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Sample records for cric ancillary study

  1. Aortic PWV in Chronic Kidney Disease: A CRIC Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.; Wimmer, Neil J.; Chirinos, Julio A.; Parsa, Afshin; Weir, Matthew; Perumal, Kalyani; Lash, James P.; Chen, Jing; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Flack, John; Go, Alan S.; Rafey, Mohammed; Rahman, Mahboob; Sheridan, Angela; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Robinson, Nancy A.; Joffe, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Background Aortic PWV is a measure of arterial stiffness and has proved useful in predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several populations of patients, including the healthy elderly, hypertensives and those with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Little data exist characterizing aortic stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease who are not receiving dialysis, and in particular the effect of reduced kidney function on aortic PWV. Methods We performed measurements of aortic PWV in a cross-sectional cohort of participants enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study to determine factors which predict increased aortic PWV in chronic kidney disease. Results PWV measurements were obtained in 2564 participants. The tertiles of aortic PWV (adjusted for waist circumference) were < 7.7 m/sec, 7.7–10.2 m/sec and > 10.2 m/sec with an overall mean (± S.D.) value of 9.48 ± 3.03 m/sec [95% CI = 9.35–9.61 m/sec]. Multivariable regression identified significant independent positive associations of age, blood glucose concentrations, race, waist circumference, mean arterial blood pressure, gender, and presence of diabetes with aortic PWV and a significant negative association with the level of kidney function. Conclusions The large size of this unique cohort, and the targeted enrollment of chronic kidney disease participants provides an ideal situation to study the role of reduced kidney function as a determinant of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness may be a significant component of the enhanced cardiovascular risk associated with kidney failure. PMID:20019670

  2. Central Pulse Pressure in Chronic Kidney Disease: A CRIC Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.; Chirinos, Julio A.; Parsa, Afshin; Weir, Matthew A.; Sozio, Stephen M.; Lash, James P.; Chen, Jing; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Go, Alan S.; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Rafey, Mohammed; Wright, Jackson T.; Duckworth, Mark J.; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Joffe, Marshall P.

    2010-01-01

    Central pulse pressure can be non-invasively derived using the radial artery tonometric methods. Knowledge of central pressure profiles has predicted cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several populations of patients, particularly those with known coronary artery disease and those receiving dialysis. Few data exist characterizing central pressure profiles in patients with mild-moderate chronic kidney disease who are not on dialysis. We measured central pulse pressure cross-sectionally in 2531 participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study to determine correlates of the magnitude of central pulse pressure in the setting of chronic kidney disease. Tertiles of central pulse pressure (CPP) were < 36 mmHg, 36–51 mmHg and > 51 mmHg with an overall mean (± S.D.) of 46 ± 19 mmHg. Multivariable regression identified the following independent correlates of central pulse pressure: age, gender, diabetes mellitus, heart rate (negatively correlated), glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin, glucose and PTH concentrations. Additional adjustment for brachial mean arterial pressure and brachial pulse pressure showed associations for age, gender, diabetes, weight and heart rate. Discrete intervals of brachial pulse pressure stratification showed substantial overlap within the associated central pulse pressure values. The large size of this unique chronic kidney disease cohort provides an ideal situation to study the role of brachial and central pressure measurements in kidney disease progression and cardiovascular disease incidence. PMID:20660819

  3. CKD in Hispanics: Baseline Characteristics From the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) and Hispanic-CRIC Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Michael J.; Go, Alan; Lora, Claudia M.; Ackerson, Lynn; Cohan, Janet; Kusek, John; Mercado, Alejandro; Ojo, Akinlolu; Ricardo, Ana C.; Rosen, Leigh; Tao, Kelvin; Xie, Dawei; Feldman, Harold; Lash, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Hispanics. We compared baseline characteristics of Hispanic participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic-CRIC (H-CRIC) Studies with non-Hispanic CRIC participants. Study Design Cross-sectional analysis Setting and Participants Participants were aged 21–74 years with CKD using age-based glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at enrollment into the CRIC/H-CRIC Studies. H-CRIC included Hispanics recruited at the University of Illinois from 2005–2008 while CRIC included Hispanics and non-Hispanics recruited at seven clinical centers from 2003–2007. Factor Race/ethnicity Outcomes Blood pressure, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) use, CKD-associated complications Measurements Demographic characteristics, laboratory data, blood pressure, and medications were assessed using standard techniques and protocols Results Among H-CRIC/ CRIC participants, 497 were Hispanic, 1650 non-Hispanic Black, and 1638 non-Hispanic White. Low income and educational attainment were nearly twice as prevalent in Hispanics compared with non-Hispanics (p<0.01). Hispanics had self-reported diabetes (67%) more frequently than non-Hispanic Blacks (51%) and Whites (40%) (p<0.01). Blood pressure > 130/80 mmHg was more common in Hispanics (62%) compared with Blacks (57%) and Whites (35%) (p<0.05), and abnormalities in hematologic, metabolic, and bone metabolism parameters were more prevalent in Hispanics (p<0.05), even after stratifying by entry eGFR. Hispanics had the lowest receipt of ACE inhibitor/ARB among high-risk subgroups, including participants with diabetes, proteinuria, and blood pressure > 130/80 mmHg. Mean eGFR (ml/min/m2) was lower in Hispanics (39.6) than in Blacks (43.7) and Whites (46.2), while median proteinuria was higher in Hispanics (0.72 g/d) than in Blacks (0.24 g/d) and Whites (0.12 g/d) (p<0.01). Limitations Generalizability; observed

  4. Estimating GFR Among Participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Amanda Hyre; Yang, Wei; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Joffe, Marshall M.; Leonard, Mary B.; Xie, Dawei; Chen, Jing; Greene, Tom; Jaar, Bernard G.; Kao, Patricia; Kusek, John W.; Landis, J. Richard; Lash, James P.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Weir, Matthew R.; Feldman, Harold I.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is considered the best measure of kidney function, but repeated assessment is not feasible in most research studies. Study Design Cross-sectional study of 1,433 participants from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study (i.e., the GFR subcohort) to derive an internal GFR estimating equation using a split sample approach. Setting & Participants Adults from 7 US metropolitan areas with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease; 48% had diabetes and 37% were black. Index Test CRIC GFR estimating equation Reference Test or Outcome Urinary 125I-iothalamate clearance testing (measured GFR) Other Measurements Laboratory measures including serum creatinine and cystatin C, and anthropometrics Results In the validation dataset, the model that included serum creatinine, serum cystatin C, age, gender, and race was the most parsimonious and similarly predictive of mGFR compared to a model additionally including bioelectrical impedance analysis phase angle, CRIC clinical center, and 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion. Specifically, the root mean square errors for the separate model were 0.207 vs. 0.202, respectively. The performance of the CRIC GFR estimating equation was most accurate among the subgroups of younger participants, men, non-blacks, non-Hispanics, those without diabetes, those with body mass index <30 kg/m2, those with higher 24-hour urine creatinine excretion, those with lower levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and those with higher mGFR. Limitations Urinary clearance of 125I-iothalamate is an imperfect measure of true GFR; cystatin C is not standardized to certified reference material; lack of external validation; small sample sizes limit analyses of subgroup-specific predictors. Conclusions The CRIC GFR estimating equation predicts measured GFR accurately in the CRIC cohort using serum creatinine and cystatin C, age, gender, and race. Its performance was best among younger and healthier

  5. Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study (CRIC): Overview and Summary of Selected Findings

    PubMed Central

    Denker, Matthew; Boyle, Suzanne; Anderson, Amanda H.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Chen, Jing; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Flack, John; Go, Alan S.; Horwitz, Edward; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Kusek, John W.; Lash, James P.; Navaneethan, Sankar; Ojo, Akinlolu O.; Rahman, Mahboob; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Townsend, Raymond R.

    2015-01-01

    The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study is a United States multicenter, prospective study of racially and ethnically diverse patients with CKD. Although the original aims of the study were to identify novel predictors of CKD progression and to elucidate the risk and manifestations of cardiovascular disease among nearly 4000 individuals with CKD, the CRIC Study has evolved into a national resource for investigation of a broad spectrum of CKD-related topics. The study has produced >90 published scientific articles, promoted many young investigative careers in nephrology, and fostered international collaborations focused on understanding the global burden of CKD. The third phase of the CRIC Study will complete enrollment of 1500 additional study participants in 2015 and is designed to answer questions regarding morbidity and mortality in mild-to-moderate CKD and to assess the burden of CKD in older persons. This review highlights some of the salient findings of the CRIC Study in the areas of race and ethnicity, CKD progression, CKD and cognition, and cardiovascular disease outcomes; it also outlines the ongoing and forthcoming opportunities for the global nephrology community to enhance its understanding of CKD and related complications through the study. PMID:26265715

  6. Factors Associated With Depressive Symptoms and Use of Antidepressant Medications Among Participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic-CRIC Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Michael J.; Xie, Dawei; Jordan, Neil; Kop, Willem J.; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Tamura, Manjula Kurella; Kusek, John W.; Ford, Virginia; Rosen, Leigh K.; Strauss, Louise; Teal, Valerie L.; Yaffe, Kristine; Powe, Neil R.; Lash, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms are correlated with poor health outcomes in adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The prevalence, severity, and treatment of depressive symptoms and potential risk factors, including level of kidney function, in diverse populations with CKD have not been well studied. Study Design Cross-sectional analysis Settings and Participants Participants at enrollment into the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic-CRIC (H-CRIC) Studies. CRIC enrolled Hispanics and non-Hispanics at seven centers from 2003-2007, and H-CRIC enrolled Hispanics at the University of Illinois from 2005-2008. Measurement Depressive symptoms measured by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) Predictors Demographic and clinical factors Outcomes Elevated depressive symptoms (BDI >= 11) and antidepressant medication use Results Among 3853 participants, 28.5% had evidence of elevated depressive symptoms and 18.2% were using antidepressant medications; 30.8% of persons with elevated depressive symptoms were using antidepressants. The prevalence of elevated depressive symptoms varied by level of kidney function: 25.2% among participants with eGFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73m2, and 35.1% of those with eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73m2. Lower eGFR (OR per 10 ml/min/1.73m2 decrease, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.03-1.16), Hispanic ethnicity (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.12-2.45), and non-Hispanic black race (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.17-1.74) were each associated with increased odds of elevated depressive symptoms after controlling for other factors. In regression analyses incorporating BDI score, while female sex was associated with a greater odds of antidepressant use, Hispanic ethnicity, non-Hispanic black race, and higher levels of urine albumin were associated with decreased odds of antidepressant use (p<0.05 for each). Limitations Absence of clinical diagnosis of depression and use of non-pharmacologic treatments Conclusions Although elevated depressive symptoms were common in individuals with CKD, use of

  7. Variability of Creatinine Measurements in Clinical Laboratories: Results from the CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Marshall; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Feldman, Harold I.; Weir, Matthew; Landis, J.R.; Hamm, L. Lee

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Estimating equations using serum creatinine (SCr) are often used to assess glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Such creatinine (Cr)-based formulae may produce biased estimates of GFR when using Cr measurements that have not been calibrated to reference laboratories. In this paper, we sought to examine the degree of this variation in Cr assays in several laboratories associated with academic medical centers affiliated with the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study; to consider how best to correct for this variation, and to quantify the impact of such corrections on eligibility for participation in CRIC. Variability of Cr is of particular concern in the conduct of CRIC, a large multicenter study of subjects with chronic renal disease, because eligibility for the study depends on Cr-based assessment of GFR. Methods A library of 5 large volume plasma specimens from apheresis patients was assembled, representing levels of plasma Cr from 0.8 to 2.4 mg/dl. Samples from this library were used for measurement of Cr at each of the 14 CRIC laboratories repetitively over time. We used graphical displays and linear regression methods to examine the variability in Cr, and used linear regression to develop calibration equations. We also examined the impact of the various calibration equations on the proportion of subjects screened as potential participants who were actually eligible for the study. Results There was substantial variability in Cr assays across laboratories and over time. We developed calibration equations for each laboratory; these equations varied substantially among laboratories and somewhat over time in some laboratories. The laboratory site contributed the most to variability (51% of the variance unexplained by the specimen) and variation with time accounted for another 15%. In some laboratories, calibration equations resulted in differences in eligibility for CRIC of as much as 20%. Conclusions The substantial variability in SCr assays

  8. Cardiovascular Disease Among Hispanics and Non-Hispanics in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ricardo, Ana C.; Fischer, Michael J.; Lora, Claudia M.; Budoff, Matthew; Keane, Martin G.; Kusek, John W.; Martinez, Monica; Nessel, Lisa; Stamos, Thomas; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Yang, Wei; Feldman, Harold I.; Go, Alan S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Hispanics are the largest minority group in the United States. The leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet little is known about its prevalence among Hispanics with CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We conducted cross-sectional analyses of prevalent self-reported clinical and subclinical measures of CVD among 497 Hispanics, 1638 non-Hispanic Caucasians, and 1650 non-Hispanic African Americans, aged 21 to 74 years, with mild-to-moderate CKD at enrollment in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic CRIC (HCRIC) studies. Measures of subclinical CVD included left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), coronary artery calcification (CAC), and ankle-brachial index. Results Self-reported coronary heart disease (CHD) was lower in Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians (18% versus 23%, P = 0.02). Compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians, Hispanics had a lower prevalence of CAC >100 (41% versus 34%, P = 0.03) and CAC >400 (26% versus 19%, P = 0.02). However, after adjusting for sociodemographic factors, these differences were no longer significant. In adjusted analyses, Hispanics had a higher odds of LVH compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians (odds ratio 1.97, 95% confidence interval, 1.22 to 3.17, P = 0.005), and a higher odds of CAC >400 compared with non-Hispanic African Americans (odds ratio, 2.49, 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 5.58, P = 0.03). Hispanic ethnicity was not independently associated with any other CVD measures. Conclusions Prevalent LVH was more common among Hispanics than non-Hispanic Caucasians, and elevated CAC score was more common among Hispanics than non-Hispanic African Americans. Understanding reasons for these racial/ethnic differences and their association with long-term clinical outcomes is needed. PMID:21896829

  9. Prevalence and Correlates of Mitral Annular Calcification in Adults with Chronic Kidney Disease: Results from CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Abd alamir, Moshrik; Radulescu, Vlad; Goyfman, Michael; Mohler, Emile R; Gao, Yan Lin; Budoff, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Risk factors for mitral annular calcification (MAC) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) demonstrate significant overlap in the general population. The aim of this paper is to determine whether there are independent relationships between MAC and demographics, traditional and novel CVD risk factors using cardiac CT in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) in a cross-sectional study. Methods A sample of 2070 subjects underwent coronary calcium scanning during the CRIC study. Data were obtained for each participant at time of scan. Subjects were dichotomized into the presence and absence of MAC. Differences in baseline demographic and transitional risk factor data were evaluated across groups. Covariates used in multivariable adjustment were age, gender, BMI, HDL, LDL, lipid lowering medications, smoking status, family history of heart attack, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, phosphate, PTH, albuminuria, and calcium. Results Our study consisted of 2070 subjects, of which 331 had MAC (prevalence of 16.0%). The mean MAC score was 511.98 (SD 1368.76). Age and white race remained independently associated with presence of MAC. Decreased GFR was also a risk factor. African American and Hispanic race, as well as former smoking status were protective against MAC. In multivariable adjusted analyses, the remaining covariates were not significantly associated with MAC. Among renal covariates, elevated phosphate was significant. Conclusion In the CRIC population, presence of MAC was independently associated with age, Caucasian race, decreased GFR, and elevated phosphate. These results are suggested by mechanisms of dysregulation of inflammation, hormones, and electrolytes in subjects with renal disease. PMID:26188533

  10. DNA methylation profile associated with rapid decline in kidney function: findings from the CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Maria R.; Devaney, Joseph M.; Joffe, Marshall M.; Xie, Dawei; Feldman, Harold I.; Dominic, Elizabeth A.; Guzman, Nicolas J.; Ramezani, Ali; Susztak, Katalin; Herman, James G.; Cope, Leslie; Harmon, Brennan; Kwabi-Addo, Bernard; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Go, Alan S.; He, Jiang; Lash, James P.; Kusek, John W.; Raj, Dominic S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Epigenetic mechanisms may be important in the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods We studied the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern associated with rapid loss of kidney function using the Infinium HumanMethylation 450 K BeadChip in 40 Chronic Renal Insufficiency (CRIC) study participants (n = 3939) with the highest and lowest rates of decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate. Results The mean eGFR slope was 2.2 (1.4) and −5.1 (1.2) mL/min/1.73 m2 in the stable kidney function group and the rapid progression group, respectively. CpG islands in NPHP4, IQSEC1 and TCF3 were hypermethylated to a larger extent in subjects with stable kidney function (P-values of 7.8E−05 to 9.5E−05). These genes are involved in pathways known to promote the epithelial to mesenchymal transition and renal fibrosis. Other CKD-related genes that were differentially methylated are NOS3, NFKBIL2, CLU, NFKBIB, TGFB3 and TGFBI, which are involved in oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways (P-values of 4.5E−03 to 0.046). Pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that gene networks related to cell signaling, carbohydrate metabolism and human behavior are epigenetically regulated in CKD. Conclusions Epigenetic modifications may be important in determining the rate of loss of kidney function in patients with established CKD. PMID:24516231

  11. Urinary sodium is a potent correlate of proteinuria: Lessons from the CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Matthew R.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Teal, Valerie; Sozio, Stephen M.; Anderson, Cheryl A.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Turban, Sharon; Chen, Jing; He, Jiang; Litbarg, Natasha; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Rosen, Leigh; Steigerwalt, Susan; Strauss, Louise; Joffe, Marshall M.

    2013-01-01

    Background While higher blood pressure is known to increase proteinuria, whether increased dietary sodium as estimated from 24-hour urinary excretion correlates with increased proteinuria in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is not well studied. Methods We measured 24-hour urine sodium, potassium, and protein excretion in 3,680 participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study, to determine the relationship between urinary sodium and potassium and urinary protein excretion in patients with CKD. We stratified our data based on the presence or absence of diabetes given the absence of any data on this relationship, and evidence that diabetics had greater urinary protein excretion at nearly every level of urinary sodium excretion. Multiple linear regressions were used with a stepwise inclusion of covariates such as systolic blood pressure (SBP), demographics, hemoglobin A1C, and type of antihypertensive medications to evaluate the relationship between urinary electrolyte excretion and proteinuria. Results Our data demonstrated that urinary sodium (+1SD above the mean), as a univariate variable, explained 12% of the variation in proteinuria (β=0.29, p<.0001) with rising urinary sodium excretion associated with increasing proteinuria. The significance of that relationship was only partially attenuated with adjustment for demographic and clinical factors and the addition of 24-hour urinary potassium to the model (β=0.13, R2=0.35, p<.0001). Conclusions An understanding of the relationship between these clinical factors and dietary sodium may allow a more tailored approach for dietary salt restriction in patients with CKD. PMID:23076013

  12. Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study: Baseline Characteristics and Associations with Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Go, Alan S.; Appel, Lawrence J.; He, Jiang; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Townsend, Raymond R.; Xie, Dawei; Cifelli, Denise; Cohan, Janet; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Fischer, Michael J.; Gadegbeku, Crystal; Hamm, L. Lee; Kusek, John W.; Landis, J. Richard; Narva, Andrew; Robinson, Nancy; Teal, Valerie; Feldman, Harold I.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study was established to examine risk factors for the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with CKD. We examined baseline demographic and clinical characteristics. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Seven clinical centers recruited adults who were aged 21 to 74 yr and had CKD using age-based estimated GFR (eGFR) inclusion criteria. At baseline, blood and urine specimens were collected and information regarding health behaviors, diet, quality of life, and functional status was obtained. GFR was measured using radiolabeled iothalamate in one third of participants. Results: A total of 3612 participants were enrolled with mean age ± SD of 58.2 ± 11.0 yr; 46% were women, and 47% had diabetes. Overall, 45% were non-Hispanic white, 46% were non-Hispanic black, and 5% were Hispanic. Eighty-six percent reported hypertension, 22% coronary disease, and 10% heart failure. Mean body mass index was 32.1 ± 7.9 kg/m2, and 47% had a BP >130/80 mmHg. Mean eGFR was 43.4 ± 13.5 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and median (interquartile range) protein excretion was 0.17 g/24 h (0.07 to 0.81 g/24 h). Lower eGFR was associated with older age, lower socioeconomic and educational level, cigarette smoking, self-reported CVD, peripheral arterial disease, and elevated BP. Conclusions: Lower level of eGFR was associated with a greater burden of CVD as well as lower socioeconomic and educational status. Long-term follow-up of participants will provide critical insights into the epidemiology of CKD and its relationship to adverse outcomes. PMID:19541818

  13. Hypertension Awareness, Treatment, and Control in Adults With CKD: Results From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Muntner, Paul; Anderson, Amanda; Charleston, Jeanne; Chen, Zhen; Ford, Virginia; Makos, Gail; O’Connor, Andrew; Perumal, Kalyani; Rahman, Mahboob; Steigerwalt, Susan; Teal, Valerie; Townsend, Raymond; Weir, Matthew; Wright, Jackson T

    2010-01-01

    Background A low rate of blood pressure control has been reported among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). These data were derived from population-based samples with a low rate of CKD awareness. Study Design Cross-sectional Setting & Participants Data from the baseline visit of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study (n=3612) were analyzed. Participants with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 20 to 70 ml/min/1.73m2 were identified from physician offices and review of laboratory databases. Outcomes Prevalence and awareness of hypertension, treatment patterns, control rates and factors associated with hypertension control. Measurements Following a standardized protocol, blood pressure was measured three times by trained staff and hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg and/or self-reported antihypertensive medication use. Patients’ awareness and treatment of hypertension were defined using self-report and two levels of hypertension control were evaluated: systolic/diastolic blood pressure <140/90 mmHg and <130/80 mmHg. Results The prevalence of hypertension was 85.7%, and 98.9% of CRIC participants were aware of this diagnosis, 98.3% were treated with medications while 67.1% and 46.1% had their hypertension controlled to <140/90 mmHg and <130/80 mmHg, respectively. Of CRIC participants with hypertension, 15%, 25%, 26% and 32% were taking one, two, three and four or more antihypertensive medications, respectively. After multivariable adjustment, older patients, blacks, those with higher urinary albumin excretion were less likely while participants taking ACE-inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers were more likely to have controlled their hypertension to <140/90 mmHg and <130/80 mmHg. Limitations Data were derived from a single study visit. Conclusions Despite almost universal hypertension awareness and treatment in this cohort of patients with CKD, rates of

  14. Interleukin-6 Is a Risk Factor for Atrial Fibrillation in Chronic Kidney Disease: Findings from the CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Amdur, Richard L.; Mukherjee, Monica; Go, Alan; Barrows, Ian R.; Ramezani, Ali; Shoji, Jun; Reilly, Muredach P.; Gnanaraj, Joseph; Deo, Raj; Roas, Sylvia; Keane, Martin; Master, Steve; Teal, Valerie; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Yang, Peter; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W.; Tracy, Cynthia M.; Raj, Dominic S.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study, we examined the association between inflammation and AF in 3,762 adults with CKD, enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. AF was determined at baseline by self-report and electrocardiogram (ECG). Plasma concentrations of interleukin(IL)-1, IL-1 Receptor antagonist, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, transforming growth factor-β, high sensitivity C-Reactive protein, and fibrinogen, measured at baseline. At baseline, 642 subjects had history of AF, but only 44 had AF in ECG recording. During a mean follow-up of 3.7 years, 108 subjects developed new-onset AF. There was no significant association between inflammatory biomarkers and past history of AF. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, comorbid conditions, laboratory values, echocardiographic variables, and medication use, plasma IL-6 level was significantly associated with presence of AF at baseline (Odds ratio [OR], 1.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 2.14; P = 0.001) and new-onset AF (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.53; P = 0.03). To summarize, plasma IL-6 level is an independent and consistent predictor of AF in patients with CKD. PMID:26840403

  15. Interleukin-6 Is a Risk Factor for Atrial Fibrillation in Chronic Kidney Disease: Findings from the CRIC Study.

    PubMed

    Amdur, Richard L; Mukherjee, Monica; Go, Alan; Barrows, Ian R; Ramezani, Ali; Shoji, Jun; Reilly, Muredach P; Gnanaraj, Joseph; Deo, Raj; Roas, Sylvia; Keane, Martin; Master, Steve; Teal, Valerie; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Yang, Peter; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W; Tracy, Cynthia M; Raj, Dominic S

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study, we examined the association between inflammation and AF in 3,762 adults with CKD, enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. AF was determined at baseline by self-report and electrocardiogram (ECG). Plasma concentrations of interleukin(IL)-1, IL-1 Receptor antagonist, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, transforming growth factor-β, high sensitivity C-Reactive protein, and fibrinogen, measured at baseline. At baseline, 642 subjects had history of AF, but only 44 had AF in ECG recording. During a mean follow-up of 3.7 years, 108 subjects developed new-onset AF. There was no significant association between inflammatory biomarkers and past history of AF. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, comorbid conditions, laboratory values, echocardiographic variables, and medication use, plasma IL-6 level was significantly associated with presence of AF at baseline (Odds ratio [OR], 1.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 2.14; P = 0.001) and new-onset AF (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.53; P = 0.03). To summarize, plasma IL-6 level is an independent and consistent predictor of AF in patients with CKD.

  16. Time-updated systolic blood pressure and the progression of chronic kidney disease: Findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Amanda H; Yang, Wei; Townsend, Raymond R; Pan, Qiang; Chertow, Glenn M; Kusek, John W; Charleston, Jeanne; He, Jiang; Kallem, RadhaKrishna; Lash, James P; Miller, Edgar R; Rahman, Mahboob; Steigerwalt, Susan; Weir, Matthew; Wright, Jackson T; Feldman, Harold I

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood pressure (BP) is often inadequately controlled in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Previous reports of the longitudinal association between achieved level of BP and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have not incorporated time-updated BP with appropriate adjustment for known confounders. Objective To assess the association between baseline and time-updated systolic BP (SBP) with the progression of CKD. Design Observational, prospective cohort study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00304148) Setting Seven US clinical centers Patients Participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study (N=3,708) followed for a median (25th, 75th percentiles) of 5.7 (4.6, 6.7) years Measurements The mean of three seated SBP measurements were used as the visit-specific SBP. SBP was time-updated as the mean of that visit and all prior visits. Outcomes were ESRD and the composite renal endpoint of ESRD (dialysis or transplantation) or halving of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Analyses investigating baseline and time-updated SBP utilized traditional Cox proportional hazards models and marginal structural models, respectively. Results SBP was ≥130 mmHg at all study visits in 19.2% of participants, and ≥140 mmHg in 10.6%. The hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for ESRD among participants with SBP 130–139 mmHg, compared to SBP <120 mmHg, was 1.46 (1.13–1.88) using only baseline data, and was 2.37 (1.48–3.80) using all available time-updated data. Among those with SBP ≥140 mmHg, corresponding hazard ratios were 1.46 (1.18–1.88) and 3.37 (2.26–5.03), respectively. Limitations SBP was measured once annually, and the CRIC Study cohort is not a random sample. Conclusions Among participants in the CRIC Study, time-updated SBP over 130 mmHg was more strongly associated with progression of CKD than analyses based on baseline SBP. Funding The CRIC Study is funded under cooperative agreements from the National Institute of

  17. STS ancillary equipment study. User reference book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plough, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A record of what is currently known about STS ancillary equipment is presented in this user-oriented design so that a potential user may evaluate whether he could use the described ancillary equipment or if he would need to design and fabricate a payload-unique item. References that the user can use to obtain additional details and requirements to aid in his evaluation and decision are included.

  18. Relation of Serum Lipids and Lipoproteins with Progression of CKD: The CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Akkina, Sanjeev; Alper, Arnold; Anderson, Amanda Hyre; Appel, Lawrence J.; He, Jiang; Raj, Dominic S.; Schelling, Jeffrey; Strauss, Louise; Teal, Valerie; Rader, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Hyperlipidemia is common in patients with CKD. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether measures of plasma lipids and lipoproteins predict progression of kidney disease in patients with CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Prospective cohort study in adults (n=3939) with CKD aged 21–74 years recruited between 2003 and 2008 and followed for a median of 4.1 years. At baseline, total cholesterol, triglycerides, very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), apoA-I , apoB, and lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] were measured. The outcomes were composite end point of ESRD or 50% decline in eGFR from baseline (rate of change of GFR). Results Mean age of the study population was 58.2 years, and the mean GFR was 44.9 ml/min per 1.73 m2; 48% of patients had diabetes. None of the lipid or lipoprotein measures was independently associated with risk of the composite end point or rate of change in GFR. However, there were significant (P=0.01) interactions by level of proteinuria. In participants with proteinuria<0.2 g/d, 1-SD higher LDL-C was associated with a 26% lower risk of the renal end point (hazard ratio [HR], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.59 to 0.92; P=0.01), and 1-SD higher total cholesterol was associated with a 23% lower risk of the renal end point (HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.62 to 0.96; P=0.02). In participants with proteinuria>0.2 g/d, neither LDL-C (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.98 to 1.05) nor total cholesterol levels were associated with renal outcomes. Treatment with statins was reported in 55% of patients and was differential across lipid categories. Conclusions In this large cohort of patients with CKD, total cholesterol, triglycerides, VLDL-C, LDL-C, HDL-C, apoA-I, apoB, and Lp(a) were not independently associated with progression of kidney disease. There was an inverse relationship between LDL-C and total cholesterol levels and kidney disease outcomes in patients with

  19. Ancillary study management systems: a review of needs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The valuable clinical data, specimens, and assay results collected during a primary clinical trial or observational study can enable researchers to answer additional, pressing questions with relatively small investments in new measurements. However, management of such follow-on, “ancillary” studies is complex. It requires coordinating across institutions, sites, repositories, and approval boards, as well as distributing, integrating, and analyzing diverse data types. General-purpose software systems that simplify the management of ancillary studies have not yet been explored in the research literature. Methods We have identified requirements for ancillary study management primarily as part of our ongoing work with a number of large research consortia. These organizations include the Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology (CHAVI), the Immune Tolerance Network (ITN), the HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN), the U.S. Military HIV Research Program (MHRP), and the Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes (nPOD). We also consulted with researchers at a range of other disease research organizations regarding their workflows and data management strategies. Lastly, to enhance breadth, we reviewed process documents for ancillary study management from other organizations. Results By exploring characteristics of ancillary studies, we identify differentiating requirements and scenarios for ancillary study management systems (ASMSs). Distinguishing characteristics of ancillary studies may include the collection of additional measurements (particularly new analyses of existing specimens); the initiation of studies by investigators unaffiliated with the original study; cross-protocol data pooling and analysis; pre-existing participant consent; and pre-existing data context and provenance. For an ASMS to address these characteristics, it would need to address both operational requirements (e.g., allocating existing specimens) and data management requirements

  20. Urine Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Death in CKD: Results From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kathleen D.; Yang, Wei; Go, Alan S.; Anderson, Amanda H.; Feldman, Harold I.; Fischer, Michael J.; He, Jiang; Kallem, Radhakrishna R.; Kusek, John W.; Master, Stephen R.; Miller, Edgar R.; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Steigerwalt, Susan; Tao, Kaixiang; Weir, Matthew R.; Hsu, Chi-yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease is common and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Currently, markers of renal tubular injury are not used routinely to describe kidney health and little is known about risk of cardiovascular events and death associated with these biomarkers independent of glomerular filtration—based markers (such as serum creatinine or albuminuria). Study Design Cohort study, Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. Setting & Participants 3386 participants with estimated glomerular filtration rate of 20-70 mL/min/1.73 m2 enrolled from June 2003 through August 2008. Predictor Urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) concentration. Outcomes Adjudicated heart failure event, ischemic atherosclerotic event (myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke or peripheral artery disease) and death through March 2011. Measurements Urine NGAL concentration measured at baseline with a two-step assay using chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay technology on an ARCHITECT i2000SR (Abbott Laboratories). Results There were 428 heart failure events (during 16383 person-years of follow-up), 361 ischemic atherosclerotic events (during 16584 person-years of follow-up) and 522 deaths (during 18214 person-years of follow-up). In Cox regression models adjusted for estimated glomerular filtration rate, albuminuria, demographics, traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors and cardiac medications, higher urine NGAL levels remained independently associated with ischemic atherosclerotic events (adjusted HR for the highest [>49.5 ng/ml] vs. lowest [≤6.9 ng/ml] quintile, 1.83 [95% CI, 1.20-2.81]; HR, per 0.1-unit increase in log urine NGAL, 1.012 [95% CI, 1.001-1.023]), but not heart failure events or deaths. Limitations Urine NGAL was measured only once. Conclusions Among patients with chronic kidney disease, urine levels of NGAL, a marker of renal tubular injury, were independently associated with future ischemic atherosclerotic

  1. Classroom Utilization of Ancillary Personnel: Delivery Systems for Mainstreaming in Elementary Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockoff, Edward

    1979-01-01

    Proposes in-service training on the utilization of ancillary personnel (special education teacher, school nurse, hearing and speech clinician, guidance counselor) in assisting the social studies teacher with the mainstreamed student. Outlines how ancillary personnel may aid in preparing students for entrance into the regular classroom, developing…

  2. The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study: Sample, Design, and Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Linda C.; Penedo, Frank J.; Carnethon, Mercedes; Isasi, Carmen; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Roesch, Scott C.; Youngblood, Marston E.; Daviglus, Martha L.; Gonzalez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study aims to examine associations between sociocultural and psychosocial factors and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and metabolic syndrome prevalence in Hispanics/Latinos. The conceptual framework is based on the Reserve Capacity and Lifespan Biopsychosocial Models, which emphasize multiple risk and protective pathways underlying socioeconomic and ethnic influences in health. This study describes the rationale, participants, and procedures for the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Design and Setting The Sociocultural Ancillary Study to the HCHS/SOL is a cross-sectional cohort study with future opportunities for prospective investigation. Participants Participants were 5,313 adults, aged 18-74 years, of self-identified Hispanic/Latino descent and representing multiple Hispanic/Latino background groups, recruited from the Bronx, NY, Chicago, IL, Miami, FL, and San Diego, CA. Intervention Participants completed an interview-administered sociocultural assessment battery within 9 months of their HCHS/SOL clinical baseline exam. Outcome Measures The primary outcomes are CVD and the metabolic syndrome and its component risk factors. Results The Sociocultural Ancillary Study sample is broadly representative of the HCHS/SOL cohort. Weighted demographics are: 55% male, 56% 18-44 years, 44% 45 years and older, and 37% Mexican, 20% Cuban, 16% Puerto Rican, 12% Dominican, 8% Central American, and 5% South American descent. Conclusions By testing theoretically driven hypotheses concerning sociocultural and psychosocial factors in CVD, the Sociocultural Ancillary Study seeks to inform future prevention and intervention efforts for U.S. Hispanic/Latinos. PMID:24620452

  3. Ancillary services

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, E.; Kirby, B

    1996-01-01

    Ancillary services are those functions performed by electrical generating, transmission, system-control, and distribution-system equipment and people to support the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission defined ancillary services as ``those services necessary to support the transmission of electric power from seller to purchaser given the obligations of control areas and transmitting utilities within those control areas to maintain reliable operations of the interconnected transmission system.`` FERC identified six ancillary services reactive power and voltage control, loss compensation, scheduling and dispatch, load following, system protection, and energy imbalance. Our earlier work identified 19 ancillary services Here we offer a revised set of seven ancillary services and mention several other services that merit consideration. In preparing its final rule on open-access transmission service, we suggest that FERC consider splitting its system-protection service into its two primary pieces, reliability reserve and supplemental-operating reserve. We also suggest that FERC define more sharply all of the ancillary services. especially load-following reserve and energy imbalance. Finally, we suggest that FERC consider other services and their provision in a restructured electricity industry; these services include black-start capability, time correction, standby service. planning reserve, redispatch. transmission services, power quality, and planning and engineering services.

  4. Selected inflammatory imitators of mycosis fungoides: histologic features and utility of ancillary studies.

    PubMed

    Arps, David P; Chen, Stephanie; Fullen, Douglas R; Hristov, Alexandra C

    2014-10-01

    Mycosis fungoides is the most common primary cutaneous lymphoma; however, it remains a significant diagnostic challenge, in part because of the overlap with several inflammatory dermatoses. Despite advances in immunohistochemistry and molecular diagnostics, false-positive, false-negative, and indeterminate diagnoses are not uncommon. In most cases, the overall balance of morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features must be considered carefully because there are few sensitive and specific clues to the diagnosis. Moreover, an appropriate clinical presentation is essential to the diagnosis and helps to favor or exclude inflammatory/reactive processes. Herein, we discuss 3 important inflammatory dermatoses that may closely simulate mycosis fungoides, and we review the use of ancillary studies in these challenging cases. PMID:25268195

  5. Selected inflammatory imitators of mycosis fungoides: histologic features and utility of ancillary studies.

    PubMed

    Arps, David P; Chen, Stephanie; Fullen, Douglas R; Hristov, Alexandra C

    2014-10-01

    Mycosis fungoides is the most common primary cutaneous lymphoma; however, it remains a significant diagnostic challenge, in part because of the overlap with several inflammatory dermatoses. Despite advances in immunohistochemistry and molecular diagnostics, false-positive, false-negative, and indeterminate diagnoses are not uncommon. In most cases, the overall balance of morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features must be considered carefully because there are few sensitive and specific clues to the diagnosis. Moreover, an appropriate clinical presentation is essential to the diagnosis and helps to favor or exclude inflammatory/reactive processes. Herein, we discuss 3 important inflammatory dermatoses that may closely simulate mycosis fungoides, and we review the use of ancillary studies in these challenging cases.

  6. Cardiovascular Fat, Menopause, and Sex Hormones in Women: The SWAN Cardiovascular Fat Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Kelly J.; Janssen, Imke; Hanley, Carrie; Budoff, Matthew J.; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Everson-Rose, Susan A.; Powell, Lynda H.; Matthews, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Cardiovascular risk increases in women after menopause. Mounting evidence demonstrates a role of cardiovascular fat (CF) in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease, but no research has examined CF in relation to sex hormones or menopausal status in women. Objective: The objective was to determine the relationship between CF depots, menopausal status, and endogenous sex hormones. Design: Cross-sectional and longitudinal study designs were used. Setting: The setting included the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Heart and Cardiovascular Fat Ancillary Study. Participants: A total of 456 women (mean age, 50.75 y); 62% premenopausal/early perimenopausal, and 38% late peri-/postmenopausal. Intervention: Menopausal status, endogenous sex hormones measured simultaneously with CF volumes, and circulating estradiol available 4.80 years (median) before CF measures. Main Outcome Measures: Volumes of CF (epicardial adipose tissue [EAT], paracardial adipose tissue [PAT], total heart adipose tissue [TAT = EAT + PAT], and aortic perivascular adipose tissue [PVAT]). Results: In final models, late peri-/postmenopausal women had 9.88% more EAT, 20.72% more PAT, and 11.69% more TAT volumes than pre-/early perimenopausal women (P < .05). PVAT was not associated with menopausal status. In final models, lower estradiol concentrations were associated with greater volumes of PAT and TAT (P < .05). Women with the greatest reduction in estradiol since baseline had greater volumes of PAT compared to women with the least reduction (P = .02). Conclusions: Late peri-/postmenopausal women have greater volumes of heart fat compared with pre-/early perimenopausal women independent of age, obesity, and other covariates. Endogenous sex hormones are associated with CF. Perhaps CF plays a role in the higher risk of coronary heart disease reported in women after menopause. PMID:26176800

  7. Prevalence and Correlates of Perceived Ethnic Discrimination in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Arellano-Morales, Leticia; Roesch, Scott C.; Gallo, Linda C.; Emory, Kristen T.; Molina, Kristine M.; Gonzalez, Patricia; Penedo, Frank J.; Navas-Nacher, Elena L.; Teng, Yanping; Deng, Yu; Isasi, Carmen R.; Schneiderman, Neil; Brondolo, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Empirical studies examining perceived ethnic discrimination in Latinos of diverse background groups are limited. This study examined prevalence and correlates of discrimination in a diverse sample of U.S. Latinos (N=5,291) from the multi-site Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) and HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study. The sample permitted an examination of differences across seven groups (Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South American, and Other/Multiple Background). Most participants (79.5%) reported lifetime discrimination exposure and prevalence rates ranged from 64.9% to 98% across groups. Structural Equation Models (SEM) indicated that after adjusting for sociodemographic covariates most group differences in reports of discrimination were eliminated. However, Cubans reported the lowest levels of discrimination, overall among all groups. Furthermore, regional effects were more important than group effects. Participants from Chicago reported the highest levels of discrimination in comparison to other regions. Group differences among Latinos appear to be primarily a function of sociodemographic differences in education, income, and acculturation. In addition, differences in exposure to discrimination may be tied to variables associated with both immigration patterns and integration to U.S. culture. Results highlight the importance of considering historical context and the intersection of discrimination and immigration when evaluating the mental health of Latinos. PMID:26491624

  8. MSM in HIV-prevention trials are sexual partners with each other: An ancillary study to the EXPLORE intervention.

    PubMed

    Mimiaga, Matthew J; Safren, Steven A; Benet, Dana Jones; Manseau, Marc W; DeSousa, Nancy; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2006-01-01

    The EXPLORE study evaluated a behavioral intervention to prevent HIV seroconversion among men who have sex with men (MSM). The present ancillary study enrolled 345 EXPLORE participants at one study site (Boston) and assessed high-risk sexual behavior with other EXPLORE participants. It also assessed sexual intentions across other EXPLORE participants, HIV-negative individuals, and unknown HIV serostatus partners. Thirty-one percent reported having sex with another EXPLORE participant: 27% unprotected receptive oral sex with ejaculation (UO), 30% unprotected insertive anal sex (UIA), and 34% reported unprotected receptive anal sex (URA). Significant relationships between intentions to engage in UO, UIA, and URA, and type of partner emerged with intentions to engage in UO, UIA, and URA higher in HIV-negative partners, other EXPLORE participants, and unknown-HIV serostatus partners. Future HIV-prevention studies recruiting MSM at increased sexual risk of HIV infection should address participants potentially becoming sexual partners with each other. PMID:16331532

  9. Ancillary Benefits for Caregivers of Children with Asthma Participating in an Environmental Intervention Study to Alleviate Asthma Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kubzansky, Laura D.; Spengler, John D.; Levy, Jonathan I.

    2009-01-01

    Providing care for children with asthma can be demanding and time-intensive with far-reaching effects on caregivers’ lives. Studies have documented childhood asthma symptom reductions and improved asthma-related quality of life (AQOL) with indoor allergen-reducing environmental interventions. Few such studies, however, have considered ancillary benefits to caregivers or other family members. Ancillary benefits could be derived from child health improvements and reduced caregiving burden or from factors such as improved living environments or social support that often accompanies intensive residential intervention efforts. As part of the Boston Healthy Public Housing Initiative (HPHI), a longitudinal single-cohort intervention study of asthmatic children, we examined trends in caregivers’ quality of life related to their child’s asthma (caregiver AQOL) using monthly Juniper Caregiver Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaires (AQLQ) for 32 primary caregivers to 42 asthmatic children aged 4 to 17 years. Longitudinal analyses were used to examine caregiver AQOL trends and their relationship to the child’s AQOL, then to consider additional predictors of caregiver AQOL. Caregiver AQLQ improved significantly over the course of the study with overall improvements significantly correlated with child AQOL (p = 0.005). However, caregiver AQOL improved most in the months before environmental interventions, while children’s AQOL improved most in the months following. Time trends in caregiver AQOL, controlling for child AQOL, were not explained by available social support or caregiver stress measures. Our findings suggest potential participation effects not adequately captured by standard measures. Future environmental intervention studies should more formally consider social support and participation effects for both children and caregivers PMID:19184446

  10. Ancillary benefits for caregivers of children with asthma participating in an environmental intervention study to alleviate asthma symptoms.

    PubMed

    Clougherty, Jane E; Kubzansky, Laura D; Spengler, John D; Levy, Jonathan I

    2009-03-01

    Providing care for children with asthma can be demanding and time-intensive with far-reaching effects on caregivers' lives. Studies have documented childhood asthma symptom reductions and improved asthma-related quality of life (AQOL) with indoor allergen-reducing environmental interventions. Few such studies, however, have considered ancillary benefits to caregivers or other family members. Ancillary benefits could be derived from child health improvements and reduced caregiving burden or from factors such as improved living environments or social support that often accompanies intensive residential intervention efforts. As part of the Boston Healthy Public Housing Initiative (HPHI), a longitudinal single-cohort intervention study of asthmatic children, we examined trends in caregivers' quality of life related to their child's asthma (caregiver AQOL) using monthly Juniper Caregiver Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaires (AQLQ) for 32 primary caregivers to 42 asthmatic children aged 4 to 17 years. Longitudinal analyses were used to examine caregiver AQOL trends and their relationship to the child's AQOL, then to consider additional predictors of caregiver AQOL. Caregiver AQLQ improved significantly over the course of the study with overall improvements significantly correlated with child AQOL (p = 0.005). However, caregiver AQOL improved most in the months before environmental interventions, while children's AQOL improved most in the months following. Time trends in caregiver AQOL, controlling for child AQOL, were not explained by available social support or caregiver stress measures. Our findings suggest potential participation effects not adequately captured by standard measures. Future environmental intervention studies should more formally consider social support and participation effects for both children and caregivers. PMID:19184446

  11. Finisher hog production in the Southeastern United States: Ancillary measurements derived from the National Air Emissions Monitoring Study (NAEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robarge, W. P.; Lee, S.; Walker, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of emissions of gases and fine particulate matter from swine animal feeding operations (AFOs) in the southeastern US have typically been confined to relatively short periods (days to several weeks) and have generally focused on waste lagoons. Access to swine animal housing units and other ancillary information has been limited. The National Air Emissions Monitoring Study (NAEMS) provided a unique opportunity to characterize emissions from swine housing units for an extended period of time (~ 2 years), and allowed access to ancillary measurements regarding nutrient flows (feed amounts and composition), manure dynamics, animal inventories, water usage and farm management. Presented here is a summary of the observations made for a NAEMS finisher site (NC3B) selected as being representative of swine production in the southeastern US. Finisher hogs are raised in rotations (~ 140 days) with a target market weight of 123 kg/hog. Among the population during a rotation (700-800 hogs/barn) the actual growth rate varies with a series of “grade-outs” of market-weight hogs starting ~ 110 days from initial load-in. Derivation of the standing live-weight in the barns during a rotation therefore requires use of a growth model and summation over several different “populations” of hogs within a single barn. Up to 5 different feed formulations are fed during a rotation with %N content ranging from (3.4 to 2.2% N; total feed consumed 181,000 kg/barn). Across 4 complete rotations, N consumed was ~50 g N per hog/day. Of this amount, we estimate ~ 60% is excreted as fecal matter and urine. The TAN (NH3 + NH4+) content of the shallow pits is consistently higher (1880 ±390 mg TAN/L) than that found in the anaerobic lagoon (800 ±70 mg TAN/L), except immediately after recharge following pit-pull (pH of the two liquids was similar). The presence of a recalcitrant layer of sludge in the shallow pits (liquid height = 20 cm; sludge depth = 5-10 cm; TAN = 2500 mg N/L; total

  12. Ancillary services market in California

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, T.; Marnay, C.; Siddiqui, A.; Liew, L.; Khavkin, M.

    1999-07-01

    This report includes sections on the following topics: (1) California restructured electricity system overview; (2) Reliability criteria; (3) Design of the California ISO ancillary services market; (4) Operation of ancillary services markets; (5) Ancillary services markets redesign; and (6) Conclusions.

  13. Study of Droplet Activation in Thin Clouds Using Ground-Based Raman Lidar and Ancillary Remote Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosoldi, Marco; Madonna, Fabio; Gumà Claramunt, Pilar; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-06-01

    A methodology for the study of cloud droplet activation based on the measurements performed with ground-based multi-wavelength Raman lidars and ancillary remote sensors collected at CNR-IMAA observatory, Potenza, South Italy, is presented. The study is focused on the observation of thin warm clouds. Thin clouds are often also optically thin: this allows the cloud top detection and the full profiling of cloud layers using ground-based Raman lidar. Moreover, broken clouds are inspected to take advantage of their discontinuous structure in order to study the variability of optical properties and water vapor content in the transition from cloudy regions to cloudless regions close to the cloud boundaries. A statistical study of this variability leads to identify threshold values for the optical properties, enabling the discrimination between clouds and cloudless regions. These values can be used to evaluate and improve parameterizations of droplet activation within numerical models. A statistical study of the co-located Doppler radar moments allows to retrieve droplet size and vertical velocities close to the cloud base. First evidences of a correlation between droplet vertical velocities measured at the cloud base and the aerosol effective radius observed in the cloud-free regions of the broken clouds are found.

  14. Chronic Stress, Inflammation, and Glucose Regulation in U.S. Hispanics from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    McCurley, Jessica L.; Mills, Paul J.; Roesch, Scott C.; Carnethon, Mercedes; Giacinto, Rebeca E.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Teng, Yanping; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Llabre, Maria M.; Penedo, Frank J.; Schneiderman, Neil; Gallo, Linda C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes prevalence is rising rapidly, and diabetes disproportionately affects Hispanics and other underserved groups. Chronic stress may contribute to diabetes risk, but few studies have examined this relationship in U.S. Hispanics. We examined associations of chronic stress with fasting glucose, glucose tolerance, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in Hispanics without diabetes, and also assessed indirect effects of stress through inflammation (CRP). Participants were 3923 men and women, aged 18-74, without diabetes, from the four U.S. field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)-Sociocultural Ancillary study. Participants completed a measure of chronic life stress and a physical exam with oral glucose tolerance test. In a multivariate regression analysis with adjustment for demographic and health covariates, higher chronic stress was related to higher fasting glucose (standardized regression coefficient: β=.09, p<0.01), post load glucose (β=.07, p<0.05), and HbA1c levels (β=.08, p<0.01). However, there was no indirect effect of stress through inflammation. Findings suggest that higher chronic stress is associated with poorer glucose regulation in Hispanics, prior to the onset of a clinical diabetes diagnosis. PMID:25898909

  15. N-Heterocyclic olefins as ancillary ligands in catalysis: a study of their behaviour in transfer hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Iturmendi, Amaia; García, Nestor; Jaseer, E A; Munárriz, Julen; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J; Polo, Victor; Iglesias, Manuel; Oro, Luis A

    2016-08-01

    The Ir(i) complexes [Ir(cod)(κP,C,P'-NHO(PPh2))]PF6 and [IrCl(cod)(κC-NHO(OMe))] (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene, NHO(PPh2) = 1,3-bis(2-(diphenylphosphanyl)ethyl)-2-methyleneimidazoline) and NHO(OMe) = 1,3-bis(2-(methoxyethyl)-2-methyleneimidazoline), both featuring an N-heterocyclic olefin ligand (NHO), have been tested in the transfer hydrogenation reaction; this representing the first example of the use of NHOs as ancillary ligands in catalysis. The pre-catalyst [Ir(cod)(κP,C,P'-NHO(PPh2))]PF6 has shown excellent activities in the transfer hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines using (i)PrOH as a hydrogen source, while [IrCl(cod)(κC-NHO(OMe))] decomposes throughout the reaction to give low yields of the hydrogenated product. Addition of one or two equivalents of a phosphine ligand to the latter avoids catalyst decomposition and significantly improves the reaction yields. The reaction mechanism has been investigated by means of stoichiometric studies and theoretical calculations. The formation of the active species ([Ir(κP,C,P'-NHO(PPh2))((i)PrO)]) has been proposed to occur via isopropoxide coordination and concomitant COD dissociation. Moreover, throughout the catalytic cycle the NHO moiety behaves as a hemilabile ligand, thus allowing the catalyst to adopt stable square planar geometries in the transition states, which reduces the energetic barrier of the process. PMID:27472896

  16. Using Dimmable Lighting for Regulation Capacity and Non-Spinning Reserves in the Ancillary Services Market. A Feasibility Study.

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Francis; Xiaolei, Li; Watson, David S.

    2010-12-03

    The objective of this Feasibility Study was to identify the potential of dimmable lighting for providing regulation capacity and contingency reserves if massively-deployed throughout the State. We found that one half of the total electric lighting load in the California commercial sector is bottled up in larger buildings that are greater an 50,000 square feet. Retrofitting large California buildings with dimmable lighting to enable fast DR lighting would require an investment of about $1.8 billion and a"fleet" of about 56 million dimming ballasts. By upgrading the existing installed base of lighting and controls (primarily in large commercial facilities) a substantial amount of ancillary services could be provided. Though not widely deployed, today's state-of-the art lighting systems, control systems and communication networks could be used for this application. The same lighting control equipment that is appropriate for fast DR is also appropriate for achieving energy efficiency with lighting on a daily basis. Thus fast DR can leverage the capabilities that are provided by a conventional dimming lighting control system. If dimmable lighting were massively deployed throughout large California buildings (because mandated by law, for example) dimmable lighting could realistically supply 380 MW of non-spinning reserve, 47percent of the total non-spinning reserves needed in 2007.

  17. N-Heterocyclic olefins as ancillary ligands in catalysis: a study of their behaviour in transfer hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Iturmendi, Amaia; García, Nestor; Jaseer, E A; Munárriz, Julen; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J; Polo, Victor; Iglesias, Manuel; Oro, Luis A

    2016-08-01

    The Ir(i) complexes [Ir(cod)(κP,C,P'-NHO(PPh2))]PF6 and [IrCl(cod)(κC-NHO(OMe))] (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene, NHO(PPh2) = 1,3-bis(2-(diphenylphosphanyl)ethyl)-2-methyleneimidazoline) and NHO(OMe) = 1,3-bis(2-(methoxyethyl)-2-methyleneimidazoline), both featuring an N-heterocyclic olefin ligand (NHO), have been tested in the transfer hydrogenation reaction; this representing the first example of the use of NHOs as ancillary ligands in catalysis. The pre-catalyst [Ir(cod)(κP,C,P'-NHO(PPh2))]PF6 has shown excellent activities in the transfer hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines using (i)PrOH as a hydrogen source, while [IrCl(cod)(κC-NHO(OMe))] decomposes throughout the reaction to give low yields of the hydrogenated product. Addition of one or two equivalents of a phosphine ligand to the latter avoids catalyst decomposition and significantly improves the reaction yields. The reaction mechanism has been investigated by means of stoichiometric studies and theoretical calculations. The formation of the active species ([Ir(κP,C,P'-NHO(PPh2))((i)PrO)]) has been proposed to occur via isopropoxide coordination and concomitant COD dissociation. Moreover, throughout the catalytic cycle the NHO moiety behaves as a hemilabile ligand, thus allowing the catalyst to adopt stable square planar geometries in the transition states, which reduces the energetic barrier of the process.

  18. Ancillary Pilot Study for the Educational Policy Research Center Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson Inst., Croton-on-Hudson, NY.

    The role of the Hudson Institute in the policy research center program was to build on and adapt current studies of the future for the purpose of assisting the Office of Education and its five pilot centers. Part 1 of this report comments briefly on some methodological and substantive issues that arose during the pilot phase and suggests how…

  19. Retinopathy and the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study).

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Juan E; Pistilli, Maxwell; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Daniel, Ebenezer; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker-Ostroff, Candace; Mohler, Emile; Lo, Joan C; Townsend, Raymond R; Gadegbeku, Crystal Ann; Lash, James Phillip; Fink, Jeffrey Craig; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W; Xie, Dawei

    2015-11-15

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience other diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to assess whether retinopathy predicts future CVD events in a subgroup of the participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. In this ancillary investigation, 2,605 participants of the CRIC study were invited to participate, and nonmydriatic fundus photographs were obtained in 1,936 subjects. Using standard protocols, presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive, or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed at a central photograph reading center by trained graders masked to study participant's information. Patients with a self-reported history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. Incident CVD events were adjudicated using medical records. Kidney function measurements, traditional and nontraditional risk factors, for CVD were obtained. Presence and severity of retinopathy were associated with increased risk of development of any CVD in this population of CKD patients, and these associations persisted after adjustment for traditional risk factors for CVD. We also found a direct relation between increased venular diameter and risk of development of CVD; however, the relation was not statistically significant after adjustment for traditional risk factors. In conclusion, the presence of retinopathy was associated with future CVD events, suggesting that retinovascular pathology may be indicative of macrovascular disease even after adjustment for renal dysfunction and traditional CVD risk factors. Assessment of retinal morphology may be valuable in assessing risk of CVD in patients with CKD, both clinically and in research settings.

  20. Ancillary effects of selected acid deposition control policies

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, R.J.; Lyke, A.J.; Nesse, R.J.

    1986-08-01

    NAPAP is examining a number of potential ways to reduce the precursors (sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) to acid deposition. However, the policies to reduce acid deposition will have other physical, biological and economic effects unrelated to acid deposition. For example, control policies that reduce sulfur dioxide emissions may also increase visibility. The effects of an acid deposition policy that are unrelated to acid deposition are referred to as ''ancillary'' effects. This reserch identifies and characterizes the principle physical and economic ancillary effects associated with acid deposition control and mitigation policies. In this study the ancillary benefits associated with four specific acid deposition policy options were investigated. The four policy options investigated are: (1) flue gas desulfurization, (2) coal blending or switching, (3) reductions in automobile emissions of NO/sub x/, and (4) lake liming. Potential ancillary benefits of each option were identified and characterized. Particular attention was paid to the literature on economic valuation of potential ancillary effects.

  1. (abstract) Towards Ancillary Data Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Charles H.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's SPICE information system for archiving, distributing, and accessing spacecraft navigation, orientation, and other ancillary data is described. A proposal is made for the further evolution of this concept to an internationally useful standard, to be.

  2. The Relationship Between Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels and Nuclear Cataract in the Carotenoid Age-Related Eye Study (CAREDS), an Ancillary Study of the Women's Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Prethy; Millen, Amy E.; Meyers, Kristin J.; Liu, Zhe; Voland, Rickie; Sondel, Sheri; Tinker, Lesley; Wallace, Robert B.; Blodi, Barbara A.; Binkley, Neil; Sarto, Gloria; Robinson, Jennifer; LeBlanc, Erin; Mares, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the relationship between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels and nuclear cataract among participants of the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS), an ancillary study of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Observational Study (OS). Methods. Nuclear cataract was assessed from slit lamp photographs (2001–2004) taken 6 years after collecting serum analyzed for 25(OH)D levels at WHI baseline (1994–1998) in 1278 CAREDS participants age 50 to 79 years. Multivariate (age, iris color, smoking, pulse pressure) odds ratios (ORs) for nuclear cataract (nuclear opacities > level 4 or cataract extraction) by quintiles of serum 25(OH)D were estimated using logistic regression. Results. No significant association was observed between serum 25(OH)D and nuclear cataract among women of all ages (age-adjusted OR [95% confidence interval (CI)] 0.97 [0.65–1.45]). However, there was a significant age interaction (P for interaction = 0.04). There were no significant associations in the women 70 years or older. In women younger than 70 years, we observed an inverse association between serum 25(OH)D and nuclear cataract (multivariate adjusted ORs [95% CI] 0.54 [0.29–0.99] and 0.66 [0.36–1.20] for quintiles 4 and 5 vs. 1, respectively; P = 0.03). Further adjustment for 25(OH)D determinants (body mass index, vitamin D intake, and UVB exposure) attenuated this association. Conclusions. Serum 25(OH)D levels were unrelated to nuclear opacities in this study sample. However, exploratory analyses suggest a protective association in women younger than 70 years. Further investigations of the relationship between vitamin D and nuclear lens opacities are warranted. PMID:26132781

  3. Organochlorine compounds and trace elements in fish tissue and ancillary data for the Connecticut, Housatonic, and Thames river basins study unit, 1992-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coles, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Concentrations of organochlorine compounds and trace elements were assayed in fish tissue collected from the Connecticut, Housatonic, and Thames River Basins Study Unit, 1992-94. These data were collected to determine the occurrence and distribution of organochlorine compounds and trace elements in the study unit. Ancillary data included are land-use categories by percentage of the sampling-site basins and the size, gender, and age of the individual fish collected for this study. Concentrations of 28 organochlorine compounds in composited whole fish samples were measured at 32 sites, and concentrations of 22 trace elements in composited fish liver samples were measured at 14 of the 32 sites. Most frequently detected organochlorines were DDT related compounds at 31 sites, total PCBs at 28 sites, and chlordane related compounds at 25 sites. Concentrations of total PCBs in fish tissue were generally higher at the large river sites than at the smaller tributary sites. Concentrations of chlordane-related compounds in fish tissue were higher at sites from more urbanized basins than at sites from predominately agriculture and forested basins. Concentrations of the DDT related compounds were undifferentiated among sites comprising different land uses. Trace elements detected at all 14 sites included boron, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, and zinc. Trace elements detected at 10 or more sites included arsenic, mercury, silver, strontium, and vanadium. Antimony, beryllium, and uranium were not detected at any site.

  4. Forum on ancillary services: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Zadeh, K.N.; Meyer, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    These are proceedings for the Forum on Ancillary Services that was held on July 12 through 14, 1995 in La Jolla, California. The need for this event came from the almost coincident release of EPRI`s ``Transmission Services Costing Framework`` (EPRI TR-105121-Volume 1 and Volume 2, April 1995) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC`s) Notice Of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) addressing ancillary services (Docket No. RM95-8-000, March 29, 1995). This forum could then address the subject of ancillary services prior to the deadline for comments on that NOPR and show how EPRI`s Framework relates to and could be used in addressing them. The stated objectives were to present the regulatory, technical, and economic background for provision of unbundled transmission services; discuss the requirements, metering, supply options, costing, pricing, trading mechanisms, and accounting of the ancillary services; and discuss the implications of ancillary services provision for power system planning, operation, and analysis. This two and one-half day workshop addressed the following topics: Regulatory Backdrop Emerging Industry and Market Structures, Industry Restructuring in California, NERC`s View, IPP`s View, FERC`s View, EPRI`s Transmission Services Costing Framework, Components of Transmission Services and their Costs, Costing and Pricing Methods, Loss-Compensation Service, Load-Following Service, Reserve (System Protection) Service, Energy Imbalances Service, VAR/Voltage Control Service, Scheduling and Dispatching Service, Experience in England and Wales, Investment Planning, Operations Planning, Power System Analysis, and Research and Development. These proceedings contain summaries of what was presented and discussed in each area, plus summaries of any subsequent discussion from questions, answers, and comments.

  5. Options for pricing ancillary services in a deregulated power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamin, Hatim Yahya

    2001-07-01

    GENCOs in restructured systems are compensated for selling energy in the market. In a restructured market, a mechanism is required to entice participants in the market to provide ancillary services and to ensure adequate compensation that would guarantee its economic viability. The ISO controls the dispatch of generation, manages the reliability of the transmission grid, provides open access to the transmission, buys and provides ancillary services as required, coordinates day-ahead, hour-ahead schedules and performs real time balancing of load and generation, settles real time imbalances and ancillary services sales and purchases. The ISO, also, administers congestion management protocols for the transmission grid. Since the ISO does not own any generating units it must ensure that there is enough reserves for maintaining reliability according to FERC regulations, and sufficient unloaded generating capacity for balancing services in a real-time market. The ISO could meet these requirements by creating a competitive market for ancillary services, which are metered and remain unbundled to provide an accurate compensation for each supplier and cost to each consumer, In this study, we give an overview for restructuring and ancillary services in a restructured power marketplace. Also, we discuss the effect of GENCOs' actions in the competitive energy and ancillary service markets. In addition, we propose an auction market design for hedging ancillary service costs in California market. Furthermore, we show how to include the n-1 and voltage contingencies in security constrained unit commitment. Finally, we present two approaches for GENCOs' unit commitment in a restructured power market; one is based on game theory and the other is based on market price forecasting. In each of the two GENCOs' unit commitment approaches, we discuss the GENCOs' optimal bidding strategies in energy and ancillary service markets to maximize the GENCOs' profit.

  6. Trajectories of Preparation for Future Care among First-Degree Relatives of Alzheimer's Disease Patients: An Ancillary Study of ADAPT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Wingyun; Sorensen, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the longitudinal patterns of Preparation for Future Care (PFC), defined as Awareness, Avoidance, Gathering Information, Decision Making, and Concrete Plans, in first-degree relatives of people with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Design and Methods: Eight time points across 6.5 years from a subsample of adults aged 70 years…

  7. Outdoor-Adventure Education as an Ancillary Component in Rehabilitation Programs for the Hearing Impaired: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckner, John L.

    This study investigated the effectiveness of using an outdoor-adventure education program as a method of intervention for enhancing the self-concept of a group of hearing impaired individuals receiving services from the Department of Vocational Rehabilitation. Nine adults (6 male, 3 female) with hearing impairments participated in a 4-day…

  8. Association of Childhood Economic Hardship with Adult Height and Adult Adiposity among Hispanics/Latinos. The HCHS/SOL Socio-Cultural Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Isasi, Carmen R.; Jung, Molly; Parrinello, Christina M.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kim, Ryung; Crespo, Noe C.; Gonzalez, Patricia; Gouskova, Natalia A.; Penedo, Frank J.; Perreira, Krista M.; Perrino, Tatiana; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Van Horn, Linda; Gallo, Linda C.

    2016-01-01

    The study examined the association of childhood and current economic hardship with anthropometric indices in Hispanic/Latino adults, using data from the HCHS/SOL Socio-cultural ancillary study (N = 5,084), a community-based study of Hispanic/Latinos living in four urban areas (Bronx, NY, Chicago, IL, Miami, FL, and San Diego, CA). Childhood economic hardship was defined as having experienced a period of time when one’s family had trouble paying for basic needs (e.g., food, housing), and when this economic hardship occurred: between 0–12, 13–18 years old, or throughout both of those times. Current economic hardship was defined as experiencing trouble paying for basic needs during the past 12 months. Anthropometry included height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and percentage body fat (%BF). Complex survey linear regression models were used to test the associations of childhood economic hardship with adult anthropometric indices, adjusting for potential confounders (e.g., age, sex, Hispanic background). Childhood economic hardship varied by Hispanic background, place of birth, and adult socio-economic status. Childhood economic hardship during both periods, childhood and adolescence, was associated with shorter height. Childhood economic hardship was associated with greater adiposity among US born individuals only. Current economic hardship was significantly associated with all three measures of adiposity (BMI, WC, %BF). These findings suggest that previous periods of childhood economic hardship appear to influence adult height more than adiposity, whereas current economic hardship may be a better determinant of adult adiposity in Hispanics. PMID:26919283

  9. Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and cardiovascular risk factor profile in youth with type 1 diabetes: Application of measurement error methodology in the SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Liese, Angela D.; Crandell, Jamie L.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kipnis, Victor; Bell, Ronny; Couch, Sarah C.; Dabelea, Dana; Crume, Tessa L.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study aims to investigate the role of dietary intake on the development of long-term complications of type 1diabetes in youth and capitalize on measurement error (ME) adjustment methodology. Research Design and Methods Using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) method for episodically-consumed foods, we evaluated the relationship of sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake and cardiovascular risk factor profile, applying ME adjustment. The calibration sample included 166 youth with two FFQs and three 24-hour dietary recalls within one month. The full sample included 2,286 youth with type 1 diabetes. Results SSB intake was significantly associated with higher triglycerides, total and LDL-cholesterol, adjusted for energy, age, diabetes duration, race/ethnicity, gender, education. The estimated effect size was larger (model coefficients increased approximately threefold) after application of the NCI method than without ME adjustment. Compared to individuals consuming one serving of SSB every two weeks, those who consumed one serving every two days had 3.7 mg/dL higher triglycerides, 4.0 mg/dL higher total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, adjusted for ME and covariates. SSB intake was not associated with measures of adiposity and blood pressure. Conclusions Our findings suggest that SSB intake is significantly related to increased lipid levels in youth with type 1diabetes and that estimates of the effect size of SSB on lipid levels are severely attenuated in the presence of measurement error. Future studies in youth with diabetes should consider a design that will allow for the adjustment for measurement error when studying the influence of diet on health status. PMID:26177613

  10. Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and cardiovascular risk factor profile in youth with type 1 diabetes: application of measurement error methodology in the SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study.

    PubMed

    Liese, Angela D; Crandell, Jamie L; Tooze, Janet A; Kipnis, Victor; Bell, Ronny; Couch, Sarah C; Dabelea, Dana; Crume, Tessa L; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2015-08-14

    The SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study aims to investigate the role of dietary intake on the development of long-term complications of type 1 diabetes in youth, and capitalise on measurement error (ME) adjustment methodology. Using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) method for episodically consumed foods, we evaluated the relationship between sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake and cardiovascular risk factor profile, with the application of ME adjustment methodology. The calibration sample included 166 youth with two FFQ and three 24 h dietary recall data within 1 month. The full sample included 2286 youth with type 1 diabetes. SSB intake was significantly associated with higher TAG, total and LDL-cholesterol concentrations, after adjusting for energy, age, diabetes duration, race/ethnicity, sex and education. The estimated effect size was larger (model coefficients increased approximately 3-fold) after the application of the NCI method than without adjustment for ME. Compared with individuals consuming one serving of SSB every 2 weeks, those who consumed one serving of SSB every 2 d had 3.7 mg/dl (0.04 mmol/l) higher TAG concentrations and 4.0 mg/dl (0.10 mmol/l) higher total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations, after adjusting for ME and covariates. SSB intake was not associated with measures of adiposity and blood pressure. Our findings suggest that SSB intake is significantly related to increased lipid levels in youth with type 1 diabetes, and that estimates of the effect size of SSB on lipid levels are severely attenuated in the presence of ME. Future studies in youth with diabetes should consider a design that will allow for the adjustment for ME when studying the influence of diet on health status.

  11. Association of Childhood Economic Hardship with Adult Height and Adult Adiposity among Hispanics/Latinos. The HCHS/SOL Socio-Cultural Ancillary Study.

    PubMed

    Isasi, Carmen R; Jung, Molly; Parrinello, Christina M; Kaplan, Robert C; Kim, Ryung; Crespo, Noe C; Gonzalez, Patricia; Gouskova, Natalia A; Penedo, Frank J; Perreira, Krista M; Perrino, Tatiana; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Van Horn, Linda; Gallo, Linda C

    2016-01-01

    The study examined the association of childhood and current economic hardship with anthropometric indices in Hispanic/Latino adults, using data from the HCHS/SOL Socio-cultural ancillary study (N = 5,084), a community-based study of Hispanic/Latinos living in four urban areas (Bronx, NY, Chicago, IL, Miami, FL, and San Diego, CA). Childhood economic hardship was defined as having experienced a period of time when one's family had trouble paying for basic needs (e.g., food, housing), and when this economic hardship occurred: between 0-12, 13-18 years old, or throughout both of those times. Current economic hardship was defined as experiencing trouble paying for basic needs during the past 12 months. Anthropometry included height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and percentage body fat (%BF). Complex survey linear regression models were used to test the associations of childhood economic hardship with adult anthropometric indices, adjusting for potential confounders (e.g., age, sex, Hispanic background). Childhood economic hardship varied by Hispanic background, place of birth, and adult socio-economic status. Childhood economic hardship during both periods, childhood and adolescence, was associated with shorter height. Childhood economic hardship was associated with greater adiposity among US born individuals only. Current economic hardship was significantly associated with all three measures of adiposity (BMI, WC, %BF). These findings suggest that previous periods of childhood economic hardship appear to influence adult height more than adiposity, whereas current economic hardship may be a better determinant of adult adiposity in Hispanics. PMID:26919283

  12. Association of Childhood Economic Hardship with Adult Height and Adult Adiposity among Hispanics/Latinos. The HCHS/SOL Socio-Cultural Ancillary Study.

    PubMed

    Isasi, Carmen R; Jung, Molly; Parrinello, Christina M; Kaplan, Robert C; Kim, Ryung; Crespo, Noe C; Gonzalez, Patricia; Gouskova, Natalia A; Penedo, Frank J; Perreira, Krista M; Perrino, Tatiana; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Van Horn, Linda; Gallo, Linda C

    2016-01-01

    The study examined the association of childhood and current economic hardship with anthropometric indices in Hispanic/Latino adults, using data from the HCHS/SOL Socio-cultural ancillary study (N = 5,084), a community-based study of Hispanic/Latinos living in four urban areas (Bronx, NY, Chicago, IL, Miami, FL, and San Diego, CA). Childhood economic hardship was defined as having experienced a period of time when one's family had trouble paying for basic needs (e.g., food, housing), and when this economic hardship occurred: between 0-12, 13-18 years old, or throughout both of those times. Current economic hardship was defined as experiencing trouble paying for basic needs during the past 12 months. Anthropometry included height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and percentage body fat (%BF). Complex survey linear regression models were used to test the associations of childhood economic hardship with adult anthropometric indices, adjusting for potential confounders (e.g., age, sex, Hispanic background). Childhood economic hardship varied by Hispanic background, place of birth, and adult socio-economic status. Childhood economic hardship during both periods, childhood and adolescence, was associated with shorter height. Childhood economic hardship was associated with greater adiposity among US born individuals only. Current economic hardship was significantly associated with all three measures of adiposity (BMI, WC, %BF). These findings suggest that previous periods of childhood economic hardship appear to influence adult height more than adiposity, whereas current economic hardship may be a better determinant of adult adiposity in Hispanics.

  13. Study of Droplet Activation in Thin Clouds Using Ground-based Raman Lidar and Ancillary Remote Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosoldi, Marco; Madonna, Fabio; Gumà Claramunt, Pilar; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    Studies on global climate change show that the effects of aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) on the Earth's radiation balance and climate, also known as indirect aerosol effects, are the most uncertain among all the effects involving the atmospheric constituents and processes (Stocker et al., IPCC, 2013). Droplet activation is the most important and challenging process in the understanding of ACI. It represents the direct microphysical link between aerosols and clouds and it is probably the largest source of uncertainty in estimating indirect aerosol effects. An accurate estimation of aerosol-clouds microphysical and optical properties in proximity and within the cloud boundaries represents a good frame for the study of droplet activation. This can be obtained by using ground-based profiling remote sensing techniques. In this work, a methodology for the experimental investigation of droplet activation, based on ground-based multi-wavelength Raman lidar and Doppler radar technique, is presented. The study is focused on the observation of thin liquid water clouds, which are low or midlevel super-cooled clouds characterized by a liquid water path (LWP) lower than about 100 gm-2(Turner et al., 2007). These clouds are often optically thin, which means that ground-based Raman lidar allows the detection of the cloud top and of the cloud structure above. Broken clouds are primarily inspected to take advantage of their discontinuous structure using ground based remote sensing. Observations are performed simultaneously with multi-wavelength Raman lidars, a cloud Doppler radar and a microwave radiometer at CIAO (CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory: www.ciao.imaa.cnr.it), in Potenza, Southern Italy (40.60N, 15.72E, 760 m a.s.l.). A statistical study of the variability of optical properties and humidity in the transition from cloudy regions to cloud-free regions surrounding the clouds leads to the identification of threshold values for the optical properties, enabling the

  14. Adult Wilms' tumor. Intraoperative cytology and ancillary studies performed in a case as an adjunct to the histologic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Berkley, C; Stanley, M W; Wolpert, J; Rainwater, L M; Smith, C

    1990-01-01

    A case of blastema-predominant Wilms' tumor in a 64-year-old woman is reported. Intraoperative cytology of a renal mass was used to rule out malignant lymphoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma. Light and electron microscopy, immunocytochemical staining and flow cytometry (FCM) were also performed. Immunoperoxidase studies of smears showed positive staining for vimentin and negative staining for cytokeratins and epithelial membrane antigen. FCM DNA analysis of paraffin-embedded tissue showed no aneuploid peak. Frozen section interpretation of such tumors as seen in this case may be difficult, requiring distinction among several small-blue-cell neoplasms, including Wilms' tumor, neuroendocrine carcinoma and malignant lymphoma; intraoperative cytology can provide a valuable adjunct to frozen section diagnosis.

  15. Donor Age and Corneal Endothelial Cell Loss 5 Years after Successful Corneal Transplantation: Specular Microscopy Ancillary Study Results

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether endothelial cell loss 5 years after successful corneal transplantation is related to the age of the donor. Design Multicenter, prospective, double-masked clinical trial. Participants Three hundred forty-seven subjects participating in the Cornea Donor Study who had not experienced graft failure 5 years after corneal transplantation for a moderate-risk condition (principally Fuchs’ dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema). Testing Specular microscopic images of donor corneas obtained before surgery and postoperatively at 6 months, 12 months, and then annually through 5 years were submitted to a central reading center to measure endothelial cell density (ECD). Main Outcome Measure Endothelial cell density at 5 years. Results At 5 years, there was a substantial decrease in ECD from baseline for all donor ages. Subjects who received a cornea from a donor 12 to 65 years old experienced a median cell loss of 69% in the study eye, resulting in a 5-year median ECD of 824 cells/mm2 (interquartile range, 613–1342), whereas subjects who received a cornea from a donor 66 to 75 years old experienced a cell loss of 75%, resulting in a median 5-year ECD of 654 cells/mm2 (interquartile range, 538–986) (P [adjusted for baseline ECD] = 0.04). Statistically, there was a weak negative association between ECD and donor age analyzed as a continuous variable (r [adjusted for baseline ECD] = −0.19; 95% confidence interval, −0.29 to −0.08). Conclusions Endothelial cell loss is substantial in the 5 years after corneal transplantation. There is a slight association between cell loss and donor age. This finding emphasizes the importance of longer-term follow-up of this cohort to determine if this relationship affects graft survival. PMID:18387408

  16. Timing of Complementary Food Introduction and Age at Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes: the SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary STUDY (SNAS)

    PubMed Central

    Crume, Tessa L.; Crandell, Jamie; Norris, Jill M.; Dabelea, Dana; Fangman, Mary T.; Pettitt, David J.; Dolan, Lawrence; Rodriguez, Beatriz L.; O'Connor, Rebecca; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    The association between timing of complementary food introduction and age at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was investigated among 1077 children in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study. Age at diagnosis was 5-month earlier for children introduced to sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) in the first 12 months of life compared to those who were not (9.0 ± 0.2 vs. 9.5 ± 0.1; p=0.02), independent of HLA-risk status. Analyses stratified by HLA-risk status found that children with a high risk HLA genotype had an earlier age at diagnosis if they were introduced to fruit juice in the first year of life (mean age of diagnosis=9.3 ± 0.1, 9.1 ± 0.1 and 9.6 ± 0.2 for introduction at ≤ 6 months, between 7 and 11 months, and ≤12 months, respectively; p=0.04). Introduction of SSB in the first year of life may accelerate onset of type 1 diabetes independent of HLA-risk status. PMID:25117987

  17. Longitudinal associations of nutritional factors with glycated hemoglobin in youth with type 1 diabetes: the SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study123

    PubMed Central

    Crandell, Jamie L; Jaacks, Lindsay M; Couch, Sarah C; Lawrence, Jean M; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Improved glycated hemoglobin (Hb A1c) delays the progression of microvascular and macrovascular complications in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D). We previously showed that higher baseline intakes of n–3 (ω-3) fatty acids and leucine are associated with preserved β cell function 2 y later in youth with T1D. Objective: In the current study, we extend this work to explore the longitudinal associations of nutritional factors with Hb A1c in youth with T1D. Design: We included 908 T1D youth with baseline and follow-up Hb A1c measurements. Nutritional factors assessed at baseline were as follows: breastfeeding status and timing of complimentary food introduction; intakes of leucine, carbohydrates, protein, fat, and fiber estimated from a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ); and plasma biomarkers for vitamins D and E, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid. We fit linear regression models adjusted for baseline Hb A1c, sociodemographic variables, diabetes-related variables, time between baseline and follow-up visits, saturated fat, physical activity, and for FFQ-derived nutrients, total calories. The vitamin D model was further adjusted for season and body mass index z score. Results: The mean ± SD age and diabetes duration at baseline was 10.8 ± 3.9 y and 10.1 ± 5.8 mo, respectively. A total of 9.3% of participants had poor Hb A1c (value ≥9.5%) at baseline, which increased to 18.3% during follow-up (P < 0.0001). Intakes of EPA (β = −0.045, P = 0.046), leucine (β = −0.031, P = 0.0004), and protein (β = −0.003, P = 0.0002) were significantly negatively associated with follow-up Hb A1c after adjustment for confounders. Intake of carbohydrates was significantly positively (β = 0.001, P = 0.003) associated with follow-up Hb A1c after adjustment for confounders. Conclusions: Several nutritional factors may be associated with Hb A1c during early stages of disease progression in youth recently diagnosed with T1D. In addition to

  18. 78 FR 41941 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; PAR12-265 Ancillary Studies in Kidney Disease and Complications... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special, Emphasis Panel; CRIC Ancillary Studies... Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; PAR 12-265: NIDDK Ancillary R01 Applications....

  19. DFT/TDDFT study on the electronic structures and optoelectronic properties of several red-emitting osmium(II) complexes with different P^P ancillary ligands.

    PubMed

    Su, Juanjuan; Shi, Lili; Sun, Xiaobo; Guan, Wei; Wu, Zhijian

    2011-11-14

    The ground and excited state geometries of several red-emitting phosphors (N^N)(2)Os(P^P) [where N^N = 5-(1-isoquinolyl)-1,2,4-triazoles, P^P = bis(dimethylphosphino)methylene(dmpm) (1); P^P = cis-1,2-bis-(dimethylphosphino)ethene(dmpe) (2); P^P = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)benzene(dmpb) (3); P^P = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)naphthalene(dmpn) (4); P^P = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)-4-cyano-benzene(dmpcb) (5)] have been investigated by using the density functional theory (DFT) methods. The calculated results indicate that, for the studied complexes, the electron-transporting performance is better than the hole-transporting performance. The alteration of cis-P^P ancillary ligands with different conjugation lengths and substituents has an impact on the optoelectronic properties of these complexes, especially the electron-withdrawing group -CN in 5. The calculated energy gaps are nearly the same for complexes 1 to 4 (3.34 eV), while for 5, the HOMO and LUMO energies are lowered and the energy gap increases (3.42 eV). The absorption of 1 is red shifted, while that of 5 is blue shifted compared with the absorptions of 2, 3, and 4, which have similar absorptions. Complexes 2, 3, and 4 have almost identical emission wavelength 699 nm, while 1 (715 nm) and 5 (735 nm) are red shifted. The calculated electron affinities and reorganization energies indicate that complex 5 is the easiest for electron injection and has the best electron-transporting performance. PMID:21681328

  20. Ancillary Services Provided from DER

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.B.

    2005-12-21

    Distributed energy resources (DER) are quickly making their way to industry primarily as backup generation. They are effective at starting and then producing full-load power within a few seconds. The distribution system is aging and transmission system development has not kept up with the growth in load and generation. The nation's transmission system is stressed with heavy power flows over long distances, and many areas are experiencing problems in providing the power quality needed to satisfy customers. Thus, a new market for DER is beginning to emerge. DER can alleviate the burden on the distribution system by providing ancillary services while providing a cost adjustment for the DER owner. This report describes 10 types of ancillary services that distributed generation (DG) can provide to the distribution system. Of these 10 services the feasibility, control strategy, effectiveness, and cost benefits are all analyzed as in the context of a future utility-power market. In this market, services will be provided at a local level that will benefit the customer, the distribution utility, and the transmission company.

  1. Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles; Kintner-Meyer, Michael

    2007-05-01

    In this study, we examine the arrangements for and experiences of end-use loads providing ancillary services (AS) in five electricity markets: Australia, the United Kingdom (UK), the Nordic market, and the ERCOT and PJM markets in the United States. Our objective in undertaking this review of international experience was to identify specific approaches or market designs that have enabled customer loads to effectively deliver various ancillary services (AS) products. We hope that this report will contribute to the ongoing discussion in the U.S. and elsewhere regarding what institutional and technical developments are needed to ensure that customer loads can meaningfully participate in all wholesale electricity markets.

  2. A Space Analysis of Physical Education Activity and Ancillary Areas in Big Ten Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strand, Bradford N.

    This study compared both physical education "Type A" (activity) space and ancillary space at the Big Ten Universities with the physical education space guidelines established in 1967 by the National Facilities Conference and the assigned guidelines for the seven ancillary space types. The data were obtained through the use of a questionnaire,…

  3. The Role of Stress in Understanding Differences in Sedentary Behavior in Hispanic/Latino Adults: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez, Elizabeth; Strizich, Garrett; Gallo, Linda; Marshall, Simon J.; Merchant, Gina C.; Murillo, Rosenda; Penedo, Frank J.; Salazar, Christian; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Shaw, Benjamin A.; Isasi, Carmen R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic stress and/or lifetime traumatic stress can create a self-reinforcing cycle of unhealthy behaviors, such as overeating and sedentary behavior, that can lead to further increases in stress. This study examined the relationship between stress and sedentary behavior in a sample of Hispanic/Latino adults (N = 4244) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Methods Stress was measured as the number of ongoing difficulties lasting 6 months or more and as lifetime exposure to traumatic events. Sedentary behavior was measured by self-report and with accelerometer. Multivariable regression models examined associations of stress measures with time spent in sedentary behaviors adjusting by potential confounders. Results Those who reported more than one chronic stressor spent, on average, 8 to 10 additional minutes per day in objectively measured sedentary activities (P < .05), whereas those with more than one lifetime traumatic stressor spent (after we adjusted for confounders) 10 to 14 additional minutes in sedentary activities (P < .01) compared with those who did not report any stressors. Statistical interactions between the 2 stress measures and age or sex were not significant. Conclusion Interventions aimed at reducing sedentary behaviors might consider incorporating stress reduction into their approaches. PMID:26181079

  4. Adverse selection and moral hazard in the provision of clinical trial ancillary care.

    PubMed

    Richards, Michael R; Helmchen, Lorens A

    2013-04-01

    As more and more clinical trials are conducted in developing countries, concerns arise about non-trial medical care available to study participants. Recent work argues for ancillary care - medical care not part of the clinical trial per se - to be formally incorporated into these studies. Although the provision of ancillary care is often justified on ethical grounds, a number of crucial implementation issues remain unresolved, including its scope, duration and financing. Drawing on lessons from health insurance benefit design, we highlight two overlooked challenges for ancillary care adoption - adverse selection and moral hazard - and offer recommendations that could attenuate their consequences. Specifically, adverse selection and moral hazard could be reduced by offering a choice between ancillary medical care and monetary compensation or rewarding low ancillary care utilization. Alternatively, researchers' financial risk due to ancillary care could be shifted to a third-party insurer. Recognizing participants' behavioral responses to prospective offers of ancillary medical care would allow funders and research teams to forecast the demand for ancillary care more accurately and to prepare for its provision more adequately. PMID:22464397

  5. Comparison of Self-Reported Sleep Duration With Actigraphy: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sueño Ancillary Study.

    PubMed

    Cespedes, Elizabeth M; Hu, Frank B; Redline, Susan; Rosner, Bernard; Alcantara, Carmela; Cai, Jianwen; Hall, Martica H; Loredo, Jose S; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Ramos, Alberto R; Reid, Kathryn J; Shah, Neomi A; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Zee, Phyllis C; Wang, Rui; Patel, Sanjay R

    2016-03-15

    Most studies of sleep and health outcomes rely on self-reported sleep duration, although correlation with objective measures is poor. In this study, we defined sociodemographic and sleep characteristics associated with misreporting and assessed whether accounting for these factors better explains variation in objective sleep duration among 2,086 participants in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos who completed more than 5 nights of wrist actigraphy and reported habitual bed/wake times from 2010 to 2013. Using linear regression, we examined self-report as a predictor of actigraphy-assessed sleep duration. Mean amount of time spent asleep was 7.85 (standard deviation, 1.12) hours by self-report and 6.74 (standard deviation, 1.02) hours by actigraphy; correlation between them was 0.43. For each additional hour of self-reported sleep, actigraphy time spent asleep increased by 20 minutes (95% confidence interval: 19, 22). Correlations between self-reported and actigraphy-assessed time spent asleep were lower with male sex, younger age, sleep efficiency <85%, and night-to-night variability in sleep duration ≥1.5 hours. Adding sociodemographic and sleep factors to self-reports increased the proportion of variance explained in actigraphy-assessed sleep slightly (18%-32%). In this large validation study including Hispanics/Latinos, we demonstrated a moderate correlation between self-reported and actigraphy-assessed time spent asleep. The performance of self-reports varied by demographic and sleep measures but not by Hispanic subgroup. PMID:26940117

  6. Comparison of Self-Reported Sleep Duration With Actigraphy: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sueño Ancillary Study.

    PubMed

    Cespedes, Elizabeth M; Hu, Frank B; Redline, Susan; Rosner, Bernard; Alcantara, Carmela; Cai, Jianwen; Hall, Martica H; Loredo, Jose S; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Ramos, Alberto R; Reid, Kathryn J; Shah, Neomi A; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Zee, Phyllis C; Wang, Rui; Patel, Sanjay R

    2016-03-15

    Most studies of sleep and health outcomes rely on self-reported sleep duration, although correlation with objective measures is poor. In this study, we defined sociodemographic and sleep characteristics associated with misreporting and assessed whether accounting for these factors better explains variation in objective sleep duration among 2,086 participants in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos who completed more than 5 nights of wrist actigraphy and reported habitual bed/wake times from 2010 to 2013. Using linear regression, we examined self-report as a predictor of actigraphy-assessed sleep duration. Mean amount of time spent asleep was 7.85 (standard deviation, 1.12) hours by self-report and 6.74 (standard deviation, 1.02) hours by actigraphy; correlation between them was 0.43. For each additional hour of self-reported sleep, actigraphy time spent asleep increased by 20 minutes (95% confidence interval: 19, 22). Correlations between self-reported and actigraphy-assessed time spent asleep were lower with male sex, younger age, sleep efficiency <85%, and night-to-night variability in sleep duration ≥1.5 hours. Adding sociodemographic and sleep factors to self-reports increased the proportion of variance explained in actigraphy-assessed sleep slightly (18%-32%). In this large validation study including Hispanics/Latinos, we demonstrated a moderate correlation between self-reported and actigraphy-assessed time spent asleep. The performance of self-reports varied by demographic and sleep measures but not by Hispanic subgroup.

  7. Prospects for ancillary treatment of sinusitis in the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, R S

    1992-09-01

    The basis for ancillary therapy of sinusitis derives from anecdotal accounts and personal beliefs rather than definitive data. The recent appreciation that noninfectious inflammatory causes predispose to infectious sinusitis has stimulated renewed interest in developing and documenting efficacious ancillary therapies that could supplement or abrogate antibiotic use. Ancillary therapies of sinusitis could be directed toward (1) preventing viral upper respiratory tract infections (immunizations, virucidal-impregnated tissues, and proper hand-washing techniques); (2) blocking rhinoviral replication and suppressing mediator release with supraphysiologic nasal hyperthermia, although contradictory studies exist with regard to efficacy; (3) promoting sinus and nasal ventilation with both topical and oral alpha-agonists and exercise; (4) improving mucociliary clearance by reducing mucus viscosity and elasticity with saline solution irrigation, mucoregulators (N-acetylcysteine, S-carboxymethylcysteine, and iodinated glycerol), and ciliary stimulants (adenosine triphosphate); and (5) suppressing/modulating cellular inflammation (eosinophilic, basophilic, and neutrophilic) with topical nasal corticosteroid sprays and mediator antagonists. Recommendations are forwarded for future investigations of promising nonantibiotic ancillary therapies of chronic sinusitis.

  8. Model-Based Estimation of Forest Canopy Height in Red and Austrian Pine Stands Using Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and Ancillary Data: a Proof-of-Concept Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brown Jr., C G; Sarabandi, K; Pierce, L E

    2007-04-06

    In this paper, accurate tree stand height retrieval is demonstrated using C-band Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) height and ancillary data. The tree height retrieval algorithm is based on modeling uniform tree stands with a single layer of randomly oriented vegetation particles. For such scattering media, the scattering phase center height, as measured by SRTM, is a function of tree height, incidence angle, and the extinction coefficient of the medium. The extinction coefficient for uniform tree stands is calculated as a function of tree height and density using allometric equations and a fractal tree model. The accuracy of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated using SRTM and TOPSAR data for 15 red pine and Austrian pine stands (TOPSAR is an airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar). The algorithm yields root-mean-square (rms) errors of 2.5-3.6 m, which is a substantial improvement over the 6.8-8.3-m rms errors from the raw SRTM minus National Elevation Dataset Heights.

  9. Recipients in need of ancillary services and their receipt of HIV medical care in California.

    PubMed

    Chan, D; Absher, D; Sabatier, S

    2002-08-01

    For many individuals with access to quality medical care, HIV disease is no longer a critical short term illness but a chronic condition giving rise to more clients requiring ongoing medical care. Programs funded by the federal Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency Act not only provide essential medical care for these individuals but also facilitate access to medical care services. These programmes fund services, including case management, transportation, and translation assistance, that feature ongoing assistance and enable individuals to remain in the health care system. Because of the importance of maintaining the strict drug regimen, retention in care is also an important part of the overall HIV care component. This study analyzed the relationship of ancillary services and a federal health programme client's receipt of medical care and retention in the health care system. We defined a cohort in need of ancillary services in part by a questionnaire designed to identify factors relating to need. These factors included education, language, and substance use. By merging client level data files we were able to identify medical service utilization trends among the individuals in the cohort who received a high number of ancillary services (more than 11 ancillary service visits in the two-year study period, n = 138) and those who received few services (fewer than six ancillary service visits in the two-year study period, n = 132). Results suggest that the receipt of ancillary services is associated with receipt of and retention in primary medical care. We found that for federal health programme clients in need of ancillary services, a positive relationship existed between their receipt of ancillary services and their access to primary medical care (p

  10. 18 CFR 35.40 - Ancillary services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....40 Section 35.40 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT FILING OF RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based Rates § 35.40...

  11. 18 CFR 35.40 - Ancillary services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....40 Section 35.40 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT FILING OF RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based Rates § 35.40...

  12. Optimal generator bidding strategies for power and ancillary services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morinec, Allen G.

    As the electric power industry transitions to a deregulated market, power transactions are made upon price rather than cost. Generator companies are interested in maximizing their profits rather than overall system efficiency. A method to equitably compensate generation providers for real power, and ancillary services such as reactive power and spinning reserve, will ensure a competitive market with an adequate number of suppliers. Optimizing the generation product mix during bidding is necessary to maximize a generator company's profits. The objective of this research work is to determine and formulate appropriate optimal bidding strategies for a generation company in both the energy and ancillary services markets. These strategies should incorporate the capability curves of their generators as constraints to define the optimal product mix and price offered in the day-ahead and real time spot markets. In order to achieve such a goal, a two-player model was composed to simulate market auctions for power generation. A dynamic game methodology was developed to identify Nash Equilibria and Mixed-Strategy Nash Equilibria solutions as optimal generation bidding strategies for two-player non-cooperative variable-sum matrix games with incomplete information. These games integrated the generation product mix of real power, reactive power, and spinning reserve with the generators's capability curves as constraints. The research includes simulations of market auctions, where strategies were tested for generators with different unit constraints, costs, types of competitors, strategies, and demand levels. Studies on the capability of large hydrogen cooled synchronous generators were utilized to derive useful equations that define the exact shape of the capability curve from the intersections of the arcs defined by the centers and radial vectors of the rotor, stator, and steady-state stability limits. The available reactive reserve and spinning reserve were calculated given a

  13. Ocular screening adherence across Hispanic/Latino heritage groups with diabetes: results from the Ocular SOL ancillary to the Miami site of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)

    PubMed Central

    Tannenbaum, Stacey L; McClure, Laura A; Zheng, D Diane; Lam, Byron L; Arheart, Kristopher L; Joslin, Charlotte E; Talavera, Gregory A; Lee, David J

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence and correlates of ocular screening adherence among select Hispanics/Latinos living with diabetes. Research design and methods Data were obtained through an ancillary study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (Miami site). Participants included Hispanics/Latinos aged 40+ years who underwent a baseline examination/risk factor assessment (2008–2011) and then completed a survey on vision health/knowledge (conducted October 2011–September 2013; sample n=1235; diabetic subsample=264). The dependent variable was having a dilated eye examination within the past 12 months. Covariate candidate selection for entry into sequential multivariable logistic regression models was guided by Anderson's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use and the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations. Results Participants aged 65+ were more likely to have dilated eye examinations (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.22 to 5.60) compared with those aged 40–54 years. Participants less likely to have dilated examinations had a high school degree or general educational development (GED) (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.96, compared to no degree) and those currently uninsured or never insured ((OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.83) and (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.51)) compared to those currently insured. Participants who heard or saw something about eye health from two or more sources (eg, media outlets, doctor's office, relatives/friends) compared to those who reported no sources in the past 12 months were more likely to have a dilated eye examination (OR 2.82, 95% CI 1.26 to 6.28). Conclusions Lack of health insurance is strongly associated with low screening uptake in Hispanics/Latinos living with diabetes. Health promotion strategies stressing the importance of annual dilated eye examinations and increasing sources of information on eye health are other potential strategies to increase screening uptake in Hispanics

  14. Creating competitive markets for ancillary services

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

    1997-10-01

    This report describes the structure of, and results from, a spreadsheet model. The model simulates markets for seven services: losses, regulation, spinning reserve, supplemental reserve,load following, energy imbalance, and voltage support. For completeness, the model also calculates costs for system control, although this service will continue to be provided solely the the system operator under cost-based prices. This computer model demonstrated the likely complexity of markets for energy and ancillary services. This complexity arises because these markets are highly interdependent. Because these markets are interactive, the costs and therefore the prices of these services will vary considerably as functions of system load and the current spot price of energy. The price of ancillary services in aggregate is highly correlated with the price of energy. A base-case utility was developed for use with the model and included in the report.

  15. A femtosecond study of the anomaly in electron injection for dye-sensitized solar cells: the influence of isomerization employing Ru(II) sensitizers with anthracene and phenanthrene ancillary ligands.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Hammad; Younts, Robert; Ogbose, Louis; Gautam, Bhoj; Gundogdu, Kenan; El-Shafei, Ahmed

    2015-01-28

    In this study, an intriguing difference caused by structural isomerization based on anthracene and phenanthrene stilbazole type ancillary ligands in Ru(ii) sensitizers for dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs) has been investigated using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Both anthracene and phenanthrene based sensitizers HD-7 and HD-8, respectively, resulted in a similar extinction coefficient, photophysical and thermodynamic free energy of electron injection and dye regeneration as measured by UV-Vis, excited state lifetime and cyclic voltammetry measurements, respectively. However, TiO2 adsorbed HD-7 resulted in up to 45% less photocurrent density than HD-8 although photovoltage was similar owing to comparable thermodynamic characteristics. It was obvious from the measurement of incident photon to current conversion efficiency (IPCE) that excited electrons in HD-7 are prone to internal energy loss before injection into the TiO2 conduction band. Analysis of photo-induced spectral features measured by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy showed that excited electrons in HD-7 are prone to ISC (intersystem crossing) much more than HD-8 and those triplet electrons are not injected into TiO2 efficiently. Interestingly, from impedance measurements, HD-7 showed higher recombination resistance than HD-8 and N719, but a shorter lifetime for electrons injected into the TiO2 conduction band.

  16. SKIN WRINKLES AND RIGIDITY IN EARLY POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN VARY BY RACE/ETHNICITY: BASELINE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SKIN ANCILLARY STUDY OF THE KEEPS TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Erin; Pal, Lubna; Altun, Tugba; Madankumar, Rajeevi; Freeman, Ruth; Amin, Hussein; Harman, Mitch; Santoro, Nanette; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To characterize skin wrinkles and rigidity in recently menopausal women. Design Baseline assessment of participants prior to randomization to study drug. Setting Multicenter trial, university medical centers. Patients Recently menopausal participants enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS). Interventions Skin wrinkles were assessed at 11 locations on the face and neck using the Lemperle wrinkle scale. Skin rigidity was assessed at the forehead and cheek using a durometer. Outcome Skin wrinkles and rigidity were compared among race/ethnic groups. Skin wrinkles and rigidity were correlated with age, time since menopause, weight, and BMI. Results In early menopausal women, wrinkles, but not skin rigidity, vary significantly among races (p=0.0003), where Black women have the lowest wrinkle scores. In White women, chronological age was significantly correlated with worsening skin wrinkles, but not with rigidity(p<0.001). Skin rigidity correlated with increasing length of time since menopause, however only in the White subgroup (p<0.01). In the combined study group, increasing weight was associated with less skin wrinkling (p<0.05). Conclusions Skin characteristics of recently menopausal women are not well studied. Ethnic differences in skin characteristics are widely accepted, but poorly described. In recently menopausal women not using hormone therapy (HT), significant racial differences in skin wrinkling and rigidity exist. Continued study of the KEEPS population will provide evidence of the effects of HT on the skin aging process in early menopausal women. PMID:20971461

  17. Vitamin D in youth with Type 1 diabetes: prevalence of insufficiency and association with insulin resistance in the SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    The, N. S.; Crandell, J. L.; Lawrence, J. M.; King, I. B.; Dabelea, D.; Marcovina, S. M.; D’Agostino, R. B.; Norris, J. M.; Pihoker, C.; Mayer-Davis, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To determine the prevalence of plasma vitamin D insufficiency in individuals with Type 1 diabetes and to determine the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of plasma vitamin D with insulin resistance. Methods Participants from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study [n = 1426; mean age 11.2 years (sd 3.9)] had physician-diagnosed Type 1 diabetes [diabetes duration mean 10.2 months (sd 6.5)] with data available at baseline and follow-up (approximately 12 and 24 months after baseline). Insulin resistance was estimated using a validated equation. Cross-sectional and longitudinal multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the association of plasma vitamin D with insulin resistance, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Forty-nine per cent of individuals had plasma vitamin D < 50 nmol/l and 26% were insulin resistant. In cross-sectional multivariate analyses, participants who had higher plasma vitamin D (65 nmol/l) had lower odds of prevalent insulin resistance than participants with lower plasma vitamin D (25 nmol/l) (odds ratio 0.70, 95% CI 0.57–0.85). This association was attenuated after additional adjustment for BMI z-score, which could be a confounder or a mediator (odds ratio 0.81, 95% CI 0.64–1.03). In longitudinal multivariate analyses, individuals with higher plasma vitamin D at baseline had lower odds of incident insulin resistance, but this was not significant (odds ratio 0.85, 95% CI 0.63–1.14). Conclusions Vitamin D insufficiency is common in individuals with Type 1 diabetes and may increase risk for insulin resistance. Additional prospective studies are needed to determine the association between plasma vitamin D and insulin resistance, and to further examine the role of adiposity on this association. PMID:23909945

  18. Theoretical study on the electronic structures and phosphorescent properties of four Ir(III) complexes with different substituents on the ancillary ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Deming; Shang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Gang; Zhao, Lihui

    2013-12-01

    The geometry structures, electronic structures, absorption and phosphorescent properties of four Ir(III) complexes {[(F2-ppy)2Ir(pta-X)], where F2-ppy = (2,4-difluoro)phenylpyridine; pta = pyridine-1,2,4-triazole; X = -CF3; -H; -CH3; -N(CH3)2}, are investigated using the density functional method. The results reveal that the electron-accepting group -CF3 has no obvious effect on absorption and emission properties, while the substitutive group -N(CH3)2 with strong electron-donating ability has obvious effect on the emission properties. The mobility of hole and electron were studied computationally based on the Marcus-Hush theory. Calculations of ionisation potential and electron affinity were used to evaluate the injection abilities of holes and electrons into these complexes. We hope that this theoretical work can provide a suitable guide to the future design and synthesis of novel phosphorescent materials for use in the organic light-emitting diodes.

  19. Agreement of single- and multi-frequency Bioimpedance Measurements in hemodialysis patients: An Ancillary Study of the Frequent Hemodialysis Network (FHN) Daily Trial

    PubMed Central

    Raimann, Jochen G.; Abbas, Samer R.; Liu, Li; Zhu, Fansan; Larive, Brett; Kotanko, Peter; Levin, Nathan W.; Kaysen, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) is well established to assess body composition. Agreements between single- and multi-frequency bioimpedance (SF-BIA, MF-BIS) assessments in subjects undergoing 6 or 3 times per week hemodialysis (HD) were analyzed. Methods Total body water (TBW), intra- and extracellular fluid (ICF, ECF) of subjects enrolled in the Frequent Hemodialysis Network (FHN) Daily Trial (www.clinicaltrials.gov # NCT00264758) were measured with a Hydra 4200 at baseline (BL) and at 5 months (M5). Volumes were computed using SF (at 50 kHz) and MF approaches. Agreement was assessed by means of Linear Regression and Bland-Altman analysis and treatment effects by T-Test. Results 35 subjects (17 on the more frequent regimen, 26 male, 20 blacks, 48±9 years, pre-HD weight 84±19 kg) were studied. Assessments with SF-BIA and MF-BIS correlated significantly at BL and M5 in both arms. No proportional errors, but systematic biases over the entire range of values were found at BL and M5. Agreement did not differ between subjects randomized to either HD treatment arm at both time points. MF-BIS appears to have better precision than SF-BIA allowing the observation of a significant treatment effect by the intervention [−1.5 (95% CI −2.5 to −0.5) L] on ECF, not found for ECF SF-BIA. Precision also affected the statistical power of the SF-BIA data in the current analysis. Conclusion Both methods showed agreement without significant proportional errors regardless of HD frequency and can be used for longitudinal analyses. SF-BIA has lower precision which needs thorough consideration in the design of future trials with similar outcomes. PMID:25402657

  20. Radiation Pneumonitis in Association with Internal Mammary Node Irradiation in Breast Cancer Patients: An Ancillary Result from the KROG 08-06 Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinhyun; Kim, Yong Bae; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Park, Won; Kim, Su Ssan; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Kyu Chan; Kim, Dong Won; Suh, Hyun Suk; Park, Kyung Ran; Shin, Hyun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to present the incidence of radiation pneumonitis (RP) reported within 6 months after treatment for breast cancer with or without internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI). Methods In the Korean Radiation Oncology Group (KROG) 08-06 phase III randomized trial, patients who were node-positive after surgery were randomly assigned to receive radiotherapy either with or without IMNI. A total of 747 patients were enrolled, and three-dimensional treatment planning with computed tomography simulation was performed for all patients. Of the 747 patients, 722 underwent chest X-rays before and within 6 months after radiotherapy. These 722 patients underwent evaluation, and RP was diagnosed on the basis of chest radiography findings and clinical symptoms. The relationship between the incidence of RP and clinical/dosimetric parameters was analyzed. Results RP developed in 35 patients (4.8%), including grade 1 RP in 26 patients (3.6%), grade 2 RP in nine patients (1.2%); there was no incidence of grade 3 or higher RP. Grade 2 RP cases were observed in only the IMNI group. The risk of developing RP was influenced by IMNI treatment; pneumonitis occurred in 6.5% of patients (n=23/356) who underwent IMNI and in 3.3% of patients (n=12/366) who did not (p=0.047). The differences in lung dosimetric parameters (mean lung dose, V10–40) were statistically significant between the two groups. Conclusion IMNI treatment resulted in increased radiation exposure to the lung and a higher rate of RP, but the incidence and severity of RP was minimal and acceptable. This minor impact on morbidity should be balanced with the impact on survival outcome in future analyses. PMID:27721877

  1. Association of adherence to a Mediterranean diet with glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in youth with type 1 diabetes: The SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Victor W.; Lamichhane, Archana P.; Crandell, Jamie L.; Couch, Sarah C.; Liese, Angela D.; The, Natalie S.; Tzeel, Benjamin A.; Dabelea, Dana; Lawrence, Jean M.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Kim, Grace; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives This study aimed to determine the association between a Mediterranean diet and glycemic control and other cardiovascular risk factors among youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Subjects/Methods Incident T1D cases aged <20 years at diagnosis between 2002 and 2005 were included. Participants were seen at baseline (N=793), 1-year (N=512) and 5-year follow-up visits (N=501). Mediterranean diet score was assessed using a modified KIDMED index (mKIDMED). Multivariate linear regression and longitudinal mixed model were applied to determine the association between mKIDMED score and log-HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure (BP), and obesity. Results In cross-sectional analyses using baseline data, for individuals with an HbA1c of 7.5%, a two-point higher mKIDMED score (one standard deviation) was associated with 0.15% lower HbA1c (P=0.02). A two-point higher mKIDMED score was associated with 4.0 mg/dL lower total cholesterol (TC) (P=0.006), 3.4 mg/dL lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-C (P=0.004), 3.9 mg/dL lower non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL)-C (P=0.004), and 0.07 lower LDL-C/HDL-C ratio (P=0.02). Using longitudinal data, a two-point increase in mKIDMED score was associated with 0.01% lower log-HbA1c (P=0.07), 1.8 mg/dL lower TC (P=0.05), 1.6 mg/dL lower LDL-C (P=0.03), and 1.8 mg/dL lower non-HDL-C (P=0.03) than would otherwise have been expected. HbA1c mediated about 20% of the association for lipids in both cross-sectional and longitudinal models. An unexpected positive association between mKIDMED score and systolic BP was found among non-Hispanic white youth in cross-sectional analyses (P=0.009). Mediterranean diet was not associated with obesity. Conclusions Mediterranean diet may improve glycemic control and cardiovascular health in T1D youth. PMID:26908421

  2. Calibrated Ancillary System (CAS) user's guide, volume 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Calibrated Ancillary System (CAS) provides real-time calibrated parameters from the orbiter downlink (ancillary data) to the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This user's guide contains the introduction to the equipment, operation, general procedures, and specific procedures of CAS. Volume 6 describes ancillary products procedures, enhancement menu and processing task procedures for SDT/TDT (shuttle data tape/telemetry descriptor tape), database errors and network data driver (NDD) product menu procedures, and utility menu procedures.

  3. Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of InternationalExperience-- Technical Appendix: Market Descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Grayson Heffner, Charles Goldman, Kintner-Meyer, M; Kirby, Brendan

    2007-05-01

    In this study, we examine the arrangements for andexperiences of end-use loads providing ancillary services (AS) in fiveelectricity markets: Australia, the United Kingdom (UK), the Nordicmarket, and the ERCOT and PJM markets in the United States. Our objectivein undertaking this review of international experience was to identifyspecific approaches or market designs that have enabled customer loads toeffectively deliver various ancillary services (AS) products. We hopethat this report will contribute to the ongoing discussion in the U.S.and elsewhere regarding what institutional and technical developments areneeded to ensure that customer loads can meaningfully participate in allwholesale electricity markets.

  4. 10 CFR 205.288 - Interim and ancillary orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim and ancillary orders. 205.288 Section 205.288 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Special Procedures for Distribution of Refunds § 205.288 Interim and ancillary orders. The Director of the Office of Hearings...

  5. 1 CFR 10.12 - Format, indexes, and ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Format, indexes, and ancillaries. 10.12 Section 10.12 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Annual Publication § 10.12 Format, indexes, and ancillaries. (a)...

  6. 1 CFR 10.12 - Format, indexes, and ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Format, indexes, and ancillaries. 10.12 Section 10.12 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Annual Publication § 10.12 Format, indexes, and ancillaries. (a)...

  7. 1 CFR 10.12 - Format, indexes, and ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Format, indexes, and ancillaries. 10.12 Section 10.12 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Annual Publication § 10.12 Format, indexes, and ancillaries. (a)...

  8. 1 CFR 10.12 - Format, indexes, and ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Format, indexes, and ancillaries. 10.12 Section 10.12 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Annual Publication § 10.12 Format, indexes, and ancillaries. (a)...

  9. 1 CFR 10.12 - Format, indexes, and ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Format, indexes, and ancillaries. 10.12 Section 10.12 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Annual Publication § 10.12 Format, indexes, and ancillaries. (a)...

  10. Planning for Ancillary Care Provision: Lessons From the Developing World.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Nora; Krupp, Anna; Bowers, Barbara J

    2016-04-01

    As part of a study designed to assess a new strategy for increasing health research participation by members of underrepresented populations in the United States, we explored expectations about volunteering for research among people from lower income and largely minority communities in Madison, Wisconsin. Members of these communities often saw research participation as a means to access health care that might otherwise be unavailable to them. In light of persistent structural barriers to access, and the resulting health disparities, we argue that one cannot assume the existence of a "fair exchange" in which a community is likely to benefit from the results of research conducted with members of that community. We use ethical analysis and empirical research conducted in the developing world to explore how investigators in the United States might think about their obligations to provide ancillary care.

  11. An integrated LANDSAT/ancillary data classification of desert rangeland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, K. P.; Ridd, M. K.; Merola, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Range inventorying methods using LANDSAT MSS data, coupled with ancillary data were examined. The study area encompassed nearly 20,000 acres in Rush Valley, Utah. The vegetation is predominately desert shrub and annual grasses, with some annual forbs. Three LANDSAT scenes were evaluated using a Kauth-Thomas brightness/greenness data transformation (May, June, and August dates). The data was classified using a four-band maximum-likelihood classifier. A print map was taken into the field to determine the relationship between print symbols and vegetation. It was determined that classification confusion could be greatly reduced by incorporating geomorphic units and soil texture (coarse vs fine) into the classification. Spectral data, geomorphic units, and soil texture were combined in a GIS format to produce a final vegetation map identifying 12 vegetation types.

  12. Evaluation report: dialysis and ancillary equipment.

    PubMed

    1986-01-01

    As part of the continuing programme of evaluation of medical equipment sponsored by the UK Health Departments, the evaluation of dialysis and ancillary equipment is being carried out within the University of Sheffield, under the direction of Professor M. M. Black. 'Health Equipment Information' Number 148, published in December 1985, carries full reports on the Cobe Centry 2Rx haemodialysis system with double blood pump module (DBPM), the Lucas Medical 2100 haemodialysis system, and the Permutit Series 8 water softener. It also contains summaries of full reports on the Organon-Teknika Sorbsystem and Cordis-Dow Seratron haemodialysis systems, and the Gordonsal RD500 and Elga Mediro D water softeners, which were published in 'HEI' 136. Readers should note that the Cordis Seratron and Lucas 2100 models are no longer available in the UK. Extracts of the evaluations of the Cobe Centry 2Rx + DBPM and the Permutit Series B models, together with summaries and overall comparisons, are given below. 'HEI' (ISSN 0261-0736) is free to NHS staff and 5.00 pounds/copy to others. Editorial enquiries to DHSS Scientific and Technical Branch, 14 Russell Square, London WC1B 5EP. PMID:3735384

  13. ETINDE. Improving the role of a methodological approach and ancillary ethnoarchaeological data application for place vulnerability and resilience to a multi-hazard environment: Mt. Cameroon volcano case study [MIA-VITA project -FP7-ENV-2007-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilaria Pannaccione Apa, Maria; Kouokam, Emmanuel; Mbe Akoko, Robert; Peppoloni, Silvia; Fabrizia Buongiorno, Maria; Thierry, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    The FP7 MIA-VITA [Mitigate and assess risk from volcanic impact on terrain and human activities] project has been designed to address multidisciplinary aspects of volcanic threat assessment and management from prevention to crisis management recovery. In the socio-economic analysis carried out at Mt. Cameroon Bakweri and Bakossi ethnic groups, ancillary ethnoarchaeological information has been included to point out the cultural interaction between the volcano and its residents. In 2009-2011, ethnoanthropological surveys and interviews for data collection were carried out at Buea, Limbe, West Coast, Tiko and Muyuka sub-divisions adjacent to Mt. Cameroon. One of the outstanding, results from the Bakweri and Bakossi cultural tradition study: natural hazards are managed and produced by supernatural forces, as: Epasa Moto, God of the Mountain (Mt. Cameroon volcano) and Nyango Na Nwana , Goddess of the sea (Gulf of Guinea). In the case of Mount Cameroon, people may seek the spirit or gods of the mountain before farming, hunting and most recently the undertaking of the Mount Cameroon annual race are done. The spirit of this mountain must be seek to avert or stop a volcanic eruption because the eruption is attributed to the anger of the spirit. Among the Northern Bakweri, the association of spirits with the mountain could also be explained in terms of the importance of the mountain to the people. Most of their farming and hunting is done on the Mountain. Some forest products, for instance, wood for building and furniture is obtained from the forest of the mountain; this implies that the people rely on the Mountain for food, game and architecture/furniture etc. In addition, the eruption of the mountain is something which affects the people. It does not only destroy property, it frustrates people and takes away human lives when it occurs. Because of this economic importance of the Mountain and its unexpected and unwanted eruption, the tendency is to believe that it has some

  14. Load Participation in Ancillary Services System from An Operator Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawski, Don; Petri, Mark C.

    2011-10-25

    Ancillary services as defined by FERC (Order 888) distinguished by response time, duration, frequency. Met when DR has capability to balance supply and demand; and LMP payment to DR is cost effective.

  15. 1. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHWEST OF ANCILLARY STRUCTURES ASSOCIATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHWEST OF ANCILLARY STRUCTURES ASSOCIATED WITH AND SURROUNDING BUILDING 3210. - Nevada Test Site, Test Cell C Facility, Elevated Water Tower, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Road J, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  16. Ancillary Data Services of NASA's Planetary Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, C.

    1994-01-01

    JPL's Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility (NAIF) has primary responsibility for design and implementation of the SPICE ancillary information system, supporting a wide range of space science mission design, observation planning and data analysis functions/activities. NAIF also serves as the geometry and ancillary data node of the Planetary Data System (PDS). As part of the PDS, NAIF archives SPICE and other ancillary data produced by flight projects. NAIF then distributes these data, and associated data access software and high-level tools, to researchers funded by NASA's Office of Space Science. Support for a broader user community is also offered to the extent resources permit. This paper describes the SPICE system and customer support offered by NAIF.

  17. Ancillary Care: From Theory to Practice in International Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Bridget; Zion, Deborah; Lwin, Khin Maung; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Nosten, Francois; Loff, Bebe

    2013-07-01

    How international research might contribute to justice in global health has not been substantively addressed by bioethics. This article describes how the provision of ancillary care can link international clinical research to the reduction of global health disparities. It identifies the ancillary care obligations supported by a theory of global justice, showing that Jennifer Ruger's health capability paradigm requires the delivery of ancillary care to trial participants for a limited subset of conditions that cause severe morbidity and mortality. Empirical research on the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit's (SMRU) vivax malaria treatment trial was then undertaken to demonstrate whether and how these obligations might be upheld in a resource-poor setting. Our findings show that fulfilment of the ancillary care obligations is feasible where there is commitment from chief investigators and funders and is strongly facilitated by SMRU's dual role as a research unit and medical non-governmental organization. PMID:23864908

  18. Ancillary Care: From Theory to Practice in International Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Bridget; Zion, Deborah; Lwin, Khin Maung; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Nosten, Francois; Loff, Bebe

    2013-07-01

    How international research might contribute to justice in global health has not been substantively addressed by bioethics. This article describes how the provision of ancillary care can link international clinical research to the reduction of global health disparities. It identifies the ancillary care obligations supported by a theory of global justice, showing that Jennifer Ruger's health capability paradigm requires the delivery of ancillary care to trial participants for a limited subset of conditions that cause severe morbidity and mortality. Empirical research on the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit's (SMRU) vivax malaria treatment trial was then undertaken to demonstrate whether and how these obligations might be upheld in a resource-poor setting. Our findings show that fulfilment of the ancillary care obligations is feasible where there is commitment from chief investigators and funders and is strongly facilitated by SMRU's dual role as a research unit and medical non-governmental organization.

  19. Ancillary Care: From Theory to Practice in International Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Bridget; Zion, Deborah; Lwin, Khin Maung; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Nosten, Francois; Loff, Bebe

    2013-01-01

    How international research might contribute to justice in global health has not been substantively addressed by bioethics. This article describes how the provision of ancillary care can link international clinical research to the reduction of global health disparities. It identifies the ancillary care obligations supported by a theory of global justice, showing that Jennifer Ruger’s health capability paradigm requires the delivery of ancillary care to trial participants for a limited subset of conditions that cause severe morbidity and mortality. Empirical research on the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit’s (SMRU) vivax malaria treatment trial was then undertaken to demonstrate whether and how these obligations might be upheld in a resource-poor setting. Our findings show that fulfilment of the ancillary care obligations is feasible where there is commitment from chief investigators and funders and is strongly facilitated by SMRU’s dual role as a research unit and medical non-governmental organization. PMID:23864908

  20. Ancillary human health benefits of improved air quality resulting from climate change mitigation

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Michelle L; Davis, Devra L; Cifuentes, Luis A; Krupnick, Alan J; Morgenstern, Richard D; Thurston, George D

    2008-01-01

    Background Greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation policies can provide ancillary benefits in terms of short-term improvements in air quality and associated health benefits. Several studies have analyzed the ancillary impacts of GHG policies for a variety of locations, pollutants, and policies. In this paper we review the existing evidence on ancillary health benefits relating to air pollution from various GHG strategies and provide a framework for such analysis. Methods We evaluate techniques used in different stages of such research for estimation of: (1) changes in air pollutant concentrations; (2) avoided adverse health endpoints; and (3) economic valuation of health consequences. The limitations and merits of various methods are examined. Finally, we conclude with recommendations for ancillary benefits analysis and related research gaps in the relevant disciplines. Results We found that to date most assessments have focused their analysis more heavily on one aspect of the framework (e.g., economic analysis). While a wide range of methods was applied to various policies and regions, results from multiple studies provide strong evidence that the short-term public health and economic benefits of ancillary benefits related to GHG mitigation strategies are substantial. Further, results of these analyses are likely to be underestimates because there are a number of important unquantified health and economic endpoints. Conclusion Remaining challenges include integrating the understanding of the relative toxicity of particulate matter by components or sources, developing better estimates of public health and environmental impacts on selected sub-populations, and devising new methods for evaluating heretofore unquantified and non-monetized benefits. PMID:18671873

  1. Survey of U.S. Ancillary Services Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhi; Levin, Todd; Conzelmann, Guenter

    2016-01-01

    In addition to providing energy to end-consumers, power system operators are also responsible for ensuring system reliability. To this end, power markets maintain an array of ancillary services to ensure it is always possible to balance the supply and demand for energy in real-time. A subset of these ancillary services are commonly procured through market-based mechanisms: namely, Regulation, Spinning, and Non-spinning Reserves.

  2. Ancillary-service details: Dynamic scheduling

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamic scheduling (DS) is the electronic transfer from one control area to another of the time-varying electricity consumption associated with a load or the time-varying electricity production associated with a generator. Although electric utilities have been using this technique for at least two decades, its use is growing in popularity and importance. This growth is a consequence of the major changes under way in US bulk-power markets, in particular efforts to unbundle generation from transmission and to increase competition among generation providers. DS can promote competition and increase choices. It allows consumers to purchase certain services from entities outside their physical-host area and it allows generators to sell certain services to entities other than their physical host. These services include regulation (following minute-to-minute variations in load) and operating reserves, among others. Such an increase in the number of possible suppliers and customers should encourage innovation and reduce the costs and prices of providing electricity services. The purpose of the project reported here was to collect and analyze data on utility experiences with DS. Chapter 2 provides additional details and examples of the definitions of DS. Chapter 3 explains why DS might be an attractive service that customers and generators, as well as transmission providers, might wan to use. Chapter 4 presents some of the many current DS examples the authors uncovered in their interviews. Chapter 5 discusses the costs and cost-effectiveness of DS. Chapter 6 explains what they believe can and cannot be electronically moved from one control area to another, primarily in terms of the six ancillary services that FERC defined in Order 888. Chapter 7 discusses the need for additional research on DS.

  3. Influence of Ancillary Ligands in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Pashaei, Babak; Shahroosvand, Hashem; Graetzel, Michael; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2016-08-24

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have motivated many researchers to develop various sensitizers with tailored properties involving anchoring and ancillary ligands. Ancillary ligands carry favorable light-harvesting abilities and are therefore crucial in determining the overall power conversion efficiencies. The use of ancillary ligands having aliphatic chains and/or π-extended aromatic units decreases charge recombination and permits the collection of a large fraction of sunlight. This review aims to provide insight into the relationship between ancillary ligand structure and DSSC properties, which can further guide the function-oriented design and synthesis of different sensitizers for DSSCs. This review outlines how the new and rapidly expanding class of chelating ancillary ligands bearing 2,2'-bipyridyl, 1,10-phenanthroline, carbene, dipyridylamine, pyridyl-benzimidazole, pyridyl-azolate, and other aromatic ligands provides a conduit for potentially enhancing the performance and stability of DSSCs. Finally, these classes of Ru polypyridyl complexes have gained increasing interest for feasible large-scale commercialization of DSSCs due to their more favorable light-harvesting abilities and long-term thermal and chemical stabilities compared with other conventional sensitizers. Therefore, the main idea is to inspire readers to explore new avenues in the design of new sensitizers for DSSCs based on different ancillary ligands. PMID:27479482

  4. Market and policy barriers for demand response providing ancillary services in U.S. markets

    SciTech Connect

    Cappers, Peter; MacDonald, Jason; Goldman, Charles

    2013-03-01

    This study provides an examination of various market and policy barriers to demand response providing ancillary services in both ISO/RTO and non-ISO/RTO regions, especially at the program provider level. It is useful to classify barriers in order to create a holistic understanding and identify parties that could be responsible for their removal. This study develops a typology of barriers focusing on smaller customers that must rely on a program provider (i.e., electric investor owned utility or IOU, ARC) to create an aggregated DR resource in order to bring ancillary services to the balancing authority. The barriers were identified through examinations of regulatory structures, market environments, and product offerings; and discussions with industry stakeholders and regulators. In order to help illustrate the differences in barriers among various wholesale market designs and their constituent retail environments, four regions were chosen to use as case studies: Colorado, Texas, Wisconsin, and New Jersey.

  5. Cohort Profile: Longitudinal Investigations into Supportive and Ancillary health services

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Katrina C; Salters, Kate; Forrest, Jamie I; Palmer, Alexis K; Wang, Hong; O’Brien, Nadia; Parashar, Surita; Cescon, Angela M; Samji, Hasina; Montaner, Julio SG; Hogg, Robert S

    2013-01-01

    The Longitudinal Investigations into Supportive and Ancillary health services (LISA) study is a cohort of people living with HIV/AIDS who have ever accessed anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in British Columbia, Canada. The LISA study was developed to better understand the outcomes of people living with HIV with respect to supportive services use, socio-demographic factors and quality of life. Between July 2007 and January 2010, 1000 participants completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire that included questions concerning medical history, substance use, social and medical support services, food and housing security and other social determinants of health characteristics. Of the 1000 participants, 917 were successfully linked to longitudinal clinical data through the provincial Drug Treatment Program. Within the LISA cohort, 27% of the participants are female, the median age is 39 years and 32% identify as Aboriginal. Knowledge translation activities for LISA include the creation of plain language summaries, internet resources and arts-based engagement activities such as Photovoice. PMID:22461127

  6. Commercial Building Loads Providing Ancillary Services in PJM

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Jason; Kiliccote, Sila; Boch, Jim; Chen, Jonathan; Nawy, Robert

    2014-06-27

    The adoption of low carbon energy technologies such as variable renewable energy and electric vehicles, coupled with the efficacy of energy efficiency to reduce traditional base load has increased the uncertainty inherent in the net load shape. Handling this variability with slower, traditional resources leads to inefficient system dispatch, and in some cases may compromise reliability. Grid operators are looking to future energy technologies, such as automated demand response (DR), to provide capacity-based reliability services as the need for these services increase. While DR resources are expected to have the flexibility characteristics operators are looking for, demonstrations are necessary to build confidence in their capabilities. Additionally, building owners are uncertain of the monetary value and operational burden of providing these services. To address this, the present study demonstrates the ability of demand response resources providing two ancillary services in the PJM territory, synchronous reserve and regulation, using an OpenADR 2.0b signaling architecture. The loads under control include HVAC and lighting at a big box retail store and variable frequency fan loads. The study examines performance characteristics of the resource: the speed of response, communications latencies in the architecture, and accuracy of response. It also examines the frequency and duration of events and the value in the marketplace which can be used to examine if the opportunity is sufficient to entice building owners to participate.

  7. Diagnostic Implication and Clinical Relevance of Ancillary Techniques in Clinical Pathology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Makki, Jaafar S.

    2016-01-01

    Hematoxylin–eosin-stained slide preparation is one of the most durable techniques in medicine history, which has remained unchanged since implemented. It allows an accurate microscopic diagnosis of the vast majority of tissue samples. In many circumstances, this technique cannot answer all the questions posed at the initial diagnostic level. The pathologist has always been looking for additional ancillary techniques to answer pending questions. In our daily histopathology practice, we referred to those techniques as special stains, but nowadays, they are more than stains and are collectively called ancillary tests. They include a wide range of techniques starting from histochemical stains and ending in one or more advanced techniques, such as immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, molecular studies, cytogenetic studies, electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and polymerase chain reaction. PMID:27042154

  8. Diagnostic Implication and Clinical Relevance of Ancillary Techniques in Clinical Pathology Practice.

    PubMed

    Makki, Jaafar S

    2016-01-01

    Hematoxylin-eosin-stained slide preparation is one of the most durable techniques in medicine history, which has remained unchanged since implemented. It allows an accurate microscopic diagnosis of the vast majority of tissue samples. In many circumstances, this technique cannot answer all the questions posed at the initial diagnostic level. The pathologist has always been looking for additional ancillary techniques to answer pending questions. In our daily histopathology practice, we referred to those techniques as special stains, but nowadays, they are more than stains and are collectively called ancillary tests. They include a wide range of techniques starting from histochemical stains and ending in one or more advanced techniques, such as immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, molecular studies, cytogenetic studies, electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and polymerase chain reaction. PMID:27042154

  9. Ascent/descent ancillary data production user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brans, H. R.; Seacord, A. W., II; Ulmer, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The Ascent/Descent Ancillary Data Product, also called the A/D BET because it contains a Best Estimate of the Trajectory (BET), is a collection of trajectory, attitude, and atmospheric related parameters computed for the ascent and descent phases of each Shuttle Mission. These computations are executed shortly after the event in a post-flight environment. A collection of several routines including some stand-alone routines constitute what is called the Ascent/Descent Ancillary Data Production Program. A User's Guide for that program is given. It is intended to provide the reader with all the information necessary to generate an Ascent or a Descent Ancillary Data Product. It includes descriptions of the input data and output data for each routine, and contains explicit instructions on how to run each routine. A description of the final output product is given.

  10. Shuttle program: OFT ascent/descent ancillary data requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C., Jr.; Knoedler, J.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements are presented for the ascent/descent (A/D) navigation and attitude-dependent ancillary data products to be generated for the space shuttle orbiter in support of the orbital flight test (OFT) flight test requirements, MPAD guidance and navigation performance assessment, and the mission evaluation team. The A/D ancillary data support for OFT mission evaluation activities is confined to providing postflight position, velocity, attitude, and associated navigation and attitude derived parameters for the Orbiter over particular flight phases and time intervals.

  11. OFT ascent/descent ancillary data requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C., Jr.; Abramson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Requirements are presented for the ascent/descent (A/D) navigation and attitude-dependent ancillary data products to be generated for the space shuttle orbiter in support of orbital flight test requirements, MPAD guidance and navigation performance assessment, and the mission evaluation team. It was intended that this document serve as the sole requirements control instrument between MPB/MPAD and the A/D ancillary data users. The requirements are primarily functional in nature, but some detail level requirements are also included.

  12. A capacity-based approach for addressing ancillary care needs: implications for research in resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Bright, Patricia L; Nelson, Robert M

    2012-11-01

    A paediatric clinical trial conducted in a developing country is likely to encounter conditions or illnesses in participants unrelated to the study. Since local healthcare resources may be inadequate to meet these needs, research clinicians may face the dilemma of deciding when to provide ancillary care and to what extent. The authors propose a model for identifying ancillary care obligations that draws on assessments of urgency, the capacity of the local healthcare infrastructure and the capacity of the research infrastructure. The model lends itself to a decision tree that can be adapted to the local context and resources so as to provide procedural guidance. This approach can help in planning and establishing organisational policies that govern the provision of ancillary care.

  13. Staff working in ancillary departments at a tertiary care hospital in Bengaluru, Karnataka, India: How healthy are they?

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanya, Bhavya; Nisha, Catherin; Ramesh, Naveen; Joseph, Bobby

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ancillary health services are those supplemental services other than room, board, and medical/nursing services provided to hospital patients in the course of care. Ancillary department staff forms an integral part in the smooth functioning of a hospital. There is a need to focus on the health of these individuals to ensure their well-being and in turn, productivity at the workplace. Objective: To study the morbidity profile of the staff working at ancillary departments of a tertiary care hospital in Bengaluru, Karnataka, India. Materials and Methods: We conducted our study in a 1,200-bedded tertiary care hospital in Bengaluru, Karnataka, India. Annual medical checkup (AMC) for all the staff working at the ancillary departments has been started in recent years and is provided free of cost and during working hours. A total of 150 employees from ancillary departments underwent AMC in the year 2013. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0. Spearman's correlation and Chi-square test were used. Results: Of the 150 employees, the majority was male (72%); the mean age was 38 ± 11 years. The most common morbidities were diabetes mellitus (11%), hypertension (10.6%), musculoskeletal disorders (9.3%), surgical problems (8.6%, hemorrhoids, varicose veins), and dental caries (6.6%). On stool microscopy, 12% of the dietary workers showed ova/cyst. There was a significant positive correlation between age and the number of chronic morbidities (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Lifestyle disorders such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension were the major morbidities among the staff in the ancillary departments of the hospital. We ensured regular follow-up, adherence to medication, and lifestyle modifications in terms of diet and exercise. PMID:27390479

  14. Weak Ligand-Field Effect from Ancillary Ligands on Enhancing Single-Ion Magnet Performance.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yin-Shan; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Wang, Bing-Wu; Gao, Song

    2016-08-26

    A series of bis-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-supported Dy complexes containing different ancillary ligands were synthesized and characterized. Magnetic studies showed that 1 Dy [Cp*2 DyCl(THF)], 1 Dy' [Cp*2 DyCl2 K(THF)]n , 2 Dy [Cp*2 DyBr(THF)], 3 Dy [Cp*2 DyI(THF)] and 4 Dy [Cp*2 DyTp] (Tp=hydrotris(1-pyrazolyl)borate) were single-ion magnets (SIMs). The 1D dysprosium chain 1 Dy' exhibited a hysteresis at up to 5 K. Furthermore, 3 Dy featured the highest energy barrier (419 cm(-1) ) among the complexes. The effects of ancillary ligands on single-ion magnetic properties were studied by experimental, ab initio calculations and electrostatic analysis methods in detail. These results demonstrated that the QTM rate was strongly dependent on the ancillary ligands and that a weak equatorial ligand field could be beneficial for constructing Dy-SIMs. PMID:27417884

  15. VITAL-Bone Health: rationale and design of two ancillary studies evaluating the effects of vitamin D and/or omega-3 fatty acid supplements on incident fractures and bone health outcomes in the VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL)

    PubMed Central

    LeBoff, Meryl S.; Yue, Amy Y.; Copeland, Trisha; Cook, Nancy R.; Buring, Julie E.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Although vitamin D is widely used to promote skeletal health, definitive data on benefits and risks of supplemental vitamin D alone on bone are lacking. Results from large, randomized controlled trials in the general population are sparse. Data on the effects of supplemental omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) on bone are also limited. Design The VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL) is a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial assessing the role of vitamin D3 (2000 IU/d) and omega-3 FA (1 g/d) supplements in reducing risks of cancer and cardiovascular disease among U.S. men aged ≥50 and women aged ≥55. To comprehensively test effects of supplemental vitamin D and/or omega-3 FAs on skeletal health, the VITAL: Effects on Fractures ancillary study is determining the effects of these supplements on incident fractures among 25,875 participants enrolled in the parent trial. Study investigators adjudicate fractures through detailed review of medical records and radiological images (hip and femur). In a complementary ancillary, VITAL: Effects on Structure and Architecture is determining the effects of supplemental vitamin D and/or omega-3 FAs on bone with detailed phenotyping during in-person visits. Comprehensive assessments of bone density, turnover, structure/architecture, body composition, and physical performance are being performed at baseline and 2 years post-randomization. Conclusion Results from these studies will clarify the relationship between supplemental vitamin D and/or omega-3 FAs on bone health outcomes, and inform clinical care and public health guidelines on the use of supplemental vitamin D for the primary prevention of fractures in women and men. PMID:25623291

  16. Utility of ancillary stains for Helicobacter pylori in near-normal gastric biopsies.

    PubMed

    Panarelli, Nicole C; Ross, Dara S; Bernheim, Oren E; Landzberg, Zachary B; Schuetz, Audrey N; Jenkins, Stephen G; Landzberg, Brian R; Jessurun, Jose; Yantiss, Rhonda K

    2015-03-01

    Documentation of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication is important, prompting some clinicians and pathologists to request ancillary stains on all gastric samples that do not demonstrate H. pylori on initial histologic review. Studies evaluating the utility of ancillary stains in patients with minimal inflammation are lacking. We used Giemsa, Warthin-Starry, acridine orange, and immunohistochemical stains to search for organisms in 56 patients with biochemical evidence of H. pylori infection (positive Campylobacter-like organism test) and gastric mucosal samples interpreted to be H pylori negative by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). We correlated the findings with severity of inflammation and patients' histories of medication use. Nineteen (34%) patients had histologically normal mucosae, 22 (39%) had chronic inflammation with or without focal activity, and 15 (27%) had chemical gastropathy. Fifty (89%) cases were negative for H. pylori with additional stains, and 6 contained bacteria that were detected with all 4 ancillary stains and on retrospective review of H&E-stained sections that also showed chronic inflammation. Eleven (20%) patients were taking proton pump inhibitors, and 4 (7%) had previously received H. pylori eradication therapy. We conclude that H&E stains demonstrate H. pylori in most infected patients, so preemptive stain requests are largely unnecessary. Failure to identify bacteria by H&E evaluation generally reflects their absence in biopsy material, even among Campylobacter-like organism test--positive patients. However, organisms may be overlooked in patients with mild inflammation and in those receiving proton pump inhibitor or antibiotic therapy, so one should consider ordering ancillary stains to enhance detection of bacteria in these settings.

  17. Financial Report of Ontario Universities 1995-96. Ancillary Enterprises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    This supplementary volume has been compiled from submissions prepared by each of the provincially assisted universities and federated and affiliated colleges of Ontario (Canada). The information in this volume provides further details concerning sources of revenue and types of expenses as reported for various ancillary operations. These include…

  18. Financial Report of Ontario Universities, 1997-98. Ancillary Enterprises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    This report provides detailed information on ancillary enterprises at provincially assisted universities and affiliated and federated colleges in Ontario (Canada) for the fiscal year ending 30 April 1998. Such enterprises include school stores (including bookstores), food services, residences, conferences, parking, publishing, and other…

  19. The Production and Archiving of Navigation and Ancillary Data for the Galileo Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J.; Clarke, T.

    1994-01-01

    The Galileo Mission to Jupiter is using the SPICE formats developed by the Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility, a node of the Planetary Data System, to archive its navigation and ancillary data.

  20. Associations between age-related nuclear cataract and lutein and zeaxanthin in the diet and serum in the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS), an ancillary study of the Women’s Health Initiative

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between lutein and zeaxanthin in the diet and serum and prevalence of age-related nuclear cataract in older women. Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study participants aged 50 y+, at 3 sites, who reported high (above the 78th percentile...

  1. Unanticipated Consequences: Thinking About Ancillary Benefits and Costs of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, James A.

    2005-03-31

    Recently there has been interest in the “ancillary benefits” of potential policies to address climate change. Ancillary benefits occur whenever a policy to address climate change also results in a reduction in some conventional pollutant. Framing the problem in terms of ancillary benefits is too narrow. In general implementation of any policy can have consequences for unpriced environmental externalities that extend beyond the original target of the policy. These ancillary consequences can be either positive, negative, or mixed. This is the inevitable implication of undertaking policy in a non-linear world. In this essay we explore some of the ancillary benefits and costs of addressing climate change.

  2. Modification of K+ channel–drug interactions by ancillary subunits

    PubMed Central

    Bett, Glenna C L; Rasmusson, Randall L

    2008-01-01

    Reconciling ion channel α-subunit expression with native ionic currents and their pharmacological sensitivity in target organs has proved difficult. In native tissue, many K+ channel α-subunits co-assemble with ancillary subunits, which can profoundly affect physiological parameters including gating kinetics and pharmacological interactions. In this review, we examine the link between voltage-gated potassium ion channel pharmacology and the biophysics of ancillary subunits. We propose that ancillary subunits can modify the interaction between pore blockers and ion channels by three distinct mechanisms: changes in (1) binding site accessibility; (2) orientation of pore-lining residues; (3) the ability of the channel to undergo post-binding conformational changes. Each of these subunit-induced changes has implications for gating, drug affinity and use dependence of their respective channel complexes. A single subunit may modulate its associated α-subunit by more than one of these mechanisms. Voltage-gated potassium channels are the site of action of many therapeutic drugs. In addition, potassium channels interact with drugs whose primary target is another channel, e.g. the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, the sodium channel blocker quinidine, etc. Even when K+ channel block is the intended mode of action, block of related channels in non-target organs, e.g. the heart, can result in major and potentially lethal side-effects. Understanding factors that determine specificity, use dependence and other properties of K+ channel drug binding are therefore of vital clinical importance. Ancillary subunits play a key role in determining these properties in native tissue, and so understanding channel–subunit interactions is vital to understanding clinical pharmacology. PMID:18096604

  3. Quantum computation mediated by ancillary qudits and spin coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Timothy J.; Dooley, Shane; Kendon, Viv

    2015-01-01

    Models of universal quantum computation in which the required interactions between register (computational) qubits are mediated by some ancillary system are highly relevant to experimental realizations of a quantum computer. We introduce such a universal model that employs a d -dimensional ancillary qudit. The ancilla-register interactions take the form of controlled displacements operators, with a displacement operator defined on the periodic and discrete lattice phase space of a qudit. We show that these interactions can implement controlled phase gates on the register by utilizing geometric phases that are created when closed loops are traversed in this phase space. The extra degrees of freedom of the ancilla can be harnessed to reduce the number of operations required for certain gate sequences. In particular, we see that the computational advantages of the quantum bus (qubus) architecture, which employs a field-mode ancilla, are also applicable to this model. We then explore an alternative ancilla-mediated model which employs a spin ensemble as the ancillary system and again the interactions with the register qubits are via controlled displacement operators, with a displacement operator defined on the Bloch sphere phase space of the spin coherent states of the ensemble. We discuss the computational advantages of this model and its relationship with the qubus architecture.

  4. Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) - Ancillary Eye Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-05

    Atherosclerosis; Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Arteriosclerosis; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Heart Failure, Congestive; Myocardial Infarction; Heart Diseases; Diabetes Mellitus, Non-insulin Dependent; Hypertension; Diabetic Retinopathy; Macular Degeneration; Diabetes Mellitus

  5. Ancillary procedures necessary for translational research in experimental craniomaxillofacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Al Rakan, Mohammed; Shores, Jaimie T.; Bonawitz, Steve; Santiago, Gabriel; Christensen, Joani M.; Grant, Gerald; Murphy, Ryan J.; Basafa, Ehsan; Armand, Mehran; Otovic, Pete; Eller, Sue; Brandacher, Gerald; Gordon, Chad R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Swine are often regarded as having analogous facial skeletons to humans and therefore serve as an ideal animal model for translational investigation. However, there's a dearth of literature describing the pertinent ancillary procedures required for craniomaxillofacial research. With this in mind, our objective was to evaluate all necessary procedures required for peri-operative management and animal safety related to experimental craniomaxillofacial surgical procedures such as orthotopic, maxillofacial transplantation. Methods Miniature swine (n=9) were used to investigate peri-operative airway management, methods for providing nutrition, and long-dwelling intravenous access. Flap perfusion using near-infrared laser angiography and facial nerve assessment with EMG were explored. Results Bivona(R) tracheostomy was deemed appropriate versus Shiley since soft, wire-reinforced tubing reduced the incidence of tracheal necrosis. PEG tube, as opposed to esophagostomy, provided a reliable route for post-operative feeding. Femoral venous access with dorsal tunneling proved to be an ideal option being far from pertinent neck vessels. Laser angiography was beneficial for real-time evaluation of graft perfusion. Facial EMG techniques for tracing capture were found most optimal using percutaneous leads near the oral commissure. Experience shows that ancillary procedures are critical and malpositioning of devices may lead to irreversible sequelae with premature animal death. Conclusion Face-jaw-teeth transplantation in swine is a complicated procedure which demands special attention to airway, feeding, and intravascular access. It is critical that each ancillary procedure be performed by a dedicated team familiar with relevant anatomy and protocol. Emphasis should be placed on secure skin-level fixation for all tube/lines to minimize risk of dislodgement. A reliable veterinarian team is invaluable and critical for long-term success. PMID:25377964

  6. 19. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARDS THE ANCILLARY BUILDINGS. FROM LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARDS THE ANCILLARY BUILDINGS. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT BACKGROUND, RETORT BUILDING, STORAGE, SMELTER BUILDING, GARAGE. THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE VANNER ROOM IS IN THE FOREGROUND AND LEFT. A 2000 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN IS IN THE FOREGROUND CENTER. THEIR USE OF THE SHED TO THE REAR OF THE AUTOMOBILE IS UNCERTAIN, ALTHOUGH IT IS CONNECTED TO THE MILL AT THE BASE OF THE WEST SIDE OF THE AMALGAMATING PANS ROOM. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  7. Demand Response Resources for Energy and Ancillary Services (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hummon, M.

    2014-04-01

    Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility particularly on future systems with high penetrations of variable wind an solar power generation. However, DR in grid models is limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the co-optimization of DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model of the Colorado test system. We assume each DR resource can provide energy services by either shedding load or shifting its use between different times, as well as operating

  8. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements ancillary systems SSDR 1.5.6

    SciTech Connect

    Spann, J.; Reed, R.; VanArsdall, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-09-01

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Ancillary Systems, which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS).

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and useful ancillary methods

    PubMed Central

    Tadic, Mario; Stoos-Veic, Tajana; Kusec, Rajko

    2014-01-01

    The role of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in evaluating pancreatic pathology has been well documented from the beginning of its clinical use. High spatial resolution and the close proximity to the evaluated organs within the mediastinum and abdominal cavity allow detection of small focal lesions and precise tissue acquisition from suspected lesions within the reach of this method. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) is considered of additional value to EUS and is performed to obtain tissue diagnosis. Tissue acquisition from suspected lesions for cytological or histological analysis allows, not only the differentiation between malignant and non-malignant lesions, but, in most cases, also the accurate distinction between the various types of malignant lesions. It is well documented that the best results are achieved only if an adequate sample is obtained for further analysis, if the material is processed in an appropriate way, and if adequate ancillary methods are performed. This is a multi-step process and could be quite a challenge in some cases. In this article, we discuss the technical aspects of tissue acquisition by EUS-guided-FNA (EUS-FNA), as well as the role of an on-site cytopathologist, various means of specimen processing, and the selection of the appropriate ancillary method for providing an accurate tissue diagnosis and maximizing the yield of this method. The main goal of this review is to alert endosonographers, not only to the different possibilities of tissue acquisition, namely EUS-FNA, but also to bring to their attention the importance of proper sample processing in the evaluation of various lesions in the gastrointestinal tract and other accessible organs. All aspects of tissue acquisition (needles, suction, use of stylet, complications, etc.) have been well discussed lately. Adequate tissue samples enable comprehensive diagnoses, which answer the main clinical questions, thus enabling targeted therapy. PMID:25339816

  10. 47 CFR 25.255 - Procedures for resolving harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for resolving harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 1.5./1.6 GHz, 1.6/2.4 GHz and 2... harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial components operating in the...

  11. 47 CFR 1.9049 - Special provisions relating to spectrum leasing arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial component of Mobile Satellite Services. 1.9049 Section 1.9049... arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial component of Mobile Satellite Services. (a) A license issued... Mobile Satellite Service licensee with an ATC authorization may enter into a spectrum manager...

  12. 47 CFR 1.9049 - Special provisions relating to spectrum leasing arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial component of Mobile Satellite Services. 1.9049 Section 1.9049... arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial component of Mobile Satellite Services. (a) A license issued... Mobile Satellite Service licensee with an ATC authorization may enter into a spectrum manager...

  13. 47 CFR 1.9049 - Special provisions relating to spectrum leasing arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial component of Mobile Satellite Services. 1.9049 Section 1.9049... arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial component of Mobile Satellite Services. (a) A license issued... Mobile Satellite Service licensee with an ATC authorization may enter into a spectrum manager...

  14. 47 CFR 1.9049 - Special provisions relating to spectrum leasing arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... arrangements involving the ancillary terrestrial component of Mobile Satellite Services. 1.9049 Section 1.9049... ancillary terrestrial component of Mobile Satellite Services. (a) A license issued under part 25 of the...” for purpose of this subpart of the rules. (b) For the purpose of this subpart, a Mobile...

  15. Analysis of wind power ancillary services characteristics with German 250-MW wind data

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, B.

    1999-12-09

    With the increasing availability of wind power worldwide, power fluctuations have become a concern for some utilities. Under electric industry restructuring in the US, the impact of these fluctuations will be evaluated by examining provisions and costs of ancillary services for wind power. This paper analyzes wind power in the context of ancillary services, using data from a German 250 Megawatt Wind project.

  16. 48 CFR 801.670-3 - Medical, dental, and ancillary service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical, dental, and..., Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 801.670-3 Medical, dental, and ancillary service. (a) When medical, dental, and ancillary services under $10,000 per authorization are not available from an...

  17. 48 CFR 801.670-3 - Medical, dental, and ancillary service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical, dental, and..., Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 801.670-3 Medical, dental, and ancillary service. (a) When medical, dental, and ancillary services under $10,000 per authorization are not available from an...

  18. 48 CFR 801.670-3 - Medical, dental, and ancillary service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical, dental, and..., Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 801.670-3 Medical, dental, and ancillary service. (a) When medical, dental, and ancillary services under $10,000 per authorization are not available from an...

  19. 48 CFR 801.670-3 - Medical, dental, and ancillary service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical, dental, and..., Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 801.670-3 Medical, dental, and ancillary service. (a) When medical, dental, and ancillary services under $10,000 per authorization are not available from an...

  20. 46 CFR 58.25-80 - Automatic pilots and ancillary steering gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-80 Automatic pilots and ancillary steering gear. (a) Automatic pilots and ancillary steering gear, and steering-gear control systems, must be arranged to allow immediate resumption of manual operation of the steering-gear control system required...

  1. Map of risks for the implementation of radio-frequency identification: application of ancillaries in the University Hospital Jean Verdier.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, E; Schlatter, J

    2010-01-01

    Ancillaries are surgical instruments, such as orthopedical instruments set for reconstruction of knee (a mounting arm...) used to implant or extract prosthesis. Their management involves the departments of sterilization and surgery as well as the suppliers. Such a long circuit exposes the instruments to potential risk hazards like a lack of traceability as the suspicion of Creutzfeldt-Jakob. In order to reduce the risk of errors we will propose the implementation of radio-frequency identification (RFID) to trace the ancillaries during each step of the supply chain. The objective of our study is to analyze and to map the risks associated with RFID implementation. A preliminary analysis of risks (APR) is conducted to map out the hazards for the implementation of RFID. The APR identifies 162 scenarios with a maximum risk connected to environment and technology. To reduce the risks identified, 22 courses of action are proposed, such as audits, training, and internal controls. For each action, a procedure has been designed and evaluated. This preliminary analysis of risks allows targeting the potential dangers for the RFID implementation applied to ancillaries and reduces them significantly.

  2. Map of risks for the implementation of radio-frequency identification: application of ancillaries in the University Hospital Jean Verdier.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, E; Schlatter, J

    2010-01-01

    Ancillaries are surgical instruments, such as orthopedical instruments set for reconstruction of knee (a mounting arm...) used to implant or extract prosthesis. Their management involves the departments of sterilization and surgery as well as the suppliers. Such a long circuit exposes the instruments to potential risk hazards like a lack of traceability as the suspicion of Creutzfeldt-Jakob. In order to reduce the risk of errors we will propose the implementation of radio-frequency identification (RFID) to trace the ancillaries during each step of the supply chain. The objective of our study is to analyze and to map the risks associated with RFID implementation. A preliminary analysis of risks (APR) is conducted to map out the hazards for the implementation of RFID. The APR identifies 162 scenarios with a maximum risk connected to environment and technology. To reduce the risks identified, 22 courses of action are proposed, such as audits, training, and internal controls. For each action, a procedure has been designed and evaluated. This preliminary analysis of risks allows targeting the potential dangers for the RFID implementation applied to ancillaries and reduces them significantly. PMID:20187581

  3. Estimating commercial property prices: an application of cokriging with housing prices as ancillary information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero-Lorenzo, José-María; Larraz-Iribas, Beatriz; Páez, Antonio

    2009-12-01

    A vast majority of the recent literature on spatial hedonic analysis has been concerned with residential property values, with only very few examples of studies focused on commercial property prices. The dearth of studies can be attributed to some of the challenges faced in the analysis of commercial properties, in particular the scarcity of information compared to residential transactions. In order to address this issue, in this paper we propose the use of cokriging and housing prices as ancillary information to estimate commercial property prices. Cokriging takes into account the spatial autocorrelation structure of property prices, and the use of more abundant information on housing prices helps to improve the accuracy of property value estimates. A case study of Toledo in Spain, a city for which commercial activity stemming from tourism is one of the key elements of the economy in the city, demonstrates that substantial accuracy and precision gains can be obtained from the use of cokriging.

  4. Effective Ancillary Services Market Designs on High Wind Power Penetration Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Navid, N.; Smith, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    This paper focuses on how the ancillary service market designs are implemented and how they may require changes on systems with greater penetrations of variable renewable energy suppliers, in particular wind power. Ancillary services markets have been developed in many of the restructured power system regions throughout the world. Ancillary services include the services that support the provision of energy to support power system reliability. The ancillary services markets are tied tightly to the design of the energy market and to the physics of the system and therefore careful consideration of power system economics and engineering must be considered in their design. This paper focuses on how the ancillary service market designs are implemented and how they may require changes on systems with greater penetrations of variable renewable energy suppliers, in particular wind power.

  5. Transactive Control and Coordination of Distributed Assets for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect

    Subbarao, Krishnappa; Fuller, Jason C.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Somani, Abhishek; Pratt, Robert G.; Widergren, Steven E.; Chassin, David P.

    2013-09-18

    The need to diversify energy supplies, the need to mitigate energy-related environmental impact, and the entry of electric vehicles in large numbers present challenges and opportunities to power system professionals. Wind and solar power provide many benefits, and to reap the benefits the resulting increased variability—forecasted as well as unforecasted—should be addressed. Demand resources are receiving increasing attention as one means of providing the grid balancing services. Control and coordination of a large number (~millions) of distributed smart grid assets requires innovative approaches. One such is transactive control and coordination (TC2)—a distributed, agent-based incentive and control system. The TC2 paradigm is to create a market system with the following characteristics: • Participation should be entirely voluntary. • The participant decides at what price s/he is willing to participate. • The bids and responses are automated. Such an approach has been developed and demonstrated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for energy markets. It is the purpose of this project to develop a similar approach for ancillary services. In this report, the following ancillary services are considered: • spinning reserve • ramping • regulation. These services are to be provided by the following devices: • refrigerators • water heaters • clothes dryers • variable speed drives. The important results are summarized below: The regulation signal can be divided into an energy-neutral high frequency component and a low frequency component. The high frequency component is particularly well suited for demand resources. The low frequency component, which carries energy non-neutrality, can be handled by a combination of generators and demand resources. An explicit method for such a separation is obtained from an exponentially weighted moving average filter. Causal filters (i.e., filters that process only present and past values of a signal

  6. Estimating Net Primary Productivity Using Satellite and Ancillary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    2002-01-01

    The net primary productivity (C) or the annual rate of carbon accumulation per unit ground area by terrestrial plant communities is the difference of gross photosynthesis (A(sub g)) and respiration (R) per unit ground area. Available field observations show that R is a large and variable fraction of A(sub g), although it is generally recognized that there are considerable difficulties in determining these fluxes, and thus pose challenge in assessing the accuracy. Further uncertainties arise in extrapolating field measurements (which are acquired over a hectare or so area) to regional scale. Here, an approach is presented for determining these fluxes using satellite and ancillary data to be representative of regional scale and allow assessment of interannual variation. A, has been expressed as the product of radiation use efficiency for gross photosynthesis by an unstressed canopy and intercepted photosynthetically active radiation, which is then adjusted for stresses due to soil water shortage and temperature away from optimum. R has been calculated as the sum of growth and maintenance components (respectively, R(sub g) and R(sub m)).The R(sub m) has been determined from nitrogen content of plant tissue per unit ground area, while R(sub g) has been obtained as a fraction of the difference of A(sub g) and R(sub m). Results for five consecutive years (1986-1990) are presented for the Amazon-Tocontins, Mississippi, and Ob River basins.

  7. Candidate Gene Association Study of Coronary Artery Calcification in Chronic Kidney Disease: Findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Jane F; Matthews, Gregory J; Townsend, Raymond R; Raj, Dominic S; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Budoff, Matthew; Fischer, Michael J; Rosas, Sylvia E; Kanthety, Radhika; Rahman, Mahboob; Master, Stephen R; Qasim, Atif; Li, Mingyao; Mehta, Nehal N.; Shen, Haiqing; Mitchell, Braxton D; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Shuldiner, Alan R; Ho, Weang Kee; Young, Robin; Rasheed, Asif; Danesh, John; He, Jiang; Kusek, John W; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Flack, John; Go, Alan S; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Wright, Jackson T; Saleheen, Danish; Feldman, Harold I; Rader, Daniel J; Foulkes, Andrea S; Reilly, Muredach P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To identify loci for coronary artery calcification (CAC) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Background CKD is associated with increased CAC and subsequent coronary heart disease (CHD) but the mechanisms remain poorly defined. Genetic studies of CAC in CKD may provide a useful strategy for identifying novel pathways in CHD. Methods We performed a candidate gene study (~2,100 genes; ~50,000 SNPs) of CAC within the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study (n=1,509; 57% European, 43% African ancestry). SNPs with preliminary evidence of association with CAC in CRIC were examined for association with CAC in PennCAC (n=2,560) and Amish Family Calcification Study (AFCS; n=784) samples. SNPs with suggestive replication were further analyzed for association with myocardial infarction (MI) in the Pakistan Risk of Myocardial Infarction study (PROMIS) (n=14,885). Results Of 268 SNPs reaching P <5×10−4 for CAC in CRIC, 28 SNPs in 23 loci had nominal support (P <0.05 and in same direction) for CAC in PennCAC or AFCS. Besides chr9p21 and COL4A1, known loci for CHD, these included SNPs having reported GWAS association with hypertension (e.g., ATP2B1). In PROMIS, four of the 23 suggestive CAC loci (chr9p21, COL4A1, ATP2B1 and ABCA4) had significant associations with MI consistent with their direction of effect on CAC. Conclusions We identified several loci associated with CAC in CKD that also relate to MI in a general population sample. CKD imparts a high risk of CHD and may provide a useful setting for discovery of novel CHD genes and pathways. PMID:23727086

  8. 21 CFR 830.340 - Voluntary submission of ancillary device identification information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Identification Database § 830.340 Voluntary submission of ancillary device identification information. (a) You may not submit any information to the Global Unique Device Identification Database (GUDID) other...

  9. 46 CFR 58.25-80 - Automatic pilots and ancillary steering gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Section 58.25-80 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN... ancillary steering gear must be arranged so that no single failure affects proper operation and independence...-failure alarm....

  10. 46 CFR 58.25-80 - Automatic pilots and ancillary steering gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Section 58.25-80 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN... ancillary steering gear must be arranged so that no single failure affects proper operation and independence...-failure alarm....

  11. Utilization of Ancillary Data Sets for SMAP Algorithm Development and Product Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, P.; Podest, E.; Njoku, E.

    2011-01-01

    Algorithms being developed for the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission require a variety of both static and ancillary data. The selection of the most appropriate source for each ancillary data parameter is driven by a number of considerations, including accuracy, latency, availability, and consistency across all SMAP products and with SMOS (Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity). It is anticipated that initial selection of all ancillary datasets, which are needed for ongoing algorithm development activities on the SMAP algorithm testbed at JPL, will be completed within the year. These datasets will be updated as new or improved sources become available, and all selections and changes will be documented for the benefit of the user community. Wise choices in ancillary data will help to enable SMAP to provide new global measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state at the targeted accuracy necessary to tackle hydrologically-relevant societal issues.

  12. TECHNOLOGY NEEDS AND STATUS ON CLOSURE OF DOE RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK ANCILLARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, H; Sharon Marra, S; Christine Langton, C

    2009-01-21

    This paper summarizes the current state of art of sampling, characterizing, retrieving, transferring and treating the incidental waste and stabilizing the void space in tank ancillary systems and the needs involved with closure of these systems. The overall effort for closing tank and ancillary systems is very large and is in the initial stages of being addressed in a systematic manner. It was recognized in doing this effort, that gaps in both technology and material application for characterization and removal of residual waste and closure of ancillary systems would be identified. Great efficiencies are to be gained by defining the technology need areas early in the closure process and providing recommendations for technical programs to improve the closure strategies. Therefore, this paper will not only summarize the state of closure of ancillary systems but also provide recommendations to address the technology gaps identified in this assessment.

  13. Generating non-classical states from spin coherent states via interaction with ancillary spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, Shane; Joo, Jaewoo; Proctor, Timothy; Spiller, Timothy P.

    2015-02-01

    The generation of non-classical states of large quantum systems has attracted much interest from a foundational perspective, but also because of the significant potential of such states in emerging quantum technologies. In this paper we consider the possibility of generating non-classical states of a system of spins by interaction with an ancillary system, starting from an easily prepared initial state. We extend previous results for an ancillary system comprising a single spin to bigger ancillary systems and the interaction strength is enhanced by a factor of the number of ancillary spins. Depending on initial conditions, we find - by a combination of approximation and numerics - that the system of spins can evolve to spin cat states, spin squeezed states or to multiple cat states. We also discuss some candidate systems for implementation of the Hamiltonian necessary to generate these non-classical states.

  14. Extending NASA's SPICE ancillary information system to meet future mission needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, C.; Bachman, N.; Elson, L.; Semenov, B.; Turner, F.; Wright, E.

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes the architecture, capabilities, characteristics and uses of the current SPICE ancillary information system, and then outlines plans and ideas for how this system can be extended to meet future space mission requirements.

  15. Making your orthopedic office profitable through the addition of ancillary services.

    PubMed

    Bert, Jack M

    2002-04-01

    With the precipitous decline of orthopedic reimbursement over the past six years, it will be critical to the success of the majority of orthopedic groups to improve their revenue stream in the future. This will involve improving management, reducing overhead, and adding ancillary services to obtain facility fee revenue. Ancillary service possibilities for the orthopedist include an in-office surgicenter with a pain center, MRI, physical therapy with orthotics and braces, occupational health department, pharmacy, and independent medical examination company.

  16. Estimating Net Primary Productivity Using Satellite and Ancillary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The net primary productivity (C) or annual rate of carbon accumulation per unit ground area by terrestrial plant communities is the difference of the rate of gross photosynthesis (A(sub g)) and autotrophic respiration (R) per unit ground area. Although available observations show that R is a large and variable fraction of A(sub g), viz., 0.3 to 0.7, it is generally recognized that much uncertainties exist in this fraction due to difficulties associated with the needed measurements. Additional uncertainties arise when these measurements are extrapolated to regional or global land surface using empirical equations, for example, using regression equations relating C to mean annual precipitation and air temperature. Here, a process-based approach has been taken to calculate A(sub g) and R using satellite and ancillary data. A(sub g) has been expressed as a product of radiation use efficiency, magnitude of intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and normalized by stresses due to soil water shortage and air temperature away from the optimum range. A biophysical model has been used to determine the radiation use efficiency from the maximum rate of carbon assimilation by a leaf, foliage temperature, and the fraction of diffuse PAR incident on a canopy. All meteorological data (PAR, air temperature, precipitation, etc.) needed for the calculation are derived from satellite observations, while a land use, land cover data (based on satellite and ground measurements) have been used to assess the maximum rate of carbon assimilation by a leaf of varied cover type based on field measurements. R has been calculated as the sum of maintenance and growth components. The maintenance respiration of foliage and live fine roots at a standard temperature of different land cover has been determined from their nitrogen content using field and satellite measurements, while that of living fraction of woody stem (viz., sapwood) from the seasonal maximum leaf area index as

  17. Evaluation of freely available ancillary data used for detailed soil mapping in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel-Rosa, Alessandro; Anjos, Lúcia; Vasques, Gustavo; Heuvelink, Gerard

    2014-05-01

    Brazil is one of the world's largest food producers, and is home of both largest rainforest and largest supply of renewable fresh water on Earth. However, it lacks detailed soil information in extensive areas of the country. The best soil map covering the entire country was published at a scale of 1:5,000,000. Termination of governmental support for systematic soil mapping in the 1980's made detailed soil mapping of the whole country a very difficult task to accomplish. Nowadays, due to new user-driven demands (e.g. precision agriculture), most detailed soil maps are produced for small size areas. Many of them rely on as is freely available ancillary data, although their accuracy is usually not reported or unknown. Results from a validation exercise that we performed using ground control points from a small hilly catchment (20 km²) in Southern Brazil (-53.7995ºE, -29.6355ºN) indicate that most freely available ancillary data needs some type of correction before use. Georeferenced and orthorectified RapidEye imagery (recently acquired by the Brazilian government) has a horizontal accuracy (root-mean-square error, RMSE) of 37 m, which is worse than the value published in the metadata (32 m). Like any remote sensing imagery, RapidEye imagery needs to be correctly registered before its use for soil mapping. Topographic maps produced by the Brazilian Army and derived geological maps (scale of 1:25,000) have a horizontal accuracy of 65 m, which is more than four times the maximum value allowed by Brazilian legislation (15 m). Worse results were found for geological maps derived from 1:50,000 topographic maps (RMSE = 147 m), for which the maximum allowed value is 30 m. In most cases positional errors are of systematic origin and can be easily corrected (e.g., affine transformation). ASTER GDEM has many holes and is very noisy, making it of little use in the studied area. TOPODATA, which is SRTM kriged from originally 3 to 1 arc-second by the Brazilian National

  18. Combining satellite data with ancillary data to produce a refined land-use/land-cover map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program in the Western Lake Michigan Drainages Study Unit, a current map of land use and land cover is needed to gain a better understanding of how land use and land cover may influence water quality. Satellite data from the Landsat Thematic Mapper provides a means to map and measure the type and amount of various land-cover types across the Study Unit and can be easily updated as changes occur in the landscape or in water quality. Translating these land cover categories to land use, however, requires the use of other thematic maps or ancillary data layers, such as wetland inventories, population data, or road networks. This report describes a process of (1) using satellite imagery to produce a land-cover map for the Fox/Wolf River basin, a portion of the Western Lake Michigan Drainages NAWQA Study Unit and (2) improving the satellite-derived land-cover map by using other thematic maps. The multiple data layers are processed in a geographic information system (GIS), and the combination provides more information than individual sources alone.

  19. Photocatalytic Conversion of CO2 to CO using Rhenium Bipyridine Platforms Containing Ancillary Phenyl or BODIPY Moieties

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, Gabriel; Pistner, Allen; Yapp, Glenn P. A.; Lutterman, Daniel A; Rosenthal, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Harnessing of solar energy to drive the reduction of carbon dioxide to fuels requires the development of efficient catalysts that absorb sunlight. In this work, we detail the synthesis, electrochemistry and photophysical properties of a set of homologous fac-ReI(CO)3 complexes containing either an ancillary phenyl (8) or BODIPY (12) substituent. These studies demonstrate that both the electronic properties of the rhenium center and BODIPY chromophore are maintained for these systems. Photolysis studies demonstrate that both assemblies 8 and 12 are competent catalysts for the photochemical reduction of CO2 to CO in DMF using triethanolamine (TEOA) as a sacrificial reductant. Both these systems display TOFs for photocatalytic CO production upon irradiation with light ( ex 400 nm) of ~5 hr 1 with TON values of approximately 20. Although structural and photophysical measurements demonstrate that electronic coupling between the BODIPY and fac-ReI(CO)3 units is limited for complex 12, this work clearly shows that the photoactive BODIPY moiety is tolerated during catalysis and does not interfere with the observed photochemistry. When taken together, these results provide a clear roadmap for the development of advanced rhenium bipyridine complexes bearing ancillary BODIPY groups for the efficient photocatalytic reduction of CO2 using visible light.

  20. Using remote sensing and ancillary data to extend airborne electromagnetic resistivity surveys for regional permafrost interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastick, N.; Wylie, B. K.; Minsley, B. J.; Jorgenson, T. T.; Ji, L.; Walvoord, M. A.; Smith, B. D.; Abraham, J. D.; Rose, J.

    2011-12-01

    landsat, and the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) using band 7. The regression tree models were applied to a 6-scene landsat mosaic and ancillary data to make estimates of electrical resistivity at 0-1m and 0-2.6m depths for the entirety of Yukon Flats. Further studies will assess relationships between mapped surface resistivity and depth to permafrost measured in the field.

  1. Catalytic water oxidation by mononuclear Ru complexes with an anionic ancillary ligand.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lianpeng; Inge, A Ken; Duan, Lele; Wang, Lei; Zou, Xiaodong; Sun, Licheng

    2013-03-01

    Mononuclear Ru-based water oxidation catalysts containing anionic ancillary ligands have shown promising catalytic efficiency and intriguing properties. However, their insolubility in water restricts a detailed mechanism investigation. In order to overcome this disadvantage, complexes [Ru(II)(bpc)(bpy)OH2](+) (1(+), bpc = 2,2'-bipyridine-6-carboxylate, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and [Ru(II)(bpc)(pic)3](+) (2(+), pic = 4-picoline) were prepared and fully characterized, which features an anionic tridentate ligand and has enough solubility for spectroscopic study in water. Using Ce(IV) as an electron acceptor, both complexes are able to catalyze O2-evolving reaction with an impressive rate constant. On the basis of the electrochemical and kinetic studies, a water nucleophilic attack pathway was proposed as the dominant catalytic cycle of the catalytic water oxidation by 1(+), within which several intermediates were detected by MS. Meanwhile, an auxiliary pathway that is related to the concentration of Ce(IV) was also revealed. The effect of anionic ligand regarding catalytic water oxidation was discussed explicitly in comparison with previously reported mononuclear Ru catalysts carrying neutral tridentate ligands, for example, 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine (tpy). When 2(+) was oxidized to the trivalent state, one of its picoline ligands dissociated from the Ru center. The rate constant of picoline dissociation was evaluated from time-resolved UV-vis spectra.

  2. Integrated Stormwater Management in Los Angeles, California: Best Management Practices and Evaluation of Ancillary Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogue, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    Best Management Practices (BMPs) and Low Impact Development (LID) have been the primary tools to address quantitative and qualitative surface runoff impacts. The City of Los Angeles (City) is evaluating plans for individual Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) pollutants in each of its major watersheds. However, it has yet to be studied if implementing individual BMP projects will adequately address water quality objectives for receiving (downstream) water bodies, such as Ballona Creek, Ballona Estuary and the Santa Monica Bay. In addition, there is significant uncertainty surrounding potential ancillary benefits (flood reduction, water supply, green space, etc.) from BMP/LID implementation. This presentation will overview our work with the City evaluating the influence of BMPs and LIDs in improving water quality at the watershed scale as well as quantifying other hydrologic benefits. Multiple BMP scenarios are considered to identify various pathways toward improved receiving water body quality in Ballona Creek and Dominquez watersheds. Specific study objectives are to: 1) identify suites of BMP scenarios which can lead to TMDL compliance, 2) quantify the multiple benefits provided by BMPs beyond their primary water quality improvement purpose, and 3) evaluate the success of using existing software for watershed-scale BMP modeling. Our goal is to provide realistic, implementable pathways that can be used by stakeholders to help plan for future education, outreach and capital improvement programs as well as determine feasible pollutant reduction objectives.

  3. Ancillary services in the health care industry: is Six Sigma reasonable?

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Peter A S; Hendrickson, Julie A W; Dernbach, Allison J; Secord, Ann R; Parker, John C; Favata, Michael A; Puckett, Michael L

    2003-01-01

    Within the naval medical center construct, the disparate disciplines encompassed within ancillary services lend themselves to formal quality analysis and process improvement. This analysis uses the Six Sigma approach. Error rates were investigated and calculated for various processes within ancillary services at Naval Medical Center, San Diego. These were translated into the common metric of defects per million opportunities (DPMO). DPMO rates vary between 21.5 and 420,000. These correspond to Sigma values from 1.7 to approaching 6. Rates vary with biological complexity of the system and the degree of automation available. Some ancillary services translate well into a Six Sigma schema. Systems with high potential patient risk if performed poorly and those amenable to second checking and computer oversight may be candidates for such optimization. This should be undertaken in a local environment conducive to individual error reporting, and in a corporate environment with the will and funding to support the transition. PMID:12593375

  4. Ancillary services in the health care industry: is Six Sigma reasonable?

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Peter A S; Hendrickson, Julie A W; Dernbach, Allison J; Secord, Ann R; Parker, John C; Favata, Michael A; Puckett, Michael L

    2003-01-01

    Within the naval medical center construct, the disparate disciplines encompassed within ancillary services lend themselves to formal quality analysis and process improvement. This analysis uses the Six Sigma approach. Error rates were investigated and calculated for various processes within ancillary services at Naval Medical Center, San Diego. These were translated into the common metric of defects per million opportunities (DPMO). DPMO rates vary between 21.5 and 420,000. These correspond to Sigma values from 1.7 to approaching 6. Rates vary with biological complexity of the system and the degree of automation available. Some ancillary services translate well into a Six Sigma schema. Systems with high potential patient risk if performed poorly and those amenable to second checking and computer oversight may be candidates for such optimization. This should be undertaken in a local environment conducive to individual error reporting, and in a corporate environment with the will and funding to support the transition.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and properties of copper(I) complexes with bis(diphenylphosphino)-ferrocene ancillary ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinfang; Zhang, Songlin; Ding, Yuqiang

    2012-06-01

    Three copper(I) complexes (2-4) containing dppf ancillary ligand (dppf = bis(diphenylphosphino)-ferrocene) were synthesized when chloride-bridged copper(I) complex 1 reacted with acetanilide and characterized by IR, element analysis and NMR spectrum. And the crystal structures of complexes 2 and 4 have been determined by X-ray diffraction method. Complex 2, an acetate-bridged copper(I) complex, was obtained under N2 atmosphere in un-dried solvent; the acetate ion came from the hydrolysis reaction of acetanilide due to residual water in solvent. Acetanilide was deprotonated and coordinated with the copper(I) centre to form a copper(I) amidate complex 3 when reacted in pre-dried solvent. In addition, a known complex 4, the oxidation product of dppf, was isolated from the same reaction system when reacted in air atmosphere. CV and TG experiments were carried out to check the electron transfer properties and thermal stabilities of complexes 2-3. Finally, the arylation reaction of complex 3 with iodobenzene was performed to study the reaction mechanism of copper(I) catalyzed Goldberg reaction.

  6. Disaggregating Census Data for Population Mapping Using Random Forests with Remotely-Sensed and Ancillary Data

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Forrest R.; Gaughan, Andrea E.; Linard, Catherine; Tatem, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    High resolution, contemporary data on human population distributions are vital for measuring impacts of population growth, monitoring human-environment interactions and for planning and policy development. Many methods are used to disaggregate census data and predict population densities for finer scale, gridded population data sets. We present a new semi-automated dasymetric modeling approach that incorporates detailed census and ancillary data in a flexible, “Random Forest” estimation technique. We outline the combination of widely available, remotely-sensed and geospatial data that contribute to the modeled dasymetric weights and then use the Random Forest model to generate a gridded prediction of population density at ~100 m spatial resolution. This prediction layer is then used as the weighting surface to perform dasymetric redistribution of the census counts at a country level. As a case study we compare the new algorithm and its products for three countries (Vietnam, Cambodia, and Kenya) with other common gridded population data production methodologies. We discuss the advantages of the new method and increases over the accuracy and flexibility of those previous approaches. Finally, we outline how this algorithm will be extended to provide freely-available gridded population data sets for Africa, Asia and Latin America. PMID:25689585

  7. Effects of ancillary ligands on selectivity of protein labeling with platinum(II) chloro complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xia-Ying.

    1990-02-01

    Potassium (2,6-pyridinedicarboxylato)chloroplatinate(II) was synthesized. The molecular structure of the complex in (n-Bu){sub 4}N(Pt(dipic)Cl){center dot}0.5H{sub 2}O was determined by x-ray crystallography. The (Pt(dipic)Cl){sup {minus}} is essentially planar and contains a Pt(II) atom, a tridentate dipicolinate dianion ligand, and a unidentate Cl{sup {minus}} ligand. The bis(bidentate) complex trans-(Pt(dipic){sub 2}){sup 2{minus}} was also observed by {sup 1}H NMR. A red gel-like substance was observed when the yellow aqueous solution of K(Pt(dipic)Cl) was cooled or concentrated. The K(Pt(dipic)Cl) molecules form stacks in the solid state and gel-like substance but remain monomeric over a wide range of concentrations and temperatures. The reactivity and selectivity of(Pt(dipic)Cl){sup {minus}} toward cytochromes c from horse and tuna were studied. The new transition-metal reagent is specific for methionine residues. Di(2-pyridyl-{beta}-ethyl)sulfidochloroplatinum(II) chloride dihydrate was also synthesized. This complex labels histidine and methionine residues in cytochrome c. The ancillary ligands in these platinum(II) complexes clearly determine the selectivity of protein labeling. 106 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Benthic macrofauna and ancillary data for San Francisco Bay, California, March to November 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, Laurence E.; Ota, Allan Y.; Harmon, J.G.; Shay, J.M.; Adorado, R.N.

    1988-01-01

    Benthic macrofauna and ancillary data were collected during 1987 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Regional Effects Monitoring Program in San Francisco Bay, California. Data were collected during five cruises at 2-month intervals from March through November. Benthic macrofauna for identification of species and sediment for size analysis were sampled at eight stations. Ancillary data, which consisted of salinity, temperature, dissolved-oxygen concentrations, and suspended sediment, were collected at 12 stations. Salinity and temperature were measured at three stations that coincided with continuous water quality monitors. Abundances and geographical distributions of a newly introduced species of clam were measured. (USGS)

  9. 30 CFR 250.210 - If I conduct ancillary activities, what reporting and data/information retention requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reporting and data/information retention requirements must I satisfy? 250.210 Section 250.210 Mineral... ancillary activities, what reporting and data/information retention requirements must I satisfy? (a... data or information obtained or derived from your ancillary activities. When applicable, MMS...

  10. 76 FR 36400 - Third-Party Provision of Ancillary Services; Accounting and Financial Reporting for New Electric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... peak and off-peak energy prices or selling ancillary services; and similar to a transmission asset (e.g... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Chapter I Third-Party Provision of Ancillary Services; Accounting...

  11. Four homochiral coordination polymers contain N-acetyl-L-tyrosine and different N-donor ligand: Influence of metal cations, ancillary ligands and coordination modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng-Li; Song, Hui-Hua

    2013-10-01

    Using the chiral ligand N-acetyl-L-tyrosine (Hacty) and maintaining identical reaction conditions, Zn(II), Co(II), and Cd(II) salts provided four novel homochiral coordination polymers {[Zn(acty)(bipy)2(H2O)2]·NO3·2H2O}n1, {[Co(acty)(bipy)2(H2O)2]·NO3·2H2O}n2, {[Cd(acty)2(bipy)H2O]·H2O}n3, and {[Cd(acty)(bpe)2(Ac)]·6H2O}n4 (bipy=4,4‧-bipyridine; bpe=1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethane) in the presence of ancillary ligands. Compounds 1 and 2 are isostructural 1D chain structures. The neighboring chains are further linked into a 3D supramolecular structure via π⋯π stacking and hydrogen bond interactions. Compound 3 shows a 2D network and 4 generates 1D infinite chains along the c-axis. Compounds 3 and 4 are further connected into 3D supramolecular network by hydrogen bond interactions. More importantly, coordination in acyl oxygen atoms and ancillary ligands (bpe) as monodentate decorating ligands in 4 are rarely reported. Ancillary ligands and metal cations significantly influence the structure of the complexes. The photoluminescence properties of 1, 3, and 4 were studied at room temperature. Circular dichroism (CD) of the complexes have been investigated.

  12. 76 FR 55890 - Cancellation of Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for Ancillary Facilities for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... Record of Decision (ROD) (72 FR 7964; February 22, 2007), DOE announced its selection of Richton... new locations for the ancillary facilities associated with the Richton site (73 FR 11895; March 5... the Strategic Petroleum Reserve AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Cancellation....

  13. Improving the Quality of Ability Estimates through Multidimensional Scoring and Incorporation of Ancillary Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Torre, Jimmy

    2009-01-01

    For one reason or another, various sources of information, namely, ancillary variables and correlational structure of the latent abilities, which are usually available in most testing situations, are ignored in ability estimation. A general model that incorporates these sources of information is proposed in this article. The model has a general…

  14. 30 CFR 250.208 - If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide? 250.208 Section 250.208 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION... notices must I provide? At least 30 calendar days before you conduct any G&G exploration or development...

  15. 30 CFR 550.208 - If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide? 550.208 Section 550.208 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT... least 30 calendar days before you conduct any G&G exploration or development G&G activity (see §...

  16. 30 CFR 550.208 - If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide? 550.208 Section 550.208 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT... least 30 calendar days before you conduct any G&G exploration or development G&G activity (see §...

  17. 30 CFR 550.208 - If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide? 550.208 Section 550.208 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT... least 30 calendar days before you conduct any G&G exploration or development G&G activity (see §...

  18. 48 CFR 801.670-3 - Medical, dental, and ancillary service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical, dental, and ancillary service. 801.670-3 Section 801.670-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Career...

  19. GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #15: WORKSHOP ON ANCILLARY BENEFITS AND COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Global Change Research Program is co-sponsoring a three-day workshop to examine possible ancillary benefits of climate change adaptation and mitigation policies. The goals of the workshop are: (1)to establish a common basis of understanding about the conceptual and empiric...

  20. Risk Management: Supporting the District's Ancillary Services Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldmann, Steve; Strasburger, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The everyday operations of a school district depend on a network of people, including students, teachers, staff, and administrators. However, the ancillary services staff are really responsible for making the school day run smoothly. They are often the first employees that students see in the morning, either on the school bus or in the cafeteria,…

  1. Regulatory issues associated with closure of the Hanford AX Tank Farm ancillary equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.L.

    1998-09-02

    Liquid mixed, high-level radioactive waste has been stored in underground single-shell tanks at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site. After retrieval of the waste from the single-shell tanks, the DOE will proceed with closure of the tank farm. The 241-AX Tank Farm includes four one-million gallon single-shell tanks in addition to sluice lines, transfer lines, ventilation headers, risers, pits, cribs, catch tanks, buildings, well and associated buried piping. This equipment is classified as ancillary equipment. This document addresses the requirements for regulatory close of the ancillary equipment in the Hanford Site 241-AX Tank Farm. The options identified for physical closure of the ancillary equipment include disposal in place, disposal in place after treatment, excavation and disposal on site in an empty single-shell tank, and excavation and disposal outside the AX Tank Farm. The document addresses the background of the Hanford Site and ancillary equipment in the AX Tank Farm, regulations for decontamination and decommissioning of radioactively contaminated equipment, requirements for the cleanup and disposal of radioactive wastes, cleanup and disposal requirements governing hazardous and mixed waste, and regulatory requirements and issues associated with each of the four physical closure options. This investigation was conducted by the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, during Fiscal Year 1998 for the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project.

  2. 30 CFR 550.207 - What ancillary activities may I conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What ancillary activities may I conduct? 550.207 Section 550.207 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... cuttings discharges, projected air emissions, or potential hydrogen sulfide (H2S) releases....

  3. 30 CFR 250.207 - What ancillary activities may I conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What ancillary activities may I conduct? 250.207 Section 250.207 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT... spills, drilling muds and cuttings discharges, projected air emissions, or potential hydrogen...

  4. 30 CFR 550.207 - What ancillary activities may I conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What ancillary activities may I conduct? 550.207 Section 550.207 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... cuttings discharges, projected air emissions, or potential hydrogen sulfide (H2S) releases....

  5. 30 CFR 550.207 - What ancillary activities may I conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What ancillary activities may I conduct? 550.207 Section 550.207 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... cuttings discharges, projected air emissions, or potential hydrogen sulfide (H2S) releases....

  6. 47 CFR 90.317 - Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions. 90.317 Section 90.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Authorization in the Band 470-512 MHz...

  7. 47 CFR 90.317 - Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions. 90.317 Section 90.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Authorization in the Band 470-512 MHz...

  8. 47 CFR 90.317 - Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions. 90.317 Section 90.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Authorization in the Band 470-512 MHz...

  9. 47 CFR 90.317 - Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions. 90.317 Section 90.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Authorization in the Band 470-512 MHz...

  10. 47 CFR 90.317 - Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed ancillary signaling and data transmissions. 90.317 Section 90.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Authorization in the Band 470-512 MHz...

  11. 47 CFR 25.255 - Procedures for resolving harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for resolving harmful interference...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.255 Procedures for resolving harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial components operating in the...

  12. Advanced technology for ancillary coal cleaning operations. Technical progress report, January 1988--March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The work under contract number DE-AC22-87PC97881 is devoted to experimental research and development to investigate the feasibility of novel ancillary coal-cleaning technologies that offer a potential for reduced capital and operating costs. The ancilliary operations that are specifically addressed in this work include pulse enhanced drying, fines reconstitution by extrusion, and hydraulic wave comminution.

  13. Camera traps and mark-resight models: The value of ancillary data for evaluating assumptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Arielle W.; Simons, Theodore R.; Pollock, Kenneth H.; Stoskopf, Michael K.; Stocking, Jessica J.; O'Connell, Allan F.

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased estimators of abundance and density are fundamental to the study of animal ecology and critical for making sound management decisions. Capture–recapture models are generally considered the most robust approach for estimating these parameters but rely on a number of assumptions that are often violated but rarely validated. Mark-resight models, a form of capture–recapture, are well suited for use with noninvasive sampling methods and allow for a number of assumptions to be relaxed. We used ancillary data from continuous video and radio telemetry to evaluate the assumptions of mark-resight models for abundance estimation on a barrier island raccoon (Procyon lotor) population using camera traps. Our island study site was geographically closed, allowing us to estimate real survival and in situ recruitment in addition to population size. We found several sources of bias due to heterogeneity of capture probabilities in our study, including camera placement, animal movement, island physiography, and animal behavior. Almost all sources of heterogeneity could be accounted for using the sophisticated mark-resight models developed by McClintock et al. (2009b) and this model generated estimates similar to a spatially explicit mark-resight model previously developed for this population during our study. Spatially explicit capture–recapture models have become an important tool in ecology and confer a number of advantages; however, non-spatial models that account for inherent individual heterogeneity may perform nearly as well, especially where immigration and emigration are limited. Non-spatial models are computationally less demanding, do not make implicit assumptions related to the isotropy of home ranges, and can provide insights with respect to the biological traits of the local population.

  14. Charged bis-cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes with carbene-based ancillary ligands.

    PubMed

    Monti, Filippo; Kessler, Florian; Delgado, Manuel; Frey, Julien; Bazzanini, Federico; Accorsi, Gianluca; Armaroli, Nicola; Bolink, Henk J; Ortí, Enrique; Scopelliti, Rosario; Nazeeruddin, Md Khaja; Baranoff, Etienne

    2013-09-16

    Charged cyclometalated (C(^)N) iridium(III) complexes with carbene-based ancillary ligands are a promising family of deep-blue phosphorescent compounds. Their emission properties are controlled primarily by the main C(^)N ligands, in contrast to the classical design of charged complexes where N(^)N ancillary ligands with low-energy π* orbitals, such as 2,2'-bipyridine, are generally used for this purpose. Herein we report two series of charged iridium complexes with various carbene-based ancillary ligands. In the first series the C(^)N ligand is 2-phenylpyridine, whereas in the second one it is 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-pyridine. One bis-carbene (:C(^)C:) and four different pyridine-carbene (N(^)C:) chelators are used as bidentate ancillary ligands in each series. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structures, and photophysical and electrochemical properties of the two series of complexes are described. At room temperature, the :C(^)C: complexes show much larger photoluminescence quantum yields (ΦPL) of ca. 30%, compared to the N(^)C: analogues (around 1%). On the contrary, all of the investigated complexes are bright emitters in the solid state both at room temperature (1% poly(methyl methacrylate) matrix, ΦPL 30-60%) and at 77 K. Density functional theory calculations are used to rationalize the differences in the photophysical behavior observed upon change of the ancillary ligands. The N(^)C:-type complexes possess a low-lying triplet metal-centered ((3)MC) state mainly deactivating the excited state through nonradiative processes; in contrast, no such state is present for the :C(^)C: analogues. This finding is supported by temperature-dependent excited-state lifetime measurements made on representative N(^)C: and :C(^)C: complexes.

  15. Reduction of CO2 using a Rhenium Bipyridine Complex Containing Ancillary BODIPY Moieties

    PubMed Central

    Teesdale, Justin J.; Pistner, Allen J.; Yap, Glenn P.A.; Ma, Ying-Zhong; Lutterman, Daniel A.; Rosenthal, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The reduction of carbon dioxide to chemical fuels such as carbon monoxide is an important challenge in the field of renewable energy conversion. Given the thermodynamic stability of carbon dioxide, it is difficult to efficiently activate this substrate in a selective fashion and the development of new electrocatalysts for CO2 reduction is of prime importance. To this end, we have prepared and studied a new fac-ReI(CO)3 complex supported by a bipyridine ligand containing ancillary BODIPY moieties ([Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl]). Voltammetry experiments revealed that this system displays a rich redox chemistry under N2, as [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] can be reduced by up to four electrons at modest potentials. These redox events have been characterized as the ReI/0 couple, and three ligand based reductions – two of which are localized on the BODIPY units. The ability of the BB2 ligand to serve as a non-innocent redox reservoir is manifest in an enhanced electrocatalysis with CO2 as compared to an unsubstituted Re-bipyridine complex lacking BODIPY units ([Re(bpy)(CO)3Cl]). The second order rate constant for reduction of CO2 by [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was measured to be k = 3400 M−1s−1 at an applied potential of −2.0 V versus SCE, which is roughly three times greater than the corresponding unsubstituted Re-bipyridine homologue. Photophysical and photochemical studies were also carried out to determine if [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was a competent platform for CO2 reduction using visible light. These experiments showed that this complex supports unusual excited state dynamics that precludes efficient CO2 reduction and are distinct from those that are typically observed for fac-ReI(CO)3 complexes. PMID:25395735

  16. Reduction of CO2 using a Rhenium Bipyridine Complex Containing Ancillary BODIPY Moieties.

    PubMed

    Teesdale, Justin J; Pistner, Allen J; Yap, Glenn P A; Ma, Ying-Zhong; Lutterman, Daniel A; Rosenthal, Joel

    2014-04-15

    The reduction of carbon dioxide to chemical fuels such as carbon monoxide is an important challenge in the field of renewable energy conversion. Given the thermodynamic stability of carbon dioxide, it is difficult to efficiently activate this substrate in a selective fashion and the development of new electrocatalysts for CO2 reduction is of prime importance. To this end, we have prepared and studied a new fac-Re(I)(CO)3 complex supported by a bipyridine ligand containing ancillary BODIPY moieties ([Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl]). Voltammetry experiments revealed that this system displays a rich redox chemistry under N2, as [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] can be reduced by up to four electrons at modest potentials. These redox events have been characterized as the Re(I/0) couple, and three ligand based reductions - two of which are localized on the BODIPY units. The ability of the BB2 ligand to serve as a non-innocent redox reservoir is manifest in an enhanced electrocatalysis with CO2 as compared to an unsubstituted Re-bipyridine complex lacking BODIPY units ([Re(bpy)(CO)3Cl]). The second order rate constant for reduction of CO2 by [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was measured to be k = 3400 M(-1)s(-1) at an applied potential of -2.0 V versus SCE, which is roughly three times greater than the corresponding unsubstituted Re-bipyridine homologue. Photophysical and photochemical studies were also carried out to determine if [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was a competent platform for CO2 reduction using visible light. These experiments showed that this complex supports unusual excited state dynamics that precludes efficient CO2 reduction and are distinct from those that are typically observed for fac-Re(I)(CO)3 complexes. PMID:25395735

  17. Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes with hydrophobic ancillary ligand as Aβ aggregation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Nilima A; Ramteke, Shefali N; Kumbhar, Avinash S; Kulkarni, Prasad P; Jani, Vinod; Sonawane, Uddhavesh B; Joshi, Rajendra R; Joshi, Bimba; Erxleben, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    The synthesis, spectral and electrochemical characterization of the complexes of the type [Ru(NN)2(txbg)](2+) where NN is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) (1), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (2), dipyrido [3,2-d:2',3f] quinoxaline (dpq) (3), and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz) (4) which incorporate the tetra-xylene bipyridine glycoluril (txbg) as the ancillary ligand are described in detail. Crystal structures of ligand txbg and complex 2 were solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results indicated that at micromolar concentration all complexes exhibit significant potential of Aβ aggregation inhibition, while the ligand txbg displayed weak activity towards Aβ aggregation. Complex 1 showed relatively low inhibition (70%) while complexes 2-4 inhibited nearly 100% Aβ aggregation after 240 h of incubation. The similar potential of complexes 2-4 and absence of any trend in their activity with the planarity of polypyridyl ligands suggests there is no marked effect of planarity of coligands on their inhibitory potential. Further studies on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition indicated very weak activity of these complexes against AChE. Detailed interactions of Aβ with both ligand and complex 2 have been studied by molecular modeling. Complex 2 showed interactions involving all three polypyridyl ligands with hydrophobic region of Aβ. Furthermore, the toxicity of these complexes towards human neuroblastoma cells was evaluated by MTT assay and except complex 4, the complexes displayed very low toxicity. PMID:27406812

  18. Reduction of CO2 using a Rhenium Bipyridine Complex Containing Ancillary BODIPY Redox Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Teesdale, Justin; Pistner, Allen; Yapp, Glenn P. A.; Ma, Yingzhong; Lutterman, Daniel A; Rosenthal, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The reduction of carbon dioxide to chemical fuels such as carbon monoxide is an important challenge in the field of renewable energy conversion. Given the thermodynamic stability of carbon dioxide, it is difficult to efficiently activate this substrate in a selective fashion and the development of new electrocatalysts for CO2 reduction is of prime importance. To this end, we have prepared and studied a new fac-ReI(CO)3 complex supported by a bipyridine ligand containing ancillary BODIPY moieties ([Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl]). Voltammetry experiments revealed that this system displays a rich redox chemistry under N2, as [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] can be reduced by up to four electrons at modest potentials. These redox events have been characterized as the ReI/0 couple, and three ligand based reductions two of which are localized on the BODIPY units. The ability of the BB2 ligand to serve as a noninnocent redox reservoir is manifest in an enhanced electrocatalysis with CO2 as compared to an unsubstituted Re-bipyridine complex lacking BODIPY units ([Re(bpy)(CO)3Cl]). The second order rate constant for reduction of CO2 by [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was measured to be k = 3400 M 1s 1 at an applied potential of 2.0 V versus SCE, which is roughly three times greater than the corresponding unsubstituted Re-bipyridine homologue. Photophysical and photochemical studies were also carried out to determine if [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was a competent platform for CO2 reduction using visible light. These experiments showed that this complex supports unusual excited state dynamics that are not typically observed for fac- ReI(CO)3 complexes.

  19. The new Heavy-ion MCP-based Ancillary Detector DANTE for the CLARA-PRISMA Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Gadea, A.; Corradi, L.; De Angelis, G.; Della Vedova, F.; Fioretto, E.; Marginean, N.; Napoli, D. R.; Orlandi, R.; Pokrovsky, I.; Sahin, E.; Stefanini, A. M.; Brambilla, S.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Beghini, S.; Farnea, E.; Lunardi, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Ur, C. A.

    2006-08-14

    The CLARA-PRISMA setup is a powerful tool for spectroscopic studies of neutron-rich nuclei produced in multi-nucleon transfer and deep-inelastic reactions. It combines the large acceptance spectrometer PRISMA with the {gamma}-ray array CLARA. At present, the ancillary heavy-ion detector DANTE, based on Micro-Channel Plates to be installed at the CLARA-PRISMA setup, is being constructed at LNL. DANTE will open the possibility of measuring {gamma}-{gamma} Doppler-corrected coincidences for the events outside the acceptance of PRISMA. In this presentation, it is described the heavy-ion detector DANTE, as well as the performances of the first prototype.

  20. Regional land cover characterization using Landsat thematic mapper data and ancillary data sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogelmann, J.E.; Sohl, T.L.; Campbell, P.V.; Shaw, D.M.; ,

    1998-01-01

    As part of the activities of the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Interagency Consortium, an intermediate-scale land cover data set is being generated for the conterminous United States. This effort is being conducted on a region-by-region basis using U.S. Standard Federal Regions. To date, land cover data sets have been generated for Federal Regions 3 (Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware) and 2 (New York and New Jersey). Classification work is currently under way in Federal Region 4 (the southeastern United States), and land cover mapping activities have been started in Federal Regions 5 (the Great Lakes region) and 1 (New England). it is anticipated that a land cover data set for the conterminous United States will be completed by the end of 1999. A standard land cover classification legend is used, which is analogous to and compatible with other classification schemes. The primary MRLC regional classification scheme contains 23 land cover classes. The primary source of data for the project is the Landsat thematic mapper (TM) sensor. For each region, TM scenes representing both leaf-on and leaf-off conditions are acquired, preprocessed, and georeferenced to MRLC specifications. Mosaicked data are clustered using unsupervised classification, and individual clusters are labeled using aerial photographs. Individual clusters that represent more than one land cover unit are split using spatial modeling with multiple ancillary spatial data layers (most notably, digital elevation model, population, land use and land cover, and wetlands information). This approach yields regional land cover information suitable for a wide array of applications, including landscape metric analyses, land management, land cover change studies, and nutrient and pesticide runoff modeling.

  1. Four homochiral coordination polymers contain N-acetyl-L-tyrosine and different N-donor ligand: Influence of metal cations, ancillary ligands and coordination modes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Meng-Li; Song, Hui-Hua

    2013-10-15

    Using the chiral ligand N-acetyl-L-tyrosine (Hacty) and maintaining identical reaction conditions, Zn(II), Co(II), and Cd(II) salts provided four novel homochiral coordination polymers ([Zn(acty)(bipy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·NO{sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O){sub n}1, ([Co(acty)(bipy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·NO{sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O){sub n}2, ([Cd(acty){sub 2}(bipy)H{sub 2}O]·H{sub 2}O){sub n}3, and ([Cd(acty)(bpe){sub 2}(Ac)]·6H{sub 2}O){sub n}4 (bipy=4,4′-bipyridine; bpe=1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethane) in the presence of ancillary ligands. Compounds 1 and 2 are isostructural 1D chain structures. The neighboring chains are further linked into a 3D supramolecular structure via π⋯π stacking and hydrogen bond interactions. Compound 3 shows a 2D network and 4 generates 1D infinite chains along the c-axis. Compounds 3 and 4 are further connected into 3D supramolecular network by hydrogen bond interactions. More importantly, coordination in acyl oxygen atoms and ancillary ligands (bpe) as monodentate decorating ligands in 4 are rarely reported. Ancillary ligands and metal cations significantly influence the structure of the complexes. The photoluminescence properties of 1, 3, and 4 were studied at room temperature. Circular dichroism (CD) of the complexes have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Four new homochiral coordination polymers were prepared and structurally characterized, which investigate the influence of the ancillary ligands and metal ions on the design and synthesis of coordination polymers. Display Omitted - Highlights: • It is rarely reported that the chiral coordination polymers prepared with N-acetyl-L-tyrosine ligands. • The alkalescent acetyl oxygen atom is difficult to participate in coordination but it is happened in the N-acetyl-L-tyrosine ligands. • The ancillary ligands (4,4′-bipy and bpe) are present in an unusual coordination modes, monodentate decorating ligands in 1, 2 and 4. • Structure comparative analyses results indicate that the

  2. Geospatial modelling of metocean and environmental ancillary data for the oil spill probability assessment in SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müllenhoff, Oliver; Bulgarelli, Barbara; Ferraro, Guido; Perkovic, Marko; Topouzelis, Kostas; Sammarini, Valerio

    2008-10-01

    The confidence level of oil spill detections in satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery requires the analysis of many different factors. Unfortunately, oil slicks are not the only phenomena which can appear as a dark feature in a SAR image. These include a number of parameters like wind speed, currents, internal waves, upwelling sea areas, algae bloom, mixing water areas, et cetera. These phenomena are called look-alikes. The largest challenge in detecting oil spills in SAR images remains in the accurate discrimination between oil spills and look-alikes. This study introduces the vantages of using geospatial analysis of various metocean data (e.g. wind speed and direction, sea surface temperature, wave direction, ocean colour data) and environmental ancillary data (e.g. vessel traffic, port locations) as a supplementary information source for the oil spill probability assessment in SAR imagery. The analysed data exists in different formats with different value scales. In addition, the parameters of the metocean data analysis are not equally important for a reliability of oil spill detection. The weight of metocean parameters depends on the impact of natural phenomena on SAR systems (e.g. wind and currents have pro rata more influence on the probability than sea surface temperature and chlorophyll-a) and the area of interest (e.g. chlorophyll-a is a more important value for the Baltic Sea than for the Mediterranean Sea). The derived oil spill probability categorisation based on the weighted analysis of metocean environmental ancillary data could be a useful tool for authorities for an efficient planning of cost-intensive verification flights.

  3. Summary of the 1993 ASHG ancillary meeting recent research on chromosome 4p syndromes and genes

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrooks, L.L.; Breg, W.R.; Hayden, M.R.

    1995-02-13

    The following is a summary of presentations given during an ancillary meeting to the 1993 American Society of Human Genetics Meeting in New Orleans, LA. This ancillary meeting, entitled Recent Research on Chromosome 4p Syndromes and Genes, reviewed the history of the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS), the natural history of patients with WHS, and the smallest region of deletion associated with the WHS. The proximal 4p deletion syndrome and the duplication 4p syndrome were also described and advice was offered regarding detection of chromosome 4p deletions, duplications, and rearrangements. The current status of the physical map of chromosome 4p with emphasis on the genes that map to the 4p16 region was presented along with a preliminary phenotypic map of 4p16. The goal of this format was to provide a comprehensive review of the clinical presentations, diagnostic capabilities, and genetic mapping advances involving chromosome 4p.

  4. Ancillary qubit spectroscopy of vacua in cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lolli, Jared; Baksic, Alexandre; Nagy, David; Manucharyan, Vladimir E; Ciuti, Cristiano

    2015-05-01

    We investigate theoretically how the spectroscopy of an ancillary qubit can probe cavity (circuit) QED ground states containing photons. We consider three classes of systems (Dicke, Tavis-Cummings, and Hopfield-like models), where nontrivial vacua are the result of ultrastrong coupling between N two-level systems and a single-mode bosonic field. An ancillary qubit detuned with respect to the boson frequency is shown to reveal distinct spectral signatures depending on the type of vacua. In particular, the Lamb shift of the ancilla is sensitive to both ground state photon population and correlations. Backaction of the ancilla on the cavity ground state is investigated, taking into account the dissipation via a consistent master equation for the ultrastrong coupling regime. The conditions for high-fidelity measurements are determined. PMID:26001000

  5. Organizational boundaries of medical practice: the case of physician ownership of ancillary services

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Physician ownership of in-office ancillary services (IOASs) has come under increasing scrutiny. Advocates of argue that IOASs allow physicians to supervise the quality and coordination of care. Critics have argued that IOASs create financial incentives for physicians to increase ancillary service volume. In this paper we develop a conceptual framework to evaluate the tradeoffs associated with physician ownership of IOASs. There is some evidence supporting the existence of scope and transaction economies in IOASs. Improvement in flow and continuity of care are likely to generate scope economies and improvements in quality monitoring and reductions in consumer transaction costs are likely to generate transaction economies. Other factors include the capture of upstream and downstream profits, but these incentives are likely to be small compared to scope and transaction economies. Policy debates on the merits of IOASs should include an explicit assessment of these tradeoffs. This research was supported in part by funding from the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). PMID:22828324

  6. Ancillary qubit spectroscopy of vacua in cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lolli, Jared; Baksic, Alexandre; Nagy, David; Manucharyan, Vladimir E; Ciuti, Cristiano

    2015-05-01

    We investigate theoretically how the spectroscopy of an ancillary qubit can probe cavity (circuit) QED ground states containing photons. We consider three classes of systems (Dicke, Tavis-Cummings, and Hopfield-like models), where nontrivial vacua are the result of ultrastrong coupling between N two-level systems and a single-mode bosonic field. An ancillary qubit detuned with respect to the boson frequency is shown to reveal distinct spectral signatures depending on the type of vacua. In particular, the Lamb shift of the ancilla is sensitive to both ground state photon population and correlations. Backaction of the ancilla on the cavity ground state is investigated, taking into account the dissipation via a consistent master equation for the ultrastrong coupling regime. The conditions for high-fidelity measurements are determined.

  7. Improved Sea Surface Salinity Retrievals using Ancillary data for Aquarius Ocean Roughness Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, L.; Hejazin, Y.; Rabollii, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D sea surface salinity (SSS) measurement mission was launched into polar orbit during the summer of 2011. The prime sensor is a combined L-band radiometer/scatterometer developed jointly by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which derives SSS from ocean surface brightness temperature (Tb) measurements. This paper deals with a method of improving AQ SSS by making a making an ocean roughness brightness temperature correction (ΔTbr). The ΔTbr is derived using several ancillary data sources of surface wind measurements, namely; NOAA numerical weather model - Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS), WindSat ocean vector wind, and the CONAE Microwave Radiometer (MWR). The basis of the correction is the excess (warming) brightness temperature that is produced when the ocean is roughened by the surface wind. We model the increase in L-band Tb as a function of wind speed and direction relative to the antenna azimuth look direction. Our radiative transfer model by El-Nimri [2010] has been tuned to actual AQ ocean surface Tb's with corresponding surface wind vector. Using this ocean emissivity model and the ancillary wind vector, we derive the roughness correction, ΔTbr, which is applied to the AQ measured ocean surface Tb before retrieving SSS. Finally the effect of ΔTbr is evaluated by computing the difference between the HYCOM ocean salinity model and the AQ retrievals. These differences are cross correlated with the ancillary surface wind vector to assess the effectiveness of the roughness correction. Finally, we compare our ΔTbr with the AQ scatterometer derived ΔTbr. We compare the similarities and differenced versus the ancillary surface wind speed. S. El-Nimri et al., 2010, "An improved C-band ocean surface emissivity model at hurricane force wind speeds over a wide range of earth incidence angles," IEEE Geosci. Rem. Sens. Letters, vol. 7, NO. 4, October.

  8. Recovery Act Weekly Video: 200 Area Asbestos Removal, U-Ancillary Demolition, 200 West Transfer Building Footings

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    A weekly update of the Recovery Act at work. Demolition of U-Ancillary that was contaminated with uranium and asbestos as well as removing asbestos from the Steam Generation Plant in the 200 East Area.

  9. Recovery Act Weekly Video: 200 Area Asbestos Removal, U-Ancillary Demolition, 200 West Transfer Building Footings

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    A weekly update of the Recovery Act at work. Demolition of U-Ancillary that was contaminated with uranium and asbestos as well as removing asbestos from the Steam Generation Plant in the 200 East Area.

  10. [Hirschsprung's disease: the immunohistochemistry as ancillary method for the diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Menchaca-Cervantes, Celestina; Rodríguez-Velasco, Alicia; Ramón-García, Guillermo; Rendón-Macías, Mario Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Background: the confirmatory diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease is made by histopathological study. However, this procedure is limited with only hematoxylin and eosin staining, especially in biopsies of premature babies or when non-expert pathologists make the evaluation. The immunohistochemistry from ganglia cell calretinin has been used to reduce the risk of misdiagnosis. Our objective was to show the benefits of this antibody in diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease in biopsy specimens. Methods: we evaluated patients with histopathological diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease made by hematoxylin and eosin staining. We determined if there was enough paraffin block for immunohistochemistry with two markers: calretinin and neurofilaments. Three controls of autopsy of children under 3 years of age with other diagnosis were included. Results: of a total of 48 cases with histopathological diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease only 13 had adequate tissue for immunohistochemistry. The immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis in nine cases. In the other four cases there were initial misdiagnosis due to evidence of calretinin (ganglion cells) and, thus, Hirschsprung's disease was discarded. Conclusions: the use of immunohistochemistry allows confirming the diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease and reduce the risk of a false-positive result with only hematoxylin and eosin staining.

  11. Distributed Smart Grid Asset Control Strategies for Providing Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Moya, Christian; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2013-10-30

    implementing real load control programs. The promise of autonomous, Grid Friendly™ response by smart appliances in the form of under-frequency load shedding was demonstrated in the GridWise Olympic Peninsula Demonstration in 2006. Each controller monitored the power grid voltage signal and requested that electrical load be shed by its appliance whenever electric power-grid frequency fell below 59.95 Hz. The controllers and their appliances responded reliably to each shallow under-frequency event, which was an average of one event per day and shed their loads for the durations of these events. Another objective of this project was to perform extensive simulation studies to investigate the impact of a population of Grid Friendly™ Appliances (GFAs) on the bulk power system frequency stability. The GFAs considered in this report are represented as demonstration units with water heaters individually modeled.

  12. The effect of spatial scale and ancillary datasets on the evaluations of EO soil moisture products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubkova, Marcela; Hegyova, Alena; Bloeschl, Guenter; van Dijk, Albert; Fernàndez Prieto, Diego

    2013-04-01

    With this presentation we follow up on the results of our previous paper that assessed the quality of the ASAR GM 1 km soil moisture product with the use of AWRA-L landscape hydrological model at 1 km scale. In that paper we concluded that that RMSE and R can be predicted with use of the error assessment of ASAR GM solely. The goal of this presentation is to study a) if and how do the results of the absolute and relative evaluation measures change with spatial scale, b) if the conclusion introduced in the previous paper holds independent of scale, and c) where do the differences between different relative and absolute evaluation measures stem from. The continental average absolute evaluation measures over Australia ranged between 2.65 % (Error Propagation (EP)) and 8.44 % (RMSE) of saturated soil moisture. The relative evaluation measures spanned from 0.39 (Spearman Correlation coefficient (RS) when computed with AWRA-L SSM) to 0.57 (RS when computed with GLDAS dataset). Clearly, the results varied between different absolute and different relative evaluation techniques and were as well influenced by the selection of the ancillary dataset. As expected, RS and R corresponded and demonstrated significantly different spatial patterns to any of the absolute measures. Surprisingly, however, the spatial patterns of the EP significantly differed from RMSE at 5 km scale. This is in contrary result to the similar analyses performed at 1 km scale (Doubková et al., 2012) and suggests that the selection of spatial scale has an important impact on the evaluation results. The findings and suggestions originating from the discussion are transferable to other satellite-derived soil moisture data. Of special interest is its transfer to data from the planned Sentinel-1 SAR sensor that shares similar technical characteristics but has an improved retrieval error comparable to the ASAR GM sensor. The operationally available medium resolution soil moisture from Sentinel-1 with a well

  13. Molecular Structure Laboratory. Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FTNMR) Spectrometer and Ancillary Instrumentation at SUNY Geneseo

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, David K

    2015-12-31

    An Agilent 400-MR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer and ancillary equipment were purchased, which are being used for molecular structure elucidation.  The instrumentation is housed in a pre-existing facility designed specifically for its use. This instrument package is being used to expand the research and educational efforts of the faculty and students at SUNY-Geneseo and is made available to neighboring educational institutions and business concerns.  Funds were also used for training of College personnel, maintenance of the instrumentation, and installation of the equipment.

  14. Intravital imaging reveals new ancillary mechanisms co-opted by cancer cells to drive tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Morghan C.; Timpson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Intravital imaging is providing new insights into the dynamics of tumor progression in native tissues and has started to reveal the layers of complexity found in cancer. Recent advances in intravital imaging have allowed us to look deeper into cancer behavior and to dissect the interactions between tumor cells and the ancillary host niche that promote cancer development. In this review, we provide an insight into the latest advances in cancer biology achieved by intravital imaging, focusing on recently discovered mechanisms by which tumor cells manipulate normal tissue to facilitate disease progression. PMID:27239290

  15. Influence of Ancillary Ligands and Isomerism on the Luminescence of Bis-cyclometalated Platinum(IV) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Juliá, Fabio; García-Legaz, María-Dulce; Bautista, Delia; González-Herrero, Pablo

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis, characterization, and photophysical properties of a wide variety of bis-cyclometalated Pt(IV) complexes featuring a C2-symmetrical or unsymmetrical {Pt(ppy)2} unit (sym or unsym complexes, respectively; ppy = C-deprotonated 2-phenylpyridine) and different ancillary ligands are reported. Complexes sym-[Pt(ppy)2X2] (X = OTf(-), OAc(-)) were obtained by chloride abstraction from sym-[Pt(ppy)2Cl2] using the corresponding AgX salts, and the triflate derivative was employed to obtain homologous complexes with X = F(-), Br(-), I(-), trifluoroacetate (TFA(-)). Complexes unsym-[Pt(ppy)2(Me)X] (X = OTf(-), F(-)) were prepared by reacting unsym-[Pt(ppy)2(Me)Cl] with AgOTf or AgF, respectively, and the triflate derivative was employed as precursor for the synthesis of the homologues with X = Br(-), I(-), or TFA(-) through its reaction with the appropriate anionic ligands. The previously reported complexes unsym-[Pt(ppy)2X2] (X = Cl(-), Br(-), OAc(-), TFA(-)) are included in the photophysical study to assess the influence of the arrangement of the cyclometalated ligands. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations on selected derivatives were performed for a better interpretation of the observed excited-state properties. Complexes sym-[Pt(ppy)2X2] (except X = I(-)) exhibit phosphorescent emissions in fluid solutions at 298 K arising from essentially (3)LC(ppy) excited states, which are very similar in shape and energy. However, their efficiencies are heavily dependent on the nature of the ancillary ligands, which affect the energy of deactivating ligand-to-ligand charge transfer (LLCT) or ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) states. The fluoride derivative sym-[Pt(ppy)2F2] shows the highest quantum yield of this series (Φ = 0.398), mainly because the relatively high metal-to-ligand charge transfer admixture in its emitting state leads to a high radiative rate constant. Complexes unsym-[Pt(ppy)2X2] emit from (3)LC(ppy) states in frozen

  16. Influence of Ancillary Ligands and Isomerism on the Luminescence of Bis-cyclometalated Platinum(IV) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Juliá, Fabio; García-Legaz, María-Dulce; Bautista, Delia; González-Herrero, Pablo

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis, characterization, and photophysical properties of a wide variety of bis-cyclometalated Pt(IV) complexes featuring a C2-symmetrical or unsymmetrical {Pt(ppy)2} unit (sym or unsym complexes, respectively; ppy = C-deprotonated 2-phenylpyridine) and different ancillary ligands are reported. Complexes sym-[Pt(ppy)2X2] (X = OTf(-), OAc(-)) were obtained by chloride abstraction from sym-[Pt(ppy)2Cl2] using the corresponding AgX salts, and the triflate derivative was employed to obtain homologous complexes with X = F(-), Br(-), I(-), trifluoroacetate (TFA(-)). Complexes unsym-[Pt(ppy)2(Me)X] (X = OTf(-), F(-)) were prepared by reacting unsym-[Pt(ppy)2(Me)Cl] with AgOTf or AgF, respectively, and the triflate derivative was employed as precursor for the synthesis of the homologues with X = Br(-), I(-), or TFA(-) through its reaction with the appropriate anionic ligands. The previously reported complexes unsym-[Pt(ppy)2X2] (X = Cl(-), Br(-), OAc(-), TFA(-)) are included in the photophysical study to assess the influence of the arrangement of the cyclometalated ligands. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations on selected derivatives were performed for a better interpretation of the observed excited-state properties. Complexes sym-[Pt(ppy)2X2] (except X = I(-)) exhibit phosphorescent emissions in fluid solutions at 298 K arising from essentially (3)LC(ppy) excited states, which are very similar in shape and energy. However, their efficiencies are heavily dependent on the nature of the ancillary ligands, which affect the energy of deactivating ligand-to-ligand charge transfer (LLCT) or ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) states. The fluoride derivative sym-[Pt(ppy)2F2] shows the highest quantum yield of this series (Φ = 0.398), mainly because the relatively high metal-to-ligand charge transfer admixture in its emitting state leads to a high radiative rate constant. Complexes unsym-[Pt(ppy)2X2] emit from (3)LC(ppy) states in frozen

  17. Estimating the distribution of snow depth via artificial neural networks combined with MODIS snow cover area and ancillary topographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jinliang; Huang, Chunlin

    2016-04-01

    Accurately estimate the distribution of snow depth (SD) is particularly difficult in mountainous environments given the complex topography, strong seasonal transition, and scarce observations. Passive microwave snow depth retrievals are too coarse to resolve small-scale terrain-induced variability; Optical sensors have the ability to determine the snow coverage extent at higher spatial resolution but not SD. By taking advantage of long time moderate-resolution optical sensors (MODIS) fractional snow cover (FSC) data series, the cubic spline interpolation algorithm is used to fill in data gaps caused by clouds in MODIS FSC Products. An innovative method based on multilayer feedforward artificial neural network (ANN) is presented to generate SD at a 500 m spatial resolution. This is trained with back propagation to learn the relationship between SD and FSC, Latitude and longitude, and ancillary topographic (e.g. elevation, slope, aspect) data. In this study, daily snow depth observations at 42 meteorological stationsare chosen to examine the proposed method during 2004 to 2005 snow seasons (from 1 November 2004 to 31 March 2005, 151 days) in northern Xinjiang Province, China. Among them, FSC, Latitude and longitude, and ancillary topographic data extracted from 35 sites are used as input information, and corresponding ground-based SD observations are used as desired output of ANN, thus a total of 151*35 samples are included in the ANN training set; Corresponding data from other 7 sites are used as independent test sample set (151*7 samples) to test the generalization ability of the ANN. Preliminary experimental results are very encouraging compared with the traditional multiple regression method. The performance evaluation results shows that the ANN derived SD have much higher coefficient of determination (R2) and lower root-mean-square error (RMSE), with R2 of 0.89 and 0.88, RMSE of 0.07 and 0.08, the mean absolute error of 2.3 and 2.3 cm for training and test

  18. Organizational boundaries of medical practice: the case of physician ownership of ancillary services.

    PubMed

    Schneider, John E; Ohsfeldt, Robert L; Scheibling, Cara M; Jeffers, Sarah A

    2012-01-01

    Physician ownership of in-office ancillary services (IOASs) has come under increasing scrutiny. Advocates of argue that IOASs allow physicians to supervise the quality and coordination of care. Critics have argued that IOASs create financial incentives for physicians to increase ancillary service volume. In this paper we develop a conceptual framework to evaluate the tradeoffs associated with physician ownership of IOASs. There is some evidence supporting the existence of scope and transaction economies in IOASs. Improvement in flow and continuity of care are likely to generate scope economies and improvements in quality monitoring and reductions in consumer transaction costs are likely to generate transaction economies. Other factors include the capture of upstream and downstream profits, but these incentives are likely to be small compared to scope and transaction economies. Policy debates on the merits of IOASs should include an explicit assessment of these tradeoffs.This research was supported in part by funding from the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). PMID:22828324

  19. Complementation for an essential ancillary non-structural protein function across parvovirus genera.

    PubMed

    Mihaylov, Ivailo S; Cotmore, Susan F; Tattersall, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Parvoviruses encode a small number of ancillary proteins that differ substantially between genera. Within the genus Protoparvovirus, minute virus of mice (MVM) encodes three isoforms of its ancillary protein NS2, while human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1), in the genus Bocaparvovirus, encodes an NP1 protein that is unrelated in primary sequence to MVM NS2. To search for functional overlap between NS2 and NP1, we generated murine A9 cell populations that inducibly express HBoV1 NP1. These were used to test whether NP1 expression could complement specific defects resulting from depletion of MVM NS2 isoforms. NP1 induction had little impact on cell viability or cell cycle progression in uninfected cells, and was unable to complement late defects in MVM virion production associated with low NS2 levels. However, NP1 did relocate to MVM replication centers, and supports both the normal expansion of these foci and overcomes the early paralysis of DNA replication in NS2-null infections.

  20. Using Ancillary Information to Improve Hypocenter Estimation: Bayesian Single Event Location (BSEL)

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, Deborah K.; Taylor, Steven R.; Schult, Frederick R.; Anderson, Dale N.

    2009-04-01

    Abstract: We have developed and tested a unifying algorithm for estimating the location of a seismic event. The estimation approach differs from established non-linear regression techniques by using Bayesian priors to incorporate ancillary physical basis constraints and knowledge about the event location. P-wave (primary) arrival times from seismic data waveforms are used in the development. Depth, a focus of this paper, may be modeled with a probability density function (potentially skewed) that captures physical basis bounds on depth from ancillary event characteristics. For instance, the surface wave Rg is present in a waveform only when an event is shallow. A high confidence Rg detection in one or more event waveforms can lead one to assume a shallow-skewed prior probability density function for the depth parameters. The proposed Bayesian algorithm is illustrated with a magnitude 5.6 earthquake in southwest Montana by comparing results with good and poor station configurations. A noninformative uniform prior is used in both cases to demonstrate a hypocenter estimate that is equivalent to the established non-linear regression approach.

  1. Access to Emissions Distributions and Related Ancillary Data through the ECCAD database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darras, Sabine; Enriquez, Edgar; Granier, Claire; Liousse, Catherine; Boulanger, Damien; Fontaine, Alain

    2016-04-01

    The ECCAD database (Emissions of atmospheric Compounds and Compilation of Ancillary Data) provides a user-friendly access to global and regional surface emissions for a large set of chemical compounds and ancillary data (land use, active fires, burned areas, population,etc). The emissions inventories are time series gridded data at spatial resolution from 1x1 to 0.1x0.1 degrees. ECCAD is the emissions database of the GEIA (Global Emissions InitiAtive) project and a sub-project of the French Atmospheric Data Center AERIS (http://www.aeris-data.fr). ECCAD has currently more than 2200 users originating from more than 80 countries. The project benefits from this large international community of users to expand the number of emission datasets made available. ECCAD provides detailed metadata for each of the datasets and various tools for data visualization, for computing global and regional totals and for interactive spatial and temporal analysis. The data can be downloaded as interoperable NetCDF CF-compliant files, i.e. the data are compatible with many other client interfaces. The presentation will provide information on the datasets available within ECCAD, as well as examples of the analysis work that can be done online through the website: http://eccad.aeris-data.fr.

  2. Humanitarian multisensor hand-held mine detector: exploitation of ancillary data in GPR processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisp, Graeme N.; Hill, Andrew

    2002-08-01

    QinetiQ is developing a hand held Multi-sensor mine detector prototype for humanitarian applications. The sensor consists of a GPR, a metal detector and ancillary sensors. This paper describes how data produced by ancillary sensors can be exploited in order to assist the GPR processing. The GPR consists of a 3x3 array of antennas, and focused images of the volume beneath the sensor are formed by post reception synthetic aperture processing. The mine detector is intended to detect sub surface targets, and an accurate knowledge of the ground surface position relative to the sensor is required. Also the high frequency dielectric constant of the ground medium is required in order to produce focused images. This paper analyses the requirements for good post reception synthetic aperture processing. The accuracy of the ground surface position data and the dielectric constant estimation are determined. A model for soil dielectric constant is used to derive the sensitivity of post reception synthetic aperture processing to unknown soil texture. It is show that for the GPR configuration considered, a wide range of texture variations is tolerable provided the soil moisture can be accurately estimated. Variations in soil composition are also tolerable.

  3. Computer-specific metrics for the regulation and load following ancillary services

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

    2000-01-01

    In competitive electricity markets, the costs for each ancillary service should be charged to those who cause the costs to be incurred with charges based on the factors that contribute to these costs. For example, the amount of generating capacity assigned to the regulation service is a function of the short-term volatility of system load. Therefore, the charges for regulation should be related to the volatility of each load, not to its average demand. This report discusses the economic efficiency and equity benefits of assessing charges on the basis of customer-specific costs (rather than the traditional billing determinants, MWh or MW), focusing on two key real-power ancillary services, regulation and load following. The authors determine the extent to which individual customers and groups of customers contribute to the system's generation requirements for these two services. In particular, they analyze load data to determine whether some customers account for shares of these two services that differ substantially from their shares of total electricity consumption.

  4. Territorial user rights for fisheries as ancillary instruments for marine coastal conservation in Chile.

    PubMed

    Gelcich, Stefan; Fernández, Miriam; Godoy, Natalio; Canepa, Antonio; Prado, Luis; Castilla, Juan Carlos

    2012-12-01

    Territorial user rights for fisheries have been advocated as a way to achieve sustainable resource management. However, few researchers have empirically assessed their potential as ancillary marine conservation instruments by comparing them to no-take marine protected areas. In kelp (Lessonia trabeculata) forests of central Chile, we compared species richness, density, and biomass of macroinvertebrates and reef fishes among territorial-user-right areas with low-level and high-level enforcement, no-take marine protected areas, and open-access areas in 42 100-m subtidal transects. We also assessed structural complexity of the kelp forest and substratum composition. Multivariate randomized permutation tests indicated macroinvertebrate and reef fish communities associated with the different access regimes differed significantly. Substratum composition and structural complexity of kelp forest did not differ among access regimes. Univariate analyses showed species richness, biomass, and density of macroinvertebrates and reef fishes were greater in highly enforced territorial-user-right areas and no-take marine protected areas than in open-access areas. Densities of macroinvertebrates and reef fishes of economic importance were not significantly different between highly enforced territorial-user-right and no-take marine protected areas. Densities of economically important macroinvertebrates in areas with low-level enforcement were significantly lower than those in areas with high-level enforcement and no-take marine protected areas but were significantly higher than in areas with open access. Territorial-user-right areas could be important ancillary conservation instruments if they are well enforced.

  5. Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Hernandez, John; Chiu, Albert; Sezgen, Osman; Goodin, John

    2009-11-06

    The Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is conducting a pilot program to investigate the technical feasibility of bidding certain demand response (DR) resources into the California Independent System Operator's (CAISO) day-ahead market for ancillary services nonspinning reserve. Three facilities, a retail store, a local government office building, and a bakery, are recruited into the pilot program. For each facility, hourly demand, and load curtailment potential are forecasted two days ahead and submitted to the CAISO the day before the operation as an available resource. These DR resources are optimized against all other generation resources in the CAISO ancillary service. Each facility is equipped with four-second real time telemetry equipment to ensure resource accountability and visibility to CAISO operators. When CAISO requests DR resources, PG&E's OpenADR (Open Automated DR) communications infrastructure is utilized to deliver DR signals to the facilities energy management and control systems (EMCS). The pre-programmed DR strategies are triggered without a human in the loop. This paper describes the automated system architecture and the flow of information to trigger and monitor the performance of the DR events. We outline the DR strategies at each of the participating facilities. At one site a real time electric measurement feedback loop is implemented to assure the delivery of CAISO dispatched demand reductions. Finally, we present results from each of the facilities and discuss findings.

  6. Ancillary therapy of intranasal T-LysYal® for patients with allergic, non-allergic, and mixed rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Gelardi, M; Taliente, S; Fiorella, M L; Quaranta, N; Ciancio, G; Russo, C; Mola, P; Ciofalo, A; Zambetti, G; Caruso Armone, A; Cantone, E; Ciprandi, G

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is caused by an IgE-mediated inflammatory reaction. Non-allergic rhinitis (NAR) is characterized by a non-IgE-mediated pathogenesis. Frequently, patients have the two disorders associated: such as mixed rhinitis (MR). Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a fundamental component of the human connective tissue. HA may exert anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating activities. Recently, an intranasal HA formulation was proposed: a supramolecular system containing lysine hyaluronate, thymine and sodium chloride (T-LysYal®). This randomized study investigated whether intranasal T-LysYal® (rinoLysYal®, Farmigea, Italy) was able to reduce symptom severity, endoscopic features, and nasal cytology in 89 patients (48 males and 41 females, mean age 36.3±7.1 years) with AR, NAR, and MR. Patients were treated with intranasal T-LysYal® or isotonic saline solution as adjunctive therapy to nasal corticosteroid and oral antihistamine for 4 weeks. Patients were visited at baseline, after treatment and after 4-week follow-up. Intranasal T-LysYal® treatment significantly reduced the quote of patients with symptoms, endoscopic features, and inflammatory cells. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that intranasal T-LysYal® is able, as ancillary therapy, to significantly improve patients with AR, NAR, and MR, and its effect is long lasting. PMID:27049100

  7. Light-emitting properties of cationic iridium complexes containing phenanthroline based ancillary ligand with blue-green and green emission colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Yiseul; Sunesh, Chozhidakath Damodharan; Choe, Youngson

    2015-01-01

    We report here two new cationic iridium(III) complexes with phenanthroline-based ancillary ligands, [Ir(dfppy)2(dibutyl-phen)]PF6 (Complex 1) and [Ir(ppz)2(dibutyl-phen)]PF6 (Complex 2) and their uses in light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs). The design is based on 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridine (dfppy) and 1-phenylpyrazole (ppz) as the cyclometalating ligands and 2,9-dibutyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dibutyl-phen) as the ancillary ligand. The photophysical and electrochemical properties of the complexes were studied and the results obtained were corroborated with theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations. LECs were fabricated incorporating each complexes which resulted in blue-green light emission (502 nm) with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.26, 0.49) for Complex 1 and green (530 nm) electroluminescence with CIE coordinates of (0.33, 0.54) for Complex 2. The luminance and the current efficiency of the LECs based on Complex 1 are 947 cd m-2 and 0.25 cd A-1, respectively, which are relatively higher than that of Complex 2 with a maximum luminance of 773 cd m-2 and an efficiency of 0.16 cd A-1.

  8. Active mechanistic target of rapamycin plays an ancillary rather than essential role in zebrafish CNS axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Diekmann, Heike; Kalbhen, Pascal; Fischer, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    The developmental decrease of the intrinsic regenerative ability of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is associated with reduced activity of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) in mature neurons such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). While mTOR activity is further decreased upon axonal injury, maintenance of its pre-injury level, for instance by genetic deletion of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), markedly promotes axon regeneration in mammals. The current study now addressed the question whether active mTOR might generally play a central role in axon regeneration by analyzing its requirement in regeneration-competent zebrafish. Remarkably, regulation of mTOR activity after optic nerve injury in zebrafish is fundamentally different compared to mammals. Hardly any activity was detected in naïve RGCs, whereas it was markedly increased upon axotomy in vivo as well as in dissociated cell cultures. After a short burst, mTOR activity was quickly attenuated, which is contrary to the requirements for axon regeneration in mammals. Surprisingly, mTOR activity was not essential for axonal growth per se, but correlated with cytokine- and PTEN inhibitor-induced neurite extension in vitro. Moreover, inhibition of mTOR using rapamycin significantly reduced axon regeneration in vivo and compromised functional recovery after optic nerve injury. Therefore, axotomy-induced mTOR activity is involved in CNS axon regeneration in zebrafish similar to mammals, although it plays an ancillary rather than essential role in this regeneration-competent species. PMID:26217179

  9. Secure provision of reactive power ancillary services in competitive electricity markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Samahy, Ismael

    decoupled and assumed to be fixed during the reactive power dispatch procedures; however, the effect of reactive power on real power is considered in the model by calculating the required reduction in real power output of a generator due to an increase in its reactive power supply. In this case, real power generation is allowed to be rescheduled, within given limits, from the already dispatched levels obtained from the energy market clearing process. The proposed dispatch model achieves the main objective of an ISO in a competitive electricity market, which is to provide the required reactive power support from generators at least cost while ensuring a secure operation of the power system. The proposed reactive power procurement and dispatch models capture both the technical and economic aspects of power system operation in competitive electricity markets; however, from an optimization point of view, these models represent non-convex mixed integer non-linear programming (MINLP) problems due to the presence of binary variables associated with the different regions of reactive power operation in a synchronous generator. Such MINLP optimization problems are difficult to solve, especially for an actual power system. A novel Generator Reactive Power Classification (GRPC) algorithm is proposed in this thesis to address this issue, with the advantage of iteratively solving the optimization models as a series of non-linear programming (NLP) sub-problems. The proposed reactive power procurement and dispatch models are implemented and tested on the CIGRE 32-bus system, with several case studies that represent different practical operating scenarios. The developed models are also compared with other approaches for reactive power provision, and the results demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed model. The results clearly reveal the main features of the proposed models for optimal provision of reactive power ancillary service, in order to suit the requirements of

  10. Utilization of Ancillary Data Sets for Conceptual SMAP Mission Algorithm Development and Product Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, P.; Podest, E.

    2011-01-01

    The planned Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond [1]. Scheduled to launch late in 2014, the proposed SMAP mission would provide high resolution and frequent revisit global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state, utilizing enhanced Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) mitigation approaches to collect new measurements of the hydrological condition of the Earth's surface. The SMAP instrument design incorporates an L-band radar (3 km) and an L band radiometer (40 km) sharing a single 6-meter rotating mesh antenna to provide measurements of soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw state [2]. These observations would (1) improve our understanding of linkages between the Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, (2) benefit many application areas including numerical weather and climate prediction, flood and drought monitoring, agricultural productivity, human health, and national security, (3) help to address priority questions on climate change, and (4) potentially provide continuity with brightness temperature and soil moisture measurements from ESA's SMOS (Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity) and NASA's Aquarius missions. In the planned SMAP mission prelaunch time frame, baseline algorithms are being developed for generating (1) soil moisture products both from radiometer measurements on a 36 km grid and from combined radar/radiometer measurements on a 9 km grid, and (2) freeze/thaw products from radar measurements on a 3 km grid. These retrieval algorithms need a variety of global ancillary data, both static and dynamic, to run the retrieval models, constrain the retrievals, and provide flags for indicating retrieval quality. The choice of which ancillary dataset to use for a particular SMAP product would be based on a number of factors

  11. DR Resources for Energy and Ancillary Services in the West (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hummon, M.; Kiliccote, S.

    2014-04-01

    Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility however, DR in grid models is limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the co-optimization of DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model of the Colorado "test system". We assume each DR resource can provide energy services by either shedding load or shifting its use between different times, as well as operating reserves: frequency regulation, contingency reserve, and flexibility (or ramping) reserve. There are significant variations in the availabilities of different types of DR resources, which affect both the operational savings as well as the revenue for each DR resource. The results presented include the system-wide avoided fuel and generator start-up costs as well as the composite revenue for each DR resource by energy and operating reserves.

  12. Critical Joints in Large Composite Primary Aircraft Structures. Volume 3: Ancillary Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunin, Bruce L.; Sagui, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technology for critical structural joints for composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The results of a comprehensive ancillary test program are summarized, consisting of single-bolt composite joint specimens tested in a variety of configurations. These tests were conducted to characterize the strength and load deflection properties that are required for multirow joint analysis. The composite material was Toray 300 fiber and Ciba-Geigy 914 resin, in the form of 0.005 and 0.01 inch thick unidirectional tape. Tests were conducted in single and double shear for loaded and unloaded hole configurations under both tensile and compressive loading. Two different layup patterns were examined. All tests were conducted at room temperature. In addition, the results of NASA Standard Toughness Test (NASA RP 1092) are reported, which were conducted for several material systems.

  13. Engaging with research ethics in central Francophone Africa: reflections on a workshop about ancillary care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Research ethics is predominantly taught and practiced in Anglophone countries, particularly those in North America and Western Europe. Initiatives to build research ethics capacity in developing countries must attempt to avoid imposing foreign frameworks and engage with ethical issues in research that are locally relevant. This article describes the process and outcomes of a capacity-building workshop that took place in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo in the summer of 2011. Although the workshop focused on a specific ethical theme – the responsibilities of researchers to provide health-related care to their research participants – we argue that the structure of the workshop offers a useful method for engaging with research ethics in general, and the theme of ancillary care encourages a broad perspective on research ethics that is highly pertinent in low-income countries. The workshop follows an interactive, locally driven model that could be fruitfully replicated in similar settings. PMID:22866822

  14. Measuring Generator Performance in Providing Regulation and Load-Following Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, E.

    2001-04-05

    In an earlier project, we analyzed data on total system load as well as the loads of eight large industrial customers (Kirby and Hirst 2000). We analyzed these data in terms of system and customer-specific requirements for two real-power ancillary services, regulation and load following. We conducted these analyses using 12 days of data from February 1999 plus 12 days of data from August and September 1999. The project discussed here focused on the supply side (provision) of these two services. Specifically, we examined the output of this control area's generation resources, in aggregate and by unit. We analyzed the performance of these generating units in two ways. First, we analyzed the contribution of these generators to overall system performance [generally relative to the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) standards]. Second, we analyzed performance relative to what the control center requested of the generators.

  15. Spot pricing of electricity and ancillary services in a competitive California market

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, A.S.; Marnay, C.; Khavkin, M.

    2000-11-01

    Typically, in competitive electricity markets, the vertically integrated utilities that were responsible for ensuring system reliability in their own service territories, or groups of territories, cease to exist. The burden falls to an independent system operator (ISO) to ensure that enough ancillary services (AS) are available for safe, stable, and reliable operation of the grid, typically defined, in part, as compliance with officially approved engineering specifications for minimum levels of AS. In order to characterize the behavior of market participants (generators, retailers, and an ISO) in a competitive electricity market with reliability requirements, spot markets for both electricity and AS are modeled. By assuming that each participant seeks to maximize its wealth and that all markets clear, we solve for the optimal quantities of electricity and AS traded in the spot market by all participants, as well as the market clearing prices for each.

  16. Ancillary operation in coal preparation instrumentation: On-line low cost sulfur and ash analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Progress in reported on ancillary operations in coal preparation instrumentation, and on-line low cost sulfur and ash analysis of coal. This quarter's activities consisted of the following; the assembly of the sample preparation and delivery (SPAD) system was completed and laboratory pretesting performed; the entire system was assembled and debugged at C.Q. Inc.; field tests were executed according to the Field Test Plan with certain modifications necessitated by actual field conditions and C.Q. test schedule; coal slurry samples collected at C.Q. Inc. were either sent to the Homer City Coal Lab or brought back to B W for ICP analysis; and Homer City Coal Lab analysis of field collected slurry samples was completed and results reported to B W.

  17. Summary of U.S. Geological Survey on-line instantaneous fluvial sediment and ancillary data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turcios, Lisa M.; Gray, John R.; Ledford, Annette L.

    2000-01-01

    Instantaneous fluvial sediment data, in addition to other instantaneous water-quality and ancillary data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), are available on-line through the National Water Information System World Wide Web (NWISWeb) water-quality data base at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/qwdata. The NWISWeb water-quality data base was populated and is periodically refreshed from electronic files maintained by individual USGS District offices across the United States and Puerto Rico. It represents the single largest repository of USGS electronic instantaneous-value suspended-sediment, bedload, and bed-material data. These Web pages provide a summary of fluvial-sediment data by State, and by USGS station number retrieved from the then-under-construction NWISWeb data base on January 13, 2000. The meta data can be accessed by following the links at the bottom of this Web page.

  18. Using Ancillary Information to Improve Hypocenter Estimation: Bayesian Single Event Location (BSEL).

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, Deborah; Taylor, Steve R.; Schult, Frederick R.; Anderson, Dale N.

    2009-04-01

    We have developed and tested an algorithm, Bayesian Single Event Location (BSEL), for esti- mating the location of a seismic event. The estimation approach di*ers from established non-linear regression techniques by using a Bayesian prior probability density function (prior PDF) to incor- porate ancillary physical basis constraints about event location. P wave arrival times from seismic events are used in the development. Depth, a focus of this paper, may be modeled with a prior PDF (potentially skewed) that captures physical basis bounds from ancillary event characteristics. For instance the surface wave Rg is present in a waveform only when an event is shallow. A high- condence Rg detection in one or more event waveforms implies a shallow-skewed prior PDF for the depth parameter. This PDF is constructed from a physically-based Rayleigh wave depth excitation eigenfunction that is based on the minimum period of observation from a spectrogram analysis and estimated near-source elastic parameters. The proposed Bayesian algorithm is illustrated with events that demonstrate its congruity with established hypocenter estimation methods and its application potential. The BSEL method is applied to the Mw 5.6 Dillon, MT earthquake of July 26, 2005 and a shallow Mw 4 earthquake that occurred near Bardwell, KY on June 6, 2003. In both cases we simulate BSEL on a small subset of arrival time data to illustrate the power of the technique. No Rg was actually observed for the Dillon, MT earthquake, but we used the minimum observed period of a Rayleigh wave (7 seconds) to reduce the depth and origin time uncertainty. A strong Rg was observed from the Bardwell, KY earthquake that places very strong constraints on depth and origin time.

  19. Scheme for Implementation of Ancillary-Free 1 → 3 Optimal Phase-Covariant Quantum Cloning with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rong-Can; Li, Hong-Cai; Lin, Xiu; Huang, Zhi-Ping; Xie, Hong

    2008-06-01

    We propose a simple scheme for the implementation of the ancillary-free 1 → 3 optimal phase-covariant quantum cloning for x-y equatorial qubits in ion-trap system. In the scheme, the vibrational mode is only virtually excited, which is very important in view of decoherence. The present proposal can be realized based on current available technologies.

  20. 47 CFR 25.252 - Special requirements for ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 2000-2020 MHz/2180...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special requirements for ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 2000-2020 MHz/2180-2200 MHz bands. 25.252 Section 25.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS...

  1. 47 CFR 25.252 - Special requirements for ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 2000-2020 MHz/2180...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special requirements for ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 2000-2020 MHz/2180-2200 MHz bands. 25.252 Section 25.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS...

  2. 47 CFR 25.252 - Special requirements for ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 2000-2020 MHz/2180...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special requirements for ancillary terrestrial components operating in the 2000-2020 MHz/2180-2200 MHz bands. 25.252 Section 25.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS...

  3. 75 FR 22125 - Market-Based Rates for Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Market-Based Rates for Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and... Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services by Public Utilities, Order No. 697- C, FERC Stats. &...

  4. 75 FR 14342 - Market-Based Rates for Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 35 Market-Based Rates for Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy... Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services by Public Utilities, Order No. 697- C, FERC Stats. & Regs. ] 31,291 (2009). \\2\\ 18 CFR 35.42. \\3\\ Market-Based Rates for Wholesale Sales of Electric...

  5. Development of a solid polymer electrolyte electrolysis cell module and ancillary components for a breadboard water electrolysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Solid polymer electrolyte technology in a water electrolysis system along with ancillary components to generate oxygen and hydrogen for a manned space station application are considered. Standard commercial components are utilized wherever possible. Presented are the results of investigations, surveys, tests, conclusions and recommendations for future development efforts.

  6. Monitoring basin-scale land cover changes in Kagera Basin of Lake Victoria using ancillary data and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasige, John E.; Groen, Thomas A.; Smaling, Eric; Jetten, Victor

    2013-04-01

    The Kagera Basin is a high value ecosystem in the Lake Victoria watershed because of the hydrological and food services it provides. The basin has faced large scale human induced land use and land cover changes (LUCC), but quantitative data is to date lacking. A combination of ancillary data and satellite imagery were interpreted to construct LUCC dynamics for the last century. This study is an initial step towards assessing the impact of LUCC on sustainable agriculture and water quality in the watershed. The results show that large trends of LUCC have rapidly occurred over the last 100 years. The most dominant LUCC processes were gains in farmland areas (not detectable in 1901 to 60% in 2010) and a net reduction in dense forest (7% to 2.6%), woodlands (51% to 6.9%) and savannas (35% to 19.6%) between 1901 and 2010. Forest degradation rapidly occurred during 1974 and 1995 but the forest re-grew between 1995 and 2010 due to forest conservation efforts. Afforestation efforts have resulted in plantation forest increases between 1995 and 2010. The rates of LUCC observed are higher than those reported in Sub Saharan Africa (SSA) and other parts of the world. This is one of the few studies in SSA at a basin scale that combines multi-source spatio-temporal data on land cover to enable long-term quantification of land cover changes. In the discussion we address future research needs for the area based on the results of this study. These research needs include quantifying the impacts of land cover change on nutrient and sediment dynamics, soil organic carbon stocks, and changes in biodiversity.

  7. Expression of KIT (CD117) in neoplasms of the head and neck: an ancillary marker for adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mino, M; Pilch, B Z; Faquin, W C

    2003-12-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma is an indolent salivary gland malignancy that is associated with a poor long-term prognosis. The distinction of adenoid cystic carcinoma from other head and neck neoplasms can occasionally be problematic, particularly in small biopsies. Recent studies suggest that KIT (CD117) might be useful as an ancillary marker for adenoid cystic carcinoma; however, the expression of KIT in other benign and malignant head and neck neoplasms, including those that might mimic adenoid cystic carcinoma, has not been well studied. Here we use two different antibodies against KIT to evaluate its expression in a series of 66 adenoid cystic carcinomas compared with its expression in 98 other neoplasms of the head and neck. Overall, 94% (n = 62) of adenoid cystic carcinomas from various anatomic sites and of various histologic subtypes were positive for at least one of the KIT antibodies, and 77% (n = 50) of adenoid cystic carcinoma cases were positive for both antibodies. This contrasted with only 8% (n = 8) of other head and neck neoplasms that were positive for both KIT antibodies (P <.001). It was of note that certain neoplasms, including pleomorphic adenoma, basal cell adenoma, polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma, that can show histologic overlap with adenoid cystic carcinoma had significantly less KIT immunoreactivity than did adenoid cystic carcinoma (P <.001). In contrast, KIT expression did not reliably distinguish adenoid cystic carcinoma from basal cell adenocarcinoma and basaloid squamous carcinoma (P >.05). The overall sensitivity of the two KIT antibodies for adenoid cystic carcinoma was 82-89%, and the specificity was 87-88%. The findings in this study support the potential use of KIT immunoexpression for distinguishing adenoid cystic carcinoma from many other benign and malignant head and neck neoplasms.

  8. Increasing Use of Vitamin D Supplementation in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Laura H.; White, Matthew T.; Shults, Justine; Anderson, Cheryl A. M.; Feldman, Harold I.; Wolf, Myles; Reese, Peter P.; Denburg, Michelle R.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Lo, Joan C.; Cappola, Anne R.; Carlow, Dean; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Steigerwalt, Susan; Leonard, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study examined rates and determinants of vitamin D supplementation among Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) participants and determined the association between dose and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level. The 2010 Institute of Medicine Report noted a significant increase in vitamin D supplementation in the general population, but use in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unknown. Methods CRIC is a multicenter prospective observational cohort study of 3,939 participants with a median baseline age of 60 and an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 42.1 mL/minute per 1.73 m2. Of the cohort, 54.9% was male, 42.1% were Black, and 48.4% were diabetic. Multivariable logistic generalized estimating equations were used to examine determinants of supplementation use assessed annually between 2003 and 2011. Cross-sectional linear regression models, based on a subset of 1,155 participants, assessed associations between supplement dose and 25(OH)D level, measured by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Results The proportion of participants reporting supplement use increased (P < .0001), from 10% at baseline to 44% at 7-year follow-up visits. This was largely due to initiation of products containing only ergocalciferol or cholecalciferol. The odds of supplementation were greater in older, female, non-Black, married participants with greater education and lower body mass index. Among participants taking supplementation, dose was positively associated with 25(OH)D level, adjusted for race, season, diabetes, dietary intake, eGFR, and proteinuria. Only 3.8% of non-Black and 16.5% of Black participants taking a supplement were deficient (<20 ng/mL), whereas 22.7% of non-Black and 62.4% of Black participants not reporting supplement use were deficient. Conclusions Vitamin D supplementation rates rose significantly among CRIC participants over 7 years of follow-up and were associated with greater serum 25(OH

  9. Preliminary Results of Ancillary Safety Analyses Supporting TREAT LEU Conversion Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Brunett, A. J.; Fei, T.; Strons, P. S.; Papadias, D. D.; Hoffman, E. A.; Kontogeorgakos, D. C.; Connaway, H. M.; Wright, A. E.

    2015-10-01

    The Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT), located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a test facility designed to evaluate the performance of reactor fuels and materials under transient accident conditions. The facility, an air-cooled, graphite-moderated reactor designed to utilize fuel containing high-enriched uranium (HEU), has been in non-operational standby status since 1994. Currently, in support of the missions of the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program, a new core design is being developed for TREAT that will utilize low-enriched uranium (LEU). The primary objective of this conversion effort is to design an LEU core that is capable of meeting the performance characteristics of the existing HEU core. Minimal, if any, changes are anticipated for the supporting systems (e.g. reactor trip system, filtration/cooling system, etc.); therefore, the LEU core must also be able to function with the existing supporting systems, and must also satisfy acceptable safety limits. In support of the LEU conversion effort, a range of ancillary safety analyses are required to evaluate the LEU core operation relative to that of the existing facility. These analyses cover neutronics, shielding, and thermal hydraulic topics that have been identified as having the potential to have reduced safety margins due to conversion to LEU fuel, or are required to support the required safety analyses documentation. The majority of these ancillary tasks have been identified in [1] and [2]. The purpose of this report is to document the ancillary safety analyses that have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory during the early stages of the LEU design effort, and to describe ongoing and anticipated analyses. For all analyses presented in this report, methodologies are utilized that are consistent with, or improved from, those used in analyses for the HEU Final Safety Analysis

  10. The ancillary protein 1 of Streptococcus pyogenes FCT-1 pili mediates cell adhesion and biofilm formation through heterophilic as well as homophilic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Becherelli, Marco; Manetti, Andrea G O; Buccato, Scilla; Viciani, Elisa; Ciucchi, Laura; Mollica, Giulia; Grandi, Guido; Margarit, Imma

    2012-01-01

    Summary Gram-positive pili are known to play a role in bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells and in the formation of biofilm microbial communities. In the present study we undertook the functional characterization of the pilus ancillary protein 1 (AP1_M6) from Streptococcus pyogenes isolates expressing the FCT-1 pilus variant, known to be strong biofilm formers. Cell binding and biofilm formation assays using S. pyogenes in-frame deletion mutants, Lactococcus expressing heterologous FCT-1 pili and purified recombinant AP1_M6, indicated that this pilin is a strong cell adhesin that is also involved in bacterial biofilm formation. Moreover, we show that AP1_M6 establishes homophilic interactions that mediate inter-bacterial contact, possibly promoting bacterial colonization of target epithelial cells in the form of three-dimensional microcolonies. Finally, AP1_M6 knockout mutants were less virulent in mice, indicating that this protein is also implicated in GAS systemic infection. PMID:22320452

  11. Using ancillary information to improve hypocenter estimation: Bayesian single event location (BSEL)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dale N

    2008-01-01

    We have developed and tested an algorithm, Bayesian Single Event Location (BSEL), for estimating the location of a seismic event. The main driver for our research is the inadequate representation of ancillary information in the hypocenter estimation procedure. The added benefit is that we have also addressed instability issues often encountered with historical NLR solvers (e.g., non-convergence or seismically infeasible results). BSEL differs from established nonlinear regression techniques by using a Bayesian prior probability density function (prior PDF) to incorporate ancillary physical basis constraints about event location. P-wave arrival times from seismic events are used in the development. Depth, a focus of this paper, may be modeled with a prior PDF (potentially skewed) that captures physical basis bounds from surface wave observations. This PDF is constructed from a Rayleigh wave depth excitation eigenfunction that is based on the observed minimum period from a spectrogram analysis and estimated near-source elastic parameters. For example, if the surface wave is an Rg phase, it potentially provides a strong constraint for depth, which has important implications for remote monitoring of nuclear explosions. The proposed Bayesian algorithm is illustrated with events that demonstrate its congruity with established hypocenter estimation methods and its application potential. The BSEL method is applied to three events: (1) A shallow Mw 4 earthquake that occurred near Bardwell, KY on June 6, 2003, (2) the Mw 5.6 earthquake of July 26, 2005 that occurred near Dillon, MT, and (3) a deep Mw 5.7 earthquake that occurred off the coast of Japan on April 22, 1980. A strong Rg was observed from the Bardwell, KY earthquake that places very strong constraints on depth and origin time. No Rg was observed for the Dillon, MT earthquake, but we used the minimum observed period of a Rayleigh wave (7 seconds) to reduce the depth and origin time uncertainty. Because the Japan

  12. Lung VITAL: Rationale, design, and baseline characteristics of an ancillary study evaluating the effects of vitamin D and/or marine omega-3 fatty acid supplements on acute exacerbations of chronic respiratory disease, asthma control, pneumonia and lung function in adults.

    PubMed

    Gold, Diane R; Litonjua, Augusto A; Carey, Vincent J; Manson, JoAnn E; Buring, Julie E; Lee, I-Min; Gordon, David; Walter, Joseph; Friedenberg, Georgina; Hankinson, John L; Copeland, Trisha; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory and observational research studies suggest that vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acids may reduce risk for pneumonia, acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases including chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) or asthma, and decline of lung function, but prevention trials with adequate dosing, adequate power, and adequate time to follow-up are lacking. The ongoing Lung VITAL study is taking advantage of a large clinical trial-the VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL)--to conduct the first major evaluation of the influences of vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on pneumonia risk, respiratory exacerbation episodes, asthma control and lung function in adults. VITAL is a 5-year U.S.-wide randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial trial of supplementation with vitamin D3 ([cholecalciferol], 2000 IU/day) and marine omega-3 FA (Omacor® fish oil, eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA]+docosahexaenoic acid [DHA], 1g/day) for primary prevention of CVD and cancer among men and women, at baseline aged ≥50 and ≥55, respectively, with 5107 African Americans. In a subset of 1973 participants from 11 urban U.S. centers, lung function is measured before and two years after randomization. Yearly follow-up questionnaires assess incident pneumonia in the entire randomized population, and exacerbations of respiratory disease, asthma control and dyspnea in a subpopulation of 4314 randomized participants enriched, as shown in presentation of baseline characteristics, for respiratory disease, respiratory symptoms, and history of cigarette smoking. Self-reported pneumonia hospitalization will be confirmed by medical record review, and exacerbations will be confirmed by Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services data review.

  13. The SPICE concept - An approach to providing geometric and other ancillary information needed for interpretation of data returned from space science instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Charles H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The Navigation Ancillary Information Facility (NAIF), acting under the direction of NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications, and with substantial participation of the planetary science community, is designing and implementing an ancillary data system - called SPICE - to assist scientists in planning and interpreting scientific observations taken from spaceborne instruments. The principal objective of the implemented SPICE system is that it will hold the essential geometric and related ancillary information needed to recover the full value of science instrument data, and that it will facilitate correlations of individual instrument datasets with data obtained from other instruments on the same or other spacecraft.

  14. Cost-Causation-Based Tariffs for Wind Ancillary Service Impacts: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; Wan, Y.

    2006-06-01

    Conference paper discussing the integration cost of wind. Although specific tariffs for wind generation for ancillary services are uncommon, we anticipate that balancing authorities (control areas) and other entities will move toward such tariffs. Tariffs for regulation and imbalance services should be cost-based, recognize the relevant time scales that correspond with utility operational cycles, and properly allocate those costs to those entities that cause the balancing authority to incur the costs. In this paper, we present methods for separating wind's impact into regulation and load following (imbalance) time scales. We show that approximating these impacts with simpler methods can significantly distort cost causation and even cause confusion between the relevant time scales. We present results from NREL's wind data collection program to illustrate the dangers of linearly scaling wind resource data from small wind plants to approximate the wind resource data from large wind plants. Finally, we provide a framework for developing regulation and imbalance tariffs, we outline methods to begin examining contingency reserve requirements for wind plants, we provide guidance on the important characteristics to consider, and we provide hypothetical cases that the tariff can be tested against to determine whether the results are desired.

  15. Producing Alaska interim land cover maps from Landsat digital and ancillary data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick-Lins, Katherine; Doughty, Eileen Flanagan; Shasby, Mark; Loveland, Thomas R.; Benjamin, Susan

    1987-01-01

    In 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated a research program to produce 1:250,000-scale land cover maps of Alaska using digital Landsat multispectral scanner data and ancillary data and to evaluate the potential of establishing a statewide land cover mapping program using this approach. The geometrically corrected and resampled Landsat pixel data are registered to a Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) projection, along with arc-second digital elevation model data used as an aid in the final computer classification. Areas summaries of the land cover classes are extracted by merging the Landsat digital classification files with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management's Public Land Survey digital file. Registration of the digital land cover data is verified and control points are identified so that a laser plotter can products screened film separate for printing the classification data at map scale directly from the digital file. The final land cover classification is retained both as a color map at 1:250,000 scale registered to the U.S. Geological Survey base map, with area summaries by township and range on the reverse, and as a digital file where it may be used as a category in a geographic information system.

  16. Current perspectives on the use of ancillary materials for the manufacture of cellular therapies.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Jennifer; Csontos, Lynn; Clarke, Dominic; Bonyhadi, Mark; Zylberberg, Claudia; McNiece, Ian; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Bell, Rosemarie; Deans, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Continued growth in the cell therapy industry and commercialization of cell therapies that successfully advance through clinical trials has led to increased awareness around the need for specialized and complex materials utilized in their manufacture. Ancillary materials (AMs) are components or reagents used during the manufacture of cell therapy products but are not intended to be part of the final products. Commonly, there are limitations in the availability of clinical-grade reagents used as AMs. Furthermore, AMs may affect the efficacy of the cell product and subsequent safety of the cell therapy for the patient. As such, AMs must be carefully selected and appropriately qualified during the cell therapy development process. However, the ongoing evolution of cell therapy research, limited number of clinical trials and registered cell therapy products results in the current absence of specific regulations governing the composition, compliance, and qualification of AMs often leads to confusion by suppliers and users in this field. Here we provide an overview and interpretation of the existing global framework surrounding AM use and investigate some common misunderstandings within the industry, with the aim of facilitating the appropriate selection and qualification of AMs. The key message we wish to emphasize is that in order to most effectively mitigate risk around cell therapy development and patient safety, users must work with their suppliers and regulators to qualify each AM to assess source, purity, identity, safety, and suitability in a given application. PMID:26596503

  17. Fly DPP10 acts as a channel ancillary subunit and possesses peptidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Shiina, Yohei; Muto, Tomohiro; Zhang, Zhili; Baihaqie, Ahmad; Yoshizawa, Takamasa; Lee, Hye-in J.; Park, Eulsoon; Tsukiji, Shinya; Takimoto, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian DPP6 (DPPX) and DPP10 (DPPY) belong to a family of dipeptidyl peptidases, but lack enzyme activity. Instead, these proteins form complexes with voltage-gated K+ channels in Kv4 family to control their gating and other properties. Here, we find that the fly DPP10 ortholog acts as an ancillary subunit of Kv4 channels and digests peptides. Similarly to mammalian DPP10, the fly ortholog tightly binds to rat Kv4.3 protein. The association causes negative shifts in voltage dependence of channel activation and steady state inactivation. It also results in faster inactivation and recovery from inactivation. In addition to its channel regulatory role, fly DPP10 exhibits significant dipeptidyl peptidase activity with Gly-Pro-MCA (glycyl-L-proline 4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide) as a substrate. Heterologously expressed Flag-tagged fly DPP10 and human DPP4 show similar Km values towards this substrate. However, fly DPP10 exhibits approximately a 6-times-lower relative kcat value normalized with anti-Flag immunoreactivity than human DPP4. These results demonstrate that fly DPP10 is a dual functional protein, controlling Kv4 channel gating and removing bioactive peptides. PMID:27198182

  18. Analysis of the Effects of a Flexible Ramping Ancillary Service Product on Power System Operations: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Krad, Ibrahim; Ibanez, Eduardo; Ela, Erik

    2015-10-19

    The recent increased interest in utilizing variable generation (VG) resources such as wind and solar in power systems has motivated investigations into new operating procedures. Although these resources provide desirable value to a system (e.g., no fuel costs or emissions), interconnecting them provides unique challenges. Their variable, non-controllable nature in particular requires significant attention, because it directly results in increased power system variability and uncertainty. One way to handle this is via new operating reserve schemes. Operating reserves provide upward and downward generation and ramping capacity to counteract uncertainty and variability prior to their realization. For instance, uncertainty and variability in real-time dispatch can be accounted for in the hour-ahead unit commitment. New operating reserve methodologies that specifically account for the increased variability and uncertainty caused by VG are currently being investigated and developed by academia and industry. This paper examines one method inspired by the new operating reserve product being proposed by the California Independent System Operator. The method is based on examining the potential ramping requirements at any given time and enforcing those requirements via a reserve demand curve in the market-clearing optimization as an additional ancillary service product.

  19. Incorporating residential AC load control into ancillary service markets: Measurement and settlement

    SciTech Connect

    Bode, Josh L.; Sullivan, Michael J.; Berghman, Dries; Eto, Joseph H.

    2013-05-01

    Many pre-existing air conditioner load control programs can provide valuable operational flexibility but have not been incorporated into electricity ancillary service markets or grid operations. Multiple demonstrations have shown that residential air conditioner (AC) response can deliver resources quickly and can provide contingency reserves. A key policy hurdle to be overcome before AC load control can be fully incorporated into markets is how to balance the accuracy, cost, and complexity of methods available for the settlement of load curtailment. Overcoming this hurdle requires a means for assessing the accuracy of shorter-term AC load control demand reduction estimation approaches in an unbiased manner. This paper applies such a method to compare the accuracy of approaches varying in cost and complexity ? including regression analysis, load matching and control group approaches ? using feeder data, household data and AC end-use data. We recommend a practical approach for settlement, relying on an annually updated set of tables, with pre-calculated reduction estimates. These tables allow users to look up the demand reduction per device based on daily maximum temperature, geographic region and hour of day, simplifying settlement and providing a solution to the policy problem presented in this paper.

  20. Electric industry restructuring, ancillary services, and the potential impact on wind

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.; Parsons, B.; Porter, K.

    1997-12-31

    The new competitive electric power environment raises increased challenges for wind power. The DOE and EPRI wind programs have dealt extensively with the traditional vertically integrated utility planning and operating environment in which the host utility owns the generation (or purchases the power) and provides dispatch and transmission services. Under this traditional environment, 1794 MW of wind power, principally in California, have been successfully integrated into the U.S. electric power system. Another 4200 MW are installed elsewhere in the world. As issues have arisen, such as intermittency and voltage regulation, they have been successfully addressed with accepted power system procedures and practices. For an intermittent, non-dispatchable resource such as wind, new regulatory rules affecting power transmission services, raise questions about which ancillary services wind plants will be able to sell, which they will be required to purchase, and what the economic impacts will be on individual wind projects. This paper begins to look at issues of concern to wind in a restructured electric industry. The paper first briefly looks at the range of unbundled services and comments on their unique significance to wind. To illustrate the concerns that arise with restructuring, the paper then takes a more detailed look at a single service: regulation. Finally, the paper takes a brief look at technologies and strategies that could improve the competitive position of wind.

  1. Ancillary ligand effects upon dithiolene redox noninnocence in tungsten bis(dithiolene) complexes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yong; Keating, Christopher; Chandrasekaran, Perumalreddy; Jayarathne, Upul; Mague, Joel T; DeBeer, Serena; Lancaster, Kyle M; Sproules, Stephen; Rubtsov, Igor V; Donahue, James P

    2013-06-01

    An expanded set of compounds of the type [W(S2C2Me2)2L1L2](n) (n = 0: L1 = L2 = CO, 1; L1 = L2 = CN(t)Bu, 2; L1 = CO, L2 = carbene, 3; L1 = CO, L2 = phosphine, 4; L1 = L2 = phosphine, 5. n = 2-: L1 = L2 = CN(-), [6](2-)) has been synthesized and characterized. Despite isoelectronic formulations, the compound set reveals gradations in the dithiolene ligand redox level as revealed by intraligand bond lengths, υ(CCchelate), and rising edge energies in the sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectra (XAS). Differences among the terminal series members, 1 and [6](2-), are comparable to differences seen in homoleptic dithiolene complexes related by full electron transfer to/from a dithiolene-based MO. The key feature governing these differences is the favorable energy of the CO π* orbitals, which are suitably positioned to overlap with tungsten d orbitals and exert an oxidizing effect on both metal and dithiolene ligand via π-backbonding. The CN(-) π* orbitals are too high in energy to mix effectively with tungsten and thus leave the filled dithiolene π* orbitals unperturbed. This work shows how, and the degree to which, the redox level of a noninnocent ligand can be modulated by the choice of ancillary ligands(s).

  2. Structure, processing and midgut secretion of putative peritrophic membrane ancillary protein (PMAP) from Tenebrio molitor larvae.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A H; Cristofoletti, P T; Pimenta, D C; Ribeiro, A F; Terra, W R; Ferreira, C

    2008-02-01

    A cDNA coding for a Tenebrio molitor midgut protein named peritrophic membrane ancillary protein (PMAP) was cloned and sequenced. The complete cDNA codes for a protein of 595 amino acids with six insect-allergen-related-repeats that may be grouped in A (predicted globular)- and B (predicted nonglobular)-types forming an ABABAB structure. The PMAP-cDNA was expressed in Pichia pastoris and the recombinant protein (64kDa) was purified to homogeneity and used to raise antibodies in rabbits. The specific antibody detected PMAP peptides (22kDa) in the anterior and middle midgut tissue, luminal contents, peritrophic membrane and feces. These peptides derive from PMAP, as supported by mass spectrometry, and resemble those formed by the in vitro action of trypsin on recombinant PMAP. Both in vitro and in vivo PMAP processing seem to occur by attack of trypsin to susceptible bonds in the coils predicted to link AB pairs, thus releasing the putative functional AB structures. The AB-domain structure of PMAP is found in homologous proteins from several insect orders, except lepidopterans that have the apparently derived protein known as nitrile-specifier protein. Immunocytolocalization shows that PMAP is secreted by exocytosis and becomes entrapped in the glycocalyx, before being released into midgut contents. Circumstantial evidence suggests that PMAP-like proteins have a role in peritrophic membrane type 2 formation.

  3. Workshop on environmental assessment. [Regulation of applications of nuclear energy and related ancillary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, E.C.

    1982-07-01

    Objectives of the workshop were: to review and evaluate the state-of-the-art of environmental impact assessments as applied to the regulation of applications of nuclear energy and related ancillary systems; to identify areas where existing technology allows establishing acceptable methods or standard practices that will meet the requirements of the NRC regulations, standards and guides for both normal operations and off-standard conditions including accident considerations; to illuminate topics where existing models or analytical methods are deficient because of unverified assumptions, a paucity of empirical data, conflicting results reported in the literature or a need for observation of operation systems; to compile, analyze and synthesize a prioritized set of research needs to advance the state-of-the-art to the level which will meet all of the requirements of the Commission's regulations, standards and guides; and to develop bases for maintaining the core of regulatory guidance at the optimum level balancing technical capabilities with practical considerations of cost and value to the regulatory process. The discussion held in small group sessions on aquatic, atmospheric, and terrestrial pathways are presented. The following research needs were identified as common to all three groups: validation of models; characterization of source terms; development of screening techniques; basis for de minimis levels of contamination; and updating of objectives for environmental monitoring programs.

  4. star Miner: A suit of classifiers for spatial, temporal, ancillary, and remote sensing data mining

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju; Shekhar, Shashi; Burk, Thomas E; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2008-01-01

    Thematic classification of multi-spectral remotely sensed imagery for large geographic regions requires complex algorithms and feature selection techniques. Traditional statistical classifiers rely exclusively on spectral characteristics, but thematic classes are often spectrally overlapping. The spectral response distributions of thematic classes are dependent on many factors including terrain, slope, aspect, soil type, and atmospheric conditions present during the image acquisition. With the availability of geo-spatial databases, it is possible to exploit the knowledge derived from these ancillary geo-spatial databases to improve the classification accuracies. However, it is not easy to incorporate this additional knowledge into traditional statistical classification methods. On the other hand, knowledge-based and neural network classifiers can readily incorporate these spatial databases, but these systems are often complex to train and their accuracy is only slightly better than statistical classifiers. In this paper we present a new suit of classifiers developed through NASA funding, which addresses many of these problems and provide a framework for mining multi-spectral and temporal remote sensing images guided by geo-spatial databases.

  5. Ancillary therapy and supportive care of chronic graft-versus-host disease: national institutes of health consensus development project on criteria for clinical trials in chronic Graft-versus-host disease: V. Ancillary Therapy and Supportive Care Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Couriel, Daniel; Carpenter, Paul A; Cutler, Corey; Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Treister, Nathaniel S; Gea-Banacloche, Juan; Shaughnessy, Paul; Hymes, Sharon; Kim, Stella; Wayne, Alan S; Chien, Jason W; Neumann, Joyce; Mitchell, Sandra; Syrjala, Karen; Moravec, Carina K; Abramovitz, Linda; Liebermann, Jerry; Berger, Ann; Gerber, Lynn; Schubert, Mary; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Weisdorf, Daniel; Schubert, Mark M; Shulman, Howard; Schultz, Kirk; Mittelman, Barbara; Pavletic, Steven; Vogelsang, Georgia B; Martin, Paul J; Lee, Stephanie J; Flowers, Mary E D

    2006-04-01

    The Ancillary Therapy and Supportive Care Working Group had 3 goals: (1) to establish guidelines for ancillary therapy and supportive care in chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), including treatment for symptoms and recommendations for patient education, preventive measures, and appropriate follow-up; (2) to provide guidelines for the prevention and management of infections and other common complications of treatment for chronic GVHD; and (3) to highlight the areas with the greatest need for clinical research. The definition of "ancillary therapy and supportive care" embraces the most frequent immunosuppressive or anti-inflammatory interventions used with topical intent and any other interventions directed at organ-specific control of symptoms or complications resulting from GVHD and its therapy. Also included in the definition are educational, preventive, and psychosocial interventions with this same objective. Recommendations are organized according to the strength and quality of evidence supporting them and cover the most commonly involved organs, including the skin, mouth, female genital tract, eyes, gastrointestinal tract, and lungs. Recommendations are provided for prevention of infections, osteoporosis, and steroid myopathy and management of neurocognitive and psychosocial adverse effects related to chronic GVHD. Optimal care of patients with chronic GVHD often requires a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:16545722

  6. Engineering Task Plan for the Integrity Assessment Examination of Double Contained Receiver Tanks (DCRT) Catch Tanks and Ancillary facilities

    SciTech Connect

    BECKER, D.L.

    2000-05-23

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) presents the integrity assessment examination of three DCRTs, seven catch tanks, and two ancillary facilities located in the 200 East and West Areas of the Hanford Site. The integrity assessment examinations, as described in this ETP, will provide the necessary information to enable the independently qualified registered professional engineer (IQRPE) to assess the condition and integrity of these facilities. The plan is consistent with the Double-Shell Tank Waste Transfer Facilities Integrity Assessment Plan.

  7. Biodiesel fuel from animal fat. Ancillary studies on transesterification of beef tallow

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, F.; Clements, L.D.; Hanna, M.A.

    1998-09-01

    Transesterification of beef tallow was investigated. The solubility of ethanol in beef tallow was much higher than that of methanol. At 100 C the solubility of methanol was 19% (w/w). The solubility of ethanol in beef tallow reached 100% (w/w) at about 68 C. For the distribution of methanol between beef tallow methyl esters (BTME) and glycerol, the percentage of total methanol in the glycerol phase was higher than that in the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) phase in a simulated system at room temperature. At 65--80 C, however, the percentage of total methanol in FAME (60% (w/w)) was higher than that in glycerol (40% (w/w)) in a 90:10 (w/w) blend of FAME and glycerol. This coincided with the methanol distribution in the transesterified product. The process for making beef tallow methyl esters should recover methanol using vacuum distillation, separate the ester and glycerol phases, and then wash the beef tallow methyl esters with warm water. At neutral pH, the separation of ester and glycerol and water washing was easier because it reduced emulsion formation.

  8. California residential indoor air quality study. Volume 3. Ancillary and exploratory analyses. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.L.; Colome, S.D.; Tian, Y.

    1995-10-01

    The topics covered in this report are: describe the relationship between measured benzene, toluene, NO2, and radon concentrations with building characteristics, appliance factors, meteorological conditions, other measured pollutants, geographical locations, and sampling parameters; extrapolate the measured CO distributions from the three service territories to the entire State of California; develop a mass balance model to predict CO concentrations from air exchange rate, home volume and cooking/heating type; and explore the relationship among CO concentrations, measured benzene levels, and smoking behaviors.

  9. Improving recombinant Rubisco biogenesis, plant photosynthesis and growth by coexpressing its ancillary RAF1 chaperone.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Spencer M; Birch, Rosemary; Kelso, Celine; Beck, Jennifer L; Kapralov, Maxim V

    2015-03-17

    Enabling improvements to crop yield and resource use by enhancing the catalysis of the photosynthetic CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco has been a longstanding challenge. Efforts toward realization of this goal have been greatly assisted by advances in understanding the complexities of Rubisco's biogenesis in plastids and the development of tailored chloroplast transformation tools. Here we generate transplastomic tobacco genotypes expressing Arabidopsis Rubisco large subunits (AtL), both on their own (producing tob(AtL) plants) and with a cognate Rubisco accumulation factor 1 (AtRAF1) chaperone (producing tob(AtL-R1) plants) that has undergone parallel functional coevolution with AtL. We show AtRAF1 assembles as a dimer and is produced in tob(AtL-R1) and Arabidopsis leaves at 10-15 nmol AtRAF1 monomers per square meter. Consistent with a postchaperonin large (L)-subunit assembly role, the AtRAF1 facilitated two to threefold improvements in the amount and biogenesis rate of hybrid L8(A)S8(t) Rubisco [comprising AtL and tobacco small (S) subunits] in tob(AtL-R1) leaves compared with tob(AtL), despite >threefold lower steady-state Rubisco mRNA levels in tob(AtL-R1). Accompanying twofold increases in photosynthetic CO2-assimilation rate and plant growth were measured for tob(AtL-R1) lines. These findings highlight the importance of ancillary protein complementarity during Rubisco biogenesis in plastids, the possible constraints this has imposed on Rubisco adaptive evolution, and the likely need for such interaction specificity to be considered when optimizing recombinant Rubisco bioengineering in plants. PMID:25733857

  10. Using Ancillary Information to Reduce Sample Size in Discovery Sampling and the Effects of Measurement Error

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, M

    2005-08-18

    big sample size might bust the budget, or the number seems intuitively excessive. To reduce the sample size, you can increase the tolerable number of defectives, the ''10'' in the preceding example, or back off on the confidence level, say from 95% to 90%. Auditors also frequently bump up the sample size as a safety factor. They know that something can go wrong. For example, they might find out that the measurements or inspections were subject to errors. Unless the auditors know exactly how measurement error affects sample size, they might be forced to give up the safety factor. Clients often choose to ''live dangerously'' (without a compelling argument to the contrary) to save money. Thus, sometimes the auditor finds that ''you just can't get there from here'', because the goals of the audit and the resources available are inherently in conflict. For discovery audits, there is a way out of this apparent conundrum. It turns out that the classical method of confidence intervals uses an implicit and very conservative assumption. We will see that this assumption is too pessimistic and too conservative in the context of a discovery audit. If we abandon this assumption and use ancillary information about the inventory, then we can significantly reduce the sample size required to achieve the desired confidence level. We will see exactly how the classical method ignores this ancillary information and misses the opportunity for an efficient audit. In the following sections, we first review the standard approach using confidence intervals. Then we present a method that incorporates the ancillary information about the inventory to design a very efficient discovery audit. We also provide results on how measurement errors affect the audit, and how exactly how much the sample size must be modified to compensate for these errors. Finally, we state asymptotic formulas that provide useful approximations for large inventories. It is suggested that the reader review the glossary of

  11. Structure-property relationship of extended π-conjugation of ancillary ligands with and without an electron donor of heteroleptic Ru(II) bipyridyl complexes for high efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Maqbool; El-Shafei, Ahmed; Islam, Ashraful; Han, Liyuan

    2013-06-01

    Two new heteroleptic Ru(II) bipyridyl complexes MH06 and MH11 were designed, synthesized and characterized for DSSCs. While the ancillary ligand of MH06 was molecularly engineered with a strong electron donating group coupled with an extended π-conjugated system, the ancillary ligand of MH11 contained a longer π-conjugated system only. Molecular modeling, photophysical, and photovoltaic properties were compared under the same experimental conditions against the benchmark N719. In an effort to understand the structure-property relationship, their photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical properties including Jsc, Voc, ground and excited state oxidation potentials, UV-Vis absorption, and molar extinction coefficients were studied. The UV-Vis results showed intense MLCT absorption peaks of MH06 and MH11 in the visible region with a red shift of 12 and 18 nm, respectively, with significantly higher molar extinction coefficients compared to N719. Tetrabutylammonium (TBA) substituted MH11-TBA demonstrated the most efficient IPCE of over 90% in the plateau region covering the entire visible spectrum and extending into the near IR region (ca. 890 nm), which showed a solar-to-power conversion efficiency (η) of 10.06%, significantly higher than that of the benchmark N719 dye (9.32%). The superior performance in terms of the IPCE and Jsc of MH11 can be attributed to the bulky and highly hydrophobic nature of the pyrene-based ancillary ligand, which behaves as a shielding barrier for hole-transport recombination between TiO2 and the electrolyte. In addition, the IMPS results showed that the contribution of dyes to the conduction band shift of the TiO2 level is almost similar, regardless of different substitutions on the bipy-moiety. This implies that the open-circuit photovoltage (Voc) increases with reduced charge recombination in the presence of a thick layer of tetrabutyl ammonium ions (TBA) of the dye anchored on the surface of TiO2.

  12. Target discrimination by RNA-binding proteins: role of the ancillary protein U2A' and a critical leucine residue in differentiating the RNA-binding specificity of spliceosomal proteins U1A and U2B".

    PubMed Central

    Rimmele, M E; Belasco, J G

    1998-01-01

    The spliceosomal proteins U1A and U2B" each use a homologous RRM domain to bind specifically to their respective snRNA targets, U1hpll and U2hpIV, two stem-loops that are similar yet distinct in sequence. Previous studies have shown that binding of U2B" to U2hpIV is facilitated by the ancillary protein U2A', whereas specific binding of U1A to U1hpll requires no cofactor. Here we report that U2A' enables U2B" to distinguish the loop sequence of U2hpIV from that of U1hpll but plays no role in stem sequence discrimination. Although U2A' can also promote heterospecific binding of U1A to U2hpIV, a much higher concentration of the ancillary protein is required due to the approximately 500-fold greater affinity of U2A' for U2B". Additional experiments have identified a single leucine residue in U1A(Leu-44) that is critical for the intrinsic specificity of this protein for the loop sequence of U1 hpll in preference to that of U2hpIV. Our data suggest that most of the difference in RNA-binding specificity between U1A and U2B" can be accounted for by this leucine residue and by the contribution of the ancillary protein U2A' to the specificity of U2B". PMID:9814759

  13. Improved wetland remote sensing in Yellowstone National Park using classification trees to combine TM imagery and ancillary environmental data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, C.; Gallant, A.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service uses the term palustrine wetland to describe vegetated wetlands traditionally identified as marsh, bog, fen, swamp, or wet meadow. Landsat TM imagery was combined with image texture and ancillary environmental data to model probabilities of palustrine wetland occurrence in Yellowstone National Park using classification trees. Model training and test locations were identified from National Wetlands Inventory maps, and classification trees were built for seven years spanning a range of annual precipitation. At a coarse level, palustrine wetland was separated from upland. At a finer level, five palustrine wetland types were discriminated: aquatic bed (PAB), emergent (PEM), forested (PFO), scrub-shrub (PSS), and unconsolidated shore (PUS). TM-derived variables alone were relatively accurate at separating wetland from upland, but model error rates dropped incrementally as image texture, DEM-derived terrain variables, and other ancillary GIS layers were added. For classification trees making use of all available predictors, average overall test error rates were 7.8% for palustrine wetland/upland models and 17.0% for palustrine wetland type models, with consistent accuracies across years. However, models were prone to wetland over-prediction. While the predominant PEM class was classified with omission and commission error rates less than 14%, we had difficulty identifying the PAB and PSS classes. Ancillary vegetation information greatly improved PSS classification and moderately improved PFO discrimination. Association with geothermal areas distinguished PUS wetlands. Wetland over-prediction was exacerbated by class imbalance in likely combination with spatial and spectral limitations of the TM sensor. Wetland probability surfaces may be more informative than hard classification, and appear to respond to climate-driven wetland variability. The developed method is portable, relatively easy to implement, and should be applicable in other

  14. Structural, Spectroscopic, And Theoretical Elucidation of a Redox-Active Pincer-Type Ancillary Applied in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, D.; Mossin, S.; Basuli, F.; Huffman, J.C.; Szilagyi, R.K.; Meyer, K.; Mindiola, D.J.

    2009-05-11

    Pincer-type ligands are believed to be very robust scaffolds that can support multifarious functionalities as well as highly reactive metal motifs applied in organometallic chemistry, especially in the realm of catalysis. In this paper, we describe the redox and, therefore, noninnocent behavior of a PNP (PNP{sup -} = N[2-P(CHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}-4-methylphenyl]{sub 2}) pincer ancillary bound to nickel. A combination of structural, spectroscopic, and theoretical techniques suggests that this type of framework can house an electron hole when coordinated to Ni(II).

  15. On combining multi-normalization and ancillary measures for the optimal score level fusion of fingerprint and voice biometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed Anzar, Sharafudeen Thaha; Sathidevi, Puthumangalathu Savithri

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we have considered the utility of multi-normalization and ancillary measures, for the optimal score level fusion of fingerprint and voice biometrics. An efficient matching score preprocessing technique based on multi-normalization is employed for improving the performance of the multimodal system, under various noise conditions. Ancillary measures derived from the feature space and the score space are used in addition to the matching score vectors, for weighing the modalities, based on their relative degradation. Reliability (dispersion) and the separability (inter-/intra-class distance and d-prime statistics) measures under various noise conditions are estimated from the individual modalities, during the training/validation stage. The `best integration weights' are then computed by algebraically combining these measures using the weighted sum rule. The computed integration weights are then optimized against the recognition accuracy using techniques such as grid search, genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimization. The experimental results show that, the proposed biometric solution leads to considerable improvement in the recognition performance even under low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions and reduces the false acceptance rate (FAR) and false rejection rate (FRR), making the system useful for security as well as forensic applications.

  16. Use of GIS and ancillary variables to predict volatile organic compound and nitrogen dioxide levels at unmonitored locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Luther; Mukerjee, Shaibal; Gonzales, Melissa; Stallings, Casson; Neas, Lucas; Norris, Gary; Özkaynak, Halûk

    In late 1999, passive air sampling of nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) and volatile organic compounds was conducted at 22 school locations and two intensive sites in El Paso, Texas. Our goal was to predict concentrations of NO 2 and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene, and m, p-xylene at a total of 55 schools. The predictive equations were developed by regressing the passive monitor measurements at the 22 monitored schools on land-use variables derived from a geographic information system (GIS). These GIS-based ancillary variables included distance to the nearest border crossing, elevation, population density, distance to roads with specified traffic volumes, traffic intensity around the schools, and distance to the nearest petroleum facility. The reliability of the predictive equations was assessed at the two intensive monitoring sites. For all pollutants, the most useful predictive ancillary variables were elevation, population density, distance to a border crossing, and distance to a petroleum facility. For estimating NO 2, traffic intensity was also important.

  17. Ancillary benefits of reduced air pollution in the US from moderate greenhouse gas mitigation policies in the electricity sector.

    SciTech Connect

    Burtraw, D.; Krupnick, A.; Palmer, K.; Paul, A.; Toman, M.; Bloyd, C.; Decision and Information Sciences; Resources for the Future

    2003-05-01

    Actions to slow atmospheric accumulation of greenhouse gases also would reduce conventional air pollutants yielding 'ancillary' benefits that tend to accrue locally and in the near-term. Using a detailed electricity model linked to an integrated assessment framework to value changes in human health, we find a tax of $25 per metric ton of carbon emissions would yield NO{sub x}-related health benefits of about $8 per metric ton of carbon reduced in the year 2010 (1997 dollars). Additional savings of $4-$7 accrue from reduced investment in NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} abatement in order to comply with emission caps. Total ancillary benefits of a $25 carbon tax are $12-$14, which appear to justify the costs of a $25 tax, although marginal benefits are less than marginal costs. At a tax of $75, greater total benefits are achieved but the value per ton of carbon reductions remains roughly constant at about $12.

  18. Tuning the structure, dimensionality and luminescent properties of lanthanide metal-organic frameworks under ancillary ligand influence.

    PubMed

    D'Vries, Richard F; Gomez, German E; Hodak, José H; Soler-Illia, Galo J A A; Ellena, Javier

    2016-01-14

    This manuscript addresses the synthesis, structural characterization and optical properties of a 1D coordination polymer (CPs) and 2D and 3D Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) obtained from lanthanide metals, 3-hydroxinaftalene-2,7-disulfonic acid (3-OHNDS) and two different phenanthroline derivates as ancillary ligands. The first is a family of 2D compounds with formula [Ln(3-OHNDS)(H2O)2], where Ln = La(), Pr(), Nd() and Sm(). The addition of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) in the reaction produces 1D compounds with general formula [Ln(3-OHNDS)(phen)(H2O)]·3H2O, where Ln = La(), Pr(), Nd() and Sm(). Finally, the synthesis with 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (3,4,7,8-TMPhen) as an ancillary ligand results in the formation of the 3D [La(3-OHNDS)(3,4,7,8-TMphen)(H2O)] () compound. The photoluminescence (PL) properties of 1D and 2D compounds were fully investigated in comparison with the 3-OHNDS ligand. One of the most important results was the obtaining of a white-light single-emitter without adding dopant atoms in the structure. With all these results in mind it was possible to establish structure-property relationships.

  19. Functional Association of Catalytic and Ancillary Modules Dictates Enzymatic Activity in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 43 β-Xylosidase*

    PubMed Central

    Moraïs, Sarah; Salama-Alber, Orly; Barak, Yoav; Hadar, Yitzhak; Wilson, David B.; Lamed, Raphael; Shoham, Yuval; Bayer, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    β-Xylosidases are hemicellulases that hydrolyze short xylo-oligosaccharides into xylose units, thus complementing endoxylanase degradation of the hemicellulose component of lignocellulosic substrates. Here, we describe the cloning, characterization, and kinetic analysis of a glycoside hydrolase family 43 β-xylosidase (Xyl43A) from the aerobic cellulolytic bacterium, Thermobifida fusca. Temperature and pH optima of 55–60 °C and 5.5–6, respectively, were determined. The apparent Km value was 0.55 mm, using p-nitrophenyl xylopyranoside as substrate, and the catalytic constant (kcat) was 6.72 s−1. T. fusca Xyl43A contains a catalytic module at the N terminus and an ancillary module (termed herein as Module-A) of undefined function at the C terminus. We expressed the two recombinant modules independently in Escherichia coli and examined their remaining catalytic activity and binding properties. The separation of the two Xyl43A modules caused the complete loss of enzymatic activity, whereas potent binding to xylan was fully maintained in the catalytic module and partially in the ancillary Module-A. Nondenaturing gel electrophoresis revealed a specific noncovalent coupling of the two modules, thereby restoring enzymatic activity to 66.7% (relative to the wild-type enzyme). Module-A contributes a phenylalanine residue that functions as an essential part of the active site, and the two juxtaposed modules function as a single functional entity. PMID:22270362

  20. The business of medicine: how to overcome financial obstacles and secure financing for your private practice and ancillary services business.

    PubMed

    Nayor, David

    2012-01-01

    Doctors across the country who operate private medical practices are facing increasing financial obstacles, namely shrinking income as a result of rising costs and lower reimbursements. In addition, as hospitals have become overburdened many physicians have opened up private surgical centers; magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography and positron emission tomography scanning facilities; pathology labs; colonoscopy/endoscopy suites; lithotripsy centers; and other medical businesses typically performed within the hospital. Moreover, many doctors seek loans to purchase existing practices or for their capital contribution in medical partnerships. The past decade has thus seen a significant increase in the number of doctors taking out small business loans. Indeed, banks view the healthcare industry as a large growth market. This article includes practical information, advice, and resources to help doctors to secure bank financing for their practices, ancillary services business, real estate, and equipment on the best possible market terms.

  1. Prediction of spatial soil property information from ancillary sensor data using ordinary linear regression: Model derivations, residual assumptions and model validation tests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geospatial measurements of ancillary sensor data, such as bulk soil electrical conductivity or remotely sensed imagery data, are commonly used to characterize spatial variation in soil or crop properties. Geostatistical techniques like kriging with external drift or regression kriging are often use...

  2. A fully automatic tool to perform accurate flood mapping by merging remote sensing imagery and ancillary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Addabbo, Annarita; Refice, Alberto; Lovergine, Francesco; Pasquariello, Guido

    2016-04-01

    Flooding is one of the most frequent and expansive natural hazard. High-resolution flood mapping is an essential step in the monitoring and prevention of inundation hazard, both to gain insight into the processes involved in the generation of flooding events, and from the practical point of view of the precise assessment of inundated areas. Remote sensing data are recognized to be useful in this respect, thanks to the high resolution and regular revisit schedules of state-of-the-art satellites, moreover offering a synoptic overview of the extent of flooding. In particular, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data present several favorable characteristics for flood mapping, such as their relative insensitivity to the meteorological conditions during acquisitions, as well as the possibility of acquiring independently of solar illumination, thanks to the active nature of the radar sensors [1]. However, flood scenarios are typical examples of complex situations in which different factors have to be considered to provide accurate and robust interpretation of the situation on the ground: the presence of many land cover types, each one with a particular signature in presence of flood, requires modelling the behavior of different objects in the scene in order to associate them to flood or no flood conditions [2]. Generally, the fusion of multi-temporal, multi-sensor, multi-resolution and/or multi-platform Earth observation image data, together with other ancillary information, seems to have a key role in the pursuit of a consistent interpretation of complex scenes. In the case of flooding, distance from the river, terrain elevation, hydrologic information or some combination thereof can add useful information to remote sensing data. Suitable methods, able to manage and merge different kind of data, are so particularly needed. In this work, a fully automatic tool, based on Bayesian Networks (BNs) [3] and able to perform data fusion, is presented. It supplies flood maps

  3. Optimal policies for simultaneous energy consumption and ancillary service provision for flexible loads under stochastic prices and no capacity reservation constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kefayati, Mahdi; Baldick, Ross

    2015-07-01

    Flexible loads, i.e. the loads whose power trajectory is not bound to a specific one, constitute a sizable portion of current and future electric demand. This flexibility can be used to improve the performance of the grid, should the right incentives be in place. In this paper, we consider the optimal decision making problem faced by a flexible load, demanding a certain amount of energy over its availability period, subject to rate constraints. The load is also capable of providing ancillary services (AS) by decreasing or increasing its consumption in response to signals from the independent system operator (ISO). Under arbitrarily distributed and correlated Markovian energy and AS prices, we obtain the optimal policy for minimising expected total cost, which includes cost of energy and benefits from AS provision, assuming no capacity reservation requirement for AS provision. We also prove that the optimal policy has a multi-threshold form and can be computed, stored and operated efficiently. We further study the effectiveness of our proposed optimal policy and its impact on the grid. We show that, while optimal simultaneous consumption and AS provision under real-time stochastic prices are achievable with acceptable computational burden, the impact of adopting such real-time pricing schemes on the network might not be as good as suggested by the majority of the existing literature. In fact, we show that such price responsive loads are likely to induce peak-to-average ratios much more than what is observed in the current distribution networks and adversely affect the grid.

  4. 30 CFR 250.207 - What ancillary activities may I conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., geotechnical, archaeological, biological, physical oceanographic, meteorological, socioeconomic, or other surveys; or (c) Studies that model potential oil and hazardous substance spills, drilling muds...

  5. Engineering evaluation cost analysis for the 100-B/C area ancillary facilities at the 108-F Building

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    In 1995, the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) conducted a removal site evaluation of selected facilities in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site in accordance with CERCLA and 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 300.410. The scope of the evaluation included the aboveground portions of the 108-F Biology Laboratory in the 100-F Area and all inactive ancillary buildings and structures in the 100-B/C Area, excluding the reactor building and the river outfall. Based on the evaluation, RL determined that hazardous substances in the 108-F Biology Laboratory and five of the 100-B/C Area facilities may present a potential threat to human health or the environment, and that a non-time critical removal action at these facilities is warranted. This determination was documented in an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) approval memorandum. The EE/CA approval memorandum is the basis on which to proceed with the performance of an EE/CA to determine the appropriate removal action. This report presents the results of the EE/CA for removal alternatives for final disposition of these six facilities. The EE/CA was conducted pursuant to the requirements of CERCLA and 40 CFR 300.415 and is intended to aid RL and the EPA in selecting a preferred removal action.

  6. A quantum algorithm for obtaining the lowest eigenstate of a Hamiltonian assisted with an ancillary qubit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Jeongho; Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Chang-Woo; Jeong, Hyunseok

    2015-01-01

    We propose a quantum algorithm to obtain the lowest eigenstate of any Hamiltonian simulated by a quantum computer. The proposed algorithm begins with an arbitrary initial state of the simulated system. A finite series of transforms is iteratively applied to the initial state assisted with an ancillary qubit. The fraction of the lowest eigenstate in the initial state is then amplified up to 1. We prove that our algorithm can faithfully work for any arbitrary Hamiltonian in the theoretical analysis. Numerical analyses are also carried out. We firstly provide a numerical proof-of-principle demonstration with a simple Hamiltonian in order to compare our scheme with the so-called "Demon-like algorithmic cooling (DLAC)", recently proposed in Xu (Nat Photonics 8:113, 2014). The result shows a good agreement with our theoretical analysis, exhibiting the comparable behavior to the best `cooling' with the DLAC method. We then consider a random Hamiltonian model for further analysis of our algorithm. By numerical simulations, we show that the total number of iterations is proportional to , where is the difference between the two lowest eigenvalues and is an error defined as the probability that the finally obtained system state is in an unexpected (i.e., not the lowest) eigenstate.

  7. Identification of possible two-reactant sources of oscillations in the Calvin photosynthesis cycle and ancillary pathways.

    PubMed

    Ryde-Pettersson, U

    1991-06-15

    A systematic search for possible sources of experimentally observed oscillations in the photosynthetic reaction system has been performed by application of recent theoretical results characterizing the transient-state rate behaviour of metabolic reactions involving two independent concentration variables. All subsystems involving two independent reactants in metabolically fundamental parts of the Calvin cycle and the ancillary pathways of starch and sucrose synthesis have been examined in order to decide on basis of their kinetic and stoichiometric structure whether or not they may trigger oscillations. The results show that no less than 20 possible oscillators can be identified in the examined reaction system, only three of which have been previously considered as potential sources of experimentally observed oscillations. This illustrates the superiority of the method now applied over those previously used to identify possible two-reactant sources of metabolic oscillations and indicates that there should be no difficulty in complex metabolic pathways to point to a multitude of interactions that may trigger an oscillatory rate behaviour of the system. PMID:2050142

  8. Reducing costs of managing and accessing navigation and ancillary data by relying on the extensive capabilities of NASA's spice system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semenov, Boris V.; Acton, Charles H., Jr.; Bachman, Nathaniel J.; Elson, Lee S.; Wright, Edward D.

    2005-01-01

    The SPICE system of navigation and ancillary data possesses a number of traits that make its use in modern space missions of all types highly cost efficient. The core of the system is a software library providing API interfaces for storing and retrieving such data as trajectories, orientations, time conversions, and instrument geometry parameters. Applications used at any stage of a mission life cycle can call SPICE APIs to access this data and compute geometric quantities required for observation planning, engineering assessment and science data analysis. SPICE is implemented in three different languages, supported on 20+ computer environments, and distributed with complete source code and documentation. It includes capabilities that are extensively tested by everyday use in many active projects and are applicable to all types of space missions - flyby, orbiters, observatories, landers and rovers. While a customer's initial SPICE adaptation for the first mission or experiment requires a modest effort, this initial effort pays off because adaptation for subsequent missions/experiments is just a small fraction of the initial investment, with the majority of tools based on SPICE requiring no or very minor changes.

  9. Modelling Aṣṭādhyāyī: An Approach Based on the Methodology of Ancillary Disciplines (Vedāṅga)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Anand

    This article proposes a general model based on the common methodological approach of the ancillary disciplines (Vedāṅga) associated with the Vedas taking examples from Śikṣā, Chandas, Vyākaraṇa and Prātiśā khya texts. It develops and elaborates this model further to represent the contents and processes of Aṣṭādhyāyī. Certain key features are added to my earlier modelling of Pāṇinian system of Sanskrit grammar. This includes broader coverage of the Pāṇinian meta-language, mechanism for automatic application of rules and positioning the grammatical system within the procedural complexes of ancillary disciplines.

  10. Molecular Basis for the Interaction of the Mammalian Amino Acid Transporters B0AT1 and B0AT3 with Their Ancillary Protein Collectrin*

    PubMed Central

    Fairweather, Stephen J.; Bröer, Angelika; Subramanian, Nandhitha; Tumer, Emrah; Cheng, Qi; Schmoll, Dieter; O'Mara, Megan L.; Bröer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Many solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family transporters require ancillary subunits to modify their expression and activity. The main apical membrane neutral amino acid transporters in mouse intestine and kidney, B0AT1 and B0AT3, require the ancillary protein collectrin or ACE2 for plasma membrane expression. Expression and activity of SLC6 neurotransmitter transporters are modulated by interaction with syntaxin 1A. Utilizing monocarboxylate-B0AT1/3 fusion constructs, we discovered that collectrin is also necessary for B0AT1 and B0AT3 catalytic function. Syntaxin 1A and syntaxin 3 inhibit the membrane expression of B0AT1 by competing with collectrin for access. A mutagenesis screening approach identified residues on trans-membrane domains 1α, 5, and 7 on one face of B0AT3 as a key region involved in interaction with collectrin. Mutant analysis established residues that were involved in collectrin-dependent functions as follows: plasma membrane expression of B0AT3, catalytic activation, or both. These results identify a potential binding site for collectrin and other SLC6 ancillary proteins. PMID:26240152

  11. MicroRNA-200 Family Profile: A Promising Ancillary Tool for Accurate Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jianhua; Xie, Botao; Li, Hao; Shen, Jihong; Chen, Jianheng

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most threatening diseases in the world and great interests have been paid to discover accurate and noninvasive methods for cancer diagnosis. The value of microRNA-200 (miRNA-200, miR-200) family has been revealed in many studies. However, the results from various studies were inconsistent, and thus a meta-analysis was designed and performed to assess the overall value of miRNA200 in cancer diagnosis. Relevant studies were searched electronically from the following databases: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure. Keyword combined with "miR-200," "cancer," and "diagnosis" in any fields was used for searching relevant studies. Then, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, area under the curve (AUC), and partial AUC were calculated using the random-effects model. Heterogeneity among individual studies was also explored by subgroup analyses. A total of 28 studies from 18 articles with an overall sample size of 3676 subjects (2097 patients and 1579 controls) were included in this meta-analysis. The overall sensitivity and specificity with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) are 0.709 (95% CI: 0.657-0.755) and 0.667 (95% CI: 0.617-0.713), respectively. Additionally, AUC and partial AUC for the pooled data is 0.735 and 0.627, respectively. Subgroup analyses revealed that using miRNA-200 family for cancer diagnosis is more effective in white than in Asian ethnic groups. In addition, cancer diagnosis by miRNA using circulating specimen is more effective than that using noncirculating specimen. Finally, miRNA is more accurate in diagnosing endometrial cancer than other types of cancer, and some miRNA family members (miR-200b and miR-429) have superior diagnostic accuracy than other miR-200 family members. In conclusion, the profiling of miRNA-200 family is likely to be a valuable tool in cancer detection and diagnosis.

  12. Evidence of ancillary trigeminal innervation of levator palpebrae in the general population.

    PubMed

    Lehman, A M; Dong, C C; Harries, A M; Patel, A; Honey, C R; Patel, M S

    2014-02-01

    The cranial synkineses are a group of disorders encompassing a variety of involuntary co-contractions of the facial, masticatory, or extraocular muscles that occur during a particular volitional movement. The neuroanatomical pathways for synkineses largely remain undefined. Our studies explored a normal synkinesis long observed in the general population - that of jaw opening during efforts to open the eyelids widely. To document this phenomenon, we observed 186 consecutive participants inserting or removing contact lenses to identify jaw opening. Seeking electrophysiological evidence, in a second study we enrolled individuals undergoing vascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm, without a history of jaw-winking, ptosis, or strabismus, to record any motor responses in levator palpebrae superioris (LPS) upon stimulation of the trigeminal motor root. Stimulus was applied to the trigeminal motor root while an electrode in levator recorded the response. We found that 37 participants (20%) opened their mouth partially or fully during contact lens manipulation. In the second study, contraction of LPS with trigeminal motor stimulation was documented in two of six patients, both undergoing surgery for trigeminal neuralgia. We speculate these results might provide evidence of an endogenous synkinesis, indicating that trigeminal-derived innervation of levator could exist in a significant minority of the general population. Our observations demonstrate plasticity in the human cranial nerve innervation pattern and may have implications for treating Marcus Gunn jaw-winking. PMID:24120706

  13. Estimating primary productivity of tropical oil palm in Malaysia using remote sensing technique and ancillary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanniah, K. D.; Tan, K. P.; Cracknell, A. P.

    2014-10-01

    The amount of carbon sequestration by vegetation can be estimated using vegetation productivity. At present, there is a knowledge gap in oil palm net primary productivity (NPP) at a regional scale. Therefore, in this study NPP of oil palm trees in Peninsular Malaysia was estimated using remote sensing based light use efficiency (LUE) model with inputs from local meteorological data, upscaled leaf area index/fractional photosynthetically active radiation (LAI/fPAR) derived using UK-DMC 2 satellite data and a constant maximum LUE value from the literature. NPP values estimated from the model was then compared and validated with NPP estimated using allometric equations developed by Corley and Tinker (2003), Henson (2003) and Syahrinudin (2005) with diameter at breast height, age and the height of the oil palm trees collected from three estates in Peninsular Malaysia. Results of this study show that oil palm NPP derived using a light use efficiency model increases with respect to the age of oil palm trees, and it stabilises after ten years old. The mean value of oil palm NPP at 118 plots as derived using the LUE model is 968.72 g C m-2 year-1 and this is 188% - 273% higher than the NPP derived from the allometric equations. The estimated oil palm NPP of young oil palm trees is lower compared to mature oil palm trees (<10 years old), as young oil palm trees contribute to lower oil palm LAI and therefore fPAR, which is an important variable in the LUE model. In contrast, it is noted that oil palm NPP decreases with respect to the age of oil palm trees as estimated using the allomeric equations. It was found in this study that LUE models could not capture NPP variation of oil palm trees if LAI/fPAR is used. On the other hand, tree height and DBH are found to be important variables that can capture changes in oil palm NPP as a function of age.

  14. Synthetic and Thermodynamic Investigations of Ancillary Ligand Influence on Catalytic Organometallic Systems. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Steven

    2003-03-20

    During the grant period we have been involved in synthesizing and experimentally determining solution enthalpy values associated with partially fluorinated ligands. This has lead to the publication of manuscripts dealing with synthetic, calorimetric and catalytic behavior of partially fluorinated ligands. The collaboration with Los Alamos researchers has lead to the publication of catalytic results in sc CO{sub 2} which have proven very interesting. Furthermore, we have also examined ligands that behave as phosphine mimics. The N-heterocyclic carbenes have been explored as alternatives for tertiary phosphines and have resulted in the design and construction of efficient palladium and nickel system capable of performing C-C and C-N cross coupling reactions. The initial studies in this areas were made possible by exploratory work conducted under the DOE/EPSCoR grant.

  15. Water-quality and ancillary data collected from the Arroyo Colorado near Rio Hondo, Texas, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roussel, Meghan C.; Canova, Michael G.; Asquith, William H.; Kiesling, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    The Arroyo Colorado is in the lower Rio Grande Valley of southern Texas and extends from near Mission, Texas, eastward to the Laguna Madre estuarine and coastal marine system, which separates Padre Island from the Texas mainland. Streamflow in the Arroyo Colorado primarily is sustained by effluent from municipal wastewater-treatment plants along the stream banks. Since 1986, the tidal segment of the Arroyo Colorado from the port of Harlingen to the Laguna Madre has been designated by the State of Texas as an impaired water body because of low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Efforts to develop predictive water-quality models for the tidal segment of the Arroyo Colorado have been hampered by a lack of physical, biological, and biochemical data. Specifically, data on primary algal productivity, nutrient cycling, sediment deposition rates, and the relations between these processes and dissolved oxygen dynamics in the stream have been inadequate to support water-quality modeling efforts. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, did a study in 2006 to collect data associated with primary algal productivity, nutrient cycling, and dissolved oxygen dynamics in the tidal segment (2201) of the Arroyo Colorado near Rio Hondo. Specific objectives of the study were to (1) characterize water quality by measuring basic properties; (2) characterize the concentrations of carbon and nutrients, biochemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, total suspended solids, and volatile suspended solids; (3) measure the seasonal differences of nutrient-dependent algal growth and algal production in the water column; (4) measure oxygen respiration or production rates; and (5) measure rates of sediment deposition.

  16. Design of Os(II) -based sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells: influence of heterocyclic ancillaries.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fa-Chun; Wang, Sheng-Wei; Planells, Miquel; Robertson, Neil; Padhy, Harihara; Du, Bo-Sian; Chi, Yun; Yang, Po-Fan; Lin, Hao-Wu; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2013-08-01

    A series of Os(II) sensitizers (TFOS-x, in which x=1, 2, or 3) with a single 4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-dipyridine (H2 dcbpy) anchor and two chelating 2-pyridyl (or 2-pyrimidyl) triazolate ancillaries was successfully prepared. Single-crystal X-ray structural analysis showed that the core geometry of the Os(II) -based sensitizers consisted of one H2 dcbpy unit and two eclipsed cis-triazolate fragments; this was notably different from the Ru(II) -based counterparts, in which the azolate (both pyrazolate and triazolate) fragments are located at the mutual trans-positions. The basic properties were extensively probed by using spectroscopic and electrochemical methods as well as time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. Fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) was then attempted by using the I(-) /I3 (-) -based electrolyte solution. One such DSC device, which utilized TFOS-2 as the sensitizer, showed promising performance characteristics with a short-circuit current density (JSC ) of 15.7 mA cm(-2) , an open-circuit voltage of 610 mV, a fill factor of 0.63, and a power conversion efficiency of 6.08 % under AM 1.5G simulated one-sun irradiation. Importantly, adequate incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency performances were observed for all TFOS derivatives over the wide spectral region of 450 to 950 nm, showing a panchromatic light harvesting capability that extended into the near-infrared regime. Our results underlined a feasible strategy for maximizing JSC and increasing the efficiency of DSCs. PMID:23843354

  17. Evolution of catalytic stereoselective olefin metathesis: from ancillary transformation to purveyor of stereochemical identity.

    PubMed

    Hoveyda, Amir H

    2014-06-01

    There have been numerous significant advances in catalytic olefin metathesis (OM) during the past two decades. Such progress has transformed this important set of reactions to strategically pivotal processes that generate stereochemical identity while delivering molecules that cannot be easily prepared by alternative routes. In this Perspective, an analysis of the origin of the inception of bidentate benzylidene ligands for Ru-based OM catalysts is first presented. This is followed by an overview of the intellectual basis that culminated in the development of Mo-based diolates and stereogenic-at-Ru complexes for enantioselective OM. The principles accrued from the study of the latter Ru carbenes and Mo alkylidenes and utilized in the design of stereogenic-at-Mo, -W, and -Ru species applicable to enantioselective and Z-selective OM are then discussed. The influence of the recently introduced catalytic OM protocols on the design of synthesis routes leading to complex organic molecules is probed. The impact of a better understanding of the mechanistic nuances of OM toward the discovery of stereoselective catalysts is reviewed as well. PMID:24720633

  18. Evolution of catalytic stereoselective olefin metathesis: from ancillary transformation to purveyor of stereochemical identity.

    PubMed

    Hoveyda, Amir H

    2014-06-01

    There have been numerous significant advances in catalytic olefin metathesis (OM) during the past two decades. Such progress has transformed this important set of reactions to strategically pivotal processes that generate stereochemical identity while delivering molecules that cannot be easily prepared by alternative routes. In this Perspective, an analysis of the origin of the inception of bidentate benzylidene ligands for Ru-based OM catalysts is first presented. This is followed by an overview of the intellectual basis that culminated in the development of Mo-based diolates and stereogenic-at-Ru complexes for enantioselective OM. The principles accrued from the study of the latter Ru carbenes and Mo alkylidenes and utilized in the design of stereogenic-at-Mo, -W, and -Ru species applicable to enantioselective and Z-selective OM are then discussed. The influence of the recently introduced catalytic OM protocols on the design of synthesis routes leading to complex organic molecules is probed. The impact of a better understanding of the mechanistic nuances of OM toward the discovery of stereoselective catalysts is reviewed as well.

  19. The anti-Candida activity by Ancillary Proteins of an Enterococcus faecium strain

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Utpal; Chalasani, Ajay G.; Shekh, M. Raeesh

    2015-01-01

    An antimycotic activity toward seven strains of Candida albicans was demonstrated erstwhile by a wild-type Enterococcus faecium isolated from a penguin rookery of the Antarctic region. In the present study the antimicrobial principle was purified by ion exchange and gel permeation chromatography and further was analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. In the purification steps, the dialyzed concentrate and ion exchange fractions inhibited C. albicans MTCC 3958, 183, and SC 5314. However, the gel filtration purified fractions inhibited MTCC 3958 and 183. The data obtained from the LC-ESI-MS/MS indicate that the antimicrobial activity of the anti-Candida protein produced by E. faecium is facilitated by Sag A/Bb for the binding of the indicator organism's cell membrane. Partial N-terminal sequence revealed 12 N-terminal amino acid residues and its analysis shown that it belongs to the LysM motif. The nucleotide sequence of PCR-amplified product could detect 574 nucleotides of the LysM gene responsible for binding to chitin of the cell wall of Candida sp. PMID:26005434

  20. Evolution of Catalytic Stereoselective Olefin Metathesis: From Ancillary Transformation to Purveyor of Stereochemical Identity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous significant advances in catalytic olefin metathesis (OM) during the past two decades. Such progress has transformed this important set of reactions to strategically pivotal processes that generate stereochemical identity while delivering molecules that cannot be easily prepared by alternative routes. In this Perspective, an analysis of the origin of the inception of bidentate benzylidene ligands for Ru-based OM catalysts is first presented. This is followed by an overview of the intellectual basis that culminated in the development of Mo-based diolates and stereogenic-at-Ru complexes for enantioselective OM. The principles accrued from the study of the latter Ru carbenes and Mo alkylidenes and utilized in the design of stereogenic-at-Mo, -W, and -Ru species applicable to enantioselective and Z-selective OM are then discussed. The influence of the recently introduced catalytic OM protocols on the design of synthesis routes leading to complex organic molecules is probed. The impact of a better understanding of the mechanistic nuances of OM toward the discovery of stereoselective catalysts is reviewed as well. PMID:24720633

  1. Blinded Validation of Breath Biomarkers of Lung Cancer, a Potential Ancillary to Chest CT Screening

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Michael; Bauer, Thomas L.; Cataneo, Renee N.; Lebauer, Cassie; Mundada, Mayur; Pass, Harvey I.; Ramakrishna, Naren; Rom, William N.; Vallières, Eric

    2015-01-01

    separate independent cohort, in a blinded replicated study. Combining breath biomarkers with chest CT could potentially improve the sensitivity and specificity of lung cancer screening. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00639067 PMID:26698306

  2. Modelling decisions to undergo genetic testing for susceptibility to common health conditions: an ancillary study of the Multiplex Initiative.

    PubMed

    Wade, Christopher H; Shiloh, Shoshana; Woolford, Samuel W; Roberts, J Scott; Alford, Sharon Hensley; Marteau, Theresa M; Biesecker, Barbara B

    2012-01-01

    New genetic tests reveal risks for multiple conditions simultaneously, although little is understood about the psychological factors that affect testing uptake. We assessed a conceptual model called the multiplex genetic testing model (MGTM) using structural equation modelling. The MGTM delineates worry, perceived severity, perceived risk, response efficacy and attitudes towards testing as predictors of intentions and behaviour. Participants were 270 healthy insured adults aged 25-40 from the Multiplex Initiative conducted within a health care system in Detroit, MI, USA. Participants were offered a genetic test that assessed risk for eight common health conditions. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that worry, perceived risk and severity clustered into two disease domains: cancer or metabolic conditions. Only perceived severity of metabolic conditions was correlated with general response efficacy (β = 0.13, p<0.05), which predicted general attitudes towards testing (β = 0.24, p<0.01). Consistent with our hypothesised model, attitudes towards testing were the strongest predictors of intentions to undergo testing (β = 0.49, p<0.01), which in turn predicted testing uptake (OR 17.7, β = 0.97, p<0.01). The MGTM explained a striking 48% of the variance in intentions and 94% of the variation in uptake. These findings support use of the MGTM to explain psychological predictors of testing for multiple health conditions. PMID:21660870

  3. Prehospital digital photography and automated image transmission in an emergency medical service – an ancillary retrospective analysis of a prospective controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Still picture transmission was performed using a telemedicine system in an Emergency Medical Service (EMS) during a prospective, controlled trial. In this ancillary, retrospective study the quality and content of the transmitted pictures and the possible influences of this application on prehospital time requirements were investigated. Methods A digital camera was used with a telemedicine system enabling encrypted audio and data transmission between an ambulance and a remotely located physician. By default, images were compressed (jpeg, 640 x 480 pixels). On occasion, this compression was deactivated (3648 x 2736 pixels). Two independent investigators assessed all transmitted pictures according to predefined criteria. In cases of different ratings, a third investigator had final decision competence. Patient characteristics and time intervals were extracted from the EMS protocol sheets and dispatch centre reports. Results Overall 314 pictures (mean 2.77 ± 2.42 pictures/mission) were transmitted during 113 missions (group 1). Pictures were not taken for 151 missions (group 2). Regarding picture quality, the content of 240 (76.4%) pictures was clearly identifiable; 45 (14.3%) pictures were considered “limited quality” and 29 (9.2%) pictures were deemed “not useful” due to not/hardly identifiable content. For pictures with file compression (n = 84 missions) and without (n = 17 missions), the content was clearly identifiable in 74% and 97% of the pictures, respectively (p = 0.003). Medical reports (n = 98, 32.8%), medication lists (n = 49, 16.4%) and 12-lead ECGs (n = 28, 9.4%) were most frequently photographed. The patient characteristics of group 1 vs. 2 were as follows: median age – 72.5 vs. 56.5 years, p = 0.001; frequency of acute coronary syndrome – 24/113 vs. 15/151, p = 0.014. The NACA scores and gender distribution were comparable. Median on-scene times were longer with picture transmission (26 vs. 22

  4. Photoactivity of mono- and dicarbonyl complexes of ruthenium(II) bearing an N,N,S-donor ligand: role of ancillary ligands on the capacity of CO photorelease.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Margarita A; Carrington, Samantha J; Chakraborty, Indranil; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Mascharak, Pradip K

    2013-10-01

    One monocarbonyl and one dicarbonyl complex of ruthenium(II), namely, [Ru(Cl)(CO)(qmtpm)(PPh3)]BF4 (2) and [Ru(Cl)(CO)2(qmtpm)]ClO4 (3), derived from the tridentate ligand 2-quinoline-N-(2'-methylthiophenyl)methyleneimine (qmtpm) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. The qmtpm ligand binds in a meridional fashion in these carbonyl complexes, and in 3, the two carbon monoxide (CO) ligands are cis to each other. Solutions of 2 in ethanol, chloroform, or acetonitrile rapidly release CO upon illumination with low-power (3-15 mW) light in the 300-450 nm range. Loss of CO from 2 brings about a dramatic color change from yellow to magenta because of the formation of [Ru(Cl)(MeCN)(qmtpm)(PPh3)]BF4 (4). In acetonitrile, photorelease of CO from 3 under 360 nm light occurs in two steps, and the violet photoproduct [Ru(Cl)(MeCN)2(qmtpm)](+) upon reaction with Ag(+) and PPh3 affords red [Ru(MeCN)2(qmtpm)(PPh3)](ClO4)2 (5). The structure of 5 has also been determined by X-ray crystallography. Reduced myoglobin assay confirms that 2 and 3 act as photoactive CO-releasing molecules (photoCORMs) that deliver 1 and 2 equiv of CO, respectively. The results of density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT studies confirm that electronic transitions from molecular orbitals with predominantly Ru-CO character to ligand-based π* orbitals facilitate CO release from these two photoCORMs. Complexes 2-5 have provided an additional opportunity to analyze the roles of the ancillary ligands, namely, PPh3, Cl(-), and MeCN, in shifting the positions of the metal-to-ligand charge-transfer bands and the associated sensitivity of the two photoCORMs to different wavelengths of light. Collectively, the results provide helpful hints toward the future design of photoCORMs that release CO upon exposure to visible light.

  5. Trends in Utilization of Ancillary Glaucoma Tests for Patients with Open-Angle Glaucoma from 2001 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Joshua D.; Talwar, Nidhi; Laverne, Alejandra; Nan, Bin; Lichter, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To assess trends in the use of ancillary diagnostic tests in the evaluation of patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) and glaucoma suspects over the past decade. Design Retrospective longitudinal cohort analysis. Participants 169,917 individuals with OAG and 395,721 with suspected glaucoma age ≥40 enrolled in a national United States managed care network between 2001–2009. Methods Claims data were analyzed to assess trends in visual field (VF) testing, fundus photography (FP), and other ocular imaging (OOI) testing for patients with OAG or suspected glaucoma in 2001–2009. Repeated measures logistic regression was performed to identify differences in the odds of undergoing these procedures in 2001, 2005, and 2009 and whether differences exist for patients under the exclusive care of optometrists versus ophthalmologists. Main Outcome Measures Odds and annual probabilities of undergoing VF testing, FP, and OOI for OAG from 2001–2009. Results For patients with OAG, the odds of undergoing VF testing decreased by 36% from 2001 to 2005, 12% from 2005 to 2009, and 44% from 2001 to 2009. By comparison, the odds of having OOI increased by 100% from 2001 to 2005, 24% from 2005 to 2009, and 147% from 2001 to 2009. Probabilities of undergoing FP were relatively low (13–25%) for both provider types and remained fairly steady over the decade. For patients cared for exclusively by optometrists, the probability of VF testing decreased from 66% in 2001 to 44% in 2009. Among those seen exclusively by ophthalmologists, the probability of VF testing decreased from 65% in 2001 to 51% in 2009. The probability of undergoing OOI increased from 26% in 2001 to 47% in 2009 for patients of optometrists and from 30% in 2001 to 46% in 2009 for patients of ophthalmologists. By 2008, patients with OAG receiving care exclusively by optometrists had a higher probability of undergoing OOI than VF testing. Conclusion During 2001–2009 OOI rose dramatically whereas VF testing

  6. Compilation, quality control, analysis, and summary of discrete suspended-sediment and ancillary data in the United States, 1901-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Casey J.; Glysson, G. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Human-induced and natural changes to the transport of sediment and sediment-associated constituents can degrade aquatic ecosystems and limit human uses of streams and rivers. The lack of a dedicated, easily accessible, quality-controlled database of sediment and ancillary data has made it difficult to identify sediment-related water-quality impairments and has limited understanding of how human actions affect suspended-sediment concentrations and transport. The purpose of this report is to describe the creation of a quality-controlled U.S. Geological Survey suspended-sediment database, provide guidance for its use, and summarize characteristics of suspended-sediment data through 2010. The database is provided as an online application at http://cida.usgs.gov/sediment to allow users to view, filter, and retrieve available suspended-sediment and ancillary data. A data recovery, filtration, and quality-control process was performed to expand the availability, representativeness, and utility of existing suspended-sediment data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in the United States before January 1, 2011. Information on streamflow condition, sediment grain size, and upstream landscape condition were matched to sediment data and sediment-sampling sites to place data in context with factors that may influence sediment transport. Suspended-sediment and selected ancillary data are presented from across the United States with respect to time, streamflow, and landscape condition. Examples of potential uses of this database for identifying sediment-related impairments, assessing trends, and designing new data collection activities are provided. This report and database can support local and national-level decision making, project planning, and data mining activities related to the transport of suspended-sediment and sediment-associated constituents.

  7. Peer-to-Peer Consultations: Ancillary Services Peer Exchange with India: Experience from South Africa, Europe & the United States (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    In support of national and subnational decision makers, the 21st Century Power Partnership regularly works with country partners to organize peer-to-peer consultations on critical issues. In March 2014, 21CPP collaborated with the Regulatory Assistance Project - India to host two peer-to-peer exchanges among experts from India, South Africa, Europe, and the United States to discuss the provision of ancillary services, particularly in the context of added variability and uncertainty from renewable energy. This factsheet provides a high level summary of the peer-to-peer consultation.

  8. Vehicle Ancillary Load Reduction Project Close-Out Report: An Overview of the Task and a Compilation of the Research Results

    SciTech Connect

    Rugh, J.; Farrington, R.

    2008-01-01

    The amount of fuel used for climate control in U.S. vehicles reduces the fuel economy of more than 200 million light-duty conventional vehicles and thus affects U.S. energy security. Researchers at the DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory estimated that the United States consumes about 7 billion gallons of fuel per year for air-conditioning (A/C) light-duty vehicles. Using a variety of tools, NREL researchers developed innovative techniques and technologies to reduce the amount of fuel needed for these vehicles' ancillary loads. For example, they found that the A/C cooling capacity of 5.7 kW in a Cadillac STS could be reduced by 30% while maintaining a cooldown performance of 30 minutes. A simulation showed that reducing the A/C load by 30% decreased A/C fuel consumption by 26%. Other simulations supported the great potential for improving fuel economy by using new technologies and techniques developed to reduce ancillary loads.

  9. Investigation of techniques for inventorying forested regions. Volume 2: Forestry information system requirements and joint use of remotely sensed and ancillary data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalepka, R. F. (Principal Investigator); Cicone, R. C.; Malila, W. A.; Crist, E. P.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Effects of terrain topography in mountainous forested regions on LANDSAT signals and classifier training were found to be significant. The aspect of sloping terrain relative to the sun's azimuth was the major cause of variability. A relative insolation factor could be defined which, in a single variable, represents the joint effects of slope and aspect and solar geometry on irradiance. Forest canopy reflectances were bound, both through simulation, and empirically, to have nondiffuse reflectance characteristics. Training procedures could be improved by stratifying in the space of ancillary variables and training in each stratum. Application of the Tasselled-Cap transformation for LANDSAT data acquired over forested terrain could provide a viable technique for data compression and convenient physical interpretations.

  10. Highly Active and Selective Manganese C=O Bond Hydrogenation Catalysts: The Importance of the Multidentate Ligand, the Ancillary Ligands, and the Oxidation State.

    PubMed

    Kallmeier, Fabian; Irrgang, Torsten; Dietel, Thomas; Kempe, Rhett

    2016-09-19

    The replacement of expensive noble metals by earth-abundant transition metals is a central topic in catalysis. Herein, we introduce a highly active and selective homogeneous manganese-based C=O bond hydrogenation catalyst. Our catalyst has a broad substrate scope, it is able to hydrogenate aryl-alkyl, diaryl, dialkyl, and cycloalkyl ketones as well as aldehydes. A very good functional group tolerance including the quantitative and selective hydrogenation of a ketone in the presence of a non-shielded olefin is observed. In Mn hydrogenation catalysis, the combination of the multidentate ligand, the oxidation state of the metal, and the choice of the right ancillary ligand is crucial for high activity. This observation emphasizes an advantage and the importance of homogeneous catalysts in 3d-metal catalysis. For coordination compounds, fine-tuning of a complex coordination environment is easily accomplished in comparison to enzyme and/or heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:27571701

  11. When core competence is not enough: functional interplay of the DEAD-box helicase core with ancillary domains and auxiliary factors in RNA binding and unwinding.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Markus G; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2015-08-01

    DEAD-box helicases catalyze RNA duplex unwinding in an ATP-dependent reaction. Members of the DEAD-box helicase family consist of a common helicase core formed by two RecA-like domains. According to the current mechanistic model for DEAD-box mediated RNA unwinding, binding of RNA and ATP triggers a conformational change of the helicase core, and leads to formation of a compact, closed state. In the closed conformation, the two parts of the active site for ATP hydrolysis and of the RNA binding site, residing on the two RecA domains, become aligned. Closing of the helicase core is coupled to a deformation of the RNA backbone and destabilization of the RNA duplex, allowing for dissociation of one of the strands. The second strand remains bound to the helicase core until ATP hydrolysis and product release lead to re-opening of the core. The concomitant disruption of the RNA binding site causes dissociation of the second strand. The activity of the helicase core can be modulated by interaction partners, and by flanking N- and C-terminal domains. A number of C-terminal flanking regions have been implicated in RNA binding: RNA recognition motifs (RRM) typically mediate sequence-specific RNA binding, whereas positively charged, unstructured regions provide binding sites for structured RNA, without sequence-specificity. Interaction partners modulate RNA binding to the core, or bind to RNA regions emanating from the core. The functional interplay of the helicase core and ancillary domains or interaction partners in RNA binding and unwinding is not entirely understood. This review summarizes our current knowledge on RNA binding to the DEAD-box helicase core and the roles of ancillary domains and interaction partners in RNA binding and unwinding by DEAD-box proteins.

  12. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  13. Configuration Control in the Synthesis of Homo- and Heteroleptic Bis(oxazolinylphenolato/thiazolinylphenolato) Chelate Ligand Complexes of Oxorhenium(V): Isomer Effect on Ancillary Ligand Exchange Dynamics and Implications for Perchlorate Reduction Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyong; Wu, Dimao; Su, Xiaoge; Han, Mengwei; Kimura, Susana Y; Gray, Danielle L; Shapley, John R; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M; Werth, Charles J; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    This study develops synthetic strategies for N,N-trans and N,N-cis Re(O)(LO-N)2Cl complexes and investigates the effects of the coordination spheres and ligand structures on ancillary ligand exchange dynamics and catalytic perchlorate reduction activities of the corresponding [Re(O)(LO-N)2](+) cations. The 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)-2-oxazoline (Hhoz) and 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)-2-thiazoline (Hhtz) ligands are used to prepare homoleptic N,N-trans and N,N-cis isomers of both Re(O)(hoz)2Cl and Re(O)(htz)2Cl and one heteroleptic N,N-trans Re(O)(hoz)(htz)Cl. Selection of hoz/htz ligands determines the preferred isomeric coordination sphere, and the use of substituted pyridine bases with varying degrees of steric hindrance during complex synthesis controls the rate of isomer interconversion. The five corresponding [Re(O)(LO-N)2](+) cations exhibit a wide range of solvent exchange rates (1.4 to 24,000 s(-1) at 25 °C) and different LO-N movement patterns, as influenced by the coordination sphere of Re (trans/cis), the noncoordinating heteroatom on LO-N ligands (O/S), and the combination of the two LO-N ligands (homoleptic/heteroleptic). Ligand exchange dynamics also correlate with the activity of catalytic reduction of aqueous ClO4(-) by H2 when the Re(O)(LO-N)2Cl complexes are immobilized onto Pd/C. Findings from this study provide novel synthetic strategies and mechanistic insights for innovations in catalytic, environmental, and biomedical research.

  14. Control of light-promoted [2+2] cycloaddition reactions by a remote ancillary regulatory group that is covalently attached to rhenium rectangles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zong-Zhan; Lee, Chung-Chou; Velayudham, Murugesan; Lee, Li-Wei; Wu, Jing-Yun; Kuo, Ting-Shen; Lu, Kuang-Lieh

    2012-12-01

    The high-yielding self-assembly of three neutral rhenium(I) rectangles, [Re(2)(CO)(6)(L)(bpe)](2) (1 a, L=2,2'-biimidazolate (biim); 1 b, L=2,2'-bisbenzimidazolate (bbim); 1 c, L=2,2'-bis(4,5-dimethylimidazolate) (bdmim); bpe=trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene), under hydrothermal conditions is described. The rectangles were structurally characterized by spectroscopic techniques and further confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Upon irradiation with a Hg lamp at 365 nm, the bpe ligands of rectangles 1 a and 1 b underwent [2+2] photocycloaddition reactions to produce [{(Re(CO)(3))(2)L}(2)(4,4'-tpcb)(2)] (2 a, L=biim; 2 b, L=bbim; 4,4'-tpcb=1,2,3,4-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)cyclobutane) through a single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) transformation. However, rectangle 1 c, which contained methyl groups on the 2,2'-biimidazolate ligand, failed to undergo cycloaddition, even after prolonged irradiation. This result indicates that the light-induced cycloaddition reaction can be preferentially controlled by the remote regulatory substituents, which are attached onto the same backbone of the rectangle complex. This transformation is the first reported utilization of a remote ancillary regulatory ligand that is covalently attached onto a coordination compound to control the [2+2] cycloaddition reaction.

  15. Water-quality, streamflow, and ancillary data for nutrients in streams and rivers across the nation, 1992-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David K.; Spahr, Norman E.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: This report is the companion data report for: Nutrients in Streams and Rivers Across the Nation - 1992-2001 (D.K. Mueller and N.E. Spahr, U.S. Geological Survey written commun., 2005). The data contained in this report were collected as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Investigations were conducted in 51 large river basins and aquifer systems, which are referred to as 'study units.' Implementation of study-unit investigations were phased so that high-intensity sampling occurred in about one-third of the study units at a time. Investigations in the first 20 study units began in 1991, and stream sampling began in 1992; however, most samples were collected during water years 1993-95. (Water year is defined as the period from October through September and is identified by the year in which it ends.) A second group of 16 study-unit investigations began in 1994, with most of the sampling completed during water years 1996-98. A third group, consisting of 15 study units, began in 1997 with most of the data collected during water years 1999-2001. At some sites, additional sampling continued after the high-intensity time period. Gilliom and others (1995) provide additional information about study-unit sampling design. Additional information about the NAWQA program is available at http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa/index.html.

  16. Monitoring and evaluation of seasonal snow cover in Kashmir valley using remote sensing, GIS and ancillary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negi, H. S.; Thakur, N. K.; Kumar, Rajeev; Kumar, Manoj

    2009-12-01

    Seasonal snow cover is a vital natural resource in the Himalaya. Monitoring of the areal extent of seasonal snow cover is important for both climatological studies as well as hydrological applications. In the present paper, snow cover monitoring was carried out to evaluate the region-wise accumulation and ablation pattern of snow cover in Pir Panjal and Shamshawari ranges of Kashmir valley. The study was carried out for the winter period between November and April of 2004-05, 2005-06 and 2006-07, using multi-temporal WiFS sensor data of IRS-1C/1D satellites. The study shows reduction in the areal extent of seasonal snow cover and rising trend of maximum temperature in three winters for the entire Kashmir valley. This has been validated with 20 years (1988-89 to 2007-08) climatic conditions prevailed in both ranges of Kashmir valley. Region-wise study shows the spatial and temporal variability in seasonal snow cover within Kashmir valley. Advance melting was observed in Banihal and Naugam/Tangdhar regions than Gurez and Machhal regions. Different geographical parameters of these regions were studied to evaluate the influence on snow cover and it was observed that altitude and position of region with respect to mountain range are the deciding factors for retaining the seasonal snow cover for longer duration. Such region-wise study of snow cover monitoring, can provide vital inputs for planning the hydropower projects, development in habitat areas, recreational and strategic planning in the region.

  17. The Virgin of Guadalupe as an ancillary modality for treating Hispanic substance abusers: Juramentos in the United States.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Mary; Lieberman, Louis

    2011-12-01

    During a 6-month research study of substance abuse outreach and retention methods in Mexico, the authors learned about the common practice of a self-control mechanism to abstain from substance abuse: Juramentos. Juramentos are pledges usually made to the Virgin of Guadalupe in the presence of a Catholic priest. The Jurado promises not to drink during a specified period of time. The authors discuss the dynamics of Juramentos and present data from an exploratory study indicating that Juramentos are being used among Mexican migrants in Florida and may provide a culturally sensitive adjunct for treatment of Mexican and other Hispanic clients in the United States.

  18. USE OF GIS AND ANCILLARY VARIABLES TO PREDICT VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND AND NITROGEN DIOXIDE LEVELS AT UNMONITORED LOCATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a GIS-based regression spatial method, known as land-use regression (LUR) modeling, to estimate ambient air pollution exposures used in the EPA El Paso Children's Health Study. Passive measurements of select volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen dioxi...

  19. Chronological evaluation of urban growth and area expansion in Aguascalientes, Mexico using remotely sensed and ancillary mapped data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falquier, Leticia G.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Pelletier, Ramona E.

    1990-01-01

    The study describes some efforts to assist the mapping procedure of Mexican towns and cities by focusing on the analysis of urban changes that have occurred in the city of Aguascalientes. To evaluate urban growth trends in Aguascalientes, historic maps of land cover, aerial photography, and SPOT data were reviewed between the period of 1857 and 1988 to determine urban boundaries. Additional analyses focused on identifying the extent and pattern of growth in reference to urban development plans initiated in 1978, and on assessing the impact of relocating people and industry after the Mexico City earthquake. Results from the study indicate a steady growth in areal expansion and population in the Aguascalientes area between 1978 and 1988.

  20. Designing ancillary ligands for heteroleptic/homoleptic zinc complex formation: synthesis, structures and application in ROP of lactides.

    PubMed

    Jędrzkiewicz, D; Ejfler, J; Gulia, N; John, Ł; Szafert, S

    2015-08-14

    Synthesis and characterization of a series of new amino-phenol/naphthol ligands (L(1,2)-H) have been developed and their respective zinc complexes ( 1 and 2-Zn ) have been synthesized. The molecular structures of L(1)-H and 1, 2-Zn were explored in detail by NMR, single-crystal X-ray studies and DFT calculations, which confirmed the existence of complexes as stabile dimers both in a solution and in the solid state. All complexes mediate the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of lactide highly efficiently, at room temperature, in a controlled fashion. The influence of the architecture of the ligand on the desired homo/heteroleptic complex formation, as well as the relationship between the initiator design and the catalytic activity have been investigated. PMID:26150026

  1. Designing ancillary ligands for heteroleptic/homoleptic zinc complex formation: synthesis, structures and application in ROP of lactides.

    PubMed

    Jędrzkiewicz, D; Ejfler, J; Gulia, N; John, Ł; Szafert, S

    2015-08-14

    Synthesis and characterization of a series of new amino-phenol/naphthol ligands (L(1,2)-H) have been developed and their respective zinc complexes ( 1 and 2-Zn ) have been synthesized. The molecular structures of L(1)-H and 1, 2-Zn were explored in detail by NMR, single-crystal X-ray studies and DFT calculations, which confirmed the existence of complexes as stabile dimers both in a solution and in the solid state. All complexes mediate the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of lactide highly efficiently, at room temperature, in a controlled fashion. The influence of the architecture of the ligand on the desired homo/heteroleptic complex formation, as well as the relationship between the initiator design and the catalytic activity have been investigated.

  2. An analysis of cropland mask choice and ancillary data for annual corn yield forecasting using MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yang; Campbell, James B.; Taff, Gregory N.; Zheng, Baojuan

    2015-06-01

    The Midwestern United States is one of the world's most important corn-producing regions. Monitoring and forecasting of corn yields in this intensive agricultural region are important activities to support food security, commodity markets, bioenergy industries, and formation of national policies. This study aims to develop forecasting models that have the capability to provide mid-season prediction of county-level corn yields for the entire Midwestern United States. We used multi-temporal MODIS NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index) 16-day composite data as the primary input, with digital elevation model (DEM) and parameter-elevation relationships on independent slopes model (PRISM) climate data as additional inputs. The DEM and PRISM data, along with three types of cropland masks were tested and compared to evaluate their impacts on model predictive accuracy. Our results suggested that the use of general cropland masks (e.g., summer crop or cultivated crops) generated similar results compared with use of an annual corn-specific mask. Leave-one-year-out cross-validation resulted in an average R2 of 0.75 and RMSE value of 1.10 t/ha. Using a DEM as an additional model input slightly improved performance, while inclusion of PRISM climate data appeared not to be important for our regional corn-yield model. Furthermore, our model has potential for real-time/early prediction. Our corn yield esitmates are available as early as late July, which is an improvement upon previous corn-yield prediction models. In addition to annual corn yield forecasting, we examined model uncertainties through spatial and temporal analysis of the model's predictive error distribution. The magnitude of predictive error (by county) appears to be associated with the spatial patterns of corn fields in the study area.

  3. DNA sequence and ancillary ligand modulate the biexponential emission decay of intercalated [Ru(L)2dppz]2+ enantiomers.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Andrew W; Andersson, Johanna; Lincoln, Per; Tuite, Eimer M

    2012-11-19

    The bi-exponential emission decay of [Ru(L)(2)dppz](2+) (L = N,N'-diimine ligand) bound to DNA has been studied as a function of polynucleotide sequence, enantiomer, and nature of L (phenanthroline vs. bipyridine). The lifetimes (τ(i)) and pre-exponential factors (α(i)) depend on all three parameters. With [poly(dA-dT)](2), the variation of α(i) with [Nu]/[Ru] has little dependence on L for Λ-[Ru(L)(2)dppz](2+) but a substantial dependence for Δ-[Ru(L)(2)dppz](2+). With [poly(dG-dC)](2), by contrast, the Λ-enantiomer α(i) values depend strongly on the nature of L, whereas those of the Δ-enantiomer are relatively unaffected. DNA-bound linked dimers show similar photophysical behaviour. The lifetimes are identified with two geometries of minor-groove intercalated [Ru(L)(2) dppz](2+), resulting in differential water access to the phenazine nitrogen atoms. Interplay of cooperative and anti-cooperative binding resulting from complex-complex and complex-DNA interactions is responsible for the observed variations of α(i) with binding ratio. [Ru(phen)(2)dppz](2+) emission is quenched by guanosine in DMF, which may further rationalise the shorter lifetimes observed with guanine-rich DNA.

  4. Identifying sources of ozone to three rural locations in Nevada, USA, using ancillary gas pollutants, aerosol chemistry, and mercury.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthieu B; Fine, Rebekka; Pierce, Ashley M; Gustin, Mae S

    2015-10-15

    Ozone (O3) is a secondary air pollutant of long standing and increasing concern for environmental and human health, and as such, the US Environmental Protection Agency will revise the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 75 ppbv to ≤ 70 ppbv. Long term measurements at the Great Basin National Park (GBNP) indicate that O3 in remote areas of Nevada will exceed a revised standard. As part of the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative, measurements of O3 and other air pollutants were made at 3 remote sites between February 2012 and March 2014, GBNP, Paradise Valley (PAVA), and Echo Peak (ECHO). Exceptionally high concentrations of each air pollutant were defined relative to each site as mixing ratios that exceeded the 90th percentile of all hourly data. Case studies were analyzed for all periods during which mean daily O3 exceeded the 90th percentile concurrently with a maximum 8-h average (MDA8) O3 that was "exceptionally high" for the site (65 ppbv at PAVA, 70 ppbv at ECHO and GBNP), and of potential regulatory significance. An MDA8 ≥ 65 ppbv occurred only five times at PAVA, whereas this occurred on 49 and 65 days at GBNP and ECHO, respectively. The overall correlation between O3 and other pollutants was poor, consistent with the large distance from significant primary emission sources. Mean CO at these locations exceeded concentrations reported for background sites in 2000. Trajectory residence time calculations and air pollutant concentrations indicate that exceedances at GBNP and ECHO were promoted by air masses originating from multiple sources, including wildfires, transport of pollution from southern California and the marine boundary layer, and transport of Asian pollution plumes. Results indicate that the State of Nevada will exceed a revised O3 standard due to sources that are beyond their control. PMID:25957787

  5. Identifying sources of ozone to three rural locations in Nevada, USA, using ancillary gas pollutants, aerosol chemistry, and mercury.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthieu B; Fine, Rebekka; Pierce, Ashley M; Gustin, Mae S

    2015-10-15

    Ozone (O3) is a secondary air pollutant of long standing and increasing concern for environmental and human health, and as such, the US Environmental Protection Agency will revise the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 75 ppbv to ≤ 70 ppbv. Long term measurements at the Great Basin National Park (GBNP) indicate that O3 in remote areas of Nevada will exceed a revised standard. As part of the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative, measurements of O3 and other air pollutants were made at 3 remote sites between February 2012 and March 2014, GBNP, Paradise Valley (PAVA), and Echo Peak (ECHO). Exceptionally high concentrations of each air pollutant were defined relative to each site as mixing ratios that exceeded the 90th percentile of all hourly data. Case studies were analyzed for all periods during which mean daily O3 exceeded the 90th percentile concurrently with a maximum 8-h average (MDA8) O3 that was "exceptionally high" for the site (65 ppbv at PAVA, 70 ppbv at ECHO and GBNP), and of potential regulatory significance. An MDA8 ≥ 65 ppbv occurred only five times at PAVA, whereas this occurred on 49 and 65 days at GBNP and ECHO, respectively. The overall correlation between O3 and other pollutants was poor, consistent with the large distance from significant primary emission sources. Mean CO at these locations exceeded concentrations reported for background sites in 2000. Trajectory residence time calculations and air pollutant concentrations indicate that exceedances at GBNP and ECHO were promoted by air masses originating from multiple sources, including wildfires, transport of pollution from southern California and the marine boundary layer, and transport of Asian pollution plumes. Results indicate that the State of Nevada will exceed a revised O3 standard due to sources that are beyond their control.

  6. TBI Patient, Injury, Therapy, and Ancillary Treatments Associated with Outcomes at Discharge and 9 Months Post-discharge

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Susan D.; Corrigan, John D.; Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Bogner, Jennifer; Barrett, Ryan S.; Giuffrida, Clare G.; Ryser, David K.; Cooper, Kelli; Carroll, Deborah M.; Deutscher, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine associations of patient and injury characteristics, inpatient rehabilitation therapy activities, and neurotropic medications with outcomes at discharge and 9 months post-discharge for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) Design Prospective, longitudinal observational study Setting 10 inpatient rehabilitation centers (9 US, 1 Canada) Participants Consecutive patients (n=2130) enrolled between 2008 and 2011, admitted for inpatient rehabilitation after an index TBI injury Interventions Not applicable Main Outcome Measures Rehabilitation length of stay, discharge to home, and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) at discharge and 9 months post-discharge Results The admission FIM Cognitive score was used to create 5 relatively homogeneous subgroups for subsequent analysis of treatment outcomes. Within each subgroup, significant associations were found between outcomes and patient and injury characteristics, time spent in therapy activities, and medications used. Patient and injury characteristics explained on average 35.7% of the variation in discharge outcomes and 22.3% in 9-month outcomes. Adding time spent and level of effort in therapy activities, as well as percent of stay using specific medications, explained approximately 20.0% more variation for discharge outcomes and 12.9% for 9-month outcomes. After patient, injury, and treatment characteristics were used to predict outcomes, center differences added only approximately 1.9% additional variance explained. Conclusions At discharge, greater effort during therapy sessions, time spent in more complex therapy activities, and use of specific medications were associated with better outcomes for patients in all admission FIM Cognitive subgroups. At 9 months post-discharge, similar but less pervasive associations were observed for therapy activities, but not classes of medications. Further research is warranted to examine more specific combinations of therapy activities and medications that

  7. Copper as ancillary diagnostic tool in preoperative evaluation of possible papillary thyroid carcinoma in patients with benign thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Dragutinović, Vesna V; Tatić, Svetislav B; Nikolić-Mandić, Snežana D; Tripković, Tatjana M; Dunđerović, Duško M; Paunović, Ivan R

    2014-09-01

    Preoperative diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) comprises numerous diagnostic procedures which are mostly applicable in tertiary institutions. Normal thyroid function depends on the presence of many trace elements and copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) are some of those. The study is based on retrospective review of 118 patients with preoperatively diagnosed benign thyroid disease (BTD) and 12 with PTC, who underwent thyroid surgery at the Center for Endocrine Surgery Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, between 2010 and 2012. The objective was to evaluate concentrations of Cu and Zn in serum as possible prediction markers for PTC in patients who underwent surgery for preoperatively diagnosed BTD. Concentrations of Cu and Zn ions in serum were measured using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Data were analyzed using methods of descriptive statistics, Anova and t-test (p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant). Definitive pathohistological findings revealed PTC in 23 (19.5%) and papillary microcarcinoma-mPTC in 13 (11.0%) of BTD patients. The concentrations of Cu ions in serum of PTC patients as well as in serum of patients with mPTC were significantly higher than in serum of BTD patients (p < 0.05). The concentrations of Zn ions and Cu/Zn ratio in serum of PTC and mPTC patients were not significantly higher than in serum of BTD patients. The concentration of Cu ions in serum of patients before thyroid surgery can be useful, easy available, and a low-cost tool in prediction of preoperatively undiagnosed PTC in patients with BTD.

  8. MCT4 surpasses the prognostic relevance of the ancillary protein CD147 in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Stefan; Rausch, Steffen; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Nies, Anne T.; Stenzl, Arnulf; Scharpf, Marcus; Fend, Falko; Kruck, Stephan; Schwab, Matthias; Schaeffeler, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation 147 (CD147/BSG) is a transmembrane glycoprotein mediating oncogenic processes partly through its role as binding partner for monocarboxylate transporter MCT4/SLC16A3. As demonstrated for MCT4, CD147 is proposed to be associated with progression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). In this study, we evaluated the prognostic relevance of CD147 in comparison to MCT4/SLC16A3 expression and DNA methylation. Methods CD147 protein expression was assessed in two independent ccRCC-cohorts (n = 186, n = 59) by immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays and subsequent manual as well as automated software-supported scoring (Tissue Studio, Definien sAG). Epigenetic regulation of CD147 was investigated using RNAseq and DNA methylation data of The Cancer Genome Atlas. These results were validated in our cohort. Relevance of prognostic models for cancer-specific survival, comprising CD147 and MCT4 expression or SLC16A3 DNA methylation, was compared using chi-square statistics. Results CD147 protein expression generated with Tissue Studio correlated significantly with those from manual scoring (P < 0.0001, rS = 0.85), indicating feasibility of software-based evaluation exemplarily for the membrane protein CD147 in ccRCC. Association of CD147 expression with patient outcome differed between cohorts. DNA methylation in the CD147/BSG promoter was not associated with expression. Comparison of prognostic relevance of CD147/BSG and MCT4/SLC16A3, showed higher significance for MCT4 expression and superior prognostic power for DNA methylation at specific CpG-sites in the SLC16A3 promoter (e.g. CD147 protein: P = 0.7780, Harrell's c-index = 53.7% vs. DNA methylation: P = 0.0076, Harrell's c-index = 80.0%). Conclusions Prognostic significance of CD147 protein expression could not surpass that of MCT4, especially of SLC16A3 DNA methylation, corroborating the role of MCT4 as prognostic biomarker for ccRCC. PMID:26384346

  9. Face Recognition Incorporating Ancillary Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Ki; Toh, Kar-Ann; Lee, Sangyoun

    2007-12-01

    Due to vast variations of extrinsic and intrinsic imaging conditions, face recognition remained to be a challenging computer vision problem even today. This is particularly true when the passive imaging approach is considered for robust applications. To advance existing recognition systems for face, numerous techniques and methods have been proposed to overcome the almost inevitable performance degradation due to external factors such as pose, expression, occlusion, and illumination. In particular, the recent part-based method has provided noticeable room for verification performance improvement based on the localized features which have good tolerance to variation of external conditions. The part-based method, however, does not really stretch the performance without incorporation of global information from the holistic method. In view of the need to fuse the local information and the global information in an adaptive manner for reliable recognition, in this paper we investigate whether such external factors can be explicitly estimated and be used to boost the verification performance during fusion of the holistic and part-based methods. Our empirical evaluations show noticeable performance improvement adopting the proposed method.

  10. Ancillary service details: Voltage control

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

    1997-12-01

    Voltage control is accomplished by managing reactive power on an alternating-current power system. Reactive power can be produced and absorbed by both generation and transmission equipment. Reactive-power devices differ substantially in the magnitude and speed of response and in their capital costs. System operators, transmission owners, generators, customers, power marketers, and government regulators need to pay close attention to voltage control as they restructure the U.S. electricity industry. Voltage control can affect reliability and commerce in three ways: (1) Voltages must be maintained within an acceptable range for both customer and power-system equipment to function properly. (2) The movement of reactive power consumes transmission resources, which limits the ability to move real power and worsens congestion. (3) The movement of reactive power results in real-power losses. When generators are required to supply excessive amounts of reactive power, their real-power production must be curtailed. These opportunity costs are not currently compensated for in most regions. Current tariffs are based on embedded costs. These embedded-cost tariffs average about $0.51/MWh, equivalent to $1.5 billion annually for the United States as a whole. Although this cost is low when compared with the cost of energy, it still aggregates to a significant amount of money. This report takes a basic look at why the power system requires reactive power (an appendix explains the fundamentals of real and reactive power). The report then examines the various types of generation and transmission resources used to supply reactive power and to control voltage. Finally it discusses how these resources are deployed and paid for in several reliability regions around the country. As the U.S. electricity industry is restructured, the generation, transmission, and system-control equipment and functions that maintain voltages within the appropriate ranges are being deintegrated.

  11. Evaluation of multiple ancillary therapies used in combination with an antimicrobial in newly received high-risk calves treated for bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B K; Step, D L; Maxwell, C L; Wagner, J J; Richards, C J; Krehbiel, C R

    2015-07-01

    Ancillary therapy (ANC) is commonly provided in conjunction with an antimicrobial when treating calves for suspected bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in an attempt to improve the response to a suspected BRD challenge. The first experiment evaluated the effects of 3 ANC in combination with an antimicrobial in high-risk calves treated for BRD during a 56-d receiving period. Newly received crossbred steers (n = 516; initial BW = 217 ± 20 kg) were monitored by trained personnel for clinical signs of BRD. Calves that met antimicrobial treatment criteria (n = 320) were then randomly assigned to experimental ANC treatment (80 steers/experimental ANC treatment): intravenous flunixin meglumine injection (NSAID), intranasal viral vaccination (VACC), intramuscular vitamin C injection (VITC), or no ANC (NOAC). Animal served as the experimental unit for all variables except DMI and G:F (pen served as the experimental unit for DMI and G:F). Within calves treated 3 times for BRD, those receiving NOAC had lower (P < 0.01) clinical severity scores (severity scores ranged from 0 to 4 on the basis of observed clinical signs and severity) and heavier (P = 0.01) BW than those receiving NSAID, VACC, or VITC at the time of third treatment. Between the second and third BRD treatments, calves receiving NOAC had decreased (P < 0.01) daily BW loss (−0.13 kg ADG) compared with those receiving NSAID, VACC, or VITC (−1.30, −1.90, and −1.41 kg ADG, respectively). There were no differences in rectal temperature, combined mortalities and removals, or overall performance among the experimental ANC treatments. Overall, morbidity and mortality attributed to BRD across treatments were 66.5% and 13.2%, respectively. After the receiving period, a subset of calves (n = 126) were allocated to finishing pens to evaluate the effects ANC administration on finishing performance, carcass characteristics, and lung scores at harvest. Ultrasound estimates, BW, and visual appraisal were used to target a

  12. Influence of number of benzodioxan-stilbazole-based ancillary ligands on dye packing, photovoltage and photocurrent in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Hammad; Islam, Ashraful; Han, Liyuan; El-Shafei, Ahmed

    2014-07-23

    Two novel heteroleptic Ru(II) bipyridyl complexes, HD-2 and HD-2-mono, were molecularly engineered, synthesized and characterized for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The influences of mono versus bis electron-donor benzodioxan ancillary ligands on optical, dye packing, electrochemical and photovoltaic properties were examined and compared to the benchmark N719. HD-2 and HD-2-mono achieved solar-to-power conversion efficiencies (%η) of 9.64 and 9.50, respectively, compared to 9.32 for N719 under the same experimental device conditions. Optical results showed that HD-2 and HD-2-mono have much higher molar extinction coefficients, longer excited state lifetimes and narrower HOMO-LUMO gaps compared to N719. Although the molar extinction coefficient of HD-2-mono was 27% less than that of HD-2, it outperformed HD-2 in photovoltaic performance when anchored on TiO2, owing to better dye packing and loading of the former. Charge recombination at the dye/TiO2 interface by impedance spectroscopy analysis showed that the recombination resistance and the lifetime of injected electron in TiO2 conduction band is directly proportional to the open-circuit voltage (Voc) observed. Furthermore, compared to HD-2 and HD-2-mono, the greater Voc of N719 can be attributed to the greater negative free energy for dye regeneration. Both HD-2 and HD-mono have almost the same negative free energy, which explains why they achieved almost the same Voc. Decay dynamic analysis for solar devices fabricated from the named dyes, by time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), elucidated that the lowest excited state decay lifetime for HD-2-mono, HD-2 and N719 are 3, 10 and 20 ps, respectively. The shorter the decay lifetime, the less kinetic redundancy, which leads to better photocurrent, and that explanation is consistent with the measured photocurrent and total solar-to-power conversion efficiency of the named dyes in the order of HD-2-mono > HD-2 > N719.

  13. Comparative absorption, electroabsorption and electrochemical studies of intervalence electron transfer and electronic coupling in cyanide-bridged bimetallic systems: ancillary ligand effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Fredrick W.; Slone, Robert V.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2000-03-01

    Electroabsorption or Stark spectroscopy has been used to evaluate the systems (NC) 5M II-CN-Ru III(NH 3) 51- and (NC) 5M II-CN-Ru III(NH 3) 4py 1-, where M II=Fe II or Ru II. When a pyridine ligand is present in the axial position on the Ru III acceptor, the effective optical electron transfer distance - as measured by the change in dipole moment, |Δ μ| - is increased by more than 35% relative to the ammine substituted counterpart. Comparison of the charge transfer distances to the crystal structure of Na[(CN) 5Fe-CN-Ru(NH 3) 4py] · 6H 2O reveals that the Stark derived distances are ˜50% to ˜90% of the geometric separation of the metal centers. The differences result in an upward revision in the Hush delocalization parameter, c b2, and of the electronic coupling matrix element, H ab, relative to those parameters obtained exclusively from electronic absorption measurements. The revised parameters are compared to those, which are obtained via electrochemical techniques and found to be in only fair agreement. We conclude that the absorption/electroabsorption analysis likely yields a more reliable set of mixing and coupling parameters.

  14. Impact of percutaneous coronary intervention on biomarker levels in patients in the subacute phase following myocardial infarction: the Occluded Artery Trial (OAT) biomarker ancillary study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the Occluded Artery Trial (OAT) Biomarker substudy was to evaluate the impact of infarct related artery (IRA) revascularization on serial levels of N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and dynamics of other biomarkers related to left ventricular remodeling, fibrosis and angiogenesis. Methods Patients were eligible for OAT-Biomarker based on the main OAT criteria. Of 70 patients (age 60.8 ± 8.8, 25% women) enrolled in the substudy, 37 were randomized to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and 33 to optimal medical therapy alone. Baseline serum samples were obtained prior to OAT randomization with follow up samples taken at one year. The primary outcome was percent change of NT-proBNP from baseline to 1 year. The secondary outcomes were respective changes of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 2 and 9, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2), Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), and Galectin-3. Results Paired (baseline and one-year) serum samples were obtained in 62 subjects. Baseline median NT-proBNP level was 944.8 (455.3, 1533) ng/L and decreased by 69% during follow-up (p < 0.0001). Baseline MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels increased significantly from baseline to follow-up (p = 0.034, and p = 0.027 respectively), while MMP-9 level decreased from baseline (p = 0.038). Levels of VEGF and Galectin-3 remained stable at one year (p = NS for both). No impact of IRA revascularization on any biomarker dynamics were noted. Conclusions There were significant changes in measured biomarkers related to LV remodeling, stress, and fibrosis following MI between 0 and 12 month. Establishing infarct vessel patency utilizing stenting 24 hours-28 days post MI did not however influence the biomarkers’ release. PMID:24156746

  15. Genome-wide association studies in nephrology: using known associations for data checks.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Matthias; Schaefer, Franz; Wong, Craig S; Köttgen, Anna

    2015-02-01

    Prior to conducting genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of renal traits and diseases, systematic checks to ensure data integrity and analytical work flow should be conducted. Using positive controls (ie, known associations between a single-nucleotide polymorphism [SNP] and a corresponding trait) allows for identifying errors that are not apparent solely from global evaluation of summary statistics. Strong genetic control associations of chronic kidney disease (CKD), as derived from GWAS, are lacking in the non-African ancestry CKD population; thus, in this perspective, we provide examples of and considerations for using positive controls among patients with CKD. Using data from individuals with CKD who participated in the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study or PediGFR (Pediatric Investigation for Genetic Factors Linked to Renal Progression) Consortium, we evaluated 2 kinds of positive control traits: traits unrelated to kidney function (bilirubin level and body height) and those related to kidney function (cystatin C and urate levels). For the former, the proportion of variance in the control trait that is explained by the control SNP is the main determinant of the strength of the observable association, irrespective of adjustment for kidney function. For the latter, adjustment for kidney function can be effective in uncovering known associations among patients with CKD. For instance, in 1,092 participants in the PediGFR Consortium, the P value for the association of cystatin C concentrations and rs911119 in the CST3 gene decreased from 2.7×10(-3) to 2.4×10(-8) upon adjustment for serum creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate. In this perspective, we give recommendations for the appropriate selection of control traits and SNPs that can be used for data checks prior to conducting GWAS among patients with CKD.

  16. Genome-Wide Association Studies in Nephrology: Using Known Associations for Data Checks

    PubMed Central

    Wuttke, Matthias; Schaefer, Franz; Wong, Craig S.; Köttgen, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Prior to conducting genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of renal traits and diseases, systematic checks to ensure data integrity and analytical workflow should be conducted. Using positive controls (ie, known associations between a single-nucleotide polymorphism [SNP] and a corresponding trait) allows for identifying errors that are not apparent solely from global evaluation of summary statistics. Strong genetic control associations of chronic kidney disease (CKD), as derived from GWAS, are lacking in the non-African CKD population; thus, in this perspective we provide examples of and considerations for using positive controls among patients with CKD. Using data from individuals with CKD who participated in the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study or PediGFR (Pediatric Investigation for Genetic Factors Linked to Renal Progression) Consortium, we evaluated 2 kinds of positive control traits: traits unrelated to kidney function (bilirubin, body height) and those related to kidney function (cystatin C, urate). For the former, the proportion of variance in the control trait that is explained by the control SNP is the main determinant of the strength of the observable association, irrespective of adjustment for kidney function. For the latter, adjustment for kidney function can be effective in uncovering known associations among patients with CKD. For instance, in 1,092 participants of the PediGFR Consortium, the p-value for association of cystatin C concentrations and rs911119 in the CST3 gene decreased from 2.7*10-3 to 2.4*10-8 upon adjustment for serum creatinine–based estimated glomerular filtration rate. In this perspective, we give recommendations for the appropriate selection of control traits and SNPs that can be used for data checks prior to conducting GWAS among patients with CKD. PMID:25465167

  17. Structural bases of oxygen-sensitivity in Fe(II) complexes with tripodal ligands. Steric effects, Lewis acidity and the role of ancillary ligands.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, Laila; Thibon, Aurore; Brelot, Lydia; Lachkar, Mohammed; Mandon, Dominique

    2012-12-21

    of the ancillary ligands in all complexes. Comparative analysis of the structures reveals relatively invariant structural parameters within the series of Fe(SO(3)CF(3))(2) complexes, whereas FeCl(2) complexes display important metal to ligand elongations upon tripod substitution. The reactivity increase upon fluorination of the ligand in the FeCl(2) complexes is interpreted as resulting from sterically-induced pyridine flexibility. The opposite situation with Fe(SO(3)CF(3))(2) complexes is due to the lock of the coordination polyhedron in the absence of important steric stress, especially when the metal center becomes electron-deficient.

  18. Structural bases of oxygen-sensitivity in Fe(II) complexes with tripodal ligands. Steric effects, Lewis acidity and the role of ancillary ligands.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, Laila; Thibon, Aurore; Brelot, Lydia; Lachkar, Mohammed; Mandon, Dominique

    2012-12-21

    of the ancillary ligands in all complexes. Comparative analysis of the structures reveals relatively invariant structural parameters within the series of Fe(SO(3)CF(3))(2) complexes, whereas FeCl(2) complexes display important metal to ligand elongations upon tripod substitution. The reactivity increase upon fluorination of the ligand in the FeCl(2) complexes is interpreted as resulting from sterically-induced pyridine flexibility. The opposite situation with Fe(SO(3)CF(3))(2) complexes is due to the lock of the coordination polyhedron in the absence of important steric stress, especially when the metal center becomes electron-deficient. PMID:23047805

  19. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Project on Criteria for Clinical Trials in Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease: V. The 2014 Ancillary Therapy and Supportive Care Working Group Report

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Paul A.; Kitko, Carrie L.; Elad, Sharon; Flowers, Mary E.D.; Gea-Banacloche, Juan C.; Halter, Jörg P.; Hoodin, Flora; Johnston, Laura; Lawitschka, Anita; McDonald, George B.; Opipari, Anthony W.; Savani, Bipin N.; Schultz, Kirk R.; Smith, Sean R.; Syrjala, Karen L.; Treister, Nathaniel; Vogelsang, Georgia B.; Williams, Kirsten M.; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Martin, Paul J.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Couriel, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    The 2006 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consensus paper presented recommendations by the Ancillary Therapy and Supportive Care Working Group to support clinical research trials in chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Topics covered in that inaugural effort included the prevention and management of infections and common complications of chronic GVHD, as well as recommendations for patient education and appropriate follow-up. Given the new literature that has emerged during the past 8 years, we made further organ-specific refinements to these guidelines. Minimum frequencies are suggested for monitoring key parameters relevant to chronic GVHD during systemic immunosuppressive therapy and, thereafter, referral to existing late effects consensus guidelines is advised. Using the framework of the prior consensus, the 2014 NIH recommendations are organized by organ or other relevant systems and graded according to the strength and quality of supporting evidence. PMID:25838185

  20. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Project on Criteria for Clinical Trials in Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease: V. The 2014 Ancillary Therapy and Supportive Care Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Paul A; Kitko, Carrie L; Elad, Sharon; Flowers, Mary E D; Gea-Banacloche, Juan C; Halter, Jörg P; Hoodin, Flora; Johnston, Laura; Lawitschka, Anita; McDonald, George B; Opipari, Anthony W; Savani, Bipin N; Schultz, Kirk R; Smith, Sean R; Syrjala, Karen L; Treister, Nathaniel; Vogelsang, Georgia B; Williams, Kirsten M; Pavletic, Steven Z; Martin, Paul J; Lee, Stephanie J; Couriel, Daniel R

    2015-07-01

    The 2006 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consensus paper presented recommendations by the Ancillary Therapy and Supportive Care Working Group to support clinical research trials in chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Topics covered in that inaugural effort included the prevention and management of infections and common complications of chronic GVHD, as well as recommendations for patient education and appropriate follow-up. Given the new literature that has emerged during the past 8 years, we made further organ-specific refinements to these guidelines. Minimum frequencies are suggested for monitoring key parameters relevant to chronic GVHD during systemic immunosuppressive therapy and, thereafter, referral to existing late effects consensus guidelines is advised. Using the framework of the prior consensus, the 2014 NIH recommendations are organized by organ or other relevant systems and graded according to the strength and quality of supporting evidence.

  1. seawaveQ: an R package providing a model and utilities for analyzing trends in chemical concentrations in streams with a seasonal wave (seawave) and adjustment for streamflow (Q) and other ancillary variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryberg, Karen R.; Vecchia, Aldo V.

    2013-01-01

    The seawaveQ R package fits a parametric regression model (seawaveQ) to pesticide concentration data from streamwater samples to assess variability and trends. The model incorporates the strong seasonality and high degree of censoring common in pesticide data and users can incorporate numerous ancillary variables, such as streamflow anomalies. The model is fitted to pesticide data using maximum likelihood methods for censored data and is robust in terms of pesticide, stream location, and degree of censoring of the concentration data. This R package standardizes this methodology for trend analysis, documents the code, and provides help and tutorial information, as well as providing additional utility functions for plotting pesticide and other chemical concentration data.

  2. Prevalence and Prognostic Significance of Apparent Treatment Resistant Hypertension in Chronic Kidney Disease: Report From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, George; Xie, Dawei; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Anderson, Amanda H; Appel, Lawrence J; Bodana, Shirisha; Brecklin, Carolyn S; Drawz, Paul; Flack, John M; Miller, Edgar R; Steigerwalt, Susan P; Townsend, Raymond R; Weir, Matthew R; Wright, Jackson T; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-02-01

    The association between apparent treatment resistant hypertension (ATRH) and clinical outcomes is not well studied in chronic kidney disease. We analyzed data on 3367 hypertensive participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) to determine prevalence, associations, and clinical outcomes of ATRH in nondialysis chronic kidney disease patients. ATRH was defined as blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg on ≥3 antihypertensives, or use of ≥4 antihypertensives with blood pressure at goal at baseline visit. Prevalence of ATRH was 40.4%. Older age, male sex, black race, diabetes mellitus, and higher body mass index were independently associated with higher odds of having ATRH. Participants with ATRH had a higher risk of clinical events than participants without ATRH-composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, congestive heart failure (CHF), and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.38 [1.22-1.56]); renal events (1.28 [1.11-1.46]); CHF (1.66 [1.38-2.00]); and all-cause mortality (1.24 [1.06-1.45]). The subset of participants with ATRH and blood pressure at goal on ≥4 medications also had higher risk for composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, CHF, and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], (1.30 [1.12-1.51]) and CHF (1.59 [1.28-1.99]) than those without ATRH. ATRH was associated with significantly higher risk for CHF and renal events only among those with estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥30 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). Our findings show that ATRH is common and associated with high risk of adverse outcomes in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease. This underscores the need for early identification and management of patients with ATRH and chronic kidney disease.

  3. A critical study of the role of the surface oxide layer in titanium bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, S.; Wightman, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The molecular understanding of the role which the surface oxide layer of the adherend plays in titanium bonding is studied. The effects of Ti6-4 adherends pretreatment, bonding conditions, and thermal aging of the lap shear specimens were studied. The use of the SEM/EDAX and ESCA techniques to study surface morphology and surface composition was emphasized. In addition, contact angles and both infrared and visible reflection spectroscopy were used in ancillary studies.

  4. Total Mercury, Methylmercury, Methylmercury Production Potential, and Ancillary Streambed-Sediment and Pore-Water Data for Selected Streams in Oregon, Wisconsin, and Florida, 2003-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Lutz, Michelle A.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Aiken, George R.; Orem, William H.; Hall, Britt D.; DeWild, John F.; Brigham, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    Mercury contamination of aquatic ecosystems is an issue of national concern, affecting both wildlife and human health. Detailed information on mercury cycling and food-web bioaccumulation in stream settings and the factors that control these processes is currently limited. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) conducted detailed studies from 2002 to 2006 on various media to enhance process-level understanding of mercury contamination, biogeochemical cycling, and trophic transfer. Eight streams were sampled for this study: two streams in Oregon, and three streams each in Wisconsin and Florida. Streambed-sediment and pore-water samples were collected between February 2003 and September 2004. This report summarizes the suite of geochemical and microbial constituents measured, the analytical methods used, and provides the raw data in electronic form for both bed-sediment and pore-water media associated with this study.

  5. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and progression to diabetes in patients at risk for diabetes: an ancillary analysis in the diabetes prevention program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the association between vitamin D status, assessed by plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and risk of incident diabetes. The research design and methods were a prospective observational study with a mean follow-up of 2.7 years in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a multi-center trial co...

  6. Annual Crop Type Classification of the U.S. Great Plains for 2000 - 2011: An Application of Classification Tree Modeling using Remote Sensing and Ancillary Environmental Data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, D. M.; Wylie, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to increase spatial and temporal availability of crop classification data using reliable source data that have the potential of being applied on local, regional, national, and global levels. This study implemented classification tree modeling to map annual crop types throughout the U.S. Great Plains from 2000 - 2011. Classification tree modeling has been shown in numerous studies to be an effective tool for developing classification models. In this study, nearly 18 million crop observation points, derived from annual U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Agriculture Statistics Service (NASS) Cropland Data Layers (CDLs), were used in the training, development, and validation of a classification tree crop type model (CTM). Each observation point was further defined by weekly Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI) readings, annual climatic conditions, soil conditions, and a number of other biogeophysical environmental characteristics. The CTM accounted for the most prevalent crop types in the area, including, corn, soybeans, winter wheat, spring wheat, cotton, sorghum, and alfalfa. Other crops that did not fit into any of these classes were identified and grouped into a miscellaneous class. An 87% success rate was achieved on the classification of 1.8 million observation points (10% of total observation points) that were withheld from training. The CTM was applied to create annual crop maps of the U.S. Great Plains for 2000 - 2011 at a spatial resolution of 250 meters. Product validation was performed by comparing county acreage derived from the modeled crop maps and county acreage data from the USDA NASS Survey Program for each crop type and each year. Greater than 15,000 county records from 2001 - 2010 were compared with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of r = 0.87.

  7. Tetrahedral nickel nitrosyl complexes with tripodal [N3] and [Se3] donor ancillary ligands: structural and computational evidence that a linear nitrosyl is a trivalent ligand.

    PubMed

    Landry, Victoria K; Pang, Keliang; Quan, Stephanie M; Parkin, Gerard

    2007-02-28

    Linear nickel nitrosyl compounds supported by tridentate nitrogen and selenium ligands, namely the tris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)hydroborato and tris(2-seleno-1-mesitylimidazolyl)hydroborato complexes, [TpMe2]NiNO and [TseMes]NiNO, have been synthesized and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. Computational studies demonstrate that the linear nitrosyl ligand behaves as a trivalent X3 ligand such that the Ni-N interaction has multiple bond character. PMID:17297507

  8. Frequent interruptions of sedentary time modulates contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake pathways in muscle: Ancillary analysis from randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bergouignan, Audrey; Latouche, Celine; Heywood, Sarah; Grace, Megan S; Reddy-Luthmoodoo, Medini; Natoli, Alaina K; Owen, Neville; Dunstan, David W; Kingwell, Bronwyn A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have observed associations between frequent interruptions of sitting time with physical activity bouts and beneficial metabolic outcomes, even in individuals who regularly exercise. Frequent interruptions to prolonged sitting reduce postprandial plasma glucose. Here we studied potential skeletal muscle mechanisms accounting for this improved control of glycemia in overweight adults under conditions of one day uninterrupted sitting and sitting interrupted with light-intensity or moderate-intensity walking every 20-min (n = 8); and, after three days of either uninterrupted sitting or light-intensity walking interruptions (n = 5). Contraction- and insulin-mediated glucose uptake signaling pathways as well as changes in oxidative phosphorylation proteins were examined. We showed that 1) both interventions reduce postprandial glucose concentration, 2) acute interruptions to sitting over one day stimulate the contraction-mediated glucose uptake pathway, 3) both acute interruptions to sitting with moderate-intensity activity over one day and light-intensity activity over three days induce a transition to modulation of the insulin-signaling pathway, in association with increased capacity for glucose transport. Only the moderate-intensity interruptions resulted in greater capacity for glycogen synthesis and likely for ATP production. These observations contribute to a mechanistic explanation of improved postprandial glucose metabolism with regular interruptions to sitting time, a promising preventive strategy for metabolic diseases. PMID:27554943

  9. Frequent interruptions of sedentary time modulates contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake pathways in muscle: Ancillary analysis from randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Bergouignan, Audrey; Latouche, Celine; Heywood, Sarah; Grace, Megan S.; Reddy-Luthmoodoo, Medini; Natoli, Alaina K.; Owen, Neville; Dunstan, David W.; Kingwell, Bronwyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have observed associations between frequent interruptions of sitting time with physical activity bouts and beneficial metabolic outcomes, even in individuals who regularly exercise. Frequent interruptions to prolonged sitting reduce postprandial plasma glucose. Here we studied potential skeletal muscle mechanisms accounting for this improved control of glycemia in overweight adults under conditions of one day uninterrupted sitting and sitting interrupted with light-intensity or moderate-intensity walking every 20-min (n = 8); and, after three days of either uninterrupted sitting or light-intensity walking interruptions (n = 5). Contraction- and insulin-mediated glucose uptake signaling pathways as well as changes in oxidative phosphorylation proteins were examined. We showed that 1) both interventions reduce postprandial glucose concentration, 2) acute interruptions to sitting over one day stimulate the contraction-mediated glucose uptake pathway, 3) both acute interruptions to sitting with moderate-intensity activity over one day and light-intensity activity over three days induce a transition to modulation of the insulin-signaling pathway, in association with increased capacity for glucose transport. Only the moderate-intensity interruptions resulted in greater capacity for glycogen synthesis and likely for ATP production. These observations contribute to a mechanistic explanation of improved postprandial glucose metabolism with regular interruptions to sitting time, a promising preventive strategy for metabolic diseases. PMID:27554943

  10. Ankle motion influences the external knee adduction moment and may predict who will respond to lateral wedge insoles?: an ancillary analysis from the SILK trial

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, G.J.; Parkes, M.J.; Forsythe, L.; Felson, D.T.; Jones, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Lateral wedge insoles are a potential simple treatment for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients by reducing the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). However in some patients, an increase in their EKAM is seen. Understanding the role of the ankle joint complex in the response to lateral wedge insoles is critical in understanding and potentially identifying why some patients respond differently to lateral wedge insoles. Method Participants with medial tibiofemoral OA underwent gait analysis whilst walking in a control shoe and a lateral wedge insole. We evaluated if dynamic ankle joint complex coronal plane biomechanical measures could explain and identify those participants that increased (biomechanical non-responder) or decreased (biomechanical responder) EKAM under lateral wedge conditions compared to the control shoe. Results Of the 70 participants studied (43 male), 33% increased their EKAM and 67% decreased their EKAM. Overall, lateral wedge insoles shifted the centre of foot pressure laterally, increased eversion of the ankle/subtalar joint complex (STJ) and the eversion moment compared to the control condition. Ankle angle at peak EKAM and peak eversion ankle/STJ complex angle in the control condition predicted if individuals were likely to decrease EKAM under lateral wedge conditions. Conclusions Coronal plane ankle/STJ complex biomechanical measures play a key role in reducing EKAM when wearing lateral wedge insoles. These findings may assist in the identification of those individuals that could benefit more from wearing lateral wedge insoles. PMID:25749010

  11. Final report and archive of the swath bathymetry and ancillary data collected in the Puerto Rico Trench region in 2002 and 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, Uri S.; Danforth, William W.; Polloni, Christopher F.

    2013-01-01

    In 2002 and 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), conducted three exploration cruises that mapped for the first time the morphology of the entire tectonic plate boundary stretching from the Dominican Republic in the west to the Lesser Antilles in the east, a distance of approximately 700 kilometers (430 miles). Observations from these three exploration cruises, coupled with computer modeling and published Global Positioning System (GPS) results and earthquake focal mechanisms, have provided new information that is changing the evaluation of the seismic and tsunami hazard from this plate boundary. The observations collected during these cruises also contributed to the basic understanding of the mechanisms that govern plate tectonics, in this case, the creation of the island of Puerto Rico and the deep trench north of it. Results of the sea floor mapping have been an important component of the study of tsunami and earthquake hazards to the northeastern Caribbean and the U.S. Atlantic coast off the United States.

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 and the Cu/Zn ratio as ancillary diagnostic tools in distinguishing between the classical and follicular variants of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dragutinović, Vesna V; Tatić, Svetislav B; Nikolić-Mandić, Snežana; Savin, Svetlana; Cvejić, Dubravka; Dunđerović, Duško; Gajić, Milan; Paunović, Ivan

    2012-10-01

    The most common histological variants of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), classical (CPTC) and follicular (FPTC), have different diagnostic features, molecular biology, and prognosis. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) endopeptidase which degrades the components of the extracellular matrix is essential in the invasive growth and metastasizing of malignant tumors. The serum copper (Cu)/zinc (Zn) ratios are sensitive diagnostic and prognostic indicators in oncology since Cu- and Zn-dependent enzymes play important roles in the genesis and the progression of tumors. The aim of this study was to examine the expressions of MMP-9 in tissues of CPTC and FPTC, as well as to determine the Cu/Zn ratios in the same samples. MMP-9 was determined immunohistochemically, and the concentrations of copper and zinc in thyroid tissue were determined by means of flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The results obtained revealed significantly higher expressions of MMP-9 in CPTC in comparison with FPTC, as well as higher Cu/Zn ratios in CPTC than in FPTC. Thus, determining MMP-9 activities and the Cu/Zn ratios could improve the accuracy of the standard histopathological diagnosis of these two types of PTC.

  13. Time-Series analysis of MODIS NDVI data along with ancillary data for Land use/Land cover mapping of Uttarakhand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patakamuri, S. K.; Agrawal, S.; Krishnaveni, M.

    2014-12-01

    Land use and land cover plays an important role in biogeochemical cycles, global climate and seasonal changes. Mapping land use and land cover at various spatial and temporal scales is thus required. Reliable and up to date land use/land cover data is of prime importance for Uttarakhand, which houses twelve national parks and wildlife sanctuaries and also has a vast potential in tourism sector. The research is aimed at mapping the land use/land cover for Uttarakhand state of India using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data for the year 2010. The study also incorporated smoothening of time-series plots using filtering techniques, which helped in identifying phenological characteristics of various land cover types. Multi temporal Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data for the year 2010 was used for mapping the Land use/land cover at 250m coarse resolution. A total of 23 images covering a single year were layer stacked and 150 clusters were generated using unsupervised classification (ISODATA) on the yearly composite. To identify different types of land cover classes, the temporal pattern (or) phenological information observed from the MODIS (MOD13Q1) NDVI, elevation data from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), MODIS water mask (MOD44W), Nighttime Lights Time Series data from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and Indian Remote Sensing (IRS) Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) data were used. Final map product is generated by adopting hybrid classification approach, which resulted in detailed and accurate land use and land cover map.

  14. Influence of multi-source and multi-temporal remotely sensed and ancillary data on the accuracy of random forest classification of wetlands in northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corcoran, Jennifer M.; Knight, Joseph F.; Gallant, Alisa L.

    2013-01-01

    Wetland mapping at the landscape scale using remotely sensed data requires both affordable data and an efficient accurate classification method. Random forest classification offers several advantages over traditional land cover classification techniques, including a bootstrapping technique to generate robust estimations of outliers in the training data, as well as the capability of measuring classification confidence. Though the random forest classifier can generate complex decision trees with a multitude of input data and still not run a high risk of over fitting, there is a great need to reduce computational and operational costs by including only key input data sets without sacrificing a significant level of accuracy. Our main questions for this study site in Northern Minnesota were: (1) how does classification accuracy and confidence of mapping wetlands compare using different remote sensing platforms and sets of input data; (2) what are the key input variables for accurate differentiation of upland, water, and wetlands, including wetland type; and (3) which datasets and seasonal imagery yield the best accuracy for wetland classification. Our results show the key input variables include terrain (elevation and curvature) and soils descriptors (hydric), along with an assortment of remotely sensed data collected in the spring (satellite visible, near infrared, and thermal bands; satellite normalized vegetation index and Tasseled Cap greenness and wetness; and horizontal-horizontal (HH) and horizontal-vertical (HV) polarization using L-band satellite radar). We undertook this exploratory analysis to inform decisions by natural resource managers charged with monitoring wetland ecosystems and to aid in designing a system for consistent operational mapping of wetlands across landscapes similar to those found in Northern Minnesota.

  15. Mutations in the Gene Encoding the Ancillary Pilin Subunit of the Streptococcus suis srtF Cluster Result in Pili Formed by the Major Subunit Only

    PubMed Central

    Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Takamatsu, Daisuke; la Cruz Domínguez-Punaro, María de; Lecours, Marie-Pier; Montpetit, Diane; Osaki, Makoto; Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    Pili have been shown to contribute to the virulence of different Gram-positive pathogenic species. Among other critical steps of bacterial pathogenesis, these structures participate in adherence to host cells, colonization and systemic virulence. Recently, the presence of at least four discrete gene clusters encoding putative pili has been revealed in the major swine pathogen and emerging zoonotic agent Streptococcus suis. However, pili production by this species has not yet been demonstrated. In this study, we investigated the functionality of one of these pili clusters, known as the srtF pilus cluster, by the construction of mutant strains for each of the four genes of the cluster as well as by the generation of antibodies against the putative pilin subunits. Results revealed that the S. suis serotype 2 strain P1/7, as well as several other highly virulent invasive S. suis serotype 2 isolates express pili from this cluster. However, in most cases tested, and as a result of nonsense mutations at the 5′ end of the gene encoding the minor pilin subunit (a putative adhesin), pili were formed by the major pilin subunit only. We then evaluated the role these pili play in S. suis virulence. Abolishment of the expression of srtF cluster-encoded pili did not result in impaired interactions of S. suis with porcine brain microvascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, non-piliated mutants were as virulent as the wild type strain when evaluated in a murine model of S. suis sepsis. Our results show that srtF cluster-encoded, S. suis pili are atypical compared to other Gram-positive pili. In addition, since the highly virulent strains under investigation are unlikely to produce other pili, our results suggest that pili might be dispensable for critical steps of the S. suis pathogenesis of infection. PMID:20052283

  16. Synthesis, structure, magnetism and nuclease activity of tetranuclear copper(II) phosphonates contatining ancillary 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhar, V.; Azhakar, R.; Senapati, T.; Thilagar, P.; Gosh, S.; Verma, S.; Boomishankar, R.; Steiner, A.; Kogerler, P.

    2008-01-07

    The reaction of cyclohexylphosphonic acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 11}PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}), anhydrous CuCl{sub 2} and 2,2{prime}-bipyridine (bpy) in the presence of triethylamine followed by a metathesis reaction with KNO{sub 3} afforded [Cu{sub 4}({micro}-Cl){sub 2}({micro}{sub 3}-C{sub 6}H{sub 11}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}(bpy){sub 4}](NO{sub 3}){sub 2} (1). In an analogous reaction involving Cu(OAc){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, the complex [Cu{sub 4}({micro}-CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}({micro}{sub 3}-C{sub 6}H{sub 11}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}(2,2-bpy){sub 4}](CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} (2) has been isolated. The three-component reaction involving Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O, cyclohexylphosphonic acid and 2,2{prime}-bipyridine in the presence of triethylamine afforded the tetranuclear assembly [Cu{sub 4}({micro}-OH)({micro}{sub 3}-C{sub 6}H{sub 11}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}(2,2{prime}-bpy){sub 4} (H{sub 2}O){sub 2}](NO{sub 3}){sub 3} (3). Replacing 2,2{prime}-bipyridine with 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) in the above reaction resulted in [Cu{sub 4}({micro}-OH)({micro}{sub 3}-C{sub 6}H{sub 11}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}(phen){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}](NO{sub 3}){sub 3} (4). In all the copper(II) phosphonates (1-4) the two phosphonate ions bridge the four copper(II) ions in a capping coordination action. Each phosphonate ion bridges four copper(II) ions in a {micro}{sub 4}, coordination mode or 4.211 of the Harris notation. Variable-temperature magnetic studies on 1-4 reveal that all four complexes exhibit moderately strong intramolecular antiferromagnetic coupling. The DNA cleavage activity of complexes 1-4 is also described. Compounds 1 and 3 were able to completely convert the supercoiled pBR322 DNA form I to nick form II without any co-oxidant. In contrast, 50% conversion occurred with 2 and 40% with 4. In the presence of magnesium monoperoxyphthalate all four compounds achieved rapid conversion of form I to form II.

  17. Multi-platform Chlorophyll and Sea Surface Temperature data fusion for Potential Fishing Zone detection using MODIS/VIIRS and ancillary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaradia, M. T.; Tijani, K.; Morea, A.; Nutricato, R.; Guerriero, L.; Giannini, L.; Nannucci, L.

    2014-12-01

    Adriatic Sea. The results of this study will be presented and commented. Moreover, our results show that data fusion applied to information obtained from different platforms and instruments, although with not overlapping wavebands and different spectral sensitivity, can give important contribution.

  18. therapy services: from ancillary to necessary.

    PubMed

    Britt, John

    2016-05-01

    Physical and occupational therapy and speech language pathology services are assuming an increasingly important role as healthcare providers transition to value-based care. Finance leaders can support the efforts of therapy leaders by working with them to: Determine priorities regarding level of care. Establish appropriate staffing and productivity metrics. Promote accurate and thorough charge-capture efforts. Broaden the referral base for therapy services PMID:27382706

  19. 1 CFR 8.5 - Ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... date in the period covered. 1 A three volume set, “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1973-1985”, lists all... currently effective regulations in the Code of Federal Regulations. (c) List of CFR sections affected..., 1949-1963” and “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972”, list all sections of the Code which...

  20. 1 CFR 8.5 - Ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... date in the period covered. 1 A three volume set, “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1973-1985”, lists all... currently effective regulations in the Code of Federal Regulations. (c) List of CFR sections affected..., 1949-1963” and “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972”, list all sections of the Code which...

  1. 1 CFR 8.5 - Ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... date in the period covered. 1 A three volume set, “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1973-1985”, lists all... currently effective regulations in the Code of Federal Regulations. (c) List of CFR sections affected..., 1949-1963” and “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972”, list all sections of the Code which...

  2. Ancillary-service details: operating reserves

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

    1997-11-01

    Operating reserves are the front lines in the defense of bulk-power systems against major generation and transmission outages. Operating reserves are provided by generating units that can increase their output rapidly to restore the system to generation/load balance after a major disturbance occurs. Dramatic changes are under way in the U.S. electricity sector, in particular the unbundling of generation from transmission and the increasingly competitive nature of bulk-power markets. Therefore, it is important to revisit the industry`s definitions of, procurement of, and payment for operating reserves. The procedures traditionally used by vertically integrated utilities may not serve the needs of an increasingly fragmented and competitive electricity industry. This report examines the past and current functions of, as well as the national and regional requirements for, operating reserves. We examine the data and analysis that support minimum-operating-reserve requirements. We obtained data on the number and severity of generator outages for three large U.S. electrical systems, including a power pool, a regional reliability council, and a utility. These limited data sets show a range of 15 to 40 major (>500 MW) outages a year for systems ranging in size from 20, 000 MW to 48,000 MW of peak demand. Finally, we discuss several emerging issues related to the underlying technical support for minimum operating-reserve requirements, alternative ways to pay for these reserves, the data needed to support the analysis of these requirements, and the mix of functions that are currently included within operating reserves.

  3. 1 CFR 8.5 - Ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... date in the period covered. 1 A three volume set, “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1973-1985”, lists all... currently effective regulations in the Code of Federal Regulations. (c) List of CFR sections affected..., 1949-1963” and “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972”, list all sections of the Code which...

  4. 1 CFR 8.5 - Ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... date in the period covered. 1 A three volume set, “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1973-1985”, lists all... currently effective regulations in the Code of Federal Regulations. (c) List of CFR sections affected..., 1949-1963” and “List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972”, list all sections of the Code which...

  5. Use of ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) Data to Study Aerosol Indirect Effects in China

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhanqing

    2012-12-19

    General goals: 1) Facilitating the deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and Ancillary Facility (AAF) in China in 2008, 2) Processing, retrieving, improving and analyzing observation data from ground-based, air-borne and space-borne instruments; 3) Conducting a series of studies to gain insights into the direct and indirect effects of these aerosols on radiation, clouds, and precipitation using both

  6. Manned maneuvering unit mission definition study. Volume 1: MMU applications analysis and performance requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Applications of Manned Maneuvering Units (MMU'S) to the space shuttle program are identified and described. The applications analyses included studies of the shuttle orbiter, orbiter subsystems, and both Sortie and Automated Payloads. Based on practicable MMU applications, general performance and control requirements for shuttle supporting maneuvering units are defined and compared to units evaluated on Skylab. The results of the MMU applications analyses and the general MMU performance and control requirements are presented. To describe a versatile utility-type maneuvering unit, conceptual designs of MMU support subsystems and ancillary equipment were prepared. Concepts for attaching and securing the MMU crewman to various vehicles, structure configurations, and rescue systems were developed. Concepts for ancillary provisions are reported.

  7. ASPREE Cancer Endpoints Study | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The ASPREE Cancer Endpoint Study (ACES), an ancillary study of the ASPirin in the Prevention of Events in the Elderly (ASPREE) Study, will allow for the examination of the effect of daily low-dose aspirin (100 mg) compared to placebo, on specific DNA biomarkers and selected specific incident and recurrent cancer and metastases. The establishment of this ACES biobank will allow for the exploration of DNA-related molecular mechanisms of aspirin's protective effect against cancer, cancer associated mortality and metastases, using blood or saliva DNA specimens, urine, and tumor tissue. |

  8. Shale worker's pneumoconiosis, associated respiratory ailments and skin tumors - plus ancillary documentation of mining and retorting processes and oil shale characterization (ex-shale workers in Scotland). Mid-project progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Seaton, A.

    1983-11-01

    Progress is reported on a study of survivors of Scottish oil shale mines, retorts, and refineries. The prevalence of pneumoconiosis and skin tumors is being determined by occupational histories, dermatology and smoking questionnaires, and x-ray surveys. A control study of workers of a colliery population in northeast England and mineralogical characterization of Scottish and Colorado shales are also being conducted. (ACR)

  9. Publication guidelines for quality improvement studies in health care: evolution of the SQUIRE project

    PubMed Central

    Batalden, Paul; Stevens, David; Ogrinc, Greg; Mooney, Susan E

    2009-01-01

    In 2005 we published draft guidelines for reporting studies of quality improvement, as the initial step in a consensus process for development of a more definitive version. The current article contains the revised version, which we refer to as standards for quality improvement reporting excellence (SQUIRE). This narrative progress report summarises the special features of improvement that are reflected in SQUIRE, and describes major differences between SQUIRE and the initial draft guidelines. It also briefly describes the guideline development process; considers the limitations of and unresolved questions about SQUIRE; describes ancillary supporting documents and alternative versions under development; and discusses plans for dissemination, testing, and further development of SQUIRE. PMID:19153129

  10. Outcomes of cytopathology studies presented at national pathology meetings.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, M C; Wojcik, E M

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what factors influence the final publication status of cytopathology studies presented at national meetings. Abstracts involving cytopathology material were obtained from the following journals: Modern Pathology (volume 11, 1998), Acta Cytologica (volume 42, 1998), and the American Journal of Clinical Pathology (volumes 109 and 110, 1998). Using the National Library of Medicine Website, each abstract was searched by author and topic to determine if the study was published as a peer-reviewed article. The following parameters were evaluated: meeting where the abstract was presented, type of institution where the research was based, type of material used in the study, and application of ancillary techniques used in the study. The subsequent published articles were evaluated for journal and time to publication. Out of 257 studies presented in 1998, 85 (33%) were published in peer-reviewed journals by May 2000. The majority of papers were published in Diagnostic Cytopathology (n = 21), Acta Cytologica (n = 15), and Cancer (n = 18). The mean time for publication was 12.8 mo. The highest percentage of published studies was presented at the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology (USCAP) meeting (50% of presented abstracts), followed by American Society of Cytopathology (ASC) (28%) and American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP) (17%) meetings. Ancillary techniques were applied in 40 of 85 (47%) published studies, 27 of 85 (32%) articles focused on morphology, and 18 of 85 (21%) papers covered other topics (e.g., quality assurance (QA), cost, and role of cytology). In nonpublished studies (n = 172), special techniques were the main focus in 40%, morphology in 25%, and other topics in 35% of abstracts. The great majority (97%) of published studies were from academic institutions. Gynecological and nongynecological material were roughly equally covered in published and nonpublished studies. Only a relatively small

  11. AX Tank farm process impacts study

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-03-18

    This study provides facility and process concepts and costs for partial decontamination of the most heavily contaminated debris from the demolition of the four AX tanks and ancillary equipment items. This debris would likely be classified as high-level and/or remote handle TRU waste based on source and radiological inventory. A process flow sheet was developed to treat contaminated metal wastes such as pipes and tank liners as well as contaminated concrete and the residual waste and grout left in the tanks after final waste retrieval. The treated solid waste is prepared for delivery to either the ERDF or the Low-Level waste burial grounds. Liquid waste products are delivered to the private vitrification contractor for further treatment and storage. This is one of several reports prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to develop retrieval performance criteria for tank farms.

  12. Chemical and ancillary data associated with bed sediment, young of year Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) tissue, and mussel (Mytilus edulis and Geukensia demissa) tissue collected after Hurricane Sandy in bays and estuaries of New Jersey and New York, 2013–14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Deshpande, Ashok D.; Blazer, Vicki; Galbraith, Heather S.; Dockum, Bruce W.; Romanok, Kristin M.; Colella, Kaitlyn; Deetz, Anna C.; Fisher, Irene J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Sharack, Beth; Summer, Lisa; Timmons, DeMond; Trainor, John J.; Wieczorek, Daniel; Samson, Jennifer; Reilly, Timothy J.; Focazio, Michael J.

    2015-09-09

    Twenty three PCB congeners, 9 PBDE congeners, and 20 OCPs were detected in composite mussel samples collected throughout the study area. The co-eluting PCB congeners 153 and 132, PBDE 47, 99, and 100, and p,p’-DDE were detected in samples from each site. The highest median concentrations of PCBs and PBDEs were present in mussels from Raritan Bay, N.Y., whereas the highest median concentrations of OCPs were present in mussels from Fire Island Inlet, N.Y., and Shark River, N.J. Mytilus edulis (blue mussels) and Geukensia demissa (ribbed mussels) were thin-sectioned and aged. The blue mussels collected ranged in age from 4 to 13 years, and the ribbed mussels ranged in age from 3 to 12 years.

  13. Chemical and ancillary data associated with bed sediment, young of year Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) tissue, and mussel (Mytilus edulis and Geukensia demissa) tissue collected after Hurricane Sandy in bays and estuaries of New Jersey and New York, 2013–14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Deshpande, Ashok D.; Blazer, Vicki; Galbraith, Heather S.; Dockum, Bruce W.; Romanok, Kristin M.; Colella, Kaitlyn; Deetz, Anna C.; Fisher, Irene J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Sharack, Beth; Summer, Lisa; Timmons, DeMond; Trainor, John J.; Wieczorek, Daniel; Samson, Jennifer; Reilly, Timothy J.; Focazio, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty three PCB congeners, 9 PBDE congeners, and 20 OCPs were detected in composite mussel samples collected throughout the study area. The co-eluting PCB congeners 153 and 132, PBDE 47, 99, and 100, and p,p’-DDE were detected in samples from each site. The highest median concentrations of PCBs and PBDEs were present in mussels from Raritan Bay, N.Y., whereas the highest median concentrations of OCPs were present in mussels from Fire Island Inlet, N.Y., and Shark River, N.J. Mytilus edulis (blue mussels) and Geukensia demissa (ribbed mussels) were thin-sectioned and aged. The blue mussels collected ranged in age from 4 to 13 years, and the ribbed mussels ranged in age from 3 to 12 years.

  14. Turbidity on the Shallow Reef off Kaulana and Hakioawa Watersheds, North Coast of Kaho`olawe, Hawai`iMeasurements of Turbidity and Ancillary Data on Winds, Waves, Precipitation, and Stream flow Discharge, November 2005 to June 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presto, M. Katherine; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Field, Michael E.; Abbott, Lyman L.

    2010-01-01

    The island of Kaho`olawe has particular cultural and religious significance for native Hawaiians. Once known as Kanaloa, the island was a center for native Hawaiian navigation. In the mid-20th century, the island was used as a bombing range by the U.S. Navy, and that practice, along with the foraging by feral goats, led to a near-complete decimation of vegetation. The loss of ground cover led to greatly increased erosion and run-off of sediment-laden water onto the island's adjacent coral reefs. Litigation in 1990 ended the U.S. Navy's use of the island as a bombing range, and in 1994 the island was transferred to the Kaho`olawe Island Reserve Commission (KIRC), http://kahoolawe.hawaii.gov/. As a result of the litigation, the U.S. Navy began a 10-year clean-up effort that was the foundation for the present restoration effort by KIRC (Slay, 2009). The restoration effort is centered on revegetating the island, reducing erosion, and limiting run-off onto adjacent reefs. Restoration efforts to mitigate sediment runoff to streams and gulches by restoring native vegetation and minimizing erosion have focused on two watersheds, Kaulana and Hakioawa, on the northeast and northwest sides of the island, respectively. Stream flow and sediment gages were installed by the U.S. Geological Survey Pacific Islands Water Science Center in each of the watersheds, and a weather station was established upland of the watersheds. For this study, turbidity monitors were installed on the insular shelf off the two watersheds to monitor the overall quality of reef waters and their changes in response to rain and stream flow discharge events.

  15. Structure and NIR-luminescence of ytterbium(III) beta-diketonate complexes with 5-nitro-1,10-phenanthroline ancillary ligand: assessment of chain length and fluorination impact.

    PubMed

    Martín-Ramos, Pablo; Pereira da Silva, Pedro S; Lavín, Victor; Martín, Inocencio R; Lahoz, Fernando; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; Silva, Manuela Ramos; Martín-Gil, Jesús

    2013-10-01

    Seven new tris(β-diketonear-nate)ytterbium(III) complexes with the general formula [Yb(β-diketonate)3(5NO2phen)] (where the β-diketone is either 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(2-naphthyl)-1,3-butanedione, 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(2-furyl)-1,3-butanedione, 1,1,1-trifluoro-2,4-pentanedione, 1,1,1-trifluoro-5,5-dimethyl-2,4-hexanedione, 1,1,1,5,5,6,6,7,7,7-decafluoro-2,4-heptanedione, 2,4-hexanedione or 2,6-dimethyl-3,5-heptanedione, and 5NO2phen = 5-nitro-1,10-phenanthroline) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Single crystal X-ray structures have been determined for three fluorinated complexes and ground state geometries of the other four complexes have been predicted using the Sparkle/PM6 model. These experimental structures and those designed by semi-empirical models reveal octacoordination around the Yb(3+) ion. Photoluminescence studies and lifetime measurements show that the increase in the fluorinated β-diketonate chain length is associated with a decrease in Yb(3+) luminescence intensity of the (2)F5/2→(2)F7/2 transition at around 980 nm and the (2)F5/2 excited state lifetime, while the ligand lifetime value remains almost unaffected. Finally, fluorination of the ligands is only advised when the complexes are to be used for co-doping with isostructural Er(3+) complexes for optical amplifiers, since it leads to a slight decrease in luminescence intensity for the same β-diketonate chain length.

  16. A kinetic study of gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT)-mediated S-nitrosoglutathione catabolism.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Valeria; Tacito, Alessia; Paolicchi, Aldo; Barsacchi, Renata; Franzini, Maria; Baldassini, Riccardo; Vecoli, Cecilia; Pompella, Alfonso; Bramanti, Emilia

    2009-01-15

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is a nitric oxide (NO) donor compound which has been postulated to be involved in transport of NO in vivo. It is known that gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) is one of the enzymes involved in the enzyme-mediated decomposition of GSNO, but no kinetics studies of the reaction GSNO-GGT are reported in literature. In this study we directly investigated the kinetics of GGT with respect to GSNO as a substrate and glycyl-glycine (GG) as acceptor co-substrate by spectrophotometry at 334 nm. GGT hydrolyses the gamma-glutamyl moiety of GSNO to give S-nitroso-cysteinylglycine (CGNO) and gamma-glutamyl-GG. However, as both the substrate GSNO and the first product CGNO absorb at 334 nm, we optimized an ancillary reaction coupled to the enzymatic reaction, based on the copper-mediated decomposition of CGNO yielding oxidized cysteinyl-glycine and NO. The ancillary reaction allowed us to study directly the GSNO/GGT kinetics by following the decrease of the characteristic absorbance of nitrosothiols at 334 nm. A K(m) of GGT for GSNO of 0.398+/-31 mM was thus found, comparable with K(m) values reported for other gamma-glutamyl substrates of GGT. PMID:19000649

  17. Assessing observational studies of medical treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hartz, Arthur; Bentler, Suzanne; Charlton, Mary; Lanska, Douglas; Butani, Yogita; Soomro, G Mustafa; Benson, Kjell

    2005-01-01

    Background Previous studies have assessed the validity of the observational study design by comparing results of studies using this design to results from randomized controlled trials. The present study examined design features of observational studies that could have influenced these comparisons. Methods To find at least 4 observational studies that evaluated the same treatment, we reviewed meta-analyses comparing observational studies and randomized controlled trials for the assessment of medical treatments. Details critical for interpretation of these studies were abstracted and analyzed qualitatively. Results Individual articles reviewed included 61 observational studies that assessed 10 treatment comparisons evaluated in two studies comparing randomized controlled trials and observational studies. The majority of studies did not report the following information: details of primary and ancillary treatments, outcome definitions, length of follow-up, inclusion/exclusion criteria, patient characteristics relevant to prognosis or treatment response, or assessment of possible confounding. When information was reported, variations in treatment specifics, outcome definition or confounding were identified as possible causes of differences between observational studies and randomized controlled trials, and of heterogeneity in observational studies. Conclusion Reporting of observational studies of medical treatments was often inadequate to compare study designs or allow other meaningful interpretation of results. All observational studies should report details of treatment, outcome assessment, patient characteristics, and confounding assessment. PMID:16137327

  18. 39 CFR 122.1 - Ancillary special services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for which the following special services have been purchased: Domestic Certified MailTM service, domestic Delivery ConfirmationTM service, domestic and inbound international Registered MailTM service, domestic Collect On Delivery, domestic electronic Return Receipt, and domestic Signature...

  19. Ancillary and Related Services for the CETA Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, Robert L.; Vincent, John

    This monograph is one of 12 that address various topics in the area of CETA/education linkages. They were designed to provide those individuals interested in the development and implementation of CETA/education linkages with information that will serve to enhance the quality of existing programs and facilitate the efficient and effective…

  20. Ancillary role of vitamin C in pink aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Sheel, Vaibhav; Purwar, Parth; Dixit, Jaya; Rai, Priya

    2015-06-08

    A smile expresses feelings of joy, affection and self-confidence in an individual. Melanin hyperpigmentation of the gingiva jeopardises the aesthetics of an individual significantly. In the present case, gingival depigmentation was performed with a surgical scalpel along with local applications of ascorbic acid, yielding satisfactory aesthetic results with low subjective pain levels, and no recurrence has been observed after 9 months of follow-up.

  1. Alternative Approaches for Incentivizing the Frequency Responsive Reserve Ancillary Service

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Tuohy, A.; Brooks, D.

    2012-03-01

    Frequency responsive reserve is the autonomous response of generators and demand response to deviations of system frequency, usually as a result of the instantaneous outage of a large supplier. Frequency responsive reserve arrests the frequency decline resulting in the stabilization of system frequency, and avoids the triggering of under-frequency load-shedding or the reaching of unstable frequencies that could ultimately lead to system blackouts. It is a crucial service required to maintain a reliable and secure power system. Regions with restructured electricity markets have historically had a lack of incentives for frequency responsive reserve because generators inherently provided the response and on large interconnected systems, more than sufficient response has been available. This may not be the case in future systems due to new technologies and declining response. This paper discusses the issues that can occur without proper incentives and even disincentives, and proposes alternatives to introduce incentives for resources to provide frequency responsive reserve to ensure an efficient and reliable power system.

  2. Alternative Approaches for Incentivizing the Frequency Responsive Reserve Ancillary Service

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Tuohy, A.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Brooks, D.

    2012-05-01

    Frequency responsive reserve is the autonomous response of generators and demand response to deviations of system frequency, usually as a result of the instantaneous outage of a large supplier. This article discusses the issues that can occur without proper incentives and even disincentives, and proposes alternatives to introduce incentives for resources to provide frequency responsive reserve to ensure an efficient and reliable power system.

  3. Integration of access control and ancillary information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.R.; Ahrens, J.S.

    1995-07-01

    The DOE has identified the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ARGUS system as the standard entry control system for the DOE Complex. ARGUS integrates several key functions, specifically, badging, entry control, and verification of clearance status. Not all sites need or can afford an ARGUS system. Such sites are therefore limited to commercial equipment which provide ARGUS like features. In this project an alternative way to integrate commercial equipment into an integrated system to include badging, access control, property control, and automated verification of clearance status has been investigated. Such a system would provide smaller sites the same functionality as is provided by ARGUS. Further, it would allow sites to fully participate in the DOE`s concept of Complex wide access control. This multi-year task is comprised of three phases. Phase 1, system requirements and definitions, and phase 2, software and hardware development, were completed during fiscal year 1994. This report covers these two phases and the demonstration system which resulted. Phase three would employ the demonstration system to evaluate system performance, identify operational limits and to integrate additional features. The demonstration system includes a badging station, a database server, a managers workstation, an entry control system, and a property protection system. The functions have been integrated through the use of custom interfaces and operator screens which greatly increase ease of use.

  4. Enhancing VELMA's Watershed Delineation and Performance with Ancillary Stream Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    VELMA (Visualizing Ecosystems for Land Management Assessment) is a hydro-ecological landscape disturbance model developed to predict the effectiveness of alternative green infrastructure scenarios for protecting water quality, and also to estimate potential ecosystem service co-b...

  5. 76 FR 41726 - Reporting Ancillary Airline Passenger Revenues

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... certificated air carrier. Many air carriers have adopted a la carte pricing with separate fees for such things as checked baggage, carry-on baggage, meals, on-board entertainment, internet connections, pillows... Medical Equipment 5. In-Flight Entertainment/Internet Access 6. Sleep Sets 7. In-Flight Food/Non...

  6. Ancillary diagnostic imaging. Angiography, ultrasonography, scintigraphy, and xeroradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Pharr, J.W.

    1985-03-01

    Veterinary medical imaging is now accepted as including a number of imaging modalities other than conventional radiography. Although the wide availability and relatively low cost of conventional radiography will keep it in the forefront of veterinary medical imaging, other imaging modalities or techniques such as those discussed in this article will, where available, be of significant value in selected cases of bovine lameness.

  7. 8 CFR 1240.49 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Proceedings To Determine Deportability of Aliens in the United States: Hearing and Appeal (for Proceedings Commenced Prior... apply for asylum in the United States or withholding of deportation to those......

  8. 8 CFR 1240.49 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 249 of the Act. The application shall be subject to the requirements of 8 CFR parts 1240, 1245, and... the Act shall be made to the director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. In conjunction with any..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. In...

  9. 8 CFR 1240.11 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... application shall be subject to the requirements of § 1240.20, and 8 CFR parts 1245 and 1249. The approval of... director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. (2) In conjunction with any application for creation of status..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. (3) In...

  10. 8 CFR 1240.49 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 249 of the Act. The application shall be subject to the requirements of 8 CFR parts 1240, 1245, and... the Act shall be made to the director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. In conjunction with any..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. In...

  11. 8 CFR 1240.11 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... application shall be subject to the requirements of § 1240.20, and 8 CFR parts 1245 and 1249. The approval of... director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. (2) In conjunction with any application for creation of status..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. (3) In...

  12. 8 CFR 1240.11 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... application shall be subject to the requirements of § 1240.20, and 8 CFR parts 1245 and 1249. The approval of... director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. (2) In conjunction with any application for creation of status..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. (3) In...

  13. 8 CFR 1240.11 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... application shall be subject to the requirements of § 1240.20, and 8 CFR parts 1245 and 1249. The approval of... director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. (2) In conjunction with any application for creation of status..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. (3) In...

  14. 8 CFR 1240.49 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 249 of the Act. The application shall be subject to the requirements of 8 CFR parts 1240, 1245, and... the Act shall be made to the director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. In conjunction with any..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. In...

  15. 42 CFR 414.40 - Coding and ancillary policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... surgery policy (for example, post- and pre-operative periods and services, and intra-operative services... interpretation)). (3) Payment modifiers (for example, assistant-at-surgery, multiple surgery, bilateral surgery, split surgical global services, team surgery, and unusual services)....

  16. 42 CFR 414.40 - Coding and ancillary policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Global surgery policy (for example, post- and pre-operative periods and services, and intra-operative... (the interpretation)). (3) Payment modifiers (for example, assistant-at-surgery, multiple surgery, bilateral surgery, split surgical global services, team surgery, and unusual services)....

  17. 42 CFR 414.40 - Coding and ancillary policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Global surgery policy (for example, post- and pre-operative periods and services, and intra-operative... (the interpretation)). (3) Payment modifiers (for example, assistant-at-surgery, multiple surgery, bilateral surgery, split surgical global services, team surgery, and unusual services)....

  18. 42 CFR 414.40 - Coding and ancillary policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... surgery policy (for example, post- and pre-operative periods and services, and intra-operative services... interpretation)). (3) Payment modifiers (for example, assistant-at-surgery, multiple surgery, bilateral surgery, split surgical global services, team surgery, and unusual services)....

  19. 77 FR 25105 - Reporting of Ancillary Airline Passenger Revenues

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... wheelchairs and scooters used by passengers with disabilities. See 76 FR 41726. You may review comments to... mishandled wheelchairs and scooters used by passengers with disabilities. During the public meeting, DOT... processing and accounting for baggage and wheelchairs. This information is critical to determining the...

  20. Functional design criteria W-367, 222-S ancillary equipment addition

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, C.B.

    1995-02-21

    This paper reviews the designs and performance of tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A large number of tubular cells of the porous support tube type have been electrically tested, some to times over 50,000 hours; these cells have shown excellent performance and performance stability. Since 1984, successfully larger electrical generators utilizing these cells have been built and operated; a 20 kW integrated SOFC system operated for 7064 hours during 1993-1994. Results of development efforts to reduce cost and increase power output of tubular cells by eliminating porous support tube and increasing active length are described, and plans to utilize such air electrode supported cells in future SOFC systems are discussed.

  1. Ancillary-service details: regulation, load following, and generator response

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine empirically these intrahour and interhour load changes and the responses of a utility`s generating resources to those load changes. We analyze data, primarily from one control area, to see how it maintains ACE close to zero in an effort to meet the A1 and A2 criteria. Overall, we estimate that load following costs US electric utilities over one billion dollars a year. We first test alternative ways to identify trends over multihour periods using both regression analysis and rolling averages. Then, we consider several metrics for intrahour load following. Next we examine characteristics of load following for different time-averaging periods and compare the dynamics of loads and load following generation across these time periods. Finally, we consider the contribution of each load to the total load following requirements of the control area.

  2. 42 CFR 413.316 - Determining payment amounts: Ancillary services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Prospectively Determined Payment Rates for Low-Volume Skilled Nursing Facilities, for Cost Reporting...

  3. 42 CFR 413.316 - Determining payment amounts: Ancillary services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Prospectively Determined Payment Rates for Low-Volume Skilled Nursing Facilities, for Cost Reporting...

  4. 42 CFR 413.316 - Determining payment amounts: Ancillary services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Prospectively Determined Payment Rates for Low-Volume Skilled Nursing Facilities, for Cost Reporting...

  5. 8 CFR 1240.11 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... application shall be subject to the requirements of § 1240.20, and 8 CFR parts 1245 and 1249. The approval of... director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. (2) In conjunction with any application for creation of status..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. (3) In...

  6. 8 CFR 1240.49 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 249 of the Act. The application shall be subject to the requirements of 8 CFR parts 1240, 1245, and... the Act shall be made to the director in accordance with 8 CFR part 1216. In conjunction with any..., in accordance with the provisions of section 213A of the Act and 8 CFR part 213a. In...

  7. 42 CFR 456.143 - Content of medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Hospitals Ur Plan...) Ancillary services furnished, including drugs and biologicals; (4) Professional services performed in...

  8. CNR-IMAA lidar systems for aerosol, clouds, and water vapour study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, G.; Amodeo, A.; Boselli, A.; Cornacchia, C.; D'Amico, G.; Madonna, F.; Mona, L.; Pandolfi, M.

    2005-10-01

    At CNR-IMAA located in Tito Scalo (40°36'N, 15°44'E, 760 m a.s.l.), two lidar systems are systematically operational: the first is devoted to tropospheric aerosol characterization, in the framework of EARLINET, and the second performs water vapour measurements. The aerosol lidar system provides independent measurements of aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficient at 355 nm and at 532 nm, aerosol backscatter profiles at 1064 nm and particles depolarization ratio at 532 nm. The Raman lidar for the water vapor allows the vertical profiling of the water vapour mixing ratio with high spatial and temporal resolution up to the tropopause. The system has been calibrated by means of intensive measurement campaign of simultaneous and co-located radiosonde launches. CNR-IMAA is also provided with a DIAL mobile system for pollutants 3-dimensional spatial distribution. Besides these lidar systems, the CNR-IMAA ground based facility for Earth Observation includes ancillary instruments: a radiosounding system for PTU, ozone and wind measurements; a Sun photometer operative since December 2004 in the framework of AERONET; a 12 channels microwave radiometer for continuous measurements of temperature, relative humidity and water vapor, operative since February 2004; a ceilometer for continuous cloud cover monitoring. Lidar systems together with these ancillary instruments make the CNR-IMAA a heavily instrumented experimental site for integrated observations of aerosols, clouds and water vapor to be used for climatological studies and for the validation of satellite data.

  9. SeaWiFS technical report series. Volume 13: Case studies for SeaWiFS calibration and validation, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Mcclain, Charles R.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Fraser, Robert S.; Firestone, James K.; Schieber, Brian D.; Yeh, Eueng-Nan; Arrigo, Kevin R.; Sullivan, Cornelius W.

    1994-01-01

    Although the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Calibration and Validation Program relies on the scientific community for the collection of bio-optical and atmospheric correction data as well as for algorithm development, it does have the responsibility for evaluating and comparing the algorithms and for ensuring that the algorithms are properly implemented within the SeaWiFS Data Processing System. This report consists of a series of sensitivity and algorithm (bio-optical, atmospheric correction, and quality control) studies based on Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) and historical ancillary data undertaken to assist in the development of SeaWiFS specific applications needed for the proper execution of that responsibility. The topics presented are as follows: (1) CZCS bio-optical algorithm comparison, (2) SeaWiFS ozone data analysis study, (3) SeaWiFS pressure and oxygen absorption study, (4) pixel-by-pixel pressure and ozone correction study for ocean color imagery, (5) CZCS overlapping scenes study, (6) a comparison of CZCS and in situ pigment concentrations in the Southern Ocean, (7) the generation of ancillary data climatologies, (8) CZCS sensor ringing mask comparison, and (9) sun glint flag sensitivity study.

  10. Interlaboratory Study on Differential Analysis of Protein Glycosylation by Mass Spectrometry: The ABRF Glycoprotein Research Multi-Institutional Study 2012*

    PubMed Central

    Leymarie, Nancy; Griffin, Paula J.; Jonscher, Karen; Kolarich, Daniel; Orlando, Ron; McComb, Mark; Zaia, Joseph; Aguilan, Jennifer; Alley, William R.; Altmann, Friederich; Ball, Lauren E.; Basumallick, Lipika; Bazemore-Walker, Carthene R.; Behnken, Henning; Blank, Michael A.; Brown, Kristy J.; Bunz, Svenja-Catharina; Cairo, Christopher W.; Cipollo, John F.; Daneshfar, Rambod; Desaire, Heather; Drake, Richard R.; Go, Eden P.; Goldman, Radoslav; Gruber, Clemens; Halim, Adnan; Hathout, Yetrib; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Horn, David M.; Hurum, Deanna; Jabs, Wolfgang; Larson, Göran; Ly, Mellisa; Mann, Benjamin F.; Marx, Kristina; Mechref, Yehia; Meyer, Bernd; Möginger, Uwe; Neusüβ, Christian; Nilsson, Jonas; Novotny, Milos V.; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Packer, Nicolle H.; Pompach, Petr; Reiz, Bela; Resemann, Anja; Rohrer, Jeffrey S.; Ruthenbeck, Alexandra; Sanda, Miloslav; Schulz, Jan Mirco; Schweiger-Hufnagel, Ulrike; Sihlbom, Carina; Song, Ehwang; Staples, Gregory O.; Suckau, Detlev; Tang, Haixu; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Viner, Rosa I.; An, Yanming; Valmu, Leena; Wada, Yoshinao; Watson, Megan; Windwarder, Markus; Whittal, Randy; Wuhrer, Manfred; Zhu, Yiying; Zou, Chunxia

    2013-01-01

    One of the principal goals of glycoprotein research is to correlate glycan structure and function. Such correlation is necessary in order for one to understand the mechanisms whereby glycoprotein structure elaborates the functions of myriad proteins. The accurate comparison of glycoforms and quantification of glycosites are essential steps in this direction. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful analytical technique in the field of glycoprotein characterization. Its sensitivity, high dynamic range, and mass accuracy provide both quantitative and sequence/structural information. As part of the 2012 ABRF Glycoprotein Research Group study, we explored the use of mass spectrometry and ancillary methodologies to characterize the glycoforms of two sources of human prostate specific antigen (PSA). PSA is used as a tumor marker for prostate cancer, with increasing blood levels used to distinguish between normal and cancer states. The glycans on PSA are believed to be biantennary N-linked, and it has been observed that prostate cancer tissues and cell lines contain more antennae than their benign counterparts. Thus, the ability to quantify differences in glycosylation associated with cancer has the potential to positively impact the use of PSA as a biomarker. We studied standard peptide-based proteomics/glycomics methodologies, including LC-MS/MS for peptide/glycopeptide sequencing and label-free approaches for differential quantification. We performed an interlaboratory study to determine the ability of different laboratories to correctly characterize the differences between glycoforms from two different sources using mass spectrometry methods. We used clustering analysis and ancillary statistical data treatment on the data sets submitted by participating laboratories to obtain a consensus of the glycoforms and abundances. The results demonstrate the relative strengths and weaknesses of top-down glycoproteomics, bottom-up glycoproteomics, and glycomics methods. PMID

  11. Interlaboratory study on differential analysis of protein glycosylation by mass spectrometry: the ABRF glycoprotein research multi-institutional study 2012.

    PubMed

    Leymarie, Nancy; Griffin, Paula J; Jonscher, Karen; Kolarich, Daniel; Orlando, Ron; McComb, Mark; Zaia, Joseph; Aguilan, Jennifer; Alley, William R; Altmann, Friederich; Ball, Lauren E; Basumallick, Lipika; Bazemore-Walker, Carthene R; Behnken, Henning; Blank, Michael A; Brown, Kristy J; Bunz, Svenja-Catharina; Cairo, Christopher W; Cipollo, John F; Daneshfar, Rambod; Desaire, Heather; Drake, Richard R; Go, Eden P; Goldman, Radoslav; Gruber, Clemens; Halim, Adnan; Hathout, Yetrib; Hensbergen, Paul J; Horn, David M; Hurum, Deanna; Jabs, Wolfgang; Larson, Göran; Ly, Mellisa; Mann, Benjamin F; Marx, Kristina; Mechref, Yehia; Meyer, Bernd; Möginger, Uwe; Neusüβ, Christian; Nilsson, Jonas; Novotny, Milos V; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Packer, Nicolle H; Pompach, Petr; Reiz, Bela; Resemann, Anja; Rohrer, Jeffrey S; Ruthenbeck, Alexandra; Sanda, Miloslav; Schulz, Jan Mirco; Schweiger-Hufnagel, Ulrike; Sihlbom, Carina; Song, Ehwang; Staples, Gregory O; Suckau, Detlev; Tang, Haixu; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Viner, Rosa I; An, Yanming; Valmu, Leena; Wada, Yoshinao; Watson, Megan; Windwarder, Markus; Whittal, Randy; Wuhrer, Manfred; Zhu, Yiying; Zou, Chunxia

    2013-10-01

    One of the principal goals of glycoprotein research is to correlate glycan structure and function. Such correlation is necessary in order for one to understand the mechanisms whereby glycoprotein structure elaborates the functions of myriad proteins. The accurate comparison of glycoforms and quantification of glycosites are essential steps in this direction. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful analytical technique in the field of glycoprotein characterization. Its sensitivity, high dynamic range, and mass accuracy provide both quantitative and sequence/structural information. As part of the 2012 ABRF Glycoprotein Research Group study, we explored the use of mass spectrometry and ancillary methodologies to characterize the glycoforms of two sources of human prostate specific antigen (PSA). PSA is used as a tumor marker for prostate cancer, with increasing blood levels used to distinguish between normal and cancer states. The glycans on PSA are believed to be biantennary N-linked, and it has been observed that prostate cancer tissues and cell lines contain more antennae than their benign counterparts. Thus, the ability to quantify differences in glycosylation associated with cancer has the potential to positively impact the use of PSA as a biomarker. We studied standard peptide-based proteomics/glycomics methodologies, including LC-MS/MS for peptide/glycopeptide sequencing and label-free approaches for differential quantification. We performed an interlaboratory study to determine the ability of different laboratories to correctly characterize the differences between glycoforms from two different sources using mass spectrometry methods. We used clustering analysis and ancillary statistical data treatment on the data sets submitted by participating laboratories to obtain a consensus of the glycoforms and abundances. The results demonstrate the relative strengths and weaknesses of top-down glycoproteomics, bottom-up glycoproteomics, and glycomics methods.

  12. Dietary approaches for bone health: lessons from the Framingham Osteoporosis Study

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Shivani; Mangano, Kelsey M; McLean, Robert R; Hannan, Marian T; Kiel, Douglas P

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by systemic impairment of bone mass, strength, and microarchitecture, resulting in increased risk for fragility fracture, disability, loss of independence and even death. Adequate nutrition is important in achieving and maintaining optimal bone mass, as well as preventing this debilitating disease. It is widely accepted that adequate calcium and vitamin D intake are necessary for good bone health; however, nutritional benefits to bone go beyond these two nutrients. This review article will provide updated information on all nutrients and foods now understood to alter bone health. Specifically, this paper will focus on related research from the Framingham Osteoporosis Study, an ancillary study of the Framingham Heart Study, with data on more than five thousand adult men and women. PMID:26045228

  13. New Perpspectives for Studies of Reaction Mechanisms at Low Medium Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramegna, F.; Mastinu, P. F.; Vannucci, L.; Marchi, E. Boscolo; Cherubini, R.; Moroni, A.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Million, B.; Wieland, O.; Benzoni, G.; Leoni, S.; Airoldi, A.; Sacchi, R.; Galbusera, E.; Giussani, A.; Ottolenghi, A.; Gadioli, E.; Ballarini, F.; Maj, A.; Brekiesz, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Barlini, S.; Lanchais, A.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Geraci, E.; Vannini, G.; Ordine, A.; Casini, G.; Nannini, A.; Chiari, M.; Abbondanno, U.; Milazzo, P. M.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Bonasera, A.

    2003-07-01

    In the energetic range between 5 and 20 MeV/n, which is covered by the accelerating system Tandem XTU - Linac ALPI of the Laboratori Nazionali of Legnaro, many open questions regarding the study of reaction mechanisms with heavy ions have still to be solved. Using complex apparatuses like GARFIELD coupled with different ancillary detectors, it is possible to perform exclusive measurements, which are necessary to get new important information. This will bring to a better understanding both on nuclear structure problems, like for example the study of the mechanisms underlying the Giant Dipole Resonance Damping, and on reaction mechanisms phenomena, like the characterization of those mechanisms, which are responsible for the many-fragment emission. Preliminary results and plans to be performed with the GARFIELD facility have been described.

  14. New Perspectives for Studies of Reaction Mechanisms at Low-Medium Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramegna, F.; Mastinu, P. F.; Vannucci, L.; Boscolo Marchi, E.; Cherubini, R.; Moroni, A.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Million, B.; Wieland, O.; Benzoni, G.; Leoni, S.; Airoldi, A.; Sacchi, R.; Galbusera, E.; Giussani, A.; Ottolenghi, A.; Gadioli, E.; Ballarini, F.; Maj, A.; Brekiesz, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Barlini, S.; Lanchais, A.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Geraci, E.; Vannini, G.; Ordine, A.; Casini, G.; Nannini, A.; Chiari, M.; Abbondanno, U.; Milazzo, P. M.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Bonasera, A.

    2003-04-01

    Many open questions regarding the study of reaction mechanisms with heavy ions have still to be solved, even in the energetic range between 5 and 20 MeV/u, which is covered by the accelerating system Tandem XTU--Linac ALPI of the Laboratori Nazionali of Legnaro. Using complex apparatuses like GARFIELD, coupled with different ancillary detectors, it is possible to perform exclusive measurements, which should be capable of giving new important information, in order to better understand both nuclear structure problems, like for example the study of the mechanisms underlying the Giant Dipole Resonance Damping, and reaction mechanisms phenomena, like the characterization of those mechanisms which are responsible for the many-fragment emission. Preliminary results and future plans to be performed with the GARFIELD facility have been described.

  15. Grid impacts of wind power: a summary of recent studies in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Brian; Milligan, Michael; Zavadil, Bob; Brooks, Daniel; Kirby, Brendan; Dragoon, Ken; Caldwell, Jim

    2004-04-01

    Several detailed technical investigations of grid ancillary service impacts of wind power plants in the United States have recently been performed. These studies were applied to Xcel Energy (in Minnesota) and PacifiCorp and the Bonneville Power Administration (both in the northwestern United States). Although the approaches vary, three utility time frames appear to be most at issue: regulation, load following and unit commitment. This article describes and compares the analytic frameworks from recent analysis and discusses the implications and cost estimates of wind integration. The findings of these studies indicate that relatively large-scale wind generation will have an impact on power system operation and costs, but these impacts and costs are relatively low at penetration rates that are expected over the next several years. Published in 2004 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-H-6:2, 105-H Reactor Ancillary Support Areas, Below-Grade Structures, and Underlying Soils; the 118-H-6:3, 105-H Reactor Fuel Storage Basin and Underlying Soils; The 118-H-6:3 Fuel Storage Basin Deep Zone Side Slope Soils; the 100-H-9, 100-H-10, and 100-H-13 French Drains; the 100-H-11 and 100-H-12 Expansion Box French Drains; and the 100-H-14 and 100-H-31 Surface Contamination Zones

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Appel

    2006-06-29

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of removal actions for the 105-H Reactor Ancillary Support Areas, Below-Grade Structures, and Underlying Soils (subsite 118-H-6:2); 105-H Reactor Fuel Storage Basin and Underlying Soils (118-H-6:3); and Fuel Storage Basin Deep Zone Side Slope Soils. This CVP also documents remedial actions for the following seven additional waste sties: French Drain C (100-H-9), French Drain D (100-H-10), Expansion Box French Drain E (100-H-11), Expansion Box French Drain F (100-H-12), French Drain G (100-H-13), Surface Contamination Zone H (100-H-14), and the Polychlorinated Biphenyl Surface Contamination Zone (100-H-31).

  17. A novel smartphone ophthalmic imaging adapter: User feasibility studies in Hyderabad, India

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Cassie A; Murthy, Somasheila I; Pappuru, Rajeev R; Jais, Alexandre; Myung, David J; Chang, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Aim of Study: To evaluate the ability of ancillary health staff to use a novel smartphone imaging adapter system (EyeGo, now known as Paxos Scope) to capture images of sufficient quality to exclude emergent eye findings. Secondary aims were to assess user and patient experiences during image acquisition, interuser reproducibility, and subjective image quality. Materials and Methods: The system captures images using a macro lens and an indirect ophthalmoscopy lens coupled with an iPhone 5S. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 229 consecutive patients presenting to L. V. Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India. Primary outcome measure was mean photographic quality (FOTO-ED study 1–5 scale, 5 best). 210 patients and eight users completed surveys assessing comfort and ease of use. For 46 patients, two users imaged the same patient's eyes sequentially. For 182 patients, photos taken with the EyeGo system were compared to images taken by existing clinic cameras: a BX 900 slit-lamp with a Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera and an FF 450 plus Fundus Camera with VISUPAC™ Digital Imaging System. Images were graded post hoc by a reviewer blinded to diagnosis. Results: Nine users acquired 719 useable images and 253 videos of 229 patients. Mean image quality was ≥ 4.0/5.0 (able to exclude subtle findings) for all users. 8/8 users and 189/210 patients surveyed were comfortable with the EyeGo device on a 5-point Likert scale. For 21 patients imaged with the anterior adapter by two users, a weighted κ of 0.597 (95% confidence interval: 0.389–0.806) indicated moderate reproducibility. High level of agreement between EyeGo and existing clinic cameras (92.6% anterior, 84.4% posterior) was found. Conclusion: The novel, ophthalmic imaging system is easily learned by ancillary eye care providers, well tolerated by patients, and captures high-quality images of eye findings. PMID:27146928

  18. Sensitivity studies for space-based measurement of atmospheric total column carbon dioxide by reflected sunlight.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S Randolph

    2004-02-01

    The feasibility of making space-based carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon-cycle studies is explored. With the proposed detection method, we use absorption of reflected sunlight near 1.58 microm. The results indicate that the small (degrees 1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable provided that an adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable. Modification of the sunlight path by scattering of aerosols and cirrus clouds could, however, lead to systematic errors in the CO2 column retrieval; therefore ancillary aerosol and cloud data are important to reduce errors. Precise measurement of surface pressure and good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile are also required.

  19. Reconnaissance Study of Water Quality in the Mining-Affected Aries River Basin, Romania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, Michael J.; Tindall, James A.; Sardan, Daniel; Fey, David L.; Poputa, G.L.

    2008-01-01

    The Aries River basin of western Romania has been subject to mining activities as far back as Roman times. Present mining activities are associated with the extraction and processing of various metals including Au, Cu, Pb, and Zn. To understand the effects of these mining activities on the environment, this study focused on three objectives: (1) establish a baseline set of physical parameters, and water- and sediment-associated concentrations of metals in river-valley floors and floodplains; (2) establish a baseline set of physical and chemical measurements of pore water and sediment in tailings; and (3) provide training in sediment and water sampling to personnel in the National Agency for Mineral Resources and the Rosia Poieni Mine. This report summarizes basin findings of physical parameters and chemistry (sediment and water), and ancillary data collected during the low-flow synoptic sampling of May 2006.

  20. Motivational factors for participation in biomedical research: evidence from a qualitative study of biomedical research participation in Blantyre District, Malawi.

    PubMed

    Mfutso-Bengo, Joseph; Manda-Taylor, Lucinda; Masiye, Francis

    2015-02-01

    Obtaining effective informed consent from research participants is a prerequisite to the conduct of an ethically sound research. Yet it is believed that obtaining quality informed consent is generally difficult in settings with low socioeconomic status. This is so because of the alleged undue inducements and therapeutic misconception among participants. However, there is a dearth of data on factors that motivate research participants to take part in research. Hence, this study was aimed at filling this gap in the Malawian context. We conducted 18 focus group discussions with community members in urban and rural communities of Blantyre in Malawi. Most participants reported that they accepted the invitation to participate in research because of better quality treatment during study also known as ancillary care, monetary and material incentives given to participants, and thorough medical diagnosis.

  1. Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in EnhancedGeothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

    2008-01-17

    There is growing interest in the novel concept of operating Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO{sub 2} instead of water as heat transmission fluid. Initial studies have suggested that CO{sub 2} will achieve larger rates of heat extraction, and can offer geologic storage of carbon as an ancillary benefit. Fluid-rock interactions in EGS operated with CO{sub 2} are expected to be vastly different in zones with an aqueous phase present, as compared to the central reservoir zone with anhydrous supercritical CO{sub 2}. Our numerical simulations of chemically reactive transport show a combination of mineral dissolution and precipitation effects in the peripheral zone of the systems. These could impact reservoir growth and longevity, with important ramifications for sustaining energy recovery, for estimating CO{sub 2} loss rates, and for figuring tradeoffs between power generation and geologic storage of CO{sub 2}.

  2. High Plains Regional Ground-water Study web site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, Sharon L.

    2000-01-01

    Now available on the Internet is a web site for the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program- High Plains Regional Ground-Water Study. The purpose of the web site is to provide public access to a wide variety of information on the USGS investigation of the ground-water resources within the High Plains aquifer system. Typical pages on the web site include the following: descriptions of the High Plains NAWQA, the National NAWQA Program, the study-area setting, current and past activities, significant findings, chemical and ancillary data (which can be downloaded), listing and access to publications, links to other sites about the High Plains area, and links to other web sites studying High Plains ground-water resources. The High Plains aquifer is a regional aquifer system that underlies 174,000 square miles in parts of eight States (Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming). Because the study area is so large, the Internet is an ideal way to provide project data and information on a near real-time basis. The web site will be a collection of living documents where project data and information are updated as it becomes available throughout the life of the project. If you have an interest in the High Plains area, you can check this site periodically to learn how the High Plains NAWQA activities are progressing over time and access new data and publications as they become available.

  3. In vivo cytological observation of liver and spleen by using high-resolution microendoscopy system under endoscopic ultrasound guidance: A preliminary study using a swine model

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rei; Shin, Dongsuk; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Coghlan, Lezlee; Bhutani, Manoop S.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is useful to obtain specimens from lesions underlying deep parts of the liver and spleen. However, the development of novel ancillary techniques must be explored to reduce the number of needle passes and potential adverse effects during this procedure. We conducted an animal study using a swine to demonstrate technical feasibility of in vivo cytological observation of liver and spleen using the high-resolution microendoscopy (HRME) system under EUS guidance. We successfully performed the study. No significant acute adverse events occurred during the procedure. The HRME system could obtain clear images representing cytology-level morphology of spleen and liver. Hence, it is found out that in vivo cytological observation of liver and spleen using the HRME system under EUS guidance is technically feasible. PMID:27503155

  4. A study on blood eosinophil level and ventilatory pulmonary function of the workers exposed to storage grain dust.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, B P; Mahata, A; Kundu, S; Alam, J; Das, S; Roychowdhury, A

    2007-01-01

    The workers engaged in storage grain handling are exposed to storage grain dust and suffer from different respiratory symptoms like, cough wheezing, chest tightness, eye and nasal irritations. It has been reported abroad and the present study results noted that the grain handlers have allergic symptoms like redness of eyes, itching, sneezing, skin rash, breathlessness and decrement of pulmonary function test values. According to their nature of job, the workers of storage grain godowns were divided into four categories i.e., load handling worker (LHW), ancillary, quality control and depot administration workers. The pulmonary function tests (PFT) and the differential count of leucocytes were carried out among the workers by standard technique. Decrement of pulmonary function test values was noted with the increment of blood eosinophil level.The PFT results were presented according to the blood eosinophil level. The decrement of mean PFT values were noticed as the blood level of eosinophil gradually increased from, up to -4%, >4-10% and above 10%. The maximum numbers of workers in different job categories are belonged to >4 -10% of eosinophil level. The percentage figure of workers in different departments were LHW 48.38%, (n=45), ancillary 38.88%, (n=7), quality control 54.54% (n=6) and depot administration workers 47.05% (n=16) are belonged to that range. Among the total workers the higher figure was found >4-10% ranges 47.43% (n=74) workers. The allergic manifestations like redness, itchiness and watering of eyes, sneezing, cough, breathless etc. are reported. These workers have blood eosinophil level and low pulmonary function test values. The respiratory impairments among the workers are restrictive, obstructive and combined restrictive and obstructive type.

  5. The Role of Postmortem Studies in Pneumonia Etiology Research

    PubMed Central

    Bunthi, Charatdao; Wonodi, Chizoba B.; Morpeth, Susan C.; Molyneux, Catherine S.; Zaki, Sherif R.; Levine, Orin S.; Murdoch, David R.; Scott, J. Anthony G.

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of etiology in severe pneumonia remains a challenging area. Postmortem lung tissue potentially increases the sensitivity of investigations for identification of causative pathogens in fatal cases of pneumonia and can confirm antemortem microbiological diagnoses. Tissue sampling allows assessment of histological patterns of disease and ancillary immunohistochemical or molecular diagnostic techniques. It may also enhance the recognition of noninfectious conditions that clinically simulate acute pneumonia. Biobanking of lung tissue or postmortem culture isolates offers opportunities for new pathogen discovery and research into host-pathogen interactions. The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health study proposes a percutaneous needle biopsy approach to obtain postmortem samples, rather than a full open autopsy. This has the advantage of greater acceptability to relatives, but risks greater sampling error. Both approaches may be susceptible to microbiological contamination or pathogen degradation. However, previous autopsy studies have confirmed the value of histological examination in revealing unsuspected pathogens and influencing clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of future pneumonia cases. PMID:22403232

  6. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) laser studies. Volume 1: Laser environmental impact study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beverly, R. E., III

    1980-01-01

    The environmental impact of space to Earth power transmission using space borne laser subsystems is emphasized. A laser system is defined, estimates of relevant efficiencies for laser power generation and atmospheric transmission are developed, and a comparison is made to a microwave system. Ancillary issues, such as laser beam spreading, safety and security, mass and volume estimates and technology growth are considered.

  7. A case study review of technical and technology issues for transition of a utility load management program to provide system reliability resources in restructured electricity markets

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, G.H.

    2001-07-15

    Utility load management programs--including direct load control and interruptible load programs--were employed by utilities in the past as system reliability resources. With electricity industry restructuring, the context for these programs has changed; the market that was once controlled by vertically integrated utilities has become competitive, raising the question: can existing load management programs be modified so that they can effectively participate in competitive energy markets? In the short run, modified and/or improved operation of load management programs may be the most effective form of demand-side response available to the electricity system today. However, in light of recent technological advances in metering, communication, and load control, utility load management programs must be carefully reviewed in order to determine appropriate investments to support this transition. This report investigates the feasibility of and options for modifying an existing utility load management system so that it might provide reliability services (i.e. ancillary services) in the competitive markets that have resulted from electricity industry restructuring. The report is a case study of Southern California Edison's (SCE) load management programs. SCE was chosen because it operates one of the largest load management programs in the country and it operates them within a competitive wholesale electricity market. The report describes a wide range of existing and soon-to-be-available communication, control, and metering technologies that could be used to facilitate the evolution of SCE's load management programs and systems to provision of reliability services. The fundamental finding of this report is that, with modifications, SCE's load management infrastructure could be transitioned to provide critical ancillary services in competitive electricity markets, employing currently or soon-to-be available load control technologies.

  8. Advancements in Wind Integration Study Input Data Modeling: The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, B.; Orwig, K.; McCaa, J. R.; Harrold, S.; Draxl, C.; Jones, W.; Searight, K.; Getman, D.

    2013-12-01

    Regional wind integration studies in the United States, such as the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS), Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS), and Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (ERGIS), perform detailed simulations of the power system to determine the impact of high wind and solar energy penetrations on power systems operations. Some of the specific aspects examined include: infrastructure requirements, impacts on grid operations and conventional generators, ancillary service requirements, as well as the benefits of geographic diversity and forecasting. These studies require geographically broad and temporally consistent wind and solar power production input datasets that realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of wind and solar power plant production, and are time-synchronous with load profiles. The original western and eastern wind datasets were generated independently for 2004-2006 using numerical weather prediction (NWP) models run on a ~2 km grid with 10-minute resolution. Each utilized its own site selection process to augment existing wind plants with simulated sites of high development potential. The original dataset also included day-ahead simulated forecasts. These datasets were the first of their kind and many lessons were learned from their development. For example, the modeling approach used generated periodic false ramps that later had to be removed due to unrealistic impacts on ancillary service requirements. For several years, stakeholders have been requesting an updated dataset that: 1) covers more recent years; 2) spans four or more years to better evaluate interannual variability; 3) uses improved methods to minimize false ramps and spatial seams; 4) better incorporates solar power production inputs; and 5) is more easily accessible. To address these needs, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind and Solar Programs have funded two

  9. Rationale and Design of the Echocardiographic Study of Hispanics / Latinos (ECHO-SOL)

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carlos J.; Dharod, Ajay; Allison, Matthew A.; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Hurwitz, Barry; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I.; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Kitzman, Dalane; Gillam, Linda; Spevack, Daniel; Dadhania, Rupal; Langdon, Sarah; Kaplan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Information regarding the prevalence and determinants of cardiac structure and function (systolic and diastolic) among the various Hispanic background groups in the United States is limited. Methods and Results The Echocardiographic Study of Latinos (ECHO-SOL) ancillary study recruited 1,824 participants through a stratified-sampling process representative of the population-based Hispanic Communities Health StudyStudy of Latinos (HCHS-SOL) across four sites (Bronx, NY; Chicago, Ill; San Diego, Calif; Miami, Fla). The HCHS-SOL baseline cohort did not include an echo exam. ECHO-SOL added the echocardiographic assessment of cardiac structure and function to an array of existing HCHS-SOL baseline clinical, psychosocial, and socioeconomic data and provides sufficient statistical power for comparisons among the Hispanic subgroups. Standard two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography protocol, including M-mode, spectral, color and tissue Doppler study was performed. The main objectives were to: 1) characterize cardiac structure and function and its determinants among Hispanics and Hispanic subgroups; and 2) determine the contributions of specific psychosocial factors (acculturation and familismo) to cardiac structure and function among Hispanics. Conclusion We describe the design, methods and rationale of currently the largest and most comprehensive study of cardiac structure and function exclusively among US Hispanics. ECHO-SOL aims to enhance our understanding of Hispanic cardiovascular health as well as help untangle the relative importance of Hispanic subgroup heterogeneity and sociocultural factors on cardiac structure and function. (Ethn Dis. 2015;25[2]:180–186) PMID:26118146

  10. Overview of receptor-based source apportionment studies for speciated atmospheric mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, I.; Xu, X.; Zhang, L.

    2015-07-01

    Receptor-based source apportionment studies of speciated atmospheric mercury are not only concerned with source contributions but also with the influence of transport, transformation, and deposition processes on speciated atmospheric mercury concentrations at receptor locations. Previous studies applied multivariate receptor models including principal components analysis and positive matrix factorization, and back trajectory receptor models including potential source contribution function, gridded frequency distributions, and concentration-back trajectory models. Combustion sources (e.g., coal combustion, biomass burning, and vehicular, industrial and waste incineration emissions), crustal/soil dust, and chemical and physical processes, such as gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) oxidation reactions, boundary layer mixing, and GEM flux from surfaces were inferred from the multivariate studies, which were predominantly conducted at receptor sites in Canada and the US. Back trajectory receptor models revealed potential impacts of large industrial areas such as the Ohio River valley in the US and throughout China, metal smelters, mercury evasion from the ocean and the Great Lakes, and free troposphere transport on receptor measurements. Input data and model parameters specific to atmospheric mercury receptor models are summarized and model strengths and weaknesses are also discussed. Multivariate models are suitable for receptor locations with intensive air monitoring because they require long-term collocated and simultaneous measurements of speciated atmospheric Hg and ancillary pollutants. The multivariate models provide more insight about the types of Hg emission sources and Hg processes that could affect speciated atmospheric Hg at a receptor location, whereas back trajectory receptor models are mainly ideal for identifying potential regional Hg source locations impacting elevated Hg concentrations. Interpretation of the multivariate model output to sources can be

  11. 77 FR 47858 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... Committee: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Ancillary Studies in Clinical... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research;...

  12. Non-clinical models: validation, study design and statistical consideration in safety pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Pugsley, M K; Towart, R; Authier, S; Gallacher, D J; Curtis, M J

    2010-01-01

    The current issue of the Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicological Methods (JPTM) focuses exclusively on safety pharmacology methods. This is the 7th year the Journal has published on this topic. Methods and models that specifically relate to methods relating to the assessment of the safety profile of a new chemical entity (NCE) prior to first in human (FIH) studies are described. Since the Journal started publishing on this topic there has been a major effort by safety pharmacologists, toxicologists and regulatory scientists within Industry (both large and small Pharma as well as Biotechnology companies) and also from Contract Research Organizations (CRO) to publish the surgical details of the non-clinical methods utilized but also provide important details related to standard and non-standard (or integrated) study models and designs. These details from core battery and secondary (or ancillary) drug safety assessment methods used in drug development programs have been the focus of these special issues and have been an attempt to provide validation of methods. Similarly, the safety pharmacology issues of the Journal provide the most relevant forum for scientists to present novel and modified methods with direct applicability to determination of drug safety-directly to the safety pharmacology scientific community. The content of the manuscripts in this issue includes the introduction of additional important surgical methods, novel data capture and data analysis methods, improved study design and effects of positive control compounds with known activity in the model.

  13. Case Study of Mixed-Phase to Ice Precipitation in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, C.; Bennartz, R.; Kulie, M.; Shupe, M.; Turner, D. D.; Walden, V. P.

    2013-12-01

    Data from the ICECAPS instrument suite at Summit Station, Greenland are utilized to observe cloud and atmospheric properties over the Greenland Ice Sheet. This study focuses on identifying and analyzing case studies of rapid transitions from mixed-phase clouds and precipitation to ice hydrometeors. Reflectivity values and Doppler velocities from the ICECAPS MilliMeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) in conjunction with ancillary meteorological data are used as input to combined microphysical and microwave radiative transfer simulation system. This modeling system depends on the frozen hydrometeor habits, snow water content, amount and distribution of supercooled water droplets, surface emissivity, and other environmental parameters. Simulated multi-frequency brightness temperatures derived from the model are compared to MicroWave Radiometer (MWR) observations under transition conditions, and sensitivities to model inputs are explored. These closure studies, between active and passive microwave instruments, will lead to a better understanding of the characteristic cloud microphysical and environmental conditions that determine mixed-phase to ice transitions in Arctic clouds.

  14. Psoriasis severity and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function: results from the CALIPSO study.

    PubMed

    Brunoni, A R; Santos, I S; Sabbag, C; Lotufo, P A; Benseñor, I M

    2014-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease that significantly impacts life quality, being associated with stress and mental disorders. We investigated whether the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis was associated with psoriasis severity, daily life stress and anxiety, and depressive symptoms. In this ancillary study, which was part of the CALIPSO (coronary artery calcium in psoriasis) study, saliva was collected from 102 patients with psoriasis immediately upon awakening, 30, and 60 min after awakening, at 2:00 pm and at bedtime (five time points) to determine salivary cortisol levels. We used Pearson's correlation coefficient to evaluate the association of clinical and psychopathological variables with HPA activity. We found a direct correlation between bedtime cortisol and psoriasis severity evaluated by the psoriasis area severity index (PASI; r=0.39, P<0.001). No correlations between other clinical and psychopathological variables or with other cortisol assessments were observed. The findings indicated that HPA dysfunction may be present in psoriasis, as bedtime cortisol was correlated with psoriasis severity. Our study is limited by the lack of a control group; therefore, we were not able to explore whether these cortisol values were different compared with a concurrent, healthy sample.

  15. Surface Meteorological Station - ARL 2m, ancillary flux, Boardman - Raw Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Clawson, Kirk

    2016-10-25

    These data contain measurements from a four-component net radiometer, as well as 2-m temperature, pressure, and relative humidity (RH). In addition, soil moisture and temperature measurements and soil heat fluxes are included.

  16. Surface Meteorological Station - ARL 2m, ancillary flux, Prineville - Raw Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Clawson, Kirk

    2016-10-25

    These data contain measurements from a 4-component net radiometer, as well as 2m temperature, pressure and RH. Also measurements of soil moisture and temperature and soil heat fluxes are found herein.

  17. Monitoring landscape change for LANDFIRE using multi-temporal satellite imagery and ancillary data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogelmann, James E.; Kost, Jay R.; Tolk, Brian; Howard, Stephen M.; Short, Karen; Chen, Xuexia; Huang, Chengquan; Pabst, Kari; Rollins, Matthew G.

    2011-01-01

    LANDFIRE is a large interagency project designed to provide nationwide spatial data for fire management applications. As part of the effort, many 2000 vintage Landsat Thematic Mapper and Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus data sets were used in conjunction with a large volume of field information to generate detailed vegetation type and structure data sets for the entire United States. In order to keep these data sets current and relevant to resource managers, there was strong need to develop an approach for updating these products. We are using three different approaches for these purposes. These include: 1) updating using Landsat-derived historic and current fire burn information derived from the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project; 2) incorporating vegetation disturbance information derived from time series Landsat data analysis using the Vegetation Change Tracker; and 3) developing data products that capture subtle intra-state disturbance such as those related to insects and disease using either Landsat or the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). While no one single approach provides all of the land cover change and update information required, we believe that a combination of all three captures most of the disturbance conditions taking place that have relevance to the fire community.

  18. Ancillary ligand-free copper catalysed hydrohydrazination of terminal alkynes with NH2NH2.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Jesse L; Jazzar, Rodolphe; Melaimi, Mohand; Bertrand, Guy

    2016-02-14

    An efficient and selective Cu-catalysed hydrohydrazination of terminal alkynes with parent hydrazine is reported. The methodology tolerates a broad range of functional groups, allows for the synthesis of symmetrical and unsymmetrical azines, and can be extended to hydrazine derivatives and amines. PMID:26757745

  19. Prediction of true test scores from observed item scores and ancillary data.

    PubMed

    Haberman, Shelby J; Yao, Lili; Sinharay, Sandip

    2015-05-01

    In many educational tests which involve constructed responses, a traditional test score is obtained by adding together item scores obtained through holistic scoring by trained human raters. For example, this practice was used until 2008 in the case of GRE(®) General Analytical Writing and until 2009 in the case of TOEFL(®) iBT Writing. With use of natural language processing, it is possible to obtain additional information concerning item responses from computer programs such as e-rater(®). In addition, available information relevant to examinee performance may include scores on related tests. We suggest application of standard results from classical test theory to the available data to obtain best linear predictors of true traditional test scores. In performing such analysis, we require estimation of variances and covariances of measurement errors, a task which can be quite difficult in the case of tests with limited numbers of items and with multiple measurements per item. As a consequence, a new estimation method is suggested based on samples of examinees who have taken an assessment more than once. Such samples are typically not random samples of the general population of examinees, so that we apply statistical adjustment methods to obtain the needed estimated variances and covariances of measurement errors. To examine practical implications of the suggested methods of analysis, applications are made to GRE General Analytical Writing and TOEFL iBT Writing. Results obtained indicate that substantial improvements are possible both in terms of reliability of scoring and in terms of assessment reliability.

  20. Combining multispectral and ancillary data in remote sensing using interval-valued probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.; Swain, P. H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a method for classifying multisource data in remote sensing and geographic information systems using interval-valued probabilities. In this method, each data source is considered as an information source which provides a body of statistical evidence. In order to integrate information obtained from multiple data sources, the method adopts Dempster's rule for combining multiple bodies of evidence. Preliminary experiments have been undertaken to illustrate the use of the method in a supervised ground-cover classification on multispectral data combined with digital elevation data. They demonstrate the ability of the method in capturing information provided by inexact and incomplete evidence when there are not enough training samples to estimate statistical parameters.

  1. Managing Sustainable Demand-side Infrastructure for Power System Ancillary Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Simon Christopher

    Widespread access to renewable electricity is seen as a viable method to mitigate carbon emissions, although problematic are the issues associated with the integration of the generation systems within current power system configurations. Wind power plants are the primary large-scale renewable generation technology applied globally, but display considerable short-term supply variability that is difficult to predict. Power systems are currently not designed to operate under these conditions, and results in the need to increase operating reserve in order to guarantee stability. Often, operating conventional generation as reserve is both technically and economically inefficient, which can overshadow positive benefits associated with renewable energy exploitation. The purpose of this thesis is to introduce and assess an alternative method of enhancing power system operations through the control of electric loads. In particular, this thesis focuses on managing highly-distributed sustainable demand-side infrastructure, in the form of heat pumps, electric vehicles, and electrolyzers, as dispatchable short-term energy balancing resources. The main contribution of the thesis is an optimal control strategy capable of simultaneously balancing grid- and demand-side objectives. The viability of the load control strategy is assessed through model-based simulations that explicitly track end-use functionality of responsive devices within a power systems analysis typically implemented to observe the effects of integrated wind energy systems. Results indicate that there is great potential for the proposed method to displace the need for increased reserve capacity in systems considering a high penetration of wind energy, thereby allowing conventional generation to operate more efficiently and avoid the need for possible capacity expansions.

  2. 47 CFR 25.149 - Application requirements for ancillary terrestrial components in Mobile-Satellite Service...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... terrestrial components in Mobile-Satellite Service networks operating in the 1.5./1.6 GHz and 1.6/2.4 GHz Mobile-Satellite Service. 25.149 Section 25.149 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses Space Stations §...

  3. NASA Glenn Research Center's Fuel Cell Stack, Ancillary and System Test and Development Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyselle, Patricia L.; Prokopius, Kevin P.; Becks, Larry A.; Burger, Thomas H.; Dick, Joseph F.; Rodriguez, George; Bremenour, Frank; Long, Zedock

    2011-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, a fully operational fuel cell test and evaluation laboratory is available which is capable of evaluating fuel cell components and systems for future NASA missions. Components and subsystems of various types can be operated and monitored under a variety of conditions utilizing different reactants. This fuel cell facility can test the effectiveness of various component and system designs to meet NASA's needs.

  4. Hydrologic remediation for the Deepwater Horizon incident drove ancillary primary production increase in coastal swamps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.; Johnson, Darren; Roberts, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    As coastal wetlands subside worldwide, there is an urgency to understand the hydrologic drivers and dynamics of plant production and peat accretion. One incidental test of the effects of high rates of discharge on forested wetland production occurred in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon incident, in which all diversions in Louisiana were operated at or near their maximum discharge level for an extended period to keep offshore oil from threatened coastal wetlands. Davis Pond Diversion was operated at six times the normal discharge levels for almost 4 months, so that Taxodium distichum swamps downstream of the diversion experienced greater inundation and lower salinity. After this remediation event in 2010, above-ground litter production increased by 2.7 times of production levels in 2007–2011. Biomass of the leaf and reproductive tissues of several species increased; wood litter was minimal and did not change during this period. Root production decreased in 2010 but subsequently returned to pre-remediation values in 2011. Both litter and root production remained high in the second growing season after hydrologic remediation. Annual tree growth (circumference increment) was not significantly altered by the remediation. The potential of freshwater pulses for regulating tidal swamp production is further supported by observations of higher T. distichum growth in lower salinity and/or pulsed environments across the U.S. Gulf Coast. Usage of freshwater pulses to manage altered estuaries deserves further consideration, particularly because the timing and duration of such pulses could influence both primary production and peat accretion.

  5. Challenging nickel-catalysed amine arylations enabled by tailored ancillary ligand design

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, Christopher M.; MacQueen, Preston M.; Rotta-Loria, Nicolas L.; Sawatzky, Ryan S.; Borzenko, Andrey; Chisholm, Alicia J.; Hargreaves, Breanna K. V.; McDonald, Robert; Ferguson, Michael J.; Stradiotto, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Palladium-catalysed C(sp2)–N cross-coupling (that is, Buchwald–Hartwig amination) is employed widely in synthetic chemistry, including in the pharmaceutical industry, for the synthesis of (hetero)aniline derivatives. However, the cost and relative scarcity of palladium provides motivation for the development of alternative, more Earth-abundant catalysts for such transformations. Here we disclose an operationally simple and air-stable ligand/nickel(II) pre-catalyst that accommodates the broadest combination of C(sp2)–N coupling partners reported to date for any single nickel catalyst, without the need for a precious-metal co-catalyst. Key to the unprecedented performance of this pre-catalyst is the application of the new, sterically demanding yet electron-poor bisphosphine PAd-DalPhos. Featured are the first reports of nickel-catalysed room temperature reactions involving challenging primary alkylamine and ammonia reaction partners employing an unprecedented scope of electrophiles, including transformations involving sought-after (hetero)aryl mesylates for which no capable catalyst system is known. PMID:27004442

  6. Annual peak streamflow and ancillary data for small watersheds in central and western Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harwell, Glenn R.; Asquith, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Estimates of annual peak-streamflow frequency are needed for flood-plain management, assessment of flood risk, and design of structures, such as roads, bridges, culverts, dams, and levees. Regional regression equations have been developed and are used extensively to estimate annual peak-streamflow frequency for ungaged sites in natural (unregulated and rural or nonurbanized) watersheds in Texas (Asquith and Slade, 1997; Asquith and Thompson, 2008; Asquith and Roussel, 2009). The most recent regional regression equations were developed by using data from 638 Texas streamflow-gaging stations throughout the State with eight or more years of data by using drainage area, channel slope, and mean annual precipitation as predictor variables (Asquith and Roussel, 2009). However, because of a lack of sufficient historical streamflow data from small, rural watersheds in certain parts of the State (central and western), substantial uncertainity exists when using the regional regression equations for the purpose of estimating annual peak-streamflow frequency.

  7. The attack on ancillary service providers at the federal and state level.

    PubMed

    Cimasi, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The health care delivery system in the United States has witnessed more dramatic changes during the last decade than it had since the passage of Medicare. The managed care revolution and changes in reimbursement for Medicare services have forced providers to look for more efficient ways to provide services as well as for additional sources of revenue- and margin-producing business. The move toward specialized inpatient and outpatient facilities, often owned by physicians, is a natural reaction to these significant changes. These developments have resulted a "turf war" between physicians and hospitals over who should control these revenues.

  8. [Radioisotope thermoelectric generators and ancillary activities]. Monthly technical progress report, 1 April--28 April 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Tehnical progress achieved during this period on radioisotope thermoelectric generators is described under the following tasks: engineering support, safety analysis, qualified unicouple fabrication, ETG fabrication/assembly/test, RTG shipping/launch support, design/review/mission applications, and project management/quality assurance/reliability.

  9. Integrating RapidEye and ancillary data to map alpine habitats in South Tyrol, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polychronaki, Anastasia; Spindler, Nadine; Schmidt, Alexander; Stoinschek, Barbara; Zebisch, Marc; Renner, Kathrin; Sonnenschein, Ruth; Notarnicola, Claudia

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present a two-stage method for mapping habitats using Earth observation (EO) data in three Alpine sites in South Tyrol, Italy. The first stage of the method was the classification of land cover types using multi-temporal RapidEye images and support vector machines (SVMs). The second stage involved reclassification of the land cover types to habitat types following a rule-based spatial kernel. The highest accuracies in land cover classification were 95.1% overall accuracy, 0.94 kappa coefficient and 4.9% overall disagreement. These accuracies were obtained when the combination of images with topographic parameters and homogeneity texture was used. The habitat classification accuracies were rather moderate due to the broadly defined rules and possible inaccuracies in the reference map. Overall, our proposed methodology could be implemented to map cost-effectively alpine habitats over large areas and could be easily adapted to map other types of habitats.

  10. SPDF Ancillary Services and Technologies Supporting Open Access, Use and Archiving of MMS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candey, R. M.; Bilitza, D.; Chimiak, R.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L. N.; Harris, B. T.; Hills, H. K.; Johnson, R. C.; Kovalick, T. J.; Lal, N.; Leckner, H. A.; Liu, M. H.; McGuire, R. E.; Papitashvili, N. E.; Roberts, D. A.; Yurow, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    The primary data and orbit services of NASA's Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) now or soon to be supporting direct and correlative analysis of MMS survey and burst science data products are discussed in the McGuire et.al. paper "SPDF Data and Orbit Services Supporting Open Access, Use and Archiving of MMS Data." This present paper will review additional services and elements of the SPDF program relevant to SPDF's support of MMS and SPDF's broader long-term role as an active heliophysics final archive. Specific topics include - Additional detail on options and APIs for accessing data in SPDF; - Status and plans for the Common Data Format (CDF) and ISTP/SPDF metadata standard, including extension of the metadata standard to planned science data in netCDF from the upcoming GOLD and ICON missions; - Future missions to be supported by SPDF; - Overview and status of MMS and other data descriptions in the Heliophysics Data Portal (HDP)/Virtual Space Physics Observatory (VSPO) - Status and plans for the OMNI database and services, as baseline solar wind data for interpreting magnetospheric data such as that of MMS; - An overview of SPDF's ingest and archiving architecture, including our ongoing effort to bring online legacy heliophysics data originally archived at NSSDC. All SPDF data and services are available from the SPDF home page at http://spdf.gsfc.nasa.gov .

  11. Conditional quantum-state engineering using ancillary squeezed-vacuum states

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyunseok; Ralph, Timothy C.; Lance, Andrew M.; Grosse, Nicolai B.; Symul, Thomas; Lam, Ping Koy

    2006-09-15

    We investigate an optical scheme to conditionally engineer quantum states using a beam splitter, homodyne detection, and a squeezed vacuum as an ancillar state. This scheme is efficient in producing non-Gaussian quantum states such as squeezed single photons and superpositions of coherent states (SCSs). We show that a SCS with well defined parity and high fidelity can be generated from a Fock state of n{<=}4, and conjecture that this can be generalized for an arbitrary n Fock state. We describe our experimental demonstration of this scheme using coherent input states and measuring experimental fidelities that are only achievable using quantum resources.

  12. Glutathione revisited: a vital function in iron metabolism and ancillary role in thiol-redox control

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Chitranshu; Igbaria, Aeid; D'Autreaux, Benoît; Planson, Anne-Gaëlle; Junot, Christophe; Godat, Emmanuel; Bachhawat, Anand K; Delaunay-Moisan, Agnès; Toledano, Michel B

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione contributes to thiol-redox control and to extra-mitochondrial iron–sulphur cluster (ISC) maturation. To determine the physiological importance of these functions and sort out those that account for the GSH requirement for viability, we performed a comprehensive analysis of yeast cells depleted of or containing toxic levels of GSH. Both conditions triggered an intense iron starvation-like response and impaired the activity of extra-mitochondrial ISC enzymes but did not impact thiol-redox maintenance, except for high glutathione levels that altered oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. While iron partially rescued the ISC maturation and growth defects of GSH-depleted cells, genetic experiments indicated that unlike thioredoxin, glutathione could not support by itself the thiol-redox duties of the cell. We propose that glutathione is essential by its requirement in ISC assembly, but only serves as a thioredoxin backup in cytosolic thiol-redox maintenance. Glutathione-high physiological levels are thus meant to insulate its cytosolic function in iron metabolism from variations of its concentration during redox stresses, a model challenging the traditional view of it as prime actor in thiol-redox control. PMID:21478822

  13. A Guide to Producing Tape-Slide Packages. Workbook Sheets. Ancillary Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Ian; Parker, John

    Prepared for use by teachers interested in producing their own audiovisual aids, this guide outlines a step-by-step approach to the design and development of instructional slide-tape packages. It is divided into nine sections, each of which describes a set of activities forming a unique part of the audiovisual production sequence: (1) preliminary…

  14. Augmenting watershed model calibration with incorporation of ancillary data sources and qualitative soft data sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watershed simulation models can be calibrated using “hard data” such as temporal streamflow observations; however, users may find upon examination of detailed outputs that some of the calibrated models may not reflect summative actual watershed behavior. Thus, it is necessary to use “soft data” (i....

  15. Industrial Use of Distributed Generation in Real-Time Energy and Ancillary Service Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, C.R.

    2001-10-24

    Industrial consumers of energy now have the opportunity to participate directly in electricity generation. This report seeks to give the reader (1) insights into the various types of generation services that distributed generation (DG) units could provide, (2) a mechanism to evaluate the economics of using DG, (3) an overview of the status of DG deployment in selected states, and (4) a summary of the communication technologies involved with DG and what testing activities are needed to encourage industrial application of DG. Section 1 provides details on electricity markets and the types of services that can be offered. Subsequent sections in the report address the technical requirements for participating in such markets, the economic decision process that an industrial energy user should go through in evaluating distributed generation, the status of current deployment efforts, and the requirements for test-bed or field demonstration projects.

  16. Ancillary operations in coal preparation instrumentation on-line low cost sulfur and ash analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Malito, M.L.

    1991-07-01

    A program of design, fabrication, and field testing of an on-line sulfur and ash analyzer was undertaken by The Babcock Wilcox Company. The analyzer is intended for use on coal slurry streams such as those found at coal cleaning facilities. The analyzer design consists of a sample preparation and delivery system (SPAD) and an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). The program consisted of the following major tasks: Selection and screening of delivery systems; Design of the analyzer system; Fabrication of SPAD system; Field testing of the SPAD system; and Laboratory ICP testing of field collected samples. The field testing was conducted at CQ Inc., (Homer City, Pa. pilot plant). Testing was completed without taking the ICP to the field, since the analysis of coal slurry by ICP had been demonstrated during the delivery system screening tests and the field tests were aimed primarily at demonstrating the performance of the SPAD system. Although the ICP was not deployed to the field, the subsequent laboratory testing of field collected samples simulated the performance of the entire system. 16 refs., 103 figs., 38 tabs.

  17. Ancillary operations in coal preparation instrumentation on-line low cost sulfur and ash analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Malito, M.L.

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the testing to be performed on field collected coal slurry samples by ICP-AES (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy). A total of 20 samples (8 from an Upper Freeport coal and 12 from an Oklahoma coal) are to be analyzed in triplicate for the elements S, Si, Al, Fe, Ca, and Mg. For each of the two coal slurry types (Upper Freeport and Oklahoma), a container of slurry labeled calibration'' has been prepared. These calibration slurries may be used to get the system tuned'' (note that the volume of the field collected slurries is relatively small and cannot be used to tune'' the system). The calibration slurries were made from the slurry collected from the drain from the second sampling stage during the field testing.

  18. Summary of Mercury Compatibility Issues for the Spallation Neutron Source Target Containment and Ancillary Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, SJ

    2003-04-08

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the primary results of the Hg compatibility research in support of the SNS target. In the absence of possible synergisms resulting from beam/irradiation effects, wetting of 316L/316LN stainless steel under SNS conditions by the Hg target is expected to be very limited. As a result, significant interactions such as dissolution, mass transfer, and embrittlement affecting general compatibility are not anticipated. A wide range of experiments on 316L/316LN stainless steel, including thermal convection and pumped loops, confirmed low corrosion/penetration rates in Hg up to 305 C and little or no wetting or mass transfer below about 250 C. A variety of standard mechanical tests comparing behavior of 316L in air and Hg revealed limited wetting and no degradation of mechanical properties such as reduced elongation or development of brittle fracture features. Preliminary fatigue tests indicated a negative effect (reduced cycles to failure and intergranular cracking) at very high loads for 316LN, but little or no effect at more modest loading. Annealed 316LN was found to be somewhat susceptible to cavitation-erosion damage, but significant improvement was realized with a kolsterizing surface treatment or coldworking the material. Within the scope of these test conditions, no compatibility-limited operations were identified for type 316L/316LN stainless steel (and variations thereof) as the Hg target containment material. More limited compatibility data on other materials are also reported.

  19. Unusually efficient pyridine photodissociation from Ru(II) complexes with sterically bulky bidentate ancillary ligands.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Jessica D; Albani, Bryan A; Durr, Christopher B; Turro, Claudia

    2014-11-13

    The introduction of steric bulk to the bidentate ligand in [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(py)](2+) (1; tpy = 2,2':2',6″-terpyridine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; py = pyridine) to provide [Ru(tpy)(Me2bpy)(py)](2+) (2; Me2bpy = 6,6'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) and [Ru(tpy)(biq)(py)](2+) (3; biq = 2,2'-biquinoline) facilitates photoinduced dissociation of pyridine with visible light. Upon irradiation of 2 and 3 in CH3CN (λirr = 500 nm), ligand exchange occurs to produce the corresponding [Ru(tpy)(NN)(NCCH3)](2+) (NN = Me2bpy, biq) complex with quantum yields, Φ500, of 0.16(1) and 0.033(1) for 2 and 3, respectively. These values represent an increase in efficiency of the reaction by 2-3 orders of magnitude as compared to that of 1, Φ500 < 0.0001, under similar experimental conditions. The photolysis of 2 and 3 in H2O with low energy light to produce [Ru(tpy)(NN)(OH2)](2+) (NN = Me2bpy, biq) also proceeds rapidly (λirr > 590 nm). Complexes 1-3 are stable in the dark in both CH3CN and H2O under similar experimental conditions. X-ray crystal structures and theoretical calculations highlight significant distortion of the planes of the bidentate ligands in 2 and 3 relative to that of 1. The crystallographic dihedral angles defined by the bidentate ligand, Me2bpy in 2 and biq in 3, and the tpy ligand were determined to be 67.87° and 61.89°, respectively, whereas only a small distortion from the octahedral geometry is observed between bpy and tpy in 1, 83.34°. The steric bulk afforded by Me2bpy and biq also result in major distortions of the pyridine ligand in 2 and 3, respectively, relative to 1, which are believed to weaken its σ-bonding and π-back-bonding to the metal and play a crucial role in the efficiency of the photoinduced ligand exchange. The ability of 2 and 3 to undergo ligand exchange with λirr > 590 nm makes them potential candidates to build photochemotherapeutic agents for the delivery of drugs with pyridine binding groups.

  20. 17 CFR 240.3b-15 - Definition of ancillary portfolio management securities activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... activities in eligible OTC derivative instruments; (ii) The issuance of securities by the dealer; or (iii... eligible OTC derivative instruments. (b) The Commission may issue an order pursuant to §...

  1. 17 CFR 240.3b-15 - Definition of ancillary portfolio management securities activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... activities in eligible OTC derivative instruments; (ii) The issuance of securities by the dealer; or (iii... eligible OTC derivative instruments. (b) The Commission may issue an order pursuant to §...

  2. Ancillary benefits for climate change mitigation and air pollution control in the world's motor vehicle fleets.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Michael P

    2008-01-01

    The global motor vehicle population has grown very rapidly in the past half century and is expected to continue to grow rapidly for the next several decades, especially in developing countries. As a result, vehicles are a major source of urban air pollution in many cities and are the fastest-growing source of greenhouse emissions. Strategies exist to reduce both problems, but many countries emphasize one over the other rather than pursuing strategies that reduce both concerns. Using diesel as an example, this article illustrates that it is now possible not only to reduce carbon dioxide with the increased use of diesel vehicles but also to improve urban air pollution. Doing so requires both stringent emissions regulations and clean fuels. Several principles contained in the Bellagio Memorandum are highlighted as guides for policy makers.

  3. Beyond androgen deprivation: ancillary integrative strategies for targeting the androgen receptor addiction of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; Hejazi, Jalal; Rastmanesh, Reza

    2014-09-01

    The large majority of clinical prostate cancers remain dependent on androgen receptor (AR) activity for proliferation even as they lose their responsiveness to androgen deprivation or antagonism. AR activity can be maintained in these circumstances by increased AR synthesis--often reflecting increased NF-κB activation; upregulation of signaling pathways that promote AR activity in the absence of androgens; and by emergence of AR mutations or splice variants lacking the ligand-binding domain, which render the AR constitutively active. Drugs targeting the N-terminal transactivating domain of the AR, some of which are now in preclinical development, can be expected to inhibit the activity not only of unmutated ARs but also of the mutant forms and splice variants selected for by androgen deprivation. Concurrent measures that suppress AR synthesis or boost AR turnover could be expected to complement the efficacy of such drugs. A number of nutraceuticals that show efficacy in prostate cancer xenograft models--including polyphenols from pomegranate, grape seed, and green tea, the crucifera metabolite diindolylmethane, and the hormone melatonin--have the potential to suppress AR synthesis via downregulation of NF-κB activity; clinical doses of salicylate may have analogous efficacy. The proteasomal turnover of the AR is abetted by diets with a high ratio of long-chain omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids, which are beneficial in prostate cancer xenograft models; berberine and sulforaphane, by inhibiting AR's interaction with its chaperone Hsp90, likewise promote AR proteasomal degradation and retard growth of human prostate cancer in nude mice. Hinge region acetylation of the AR is required for optimal transactivational activity, and low micromolar concentrations of the catechin epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) can inhibit such acetylation--possibly explaining the ability of EGCG administration to suppress androgenic activity and cell proliferation in prostate cancer xenografts. Hence, it is proposed that regimens featuring an N-terminal domain-targeting drug, various nutraceuticals/drugs that downregulate NF-κB activity, and/or supplemental intakes of fish oil, berberine, sulforaphane, and EGCG have potential for blocking proliferation of prostate cancer by targeting its characteristic addiction to androgen receptor activity.

  4. Unusually Efficient Pyridine Photodissociation from Ru(II) Complexes with Sterically Bulky Bidentate Ancillary Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of steric bulk to the bidentate ligand in [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(py)]2+ (1; tpy = 2,2′:2′,6″-terpyridine; bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine; py = pyridine) to provide [Ru(tpy)(Me2bpy)(py)]2+ (2; Me2bpy = 6,6′-dimethyl-2,2′-bipyridine) and [Ru(tpy)(biq)(py)]2+ (3; biq = 2,2′-biquinoline) facilitates photoinduced dissociation of pyridine with visible light. Upon irradiation of 2 and 3 in CH3CN (λirr = 500 nm), ligand exchange occurs to produce the corresponding [Ru(tpy)(NN)(NCCH3)]2+ (NN = Me2bpy, biq) complex with quantum yields, Φ500, of 0.16(1) and 0.033(1) for 2 and 3, respectively. These values represent an increase in efficiency of the reaction by 2–3 orders of magnitude as compared to that of 1, Φ500 < 0.0001, under similar experimental conditions. The photolysis of 2 and 3 in H2O with low energy light to produce [Ru(tpy)(NN)(OH2)]2+ (NN = Me2bpy, biq) also proceeds rapidly (λirr > 590 nm). Complexes 1–3 are stable in the dark in both CH3CN and H2O under similar experimental conditions. X-ray crystal structures and theoretical calculations highlight significant distortion of the planes of the bidentate ligands in 2 and 3 relative to that of 1. The crystallographic dihedral angles defined by the bidentate ligand, Me2bpy in 2 and biq in 3, and the tpy ligand were determined to be 67.87° and 61.89°, respectively, whereas only a small distortion from the octahedral geometry is observed between bpy and tpy in 1, 83.34°. The steric bulk afforded by Me2bpy and biq also result in major distortions of the pyridine ligand in 2 and 3, respectively, relative to 1, which are believed to weaken its σ-bonding and π-back-bonding to the metal and play a crucial role in the efficiency of the photoinduced ligand exchange. The ability of 2 and 3 to undergo ligand exchange with λirr > 590 nm makes them potential candidates to build photochemotherapeutic agents for the delivery of drugs with pyridine binding groups. PMID:25027458

  5. Optical and Ancillary Measurements at High Latitudes in Support of the MODIS Ocean Validation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stramski, Dariusz; Stramska, Malgorzata; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to validate and refine ocean color algorithms at high latitudes in the north polar region of the Atlantic. The specific objectives were defined as follows: (1) to identify and quantify errors in the satellite-derived water-leaving radiances and chlorophyll concentration; (2) to develop understanding of these errors; and (3) to improve in-water ocean color algorithms for retrieving chlorophyll concentration in the investigated region.

  6. 47 CFR 25.255 - Procedures for resolving harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... bands. 25.255 Section 25.255 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.255 Procedures for resolving...

  7. 47 CFR 25.255 - Procedures for resolving harmful interference related to operation of ancillary terrestrial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... bands. 25.255 Section 25.255 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.255 Procedures for resolving...

  8. What Is Social Comparison and How Should We Study It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Joanne V.

    1996-01-01

    Examines frequently used measures and procedures in social comparison research. The question of whether a method truly captures social comparison requires a clear understanding of what social comparison is; hence a definition of social comparison is proposed, multiple ancillary processes in social comparison are identified, and definitional…

  9. Bio-Contamination Control for Spacesuit Garments - A Preliminary Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Richard; Korona, Adam; Orndoff, Evelyn; Ott, Mark; Poritz, Darwin

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines a preliminary study to review, test, and improve upon the current state of spacesuit bio-contamination control. The study includes an evaluation of current and advanced suit materials, ground and on-orbit cleaning methods, and microbial test and analysis methods. The first aspect of this study was to identify potential anti-microbial textiles and cleaning agents, and to review current microbial test methods. The anti-microbial cleaning agent and textile market survey included a review of current commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) products that could potentially be used as future space flight hardware. This review included replacements for any of the softgood layers that may become contaminated during an extravehicular activity (EVA), including the pressure bladder, liquid cooling garment, and ancillary comfort undergarment. After a series of COTS anti-microbial textiles and clean ing agents were identified, a series of four tests were conducted: (1) a stacked configuration test that was conducted in order to review how bio-contamination would propagate through the various suit layers, (2) a individual materials test that evaluated how well each softgood layer either promoted or repressed growth, (3) a cleaning agent test that evaluated the efficacy on each of the baseline bladders, and (4) an evaluation of various COTS anti-microbial textiles. All antimicrobial COTS materials tested appeared to control bacteria colony forming unit (CFU) growth better than the Thermal Comfort Undergarment (TCU) and ACES Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG)/EMU Liquid Cooling Ventilation Garment (LCVG) materials currently in use. However, a comparison of fungi CFU growth in COTS to current suit materials appeared to vary per material. All cleaning agents tested in this study appeared to inhibit the level of bacteria and fungi growth to acceptable levels for short duration tests. While several trends can be obtained from the current analysis, a series of test improvements are

  10. Photochemical studies of the Eastern Caribbean: An introductory overview

    SciTech Connect

    Zika, R.G.; Milne, P.J. ); Zafiriou, O.C. )

    1993-02-15

    This special section of the Journal of Geophysical Research reports a multi-investigator study of a number of sunlight-initiated photoprocesses taking place in the varied biogeochemical and oceanographic environment found in the tropical Eastern Caribbean and Orinoco River delta in the spring and fall of 1988. Principal conceptual themes that were addressed by the program included (1) the characterization of the role of dissolved organic matter as the main chromophore initiating photoprocesses in surface seawater, (2) the determination of the fluxes and pathways of reactants and transient species involved in oxygen photoredox chemistry, and (3) the continuing development of chemical mapping strategies, including observing and modelling reactive phototransient distribution in terms of their sources, mixing, and fates. Ancillary supporting studies included observation of water mass tracers, dissolved trace gases, atmospheric components, nutrients and the geochemistry of estuarine mixing processes in an important continental margin. The observational and mechanistic investigations reported here feature a number of novel or improved methods allied with some advanced underway sampling, sensing and computing facilities that were implemented aboard the R/V Columbus Iselin. Results from the study showed large-scale ([approximately]1,000 km) seasonal variations in surface water photoreactivity, optical and biooptical characteristics over much of the Caribbean basin. These changes resulted from seasonally varying riverine inputs of organic chromophores, nutrients and suspended material. Smaller scale (10-100 km) studies carried out in the Orinoco delta and the Gulf of Paria showed that estuarine mixing processes did not affect major net removal of dissolved organic matter, consistent with the hypothesis that riverine chromophore input plays a dominant role in open-water photochemistry. 56 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Connective tissue spectrum abnormalities associated with spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Eyal; Pariani, Mitchel; Bannykh, Serguei; Rimoin, David L; Schievink, Wouter I

    2013-04-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of connective tissue abnormalities among patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks in a prospective study using a large cohort of patients. We enrolled a consecutive group of 50 patients, referred for consultation because of CSF leak. All patients have been carefully examined for the presence of connective tissue abnormalities, and based on findings, patients underwent genetic testing. Ancillary diagnostic studies included echocardiography, eye exam, and histopathological examinations of skin and dura biopsies in selected patients. We identified nine patients with heritable connective tissue disorders, including Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and other unclassified forms. In seven patients, spontaneous CSF leak was the first noted manifestation of the genetic disorder. We conclude that spontaneous CSF leaks are associated with a spectrum of connective tissue abnormalities and may be the first noted clinical presentation of the genetic disorder. We propose that there is a clinical basis for considering spontaneous CSF leak as a clinical manifestation of heritable connective tissue disorders, and we suggest that patients with CSF leaks should be screened for connective tissue and vascular abnormalities.

  12. Assessing opinions in community leadership networks to address health inequalities: a case study from Project IMPACT.

    PubMed

    McCauley, M P; Ramanadhan, S; Viswanath, K

    2015-12-01

    This study demonstrates a novel approach that those engaged in promoting social change in health can use to analyze community power, mobilize it and enhance community capacity to reduce health inequalities. We used community reconnaissance methods to select and interview 33 participants from six leadership sectors in 'Milltown', the New England city where the study was conducted. We used UCINET network analysis software to assess the structure of local leadership and NVivo qualitative software to analyze leaders' views on public health and health inequalities. Our main analyses showed that community power is distributed unequally in Milltown, with our network of 33 divided into an older, largely male and more powerful group, and a younger, largely female group with many 'grassroots' sector leaders who focus on reducing health inequalities. Ancillary network analyses showed that grassroots leaders comprise a self-referential cluster that could benefit from greater affiliation with leaders from other sectors and identified leaders who may serve as leverage points in our overall program of public agenda change to address health inequalities. Our innovative approach provides public health practitioners with a method for assessing community leaders' views, understanding subgroup divides and mobilizing leaders who may be helpful in reducing health inequalities.

  13. Telomere length is a prognostic biomarker in elderly advanced ovarian cancer patients: a multicenter GINECO study

    PubMed Central

    Falandry, Claire; Horard, Béatrice; Bruyas, Amandine; Legouffe, Eric; Cretin, Jacques; Meunier, Jérôme; Alexandre, Jérôme; Delecroix, Valérie; Fabbro, Michel; Certain, Marie-Noëlle; Maraval-Gaget, Raymonde; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Gilson, Eric; Freyer, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Age induces a progressive decline in functional reserve and impacts cancer treatments. Telomere attrition leads to tissue senescence. We tested the hypothesis that telomere length (TL) could predict patient vulnerability and outcome with cancer treatment. Patients and methods An ancillary study in the Elderly Women GINECO Trial 3 was performed to evaluate the impact of geriatric covariates on survival in elderly advanced ovarian cancer patients receiving six cycles of carboplatin. TL was estimated from peripheral blood at inclusion using standard procedures. Results TL (in base pairs) was estimated for 109/111 patients (median 6.1 kb; range [4.5-8.3 kb]). With a cut-off of 5.77 kb, TL discriminated two patient groups, long telomere (LT) and short telomeres (ST), with significantly different treatment completion rates of 0.80 (95%CI [0.71-0.89]) and 0.59 (95%CI [0.41-0.76]), respectively (odds ratio [OR]=2.8, p=0.02). ST patients were at higher risk of serious adverse events (SAE, OR=2.7; p=0.02) and had more unplanned hospital admissions (OR=2.1; p=0.08). After adjustment on FIGO stage, TL shorter than 6 kb was a risk factor of premature death (HR=1.57; p=0.06). Conclusion This exploratory study identifies TL as predictive factor of decreased treatment completion, SAE risk, unplanned hospital admissions and OS after adjustment on FIGO stage. PMID:26638179

  14. Assessing opinions in community leadership networks to address health inequalities: a case study from Project IMPACT.

    PubMed

    McCauley, M P; Ramanadhan, S; Viswanath, K

    2015-12-01

    This study demonstrates a novel approach that those engaged in promoting social change in health can use to analyze community power, mobilize it and enhance community capacity to reduce health inequalities. We used community reconnaissance methods to select and interview 33 participants from six leadership sectors in 'Milltown', the New England city where the study was conducted. We used UCINET network analysis software to assess the structure of local leadership and NVivo qualitative software to analyze leaders' views on public health and health inequalities. Our main analyses showed that community power is distributed unequally in Milltown, with our network of 33 divided into an older, largely male and more powerful group, and a younger, largely female group with many 'grassroots' sector leaders who focus on reducing health inequalities. Ancillary network analyses showed that grassroots leaders comprise a self-referential cluster that could benefit from greater affiliation with leaders from other sectors and identified leaders who may serve as leverage points in our overall program of public agenda change to address health inequalities. Our innovative approach provides public health practitioners with a method for assessing community leaders' views, understanding subgroup divides and mobilizing leaders who may be helpful in reducing health inequalities. PMID:26471919

  15. Analysis of ABCG2 and other urate transporters in uric acid homeostasis in chronic kidney disease: potential role of remote sensing and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Vibha; Richard, Erin L.; Wu, Wei; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Lipkowitz, Michael S.; Jeff, Janina; Maihofer, Adam X.; Nigam, Sanjay K.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the setting of chronic kidney disease (CKD), altered extra-renal urate handling may be necessary to regulate plasma uric acid. The Remote Sensing and Signaling Hypothesis (Nigam S. What do drug transporters really do? Nat Rev Drug Discov 2015; 14: 29–44) suggests that multispecific solute carrier (SLC) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters in different tissues are part of an inter-organ communication system that maintains levels of urate and other metabolites after organ injury. Methods Data from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC; n = 3598) were used to study associations between serum uric acid and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the following uric acid transporters: ABCG2 (BRCP), SLC22A6 (OAT1), SLC22A8 (OAT3), SLC22A10 (OAT5), SLC22A11 (OAT4), SLC22A12 (URAT1), SLC22A13 (OAT10), SLC17A1-A3 (NPTs), SLC2A9 (GLUT9), ABCC2 (MRP2) and ABCC4 (MRP4). Regression models, controlling for principal components age, gender and renal function, were run separately for those of European (EA) and African ancestry (AA), and P-values corrected for multiple comparisons. A twin cohort with participants of EA and normal renal function was used for comparison. Results Among those of EA in CRIC, statistically significant signals were observed for SNPs in ABCG2 (rs4148157; beta-coefficient = 0.68; P = 4.78E-13) and SNPs in SLC2A9 (rs13125646; beta-coefficient = −0.30; P = 1.06E-5). Among those of AA, the strongest (but not statistically significant) signals were observed for SNPs in SLC2A9, followed by SNPs in ABCG2. In the twin study (normal renal function), only SNPs in SLC2A9 were significant (rs4481233; beta-coefficient=−0.45; P = 7.0E-6). In CRIC, weaker associations were also found for SLC17A3 (NPT4) and gender-specific associations found for SLC22A8 (OAT3), SLC22A11 (OAT4), and ABCC4 (MRP4). Conclusions In patients of EA with CKD (CRIC cohort), we found striking associations between uric acid and SNPs on ABCG2, a key transporter

  16. Payload transportation system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A standard size set of shuttle payload transportation equipment was defined that will substantially reduce the cost of payload transportation and accommodate a wide range of payloads with minimum impact on payload design. The system was designed to accommodate payload shipments between the level 4 payload integration sites and the launch site during the calendar years 1979-1982. In addition to defining transportation multi-use mission support equipment (T-MMSE) the mode of travel, prime movers, and ancillary equipment required in the transportation process were also considered. Consistent with the STS goals of low cost and the use of standardized interfaces, the transportation system was designed to commercial grade standards and uses the payload flight mounting interfaces for transportation. The technical, cost, and programmatic data required to permit selection of a baseline system of MMSE for intersite movement of shuttle payloads were developed.

  17. Neuronal Organization of the Brain in the Adult Amphioxus (Branchiostoma lanceolatum): A Study With Acetylated Tubulin Immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Castro, Antonio; Becerra, Manuela; Manso, María Jesús; Anadón, Ramón

    2015-10-15

    Amphioxus (Cephalochordata) belongs to the most basal extant chordates, and knowledge of their brain organization appears to be key to deciphering the early stages of evolution of vertebrate brains. Most comprehensive studies of the organization of the central nervous system of adult amphioxus have investigated the spinal cord. Some brain populations have been characterized via neurochemistry and electron microscopy, and the overall cytoarchitecture of the brain was studied by Ekhart et al. (2003; J. Comp. Neurol. 466:319-330) with general staining methods and retrograde transport from the spinal cord. Here, the cytoarchitecture of the brain of adult amphioxus Branchiostoma lanceolatum was reinvestigated by using acetylated tubulin immunohistochemistry, which specifically stains neurons and fibers, in combination with some ancillary methods. This method allowed reproducible staining and mapping of types of neuron, mostly in brain regions caudal to the entrance level of nerve 2, and its comparison with spinal cord populations. The brain populations studied and discussed in detail were the Retzius bipolar cells, lamellate cells, Joseph cells, various types of translumenal cells, somatic motoneurons, Rohde nucleus cells, small ventral multipolar neurons, and Edinger cells. These observations expand our knowledge of the distribution of cell types and provide additional data on the number of cells and the axonal tracts and commissural regions of the adult amphioxus brain. The results of this comprehensive study provide a framework for comparison of complex adult populations with the early brain neuronal populations revealed in developmental studies of the amphioxus.

  18. Neuronal Organization of the Brain in the Adult Amphioxus (Branchiostoma lanceolatum): A Study With Acetylated Tubulin Immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Castro, Antonio; Becerra, Manuela; Manso, María Jesús; Anadón, Ramón

    2015-10-15

    Amphioxus (Cephalochordata) belongs to the most basal extant chordates, and knowledge of their brain organization appears to be key to deciphering the early stages of evolution of vertebrate brains. Most comprehensive studies of the organization of the central nervous system of adult amphioxus have investigated the spinal cord. Some brain populations have been characterized via neurochemistry and electron microscopy, and the overall cytoarchitecture of the brain was studied by Ekhart et al. (2003; J. Comp. Neurol. 466:319-330) with general staining methods and retrograde transport from the spinal cord. Here, the cytoarchitecture of the brain of adult amphioxus Branchiostoma lanceolatum was reinvestigated by using acetylated tubulin immunohistochemistry, which specifically stains neurons and fibers, in combination with some ancillary methods. This method allowed reproducible staining and mapping of types of neuron, mostly in brain regions caudal to the entrance level of nerve 2, and its comparison with spinal cord populations. The brain populations studied and discussed in detail were the Retzius bipolar cells, lamellate cells, Joseph cells, various types of translumenal cells, somatic motoneurons, Rohde nucleus cells, small ventral multipolar neurons, and Edinger cells. These observations expand our knowledge of the distribution of cell types and provide additional data on the number of cells and the axonal tracts and commissural regions of the adult amphioxus brain. The results of this comprehensive study provide a framework for comparison of complex adult populations with the early brain neuronal populations revealed in developmental studies of the amphioxus. PMID:25846052

  19. Critical Illness Outcome Study: An Observational Study on Protocols and Mortality in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Naeem A.; Gutteridge, David; Shahul, Sajid; Checkley, William; Sevransky, Jonathan; Martin, Greg S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many individual Intensive Care Unit (ICU) characteristics have been associated with patient outcomes, including staffing, expertise, continuity and team structure. Separately, many aspects of clinical care in ICUs have been operationalized through the development of complex treatment protocols. The United State Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group-Critical Illness Outcomes Study (USCIITG-CIOS) was designed to determine whether the extent of protocol availability and use in ICUs is associated with hospital survival in a large cohort of United States ICUs. Here, we describe the study protocol and analysis plan approved by the USCIITG-CIOS Steering Committee. Methods USCIITG-CIOS is a prospective, observational, ecological multi-centered “cohort” study of mixed ICUs in the U.S. The data collected include organizational information for the ICU (e.g., protocol availability and utilization, multi-disciplinary staffing assessment) and patient level information (e.g. demographics, acute and chronic medical conditions). The primary outcome is all-cause hospital mortality, with the objective being to determine whether there is an association between protocol number and hospital mortality for ICU patients. USCIITG-CIOS is powered to detect a 3% difference in crude hospital mortality between high and low protocol use ICUs, dichotomized according to protocol number at the median. The analysis will utilize regression modeling to adjust for outcome clustering by ICU, with secondary linear analysis of protocol number and mortality and a variety of a priori planned ancillary studies. There are presently 60 ICUs participating in USCIITG-CIOS to enroll approximately 6,000 study subjects. Conclusions USCIITG-CIOS is a large multicentric study examining the effect of ICU protocol use on patient outcomes. The primary results of this study will inform our understanding of the relationship between protocol availability, use, and patient outcomes in the ICU. Moreover

  20. Soil, environmental, and watershed measurements in support of carbon cycling studies in northwestern Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huntington, T.G.; Harden, J.W.; Dabney, S.M.; Marion, D.A.; Alonso, C.; Sharpe, J.M.; Fries, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    Measurements including soil respiration, soil moisture, soil temperature, and carbon export in suspended sediments from small watersheds were recorded at several field sites in northwestern Mississippi in support of hillslope process studies associated with the U.S. Geological Survey's Mississippi Basin Carbon Project (MBCP). These measurements were made to provide information about carbon cycling in agricultural and forest ecosystems to understand the potential role of erosion and deposition in the sequestration of soil organic carbon in upland soils. The question of whether soil erosion and burial constitutes an important net sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide is one hypothesis that the MBCP is evaluating to better understand carbon cycling and climate change. This report contains discussion of methods used and presents data for the period December 1996 through March 1998. Included in the report are ancillary data provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) ARS National Sedimentation Laboratory and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) Center for Bottomland Hardwoods Research on rainfall, runoff, sediment yield, forest biomass and grain yield. Together with the data collected by the USGS these data permit the construction of carbon budgets and the calibration of models of soil organic matter dynamics and sediment transport and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has established cooperative agreements with the USDA and USFS to facilitate collaborative research at research sites in northwestern Mississippi.

  1. A Pilot Pharmacologic Biomarker Study in HLA-Haploidentical Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Sorror, Mohamed; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; O’Donnell, Paul V.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Eleven patients diagnosed with various hematologic malignancies receiving an HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) participated in an ancillary biomarker trial. The goal of the trial was to evaluate potential pharmacologic biomarkers pertinent to the conditioning regimen (fludarabine monophosphate (fludarabine) and cyclophosphamide (CY)) or postgrafting immunosuppression (CY and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)) in these patients. METHODS We characterized the interpatient variability of nine pharmacologic biomarkers. The biomarkers evaluated were relevant to fludarabine (i.e., area under the curve (AUC) of 2-fluoro-ara-A or F-ara-A); CY (i.e., AUCs of CY and four of its metabolites); and MMF (i.e., total mycophenolic acid (MPA) AUC, unbound MPA AUC, and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity). RESULTS Interpatient variability in the pharmacologic biomarkers was high. Among those related to HCT conditioning, the interpatient variability ranged from 1.5-fold (CY AUC) to 4.0-fold (AUC of carboxyethlphosphoramide mustard, a metabolite of CY). Among biomarkers evaluated as part of postgrafting immunosuppression, the interpatient variability ranged from 1.7-fold (CY AUC) to 4.9-fold (IMPDH area under the effect curve). There was a moderate correlation (R2=0.441) of within-patient 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide formation clearance. CONCLUSIONS Considerable interpatient variability exists in the pharmacokinetic and drug-specific biomarkers potentially relevant to clinical outcomes in HLA-haploidentical HCT recipients. Pharmacodynamic studies are warranted to optimize the conditioning regimen and postgrafting immunosuppression administered to HLA-haploidentical HCT recipients. PMID:23907443

  2. Inelastic neutron scattering study of Pt(II) complexes displaying anticancer properties.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Luís A E Batista; Marques, M Paula M; Martin, Christine; Parker, Stewart F; Tomkinson, John

    2011-05-01

    The well-known platinum(II) chemotherapeutic drugs cisplatin [cis-(NH(3))(2)PtCl(2)] and carboplatin [Pt(NH(3))(2)C(6)O(4)H(6)], as well as the analogous transplatin [trans-(NH(3))(2)PtCl(2)], were studied by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy, coupled to quantum mechanical methods, and some ancillary work with X-ray diffraction on powders. An assignment of the experimental spectra was carried out based on the calculated INS transition frequencies and intensities (at the DFT level), thereby achieving a good correspondence between the calculated and observed data. Unusually good-quality INS spectra were obtained from about 250 mg, which is the smallest sample of a hydrogenous compound for which a successful INS interpretation has been reported. The knowledge of the local configuration of this kind of complexes is essential for an accurate understanding of their activity, which will pave the way for the rational design of novel third-generation drugs comprising cisplatin- and carboplatin-like moieties. PMID:21523878

  3. ROBO: a model and a code for studying the interstellar medium

    SciTech Connect

    Grassi, T; Krstic, Predrag S; Merlin, E; Buonomo, U; Piovan, L; Chiosi, C

    2011-01-01

    We present robo, a model and its companion code for the study of the interstellar medium (ISM). The aim is to provide an accurate description of the physical evolution of the ISM and to set the ground for an ancillary tool to be inserted in NBody-Tree-SPH (NB-TSPH) simulations of large-scale structures in the cosmological context or of the formation and evolution of individual galaxies. The ISM model consists of gas and dust. The gas chemical composition is regulated by a network of reactions that includes a large number of species (hydrogen and deuterium-based molecules, helium, and metals). New reaction rates for the charge transfer in H{sup +} and H{sub 2} collisions are presented. The dust contains the standard mixture of carbonaceous grains (graphite grains and PAHs) and silicates. In our model dust are formed and destroyed by several processes. The model accurately treats the cooling process, based on several physical mechanisms, and cooling functions recently reported in the literature. The model is applied to a wide range of the input parameters, and the results for important quantities describing the physical state of the gas and dust are presented. The results are organized in a database suited to the artificial neural networks (ANNs). Once trained, the ANNs yield the same results obtained by ROBO with great accuracy. We plan to develop ANNs suitably tailored for applications to NB-TSPH simulations of cosmological structures and/or galaxies.

  4. Study plan for urban stream indicator sites of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, T.J.; Price, C.V.

    1997-01-01

    Urban Indicator Sites are one component of the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water- Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The objectives of monitoring at the Urban Indicator Sites are to: (1) characterize stream quality from drainage basins with predominantly residential and commercial land use, and (2) determine which selected natural and human factors most strongly affect stream quality. Urban Indicator Sites will be distributed across the United States in settings with statistically different climate and in metropolitan areas that have a population of 250,000 or more. Multiple sites in the same climatic setting will have a range in population density. Ideally, Urban Indicator Sites will monitor drainage basins that have only residential and commercial land use, are 50 square kilometers or larger, are in the same physiographic setting as other Indicator Sites, have sustained flow, and overlap other NAWQA study components. Ideal drainage basins will not have industrial or agricultural land use and will not have point-source-contamination discharges. Stream quality will be characterized by collecting and analyzing samples of streamflow, bed sediment, and tissue of aquatic organisms for selected constituents. Factors affecting stream quality will be determined by statistical analysis of ancillary data associated with Urban Indicator Sites and stream-quality samples.

  5. Coordinated field study for CaPE: Analysis of energy and water budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Duchon, Claude; Kanemasu, Edward T.; Smith, Eric A.; Crosson, William; Laymon, Chip; Luvall, Jeff

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this hydrologic cycle study are to understand and model (1) surface energy and land-atmosphere water transfer processes, and (2) interactions between convective storms and surface energy fluxes. A surface energy budget measurement campaign was carried out by an interdisciplinary science team during the period July 8 - August 19, 1991 as part of the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification Experiment (CaPE) in the vicinity of Cape Canaveral, FL. Among the research themes associated with CaPE is the remote estimation of rainfall. Thus, in addition to surface radiation and energy budget measurements, surface mesonet, special radiosonde, precipitation, high-resolution satellite (SPOT) data, geosynchronous (GOES) and polar orbiting (DMSP SSM/I, OLS; NOAA AVHRR) satellite data, and high altitude airplane data (AMPR, MAMS, HIS) were collected. Initial quality control of the seven surface flux station data sets has begun. Ancillary data sets are being collected and assembled for analysis. Browsing of GOES and radar data has begun to classify days as disturbed/undisturbed to identify the larger scale forcing of the pre-convective environment, convection storms and precipitation. The science analysis plan has been finalized and tasks assigned to various investigators.

  6. Feasibility Study for Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect

    John Hendrix, Project Director; Charles Weir, Project Manager; Dr. John Plodinec, Technology Advisor; Dr. Steve Murray, Economic Advisor

    2005-07-21

    Project Objective: The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) conducted a study of the feasibility of siting a renewable energy biomass-based installation on tribal lands. The purpose of the study was to determine whether such an installation can be economically sustainable, as well as consistent with the cultural, social, and economic goals of the Tribe. Scope: To achieve the goal of the feasibility study, the following tasks were carried out: (1) Resource availability assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the availability of both poultry litter and wood residues for use in the proposed facility. (2) Power utilization assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the potential market size for power produced, the existing infrastructure for delivering power to that market, and the costs and economic returns for doing so. (3) Technology review--The objective of this review was to identify one, or more, technical options for detailed economic and technical assessment. The study considered a range of feedstock and product mixtures of poultry litter; wood residues as feedstock; and electrical power and other ancillary products as outputs. Distributed power sources was also examined. Technologies ranging from gasification to systems that produce both power and value-added chemicals were considered. Technologies selected for detailed review were those that can be sized to process the amount of available feed (poultry litter, or poultry litter and wood residues), and that also appear to make economic sense in terms of the value of their inputs. The technology review leaned heavily on the experience from similar prior DOE projects, particularly those conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). NREL was involved in a consultative role, so that the project team could leverage their experience. (4) Systems Design(s)--Based on the technology review, a pre-conceptual design for an installation was developed. This

  7. Design of the Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network (NEPTUNE) to evaluate primary glomerular nephropathy by a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Gipson, Debbie S; Holzman, Lawrence B; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Song, Peter X K; Barisoni, Laura; Sampson, Matthew G; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Lemley, Kevin V; Nelson, Peter J; Lienczewski, Chrysta C; Adler, Sharon G; Appel, Gerald B; Cattran, Daniel C; Choi, Michael J; Contreras, Gabriel; Dell, Katherine M; Fervenza, Fernando C; Gibson, Keisha L; Greenbaum, Larry A; Hernandez, Joel D; Hewitt, Stephen M; Hingorani, Sangeeta R; Hladunewich, Michelle; Hogan, Marie C; Hogan, Susan L; Kaskel, Frederick J; Lieske, John C; Meyers, Kevin E C; Nachman, Patrick H; Nast, Cynthia C; Neu, Alicia M; Reich, Heather N; Sedor, John R; Sethna, Christine B; Trachtman, Howard; Tuttle, Katherine R; Zhdanova, Olga; Zilleruelo, Gastòn E; Kretzler, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    The Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network (NEPTUNE) is a North American multicenter collaborative consortium established to develop a translational research infrastructure for nephrotic syndrome. This includes a longitudinal observational cohort study, a pilot and ancillary study program, a training program, and a patient contact registry. NEPTUNE will enroll 450 adults and children with minimal change disease, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, and membranous nephropathy for detailed clinical, histopathological, and molecular phenotyping at the time of clinically indicated renal biopsy. Initial visits will include an extensive clinical history, physical examination, collection of urine, blood and renal tissue samples, and assessments of quality of life and patient-reported outcomes. Follow-up history, physical measures, urine and blood samples, and questionnaires will be obtained every 4 months in the first year and biannually, thereafter. Molecular profiles and gene expression data will be linked to phenotypic, genetic, and digitalized histological data for comprehensive analyses using systems biology approaches. Analytical strategies were designed to transform descriptive information to mechanistic disease classification for nephrotic syndrome and to identify clinical, histological, and genomic disease predictors. Thus, understanding the complexity of the disease pathogenesis will guide further investigation for targeted therapeutic strategies.

  8. DETERMINATION OF IMPORTANCE EVALUATION FOR THE SUBSURFACE EXPORATORY STUDIES FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    W.J. Clark

    1999-06-28

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) East-West Cross Drift Starter Tunnel (to approximate ECRB Station 0+26 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas in the TS Loop. This evaluation applies to the construction, operation, and maintenance of these excavations. A more detailed description of these items is provided in Section 6.0. Testing activities are not evaluated in this DIE. Certain construction activities with respect to testing activities are evaluated; but the testing activities themselves are not evaluated. The DIE for ESF Subsurface Testing Activities (BAJ3000000-01717-2200-00011 Rev 01) (CRWMS M&O 1998a) evaluates Subsurface ESF Testing activities. The construction, operation, and maintenance of the TS Loop niches and alcove slot cuts is evaluated herein and is also discussed in CRWMS M&O 1998a. The construction, operation, and maintenance of the Busted Butte subsurface test area in support of the Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test is evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1998a. Potential test-to-test interference and the waste isolation impacts of testing activities are evaluated in the ESF Subsurface Testing Activities DIE and other applicable evaluation(s) for the Job Package (JP), Test Planning Package (TPP), and/or Field Work Package (FWP). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether the Subsurface ESF TS Loop and associated excavations, including activities associated with their construction and operation, potentially impact site characterization testing or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified. The validity and veracity of the individual tests, including data collection, are the responsibility

  9. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cardiac metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Seeholzer, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the increasing use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques for following the metabolic fate of compounds specifically labeled with /sup 13/C. The goals of the present study are: (1) to develop reliable quantitative procedures for measuring the /sup 13/C enrichment of specific carbon sites in compounds enriched by the metabolism of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates in rat heart, and (2) to use these quantitative measurements of fractional /sup 13/C enrichment within the context of a mathematical flux model describing the carbon flow through the TCA cycle and ancillary pathways, as a means for obtaining unknown flux parameters. Rat hearts have been perfused in vitro with various combinations of glucose, acetate, pyruvate, and propionate to achieve steady state flux conditions, followed by perfusion with the same substrates labeled with /sup 13/C in specific carbon sites. The hearts were frozen at different times after addition of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates and neutralized perchloric acid extracts were used to obtain high resolution proton-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectra at 90.55 MHz. The fractional /sup 13/C enrichment (F.E.) of individual carbon sites in different metabolites was calculated from the area of the resolved resonances after correction for saturation and nuclear Overhauser effects. These F.E. measurements by /sup 13/C NMR were validated by the analysis of /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H scalar coupling patterns observed in /sup 1/H NMR spectra of the extracted metabolites. The results obtained from perfusion of hearts glucose plus either (2-/sup 13/C) acetate or (3-/sup 13/C) pyruvate are similar to those obtained by previous investigators using /sup 14/C-labeled substrates.

  10. Cohort Profile: The HealthNuts Study: Population prevalence and environmental/genetic predictors of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Koplin, Jennifer J; Wake, Melissa; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Matheson, Melanie; Tang, Mimi L K; Gurrin, Lyle C; Dwyer, Terry; Peters, Rachel L; Prescott, Susan; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Lowe, Adrian J; Allen, Katrina J

    2015-08-01

    HealthNuts is a single-centre, multi-wave, population-based longitudinal study designed to assess prevalence, determinants, natural history and burden of allergy (particularly food allergy) in the early years of life. It is novel in the use of serial food challenge measures within its population frame to confirm food allergy. The cohort comprises 5276 children initially recruited at age 12 months from council-run immunization sessions across Melbourne, Australia. As well as parent-completed questionnaires and researcher-observed eczema status, all infants underwent skin-prick testing to egg, peanut, sesame and either cow's milk or shellfish, and those with detectable wheals underwent food challenges to determine clinical allergy. In wave 2, conducted at age 4 years, validated questionnaires collected data on asthma, allergic rhinitis (hay fever), eczema and food allergies. Food challenges were repeated in children previously identified as food allergic to determine resolution. In wave 3, all children (irrespective of food allergy status) were invited for clinical assessment at age 6 years, including lung function, physical measurements, skin-prick testing to foods and aeroallergens and food challenges if food sensitized. Biological specimens (blood, cheek swabs) were collected at each wave for ancillary immunological, genetic and epigenetic studies. Applications to access data and/or samples can be submitted to [katrina.allen@mcri.edu.au].

  11. Event-related Potential Patterns Reflect Reversed Hemispheric Activity during Visual Attention Processing in Children with Dyslexia: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joong-Gu; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Park, Eun-Jin; Leem, Hyun-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Individuals with dyslexia experience reading difficulties, whereas their other cognitive abilities seem normal. The purpose of this study was to investigate the event-related potential (ERP) patterns of children with dyslexia during a target-detection task. Methods Seventeen children with dyslexia and 18 children without this disorder participated in this study. We evaluated their writing and reading ability, symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and intelligence quotient. ERPs were recorded while participants performed a target-detection task, and the peak amplitude and latency of P100 and P300 were analyzed. The lateral asymmetry index (LAI) was calculated for each ERP component. Results The dyslexic group exhibited longer reaction times and larger P100 amplitudes than the non-dyslexic group in the right hemisphere. The P100 latency was also significantly delayed in the right hemisphere of those in the dyslexic group compared with those in the non-dyslexic group. The P300 amplitude was larger in the right hemisphere compared with left hemisphere in the dyslexic group, whereas no interhemispheric differences were observed with respect to the P300 latency. The LAI for P100 showed a significant right hemispheric dominance, whereas the LAI for P100 was significantly correlated with the accuracy of target detection in children with dyslexia. Conclusion Our results suggest that right hemispheric dominance acts as an ancillary system that compensates for poor reading in children with dyslexia. PMID:26792038

  12. Ethics of medical care and clinical research: a qualitative study of principal investigators in biomedical HIV prevention research.

    PubMed

    Haire, Bridget G

    2013-04-01

    In clinical research there is a tension between the role of a doctor, who must serve the best interests of the patient, and the role of the researcher, who must produce knowledge that may not have any immediate benefits for the research participant. This tension is exacerbated in HIV research in low and middle income countries, which frequently uncovers comorbidities other than the condition under study. Some bioethicists argue that as the goals of medicine and those of research are distinct, it is a mistake for researchers to assume therapeutic responsibilities while engaging in research. Others propose that there is a duty of care, but disagree as to how this is limited and specified. In this qualitative study, principal investigators from HIV prevention trials discuss their experience of providing medical benefits to participants within the context of conducting research into HIV biomedical prevention technologies. They describe the limitations imposed at times by funders and at times by infrastructure constraints, and canvass the importance of ancillary care provision and capacity building in trial communities. The views of the principal investigators are compatible with the perspective that there is a duty of care, limited by the nature of the research, the depth of the relationship between research and participant, and the capacity of the research site. The therapeutic orientation in HIV prevention trial appears to be indivisible from competent research practise by making concrete and appropriate benefits available to trial participants and their communities that support rather than compete with local infrastructure.

  13. Density functional theory study of oxygen-atom insertion into metal-methyl bonds of iron(II), ruthenium(II), and osmium(II) complexes: study of metal-mediated C-O bond formation.

    PubMed

    Pardue, Daniel B; Mei, Jiajun; Cundari, Thomas R; Gunnoe, T Brent

    2014-03-17

    Metal-mediated C-O bond formation is a key step in hydrocarbon oxygenation catalytic cycles; however, few examples of this reaction have been reported for low-oxidation-state complexes. Oxygen insertion into a metal-carbon bond of Cp*M(CO)(OPy)R (Cp* = η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl; R = Me, Ph; OPy = pyridine-N-oxide; M = Fe, Ru, Os) was analyzed via density functional theory calculations. Oxygen-atom insertions through a concerted single-step organometallic Baeyer-Villiger pathway and a two-step pathway via a metal-oxo intermediate were studied; calculations predict that the former pathway was lower in energy. The results indicated that functionalization of M-R to M-OR (R = Me, Ph) is plausible using iron(II) complexes. Starting from Cp*Fe(CO)(OPy)Ph, the intermediate Fe-oxo showed oxyl character and, thus, is best considered an Fe(III)O(•-) complex. Oxidation of the π-acid ancillary ligand CO was facile. Substitutions of CO with dimethylamide and NH3 were calculated to lower the activation barrier by ∼1-2 kcal/mol for formation of the Fe(III)O(•-) intermediate, whereas a chloride ligand raised the activation barrier to 26 kcal/mol from 22.9 kcal/mol. PMID:24571202

  14. Nuclear weapons effects studies for the 5ESS switch. Volume 3. EMP (electromagnetic pulse) studies. Part 1. Testing and analysis. Final technical report, 7 January 1985-30 September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, N.A.; Fuller, D.R.; Harris, J.D.; Polakos, P.A.; Spata, D.A.

    1986-09-01

    As part of its Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Mitigation Program, the National Communications System (NCS) funded ATandT to study the ability of the ATandT 5ESS(TM) Switch to withstand the potentially disabling effects of EMP from high-altitude nuclear bursts and fallout radiation from distant near-surface bursts. This volume reports the results of the assessment of the survivability and performance of a standard 5ESS Switch in a HEMP environment. A fully operational 5ESS Switch and its ancillary central-office support equipment were exposed to simulated-HEMP fields of 5 kV/m to 80 kV/m at the Air Force Weapons Laboratory test facilities. The tests (1) established the physical survivability of the switch, (2) investigated the types of upsets that occur (i.e., temporary and permanent changes in logic-circuit functioning), and (3) characterized the performance of the switch upon exposure to one or more EMP pulses as a function of incident field level and time after exposure. Performance was characterized in terms of the switch's ability to (1) hold calls set up before the EMP exposure, (2) recover automatically from EMP-induced upsets, and (3) establish new connections during and after recovery.

  15. Co-Simulation of Detailed Whole Building with the Power System to Study Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Fuller, Jason C.; Srivastava, Viraj; Ciraci, Selim; Daily, Jeffrey A.

    2014-12-24

    Modernization of the power system in a way that ensures a sustainable energy system is arguably one of the most pressing concerns of our time. Buildings are important components in the power system. First, they are the main consumers of electricity and secondly, they do not have constant energy demand. Conventionally, electricity has been difficult to store and should be consumed as it is generated. Therefore, maintaining the demand and supply is critical in the power system. However, to reduce the complexity of power models, buildings (i.e., end-use loads) are traditionally modeled and represented as aggregated “dumb” nodes in the power system. This means we lack effective detailed whole building energy models that can support requirements and emerging technologies of the smart power grid. To gain greater insight into the relationship between building energy demand and power system performance, it is important to constitute a co-simulation framework to support detailed building energy modeling and simulation within the power system to study capabilities promised by the modern power grid. This paper discusses ongoing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and presents underlying tools and framework needed to enable co-simulation of building, building energy systems and their control in the power system to study applications such as demand response, grid-based HVAC control, and deployment of buildings for ancillary services. The optimal goal is to develop an integrated modeling and simulation platform that is flexible, reusable, and scalable. Results of this work will contribute to future building and power system studies, especially those related to the integrated ‘smart grid’. Results are also expected to advance power resiliency and local (micro) scale grid studies where several building and renewable energy systems transact energy directly. This paper also reviews some applications that can be supported and studied using the framework introduced

  16. Red blood cell MUFAs and risk of coronary artery disease in the Physicians’ Health Study1234

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Chisa; Matthan, Nirupa R; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Gaziano, J Michael; Djoussé, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have reported beneficial effects of a Mediterranean diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) on coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. However, these findings remain inconsistent because some experimental studies have suggested atherogenic and lipotoxicity effects of long-chain and very-long-chain MUFAs on cardiomyocytes. Objective: We examined whether red blood cell (RBC) long-chain and very-long-chain MUFAs are associated with risk of CAD in the Physicians’ Health Study. Design: The ancillary study used a prospective nested case-control design to select 1000 cases of incident CAD and 1000 control subjects matched for age, year of birth, and time of blood collection. RBC MUFAs were measured by using gas chromatography, and CAD was validated by an endpoint committee. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate RRs. Results: The mean (±SD) age was 68.7 ± 8.7 y. In a multivariable model that was controlled for matching factors and established CAD risk factors and RBC saturated and omega-3 (n−3) fatty acids, ORs for CAD associated with each SD increase of 20:1n−9 and log 22:1n−9 were 0.89 (95% CI: 0.80, 1.00; P = 0.0441) and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.95; P = 0.0086). However, only the 22:1n−9–CAD relation remained statistically significant after Bonferroni correction (P < 0.0125). RBC cis 18:1n−9 and 24:1n−9 were not associated with CAD risk. Conclusion: Our data suggest an inverse association of RBC 22:1n−9 but not 20:1n−9, 18:1n−9, or 24:1n−9 with CAD risk after Bonferroni correction in the Physicians’ Health Study. PMID:23824727

  17. Integration of environmental simulation models with satellite remote sensing and geographic information systems technologies: case studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steyaert, Louis T.; Loveland, Thomas R.; Brown, Jesslyn F.; Reed, Bradley C.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental modelers are testing and evaluating a prototype land cover characteristics database for the conterminous United States developed by the EROS Data Center of the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Nebraska Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies. This database was developed from multi temporal, 1-kilometer advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data for 1990 and various ancillary data sets such as elevation, ecological regions, and selected climatic normals. Several case studies using this database were analyzed to illustrate the integration of satellite remote sensing and geographic information systems technologies with land-atmosphere interactions models at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. The case studies are representative of contemporary environmental simulation modeling at local to regional levels in global change research, land and water resource management, and environmental simulation modeling at local to regional levels in global change research, land and water resource management and environmental risk assessment. The case studies feature land surface parameterizations for atmospheric mesoscale and global climate models; biogenic-hydrocarbons emissions models; distributed parameter watershed and other hydrological models; and various ecological models such as ecosystem, dynamics, biogeochemical cycles, ecotone variability, and equilibrium vegetation models. The case studies demonstrate the important of multi temporal AVHRR data to develop to develop and maintain a flexible, near-realtime land cover characteristics database. Moreover, such a flexible database is needed to derive various vegetation classification schemes, to aggregate data for nested models, to develop remote sensing algorithms, and to provide data on dynamic landscape characteristics. The case studies illustrate how such a database supports research on spatial heterogeneity, land use, sensitivity analysis, and scaling issues

  18. Numerical study of local/regional atmospheric changes caused by a large solar central receiver power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhumralkar, C. M.; Slemmons, A. J.; Nitz, K. C.

    1981-06-01

    A two-dimensional numerical atmospheric mesoscale model with a vertical cross section is applied to study the potential local/regional atmospheric effects of the installation of a 100 MWe solar thermal central receiver power plant in California. The plant comprises heliostats (mirrors) covering a portion of ground surface and reflecting sunlight onto a central receiving tower. The model is able to simulate the changes in surface characteristics associated with the installation of heliostats and other power plant ancillaries and can also simulate the effects of waste heat from cooling towers. The model equations are integrated to simulate typical summer and atypical summer. The results for typical summer conditions at the site and in the surrounding region demonstrate that the power plant has the potential to increase local humidity and wind circulation but cannot induce the formation of clouds or rain. The results for atypical summer conditions show that the solar power plant is potentially able to increase the wind circulation and form clouds and rain. It is noted, however, that the life cycle of such formations is only 2-3 h.

  19. Childhood abuse, parental warmth, and adult multisystem biological risk in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Judith E; Gruenewald, Tara L; Taylor, Shelley E; Janicki-Deverts, Denise; Matthews, Karen A; Seeman, Teresa E

    2013-10-15

    Childhood abuse increases adult risk for morbidity and mortality. Less clear is how this "toxic" stress becomes embedded to influence health decades later, and whether protective factors guard against these effects. Early biological embedding is hypothesized to occur through programming of the neural circuitry that influences physiological response patterns to subsequent stress, causing wear and tear across multiple regulatory systems. To examine this hypothesis, we related reports of childhood abuse to a comprehensive 18-biomarker measure of multisystem risk and also examined whether presence of a loving parental figure buffers against the impact of childhood abuse on adult risk. A total of 756 subjects (45.8% white, 42.7% male) participated in this ancillary substudy of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study. Childhood stress was determined by using the Risky Families Questionnaire, a well-validated retrospective self-report scale. Linear regression models adjusting for age, sex, race, parental education, and oral contraceptive use found a significant positive relationship between reports of childhood abuse and multisystem health risks [B (SE) = 0.68 (0.16); P < 0.001]. Inversely, higher amounts of reported parental warmth and affection during childhood was associated with lower multisystem health risks [B (SE) = -0.40 (0.14); P < 0.005]. A significant interaction of abuse and warmth (P < 0.05) was found, such that individuals reporting low levels of love and affection and high levels of abuse in childhood had the highest multisystem risk in adulthood. PMID:24062432

  20. The design and rationale for the Acute Medically Ill Venous Thromboembolism Prevention with Extended Duration Betrixaban (APEX) study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Harrington, Robert; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Hull, Russell; Gibson, C Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F; Kitt, Michael M; Lorenz, Todd J

    2014-03-01

    Randomized clinical trials have identified a population of acute medically ill patients who remain at risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) beyond the standard duration of therapy and hospital discharge. The aim of the APEX study is to determine whether extended administration of oral betrixaban (35-42 days) is superior to a standard short course of prophylaxis with subcutaneous enoxaparin (10 ± 4 days followed by placebo) in patients with known risk factors for post-discharge VTE. Patients initially are randomized to receive either betrixaban or enoxaparin (and matching placebo) in a double dummy design. Following a standard duration period of enoxaparin treatment (with placebo tablets) or betrixaban (with placebo injections), patients receive only betrixaban (or alternative matching placebo). Patients are considered for enrollment if they are older than 40 years, have a specified medical illness, and restricted mobility. They must also meet the APEX criteria for increased VTE risk (aged ≥75 years, baseline D-Dimer ≥2× upper the limit of "normal", or 2 additional ancillary risk factors for VTE). The primary efficacy end point is the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep venous thrombosis, symptomatic deep venous thrombosis, non-fatal (pulmonary embolus) pulmonary embolism, or VTE-related death through day 35. The primary safety outcome is the occurrence of major bleeding. We hypothesize that extended duration betrixaban VTE prophylaxis will be safe and more effective than standard short duration enoxaparin in preventing VTE in acute medically ill patients with known risk factors for post hospital discharge VTE. PMID:24576517