled and has not migrated into the adjacent sandstone reservoirs. In addition, the coal-bed reservoirs produce a distinctive bicarbonate-type connate water and have higher reservoir pressures than adjacent sandstones. The combination of these factors indicates that coal beds are a closed reservoir system created by the gases, waters, and associated pressures in the micropore coal structure. In contrast, gases produced from overlying sandstones in the Fruitland Formation and underlying Pictured Cliffs Sandstone have a wider range of isotopic values (??13C1 values range from -43.5 to -38

  17. Geochemistry and argon thermochronology of the Variscan Sila Batholith, southern Italy: source rocks and magma evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, R.A.; Messina, A.; de Vivo, B.; Russo, S.; Woodruff, L.G.; Sutter, J.F.; Belkin, H.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Sila batholith is the largest granitic massif in the Calabria-Peloritan Arc of southern Italy, consisting of syn to post-tectonic, calc-alkaline and metaluminous tonalite to granodiorite, and post-tectonic, peraluminous and strongly peraluminous, two-mica??cordierite??Al silicate granodiorite to leucomonzogranite. Mineral 40Ar/39Ar thermochronologic analyses document Variscan emplacement and cooling of the intrusives (293-289 Ma). SiO2 content in the granitic rocks ranges from ???57 to 77 wt%; cumulate gabbro enclaves have SiO2 as low as 42%. Variations in absolute abundances and ratios involving Hf, Ta, Th, Rb, and the REE, among others, identify genetically linked groups of granitic rocks in the batholith: (1) syn-tectonic biotite??amphibole-bearing tonalites to granodiorites, (2) post-tectonic two-mica??Al-silicate-bearing granodiorites to leucomonzogranites, and (3) post-tectonic biotite??hornblende tonalites to granodiorites. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns display variable values of Ce/Yb (up to ???300) and generally small negative Eu anomalies. Degree of REE fractionation depends on whether the intrusives are syn- or post-tectonic, and on their mineralogy. High and variable values of Rb/Y (0.40-4.5), Th/Sm (0.1-3.6), Th/Ta (0-70), Ba/Nb (1-150), and Ba/Ta (???50-2100), as well as low values of Nb/U (???2-28) and La/Th (???1-10) are consistent with a predominant and heterogeneous crustal contribution to the batholith. Whole rock ??18O ranges from ???+8.2 to +11.7???; the mafic cumulate enclaves have the lowest ??18O values and the two-mica granites have the highest values. ??18O values for biotite??honblende tonalitic and granodioritic rocks (9.1 to 10.8???) overlap the values of the mafic enclaves and two-mica granodiorites and leucogranites (10.7 to 11.7???). The initial Pb isotopic range of the granitic rocks (206Pb/204Pb ???18.17-18.45, 207Pb/204Pb ???15.58-15.77, 208Pb/204Pb ???38.20-38.76) also indicates the predominance of a crustal source

  18. New explanation of an old magnetotelluric observation: source rock of the Transdanubian Range Conductivity Anomaly ascertained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Viktória; Horváth, Frank; Tari, Gabor; Wesztergom, Viktor

    2014-05-01

    The so-called Transdanubian Conductivity Anomaly (TCA) at the Hungarian part of the NW Pannonian Basin has been well known for nearly four decades. Hungarian research institutions carried out several magnetotelluric soundings and exceptionally low resistivity (i.e. 1-2 Ohmm) zones were found with a large areal extent (on the order of few thousand square km). The low resistivity bodies are situated in the depth range of 4 to 10 km and no surface outcrops of such a highly conducting rock mass can be found in Hungary. This enigmatic geophysical anomaly was explained in a number of ways by different authors, invoking sub-horizontal Alpine nappe contacts to subvertical dikes with graphite and/or saline fluid content. Only one possible outcrop area of the high conductivity anomaly was considered so far, in the Drauzug/Gailtal area of the Eastern Alps in Austria, some 300 km to the West from the anomaly area. Whereas there were previous attempts to find correspondence between the TCA and prominent seismic reflectors seen on 2D seismic reflection profiles, in this study we have systematically correlated, for the first time, the TCA with modern 2D and 3D industry seismic reflection data. Our results show a very strong correlation between the subsurface extent and position of TCA and various sub-horizontal Cretaceous Alpine nappe surfaces. In addition, we drew on the latest structural correlation of the Alpine nappe stack of the Transdanubian Central Range with its proper tectonic counterpart in the Eastern Alps. At the southern edge of the Upper Austroalpine units in northern Styria, in the Veitsch Nappe of the Greywacke Zone, numerous graphite localities are known historically. We propose that the best explanation for the observed extent and geometry of the TCA is the presence of graphite in subhorizontal, tectonically thinned detachment surfaces in the Upper Austroalpine nappe edifice of NW Hungary. This explanation is supported by reinterpretation of old magnetotelluric

  19. Oils and source rocks from the Anadarko Basin: Final report, March 1, 1985-March 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Philp, R. P.

    1996-11-01

    The research project investigated various geochemical aspects of oils, suspected source rocks, and tar sands collected from the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma. The information has been used, in general, to investigate possible sources for the oils in the basin, to study mechanisms of oil generation and migration, and characterization of depositional environments. The major thrust of the recent work involved characterization of potential source formations in the Basin in addition to the Woodford shale. The formations evaluated included the Morrow, Springer, Viola, Arbuckle, Oil Creek, and Sylvan shales. A good distribution of these samples was obtained from throughout the basin and were evaluated in terms of source potential and thermal maturity based on geochemical characteristics. The data were incorporated into a basin modelling program aimed at predicting the quantities of oil that could, potentially, have been generated from each formation. The study of crude oils was extended from our earlier work to cover a much wider area of the basin to determine the distribution of genetically-related oils, and whether or not they were derived from single or multiple sources, as well as attempting to correlate them with their suspected source formations. Recent studies in our laboratory also demonstrated the presence of high molecular weight components(C{sub 4}-C{sub 80}) in oils and waxes from drill pipes of various wells in the region. Results from such a study will have possible ramifications for enhanced oil recovery and reservoir engineering studies.

  20. Tuffaceous sediments as source rocks for uranium: A case study of the White River Formation, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Fine-grained tuffaceous sediments of the White River Formation (Oligocene) are evaluated as a possible source of uranium for the sedimentary uranium deposits of Wyoming. The evaluation is based upon a model in which volcanic glass is considered to be a major host of uranium and thorium and in which uranium and silica are released during alteration of glass to montmorillonite. The evaluation scheme is applicable to other tuffaceous sediments in similar geologic settings. The average uranium and thorium contents of glass separates and glassy air-fall ashes of the White River Formation are 8 ppm and 22.4 ppm respectively, and these values approximate the average composition of glass deposited in Wyoming basins in Oligocene time. Comparison of these values with the uranium and thorium concentrations in montmorillonite separates indicates little change in thorium concentrations but reductions in uranium concentrations which average 3.3 ppm. In spite of the apparent major removal of uranium during alteration of glass to montmorillonite, whole-rock samples of tuffaceous siltstones show an average uranium loss of only 0.4 ?? 0.4 ppm, because of generally small amounts of clay alteration. This conclusion is generated by comparisons between glassy ash and partially altered vitric siltstones, the latter corrected for dilution of glass and clay-altered glass with uranium- and thorium-poor primary and detrital materials. The original volume of the White River Formation is adequate to generate economically significant quantities of mobile uranium, even with such modest losses. Uranium and silica which are mobilized during glass alteration can coprecipitate as uraniferous secondary silica in areas where solutions become silica saturated. These precipitates indicate pathways of ancient, uranium-rich solutions in tuffaceous rocks. Exploration efforts in the White River Formation and underlying units should concentrate on areas where such pathways intercept reducing environments

  1. Source rock identification and oil generation related to trap formation: Southeast Constantine oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Boudjema, A.; Rahmani, A.; Belhadi, E.M.; Hamel, M.; Bourmouche, R. )

    1990-05-01

    Petroleum exploration began in the Southeast Constantine basin in the late 1940s. Despite the very early discovery of Djebel Onk field (1954), exploration remains very sparse and relatively unsuccessful due mainly to the geological complexity of the region. The Ras-Toumb oil field was discovered only twenty years later. In 1988, a new discovery, the Guerguit-El-Kihal oil field renewed the interest of explorationists in this region. The Southeast Constantine Mesozoic-Cenozoic basin has a sedimentary sequence of shales and carbonates with a thickness exceeding 7,000 m. Structural traps are related to pyrenean and post-Villafranchian phases. Potential reservoirs with good petrophysical characteristics and seals can be found throughout the section and are mainly Cenomanian-Turonian and Coniacian limestones and dolomites. The known source rocks are Cenomanian-Turonian and Campanian carbonate shales. Kerogen is a mixture of type II and type III for the Campanian. The kerogen has a fair petroleum potential and is often immature or low mature. The Cenomanian-Turonian kerogen is type II amorphous, with a variable but important petroleum potential. Total organic carbon values range from 1.5% to 7%. Maturity corresponds to the oil window. This source rock is well known throughout the Mediterranean region and is related to the oceanic anoxic event. Kinetic modeling of this organic matter evolution indicates favorable oil generation timing related to trap formation ages.

  2. Precambrian Chuar source rock play: An exploration case history in southern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Uphoff, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    Source rock potential of the Upper Proterozoic Chuar Group, specifically the Walcott Member of the Kwagunt Formation, provides the basis for a petroleum play in southern Utah. Analyses of Chuar black shales from outcrops in the Grand Canyon show total organic carbon values of 3-9%, hydrogen indices up to 255, and maximum maturity within the oil window. Modeling indicates a potential 150 mi{sup 2} (400 km{sup 2}) area with a minimum generative potential of 2700 MBO{sup *}. Chuar source rocks are proposed as one part of a petroleum system that includes reservoirs in the Cambrian Tapeats Sandstone and seal in the overlying Bright Angel Shale. Prospective structures include anticlines of Laramide age not drilled through the Tapeats interval. One such structure is the Circle Cliffs uplift, which exhibits an area under closure of 9000 mi{sup 2} (2300 km{sup 2}) at the top of the Devonian. In 1994, BHP Petroleum drilled the 28-1 Federal well on the Circle Cliffs structure. The well logged 142 ft (43 m) of Tapeats porosity (>7%) and flowed CO{sub 2} gas at rates up to 5.0 Mcf{sup *} per day. Analysis of bitumen in the reservoir indicated an earlier hydrocarbon charge and suggested a new oil type for the region.

  3. Was Late Cretaceous Magmatism in the Northern Rocky Mountains Really Arc-Related?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, G.

    2011-12-01

    Calc-alkaline, Cretaceous magmatism affected much of the northern Rocky Mountain region in the western U.S. and is generally interpreted as continental arc magmatism despite the fact that it occurred as far east into the continental interior as the Late Cretaceous (75 Ma to 78 Ma) Sliderock Mountain volcanoplutonic complex in south-central Montana. Magmatism may have migrated so far inboard as a response to shallowing of the dip angle of underthrust oceanic lithosphere, but the exact sources, tectonic setting and trigger mechanisms for the Late Cretaceous igneous activity remain unclear. In this study, new trace element and Nd and Sr isotopic data, combined with existing age and major element data (duBray et al., 1998, USGS Prof. Paper 1602), from the most mafic lavas present at the Sliderock Mountain Volcano were used to further define the source regions of the Late Cretaceous magmatism. The most mafic lava flows are high K (~2-3 wt. % K2O), low Ti (< 1 wt. % TiO2), low Ni (< 20 ppm) basaltic andesites. Major element oxide contents for these rocks are only weakly correlated with increasing wt. % SiO2 on conventional Harker diagrams. All of the rocks are characterized by high LILE/HFSE ratios and high Pb contents (17-20 ppm), as expected for arc-related magmatism. The rocks also have high (La/Yb)N (7-20) but show decreasing (Dy/Yb)N with increasing wt.% SiO2, suggesting a cryptic role for amphibole fractionation during evolution of their parental magmas. Initial ɛNd values range from -19 to -29 but do not covary with rock bulk composition and as a result are unlikely to represent the result of interaction with local Archean continental crust. Initial 87Sr/86Sr, in contrast, vary over a restricted range from 0.7045 to 0.7065. The lowest 87Sr/86Sr correspond to samples with the highest Sr/Y (120-190). The low ɛNd values for the basaltic andesites suggest that if these volcanic rocks were ultimately derived from ultramafic mantle sources, melting must have occurred

  4. Petroleum source potential of the Lower Cretaceous mudstone succession of the NPRA and Colville Delta area, North Slope Alaska, based on sonic and resistivity logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keller, Margaret A.; Bird, Kenneth J.

    2003-01-01

    Resource assessment of the North Slope of Alaska by the U. S. Geological Survey includes evaluation of the petroleum source potential of Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks using the delta log R technique (Passey and others, 1990). Porosity and resistivity logs are used in combination with thermal maturity data to produce a continuous profile of total organic carbon content in weight % (TOC). From the pattern and amount of TOC in the profile produced, the depositional setting and thus the petroleum source-rock potential (kerogen type) of the organic matter can be inferred and compared to interpretations from other data such as Rock-Eval pyrolysis. TOC profiles determined by this technique for the contiguous interval of pebble shale unit, Hue Shale (including the Gamma Ray Zone or GRZ), and lower part of the Torok Formation indicate important potential for petroleum generation in the Tunalik 1, Inigok 1, N. Inigok 1, Kuyanak 1, Texaco Colville Delta 1, Nechelik 1, and Bergschrund 1 wells of the western North Slope region. TOC profiles suggest that this interval contains both type II and III kerogens – consistent with proposed depositional models -- and is predominantly greater than 2 wt. % TOC (cut-off used for effective source potential). Average TOC for the total effective section of the pebble shale unit + Hue Shale ranges from 2.6 to 4.1 wt % TOC (values predominantly 2-8% TOC) over 192-352 ft. Source potential for the lower Torok Formation, which also has interbedded sandstone and lean mudstone, is good to negligible in these 7 wells.

  5. Single-crystal {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages for rocks in the lower part of the frontier formation (Upper Cretaceous), Southwest Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    M`Gonigle, J.W.; Holmes, C.W.; Dalrymple, G.B.

    1995-04-01

    Five tuff beds in a 150 m (490 ft) thick section within the nonmarine Chalk Creek Member of the Frontier Formation and one bentonite bed within the Allen Hollow Shale Member of the Frontier Formation were sampled for {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar dating at localities south of Kemmerer, Wyoming. The study area extends from Cumberland Gap northward for 15 km (9.3 mi) past Blason Gap, and includes units 5-43 and unit 91 of the reference section measured by Cobban and Reeside in 1952. The age of the tuff beds ranges from 96.6 {plus_minus} 0.3 to 93.6 {plus_minus} 0.3 Ma and confirms the inferred Cenomanian age of much of the Chalk Creek Member. Previously, the member`s age had been based solely on its stratigraphic position between the Albian-to-lower Cenomanian marine rocks for the Aspen Shale and the lower Turonian marine shales in the middle of the Frontier Formation. The age of biotite crystals from the bentonite in the Allen Hollow Member, 92.1 {plus_minus} 0.2 Ma, confirms the paleontologic Turonian age of the member.

  6. Paleoenvironments of the Jurassic and Cretaceous Oceans: Selected Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogg, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    There are many themes contributing to the sedimentation history of the Mesozoic oceans. This overview briefly examines the roles of the carbonate compensation depth (CCD) and the associated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, of the evolution of marine calcareous microplankton, of major transgressive and regressive trends, and of super-plume eruptions. Initiation of Atlantic seafloor spreading in the Middle Jurassic coincided with an elevated carbonate compensation depth (CCD) in the Pacific-Tethys mega-ocean. Organic-rich sediments that would become the oil wealth of regions from Saudi Arabia to the North Sea were deposited during a continued rise in CCD during the Oxfordian-early Kimmeridgian, which suggests a possible increase in carbon dioxide release by oceanic volcanic activity. Deep-sea deposits in near-equatorial settings are dominated by siliceous shales or cherts, which reflect the productivity of siliceous microfossils in the tropical surface waters. The end-Jurassic explosion in productivity by calcareous microplankton contributed to the lowering of the CCD and onset of the chalk ("creta") deposits that characterize the Tithonian and lower Cretaceous in all ocean basins. During the mid-Cretaceous, the eruption of enormous Pacific igneous provinces (Ontong Java Plateau and coeval edifices) increased carbon dioxide levels. The resulting rise in CCD terminated chalk deposition in the deep sea. The excess carbon was progressively removed in widespread black-shale deposits in the Atlantic basins and other regions - another major episode of oil source rock. A major long-term transgression during middle and late Cretaceous was accompanied by extensive chalk deposition on continental shelves and seaways while the oceanic CCD remained elevated. Pacific guyots document major oscillations (sequences) of global sea level superimposed on this broad highstand. The Cretaceous closed with a progressive sea-level regression and lowering of the CCD that again enabled

  7. Identification of aryl isoprenoids in source rocks and crude oils: Biological markers for the green sulphur bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summons, R. E.; Powell, T. G.

    1987-03-01

    A series of C 13 to C 31 aryl isoprenoids (1-alkyl,2,3,6-trimethylbenzenes) have been identified in reef-hosted oils and their source rocks from the Middle and Upper Silurian of the Michigan Basin and Middle Devonian of the Alberta Basin, Canada. Their structure has been confirmed by unambiguous synthesis of the C 14 member of the series. Their structure and isotopic composition indicate that they are derived from isorenieratene from the Chlorobiaceae family of sulphur bacteria. These results are consistent with geological and geochemical studies that show that the source rocks were deposited under metahaline to hypersaline sulphate and sulphide rich water columns. The distribution of other biomarkers in these oils and source rocks indicates that a diverse biota contributed organic matter to the source environment. In conjunction with the aryl isoprenoids, they show that there is a remarkable similarity in composition between the two sets of oils and source rocks despite their great temporal and geographic separation. This reflects the similarity of their environments and emphasizes the importance of sedimentary facies in controlling the composition of organic matter in source rocks and their derived oils.

  8. Sea Level and Paleoenvironment Control on Late Ordovician Source Rocks, Hudson Bay Basin, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Hefter, J.

    2009-05-01

    Hudson Bay Basin is one of the largest Paleozoic sedimentary basins in North America, with Southampton Island on its north margin. The lower part of the basin succession comprises approximately 180 to 300 m of Upper Ordovician strata including Bad Cache Rapids and Churchill River groups and Red Head Rapids Formation. These units mainly comprise carbonate rocks consisting of alternating fossiliferous limestone, evaporitic and reefal dolostone, and minor shale. Shale units containing extremely high TOC, and interpreted to have potential as petroleum source rocks, were found at three levels in the lower Red Head Rapids Formation on Southampton Island, and were also recognized in exploration wells from the Hudson Bay offshore area. A study of conodonts from 390 conodont-bearing samples from continuous cores and well cuttings from six exploration wells in the Hudson Bay Lowlands and offshore area (Comeault Province No. 1, Kaskattama Province No. 1, Pen Island No. 1, Walrus A-71, Polar Bear C-11 and Narwhal South O-58), and about 250 conodont-bearing samples collected from outcrops on Southampton Island allows recognition of three conodont zones in the Upper Ordovician sequence, namely (in ascendant sequence) Belodina confluens, Amorphognathus ordovicicus, and Rhipidognathus symmetricus zones. The three conodont zones suggest a cycle of sea level changes of rising, reaching the highest level, and then falling during the Late Ordovician. Three intervals of petroleum potential source rock are within the Rhipidognathus symmetricus Zone in Red Head Rapids Formation, and formed in a restricted anoxic and hypersaline condition during a period of sea level falling. This is supported by the following data: 1) The conodont Rhipidognathus symmetricus represents the shallowest Late Ordovician conodont biofacies and very shallow subtidal to intertidal and hypersaline condition. This species has the greatest richness within the three oil shale intervals to compare other parts of Red

  9. High-frequency observations and source parameters of microearthquakes recorded at hard-rock sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cranswick, Edward; Wetmiller, Robert; Boatwright, John

    1985-01-01

    We have estimated the source parameters of 53 microearthquakes recorded in July 1983 which were aftershocks of the Miramichi, New Brunswick, earthquake that occurred on 9 January 1982. These events were recorded by local three-component digital seismographs at 400 sps/component from 2-Hz velocity transducers sited directly on glacially scoured crystalline basement outcrop. Hypocentral distances are typically less than 5 km, and the hypocenters and the seven digital seismograph stations established all lie essentially within the boundaries of a granitic pluton that encompasses the faults that ruptured during the main shock and major aftershocks. The P-wave velocity is typically 5 km/sec at the surface and at least 6 km/sec at depths greater than about 1 km.The events have S-wave corner frequencies in the band 10 to 40 Hz, and the calculated Brune model seismic moments range from 1015 to 1018 dyne-cm. The corresponding stress drops are generally less than 1.0 bars, but there is considerable evidence that the seismic-source signals have been modified by propagation and/or site-effects. The data indicate: (a) there is a velocity discontinuity at 0.5 km depth; (b) the top layer has strong scattering/attenuating properties; (c) some source-receiver paths differentiate the propagated signal; (d) there is a hard-rock-site P-wave “fmax” between 50 and 100 Hz; and (e) some hard-rock sites are characterized by P-wave resonance frequencies in the range 50 to 100 Hz. Comparison of this dataset with the January 1982 New Brunswick digital seismograms which were recorded at sites underlain by several meters of low-velocity surface sediments suggests that some of the hard-rock-site phenomena listed above can be explained in terms of a layer-over-a-half-space model. For microearthquakes, this result implies that spectrally determined source dimension scales with site dimension (thickness of the layer). More generally, it emphasizes that it is very difficult to accurately observe

  10. Late Jurassic--Early Cretaceous cooling for Late Proterozoic through Early Devonian crystalline rocks from the Bronson Hill anticlinorium, MA--VT: Evidence from apatite fission track analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, M.K. . Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science)

    1993-03-01

    Ten samples of crystalline rocks from the Bronson Hill anticlinorium in north central Massachusetts--south central Vermont yield Mesozoic apatite fission track cooling ages ranging from 98 [+-] 8 to 158 [+-] 24 Ma. Compositionally, the samples include a quartz-phyric rhyolite from the Ammonoosuc Volcanics, a pegmatite from the Kempfield Anticline, a gabbro from the Prescott Intrusive Complex, the Dry Hill and Fourmile Gneisses from the Pelham Dome, Swanzey Gneiss from the Keene Dome, Pauchaug Gneiss from the Warwick Dome, and the Monson Gneiss. Published U-Pb zircon analyses for the same samples yield ages of 613 [+-] 3 Ma for the Dry Hill Gneiss; 454--442 [+-] 3 Ma for the Swanzey, Pauchaug, Monson and Fourmile Gneisses; 453 [+-] 2 Ma for the Ammonoosuc Volcanics; and 407 [+-] 3/[minus]2 Ma for the Prescott Intrusive Complex gabbro (Tucker and Robinson, 1990). Apatite fission track ages are all reset and increase in apparent age eastward from the edge of the Deerfield-Hartford Basin, consistent with published apatite fission track ages from Jurassic sedimentary units within the Deerfield and Northern Hartford Basins. Mean track lengths ranged from 13.4 to 14.4 [mu]m with moderately large standard deviations. These track length distributions suggest relatively slow cooling through the track annealing range of 70--90 C and are consistent with track length distributions for sedimentary samples within the Deerfield and Northern Hartford Basins. The trend of increasing apatite fission track apparent age eastward from the basin margin suggests several interpretations: (1) differential uplift; (2) deeper burial in the basin and adjacent areas; (3) higher heat flow along the basin margin. Zircon fission track analyses are in progress to constrain maximum burial depths and should help differentiate between these models.

  11. Preliminary investigation of oil and source rock organic geochemistry from selected Tertiary basins of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawwongngam, Kulwadee; Philp, R. P.

    Selected samples of crude oils and extracts from source rocks obtained from six Thailand Tertiary basins of the central plain and of the Gulf of Thailand regions were examined for geochemical properties and molecular compositions. Analyses were performed using GC, CGCMS and carbon isotope mass spectrometry. Though these results should be viewed as preliminary, the results are significant in terms of a regional understanding of the petroleum geochemistry of Thailand. Results from bulk geochemical properties and biomarker assemblages characterize derivatives of organic sources deposited in lacustrine environments. The organic matter is mainly derived from algae with varying amounts of higher plant material. However, an observed variation in the pristane/phytane ratios among the samples may imply differences in depositional oxicity. On the other hand, basinal differences in sedimentation rates, or in the oxygen concentration of the varying waters and/or sediment pore-waters resulted in spatial heterogeneities in the quantity and degree of preservation of the organic matter. In addition, a degree of physical separation between these paleo-lacustrine environments is indicated by differences in paleosalinity, e.g. the hypersaline biomarker, gammacerane, which is restricted to samples from the offshore Gulf of Thailand basins. Maturity parameters for these Tertiary oils and source rock extracts were determined using biomarker analyses of T s/T m, 22S/22S + 22R C 31 hopane, C 30 moretane/hopane, 20R/20S + 20R C 29 sterane, and aromatic compounds. Though the samples demonstrate an overall relatively low level of maturity as specified by the biomarker index, a degree of individual basinal variability is also distinguishable. The observed differences in the maturity values indicate regional heterogeneity among the basin thermal histories, suggesting differences in geothermal gradients and/or in the basin subsidence rates.

  12. The Talara Basin province of northwestern Peru: cretaceous-tertiary total petroleum system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, Debra K.

    2004-01-01

    reason, and also because geochemical data on oils and source rocks is very limited, Tertiary and Cretaceous production is grouped into one total petroleum system. The most likely source rocks are Tertiary marine shales, but some of the Cretaceous marine shales are also probable source rocks, and these would represent separate total petroleum systems. Geochemical data on one oil sample from Pennsylvanian rock indicates that it was probably also sourced from Tertiary shales.

  13. Geology, thermal maturation, and source rock geochemistry in a volcanic covered basin: San Juan sag, south-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gries, R.R.; Clayton, J.L.; Leonard, C.

    1997-01-01

    The San Juan sag, concealed by the vast San Juan volcanic field of south-central Colorado, has only recently benefited from oil and gas wildcat drilling and evaluations. Sound geochemical analyses and maturation modeling are essential elements for successful exploration and development. Oil has been produced in minor quantities from an Oligocene sill in the Mancos Shale within the sag, and major oil and gas production occurs from stratigraphically equivalent rocks in the San Juan basin to the south-west and in the Denver basin to the northeast. The objectives of this study were to identify potential source rocks, assess thermal maturity, and determine hydrocarbon-source bed relationships. Source rocks are present in the San Juan sag in the upper and lower Mancos Shale (including the Niobrara Member), which consists of about 666 m (2184 ft) of marine shale with from 0.5 to 3.1 wt. % organic carbon. Pyrolysis yields (S1 + S2 = 2000-6000 ppm) and solvent extraction yields (1000-4000 ppm) indicate that some intervals within the Mancos Shale are good potential source rocks for oil, containing type II organic matter, according to Rock-Eval pyrolysis assay. Oils produced from the San Juan sag and adjacent part of the San Juan basin are geochemically similar to rock extracts obtained from these potential source rock intervals. Based on reconstruction of the geologic history of the basin integrated with models of organic maturation, we conclude that most of the source rock maturation occurred in the Oligocene and Miocene. Little to no maturation took place during Laramide subsidence of the basin, when the Animas and Blanco Basin formations were deposited. The timing of maturation is unlike that of most Laramide basins in the Rocky Mountain region, where maturation occurred as a result of Paleocene and Eocene basin fill. The present geothermal gradient in the San Juan sag is slightly higher (average 3.5??C/100 m; 1.9??F/100 ft) than the regional average for southern Rocky

  14. Detrital sources and water mass circulation in the tropical North Atlantic during the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E. E.; Pugh, E.; Kamenov, G. D.; MacLeod, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Seawater Nd isotopes from fossil fish teeth in Campanian to Paleogene calcareous claystone on Demerara Rise in the tropical North Atlantic record a change from epsilon Nd values of -17 to -11 during the late Maastrichtian. This shift has been identified in three different Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) sites that span from 600 to 1500 m paleodepths (ODP sites 1259, 1260 and 1261) and has been interpreted as a transition from a warm saline intermediate water mass formed on the South American margin, referred to as Demerara Bottom Water, to a source from the North Atlantic. A study of corresponding detrital Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes was undertaken to confirm the isotopic values derived from fish teeth record water mass compositions rather than diagenesis or boundary exchange. Several leaching procedures designed to remove Fe-Mn oxide coatings and the seawater signature they carry from the detrital fractions were tested. Sr isotopic data indicate a 0.02 M hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HH) leach was ineffective at removing the Fe-Mn oxides whereas a 1.0 M HH leach produced detrital Sr isotopic values that were consistent for all three sites and plotted farther from the seawater value. Detrital isotopic results can be divided into three intervals: 1) 73 - 66 Ma, when DBW is present, 2) 66 - 61 Ma, during the transition to North Atlantic sources, and 3) <61 Ma, when North Atlantic sources appear to dominate. During interval 1, detrital Nd isotopes increase gradually, while Sr and Pb isotopic ratios are relatively constant. Leading into interval 2, detrital Nd isotopes are fairly constant while there is a stepwise increase in Sr and Pb isotopes. Leading into interval 3, there is a large increase in Nd and decrease in Sr isotopes and a slight decrease in Pb isotopes. The subtle differences in the timing of changes in fish teeth and detrital Nd isotopes suggest the seawater signal is responding to changes in water mass rather than changes in sediment composition (boundary

  15. Geochemical relationships of petroleum in Mesozoic reservoirs to carbonate source rocks of Jurassic Smackover Formation, southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Claypool, G.E.; Mancini, E.A.

    1989-07-01

    Algal carbonate mudstones of the Jurassic Smackover Formation are the main source rocks for oil and condensate in Mesozoic reservoir rocks in southwestern Alabama. This interpretation is based on geochemical analyses of oils, condensates, and organic matter in selected samples of shale (Norphlet Formation, Haynesville Formation, Trinity Group, Tuscaloosa Group) and carbonate (Smackover Formation) rocks. Potential and probable oil source rocks are present in the Tuscaloosa Group and Smackover Formation, respectively. Extractable organic matter from Smackover carbonates has molecular and isotopic similarities to Jurassic oil. Although the Jurassic oils and condensates in southwestern Alabama have genetic similarities, they show significant compositional variations due to differences in thermal maturity and organic facies/lithofacies. Organic facies reflect different depositional conditions for source rocks in the various basins. The Mississippi Interior Salt basin was characterized by more continuous marine to hypersaline conditions, whereas the Manila and Conecuh embayments periodically had lower salnity and greater input of clastic debris and terrestrial organic matter. Petroleum and organic matter in Jurassic rocks of southwestern Alabama show a range of thermal transformations. The gas content of hydrocarbons in reservoirs increases with increasing depth and temperature. In some reservoirs where the temperature is above 266/degrees/F(130/degrees/C), gas-condensate is enriched in isotopically heavy sulfur, apparently derived from thermochemical reduction of Jurassic evaporite sulfate. This process also resulted in increase H/sub 2/S and CO in the gas, and depletion of saturated hydrocarbons in the condensate liquids.

  16. Water Sources for Cyanobacteria Below Desert Rocks in the Negev Desert Determined by Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    We present year round meteorological and conductivity measurements of colonized hypolithic rocks in the Arava Valley, Negev Desert, Israel. The data indicate that while dew is common in the Negev it is not an important source of moisture for hypolithic organisms at this site. The dominance of cyanobacteria in the hypolithic community are consistent with predictions that cyanobacteria are confined to habitats supplied by rain. To monitor the presence of liquid water under the small Negev rocks we developed and tested a simple field conductivity system based on two wires placed about 0.5 cm apart. Based on 21 replicates recorded for one year in the Negev we conclude that in natural rains (0.25 mm to 6 mm) the variability between sensor readings is between 20 and 60% decreasing with increasing rain amount. We conclude that the simple small electrical conductivity system described here can be used effectively to monitor liquid water levels in lithic habitats. However, the natural variability of these sensors indicates that several replicates should be deployed. The results and method presented have use in arid desert reclamation programs.

  17. Early cretaceous platform-margin configuration and evolution in the central Oman mountains, Arabian peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, B.R. ); Smewing, J.D. )

    1993-02-01

    The Hajar Supergroup (Middle Permian-Lower Cretaceous) of northeastern Oman records rifting and development of a passive margin along the edge of the Arabian platform facing Neo-Tethys. The Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous part, comprising the Sahtan, Kahmah, and Wasia groups, was deposited during the maximum extent of the broad epicontinental sea landward of this margin. These limestone units reach a total of 1500 m in thickness and correlate with the hydrocarbon reservoirs of the Arabian Peninsula. The trace of the Jurassic and Cretaceous margin in northeastern Oman followed a zigzag series of rift segments, resulting in promontories and reentrants that changed in position through time in response to the configuration and differential motion of underlying rift blocks. Synsedimentary normal faulting occurred locally in the Middle Jurassic, whereas in the Late Jurassic, the margin was eroded from variable uplift of up to 300 m before subsiding to below storm wave base. This uplift may have been caused by compression from oceanic crust that obducted along the southeastern side of the platform. The Lower Cretaceous succession in the central Oman Mountains and adjacent subsurface began with regional drowning around the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary. The succession in the east (Saih Hatat) records a single regressive sequence, ending in the progradation of the shallow-water carbonate platform by the Cenomanian. However, the succession in the west (Jebel Akhdar and interior) is dominated by shallow-water carbonate facies, but punctuated by a second regional drowning in the late Aptian. A third, Late Cretaceous drowning terminated deposition of the Wasia Group in the Turonian and was caused by convergence of oceanic crust and foreland basic formation. The record of tectonic behavior of carbonate platforms has important implications for the development of hydrocarbon source rocks and porosity. 68 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  18. DRIFT spectroscopic study of diagenetic organic-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingli; Cai, Jingong; Song, Guoqi; Ji, Junfeng

    2015-09-01

    Thermo diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy was used to study the diagenetic organic-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks from the Dongying Depression, Bohai Bay Basin, China. The results indicated that aliphatic organic matter (OM) represented the most prominent organic functional groups in the spectra, with two CH2 stretching vibrations at approximately 2926 cm-1 and 2852 cm-1. The peak areas of these vibrations correlated well with the amount of total organic carbon (TOC), indicating that the OM evolution may be represented by the variation in CH2 with depth. Infrared spectra obtained from samples that were heated to 105 °C, 250 °C and 550 °C suggest that the aliphatic OM consists of two fractions: combined OM and free OM. The former was more stable between 250 °C and 550 °C. This phenomenon was correlated with the H2O stretching vibration near 3300 cm-1, indicating that this OM was bonded to the clay via H2O bridges. The location of the broad H2O stretching band gradually shifted with depth from 3298 cm-1 to a higher wavenumber of 3305 cm-1, whereas the corresponding bending band shifted rapidly from 1640 cm-1 to 1605 cm-1, indicating a weakening of the hydrogen bond and a decrease in the combined OM fraction. The correlation between the diagenetic smectite illitization and the decrease in the amount of combined OM leads to the conclusion that the smectite illitization may be a driving force for the OM desorption. This study demonstrates the usefulness of the thermo-DRIFT approach for exploring diagenetic OM-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks.

  19. DRIFT spectroscopic study of diagenetic organic-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingli; Cai, Jingong; Song, Guoqi; Ji, Junfeng

    2015-09-01

    Thermo diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy was used to study the diagenetic organic-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks from the Dongying Depression, Bohai Bay Basin, China. The results indicated that aliphatic organic matter (OM) represented the most prominent organic functional groups in the spectra, with two CH2 stretching vibrations at approximately 2926 cm(-1) and 2852 cm(-1). The peak areas of these vibrations correlated well with the amount of total organic carbon (TOC), indicating that the OM evolution may be represented by the variation in CH2 with depth. Infrared spectra obtained from samples that were heated to 105 °C, 250 °C and 550 °C suggest that the aliphatic OM consists of two fractions: combined OM and free OM. The former was more stable between 250 °C and 550 °C. This phenomenon was correlated with the H2O stretching vibration near 3300 cm(-1), indicating that this OM was bonded to the clay via H2O bridges. The location of the broad H2O stretching band gradually shifted with depth from 3298 cm(-1) to a higher wavenumber of 3305 cm(-1), whereas the corresponding bending band shifted rapidly from 1640 cm(-1) to 1605 cm(-1), indicating a weakening of the hydrogen bond and a decrease in the combined OM fraction. The correlation between the diagenetic smectite illitization and the decrease in the amount of combined OM leads to the conclusion that the smectite illitization may be a driving force for the OM desorption. This study demonstrates the usefulness of the thermo-DRIFT approach for exploring diagenetic OM-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks.

  20. DRIFT spectroscopic study of diagenetic organic-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingli; Cai, Jingong; Song, Guoqi; Ji, Junfeng

    2015-09-01

    Thermo diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy was used to study the diagenetic organic-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks from the Dongying Depression, Bohai Bay Basin, China. The results indicated that aliphatic organic matter (OM) represented the most prominent organic functional groups in the spectra, with two CH2 stretching vibrations at approximately 2926 cm(-1) and 2852 cm(-1). The peak areas of these vibrations correlated well with the amount of total organic carbon (TOC), indicating that the OM evolution may be represented by the variation in CH2 with depth. Infrared spectra obtained from samples that were heated to 105 °C, 250 °C and 550 °C suggest that the aliphatic OM consists of two fractions: combined OM and free OM. The former was more stable between 250 °C and 550 °C. This phenomenon was correlated with the H2O stretching vibration near 3300 cm(-1), indicating that this OM was bonded to the clay via H2O bridges. The location of the broad H2O stretching band gradually shifted with depth from 3298 cm(-1) to a higher wavenumber of 3305 cm(-1), whereas the corresponding bending band shifted rapidly from 1640 cm(-1) to 1605 cm(-1), indicating a weakening of the hydrogen bond and a decrease in the combined OM fraction. The correlation between the diagenetic smectite illitization and the decrease in the amount of combined OM leads to the conclusion that the smectite illitization may be a driving force for the OM desorption. This study demonstrates the usefulness of the thermo-DRIFT approach for exploring diagenetic OM-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks. PMID:25879983

  1. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of Dibenzofuran, Alkyldibenzofurans, and Benzo[b]naphthofurans in crude oils and source rock extracts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meijun Li,; Ellis, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Dibenzofuran (DBF), its alkylated homologues, and benzo[b]naphthofurans (BNFs) are common oxygen-heterocyclic aromatic compounds in crude oils and source rock extracts. A series of positional isomers of alkyldibenzofuran and benzo[b]naphthofuran were identified in mass chromatograms by comparison with internal standards and standard retention indices. The response factors of dibenzofuran in relation to internal standards were obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses of a set of mixed solutions with different concentration ratios. Perdeuterated dibenzofuran and dibenzothiophene are optimal internal standards for quantitative analyses of furan compounds in crude oils and source rock extracts. The average concentration of the total DBFs in oils derived from siliciclastic lacustrine rock extracts from the Beibuwan Basin, South China Sea, was 518 μg/g, which is about 5 times that observed in the oils from carbonate source rocks in the Tarim Basin, Northwest China. The BNFs occur ubiquitously in source rock extracts and related oils of various origins. The results of this work suggest that the relative abundance of benzo[b]naphthofuran isomers, that is, the benzo[b]naphtho[2,1-d]furan/{benzo[b]naphtho[2,1-d]furan + benzo[b]naphtho[1,2-d]furan} ratio, may be a potential molecular geochemical parameter to indicate oil migration pathways and distances.

  2. Growing Pebbles and Conceptual Prisms - Understanding the Source of Student Misconceptions about Rock Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusnick, Judi

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes narrative essays--stories of rock formation--written by pre-service elementary school teachers. Reports startling misconceptions among preservice teachers on pebbles that grow, human involvement in rock formation, and sedimentary rocks forming as puddles as dry up, even though these students had completed a college level course on Earth…

  3. Chapter 4: The Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Composite Total Petroleum System, Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.C.; Finn, Thomas M.; Kirschbaum, Mark A.; Roberts, Stephen B.; Roberts, Laura N.R.; Cook, Troy; Taylor, David J.

    2007-01-01

    The Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Composite Total Petroleum System (TPS) of the Wind River Basin Province includes all strata from the base of the Lower Cretaceous Cloverly Formation to the base of the Waltman Shale Member of the Paleocene age Fort Union Formation and, where the Waltman is absent, includes strata as young as the Eocene Wind River Formation. Locally, Cretaceous-sourced gas migrated into strata as old as the Mississippian Madison Limestone, and in these areas the TPS extends stratigraphically downward to include these reservoirs. The extensive vertical migration of gases in highly fractured areas of the Wind River Basin led to the commingling of gases from several Upper Cretaceous and lower Tertiary sources, thus only two petroleum systems are recognized in these rocks, the Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Composite TPS, the subject of this report, and the Waltman Shale TPS described by Roberts and others (Chapter 5, this CD-ROM). The Cretaceous-lower Tertiary Composite TPS was subdivided into (1) seven continuous gas assessment units (AU): (a) Frontier-Muddy Continuous Gas AU, (b) Cody Sandstone Continuous Gas AU, (c) Mesaverde--Meeteetse Sandstone Gas AU, (d) Lance-Fort Union Sandstone Gas AU, (e) Mesaverde Coalbed Gas AU, (f) Meeteetse Coalbed Gas AU, and (g) Fort Union Coalbed Gas AU; (2) one continuous oil assessement unit--- Cody Fractured Shale Continuous Oil AU; and (3) one conventional assessment Unit--- Cretaceous-Tertiary Conventional Oil and Gas AU. Estimates of undiscovered resources having the potential for additions to reserves were made for all but the Cody Fractured Shale Continuous Oil AU, which is considered hypothetical and was not quantitively assessed. The mean estimate of the total oil is 41.99 million barrels, mean estimate of gas is 2.39 trillion cubic feet, and mean estimate of natural gas liquids is 20.55 million barrels. For gas, 480.66 billion cubic feet (BCFG) is estimated for the Frontier-Muddy Continuous Gas AU, 115.34 BCFG for

  4. Nanoscale Compositional Relations in Lunar Rock Patina: Deciphering Sources for Patina Components on an Apollo 17 Station 6 Boulder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Noble, S. K.; Keller, L. P.

    2014-01-01

    Space weathering on the Moon and other airless bodies modifies the surfaces of regolith grains as well as the space-exposed surfaces of larger rocks and boulders. As space weathering witness plates, rocks and boulders are distinguished from regolith grains based on their ability to persist as physically intact substrates over longer time scales before being disaggregated by impact processes. Because lunar surfaces, including exposed rocks, quickly develop an optically thick layer of patina, it is important to understand the compositional relationship between patinas and their underlying rock substrates, particularly to support remote-sensing of rocky lunar terrains. Based on analytical TEM techniques, supported by focused ion beam (FIB) cross-sectioning, we have begun to systematize the multi-layer microstructural complexity of patinas on rock samples with a range of space exposure histories. Our on-going work has particularly focused on lunar rock 76015, both because it has a long (approx. 22 my) exposure history, and because its surface was exposed to patina development approximately 1 m off the regolith surface on a boulder in the Apollo 17 Station 6 boulder field. Potential sources for the 76015 patina therefore include impact-melted and vaporized material derived from the local rock substrate, as well as from the mix of large boulders and regolith in the Station 6 area. While similar, there are differences in the mineralogy and chemistry of the rocks and regolith at Station 6. We were interested to see if these, or other sources, could be distinguished in the average composition, as well as the compositional nanostratigraphy of the 76015 patina. To date we have acquired a total of 9 TEM FIB cross-sections from the 76015 patina, giving us reasonable confidence of being able to arrive at an integrated average for the patina major element composition based on analytical TEM methods.

  5. An effective methodology for integrating displacement and velocity data from different sources for rock glaciers monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitta, Marcello; Thiebes, Benni; Cuozzo, Giovanni; Callegari, Mattia; Schlögel, Romy; Chinellato, Giulia; Kenner, Robert

    2016-04-01

    different data sources are available and an integrative method is needed. In our presentation, we will highlight the results of rock glacier monitoring and the subsequent data integration, and also share our experiences on applying the aforementioned methodologies in a high-alpine environment.

  6. Petroleum evaluation of Ordovician black shale source rocks in northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.G.; Roen, J.B.

    1988-08-01

    A preliminary appraisal of the Ordovician black shale source beds in the northern part of the Appalachian basin shows that the sequence is composed of the Upper Ordovician Utica Shale and its correlatives. The shales range in thickness from less than 200 ft in the west to more than 600 ft in the east along the Allegheny Front. Structure contours indicate that the shales plunge from 2,000 ft below sea level in central Ohio and to about 12,000 ft below sea level in central and northeastern Pennsylvania. Geochemical analyses of 175 samples indicate that the sequence has an average total organic carbon content (TOC) of 1.34%. Conodont alteration indices (CAI) and production indices indicate that the stages of maturation range from diagenetic in the less deeply buried western part of the basin, which probably produced mostly oil, to catagenetic in the more deeply buried eastern part of the basin, which probably produced mostly gas. Potential for continued hydrocarbon generation is poor in the east and fair to moderate in the western part of the basin. If the authors assume that these rocks have produced hydrocarbons, the hydrocarbons have since migrated. Using an average TOC of 1%, an organic carbon to hydrocarbon conversion factor of 10%, and a volume of rock within the oil and gas generation range as defined by CAI values of 1.5-4, the Ordovician shale could have generated 165 billion bbl of oil or equivalent. If only 1% of the 165 billion bbl was trapped after migration, then 1.65 billion bbl of oil or equivalent would be available for discovery.

  7. Cretaceous shallow drilling, US Western Interior: Core research. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, M.A.

    1993-02-17

    This project is a continuing multidisciplinary study of middle to Upper Cretaceous marine carbonate and clastic rocks in the Utah-Colorado-Kansas corridor of the old Cretaceous seaway that extended from the Gulf Coast to the Arctic during maximum Cretaceous transgressions. It is collaborative between in the US Geological Survey (W.E. Dean, P.I.) and University researchers led by The Pennsylvania State University(M.A. Arthur, P.I.) and funded by DOE and the USGS, in part. Research focusses on the Greenhom, Niobrara and lower Pierre Shale units and their equivalents, combining biostratigraphic/paleoecologic studies, inorganic, organic and stable isotopic geochemical studies, mineralogical investigations and high-resolution geophysical logging. This research requires unweathered samples and continuous smooth ``exposures`` in the form of cores from at least 4 relatively shallow reference holes (i.e. < 1000m) in transect from east to west across the basin. The major initial effort was recovery in Year 1 of the project of continuous cores from each site in the transect. This drilling provided samples and logs of strata ranging from pelagic sequences that contain organic-carbon-rich marine source rocks to nearshore coal-bearing units. This transect also will provide information on the extent of thermal maturation and migration of hydrocarbons in organic-carbon-rich strata along a burial gradient.

  8. A total petroleum system of the Browse Basin, Australia; Late Jurassic, Early Cretaceous-Mesozoic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bishop, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    The Browse Basin Province 3913, offshore northern Australia, contains one important petroleum system, Late Jurassic, Early Cretaceous-Mesozoic. It is comprised of Late Jurassic through Early Cretaceous source rocks deposited in restricted marine environments and various Mesozoic reservoir rocks deposited in deep-water fan to fluvial settings. Jurassic age intraformational shales and claystones and Cretaceous regional claystones seal the reservoirs. Since 1967, when exploration began in this 105,000 km2 area, fewer than 40 wells have been drilled and only one recent oil discovery is considered potentially commercial. Prior to the most recent oil discovery, on the eastern side of the basin, a giant gas field was discovered in 1971, under a modern reef on the west side of the basin. Several additional oil and gas discoveries and shows were made elsewhere. A portion of the Vulcan sub-basin lies within Province 3913 where a small field, confirmed in 1987, produced 18.8 million barrels of oil (MMBO) up to 1995 and has since been shut in.

  9. Geochemistry, palynology, and regional geology of worldclass Upper Devonian source rocks in the Madre de Dios basin, Bolivia

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, K.E.; Conrad, K.T.; Carpenter, D.G.; Wagner, J.B.

    1996-08-01

    Recent exploration drilling indicates the existence of world-class source rock in the Madre de Dios basin, Bolivia. In the Pando-1 X and -2X wells, over 200 m of poorly bioturbated, organic-rich (TOC = 3-16 wt.%) prodelta to shelf mudstones in the Frasnian-Famennian Tomachi Formation contain oil-prone organic matter (hydrogen index = 400-600 mg HC/g TOC). Our calculated source prolificity indices for this interval in these wells (SPI = 15-18 tons of hydrocarbons per square meter of source rock) exceed that for the Upper Jurassic in Central Saudi Arabia. The Tomachi interval is lithologically equivalent to the Colpacucho Formation in the northern Altiplano, the Iquiri Formation in the Cordillera Oriental, and is coeval with other excellent source rocks in North America, Africa, and Eurasia. All of these rocks were deposited under conditions favorable for accumulation of organic matter, including a global highstand and high productivity. However, the Madre de Dios basin was situated at high latitude during the Late Devonian and some of the deposits are interpreted to be of glacial origin, indicating conditions not generally associated with organic-rich deposition. A biomarker and palynological study of Upper Devonian rocks in the Pando-1X well suggests deposition under conditions similar to certain modern fjords. High productivity resulted in preservation of abundant organic matter in the bottom sediments despite a cold, toxic water column. Low-sulfur crude oil produced from the Pando-1X well is geochemically similar to, but more mature than, extracts from associated organic-rich Tomachi samples, and was generated from deeper equivalents of these rocks.

  10. Isotope geochemistry of mercury in source rocks, mineral deposits and spring deposits of the California Coast Ranges, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, C.N.; Kesler, S.E.; Blum, J.D.; Rytuba, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    We present here the first study of the isotopic composition of mercury in rocks, ore deposits, and active spring deposits from the California Coast Ranges, a part of Earth's crust with unusually extensive evidence of mercury mobility and enrichment. The Franciscan Complex and Great Valley Sequence, which form the bedrock in the California Coast Ranges, are intruded and overlain by Tertiary volcanic rocks including the Clear Lake Volcanic Sequence. These rocks contain two types of mercury deposits, hot-spring deposits that form at shallow depths (< 300??m) and silica-carbonate deposits that extend to depths of 1000??m. Active springs and geothermal areas continue to precipitate Hg and Au and are modern analogues to the fossil hydrothermal systems preserved in the ore deposits. The Franciscan Complex and Great Valley Sequence contain clastic sedimentary rocks with higher concentrations of mercury than volcanic rocks of the Clear Lake Volcanic Field. Mean mercury isotopic compositions (??202Hg) for all three rock units are similar, although the range of values in Franciscan Complex rocks is greater than in either Great Valley or Clear Lake rocks. Hot spring and silica-carbonate mercury deposits have similar average mercury isotopic compositions that are indistinguishable from averages for the three rock units, although ??202Hg values for the mercury deposits have a greater variance than the country rocks. Precipitates from spring and geothermal waters in the area have similarly large variance and a mean ??202Hg value that is significantly lower than the ore deposits and rocks. These observations indicate that there is little or no isotopic fractionation (< ?? 0.5???) during release of mercury from its source rocks into hydrothermal solutions. Isotopic fractionation does appear to take place during transport and concentration of mercury in deposits, however, especially in their uppermost parts. Boiling of hydrothermal fluids, separation of a mercury-bearing CO2 vapor

  11. Oxygen isotope constraints on the origin of impact glasses from the cretaceous-tertiary boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, J.D.; Chamberlain, C.P. )

    1992-08-21

    Laser-extraction oxygen isotope and major element analyses of individual glass spherules from Haitian Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary sediments demonstrate that the glasses fall on a mixing line between an isotopically heavy ({delta}{sup 18}O = 14 per mil) high-calcium composition and an isotopically light ({delta}{sup 18}O = 6 per mil) high-silicon composition. This trend can be explained by melting of heterogeneous source rocks during the impact of an asteroid (or comet) {approximately}65 million years ago. The data indicate that the glasses are a mixture of carbonate and silicate rocks and exclude derivation of the glasses either by volcanic processes or as mixtures of sulfate-high evaporate and silicate rocks.

  12. Heat transport by fluids during late Cretaceous regional metamorphism in the Big Maria Mountains, southeastern California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoisch, T.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Big Maria Mountains of SE California preserve evidence of a large-scale fluid flux that accompanied regional metamorphism in late Cretaceous time. Neither magmatism nor radioactive heat sources are adequate to explain the T of metamorphism. Simultaneously crystallizing plutons at different levels within the crust could have contributed to the overall hot fluid flux. A fluid:rock ratio of 17:1 may be calculated given average conditions of 3 kbar, 500oC, an infiltrating fluid of composition XH2O = 1.0, an equilibrium fluid composition of XH2O = 0.97, and 90% wollastonite in the final rock form the reaction quartz + calcite = CO2 + wollastonite. The minimum quantity of fluid of 1.7 rock volume was estimated to pass through the area if the fluid was approximately at granite solidus T at the start. Deep penetrative structures within the crust may have served to channel fluids. -L.C.H.

  13. Natural arsenic in Triassic rocks: A source of drinking-water contamination in Bavaria, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrichs, Gerold; Udluft, Peter

    The aquifer system of the Upper Triassic Keuper Sandstone, an important source of drinking water in northern Bavaria, is affected by elevated arsenic concentrations. Within the study area of 8000km2, no evidence exists for any artificial source of arsenic. Data from about 500 deep water wells show that in approximately 160 wells arsenic concentrations are 10-150μg/L. The regional distribution of arsenic in the groundwater shows that elevated arsenic concentrations are probably related to specific lithofacies of the aquifers that contain more sediments of terrestrial origin. Geochemical measurements on samples from four selected well cores show that arsenic has accumulated in the rocks. This indigenous arsenic is the source of arsenic in the groundwater of certain facies of the middle unit of the Keuper Sandstone. Résumé Le système aquifère des grès du Keuper, ressource en eau potable importante du nord de la Bavière, est marqué par des concentrations en arsenic élevées. Dans la région étudiée, qui s'étend sur 8000km2, il n'existe aucun indice d'une source artificielle d'arsenic. Les données provenant d'environ 500 puits profonds montrent que dans environ 160 puits les concentrations en arsenic sont comprises entre 10-150μg/L. La distribution régionale de l'arsenic dans les eaux souterraines montre que les concentrations élevées en arsenic sont probablement associées à des lithofaciès spécifiques qui contiennent plus de sédiments d'origine continentale. Des analyses géochimiques sur des échantillons provenant des carottes de quatre puits sélectionnés montrent que l'arsenic s'est accumulé dans ces roches. L'arsenic autochtone est la source de l'arsenic dans les eaux souterraines de certains faciès de l'unité médiane des grès du Keuper.

  14. Early Cretaceous arc volcanic suite in Cebu Island, Central Philippines and its implications on paleo-Pacific plate subduction: Constraints from geochemistry, zircon U-Pb geochronology and Lu-Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jianghong; Yang, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Santosh, M.

    2015-08-01

    The Philippine island arc system is a collage of amalgamated terranes of oceanic, continental and island arc affinities. Here we investigate a volcanic suite in Cebu Island of central Philippines, including basalt, diabase dike, basaltic pyroclastic rock and porphyritic andesite. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb geochronology of zircon grains from the porphyritic andesite and pyroclastic rock yielded ages of 126 ± 3 Ma and 119 ± 2 Ma, respectively, indicating an Early Cretaceous age. The age distribution of the detrital zircons from river sand in the area displays a peak at ca. 118 Ma, close to the age of the pyroclastic rock. The early Cretaceous volcanic rocks in the central Philippines were previously regarded as parts of ophiolite complexes by most investigators, whereas the Cebu volcanics are distinct from these, and display calc-alkaline affinity and island arc setting, characterized by high LREE/HREE ratios and low HFSE contents. These features are similar to the Early Cretaceous arc basalts in the Amami Plateau and east Halmahera in the northernmost and southernmost West Philippine Basin respectively. Zircon Hf isotopes of the pyroclastic rocks show depleted nature similar to those of the Amami Plateau basalts, implying the subducted Pacific-type MORB as probable source. Zircon Hf isotopes of the porphyritic andesite show slight enrichment relative to that of the pyroclastic rocks and MORB, indicating subducted sediments as a minor end-member in the source. The Hf isotopic compositions of the volcanic rocks are also reflected in the detrital zircons from the river sands. We propose that the volcanic rocks of Cebu Island were derived from partial melting of sub-arc mantle wedge which was metasomatized by dehydration of subducted oceanic crust together with minor pelagic sediments. Within the tectonic environment of Southeast Asia during Early Cretaceous, the volcanic rocks in Cebu Island can be correlated to the subduction of paleo-Pacific plate. The Early Cretaceous

  15. Mineralogy of Apollo 15415 ?genesis rock' - Source of anorthosite on moon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, I. M.; Smith, J. V.

    1971-01-01

    Results of electron microprobe analyses of plagioclase points and pyroxene grains of Apollo 15415 ?genesis rock.' It is pointed out that no evidence of cumulate textures has yet appeared to support suggestions of extensive crystal-liquid differentiation producing an anorthositic crust or a lunar crust composed of a mixture of plagioclase-rich rock, basalts and minor ultramafic material, which require that plagioclase crystals float in a basaltic liquid. The plagioclase in 15415 does not show cumulate texture either. It is noted that it remains to be seen whether rock 15415 is correctly named the ?genesis rock.'

  16. Uranium enrichment in lacustrine oil source rocks of the Chang 7 member of the Yanchang Formation, Erdos Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hua; Zhang, Wenzheng; Wu, Kai; Li, Shanpeng; Peng, Ping'an; Qin, Yan

    2010-09-01

    The oil source rocks of the Chang 7 member of the Yanchang Formation in the Erdos Basin were deposited during maximum lake extension during the Late Triassic and show a remarkable positive uranium anomaly, with an average uranium content as high as 51.1 μg/g. Uranium is enriched together with organic matter and elements such as Fe, S, Cu, V and Mo in the rocks. The detailed biological markers determined in the Chang 7 member indicate that the lake water column was oxidizing during deposition of the Chang 7 member. However, redox indicators for sediments such as S 2- content, V/Sc and V/(V + Ni) ratios demonstrate that it was a typical anoxic diagenetic setting. The contrasted redox conditions between the water column and the sediment with a very high content of organic matter provided favorable physical and chemical conditions for syngenetic uranium enrichment in the oil source rocks of the Chang 7 member. Possible uranium sources may be the extensive U-rich volcanic ash that resulted from contemporaneous volcanic eruption and uranium material transported by hydrothermal conduits into the basin. The uranium from terrestrial clastics was unlike because uranium concentration was not higher in the margin area of basin where the terrestrial material input was high. As indicated by correlative analysis, the oil source rocks of the Chang 7 member show high gamma-ray values for radioactive well log data that reflect a positive uranium anomaly and are characterized by high resistance, low electric potential and low density. As a result, well log data can be used to identify positive uranium anomalies and spatial distribution of the oil source rocks in the Erdos Basin. The estimation of the total uranium reserves in the Chang 7 member attain 0.8 × 10 8 t.

  17. The origin, source, and cycling of methane in deep crystalline rock biosphere.

    PubMed

    Kietäväinen, Riikka; Purkamo, Lotta

    2015-01-01

    The emerging interest in using stable bedrock formations for industrial purposes, e.g., nuclear waste disposal, has increased the need for understanding microbiological and geochemical processes in deep crystalline rock environments, including the carbon cycle. Considering the origin and evolution of life on Earth, these environments may also serve as windows to the past. Various geological, chemical, and biological processes can influence the deep carbon cycle. Conditions of CH4 formation, available substrates and time scales can be drastically different from surface environments. This paper reviews the origin, source, and cycling of methane in deep terrestrial crystalline bedrock with an emphasis on microbiology. In addition to potential formation pathways of CH4, microbial consumption of CH4 is also discussed. Recent studies on the origin of CH4 in continental bedrock environments have shown that the traditional separation of biotic and abiotic CH4 by the isotopic composition can be misleading in substrate-limited environments, such as the deep crystalline bedrock. Despite of similarities between Precambrian continental sites in Fennoscandia, South Africa and North America, where deep methane cycling has been studied, common physicochemical properties which could explain the variation in the amount of CH4 and presence or absence of CH4 cycling microbes were not found. However, based on their preferred carbon metabolism, methanogenic microbes appeared to have similar spatial distribution among the different sites. PMID:26236303

  18. The origin, source, and cycling of methane in deep crystalline rock biosphere

    PubMed Central

    Kietäväinen, Riikka; Purkamo, Lotta

    2015-01-01

    The emerging interest in using stable bedrock formations for industrial purposes, e.g., nuclear waste disposal, has increased the need for understanding microbiological and geochemical processes in deep crystalline rock environments, including the carbon cycle. Considering the origin and evolution of life on Earth, these environments may also serve as windows to the past. Various geological, chemical, and biological processes can influence the deep carbon cycle. Conditions of CH4 formation, available substrates and time scales can be drastically different from surface environments. This paper reviews the origin, source, and cycling of methane in deep terrestrial crystalline bedrock with an emphasis on microbiology. In addition to potential formation pathways of CH4, microbial consumption of CH4 is also discussed. Recent studies on the origin of CH4 in continental bedrock environments have shown that the traditional separation of biotic and abiotic CH4 by the isotopic composition can be misleading in substrate-limited environments, such as the deep crystalline bedrock. Despite of similarities between Precambrian continental sites in Fennoscandia, South Africa and North America, where deep methane cycling has been studied, common physicochemical properties which could explain the variation in the amount of CH4 and presence or absence of CH4 cycling microbes were not found. However, based on their preferred carbon metabolism, methanogenic microbes appeared to have similar spatial distribution among the different sites. PMID:26236303

  19. The origin, source, and cycling of methane in deep crystalline rock biosphere.

    PubMed

    Kietäväinen, Riikka; Purkamo, Lotta

    2015-01-01

    The emerging interest in using stable bedrock formations for industrial purposes, e.g., nuclear waste disposal, has increased the need for understanding microbiological and geochemical processes in deep crystalline rock environments, including the carbon cycle. Considering the origin and evolution of life on Earth, these environments may also serve as windows to the past. Various geological, chemical, and biological processes can influence the deep carbon cycle. Conditions of CH4 formation, available substrates and time scales can be drastically different from surface environments. This paper reviews the origin, source, and cycling of methane in deep terrestrial crystalline bedrock with an emphasis on microbiology. In addition to potential formation pathways of CH4, microbial consumption of CH4 is also discussed. Recent studies on the origin of CH4 in continental bedrock environments have shown that the traditional separation of biotic and abiotic CH4 by the isotopic composition can be misleading in substrate-limited environments, such as the deep crystalline bedrock. Despite of similarities between Precambrian continental sites in Fennoscandia, South Africa and North America, where deep methane cycling has been studied, common physicochemical properties which could explain the variation in the amount of CH4 and presence or absence of CH4 cycling microbes were not found. However, based on their preferred carbon metabolism, methanogenic microbes appeared to have similar spatial distribution among the different sites.

  20. Pyrolysis comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography study of petroleum source rock.

    PubMed

    Wang, Frank Cheng-Yu; Walters, Clifford C

    2007-08-01

    Detailed compositional analyses of sedimentary organic matter can provide information on its biotic input, environment of deposition, and level of thermal maturation. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography (py-GC), often coupled with a mass spectrometer (py-GC/MS), is one technique used to provide this information. New developments in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC or 2D-GC), coupled with pyrolysis (py-GC x GC), offer the prospect of providing more complete and quantitative compositional information of complex organic solids, such as kerogen and coals. This study will describe applications of pyrolysis-GC x GC to the characterization of petroleum source rocks using flame ionization detector (FID) and sulfur chemiluminescence detector (SCD). In the hydrocarbon analysis by FID, paraffins, naphthenes, and aromatics form distinct two-dimensional separated groups. In the analysis with SCD, sulfur-containing compounds can be distinguished as different classes, such as mercaptans, sulfides, thiophenes, benzothiophenes, and dibenzothiophenes. Single components or summed bands of homologous components can be analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. With these detailed molecular fingerprints, the relations between kerogen composition and its biotic input, environment of deposition, and thermal maturation may be better understood.

  1. Rocks of the Thirtynine Mile volcanic field as possible sources of uranium for epigenetic deposits in central Colorado, USA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    The most likely volcanic source rock for uranium in epigenetic deposits of the Tallahassee Creek uranium district and nearby areas is the Wall Mountain Tuff. The widespread occurrence of the Tuff, its high apparent original uranium content, approx 11 ppm, and its apparent loss of uranium from devitrification and other alteration suggest its role in providing that element. An estimate of the original Th/U ratio is based on the present thorium and uranium contents of the basal vitrophyre of the Tuff from Castle Rock Gulch, Hecla Junction and other areas.-from Author

  2. REDBACK: an Open-Source Highly Scalable Simulation Tool for Rock Mechanics with Dissipative Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, T.; Veveakis, M.; Paesold, M.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2014-12-01

    Multiphysics modelling has become an indispensable tool for geoscientists to simulate the complex behaviours observed in their various fields of study where multiple processes are involved, including thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical (THMC) laws. This modelling activity involves simulations that are computationally expensive and its soaring uptake is tightly linked to the increasing availability of supercomputing power and easy access to powerful nonlinear solvers such as PETSc (http://www.mcs.anl.gov/petsc/). The Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) is a finite-element, multiphysics framework (http://mooseframework.org) that can harness such computational power and allow scientists to develop easily some tightly-coupled fully implicit multiphysics simulations that run automatically in parallel on large clusters. This open-source framework provides a powerful tool to collaborate on numerical modelling activities and we are contributing to its development with REDBACK (https://github.com/pou036/redback), a module for Rock mEchanics with Dissipative feedBACKs. REDBACK builds on the tensor mechanics finite strain implementation available in MOOSE to provide a THMC simulator where the energetic formulation highlights the importance of all dissipative terms in the coupled system of equations. We show first applications of fully coupled dehydration reactions triggering episodic fluid transfer through shear zones (Alevizos et al, 2014). The dimensionless approach used allows focusing on the critical underlying variables which are driving the resulting behaviours observed and this tool is specifically designed to study material instabilities underpinning geological features like faulting, folding, boudinage, shearing, fracturing, etc. REDBACK provides a collaborative and educational tool which captures the physical and mathematical understanding of such material instabilities and provides an easy way to apply this knowledge to realistic

  3. Evidence from the lamarck granodiorite for rapid late cretaceous crust formation in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, D.S.; Frost, T.P.; Glazner, A.F.

    1992-01-01

    Strontium and neodymium isotopic data for rocks from the voluminous 90-million-year-old Lamarck intrusive suite in the Sierra Nevada batholith, California, show little variation across a compositional range from gabbro to granite. Data for three different gabbro intrusions within the suite are identical within analytical error and are consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle source. Recognition of local involvement of enriched mantle during generation of the Sierran batholith modifies estimates of crustal growth rates in the United States. These data indicate that parts of the Sierra Nevada batholith may consist almost entirely of juvenile crust added during Cretaceous magmatism.

  4. Evidence from the lamarck granodiorite for rapid late cretaceous crust formation in california.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D S; Glazner, A F; Frost, T P

    1992-12-18

    Strontium and neodymium isotopic data for rocks from the voluminous 90-million-year-old Lamarck intrusive suite in the Sierra Nevada batholith, California, show little variation across a compositional range from gabbro to granite. Data for three different gabbro intrusions within the suite are identical within analytical error and are consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle source. Recognition of local involvement of enriched mantle during generation of the Sierran batholith modifies estimates of crustal growth rates in the United States. These data indicate that parts of the Sierra Nevada batholith may consist almost entirely of juvenile crust added during Cretaceous magmatism.

  5. Evidence from the lamarck granodiorite for rapid late cretaceous crust formation in california.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D S; Glazner, A F; Frost, T P

    1992-12-18

    Strontium and neodymium isotopic data for rocks from the voluminous 90-million-year-old Lamarck intrusive suite in the Sierra Nevada batholith, California, show little variation across a compositional range from gabbro to granite. Data for three different gabbro intrusions within the suite are identical within analytical error and are consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle source. Recognition of local involvement of enriched mantle during generation of the Sierran batholith modifies estimates of crustal growth rates in the United States. These data indicate that parts of the Sierra Nevada batholith may consist almost entirely of juvenile crust added during Cretaceous magmatism. PMID:17836186

  6. Fractured-rock aquifers, understanding an increasingly important source of water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, Allen M.

    2002-01-01

    Ground water is one of the Nation?s most important natural resources. It provides drinking water to communities, supports industry and agriculture, and sustains streams and wetlands. A long record of contributions exists in understanding ground-water movement in sand and gravel aquifers; historically, these aquifers were easily accessible and the first to be investigated. With increased demand for water, communities are looking to fractured-rock aquifers, where water moves through fractures in the rock. Frac-tures, however, may not always convey or store large quantities of water. Understanding ground-water flow through fractured-rock aquifers is an area of ground-water research that will have increasing importance to our Nation over the coming years. Many areas of the United States rely on fractured-rock aquifers for water supply. In addition, areas experiencing population growth in the Northeast, Southeast, and mountainous regions of the West are likely to rely heavily on water supplies from fractured-rock aquifers. Finding water for thirsty communities, however, is not the only societal issue requiring an understanding of ground-water flow in fractured rock. Land-use practices affect water quality in fractured-rock aquifers, particularly where ground water flows rapidly through fractures. Fractured rock aquifers also are viewed as potential repositories for radioactive and other types of waste, where it is desirable for the ground water to be inaccessible or move at a very slow rate.

  7. Thermal and petroleum-generation history of the Mississippian Eleana Formation and Tertiary source rocks, Yucca Mountain Area, Southern Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    A geochemical and geologic assessment of petroleum potential in the Yucca Mountain area indicates little remaining potential for significant oil and gas generation in the Mississippian Eleana Formation or related Paleozoic rocks, and good but a really restricted potential in Tertiary rocks in Area 8 of the Nevada Test Site. Mesozoic source rocks are not present in the Yucca Mountain area. The Tertiary source rocks in Area 8 of the Nevada Test Site are typically carbon-rich, and where hydrogen-rich, they are good oil-prone source rocks that are immature to marginally mature with respect to oil and gas generation. A geologically similar occurrence of hydrothermally altered Tertiary source rocks at north Bare Mountain retains little hydrocarbon generation capacity. The implication is that hydrocarbons were generated during hydrothermal alteration and have since migrated out of the source rocks or alive been lost during exhumation. A reconstructed thermal history of the Yucca Mountain area, based on the Eleana Formation, indicates petroleum was generated in the Late Paleozoic and possibly Early Mesozoic and that the oil was lost or metamorphosed to pyrobitumen during later heating, probably related to igneous activity. The Tertiary rocks are still capable of generating oil and gas, but little potential exists for a major hydrocarbon discovery due to the restricted occurrence of good source rocks and their marginal thermal maturity when situated away from intrusions.

  8. Organic geochemistry and petrology of oil source rocks, Carpathian Overthrust region, southeastern Poland - Implications for petroleum generation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kruge, M.A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Solecki, A.; Stankiewicz, B.A.

    1996-01-01

    The organic mailer rich Oligocene Menilite black shales and mudstones are widely distributed in the Carpathian Overthrust region of southeastern Poland and have excellent hydrocarbon generation potential, according to TOC, Rock-Eval, and petrographic data. Extractable organic matter was characterized by an equable distribution of steranes by carbon number, by varying amounts of 28,30-dinor-hopane, 18??(H)-oleanane and by a distinctive group of C24 ring-A degraded triterpanes. The Menilite samples ranged in maturity from pre-generative to mid-oil window levels, with the most mature in the southeastern portion of the study area. Carpathian petroleum samples from Campanian Oligocene sandstone reservoirs were similar in biomarker composition to the Menilite rock extracts. Similarities in aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon distributions between petroleum asphaltene and source rock pyrolyzates provided further evidence genetically linking Menilite kerogens with Carpathian oils.

  9. HYDROCARBON SOURCE ROCK EVALUATION OF MIDDLE PROTEROZOIC SOLOR CHURCH FORMATION, NORTH AMERICAN MID-CONTINENT RIFT SYSTEM, RICE COUNTY, MINNESOTA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, J.R.; Morey, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrocarbon source rock evaluation of the Middle Proterozoic Solor Church Formation (Keweenawan Supergroup) as sampled in the Lonsdale 65-1 well, Rice County, shows that: the rocks are organic matter lean; the organic matter is thermally post-mature, probably near the transition between the wet gas phase of catagenesis and metagenesis; and the rocks have minimal potential for producing additional hydrocarbons. The observed thermal maturity of the organic matter requires significantly greater burial depths, a higher geothermal gradient, or both. It is likely, that thermal maturation of the organic matter in the Solor Church took place relatively early, and that any hydrocarbons generated during this early phase were probably lost prior to deposition of the overlying formation.

  10. Methane-derived authigenic carbonates of mid-Cretaceous age in southern Tibet: Types of carbonate concretions, carbon sources, and formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Huimin; Chen, Xi; Wang, Chengshan; Zhao, Dekun; Weissert, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Methane-derived authigenic carbonates with distinctive structures and morphologies have been documented worldwide, but they are rarely found from ancient strata in the Eastern Tethys Ocean. The methane-derived authigenic carbonates found in southern Tibet are developed in calcareous or silty shales of mid-Cretaceous age in the Xigaze forearc basin and in the Tethyan Himalaya tectonic zone. The morphology, mineralogy, elemental geochemistry and composition of carbon and oxygen isotopes of these carbonates are studied in detail. The carbonates have nodular, tubular, and tabular morphologies. They are primarily composed of carbonate cement that binds and partly replaces host sediment grains; host siliciclastic sediments are composed mainly of quartz and plagioclase feldspar; a few foraminifers; and framboidal or subhedral to euhedral pyrite. Carbonate cements dominantly are micritic calcite, with minor contribution of dolomite. Nodular concretions are characterized by depleted δ13C values, commonly ranging from -30‰ to -5‰. The δ13C values show a gradual decrease from the periphery to the center, and the CaO, SiO2, Fe2O3, Al2O3, K2O, and TiO2 contents generally show a gradual change. These features indicate that the nodular concretions grew from an early-formed center toward the periphery, and that the carbon source of the nodular concretions was derived from a mixture of methane, methanogenic CO2, and seawater-dissolved inorganic carbon. The tubular concretions are characterized by δ13C values of -8.85‰ to -3.47‰ in the Shangba Section, and -27.37‰ to -23.85‰ in the upper Gamba Section. Unlike the nodular concretions, the tubular concretions show central conduits, which are possible pathways of methane-rich fluids, suggesting that the cementation of tubular concretions begins at the periphery and proceeds inward. Moreover, the tubular concretions show morphological similarity with the methane-derived carbonate chimneys, pipes and slabs reported in

  11. Lead isotopes tracing the life cycle of a catchment: From source rock via weathering to human impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrel, P. J.; Petelet-Giraud, E.; Guerrot, C.; Millot, R.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical weathering of rocks involves consumption of CO2, a greenhouse gas with a strong influence on climate. Among rocks exposed to weathering, basalt plays a major role in the carbon cycle as it is more easily weathered than other crystalline silicate rocks. This means that basalt weathering acts as a major atmospheric CO2 sink. The present study investigated the lead isotopes in rock, soil and sediment for constraining the life cycle of a catchment, covering source rocks, erosion processes and products, and anthropogenic activities. For this, we investigated the Allanche river drainage basin in the Massif Central, the largest volcanic areas in France, that offers opportunities for selected geochemical studies since it drains a single type of virtually unpolluted volcanic rock, with agricultural activity increasing downstream. Soil and sediment are derived exclusively from basalt weathering, and their chemistry, coupled to isotope tracing, should shed light on the behavior of chemical species during weathering from parental bedrock. Bedrock samples of the basin, compared to regional bedrock of the volcanic province, resulted from a complex history and multiple mantle reservoir sources and mixing. Regarding soils and sediments, comparison of Pb and Zr normalized to mobile K shows a linear evolution of weathering processes, whereby lead enrichment from atmospheric deposition is the other major contributor. Lead-isotope ratios showed that most of the lead budget in sediment and soil results from bedrock weathering with an influence of past mining and mineral processing of ores in the Massif Central, and deposition of lead-rich particles from gasoline combustion, but no lead input from agricultural activity. A classic box model was used to investigate the dynamics of sediment transfer at the catchment scale, the lead behavior in the continuum bedrock-soil-sediment and the historical evolution of anthropogenic aerosol emissions.

  12. Cretaceous shallow drilling, U.S. Western Interior: Core research. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, M.A.

    1998-07-08

    The primary objective of the project is to construct a subsurface transect of Cretaceous strata that were deposited in the Kansas-Colorado-Utah corridor, going from marine sequences that contain organic-carbon-rich hydrocarbon source rocks in Kansas and eastern Colorado to nearshore coal-bearing units in western Colorado and Utah. The drilling transect will provide continuous, unweathered samples for inorganic, organic, and isotopic geochemical studies and mineralogical investigations to determine the characteristics of hydrocarbon source rocks. This transect also will provide information on the extent of thermal maturation and migration of hydrocarbons in organic-carbon-rich strata along a burial gradient. In addition, the eastern Colorado hole will provide characteristics of an important fractured reservoir (the Pierre Shale) in the Florence oil field, the oldest continuously producing field in the United States (>100 years; 600 wells; >14 Mbbls).

  13. A measurement method and system of the thermal properties of rocks under high pressure without heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoqiu; Lin, Weiren; Tadai, Osamu; Zeng, Xin; Xu, Ziying; Shi, Xiaobin; Yu, Chuanhai

    2016-04-01

    Thermal properties of rocks under high pressure are very important for us to understand the thermal structure and state of earth. Basing on the classical thermo-elastic theory, we can know that the temperature of an elastic substance will change when it is compressed or stretched under adiabatic condition. Our measurement results show that the adiabatic stress derivative of temperature (dT/dP) of rocks ranges from 1 to 6 mK/MPa. But the result of silicone oil is up to about 140 mK/MPa. So, we developed a measurement method and system of the thermal properties of rocks under high pressure. In the hydrostatic compression system, the confining pressure can rapidly increase to high pressure within 1~2 s by controlling the value. By monitoring the temperature changes in center and on surface of rock sample during the rapidly loading process, the thermal properties, including thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and volumetric heat capacity, can be resolved by our finite element numerical inversion method. We measured several representative rocks from Longmenshan Fault Zone and Chelungpu Fault Zone (TCDP Hole-A), such as sandstone, siltstone, limestone, granite, basalt, tuff and so on. The results indicate that this method and system is suitable for thermal properties measurement under high pressure even though there is without heat source.

  14. [DWT-iPLS applied in the infrared diffuse reflection spectrum of hydrocarbon source rocks].

    PubMed

    Song, Ning; Xu, Xiao-xuan; Wu, Zhong-chen; Zhang, Cun-zhou; Wang, Bin

    2008-08-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is useful to monitor the quality of products on-line, or to quality multivariate properties simultaneously. The IR spectrometer satisfies the requirements of users who want to have quantitative product information in real-time because the instrument provides the information promptly and easily. However, Samples that are measured using diffuse reflectance often exhibit significant differences in the spectra due to the non-homogeneous distribution of the particles. In fact, multiple spectral measurements of the same sample can look completely different. In many cases, the scattering can be an overpowering contributor to the spectrum, sometimes accounting for most of the variance in the data. Although the degree of scattering is dependent on the wavelength of the light that is used and the particle size and refractive index of the sample, the scattering is not uniform throughout the spectrum. Typically, this appears as a baseline shift, tilt and sometimes curvature, where the degree of influence is more pronounced at the longer-wavelength end of the spectrum. The diffuse reflection spectrum is unsatisfactory and the calibration may provide unsatisfactory prediction results. So we must use some methods to remove the effects of the scattering for multivariate calibration of IR spectral signals. Discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is a good method to remove the effects of the scattering for multivariate calibration of IR spectral signals. By using DWT on individual signals as a preprocessing method in regression modeling on IR spectra, good compression is achieved with almost no loss of information, the low-frequency varying background and the high-frequency noise be removed simultaneously. In this report, we use the iPLS method to establish the calibration models of hydrocarbon source rocks. iPLS is a new regression method and the authors can get better results by using DTW- iPLS.

  15. Petroleum source rock evaluation of the Sebahat and Ganduman Formations, Dent Peninsula, Eastern Sabah, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustapha, Khairul Azlan; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah

    2013-10-01

    The Sebahat (Middle Miocene to Early Pliocene) and Ganduman (Early Pliocene to Late Pliocene) Formations comprise part of the Dent Group. The onshore Sebahat and Ganduman Formations form part of the sedimentary sequence within the Sandakan sub-basin which continues offshore in the southern portion of the Sulu Sea off Eastern Sabah. The Ganduman Formation lies conformably on the Sebahat Formation. The shaly Sebahat Formation represents a distal holomarine facies while the sandy Ganduman Formation represents the proximal unit of a fluvial-deltaic system. Based on organic geochemical and petrological analyses, both formations posses very variable TOC content in the range of 0.7-48 wt% for Sebahat Formation and 1-57 wt% for Ganduman Formation. Both formations are dominated by Type III kerogen, and are thus considered to be gas-prone based on HI vs. Tmax plots. Although the HI-Tmax diagram indicates a Type III kerogen, petrographic observations indicate a significant amount of oil-prone liptinite macerals. Petrographically, it was observed that significant amounts (1-17% by volume) of liptinite macerals are present in the Ganduman Formation with lesser amounts in the Sebahat Formation. Both formations are thermally immature with vitrinite reflectance values in the range of 0.20-0.35%Ro for Ganduman Formation and 0.25-0.44%Ro for Sebahat Formation. Although these onshore sediments are thermally immature for petroleum generation, the stratigraphic equivalent of these sediments offshore are known to have been buried to deeper depth and could therefore act as potential source rocks for gas with minor amounts of oil.

  16. Geochemical and detrital mode evidence for two sources of Early Proterozoic sedimentary rocks from the Tonto Basin Supergroup, central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Condie, K.C.; Noll, P.D., Jr.; Conway, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Tonto Basin Supergroup includes up to 6.5 km of Early Proterozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks that were deposited in a relatively short period of time at about 1.7 Ga in central Arizona. Moderate correlations of rare earth elements (REE) and Ti with Al2O3 and REE distributions in detrital sediments of this supergroup suggest that these elements are contained chiefly in clay-mica and/or zircon fractions. REE distributions, including negative Eu anomalies in most Tonto Basin sediments, are similar to those in Phanerozoic shales. Weak to moderate correlations of Fe, Sc, Ni, and Co to Al2O3 also suggest a clay-mica control of these elements. Detrital modes and geochemical characteristics of sediments indicate two dominant sources for sedimentary rocks of the Tonto Basin Supergroup: a granitoid source and a volcanic source. The granitoid source was important during deposition of the upper part of the succession (the Mazatzal Group) as shown by increases in K2O, Al2O3, and Th in pelites with stratigraphic height, and increases in Zr and Hf and decreases in Eu/Eu*, Cr, and Ni in in pelites of the Maverick Shale. Sediment provenance characteristics and paleocurrent indicators are consistent with deposition of the supergroup in a continental-margin back-arc basin. The granitoid sediment source appears to have been the North American craton on the north, and the volcanic source a more local source from an arc on the south. ?? 1992.

  17. Age, sources, and provenances of protoliths of metasedimentary rocks of the Dzheltulak group, Dzheltulak suture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikoslavinskii, S. D.; Kotov, A. B.; Kovach, V. P.; Tolmacheva, E. V.; Larin, A. M.; Sorokin, A. A.; Sorokin, A. P.; Wang, K. L.; Salnikova, E. B.

    2016-06-01

    The results of Sm-Nb isotopic-geochemical studies of metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks of the Dzheltulak Group of the central part of the Dzheltulak suture, as well as geochronological U-Th-Pb (LA ICP MS) studies of detrital zircons from metasedimentary rocks, which are considered as Paleoproterozoic in current stratigraphic schemes, are presented. The age of the youngest zircons is 170-190 Ma, whereas the age of the last stage of regional metamorphism is 140-150 Ma. Thus, the Dzheltulak Group hosts metasedimentary rocks, the age of the protolith of which ranges from 140-150 to 170-190 Ma. The detrital zircons derived from intrusive and metamorphic rocks of the Selenga-Stanovoi and Dzhugdzhur-Stanovoi superterranes.

  18. A Multi-technique Approach for Provenance Studies of Mesozoic Clastic Rocks in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, N. E.; Zimmermann, U.; Støle, L.; Ruud, C.; Mostafa, E.; Andò, S.; Borromeo, L.; Magnaghi, M.; Lapen, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Sediments of Mesozoic age deposited in the Arctic Hammerfest and Tromsø basins (southern Barents Sea) are the focus of a comprehensive provenance study which forms part of ongoing work by the LoCrA consortium (Lower Cretaceous Basin Studies in the Arctic). Jurassic (Stø, Fuglen, Hekkingen) and Cretaceous (Knurr, Kolje, Kolmule) formations were sampled from seven wells. Analytical methods include petrography, whole-rock geochemistry, heavy mineral (HM) analysis and U-Pb on detrital zircons. HM concentration is <1%, with an ultrastable HM assemblage of zircon, rutile, tourmaline, spinel, apatite, garnet, chloritoid and common authigenic heavy minerals and opaques. Cretaceous sedimentary rocks show geochemical variations that reflect an unrecycled Upper Continental Crust signature, whereas Jurassic detritus tends to show more evidence of recycling with a relatively low input of mafic material. Kolmule Formation whole-rock geochemistry indicates sediment recycling from a major Sc-depleted but intermediate to mafic source and hence suggests input of rift detritus from the syn-depositional opening of the Atlantic Ocean. U-Pb ages for detrital zircons for Cretaceous sandstones show age groups of 200-500 Ma, 1200-1800 Ma, and 2100-2800 Ma, indicating potential source regions in the Urals/Novaya Zemlya, the Caledonides, Grenvillian/Sveconorwegian, and Palaeoproterozoic and Archean sources. Provenance data via geochemistry and HM analysis indicate different sources in the same formation basin-wide, with a significant change in provenance and sediment composition from Jurassic to Cretaceous and between the Knurr and Kolmule formations. These differences in composition need to be compared to detailed single grain studies and may only be explained in terms of basin dynamics, or even on a smaller scale, in terms of facies distributions. If so, this case study raises concerns about the use of single samples for provenance models on a larger scale.

  19. Chapter 2: 2003 Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Conventional Oil and Gas Resources in the Upper Cretaceous Navarro and Taylor Groups, Western Gulf Province, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Condon, S.M.; Dyman, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Navarro and Taylor Groups in the western part of the Western Gulf Province were assessed for undiscovered oil and gas resources in 2003. The area is part of the Smackover-Austin-Eagle Ford Composite Total Petroleum System. The rocks consist of, from youngest to oldest, the Escondido and Olmos Formations of the Navarro Group and the San Miguel Formation and the Anacacho Limestone of the Taylor Group (as well as the undivided Navarro Group and Taylor Group). Some units of the underlying Austin Group, including the 'Dale Limestone' (a term of local usage that describes a subsurface unit), were also part of the assessment in some areas. Within the total petroleum system, the primary source rocks comprise laminated carbonate mudstones and marine shales of the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation, mixed carbonate and bioclastic deposits of the Upper Cretaceous Eagle Ford Group, and shelf carbonates of the Upper Cretaceous Austin Group. Possible secondary source rocks comprise the Upper Jurassic Bossier Shale and overlying shales within the Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group, Lower Cretaceous marine rocks, and the Upper Cretaceous Taylor Group. Oil and gas were generated in the total petroleum system at different times because of variations in depth of burial, geothermal gradient, lithology, and organic-matter composition. A burial-history reconstruction, based on data from one well in the eastern part of the study area (Jasper County, Tex.), indicated that (1) the Smackover generated oil from about 117 to 103 million years ago (Ma) and generated gas from about 52 to 41 Ma and (2) the Austin and Eagle Ford Groups generated oil from about 42 to 28 Ma and generated gas from about 14 Ma to the present. From the source rocks, oil and gas migrated upsection and updip along a pervasive system of faults and fractures as well as along bedding planes and within sandstone units. Types of traps include stratigraphic pinchouts, folds, faulted

  20. Crustal Seismic Anisotropy Produced by Rock Fabric Terranes in the Taiwan Central Range Deformational Orogen: Integrative Study Combining Rock Physics, Structural Geology, and Passive/Active-Source Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaya, D. A.; Ross, Z.; Christensen, N. I.; Wu, F. T.; Byrne, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    The island of Taiwan is currently under construction due to the collision of the northwestern corner of the Philippine Sea plate and the embedded Luzon island arc with the larger continental Eurasian plate. This collision is responsible for the current growth of the Central Range that dominates the eastern half of the island. An international collaboration involving several USA and Taiwan universities and academic institutions was formed to study how the orogen evolves through time and to understand the role of a colliding island arc in mountain building. The project, Taiwan Integrated Geodynamics Research (TAIGER), was funded by NSF-Continental Dynamics and Taiwan National Science Council. The Central Range grows at one of the most rapid rates of uplift in the world, exposing metamorphic rocks that were once at least 10 km deep. The range offers unique opportunities for studies of crustal seismic anisotropy for two major reasons: (1) its geological makeup is conducive for producing crustal seismic anisotropy; that is, the rocks are highly foliated; and (2) a seismological data volume of significant breadth offers extensive coverage of sources and recording stations throughout the region. We carried out a crustal shear wave splitting study by data mining 3300 local earthquakes collected in the TAIGER 2009 sea-land experiment. We used an automated P and S wave arrival time picking method (Ross and Ben-Zion, 2014) applied to over 100,000 event-station pairs. These data were analyzed for shear-wave splitting using the MFAST automated package (Savage et al., 2010), producing 3300 quality shear wave split measurements. The splitting results were then station-averaged. The results show NNE to NE orientation trends that are consistent with regional cleavage strikes. Average crustal shear wave split time is 0.244 sec. These measurements are consistent with rock physics measurements of Central Range slate and metamorphic acoustic velocities. The splits exhibit orientations

  1. High Resolution Magnetostratigraphy Susceptibility (MS) and Gamma Radiation (GR) Measurements from Three Coeval Upper Cretaceous Stratigraphic Sequences in Colorado: Testing MS and GR Variations Arising from Detrital Components in Variably Weathered Marine Sedimentary Rocks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwood, B. B.; Tomkin, J. H.; Wang, W.

    2010-12-01

    We have measured the magnetic susceptibility(MS) and gamma radiation (GR) for three Upper Cretaceous marine sedimentary sequences that span the Cenomanian-Turonian (C-T) boundary exposed as part of the Western Interior Seaway in Central Colorado. The purpose of this study was three fold: (1) to evaluate the combined potential of MS and GR as a correlation tool using well-studied sequences that have been previously correlated based on high-resolution lithostratigraphy, (2) to evaluate the effect of differential weathering on MS and GR values, and (3) to evaluate how their relationship with each other changes. This work includes sampling of the moderately weathered Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the C-T boundary that is exposed in a railroad cut near Pueblo, CO. A nearby (~1 km) coeval section in an old road cut, where weathering is pronounced, was also sampled, as was fresh material through the C-T boundary interval from a core drilled ~40 km to the west of Pueblo (the USGS#1 Portland Core). MS was measured in the laboratory at LSU on samples collected at ~5 cm intervals from each of these sequences. GR was measured in the field at ~5 cm intervals on the two outcrop sequences, using a portable GR spectrometer. In addition, the GR also was measured on samples collected for MS measurement, using a laboratory-based Germanium detector. It is argued that both MS and GR data sets are controlled by detrital fluxes into the marine environment, although the effect of weathering, if any, on these parameters when exposed in outcrop, is not well documented. In addition, these parameters are controlled by different detrital components that may be derived from different sources, or be differentially concentrated within the marine system. Here we report the results of a number of experiments designed to evaluate how the MS and GR data sets co-vary, and to test their usefulness as correlation tools in stratigraphically. We have also examined the effects of

  2. Geochemical evidence for mudstone as the possible major oil source rock in the Jurassic Turpan Basin, Northwest China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, J.; Qin, Yelun; Huff, B.G.; Wang, D.; Han, D.; Huang, D.

    2001-01-01

    Geologists and geochemists have debated whether hydrocarbons from Jurassic coal measures are derived from the mudstones or the coals themselves. This paper identifies mudstones as the possible major source rock of hydrocarbons in the Jurassic basins in Northwest China. The Turpan Basin is used as a representative model. Mudstones in the Middle-Lower Jurassic are very well developed in the basin and have an average genetic potential from 2 to 4 mg/g. The vitrinite reflectance of the source rocks ranges from 0.6 to 1.3%, exhibiting sufficient thermal maturity to generate oil and gas. Biomarkers in crude oils from the basin are similar to those in mudstones from the coal-bearing strata, with a low tricyclic terpane (cheilanthane) content, a relatively high content of low carbon number (less than C22) tricyclic terpanes and a low content of high carbon number tricyclic terpanes, relatively high ratios of Ts/Tm, and C29 Ts/17?? (H)-C29 norhopane, and low ratios of Tm/17?? (H)-C30 hopane and 17?? (H)-C31 homohopane/17?? (H)-C30 hopane. These characteristics and the distribution of steranes and terpanes in the crude oil and mudstone differ significantly from those of the Jurassic coals and carbonaceous shales of the basin, indicating mudstone is possibly the major source rock of the oils in the Turpan Basin. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Quantities analysis of the infrared diffuse reflection spectrum of hydrocarbon source rocks by OSC-iPLS].

    PubMed

    Song, Ning; Xu, Xiao-Xuan; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Cun-Zhou

    2009-02-01

    In many cases, the scattering can be an overpowering contributor to the spectrum, sometimes accounting for most of the variance in the data. Although the degree of scattering is dependent on the wavelength of the light that is used and the particle size and refractive index of the sample, the scattering is not uniform throughout the spectrum. In order to remove the effects of scattering and noise on multivariate calibration of IR spectral signals, orthogonal signal correction (OSC) was used as a method to preprocess the infrared spectra of the hydrocarbon source rocks to be quantitatively determined, thus to establish the calibration model of hydrocarbon source rocks before and after pretreatment by inetval partial least square (iPLS). Pretreatment was smoother and more orderly array. This indicated that the major information in hydrocarbon source rocks spectra could be reserved while part of noise was removed by OSC method. In this study, pretreatment calibration model was obtained, the model's correlation coefficient is 0.994 04 and RMSE is 0.635 2, but with no pretreatment the calibration model's correlation coefficient is 0.770 9 and RMSE is 3.925 7.

  4. Maximum sedimentation ages and provenance of metasedimentary rocks from Tinos Island, Cycladic blueschist belt, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinsken, Tim; Bröcker, Michael; Berndt, Jasper; Gärtner, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    U-Pb zircon ages of five metasedimentary rocks from the Lower Unit on Tinos Island (Cycladic blueschist belt, Greece) document supply of detritus from various Proterozoic, Paleozoic and Mesozoic source rocks as well as post-depositional metamorphic zircon formation. Essential features of the studied zircon populations are Late Cretaceous (70-80 Ma) maximum sedimentation ages for the lithostratigraphic succession above the lowermost dolomite marble, significant contributions from Triassic to Neoproterozoic source rocks, minor influx of detritus recording Paleoproterozoic and older provenance (1.9-2.1, 2.4-2.5 and 2.7-2.8 Ga) and a lack or paucity of zircons with Mesoproterozoic ages (1.1-1.8 Ga). In combination with biostratigraphic evidence, the new dataset indicates that Late Cretaceous or younger rocks occur on top of or very close to the basal Triassic metacarbonates, suggesting a gap in the stratigraphic record near the base of the metamorphic succession. The time frame for sediment deposition is bracketed by the youngest detrital zircon ages (70-80 Ma) and metamorphic overgrowths that are related to high-pressure/low-temperature overprinting in the Eocene. This time interval possibly indicates a significant difference to the sedimentation history of the southern Cyclades, where Late Cretaceous detrital zircons have not yet been detected.

  5. Maximum sedimentation ages and provenance of metasedimentary rocks from Tinos Island, Cycladic blueschist belt, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinsken, Tim; Bröcker, Michael; Berndt, Jasper; Gärtner, Claudia

    2015-10-01

    U-Pb zircon ages of five metasedimentary rocks from the Lower Unit on Tinos Island (Cycladic blueschist belt, Greece) document supply of detritus from various Proterozoic, Paleozoic and Mesozoic source rocks as well as post-depositional metamorphic zircon formation. Essential features of the studied zircon populations are Late Cretaceous (70-80 Ma) maximum sedimentation ages for the lithostratigraphic succession above the lowermost dolomite marble, significant contributions from Triassic to Neoproterozoic source rocks, minor influx of detritus recording Paleoproterozoic and older provenance (1.9-2.1, 2.4-2.5 and 2.7-2.8 Ga) and a lack or paucity of zircons with Mesoproterozoic ages (1.1-1.8 Ga). In combination with biostratigraphic evidence, the new dataset indicates that Late Cretaceous or younger rocks occur on top of or very close to the basal Triassic metacarbonates, suggesting a gap in the stratigraphic record near the base of the metamorphic succession. The time frame for sediment deposition is bracketed by the youngest detrital zircon ages (70-80 Ma) and metamorphic overgrowths that are related to high-pressure/low-temperature overprinting in the Eocene. This time interval possibly indicates a significant difference to the sedimentation history of the southern Cyclades, where Late Cretaceous detrital zircons have not yet been detected.

  6. Cretaceous biostratigraphy in the Wyoming thrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, D.J.; Jacobson, S.R.

    1982-07-01

    Biostratigraphy is essential to exploration for oil and gas in the Wyoming thrust belt because fossils provide a temporal framework for interpretation of events of faulting, erosion, sedimentation, and the development of hydrocarbon traps and migration pathways. In the Cretaceous section, fossils are especially useful for dating and correlating repetitive facies of different ages in structurally complex terrain. The biostratigraphic zonation for the region is based on megafossils (chiefly ammonites), which permit accurate dating and correlation of outcrop sections, and which have been calibrated with the radiometric time scale for the Western Interior. Molluscan and vertebrate zone fossils are difficult to obtain from the subsurface, however, and ammonities are restricted to rocks of margin origin. Palynomorphs (plant microfossils) have proven to be the most valuable fossils in investigations of stratigraphy and structures in the subsurface of the thrust belt because palynomorphs can be recovered from drill cuttings. Palynomorphs also are found in both marine and nonmarine rocks and can be used for correlation between facies. In this paper, stratigraphic ranges of selected Cretaceous marine and nonmarine palynomorphs in previously designated reference sections in Fossil Basin, Wyoming, are correlated with the occurrence of ammonities and other zone fossils in the same sections. These correlations can be related to known isotopic ages, and they contribute to the calibration of palynomorph ranges in the Cretaceous of the Western Interior.

  7. Cretaceous biostratigraphy in the Wyoming thrust belt.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, D.J.; Jacobson, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    In the Cretaceous section of the thrust belt, fossils are especially useful for dating and correlating repetitive facies of different ages in structurally complex terrain. The biostratigraphic zonation for the region is based on megafossils (chiefly ammonites) , which permit accurate dating and correlation of outcrop sections, and which have been calibrated with the radiometric time scale for the Western Interior. Molluscan and vertebrate zone fossils are difficult to obtain from the subsurface, however, and ammonites are restricted to rocks of marine origin. Palynomorphs (plant microfossils) have proven to be the most valuable fossils in the subsurface because they can be recovered from drill cuttings. Palynomorphs also are found in both marine and nonmarine rocks and can be used for correlation between facies. Stratigraphic ranges of selected Cretaceous marine and nonmarine palynomorphs in previously designated reference sections in Fossil Basin, Wyoming are correlated with the occurrence of ammonites and other zone fossils in the same sections. These correlations can be related to known isotopic ages, and they contribute to the calibration of palynomorph ranges in the Cretaceous of the Western Interior. -from Authors

  8. Linkages Between Cretaceous Forearc and Retroarc Basin Development in Southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, D. A.; Laskowski, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Integrated provenance and subsidence analysis of forearc and retroarc foreland basin strata were used to reconstruct the evolution of the southern margin of Eurasia during the Early to Late Cretaceous. The Cretaceous-Eocene Xigaze forearc basin, preserved along ~600 km of the southern Lhasa terrane, formed between the Gangdese magmatic arc and accretionary complex as subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere accommodated the northward motion and subsequent collision of the Indian plate. Petrographic similarities between Xigaze forearc basin strata and Cretaceous-Eocene sedimentary rocks of the northern Lhasa terrane, interpreted as a retroarc foreland basin, were previously interpreted to record N-S trending river systems connecting the retro- and forearc regions during Cretaceous time. New sandstone petrographic and U-Pb detrital zircon provenance analysis of Xigaze forearc basin strata support this hypothesis. Qualitative and statistical provenance analysis using cumulative distribution functions and Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) tests show that the forearc basin was derived from either the same source region as or recycled from the foreland basin. Quartz-rich sandstones with abundant carbonate sedimentary lithic grains and rounded, cobble limestone clasts suggests a more distal source than the proximal Gangdese arc. Therefore, we interpret that the northern Lhasa terrane was a significant source of Xigaze forearc detritus and track spatial and temporal variability in the connection between the retro- and forearc basin systems during the Late Cretaceous. A tectonic subsidence curve for the Xigaze forearc basin shows a steep and "kinked" shape similar to other ancient and active forearc basins. Initial subsidence was likely driven by thermal relaxation of the forearc ophiolite after emplacement while additional periods of rapid subsidence likely result from periods of high flux magmatism in the Gangdese arc and changes in plate convergence rate. Comparison of the

  9. Rock flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matveyev, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Rock flows are defined as forms of spontaneous mass movements, commonly found in mountainous countries, which have been studied very little. The article considers formations known as rock rivers, rock flows, boulder flows, boulder stria, gravel flows, rock seas, and rubble seas. It describes their genesis as seen from their morphological characteristics and presents a classification of these forms. This classification is based on the difference in the genesis of the rubbly matter and characterizes these forms of mass movement according to their source, drainage, and deposit areas.

  10. Paleocology and biogeography of Late Cretaceous Molluskan assemblages near Loma Prieta, California

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, W.P. )

    1990-05-01

    Deformed, fossilliferous turbidite deposits resembling the Great Valley sequence are present in a fault wedge just east of the San Andreas fault near Loma Prieta Santa Cruz Mountains, California. Near the top of these deposits late Campanian to early Maastrichtian Baculites rex is found along with late Campanian B. inornatus and B. aff B. anceps. Turbidite deposits associated with a conglomerate near the base of the Upper Cretaceous strata contain abundant exogyrid oysters and many rare or uncommon taxa including Amphidonte parasitica, Lyriochlamys traskii, Spondvlus subnodosus, and Hipponix dichotomus, which also imply a late Campanian age. Composition of the oyster-rich assemblage indicates a relatively high-energy, nearshore source area for those turbidite deposits. This source area consisted of mixed sand and rock or shell bed substrates. Fossils found in the overlying Upper Cretaceous turbidites are indicative of a more offshore shelf habitat, suggesting a seaward shift in sediment source area or transgression through time. Molluskan assemblages include North Pacific species having tectonically transported distributions ranging from Baja California to Vancouver Island. Some species in the oyster beds have been previously reported only to the north and some only to the south of Loma Prieta; thus, the unusual faunal composition is apparently due to the preservation of a very nearshore assemblage, which is rare in strata of this age in California, rather than to biogeographic constraints. The apparent absence of rudists in this very nearshore assemblage, where they would be expected if present suggests significant displacement of the Upper Cretaceous rudist-bearing rocks found to the west of the San Andreas fault relative to Loma Prieta.

  11. Geologic models and evaluation of undiscovered conventional and continuous oil and gas resources: Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Krystal

    2012-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk forms a low-permeability, onshore Gulf of Mexico reservoir that produces oil and gas from major fractures oriented parallel to the underlying Lower Cretaceous shelf edge. Horizontal drilling links these fracture systems to create an interconnected network that drains the reservoir. Field and well locations along the production trend are controlled by fracture networks. Highly fractured chalk is present along both regional and local fault zones. Fractures are also genetically linked to movement of the underlying Jurassic Louann Salt with tensile fractures forming downdip of salt-related structures creating the most effective reservoirs. Undiscovered accumulations should also be associated with structure-controlled fracture systems because much of the Austin that overlies the Lower Cretaceous shelf edge remains unexplored. The Upper Cretaceous Eagle Ford Shale is the primary source rock for Austin Chalk hydrocarbons. This transgressive marine shale varies in thickness and lithology across the study area and contains both oil- and gas-prone kerogen. The Eagle Ford began generating oil and gas in the early Miocene, and vertical migration through fractures was sufficient to charge the Austin reservoirs.

  12. The Yukon Flats Cretaceous(?)-Tertiary Extensional Basin, East-Central Alaska: Burial and Thermal History Modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Stanley, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    One-dimensional burial and thermal history modeling of the Yukon Flats basin, east-central Alaska, was conducted as part of an assessment of the region's undiscovered oil and gas resources. No deep exploratory wells have been drilled in the Yukon Flats region, and the subsurface geology of the basin is inferred from seismic reflection, gravity and magnetic surveys, and studies of shallow core holes in the basin and outcrops in the surrounding region. A thick sequence of Upper Cretaceous(?) and Cenozoic nonmarine sedimentary rocks is believed to fill the basin; coal and organic-rich mudstone and shale within this sequence represent potential hydrocarbon source rocks. The burial and thermal history models presented here represent the sole source of information on the thermal maturity of these potential source rocks at depth. We present four alternative burial history scenarios for a hypothetical well through the deepest portion of Yukon Flats basin. They differ from each other in the thicknesses of Upper Cretaceous and Cenozoic strata, the timing of initial basin subsidence, and the timing of inferred unconformities. The burial modeling results suggest a present-day depth to the oil window of approximately 6,000 feet.

  13. Lower Cody Shale (Niobrara equivalent) in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming and Montana: thickness, distribution, and source rock potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The lower shaly member of the Cody Shale in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming and Montana is Coniacian to Santonian in age and is equivalent to the upper part of the Carlile Shale and basal part of the Niobrara Formation in the Powder River Basin to the east. The lower Cody ranges in thickness from 700 to 1,200 feet and underlies much of the central part of the basin. It is composed of gray to black shale, calcareous shale, bentonite, and minor amounts of siltstone and sandstone. Sixty-six samples, collected from well cuttings, from the lower Cody Shale were analyzed using Rock-Eval and total organic carbon analysis to determine the source rock potential. Total organic carbon content averages 2.28 weight percent for the Carlile equivalent interval and reaches a maximum of nearly 5 weight percent. The Niobrara equivalent interval averages about 1.5 weight percent and reaches a maximum of over 3 weight percent, indicating that both intervals are good to excellent source rocks. S2 values from pyrolysis analysis also indicate that both intervals have a good to excellent source rock potential. Plots of hydrogen index versus oxygen index, hydrogen index versus Tmax, and S2/S3 ratios indicate that organic matter contains both Type II and Type III kerogen capable of generating oil and gas. Maps showing the distribution of kerogen types and organic richness for the lower shaly member of the Cody Shale show that it is more organic-rich and more oil-prone in the eastern and southeastern parts of the basin. Thermal maturity based on vitrinite reflectance (Ro) ranges from 0.60–0.80 percent Ro around the margins of the basin, increasing to greater than 2.0 percent Ro in the deepest part of the basin, indicates that the lower Cody is mature to overmature with respect to hydrocarbon generation.

  14. Oxygen isotopes as tracers of tektite source rocks: An example from the Ivory Coast tektites and Lake Bosumtwi Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Joel D.; Koeberl, Christian; Chamberlain, C. Page

    1993-01-01

    Oxygen isotope studies of tektites and impact glasses provide an important tool to help in identifying the target lithologies for terrestrial impacts, including the K-T boundary impact. However, such studies may be complicated by modification of the original oxygen isotope values of some source rocks during the tektite formation process either by vapor fractionation or incorporation of meteoric water. To further investigate the relationship between the oxygen isotopic composition of tektites and their source rocks, Ivory Coast tektites and samples of impact glasses and bedrock lithologies from the Bosumtwi Crater in Ghana--which is widely believed to be the source crater for the Ivory Coast tektites--were studied. Our preliminary results suggest that the phyllites and metagraywackes from the Bosumtwi Crater were the predominant source materials for the impact glasses and tektites and that no significant oxygen isotope modification (less than 1 percent delta(O-18)) took place during impact melting. This contrasts with previous studies of moldavites and Australasian tektites and their sedimentary source materials which suggests a 4 to 5 percent lowering of delta(O-18) due to meteoric water incorporation during impact melting.

  15. Rockfall source characterization at high rock walls in complex geological settings by photogrammetry, structural analysis and DFN techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, Federico; Riva, Federico; Galletti, Laura; Zanchi, Andrea; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2016-04-01

    Rockfall quantitative risk analysis in areas impended by high, subvertical cliffs remains a challenge, due to the difficult definition of potential rockfall sources, event magnitude scenarios and related probabilities. For this reasons, rockfall analyses traditionally focus on modelling the runout component of rockfall processes, whereas rock-fall source identification, mapping and characterization (block size distribution and susceptibility) are over-simplified in most practical applications, especially when structurally complex rock masses are involved. We integrated field and remote survey and rock mass modelling techniques to characterize rock masses and detect rockfall source in complex geo-structural settings. We focused on a test site located at Valmadrera, near Lecco (Southern Alps, Italy), where cliffs up to 600 m high impend on a narrow strip of Lake Como shore. The massive carbonates forming the cliff (Dolomia Principale Fm), normally characterized by brittle structural associations due to their high strength and stiffness, are here involved in an ENE-trending, S-verging kilometre-scale syncline. Brittle mechanisms associated to folding strongly controlled the nature of discontinuities (bedding slip, strike-slip faults, tensile fractures) and their attributes (spacing and size), as well as the spatial variability of bedding attitude and fracture intensity, with individual block sizes up to 15 m3. We carried out a high-resolution terrestrial photogrammetric survey from distances ranging from 1500 m (11 camera stations from the opposite lake shore, 265 pictures) to 150 m (28 camera stations along N-S directed boat routes, 200 pictures), using RTK GNSS measurements for camera station geo-referencing. Data processing by Structure-from-Motion techniques resulted in detailed long-range (1500 m) and medium-range (150 to 800 m) point clouds covering the entire slope with maximum surface point densities exceeding 50 pts/m2. Point clouds allowed a detailed

  16. Preliminary vitrinite and bitumen reflectance, total organic carbon, and pyrolysis data for samples from Upper and Lower Cretaceous strata, Maverick Basin, south Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.; Dennen, Kristin O.; Gesserman, Rachel M.; Ridgley, Jennie L.

    2009-01-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Pearsall Formation, a regionally occurring limestone and shale interval of 500-600-ft maximum thickness (Rose, 1986), is being evaluated as part of an ongoing U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in onshore Lower Cretaceous strata of the northern Gulf of Mexico. The purpose of this report is to release preliminary vitrinite and bitumen reflectance, total organic carbon, and pyrolysis data for Pearsall Formation, Glen Rose Formation, Hosston Formation, Austin Group, and Eagle Ford Group samples from the Maverick Basin in south Texas in order to aid in the characterization of these strata in this area. The preliminary nature of this report and the data contained herein reflect that the assessment and characterization of these samples is a work currently in progress. Pearsall Formation subdivisions are, in ascending stratigraphic order, the Pine Island Shale, James Limestone, and Bexar Shale Members (Loucks, 2002). The Lower Cretaceous Glen Rose Formation is also part of the USGS Lower Cretaceous assessment and produces oil in the Maverick Basin (Loucks and Kerans, 2003). The Hosston Formation was assessed by the USGS for undiscovered oil and gas resources in 2006 (Dyman and Condon, 2006), but not in south Texas. The Upper Cretaceous Austin Group is being assessed as part of the USGS assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in the Upper Cretaceous strata of the northern Gulf of Mexico and, along with the Upper Cretaceous Eagle Ford Group, is considered to be an important source rock in the Smackover-Austin-Eagleford Total Petroleum System (Condon and Dyman, 2006). Both the Austin Group and the Eagle Ford Group are present in the Maverick Basin in south Texas (Rose, 1986).

  17. Evolution of subsidence styles in forearc basin: example from Cretaceous of southern Vizcaino Peninsula, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Busby-Spera, C.J.; Boles, J.R.

    1986-04-01

    Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous arc magmatism is represented by volcaniclastic rocks of the Eugenia Formation in the northern Vizcaino Peninsula and by the metamorphosed Cedros-San Andres volcanoplutonic complex, with a dismembered ophiolitic basement, in the southern peninsula. The Vizcaino Peninsula became the site of forearc sedimentation by the Aptian-Albian (late Early Cretaceous), when arc magmatism moved abruptly eastward to the present-day Peninsular Range. On the southern Vizcaino Peninsula, a conformable stratigraphic section, complicated by later faulting, records a gradual transition from a ridged forearc, broken by basement uplifts and grabens (the Aptian-Albian Asunction Formation), to a broadly subsiding, deep marine forearc basin (the Cenomanian Valle Formation). The basal contact of the Asunction formation has irregular relief caused by brecciated basement rocks and talus accumulated along fault zones. An upward-fining sequence several hundred meters thick records abrupt uplift and gradual denudation of adjacent metamorphic basement. Contemporaneous andesite arc volcanism to the east supplied ash and fresh volcanic detritus to the grabens. Angular sand to boulder-size detritus of the Asunction Formation was derived locally, and includes basic to intermediate meta-igneous rock fragments, with epidote, actinolite, and chlorite, as well as serpentine. Abundant calcareous fossils are commonly unbroken, suggesting local sources for these as well. Angular to subrounded, sand to cobble-sized, intermediate to mafic volcanic rock fragments were derived from a more distant island arc to the east, which occasionally provided intermediate to felsic tuffs to the basin. This source is probably represented by the Aptian-Albian Alisitos Group, which forms much of the western wall of the Late Cretaceous Peninsular Range batholith.

  18. Estimates of Oil and Gas Potential of Source Rock by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbottom, T. L.; Hockaday, W. C.; Boling, K. S.; Dworkin, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Kerogen is defined as the insoluble fraction of organic matter preserved in sediments. Due to its structural complexity, kerogen is poorly understood, yet it holds vast economic importance as petroleum source rock, and represents the largest organic carbon pool on earth. Kerogen originates from a mixture of organic biomolecules and tends to be dominated by the polymeric components of cell walls and cellular membranes, which undergo interactions with sedimentary minerals at elevated temperature and pressure upon burial. Due to the importance of burial diagenesis to petroleum formation, much of our knowledge of chemical properties of kerogens is related to diagenetic and catagenetic effects. The more common geochemical evaluations of the oil and gas potentials of source rock are based upon proximate analyses such as hydrogen and oxygen indices and thermal stability indices, such as those provided by Fisher assay and Rock Eval®. However, proximate analyses provide limited information regarding the chemical structure of kerogens, and therefore provide little insight to the processes of kerogen formation. NMR spectra of kerogen have been previously shown to be useful in estimating oil and gas potential, and the proposed study seeks to refine nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool in kerogen characterization, specifically for the purpose of oil and gas potential calculations.

  19. Provenance and U-Pb geochronology of the Upper Cretaceous El Chanate Group, northwest Sonora, Mexico, and its tectonic significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacques-Ayala, C.; Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.; Jacobson, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous El Chanate Group, northwest Sonora, Mexico, is a 2.8km thick clastic sedimentary sequence deposited in a continental basin closely related to volcanic activity. It consists of three formations: the Pozo Duro (oldest), the Anita, and the Escalante (youngest). Petrographic study, conglomerate pebble counts, and U-Pb geochronology of detrital zircons were performed to determine the source and age of this sequence, and to interpret its tectonic setting. In the sandstones of all three formations, the most abundant grains are those of volcanic composition (Q38F22L 40, Q35F19L46, and Q 31F22L47, respectively). The Pozo Duro Formation includes well-rounded quartz-arenite clast conglomerates, whereas conglomerates of the two upper units have clasts predominantly of andesitic and rhyolitic composition. The most likely source for these sediments was the Jurassic volcanic arc exposed in northern Sonora and southern Arizona. Zircons from five sandstone samples define two main age groups, Proterozoic and Mesozoic. The first ranges mostly from 1000 to 1800Ma, which suggests the influence of a cratonic source. This zircon suite is interpreted to be recycled and derived from the same source area as the quartz-rich sandstone clasts in the basal part of the section. Mesozoic zircons range from Triassic to Late Cretaceous, which confirms the proposed Late Cretaceous age for the sequence, and also corroborates Jurassic felsic source rocks. Another possible source was the Alisitos volcanic arc, exposed along the western margin of the Baja California Peninsula. Of regional significance is the great similarity between the El Chanate Group and the McCoy Mountains Formation of southeastern California and southwestern Arizona. Both are Cretaceous, were deposited in continental environments, and have similar zircon-age patterns. Also, both exhibit intense deformation and locally display penetrative foliation. These features strongly suggest that both units underwent

  20. Petrologic and geochemical links between the post-collisional Proterozoic Harney Peak leucogranite, South Dakota, USA, and its source rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabelek, Peter I.; Bartlett, Cindy D.

    1998-12-01

    The Proterozoic terrane of the Black Hills, South Dakota, includes the composite Harney Peak leucogranite and associated pegmatites that were emplaced into metamorphosed pelites and graywackes. Available dates indicate that granite generation post-dated regional metamorphism and deformation that have been attributed to collision of the Wyoming and Superior cratons at ˜1760 Ma. Previous radiogenic and stable isotope work indicates that the exposed metasedimentary rocks are equivalent to sources of the leucogranites. In this study, whole rock and mineral compositions of the metasedimentary rocks were used to calculate the likely average residue mineralogies and melt fractions that would be generated by muscovite dehydration melting of the rocks. These were then used to model observed trace element compositions of the granites using published mineral/melt distribution coefficients. Model trace element melt compositions using pelitic and graywacke protoliths yield similar results. The models reproduce well the observed depletion of transition metals and Ba in the granites relative to metasedimentary protoliths. The depletion is due mainly to high proportion of biotite with variable amounts of K-feldspar in the model residue. Sr is also depleted in the granites compared to source rocks, but to a lesser relative extent than Ba. This is because of the low biotite/melt distribution coefficient for Sr and because high proportion of plagioclase in the residue is compensated by high Sr concentrations in protoliths. Rubidium, Cs and Ta behaved as slightly compatible to incompatible elements, and therefore, were not strongly fractionated during melting. Of the considered elements, only B appears to have been highly incompatible relative to residue during melting. The protoliths had sufficient B to allow tourmaline crystallization in those parts of the Harney Peak Granite in which Ti concentration was sufficiently low not to enhance crystallization of biotite. The

  1. Late Cretaceous volcanism in south-central New Mexico: Conglomerates of the McRae and Love Ranch Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman-Fahey, J.L.; McMillan, N.J.; Mack, G.H.; Seager, W.R. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Evidence to support Late Cretaceous volcanism in south central New Mexico is restricted to a small area of 75-Ma-old andesitic rocks at Copper Flats near Hillsboro, and volcanic clasts in the McRae (Late Cretaceous/Paleocene ) and Love Ranch (Paleocene/Eocene). Formations located in the Jornada del Muerto basin east and northeast of the Caballo Mountains. Major and trace element data and petrographic analysis of 5 samples from Copper Flats lavas and 40 samples of volcanic clasts from the McRae and Love Ranch conglomerates will be used to reconstruct the Cretaceous volcanic field. The McRae Formation consists of two members: the lower Jose Creek and the upper Hall Lake. The lowermost Love Ranch Formation is unconformable in all places on the Hall Lake Member. Stratigraphic variations in clast composition from volcanic rocks in the lower Love Ranch Formation to Paleozoic and Precambrian clasts in the upper Love Ranch Formation reflect the progressive unroofing of the Laramide Rio Grande Uplift. Volcanic clasts in the McRae and Love Ranch Formations were derived from the west and south of the depositional basin, but the source area for McRae clasts is less well constrained. Stratigraphic, chemical, and petrographic data will be used to reconstruct the volcanic complex and more clearly define magma genesis and metasomatism associated with Laramide deformation.

  2. Sedimentology and hydrocarbon potential of Yager structural complex--possible paleogene source rocks in Eel River Basin, Northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, M.B.

    1985-07-01

    The Yager structural complex of coastal northern California is composed of Paleogene mudrocks, turbidites, and related deep marine deposits. The strata are folded but lack the severe and pervasive stratal disruption that characterizes surrounding accreted terranes, such as the Franciscan Coastal belt. Lithofacies associations and depositional cycles define three environmental settings: slope, feeder channel, and restricted basin. The rocks probably represent a sequence of trench-slope and slope-basin deposits that accumulated above a broadly coeval basement of accreted Coastal belt rocks. Yager strata are possible source beds for hydrocarbons within the late Cenozoic Eel River basin. Type III kerogen is dominant, and organic carbon content and hydrocarbon yield are relatively low. Nevertheless, the thermal maturity of Yager shales is well within the window of peak hydrocarbon generation. This level of maturation is attributed to a combination of middle Tertiary thrust faulting and subsequent depositional burial beneath the Neogene Wildcat Group.

  3. New links between the Chicxulub impact structure and the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharpton, V.L.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Marin, L.E.; Ryder, G.; Schuraytz, B.C.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    1992-01-01

    THE 200-km-diameter Chicxulub structure1-3 in northern Yucatan, Mexico has emerged as the prime candidate for the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary impact crater3-6. Concentric geophysical anomalies associated with enigmatic occurrences of Upper Cretaceous breccias and andesitic rocks led Penfield and Camargo1 to suspect that this structure was a buried impact basin. More recently, the discovery of shocked quartz grains in a Chicxulub breccia3, and chemical similarities between Chicxulub rocks and K/T tektite-like glasses3-6 have been advanced as evidence that the Chicxulub structure is a K/T impact site. Here we present evidence from core samples that Chicxulub is indeed a K/T source crater, and can apparently account for all the evidence of impact distributed globally at the K/T boundary without the need for simultaneous multiple impacts or comet showers. Shocked breccia clasts found in the cores are similar to shocked lithic fragments found worldwide in the K/T boundary ejecta layer7,8. The Chicxulub melt rocks that we studied contain anomalously high levels of iridium (up to 13.5 parts per 109), also consistent with the indium-enriched K/T boundary layer9. Our best estimate of the crystallization age of these melt rocks, as determined by 40Ar/39Ar analyses, is 65.2??0.4 (1??) Myr, in good agreement with the mean plateau age of 64.98 ?? 0.05 Myr recently reported10. Furthermore, these melt rocks acquired a remanent magnetization indicating that they cooled during an episode of reversed geomagnetic polarity. The only such episode consistent with 40Ar/39Ar constraints is chron 29R, which includes the K/T boundary.

  4. Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic Basin framework and petroleum potential of Panama and Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, P. ); Kolarsky, R. )

    1993-02-01

    Despite its location between major petroleum provinces in northwestern South America and northern Central America, there is a widespread negative perception of the petroleum potential of Panama and Costa Rica in southern Central America. Several factors may contribute to this perception: (1) the on and offshore geology of many areas has only be studied in a reconnaissance fashion; (2) sandstone reservoirs and source rocks are likely to be of poor quality because Upper Cretaceous-Cenozoic sandstones are eroded from island arc or oceanic basement rocks and because oil-prone source rocks are likely to be scarce in near-arc basins; and (3) structural traps are likely to be small and fragmented because of complex late Cenozoic thrust and strike-slip tectonics. On the other hand, onshore oil and gas seeps, shows and small production in wildcat wells, and source rocks with TOC values up to 26% suggest the possibility of future discoveries. In this talk, we present the results of a regional study using 3100 km of offshore seismic lines kindly provided by industry. Age and stratigraphic control of offshore lines is constrained by limited well data and detailed field studies of basin outcrops in coastal areas. We describe the major structures, stratigraphy, and tectonic history of the following areas: Gulf of Panama and Gulf of Chiriqui of Panama and the Pacific and Caribbean margins of Costa Rica.

  5. Middle Jurassic - Early Cretaceous rifting on the Chortis Block in Honduras: Implications for proto-Caribbean opening (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, R. D.; Emmet, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    Regional mapping integrated with facies analysis, age constraints and airborne geophysical data reveal WNW and NE trends of Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous basins which intersect in southeast Honduras that we interpret as the result of rifting associated with the breakup of the Americas and opening of the proto-Caribbean seaway. The WNW-trending rift is 250 km long by 90 km wide and defined by a basal 200 to 800 m thick sequence of Middle to Late Jurassic fluvial channel and overbank deposits overlain by transgressive clastic shelf strata. At least three sub-basins are apparent. Flanking the WNW trending rift basins are fault bounded exposures of the pre-Jurassic continental basement of the Chortis block which is the source of the conglomeratic channel facies that delineate the axes of the rifts. Cretaceous terrigenous strata mantle the exposed basement-cored rift flanks. Lower Cretaceous clastic strata and shallow marine limestone strata are dominant along this trend indicating that post-rift related subsidence continued through the Early Cretaceous. The rifts coincide with a regional high in the total magnetic intensity data. We interpret these trends to reflect NNE-WSW extension active from the Middle Jurassic through Early Cretaceous. These rifts were inverted during Late Cretaceous shortening oriented normal to the rift axes. To the east and at a 120 degree angle to the WNW trending rift is the 300 km long NE trending Guayape fault system that forms the western shoulder of the Late Jurassic Agua Fria rift basin filled by > 2 km thickness of clastic marine shelf and slope strata. This NE trending basin coincides with the eastern extent of the surface exposure of continental basement rocks and a northeast-trending fabric of the Jurassic (?) metasedimentary basement rocks. We have previously interpreted the eastern basin to be the Jurassic rifted margin of the Chortis block with the Guayape originating as a normal fault system. These two rifts basin intersect

  6. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation using compressional acoustic sources

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2016-09-27

    A system and method for investigating rock formations outside a borehole are provided. The method includes generating a first compressional acoustic wave at a first frequency by a first acoustic source; and generating a second compressional acoustic wave at a second frequency by a second acoustic source. The first and the second acoustic sources are arranged within a localized area of the borehole. The first and the second acoustic waves intersect in an intersection volume outside the borehole. The method further includes receiving a third shear acoustic wave at a third frequency, the third shear acoustic wave returning to the borehole due to a non-linear mixing process in a non-linear mixing zone within the intersection volume at a receiver arranged in the borehole. The third frequency is equal to a difference between the first frequency and the second frequency.

  7. Cretaceous( )-Paleocene uplift, drainage, and depositional basins along the southwestern margin of the Colorado Plateau, NW Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The SW margin of the Colorado Plateau has over 1,200 m of paleorelief partially buried by arkosic sediments with intercalated fossiliferous limestones of middle Eocene or greater age, indicating a Laramide origin for nearly 1.5 km of uplift by late Cretaceous or Paleocene time. The arkosic sediments contain 30-cm clasts currently 100 to 150 km from potential source areas bordering the plateau margin. Clast studies of stratigraphic sequences 150+ m thick and at elevations from 975 to 2,010 m (3,200 to 6,600 ft) demonstrate an initial unroofing of upper Paleozoic rocks from source terranes to the south and west, followed by an increase in the percentages of Precambrian quartzites and older crystalline basement clasts. These basal gravels give way to an influx of exotic volcanic debris (exceeding 50% of total clasts) with measured ages in the 63 to 80 Ma range. The upward change to predominantly exotic volcanic clasts in some sections is interpreted to record Laramide tectonism, erosion, and syntectonic sedimentation along the Plateau margin, accompanying late Cretaceous volcanism. Erosional unroofing of plausible Laramide source terranes beginning after volcanism could not have produced the observed vertical distribution of clasts. Clast lithologies also demonstrate a convergence of several distinct drainages toward the Hurricane fault structural zone, paralleling the northward trends of other Laramide monoclines. Stratigraphic and paleogeographic field relations at three sites suggest some monoclinal deformation accompanied sedimentation and paleocanyon incision. Thus a strong case exists for syntectonic Laramide sedimentation following Cretaceous uplift.

  8. Evaluation of chemical indicators for tracking and apportionment of phosphorus sources to Table Rock Lake in Southwest Missouri, USA.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhiwen; Ramaswami, Bala; Casaletto, David; Falke, Stefan; Angenent, Largus T; Giammar, Daniel E

    2007-04-01

    This work evaluated the suitability of selected chemical species as indicators for tracking and apportionment of point and non-point phosphorus sources within the Table Rock Lake watershed in Southwest Missouri, USA. The species were evaluated with respect to their uniqueness to specific source types, their ability to be detected in both sources and receiving waters, and the consistency of their concentration ratios to phosphorus. Four sampling events were conducted at 15 sample locations in one year to collect water samples for measuring the concentrations of total and dissolved phosphorus, seven anions, and 19 major and trace elements. Current analytical methods were sensitive enough for quantification of most of the chemical species in both sources and the receiving waterbody. Due to the high seasonal variation of phosphorus concentrations in source samples, no chemical species had consistent concentration ratios to phosphorus across source types. However, several chemicals were found to be unique to specific sources; bromide ion can be used as a unique indicator for the effluent of the largest wastewater treatment plant in the watershed. PMID:17287001

  9. Seawater as the source of minor elements in black shales, phosphorites and other sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, D.Z.

    1994-01-01

    Many of the minor elements in seawater today have a concentration-depth profile similar to that of the biologically essential nutrients, NO-3 and PO3-4. They show a relative depletion in the photic zone and enrichment in the deep ocean. The difference between their surface- and deep-ocean values, normalized to the change in PO3-4, approaches the average of measured minor-element: P ratios in marine plankton, although individual analyses of the latter show extreme scatter for a variety of reasons. Despite this scatter in the minor-element analyses of plankton, agreement between the two sets of data shows unequivocally that an important marine flux of many minor elements through the ocean is in the form of biogenic matter, with a composition approaching that of plankton. This interpretation is further supported by sediment studies, particularly of sediments which accumulate in shelf-slope environments where biological productivity in the photic zone is exceptionally high and organic carbon contents of the underlying sediment elevated. The interelement relations observed for some of these sediments approach the average values of plankton. These same interelement relations are observed in many marine sedimentary rocks such as metalliferous black shales and phosphorites, rocks which have a high content of marine fractions (e.g., organic matter, apatite, biogenic silica and carbonates). Many previous studies of the geochemistry of these rocks have concluded that local hydrothermal activity, and/or seawater with an elemental content different from that of the modern ocean, was required to account for their minor-element contents. However, the similarity in several of the minor-element ratios in many of these formations to minor-element ratios in modern plankton demonstrates that these sedimentary rocks accumulated in environments whose marine chemistry was virtually identical to that seen on continental shelf-slopes, or in marginal seas, of the ocean today. The

  10. Microscale modeling of fluid flow-geomechanics-seismicity: Relationship between permeability and seismic source response in deformed rock joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raziperchikolaee, S.; Alvarado, V.; Yin, S.

    2014-09-01

    Studying rock joint deformation including both slippage and opening mechanisms provides an opportunity to investigate the connection between the permeability and seismic source mechanisms. A microscale fluid flow-geomechanics-seismicity model was built to evaluate the transport response and failure mechanism of microcracks developed along a joint in Berea sandstone samples during deformation. The modeling method considers comprehensive grain-cement interactions. Fluid flow behavior is obtained through a realistic network model of the pore space in the compacted assembly. The geometric description of the complex pore structure is characterized to predict permeability of the rock sample as a function of rock deformation by using a dynamic pore network model. As a result of microcracks development, forces and displacements in grains involved in bond breakage are measured to determine seismic moment tensor. Shear and nonshear displacements are applied to the joint samples to investigate their effects on permeability evolution and failure mechanism of microcracks during joint deformation. In addition, the effect of joint roughness is analyzed by performing numerical compression tests. We also investigate how confining pressure affects volumetric deformation leading to opening or closure of developed microcracks and permeability changes of samples with joints.

  11. Age and Sr isotopic composition of volcanic rocks in the Maricunga Belt, Chile: implications for magma sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, E.H.; Robinson, A.C.; Rybuta, J.J.; Cuitino, L.; Moscoso, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating of volcanic rocks from the Maricunga belt of north-central Chile indicate that igneous activity took place throughout most of Miocene time at various places in the 150 by 30 km belt. No migration patterns of volcanism appear in the Miocene rocks of the belt. Volcanic activity ceased by the end of the Miocene. All the Miocene volcanic rocks studied are calcic andesites to dacites with about 62% SiO2, 18% A12O3, 4% Fe2O3 (total), and 2% K2O. Initial 87Sr/86Sr (Sri) values fall into two groups, one of lower values around 0.7050 to the west and the other of higher values around 0.7060 to the east. It is postulated that the two Sri groups reflect two adjoining coherent lower-crustal magma sources of possibly different age and subtly different composition that form part of the western edge of the South American craton. ?? 1994.

  12. Cretaceous paleogeography of Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Hulver, M.L.; Ziegler, A.M.; Rowley, D.B.; Sahagian, D.

    1986-05-01

    Five stage-length maps (Valanginian, Aptian, Cenomanian, Coniacian, and Maestrichtian) of Africa integrate topography/bathymetry, lithofacies, tectonics, and climatically sensitive sediments. These reconstructions differ from currently available maps in their level of detail and accuracy, and in that computer routines were developed to plot all aspects of the maps, including lithofacies patterns. Bathymetric contours were determined from community paleoecology and from thermal subsidence models of the newly opening Atlantic and Indian oceans. Topographic contours have been estimated from uplift models of rift shoulders, as well as from the erosion and sedimentation record of both the internal and marginal basins. The uplift of rift shoulders from Nigeria to Sudan is suggested by the extensive Nubian and equivalent sandstones across north Africa. This Benue-Ngaoundere-Abu Gabra rift system approximately paralleled the paleoequator, and its shoulders must have experienced the high rainfall normally associated with the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). In fact, these mountains would have served as a high level heat source, and would have pinned the ITCZ to their summits. Such a system tends to reduce seasonal excursions of the ITCZ, and may have influenced the high biological productivity represented by the oil source rocks of the Arabian peninsula. These sources also lie on the equator and could have resulted from a shelf incursion of the equatorial divergence zone, which is controlled by the ITCZ.

  13. Black shale source rocks and oil generation in the Cambrian and Ordovician of the central Appalachian Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, R.T.; Burruss, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Nearly 600 million bbl of oil (MMBO) and 1 to 1.5 trillion ft3 (tcf) of gas have been produced from Cambrian and Ordovician reservoirs (carbonate and sandstone) in the Ohio part of the Appalachian basin and on adjoining arches in Ohio, Indiana, and Ontario, Canada. Most of the oil and gas is concentrated in the giant Lima-Indiana field on the Findlay and Kankakee arches and in small fields distributed along the Knox unconformity. Based on new geochemical analyses of oils, potential source rocks, bitumen extracts, and previously published geochemical data, we conclude that the oils in both groups of fields originated from Middle and Upper Ordovician blcak shale (Utica and Antes shales) in the Appalachian basin. Moroever, we suggest that approximately 300 MMBO and many trillions of cubic feet of gas in the Lower Silurian Clinton sands of eastern Ohio originated in the same source rocks. Oils from the Cambrian and Ordovician reservoirs have similar saturated hydrocarbon compositions, biomarker distributions, and carbon isotope signatures. Regional variations in the oils are attributed to differences in thermal maturation rather than to differences in source. Total organic carbon content, genetic potential, regional extent, and bitument extract geochemistry identify the balck shale of the Utica and Antes shales as the most plausible source of the oils. Other Cambrian and Ordovician shale and carbonate units, such as the Wells Creek formation, which rests on the Knox unconformity, and the Rome Formation and Conasauga Group in the Rome trough, are considered to be only local petroleum sources. Tmax, CAI, and pyrolysis yields from drill-hole cuttings and core indicate that the Utica Shale in eastern and central Ohio is mature with respect to oil generation. Burial, thermal, and hydrocarbon-generation history models suggest that much of the oil was generated from the Utica-Antes source in the late Paleozoic during the Alleghanian orogeny. A pervasive fracture network

  14. Heavy-mineral analysis of sedimentary rocks of northern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morris, Robert Hamilton

    1952-01-01

    The Navy Oil Unit of the United States Geological Survey has been investigating the geology of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 4, northern Alaska. As part of this program, heavy-mineral samples were prepared from cores of the test wells and core holes and studied to determine stratigraphic correlations. Using the following criteria: (1) presence of diagnostic minerals or mineral suites; (2) relative abundance of specific minerals; (3) degree of rounding of mineral grains; (4) distinction as to grain form; eight heavy-mineral zones have been recognized in Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Quaternary sedimentary rocks. Correlations based on these zones are shown. Source areas and rocks are discussed in relation to geologic history and genesis of the Mesozoic and Quaternary sedimentary rocks.

  15. Detrital Zircon Geochronology of Cretaceous and Paleogene Strata Across the South-Central Alaskan Convergent Margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight; Haeussler, Peter; O'Sullivan, Paul; Friedman, Rich; Till, Alison; Bradley, Dan; Trop, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Ages of detrital zircons are reported from ten samples of Lower Cretaceous to Paleogene metasandstones and sandstones from the Chugach Mountains, Talkeetna Mountains, and western Alaska Range of south-central Alaska. Zircon ages are also reported from three igneous clasts from two conglomerates. The results bear on the regional geology, stratigraphy, tectonics, and mineral resource potential of the southern Alaska convergent margin. Chugach Mountains - The first detrital zircon data are reported here from the two main components of the Chugach accretionary complex - the inboard McHugh Complex and the outboard Valdez Group. Detrital zircons from sandstone and two conglomerate clasts of diorite were dated from the McHugh Complex near Anchorage. This now stands as the youngest known part of the McHugh Complex, with an inferred Turonian (Late Cretaceous) depositional age no older than 91-93 Ma. The zircon population has probability density peaks at 93 and 104 Ma and a smattering of Early Cretaceous and Jurassic grains, with nothing older than 191 Ma. The two diorite clasts yielded Jurassic U-Pb zircon ages of 179 and 181 Ma. Together, these findings suggest a Mesozoic arc as primary zircon source, the closest and most likely candidate being the Wrangellia composite terrane. The detrital zircon sample from the Valdez Group contains zircons as young as 69 and 77 Ma, consistent with the previously assigned Maastrichtian to Campanian (Late Cretaceous) depositional age. The zircon population has peaks at 78, 91, 148, and 163 Ma, minor peaks at 129, 177, 330, and 352 Ma, and no concordant zircons older than Devonian. A granite clast from a Valdez Group conglomerate yielded a Triassic U-Pb zircon age of 221 Ma. Like the McHugh Complex, the Valdez Group appears to have been derived almost entirely from Mesozoic arc sources, but a few Precambrian zircons are also present. Talkeetna Mountains - Detrital zircons ages were obtained from southernmost metasedimentary rocks of the

  16. Lower Cretaceous carbonate megabank, south Florida, depositional setting and petroleum potential

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.L.; Applegate, A.V.

    1987-05-01

    Reinterpretation of the South Florida basin reveals that it was a keep-up carbonate shelf during the Lower Cretaceous. Until the Cenomanian, it was connected to the Bahamas and the Cay Sal Bank north of Cuba. The Cenomanian sea level rise was at least partially responsible for the formation of the Florida Straits, isolating the platform. The combination of an abrupt worldwide rise in sea level and subsidence caused the South Florida platform to founder, ending shallow-water and evaporitic sedimentation over the majority of the shelf. The Cay Sal and Bahamian platforms remained as active shallow shelves separated by the Old Bahamas Channel. The Lower Cretaceous sediments are characterized by shallow shelf limestones, dolomites, and evaporites (mostly anhydrite). The evaporite-rich sections, originally thought to represent basinal facies, are reinterpreted as supratidal to shallow subtidal evaporites, based on examination of core and cuttings. Influx of normal marine waters over rudist fringing reefs controls both the carbonate/evaporite cycles and biota. A major salinity barrier within the platform can be defined. Production to date from the South Florida platform is from rudist patch reefs within the Sunniland formation onshore Florida. The petroleum potential of the Lower Cretaceous Sunniland formation increases offshore where more normal marine waters would have been encountered and might have allowed larger, coalescing, or even stacked rudist patch reefs to develop. The most porous reservoir in the Lower Cretaceous is the Brown dolomite member of the Lehigh Acres formation. This unit also would have much greater potential offshore as the underlying section of carbonate/evaporite source rocks thickens.

  17. Geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb-O isotope composition of granitoids of the Early Cretaceous Copiapó plutonic complex (27°30'S), Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschik, Robert; Fontignie, Denis; Chiaradia, Massimo; Voldet, Pia

    2003-10-01

    Early Cretaceous plutonic rocks exposed south of Copiapó form part of the Coastal Batholith of northern Chile. These rocks intrude arc-derived volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks and marine limestones that were deposited in the Early Cretaceous Atacama backarc basin. The Copiapó plutonic complex consists mainly of calc-alkaline, medium- to coarse-grained diorite, granodiorite, tonalite, monzodiorite, and quartz monzonite. The plutonic rocks are subalkaline to alkaline, metaluminous, magnetite-series, volcanic arc, I-type granitoids. Batholithic magmas are a heat, potential fluid, metal, and sulphur source for the hydrothermal iron oxide-rich Cu-Au mineralization in the Candelaria-Punta del Cobre district. Ore-related hydrothermal alteration affected large portions of the Copiapó complex. The least altered batholithic rocks have initial 87Sr/ 86Sr of 0.703070-0.703231; initial 143Nd/ 144Nd of 0.512733-0.512781; and 206Pb/ 204Pb, 207Pb/ 204Pb, and 208Pb/ 204Pb of 18.428-18.772, 15.550-15.603, and 38.127-38.401, respectively. The δ18O values for these rocks range from +6.9 to +8.6‰. Isotope signatures and trace element distributions suggest that the magmas are mantle derived. A subduction fluid-modified mantle source may explain the geochemical characteristics of the Copiapó complex. The ascent of magmas occurred along deep-rooted structures without significant crustal contamination, though minor contamination by relatively young (e.g. Jurassic) igneous rocks during ascent is possible. Intrusive rocks with high-K to shoshonitic characteristics probably represent residual liquids of less evolved magmas. The regional geologic context suggests that the plutons of the Copiapó complex were emplaced at a relatively shallow crustal level of 2-3 km.

  18. Iridium anomaly in the Cretaceous section of the Eastern Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelyev, Dmitry; Savelyeva, Olga

    2010-05-01

    The origin of iridium anomalies is widely discussed with regard to massive fauna and flora extinction at several geologic boundaries. Two hypotheses are most popular, cosmogenic and volcanogenic. Anomalies of iridium are known at many stratigraphic levels, both at the geologic series borders and within geologic series. Our studies revealed increased content of iridium in a section of Cretaceous oceanic deposits on the Kamchatsky Mys Peninsula (Eastern Kamchatka, Russia). The investigated section (56°03.353´N, 163°00.376´E) includes interbedded jaspers and siliceous limestones overlaying pillow-basalts. These deposits belong to the Smagin Formation of the Albian-Cenomanian age. In the middle and upper parts of the section two beds of black carbonaceous rocks with sapropelic organic matter were observed. Their formation marked likely episodes of oxygen depletion of oceanic intermediate water (oceanic anoxic events). Our geochemical studies revealed an enrichment of the carbonaceous beds in a number of major and trace elements (Al2O3, TiO2, FeO, MgO, K2O, P2O5, Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr, V, Mo, Ba, Y, Zr, Nb, REE, U, Au, Pt etc.) in comparison with associating jaspers and limestones. There are likely different sources which contributed to the enrichment. It is possible however to correlate the excess of Al, Ti, Zr, Nb with volcanogenic admixture, which is absent in limestones and jaspers. A possible source of the volcanogenic material was local volcanism as suggested by the close association of the investigated section with volcanic rocks (basaltic lavas and hyaloclastites). The basalts of the Smagin Formation were previously proposed to originate during Cretaceous activity of the Hawaiian mantle plume (Portnyagin et al., Geology, 2008). Neutron activation analysis indicated increased up to 9 ppb concentration of Ir at the bottom of the lower carbonaceous bed (inorganic part of the sample was analyzed comprising 46% of the bulk rock). In other samples Ir content was below

  19. Late Cretaceous Arc Initiation on the Edge of an Oceanic Plateau (Southern Central America)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchs, D. M.; Baumgartner, P. O.; Arculus, R.

    2007-12-01

    The Caribbean Plate comprises one or several late Cretaceous oceanic plateaus imbricated between the Northern and Southern Americas. Uplifted portions of plateau(s) along plate boundaries have been recognized in many sites, including that underlying the south Central American Volcanic Arc. We provide new constraints for the role of the plateau in the evolution of this arc obtained by mapping of the uplifted forearc area between southern Costa Rica and western Panama. An oceanic plateau, accreted seamounts and arc rocks were identified, and a new tectono-stratigraphy defined. The arc basement is composed of a Coniacian oceanic plateau. In the outer margin, late Cretaceous-Eocene accreted seamounts are in contact with the plateau along tectonic mélanges and active faults. Campanian-Maastrichtian primitive arc rocks are found 40-110 km to the trench on the top of -or as dykes within- the plateau. The location of these rocks correlates to previous observations and indicates that the arc front migrated away from the trench during the late Cretaceous, potentially in response to subduction erosion or slab flattening [Lissinna et al., EGU 2006]. The first island arc lavas were deposited under sea level, over a broad area. They were quickly followed by more evolved intrusives and lavas, which were emplaced along a volcanic front during the late Cretaceous-Paleocene. Detrital and volcanic records along the Central American isthmus indicate that a continuous volcanic arc extended between eastern Panama and northern Costa Rica in this time. In southern Costa Rica (Golfito complex) and western Panama (Sona-Azuero-Coiba complex), the oceanic plateau consists mainly of pillowed and massive low Fe (tholeiitic) basalts. These rocks have a highly consistent geochemistry characterized by flat, primitive upper mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns with low Pb and high Nb-Ti contents. Primitive arc igneous samples are low-medium Fe basalts to trachyandesites found as pillow

  20. Effects of source rocks, soil features and climate on natural gamma radioactivity in the Crati valley (Calabria, Southern Italy).

    PubMed

    Guagliardi, Ilaria; Rovella, Natalia; Apollaro, Carmine; Bloise, Andrea; De Rosa, Rosanna; Scarciglia, Fabio; Buttafuoco, Gabriele

    2016-05-01

    The study, which represents an innovative scientific strategy to approach the study of natural radioactivity in terms of spatial and temporal variability, was aimed to characterize the background levels of natural radionuclides in soil and rock in the urban and peri-urban soil of a southern Italy area; to quantify their variations due to radionuclide bearing minerals and soil properties, taking into account nature and extent of seasonality influence. Its main novelty is taking into account the effect of climate in controlling natural gamma radioactivity as well as analysing soil radioactivity in terms of soil properties and pedogenetic processes. In different bedrocks and soils, activities of natural radionuclides ((238)U, (232)Th (4) K) and total radioactivity were measured at 181 locations by means of scintillation γ-ray spectrometry. In addition, selected rocks samples were collected and analysed, using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) and an X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD), to assess the main sources of radionuclides. The natural-gamma background is intimately related to differing petrologic features of crystalline source rocks and to peculiar pedogenetic features and processes. The radioactivity survey was conducted during two different seasons with marked changes in the main climatic characteristics, namely dry summer and moist winter, to evaluate possible effects of seasonal climatic variations and soil properties on radioactivity measurements. Seasonal variations of radionuclides activities show their peak values in summer. The activities of (238)U, (232)Th and (4) K exhibit a positive correlation with the air temperature and are negatively correlated with precipitations.

  1. Effects of source rocks, soil features and climate on natural gamma radioactivity in the Crati valley (Calabria, Southern Italy).

    PubMed

    Guagliardi, Ilaria; Rovella, Natalia; Apollaro, Carmine; Bloise, Andrea; De Rosa, Rosanna; Scarciglia, Fabio; Buttafuoco, Gabriele

    2016-05-01

    The study, which represents an innovative scientific strategy to approach the study of natural radioactivity in terms of spatial and temporal variability, was aimed to characterize the background levels of natural radionuclides in soil and rock in the urban and peri-urban soil of a southern Italy area; to quantify their variations due to radionuclide bearing minerals and soil properties, taking into account nature and extent of seasonality influence. Its main novelty is taking into account the effect of climate in controlling natural gamma radioactivity as well as analysing soil radioactivity in terms of soil properties and pedogenetic processes. In different bedrocks and soils, activities of natural radionuclides ((238)U, (232)Th (4) K) and total radioactivity were measured at 181 locations by means of scintillation γ-ray spectrometry. In addition, selected rocks samples were collected and analysed, using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) and an X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD), to assess the main sources of radionuclides. The natural-gamma background is intimately related to differing petrologic features of crystalline source rocks and to peculiar pedogenetic features and processes. The radioactivity survey was conducted during two different seasons with marked changes in the main climatic characteristics, namely dry summer and moist winter, to evaluate possible effects of seasonal climatic variations and soil properties on radioactivity measurements. Seasonal variations of radionuclides activities show their peak values in summer. The activities of (238)U, (232)Th and (4) K exhibit a positive correlation with the air temperature and are negatively correlated with precipitations. PMID:26891362

  2. Definition of Greater Gulf Basin Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous Lower Cenomanian Shale Gas Assessment Unit, United States Gulf of Mexico Basin Onshore and State Waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dennen, Kristin O.; Hackley, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    An assessment unit (AU) for undiscovered continuous “shale” gas in Lower Cretaceous (Aptian and Albian) and basal Upper Cretaceous (lower Cenomanian) rocks in the USA onshore Gulf of Mexico coastal plain recently was defined by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The AU is part of the Upper Jurassic-Cretaceous-Tertiary Composite Total Petroleum System (TPS) of the Gulf of Mexico Basin. Definition of the AU was conducted as part of the 2010 USGS assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in Gulf Coast Mesozoic stratigraphic intervals. The purpose of defining the Greater Gulf Basin Lower Cretaceous Shale Gas AU was to propose a hypothetical AU in the Cretaceous part of the Gulf Coast TPS in which there might be continuous “shale” gas, but the AU was not quantitatively assessed by the USGS in 2010.

  3. Mineralogy and source rock evaluation of the marine Oligo-Miocene sediments in some wells in the Nile Delta and North Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El sheikh, Hassan; Faris, Mahmoud; Shaker, Fatma; Kumral, Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    This paper aims to study the mineralogical composition and determine the petroleum potential of source rocks of the Oligocene-Miocene sequence in the Nile Delta and North Sinai districts. The studied interval in the five wells can be divided into five rock units arranged from the top to base; Qawasim, Sidi Salem, Kareem, Rudeis, and Qantara formations. The bulk rock mineralogy of the samples was investigated using X-Ray Diffraction technique (XRD). The results showed that the sediments of the Nile Delta area are characterized by the abundance of quartz and kaolinite with subordinate amounts of feldspars, calcite, gypsum, dolomite, and muscovite. On the other hand, the data of the bulk rock analysis at the North Sinai wells showed that kaolinite, quartz, feldspar and calcite are the main constituents associated with minor amounts of dolomite, gypsum, mica, zeolite, and ankerite. Based on the organic geochemical investigations (TOC and Rock-Eval pyrolysis analyses), all studied formations in both areas are thermally immature but in the Nile delta area, Qawasim, Sidi Salem and Qantara formations (El-Temsah-2 Well) are organically-rich and have a good petroleum potential (kerogen Type II-oil-prone), while Rudeis Formation is a poor petroleum potential source rock (kerogen Type III-gas-prone). In the North Sinai area, Qantara Formation has a poor petroleum potential (kerogen Type III-gas-prone) and Sidi Salem Formation (Bardawil-1 Well) is a good petroleum potential source rock (kerogen Type II-oil-prone).

  4. The use of predictive lithostratigraphy to significantly improve the ability to forecast reservoir and source rocks? Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, R. D.; Moore, T. L.; Energy Systems

    2010-06-29

    The purpose of this CRADA, which ended in 2003, was to make reservoir and source rock distribution significantly more predictable by quantifying the fundamental controls on stratigraphic heterogeneity. To do this, the relationships among insolation, climate, sediment supply, glacioeustasy, and reservoir and source rock occurrence were investigated in detail. Work current at the inception of the CRADA had uncovered previously unrecognized associations among these processes and properties that produce a phenomenon that, when properly analyzed, will make lithostratigraphic variability (including texture, porosity, and permeability) substantially more understandable. Computer climate simulations of selected time periods, compared with the global distribution of paleoclimatic indicators, documented spatial and temporal climate changes as a function of insolation and provided quantitative changes in runoff, lake level, and glacioeustasy. The effect of elevation and climate on sediment yield was assessed numerically by analyzing digital terrain and climate data. The phase relationships of climate, yield, and glacioeustatic cycles from the Gulf of Mexico and/or other sedimentary basins were assessed by using lacunarity, a statistical technique.

  5. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating coded signals

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S

    2014-12-30

    A system and a method for investigating rock formations includes generating, by a first acoustic source, a first acoustic signal comprising a first plurality of pulses, each pulse including a first modulated signal at a central frequency; and generating, by a second acoustic source, a second acoustic signal comprising a second plurality of pulses. A receiver arranged within the borehole receives a detected signal including a signal being generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first-and-second acoustic signal in a non-linear mixing zone within the intersection volume. The method also includes-processing the received signal to extract the signal generated by the non-linear mixing process over noise or over signals generated by a linear interaction process, or both.

  6. Early cretaceous radiolarian assemblages from the East Sakhalin Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurilov, D. V.; Vishnevskaya, V. S.

    2011-02-01

    Three-dimensional radiolarian skeletons isolated from rock matrix in HF solution and then studied under scanning electron microscope substantiate the Early Cretaceous age of volcanogenic-cherty deposits sampled from fragmentary rock successions of the East Sakhalin Mountains. Accordingly the Berriasian age is established for jasper packets formerly attributed to the Upper Paleozoic-Mesozoic Daldagan Group; the Valanginian radiolarians are identified in cherty rock intercalations in the Upper Paleozoic (?) Ivashkino Formation; the Berriasian-Barremian assemblage is macerated from cherty tuffites of the Jurassic-Cretaceous Ostraya Formation; and the Aptian-early Albian radiolarians are characteristic of tuffaceous cherty rocks sampled from the Cretaceous Khoe Formation of the Nabil Group. Photographic documentation of radiolarian skeletons specifies taxonomic composition and age of the Berriasian, Valanginian, Berriasian-Valanginian, Barremian, and Aptian-Albian radiolarian assemblages from the East Sakhalin Mountains, and their evolution as related to abiotic events is considered. Coexistence of Tethyan and Pacific species in the same rock samples evidence origin of radiolarian assemblages in an ecotone. Consequently, the assemblages are applicable for intra- and interregional correlations and paleogeographic reconstructions.

  7. Jurassic-Cretaceous Composite Total Petroleum System and Geologic Assessment of Oil and Gas Resources of the North Cuba Basin, Cuba

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) World Oil and Gas Assessment is to develop geologically based hypotheses regarding the potential for additions to oil and gas reserves in priority areas of the world. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed an assessment of the undiscovered oil and gas potential of the North Cuba Basin. The assessment is based on the geologic elements of the total petroleum system (TPS) defined in the province, including petroleum source rocks (source-rock maturation, generation, and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and petroleum traps (Trap formation and timing). Using this geologic framework, the USGS defined a Jurassic-Cretaceous Total Petroleum System in the North Cuba Basin Province. Within this TPS, three assessment units were defined and assessed for undiscovered oil and gas resources.

  8. Episodic growth of a Late Cretaceous and Paleogene intrusive complex of pegmatitic leucogranite, Ruby Mountains core complex, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, K.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Barnes, C.G.; Premo, W.R.; Snoke, A.W.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    Gneissic pegmatitic leucogranite forms a dominant component (>600 km3) of the midcrustal infrastructure of the Ruby Mountains-East Humboldt Range core complex (Nevada, USA), and was assembled and modified episodically into a batholithic volume by myriad small intrusions from ca. 92 to 29 Ma. This injection complex consists of deformed sheets and other bodies emplaced syntectonically into a stratigraphic framework of marble, calc-silicate rocks, quartzite, schist, and other granitoids. Bodies of pegmatitic granite coalesce around host-rock remnants, which preserve relict or ghost stratigraphy, thrusts, and fold nappes. Intrusion inflated but did not disrupt the host-rock structure. The pegmatitic granite increases proportionally downward from structurally high positions to the bottoms of 1-km-deep canyons where it constitutes 95%-100% of the rock. Zircon and monazite dated by U-Pb (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe, SHRIMP) for this rock type cluster diffusely at ages near 92, 82(?), 69, 38, and 29 Ma, and indicate successive or rejuvenated igneous crystallization multiple times over long periods of the Late Cretaceous and the Paleogene. Initial partial melting of unexposed pelites may have generated granite forerunners, which were remobilized several times in partial melting events. Sources for the pegmatitic granite differed isotopically from sources of similar-aged interleaved equigranular granites. Dominant Late Cretaceous and fewer Paleogene ages recorded from some pegmatitic granite samples, and Paleogene-only ages from the two structurally deepest samples, together with varying zircon trace element contents, suggest several disparate ages of final emplacement or remobilization of various small bodies. Folded sills that merge with dikes that cut the same folds suggest that there may have been in situ partial remobilization. The pegmatitic granite intrusions represent prolonged and recurrent generation, assembly, and partial melting modification of a

  9. Mid-Paleozoic age of granitoids in enclaves within early Cretaceous granulites, Fiordland, southwest New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradshaw, J.Y.; Kimbrough, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    Orthogneisses of granite, quartz monzonite, monzonite, and tonalite, occur locally as isolated enclaves within the Early Cretaceous granulite terrain (Western Fiordland Orthogneiss - WFO). Discordant U-Pb zircon isotopic data (seven fractions) from four granitoid samples from enclaves at George Sound, define an upper intecept age of 341??34 Ma that is interpreted as approximating the time of formation of the granitoid suite. The lower intercept age of 93??37 Ma is interpreted as approximating the time of zircon isotopic disturbance by major episodic Pb loss. The low 87Sr/ 86Sr initial ratio indicates that these mid-Paleozoic granitoids were derived from an isotopically primitive source. The granitoid enclaves within WFO show influences of several different sources. The granitoids provide evidence linking WFO to a mid-Palaeozoic country rock similar to the central Fiordland metasediments. -from Authors

  10. Geochemical characterisation, provenance, source and depositional environment of ‘Roches Argilo-Talqueuses’ (RAT) and Mines Subgroups sedimentary rocks in the Neoproterozoic Katangan Belt (Congo): Lithostratigraphic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampunzu, A. B.; Cailteux, J. L. H.; Moine, B.; Loris, H. N. B. T.

    2005-07-01

    The chemical characteristics of sedimentary rocks provide important clues to their provenance and depositional environments. Chemical analyses of 192 samples of Katangan sedimentary rocks from Kolwezi, Kambove-Kabolela and Luiswishi in the central African Copperbelt (Katanga, Congo) are used to constrain (1) the source and depositional environment of RAT and Mines Subgroup sedimentary rocks and (2) the geochemical relations between the rocks from these units and the debate on the lithostratigraphic position of the RAT Subgroup within the Katangan sedimentary succession. The geochemical data indicate that RAT, D. Strat., RSF and RSC are extremely poor in alkalis and very rich in MgO. SD are richer in alkalis, especially K 2O. Geochemical characteristics of RAT and Mines Subgroups sedimentary rocks indicate deposition under an evaporitic environment that evolved from oxidizing (Red RAT) to reducing (Grey RAT and Mines Subgroup) conditions. There is no chemical difference between RAT and fine-grained clastic rocks from the lower part of the Mines Subgroup. The geochemical data preclude the genetic model that RAT are syn-orogenic sedimentary rocks originating from Mines Group rocks by erosion and gravity-induced fragmentation in front of advancing nappes.

  11. Pb and O isotopic constraints on the source of granitic rocks from Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, R.A.; Barr, S.M.; Longstaffe, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    Pb isotopic compositions of leached feldspars from twenty-three plutons in Cape Breton Island can be divided into two groups: anorthosite, syenite, and granite in the Blair River Complex, which have the least radiogenic compositions on the Island, and granitic rocks from terranes (Aspy, Bras d'Or, and Mira) to the south. Pb isotopic data for the Blair River Complex (206Pb/204Pb = 17.399-18.107; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.505-15.560; 208Pb/204Pb = 36.689-37.733) are consistent with an old source region ultimately derived from the mantle and contaminated by sialic crust. Oxygen isotopic compositions of syenite in the Blair River Complex (??18O = +8.0 to +8.5 permil) are slightly higher than anorthosite (+7.0 to +8.3 permil); a Silurian granite in the Blair River Complex has ??18O = +7.5 permil. Cambrian to Devonian plutons in the Aspy, Bras d'Or, and Mira terranes are more radiogenic (206Pb/204Pb = 18.192-18.981; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.574-15.712; 208Pb/ 204Pb =37.815-38.936) than the Blair River Complex and were generated from source regions having a predominant crustal Pb signature (high ??). The ??18O values of granites and granodiorites in the Aspy terrane (+7.5 to +9.2 permil; avg = +8.6 permil) and Bras d'Or (+3.7 to +11.3 permil; avg = +9.4 permil) are also consistent with involvement of sialic crust. Many Late Proterozoic granites from the Mira terrane have anomalously low ??18O values (+0.2 to +5.9 permil), perhaps produced from protoliths that had undergone hydrothermal alteration prior to melting. Paleozoic granitic rocks from the Aspy, Bras d'Or, and Mira terranes cannot be uniquely distinguished on the basis of their Pb and O isotopic compositions. The granitic rocks could have been generated during terrane amalgamation from combinations of unradiogenic (Grenville-like) and more radiogenic (Avalon-like) sources.

  12. Organic petrology and geochemistry of Eocene Suzak bituminous marl, north-central Afghanistan: Depositional environment and source rock potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.; Sanfilipo, John

    2016-01-01

    Organic geochemistry and petrology of Eocene Suzak bituminous marl outcrop samples from Madr village in north-central Afghanistan were characterized via an integrated analytical approach to evaluate depositional environment and source rock potential. Multiple proxies suggest the organic-rich (TOC ∼6 wt.%) bituminous marls are ‘immature’ for oil generation (e.g., vitrinite Ro < 0.4%, Tmax < 425 °C, PI ≤ 0.05, C29 ααα S/S + R ≤ 0.12, C29 ββS/ββS+ααR ≤ 0.10, others), yet oil seeps are present at outcrop and live oil and abundant solid bitumen were observed via optical microscopy. Whole rock sulfur content is ∼2.3 wt.% whereas sulfur content is ∼5.0–5.6 wt.% in whole rock extracts with high polar components, consistent with extraction from S-rich Type IIs organic matter which could generate hydrocarbons at low thermal maturity. Low Fe-sulfide mineral abundance and comparison of Pr/Ph ratios between saturate and whole extracts suggest limited Fe concentration resulted in sulfurization of organic matter during early diagenesis. From these observations, we infer that a Type IIs kerogen in ‘immature’ bituminous marl at Madr could be generating high sulfur viscous oil which is seeping from outcrop. However, oil-seep samples were not collected for correlation studies. Aluminum-normalized trace element concentrations indicate enrichment of redox sensitive trace elements Mo, U and V and suggest anoxic-euxinic conditions during sediment deposition. The bulk of organic matter observed via optical microscopy is strongly fluorescent amorphous bituminite grading to lamalginite, possibly representing microbial mat facies. Short chain n-alkanes peak at C14–C16 (n-C17/n-C29 > 1) indicating organic input from marine algae and/or bacterial biomass, and sterane/hopane ratios are low (0.12–0.14). Monoaromatic steroids are dominated by C28clearly indicating a marine setting. High gammacerane index values (∼0.9) are consistent with

  13. Cretaceous eustasy revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Bilal U.

    2014-02-01

    Eustatic sea-level changes of the Cretaceous are reevaluated based on a synthesis of global stratigraphic data. A new terminology for local/regional or relative sea-level changes (eurybatic shifts) is proposed to distinguish them from global (eustatic) sea-level changes, with the observation that all measures of sea-level change in any given location are eurybatic, even when they include a strong global signal. Solid-earth factors that influence inherited regional topography and thus modify physical measures of amplitude of the sea-level rises and falls locally are reviewed. One of these factors, dynamic topography (surface expression of mass flow in the upper mantle on land- and seascapes), is considered most pertinent in altering local measures of amplitude of sea-level events on third-order time scales (0.5-3.0 Myr). Insights gained from these models have led to the reconciliation of variance between amplitude estimates of eurybatic shifts in any given region and global measures of eustatic changes. Global estimates of third-order events can only be guesstimated at best by averaging the eurybatic data from widely distributed time-synchronous events. Revised curves for both long-term and short-term sea-level variations are presented for the Cretaceous Period. The curve representing the long-term envelope shows that average sea levels throughout the Cretaceous remained higher than the present day mean sea level (75-250 m above PDMSL). Sea level reached a trough in mid Valanginian (~ 75 m above PDMSL), followed by two high points, the first in early Barremian (~ 160-170 m above PDMSL) and the second, the highest peak of the Cretaceous, in earliest Turonian (~ 240-250 m above PDMSL). The curve also displays two ~ 20 Myr-long periods of relatively high and stable sea levels (Aptian through early Albian and Coniacian through Campanian). The short-term curve identifies 58 third-order eustatic events in the Cretaceous, most have been documented in several basins, while

  14. TEM observations on Type III kerogen, with special reference to coal as a source rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Susie Y.; Taylor, Geoff H.

    Type III kerogen follows the coalification track of vitrinite or a bulk coal. It is often inferred that, because this organic matter is of comparatively low hydrogen and high oxygen content, it cannot be more than a marginal source of petroleum. This is not a correct approach because the actual source material is not the whole coal but only a small fraction. Some, at least, of this small fraction appears likely to be just as rich a source as much of Type I or Type II kerogen. There is no doubt that the liptinite macerals are important source materials. However, with TEM it can be shown that there are additional, and in some cases more significant, sources with varying degrees of thermal reactivity. These include: -in vitrinite, the remains of fungi and bacteria, other fine lipid-rich matter, and suberin; -in vitrinitic and especially in inertinitic coal, algal and algae-like material. Micrinite consists of aggregates of very fine spherical bodies which are formed when hydrocarbons are generated. The presence of such aggregates within the coal texture confirms the generative role of the lipid-rich components and provides an important indication as to whether generation has occurred.

  15. Sulfur species in source rock bitumen before and after hydrous pyrolysis determined by X-ray absorption near-edge structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolin, Trudy B.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Lewan, Michael; Hill, Ronald J.; Grayson, Michael B.; Mitra-Kirtley, Sudipa; Bake, Kyle D.; Craddock, Paul R.; Abdallah, Wael; Pomerantz, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    The sulfur speciation of source rock bitumen (chloroform-extractable organic matter in sedimentary rocks) was examined using sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy for a suite of 11 source rocks from around the world. Sulfur speciation was determined for both the native bitumen in thermally immature rocks and the bitumen produced by thermal maturation of kerogen via hydrous pyrolysis (360 °C for 72 h) and retained within the rock matrix. In this study, the immature bitumens had higher sulfur concentrations than those extracted from samples after hydrous pyrolysis. In addition, dramatic and systematic evolution of the bitumen sulfur moiety distributions following artificial thermal maturation was observed consistently for all samples. Specifically, sulfoxide sulfur (sulfur double bonded to oxygen) is abundant in all immature bitumen samples but decreases substantially following hydrous pyrolysis. The loss in sulfoxide sulfur is associated with a relative increase in the fraction of thiophene sulfur (sulfur bonded to aromatic carbon) to the extent that thiophene is the dominant sulfur form in all post-pyrolysis bitumen samples. This suggests that sulfur moiety distributions might be used for estimating thermal maturity in source rocks based on the character of the extractable organic matter.

  16. Depositional and diagenetic controls on source-rock characteristics of the Lower Jurassic ``Nordegg Member``, western Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Riediger, C.L.; Bloch, J.D.

    1995-01-02

    Petrographic, mineralogical, and bulk-geochemical (XRD, XRF, and Rock-Eval) data indicate that depositional and early diagenetic processes were the principal controls on the organic and inorganic characteristics of the Lower Jurassic Nordegg Member source rock. This unit comprises organic-rich, calcareous mudstones to marlstones and marly limestones that were deposited in a predominantly anoxic, hypersaline, silled marine basin during two transgressive-regressive (T-R) events. Sediments deposited during marine transgression have a higher content of carbonate (calcite and dolomite) and organic matter. Fe (mainly as pyrite) content varies inversely with carbonate content. The basal ``Nordegg Member`` is phosphatic with stratiform apatite laminae and phosphatic nodules. Early diagenetic phosphatogenesis was probably mediated by bacteria under variably dysoxic conditions during the initial transgressive event. Regressive parts of T-R cycles are expressed as an increase in abundance of silicate (quartz, illite, kaolinite, and minor K-feldspar) and lower organic carbon contents. Deposition of abundant marine organic matter fueled vigorous bacterial reduction of sulfate and almost total bacterial reworking of the sedimented organic matter, resulting in significant production of reduced sulfur species and predominantly amorphous kerogen. Pyrite formation was ubiquitous but limited by the abundance of Fe. Furthermore, content of organic S increases with increasing Hydrogen Index, indicating the importance of type and reactivity of organic matter on the extent of incorporation of sulfur into the kerogen during early diagenesis.

  17. Organic facies of some Mesozoic source rocks on Alaskan North Slope

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, U.A.; Daly, A.R.; Brown, S.W.

    1983-03-01

    Geochemical screening (TOC and Rock-Eval pyrolysis) of picked cuttings of Mesozoic age from seven wells located between Prudhoe Bay and the Colville delta distinguished three types of organic facies and one subtype. This paper demonstrates relationships between organic facies of the sediments and their inferred depositional environment. The organic matter type and quantity serve to separate the Mesozoic stratigraphy into five intervals: (a) Shublik Formation; (b) basal Kingak Shale; (c) upper Kingak Shale; (d) Pebble Shale/Hot Zone; and (e) Torok/Seabee Formation. The Shublik Formation in the study area was deposited on a carbonate platform with a deep basin lying to the south. High organic-carbon content and relatively high hydrogen content of the Shublik can be explained by preservation of marine organic matter in anoxic lagoons or local depressions. Deposition of the basal Kingak Shale and of the Pebble Shale/Hot Zone is the result of major transgressions during the Jurassic and the Neocomain, respectively. Both intervals were deposited as bottomsets of prograding sequences (prodelta) and contain high quantities of relatively hydrogen-rich organic matter. The upper Kingak Shale and the Torok/Seabee Formations are of a similar organic facies that is characterized by relatively low quantities of hydrogen-poor organic matter. Both intervals were deposited as foresets in a progradational sequence. The organic facies of these intervals are the result of clastic dilution, increased input of terrigenous organic matter, and increased bioturbation during early burial.

  18. Some aspects of Cenozoic maar sediments in Europe: the source-rock potential and their exceptionally good fossil preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerle, W.

    During the last decade, two particular aspects of maar geology have been reported using Cenozoic examples: (1) the formation of sediments rich in organic matter (hydrocarbon source rocks) and (2) the exceptionally good fossil preservation in maar sediments, which invariably contain a certain amount of volcanogenic material. The periodically high sedimentation rate of maar sediments leads to rapid burial of animal or plant remains. The minute particle size of much volcanic ash, their thixotropic behaviour, and the neoformation of cryptocrystalline silica ensure rapid and complete isolation of organic matter and fossils. These factors impede exchange between the pore water in the sediment and the overlying water body, thus, protecting the organic material against oxidation.

  19. Lead and sulfur isotopes of Guarn Halfaya and Bou Grine deposits associated to salt dome cap rocks (Diapirs zone, Northern Tunisia): sources of metals and genetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemmali, N.; Souissi, F.; Carranza, E. J. M.; Vennemann, T. W.

    2012-04-01

    The Pb-Zn ores districts at Guarn Halfaya and Bou Grine are hosted mainly by the dolostones in the contact breccias between Triassic and Upper Cretaceous and by Upper Cretaceous limestones. The mineralization occurs as lenticular, impregnations, substitutions, replacements, stratiform, vein, dissemination, and stockwork. A complex polymetallic sulfide assemblage typifies the main ore stage, dominated by sphalerite and galena, pyrite with minor chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, and sulfosalt (grey copper). Limestone, barite and celestite dominate the gangue, with lesser calcite. Barite and celestite intergrown with main ore-stage sulfides of Oum Edeboua has δ34S values of 12.7 to 15.0 ‰, consistent with the derivation of sulfate from Triassic evaporites form the study area (12.8<δ34S<14.0 ‰). The δ34S values for sulfides of the both study area range from 2.6 to 9.5 ‰. These positive δ34S values are likely due to abiotic thermally-driven abiotic sulfate reduction (TSR) of Triassic sulfates at depth. However, the presence of bacterial relics suggests involvement of bacterially-mediated sulfate reduction (BSR). The lead isotope composition is homogeneous with 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb ratio ranging between from 18.723 to 18.783, 15.667 to 15.685, and 38.806 to 38.889, respectively, and plot between the upper crust and orogene curves of Zartman and Doe (1981) which imply involvement of a well-mixed multi-source reservoir of Pb at depth. The syn-diagenetic mineralization in the Bahloul Formation and the calculate of model age suggest a Late Cretaceous age, correspond to a NE-SW to ENE-WSS regional extensional tectonic events, which likely favored migration of mineralizing fluids and eventual deposition at Guarn Halfaya and Bou Grine.

  20. Carbon Sources to Authigenic Carbonate Rock at Chemosynthetic Communities: Lower Slope of the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassen, R.; Jung, W.; Zhang, C.; Defreitas, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    Flux of biogenic methane, crude oil and associated hydrocarbon gases occurs from the deep subsurface to the seafloor, water column, and atmosphere of the Gulf of Mexico slope. Chemosynthetic communities occur at sites of relatively high gas flux, frequently with gas hydrate, but always with authigenic carbonate rock \\(ACR\\). ACR contains carbonate carbon derived from microbial hydrocarbon oxidation that geologically sequesters much fossil carbon, perturbing the carbon cycle. ACR was collected using the ALVIN from sites with chemosynthetic communities in Alaminos Canyon, Atwater Valley, and the Florida Escarpment areas at water depths as much as 3.3 km. Bulk δ 13C was measured and carbonate petrology used to identify carbonate cements, normal marine carbonate, and non-carbonate components such as metal oxides and sulfides. ACR is depleted in 13C. However, the δ 13C of major hydrocarbon types is typically more depleted in 13C than the associated ACR. For example, the mean δ 13C of biogenic methane seeps in the Gulf slope is -74.0\\permil PDB but the lightest bulk ACR measured in the study area is -46.6\\permil PDB. Carbonate cements from hydrocarbon oxidation are shown to enclose skeletal remains of chemosynthetic fauna such as mussels, clams, as well as other fauna characterized by normal marine carbonate \\(\\sim 0\\permil PDB\\). The best explanation of why the δ 13C of ACR does not closely correspond to that of the hydrocarbon starting products is that normal marine carbon dilutes the δ 13C from hydrocarbon oxidation and thus affects the bulk isotopic properties of ACR.

  1. Reclamation of acidic, denuded copper basin land: Revegetation performance of phosphate rock vs other nutrient sources

    SciTech Connect

    Soileau, J.M.; Sikora, F.J.; Maddox, J.J.; Kelsoe, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    Open pit smelting of Copper ore about 100 years ago resulted in approximately 9,300 ha of severely eroded, very acidic (pH 4.0 to 5.0) soils at Copper Basin, Tennessee. Along with other essential nutrients, phosphorus (P) amendments are critical for long-term productivity and sustainability of vegetation on this depleted soil. A field study was conducted (1992-1995) to compare revegetation from surface-applied North Carolina phosphate rock (PR) and triple superphosphate (TSP) at 20, 59, and 295 kg P ha{sup -1}, and to determine benefits of starter NPK tree tablets. The experimental design consisted of 7.3 x 9.1 m replicated plots, each planted to 20 loblolly pine seedlings and aerially seeded with a mixture of grasses and legumes. Tree survivability was high from all treatments. Through the third year, tree height and diameter increased with increasing P to 59 kg P ha without fertilizer tablets. There were no pine growth differences between PR and TSP. Weeping lovegrass has been the dominant cover crop through 1995, with increased stimulation to tree tablets and surface P. Tall fescue (KY 31), sericea lespedeza, and black locust responded more to PR than to TSP. Surface soil pH increased, and 0.01 M SrCl{sub 2} extractable Al decreased, with increasing rate of PR. For future loblolly pine plantings in the Copper Basin, this study suggests there is no benefit to applying both tree tablets and surface P at rates above 59 kg P ha{sup -1}. For reclaiming land with high acidity and low P fertility, PR has significant benefits. In reclaiming steep, gullied land, there is great potential for aerial application of PR and/or pelletized liming agents.

  2. Termination time of peak decratonization in North China: Geochemical evidence from mafic igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Zhao, Zi-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Geophysical and petrological data indicate destruction of the cratonic lithosphere in North China in the Mesozoic, resulting in replacement of the ancient subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) by the juvenile SCLM. However, it remains to be answered when the craton destruction would have been terminated in the Mesozoic. This question is resolved by studying the two types of mafic igneous rocks with contrasting geochemical compositions from North China. The first type of mafic igneous rock shows arc-like trace element distribution patterns and enriched radiogenic Sr-Nd isotope compositions, with emplacement ages spanning from the Triassic to Early Cretaceous. The mafic magmatism is absent in a period from ~ 200 Ma to ~ 135 Ma, recording the thinning of cratonic lithosphere due to the westward flat subduction of the Paleo-Pacific slab beneath the North China Craton. In contrast, the second type of mafic igneous rocks exhibits oceanic island basalts (OIB)-like trace element distribution patterns and relatively depleted radiogenic Sr-Nd isotope compositions, with emplacement ages spanning from the Early Cretaceous to Cenozoic. Zircon U-Pb dating yields an age of ~ 121 Ma for the geochemical transformation between the two types of mafic igneous rocks. This age marks a dramatic demarcation in the composition of their mantle sources. As such, the nature of mantle lithosphere in North China was changed from the ancient SCLM to the juvenile SCLM at ~ 121 Ma. Thus, this age not only signifies the tectonic transition from the enriched mantle to the depleted mantle in the Early Cretaceous, but also dates the termination of peak decratonization in North China. Therefore, the craton destruction in the Early Cretaceous is temporally and spatially associated with the dramatic changes in the geochemical composition of mantle lithosphere.

  3. The crystallization water of gypsum rocks is a relevant water source for plants.

    PubMed

    Palacio, Sara; Azorín, José; Montserrat-Martí, Gabriel; Ferrio, Juan Pedro

    2014-08-18

    Some minerals, like gypsum, hold water in their crystalline structure. Although still unexplored, the use of such crystallization water by organisms would point to a completely new water source for life, critical under dry conditions. Here we use the fact that the isotopic composition of free water differs from gypsum crystallization water to show that plants can use crystallization water from the gypsum structure. The composition of the xylem sap of gypsum plants during summer shows closer values to gypsum crystallization water than to free soil water. Crystallization water represents a significant water source for organisms growing on gypsum, especially during summer, when it accounts for 70-90% of the water used by shallow-rooted plants. Given the widespread occurrence of gypsum in dry lands throughout the Earth and in Mars, these results may have important implications for arid land reclamation and exobiology.

  4. The crystallization water of gypsum rocks is a relevant water source for plants.

    PubMed

    Palacio, Sara; Azorín, José; Montserrat-Martí, Gabriel; Ferrio, Juan Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Some minerals, like gypsum, hold water in their crystalline structure. Although still unexplored, the use of such crystallization water by organisms would point to a completely new water source for life, critical under dry conditions. Here we use the fact that the isotopic composition of free water differs from gypsum crystallization water to show that plants can use crystallization water from the gypsum structure. The composition of the xylem sap of gypsum plants during summer shows closer values to gypsum crystallization water than to free soil water. Crystallization water represents a significant water source for organisms growing on gypsum, especially during summer, when it accounts for 70-90% of the water used by shallow-rooted plants. Given the widespread occurrence of gypsum in dry lands throughout the Earth and in Mars, these results may have important implications for arid land reclamation and exobiology. PMID:25130772

  5. Evaluation of an indigenous source of rock phosphate as a supplement for broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Tahir, M; Lughmani, A B; Pesti, G M

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of replacing dicalcium phosphate (DCP) with Hazara rock phosphate (HRP) on the growth performance of broiler chickens. The purpose was to determine the maximum level of F that could be well tolerated. The HRP (13.16% P and 2.98% F) was incorporated into a standard corn- and soybean meal-based diet by replacing 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% of DCP based on P. Each treatment consisted of 5 replicate pens of 10 chicks each. The Ca and nonphytate P contents of all diets were maintained constant at 1.0 and 0.45%, respectively. Replacing 25% DCP with HRP significantly increased average BW gain. Substituting 100% HRP (562 mg of F/kg) decreased (P < 0.05) BW gain. The BW gain was maximized at 63.5:36.5 (DCP:HRP) using a quadratic relationship: BW gain (g) = 1,128.6 + 2.6848 × HRP - 0.0368 × HRP(2). Increasing the level of HRP decreased feed intake: feed intake (g) = 1,987.4 + 2.775 × HRP - 0.0515 × HRP(2). The effect of HRP was not pronounced (significant at P < 0.05) until 75% of DCP was replaced by HRP. Feed intake decreased by an average 3.77 g with each 1.0% increase in the levels of HRP beyond 27% HRP substitution. Replacing DCP with HRP up to 50% caused a significant increase in hot carcass weights. The Ca content of tibia was a quadratic function of HRP and was predicted to be highest at 56% HRP substitution. However, increasing HRP in the diet gradually decreased tibia P content (linear function). Serum Ca was increased by substituting HRP for DCP (linear effect). Increasing HRP in the diet decreased the P content of the serum and was predicted to be lowest (P < 0.05) beyond 50% HRP substitution, suggesting poor P availability at high HRP. In conclusion, growth was maximized by feeding about 36.5% HRP (205 mg of F/kg) and 63.5% DCP as P supplements. Using a multiple range test, it was concluded that between 25 and 50% DCP with HRP replacement (141 and 281 mg of F/kg, respectively) could be used safely without significantly

  6. Sulfide Oxidation in Marine Sedimentary Rocks as a Source of Trace Metals and Sulfate to Urban California Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardsley, A.; Hammond, D. E.; von Bitner, T.

    2013-12-01

    Watersheds in southern Orange County, CA have received regulatory scrutiny for elevated levels of total dissolved solids (TDS) along with cadmium, nickel, and sulfate as threats to in-stream and marine ecology. Multiple source investigations have failed to attribute these chronic contaminants to anthropogenic sources. Patterns of high TDS in the study region's surface waters correlate poorly with landuse and instead appear to follow geologic substrate. Measurements of springs and seeps reveal groundwater pH as low as 4.8, TDS as high as 8700 mg/L, dissolved concentrations of sulfate up to 50 mM, cadmium up to 1.8 uM, selenium up to 2.4 uM, and nickel up to 14.8 uM flowing directly into creeks. We suggest that subsurface oxidation of sulfide in prevalent Neogene marine sedimentary rock formations is the key weathering mechanism behind this phenomenon. Bulk analysis of the Capistrano and other local formations indicates that they are enriched in select trace metals up to two orders of magnitude relative to average crustal abundance, making them a plausible source of contamination to groundwater, and ultimately, surface water. Though carbonate dissolution in these same formations may offset the acidity at some sites, many groundwater samples were substantially undersaturated in calcite and capable of maintaining low pH and high dissolved metals concentration. While sulfide mineral weathering has been invoked as the cause of significant contamination at former mining sites and undeveloped mineralized regions, our findings indicate this same weathering mechanism may have implications for urbanized catchments that contain marine sedimentary units. Sulfide mineral oxidation can result in substantial sulfate loading, acid production and subsequent mobilization of trace metals and other ions from the surrounding rock matrix, leading to high dissolved contaminant levels. To evaluate water and sulfate sources to these high TDS springs, we measured stable isotopes of water and

  7. Total petroleum systems of the Bonaparte Gulf Basin area, Australia; Jurassic, Early Cretaceous-Mesozoic; Keyling, Hyland Bay-Permian; Milligans-Carboniferous, Permian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bishop, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    The Bonaparte Gulf Basin Province (USGS #3910) of northern Australia contains three important hydrocarbon source-rock intervals. The oldest source-rock interval and associated reservoir rocks is the Milligans-Carboniferous, Permian petroleum system. This petroleum system is located at the southern end of Joseph Bonaparte Gulf and includes both onshore and offshore areas within a northwest to southeast trending Paleozoic rift that was initiated in the Devonian. The Milligans Formation is a Carboniferous marine shale that sources accumulations of both oil and gas in Carboniferous and Permian deltaic, marine shelf carbonate, and shallow to deep marine sandstones. The second petroleum system in the Paleozoic rift is the Keyling, Hyland Bay-Permian. Source rocks include Lower Permian Keyling Formation delta-plain coals and marginal marine shales combined with Upper Permian Hyland Bay Formation prodelta shales. These source-rock intervals provide gas and condensate for fluvial, deltaic, and shallow marine sandstone reservoirs primarily within several members of the Hyland Bay Formation. The Keyling, Hyland Bay-Permian petroleum system is located in the Joseph Bonaparte Gulf, north of the Milligans-Carboniferous, Permian petroleum system, and may extend northwest under the Vulcan graben sub-basin. The third and youngest petroleum system is the Jurassic, Early Cretaceous-Mesozoic system that is located seaward of Joseph Bonaparte Gulf on the Australian continental shelf, and trends southwest-northeast. Source-rock intervals in the Vulcan graben sub-basin include deltaic mudstones of the Middle Jurassic Plover Formation and organic-rich marine shales of the Upper Jurassic Vulcan Formation and Lower Cretaceous Echuca Shoals Formation. These intervals produce gas, oil, and condensate that accumulates in, shallow- to deep-marine sandstone reservoirs of the Challis and Vulcan Formations of Jurassic to Cretaceous age. Organic-rich, marginal marine claystones and coals of the

  8. Age correlation of petroleum of unknown source using biological markers

    SciTech Connect

    Moldowan, J.M.; Jacobson, S.R.; Lee, C.Y. ); Huizinga, B.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Determination of age constraints on petroleums from unknown sources provides a means of choosing among possible source rock candidates, predicting migration scenarios for oil, and determining the timing of its emplacement in the reservoir. A number of parameters used to assign such age constraints to petroleum have been suggested by geochemists. However, any constraining marker, regardless of age, may not be found in a particular facies because the parent organisms are absent in those sediments. Thus, the presence of a specific age correlation marker may be significant whereas its absence may not. The authors have investigated two markers for their age-correlation significance. Oleanane, a marker related to pentacyclic triterpanes in flowering plants (angiosperms) occurs in many Late Cretaceous or younger rocks and oils, even though angiosperm fossils are known in older rocks. A survey of a sequence of middle to upper Cretaceous rocks from Wyoming provides an example of a Late Cretaceous age for the onset of oleanane. However, a level of uncertainty exists for older Cretaceous rocks where a trace component with many similarities to oleanane (which could in fact be oleanane) can occur. C{sub 30}-steranes (24-n-propylcholestanes) have been used as a widely occurring marker for marine organic input to petroleum. A recent report postulates the origin of C{sub 30}-steranes from marine Sarcinochrysidales order of Chrysophycase (golden brown algae). Although the fossil record of these algae has not been recorded, their sample base indicates that C{sub 30} steranes, and therefore their parent organisms, originate in the Middle Ordovician.

  9. Overview of the potential and identified petroleum source rocks of the Appalachian basin, eastern United States: Chapter G.13 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, James L.; Ryder, Robert T.; Milici, Robert C.; Brown, Stephen; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    The Appalachian basin is the oldest and longest producing commercially viable petroleum-producing basin in the United States. Source rocks for reservoirs within the basin are located throughout the entire stratigraphic succession and extend geographically over much of the foreland basin and fold-and-thrust belt that make up the Appalachian basin. Major source rock intervals occur in Ordovician, Devonian, and Pennsylvanian strata with minor source rock intervals present in Cambrian, Silurian, and Mississippian strata.

  10. Diagenetic evolution of Cretaceous-Tertiary turbidite reservoirs, Campos Basin, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes, M.A.S.

    1989-05-01

    Three sandstone turbidite sequences of the Campos basin (offshore, state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) were petrologically studied: (1) the Albian-Cenomanian Namorado Sandstone on the Macae Formation, (2) the Upper Cretaceous Carapebus Member of the Campos Formation, and (3) the Eocene Carapebus Member of the Campos Formation. The sequences represent deep marine deposits consisting mostly of massive sandstones rather than classical turbidites, indicating sand-rich submarine fans were the main depositional system of these sequences. The framework composition of the sandstones averages for quartz, feldspar, and lithics are Q/sub 60/F/sub 40/L/sub tr/ for the Cretaceous rocks and Q/sub 71/F/sub 29/L/sub tr/ for the Eocene rocks, plotting granitic rock fragments at the feldspar pole. The main diagenetic phases that affected the sandstones studied were (1) development of a clay matrix due to compaction of rip-up mud clasts, (2) partial replacement of the matrix by opal, (3) precipitation of small pyrite framboids, (4) widespread direct precipitation or replacement of different materials by calcite, (5) intense generation of secondary porosity, (6) localized kaolinite development, (7) minor precipitation of quartz and feldspar overgrowths, (8) development of dolomite, ferroan dolomite, and ankerite, and (9) replacement of different materials with minor direct precipitation of late pyrite. Geologic and geochemical evidence lets them infer the main processes that controlled diagenetic transformations and mass transfer within the sequence studied. The principal source of carbonate cements was pressure solution of the underlying Macae Formation. Most of the diagenetic evolution of the sandstones was apparently controlled by the relative balance between the activity of CO/sub 2/ and carboxylic acid species in the formation waters, both related to organic matter transformations within adjacent marine shales.

  11. Paleobotany of Livingston Island: The first report of a Cretaceous fossil flora from Hannah Point

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leppe, M.; Michea, W.; Muñoz, C.; Palma-Heldt, S.; Fernandoy, F.

    2007-01-01

    This is the first report of a fossil flora from Hannah Point, Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. The fossiliferous content of an outcrop, located between two igneous rock units of Cretaceous age are mainly composed of leaf imprints and some fossil trunks. The leaf assemblage consists of 18 taxa of Pteridophyta, Pinophyta and one angiosperm. The plant assemblage can be compared to other Early Cretaceous floras from the South Shetland Islands, but several taxa have an evidently Late Cretaceous affinity. A Coniacian-Santonian age is the most probable age for the outcrops, supported by previous K/Ar isotopic studies of the basalts over and underlying the fossiliferous sequence

  12. Along-arc geochemical and isotopic variations in Javanese volcanic rocks: 'crustal' versus 'source' contamination at the Sunda arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, H.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Turner, S.; Macpherson, C. G.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the genesis of volcanic rocks in subduction zone settings is complicated by the multitude of differentiation processes and source components that exert control on lava geochemistry. Magma genesis and evolution at the Sunda arc is controlled and influenced by 1) along arc changes in the composition and thickness of the overriding Eurasian plate, 2) the variable age of the subducting oceanic crust and, 3) changes in the type and amount of sediment deposited on the subducting plate. Along-arc changes in geochemistry have long been recognised in the Sunda arc (Whitford, 1975), but debate still prevails over the cause of such variations and the relative importance of shallow (crustal) versus deep (subduction) contamination at the Sunda arc, Indonesia. Detailed study of individual Sunda arc volcanic centres is, therefore, a prerequisite in order to establish the relative importance and contributions of various potential source components and composition modifying differentiation processes at individual volcanoes, prior to an along arc comparative petrogenetic investigation. We present new radiogenic isotope data for Javanese volcanoes, which is combined with our recently published (Handley et al., 2007; Handley et al., 2008, Handley et al., 2010; Handley et al., 2011) geochemical and isotopic data of Javanese volcanic rocks along with data from other detailed geochemical studies to establish whether variable contributions from the subducting slab, or a change in crustal architecture of the overriding plate, best explain along-arc variations in isotope ratios and trace element characteristics. In West and Central Java Sr isotope ratios of the volcanic rocks broadly correlate with inferred lithospheric thickness implicating a shallow level control on isotopic composition. However, key trace element ratios combined with Hf isotope data indicate that the subducted slab and slab thermal regime also exert major control on the composition of the erupted Javanese

  13. Analysis of source characteristics of experimental gas burst and fragmentation explosions generated by rapid decompression of volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-07-01

    Gas burst and fragmentation explosions induced by rapid decompression of volcanic rocks in a high-pressure autoclave have been analyzed. We performed experiments from 4 to 20 MPa on (1) loose pyroclasts and (2) pumice from recent eruptions of Popocatépetl volcano. Our aim is to characterize the source mechanism distinguishing the physical processes that operate in the conduit which determine the dynamics of explosive volcanoes. For this aim we have analyzed experimentally the parameters that indicate the state and behavior of the conduit (i.e., decompression time, fragmentation threshold and speed, forces, and the partitioning of energy), using microseismic monitoring, the decompression time curves, and the sample rheological properties. The initial available potential energy in the system and its partitioning into different types of energies are correlated in space and time with specific stages of the explosive phenomenon. Such correlations, taken together with the energy distribution, enable the distinction of the individual physical processes involved and their causal sequence and relationships. Our observations suggest that in volcanic conduits with regular explosive activity, a source mechanism may operate whereby a causal sequence of processes results in a system that undergoes both rapid and stable transitions. Such behavior may persist over long periods of time.

  14. Pore-space alteration in source rock (shales) during hydrocarbons generation: X-ray microtomography and pore-scale modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korost, Dmitry; Gerke, Kirill; Akhmanov, Grigory; Vasilyev, Roman; Čapek, Pavel; Karsanina, Marina; Nadezhkin, Dmitry

    2013-04-01

    Hydrocarbons (HC) are generated from solid organic matter (kerogen) due to thermocatalytic reactions. The rate of such reactions shows direct correlation with temperature and depends on the depth of source rock burial. Burial of sedimentary rock is also inevitably accompanied by its structural alteration owing to compaction, dehydration and re-crystallization. Processes of HC generation, primary migration and structural changes are inaccessible for direct observation in nature, but they can be studied in laboratory experiments. Modern technical facilities of laboratories make it possible to carry out experiments on HC generation from the organic-rich rocks at a completely new level (Kobchenko et al., 2011). Some new technologies, including X-ray microtomography and pore-scale modeling, allow us to carry out a step-by-step description of such processes and their development, and to study their reflection in alterations of rock structure. Experiments were carried out with a clayey-carbonate rock sample of the Domanic Formaition taken at a depth of 1939 m from borehole drilled in the central part of the Melekes depression (West Tatar arch, Russia). The rock chosen fits the very essential requirements for studying HC generation under laboratory conditions - high organic matter content and its low metamorphic grade. Our work aimed such a study in an undisturbed rock sample by heating it in nitrogen atmosphere based on a specified temperature regime in a RockEval6 analyzer and monitoring alterations in the pore space structure. Observations were carried out with a SkyScan-1172 X-ray microtomography scanner (resulting scan resolution of 1 µm). A cylinder, 4 mm in diameter, was prepared from the rock sample for the pyrolitic and microtomographic analyses. Scanning procedures were carried out in 5 runs. Temperature interval for each run had to match the most important stage of HC generation in the source rock, namely: (1) original structure; (2) 100-300˚? - discharge of

  15. Rock face stability analysis and potential rockfall source detection in Yosemite Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matasci, B.; Stock, G. M.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Oppikofer, T.; Pedrazzini, A.; Carrea, D.

    2012-04-01

    Rockfall hazard in Yosemite Valley is especially high owing to the great cliff heights (~1 km), the fracturing of the steep granitic cliffs, and the widespread occurrence of surface parallel sheeting or exfoliation joints. Between 1857 and 2011, 890 documented rockfalls and other slope movements caused 15 fatalities and at least 82 injuries. The first part of this study focused on realizing a structural study for Yosemite Valley at both regional (valley-wide) and local (rockfall source area) scales. The dominant joint sets were completely characterized by their orientation, persistence, spacing, roughness and opening. Spacing and trace length for each joint set were accurately measured on terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds with the software PolyWorks (InnovMetric). Based on this fundamental information the second part of the study aimed to detect the most important failure mechanisms leading to rockfalls. With the software Matterocking and the 1m cell size DEM, we calculated the number of possible failure mechanisms (wedge sliding, planar sliding, toppling) per cell, for several cliffs of the valley. Orientation, spacing and persistence measurements directly issued from field and TLS data were inserted in the Matterocking calculations. TLS point clouds are much more accurate than the 1m DEM and show the overhangs of the cliffs. Accordingly, with the software Coltop 3D we developed a methodology similar to the one used with Matterocking to identify on the TLS point clouds the areas of a cliff with the highest number of failure mechanisms. Exfoliation joints are included in this stability analysis in the same way as the other joint sets, with the only difference that their orientation is parallel to the local cliff orientation and thus variable. This means that, in two separate areas of a cliff, the exfoliation joint set is taken into account with different dip direction and dip, but its effect on the stability assessment is the same. Areas with a high

  16. La-Ce and Sm-Nd systematics of siliceous sedimentary rocks: A clue to marine environment in their deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroshi Shimizu; Masayo Amano; Akimasa Masuda )

    1991-04-01

    La-Ce isotopic data, together with Sm-Nd isotopic data, were determined on siliceous sedimentary rocks (cherts) in order to elucidate the rare earth element (REE) character of their sources and the nature of their depositional environments. The cherts studied are a late Archean chert from the Gorge Creek Group in the Pilbara block of Western Australia, Triassic cherts from central Japan, and Cretaceous and Paleogene deep-sea cherts from the central Pacific and the Caribbean Sea. The Archean chert from the Gorge Creek Group shows chondritic Ce and Nd isotope ratios at its sedimentation age which indicate that its sources had a time-integrated chondritic REE pattern. Triassic cherts from Japan have initial Ce and Nd isotope ratios that show a direct derivation from their continental source. On the other hand, for Cretaceous and Paleogene deep-sea cherts having negative Ce anomalies in their REE patterns, two different sources for Ce and Nd are revealed from their initial Ce and Nd isotope data: Ce from long-term light-REE-depleted oceanic volcanic rocks and Nd from light-REE-enriched continental rocks. The reverse nature observed for deep-sea cherts is considered to be a reflection of their depositional environment far from a continent. These results confirm that the La-Ce isotope system is highly useful in determining the nature and cause of Ce anomalies observed in marine sedimentary rocks such as chert.

  17. Sedimentology, stratigraphy, and extinctions during the Cretaceous-Paleogene transition at Bug Creek, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Fastovsky, D.E.; Dott, R.H. Jr.

    1986-04-01

    Bug Creek Valley, the source of an unusual and controversial Cretaceous-Paleogene coincidence of mammals, dinosaurs, pollen, and iridium, exemplifies the importance of depositional process in the reconstruction of evolutionary events. Five sedimentary facies are recognized at Bug Creek: a cross-stratified sandstone, a green and purple siltstone, a lateral accretionary sandstone, a coal, and a variegated siltstone. Repeated fluvial channeling restricts the accuracy of lateral correlations, and the relationship of the fossil assemblage to the presumed Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary cannot be established. Sedimentologically, the Cretaceous-Paleogene transition is represented here by Cretaceous meandering channels that gave way initially to Paleogene swamp deposition. 13 references, 4 figures.

  18. Late Cretaceous biostratigraphy of the La Luna Formation, Maracaibo basin

    SciTech Connect

    Truskowski, I.; Galeaalvarez, F.; Sliter, W.V.

    1996-08-01

    Micropaleontological analysis, sedimentological studies, and geochemical data are presented for the Upper Cretaceous {open_quote}black shales{close_quote} of the La Luna Formation of Western Venezuela. The detailed planktonic foraminiferal studies allowed the establishment of the first biozonation, determination of sedimentation rates, and documentation of occurrences of benthic foraminifers for these unusually thick black shales that extend stratigraphically nearly 100 m. Hedbergellids, whiteinellids and Heterohelix characterize the lower part of the La Luna Formation, dated from the late Cenomanian Rotalipora cushmani Zone to middle Turonian Helvetoglobotruncana belvetica Zone. The high productivity of these groups associated with phosphatized fish remains suggest upwelling and a poorly stratified water column. The presence of buliminids and Favreina sp. at some levels, imply disoxic conditions in this anoxic interval. Planktonic foraminifers in the middle and upper parts of the formation range in age from the late Turonian Marginotruncana sigali- Dicarinella primitiva Zone to the early Campanian Globotruncanita elevata Zone. The increase in keeled planktonic foraminifers toward the top of the formation suggest more stratified, oligotrophic surface waters. Benthic foraminifers found at the top are indicative of dysaerobic conditions. This study provides new opportunities for utilizing the petroleum system in the La Luna Formation, arguably the most prolific source rock in northern South America.

  19. The origin of Cretaceous black shales: a change in the surface ocean ecosystem and its triggers.

    PubMed

    Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Kuroda, Junichiro; Taira, Asahiko

    2015-01-01

    Black shale is dark-colored, organic-rich sediment, and there have been many episodes of black shale deposition over the history of the Earth. Black shales are source rocks for petroleum and natural gas, and thus are both geologically and economically important. Here, we review our recent progress in understanding of the surface ocean ecosystem during periods of carbonaceous sediment deposition, and the factors triggering black shale deposition. The stable nitrogen isotopic composition of geoporphyrins (geological derivatives of chlorophylls) strongly suggests that N2-fixation was a major process for nourishing the photoautotrophs. A symbiotic association between diatoms and cyanobacteria may have been a major primary producer during episodes of black shale deposition. The timing of black shale formation in the Cretaceous is strongly correlated with the emplacement of large igneous provinces such as the Ontong Java Plateau, suggesting that black shale deposition was ultimately induced by massive volcanic events. However, the process that connects these events remains to be solved.

  20. Paleocurrent, petrography and provenance analyses of the Ajali Sandstone (Upper Cretaceous), southeastern Benue Trough, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amajor, L. C.

    1987-09-01

    Paleocurrent, petrographic and heavy-mineral analyses of the Ajali Sandstone (Late Cretaceous) in southeastern Nigeria show that the sedimentary rocks on the Santonian Okigwe-Abakaliki anticlinorium provided the major detritus, whereas minor contributions of the eastern Precambrian basement block (Oban massif) are confined along a narrow belt southeast of Alayi in the Afikpo Basin. The sandstones derived from the major sedimentary source are quartz arenites characterized by a zircon-tourmaline heavy-mineral assemblage and a radial paleocurrent pattern which parallels the paleoslope of the provenance. On the other hand, those sands generated from the eastern basement block are arkose and sub-arkose dominated by a garnet-apatite-rutile heavy-mineral assemblage and southwesterly directed paleocurrent modes. The results of this study support the previous hypothesis that most ancient quartz arenites are multicycle in origin.

  1. Fault Rock Variation as a Function of Host Rock Lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.; Diener, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fault rocks contain an integrated record of the slip history of a fault, and thereby reflect the deformation processes associated with fault slip. Within the Aus Granulite Terrane, Namibia, a number of Jurassic to Cretaceous age strike-slip faults cross-cut Precambrian high grade metamorphic rocks. These strike-slip faults were active at subgreenschist conditions and occur in a variety of host rock lithologies. Where the host rock contains significant amounts of hydrous minerals, representing granulites that have undergone retrogressive metamorphism, the fault rock is dominated by hydrothermal breccias. In anhydrous, foliated rocks interlayered with minor layers containing hydrous phyllosilicates, the fault rock is a cataclasite partially cemented by jasper and quartz. Where the host rock is an isotropic granitic rock the fault rock is predominantly a fine grained black fault rock. Cataclasites and breccias show evidence for multiple deformation events, whereas the fine grained black fault rocks appear to only record a single slip increment. The strike-slip faults observed all formed in the same general orientation and at a similar time, and it is unlikely that regional stress, strain rate, pressure and temperature varied between the different faults. We therefore conclude that the type of fault rock here depended on the host rock lithology, and that lithology alone accounts for why some faults developed a hydrothermal breccia, some cataclasite, and some a fine grained black fault rock. Consequently, based on the assumption that fault rocks reflect specific slip styles, lithology was also the main control on different fault slip styles in this area at the time of strike-slip fault activity. Whereas fine grained black fault rock is inferred to represent high stress events, hydrothermal breccia is rather related to events involving fluid pressure in excess of the least stress. Jasper-bearing cataclasites may represent faults that experienced dynamic weakening as seen

  2. Tracing retrograde fluid sources in serpentinite and greenschist facies rocks from Syros, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, M.; Raia, N.; Barnes, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Cyclades are a prime locality for studying a fossil subduction zone and volatile transfer that occurs within convergent margin and back-arc settings. We have begun to constrain the composition and timing of influx for fluids that caused retrograde metamorphism in southern Syros lithologies. Most of the southern part of the island has experienced greenschist facies metamorphism, and as a reconnaissance study, we have analyzed carbonate veins from metabasalt and serpentinite lithologies. Calcite veins from serpentinites and one carbonate vein from metabasite average low δ13C values: δ13C = -8.98‰ and δ13C = -8.33‰, respectively. Relative to the preceding samples, other carbonate veins from metabasites [avg. δ13C = -0.27‰] and a dolomite vein from serpentinite (δ13C = -2.90‰) are enriched in 13C. In contrast, δ18O values are homogenous and range from +24.2‰ to +28.1‰. Carbonates with low δ13C values are consistent with derivation of carbon from organic matter, and have δ18O values that reflect interaction and precipitation from meteoric water. Based on an estimated mean annual value of Syros meteoric water (δ18O = -5.4‰), calcite/dolomite-water equilibrium fractionation estimate reaction temperatures of ~25-44 °C. Samples with higher δ13C values likely reflect C contribution from dissolved limestone, wherein CO2-bearing fluids retain constant δ18O values because of the high abundance of water in the metamorphic fluid, but constantly change δ13C because of the abundant carbonate in the region that is readily dissolved. To help constrain fluid sources, we will determine oxygen isotope values of silicate minerals formed during various stages of retrogression. Petrography on thin sections will also assist in determining if various stages of retrogression exist. Ar-Ar dating of micas will be carried-out to determine the timing of fluid-assisted retrogression.

  3. Late-Cretaceous allochthons and post-Cretaceous strike-slip displacement along the Cuilco-Chixoy-Polochic Fault, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Thomas H.; Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.; Sandstrom, Melissa A.

    1985-08-01

    The disposition of allochthonous masses, emplaced in late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary time, along the Cuilco-Chixoy-Polochic strike-slip fault zone in western Guatemala, constrains the amount of Tertiary displacement. The absence of major disruption of the allochthons argues against lateral displacements of hundreds of kilometers during the Tertiary. In westernmost Guatemala, along the flank of the Cuilco-Chixoy-Polochic fault, granite, volcaniclastic and volcanic rocks, minor carbonate and phyllite comprise a sequence of south-dipping allochthons. These tilted slabs lie against almost horizontal Jurassic and Cretaceous beds to the north. Field relations indicate that the slides were emplaced across the Cuilco-Chixoy-Polochic fault from south to north probably during late Cretaceous or early Tertiary time. Other fault-bounded masses, which crop out tens of kilometers eastward, near San Sebastián Huehuetenango, probably were emplaced contemporaneously with those to the west. Locally, these allochthons lie astride the active trace of the Cuilco-Chixoy-Polochic fault along which offset streams record about 1 km of left-lateral motion. Total displacement recorded by the apparent offset of allochthonous sheets is no more than several kilometers. Farther east, along much of the Cuilco-Chixoy-Polochic fault zone, a throughgoing strike-slip trace has not been identified. We postulate that the pre-Tertiary tectonic record is obscured by an extensive series of allochthons composed of regional stratigraphic suites emplaced during late Cretaceous time. In western Guatemala stratigraphic relationships between serpentinized peridotite and carbonate beds of late Cretaceous age indicate Turonian as a maximum age for initial emplacement of allochthonous material. Regional relationships indicate that deformation culminated during latest Cretaceous - earliest Tertiary time. The emplacement of thrust sheets along the Cuilco-Chixoy-Polochic fault is a likely product of

  4. Analysis of Micro-Seismic Signals and Source Parameters of Eruptions Generated by Rapid Decompression of Volcanic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, M. A.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic evaluation of well-controlled experimental volcanic simulations offers the hope of a better understanding of source mechanisms in natural volcanic seismicity. Here, we have performed the first investigation of the dynamics of explosive volcanic eruption of magma under controlled laboratory conditions. Specifically, we analyzed the micro-seismicity generated by the rapid depressurization of volcanic rocks in a shock tube apparatus, which represents the seismic mechanism. The source parameters and the force system have been analyzed considering the relationship F=πr2 Po. Our well-constrained physical mechanism consists of the slow pressurization of the system (using Argon gas) followed by rapid depressurization of natural volcanic samples (ash, pumice and fragmented particles of pumice) contained in a steel pipe-like conduit of radius r and height ~2r. Several experiments with samples with different porosities were performed under controlled pressure conditions (ranging from 4 to 20 MPa), at room temperature. We calculated the magnitude of the vertical and downward forces and forces at the walls of the reservoir, and the kinetic energy involved during decompression and fragmentation processes from the micro-seismic signals detected at several points in the apparatus using highly dynamic piezo-film transducers. We first characterized the frequencies of the apparatus in order to distinguish in the signals between the waves produced by the natural resonance of the system due to the pressure shock and the waves generated by the rapid depressurization of the samples. In the micro-seismic records the inflation-deflation states of the pipe-like conduit and the fragmentation process after the rapid removal of the diaphragm can be recognized clearly. The decompression time is directly measured from the pressure drop curves of the system recorded by dynamic pressure transducers and correlates well with the duration of maximum amplitudes of micro-seismic waves

  5. Locating Desired Source Rocks by Using Shallow Ground Penetrating Radar and Seismic Survey Methods in western Washington, Pacific Northwest of the U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakir, R.; Meng, X.; Butler, Q.; Jenkins, J.; Keck, J.; Walsh, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WADNR) manages 2.1 million acres of forested state trust lands in Washington. WADNR sells timber and other agricultural products to help fund local services and the construction of institutions such as public schools and universities. Quality of rocks used as a surface on the roads built to access the timber is the essential and selecting appropriate rock quarry locations is challenging. Traditional borehole drilling methods only provide information from discrete locations. The study was conducted in the Capitol Forest area of western Washington. In our previous study, we suggested that a combination of P-wave seismic and ground penetrating radar (GPR) can be a rapid, comprehensive and cost effective alternative for identifying desired rock sources. In this study, we further improved upon that method and accomplished the following: 1) rock quality at a relatively fine resolution was distinguished and 2) the spatial variability of the rock was identified. Both 450 MHz and 80 MHz GPR antennas were used to obtain high resolution radargrams in the near-surface zone with 5m maximum penetration depth and lower resolution radargrams in the deeper subsurface zone with about 20m maximum penetration depth. We then correlated the GPR radargrams with P-wave velocities using the refraction survey data as well as S-wave velocities, estimated using Multi-Channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) survey data. Additionally, nearby test pits and boreholes (maximum depth = 15 meters) were used to confirm the geophysical measurements. Our study results demonstrate that the combination of GPR, using the two antennas, and seismic surveys provides very useful subsurface information regarding quality and spatial distribution of the rocks beneath the overburden. Subsurface images gathered from these combined geophysical methods do assist quarry operators to rapidly locate the desired rock sources.

  6. The geochemistry of primitive volcanic rocks of the Ankaratra volcanic complex, and source enrichment processes in the genesis of the Cenozoic magmatism in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melluso, L.; Cucciniello, C.; le Roex, A. P.; Morra, V.

    2016-07-01

    The Ankaratra volcanic complex in central Madagascar consists of lava flows, domes, scoria cones, tuff rings and maars of Cenozoic age that are scattered over 3800 km2. The mafic rocks include olivine-leucite-nephelinites, basanites, alkali basalts and hawaiites, and tholeiitic basalts. Primitive samples have high Mg# (>60), high Cr and Ni concentrations; their mantle-normalized patterns peak at Nb and Ba, have troughs at K, and smoothly decrease towards the least incompatible elements. The Ankaratra mafic rocks show small variation in Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions (e.g., 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70377-0.70446, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.51273-0.51280, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.25-18.87). These isotopic values differ markedly from those of Cenozoic mafic lavas of northern Madagascar and the Comoro archipelago, typical Indian Ocean MORB and oceanic basalt end-members. The patterns of olivine nephelinitic magmas can be obtained through 3-10% partial melting of a mantle source that was enriched by a Ca-rich alkaline melt, and that contained garnet, carbonates and phlogopite. The patterns of tholeiitic basalts can be obtained after 10-12% partial melting of a source enriched with lower amounts of the same alkaline melt, in the spinel- (and possibly amphibole-) facies mantle, hence in volumes where carbonate is not a factor. The significant isotopic change from the northernmost volcanic rocks of Madagascar and those in the central part of the island implicates a distinct source heterogeneity, and ultimately assess the role of the continental lithospheric mantle as source region. The source of at least some volcanic rocks of the still active Comoro archipelago may have suffered the same time-integrated geochemical and isotopic evolution as that of the northern Madagascar volcanic rocks.

  7. Tectonic development of Upper Cretaceous to Eocene strata of southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstrand, P.M. )

    1994-01-01

    Upper Cretaceous to Paleogene nonmarine sedimentary rocks of southwest Utah record Sevier foreland basin sedimentation, Laramide-style folding and intermontane sedimentation, and cessation of Laramide deformation. The formations that record this tectonic evolution arc, from oldest to youngest, the Iron Springs, Kaiparowits, Canaan Peak, Grand Castle (informal name), Pine Hollow, and basal part of the Claron. The upper part of the Santonian to lower Campanian( ) Iron Springs Formation represents synorogenic, fluvial deposits derived from the Wah Wah and Blue Mountain thrust sheets of southwestern Utah. The middle to upper Campanian Kaiparowits and upper Campanian( ) to lower Paleocene Canaan Peak Formations are an upward-coarsening sequence derived from southeastern California and southern Nevada. Initial Laramide-style deformation occurred during latest Cretaceous or early Paleocene time, influencing the depositional pattern of the Canaan Peak fluvial system. The lower Paleocene Grand Castle formation represents an east- to southeast-flowing, braided-river system with the same source as the Iron Springs Formation (the Wah Wah and Blue Mountain thrust sheets). Conglomerate of Grand Castle onlaps the easternmost Sevier thrusts and is folded by Laramide structures. Although strata of the Grand Castle formation represent post-thrust and, in part, pre-Laramide deposition, initial development of a south-southwest-trending, Laramide-style upwarp controlled the geometry of the Grand Castle basin. 55 refs., 11 figs.

  8. Chlorine isotope composition of volcanic gases and rocks at Mount Etna (Italy) and inferences on the local mantle source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Andrea L.; Caracausi, Antonio; Liotta, Marcello; Paonita, Antonio; Barnes, Jaime D.; Corsaro, Rosa A.; Martelli, Mauro

    2013-06-01

    We present the first chlorine isotope compositional data for gases and lavas from Mount Etna (Italy), and to our knowledge, of active Mediterranean volcanism. We investigated lavas erupted and gases discharged during 2008-2011 from a high-temperature fumarole (HT; >300 °C) and plume gases from both North East and Central Craters. Most of the samples vary in a narrow range of chlorine isotope composition (δ37Cl values≈0±0.7‰) with gases partially overlapping with rocks. Only HT gases sampled in 2009 have been clearly affected by secondary processes (δ37Cl values>15.9‰), resulting in partial removal of chlorine and isotopic fractionation producing a 37Cl enrichment in the residual gaseous HCl. These secondary processes also affect, although to a lesser extent, plume gases from North East Crater (NEC). Although post-magmatic processes are able to modify the chlorine isotope composition, δ37Cl values are not affected by magma degassing for residual fractions ≥0.3 in the melt, or any effect is within our data variability. Finally, δ37Cl values and Cl/K ratios of magmatic chlorine constrain the Etnean source to be compatible with depleted mantle (DMM) contaminated by altered oceanic crust (AOC), in agreement with indications from more common isotopic tracers of mantle processes.

  9. Ages and geochemistry of Cretaceous mafic dikes in Southeastern China: implications for paleo-Pacific subduction evolution during Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian-wei; Lee, Chi-Yu; Chen, Cheng-Hong

    2016-04-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of two Cretaceous mafic dike populations in SE China provides an opportunity to study the mantle evolution related to the paleo-Pacific subduction. They include early Cretaceous (143-131 Ma) mafic dikes in the interior SE China (Jiangxi and north Guangdong), and late Cretaceous (98-79 Ma) mafic dikes in the coastal area of Fujian and Hong Kong. All these rocks exhibit some arc-like geochemical signatures, such as large ion lithophile element (LILE; Rb, Ba) enrichment and high field strength element (HFSE; Nb, Ta, Ti) depletion. However, the former have higher concentrations in TiO2, Nb, Ta and lower La/Nb ratio. Sr and Nd isotope data indicate that they may involve two end-members, one with lithosphere-modified OIB-like asthenosphere composition and the other with subduction-modified lithosphere composition. These results suggest that asthenospheric mantle probably play a role for the formation of early Cretaceous mafic dikes. Conversely, the latter exhibits typical mantle compositions of an arc system. Abundances of Jurassic basalts in the interior SE China with typical asthenosphere signatures suggest that they might be the products in response to the delamination of partially over-thickened lithosphere under a rifting environment. Appearance of early Cretaceous mafic dikes, tinged with OIB-like in addition to the arc-like signatures in the interior SE China, may be an indication that paleo-Pacific subduction started or resumed at the beginning of the early Cretaceous. On the other hand, the coastal SE China was characterized by the formation of a NE-trending A-type granite and rhyolite belt near the end of the late Cretaceous, a sign for the epilog of the paleo-Pacific movement. Therefore, widespread of the late Cretaceous mafic dikes would be a reflection of a well-modified mantle by the paleo-Pacific before the cessation of the subduction system in the coastal SE China. (Keywords: Cretaceous, Mafic dike, SE China)

  10. Cretaceous and Tertiary samples dredged from Florida Escarpment, Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman-Lynde, R.P.

    1983-09-01

    Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks were dredged along the Florida Escarpment at five areas south of 27/sup 0/05'N in late 1982 during cruise LY-82A of USNS Lynch. The escarpment was sampled from near the base (as deep as 3300 m, 10,800 ft) to near the top (as shallow as 1500 m, 4900 ft) of the slope. Presumed middle Cretaceous dolomites deposited in hypersaline bank-interior environments were taken primarily from the walls of canyons incised from 10 to 50 km (6 to 30 mi) into the escarpment, and also from the escarpment proper at several dredge stations. Limestone lithologic characteristics are generally bioturbated miliolid and mollusk wackestone/packstone (lagoonal) and fenestral and algal-laminated mudstone/wackestone (peritidal). Some dolomites retain primary sedimentary structures (e.g., mottling and algal lamination), whereas others appear structureless, perhaps due to recrystallization. Few of the middle Cretaceous samples were deposited under high-energy conditions. Those that are high-energy deposits are bioclastic rudstones and coral boundstones. Late Cretaceous and Tertiary deep-water limestones and chalks unconformably overlie and drape the older shallow-water carbonates. The limestones are Late Cretaceous through Pleistocene. The limited occurrence of high-energy facies rocks indicates that the escarpment has been eroded bankward over its entire length south of 27/sup 0/05'N, and not just at canyon reentrants. The younger deep-water rocks reflect the drowning of the middle Cretaceous platform in Late Cretaceous time. The facies change from limestone to dolomite is attributed to higher salinities in the bank interior during the middle Cretaceous.

  11. A review of the geochronology and geochemistry of Late Yanshanian (Cretaceous) plutons along the Fujian coastal area of southeastern China: Implications for magma evolution related to slab break-off and rollback in the Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Qiu, Jian-Sheng; Yang, Xue-Mei

    2014-01-01

    The Cretaceous plutonic suites in the Fujian coastal area include abundant I-type and A-type granitoids and lesser gabbroids. They are important components of the Late Yanshanian magmatic belt along the southeastern coast of China, and define a linear NNE-SSW-trending belt of magmatism. Geochronological, geochemical and geological data from thirty intrusions are summarised in this paper, and the data provide distinct magmatic, geochemical and tectonic patterns in the area. A compilation of geochronological data for these intrusive rocks indicates emplacement mainly from around 125 to 90 Ma, with a major peak from 115 to 90 Ma, and a subordinate peak from 125 to 115 Ma. Besides their temporal and spatial coexistence, all these intrusive rocks have similar geochemical patterns which point to involvement of components from a depleted asthenospheric mantle source for the parental magmas, most probably by magma mixing. The first appearance of sparse I-type granitoids with post-collisional extensional granite affinities, and the emplacement of the Baijuhuajian and Suzhou A-type granites, mark the beginning of extension during the Early Cretaceous at ca. 125 to 119 Ma. The subsequent development of bimodal magmatism at 115 to 90 Ma, with numerous arc-related mafic gabbros and I-type granites, together with some A-type granites, suggests that this major igneous event took place as a response to back-arc extension. On the basis of petrology, geochronology, tectonics, and elemental and isotopic geochemistry, we speculate that break-off and rollback of the subducting Palaeo-Pacific Plate during the Cretaceous were responsibl