Science.gov

Sample records for crisis user perspectives

  1. A user's Perspective on Software

    SciTech Connect

    Isadoro T. Carlino

    2006-10-24

    The user is often the most overlooked component of control system design. At Jefferson Lab the control system is almost entirely digital in nature, with little feedback except that which is deliberately designed into the control system. In the complex control room environment a good design can enhance the user's abilities to preform good science. A bad design can leave the user frustrated and contribute significantly to down time, when science is not being done. Key points of use and design from the user's perspective are discussed, along with some techniques which have been adopted at Jefferson Lab to improve the user experience and produce better, more usable software.

  2. An ASCI user perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    The ASCI project supports the hardware and software projects that ultimately are put to use by the nuclear weapon design community in order to solve problems relevant to the stockpile. This talk describes a group of ASCI code project users and an example problem from one of those users in terms of its computing resources. Significant discussion focuses Ion important considerations as a user when interacting with ASCI hardware and software.

  3. The Carbon Crisis: An Evolutionary Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, K.

    2013-12-01

    By the 'carbon crisis' I mean the coupled crises of the depletion of the highest-EROI sources of fossil fuels and the global warming caused by our use of those fossil fuels. (EROI means 'energy return on energy investment'; Hall 2011.) While global warming is arguably more urgent, either of these factors would sooner or later be sufficient by itself to call a halt to our global-scale, energy-intensive, high technology economy. In lethal combination, they threaten to drastically reduce the capacity of the planet to support 7+ billion talking hominids. I will pull the camera back for a very long view and characterize the carbon crisis and our possible responses to it from an evolutionary and ecological perspective. It remains unclear why sapiens emerged rather suddenly as the most successful member of the family Homo about 50 to 60 kya; some argue that this neurological explosion could be due to our ancestors having survived the rigors of the Toba population bottleneck, which presumably would have favoured high adaptability (Ambrose 1998). Whatever the cause, Paleolithic humans deployed an unprecedented combination of technological and social ingenuity (the capacity for adaptive social organization; Homer-Dixon 2001). Aided by the relatively benign climate of the Holocene and ultimately by our increasing ability to tap into the resources of the 'found' ecology, especially the vast stores of hydrocarbons bequeathed by the Paleozoic and Mesozoic eras, our population has grown exponentially to its present unsteady pinnacle of (possibly) temporary reproductive success. The question now is what happens next. It was human ingenuity that got us through the ice age, put footprints on the Moon, and brought us to this crisis point; now, only human ingenuity (both social and technical) can get us past it. Our species will finally achieve a sustainable mode of existence on this planet when (in E. Odum's words; 1973) 'the present-day concept of ';unlimited exploitation of

  4. Presidential Perspectives of Crisis Preparedness at Christian Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrell, Stacy M.; Heiselt, April K.

    2012-01-01

    Crises, whether human or natural, occur on all college campuses. Extensive research has been conducted on crisis preparedness at four-year, nondenominational institutions. This study examined crisis preparedness at Christian institutions of higher education. The study examined the perspectives of presidents of Christian institutions of higher…

  5. The Cuban Missile Crisis: Evolving Historical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medland, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a synthesis of the views of participants and counterviews of scholars concerning the Cuban missile crisis of 1962. Reviews historical and analytical accounts of the crisis. Describes critical areas of conflicting interpretations by historians and participants. Includes an annotated bibliography of teaching resources. (NL)

  6. The Cuban Missile Crisis: Evolving Historical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medland, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a synthesis of the views of participants and counterviews of scholars concerning the Cuban missile crisis of 1962. Reviews historical and analytical accounts of the crisis. Describes critical areas of conflicting interpretations by historians and participants. Includes an annotated bibliography of teaching resources. (NL)

  7. Design hourly volume from road users' perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.C.

    1986-07-01

    Highway designers have raised some serious questions in the past about the validity of the conventional DHV approach. One criticism is that it focuses on facility utilization rather than being roadway-user oriented. The purpose of this study is to reexamine the traditional 30th highest hourly approach from the road users' perspective. The road use type, or road users' perspective is characterized in this note by variables such as trip purpose and trip length distribution. More specifically, the objectives of the analysis presented in this note are: (1) To investigate the effect of road use type on the DHV considerations; and (2) to suggest a range of highest hourly volumes suitable for design purpose from the point of view of the total number of users experiencing traffic congestion rather than a number of hours of facility congestion, such as the 30th highest hour approach permitting a total of 30 hours of facility congestion for all types of road users.

  8. [About the addiction to using the telephone or a structural approach in the crisis intervention for a better work with long-term users].

    PubMed

    Neumann, Olaf

    2002-11-01

    The presented document discusses the problems of psychological/psychiatric and emergency long term users. The author, director of the East Berlin Crisis Centre, describes the long-term patient phenomenon from different perspectives. He develops ideas to change the concept of acute intervention. The crisis intervention is established in the context of the Empowerment Theory. The developed structural basis will be discussed accompanied by practical examples.

  9. Crisis discussions in psychology--New historical and philosophical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Thomas; Mülberger, Annette

    2012-06-01

    In this introductory article, we provide a historical and philosophical framework for studying crisis discussions in psychology. We first trace the various meanings of crisis talk outside and inside of the sciences. We then turn to Kuhn's concept of crisis, which is mainly an analyst's category referring to severe clashes between theory and data. His view has also dominated many discussions on the status of psychology: Can it be considered a "mature" science, or are we dealing here with a pre- or multi-paradigmatic discipline? Against these Kuhnian perspectives, we point out that especially, but not only in psychology distinctive crisis declarations and debates have taken place since at least the late 19th century. In these, quite different usages of crisis talk have emerged, which can be determined by looking at (a) the content and (b) the dimensions of the declarations, as well as (c) the functions these declarations had for their authors. Thus, in psychology at least, 'crisis' has been a vigorous actor's category, occasionally having actual effects on the future course of research. While such crisis declarations need not be taken at face value, they nevertheless help to break the spell of Kuhnian analyses of psychology's history. They should inform ways in which the history and philosophy of psychology is studied further. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. ALMA from the Users' Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey

    2010-05-01

    After decades of dreaming and preparation, the call for early science with ALMA is just around the corner. The goal of this talk is to illustrate the process of preparing and carrying out a research program with ALMA. This presentation will step through the user interface for proposal preparation, proposal review, project tracking, data acquisition, and post-processing. Examples of the software tools, including the simulator and spectral line catalog, will be included.

  11. Confidentiality in Crisis Counseling: A Philosophical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, David J.

    1984-01-01

    Crisis interventionists frequently confront a moral dilemma when violating client trust seems necessary if self-destructive behavior is to be prevented. Concern for client welfare and respect for client rights and autonomy which are grounded in Utilitarianism and Kantian Formalism, respectively, conflict in such cases. These theories are examined,…

  12. Confidentiality in Crisis Counseling: A Philosophical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, David J.

    1984-01-01

    Crisis interventionists frequently confront a moral dilemma when violating client trust seems necessary if self-destructive behavior is to be prevented. Concern for client welfare and respect for client rights and autonomy which are grounded in Utilitarianism and Kantian Formalism, respectively, conflict in such cases. These theories are examined,…

  13. Managing the water crisis: A youth perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simataa, Faith

    2017-04-01

    The youth are identified as a key group to include in effective engagement and decision-making for water security and sustainable development. An increase in severe droughts in Namibia has highlighted its destructive impacts and led to a growing concern about the societal exposure of communities. Acknowledging the benefit of access to safe drinking water to humanity, in reality a disproportionate burden of protecting environmental benefits such as clean water is borne by the poor and vulnerable sections of the society. As a result, a key consideration highlighted in the Hyogo and Sendai Frameworks is the inclusion of gender & age perspectives, and vulnerable groups in planning for disaster risk reduction. Therefore, the paper argues that empowering the youth with knowledge and skills capability in disaster risk issues becomes essential for a sustainable management approach, and a potential 'rescue' mechanism from the web of poverty. The paper also illustrates that there is indeed weak adherence to good governance and that the government needs to improve structures for youth coordination to ensure water stewardship. Realizing this gap in knowledge, innovation and education to build a culture of resilience at all levels of society, the paper offers a perspective on the role of youth in the development agenda of Namibia and how they can influence decision-making processes in addressing water insecurity in the country. Keywords: Empowerment, Namibia, Water insecurity, Youth

  14. Advances in crisis management of the suicidal patient: perspectives from patients.

    PubMed

    Bergmans, Yvonne; Brown, Adrienne L; Carruthers, Anne S H

    2007-02-01

    This paper discusses crisis intervention with the suicidal client from the perspective of two clients who discuss both the strengths and challenges they have encountered while in crisis. The paper then discusses a model for understanding a suicidal crisis and a template for intervention.

  15. The Graphical User Interface: Crisis, Danger, and Opportunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, L. H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This article describes differences between the graphical user interface and traditional character-based interface systems, identifies potential problems posed by graphic computing environments for blind computer users, and describes some programs and strategies that are being developed to provide access to those environments. (Author/JDD)

  16. State behavior during the Ukrainian crisis: the perspectives of Romania, France, and the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-26

    State Behavior During the Ukrainian Crisis: The Perspectives of Romania, France , and the...Perspectives of Romania, France , and the United States Sb. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER MAJ Valerica-Iulian...TERMS State behavior, Ukrainian crisis, Romania, France , the United States, geographical proximity, cultural-historical connectivity, economic

  17. The Graphical User Interface Crisis: Danger and Opportunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Lawrence H.; And Others

    This paper examines graphic computing environments, identifies potential problems in providing access to blind people, and describes programs and strategies being developed to provide this access. The paper begins with an explanation of how graphic user interfaces differ from character-based systems in their use of pixels, visual metaphors such as…

  18. Crisis phenomena after stroke reflected in an existential perspective.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, I; Jansson, L; Norberg, A

    1999-01-01

    The study gains a deeper understanding of crisis phenomena emerging after stroke and focuses on these phenomena viewed in an existential perspective. Ten stroke victims narrated their experiences of their new life situation in open-ended interviews, conducted during the first few months after discharge. The participants were analyzed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. This analysis disclosed an extremely distressing situation related to the individuals' struggle to manage in various dimensions of life. The phenomena were intertwined in a complex way and the critical interpretation involved a transcendence to the existential dimension of life. The situation was metaphorically depicted as "a struggle in the darkness" in a "boundary situation," where the issues ultimately touched on life and death, fate and future, meaning and meaninglessness. The study indicates the significance of existential issues pervading the seemingly concrete struggle to manage life after stroke.

  19. Family and Staff Perspectives on Service Use for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorris, Carly A.; Weiss, Jonathan A.; Cappelletti, Gabriella; Lunsky, Yona

    2013-01-01

    Carers of individuals with an intellectual disability are often responsible for managing their children's psychiatric crises when they arise. The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of families using crisis and short-term transitional supports from the perspectives of families and of crisis and transitional support staff. Three…

  20. Family and Staff Perspectives on Service Use for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorris, Carly A.; Weiss, Jonathan A.; Cappelletti, Gabriella; Lunsky, Yona

    2013-01-01

    Carers of individuals with an intellectual disability are often responsible for managing their children's psychiatric crises when they arise. The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of families using crisis and short-term transitional supports from the perspectives of families and of crisis and transitional support staff. Three…

  1. [Implementation of joint-crisis plans--a study of health care users and professionals].

    PubMed

    Grätz, Juliane; Brieger, Peter

    2012-11-01

    To study effects of the implementation of joint-crisis plans (JCP) on health-care users and professionals. The first 3 years of the implementation of JCP were followed with structured interviews with health-care users and professionals. Legal and administrative complications were documented. 36 of 44 subjects with JCP were assessed. Most of them had learned of JCP through other users or self-help. 55 % had prior experience with compulsory treatment. Better communication and self-determination were main goals of JCP. A relevant change in hospital treatment through JCP was not observed. Only few professionals had made direct experience with JCP. They valued JCP mildly positive. No legal and administrative complications were documented. Only a small minority of users signed JCP. JCP were easily employed and improved communication and self-determination. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. User Perspectives of the Future of the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Trevor

    This paper presents user perspectives on the future of the Internet. The first section discusses understanding users, including the difference between technology service offerings and potential uses, the need for investigation into the relationship between new communications technology and social behavior, and the shift from supply-led development…

  3. How do frequent users of crisis helplines differ from other users regarding their reasons for calling? Results from a survey with callers to Lifeline, Australia's national crisis helpline service.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Aves; Woodward, Alan; Gunn, Jane; Bassilios, Bridget; Pirkis, Jane

    2017-05-01

    Crisis helplines are designed to provide short-term support to people in an immediate crisis. However, there is a group of users who call crisis helplines frequently over an extended period of time. The reasons for their ongoing use remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in the reasons for calling between frequent and other users of crisis helplines. This was achieved by examining the findings from a brief survey completed by callers to Lifeline Australia at the end of their call between February and July 2015. In the survey, callers reported on their socio-demographics, reasons for their current call and number of calls made in the past month. Survey respondents were categorised as frequent, episodic and one-off users, and analyses were conducted using ordered logistic regression. Three hundred and fifteen callers completed the survey, which represented 57% of eligible callers. Twenty-two per cent reported calling 20 times or more in the past month (frequent users), 51% reported calling between 2 and 19 times (episodic users) and 25% reported calling once (one-off users). Two per cent were unable to recall the number of calls they made in the past month. Frequent users reported similar reasons for calling as other users but they were more likely to call regularly to talk about their feelings [OR = 6.0; 95% CI: 3.7-9.8]. This pattern of service use is at odds with the current model of care offered by crisis helplines which is designed to provide one-off support. There is a need to investigate further the factors that drive frequent users to call crisis helplines regularly. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Appreciating the user's perspective: listening to the "methadonians".

    PubMed

    Montagne, Michael

    2002-03-01

    Researchers have long neglected the user's perspective and experiences in assessing drug effects and drug use. With increased interest in Canada directed at prescribing heroin in place of methadone, researchers took the relatively unique approach of gathering data and information from methadone users to determine their views and experiences with methadone programs and alternative treatment choices. The results of that research portrayed very interesting and useful notions of users regarding methadone maintenance and the prescribing of heroin.

  5. WHAT ARE USER PERSPECTIVES OF EXOSKELETON TECHNOLOGY? A LITERATURE REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Hill, Deborah; Holloway, Catherine Sarah; Morgado Ramirez, Dafne Zuleima; Smitham, Peter; Pappas, Yannis

    2017-01-01

    Exoskeletons are electromechanical devices that are worn by a human operator to increase their physical performance. Several exoskeletons have been developed to restore functional movements, such as walking, for those with paralysis due to neurological impairment. However, existing exoskeletons have limitations with respect to affordability, size, weight, speed, and efficiency, which may reduce their functional application. Therefore, the aim of this scoping review is to collect and narratively synthesize the perspectives of users of exoskeleton technology. A systematic literature search was conducted across several healthcare related online databases. A total of 4,619 articles were identified, of which 51 were selected for full review. Only three studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. Of these, one showed an incongruence between users' expectations and experiences of device use; another reported perspectives on potential rather than actual device use, ranking design features in order of perceived importance; and the other reported ratings of ease of device use in training. The heterogeneity of studies included within this review, leave the authors unable to suggest consensus as to user perspectives of exoskeleton technology. However, it is apparent that users are able to suggest priorities for exoskeleton design and that users' perspectives of exoskeleton technology might change in response to experience of use. The authors, therefore, suggest that exoskeleton design should be an iterative process, whereby user perspectives are sought, incorporated and refined by tangible experience, to ensure that devices developed are acceptable to and usable by the populations they seek to re-enable.

  6. CRISIS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinnell, Richard M.; Kyte, Nancy S.

    1977-01-01

    Examines some different ways that a client's crisis affects the social worker who is attempting to help him resolve his crisis, the agency or facility within which the worker operates, and the community in which all three function. (Author/RK)

  7. Industrial Wireless Sensor Standards; A User Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Sorge, John N; Taft, Cyrus W.; Manges, Wayne W

    2011-01-01

    Future industrial use of wireless instrumentation will undoubtedly increase dramatically in the coming years. Deployment of such instrumentation in an industrial setting with its security and robustness criteria that are much more stringent than residential performance criteria hinges on user acceptance of verified performance as well as meeting cost requirements. Today, circa 2011, these industrial users are faced with many choices when specifying a wireless sensor network, including radio performance, battery life, interoperability concerns, and standards compliance. With industrial users standing on the precipice to order and deploy (literally) millions of wireless instruments, it is imperative that accurate information for applying the technology to real-world applications be available to the end-user.

  8. Crisis communication: an inequalities perspective on the 2010 Boston water crisis.

    PubMed

    Galarce, Ezequiel M; Viswanath, K

    2012-12-01

    Although the field of crisis risk communication has generated substantial research, the interaction between social determinants, communication processes, and behavioral compliance has been less well studied. With the goal of better understanding these interactions, this report examines how social determinants influenced communications and behavioral compliance during the 2010 Boston, Massachusetts, water crisis. An online survey was conducted to assess Boston residents' knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, mass and interpersonal communication, and preventive behaviors on emergency preparedness topics dealing with the water crisis. Of a total sample of 726 respondents, approximately one-third (n = 267) reported having been affected by the water crisis. Only data from affected participants were analyzed. Following an order to boil water, 87.5% of respondents refrained from drinking unboiled tap water. These behaviors and other cognitive and attitudinal factors, however, were not uniform across population subgroups. All communication and behavioral compliance variables varied across sociodemographic factors. Crisis communication, in conjunction with other public health preparedness fields, is central to reducing the negative impact of sudden hazards. Emergency scenarios such as the Boston water crisis serve as unique opportunities to understand how effectively crisis messages are conveyed to and received by different segments of the population.

  9. A User's Perspective on Augmentative Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Lewis, Marsha R.; Ford, Alison

    1987-01-01

    In extensive interviews, an augmentative communication user with cerebral palsy (age 25) reflected on the effectiveness of devices designed for her during her school career. Among emergent themes were a disproportionate emphasis on "device usage" over "speech usage," allowing professionals to dominate the decision-making…

  10. Users' Information Behaviour--A Gender Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinerová, Jela; Šušol, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The paper is based on the study of library users in Slovakia as part of a larger research project on the use of information. Method: A large-scale questionnaire survey was conducted in 2002 in sixteen academic and research libraries with 793 subjects, especially students and educators. Analysis: The data were analysed with the use of…

  11. Advanced Neutron Source: The users' perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Peretz, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    User experiments will cover fields such as activation analysis of pollutants, irradiation of materials for the fusion program, and neutron scattering studies of materials as diverse as viruses, aerospace composites, and superconductors. Production capabilities must also be provided for the production of isotopes, especially of transuranic elements. The different ways in which these research areas and their required infrastructure influence the design of the Advanced Neutron Source will be the subject of this paper.

  12. Whose crisis is it? A relational psychoanalytic perspective.

    PubMed

    Yerushalmi, Hanoch

    2010-01-01

    Life crises are severe psychological states that may elicit either growth and positive change or harm and limited development in those experiencing them. This article examines various intersubjective elements of crisis states in light of some of the significant theoretical and clinical developments in psychoanalytic thinking. Amongst these is the mutual influence believed to exist between those experiencing a crisis and those in close relational surroundings. It is proposed herein that some of the actions and reactions of those experiencing a crisis are, in fact, enactments expressing the wishes, fantasies, and needs of others around them. An appropriate interpretation of these enactments can relieve the anxiety accompanying the sense of loneliness, strangeness, and exceptionality that so often characterize crisis states.

  13. Optical lens specifications from the user's perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Progler, Christopher J.; Wheeler, Donald C.

    1998-06-01

    We develop three main topics in support of further understanding and specifying wavefront aberrations from the lithographer's point of view. The concept of the Magnitude Weighted Aberration is introduced providing a convenient and rapid numerical method for assessing the interaction of wavefront aberrations with reticle pattern and illumination mode. This analysis suggests that the advanced lithographic lens user will require unprecedented correction on the total wavefront aberration to realize the full potential of the imaging system in high yielding integrated circuit fabrication. Specific details on the required aberration control are provided with a Monte Carlo tolerancing analysis of the RMS wavefront error using lithographic CD control and pattern placement as quality metrics. Patten placement proves to be as sensitive to wavefront aberrations as CD control forcing a tight specification on the asymmetric aberration components even when a large focus and exposure latitude is available. Based on the wavefront specifications generated it is imperative that the lithographic lens user be able to independently de-couple and quantify the state of certain aberration coefficients. Toward this goal, we demonstrate an aberration reverse engineering procedure using experimental pattern placement error as the input response.

  14. Synthetic environment employing a craft for providing user perspective reference

    DOEpatents

    Maples, Creve; Peterson, Craig A.

    1997-10-21

    A multi-dimensional user oriented synthetic environment system allows application programs to be programmed and accessed with input/output device independent, generic functional commands which are a distillation of the actual functions performed by any application program. A shared memory structure allows the translation of device specific commands to device independent, generic functional commands. Complete flexibility of the mapping of synthetic environment data to the user is thereby allowed. Accordingly, synthetic environment data may be provided to the user on parallel user information processing channels allowing the subcognitive mind to act as a filter, eliminating irrelevant information and allowing the processing of increase amounts of data by the user. The user is further provided with a craft surrounding the user within the synthetic environment, which craft, imparts important visual referential an motion parallax cues, enabling the user to better appreciate distances and directions within the synthetic environment. Display of this craft in close proximity to the user's point of perspective may be accomplished without substantially degrading the image resolution of the displayed portions of the synthetic environment.

  15. Getting the Crisis Right: Missing Perspectives on Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamal, Vali

    1988-01-01

    Considers major characteristics of African countries that influence the African crisis. Distinguishes between export crops and food crops and divides food crops into subsistence and sales components. States that three crises afflict Africa: (1) food production, (2) urban supply, and (3) external imbalances and foreign debt. Reflects on the role of…

  16. The global food crisis: an Australian dairy industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Greg

    2009-01-01

    This paper seeks to shed further light on the factors contributing to the emerging global food crisis by examining the reasons for an unusual downturn in dairy food production in Australia, from where 11% of the world trade in dairy foods originates.

  17. Perspectives from Fragile Crescent: A South Asia Crisis Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-24

    World War II. Instability in Afghanistan and Pakistan has propelled South Asia to the top of a U.S. national security agenda already crowded with a...a South Asia crisis simulation exercise. The exercise posed a number of hypothetical scenarios intend- ed to stimulate thinking about current and...future challenges in South Asia . The Institute for National Strategic Studies (INSS) Center for Applied Strategic Learning at NDU devel- oped the

  18. Power wheelchair driving challenges in the community: a users' perspective.

    PubMed

    Torkia, Caryne; Reid, Denise; Korner-Bitensky, Nicol; Kairy, Dahlia; Rushton, Paula W; Demers, Louise; Archambault, Philippe S

    2015-05-01

    There is limited information on the difficulties individuals experience in manoeuvring their power wheelchairs during daily activities. The aim of this study was to describe the nature and context of power wheelchair driving challenges from the perspective of the user. A qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with power wheelchair users. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify themes. Twelve experienced power wheelchair users were interviewed. Findings revealed that power wheelchair driving difficulties were related to the accomplishment of activities of daily living, and the influence of environmental context. Four key themes emerged: (1) difficulties accessing and using public buildings-facilities, (2) outdoor mobility, (3) problems in performing specific wheelchair mobility tasks/manoeuvres and (4) barriers and circumstances that are temporary, unforeseen or specific to a particular context. This qualitative study furthers our understanding of the driving difficulties powered wheelchair (PW) users experience during daily activities. This knowledge will assist clinicians and researchers in two areas: in choosing assessment measures that are ecologically valid for power wheelchair users; and, in identifying and refining the content of training programs specific to the use of power wheelchairs. A better understanding of the everyday challenges individuals experience in driving their power wheelchair will assist clinicians and researchers in: Choosing assessment measures and identifying training programs for this population. Refining the content of power wheelchair training programs.

  19. Automotive HMI design and participatory user involvement: review and perspectives.

    PubMed

    François, Mathilde; Osiurak, François; Fort, Alexandra; Crave, Philippe; Navarro, Jordan

    2017-04-01

    Automotive human-machine interface (HMI) design is facing new challenges due to the technological advances of the last decades. The design process has to be adapted in order to address human factors and road safety challenges. It is now widely accepted that user involvement in the HMI design process is valuable. However, the current form of user involvement in industry remains at the stages of concept assessment and usability tests. Moreover, the literature in other fields (e.g. information systems) promotes a broader user involvement with participatory design (i.e. the user is fully involved in the development process). This article reviews the established benefits of participatory design and reveals perspectives for automotive HMI quality improvement in a cognitive ergonomic framework. Practitioner Summary: Automotive HMI quality determines, in part, drivers' ability to perform primary driving tasks while using in-vehicle devices. User involvement in the design process is a key point to contribute to HMI quality. This article reports the potential benefits of a broad involvement from drivers to meet automotive HMI design challenges.

  20. Perspectives on distributed computing : thirty people, four user types, and the distributed computing user experience.

    SciTech Connect

    Childers, L.; Liming, L.; Foster, I.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago

    2008-10-15

    This report summarizes the methodology and results of a user perspectives study conducted by the Community Driven Improvement of Globus Software (CDIGS) project. The purpose of the study was to document the work-related goals and challenges facing today's scientific technology users, to record their perspectives on Globus software and the distributed-computing ecosystem, and to provide recommendations to the Globus community based on the observations. Globus is a set of open source software components intended to provide a framework for collaborative computational science activities. Rather than attempting to characterize all users or potential users of Globus software, our strategy has been to speak in detail with a small group of individuals in the scientific community whose work appears to be the kind that could benefit from Globus software, learn as much as possible about their work goals and the challenges they face, and describe what we found. The result is a set of statements about specific individuals experiences. We do not claim that these are representative of a potential user community, but we do claim to have found commonalities and differences among the interviewees that may be reflected in the user community as a whole. We present these as a series of hypotheses that can be tested by subsequent studies, and we offer recommendations to Globus developers based on the assumption that these hypotheses are representative. Specifically, we conducted interviews with thirty technology users in the scientific community. We included both people who have used Globus software and those who have not. We made a point of including individuals who represent a variety of roles in scientific projects, for example, scientists, software developers, engineers, and infrastructure providers. The following material is included in this report: (1) A summary of the reported work-related goals, significant issues, and points of satisfaction with the use of Globus software; (2

  1. Cuban missile crisis of October 1962: Comparative perspectives of the United States and the Soviet Union. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miro, R.

    1993-04-02

    This study provides comparative perspectives of the October 1962 Cuban missile crisis. The purpose is to present briefly the alternative perceptions of the United States and the Soviet Union during the crisis, comparing these perceptions with each other and with current appraisals of the actual course of events. The major events of the crisis are summarized in chronological order, with the perspectives of the United States and the Soviet Union summarized separately. A current appraisal of the actual course of events, based on the most recent available declassified primary and secondary literature, is also provided.

  2. The User Perspective in Performance Auditing--A Case Study of Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Arnfrid; Rydland, Lars Tore; Amundsen, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    The user perspective is an important contextual factor for Supreme Audit Institutions (SAIs). This article provides examples from performance audits in Norway and explores why the user perspective has become important in performance audit practices. It shows that user satisfaction can be employed as a key performance indicator of effectiveness of…

  3. The User Perspective in Performance Auditing--A Case Study of Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Arnfrid; Rydland, Lars Tore; Amundsen, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    The user perspective is an important contextual factor for Supreme Audit Institutions (SAIs). This article provides examples from performance audits in Norway and explores why the user perspective has become important in performance audit practices. It shows that user satisfaction can be employed as a key performance indicator of effectiveness of…

  4. Continuity of care from the perspective of users.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Felismina Rosa P; Gemito, Maria Laurência G Parreirinha; Caldeira, Ermelinda do Carmo; Serra, Isaura da Conceição; Casas-Novas, Maria Vitória

    2017-03-01

    Continuity of care, in addition to ensuring improvement of the quality of care, contributes to the reduction of health costs. The objective of this study was to analyse the continuity of care in health units in the municipality of Évora (south of Portugal), from the perspective of users. This is across-sectional, exploratory and descriptive study with a quantitative approach, with a sample consisting of 342 users of health units. The instrument was a questionnaire adapted from English and Spanish studies. The results show that elements of continuity were identified in the different dimensions of the continuity of care - relational, management, information and some items of flexible continuity. Longitudinal continuity has the lowest values in nursing care. In conclusion, what stands out positively, and in its different dimensions, is relational continuity, in which most users recommend their family doctor and nurse to family and friends, and flexible continuity, which translates into reduced waiting times to be attended by a doctor or nurse and access to care. What stands out negatively is the weak involvement of the user in care by health professionals, in the dimensions of relational continuity.

  5. The Relationship between Therapeutic Alliance and Service User Satisfaction in Mental Health Inpatient Wards and Crisis House Alternatives: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Angela; Fahmy, Sarah; Nolan, Fiona; Morant, Nicola; Fox, Zoe; Lloyd-Evans, Brynmor; Osborn, David; Burgess, Emma; Gilburt, Helen; McCabe, Rosemarie; Slade, Mike; Johnson, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor service user experiences are often reported on mental health inpatient wards. Crisis houses are an alternative, but evidence is limited. This paper investigates therapeutic alliances in acute wards and crisis houses, exploring how far stronger therapeutic alliance may underlie greater client satisfaction in crisis houses. Methods and Findings Mixed methods were used. In the quantitative component, 108 crisis house and 247 acute ward service users responded to measures of satisfaction, therapeutic relationships, informal peer support, recovery and negative events experienced during the admission. Linear regressions were conducted to estimate the association between service setting and measures, and to model the factors associated with satisfaction. Qualitative interviews exploring therapeutic alliances were conducted with service users and staff in each setting and analysed thematically. Results We found that therapeutic alliances, service user satisfaction and informal peer support were greater in crisis houses than on acute wards, whilst self-rated recovery and numbers of negative events were lower. Adjusted multivariable analyses suggest that therapeutic relationships, informal peer support and negative experiences related to staff may be important factors in accounting for greater satisfaction in crisis houses. Qualitative results suggest factors that influence therapeutic alliances include service user perceptions of basic human qualities such as kindness and empathy in staff and, at service level, the extent of loss of liberty and autonomy. Conclusions and Implications We found that service users experience better therapeutic relationships and higher satisfaction in crisis houses compared to acute wards, although we cannot exclude the possibility that differences in service user characteristics contribute to this. This finding provides some support for the expansion of crisis house provision. Further research is needed to investigate why acute

  6. The relationship between therapeutic alliance and service user satisfaction in mental health inpatient wards and crisis house alternatives: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Angela; Fahmy, Sarah; Nolan, Fiona; Morant, Nicola; Fox, Zoe; Lloyd-Evans, Brynmor; Osborn, David; Burgess, Emma; Gilburt, Helen; McCabe, Rosemarie; Slade, Mike; Johnson, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Poor service user experiences are often reported on mental health inpatient wards. Crisis houses are an alternative, but evidence is limited. This paper investigates therapeutic alliances in acute wards and crisis houses, exploring how far stronger therapeutic alliance may underlie greater client satisfaction in crisis houses. Mixed methods were used. In the quantitative component, 108 crisis house and 247 acute ward service users responded to measures of satisfaction, therapeutic relationships, informal peer support, recovery and negative events experienced during the admission. Linear regressions were conducted to estimate the association between service setting and measures, and to model the factors associated with satisfaction. Qualitative interviews exploring therapeutic alliances were conducted with service users and staff in each setting and analysed thematically. We found that therapeutic alliances, service user satisfaction and informal peer support were greater in crisis houses than on acute wards, whilst self-rated recovery and numbers of negative events were lower. Adjusted multivariable analyses suggest that therapeutic relationships, informal peer support and negative experiences related to staff may be important factors in accounting for greater satisfaction in crisis houses. Qualitative results suggest factors that influence therapeutic alliances include service user perceptions of basic human qualities such as kindness and empathy in staff and, at service level, the extent of loss of liberty and autonomy. We found that service users experience better therapeutic relationships and higher satisfaction in crisis houses compared to acute wards, although we cannot exclude the possibility that differences in service user characteristics contribute to this. This finding provides some support for the expansion of crisis house provision. Further research is needed to investigate why acute ward service users experience a lack of compassion and humanity from

  7. Roles of publishers, subscription agents, and institutional subscribers in the academic journal business : Opinions after reading the “Series: Perspectives on serials crisis and scholarly communication practice”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Nobuyuki

    Roles of publishers, subscription agents, and institutional subscribers in the academic journal business : Opinions after reading the “Series: Perspectives on serials crisis and scholarly communication practice”

  8. Climate change and managing water crisis: Pakistan's perspective.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mumtaz; Mumtaz, Saniea

    2014-01-01

    scarcity. To minimize adverse impacts of climate change on the water crisis in Pakistan, the preparation of integrated national, provincial, and local level master plans encompassing technical, social, environmental, administrative, and financial considerations is necessary. It is imperative to implement two simultaneous approaches of adaptation (living with climate change) and mitigation (addressing negativities of climate change). Salient features are integrated management of watersheds/catchments/water bodies, optimum exploitation of present sources, development of new sources, water conservation, adequate drainage, efficient design of water storage, conveyance, distribution and supply systems, utilization of waste water, and regulation of water quality.

  9. Older users' perspectives on the benefits of preventive home visits.

    PubMed

    Tøien, Mette; Bjørk, Ida Torunn; Fagerström, Lisbeth

    2015-05-01

    In this article we explore older people's perspectives on the benefits of preventive home visits (PHVs), after long-term follow-up. PHVs are health services intended to promote older people's health and independence, prevent disease, and postpone functional decline. We applied an explorative and descriptive design and analyzed qualitative research interviews of 10 PHV users who had received multiple visits for at least 6 years. We sought manifest and latent content in our analysis. The participants reported benefits falling within four main categories: to feel safe, to manage everyday life, to live well, and to be somebody. Two latent themes emerged: living with an underlying, realistic concern about an uncertain future, and striving to maintain oneself as a person. The perceived benefits of PHVs differed significantly from the outcome measures commonly used in randomized, controlled trials. PHV interventions should have a longitudinal approach and support each person's current needs and valued goals.

  10. PERSPECTIVE: Consideration of user priorities when developing neural prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Kim D.

    2009-10-01

    For too long there has been separation of basic science, biomedical engineering, clinical science and the people these disciplines are serving. A key ingredient to understanding the real-life consequences of many neurologic disorders that produce physical disabilities, such as spinal cord injury, is to obtain valuable information from the individuals that are actually living with the disorders everyday. This information can be obtained in an objective and usable format, which can then be used to direct biomedical research in a manner that is meaningful to the intended beneficiaries. In particular, the field of neural prosthetics for spinal cord injury can make great strides if user input is obtained throughout the stages of development. Presented here is the perspective of a scientist who also has 20 years of experience living with a cervical spinal cord injury.

  11. Adoption of Library 2.0 Functionalities by Academic Libraries and Users: A Knowledge Management Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yong-Mi; Abbas, June

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the adoption of Library 2.0 functionalities by academic libraries and users through a knowledge management perspective. Based on randomly selected 230 academic library Web sites and 184 users, the authors found RSS and blogs are widely adopted by academic libraries while users widely utilized the bookmark function.…

  12. Adoption of Library 2.0 Functionalities by Academic Libraries and Users: A Knowledge Management Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yong-Mi; Abbas, June

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the adoption of Library 2.0 functionalities by academic libraries and users through a knowledge management perspective. Based on randomly selected 230 academic library Web sites and 184 users, the authors found RSS and blogs are widely adopted by academic libraries while users widely utilized the bookmark function.…

  13. Designing visual displays and system models for safe reactor operations based on the user`s perspective of the system

    SciTech Connect

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    Most designers are not schooled in the area of human-interaction psychology and therefore tend to rely on the traditional ergonomic aspects of human factors when designing complex human-interactive workstations related to reactor operations. They do not take into account the differences in user information processing behavior and how these behaviors may affect individual and team performance when accessing visual displays or utilizing system models in process and control room areas. Unfortunately, by ignoring the importance of the integration of the user interface at the information process level, the result can be sub-optimization and inherently error- and failure-prone systems. Therefore, to minimize or eliminate failures in human-interactive systems, it is essential that the designers understand how each user`s processing characteristics affects how the user gathers information, and how the user communicates the information to the designer and other users. A different type of approach in achieving this understanding is Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP). The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving the design of visual displays, NLP, and the user`s perspective model of a reactor system. The studies involve the methodology known as NLP, and its use in expanding design choices from the user`s ``model of the world,`` in the areas of virtual reality, workstation design, team structure, decision and learning style patterns, safety operations, pattern recognition, and much, much more.

  14. Changes in access to health care for immigrants in Catalonia during the economic crisis: Opinions of health professionals and immigrant users.

    PubMed

    Porthé, Victoria; Vargas, Ingrid; Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Plaza-Espuña, Isabel; Bosch, Lola; Vázquez, Maria Luisa

    2016-11-01

    Policy measures introduced in Spain during the economic crisis included a reduction in public health expenditure and in healthcare entitlements (RDL16/2012), which affected the general population as a whole, but especially immigrants. This paper analyzes changes in immigrants' access to health care during the economic crisis from the perspective of health professionals (medical and administrative) and immigrants. A qualitative descriptive-interpretative study was conducted in Catalonia through individual interviews with a theoretical sample of health professionals (n=34) and immigrant users (n=20). Thematic analysis was conducted and data quality was ensured through triangulation. Informants described barriers to enter the health system related to reduced healthcare entitlements and a stricter enforcement of administrative requirements: while medical professionals highlighted restrictions to accessing the healthcare continuum, immigrants accentuated barriers to obtaining the individual health card. With regard to use of services, an increase in waiting times due to cutbacks in human resources dominated the informants' discourse. Health professionals pointed out organizational changes to increase efficiency that may improve access to primary care. Informants related lower health services utilization to a deterioration in immigrants' living and working conditions. According to health professionals, these conditions limited the use of services during working hours and led to delays in seeking care and treatment interruptions. Results show an aggravation of pre-existing barriers to health services utilization and, simultaneously, the appearance of new barriers to enter the system. These changes in the healthcare services contradict the equity principles of the national health system (NHS), thus policy decisions are needed to address this problem.

  15. IDA/BPT crisis relocation planning model: description, documentation and user's guide to the computer program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pearsall, E.S.; Bushnell, R.C.

    1982-12-22

    This report describes work performed by Bushnell, Pearsall and Trozzo, Inc., under subcontract with the Institute for Defense Analyses on Task A-1 of IDA Contract No. EMW-0749 with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Task A-1 calls for the development of a model to simulate population movement during an evacuation from the risk area to the various host areas over a transportation network. This report describes, documents and provides a user's guide to a system of computer routines which perform the various computations required to apply a crisis relocation model developed jointly by IDA and BPT, Inc. The computer routines together comprise an interactive system resident on the FEMA Univac 1108 facility. The model and its attached national data base can be used to analyze in detail the evacuation.

  16. Mental health policy and mental health service user perspectives on involvement: a discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Ada; Stickley, Theodore

    2007-08-01

    This paper is a report of an exploration of the concept of service user involvement in mental health nursing using a discourse analysis approach. Service user involvement has come to be expected in mental health nursing policy and practice. This concept, however, is often applied somewhat ambiguously and some writers call for a clearer understanding of what service users actually want. A Foucauldian discourse analysis was conducted in 2005, examining literature and health policies published by the United Kingdom government and service users. The discursive perspectives of both were explored and conceptual themes were generated from the data. Concepts occurring within government discourse include language relating to service users, the notion of service user involvement and power. Concepts from the service user discourse include power, change and control, theory, policy and practice, and experiential expertise. Differences in perspectives were found within these themes which distinguished government from service user discourses. Greater flexibility in ideas and perspectives was demonstrated by service users, with a seemingly greater range of theoretical underpinnings. Greater awareness is needed of the significance of language, of how subtle inferences may be drawn from the rhetorical language of policies, of how these might affect the involvement of service users, and of the implications for the role of mental health nurses. Nurses need to be aware of these tensions and conflicts in managing their practice and in creating a mental health nursing philosophy of 'involvement'. If true 'involvement' is to ensue, nurses may also need to consider the transfer of power to service users.

  17. Developing medical device technologies from users' perspectives: a theoretical framework for involving users in the development process.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Ghulam Sarwar; Robinson, Ian; AlShawi, Sarmad

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to suggest an acceptable and generic theoretical framework for involving various types of users in the medical device technology (MDT) development process (MDTDP). The authors propose a theoretical framework suggesting different routes, methods and stages through which various types of medical device users can be involved in the MDTDP. The suggested framework comprises two streams of users' involvement in MDT development, that is, what might be called the end users' stream and the professional users' stream for involving these two groups respectively in the process of developing both simple and more complex and innovative medical devices from conceptualization through to the market deployment. This framework suggests various methods that can be used for users' involvement at different stages of the MDT lifecycle. To illustrate the application of the framework, several MDT development scenarios and device exemplars are presented. Development of medical devices from users' perspectives requires not only the involvement of healthcare professionals but also that of the ultimate end users, that is, patients, people with disabilities and/or special needs, and their caregivers. The evidence shows that such end users quickly discard devices that do not fulfill their personal expectations, even though both manufacturers and healthcare professionals may consider those end users' requirements met. Developers and manufacturers need to recognize this potent potential discrepancy between the parties involved, and involve end users and professional healthcare staff directly in the MDTDP. The framework, the authors contend, is a step forward in helping medical device manufacturers plan and make decisions about users' involvement at different stages of the MDTDP.

  18. The private-practice perspective of the manpower crisis in radiology: greener pastures?

    PubMed

    Swayne, Lawrence C

    2004-11-01

    Rising consumer expectations and a rapidly aging population point to a long-term shortage of all physicians, including radiologists. While attention has been drawn to the escalating manpower crisis in academic radiology departments, the private-practice perspective has been generally overlooked. Although clinical workloads and income are higher in private practice, studies have shown higher satisfaction levels (likely because of a greater variety of work) among academic radiologists. As the distinction between community and teaching hospitals has become increasingly blurred, there is now considerable overlap in the skill sets, sources of job satisfaction, and stresses that are encountered in both practice settings. Perhaps more than at any time in the recent past, diagnostic radiologists in academic and private practice share more in common than any perceived differences. Both groups must work together in concert with the ACR to address the growing manpower shortage, as well as the other challenges that confront diagnostic radiology at the beginning of the 21st century.

  19. Seeking fluid possibility and solid ground: space and movement in mental health service users' experiences of 'crisis'.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Laura; Reavey, Paula

    2015-03-01

    Since the closure of the UK asylums, 'the community' has become short hand for describing a variety of disparate and complex spaces, in which service users manage their experiences of distress. An examination of such spaces here forms the basis of an analysis of the way in which service users move through and within space, to establish agency and dis/order while distressed. Seventeen participants, with various experiences of mental distress took part in a qualitative study, and a further textual analysis was conducted on eight published autobiographies. In the context of the interviews, participants presented drawings of the spaces they occupy during times of crisis, wellbeing and recovery. All texts were analysed using a thematic approach, informed by theories of embodiment and relational space. In this paper, the focus is directed towards two key patterns of movement, in order to explore ways in which participants experiencing various forms of mental health crisis used space in order to maintain and manage feelings of agency. Firstly, incidents where participants described moving towards fluid, outside spaces are explored, with agency being established through seeking, and utilising, greater possibilities for action and engaging others. In addition, the opposite pattern of movement is also explored, using incidents where participants described moving indoors, using the private space of the home to establish order and restore feelings of agency and strength, in contrast to overwhelming experiences in public space. Connections between these patterns of movement and particular forms of distress are discussed. It is argued that community and private spaces are integral to the ways in which selfhood, agency and action is experienced in mental distress, which in turn has implications for policy, treatment and community action. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. User-Centered Perspective of Information Retrieval Research and Analysis Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugar, William

    1995-01-01

    Reviews information retrieval (IR) studies since 1986 from the user's perspective. Identifies two main approaches that advocate user-centered design theory: (1) the cognitive approach; and (2) the holistic approach. Also explores other approaches--systems thinking/action research and usability techniques that may have potential for IR research and…

  1. Pitfalls of Personal Development Plans--The User Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grohnert, Therese; Beausaert, Simon; Segers, Mien

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate which pitfalls users of personal development plans (PDPs) perceive in business and governmental organisations with mandatory PDP use. Hundred and thirty-one written statements of PDP users across three Dutch organisations were analysed and categorised into nine pitfalls. Next to an overall lack of use and…

  2. Pitfalls of Personal Development Plans--The User Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grohnert, Therese; Beausaert, Simon; Segers, Mien

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate which pitfalls users of personal development plans (PDPs) perceive in business and governmental organisations with mandatory PDP use. Hundred and thirty-one written statements of PDP users across three Dutch organisations were analysed and categorised into nine pitfalls. Next to an overall lack of use and…

  3. Crisis Preparedness in Schools: Evaluating Staff Perspectives and Providing Recommendations for Best Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olinger Steeves, Rachel M.; Metallo, Sarah A.; Byrd, Shelby M.; Erickson, Megan R.; Gresham, Frank M.

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigated the content of school crisis plans and perceptions of crisis preparedness among school staff in six public elementary schools. Surveys were administered to 72 teachers, administrators, and other school staff members measuring their perceptions of crisis preparedness and performance of activities related to crisis…

  4. The Global Land-Gover Gharacteristics Database: The users' perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Jesslyn F.; Loveland, Thomas R.; Ohlen, Donald O.; Zhu, Zhi-Liang

    1999-01-01

    A unique global land-cover characteristics database developed by the U.S. Geological Survey has been available to users since mid-1997. Access to the data is through the internet under the EROS (Earth Resources Observation Systems) Data Center's home page (http://edcwww.cr.usgs.gov/landdaac/glcc/glcc.html). Since the release of the database, the data have been incorporated into various environmental research and modeling applications, including mapping global biodiversity, mesoscale climate simulations, carbon cycle modeling, and estimating habitat destruction. Since the early stages of the project, user feedback has provided a means to understand data utility in applications, garner suggestions for data improvements, and gain insights into the technical challenges faced by users. Synthesis of user feedback provided a means to generate a user profile and derive a list of applications-critical criteria for land-cover data. User suggestions have lead to revisions in the database, including label changes, alternative classification schemes, and additional projections for the data.

  5. A bus stop shelter evaluated from the user's perspective.

    PubMed

    Ely, Vera Helena Moro Bins; de Oliveira, Jonara Machado; Logsdon, Louise

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the current bus stop shelter model used in Florianópolis, Brazil, through a functional analysis--focused in the relationship between the shelter, the users and their activities--and also to analyse users' perceptions. The methodology consisted of exploratory visits, anthropometric analysis, observation and interviews. The exploratory visit intended to survey the physical characteristics of the shelter (dimensions, materials, colors, displayed information) and its position on the sidewalk. The anthropometric analysis was made to verify whether the dimensions of the shelters were adequate to users' needs. The observation provided data for the analysis of users' behavior, which involved a biomechanical study of their postures, an ownership/occupancy analysis in terms of territoriality and studies about spatial requirements of interpersonal relations (proxemics). The interviews helped to analyze how the user perceives the quality of some of the main functions of the shelter: to provide physical and psychological comfort and to display information about the public transportation system. As a result, the overall conclusion is that shelters do not meet users' needs. Recommendations are provided in order to improve physical and psychological comfort and to display relevant information about the transportation system.

  6. Has the quality of health care for the immigrant population changed during the economic crisis in Catalonia (Spain)? Opinions of health professionals and immigrant users.

    PubMed

    Porthé, Victoria; Vargas, Ingrid; Ronda, Elena; Malmusi, Davide; Bosch, Lola; Vázquez, M Luisa

    2017-06-02

    To analyse changes in health professionals' and immigrant users' perceptions of the quality of care provided to the immigrant population during the crisis. A qualitative descriptive-interpretative and exploratory study was conducted in two areas of Catalonia. Semi-structured individual interviews were used with a theoretical sample of medical (n=24) and administrative (n=10) professionals in primary care (PC) and secondary care (SC), and immigrant users (n=20). Thematic analysis was conducted and the results were triangulated. Problems related to technical and interpersonal quality emerged from the discourse of both professionals and immigrants. These problems were attributed to cutbacks during the economic crisis. Regarding technical quality, respondents reported an increase in erroneous or non-specific diagnoses, inappropriate use of diagnostic tests and non-specific treatments, due to reduction in consultation times as a result of cuts in human resources. With regard to interpersonal quality, professionals reported less empathy, and users also reported worse communication, due to changes in professionals' working conditions and users' attitudes. Finally, a reduction in the resolution capacity of the health services emerged: professionals described unnecessary repeated PC visits and limited responses in SC, while young immigrants reported an insufficient response to their health problems. The results indicate a deterioration in perceived technical and interpersonal quality during the economic crisis, due to cutbacks mainly in human resources. These changes affect the whole population, but especially immigrants. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Crisis on campus: Eating disorder intervention from a developmental-ecological perspective.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Julia V; Gibson, Donna M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review a crisis intervention using the developmental-ecological protocol (Collins and Collins, 2005) with a college student presenting with symptomatology of an active eating disorder. Participants included University Wellness Center employees responding to the crisis. Methods include an informal review of the crisis intervention response and application of the ABCDE developmental-ecological crisis model. Results reported include insight into crisis intervention when university counseling and health center is not available as resources. ABCDE Developmental-ecological model recommendations for university faculty and staff are included.

  8. Charging for nature: marine park fees and management from a user perspective.

    PubMed

    Uyarra, Maria C; Gill, Jennifer A; Côté, Isabelle M

    2010-11-01

    User fees can contribute to the financial sustainability of marine protected areas (MPAs), yet they must be acceptable to users. We explore changes in the fee system and management of Bonaire National Marine Park (BNMP) from the perspective of users. Responses from 393 tourists indicated that 90% were satisfied with park conditions and considered current user fees reasonable. However, only 47% of divers and 40% of non-divers were prepared to pay more. Diver willingness-to-pay (WTP) appears to have decreased since 1991, but this difference could be due in part to methodological differences between studies. Although current fees are close to diver maximum stated WTP, revenues could potentially be increased by improving the current fee system in ways that users deem acceptable. This potential surplus highlights the value of understanding user perceptions toward MPA fees and management.

  9. The Effectiveness of Commercial Internet Web Sites: A User's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Hudson; Tang, Nelson K. H.

    1998-01-01

    A user survey of 60 company Web sites (electronic commerce, entertainment and leisure, financial and banking services, information services, retailing and travel, and tourism) determined that 30% had facilities for conducting online transactions and only 7% charged for site access. Overall, Web sites were rated high in ease of access, content, and…

  10. Digital Intermediation: An Exploration of User and Intermediary Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwick, Silvia Barcellos

    2003-01-01

    Reports on an exploratory case study of intermediation in a hospital digital library information service. Focuses on intermediation where user-intermediary communications were conducted through an asynchronous text-based digital medium. Contributions of the study are evidenced in a descriptive framework of nine categories of factors perceived as…

  11. Assistive Technology User Group Perspectives of Early Childhood Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parette, Howard P.; Stoner, Julia B.; Watts, Emily H.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing usage of assistive technology (AT) usage in early childhood education settings serving children who are at-risk or who have developmental disabilities, there is a corresponding need for effective professional development experiences such as user groups to develop skills in using AT. Using a collective case study approach, 10…

  12. Social Tagging in a Scholarly Digital Library Environment: Users' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noorhidawati, A.; Hanum, N. Fariza; Zohoorian-Fooladi, N.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports an exploratory study examining how users participate in social tagging activities in a scholarly digital library environment to learn about their motivations, behaviour, and practices. Method: This study was conducted in two phases: a survey to investigate usage and attitudes of social tagging tool, and a…

  13. The Effectiveness of Commercial Internet Web Sites: A User's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Hudson; Tang, Nelson K. H.

    1998-01-01

    A user survey of 60 company Web sites (electronic commerce, entertainment and leisure, financial and banking services, information services, retailing and travel, and tourism) determined that 30% had facilities for conducting online transactions and only 7% charged for site access. Overall, Web sites were rated high in ease of access, content, and…

  14. Indian Institutional Repositories: A Study of User's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawant, Sarika

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aims to investigate the experience, contribution and opinions of users of respective institutional repositories (IRs) developed in India. Design/methodology/approach: The survey method was used. The data collection tool was a web questionnaire, which was created with the help of software provided by surveymonkey.com…

  15. Verbal Memory Impairment in Polydrug Ecstasy Users: A Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kuypers, Kim P. C.; Theunissen, Eef L.; van Wel, Janelle H. P.; de Sousa Fernandes Perna, Elizabeth B.; Linssen, Anke; Sambeth, Anke; Schultz, Benjamin G.; Ramaekers, Johannes G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ecstasy use has been associated with short-term and long-term memory deficits on a standard Word Learning Task (WLT). The clinical relevance of this has been debated and is currently unknown. The present study aimed at evaluating the clinical relevance of verbal memory impairment in Ecstasy users. To that end, clinical memory impairment was defined as decrement in memory performance that exceeded the cut-off value of 1.5 times the standard deviation of the average score in the healthy control sample. The primary question was whether being an Ecstasy user (E-user) was predictive of having clinically deficient memory performance compared to a healthy control group. Methods WLT data were pooled from four experimental MDMA studies that compared memory performance during placebo and MDMA intoxication. Control data were taken from healthy volunteers with no drug use history who completed the WLT as part of a placebo-controlled clinical trial. This resulted in a sample size of 65 E-users and 65 age- and gender-matched healthy drug-naïve controls. All participants were recruited by similar means and were tested at the same testing facilities using identical standard operating procedures. Data were analyzed using linear mixed-effects models, Bayes factor, and logistic regressions. Results Findings were that verbal memory performance of placebo-treated E-users did not differ from that of controls, and there was substantial evidence in favor of the null hypothesis. History of use was not predictive of memory impairment. During MDMA intoxication of E-users, verbal memory was impaired. Conclusion The combination of the acute and long-term findings demonstrates that, while clinically relevant memory impairment is present during intoxication, it is absent during abstinence. This suggests that use of Ecstasy/MDMA does not lead to clinically deficient memory performance in the long term. Additionally, it has to be investigated whether the current findings apply to more

  16. Verbal Memory Impairment in Polydrug Ecstasy Users: A Clinical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Kim P C; Theunissen, Eef L; van Wel, Janelle H P; de Sousa Fernandes Perna, Elizabeth B; Linssen, Anke; Sambeth, Anke; Schultz, Benjamin G; Ramaekers, Johannes G

    2016-01-01

    Ecstasy use has been associated with short-term and long-term memory deficits on a standard Word Learning Task (WLT). The clinical relevance of this has been debated and is currently unknown. The present study aimed at evaluating the clinical relevance of verbal memory impairment in Ecstasy users. To that end, clinical memory impairment was defined as decrement in memory performance that exceeded the cut-off value of 1.5 times the standard deviation of the average score in the healthy control sample. The primary question was whether being an Ecstasy user (E-user) was predictive of having clinically deficient memory performance compared to a healthy control group. WLT data were pooled from four experimental MDMA studies that compared memory performance during placebo and MDMA intoxication. Control data were taken from healthy volunteers with no drug use history who completed the WLT as part of a placebo-controlled clinical trial. This resulted in a sample size of 65 E-users and 65 age- and gender-matched healthy drug-naïve controls. All participants were recruited by similar means and were tested at the same testing facilities using identical standard operating procedures. Data were analyzed using linear mixed-effects models, Bayes factor, and logistic regressions. Findings were that verbal memory performance of placebo-treated E-users did not differ from that of controls, and there was substantial evidence in favor of the null hypothesis. History of use was not predictive of memory impairment. During MDMA intoxication of E-users, verbal memory was impaired. The combination of the acute and long-term findings demonstrates that, while clinically relevant memory impairment is present during intoxication, it is absent during abstinence. This suggests that use of Ecstasy/MDMA does not lead to clinically deficient memory performance in the long term. Additionally, it has to be investigated whether the current findings apply to more complex cognitive measures in diverse

  17. Quality of care in psychosis and bipolar disorder from the service user perspective.

    PubMed

    Skelly, Niamh; Schnittger, Rebecca I; Butterly, Lisa; Frorath, Charlotte; Morgan, Craig; McLoughlin, Declan M; Fearon, Paul

    2013-12-01

    According to the recovery model of mental health care, service development should incorporate the expert knowledge of service users. To date, there has been limited research into conceptualizations of mental health care quality among services users diagnosed with bipolar disorder or psychosis. To investigate service user perspectives on quality of care, we conducted six focus groups (N = 29) with inpatients and outpatients of an independent Irish mental health service. We undertook an inductive thematic analysis of the data. Participants identified proactive staff, meaningful and warm staff-patient interactions, and safety and sociability in the inpatient environment as components of good quality mental health care. Participants also discussed how the implementation of best practice guidelines does not necessarily improve quality of care from the service user perspective. This and similar qualitative research should be used to inform service development and the creation of evaluation instruments compatible with the recovery model.

  18. Bioinformatics meets user-centred design: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Pavelin, Katrina; Cham, Jennifer A; de Matos, Paula; Brooksbank, Cath; Cameron, Graham; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Designers have a saying that "the joy of an early release lasts but a short time. The bitterness of an unusable system lasts for years." It is indeed disappointing to discover that your data resources are not being used to their full potential. Not only have you invested your time, effort, and research grant on the project, but you may face costly redesigns if you want to improve the system later. This scenario would be less likely if the product was designed to provide users with exactly what they need, so that it is fit for purpose before its launch. We work at EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), and we consult extensively with life science researchers to find out what they need from biological data resources. We have found that although users believe that the bioinformatics community is providing accurate and valuable data, they often find the interfaces to these resources tricky to use and navigate. We believe that if you can find out what your users want even before you create the first mock-up of a system, the final product will provide a better user experience. This would encourage more people to use the resource and they would have greater access to the data, which could ultimately lead to more scientific discoveries. In this paper, we explore the need for a user-centred design (UCD) strategy when designing bioinformatics resources and illustrate this with examples from our work at EMBL-EBI. Our aim is to introduce the reader to how selected UCD techniques may be successfully applied to software design for bioinformatics.

  19. Bioinformatics Meets User-Centred Design: A Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Pavelin, Katrina; Cham, Jennifer A.; de Matos, Paula; Brooksbank, Cath; Cameron, Graham; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Designers have a saying that “the joy of an early release lasts but a short time. The bitterness of an unusable system lasts for years.” It is indeed disappointing to discover that your data resources are not being used to their full potential. Not only have you invested your time, effort, and research grant on the project, but you may face costly redesigns if you want to improve the system later. This scenario would be less likely if the product was designed to provide users with exactly what they need, so that it is fit for purpose before its launch. We work at EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), and we consult extensively with life science researchers to find out what they need from biological data resources. We have found that although users believe that the bioinformatics community is providing accurate and valuable data, they often find the interfaces to these resources tricky to use and navigate. We believe that if you can find out what your users want even before you create the first mock-up of a system, the final product will provide a better user experience. This would encourage more people to use the resource and they would have greater access to the data, which could ultimately lead to more scientific discoveries. In this paper, we explore the need for a user-centred design (UCD) strategy when designing bioinformatics resources and illustrate this with examples from our work at EMBL-EBI. Our aim is to introduce the reader to how selected UCD techniques may be successfully applied to software design for bioinformatics. PMID:22807660

  20. User-Perspective AR Magic Lens from Gradient-Based IBR and Semi-Dense Stereo.

    PubMed

    Baricevic, Domagoj; Hollerer, Tobias; Sen, Pradeep; Turk, Matthew

    2017-07-01

    We present a new approach to rendering a geometrically-correct user-perspective view for a magic lens interface, based on leveraging the gradients in the real world scene. Our approach couples a recent gradient-domain image-based rendering method with a novel semi-dense stereo matching algorithm. Our stereo algorithm borrows ideas from PatchMatch, and adapts them to semi-dense stereo. This approach is implemented in a prototype device build from off-the-shelf hardware, with no active depth sensing. Despite the limited depth data, we achieve high-quality rendering for the user-perspective magic lens.

  1. Respecting, protecting and fulfilling the right to food and nutrition during the economic crisis: the Indonesian perspective.

    PubMed

    Soekirman

    1999-07-01

    This article presents perspectives on the availability and stability of food and nutrition during the economic crisis in Indonesia. The Indonesian Food Law defined food security as a condition in which every household has access to adequate and affordable food. However, due to economic crisis and El Nino induced drought, food availability and accessibility declined leading to poverty and malnutrition. In response to this crisis, the Indonesian government launched several food policies and programs such as the Social Safety Net Program (SSN). The objective of this program is to help minimize the risk of malnutrition, loss of educational opportunities and lack of health services. Supplementary feeding of infants and malnourished pregnant mothers was part of the nutrition component of SSN. The authorities decided to apply the SSN program not only in times of crisis but as part of the nutrition program. Furthermore, all UN agencies should monitor and coordinate with the SSN in the growth and development of Indonesians in order to make the SSN program effective.

  2. Collaboration in crisis: Carer perspectives on police and mental health professional's responses to mental health crises.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Alice; Warren, Narelle; Peterson, Violeta; Hollander, Yitzchak; Boscarato, Kara; Lee, Stuart

    2016-10-01

    For many situations involving a mental health crisis, carers (e.g. family or friends) are present and either attempt to help the person overcome the crisis or request assistance from professional services (e.g. mental health or police). Comparatively, little research has explored how carers experience the crisis, the professional response and how the nature of the response, in turn, impacts carers. The current study was conducted to explore these issues during individual interviews with nine carers who had previous contact with police and mental health services during a crisis response. Collected data described the definition and perceived impact of a mental health crisis for carers, how carers had experienced a crisis response from police and mental health services, and how the professional response had impacted on carers. Of importance was the finding that carers were often themselves traumatized by witnessing or being involved in the crisis, however, were rarely offered direct education or support to help them cope or prevent future crises. A number of carers described a reluctance to request assistance from professional services due to previous poor experiences. This highlighted the importance of implementing strategies to deliver more timely, respectful, specialist and collaborative crisis responses to improve carer and consumer outcomes. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. Crisis Speeches Delivered during World War II: A Historical and Rhetorical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Tomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Rhetorical analyses of speeches made by United States presidents and world leaders abound, particularly studies about addresses to nations in times of crisis. These are important because what presidents say amidst uncertainty and chaos defines their leadership in the eyes of the public. But with new forms of crisis rhetoric, our understanding of…

  4. Crisis Speeches Delivered during World War II: A Historical and Rhetorical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Tomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Rhetorical analyses of speeches made by United States presidents and world leaders abound, particularly studies about addresses to nations in times of crisis. These are important because what presidents say amidst uncertainty and chaos defines their leadership in the eyes of the public. But with new forms of crisis rhetoric, our understanding of…

  5. Crisis on Campus: Eating Disorder Intervention from a Developmental-Ecological Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Julia V.; Gibson, Donna M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to review a crisis intervention using the developmental-ecological protocol (Collins and Collins, 2005) with a college student presenting with symptomatology of an active eating disorder. Participants: Participants included University Wellness Center employees responding to the crisis. Methods: Methods…

  6. Crisis on Campus: Eating Disorder Intervention from a Developmental-Ecological Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Julia V.; Gibson, Donna M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to review a crisis intervention using the developmental-ecological protocol (Collins and Collins, 2005) with a college student presenting with symptomatology of an active eating disorder. Participants: Participants included University Wellness Center employees responding to the crisis. Methods: Methods…

  7. Staff Perspectives of Service User Involvement on Two Clinical Psychology Training Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Simon P.; Holttum, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated both negative and positive staff perspectives of service user involvement on two clinical psychology training courses as part of an ongoing process of service evaluation. Ten clinical psychology staff from two training courses were interviewed over the telephone by a current trainee clinical psychologist using a…

  8. Staff Perspectives of Service User Involvement on Two Clinical Psychology Training Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Simon P.; Holttum, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated both negative and positive staff perspectives of service user involvement on two clinical psychology training courses as part of an ongoing process of service evaluation. Ten clinical psychology staff from two training courses were interviewed over the telephone by a current trainee clinical psychologist using a…

  9. Sharing Designer and User Perspectives of Web Site Evaluation: A Cross-Campus Collaborative Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collings, Penny; Pearce, Jon

    2002-01-01

    Presents an online collaborative process that facilitates usability evaluation of Web sites. Describes how the system was designed and used by students and staff at two Australian universities and shows that the process provides feedback on Web site usability and the experience of usability evaluation from the perspectives of a user and a…

  10. Tools Used to Evaluate Written Medicine and Health Information: Document and User Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luk, Alice; Aslani, Parisa

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to identify and review tools used to evaluate consumer-oriented written medicine (WMI) and health (WHI) information from a document and user perspective. Articles that met the following inclusion criteria were reviewed: studies evaluating readability, presentation, suitability, quality of WMI/WHI. A total of 152 articles were…

  11. Tools Used to Evaluate Written Medicine and Health Information: Document and User Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luk, Alice; Aslani, Parisa

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to identify and review tools used to evaluate consumer-oriented written medicine (WMI) and health (WHI) information from a document and user perspective. Articles that met the following inclusion criteria were reviewed: studies evaluating readability, presentation, suitability, quality of WMI/WHI. A total of 152 articles were…

  12. The Promise and Challenge of Producing Biofuel Feedstocks: An Ecological Perspective (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    DeLucia, Evan

    2016-07-12

    Evan DeLucia of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute talks about "The Promise and Challenge of Producing Biofuel Feedstocks: An Ecological Perspective" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  13. Model testing on the crisis interventions and actions to prevent medical disputes: a Taiwanese nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming

    2006-05-01

    This study investigated the contributions of comprehensiveness and necessity scales on crisis interventions and actions toward nursing practice-related medical disputes in Taiwanese hospitals and institutions' demographic characteristics, to overall satisfaction toward nursing-related crisis management policies and interventions and overall satisfaction toward their institution's crisis management system. In a health-care environment that is focused on cost containment, for overworked nurses and understaffed medical wards, patients still expect nurses to provide high quality, compassionate care. Patients usually regard nurses as the principal link between the technical and interpersonal aspects of their care. However, current hospital systems tend to require patients to be self-reliant in managing their own care. Patient mistrust of medical care providers might have contributed to the current medical error/dispute crisis. In this cross-sectional study, the subjects were nursing directors of Taiwanese hospitals (197 valid subjects). The author developed the questionnaire used in this study. The ordinal logistic regression analyses demonstrated that being a public hospital managed by the government, being a hospital operated by a corporate body, the more comprehensive the technical/structural aspect and the assessment aspect and the more needed the psychological aspect, contribute to higher general satisfaction levels toward nursing-related crisis management. The more comprehensive the strategic aspect and having more acute beds, contributes to higher satisfaction levels with their institution's overall crisis management activities. These findings inferred a possible change in a hospital's resource allocation or power structure when dealing with issues of patient care quality, including nursing practice-related crisis management policies, interventions and actions. RELEVANT TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: A good crisis management system may help to keep a crisis from worsening

  14. Recovery from mental illness: a service user perspective on facilitators and barriers.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Kirsten Schultz; Friis, Vivi Soegaard; Haxholm, Birthe Lodahl; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Wind, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Mental health services strive to implement a recovery-oriented approach to rehabilitation. Little is known about service users' perception of the recovery approach. The aim is to explore the service user's perspectives on facilitators and barriers associated with recovery. Twelve residents living in supported housing services are interviewed. The analysis is guided by a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach and the interpretation involves theories from critical theory, sociology, and learning. Learning, social relations, and willpower are identified as having an impact on recovery. Stigmatization and social barriers occurred. Social relations to peer residents and staff were reported as potentially having a positive and negative impact on recovery. Studies have explored the user's perspectives on recovery but this study contributes with knowledge on how recovery-oriented services have an impact on recovery.

  15. Vermont School Crisis Guide, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermont Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The 2004 Vermont School Crisis Guide has been revised to improve its use by School Crisis Teams and Public Safety Committees. The Guide is now organized by roles so users can quickly locate their responsibilities in a crisis. The Crisis Guide pages can be used to document pertinent information (time, witnesses) immediately after an emergency…

  16. Socio-ecological perspective of older age life expectancy: income, gender inequality, and financial crisis in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong In; Kim, Gukbin

    2017-08-18

    Population is aging rapidly in Europe. Older age life expectancy (OLE) can be influenced by country-level depth of credit information (DCI) as an indicator of financial crisis, gross national income (GNI) per capita, and gender inequality index (GII). These factors are key indicators of socio-ecological inequality. They can be used to develop strategies to reduce country-level health disparity. The objective of this study was to confirm the relationship between socio-ecological factors and OLE in Europe. Data were obtained from World Bank, WHO, and UN database for 34 Europe countries. Associations between socio-ecological factors and OLE were assessed with Pearson correlation coefficients and three regression models. These models assumed that appropriate changes in country-level strategies of healthy aging would produce changes in GNI per capital as personal perspective, GII in social environment perspective, and DCI in public policy perspective to implement socio-ecological changes. Hierarchal linear regression was used for final analysis. Although OLE (women and men) had significant negative correlation with GII (gender inequality index, r = - 0.798, p = 0.001), it had positive correlations with GNI (gross national income per capita, r = 0.834, p = 0.001) and DCI (depth of credit information index, r = 0.704, p = 0.001) levels caused by financial crisis. Higher levels GNI and DCI but lower GII were found to be predictors of OLE (women and men) (R(2) = 0.804, p < 0.001). Factors affecting older age life expectancy in Europe were identified from socio-ecological perspective. Socio-ecological indicators (GII, GNI, and DCI) in Europe appear to have a latent effect on OLE levels. Thus, country-level strategies of successful aging in Europe should target socio-ecological factors such as GII, GNI, and DCI value.

  17. Aligning product development and user perspectives: social-behavioural dimensions of multipurpose prevention technologies.

    PubMed

    Brady, M; Tolley, E

    2014-10-01

    Multipurpose prevention technologies provide a compelling response to the multiple and reinforcing sexual and reproductive health risks faced by women globally. To ensure that this potential is realised, product-specific characteristics and their social-behavioural correlates must be considered early in the product development process. This paper provides an overview of the key user-related social and behavioural dimensions of three broad categories of multipurpose prevention technologies: 1) sustained release vaginal rings, 2) pericoital vaginal products, and 3) co-formulated or co-administered injectables. The authors build upon the broad parameters of Target Product Profiles for such products, aligning them with user perspective considerations.

  18. User involvement as sharing knowledge – an extended perspective in patient education

    PubMed Central

    Strøm, Anita; Fagermoen, May Solveig

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient education is undergoing a paradigm shift in which the perspectives of patients are increasingly being incorporated into learning programs. Access to the users’ experience is now considered a prerequisite for the development of quality health services, but how this user experience is incorporated is somewhat unclear. The inclusion of experiential knowledge and user involvement can challenge professional authority, roles, and working methods because knowledge sharing is different from persuasion, professional explanation, and consent. Dialogue and collaboration between professionals and users are essential to effective user involvement; however, little is understood about the characteristics of their collaboration. Objective To describe characteristics of the collaboration between users and health professionals in developing, implementing, and evaluating patient education courses in hospitals. Design, setting, and methods A field study was conducted in three different hospitals. Data collection comprised open observations in meetings of 17 different collaboration groups with a total of 100 participants, and 24 interviews with users and professionals. The data analyses included both thematic and the Systematic Data Integration approach. Results Two contrasting types of collaboration emerged from the analyses; knowledge sharing and information exchange. The first was characterized by mutual knowledge sharing, involvement, and reciprocal decision making. Characteristics of the second were the absence of dialogue, meagre exploration of the users’ knowledge, and decisions usually made by the professionals. Conclusion Collaboration between users and health personnel takes place in an asymmetric relationship. Mutual knowledge sharing was found to be more than the exchange of information and consultation and also to be a prerequisite for shared decision making. In developing patient education when users are involved the health professionals have the

  19. American medical policy and the "crisis" of the welfare state: a comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Marmor, T R

    1986-01-01

    Health policy debates rarely include broad review of cross-national experiences with related social policies. This article addresses the connection between medical policy concerns and the development of welfare states in the advanced industrial democracies following the oil crisis of 1973-74. After examining the evidence about what actually occurred during the "crisis" years of the welfare state, the article relates the debates about the welfare state's crisis to American concerns about medical care in the 1980s. The distinctive American response to the fiscal strains of stagflation-more severe cuts in social spending than necessary based on the country's economic strength, threats of bankruptcy to produce small adjustments to large programs, and inability to address the problems of medical care as anything other than budgetary strain--is linked to American dissensus about the purposes of the welfare state.

  20. Should service user involvement be consigned to history? A critical realist perspective.

    PubMed

    Stickley, T

    2006-10-01

    Service user involvement in the UK healthcare agenda is now widely expected. Historically, service user groups have been increasingly successful in their demands for greater involvement. Hierarchies of involvement exist that include consultation and partnership working. Psychiatry is an archetypal arena in terms of power and control. The traditional view of interpreting the place of service users within this arena is that the service user is at the bottom of this hierarchy; involvement allows transcendence of the power hierarchy. Critical realist theory is offered as an alternative approach to understanding these complex relationships. It is argued that contemporary models of involvement perpetuate and sustain the power positions of the dominant discourse within psychiatry. It is suggested that a critical realism perspective, offers a model that does not kowtow to the dominant discourse but rather recognizes that service users now possess power, especially in terms of being able to provide services that statutory services providers now require. Is it time for service users to call the tune, and, in doing so, establish a power position outside the traditional hierarchy of power?

  1. Enhanced ergonomics approaches for product design: a user experience ecosystem perspective and case studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper first discusses the major inefficiencies faced in current human factors and ergonomics (HFE) approaches: (1) delivering an optimal end-to-end user experience (UX) to users of a solution across its solution lifecycle stages; (2) strategically influencing the product business and technology capability roadmaps from a UX perspective and (3) proactively identifying new market opportunities and influencing the platform architecture capabilities on which the UX of end products relies. In response to these challenges, three case studies are presented to demonstrate how enhanced ergonomics design approaches have effectively addressed the challenges faced in current HFE approaches. Then, the enhanced ergonomics design approaches are conceptualised by a user-experience ecosystem (UXE) framework, from a UX ecosystem perspective. Finally, evidence supporting the UXE, the advantage and the formalised process for executing UXE and methodological considerations are discussed. Practitioner Summary: This paper presents enhanced ergonomics approaches to product design via three case studies to effectively address current HFE challenges by leveraging a systematic end-to-end UX approach, UX roadmaps and emerging UX associated with prioritised user needs and usages. Thus, HFE professionals can be more strategic, creative and influential.

  2. An assessment of primary care attributes from the perspective of female healthcare users1

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Eliane de Fátima Almeida; Sousa, Ana Inês; Primo, Cândida Caniçali; Leite, Francielie Marabotti Costa; Lima, Rita de Cassia Duarte; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Nóia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: this study sought to assess the quality of the Family Health Strategy (FHS) and investigated the association between primary care attributes (PCAs) and the sociodemographic characteristics of users. METHOD: a total of 215 female FHS users were interviewed for this descriptive and cross-sectional study. The Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCATool), Adult Edition was used, and the results were analyzed using Fisher's exact tests, Pearson's chi-square tests and logistic regressions. RESULTS: the lowest average score corresponded to the dimension "accessibility" (1.80), and the highest score corresponded to "access" (8.76). The results corresponding to the attributes "longitudinality", "coordination", "comprehensiveness", and "orientation" were not significant. No association was found between the participants' sociodemographic characteristics and the essential, derivative, and general attributes (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: several attributes must be improved across all the investigated services from the perspective of female FHS users. PMID:26155006

  3. 'Getting used to' hearing aids from the perspective of adult hearing-aid users.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Piers; Maslin, Michael; Munro, Kevin J

    2014-12-01

    To describe getting used to hearing aids from the perspective of adult hearing-aid users. Three focus group discussions were carried out. A topic guide and discussion exercises were used to elicit views on getting used to hearing aids. Discussion was audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and subjected to qualitative content analysis. Adult hearing aid users (n = 16). Participants described getting used to hearing aids as a multi-factorial process which included adjusting to altered sensory input, practical matters such as cleaning and maintenance, and managing the psychosocial impact of hearing-aid use, such as on self-image. Users reported a process of discovering benefits and limitations of hearing aids leading to individual patterns of use that was relatively independent of input from audiologists. Getting used to hearing aids is a challenging multi-factorial process with both psychosocial and practical difficulties besides demands of adjusting to hearing-aid input.

  4. The Global Economic Crisis, Poverty and Education: A Perspective from India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nambissan, Geetha B.

    2010-01-01

    Debates on the global economic recession have failed to draw adequate attention to the meaning of the crisis for the poor and their education, especially in later developing societies. In this paper, I focus on the education of children of the poor in India--a country that has experienced economic slowdown rather than recession. Available research…

  5. The Global Economic Crisis, Poverty and Education: A Perspective from India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nambissan, Geetha B.

    2010-01-01

    Debates on the global economic recession have failed to draw adequate attention to the meaning of the crisis for the poor and their education, especially in later developing societies. In this paper, I focus on the education of children of the poor in India--a country that has experienced economic slowdown rather than recession. Available research…

  6. Marking Time: Some Methodological and Historical Perspectives on the "Crisis of Childhood"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Historical amnesia besets the consensus that Britain faces an unprecedented "crisis of childhood", and of child well-being. Drawing on evidence about changing uses of instruments and measures of well-being over time, this article explores and critiques claims about historical change and trends over time that are central to the imagined…

  7. Marking Time: Some Methodological and Historical Perspectives on the "Crisis of Childhood"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Historical amnesia besets the consensus that Britain faces an unprecedented "crisis of childhood", and of child well-being. Drawing on evidence about changing uses of instruments and measures of well-being over time, this article explores and critiques claims about historical change and trends over time that are central to the imagined…

  8. Crisis support following the Herald of Free-Enterprise disaster: a longitudinal perspective.

    PubMed

    Dalgleish, T; Joseph, S; Thrasher, S; Tranah, T; Yule, W

    1996-10-01

    Crisis support was assessed with survivors of the Herald of Free Enterprise ferry sinking at 3 and 6 years postdisaster. It was found that reported levels of support received from family and friends decreased over the first 3 years after the event but increased over the subsequent 3 years. In addition, higher retrospective ratings of crisis support received in the immediate aftermath of the disaster were found to predict lower levels of posttraumatic symptomatology as assessed by the Impact of Event Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory at a later period. The results replicate earlier findings following the Jupiter Cruise ship disaster and are thought to have implications for the assessment and treatment of survivors at high risk of disturbance.

  9. Media portrayal of nurses' perspectives and concerns in the SARS crisis in Toronto.

    PubMed

    Hall, Linda McGillis; Angus, Jan; Peter, Elizabeth; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Wynn, Francine; Donner, Gail

    2003-01-01

    To describe nursing work life issues as portrayed in the media during the SARS crisis in Toronto. Content analysis of local and national news media documents in Canada. Media articles were sorted and classified by topic, and themes were identified. Themes were: (a) changing schemas of nursing practice: the new normal; (b) barriers to relational nursing work; (c) work life concerns: retention and recruitment; (d) nursing virtue: nurses as heroes and professionals; (e) paradoxical responses to nurses from the community; and (f) leadership in nursing during the SARS crisis. This analysis enhanced understanding of how nurses are portrayed in the media, but it indicated the significance of quality of work life and issues about work-home life. Some descriptions of the care and caring of nurses have made nursing seem like an important and influential profession to potential applicants who might previously have dismissed nursing as a career.

  10. [Needs and quality of counseling in long-term care : User perspective on counseling services in Germany].

    PubMed

    Englert, N; Oetting-Roß, C; Büscher, A

    2017-01-13

    A wide range of counseling services with a variety of counseling purposes have been established in Germany to support care recipients and their relatives; however, there is a lack of quality criteria that are based on the counseling needs from the user's perspective. To summarize empirical knowledge on counseling needs and quality of counseling services from the user perspective and identification of counseling-specific understanding of users. A literature search was conducted in the databases CareLit®, LIVIVO and SpringerLink with additional online research via Google and MetaGer. Analysis of the literature and discussion on the state of research. A trustful relationship between counselor and user as well as the orientation to the user's individual situation are key elements of counseling that have been found helpful; however, a differentiated view of the diverse user groups and counseling purposes is lacking. In order to include the user's perspective in conceptual approaches for counseling and to define user-generated quality criteria, further scientific research is needed regarding the counseling needs of different user groups. Consideration must be given to particular care situations that involve various counseling purposes. Particularly vulnerable groups need special support in working out their counseling needs.

  11. 'Dale': an interpretative phenomenological analysis of a service user's experience with a crisis resolution/home treatment team in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Nelson, L J; Miller, P K; Ashman, D

    2016-08-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE SUBJECT?: This paper describes crisis resolution/home treatment (CRHT) teams, which are part of mental health services in the United Kingdom. CRHT is expected to assist individuals in building resilience and work within a recovery approach. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This paper arises from an interview with one individual, Dale, as part of a larger study exploring service users' experiences of CRHT. It adds to the body of narrative knowledge in CRHT through Dale's co-authorship of this paper, reflecting on his original interview 4 years later, with co-authors providing critical interpretation of his experience, in turn supported by cognate literature. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Implications for practice are considered, themselves mediated through Dale's own descriptions of how CRHT interventions impacted upon him. These impacts are analysed with respect to three themes: Resilience, Recovery and Power. It is centrally contended that clinicians need to more clearly comprehend three core matters. First, what resilience 'is' for service users as well as the complex process through which these individuals move in developing resilience. Second, the distinction that service users might make between 'recovery' and 'functionality', and how this in turn can impact on individuals both in personal and socioeconomic sense. Finally, the mechanics of power within CRHT contexts and how these interpersonal dynamics can affect the relationship between service user and clinician in practice. Introduction and Aim The central purpose of this paper, part of a larger study exploring the experiences of Service Users (SUs) with CRHT, is to emphasise the importance of the SU voice itself within the domain. Following an interrogation of the historical contexts of CRHT. Method This paper uses interpretative phenomological approach around detailed thematic examination of an extended, semi-structured with a single SU: Dale. Moreover, four

  12. [Relationships between health care professionals and users from a gender perspective].

    PubMed

    Gomes, Romeu; Couto, Márcia Thereza

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this article is to analyze relationships between health professionals and users from a gender perspective. Using Pierre Bourdieu as a theoretical reference, we critically analyze data from two studies carried out in Brazil in which we took part as authors. The first of these studies was based in Rio de Janeiro and the second was a multicenter and ethnographical study carried out in eight health care facilities distributed throughout four Brazilian states, two in the Southeast region and two in the Northeast region. Among the principal results of the present study, we found that although the relationships between health professionals and users demonstrate varied opinions, all are marked by a gendered habitus. We conclude that, among other aspects, the construction of diverse femininities and masculinities and the way in which these are exercised in health care contexts are the product of process that is both socio-historical and personal.

  13. [Perception of the quality of care in the health services in Mexico. perspective of the users].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Sánchez, T J; Nájera-Aguilar, P; Nigenda-López, G

    1998-01-01

    To describe the quality of health services as perceived by users in Mexico, as well as an analysis of predisposing and enabling factors to the use of these services. Data were selected from the National Health Survey II of 1994. The survey contains information from 3324 ambulatory health service users who sought care in the two week period previous to the survey. 81.2% of users perceived the quality as good and 18.8% thought it was poor. The main reasons for good quality of care were: personal attention (23.3%) improvement of the health problem (11.9%). For poor quality of care, the main reasons were: long waiting time (23.7%) and poor clinical examination (11.7%) Social security health service users perceived 2.6 times more frequently quality of attention as poor, than those who consulted private health services. Quality is represented by the aspects of the attention process (44.8% 9, its results (21.3%), the structure (18.0%) and accessibility (15.7%) The main reasons for not returning to the same health service center were: deficient attention (18.2%) and long waiting times (11.8%). The perspective of the population should be studied further and actions for the continuous improvement of the quality of health care should be implemented.

  14. Service user and clinical perspectives of psychiatric advance directives in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Thom, Katey; O'Brien, Anthony John; Tellez, Juan Jose

    2015-12-01

    Advance care planning is becoming an increasingly important feature of health service provision. Although the New Zealand Mental Health Commission has advocated strongly for the provision of advance directives in mental health services, little is known about clinician or service user views on advance directives. The aim of the study was to survey the perspectives of service users and clinicians on the use of psychiatric advance directives. The study used an anonymous online survey to collect data from 110 mental health service users and 175 clinicians. Survey items included existing knowledge, preferred content and potential benefits of advance directives. Descriptive statistics and intergroup comparisons were conducted. Over 90% of service users and clinicians agreed that they support advance directives in mental health. There were similarities in the preferred content of an advance directive across the two groups, particularly regarding the notification of support persons, cultural support and preferred methods of de-escalation. Significant differences in opinion were found regarding the use of coercive measures and the ability of mental health legislation to override advance directives. The results indicate strong support for the use of advance directives within New Zealand mental health services, as well as for further research in the area.

  15. Effects of hippotherapy on people with cerebral palsy from the users' perspective: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Debuse, D; Gibb, C; Chandler, C

    2009-04-01

    Although there is now some evidence for specific effects of hippotherapy on people with cerebral palsy, these studies fail to provide a comprehensive picture of the effects of hippotherapy. This was the first qualitative study to explore the hippotherapy experience of people with cerebral palsy from a user perspective. The effects of hippotherapy and their context were of particular interest. Seventeen users aged from 4 to 63, with or without their parents, participated in focus groups or individual interviews in six centres in Britain and in Germany. The main effects of hippotherapy, as identified by users and parents, are normalisation of muscle tone, improved trunk control, improved walking ability, carryover effects of hippotherapy to activities of daily living, and increased self-efficacy, confidence, and self-esteem. This study provided unique and new insights into the context in which hippotherapy happens, as well as its effects on impairment, activity, participation, and quality of life in people with cerebral palsy. The study's findings are integrated with the existing literature on motor learning and pedagogy to try to explain the complex effects of hippotherapy as reported by users and parents. A conceptual framework that illustrates these effects and their interactions is introduced.

  16. Public transport accessibility for wheelchair users: a perspective from macro-ergonomic design.

    PubMed

    Almada, Juan Felipe; Renner, Jacinta Sidegum

    2015-01-01

    Considering the current experience of Persons with Disabilities (PWD) seeking to join the labor market as well as improve their quality of life, full accessibility is an important tool to enable their integration into society. The primary objective of this study was to identify ergonomics and accessibility issues faced by wheelchair users and persons with mobility alterations when using public transport, from a user perspective. This was an observational, descriptive study, with a quantitative approach to data analysis and discussion. The study sample comprised 30 wheelchair-bound public transport users, and was drawn from the membership of LEME - Associação dos Lesados Medulares de Novo Hamburgo (Novo Hamburgo Spinal Injury Victims' Association). Data were collected by means of an open-ended interview, which guided questionnaire development, and direct field observations conducted during bus rides. Results indicate that the primary issues are the quality of services offered, particularly the schedule and number of accessible vehicles, and the lack of trained employees to aid wheelchair users. The paper also identifies issues related to accessibility and safety, both when accessing vehicles and during transportation.

  17. Evaluation Studies of Robotic Rollators by the User Perspective: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Werner, Christian; Ullrich, Phoebe; Geravand, Milad; Peer, Angelika; Hauer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Robotic rollators enhance the basic functions of established devices by technically advanced physical, cognitive, or sensory support to increase autonomy in persons with severe impairment. In the evaluation of such ambient assisted living solutions, both the technical and user perspectives are important to prove usability, effectiveness and safety, and to ensure adequate device application. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize the methodology of studies evaluating robotic rollators with focus on the user perspective and to give recommendations for future evaluation studies. A systematic literature search up to December 31, 2014, was conducted based on the Cochrane Review methodology using the electronic databases PubMed and IEEE Xplore. Articles were selected according to the following inclusion criteria: evaluation studies of robotic rollators documenting human-robot interaction, no case reports, published in English language. Twenty-eight studies were identified that met the predefined inclusion criteria. Large heterogeneity in the definitions of the target user group, study populations, study designs and assessment methods was found across the included studies. No generic methodology to evaluate robotic rollators could be identified. We found major methodological shortcomings related to insufficient sample descriptions and sample sizes, and lack of appropriate, standardized and validated assessment methods. Long-term use in habitual environment was also not evaluated. Apart from the heterogeneity, methodological deficits in most of the identified studies became apparent. Recommendations for future evaluation studies include: clear definition of target user group, adequate selection of subjects, inclusion of other assistive mobility devices for comparison, evaluation of the habitual use of advanced prototypes, adequate assessment strategy with established, standardized and validated methods, and statistical analysis of study results. Assessment

  18. A systematic review of study results reported for the evaluation of robotic rollators from the perspective of users.

    PubMed

    Werner, Christian; Ullrich, Phoebe; Geravand, Milad; Peer, Angelika; Bauer, Jürgen M; Hauer, Klaus

    2017-01-26

    To evaluate the effectiveness and perception of robotic rollators (RRs) from the perspective of users. Studies identified in a previous systematic review published on 2016 on the methodology of studies evaluating RRs by the user perspective were re-screened for eligibility based on the following inclusion criteria: evaluation of the human-robot interaction from the user perspective, use of standardized outcome measurements, and quantitative presentation of study results. Seventeen studies were eligible for inclusion. Due to the clinical and methodological heterogeneity across studies, a narrative synthesis of study results was conducted. We found conflicting results concerning the effectiveness of the robotic functionalities of the RRs. Only a few studies reported superior user performance or reduced physical demands with the RRs compared to unassisted conditions or conventional assistive mobility devices; however, without providing statistical evidence. The user perception of the RRs was found to be generally positive. There is still no sufficient evidence on the effectiveness of RRs from the user perspective. More well-designed, high-quality studies with adequate study populations, larger sample sizes, appropriate assessment strategies with outcomes specifically tailored to the robotic functionalities, and statistical analyses of results are required to evaluate RRs at a higher level of evidence. Implications for Rehabilitation RRs cover intelligent functionalities that focus on gait assistance, obstacle avoidance, navigation assistance, sit-to-stand transfer, body weight support or fall prevention. The evaluation from the user perspective is essential to ensure that RRs effectively address users' needs, requirements and preferences. The evidence on the effectiveness of RRs is severely hampered by the low methodological quality of most of the available studies. RRs seem generally to be perceived as positive by the users. There is very limited evidence on the

  19. The IDA/BPT Crisis Relocation Planning Model: Description, Documentation and User’s Guide to the Computer Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-22

    CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Federal Emergency Management Agency December 22, 1982 Office of Research 13. NUMBER OF PAGES...18 2.0 User’s Guide to the Computer Program ..................... 20 2.1 Master Control Sequence ............................. 22 2.2 Input/Output... control during an evacuation. Users of the IDA/BPT model may choose among three options for controlling traffic during an evacuation. Normal Traffic

  20. Institutional and relational determinants in high- and medium-extent food product crises: the inner perspective of a public health crisis.

    PubMed

    Charlebois, Sylvain; Horan, Hilary

    2010-08-01

    In 2008, Canada enacted its biggest-ever food recall in response to a Listeria crisis, stemming from a Maple Leaf Foods plant, that killed 22 Canadians. Afterwards, Maple Leaf's market share quickly returned to pre-crisis levels, but the long-term repercussions of the scare still reverberate in Maple Leaf's brand. In this case study, which offers an organizational perspective on the food recall, data was collected, through in-depth interviews of persons involved in the crisis response, and analyzed. The aim of this paper is to make transparent the ways in which Maple Leaf Foods organized their resources to manage the 2008 food recall. Results reveal that institutional and relational determinants are the most important factors in high- and medium-extent food product crises, whereas external and internal effects primarily influence an organization's capacity to cope with severe crises. Based on these findings, a conceptual framework is presented and managerial implications are discussed.

  1. Bringing meaning to user involvement in mental health care planning: a qualitative exploration of service user perspectives.

    PubMed

    Grundy, A C; Bee, P; Meade, O; Callaghan, P; Beatty, S; Olleveant, N; Lovell, K

    2016-02-01

    Service users wish to be involved in care planning but typically feel marginalized in this process. Qualitative explorations of the barriers and enablers of user involvement in mental health care planning are limited. How is user involvement in care planning conceptualized by service users and how can meaningful involvement be instilled in the care planning process? In 2013, we conducted five focus groups (n = 27) and 23 individual interviews with current or recent adult users of secondary care mental health services (n = 27) in England. Eight users participated in both. Data were analysed using Framework Analysis. Results Ten themes emerged from the data: these themes encompassed procedural elements (connection; contribution; currency; care consolidation; and consequence), service user characteristics (capacity and confidence) and professional enablers (consultation; choice; and clarity of expression). Procedural elements were discussed most frequently in service user discourse. The process of care planning, centred on the user-clinician relationship, is key to user involvement. Users describe a common model of meaningful involvement in care planning. Their requests, summarized through a 10C framework of care planning involvement, provide clear direction for improving service users satisfaction with care planning and enhancing the culture of services. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Cancer-related psychosocial research: what are the perspectives of cancer care centre users on participation?

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Julie; Robertson, Ann R R; Jhunjhunwala, Anita; Jarvis, Glyn C; McVittie, Chris

    2011-07-01

    To explore the perspectives of cancer care centre users on participation in psychosocial research to inform research design and ethics. The study is based on a qualitative research design. Fourteen semistructured interviews were carried in people diagnosed with cancer and carers. The interview included four main questions about practical barriers to participation, types of research design, motivating factors and the conduct of research in a cancer care support setting. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Interviewees demonstrated a willingness to participate in psychosocial research within certain circumstances. There were no practical barriers identified, although they considered payment for research-related travel important. The most acceptable research design was the face-to-face interview and the least preferred was the randomised control trial. The factors that motivated participation were altruism, valuing research, and making a contribution to the centre. Interviewees supported the conduct of research in cancer care support centres conditional upon delaying recruitment during the initial months of users' visits and its need to be discreet to avoid deterring visitors from accessing the centre. The study concludes that the personal interaction between participants and researchers is the most important feature of decision-making by patients/carers to join studies. Taking into account the perspectives of people affected by cancer during the early stages of research design may enhance recruitment and retention and can contribute to the development of research protocols and ethics.

  3. The health care crisis: impact on surgery from a chief executive officer's perspective.

    PubMed

    Pearl, R M

    2001-02-01

    Kaiser Permanente, in conjunction with the surrounding academic institutions, trains 64 surgical residents annually in Northern California. Although the current health care crisis has made resident education increasingly difficult, we are committed to maintaining and expanding our programs. The current health care crisis reflects the effect that for-profit health plans, hospitals, and pharmaceutical groups have had on medicine. Their negative impact has not been simply the extraction of resources from the delivery system to their equity shareholders, but the implementation of an authorization process designed to frustrate and deny. As executive director and chief executive officer of the Permanente Medical Group, I believe that resident training allows us to attract outstanding clinicians, train the physicians of the future, and improve the clinical care of our patients. The multispecialty nature of our medical group and our size allows us to work collaboratively, offer evidence-based approaches, preserve professional independence, and implement innovative programs to increase quality and service. Although it is uncertain how health care will evolve in the future, we at Kaiser Permanente are committed to maintaining and expanding our involvement in the education of the next generation of surgeons.

  4. A Qualitative Study of Prescription Contraception Use: The Perspectives of Users, General Practitioners and Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Leigh-Ann; Molloy, Gerard J.; Byrne, Molly; Murphy, Andrew W.; Morgan, Karen; Hughes, Carmel M.; Ingham, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Background The oral contraceptive pill (OCP) remains the most popular form of prescription contraception in many countries, despite adherence difficulties for many. Uptake of long acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs), which are less reliant on user adherence, remains low. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of, and attitudes towards, prescription contraception amongst samples of contraception users, general practitioners (GPs) and pharmacists. Methodology and Findings We conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with 18 contraception users, 18 GPs and 9 pharmacists. The study took place in Galway, Republic of Ireland between June and September 2014. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Overall, contraception users were more familiar with the OCP, and all the women interviewed began their prescription contraception journey using this method. All participants identified episodes of poor adherence throughout the reproductive life course. The identified barriers for use of LARCs were lack of information, misconceptions, lack of access and high cost. In contrast, GPs believed that adherence to the OCP was good and stated they were more likely to prescribe the OCP than other methods, as they were most familiar with this option. Barriers to prescribing LARCSs were time, cost to practice, training and deskilling. Pharmacists also believed that adherence to the OCP was generally good and that their role was limited to dispensing medication and providing information when asked. Discussion and Conclusion There are contrasting perspectives between contraception service providers and contraceptive users. Training for healthcare providers is required to support informed contraceptive choice and adherence. It is necessary to address the practice barriers of cost and lack of time, to promote better communication around adherence issues and prescription contraception options. There is a need for more easily-accessible public

  5. Characterizing mobility from the prosthetic limb user's perspective: Use of focus groups to guide development of the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Brian J; Morgan, Sara J; Abrahamson, Daniel C; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2016-10-01

    Input from target respondents in the development of patient-reported outcome measures is necessary to ensure that the instrument is meaningful. To solicit perspectives of prosthetic limb users about their mobility experiences and to inform development of the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility. Qualitative study. Four focus groups of lower limb prosthesis users were held in different regions of the United States. Focus group transcripts were coded, and themes were identified. Feedback from participants was used to develop a framework for measuring mobility with a lower limb prosthesis. Focus group participants (N = 37) described mobility as a confluence of factors that included characteristics of the individual, activity, and environment. Identified themes were defined as individual characteristics, forms of movement, and environmental situations. Prosthetic mobility was conceptualized as movement activities performed in an environmental or situational context. Respondent feedback used to guide development of Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility established a foundation for a new person-centered measure of mobility with a prosthetic limb. Perspectives of target respondents are needed to guide development of instruments intended to measure health outcomes. Focus groups of prosthetic limb users were conducted to solicit experiences related to mobility with a lower limb prosthesis. Results were used to inform development of a clinically meaningful, person-centered instrument. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  6. Click-words: learning to predict document keywords from a user perspective

    PubMed Central

    Islamaj Doğan, Rezarta; Lu, Zhiyong

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Recognizing words that are key to a document is important for ranking relevant scientific documents. Traditionally, important words in a document are either nominated subjectively by authors and indexers or selected objectively by some statistical measures. As an alternative, we propose to use documents' words popularity in user queries to identify click-words, a set of prominent words from the users' perspective. Although they often overlap, click-words differ significantly from other document keywords. Results: We developed a machine learning approach to learn the unique characteristics of click-words. Each word was represented by a set of features that included different types of information, such as semantic type, part of speech tag, term frequency–inverse document frequency (TF–IDF) weight and location in the abstract. We identified the most important features and evaluated our model using 6 months of PubMed click-through logs. Our results suggest that, in addition to carrying high TF–IDF weight, click-words tend to be biomedical entities, to exist in article titles, and to occur repeatedly in article abstracts. Given the abstract and title of a document, we are able to accurately predict the words likely to appear in user queries that lead to document clicks. Contact: luzh@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20810602

  7. Accessibility to Specialized Public Oral Health Services from the Perspective of Brazilian Users.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Ricardo Dias; Rangel, Marianne de Lucena; da Silva, Marcos André Azevedo; de Lucena, Brunna Thaís Lucwu; Cavalcanti, Alessandro Leite; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti; Oliveira, Julyana de Araújo

    2016-10-19

    The Specialized Dental Clinics (SDCs) represent the first government initiative in Latin America aimed at providing specialized oral health services. This study sought to evaluate the organizational accessibility to specialized oral health care services in Brazil and to understand the factors that may be associated with accessibility from the user's perspective. This epidemiological, cross-sectional and quantitative study was conducted by means of interviews with individuals who sought specialized public oral health services in the city of João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil, and consisted of a sample of 590 individuals. Users expressed a favorable view of the classification and resolutive nature of specialized services offered by Brazilian public health. The binary logistic regression analysis revealed weak points highlighting the difficulty involved in obtaining such treatments leading to unfavorable evaluations. In the resolutive nature item, difficulty in accessing the location, queues and lack of materials and equipment were highlighted as statistically significant unfavorable aspects. While many of the users considered the service to be resolutive, weaknesses were mentioned that need to be detected to promote improvements and to prevent other health models adopted worldwide from reproducing the same flaws.

  8. The "Crisis" of Public Higher Education: A Comparative Perspective. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.18.07

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent-Lancrin, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Is public tertiary education really in a crisis, and, if so, what is the crisis about? This paper analyses international aggregated data and examines to what extent there has been a crisis of public tertiary education in OECD [Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development] countries in the past decade. It first focuses on relative…

  9. The Perspectives of Secondary School Students with Special Needs in Spain during the Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitburn, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of a situational analysis of inclusive schooling in Spain from the perspective of students with special educational needs. The purpose of this work was to learn how young people collectively considered their experiences of school inclusion. The participants--aged 12-19 years who attended six different…

  10. Higher Education in Crisis: New York in National Perspective. Garland Studies in Higher Education, Vol. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barba, William C., Ed.

    In a set of 10 papers this volume explores nationally pressing issues in higher education, particularly financial and access issues, by examining those issues in the New York State's higher education system. The papers are: "Factors that Have Shaped Higher Education in New York State: A Historical and Current Perspective" (William C.…

  11. The Perspectives of Secondary School Students with Special Needs in Spain during the Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitburn, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of a situational analysis of inclusive schooling in Spain from the perspective of students with special educational needs. The purpose of this work was to learn how young people collectively considered their experiences of school inclusion. The participants--aged 12-19 years who attended six different…

  12. What is known about the experiences of using CPAP for OSA from the users' perspective? A systematic integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Ward, Kim; Hoare, Karen J; Gott, Merryn

    2014-08-01

    Economic, social and personal costs of untreated obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) are high. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is recommended and cost effective. Increasing OSA prevalence may accompany predicted globally increasing obesity. To synthesise international evidence regarding personal experiences using CPAP for OSA. A systematic integrative literature review was conducted and quality assessment criteria applied. 22, of 538, identified papers met inclusion criteria. Thematic analysis identified three themes: 1) users' beliefs about CPAP influence users' experiences of CPAP; 2) CPAP users are primed to reflect negatively on experiences of CPAP; and 3) spouse and family influence users' experiences of CPAP. Personality and attitude impact expectations about CPAP prior to use, whilst engagement of spouse and family also influence experiences. Analysis highlighted that users' reporting of CPAP experiences is constrained by investigator defined assessment methods. Overall, research relating to experiences using CPAP is limited. Users' perspectives of CPAP are constrained by researchers' concern with non-compliance. Typically experiences are not defined by the user, but from an 'expert' healthcare perspective, using words which frame CPAP as problematic. Family and social support is a significant, but neglected area of experiencing CPAP warranting further investigation. More information from users is required to determine how CPAP can be managed successfully. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Removing user fees for health services: A multi-epistemological perspective on access inequities in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Mladovsky, Philipa; Ba, Maymouna

    2017-09-01

    Plan Sésame (PS) is a user fee exemption policy launched in 2006 to provide free access to health services to Senegalese citizens aged 60 and over. Analysis of a large household survey evaluating PS echoes findings of other studies showing that user fee removal can be highly inequitable. 34 semi-structured interviews and 19 focus group discussions with people aged 60 and over were conducted in four regions in Senegal (Dakar, Diourbel, Matam and Tambacounda) over a period of six months during 2012. They were analysed to identify underlying causes of exclusion from/inclusion in PS and triangulated with the household survey. The results point to three steps at which exclusion occurs: (i) not being informed about PS; (ii) not perceiving a need to use health services under PS; and (iii) inability to access health services under PS, despite having the information and perceived need. We identify lay explanations for exclusion at these different steps. Some lay explanations point to social exclusion, defined as unequal power relations. For example, poor access to PS was seen to be caused by corruption, patronage, poverty, lack of social support, internalised discrimination and adverse incorporation. Other lay explanations do not point to social exclusion, for example: poor implementation; inadequate funding; high population demand; incompetent bureaucracy; and PS as a favour or moral obligation to friends or family. Within a critical realist paradigm, we interpret these lay explanations as empirical evidence for the presence of the following hidden underlying causal mechanisms: lacking capabilities; mobilisation of institutional bias; and social closure. However, social constructionist perspectives lead us to critique this paradigm by drawing attention to contested health, wellbeing and corruption discourses. These differences in interpretation lead to subsequent differential policy recommendations. This demonstrates the need for the adoption of a "multi

  14. [Science in a crisis. Medical countermeasures in Ebola virus disease, 2016: lessons learned and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Malvy, D

    2016-10-01

    In 2013, the world began to witness an unprecedented Ebola epidemic in West Africa that was smoldering by early 2016. Under this urgent circumstance, the global scientific community organized and made progress in identifying potential preventive countermeasures and therapeutics and accelerated the development of those promising interventions. Trials of experimental interventions soon emerged as a key component of the global response. Hence, an interdisciplinary issue ensued concerning how best to assess clinical safety and effectiveness of potential interventions prior to or concurrent with their broad use in humans. Key issues rely on the close collaboration between research and clinical teams involved in care in the field. Indeed, it is of prime importance to consider cultural dimensions when aiming to build trust within communities and flexibility to adapt trial procedures to field constraints. Trials implemented during the outbreak crisis illustrates challenging inputs for producing scientific and ethical gains for the benefits of vulnerable populations in the context of an international emerging or re-emerging infectious disease event. This includes rapid implementation of clinical research studies from the early phase of the next global outbreak on the basis of practical and ready-to-apply innovative methodological framework built during interepidemic periods.

  15. Community Families: Bridging the gap between mental health services and civil society - A qualitative study from users' perspective.

    PubMed

    Væggemose, Ulla; Lou, Stina; Frumer, Michal; Christiansen, Nanna Limskov Stærk; Aagaard, Jørgen; Ørtenblad, Lisbeth

    2017-03-01

    Social interventions to support people with severe mental illness are important to improving the quality of life. The perspectives of users are essential in this process. This article explores users' experiences, investments and concerns of a befriending programme. Focus group and individual qualitative interviews with service users. Overall, the experiences with the programme were positive, and the social interaction was highly valued. However, that the relationships were arranged and facilitated by mental health workers remained an unresolved concern even after several years. People with severe mental illness benefit from relationships despite the need of professional assistant.

  16. What factors determine the intention to use hospital report cards? The perspectives of users and non-users.

    PubMed

    Emmert, Martin; Wiener, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Hospitals report cards (HRC) are publicly available Internet websites that provide patients with quality-related information on hospitals and enable hospital comparisons. We aim to identify factors that explain the (intended) use of HRC, including differences between current users and non-users. Drawing on UTAUT (Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology), a cross-sectional study was conducted. Data were derived from an online survey with 1350 respondents and analyzed using structural equation modeling. 42% of the survey participants had already used HRC to search for a hospital. Performance expectancy, facilitating conditions, and attitude were found to be significantly related to HRC use intention, with notable differences between users and non-users. Effort expectancy and social influence did not show any significant effects in both subsamples. Patients consider HRC to be a useful instrument and are willing to make the efforts it takes to use HRC. The greater effect of performance expectancy in the non-user sample (compared to the user sample) indicates a certain disillusion among users. Health policy makers should focus on reviewing and restructuring the information content of HRC. In addition, coordinated efforts are still required to facilitate HRC access, especially for the 'less fortunate'. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Service-user and carer perspectives on compliance and compulsory treatment in community mental health services.

    PubMed

    Gault, Iris

    2009-09-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study analyzing service-user (SU) and carer perspectives on medication compliance and their experience of compulsory treatment. Eleven SUs and eight carers were interviewed. The research is set against the background of changes to mental health legislation in England, in the form of Supervised Community Treatment. This signals a change in community mental health practice and urges a reconsideration of concepts such as compliance, concordance and coercion. These concepts are discussed in the context of legislative changes and in relation to the perspectives of service-SUs and carers. Five themes emerged from qualitative interview data, analysed using an adapted form of grounded theory: loss of credible identity, playing the game, medicalization, therapeutic competence and incompetence and increased control. The findings suggest that SUs are initially reluctant to comply with mental health treatment, but do eventually accept the need for treatment; they also stress the significance of respectful relationships with professionals and the importance of communicative competence.

  18. Accessibility to Specialized Public Oral Health Services from the Perspective of Brazilian Users

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Ricardo Dias; Rangel, Marianne de Lucena; da Silva, Marcos André Azevedo; de Lucena, Brunna Thaís Lucwu; Cavalcanti, Alessandro Leite; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti; Oliveira, Julyana de Araújo

    2016-01-01

    The Specialized Dental Clinics (SDCs) represent the first government initiative in Latin America aimed at providing specialized oral health services. This study sought to evaluate the organizational accessibility to specialized oral health care services in Brazil and to understand the factors that may be associated with accessibility from the user’s perspective. This epidemiological, cross-sectional and quantitative study was conducted by means of interviews with individuals who sought specialized public oral health services in the city of João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil, and consisted of a sample of 590 individuals. Users expressed a favorable view of the classification and resolutive nature of specialized services offered by Brazilian public health. The binary logistic regression analysis revealed weak points highlighting the difficulty involved in obtaining such treatments leading to unfavorable evaluations. In the resolutive nature item, difficulty in accessing the location, queues and lack of materials and equipment were highlighted as statistically significant unfavorable aspects. While many of the users considered the service to be resolutive, weaknesses were mentioned that need to be detected to promote improvements and to prevent other health models adopted worldwide from reproducing the same flaws. PMID:27775584

  19. Health Care User Perspectives on Constructing, Contextualizing, and Co-Producing “Quality of Care”

    PubMed Central

    Baim-Lance, Abigail; Tietz, Daniel; Schlefer, Madeleine; Agins, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Most of the research on health care user “quality of care” perspectives seeks discrete and measurable indicators to advance quality improvement (QI) goals. This lacks sufficiently grounded query about the meaning of “quality of care” for health users, and how context influences their ideas and experiences. We studied this between 2010 and 2011, repeatedly interviewing and shadowing 45 individuals in three of New York’s hospital-based outpatient HIV care settings during routine visits. We found participants using common terminology, but across the cohort meaning varied and employed personal narratives. Participants conveyed the impact of historic and current experiences of stigma and discrimination on limiting access to care, and showed its destabilizing effects on quality constructs. Participants also felt they contributed to their health care settings’ delivery of quality care. From our findings, we discuss the applicability and implications of “co-production” to conceptualize health care as jointly delivered by typical “givers” and “receivers” of care. PMID:25670664

  20. Bridging user and provider perspectives: family planning access and utilization in rural Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Agadjanian, Victor; Hayford, Sarah R; Luz, Luciana; Yao, Jing

    2015-08-01

    To examine how the contraceptive behavior of women in rural southern Mozambique is shaped by their individual and household characteristics; community characteristics; access to family planning services; and characteristics of health facilities. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected mostly between January 20 and December 15, 2011, in rural areas of four districts in Gaza Province, Mozambique. The data included: a retrospective household-based survey of women of reproductive age (the analytical sample consisted of 1554 non-pregnant women in marital union); qualitative interviews with a subsample of surveyed women; a survey of communities where the women resided (n=56); and a survey of all health facilities in the study area (n=56). Binomial and multinomial logistic models were fitted to predict current use of modern contraceptive methods. Statistical analyses were complemented by insights from qualitative data. Positive associations were detected between contraceptive use and education, household wealth, and perceived HIV infection status. Distance to the clinic was negatively associated with contraceptive use. These effects were additive, with some varying by type of contraceptive method. Examination of qualitative data highlighted frequent cognitive dissonance between service providers and users. A simultaneous consideration of user-level and provider-level perspectives on contraceptive use improves our understanding of contraceptive dynamics and can usefully inform policy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. End-user support for a primary care electronic medical record: a qualitative case study of a vendor's perspective.

    PubMed

    Shachak, Aviv; Barnsley, Jan; Montgomery, Catherine; Tu, Karen; Jadad, Alejandro R; Lemieux-Charles, Louise

    2012-01-01

    In primary care settings, users often rely on vendors to provide support for health information technology (HIT). Yet, little is known about the vendors' perspectives on the support they provide, how support personnel perceive their roles, the challenges they face and the ways they deal with them. To provide in-depth insight into an electronic medical record (EMR) vendor's perspective on end-user support. As part of a larger case study research, we conducted nine semi-structured interviews with help desk staff, trainers and service managers of an EMR vendor, and observed two training sessions of a new client. With a growing client base, the vendor faced challenges of support staff shortage and high variance in users' technical knowledge. Additionally, users sometimes needed assistance with infrastructure, and not just software problems. These challenges sometimes hindered the provision of timely support and required supporters to possess good interpersonal skills and adapt to diverse client population. This study highlights the complexity of providing end-user support for HIT. With increased adoption, other vendors are likely to face similar challenges. To deal with these issues, supporters need not only strong technical knowledge of the systems, but also good interpersonal communication skills. Some responsibilities may be delegated to super-users. Users may find it useful to hire local IT staff, at least on an on-call basis, to provide assistance with infrastructure problems, which are not supported by the software vendor. Vendors may consider expanding their service packages to cover these elements.

  2. The Crisis in Scholarly Communication, Open Access, and Open Data Policies: The Libraries' Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besara, Rachel

    2015-03-01

    For years the cost of STEM databases have exceeded the rate of inflation. Libraries have reallocated funds for years to continue to provide support to their scientific communities, but they are reaching a point at many institutions where they are no longer able to provide access to many databases considered standard to support research. A possible or partial alleviation to this problem is the federal open access mandate. However, this shift challenges the current model of publishing and data management in the sciences. This talk will discuss these topics from the perspective of research libraries supporting physics and the STEM disciplines.

  3. Fit for purpose: perspectives on rapid reviews from end-user interviews.

    PubMed

    Hartling, Lisa; Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Hempel, Susanne; Featherstone, Robin; Mitchell, Matthew D; Motu'apuaka, Makalapua L; Robinson, Karen A; Schoelles, Karen; Totten, Annette; Whitlock, Evelyn; Wilt, Timothy J; Anderson, Johanna; Berliner, Elise; Gozu, Aysegul; Kato, Elisabeth; Paynter, Robin; Umscheid, Craig A

    2017-02-17

    There is increasing demand for rapid reviews and timely evidence synthesis. The goal of this project was to understand end-user perspectives on the utility and limitations of rapid products including evidence inventories, rapid responses, and rapid reviews. Interviews were conducted with key informants representing: guideline developers (n = 3), health care providers/health system organizations (n = 3), research funders (n = 1), and payers/health insurers (n = 1). We elicited perspectives on important characteristics of systematic reviews, acceptable methods to streamline reviews, and uses of rapid products. We analyzed content of the interview transcripts and identified themes and subthemes. Key informants identified the following as critical features of evidence reviews: (1) originating from a reliable source (i.e., conducted by experienced reviewers from an established research organization), (2) addressing clinically relevant questions, and (3) trusted relationship between the user and producer. Key informants expressed strong preference for the following review methods and characteristics: use of evidence tables, quality rating of studies, assessments of total evidence quality/strength, and use of summary tables for results and conclusions. Most acceptable trade-offs to increase efficiencies were limiting the literature search (e.g., limiting search dates or language) and performing single screening of citations and full texts for relevance. Key informants perceived rapid products (particularly evidence inventories and rapid responses) as useful interim products to inform downstream investigation (e.g., whether to proceed with a full review or guideline, direction for future research). Most key informants indicated that evidence analysis/synthesis and quality/strength of evidence assessments were important for decision-making. They reported that rapid reviews in particular were useful for guideline development on narrow topics, policy decisions

  4. What Do Our Users Want? Perspectives on Understanding and Meeting User Needs for Multi-Mission Data Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Robert E.; Candey, Robert M.; Bilitza, D.

    2006-01-01

    The Sun-Earth Connection Active Archive (SECAA) project of NASA's Space Physics Data Facility operates a range of unique and heavily used multi-mission data services in support of the large-scale science objectives of the Great Observatory, including services such as CDAWeb, the CDAWeb Plus client, SSCWeb, OMNIweb and the CDF data format. In developing and operating these services, we have encountered and continue to struggle with a wide range of issues such as balancing scope and functionality with simplicity and ease of use, understanding the effectiveness of our choices and identifying areas most important for further improvement. In this paper, we will review our key services and then discuss some of our observations and new approaches to understanding and meeting user data service requirements. Some observations are obvious but may still have substantial implications; e.g. functionality without information content is of little user interest, which has led to our recent emphasis on development of web services interfaces, so the content and functionality we already serve is readily and fully available as a building block for new services. Some observations require careful design and tradeoffs; e.g. users will complain when they are offered interfaces with limited options but users are also easily intimidated and become lost when offered extensive options for customization. Some observations remain highly challenging; e.g. a comprehensive multi-mission, multi-source view of all data and services available easily produces a daunting list, but a more selective view can easily lead users to overlook available and relevant data. It is often difficult to obtain and meaningfully interpret measures of true productive usage and overall user satisfaction, even with a variety of techniques including statistics, citations, case studies, user feedback and advisory committees. Most of these issues will apply to and may even be more acute for distributed implementation

  5. What Do Our Users Want? Perspectives on Understanding and Meeting User Needs for Multi-Mission Data Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, R. E.; Candey, R. M.; Bilitza, D.

    2006-05-01

    The Sun-Earth Connection Active Archive (SECAA) project of NASA's Space Physics Data Facility operates a range of unique and heavily used multi-mission data services in support of the large-scale science objectives of the Great Observatory, including services such as CDAWeb, the CDAWeb Plus client, SSCWeb, OMNIweb and the CDF data format. In developing and operating these services, we have encountered and continue to struggle with a wide range of issues such as balancing scope and functionality with simplicity and ease of use, understanding the effectiveness of our choices and identifying areas most important for further improvement. In this paper, we will review our key services and then discuss some of our observations and new approaches to understanding and meeting user data service requirements. Some observations are obvious but may still have substantial implications; e.g. functionality without information content is of little user interest, which has led to our recent emphasis on development of web services interfaces, so the content and functionality we already serve is readily and fully available as a building block for new services. Some observations require careful design and tradeoffs; e.g. users will complain when they are offered interfaces with limited options but users are also easily intimidated and become lost when offered extensive options for customization. Some observations remain highly challenging; e.g. a comprehensive multi-mission, multi-source view of all data and services available easily produces a daunting list, but a more selective view can easily lead users to overlook available and relevant data. It is often difficult to obtain and meaningfully interpret measures of true productive usage and overall user satisfaction, even with a variety of techniques including statistics, citations, case studies, user feedback and advisory committees. Most of these issues will apply to and may even be more acute for distributed implementation

  6. What Do Our Users Want? Perspectives on Understanding and Meeting User Needs for Multi-Mission Data Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Robert E.; Candey, Robert M.; Bilitza, D.

    2006-01-01

    The Sun-Earth Connection Active Archive (SECAA) project of NASA's Space Physics Data Facility operates a range of unique and heavily used multi-mission data services in support of the large-scale science objectives of the Great Observatory, including services such as CDAWeb, the CDAWeb Plus client, SSCWeb, OMNIweb and the CDF data format. In developing and operating these services, we have encountered and continue to struggle with a wide range of issues such as balancing scope and functionality with simplicity and ease of use, understanding the effectiveness of our choices and identifying areas most important for further improvement. In this paper, we will review our key services and then discuss some of our observations and new approaches to understanding and meeting user data service requirements. Some observations are obvious but may still have substantial implications; e.g. functionality without information content is of little user interest, which has led to our recent emphasis on development of web services interfaces, so the content and functionality we already serve is readily and fully available as a building block for new services. Some observations require careful design and tradeoffs; e.g. users will complain when they are offered interfaces with limited options but users are also easily intimidated and become lost when offered extensive options for customization. Some observations remain highly challenging; e.g. a comprehensive multi-mission, multi-source view of all data and services available easily produces a daunting list, but a more selective view can easily lead users to overlook available and relevant data. It is often difficult to obtain and meaningfully interpret measures of true productive usage and overall user satisfaction, even with a variety of techniques including statistics, citations, case studies, user feedback and advisory committees. Most of these issues will apply to and may even be more acute for distributed implementation

  7. Medical device innovation: prospective solutions for an ecosystem in crisis. Adding a professional society perspective.

    PubMed

    Krucoff, Mitchell W; Brindis, Ralph G; Hodgson, Patricia K; Mack, Michael J; Holmes, David R

    2012-07-01

    Barriers to medical device innovation compromise timelines and costs from bench to bedside. Fragmented strategies by individual competitors are no longer sustainable. Pragmatically focused pre-competitive collaboration across stakeholders approaches innovation as an ecosystem. Desiloing experience and expertise encourages high-impact infrastructure efficiencies unique to pre-competitive constructs. Alignment of processes and objectives across the regulatory, reimbursement, clinical research, and clinical practice enterprises, with particular attention to the total product life cycle and continuous accrual of safety information, promotes more predictable equipoise for speed of access relative to residual safety concerns. Professional societies are well positioned to convene pre-competitive dialogue, facilitate alignment, and add perspective to equipoise within the innovation ecosystem.

  8. Transitioning from Free-Flight to TRACON Airspace: The Ground Perspective of User-Preferred Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevot, Thomas; Smith, Nancy; Palmer, Everett; Null, Cynthia (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Free-flight is considered to play a major role in the future air traffic environment. Studies are underway addressing different concepts for free-flight and self separation in enroute airspace. One common opinion throughout the different concepts is that the airspace surrounding major airports, the Terminal Radar Approach CONtrol (TRACON) will not be a free flight area. This means that aircraft in this area are completely controlled by air traffic controllers, who may be supported by decision support system like the Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS). How the transition from the free-flight area (enroute airspace) to the terminal area will take place is currently unclear, This paper describes a study at NASA Ames Research Center addressing the perspective of air traffic controllers handling user-preferred (FMS-optimized) descent trajectories during this transition phase. Two major issues in enabling user preferred descents from the controllers' point of view are predictability and controllability. In an environment in which the air traffic services are highly responsive to user preferences controllers need to know, where and when aircraft will change their trajectory and they need to have appropriate means and procedures at hand to control the aircraft according to the overall traffic situation. Predictability shall be enhanced by: 1) Indicating airspace corridors for descending aircraft; 2) Modify the controller interface; 3) Using a ground based conflict probe; 4) Making use of downlinked intent information from the aircraft FMS; and 5) Requiring to fly pilots on user preferred trajectories coupled to the FMS in the lateral and vertical axis. Additional controllability shall be achieved by supporting the controllers with CTAS center tools: 1) Traffic Management Advisor (TMA); 2) Conflict Probing and Trial Planning (CP/TP); and 3) Enroute Descent Advisor (E/DA). The paper describes the general concept and the modifications to current systems required to enable

  9. Defining continuity of care from the perspectives of mental health service users and professionals: an exploratory, comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Angela; Davies, Jonathon; McLaren, Susan; Whittock, Margaret; Lemma, Ferew; Belling, Ruth; Clement, Sarah; Burns, Tom; Catty, Jocelyn; Jones, Ian Rees; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2016-08-01

    Continuity of care (COC) is central to the organization and delivery of mental health services. Traditional definitions have excluded service users, and this lack of involvement has been linked to poor conceptual clarity surrounding the term. Consequently, very little is known about the differences and similarities in the conceptualization of COC by mental health service users and professionals. To explore and compare mental health service users' and professionals' definitions of COC. Using an exploratory, qualitative design, five focus groups with 32 service users each met twice. Data were analysed thematically to generate a service user-defined model of COC. In a cross-sectional survey, health and social care professionals (n = 184) defined COC; responses were analysed thematically. Service user and professional definitions were conceptually mapped and compared to identify similarities and differences. There was crossover between the service user and professional derived models of COC. Both contained temporal, quality, systemic, staff, hospital and needs-related elements of COC. Service users prioritized access, information, peer support and avoiding services; health professionals most frequently referred to staff, cross-sectional and temporal COC. Service users alone identified service avoidance, peer support and day centres as COC elements; professionals alone identified cross-sectional working. Important similarities and differences exist in service user and professional conceptualizations of COC. Further research is necessary to explore these differences, prior to integrating service user and professional perspectives in a validated COC framework which could enable the development and evaluation of interventions to improve COC, informing policy and practice. © 2015 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Understanding readmission to psychiatric hospital in Australia from the service users' perspective: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Duhig, Michael; Gunasekara, Imani; Patterson, Sue

    2017-01-01

    Inpatient care is integral to balanced mental health systems, contributing to containment of risk associated with psychiatric crises and affording opportunities for treatment. However, psychiatric wards are not always safe and service users are often dissatisfied with the experience. Hence, and because inpatient care is the most costly component of mental health systems, minimising duration of admission and reducing risk of readmission are clinical and strategic priorities internationally. With (primarily quantitative) research to date focused on explaining readmission in terms of characteristics of individuals and services, understanding of the 'revolving door phenomenon' remains limited. Considering verstehen critical to addressing this messy problem, we examined readmission from the service users' perspective. Using grounded theory techniques, we inductively analysed data from interviews with 13 people readmitted to inpatient care within 28 days of discharge. Participants, including eight men, were recruited in 2013 from three psychiatric wards at a metropolitan hospital in Australia. Analysis supported description of readmission as a process, fundamentally related to insufficiency of internal, interpersonal and/or environmental resources to maintain community tenure. For the people in this study, admission to hospital was either the default coping mechanism or the culmination of counter-productive attempts to manage stressful circumstances. Readmission can appropriately be understood as one representation of a fundamental social malaise and the struggle of some people to survive in an apparently inhospitable world. The findings indicate that neither locating the 'problem of readmission' within an individual and promoting self-governance/self-control/self-regulation, nor identifying failures of specific services or sectors are likely to support the economic and ethical imperative of reducing psychiatric admissions. The findings of the study and limitations

  11. Direct-to-consumer genomic testing: systematic review of the literature on user perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Lesley; Jackson, Leigh; O'Connor, Anita; Skirton, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Genetic tests have traditionally been offered by health professionals. However, genomic tests have been available direct to the consumer for the last decade, increasingly via the Internet. The aim of this systematic review was to ascertain the evidence concerning use of direct-to-consumer genomic testing from the consumer perspective. Primary research was identified using the search terms ‘direct-to-consumer' and ‘genomic or genetic' in six bibliographic databases and citation searching of findings. In all, 17 papers were reviewed: 3 qualitative and 14 quantitative. Findings indicate a low level of awareness of direct-to-consumer genomic testing and, because of the hypothetical nature of many studies, little evidence from users of such tests. Although potential users appear to be interested in information about their risks of developing common diseases, concerns were expressed about privacy of genetic risk information and the reliability of genomic tests. Consumers were anxious about the nature of the results. There appeared to be a preference to access genomic tests via a health professional, or to discuss the results and obtain advice from a health professional. Authors of only two papers recruited participants who had used direct-to-consumer tests and samples from the large quantitative studies were not representative of the population. These factors limit the value of the available evidence. However, we conclude that there is public interest in direct-to-consumer genomic tests, and that this is likely to result in an increased workload for a range of health professionals. We also consider that there are educational implications for both consumers and health professionals. PMID:22333900

  12. Social media in health professional education: a student perspective on user levels and prospective applications.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Stephen; Moss, Alan; Ilic, Dragan

    2014-12-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNS) have seen exponential growth in recent years. The high utilisation of SNS by tertiary students makes them an attractive tool for educational institutions. This study aims to identify health professional students' use and behaviours with SNS, including students' perspectives on potential applications within health professional curricula. Students enrolled in an undergraduate physiotherapy program were invited to take part in an anonymous, online questionnaire at the end of 2012. The survey consisted of 20 items, gathering demographic data, information on current use of SNS, and opinions regarding the application of SNS into education. Both quantitative and qualitative data were gathered. A total of 142 students, from all years of study, completed the online questionnaire. Only two participants were not current users of social media. Facebook and YouTube had been utilised for educational purposes by 97 and 60 % of participants respectively; 85 % believed that SNS could benefit their learning experience. Only five respondents were not interested in following peers, academic staff, clinicians or professional associations on Facebook. Four key themes emerged: peer collaboration, need for separation between personal and professional realms, complimentary learning and enhanced communication. Students wish to make educational connections via SNS, yet expressed a strong desire to maintain privacy, and a distinction between personal and professional lives. Educational utilisation of SNS may improve communication speed and accessibility. Any educator involvement should be viewed with caution.

  13. User Perspectives of Characteristics of Improved Cookstoves from a Field Evaluation in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Loo, Jennifer D; Hyseni, Lirije; Ouda, Rosebel; Koske, Selline; Nyagol, Ronald; Sadumah, Ibrahim; Bashin, Michelle; Sage, Mike; Bruce, Nigel; Pilishvili, Tamara; Stanistreet, Debbi

    2016-01-27

    Over half of the world's population uses biomass fuels; these households cook on open fires indoors, increasing their risk of adverse health effects due to household air pollution (HAP) from biomass combustion. This study evaluated six improved cookstoves (ICS) for effectiveness and acceptability in a rural community in Western Kenya. This paper describes women's views on each ICS compared to the traditional three-stone fire. Views on stove characteristics, fuel consumption, health effects and acceptability were assessed through structured interviews and focus group discussions. Data were coded and analyzed using a thematic approach. In total, 262 interviews and 11 focus groups were conducted from 43 women. Overall, women preferred the ICS over the traditional three-stone fire for various reasons including ease of use, efficiency, fuel efficiency and perceived reduction in smoke and improved health. However, there were clear preferences for specific ICS with almost half of women preferring a Philips stove. Despite acceptance and use of ICS, women used multiple stoves to meet their daily needs. Qualitative studies are essential to field evaluations to provide insight into user perspectives and acceptability of ICS and to inform research and development of technologies that are both effective in reducing HAP and practical in use.

  14. User Perspectives of Characteristics of Improved Cookstoves from a Field Evaluation in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Jennifer D.; Hyseni, Lirije; Ouda, Rosebel; Koske, Selline; Nyagol, Ronald; Sadumah, Ibrahim; Bashin, Michelle; Sage, Mike; Bruce, Nigel; Pilishvili, Tamara; Stanistreet, Debbi

    2016-01-01

    Over half of the world’s population uses biomass fuels; these households cook on open fires indoors, increasing their risk of adverse health effects due to household air pollution (HAP) from biomass combustion. This study evaluated six improved cookstoves (ICS) for effectiveness and acceptability in a rural community in Western Kenya. This paper describes women’s views on each ICS compared to the traditional three-stone fire. Views on stove characteristics, fuel consumption, health effects and acceptability were assessed through structured interviews and focus group discussions. Data were coded and analyzed using a thematic approach. In total, 262 interviews and 11 focus groups were conducted from 43 women. Overall, women preferred the ICS over the traditional three-stone fire for various reasons including ease of use, efficiency, fuel efficiency and perceived reduction in smoke and improved health. However, there were clear preferences for specific ICS with almost half of women preferring a Philips stove. Despite acceptance and use of ICS, women used multiple stoves to meet their daily needs. Qualitative studies are essential to field evaluations to provide insight into user perspectives and acceptability of ICS and to inform research and development of technologies that are both effective in reducing HAP and practical in use. PMID:26828505

  15. Engaging Consumers with Musculoskeletal Conditions in Health Research: A User-Centred Perspective.

    PubMed

    Pang, Patrick Cheong-Iao; Clavisi, Ornella; Chang, Shanton

    2017-01-01

    Consumers are frequently involved in different kinds of health research, such as clinical trials, focus groups, and surveys. As pointed out by different studies, recruiting and involving consumers to participate in academic research can be challenging. While different research and guidelines are provided to instruct researchers to recruit participants ethically, they seldom consider the needs and expectations of consumers. In this research, we interviewed 23 consumers with musculoskeletal conditions in Australia, to understand their needs and motivations for participating in research from a user-centred perspective. Based on these data, we systematically summarise consumers' feedback into four main themes: (1) Research as Learning Opportunity; (2) The Important Role of Communities and Health Professionals; (3) Research Transparency and Updates; and (4) Special Needs for People with MSK Conditions. As a result, a few recommendations are proposed and researchers should further consider these when designing consumer-based studies. Ultimately, with a better understanding of consumers, we hope that our research can enhance consumer engagement and improve their participation in health research.

  16. The End User and the Librarian: Perspectives from a DIALOG Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmsted, Marcia

    1986-01-01

    Trends in online searching are discussed in terms of how end users continue to change role of the librarian and information specialist. Identification and description of end users, user-friendly information retrieval systems, front-end software packages, and current and potential developments in end user searching are covered. Ten readings are…

  17. Service user perspectives of a psychoeducation group for individuals with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Caroline; Gordon, Olivia; Graham, Marie; Kelly, Finian; O'Grady-Walshe, Ann

    2008-07-01

    Group psychoeducation, incorporating cognitive-behavioral techniques, is increasingly used as part of the treatment package for bipolar disorder. The aim of this study was to explore service-users' perspectives of a psychoeducation group which was run in the context of a community mental health service. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 participants who had completed a psychoeducation group for individuals with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. The verbatim transcripts of those interviews were analyzed using IPA. Three superordinate themes emerged from the data, including the treatment of bipolar disorder, perception of others, and learning from the group. From the perspectives of the service-users, positive working alliances with mental health professionals and the need for a treatment strategy that matches the individual's own approach to their illness were highlighted as benefits of participation in the group.

  18. A Preliminary Investigation of User Perception and Behavioral Intention for Different Review Types: Customers and Designers Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Atika; Waheed, Mahwish; Abraham, Ajith

    2014-01-01

    Existing opinion mining studies have focused on and explored only two types of reviews, that is, regular and comparative. There is a visible gap in determining the useful review types from customers and designers perspective. Based on Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and statistical measures we examine users' perception about different review types and its effects in terms of behavioral intention towards using online review system. By using sample of users (N = 400) and designers (N = 106), current research work studies three review types, A (regular), B (comparative), and C (suggestive), which are related to perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and behavioral intention. The study reveals that positive perception of the use of suggestive reviews improves users' decision making in business intelligence. The results also depict that type C (suggestive reviews) could be considered a new useful review type in addition to other types, A and B. PMID:24711739

  19. A preliminary investigation of user perception and behavioral intention for different review types: customers and designers perspective.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Atika; Raj, Ram Gopal; Tahir, Muhammad; Waheed, Mehwish; Waheed, Mahwish; Khan, Saif Ur Rehman; Abraham, Ajith

    2014-01-01

    Existing opinion mining studies have focused on and explored only two types of reviews, that is, regular and comparative. There is a visible gap in determining the useful review types from customers and designers perspective. Based on Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and statistical measures we examine users' perception about different review types and its effects in terms of behavioral intention towards using online review system. By using sample of users (N = 400) and designers (N = 106), current research work studies three review types, A (regular), B (comparative), and C (suggestive), which are related to perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and behavioral intention. The study reveals that positive perception of the use of suggestive reviews improves users' decision making in business intelligence. The results also depict that type C (suggestive reviews) could be considered a new useful review type in addition to other types, A and B.

  20. Atomic and Molecular Input Data for Plasma Modelling: a user's perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, Jan

    2012-10-01

    With the advent of cheap, yet powerful computers, self-consistent numerical simulation has become a viable tool for understanding, designing and improving technological and scientific plasma sources. Nowadays, multi-dimensional models that are capable of simulating time-dependent discharge behaviour are in use at various universities and research institutes. One such computer code is Plasimo, a PLAsma SImulation MOdel that is being developed at Eindhoven University of Technology (http://plasimo.phys.tue.nl). Plasimo provides kinetic (Monte Carlo), hybrid and fluid models for transport-sensitive and equilibrium plasma. It is obvious that codes like Plasimo require a multitude of input data to function properly, but the measurement or calculation of such data is mostly outside the project's reach. In this contribution we, as Plasimo developers, will therefore provide a user's perspective of the subject of atomic and plasma data. In the first part of this contribution, we will provide an overview of the various sorts of input data that are needed for the types of plasma modelling that are supported by Plasimo. The discussion will be guided by real-world examples of models for low- and high-pressure plasma sources. In the second part of the contribution, we will discuss how modern Internet technologies can help us to fulfill our input data needs. As of today, input data are typically either hard-coded in computer programs, or read from local input files. Moreover, data pre-processing tasks, like integrating cross sections to rate coefficients, are usually carried out locally as well. We will demonstrate how Web Services (http://www.w3.org/2002/ws/) can be used to manage, disseminate and manipulate data sets more conveniently. We will also identify various input data pre-processing tasks that could be taken over by data distributors, suggest how this could be implemented, and sketch the work flow that would result from such effort.

  1. On the crisis of conscience.

    PubMed

    Lachter, Bruce

    2012-04-01

    This paper examines the crisis of conscience as portrayed in the biblical story of Abraham and Isaac. The perspective of allegory allows intense emotion to be contained, and placed in a socio-cultural context, which may work against bloodshed.

  2. The Rules of Engagement: Perspectives on Secure Messaging From Experienced Ambulatory Patient Portal Users.

    PubMed

    Sieck, Cynthia J; Hefner, Jennifer L; Schnierle, Jeanette; Florian, Hannah; Agarwal, Aradhna; Rundell, Kristen; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2017-07-04

    Patient portals have shown promise in engaging individuals in self-management of chronic conditions by allowing patients to input and track health information and exchange secure electronic messages with their providers. Past studies have identified patient barriers to portal use including usability issues, low health literacy, and concerns about loss of personal contact as well as provider concerns such as increased time spent responding to messages. However, to date, studies of both patient and provider perspectives on portal use have focused on the pre-implementation or initial implementation phases and do not consider how these issues may change as patients and providers gain greater experience with portals. Our study examined the following research question: Within primary care offices with high rates of patient-portal use, what do experienced physician and patient users of the ambulatory portal perceive as the benefits and challenges of portal use in general and secure messaging in particular? This qualitative study involved 42 interviews with experienced physician and patient users of an ambulatory patient portal, Epic's MyChart. Participants were recruited from the Department of Family Medicine at a large Academic Medical Center (AMC) and included providers and their patients, who had been diagnosed with at least one chronic condition. A total of 29 patients and 13 primary care physicians participated in the interviews. All interviews were conducted by telephone and followed a semistructured interview guide. Interviews were transcribed verbatim to permit rigorous qualitative analysis. Both inductive and deductive methods were used to code and analyze the data iteratively, paying particular attention to themes involving secure messaging. Experienced portal users discussed several emergent themes related to a need for greater clarity on when and how to use the secure messaging feature. Patient concerns included worry about imposing on their physician's time

  3. The Rules of Engagement: Perspectives on Secure Messaging From Experienced Ambulatory Patient Portal Users

    PubMed Central

    Schnierle, Jeanette; Florian, Hannah; Agarwal, Aradhna; Rundell, Kristen; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2017-01-01

    Background Patient portals have shown promise in engaging individuals in self-management of chronic conditions by allowing patients to input and track health information and exchange secure electronic messages with their providers. Past studies have identified patient barriers to portal use including usability issues, low health literacy, and concerns about loss of personal contact as well as provider concerns such as increased time spent responding to messages. However, to date, studies of both patient and provider perspectives on portal use have focused on the pre-implementation or initial implementation phases and do not consider how these issues may change as patients and providers gain greater experience with portals. Objective Our study examined the following research question: Within primary care offices with high rates of patient-portal use, what do experienced physician and patient users of the ambulatory portal perceive as the benefits and challenges of portal use in general and secure messaging in particular? Methods This qualitative study involved 42 interviews with experienced physician and patient users of an ambulatory patient portal, Epic’s MyChart. Participants were recruited from the Department of Family Medicine at a large Academic Medical Center (AMC) and included providers and their patients, who had been diagnosed with at least one chronic condition. A total of 29 patients and 13 primary care physicians participated in the interviews. All interviews were conducted by telephone and followed a semistructured interview guide. Interviews were transcribed verbatim to permit rigorous qualitative analysis. Both inductive and deductive methods were used to code and analyze the data iteratively, paying particular attention to themes involving secure messaging. Results Experienced portal users discussed several emergent themes related to a need for greater clarity on when and how to use the secure messaging feature. Patient concerns included worry

  4. Effects of financial crisis on the industry sector of Chinese stock market — from a perspective of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chunxia; Chen, Yanhua; Hao, Weiwei; Shen, Ying; Tang, Minxuan; Niu, Lei

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we use mutual information to measure the statistical interdependence between 23 industry sectors of Shanghai stock market and construct corresponding correlation network to analyze the shock of 2008 financial crisis on industry sectors. The obtained meaningful facts are as follows. First, such crisis has only a limited impact on leading industries such as Manufacturing, Commercial trade and Machinery & Equipment, which still play an important role in Chinese economy. Second, the crisis badly attacks China's export industries like Electronics, Wood & Furniture and Textile & Clothing. The damage further hurts other industries, and then export industries' influence becomes larger. Third, the crisis adversely impacts the import industries like Petrochemical, Metal & Nonmetal and Pharmaceutical Biotechnology. While due to the stimulation of macroeconomic policies, the influence of crisis on import industries is limited. Similarly, due to relatively strict capital control and the macroeconomic policies stimulating the domestic demand, those industries like Construction, Real Estate and Financial Services are slightly wounded. All these findings suggest that Chinese government should transform from the external demand to the domestic consumption to sustain economic growth.

  5. Using heart rate monitors for personal wellness--the user experience perspective.

    PubMed

    Ahtinen, Aino; Mantyjarvi, Jani; Hakkila, Jonna

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a user study of the heart rate monitors (HRM), which is a commonly used personal wellness technology. HRMs have been used over several years for adjusting the exercise level and in the advanced form, also for measuring the users' fitness level and its progress. The user study included interviews with the HRM users and a survey with over 860 active or former users. We identified four different types of HRM users based on the current usage activity and their perceived progress of usage motivation within time, and compared their perceptions of the strengths and weaknesses related to HRMs. The findings provide valuable information for understanding the end-user needs and background knowledge for developing personal wellness technologies and applications further.

  6. Comparison of user groups' perspectives of barriers and facilitators to implementing electronic health records: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    of time and workload. Each user group also identified factors specific to their professional and individual priorities. Conclusions This systematic review presents innovative research on the barriers and facilitators to EHR implementation. While important similarities between user groups are highlighted, differences between them demonstrate that each user group also has a unique perspective of the implementation process that should be taken into account. PMID:21524315

  7. Analyzing and Predicting User Participations in Online Health Communities: A Social Support Perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Zhao, Kang; Street, Nick

    2017-04-24

    Online health communities (OHCs) have become a major source of social support for people with health problems. Members of OHCs interact online with similar peers to seek, receive, and provide different types of social support, such as informational support, emotional support, and companionship. As active participations in an OHC are beneficial to both the OHC and its users, it is important to understand factors related to users' participations and predict user churn for user retention efforts. This study aimed to analyze OHC users' Web-based interactions, reveal which types of social support activities are related to users' participation, and predict whether and when a user will churn from the OHC. We collected a large-scale dataset from a popular OHC for cancer survivors. We used text mining techniques to decide what kinds of social support each post contained. We illustrated how we built text classifiers for 5 different social support categories: seeking informational support (SIS), providing informational support (PIS), seeking emotional support (SES), providing emotional support (PES), and companionship (COM). We conducted survival analysis to identify types of social support related to users' continued participation. Using supervised machine learning methods, we developed a predictive model for user churn. Users' behaviors to PIS, SES, and COM had hazard ratios significantly lower than 1 (0.948, 0.972, and 0.919, respectively) and were indicative of continued participations in the OHC. The churn prediction model based on social support activities offers accurate predictions on whether and when a user will leave the OHC. Detecting different types of social support activities via text mining contributes to better understanding and prediction of users' participations in an OHC. The outcome of this study can help the management and design of a sustainable OHC via more proactive and effective user retention strategies.

  8. Communications and Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, Robert L.

    At a time of urban crisis, it becomes essential for people to learn about the special problems and needs of other people in the same community. If not actual experience, then visual experience through television can provide a good view into the perspective of other cultures. Television has an obligation to provide education of this sort,…

  9. Managing a Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Planning ahead, practicing your response for various scenarios, being open and honest, showing empathy and respect for other peoples' perspectives and assuring stakeholders that you have the situation covered are the foundations of communicating successfully during a crisis, experts say. This article provides strategies for Community College…

  10. Managing a Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Planning ahead, practicing your response for various scenarios, being open and honest, showing empathy and respect for other peoples' perspectives and assuring stakeholders that you have the situation covered are the foundations of communicating successfully during a crisis, experts say. This article provides strategies for Community College…

  11. Service user involvement enhanced the research quality in a study using interpretative phenomenological analysis - the power of multiple perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mjøsund, Nina Helen; Eriksson, Monica; Espnes, Geir Arild; Haaland-Øverby, Mette; Jensen, Sven Liang; Norheim, Irene; Kjus, Solveig Helene Høymork; Portaasen, Inger-Lill; Vinje, Hege Forbech

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how service user involvement can contribute to the development of interpretative phenomenological analysis methodology and enhance research quality. Interpretative phenomenological analysis is a qualitative methodology used in nursing research internationally to understand human experiences that are essential to the participants. Service user involvement is requested in nursing research. We share experiences from 4 years of collaboration (2012-2015) on a mental health promotion project, which involved an advisory team. Five research advisors either with a diagnosis or related to a person with severe mental illness constituted the team. They collaborated with the research fellow throughout the entire research process and have co-authored this article. We examined the joint process of analysing the empirical data from interviews. Our analytical discussions were audiotaped, transcribed and subsequently interpreted following the guidelines for good qualitative analysis in interpretative phenomenological analysis studies. The advisory team became 'the researcher's helping hand'. Multiple perspectives influenced the qualitative analysis, which gave more insightful interpretations of nuances, complexity, richness or ambiguity in the interviewed participants' accounts. The outcome of the service user involvement was increased breadth and depth in findings. Service user involvement improved the research quality in a nursing research project on mental health promotion. The interpretative element of interpretative phenomenological analysis was enhanced by the emergence of multiple perspectives in the qualitative analysis of the empirical data. We argue that service user involvement and interpretative phenomenological analysis methodology can mutually reinforce each other and strengthen qualitative methodology. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Quality of integrated chronic disease care in rural South Africa: user and provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ameh, Soter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; D'ambruoso, Lucia; Kahn, Kathleen; Tollman, Stephen M; Gómez-Olivé, Francesc Xavier

    2016-09-01

    The integrated chronic disease management (ICDM) model was introduced as a response to the dual burden of HIV/AIDS and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in South Africa, one of the first of such efforts by an African Ministry of Health. The aim of the ICDM model is to leverage HIV programme innovations to improve the quality of chronic disease care. There is a dearth of literature on the perspectives of healthcare providers and users on the quality of care in the novel ICDM model. This paper describes the viewpoints of operational managers and patients regarding quality of care in the ICDM model.In 2013, we conducted a case study of the seven PHC facilities in the rural Agincourt sub-district in northeast South Africa. Focus group discussions (n = 8) were used to obtain data from 56 purposively selected patients ≥18 years. In-depth interviews were conducted with operational managers of each facility and the sub-district health manager. Donabedian's structure, process and outcome theory for service quality evaluation underpinned the conceptual framework in this study. Qualitative data were analysed, with MAXQDA 2 software, to identify 17 a priori dimensions of care and unanticipated themes that emerged during the analysis.The manager and patient narratives showed the inadequacies in structure (malfunctioning blood pressure machines and staff shortage); process (irregular prepacking of drugs); and outcome (long waiting times). There was discordance between managers and patients regarding reasons for long patient waiting time which managers attributed to staff shortage and missed appointments, while patients ascribed it to late arrival of managers to the clinics. Patients reported anti-hypertension drug stock-outs (structure); sub-optimal defaulter-tracing (process); rigid clinic appointment system (process). Emerging themes showed that patients reported HIV stigmatisation in the community due to defaulter-tracing activities of home-based carers, while managers

  13. Quality of integrated chronic disease care in rural South Africa: user and provider perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; D’ambruoso, Lucia; Kahn, Kathleen; Tollman, Stephen M; Gómez-Olivé, Francesc Xavier

    2017-01-01

    The integrated chronic disease management (ICDM) model was introduced as a response to the dual burden of HIV/AIDS and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in South Africa, one of the first of such efforts by an African Ministry of Health. The aim of the ICDM model is to leverage HIV programme innovations to improve the quality of chronic disease care. There is a dearth of literature on the perspectives of healthcare providers and users on the quality of care in the novel ICDM model. This paper describes the viewpoints of operational managers and patients regarding quality of care in the ICDM model. In 2013, we conducted a case study of the seven PHC facilities in the rural Agincourt sub-district in northeast South Africa. Focus group discussions (n = 8) were used to obtain data from 56 purposively selected patients ≥18 years. In-depth interviews were conducted with operational managers of each facility and the sub-district health manager. Donabedian’s structure, process and outcome theory for service quality evaluation underpinned the conceptual framework in this study. Qualitative data were analysed, with MAXQDA 2 software, to identify 17 a priori dimensions of care and unanticipated themes that emerged during the analysis. The manager and patient narratives showed the inadequacies in structure (malfunctioning blood pressure machines and staff shortage); process (irregular prepacking of drugs); and outcome (long waiting times). There was discordance between managers and patients regarding reasons for long patient waiting time which managers attributed to staff shortage and missed appointments, while patients ascribed it to late arrival of managers to the clinics. Patients reported anti-hypertension drug stock-outs (structure); sub-optimal defaulter-tracing (process); rigid clinic appointment system (process). Emerging themes showed that patients reported HIV stigmatisation in the community due to defaulter-tracing activities of home-based carers, while

  14. Power mobility with collision avoidance for older adults: user, caregiver, and prescriber perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rosalie H; Korotchenko, Alexandra; Hurd Clarke, Laura; Mortenson, W Ben; Mihailidis, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Collision avoidance technology has the capacity to facilitate safer mobility among older power mobility users with physical, sensory, and cognitive impairments, thus enabling independence for more users. Little is known about consumers' perceptions of collision avoidance. This article draws on interviews (29 users, 5 caregivers, and 10 prescribers) to examine views on design and utilization of this technology. Data analysis identified three themes: "useful situations or contexts," "technology design issues and real-life application," and "appropriateness of collision avoidance technology for a variety of users." Findings support ongoing development of collision avoidance for older adult users. The majority of participants supported the technology and felt that it might benefit current users and users with visual impairments, but might be unsuitable for people with significant cognitive impairments. Some participants voiced concerns regarding the risk for injury with power mobility use and some identified situations where collision avoidance might be beneficial (driving backward, avoiding dynamic obstacles, negotiating outdoor barriers, and learning power mobility use). Design issues include the need for context awareness, reliability, and user interface specifications. User desire to maintain driving autonomy supports development of collaboratively controlled systems. This research lays the groundwork for future development by illustrating consumer requirements for this technology.

  15. Understanding the online health information user profiles in Korea: from a psychological perspective.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung Hee; Yun, Eun Kyoung

    2011-06-01

    This study was conducted to explore the profiles of online health information users in terms of certain psychological characteristics and to suggest guidelines for the provision of better user-oriented health information service. The cross-sectional study design was used with convenient sampling by Web-based questionnaire survey in Korea. To analyze health information user profiles on the Internet, a two-step cluster analysis was conducted. The results reveal that online health information users can be classified into four groups according to their level of subjective knowledge and health concern. The findings also suggest that four clusters that exhibit distinct profile patterns exist. The findings of this study would be useful for health portal developers who would like to understand users' characteristics and behaviors and to provide more user-oriented service in a satisfactory manner. It is suggested that to develop a full understanding of users' behaviors regarding Internet health information service, further research would be needed to explore users' various needs, their preferences, and relevant factors among users across a variety of health problem-addressing Web sites at different professional levels.

  16. Current Crisis in Science Education? Women in Science and Problems for the Behavioral Scientists. Some Perspectives of a Physicist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    A number of problems exist in society which require the cooperation of physical and social scientists. One of these problems is the current crisis in science education. There are several aspects to this problem, including the declining interest of students in math and science at a time when functioning in our society requires more, not less,…

  17. Current Crisis in Science Education? Women in Science and Problems for the Behavioral Scientists. Some Perspectives of a Physicist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    A number of problems exist in society which require the cooperation of physical and social scientists. One of these problems is the current crisis in science education. There are several aspects to this problem, including the declining interest of students in math and science at a time when functioning in our society requires more, not less,…

  18. Hypertensive Crisis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Hypertensive Crisis: When You Should Call 9-1-1 for ... 18,2017 Know the two types of HBP crisis to watch for A hypertensive ( high blood pressure ) ...

  19. Power Mobility with Collision Avoidance for Older Adults: User, Caregiver and Prescriber Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rosalie H; Korotchenko, Alexandra; Clarke, Laura Hurd; Ben Mortenson, W; Mihailidis, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Collision avoidance technology has the capacity to facilitate safer mobility among older power mobility users with physical, sensory and cognitive impairments, thus enabling independence for more potential users. However, little is known about consumers’ perceptions of collision avoidance. This article draws on interviews with 29 users, five caregivers, and 10 prescribers to examine views on the design and utilization of this technology. Data analysis identified three themes: “useful situations or contexts”, “technology design issues and real life application”, and “appropriateness of collision avoidance technology for a variety of users”. Findings support the ongoing development of collision avoidance for older adult users. The majority of participants were supportive of the technology, and felt that it might benefit current power mobility users and users with visual impairments, but might be unsuitable for people with significant cognitive impairments. Some participants voiced concerns regarding the risk for injury with power mobility use and some identified situations where collision avoidance might be beneficial (driving backwards, avoiding dynamic obstacles, negotiating outdoor barriers, and learning power mobility use). Design issues include the need for context awareness, reliability, and user interface specifications. Furthermore, user desire to maintain driving autonomy indicates the need to develop collaboratively-controlled systems. This research lays the groundwork for future development by identifying and illustrating consumer needs for this technology. PMID:24458968

  20. Myasthenic Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Wendell, Linda C.; Levine, Joshua M.

    2011-01-01

    Myasthenic crisis is a complication of myasthenia gravis characterized by worsening of muscle weakness, resulting in respiratory failure that requires intubation and mechanical ventilation. Advances in critical care have improved the mortality rate associated with myasthenic crisis. This article reviews the epidemiology of myasthenic crisis and discusses patient evaluation. Therapeutic options including mechanical ventilation and pharmacological and surgical treatments are also discussed. PMID:23983833

  1. Adaptation and development of software simulation methodologies for cardiovascular engineering: present and future challenges from an end-user perspective.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Zuccarini, V; Narracott, A J; Burriesci, G; Zervides, C; Rafiroiu, D; Jones, D; Hose, D R; Lawford, P V

    2009-07-13

    This paper describes the use of diverse software tools in cardiovascular applications. These tools were primarily developed in the field of engineering and the applications presented push the boundaries of the software to address events related to venous and arterial valve closure, exploration of dynamic boundary conditions or the inclusion of multi-scale boundary conditions from protein to organ levels. The future of cardiovascular research and the challenges that modellers and clinicians face from validation to clinical uptake are discussed from an end-user perspective.

  2. Adaptation and development of software simulation methodologies for cardiovascular engineering: present and future challenges from an end-user perspective

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Zuccarini, V.; Narracott, A.J.; Burriesci, G.; Zervides, C.; Rafiroiu, D.; Jones, D.; Hose, D.R.; Lawford, P.V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the use of diverse software tools in cardiovascular applications. These tools were primarily developed in the field of engineering and the applications presented push the boundaries of the software to address events related to venous and arterial valve closure, exploration of dynamic boundary conditions or the inclusion of multi-scale boundary conditions from protein to organ levels. The future of cardiovascular research and the challenges that modellers and clinicians face from validation to clinical uptake are discussed from an end-user perspective. PMID:19487202

  3. Provider and service-user perspectives of volunteer health-worker service provision in Ayeyarwady Region, Myanmar: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Nicola; Yupar, Aye; Sender, Paul; Campbell, Fiona; Legido-Quigley, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore perspectives and reported experiences of service users, community providers and policymakers related to volunteer health-worker services provision in a rural area of Myanmar. Methods A qualitative interview study was conducted in rural communities with 54 service users and 17 community providers in Ayeyarwady Region, Myanmar, and with 14 national managers and policymakers in Yangon Myanmar. Topics included reasons for seeking health services, views and experiences, and comparison with experiences of other services. Data were analysed thematically using deductive and inductive coding. Results Accessibility and affordability were important to all participants. Service users described the particular relevance of trust, familiarity and acceptability in choosing a provider. Perceived quality and effectiveness were necessary for trust to develop. Perceived value of volunteers was a cross-cutting dimension, which was interpreted differently by different participants. Conclusions Results suggest that volunteers are appropriate and valued, and support ‘availability’, ‘accessibility’ and ‘acceptability’ as dimensions of health services access in this setting. However, social complexities should be considered to ensure effective service delivery. Further research into trust-building, developing quality perceptions and resulting service-user choices would be useful to inform effective policy and planning. PMID:27940629

  4. Spatial issues in user interface design from a graphic design perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, Aaron

    1989-01-01

    The user interface of a computer system is a visual display that provides information about the status of operations on data within the computer and control options to the user that enable adjustments to these operations. From the very beginning of computer technology the user interface was a spatial display, although its spatial features were not necessarily complex or explicitly recognized by the users. All text and nonverbal signs appeared in a virtual space generally thought of as a single flat plane of symbols. Current technology of high performance workstations permits any element of the display to appear as dynamic, multicolor, 3-D signs in a virtual 3-D space. The complexity of appearance and the user's interaction with the display provide significant challenges to the graphic designer of current and future user interfaces. In particular, spatial depiction provides many opportunities for effective communication of objects, structures, processes, navigation, selection, and manipulation. Issues are presented that are relevant to the graphic designer seeking to optimize the user interface's spatial attributes for effective visual communication.

  5. Recovery in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD): a qualitative study of service users' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Katsakou, Christina; Marougka, Stamatina; Barnicot, Kirsten; Savill, Mark; White, Hayley; Lockwood, Kate; Priebe, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Symptom improvement in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is more common than previously hypothesised. However, it remains unclear whether it reflects service users' personal goals of recovery. The present study aimed to explore what service users with BPD view as recovery. 48 service users were recruited from secondary mental health services and their views on their personal goals and the meaning of recovery were explored in in-depth semi-structured interviews. The study drew on grounded theory and thematic analysis. Service users believed that recovery involved developing self-acceptance and self-confidence, gaining control over emotions, improving relationships, employment, and making progress in symptoms like suicidality and self-harming. They felt that psychotherapies for BPD often had an extreme focus on specific areas, like self-harming or relationships, and that some of their goals were neglected. Although full recovery was seen as a distant goal, interviewees felt that they could learn how to deal with their problems in more effective ways and make meaningful progress in their lives. Specialist therapies for BPD explicitly address some of the recovery goals that are important to service users, whereas other goals are only indirectly or poorly addressed. Professionals might need to work with service users towards devising comprehensive individualised case formulations, including all treatment targets that are important to service users, their priorities, and long-term plans on how their targets might be met and which services might be involved.

  6. Effective therapeutic milieus in secure services for women: the service user perspective.

    PubMed

    Long, C G; Knight, C; Bradley, L; Thomas, M

    2012-12-01

    Women in secure setting represent a group for whom gender sensitive treatments are only emergent. Service users are viewed as participants in treatment developments. However, the opinions of forensic patients have, in contrast to other service users, been under researched. To identify service users' views of the constituents of an effective therapeutic milieu for women in secure settings and to help identify the extent to which services need to be specifically tailored for women. A qualitative service user-led participatory research approach was used. Two focus groups with service users from low and medium secure settings discussed the ingredients of an effective therapeutic milieu based on their experience of gender-specific treatment. Group transcripts were subjected to thematic analysis. Themes identified covered interpersonal relationships; treatment programming; service user empowerment; the ward as a place of safety; and hope for the future. Participants did not highlight gender-specific issues despite this being implicit in focus group questions. Findings echo themes from other psychiatric settings and provide a much needed consensus between service providers and users on which to base healthcare planning. The elucidation of gender-specific factors in effective therapeutic milieus requires more focussed research.

  7. [Crisis intervention].

    PubMed

    Stein, Claudius

    2012-01-01

    The Austrian Program for Suicide Prevention defines as Point 2: "Support and treatment". The suicide-preventive outcome of the development of psychotherapeutic-psychosocial care in Austria has been proved. This means, that the further development of institutions with focus on crisis intervention is a central agenda of Suicide prevention Austria (SUPRA). First, in this article are defined the terms crisis and crisis intervention, also the close connection to programs of suicide prevention is pointed out. Furthermore general aims and standards for crisis intervention are defined and the current situation of crisis intervention in Austria is described. Finally recommendations for practical aims and their implementation in the context of SUPRA are made.

  8. Assessing Quality of Experience while comparing competing mobile broadband services from the user perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madruga, Ewerton L.; David, Rodrigo; Sabóia de Souza, Rodolfo; Dantas, Romulo

    2015-01-01

    The growth of mobile traffic is exploding globally, and users can already choose their best smartphone or tablet options from a handful of manufacturers based on specific criteria such as price and usability. It is much less clear when the user needs to pick from various mobile broadband service providers when choices are available. After all, how does one know what is the best provider for a given usage profile? This work uses drive tests to investigate the variation of radio frequency conditions and relate them to the quality of experience from the viewpoint of the user.

  9. Service users' and caregivers' perspectives on continuity of care in out-of-hours primary care.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Niamh; MacFarlane, Anne; Murphy, Andrew W; Freeman, George K; Glynn, Liam G; Bradley, Colin P

    2013-03-01

    Modernization policies in primary care, such as the introduction of out-of-hours general practice cooperatives, signify a marked departure from many service users' traditional experiences of continuity of care. We report on a case study of accounts of service users with chronic conditions and their caregivers of continuity of care in an out-of-hours general practice cooperative in Ireland. Using Strauss and colleagues' Chronic Illness Trajectory Framework, we explored users' and caregivers' experiences of continuity in this context. Whereas those dealing with "routine trajectories" were largely satisfied with their experiences, those dealing with "problematic trajectories" (characterized by the presence of, for example, multimorbidity and complex care regimes) had considerable concerns about continuity of experiences in this service. Results highlight that modernization policies that have given rise to out-of-hours cooperatives have had a differential impact on service users with chronic conditions and their caregivers, with serious consequences for those who have "problematic" trajectories.

  10. Foundation and Development of Local Trimble User Groups: Perspectives from the Beginning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Brean W.

    1996-01-01

    Trimble Navigation was one of the original contractors building military grade GPS receivers and has been a dominant manufacturer in the civilian market. Two Trimble user groups have been formed. By participating in GPS user groups, members become more aware of GPS capabilities and opportunities, meet people with similar interests and needs, expand business opportunities, and provide Trimble with valuable information needed to engineer better GPS equipment.

  11. Industrial Wireless Sensors: A User's Perspective on the Impact of Standards on Wide-spread Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Taft, Cyrus W.; Manges, Wayne W; Sorge, John N

    2012-01-01

    The role of wireless sensing technologies in industrial instrumentation will undoubtedly become more important in the years ahead. . Deployment of such instrumentation in an industrial setting with its heightened security and robustness criteria hinges on user acceptance of verified performance as well as meeting cost requirements. Today, industrial users face many choices when specifying a wireless sensor network, including radio performance, battery life, interoperability, security, and standards compliance. The potential market for industrial wireless sensors is literally millions of wireless instruments and it is imperative that accurate information for applying the technology to real-world applications be available to the end-user so that they can make informed deployment decisions. The majority of industrial wireless automation designs now being deployed or being considered for deployment are based on three different standards . The HART Communications Foundation s WirelessHART (IEC 62591), the International Society of Automation s ISA100.11a, and the offering from the Industrial Wireless Alliance of China known as WIA-PA (IEC 62601). Aside from these industrial automation standards, users must also be cognizant of the underlying wireless network standards IEEE 802.11, IEEE 802.15.4, and IEEE 802.15.3a and their interactions with the three principal industrial automation protocols mentioned previously. The crucial questions being asked by end users revolve around sensor network performance, interoperability, reliability, and security. This paper will discuss potential wireless sensor applications in power plants, barriers to the acceptance of wireless technology, concerns related to standards, and provide an end user prospective on the issues affecting wide-spread deployment of wireless sensors. Finally, the authors conclude with a discussion of a recommended path forward including how standards organizations can better facilitate end user decision making and

  12. Professional perspectives on service user and carer involvement in mental health care planning: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Penny; Brooks, Helen; Fraser, Claire; Lovell, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Background Involving users/carers in mental health care-planning is central to international policy initiatives yet users frequently report feeling excluded from the care planning process. Rigorous explorations of mental health professionals’ experiences of care planning are lacking, limiting our understanding of this important translational gap. Objectives To explore professional perceptions of delivering collaborative mental health care-planning and involving service users and carers in their care. Design Qualitative interviews and focus groups with data combined and subjected to framework analysis. Setting UK secondary care mental health services. Participants 51 multi-disciplinary professionals involved in care planning and recruited via study advertisements. Results Emergent themes identified care-planning as a meaningful platform for user/carer involvement but revealed philosophical tensions between user involvement and professional accountability. Professionals emphasised their individual, relational skills as a core facilitator of involvement, highlighting some important deficiencies in conventional staff training programmes. Conclusions Although internationally accepted on philosophical grounds, user-involved care-planning is poorly defined and lacks effective implementation support. Its full realisation demands greater recognition of both the historical and contemporary contexts in which statutory mental healthcare occurs. PMID:26253574

  13. Professional perspectives on service user and carer involvement in mental health care planning: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Bee, Penny; Brooks, Helen; Fraser, Claire; Lovell, Karina

    2015-12-01

    Involving users/carers in mental health care-planning is central to international policy initiatives yet users frequently report feeling excluded from the care planning process. Rigorous explorations of mental health professionals' experiences of care planning are lacking, limiting our understanding of this important translational gap. To explore professional perceptions of delivering collaborative mental health care-planning and involving service users and carers in their care. Qualitative interviews and focus groups with data combined and subjected to framework analysis. UK secondary care mental health services. 51 multi-disciplinary professionals involved in care planning and recruited via study advertisements. Emergent themes identified care-planning as a meaningful platform for user/carer involvement but revealed philosophical tensions between user involvement and professional accountability. Professionals emphasised their individual, relational skills as a core facilitator of involvement, highlighting some important deficiencies in conventional staff training programmes. Although internationally accepted on philosophical grounds, user-involved care-planning is poorly defined and lacks effective implementation support. Its full realisation demands greater recognition of both the historical and contemporary contexts in which statutory mental healthcare occurs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Value versus user fees: perspectives of patients before and after using a web-based portal for management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bryce, Cindy L; Zickmund, Susan; Hess, Rachel; McTigue, Kathleen M; Olshansky, Ellen; Fitzgerald, Katharine; Fischer, Gary

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this work was to rate the potential or actual usefulness of 15 features of a Web-based portal for diabetes management and assess whether patients would be willing to pay user fees for portal access. We used a combination of qualitative methods (focus group discussions) and quantitative methods (survey responses) to examine patients' perspectives. We enrolled 21 patients before the diabetes-specific portal was released ("preportal" group) and 18 patients after it was released ("portal-users" group). The two groups were similar except that 67% of preportal patients and 100% of portal users were Internet users. Overall, portal features that were rated most favorably were the online calculator to estimate blood glucose control (characterized as "very useful" by 74% of patients), appointment reminder systems (74%), e-mail access to health team (74%), personal tracking logs (69%), and online scheduling (69%). More patients from the preportal group than the portal-users group favored personal logs (86% versus 50%; p = 0.015) and opportunities to form interest groups (62% versus 28%; p = 0.034). Of the 30 patients who assigned a dollar amount for 1 month of portal access, 20 assigned zero dollars. Discussions about payment focused on equity and access. Because fees are expected to discourage portal usage, many patients believed that the potential benefits associated with self-management would not be realized. Others felt that the health system would benefit financially from a portal and should therefore absorb the costs. Even if portals are valued, patients may be resistant to paying for them. This opposition stems from concerns about fairness and from the recognition that health systems may experience cost savings if patients manage their diabetes successfully.

  15. Analyzing and Predicting User Participations in Online Health Communities: A Social Support Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Street, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Background Online health communities (OHCs) have become a major source of social support for people with health problems. Members of OHCs interact online with similar peers to seek, receive, and provide different types of social support, such as informational support, emotional support, and companionship. As active participations in an OHC are beneficial to both the OHC and its users, it is important to understand factors related to users’ participations and predict user churn for user retention efforts. Objective This study aimed to analyze OHC users’ Web-based interactions, reveal which types of social support activities are related to users’ participation, and predict whether and when a user will churn from the OHC. Methods We collected a large-scale dataset from a popular OHC for cancer survivors. We used text mining techniques to decide what kinds of social support each post contained. We illustrated how we built text classifiers for 5 different social support categories: seeking informational support (SIS), providing informational support (PIS), seeking emotional support (SES), providing emotional support (PES), and companionship (COM). We conducted survival analysis to identify types of social support related to users’ continued participation. Using supervised machine learning methods, we developed a predictive model for user churn. Results Users’ behaviors to PIS, SES, and COM had hazard ratios significantly lower than 1 (0.948, 0.972, and 0.919, respectively) and were indicative of continued participations in the OHC. The churn prediction model based on social support activities offers accurate predictions on whether and when a user will leave the OHC. Conclusions Detecting different types of social support activities via text mining contributes to better understanding and prediction of users’ participations in an OHC. The outcome of this study can help the management and design of a sustainable OHC via more proactive and effective user

  16. Development of a mental health smartphone app: perspectives of mental health service users.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, John; Cummins, John; Behan, Laura; O'Brien, Sinead M

    2016-10-01

    Current mental health policy emphasises the importance of service user involvement in the delivery of care. Information Technology can have an effect on quality and efficiency of care. The aim of this study is to gain the viewpoint of service users from a local mental health service in developing a mental health app. A qualitative descriptive approach was used. Eight volunteers aged 18-49 years were interviewed with the aid of a semi-structured questionnaire. Interviewees defined a good app by its ease of use. Common themes included availability of contact information, identifying triggers, the ability to rate mood/anxiety levels on a scale, guided relaxation techniques, and the option to personalise the app. The researchers will aim to produce an app that is easily accessible, highly personalisable and will include functions highlighted as important (i.e. contact information, etc.). This research will assist in the development of an easy-to-use app that could increase access to services, and allow service users to take an active role in their care. In previous studies, apps were developed without the involvement of service users. This study recognises the important role of service users in this area.

  17. Exploring Powered Wheelchair Users and Their Caregivers’ Perspectives on Potential Intelligent Power Wheelchair Use: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kairy, Dahlia; Rushton, Paula W.; Archambault, Philippe; Pituch, Evelina; Torkia, Caryne; El Fathi, Anas; Stone, Paula; Routhier, François; Forget, Robert; Demers, Louise; Pineau, Joelle; Gourdeau, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Power wheelchairs (PWCs) can have a positive impact on user well-being, self-esteem, pain, activity and participation. Newly developed intelligent power wheelchairs (IPWs), allowing autonomous or collaboratively-controlled navigation, could enhance mobility of individuals not able to use, or having difficulty using, standard PWCs. The objective of this study was to explore the perspectives of PWC users (PWUs) and their caregivers regarding if and how IPWs could impact on current challenges faced by PWUs, as well as inform current development of IPWs. A qualitative exploratory study using individual interviews was conducted with PWUs (n = 12) and caregivers (n = 4). A semi-structured interview guide and video were used to facilitate informed discussion regarding IPWs. Thematic analysis revealed three main themes: (1) “challenging situations that may be overcome by an IPW” described how the IPW features of obstacle avoidance, path following, and target following could alleviate PWUs’ identified mobility difficulties; (2) “cautious optimism concerning IPW use revealed participants” addresses concerns regarding using an IPW as well as technological suggestions; (3) “defining the potential IPW user” revealed characteristics of PWUs that would benefit from IPW use. Findings indicate how IPW use may help overcome PWC difficulties and confirm the importance of user input in the ongoing development of IPWs. PMID:24566051

  18. Assistive devices utilisation in activities of everyday life--a proposed framework of understanding a user perspective.

    PubMed

    Krantz, Oskar

    2012-05-01

    This theoretical article proposes a framework of understanding a user perspective of assistive devices utilisation in everyday life. Utilising the MPT model (Matching Person and Technology) and the ValMO model (Values and Meaning in Human Occupations), a framework of understanding is proposed. Main components are person, assistive device, and activity, connected by the person's expectations and experiences concerning the doability/doworthiness (possible to do/worth doing) of an activity, and the usability/useworthiness (possible to use/worth using) of an assistive device. Expectations may differ based on not only earlier experiences (habitus), but also situational and environmental variations, and result in differing experiences. In general, the purpose of an assistive device is to increase a person's repertoire of doable activities. For a person, this can be a function of the evaluation of possible gains, in terms of correlation between investments (in terms of time and energy), and the (expected) result of the activity. The only person able to estimate the useworthiness/usability of a device and the doworthiness/doability of an activity is the user her/himself, assessing the degree at which a specific assistive device enhances the value of an activity, in turn affecting the habitus of the (presumptive) user. [Box: see text].

  19. The potential impact of intelligent power wheelchair use on social participation: perspectives of users, caregivers and clinicians.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Paula W; Kairy, Dahlia; Archambault, Philippe; Pituch, Evelina; Torkia, Caryne; El Fathi, Anas; Stone, Paula; Routhier, François; Forget, Robert; Pineau, Joelle; Gourdeau, Richard; Demers, Louise

    2015-05-01

    To explore power wheelchair users', caregivers' and clinicians' perspectives regarding the potential impact of intelligent power wheelchair use on social participation. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with power wheelchair users (n = 12), caregivers (n = 4) and clinicians (n = 12). An illustrative video was used to facilitate discussion. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. Three main themes were identified based on the experiences of the power wheelchair users, caregivers and clinicians: (1) increased social participation opportunities, (2) changing how social participation is experienced and (3) decreased risk of accidents during social participation. Findings from this study suggest that an intelligent power wheelchair would enhance social participation in a variety of important ways, thereby providing support for continued design and development of this assistive technology. An intelligent power wheelchair has the potential to: Increase social participation opportunities by overcoming challenges associated with navigating through crowds and small spaces. Change how social participation is experienced through "normalizing" social interactions and decreasing the effort required to drive a power wheelchair. Decrease the risk of accidents during social participation by reducing the need for dangerous compensatory strategies and minimizing the impact of the physical environment.

  20. [Systematized care in cardiac preoperative: theory of human caring in the perspective of nurses and users].

    PubMed

    Amorim, Thais Vasconselos; Arreguy-Sena, Cristina; Alves, Marcelo da Silva; Salimena, Anna Maria de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    This is a case study research that aimed to know, with the adoption of the Theory of Human Caring, the meanings of therapeutic interpersonal relationship between nurse and user on the preoperative nursing visit after the experience of the surgical process. The convenience sample was composed of three nurses and three users of an institution that has updated records to perform highly complex cardiovascular surgery, comprising nine combinations of therapeutic interactions. It was used instruments, structured according to the theory of Jean Watson and North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, Nursing Intervention Classification and Nursing Outcomes Classification taxonomies. The legal and ethical aspects of research involving human subjects were assured. The results revealed three clusters to grasp the significance of preoperative visits by users and five clusters to capture the perception of nurses when they experience this clinical experience.

  1. User perspectives on the usability of a regional health information exchange

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yun-Xian; Cala, Cather Marie; Blakemore, Dana; Chen, Qingxia; Frisse, Mark E; Johnson, Kevin B

    2011-01-01

    Objective We assessed the usability of a health information exchange (HIE) in a densely populated metropolitan region. This grant-funded HIE had been deployed rapidly to address the imminent needs of the patient population and the need to draw wider participation from regional entities. Design We conducted a cross-sectional survey of individuals given access to the HIE at participating organizations and examined some of the usability and usage factors related to the technology acceptance model. Measurements We probed user perceptions using the Questionnaire for User Interaction Satisfaction, an author-generated Trust scale, and user characteristic questions (eg, age, weekly system usage time). Results Overall, users viewed the system favorably (ratings for all usability items were greater than neutral (one-sample Wilcoxon test, p<0.0014, Bonferroni-corrected for 35 tests). System usage was regressed on usability, trust, and demographic and user characteristic factors. Three usability factors were positively predictive of system usage: overall reactions (p<0 0.01), learning (p<0.05), and system functionality (p<0.01). Although trust is an important component in collaborative relationships, we did not find that user trust of other participating healthcare entities was significantly predictive of usage. An analysis of respondents' comments revealed ways to improve the HIE. Conclusion We used a rapid deployment model to develop an HIE and found that perceptions of system usability were positive. We also found that system usage was predicted well by some aspects of usability. Results from this study suggest that a rapid development approach may serve as a viable model for developing usable HIEs serving communities with limited resources. PMID:21622933

  2. Code Optimization and Parallelization on the Origins: Looking from Users' Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Yan-Tyng Sherry; Thigpen, William W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Parallel machines are becoming the main compute engines for high performance computing. Despite their increasing popularity, it is still a challenge for most users to learn the basic techniques to optimize/parallelize their codes on such platforms. In this paper, we present some experiences on learning these techniques for the Origin systems at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division. Emphasis of this paper will be on a few essential issues (with examples) that general users should master when they work with the Origins as well as other parallel systems.

  3. Integrating spiritual and Western treatment modalities in a Native American substance user center: provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Jacquelene F; Momper, Sandra L

    2011-01-01

    Few studies examine how traditional Native American and Western healing practices are being integrated in Native American substance user treatment centers. Data are presented from a 2008 study of providers of integrated substance user treatment for Native Americans at an urban Western US center. Nineteen semistructured interviews were conducted to examine 10 providers' views of the integration of traditional and Western healing and the impact on recovery for clients. We used a grounded theory approach to data analysis with manual and NVivo codes and themes developed. Limitations and implications for practice are discussed.

  4. Gamification in Healthcare: Perspectives of Mental Health Service Users and Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Hopia, Hanna; Raitio, Katja

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study is to explore the perceptions and experiences that mental health service users (n = 10) and healthcare professionals (n = 32) have regarding the use of gamification in mental health care. Data was gathered by interviews. The mental health service users described promoting and retarding factors in the use of gamification, while professionals described the requirements for using gamification and changes occurring in the work culture. Additional research is needed on how game-playing elements could be integrated as a systematic part of mental health practice and how the digital skills of professionals could be effectively developed.

  5. Integrating Spiritual and Western Treatment Modalities in a Native American Substance User Center: Provider Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Jacquelene F.; Momper, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies examine how traditional Native American and Western healing practices are being integrated in Native American substance user treatment centers. Data are presented from a 2008 study of providers of integrated substance user treatment for Native Americans at an urban Western US center. Nineteen semi-structured interviews were conducted to examine 10 providers’ views of the integration of traditional and Western healing and the impact on recovery for clients. We used a grounded theory approach to data analysis with manual and NVivo codes and themes developed. Limitations and implications for practice are discussed. PMID:21810077

  6. [The migration crisis of the summer of 1994. Balance and perspectives of Cuban emigration flows: 1984-1996].

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Chavez, E

    1996-01-01

    "The article argues that the rafters crisis of 1994 and the resulting migration agreements between the United States and Cuba in 1994 and 1995 were a radical turn in policies and migration flows between the two countries. The article also describes the general evolution of Cuban migration flows towards the U.S. from the 1984 bilateral agreement up to 1996. As a context, it describes the structural elements of recent Cuban emigration and the place Cubans occupy in the general immigration from Latin America and the Caribbean." (EXCERPT)

  7. [Crisis intervention].

    PubMed

    Sonneck, G

    1986-10-31

    The main aspects of crisis intervention are an immediate onset without time-consuming referrals, activities of the helper always keeping in mind the biopycho-social context, and assistance for selfhelp. Helping people in crises minds to find out and develop the possibilities of the afflicted person aiming that he can overcome his crisis by himself, gaining maturity and reaching a less crisis-prone life style.

  8. Social Media in Health Professional Education: A Student Perspective on User Levels and Prospective Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Stephen; Moss, Alan; Ilic, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNS) have seen exponential growth in recent years. The high utilisation of SNS by tertiary students makes them an attractive tool for educational institutions. This study aims to identify health professional students' use and behaviours with SNS, including students' perspectives on potential applications within…

  9. Affordances Perspective and Grammaticalization: Incorporation of Language, Environment and Users in the Model of Semantic Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrason, Alexander; Visser, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    The present paper demonstrates that insights from the affordances perspective can contribute to developing a more comprehensive model of grammaticalization. The authors argue that the grammaticalization process is afforded differently depending on the values of three contributing parameters: the factor (schematized as a qualitative-quantitative…

  10. Social Media in Health Professional Education: A Student Perspective on User Levels and Prospective Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Stephen; Moss, Alan; Ilic, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNS) have seen exponential growth in recent years. The high utilisation of SNS by tertiary students makes them an attractive tool for educational institutions. This study aims to identify health professional students' use and behaviours with SNS, including students' perspectives on potential applications within…

  11. Symphony: SirsiDynix's Flagship Integrated Library System--A Horizon User's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khurshid, Zahiruddin; Al-Baridi, Saleh

    2009-01-01

    At the end of 2007, SirsiDynix introduced the first version of Symphony, its new flagship Integrated Library System (ILS). This article begins with a look at the evolution of Symphony, user reactions to Symphony, and Symphony's design and functionality. The authors, along with a team of librarians from various functional areas, have completed…

  12. Sexuality and Personal Relationships for People with an Intellectual Disability. Part I: Service-User Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, E.; McGuire, B. E.; Evans, D. S.; Carley, S. N.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Despite a recent ideological shift towards the recognition of sexual autonomy for people with an intellectual disability (ID), there are continuing social and cultural barriers to sexual expression. Part I of the current two-part study assessed the sexual knowledge, experiences and aspirations of service users through focus groups and…

  13. A Comparative Study of Campus Portal User Acceptance: Student and Faculty Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abuhamdieh, Ayman H.; Sehwail, Loay

    2007-01-01

    This study examined campus portal module use patterns and its user acceptance. A random sample is collected and the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) is used to explore student and faculty perceptions of the portal's ease of use and usefulness. These perceptions are contrasted to find any significant differences between the two groups. Study…

  14. Analysis of Factors for Incorporating User Preferences in Air Traffic Management: A system Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Kapil S.; Gutierrez-Nolasco, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of factors that impact user flight schedules during air traffic congestion. In pre-departure flight planning, users file one route per flight, which often leads to increased delays, inefficient airspace utilization, and exclusion of user flight preferences. In this paper, first the idea of filing alternate routes and providing priorities on each of those routes is introduced. Then, the impact of varying planning interval and system imposed departure delay increment is discussed. The metrics of total delay and equity are used for analyzing the impact of these factors on increased traffic and on different users. The results are shown for four cases, with and without the optional routes and priority assignments. Results demonstrate that adding priorities to optional routes further improves system performance compared to filing one route per flight and using first-come first-served scheme. It was also observed that a two-hour planning interval with a five-minute system imposed departure delay increment results in highest delay reduction. The trend holds for a scenario with increased traffic.

  15. Dialectical Behaviour Therapy in an Inpatient Unit for Women with a Learning Disability: Service Users' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Paula; Petalas, Michael; Hastings, Richard; Thomas, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    There is a general lack of self-report data from service users with an intellectual disability (ID) about their views of psychological interventions. This research explored the views and experiences of female inpatients, with a diagnosis of a personality disorder and an ID, about dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT). Semi-structured interviews were…

  16. Reconciling the Perspective of Practitioner and Service User: Findings from The Aphasia in Scotland Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, James; Huby, Guro; Irving, Anne-Marie; Pringle, Ann-Marie; Conochie, Douglas; Haworth, Catherine; Burston, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is widely accepted that service users should be actively involved in new service developments, but there remain issues about how best to consult with them and how to reconcile their views with those of service providers. Aims: This paper uses data from The Aphasia in Scotland study, set up by NHS Quality Improvement Scotland to…

  17. Perspectives on Health among Adult Users of Illicit Stimulant Drugs in Rural Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; Draus, Paul J.; Carlson, Robert G.; Falck, Russel S.; Wang, Jichuan

    2006-01-01

    Context: Although the nonmedical use of stimulant drugs such as cocaine and methamphetamine is increasingly common in many rural areas of the United States, little is known about the health beliefs of people who use these drugs. Purpose: This research describes illicit stimulant drug users' views on health and health-related concepts that may…

  18. A Comparative Study of Campus Portal User Acceptance: Student and Faculty Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abuhamdieh, Ayman H.; Sehwail, Loay

    2007-01-01

    This study examined campus portal module use patterns and its user acceptance. A random sample is collected and the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) is used to explore student and faculty perceptions of the portal's ease of use and usefulness. These perceptions are contrasted to find any significant differences between the two groups. Study…

  19. Perspectives on Health among Adult Users of Illicit Stimulant Drugs in Rural Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; Draus, Paul J.; Carlson, Robert G.; Falck, Russel S.; Wang, Jichuan

    2006-01-01

    Context: Although the nonmedical use of stimulant drugs such as cocaine and methamphetamine is increasingly common in many rural areas of the United States, little is known about the health beliefs of people who use these drugs. Purpose: This research describes illicit stimulant drug users' views on health and health-related concepts that may…

  20. Sexuality and Personal Relationships for People with an Intellectual Disability. Part I: Service-User Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, E.; McGuire, B. E.; Evans, D. S.; Carley, S. N.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Despite a recent ideological shift towards the recognition of sexual autonomy for people with an intellectual disability (ID), there are continuing social and cultural barriers to sexual expression. Part I of the current two-part study assessed the sexual knowledge, experiences and aspirations of service users through focus groups and…

  1. Symphony: SirsiDynix's Flagship Integrated Library System--A Horizon User's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khurshid, Zahiruddin; Al-Baridi, Saleh

    2009-01-01

    At the end of 2007, SirsiDynix introduced the first version of Symphony, its new flagship Integrated Library System (ILS). This article begins with a look at the evolution of Symphony, user reactions to Symphony, and Symphony's design and functionality. The authors, along with a team of librarians from various functional areas, have completed…

  2. The health-disease process and the family health strategy: the user's perspective1

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Débora de Souza; Tenório, Elainey de Albuquerque; Brêda, Mércia Zeviane; Mishima, Silvana Martins

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the meanings Primary Health Care users attribute to their health-disease process and the services used. METHODS: this qualitative research uses the focus group technique to interview two groups of users the service monitors. The first is a group of elderly people and the second of pregnant women. To analyze the meanings, the discourse analysis technique and the reference framework of health promotion are used. RESULTS: the group of elderly, being mostly female arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus patients, visualizes the health-disease process as the evolution of human existence controlled by divine power, signifying the health service as a blessing in the control of the disease. The Group of young pregnant women signified health as the ability for self-care and disease as the disability for that purposes, considering the Primary Health Care service as responsible for the recovery of individual and family health. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: the users demonstrated dissatisfaction with bureaucratic and vertical relations present at the health services. In each group, it was observed that the meanings for health and disease and meanings of the health service the users elaborated can be related. PMID:25591086

  3. Reconciling the Perspective of Practitioner and Service User: Findings from The Aphasia in Scotland Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, James; Huby, Guro; Irving, Anne-Marie; Pringle, Ann-Marie; Conochie, Douglas; Haworth, Catherine; Burston, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is widely accepted that service users should be actively involved in new service developments, but there remain issues about how best to consult with them and how to reconcile their views with those of service providers. Aims: This paper uses data from The Aphasia in Scotland study, set up by NHS Quality Improvement Scotland to…

  4. Dialectical Behaviour Therapy in an Inpatient Unit for Women with a Learning Disability: Service Users' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Paula; Petalas, Michael; Hastings, Richard; Thomas, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    There is a general lack of self-report data from service users with an intellectual disability (ID) about their views of psychological interventions. This research explored the views and experiences of female inpatients, with a diagnosis of a personality disorder and an ID, about dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT). Semi-structured interviews were…

  5. Health Care Austerity Measures in Times of Crisis: The Perspectives of Primary Health Care Physicians in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Heras-Mosteiro, Julio; Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Otero-Garcia, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The current financial crisis has seen severe austerity measures imposed on the Spanish health care system, including reduced public spending, copayments, salary reductions, and reduced services for undocumented migrants. However, the impacts have not been well-documented. We present findings from a qualitative study that explores the perceptions of primary health care physicians in Madrid, Spain. This article discusses the effects of austerity measures implemented in the public health care system and their potential impacts on access and utilization of primary health care services. This is the first study, to our knowledge, exploring the health care experiences during the financial crisis of general practitioners in Madrid, Spain. The majority of participating physicians disapproved of austerity measures implemented in Spain. The findings of this study suggest that undocumented migrants should regain access to health care services; copayments should be minimized and removed for patients with low incomes; and health care professionals should receive additional help to avoid burnout. Failure to implement these measures could result in the quality of health care further deteriorating and could potentially have long-term negative consequences on population health. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. GEO Label: User and Producer Perspectives on a Label for Geospatial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lush, V.; Lumsden, J.; Masó, J.; Díaz, P.; McCallum, I.

    2012-04-01

    One of the aims of the Science and Technology Committee (STC) of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) was to establish a GEO Label- a label to certify geospatial datasets and their quality. As proposed, the GEO Label will be used as a value indicator for geospatial data and datasets accessible through the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). It is suggested that the development of such a label will significantly improve user recognition of the quality of geospatial datasets and that its use will help promote trust in datasets that carry the established GEO Label. Furthermore, the GEO Label is seen as an incentive to data providers. At the moment GEOSS contains a large amount of data and is constantly growing. Taking this into account, a GEO Label could assist in searching by providing users with visual cues of dataset quality and possibly relevance; a GEO Label could effectively stand as a decision support mechanism for dataset selection. Currently our project - GeoViQua, - together with EGIDA and ID-03 is undertaking research to define and evaluate the concept of a GEO Label. The development and evaluation process will be carried out in three phases. In phase I we have conducted an online survey (GEO Label Questionnaire) to identify the initial user and producer views on a GEO Label or its potential role. In phase II we will conduct a further study presenting some GEO Label examples that will be based on Phase I. We will elicit feedback on these examples under controlled conditions. In phase III we will create physical prototypes which will be used in a human subject study. The most successful prototypes will then be put forward as potential GEO Label options. At the moment we are in phase I, where we developed an online questionnaire to collect the initial GEO Label requirements and to identify the role that a GEO Label should serve from the user and producer standpoint. The GEO Label Questionnaire consists of generic questions to identify whether

  7. Users' perspectives of barriers and facilitators to implementing EHR in Canada: A study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Shaw, Nicola; Sicotte, Claude; Mathieu, Luc; Leduc, Yvan; Duplantie, Julie; Maclean, James; Légaré, France

    2009-01-01

    Background In Canada, federal, provincial, and territorial governments are developing an ambitious project to implement an interoperable electronic health record (EHR). Benefits for patients, healthcare professionals, organizations, and the public in general are expected. However, adoption of an interoperable EHR remains an important issue because many previous EHR projects have failed due to the lack of integration into practices and organizations. Furthermore, perceptions of the EHR vary between end-user groups, adding to the complexity of implementing this technology. Our aim is to produce a comprehensive synthesis of actual knowledge on the barriers and facilitators influencing the adoption of an interoperable EHR among its various users and beneficiaries. Methods First, we will conduct a comprehensive review of the scientific literature and other published documentation on the barriers and facilitators to the implementation of the EHR. Standardized literature search and data extraction methods will be used. Studies' quality and relevance to inform decisions on EHR implementation will be assessed. For each group of EHR users identified, barriers and facilitators will be categorized and compiled using narrative synthesis and meta-analytical techniques. The principal factors identified for each group of EHR users will then be validated for its applicability to various Canadian contexts through a two-round Delphi study, involving representatives from each end-user groups. Continuous exchanges with decision makers and periodic knowledge transfer activities are planned to facilitate the dissemination and utilization of research results in policies regarding the implementation of EHR in the Canadian healthcare system. Discussion Given the imminence of an interoperable EHR in Canada, knowledge and evidence are urgently needed to prepare this major shift in our healthcare system and to oversee the factors that could affect its adoption and integration by all its

  8. User Perspectives on Exergames Designed to Explore the Hemineglected Space for Stroke Patients With Visuospatial Neglect: Usability Study.

    PubMed

    Tobler-Ammann, Bernadette C; Surer, Elif; Knols, Ruud H; Borghese, N Alberto; de Bruin, Eling D

    2017-08-25

    Visuospatial neglect due to stroke is characterized by the inability to perceive stimuli emerging in the area opposite to the side of brain damage. Besides adopting conventional rehabilitation methods to treat neglect symptoms, the use of virtual reality (VR) is becoming increasingly popular. We designed a series of 9 exergames aimed to improve exploration of the neglected side of space. When new VR interventions are designed, it is important to assess the usability aspects of such management strategies within the target population. To date, most studies used questionnaires to assess user satisfaction with the intervention or product being tested. However, only a combination of both quantitative and qualitative data allows a full picture of user perspective. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively assess patient and therapist perspectives of a VR intervention based on the series of 9 exergames designed to explore hemineglected space. Specifically, we wanted to evaluate (1) perceived-user friendliness of the exergames, (2) attitude towards using the exergames, and (3) intention to use the exergames in the future. A total of 19 participants (7 patients, 12 therapists) evaluated the exergames they had used 5 times a week during 3 weeks. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) questionnaire was filled out after the intervention. Based on those responses, we conducted focus group interviews (with therapists) and individual interviews (with patients). To analyze the TAM questionnaires, we used descriptive statistics. We adopted content and comparative analysis to analyze the interviews and drew illustration maps to analyze the focus group interviews. The therapists took a more critical stance with a mean TAM questionnaire total score of 48.6 (SD 4.5) compared to the patients who had a mean total score of 56.1 (SD 12.3). The perceived user-friendliness score was 5.6 (SD 1.4) for patients and 4.9 (SD 1.4) for therapists. The attitude towards using

  9. User Perspectives on Exergames Designed to Explore the Hemineglected Space for Stroke Patients With Visuospatial Neglect: Usability Study

    PubMed Central

    Knols, Ruud H; Borghese, N Alberto; de Bruin, Eling D

    2017-01-01

    Background Visuospatial neglect due to stroke is characterized by the inability to perceive stimuli emerging in the area opposite to the side of brain damage. Besides adopting conventional rehabilitation methods to treat neglect symptoms, the use of virtual reality (VR) is becoming increasingly popular. We designed a series of 9 exergames aimed to improve exploration of the neglected side of space. When new VR interventions are designed, it is important to assess the usability aspects of such management strategies within the target population. To date, most studies used questionnaires to assess user satisfaction with the intervention or product being tested. However, only a combination of both quantitative and qualitative data allows a full picture of user perspective. Objective The purpose of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively assess patient and therapist perspectives of a VR intervention based on the series of 9 exergames designed to explore hemineglected space. Specifically, we wanted to evaluate (1) perceived-user friendliness of the exergames, (2) attitude towards using the exergames, and (3) intention to use the exergames in the future. Methods A total of 19 participants (7 patients, 12 therapists) evaluated the exergames they had used 5 times a week during 3 weeks. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) questionnaire was filled out after the intervention. Based on those responses, we conducted focus group interviews (with therapists) and individual interviews (with patients). To analyze the TAM questionnaires, we used descriptive statistics. We adopted content and comparative analysis to analyze the interviews and drew illustration maps to analyze the focus group interviews. Results The therapists took a more critical stance with a mean TAM questionnaire total score of 48.6 (SD 4.5) compared to the patients who had a mean total score of 56.1 (SD 12.3). The perceived user-friendliness score was 5.6 (SD 1.4) for patients and 4.9 (SD 1.4) for

  10. Recognition as a valued human being: perspectives of mental health service users.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Kristin Ådnøy; Sundfør, Bengt; Karlsson, Bengt; Råholm, Maj-Britt; Arman, Maria

    2012-05-01

    The acknowledgement of basic human vulnerability in relationships between mental health service users and professionals working in community-based mental health services (in Norway) was a starting point. The purpose was to explore how users of these services describe and make sense of their meetings with other people. The research is collaborative, with researcher and person with experienced-based knowledge cooperating through the research process. Data is derived from 19 interviews with 11 people who depend on mental health services for assistance at least three times a week. Data is analysed according to the Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Results confirm that reciprocity is fundamental for relationships, and that recognizing the individual entails personal involvement. The participants describe a struggle, and recognizing this struggle may help the professional to achieve a deeper understanding of the individual.

  11. The meanings of death and dying: the perspective of crack users.

    PubMed

    Silva Júnior, Fernando José Guedes da; Monteiro, Claudete Ferreira de Souza

    2012-01-01

    The consumption of crack can constitute in an inauthentic form of the existence that leads a person to live improperly the being-toward-death. Given this reality, this study aimed to comprehend the significance of death and dying for the user of crack and to unveil the meanings attributed to this significance. This qualitative study was conducted, based on the phenomenological method, with 12 crack users, in the therapeutic process, in a Psychosocial Care CenterAlcohol and Drugs (CAPSad), in the period from February to April 2011, in Teresina, Piauí. The results show that death is signified, ontically, as a companion, a partner, a passage, a journey and as the crack itself. It was concluded that this significance expressed an inauthentic experience, directed toward the incessant interaction with crack, accompanied by a feeling of nullity and relational disengagement.

  12. Privacy and data security in E-health: requirements from the user's perspective.

    PubMed

    Wilkowska, Wiktoria; Ziefle, Martina

    2012-09-01

    In this study two currently relevant aspects of using medical assistive technologies were addressed-security and privacy. In a two-step empirical approach that used focus groups (n = 19) and a survey (n = 104), users' requirements for the use of medical technologies were collected and evaluated. Specifically, we focused on the perceived importance of data security and privacy issues. Outcomes showed that both security and privacy aspects play an important role in the successful adoption of medical assistive technologies in the home environment. In particular, analysis of data with respect to gender, health-status and age (young, middle-aged and old users) revealed that females and healthy adults require, and insist on, the highest security and privacy standards compared with males and the ailing elderly.

  13. End-user perspective of low-cost sensors for outdoor air pollution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rai, Aakash C; Kumar, Prashant; Pilla, Francesco; Skouloudis, Andreas N; Di Sabatino, Silvana; Ratti, Carlo; Yasar, Ansar; Rickerby, David

    2017-12-31

    Low-cost sensor technology can potentially revolutionise the area of air pollution monitoring by providing high-density spatiotemporal pollution data. Such data can be utilised for supplementing traditional pollution monitoring, improving exposure estimates, and raising community awareness about air pollution. However, data quality remains a major concern that hinders the widespread adoption of low-cost sensor technology. Unreliable data may mislead unsuspecting users and potentially lead to alarming consequences such as reporting acceptable air pollutant levels when they are above the limits deemed safe for human health. This article provides scientific guidance to the end-users for effectively deploying low-cost sensors for monitoring air pollution and people's exposure, while ensuring reasonable data quality. We review the performance characteristics of several low-cost particle and gas monitoring sensors and provide recommendations to end-users for making proper sensor selection by summarizing the capabilities and limitations of such sensors. The challenges, best practices, and future outlook for effectively deploying low-cost sensors, and maintaining data quality are also discussed. For data quality assurance, a two-stage sensor calibration process is recommended, which includes laboratory calibration under controlled conditions by the manufacturer supplemented with routine calibration checks performed by the end-user under final deployment conditions. For large sensor networks where routine calibration checks are impractical, statistical techniques for data quality assurance should be utilised. Further advancements and adoption of sophisticated mathematical and statistical techniques for sensor calibration, fault detection, and data quality assurance can indeed help to realise the promised benefits of a low-cost air pollution sensor network. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [The quality of outpatient services in health facilities in Hidalgo, Mexico, from the users' perspective].

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Rosa María Ortiz; Juárez, Sergio Muñoz; Del Campo, Diana Lechuga Martín; Carreño, Erick Torres

    2003-04-01

    To identify and assess factors associated with the quality of health care in hospital outpatient services within the state of Hidalgo, Mexico, based on a user survey. We performed a cross-sectional, comparative, analytical study of 15 public hospitals within the state of Hidalgo, Mexico. The sample, which was made up of 9 936 interviewees (power: 85%; significance level: 95%) was randomly selected among users of outpatient services between July 1999 and December 2000. We looked at the quality of care using a Likert-type scale. The statistical analysis consisted of inconditional logistic regression. The quality of care was perceived as being good by 71,37% of users surveyed and as bad by 28,63%. Poor quality was primarily perceived in institutions belonging to the social security system (39,41% vs. 19,42% in other institutions). Of those surveyed, 84,94% said they were satisfied with the care they received, and 49,2% said they expected to get better care. In all, 16% claimed they would return to the same hospital only because they had no other choice, and 2% said they would never return. A higher educational level and a better income showed a direct association with the perception of poor quality and discontent with the lenghty waiting period (odds ratio [OR]: 2,3; 95% CI: 2,02 to 2,82) and with the physician's discourteous attitude (OR: 4,22; 95% CI: 3,6-4,8). They main factors that determine poor quality in health care, according to users, are lengthy waiting times before being ushered in, incomplete physical examination and diagnosis, difficulty of getting an appointment, and poor treatment on the part of services staff.

  15. Neural correlates of user-initiated motor success and failure - A brain-computer interface perspective.

    PubMed

    Yazmir, Boris; Reiner, Miriam

    2016-11-02

    Any motor action is, by nature, potentially accompanied by human errors. In order to facilitate development of error-tailored Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) correction systems, we focused on internal, human-initiated errors, and investigated EEG correlates of user outcome successes and errors during a continuous 3D virtual tennis game against a computer player. We used a multisensory, 3D, highly immersive environment. Missing and repelling the tennis ball were considered, as 'error' (miss) and 'success' (repel). Unlike most previous studies, where the environment "encouraged" the participant to perform a mistake, here errors happened naturally, resulting from motor-perceptual-cognitive processes of incorrect estimation of the ball kinematics, and can be regarded as user internal, self-initiated errors. Results show distinct and well-defined Event-Related Potentials (ERPs), embedded in the ongoing EEG, that differ across conditions by waveforms, scalp signal distribution maps, source estimation results (sLORETA) and time-frequency patterns, establishing a series of typical features that allow valid discrimination between user internal outcome success and error. The significant delay in latency between positive peaks of error- and success-related ERPs, suggests a cross-talk between top-down and bottom-up processing, represented by an outcome recognition process, in the context of the game world. Success-related ERPs had a central scalp distribution, while error-related ERPs were centro-parietal. The unique characteristics and sharp differences between EEG correlates of error/success provide the crucial components for an improved BCI system. The features of the EEG waveform can be used to detect user action outcome, to be fed into the BCI correction system. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. CAD-CAM experiences at Bendix Kansas City: the user perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Mentesana, C.

    1983-04-01

    The Bendix Kansas City Division manufactures a variety of precision mechanical, electrical and electronic components and assemblies for the Department of Energy. CAD-CAM has been in use at Bendix for about two years. Development of CAD-CAM is the responsibility of the CAD-CAM Operations group. This group works with users, in-house computer professionals and vendors to provide CAD-CAM products and services.

  17. Integrating user perspectives into the development of a web-based weight management intervention.

    PubMed

    Yardley, L; Williams, S; Bradbury, K; Garip, G; Renouf, S; Ware, L; Dorling, H; Smith, E; Little, P

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to adapt the design of our weight management intervention to the needs, expectations and capabilities of potential users. In study 1, we interviewed 25 people about their experiences of weight management. The findings of these interviews were combined with findings from existing theory and research in a process of 'intervention planning' that informed the design of the intervention. Study 2 comprised in-depth think-aloud studies with a further 16 people interested in using a web-based intervention to manage their weight, in order to elicit reactions to the intervention techniques and materials. In study 1, overly intrusive and restrictive aspects of eating self-regulation were commonly cited reasons for failure to maintain weight management long-term. We therefore designed an intervention with a more flexible approach to autonomous self-regulation. This approach was broadly welcomed in study 2, but there were indications that some participants might have difficulty effectively implementing self-regulation techniques independently. A flexible and autonomous approach to changing eating habits is attractive to potential intervention users but may be difficult for some users to implement successfully.

  18. Perspectives on Physical Activity Among People with Multiple Sclerosis Who Are Wheelchair Users

    PubMed Central

    Learmonth, Yvonne C.; Rice, Ian M.; Ostler, Teresa; Rice, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: People with advanced multiple sclerosis (MS) are less physically active than those with milder forms of the disease, and wheelchair use has a negative association with physical activity participation. Thus, wheelchair users with MS are doubly disadvantaged for accruing the benefits of physical activity and exercise. Appropriate physical activity and exercise interventions are needed for this population. Methods: We undertook a qualitative study to explore the meanings, motivations, and outcomes of physical activity in wheelchair users with MS. We sought to understand daily opportunities to accumulate physical activity and exercise, and to identify perceived barriers, facilitators, and benefits that might inform the design of future interventions. Results: We interviewed 15 wheelchair users (mean age, 52 ± 8.8 years; n = 12 women). Data were transcribed and analyzed to identify and explore common themes. Our first theme was the reduced opportunity to participate in physical activity due to participants' dependence on mobility devices, environmental adaptations, and tangible support. Our second theme was the importance of incorporating physical activity and exercise into the everyday environment, highlighting the need for adaptive exercise and accessible environments. This indicated the need to incorporate behavior change modulators into physical activity and exercise interventions for those with advanced MS. Health-care professionals played an important role in promoting increased physical activity and exercise participation in those with advanced MS. Conclusions: Our findings may inform future interventions to increase initiation and maintenance of physical activity and exercise among people with advanced MS. PMID:26052256

  19. Do military dentists advise tobacco users to quit? The patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Chisick, M C

    2000-03-01

    This study explores whether tobacco users in the US military report having been counseled against tobacco use by a military dentist. The data come from a 26-site survey of active duty Army, Navy, Marine, and Air Force personnel conducted from April 1994 to January 1995. A prestratified, random sample was drawn. Women and minorities were oversampled. Respondents provided demographic and tobacco use data by self-administered questionnaires. Of 12 950 respondents (81% response rate), 4777 reported using some type of tobacco. Prior to analysis, the data were weighted to reflect the military population. Bivariate and logistic regression analysis were employed to determine what demographic and clinical factors are associated with having been counseled against tobacco use. Results show that among tobacco users, cigarettes (73%) are the most popular type of tobacco consumed followed by snuff (23%), pipes (12%), chewing tobacco (8%), and cigars (5%). Advisement to cease tobacco use varies across type of tobacco consumed, with snuff users (72%) most likely and pipe smokers (57%) least likely being advised to quit. Logistic regression results show that advisement to quit tobacco use varies across patient demographics but is unrelated to periodontal health status. Military dentists should be encouraged to counsel all patients who use tobacco to quit.

  20. Treatment Barriers and Support for Male Ex-Armed Forces Personnel in Prison: Professional and Service User Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Verity; McDonnell, Sharon; Lennox, Charlotte; Shaw, Jenny; Senior, Jane

    2016-03-15

    Ex-armed forces personnel represent a potentially vulnerable group within the prison population. To provide support to this group, we need to understand their needs and help-seeking behavior. A focus group with professionals and semi-structured interviews with service users explored perspectives of the treatment barriers faced by this group and their support needs. Data were analyzed using constant comparison methods, and four primary themes were identified. The findings suggest ex-armed forces personnel consider prison an opportunity to access support but find it difficult to ask for help. Staff having an awareness of military issues was thought to encourage help-seeking, but the variability of provision across prison establishments was considered a barrier. Resettlement was a prominent concern, and access to support when preparing for, and after, release was felt by all participants to be important. Implications for the provision of support in prison are discussed along with recommendations for practice.

  1. What Does Success Look Like in the Forensic Mental Health System? Perspectives of Service Users and Service Providers.

    PubMed

    Livingston, James D

    2016-03-21

    Outcomes research in forensic mental health (FMH) has concentrated on reoffending as the principal indicator of success. Defining success in one-dimensional, negative terms can create a distorted view of the diverse objectives of the FMH system. This qualitative study examined the complexity of success from the perspectives of people in the FMH system. Interviews were conducted with 18 forensic service users and 10 forensic service providers. Data were analyzed inductively using thematic analysis to identify predominant themes. The participants conceptualized success as a dynamic process materializing across six different domains in the context of the FMH system: (a) normal life, (b) independent life, (c) compliant life, (d) healthy life, (e) meaningful life, and (f) progressing life. The results indicate that people who provide or use FMH services emphasize a broad range of processes and outcomes, apart from public safety, when they think about success.

  2. TU-C-201-01: Clinical Implementation of HDR: A New User’s Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hallaq, H.

    2015-06-15

    Recent use of HDR has increased while planning has become more complex often necessitating 3D image-based planning. While many guidelines for the use of HDR exist, they have not kept pace with the increased complexity of 3D image-based planning. Furthermore, no comprehensive document exists to describe the wide variety of current HDR clinical indications. This educational session aims to summarize existing national and international guidelines for the safe implementation of an HDR program. A summary of HDR afterloaders available on the market and their existing applicators will be provided, with guidance on how to select the best fit for each institution’s needs. Finally, the use of checklists will be discussed as a means to implement a safe and efficient HDR program and as a method by which to verify the quality of an existing HDR program. This session will provide the perspective of expert HDR physicists as well as the perspective of a new HDR user. Learning Objectives: Summarize national and international safety and staffing guidelines for HDR implementation Discuss the process of afterloader and applicator selection for gynecologic, prostate, breast, interstitial, surface treatments Learn about the use of an audit checklist tool to measure of quality control of a new or existing HDR program Describe the evolving use of checklists within an HDR program.

  3. Incorporating user perspectives in the design of an online intervention tool for people with visible differences: face IT.

    PubMed

    Bessell, Alyson; Clarke, Alex; Harcourt, Diana; Moss, Tim P; Rumsey, Nichola

    2010-10-01

    Individuals with visible differences can experience social anxiety in relation to their appearance. Social skills-based psychosocial interventions have to date shown only limited effectiveness at addressing their concerns. To incorporate user perspectives in the development of an online psychosocial intervention, known as Face IT. Study one consisted of a needs assessment with 12 individuals with a visible difference and six health professionals in order to identify the difficulties experienced by those with visible difference and obtain feedback on the proposed content of Face IT. The findings demonstrated support for the social skills model and the use of an online intervention. Study two consisted of an empirical usability evaluation of Face IT with 14 potential users and 14 health professionals. Based on feedback from the participants, changes were made to the graphics and navigation of the programme. The clinical content has been made more acceptable. The findings indicate support for the importance of social skills-based psychosocial interventions for addressing the needs of those with a visible difference, and have allowed modifications to be made to Face IT ahead of a randomized controlled trial of effectiveness.

  4. Users' perspectives on the provision of assistive technologies in Bangladesh: awareness, providers, costs and barriers.

    PubMed

    Borg, Johan; Östergren, Per-Olof

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to contribute to a better understanding of challenges and solutions to equitable provision of assistive technologies in resource limited environments by (i) describing sources of awareness, types of providers and costs of assistive technologies; (ii) describing common reasons for not possessing assistive technologies; and (iii) comparing these sources, providers, costs and reasons among younger and older men and women living in urban and rural settings. Descriptive and analytic statistics were used to analyze cross-sectional data from a total sample of 581 hearing aid users, wheelchair users, individuals with hearing impairments not using hearing aids and individuals with ambulatory impairments not using wheelchairs living in eight districts of Bangladesh. Major sources of awareness, types of providers and costs paid varied between users of different types of assistive technology. Lack of affordability was the main reason for not possessing assistive technology. Outcome differences were found between younger and older groups, men and women, and literate and illiterate respondents, while no differences related to place of living were identified. Age, gender, type of impairment and socioeconomic status need to be considered when planning and implementing equitable provision of assistive technologies. Implications for Rehabilitation Provision of assistive technologies needs to be made affordable as lack of affordability was the major reason for not possessing such technologies. To ensure equitable provision of assistive technology, services ought to consider age, gender, impairment and socioeconomic status of their target groups. This includes offering a range of products of different sizes provided by culturally appropriate personnel at affordable cost, which to many may be at no or reduced cost. To cater to the assistive technology needs among the most vulnerable groups, assistive technology providers may learn from CBR strategies, such

  5. Evaluating space weather forecasts of geomagnetic activity from a user perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, A. W. P.

    2000-12-01

    Decision Theory can be used as a tool for discussing the relative costs of complacency and false alarms with users of space weather forecasts. We describe a new metric for the value of space weather forecasts, derived from Decision Theory. In particular we give equations for the level of accuracy that a forecast must exceed in order to be useful to a specific customer. The technique is illustrated by simplified example forecasts for global geomagnetic activity and for geophysical exploration and power grid management in the British Isles.

  6. Evaluation of Brazilian Primary Health Care From the Perspective of the Users

    PubMed Central

    Bousquat, Aylene; Lima, Juliana Gagno; Giovanella, Ligia; de Almeida, Patty Fidelis; de Mendonça, Maria Helena Magalhães; Seidl, Helena; da Silva, Andréa Tenório Correia

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the experience of primary care center (PCC) users in Brazil, classified according to the quality of its structure, in relation to the aspects of accessibility, continuity, and acceptability. The source of information was the National Program to Improve Access and Quality of Primary Care in 2013-2014. A total of 109 919 interviewees in 24 055 PCCs comprised the sample. Results show that the structure of a PCC was associated with better indicators of accessibility (oral health and medicines) and continuity of care (patient navigation in the health system). No association was found between indicators of accessibility and the PCC structure. PMID:28252503

  7. Energy recapture through deceleration - regenerative braking in electric vehicles from a user perspective.

    PubMed

    Cocron, Peter; Bühler, Franziska; Franke, Thomas; Neumann, Isabel; Dielmann, Benno; Krems, Josef F

    2013-01-01

    We report results from a 1-year field study (N = 80) on user interactions with regenerative braking in electric vehicles. Designed to recapture energy in vehicles with electric powertrains, regenerative braking has an important influence on both the task of driving and energy consumption. Results from user assessments and data from onboard data loggers indicate that most drivers quickly learned to interact with the system, which was triggered via accelerator. Further, conventional braking manoeuvres decreased significantly as the majority of deceleration episodes could only be executed through regenerative braking. Still, some drivers reported difficulties when adapting to the system. These difficulties could be addressed by offering different levels of regeneration so that the intensity of the deceleration could be individually modified. In general, the system is trusted and regarded as a valuable tool for prolonging range. Regenerative braking in electric vehicles has direct implications for the driving task. We found that drivers quickly learn to use and accept a system, which is triggered via accelerator. For those reporting difficulties in the interaction, it appears reasonable to integrate options to customise or switch off the system.

  8. Radon hazards, geology, and exposure of cave users: a case study and some theoretical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gillmore, G K; Sperrin, M; Phillips, P; Denman, A

    2000-07-01

    The concerns over the risks to human health from radon in underground caves are poorly documented, unlike in workplace or domestic environments where exposures are relatively well known. In U.K. caves, radon has been identified as occurring at elevated levels; but with the exception of major show caves, its impact and risk to the many groups who use the caves have thus far received inadequate attention. This paper presents a survey performed in a relatively "low-risk" geographical area of the United Kingdom and quantifies the risk of exposure in this cave environment. Radon levels up to 12,552 Bq m(-3) were measured: Such concentrations are very high but are likely to underestimate the levels in many other parts of the cave system, for reasons associated with cave architecture and meteorology. This study confirms previous workers' conclusions that long-term users of deep caves, as opposed to rock shelters, are at risk. Annual doses to certain groups of cave users have been calculated to be as high as 120 mSv, a very high value. The study also demonstrates that there is variation both within and between caves as a result of subtleties of the bedrock geology, fault patterns, and weathering. This paper sets out a theoretical model.

  9. Primary health care assessment from the users' perspectives: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Paula, Weslla Karla Albuquerque Silva de; Samico, Isabella Chagas; Caminha, Maria de Fátima Costa; Filho, Malaquias Batista; Silva, Suzana Lins da

    2016-04-01

    Analyze the evaluation of the attributes of primary care made by users of basic units of Brazilian health by using PCATool instrument adapted to Brazil. A systematic literature review conducted in the PubMed database, IBECS, LILACS, SciELO and BDTD. 4,405 documents were found, selected 23 full texts. After Full reading and application of eligibility criteria, 14 articles were evaluated. The studies showed that primary care performs well in longitudinality attributes, completeness and coordination and worse performance on attributes access first contact, family counseling and community orientation, even in the basic units with the Family Health. The users of basic health units assessed as unsatisfactory attributes considered essential for a health care more equitable and competing for user autonomy and social control. It is inferred that there are still obstacles hindering user access to basic health services and care actions are still being developed without favoring user participation and the community context in which they live. Analisar a avaliação dos atributos da Atenção Básica feita por usuários de unidades básicas de saúde brasileiras, mediante utilização de adaptações do instrumento PCATool para o Brasil. Revisão sistemática da literatura realizada nas bases de dados Medline/PubMed, LILACS, IBECS, SciELO e BDTD. Foram encontrados 4.405 documentos, sendo selecionados 23 textos completos. Após leitura integral e aplicação dos critérios de elegibilidade, 14 artigos foram avaliados. Os estudos apontaram que a Atenção Básica tem bom desempenho nos atributos longitudinalidade, integralidade e coordenação e pior desempenho nos atributos acesso de primeiro contato, orientação familiar e a orientação comunitária, mesmo nas unidades básicas com Saúde da Família. Os usuários das unidades básicas de saúde avaliaram como insatisfatórios atributos considerados fundamentais para uma atenção à saúde mais equânime e concorrente para

  10. The importance of the criteria of residential buildings from the perspective of future users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirochmanová, Lenka; Kozlovská, Mária; Bašková, Renáta

    2016-06-01

    The developers need to know what is important to their customers in preparation of new construction of residential buildings. The paper deals with finding the importance of structure, material, cost, time and environmental criteria of residential buildings from the perspective of the future owners. The research methodology that provided the information was questionnaire survey. Research was conducted in two lines. The first line is dedicated to the research of main construction domains of residential building. The second line of the research deals with the specific criteria of main construction domains. The order of importance of the main areas and the specific criteria is determined by analyzing of data through descriptive characteristics: median, modus, variance, average value and by weigh of importance.

  11. [Life risk and nature of SAMU: users' perspectives and implications for nursing].

    PubMed

    Veronese, Andréa Márian; de Oliveira, Dora Lúcia Leidens Corrêa; Nast, Karoline

    2012-12-01

    The article is part of a qualitative study analisys developed in 2009 aiming at investigating the demand of emergency calls to the Emergency Mobile Attendance Service/Porto Alegre (SAMU) that classifies it as non-pertinent. The information was gathered from 16 semi-structured interviews with the subjects of that demand by utilizing as a methodological guideline the Grounded Theory. The article approaches the content of the sub-category "Entering into conflict with SAMU regulation in the evaluation of life-threatening", by focusing the divergences between the regulation and the users' perception about the operation of the service and the meaning of "life-threatening", factors implied in the construction of the non-pertinent demand. The importance of Nursing within this scenery is in its competence to perform education actions about first aid and to participate in projects among sectors which are able to intervene in situations that generate vulnerability.

  12. Maternal-child health and family planning: user perspectives and service constraints in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Simmons, R; Koenig, M A; Huque, A A

    1990-01-01

    This article presents a microanalysis of interactions between female fieldworkers and women in rural Bangladesh, and a discussion of the broader organizational constraints that hamper service delivery. It is argued that the fieldworker, herself a rural woman, is faced with considerable demand for both maternal-child health (MCH) and reproductive health care services, but that operational constraints prevent her from realizing her potential in both of these areas. Qualitative data show that, in the eyes of rural women, contraceptive use and health care are intricately intertwined, and that this association often raises a range of questions that the worker cannot address competently. A number of specific operational barriers--worker densities, staff motivation, supervision, technical competence, supplies--are identified. These barriers reflect a general institutional weakness in the Ministry of Health bureaucracy that prevents it from organizing itself to deliver user-oriented health and family planning services while maintaining adequate and appropriate standards of care.

  13. Dialectical behaviour therapy in an inpatient unit for women with a learning disability: Service users' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Paula; Petalas, Michael; Hastings, Richard; Thomas, Cathy

    2016-09-01

    There is a general lack of self-report data from service users with an intellectual disability (ID) about their views of psychological interventions. This research explored the views and experiences of female inpatients, with a diagnosis of a personality disorder and an ID, about dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT). Semi-structured interviews were used with 10 women, recruited from two independent mental health hospitals. The interviews were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Participants showed varying levels of understanding of DBT. Findings highlight the need for a standardized approach with a suitably adapted structure and curriculum to meet the needs of inpatients with an ID. Factors such as the therapeutic relationship were identified as playing a role in participants' motivation, engagement and participation in DBT. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Investigating Agile User-Centered Design in Practice: A Grounded Theory Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Zahid; Slany, Wolfgang; Holzinger, Andreas

    This paper investigates how the integration of agile methods and User-Centered Design (UCD) is carried out in practice. For this study, we have applied grounded theory as a suitable qualitative approach to determine what is happening in actual practice. The data was collected by semi-structured interviews with professionals who have already worked with an integrated agile UCD methodology. Further data was collected by observing these professionals in their working context, and by studying their documents, where possible. The emerging themes that the study found show that there is an increasing realization of the importance of usability in software development among agile team members. The requirements are emerging; and both low and high fidelity prototypes based usability tests are highly used in agile teams. There is an appreciation of each other's work from both UCD professionals and developers and both sides can learn from each other.

  15. Do users ignore spatial data quality? A decision-theoretic perspective.

    PubMed

    van Oort, P A J; Bregt, A K

    2005-12-01

    Risk analysis (RA) has been proposed as a means of assessing fitness for use of spatial data but is only rarely adopted. The proposal is that better decisions can be made by accounting for risks due to errors in spatial data. Why is RA so rarely adopted? Most geographical information science (GISc) literature stresses educational and technical constraints. In this article we propose, based on decision theory, a number of hypotheses for why the user would be more or less willing to spend resources on RA. The hypotheses were tested with a questionnaire, which showed that the willingness to spend resources on RA depends on the presence of feedback mechanisms in the decision-making process, on how much is at stake, and to a minor extent on how well the decision-making process can be modeled.

  16. Health effects of using cannabis for therapeutic purposes: a gender analysis of users' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bottorff, Joan L; Bissell, Laura J L; Balneaves, Lynda G; Oliffe, John L; Kang, H Bindy K; Capler, N Rielle; Buxton, Jane A; O'Brien, Robin K

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe how individuals who self-report therapeutic use of cannabis perceive its health effects. Data from 23 individual interviews were transcribed and analyzed. Understandings of gendered roles and identities were used to explore the data and interpret differences in perceptions. Descriptions of the health benefits of cannabis for therapeutic purposes included cannabis as life preserving, a disease therapy, a medicine for the mind, a means for self-management, and a way to manage addiction. Self-management of risks focused on the potential effects of excessive use, smoking-related risks, and purchasing precautions. Although the reports of women and men were similar in many respects, there were important differences in patterns and practices of use that reflected gender influences. Insights from the study provide direction for developing gender-specific information to support decision making and usage for therapeutic users.

  17. Resource Guide for Crisis Management in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPointe, Richard T.; And Others

    A crisis can occur at any time, whether or not a school's staff plans for it. This resource guide is a compilation of user-friendly examples of policies, procedures, guidelines, checklists, and forms to help Virginia schools develop and implement a systematic crisis-management plan. Chapter 1 provides an introductory overview of the essential…

  18. Midlife Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Mary Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Indicates that women experiencing a midlife crisis pass through five recognizable stages: (1) feeling trapped, (2) the first change, (3) multiple changes, (4) rational planning, and (5) implementing the plan. (NKA)

  19. Hyperglycemic crisis.

    PubMed

    Van Ness-Otunnu, Ronald; Hack, Jason B

    2013-11-01

    Hyperglycemic crisis is a metabolic emergency associated with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus that may result in significant morbidity or death. Acute interventions are required to manage hypovolemia, acidemia, hyperglycemia, electrolyte abnormalities, and precipitating causes. Despite advances in the prevention and management of diabetes, its prevalence and associated health care costs continue to increase worldwide. Hyperglycemic crisis typically requires critical care management and hospitalization and contributes to global health expenditures. Diagnostic and resolution criteria and management strategies for diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic crisis are provided. A discussion of prevalence, mortality, pathophysiology, risk factors, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, evaluation, and management considerations for hyperglycemic crisis are included. Emergency physicians confront the most severe sequelae of uncontrolled diabetes and provide crucial, life-saving management. With ongoing efforts from diabetes societies to incorporate the latest clinical research to refine treatment guidelines, management and outcomes of hyperglycemic crisis in the emergency department continue to improve. We provide an overview of the evaluation and treatment of hyperglycemic crisis and offer a concise, targeted management algorithm to aid the practicing emergency physician. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Student-Centered Modules to Support Active Learning in Hydrology: Development Experiences and Users' Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Habib, E. H.; Deshotel, M.; Merck, M. F.; Lall, U.; Farnham, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Traditional approaches to undergraduate hydrology and water resource education are textbook based, adopt unit processes and rely on idealized examples of specific applications, rather than examining the contextual relations in the processes and the dynamics connecting climate and ecosystems. The overarching goal of this project is to address the needed paradigm shift in undergraduate education of engineering hydrology and water resources education to reflect parallel advances in hydrologic research and technology, mainly in the areas of new observational settings, data and modeling resources and web-based technologies. This study presents efforts to develop a set of learning modules that are case-based, data and simulation driven and delivered via a web user interface. The modules are based on real-world case studies from three regional hydrologic settings: Coastal Louisiana, Utah Rocky Mountains and Florida Everglades. These three systems provide unique learning opportunities on topics such as: regional-scale budget analysis, hydrologic effects of human and natural changes, flashflood protection, climate-hydrology teleconnections and water resource management scenarios. The technical design and contents of the modules aim to support students' ability for transforming their learning outcomes and skills to hydrologic systems other than those used by the specific activity. To promote active learning, the modules take students through a set of highly engaging learning activities that are based on analysis of hydrologic data and model simulations. The modules include user support in the form of feedback and self-assessment mechanisms that are integrated within the online modules. Module effectiveness is assessed through an improvement-focused evaluation model using a mixed-method research approach guiding collection and analysis of evaluation data. Both qualitative and quantitative data are collected through student learning data, product analysis, and staff interviews

  1. A family support service for homeless children and parents: users' perspectives and characteristics.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Victoria; Karim, Khalid; Rustall, Sue; Gregory, Peter; Vostanis, Panos

    2004-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to establish the psychosocial characteristics and perspectives of 49 consecutive homeless families who received input from a new designated family support worker (FSW) post at a large statutory hostel for homeless parents and children. The FSW provided: assessment of social, educational and health needs; support and parent training; and liaison with and referral to specialist services. Measures included quantitative questionnaires (i.e. the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Parenting Daily Hassles Scale, the Eyberg Child Behaviour Inventory, and the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents), and a qualitative (semistructured) interview on service experiences and satisfaction. The psychosocial measures indicated high rates of parenting difficulties, mental health and related needs among children and their parents. Parenting difficulties were associated with child behaviour problems. Parents expressed satisfaction with the service whilst they were residents at the hostel, but they were often not clear about the objectives of agencies and interventions. Family support interventions have a key role in service provision for homeless and other vulnerable families by providing direct parenting interventions and ensuring that specialist agencies are appropriately involved. Family support worker involvement needs to continue when families are re-housed in the community.

  2. SCOSII: ESA's new generation of mission control systems: The user's perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufeler, P.; Pecchioli, M.; Shurmer, I.

    1994-11-01

    In 1974 ESOC decided to develop a reusable Mission Control System infrastructure for ESA's missions operated under its responsibility. This triggered a long and successful product development line, which started with the Multi Mission Support System (MSSS) which entered in service in 1977 and is still being used today by the MARECS and ECS missions; it was followed in 1989 by a second generation of systems known as SCOS-I, which was/is used by the Hipparcos, ERS-1 and EURECA missions and will continue to support all future ESCO controlled missions until approximately 1995. In the meantime the increasing complexity of future missions together with the emergence of new hardware and software technologies have led ESOC to go for the development of a third generation of control systems, SCOSII, which will support their future missions up to at least the middle of the next decade. The objective of the paper is to present the characteristics of the SCOSII system from the perspective of the mission control team; i.e. it will concentrate on the improvements and advances in the performance, functionality and work efficiency of the system.

  3. SCOSII: ESA's new generation of mission control systems: The user's perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufeler, P.; Pecchioli, M.; Shurmer, I.

    1994-01-01

    In 1974 ESOC decided to develop a reusable Mission Control System infrastructure for ESA's missions operated under its responsibility. This triggered a long and successful product development line, which started with the Multi Mission Support System (MSSS) which entered in service in 1977 and is still being used today by the MARECS and ECS missions; it was followed in 1989 by a second generation of systems known as SCOS-I, which was/is used by the Hipparcos, ERS-1 and EURECA missions and will continue to support all future ESCO controlled missions until approximately 1995. In the meantime the increasing complexity of future missions together with the emergence of new hardware and software technologies have led ESOC to go for the development of a third generation of control systems, SCOSII, which will support their future missions up to at least the middle of the next decade. The objective of the paper is to present the characteristics of the SCOSII system from the perspective of the mission control team; i.e. it will concentrate on the improvements and advances in the performance, functionality and work efficiency of the system.

  4. Preparing for a crisis: crisis team development.

    PubMed

    Calarco, C

    1999-02-01

    Emergency preparedness in the school setting necessitates the formation and development of a Crisis Team that will be prepared to assume critical roles in the event of a crisis. This paper discusses the school Crisis Team, including member identification and responsibilities, and the relationship of the Crisis Team to the school crisis plan and policies.

  5. Navigating the Alcohol Treatment Pathway: A Qualitative Study from the Service Users' Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gilburt, Helen; Drummond, Colin; Sinclair, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Aims Provision of effective treatment for dependent drinkers has been identified as a priority in England yet evidence suggests that access is problematic and there are low levels of retention. This qualitative study explores how the alcohol treatment system is experienced by service users, identifying barriers and facilitators that influence treatment outcomes. Methods A total of 20 semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with patients from community alcohol treatment services in three London boroughs in 2012. Interviews were undertaken one year after initially entering treatment. A thematic analysis was conducted, with the results further abstracted to relate them to specific aspects of the treatment journey. Results Patients journeys were characterized by a perceived lack of control leading to help-seeking, with treatment outcomes influenced by an individuals' self-efficacy and the capabilities and skills of staff in actively engaging and supporting patients on the journey. A focus of services on the detoxification process and fragmented care pathways impacted negatively on engagement. Conclusions Current alcohol care pathways require significant levels of motivation and self-efficacy to navigate that few patients possess. Pathways need to better reflect the capacity and capabilities of patients to be successful in supporting recovery. PMID:25825267

  6. Developing framework for agent- based diabetes disease management system: user perspective.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza; Rahimi, Azin

    2014-02-01

    One of the characteristics of agents is mobility which makes them very suitable for remote electronic health and tele medicine. The aim of this study is developing a framework for agent based diabetes information management at national level through identifying required agents. The main tool is a questioner that is designed in three sections based on studying library resources, performance of major organizations in the field of diabetes in and out of the country and interviews with experts in the medical, health information management and software fields. Questionnaires based on Delphi methods were distributed among 20 experts. In order to design and identify agents required in health information management for the prevention and appropriate and rapid treatment of diabetes, the results were analyzed using SPSS 17 and Results were plotted with FREEPLANE mind map software. ACCESS TO DATA TECHNOLOGY IN PROPOSED FRAMEWORK IN ORDER OF PRIORITY IS: mobile (mean 1/80), SMS, EMAIL (mean 2/80), internet, web (mean 3/30), phone (mean 3/60), WIFI (mean 4/60). In delivering health care to diabetic patients, considering social and human aspects is essential. Having a systematic view for implementation of agent systems and paying attention to all aspects such as feedbacks, user acceptance, budget, motivation, hierarchy, useful standards, affordability of individuals, identifying barriers and opportunities and so on, are necessary.

  7. Developing Framework for Agent- Based Diabetes Disease Management System: User Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza; Rahimi, Azin

    2014-01-01

    Background: One of the characteristics of agents is mobility which makes them very suitable for remote electronic health and tele medicine. The aim of this study is developing a framework for agent based diabetes information management at national level through identifying required agents. Methods: The main tool is a questioner that is designed in three sections based on studying library resources, performance of major organizations in the field of diabetes in and out of the country and interviews with experts in the medical, health information management and software fields. Questionnaires based on Delphi methods were distributed among 20 experts. In order to design and identify agents required in health information management for the prevention and appropriate and rapid treatment of diabetes, the results were analyzed using SPSS 17 and Results were plotted with FREEPLANE mind map software. Results: Access to data technology in proposed framework in order of priority is: mobile (mean 1/80), SMS, EMAIL (mean 2/80), internet, web (mean 3/30), phone (mean 3/60), WIFI (mean 4/60). Conclusions: In delivering health care to diabetic patients, considering social and human aspects is essential. Having a systematic view for implementation of agent systems and paying attention to all aspects such as feedbacks, user acceptance, budget, motivation, hierarchy, useful standards, affordability of individuals, identifying barriers and opportunities and so on, are necessary. PMID:24757407

  8. The Melding of Drug Markets in Houston After Katrina: Dealer and User Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kotarba, Joseph A.; Fackler, Jennifer; Johnson, Bruce D.; Dunlap, Eloise

    2013-01-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the majority of routine activities in New Orleans were disrupted, including the illegal drug market. The large-scale relocation of New Orleans evacuees (NOEs), including many illegal drug users and sellers, to host cities led to a need for new sources of illegal drugs. This need was quickly satisfied by two initially distinct drug markets (1) drug dealers from New Orleans who were themselves evacuees and (2) established drug dealers in the host cities. To be expected, the two markets did not operate indefinitely in parallel fashion. This paper describes the evolving, operational relationship between these two drug markets over time, with a focus on Houston. We analyze the reciprocal evolution of these two markets at two significant points in time: at the beginning of the relocation (2005) and two years later (2007). The overall trend is towards a melding of the two drug markets, as evidenced primarily by decreases in drug-related violence and the cross-fertilization of drug tastes. We describe the process by which the two drug markets are melded over time, in order to seek a better understanding of the social processes by which drug markets in general evolve. PMID:20509741

  9. Artificial gametes: perspectives of geneticists, ethicists and representatives of potential users.

    PubMed

    Cutas, Daniela; Dondorp, Wybo; Swierstra, Tsjalling; Repping, Sjoerd; de Wert, Guido

    2014-08-01

    Several threads of research towards developing artificial gametes are ongoing in a number of research labs worldwide. The development of a technology that could generate gametes in vitro has significant potential for human reproduction, and raises a lot of interest, as evidenced by the frequent and extensive media coverage of research in this area. We have asked researchers involved in work with artificial gametes, ethicists, and representatives of potential user groups, how they envisioned the use of artificial gametes in human reproduction. In the course of three focus groups, the participants commented on the various aspects involved. The two recurring themes were the strength of the claim of becoming a parent genetically, and the importance of responsible communication of science. The participants concurred that (a) the desire or need to have genetic offspring of one's own does not warrant the investment of research resources into these technologies, and that (b) given the minefield in terms of moral controversy and sensitivity that characterises the issues involved, how information is communicated and handled is of great importance.

  10. The melding of drug markets in Houston after Katrina: dealer and user perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kotarba, Joseph A; Fackler, Jennifer; Johnson, Bruce D; Dunlap, Eloise

    2010-07-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the majority of routine activities in New Orleans were disrupted, including the illegal drug market. The large-scale relocation of New Orleans evacuees (NOEs), including many illegal drug users and sellers, to host cities led to a need for new sources of illegal drugs. This need was quickly satisfied by two initially distinct drug markets (1) drug dealers from New Orleans who were themselves evacuees and (2) established drug dealers in the host cities. To be expected, the two markets did not operate indefinitely in parallel fashion. This paper describes the evolving, operational relationship between these two drug markets over time, with a focus on Houston. We analyze the reciprocal evolution of these two markets at two significant points in time: at the beginning of the relocation (2005) and two years later (2007). The overall trend is towards a melding of the two drug markets, as evidenced primarily by decreases in drug-related violence and the cross-fertilization of drug tastes. We describe the process by which the two drug markets are melded over time, in order to seek a better understanding of the social processes by which drug markets in general evolve.

  11. Does a quarterlife crisis exist?

    PubMed

    Rossi, Nicole E; Mebert, Carolyn J

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined quarterlife crisis, defined in the popular press as an identity crisis that leaves recent college graduates depressed, anxious, and full of doubt. To determine if a unique crisis exists, 4 groups of young adults (recent high school [n = 23] and college [n = 117] graduates in the workforce, present undergraduate [n = 75], and graduate [n = 57] students) completed self-report measures assessing identity development, future time perspective, social support, coping, depression, anxiety, and job and life satisfaction. No support was found for a quarterlife crisis among these 4 groups. Working high school graduates displayed the highest anxiety, followed by present undergraduates. Depression was predicted by family support and identity commitment. Job satisfaction was associated with income and support from friends. Life satisfaction was associated with income, social support from friends and family, and identity commitment.

  12. [Innovation in mental health from the perspective of users: a community movement in the Northeast of Brazil].

    PubMed

    Bosi, Maria Lúcia Magalhães; Carvalho, Liliane Brandão; Ximenes, Veronica Morais; Melo, Anna Karynne da Silva; Godoy, Maria Gabriela Curubeto

    2012-03-01

    This study, originating from a multidimensional analysis on the innovation category in a Community Mental Health Movement of Bom Jardim (Fortaleza, Brazil) that examines subjective and psychosocial dimensions, seeks to examine to what extent the work developed by this movement is effectively an innovative model in mental healthcare from the perspective of users of this service. The methodology adopted was a qualitative case study method based on a critical-interpretive approach employing techniques such as in-depth interviews associated with focus groups. The categorization of the discursive material was conducted using a model based on the four main dimensions of psychiatric reform, namely conceptual, technical, legal and socio-cultural aspects. The results reveal the following: an emphasis on the individual rather than focusing on the sickness; care as the basis for purposeful actions; the co-production of genuine dialogue with multiple stakeholders, and the construction of autonomy emphasizing individual potential. In conclusion, it can be said that healthcare practices developed by the Movement involve deconstructing the traditional model of mental healthcare, permitting new forms of citizenship, thereby contributing to deinstitutionalization.

  13. Earth Science Informatics Community Requirements for Improving Sustainable Science Software Practices: User Perspectives and Implications for Organizational Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, R. R.; Lenhardt, W. C.; Robinson, E.

    2014-12-01

    Science software is integral to the scientific process and must be developed and managed in a sustainable manner to ensure future access to scientific data and related resources. Organizations that are part of the scientific enterprise, as well as members of the scientific community who work within these entities, can contribute to the sustainability of science software and to practices that improve scientific community capabilities for science software sustainability. As science becomes increasingly digital and therefore, dependent on software, improving community practices for sustainable science software will contribute to the sustainability of science. Members of the Earth science informatics community, including scientific data producers and distributers, end-user scientists, system and application developers, and data center managers, use science software regularly and face the challenges and the opportunities that science software presents for the sustainability of science. To gain insight on practices needed for the sustainability of science software from the science software experiences of the Earth science informatics community, an interdisciplinary group of 300 community members were asked to engage in simultaneous roundtable discussions and report on their answers to questions about the requirements for improving scientific software sustainability. This paper will present an analysis of the issues reported and the conclusions offered by the participants. These results provide perspectives for science software sustainability practices and have implications for actions that organizations and their leadership can initiate to improve the sustainability of science software.

  14. Using multi-perspective methodologies to study users' interactions with the prototype front end of a guideline-based decision support system for diabetic foot care.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Mor; Shachak, Aviv; Wang, Dongwen; Karnieli, Eddy

    2009-07-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are important instruments for improving the quality of care; in paper form, however, they are not used as effectively as possible. In order to develop a guideline-based decision support system (DSS) prototype to help clinicians deal with diabetic patients' foot problems, we drew on methodologies from qualitative research, cognitive science, and information systems. This multi-perspective approach was intended to facilitate user-centered design and evaluation. We employed field observations, structured interviews, and document analyses to collect and analyze users' workflow patterns, decision support goals, and preferences regarding interactions with a DSS. Next, we aligned their requirements with sequence diagrams and followed Nielsen's heuristics to develop a DSS prototype. We then performed think-aloud analyses and used the technology acceptance model to direct our evaluation of users' perceptions of the prototype. Users had a positive response to the DSS prototype in terms of its clarity of design and ease of use. They expressed a high intention of using the system in the future. Applying multi-perspective methodologies is an effective way to study and design user interactions with the front end of a guideline-based DSS.

  15. Service user involvement in mental health assessment: comparing people's experiences of mental health triage assessments with theoretical perspectives on user involvement.

    PubMed

    Hird, Martin

    2007-09-01

    Separately, both user involvement and assessment are conceptually poorly defined by practitioners. Not surprisingly, reviews suggest that involvement in assessment is poorly researched, understood and largely achieved only at low levels. In this study fourteen service users and five assessors were interviewed, and a conceptual framework developed using grounded theory methods for data gathering and analysis. Two key dimensions of the experience emerged for involvement; the nature of the relationship with the assessor; and the construction of assessment as a process of dialogue. Recommendations for practice include: the use of an introductory letter to orientate service users to the assessment process; reconstructing the assessment as a series of encounters rather than as a single event; the provision of a written formulation to service users and; the introduction of systems to ensure that staff maintain their capacity for emotional reactivity to people presenting for this initial contact with mental health services.

  16. Beyond the crisis: building back better mental health care in 10 emergency-affected areas using a longer-term perspective.

    PubMed

    Epping-Jordan, JoAnne E; van Ommeren, Mark; Ashour, Hazem Nayef; Maramis, Albert; Marini, Anita; Mohanraj, Andrew; Noori, Aqila; Rizwan, Humayun; Saeed, Khalid; Silove, Derrick; Suveendran, T; Urbina, Liliana; Ventevogel, Peter; Saxena, Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Major gaps remain - especially in low- and middle-income countries - in the realization of comprehensive, community-based mental health care. One potentially important yet overlooked opportunity for accelerating mental health reform lies within emergency situations, such as armed conflicts or natural disasters. Despite their adverse impacts on affected populations' mental health and well being, emergencies also draw attention and resources to these issues and provide openings for mental health service development. Cases were considered if they represented a low- or middle-income country or territory affected by an emergency, were initiated between 2000 and 2010, succeeded in making changes to the mental health system, and were able to be documented by an expert involved directly with the case. Based on these criteria, 10 case examples from diverse emergency-affected settings were included: Afghanistan, Burundi, Indonesia (Aceh Province), Iraq, Jordan, Kosovo, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, Sri Lanka, and Timor-Leste. These cases demonstrate generally that emergency contexts can be tapped to make substantial and sustainable improvements in mental health systems. From these experiences, 10 common lessons learnt were identified on how to make this happen. These lessons include the importance of adopting a longer-term perspective for mental health reform from the outset, and focusing on system-wide reform that addresses both new-onset and pre-existing mental disorders. Global progress in mental health care would happen more quickly if, in every crisis, strategic efforts were made to convert short-term interest in mental health problems into momentum for mental health reform.

  17. Availability and components of maternity services according to providers and users perspectives in North Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Worku, Abebaw Gebeyehu; Yalew, Alemayehu Worku; Afework, Mesganaw Fantahun

    2013-08-23

    The goal of reducing maternal mortality can be achieved when women receive important service components at the time of their maternity care. This study attempted to assess the availability and the components of maternity services according to the perspectives of service users and providers. A linked facility and population-based survey was conducted over three months (January to March 2012) in North Gondar Zone. Twelve kebeles (clusters) were selected randomly from six districts to identify maternity clients cared for by skilled providers. Then 12 health centers and 3 hospitals utilized by the corresponding cluster population were selected for facility survey. Interview with facility managers/heads, providers and clients and observations were used for data collection. Data were entered using Epi Info and were exported to SPSS software for analysis. Antenatal and delivery care were available in most of the visited facilities. However, the majority of them were not fully functioning for EmOC according to their level. Signal functions including administration of anticonvulsants and assisted vaginal delivery were missing in seven and five of the 12 health centers, respectively. Only one hospital met the criteria for comprehensive emergency obstetric care (performed cesarean section). Only 24% of the providers used partograph consistently. About 538 (32.3%) and 231 (13.8%) of the women received antenatal and delivery care from skilled providers, respectively. Most of the services were at health centers by nurses/midwives. At the time of the antenatal care, women received the important components of the services (percentage of users in bracket) like blood pressure checkup (79%), urine testing (35%), tetanus immunization (45%), iron supplementation (64%), birth preparedness counseling (51%) and HIV testing (71%). During delivery, 80% had their blood pressure measured, 78% were informed on labor progress, 89% had auscultation of fetal heartbeat, 80% took drugs to prevent

  18. Availability and components of maternity services according to providers and users perspectives in North Gondar, northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The goal of reducing maternal mortality can be achieved when women receive important service components at the time of their maternity care. This study attempted to assess the availability and the components of maternity services according to the perspectives of service users and providers. Method A linked facility and population-based survey was conducted over three months (January to March 2012) in North Gondar Zone. Twelve kebeles (clusters) were selected randomly from six districts to identify maternity clients cared for by skilled providers. Then 12 health centers and 3 hospitals utilized by the corresponding cluster population were selected for facility survey. Interview with facility managers/heads, providers and clients and observations were used for data collection. Data were entered using Epi Info and were exported to SPSS software for analysis. Results Antenatal and delivery care were available in most of the visited facilities. However, the majority of them were not fully functioning for EmOC according to their level. Signal functions including administration of anticonvulsants and assisted vaginal delivery were missing in seven and five of the 12 health centers, respectively. Only one hospital met the criteria for comprehensive emergency obstetric care (performed cesarean section). Only 24% of the providers used partograph consistently. About 538 (32.3%) and 231 (13.8%) of the women received antenatal and delivery care from skilled providers, respectively. Most of the services were at health centers by nurses/midwives. At the time of the antenatal care, women received the important components of the services (percentage of users in bracket) like blood pressure checkup (79%), urine testing (35%), tetanus immunization (45%), iron supplementation (64%), birth preparedness counseling (51%) and HIV testing (71%). During delivery, 80% had their blood pressure measured, 78% were informed on labor progress, 89% had auscultation of fetal heartbeat

  19. Crisis Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents summaries of four articles relevant to school crisis response. The first article, "Peritraumatic Dissociation Predicts Posttraumatic Stress in Youth Following Accidents" summarized by Jim Matthews, suggests that peritraumatic dissociation is a powerful predictor of PTSD symptoms among youth who have been in a car…

  20. Crisis Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents summaries of four articles relevant to school crisis response. The first article, "Peritraumatic Dissociation Predicts Posttraumatic Stress in Youth Following Accidents" summarized by Jim Matthews, suggests that peritraumatic dissociation is a powerful predictor of PTSD symptoms among youth who have been in a car…

  1. User Perspectives on the Application of Pattern-Scaled and Emulated Projections for Climate Change Impact Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    Pattern-scaled (PS) and emulated climate data are derived from climate model projections in order to offer a more comprehensive, though approximate, representation of uncertainties in future climate. These data are widely used by analysts studying climate change impacts, adaptation and mitigation, often in the form of "scenario generator" tools. Some of the advantages they provide include: rapid and flexible access to climate projections; representation of a range of uncertainties in projections, including multiple radiative forcings, time periods, variables and regional patterns; and (in some cases) access to probabilistic projections. They also present challenges to analysts, including: access to projections consistent with forcing levels not provided from climate models; selection of a manageable sample of projections; determination of a reference or baseline climate; issues around downscaling of projections; representation of future changes in climate variability at different scales; provision of variables other than temperature and precipitation; ensuring internal consistency between variables being projected; and consideration of climate projections alongside other uncertainties (such as socioeconomic futures and impact model projections). In view of these advantages and challenges, and mindful of the potential needs of impact analysts affecting the design of forthcoming CMIP6 climate model simulation runs, this presentation offers some user perspectives on the kinds of data and information that may be required in the coming decades. The main messages have been developed out of discussions around this theme in a Workshop held at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Co in April 2014. In brief, some basic needs to be explored include: (1) evaluation of the PS/emulation techniques using formal statistical techniques, (2) compilation and critical evaluation of tools applying PS and emulation to scenario provision, (3) guidance on the use of PS

  2. Effective heart disease prevention: lessons from a qualitative study of user perspectives in Bangladeshi, Indian and Pakistani communities.

    PubMed

    Netto, G; McCloughan, L; Bhatnagar, A

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) has a high mortality, incidence and prevalence among Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities in the UK, indicating the need for effective heart disease prevention initiatives for these communities. This paper considers how service user perspectives can be used to develop effective, culturally focused CHD prevention interventions for these target groups by addressing identified barriers, including deeply held cultural beliefs. A qualitative research study, using a longitudinal action research approach. This was a community-based study in Edinburgh. Six focus group discussions--two for each community--were organized with participants from these communities at the beginning of the project. A further six focus group discussions for the same communities were organized six months later. Over the period examined, participants reported varying changes in levels of knowledge relating to the nature, causes and symptoms of CHD. Some participants reported taking slight to significant steps to reduce or prevent heart disease, while others did not. The project was viewed as helpful in increasing knowledge about CHD and preventive measures and encouraging healthier lifestyles. However, persistent barriers to change were also identified, requiring changes to the project that involved not only matching intervention materials and messages to observable, superficial characteristics of the target population, but more fundamental changes that address the cultural, social, historical, environmental and psychological forces that influence health behaviour. CHD prevention initiatives need to identify and respond to deep-rooted influences on health-behaviour in 'at-risk' groups, in addition to superficial characteristics of the target populations. It is important for specific prevention initiatives to be linked into wider CHD frameworks to ensure transferability of learning and integration within wider service provision.

  3. Crisis Inventory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    involved Egypt and Israel on opposing sides, as well as other opposing pairs such as Syria and Israel . The advantage of organ- izing the cases in...West municipalities. An agreement to end the blockade was reached in May 1949. Crisis: Costa Rica- Nicaragua Dates: 12/3/48-1/30/49 Country Pair...Costa Rica- Nicaragua In the midst of domestic political turmoil in Costa Rica, Rafael Calderon - previously a Presidential candidate in Costa Rica

  4. Crisis behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Grinspoon, L.

    1984-04-01

    The Department of Defense has rules and procedures to minimize the opportunity for error and improper behavior among those with access to strategic weapons, but no psychiatric screening system can predict with assurance who will or will not behave rationally during a crisis. Personal problems and institutional decision-making pressures may destroy nuclear deterrence. Certain features of military life, including drug and alcohol abuse, heavy responsibility, tension, and group decision making, can destreoy rationality. 12 references.

  5. Demarcating User eXperience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roto, Virpi

    This panel discusses the scoping of user experience as a research field. User experience is a crossing point of several disciplines, each of which tends to define user experience from their own perspective. The distinguished panelists from academia and industry represent the different perspectives to user experience: Traditional human-computer interaction, Psychology, Cognitive psychology, and Design. The goal of the panel is to get one step closer to a shared understanding of the concept of user experience.

  6. Service users' perspectives in the design of an online tool for assisted self-help in mental health: a case study of implications.

    PubMed

    Gammon, Deede; Strand, Monica; Eng, Lillian Sofie

    2014-01-09

    The involvement of persons with lived experiences of mental illness and service use is increasingly viewed as key to improving the relevance and utility of mental health research and service innovation. Guided by the principles of Community-Based Participatory Research we developed an online tool for assisted self-help in mental health. The resulting tool, PsyConnect, is ready for testing in two communities starting 2014. This case study reports from the design phase which entailed clarifying very basic questions: Who is the primary target group? What are the aims? What functions are priorities? Roles and responsibilities? What types of evidence can legitimize tool design decisions? Here we highlight the views of service users as a basis for discussing implications of user involvement for service design and research. PsyConnect has become a tool for those who expect to need assistance over long periods of time regardless of their specific condition(s). The aim is to support service users in gaining greater overview and control, legitimacy, and sense of continuity in relationships. It has a personalized "my control panel" which depicts status → process → goals. Functionality includes support for: mapping life domains; medication overview; crisis management; coping exercises; secure messaging; and social support. While the types of evidence that can legitimize design decisions are scattered and indirectly relevant, recent trends in recovery research will be used to guide further refinements. PsyConnect has undoubtedly become something other than it would have been without careful attention to the views of service users. The tool invites a proactive approach that is likely to challenge treatment cultures that are reactive, disorder-focused and consultation-based. Service user representatives will need to play central roles in training peers and clinicians in order to increase the likelihood of tool usage in line with intentions. Similarly, their influence on tool

  7. Developing a useful, user-friendly website for cancer patient follow-up: users' perspectives on ease of access and usefulness.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Y K; Selby, D L; Newsham, A; Keding, A; Forman, D; Brown, J; Velikova, G; Wright, P

    2012-11-01

    UK cancer survival has improved, leading to an increase in review patients and pressure on clinics. Use of the Internet for information exchange between patients and healthcare staff may provide a useful adjunct or alternative to traditional follow-up. This study aimed to develop and evaluate a website for use in follow-up cancer care in terms of usability, feasibility and acceptability. A website was developed and underwent iterative amendment following patient usability testing in focus groups. Patients on follow-up completed a Computer and Internet Usage Questionnaire. Internet users consented to a randomised crossover study to complete paper and online questionnaires, browse the website and participate in a website evaluation interview. Patient website use was tracked. Usability: Website changes were made following patient testing (n= 21). Patients would have liked a 'personalized' website with links to their clinical team, out with the scope of this study. Feasibility: The majority of participants (65%) had Internet access. Age remained a differentiating factor. Acceptability: Final evaluation (n= 103) was positive although many would like to maintain face-to-face hospital contact. User involvement in website design can ensure patient needs are met. A website model for follow-up will suit some patients but others will prefer clinical contact.

  8. Spent fuel management - A user's perspective: summary of panel discussions and findings from WM'07 in Tucson, Arizona - SAN D2007-4931C

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Dennis L.

    2007-07-01

    A global partnership between nuclear energy supplier nations and user nations could enable the safe and secure expansion of nuclear power throughout the world. Although it is likely that supplier nations and their industries would be anxious to sell reactors and fuel services as part of this partnership, their commitment to close the fuel cycle (i.e., permanently take back fuel and high-level waste) remains unclear. At the 2007 Waste Management Symposia in Tucson, Arizona, USA, a distinguished international panel explored fuel take back and waste disposal from the perspective of current and prospective user nations. This paper reports on the findings of that panel and presents a path for policy makers to move forward with the partnership vision. (authors)

  9. 'One man's medicine is another man's poison': a qualitative study of user perspectives on low intensity interventions for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

    PubMed

    Knopp-Hoffer, Jasmin; Knowles, Sarah; Bower, Peter; Lovell, Karina; Bee, Penny E

    2016-05-18

    Low intensity interventions based on cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) such as computerized therapy or guided self-help can offer effective and accessible care for mild to moderate mental health problems. However, critics argue that by reducing therapist input and the level of experience of the professionals delivering therapy, low intensity interventions deprive users of critical 'active ingredients'. Thus, while demand management arguments support the use of low intensity interventions for OCD, their integration into existing mental health services remains incomplete. Studies of user views of low intensity interventions can offer valuable insights to define their role and optimize their implementation in practice. Qualitative interviews (n = 36) in adults with OCD explored user perspectives on the initiation, continuation and acceptability of two low intensity CBT interventions: guided self-help (6 h of professional support) and computerized CBT (1 h of professional support), delivered within the context of a large pragmatic effectiveness trial (ISRCTN73535163). While uptake was relatively high, continued engagement with the low intensity interventions was complex, with the perceived limitations of self-help materials impacting on users' willingness to continue therapy. The addition of professional support provided an acceptable compromise between the relative benefits of self-help and the need for professional input. However, individual differences were evident in the extent to which this compromise was considered necessary and acceptable. The need for some professional contact to manage expectations and personalize therapy materials was amplified in users with OCD, given the unique features of the disorder. However, individual differences were again evident regarding the perceived value of face-to-face support. Overall the findings demonstrate the need for flexibility in the provision of low intensity interventions for OCD, responsive to user preferences

  10. Migration, crisis and theoretical conflict.

    PubMed

    Bach, R L; Schraml, L A

    1982-01-01

    The nature of the distinction between the equilibrium and historical-structuralist positions on migration is examined. Theoretical and political differences in the two positions are considered both historically and in the context of the current global economic crisis. The proposal of Wood to focus on households as a strategy for integrating the two perspectives and for achieving a better understanding of migration and social change is discussed.

  11. User fees for public health care services in Hungary: expectations, experience, and acceptability from the perspectives of different stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Baji, Petra; Pavlova, Milena; Gulácsi, László; Groot, Wim

    2011-10-01

    The introduction of user fees for health care services is a new phenomenon in Central-Eastern European Countries. In Hungary, user fees were first introduced in 2007, but abolished one year later after a referendum. The aim of our study is to describe the experiences and expectations of health system stakeholders in Hungary related to user fees as well as their approval of such fees. For our analysis we use both qualitative and quantitative data from focus-group discussions with health care consumers and physicians, and in-depth interviews with policy makers and health insurance representatives. Our findings suggest that the reasons behind the unpopularity of user fees might be (a) the rejection of the objectives of user fees defined by the government, (b) negative personal experiences with user fees, and (c) the general mistrust of the Hungarian population when it comes to the utilization of public resources. Successful policy implementation of user fees requires social consensus on the policy objectives, also there should be real improvements in health care provision noticeable for consumers, to assure the fees acceptance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Design in mind: eliciting service user and frontline staff perspectives on psychiatric ward design through participatory methods

    PubMed Central

    Csipke, Emese; Papoulias, Constantina; Vitoratou, Silia; Williams, Paul; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Psychiatric ward design may make an important contribution to patient outcomes and well-being. However, research is hampered by an inability to assess its effects robustly. This paper reports on a study which deployed innovative methods to capture service user and staff perceptions of ward design. Method: User generated measures of the impact of ward design were developed and tested on four acute adult wards using participatory methodology. Additionally, inpatients took photographs to illustrate their experience of the space in two wards. Data were compared across wards. Results: Satisfactory reliability indices emerged based on both service user and staff responses. Black and minority ethnic (BME) service users and those with a psychosis spectrum diagnosis have more positive views of the ward layout and fixtures. Staff members have more positive views than service users, while priorities of staff and service users differ. Inpatient photographs prioritise hygiene, privacy and control and address symbolic aspects of the ward environment. Conclusions: Participatory and visual methodologies can provide robust tools for an evaluation of the impact of psychiatric ward design on users. PMID:26886239

  13. Design in mind: eliciting service user and frontline staff perspectives on psychiatric ward design through participatory methods.

    PubMed

    Csipke, Emese; Papoulias, Constantina; Vitoratou, Silia; Williams, Paul; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric ward design may make an important contribution to patient outcomes and well-being. However, research is hampered by an inability to assess its effects robustly. This paper reports on a study which deployed innovative methods to capture service user and staff perceptions of ward design. User generated measures of the impact of ward design were developed and tested on four acute adult wards using participatory methodology. Additionally, inpatients took photographs to illustrate their experience of the space in two wards. Data were compared across wards. Satisfactory reliability indices emerged based on both service user and staff responses. Black and minority ethnic (BME) service users and those with a psychosis spectrum diagnosis have more positive views of the ward layout and fixtures. Staff members have more positive views than service users, while priorities of staff and service users differ. Inpatient photographs prioritise hygiene, privacy and control and address symbolic aspects of the ward environment. Participatory and visual methodologies can provide robust tools for an evaluation of the impact of psychiatric ward design on users.

  14. Crisis Paper No. 33. The Energy Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlantic Information Centre for Teachers, London (England).

    This Crisis Paper is thirty-third in a series which expands the analysis of the crisis under discussion to provide a multi-national view of the issue by quoting comment from a selection of newspapers and journals of several countries. A brief introduction outlines the history and background of the energy crisis, emphasizing the underestimated…

  15. Crisis Paper No. 33. The Energy Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlantic Information Centre for Teachers, London (England).

    This Crisis Paper is thirty-third in a series which expands the analysis of the crisis under discussion to provide a multi-national view of the issue by quoting comment from a selection of newspapers and journals of several countries. A brief introduction outlines the history and background of the energy crisis, emphasizing the underestimated…

  16. Health protection in times of economic crisis: challenges and opportunities for Europe.

    PubMed

    McDaid, David; Quaglio, Gianluca; Correia de Campos, António; Dario, Claudio; Van Woensel, Lieve; Karapiperis, Theodoros; Reeves, Aaron

    2013-11-01

    STOA, the European Parliament's technology assessment body, and the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies recently organised a workshop on the impacts of the economic crisis on European health systems. Evidence of the impact of the recent financial crisis on health outcomes is only just beginning to emerge. Data suggests that this latest recession has led to more frequent poor health status, rising incidence of some communicable diseases, and higher suicide rates. Further, available data are likely to underestimate the broader mental health crisis linked to increased rates of stress, anxiety, and depression among the economically vulnerable. Not only does recession affect factors that determine health, but it also affects the financial capacity to respond. Many European governments have reduced public expenditure on health services during the financial crisis, while introducing or increasing user charges. The recession has driven structural reforms, and has affected the priority given to public policies that could be used to help protect population health. The current economic climate, while challenging, presents an opportunity for reforming and restructuring health promotion actions and taking a long-term perspective.

  17. The role of the user within the medical device design and development process: medical device manufacturers' perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Academic literature and international standards bodies suggest that user involvement, via the incorporation of human factors engineering methods within the medical device design and development (MDDD) process, offer many benefits that enable the development of safer and more usable medical devices that are better suited to users' needs. However, little research has been carried out to explore medical device manufacturers' beliefs and attitudes towards user involvement within this process, or indeed what value they believe can be added by doing so. Methods In-depth interviews with representatives from 11 medical device manufacturers are carried out. We ask them to specify who they believe the intended users of the device to be, who they consult to inform the MDDD process, what role they believe the user plays within this process, and what value (if any) they believe users add. Thematic analysis is used to analyse the fully transcribed interview data, to gain insight into medical device manufacturers' beliefs and attitudes towards user involvement within the MDDD process. Results A number of high-level themes emerged, relating who the user is perceived to be, the methods used, the perceived value and barriers to user involvement, and the nature of user contributions. The findings reveal that despite standards agencies and academic literature offering strong support for the employment formal methods, manufacturers are still hesitant due to a range of factors including: perceived barriers to obtaining ethical approval; the speed at which such activity may be carried out; the belief that there is no need given the 'all-knowing' nature of senior health care staff and clinical champions; a belief that effective results are achievable by consulting a minimal number of champions. Furthermore, less senior health care practitioners and patients were rarely seen as being able to provide valuable input into the process. Conclusions Medical device manufacturers often

  18. User acceptance of mobile health services from users' perspectives: The role of self-efficacy and response-efficacy in technology acceptance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Han, Xiaocui; Dang, Yuanyuan; Meng, Fanbo; Guo, Xitong; Lin, Jiayue

    2017-03-01

    With the swift emergence of electronic medical information, the global popularity of mobile health (mHealth) services continues to increase steadily. This study aims to investigate the efficacy factors that directly or indirectly influence individuals' acceptance of mHealth services. Based on the technology acceptance model, this research incorporates efficacy factors into the acceptance decision process. A research model was proposed involving the direct and indirect effects of self-efficacy and response-efficacy on acceptance intention, along with their moderating effects. The model and hypotheses were validated using data collected from a field survey of 650 potential service users. The results reveal that: (1) self-efficacy and response-efficacy are both positively associated with perceived ease of use; and (2) self-efficacy and response-efficacy moderate the impact of perceived usefulness toward adoption intention. Self-efficacy and response-efficacy both play an important role in individuals' acceptance of mHealth services, which not only affect their perceived ease of use of mHealth services, but also positively moderate the effects of perceived usefulness on adoption intention. Our findings serve to provide recommendations that are specifically customized for mHealth service providers and their marketers.

  19. The User-Centered Design as Novel Perspective for Evaluating the Usability of BCI-Controlled Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kübler, Andrea; Holz, Elisa M.; Riccio, Angela; Zickler, Claudia; Kaufmann, Tobias; Kleih, Sonja C.; Staiger-Sälzer, Pit; Desideri, Lorenzo; Hoogerwerf, Evert-Jan; Mattia, Donatella

    2014-01-01

    Albeit research on brain-computer interfaces (BCI) for controlling applications has expanded tremendously, we still face a translational gap when bringing BCI to end-users. To bridge this gap, we adapted the user-centered design (UCD) to BCI research and development which implies a shift from focusing on single aspects, such as accuracy and information transfer rate (ITR), to a more holistic user experience. The UCD implements an iterative process between end-users and developers based on a valid evaluation procedure. Within the UCD framework usability of a device can be defined with regard to its effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction. We operationalized these aspects to evaluate BCI-controlled applications. Effectiveness was regarded equivalent to accuracy of selections and efficiency to the amount of information transferred per time unit and the effort invested (workload). Satisfaction was assessed with questionnaires and visual-analogue scales. These metrics have been successfully applied to several BCI-controlled applications for communication and entertainment, which were evaluated by end-users with severe motor impairment. Results of four studies, involving a total of N = 19 end-users revealed: effectiveness was moderate to high; efficiency in terms of ITR was low to high and workload low to medium; depending on the match between user and technology, and type of application satisfaction was moderate to high. The here suggested evaluation metrics within the framework of the UCD proved to be an applicable and informative approach to evaluate BCI controlled applications, and end-users with severe impairment and in the locked-in state were able to participate in this process. PMID:25469774

  20. The user-centered design as novel perspective for evaluating the usability of BCI-controlled applications.

    PubMed

    Kübler, Andrea; Holz, Elisa M; Riccio, Angela; Zickler, Claudia; Kaufmann, Tobias; Kleih, Sonja C; Staiger-Sälzer, Pit; Desideri, Lorenzo; Hoogerwerf, Evert-Jan; Mattia, Donatella

    2014-01-01

    Albeit research on brain-computer interfaces (BCI) for controlling applications has expanded tremendously, we still face a translational gap when bringing BCI to end-users. To bridge this gap, we adapted the user-centered design (UCD) to BCI research and development which implies a shift from focusing on single aspects, such as accuracy and information transfer rate (ITR), to a more holistic user experience. The UCD implements an iterative process between end-users and developers based on a valid evaluation procedure. Within the UCD framework usability of a device can be defined with regard to its effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction. We operationalized these aspects to evaluate BCI-controlled applications. Effectiveness was regarded equivalent to accuracy of selections and efficiency to the amount of information transferred per time unit and the effort invested (workload). Satisfaction was assessed with questionnaires and visual-analogue scales. These metrics have been successfully applied to several BCI-controlled applications for communication and entertainment, which were evaluated by end-users with severe motor impairment. Results of four studies, involving a total of N = 19 end-users revealed: effectiveness was moderate to high; efficiency in terms of ITR was low to high and workload low to medium; depending on the match between user and technology, and type of application satisfaction was moderate to high. The here suggested evaluation metrics within the framework of the UCD proved to be an applicable and informative approach to evaluate BCI controlled applications, and end-users with severe impairment and in the locked-in state were able to participate in this process.

  1. The Status of Crisis Management at NASPA Member Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catullo, Linda A.; Walker, David A.; Floyd, Deborah L.

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the level of crisis preparedness in higher education from the perspective of chief student affairs administrators at residential universities post-September 11, 2001 to pre-Virginia Tech shootings in April 2007. Crisis preparedness was determined by compiling and comparing data results derived from an instrument implemented in…

  2. World Hunger Crisis Kit. Hope for the Hungry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woito, Robert, Ed.

    This booklet introduces the problem of world hunger and provides information, facts, and perspectives about the crisis. Section one presents the reader with the basic facts of the hunger crisis through a self-survey, a statistical study of the developed Oil Producing Export Countries (OPEC), and a one-page indication of what one would have to give…

  3. A user-centred approach to requirements elicitation in medical device development: a case study from an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jennifer L; Clark, Daniel J; Morgan, Stephen P; Crowe, John A; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The healthcare industry is dependent upon the provision of well designed medical devices. To achieve this it is recommended that user-centred design should begin early, and continue throughout device development. This is a challenge, particularly for smaller companies who may lack the necessary expertise and knowledge. The aim of this study was to conduct a rigorous yet focused investigation into the user requirements for a new medical imaging device. Open-ended semi-structured interviews were conducted with potential clinical users of the device to investigate the clinical need for the device and the potential benefits for patients and clinical users. The study identified a number of new and significant clinical needs that suggested that the concept of the device should be fundamentally changed. The clinical and organisational priorities of the clinical users were identified, as well as a number of factors that would act as barriers to the safe and effective adoption of the device. The developers reported that this focused approach to early requirements elicitation would result in an improved product, reduce the time to market, and save the time and cost of producing and evaluating an inappropriate prototype. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Restraining good practice: Reviewing evidence of the effects of restraint from the perspective of service users and mental health professionals in the United Kingdom (UK).

    PubMed

    Cusack, P; McAndrew, S; Cusack, F; Warne, T

    2016-01-01

    Safeguarding, balancing the concept of risk with the need for public protection and its implication for the lives of individuals, is an important facet of contemporary mental health care. Integral to safeguarding is the protection of human rights; the right to live free from torture, inhuman, or degrading treatment, and having the right to liberty, security, respect, and privacy. Professionals are required to recognise all of these rights when delivering care to vulnerable people. In the United Kingdom (UK) there has been growing public concern regarding abusive practices in institutions, with a number of unacceptable methods of restraint being identified as a feature of care, particularly in mental health care. In keeping with the service user movement, and following a review of the literature, this paper discusses the evidence regarding restraint from the perspectives of service users and professionals within mental health services and considers the implications for future practice and research. In reviewing the literature, findings revealed that restraint can be a form of abuse, it's inappropriate use often being a consequence of fear, neglect, and lack of using de-escalation techniques. Using restraint in this way can have negative implications for the well-being of service users and mental health professionals alike. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Illicit drug use and the critical perspectives of drug users' relatives and acquaintances in Northern Rio de Janeiro City, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Loyola, Cristina Maria Douat; Brands, Bruna; Adlaf, Edward; Giesbrecht, Norman; Simich, Laura; Wright, Maria da Gloria Miotto

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the partial results of a multicenter, cross-temporal study, which was performed using multiple methods, and involved seven Latin-American countries and Canada. The results presented refer to the city center of Rio de Janeiro (n=108). The central question of the study was: 'How do illicit drug users' relatives and acquaintances describe protective and risk factors, prevention initiatives, treatment services, laws and policies regarding illicit drugs?' The quantitative data was collected using an instrument containing closed questions. In total, 108 young adults (18 years of age or older) were interviewed, who stated being affected by the drug although they were not users. For 104 interviewees (96%), negligence is the family dynamics that causes the greatest exposure to drugs, and 106 (98%) consider that parent support is what offers the greatest protection. Policies, the police and the criminal system have neither reduced drug use nor do they protect users.

  6. [Crisis and crisis therapy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Culberg, J

    1978-02-01

    A psychic crisis is defined as a reaction to external events where the individual is unable to cope with these events by means of his usual adaptive mechanisms and earlier experiences. Examples of a traumatic crisis is the death of a near relative, the sudden onset of a severe illness, a sudden infidelity in marriage etc. So called transitional life situations may also elicit crisis reaction, i.e. the birth of a first child, retirement from work etc. A psychic crisis is often overdetermined from experiences in early childhood. The more "pure" crisis reactions are often seen in medical or surgical clinics while the psychiatrists usually meet the overdetermined crisis reaction. Four different phases of the crisis reaction are described. The goal of crisis therapy is to support the individual's and his surroundings own resources. It is not to replace the loss or to help the individual deny the emotional impact of what has happened. The function of the therapist can often be described in terms of "containing function" and "vicarious hope". Listening to a client in acute crisis often evokes feelings of anxiety and helplessness in the therapist. He often feels seduced to behave omnipotently, helping the patient to suppress the feelings of sorrow and anger. He may also be overprotective or may avoid discussing the pertinent feelings. The antitherapeutic risks of crisis psychotherapy are discussed and also illustrated with examples from the author's research on reactions of mothers to the birth of stillborn children.

  7. The needs of people with dementia living at home from user, caregiver and professional perspectives: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Few reports have been published about differences in perspectives on perceived needs among community-residing people with dementia, their family caregivers, and professionals. The aim of this study was to compare these perspectives. Method During 2006 and 2007, one-hundred and fifty two interviews of people with dementia and their caregivers about the needs of the person with dementia were performed by four professionals using The Camberwell Assessment of Need for the Elderly (CANE). Professionals’ views on met and unmet needs of people with dementia were obtained for the total sample, family caregivers’ perspectives were gained for 125 people with dementia, and people with dementia’s views on their own needs were obtained for 125 persons with dementia. Results People with dementia reported fewer needs compared with the reports of their caregivers and the professionals. The most frequent unmet needs reported by people with dementia, caregivers and professionals were in the areas of daytime activities, company, and psychological distress; however, people with dementia rated psychological distress as the commonest unmet need. Conclusions Since the priorities of people with dementia can be different from those of caregivers and professionals, it is important to consider all perspectives when making care plans. Thus, compliance with treatment of people with dementia and also their quality of life could be potentially improved by a more collaborative partnership with them. PMID:23379786

  8. Applications of the Helping Relationship in Multi-User Virtual Environments: An Exploration of Counseling from Practitioners' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Karl Jerome

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the perceptions of professional counselors who provide avatar-based services in multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) and their descriptions of those services. Using a virtual micro-ethnographic design, the principal investigator interviewed counselors (N=5) licensed or certified to practice in their geographic location about…

  9. Exploratory Study on Drug Users' Perspectives on Quality of Life: More than Health-Related Quality of Life?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Maeyer, Jessica; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; Broekaert, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In drug treatment outcome literature, a focus on objective and socially desirable indicators of change (e.g. no drug use) has predominated, while outcome indicators that are important for drug users themselves (e.g. quality of life, satisfaction with treatment) have largely been neglected. Nonetheless, Quality of Life (QoL) has become an important…

  10. What Do You Mean It Doesn't Make Sense? Redesigning Finding Aids from the User's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimer, Cory; Daines, J. Gordon, III

    2008-01-01

    Archivists have begun to rethink the way that they present finding aids to patrons online. They are utilizing user studies to gain a better understanding of what information patrons expect to find and are investigating how to utilize Web 2.0 technologies to better meet patron needs. This article examines how the L. Tom Perry Special Collections is…

  11. A Look at the Roles of Look & Roles in Embodied Pedagogical Agents--A User Preference Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haake, Magnus; Gulz, Agneta

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical framework addressing three aspects of embodied pedagogical agents: visual static appearance, pedagogical role, and communicative style. The framework is then applied to a user study where 90 school children (aged 12-15) in a dummy multimedia program were presented with either an instructor or a learning companion…

  12. "It's Only Right that We Get Involved": Service-User Perspectives on Involvement in Learning Disability Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoole, Lucy; Morgan, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Promotion of service-user and carer involvement is part of the mainstream policy agenda in health and social care ["Crit Soc Policy 25" (2005) 164]. Much effort has been invested into involving people with learning disabilities in decisions regarding aspects of their lives through advocacy projects and the utilisation of person-centred planning…

  13. A Look at the Roles of Look & Roles in Embodied Pedagogical Agents--A User Preference Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haake, Magnus; Gulz, Agneta

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical framework addressing three aspects of embodied pedagogical agents: visual static appearance, pedagogical role, and communicative style. The framework is then applied to a user study where 90 school children (aged 12-15) in a dummy multimedia program were presented with either an instructor or a learning companion…

  14. What Do You Mean It Doesn't Make Sense? Redesigning Finding Aids from the User's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimer, Cory; Daines, J. Gordon, III

    2008-01-01

    Archivists have begun to rethink the way that they present finding aids to patrons online. They are utilizing user studies to gain a better understanding of what information patrons expect to find and are investigating how to utilize Web 2.0 technologies to better meet patron needs. This article examines how the L. Tom Perry Special Collections is…

  15. Applications of the Helping Relationship in Multi-User Virtual Environments: An Exploration of Counseling from Practitioners' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Karl Jerome

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the perceptions of professional counselors who provide avatar-based services in multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) and their descriptions of those services. Using a virtual micro-ethnographic design, the principal investigator interviewed counselors (N=5) licensed or certified to practice in their geographic location about…

  16. Towards a psychological model of midlife crisis.

    PubMed

    Oles, P K

    1999-06-01

    Midlife crisis in men is seen as a process of intensive and subjectively difficult transition of the self dealing with a reinterpretation of time perspective, the confrontation with death as a future personal event, the re-evaluation of life values and goals, and planning the second half of life. Midlife crisis arises on the relationships between the changing sociopsychological situation and internal predispositions. This study was conducted in Poland, using a sample of 144 men (aged 35-45 years). Measures were the Midlife Crisis Questionnaire, the Time Orientation Scale, the Adjective Check List, the modified version of the Ways of Coping Checklist, and the Value crisis Questionnaire. The findings indicated that the midlife crisis consists of three relatively independent dimensions, extracted by factor analysis, namely, (i) intensity of symptoms focused on changes in the self-concept, (ii) psychological maturity, and (iii) acceptance of time passing and death. Necessary and sufficient conditions of the crisis appeared to be (1) value crisis, understood as difficulties in hierarchization, integration, and realization of values, (2) emotion-focused coping versus problem-focused coping, (3) past versus future time orientation and lack of goals for the future, (4) sense of time pressure, (5) some conscientiousness, introversion, and openness to experience.

  17. Identifying service needs from the users and service providers' perspective: a focus group study of Chinese elders, health and social care professionals.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jean; Mak, Benise; Cheng, Joanna O Y; Choy, Edith

    2011-12-01

    This is a preliminary study to identify older people service needs in Hong Kong from the users' and service providers' perspective. As the Hong Kong population is ageing rapidly, it is important to identify the needs for care of older people. Although a wide variety of medical and social services have been provided to meet the needs of older people, there has been little evaluation from the users' or service providers' perspective regarding what the needs are and how well current service provisions match their needs. In recent years the importance of patient-centred care has been emphasised, where patient's expectation of care has been given a central role in guiding and improving the provision of health. However few studies have been carried out with respect to services for older people. To identify the service needs, a focus group study was conducted. Both service providers and older people were interviewed. This preliminary study used a qualitative research method to identify older people's service needs, generating rich information which could be used to inform older people care service development. Data were collected by conducting eight focus group discussions. The focus group interviews were audio-taped. Interviews were then transcribed and themes were identified. The study identified several areas for improvement in services for older people, covering adequacy, accessibility and affordability of medical services, coordination of health and social care, quality of long-term care, negative perceptions and training needs. Some themes such as service adequacy and negative staff attitudes occurred in both older people and health professional focus groups. The themes of fast access, continuity of care and smooth transition, affordability, provision of information of available health and social services appear to be universal as these have also been identified in similar studies in other countries. In addition to other objective outcomes, such as duration of stay

  18. Identity Crisis among Adolescent Adoptees: Narcissus Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallee, Alvin L.; LeVine, Elaine S.

    Presented are: (1) a review of literature which attempts to define the nature of the adolescent crisis among adopted children; and (2) an attempt to develop a theoretical perspective on adopted adolescents which incorporates a biological-social view of the causes of adolescents' problems. The paper attempts to develop an intervention-guiding model…

  19. Androgyny, Ego Development and Psychosocial Crisis Resolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prager, Karen J.; Bailey, John M.

    The present study examined the relationship of psychological androgyny with ego development in the context of Loevinger's theory, and with psychosocial crisis resolution from the perspective of Erikson's theory. A sample of 30 male and 30 female adults completed the Bem Sex Role Inventory, the Washington University Sentence Completion Test and the…

  20. Causes and Consequences of the Urban Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., St. Louis. Extension Div.

    A cooperative presentation of the University of Missouri, St. Louis, Extension Division and the Missouri Department of Community Affairs, this project was designed as a reference for discussion groups of all types, to give perspective and direction in the search for an understanding of the complex situations which contribute to the crisis in…

  1. Recasting perceptions of a water crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Knopman, D.S.

    1994-12-31

    The state of water resources is discussed from a historical and policy perspective. The author presents the different views of water conditions in the nation and the changes in institutional arrangements that are in progress now. In addition, she evaluates the fundamental qualities of water that make the notion of a crisis a hard sell in the US.

  2. Sickle Cell Crisis (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Sickle Cell Crisis (Pain Crisis) KidsHealth > For Teens > Sickle Cell ... drepanocíticas (Crisis de dolor) What Is a Sickle Cell Crisis? Sickle cell disease changes the shape of ...

  3. Shared decision-making in mental health care—A user perspective on decisional needs in community-based services

    PubMed Central

    Grim, Katarina; Rosenberg, David; Svedberg, Petra; Schön, Ulla-Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background Shared decision-making (SDM) is an emergent research topic in the field of mental health care and is considered to be a central component of a recovery-oriented system. Despite the evidence suggesting the benefits of this change in the power relationship between users and practitioners, the method has not been widely implemented in clinical practice. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate decisional and information needs among users with mental illness as a prerequisite for the development of a decision support tool aimed at supporting SDM in community-based mental health services in Sweden. Methods Three semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with 22 adult users with mental illness. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using a directed content analysis. This method was used to develop an in-depth understanding of the decisional process as well as to validate and conceptually extend Elwyn et al.'s model of SDM. Results The model Elwyn et al. have created for SDM in somatic care fits well for mental health services, both in terms of process and content. However, the results also suggest an extension of the model because decisions related to mental illness are often complex and involve a number of life domains. Issues related to social context and individual recovery point to the need for a preparation phase focused on establishing cooperation and mutual understanding as well as a clear follow-up phase that allows for feedback and adjustments to the decision-making process. Conclusions and Implications for Practice The current study contributes to a deeper understanding of decisional and information needs among users of community-based mental health services that may reduce barriers to participation in decision-making. The results also shed light on attitudinal, relationship-based, and cognitive factors that are important to consider in adapting SDM in the mental health system. PMID:27167556

  4. Shared decision-making in mental health care-A user perspective on decisional needs in community-based services.

    PubMed

    Grim, Katarina; Rosenberg, David; Svedberg, Petra; Schön, Ulla-Karin

    2016-01-01

    Shared decision-making (SDM) is an emergent research topic in the field of mental health care and is considered to be a central component of a recovery-oriented system. Despite the evidence suggesting the benefits of this change in the power relationship between users and practitioners, the method has not been widely implemented in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to investigate decisional and information needs among users with mental illness as a prerequisite for the development of a decision support tool aimed at supporting SDM in community-based mental health services in Sweden. Three semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with 22 adult users with mental illness. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using a directed content analysis. This method was used to develop an in-depth understanding of the decisional process as well as to validate and conceptually extend Elwyn et al.'s model of SDM. The model Elwyn et al. have created for SDM in somatic care fits well for mental health services, both in terms of process and content. However, the results also suggest an extension of the model because decisions related to mental illness are often complex and involve a number of life domains. Issues related to social context and individual recovery point to the need for a preparation phase focused on establishing cooperation and mutual understanding as well as a clear follow-up phase that allows for feedback and adjustments to the decision-making process. The current study contributes to a deeper understanding of decisional and information needs among users of community-based mental health services that may reduce barriers to participation in decision-making. The results also shed light on attitudinal, relationship-based, and cognitive factors that are important to consider in adapting SDM in the mental health system.

  5. The Public Library as Community Crisis Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Barbara H.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the role of public libraries in helping their communities deal with crisis situations, especially after the September 11 terrorist attacks. Highlights include the need to be proactive and not wait to be asked to participate in planning; status of emergency planning; providing reliable information; and asking users about their information…

  6. User perspectives on an electronic decision-support tool performing comprehensive medication reviews - a focus group study with physicians and nurses.

    PubMed

    Koskela, Tuomas; Sandström, Saana; Mäkinen, Joonas; Liira, Helena

    2016-01-22

    Although a number of studies have evaluated the effectiveness of computerized decision-support systems (CDSS), there is lack of data on user perspectives, barriers, and facilitators to the implementation of CDSSs in real-life surroundings. The aim of this study was to assess individually perceived barriers, facilitators and ideas influencing the CDSS implementation and usability. In this qualitative study, five focus groups were carried out with physicians and nurses separately at the Tampere City Health Center, Finland. The participants were end-users of the EBMeDS computerized decision support system. An explorative data content analysis was applied. The most important barrier to benefitting from CDSS was the lack of structured and coded diagnosis documentation and outdated medication information in the electronic health records. This led to false alerts and distrust towards the system. Among the major facilitators found were e.g. the beneficial reminders that helped practitioners take into account matters otherwise ignored; automatic glomerular filtration rate (GFR) calculations; medication safety checks; and the summaries in the single medication review at a glance. Physicians' and nurses' are keen to use the CDSS and it may enhance their inter-professional collaboration. Documenting patient information in a structured, uniform and easy manner is the essential starting point for electronic decision support. When implementing CDSS, managers need to focus on common practices in documenting structured data in their organizations in order to prevent undermining trust in the system.

  7. Perspectives of basic wheelchair users on improving their access to wheelchair services in Kenya and Philippines: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Emma; Hurwitz, Elizabeth; Obaga, Immaculate; Onguti, Brenda; Rivera, Adovich; Sy, Tyrone Reden L; Kirby, R Lee; Noon, Jamie; Tanuku, Deepti; Gichangi, Anthony; Bazant, Eva

    2017-08-17

    The United Nations has called for countries to improve access to mobility devices when needed. The World Health Organization has published guidelines on the provision of manual wheelchairs in less-resourced settings. Yet little is known about the extent to which appropriate wheelchairs are available and provided according to international guidelines. This study's purpose was to describe wheelchair users' experiences receiving services and acquiring wheelchair skills in urban and peri-urban areas of Kenya and the Philippines. Local researchers in Nairobi and Manila interviewed 48 adult basic wheelchair users, with even distribution of those who had and had not received wheelchair services along with their wheelchair. Recordings were transcribed in the local language and translated into English. The study team coded transcripts for predetermined and emergent themes, using Atlas-ti software. A qualitative content analysis approach was taken with the WHO service delivery process as an organizing framework. Wheelchair users frequently described past experiences with ill-fitting wheelchairs and little formal training to use wheelchairs effectively. Through exposure to multiple wheelchairs and self-advocacy, they learned to select wheelchairs suitable for their needs. Maintenance and repair services were often in short supply. Participants attributed shorter duration of wheelchair use to lack of repair. Peer support networks emerged as an important source of knowledge, resources and emotional support. Most participants acknowledged that they received wheelchairs that would have been difficult or impossible for them to pay for, and despite challenges, they were grateful to have some means of mobility. Four themes emerged as critical for understanding the implementation of wheelchair services: barriers in the physical environment, the need for having multiple chairs to improve access, perceived social stigma, and the importance of peer support. Interventions are needed to

  8. Crisis Management: Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Dorman, Sally; Anderson, Luke; McNair, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three studies relevant to school crisis response. The first report, "A Framework for International Crisis Intervention" (Sally Dorman), is a review of how existing crisis intervention models (including the NASP PREPaRE model) have been adapted for international use. The second article, "Responding…

  9. Crisis Management: Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Dorman, Sally; Anderson, Luke; McNair, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three studies relevant to school crisis response. The first report, "A Framework for International Crisis Intervention" (Sally Dorman), is a review of how existing crisis intervention models (including the NASP PREPaRE model) have been adapted for international use. The second article, "Responding…

  10. Images for Crisis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffan, James

    1984-01-01

    Most take canoeing, leadership, first aid, CPR and other courses to help cope when something happens, but there is more to dealing with crisis than learning proper procedures and techniques. Three areas of concern interlock to form the Crisis Management Triangle: knowledge and skill, preventive awareness, and crisis management planning. (ERB)

  11. Teaching Crisis Creatively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, JoAnne Howland

    1982-01-01

    Describes a creative approach to teaching the application of crisis theory to nursing students. Students experience crisis themselves, evaluate their own and others' coping mechanisms, and learn to recognize the various physical and psychological symptoms of people in crisis. (Author/CT)

  12. Evaluation of Electronic Prescribing Decision Support System at a Tertiary Care Pediatric Hospital: The User Acceptance Perspective.

    PubMed

    Omar, Abdurahman; Ellenius, Johan; Lindemalm, Synnöve

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate pediatrician's acceptance, perception and use of Electronic Prescribing Decision Support Systems (EPDSS) at a tertiary care using Extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM2). Qualitative research methodology was applied. Semi-structured questions were developed according to TAM2 model. Pediatricians perceived that the EPDSS is useful and they showed a favorable attitude. However, perceived ease of use and output quality appeared to affect use of EPDSS. Concerns were expressed about complicated screens, difficulty to read and view medication overview of the patient, the navigation requires many clicks and medication system don't meet their need. End users have difficulty of ordering drugs for ploy-clinical patients and they were unable to cancel or stop medications. Junior pediatricians were influenced by senior colleague since they can get better advice about medication order than the system. Applying TAM2 framework has revealed that pediatrician's attitude and acceptance of electronic prescribing system. This study has identified factors that are important for end user acceptance as well as suggestions for system improvement. Although pediatricians are positive to the usefulness of EPDSS, it appears there are some acceptance problems due to ease of use concern and usability issues of the system.

  13. Knowledge communication: a key to successful crisis management.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anders; Härenstam, Malin

    2013-09-01

    A winning concept of crisis management can be summarized in 2 words: knowledge communication. If decision makers, communicators, experts, and the public understand what the crisis is about and share their knowledge, the process of handling it will be optimized. Effective crisis communication implies the necessity of an unhindered but purposeful exchange of information within and between authorities, organizations, media, involved individuals, and groups before, during, and after a crisis. This article focuses on the importance of the before, or prevention, part of a crisis since it holds a rich possibility to enhance the chances for successful crisis management of a bioterrorism incident. An extended perspective on crisis communication efficiently links to a more thorough understanding of risk perception with various stakeholders and the public, which also will be helpful for situational awareness. Furthermore, the grounded baseline for the dialogue type of crisis communication suitable in modern society and to modern social media is achieved by linking to those risk communication efforts that are made. The link between risk and crisis should be afforded more attention since, especially in biosecurity, there would be no crisis without risk negligence and poor or malfunctioning preventive efforts.

  14. The Economic Crisis and Its Ethical Relevance for Public Health in Europe - an Analysis in the Perspective of the Capability Approach.

    PubMed

    Brall, Caroline; Schröder-Bäck, Peter; Brand, Helmut

    2016-03-01

    Policy responses to the economic crisis have manifest consequences to European population health and health systems. The aim of this article is to assess, by using the capability approach advanced by Sen, the ethical dimension of trade-offs made in health policy due to austerity measures. From a capability approach point of view, austerity measures such as reducing resources for health care, further deregulating the health care market or moving towards privatisation are ethically challenging since they limit opportunities and capabilities for individuals of a population. Public policies should thus aim to guarantee sufficient capabilities (options to access health care and possibilities to make healthy choices) for its populations. Prioritising those in need is a notion the capability approach particularly focuses on in its goal of supporting those with the least capabilities.

  15. Scaffolding the design of accessible eLearning content: a user-centered approach and cognitive perspective.

    PubMed

    Catarci, Tiziana; De Giovanni, Loredana; Gabrielli, Silvia; Kimani, Stephen; Mirabella, Valeria

    2008-08-01

    There exist various guidelines for facilitating the design, preparation, and deployment of accessible eLearning applications and contents. However, such guidelines prevalently address accessibility in a rather technical sense, without giving sufficient consideration to the cognitive aspects and issues related to the use of eLearning materials by learners with disabilities. In this paper we describe how a user-centered design process was applied to develop a method and set of guidelines for didactical experts to scaffold their creation of accessible eLearning content, based on a more sound approach to accessibility. The paper also discusses possible design solutions for tools supporting eLearning content authors in the adoption and application of the proposed approach.

  16. The Reading Crisis: Why Poor Children Fall Behind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geva, Esther; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reviews the following books: (1) "The Reading Crisis: Why Poor Children Fall Behind"; (2) "Prevention of Child Maltreatment: Developmental and Ecological Perspectives"; (3) "Attention and Information Processing in Infants and Adults: Perspectives from Human and Animal Research"; and (4) "Children's Interpersonal Trust: Sensitivity to Lying,…

  17. Reviewing the definition of crisis in dementia care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Crisis is a term frequently used in dementia care lacking a standardized definition. This article systematically reviews existing definitions of crisis in dementia care literature to create a standardized definition that can be utilized for research, policy and clinical practice. Methods We systematically searched for articles containing definitions of crisis in the context of dementia care. We created an operational framework of crisis based on retrieved definitions. Recommendations to address crisis situations were reviewed and classified according to care settings. Results Abstracts and titles of 1,113 articles, screened from PubMed and EMBASE, were narrowed down to 27 articles. After review, crisis in dementia was defined as a process where a stressor causes an imbalance requiring an immediate decision to be made which leads to a desired outcome and therefore a resolution of the crisis. If the crisis is not resolved, the cycle continues. Recommendations for resolving crisis involving persons with dementia and their caregivers include awareness therapy after diagnosis and increased contact with general practitioners, case manager consultations, caregiver support and education. Furthermore, nursing home staff should be attuned to the environmental, physical and psychological needs of persons with dementia. Conclusions This is the first article to review the definition of crisis in the context of dementia care. A review of the literature indicated that the definition of a crisis is idiosyncratic. Therefore, it is difficult to prevent or plan for all crises. We used an operational framework to compile types of crisis stressors and recommendations from the crisis literature based on three different perspectives; the person with the dementia, the caregiver and the healthcare providers. PMID:23374634

  18. Reviewing the definition of crisis in dementia care.

    PubMed

    MacNeil Vroomen, Janet; Bosmans, Judith E; van Hout, Hein P J; de Rooij, Sophia E

    2013-02-01

    Crisis is a term frequently used in dementia care lacking a standardized definition. This article systematically reviews existing definitions of crisis in dementia care literature to create a standardized definition that can be utilized for research, policy and clinical practice. We systematically searched for articles containing definitions of crisis in the context of dementia care. We created an operational framework of crisis based on retrieved definitions. Recommendations to address crisis situations were reviewed and classified according to care settings. Abstracts and titles of 1,113 articles, screened from PubMed and EMBASE, were narrowed down to 27 articles. After review, crisis in dementia was defined as a process where a stressor causes an imbalance requiring an immediate decision to be made which leads to a desired outcome and therefore a resolution of the crisis. If the crisis is not resolved, the cycle continues. Recommendations for resolving crisis involving persons with dementia and their caregivers include awareness therapy after diagnosis and increased contact with general practitioners, case manager consultations, caregiver support and education. Furthermore, nursing home staff should be attuned to the environmental, physical and psychological needs of persons with dementia. This is the first article to review the definition of crisis in the context of dementia care. A review of the literature indicated that the definition of a crisis is idiosyncratic. Therefore, it is difficult to prevent or plan for all crises. We used an operational framework to compile types of crisis stressors and recommendations from the crisis literature based on three different perspectives; the person with the dementia, the caregiver and the healthcare providers.

  19. Integration for coexistence? Implementation of intercultural health care policy in Ghana from the perspective of service users and providers.

    PubMed

    Gyasi, Razak Mohammed; Poku, Adjoa Afriyie; Boateng, Simon; Amoah, Padmore Adusei; Mumin, Alhassan Abdul; Obodai, Jacob; Agyemang-Duah, Williams

    2017-01-01

    In spite of the World Health Organization's recommendations over the past decades, Ghana features pluralistic rather than truly integrated medical system. Policies about the integration of complementary medicine into the national health care delivery system need to account for individual-level involvement and cultural acceptability of care rendered by health care providers. Studies in Ghana, however, have glossed over the standpoint of the persons of the illness episode about the intercultural health care policy framework. This paper explores the health care users, and providers' experiences and attitudes towards the implementation of intercultural health care policy in Ghana. In-depth interviews, augmented with informal conversations, were conducted with 16 health service users, 7 traditional healers and 6 health professionals in the Sekyere South District and Kumasi Metropolis in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. Data were thematically analysed and presented based on the a posteriori inductive reduction approach. Findings reveal a widespread positive attitude to, and support for integrative medical care in Ghana. However, inter-provider communication in a form of cross-referrals and collaborative mechanisms between healers and health professionals seldom occurs and remains unofficially sanctioned. Traditional healers and health care professionals are skeptical about intercultural health care policy mainly due to inadequate political commitment for provider education. The medical practitioners have limited opportunity to undergo training for integrative medical practice. We also find a serious mistrust between the practitioners due to the "diversity of healing approaches and techniques." Weak institutional support, lack of training to meet standards of practice, poor registration and regulatory measures as well as negative perception of the integrative medical policy inhibit its implementation in Ghana. In order to advance any useful intercultural health care policy in

  20. A Study of Personal Health Record User's Behavioral Model Based on the PMT and UTAUT Integrative Perspective.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hui-Lung; Kuo, Yu-Ming; Wang, Shiang-Ru; Chuang, Bi-Kun; Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2016-12-23

    The personal health record (PHR) is a system that enables borderless medical care services by combining technological innovation and human consideration. This study explored factors affecting the adoption of PHR from technical, medical, and social perspectives according to the Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) and Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) model. A survey using a structured questionnaire was subsequently conducted, which produced the following results: (1) The PMT and UTAUT were effective at predicting PHR usage behaviors; (2) Perceived ease-of-use was the most decisive factor influencing the use of PHR, followed by self-efficacy and perceived usefulness; and (3) Behavioral intention for PHR was significantly and positively correlated with usage behavior. From the obtained results, this study recommends that health authorities and medical institutions promote self-efficacy in the use of PHR to improve the levels of behavioral intention and usage behavior among the people. Additionally, medical care institutions are recommended to promote health management and preventive healthcare concepts to help improve public acceptance of the PHR system as a means to self-manage their health. Finally, community centers, medical institutions, and health authorities are urged to work together to enhance public medical knowledge and pool resources for the PHR system, both of which are essential for improving the popularity of the PHR, public quality of life, and the effectiveness of health management.

  1. Learning Crisis Unit through Post-Crisis: Characteristics and Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chebbi, Hela; Pündrich, Aline Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to identify the characteristics that a crisis unit should have to achieve effective learning after crisis. Literature has identified many relations between learning organizations and crisis; yet, there is a dearth of research on specific studies about crisis units and their post-crisis learning features. Thus, this paper…

  2. Learning Crisis Unit through Post-Crisis: Characteristics and Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chebbi, Hela; Pündrich, Aline Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to identify the characteristics that a crisis unit should have to achieve effective learning after crisis. Literature has identified many relations between learning organizations and crisis; yet, there is a dearth of research on specific studies about crisis units and their post-crisis learning features. Thus, this paper…

  3. Injecting drug users' experiences of policing practices in two Mexican-U.S. border cities: public health perspectives.

    PubMed

    Miller, Cari L; Firestone, Michelle; Ramos, Rebeca; Burris, Scott; Ramos, Maria Elena; Case, Patricia; Brouwer, Kimberly C; Fraga, Miguel Angel; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2008-08-01

    Previous research has identified the impact of law enforcement practices on the behaviours and health of injection drug users (IDUs). We undertook a qualitative study of IDUs' experiences of policing practices in two Mexican cities on the U.S. border. In 2004, two teams of Mexican interviewers conducted in-depth interviews with IDUs residing in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez (Cd. Juarez), Mexico, who had injected drugs at least once in the prior month. Topics included types of drug used, injection settings, access to sterile needles and experiences with police. Field notes and transcribed interviews were analysed to identify emergent themes. Amongst the 43 participants, most reported that it is common for IDUs to be arrested and detained for 36h for carrying sterile or used syringes. Most reported that they or someone they knew had been beaten by police. Interviews suggested five key themes relating to police influence on the risk environment: (1) impact of policing practices on accessibility of sterile syringes, (2) influence of police on choice of places to inject drugs (e.g., shooting galleries), (3) police violence, (4) police corruption and (5) perceived changes in policing practices. Findings suggest that some behaviour of police officers in Tijuana and Cd. Juarez is inconsistent with legal norms and may be negatively influencing the risk of acquiring blood-borne infections amongst IDUs. Implementing a comprehensive and successful HIV prevention programme amongst IDUs requires interventions to influence the knowledge, attitudes and practices of law enforcement officers.

  4. Ergonomics Perspective in Agricultural Research: A User-Centred Approach Using CAD and Digital Human Modeling (DHM) Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Thaneswer; Sanjog, J.; Karmakar, Sougata

    2016-09-01

    Computer-aided Design (CAD) and Digital Human Modeling (DHM) (specialized CAD software for virtual human representation) technologies endow unique opportunities to incorporate human factors pro-actively in design development. Challenges of enhancing agricultural productivity through improvement of agricultural tools/machineries and better human-machine compatibility can be ensured by adoption of these modern technologies. Objectives of present work are to provide the detailed scenario of CAD and DHM applications in agricultural sector; and finding out means for wide adoption of these technologies for design and development of cost-effective, user-friendly, efficient and safe agricultural tools/equipment and operator's workplace. Extensive literature review has been conducted for systematic segregation and representation of available information towards drawing inferences. Although applications of various CAD software have momentum in agricultural research particularly for design and manufacturing of agricultural equipment/machinery, use of DHM is still at its infancy in this sector. Current review discusses about reasons of less adoption of these technologies in agricultural sector and steps to be taken for their wide adoption. It also suggests possible future research directions to come up with better ergonomic design strategies for improvement of agricultural equipment/machines and workstations through application of CAD and DHM.

  5. The future of forensic and crime scene science. Part I. A UK forensic science user and provider perspective.

    PubMed

    Mennell, Julie; Shaw, Ian

    2006-03-14

    This paper presents an overview of the views expressed by UK forensic science users and providers during the Centre for Forensic Investigation's 1 day conference 'The Future of Forensic and Crime Scene Science' and is set in the context of the changing national agenda and likely advances in current and future technology. It begins by examining the success of the Home Office DNA Expansion Programme and future demands of the Criminal Justice System, highlighting the changing use of forensic science both at the crime scene and within the forensic process itself. In particular, the use of forensic science at the early stages of an investigation to provide intelligence and support the decision making process is discussed together with the need to adopt a partnership approach to tackling crime and its causes. Key system and technological drivers for performance improvement and change are identified and the likely timescales and implications of their introduction are discussed. Finally, the Home Office plans to build on the success of the DNA Expansion Programme, through the introduction of the proposed Home Office Forensic Integration Strategy, are explored and the paper concludes by highlighting the benefits, implications and issues arising from the changing and developing use of forensic science.

  6. Attitudes of Australian Heroin Users to Peer Distribution of Naloxone for Heroin Overdose: Perspectives on Intranasal Administration

    PubMed Central

    Dietze, Paul; Kelly, Anne-Maree; Jolley, Damien

    2008-01-01

    Naloxone distribution to injecting drug users (IDUs) for peer administration is a suggested strategy to prevent fatal heroin overdose. The aim of this study was to explore attitudes of IDUs to administration of naloxone to others after heroin overdose, and preferences for method of administration. A sample of 99 IDUs (median age 35 years, 72% male) recruited from needle and syringe programs in Melbourne were administered a questionnaire. Data collected included demographics, attitudes to naloxone distribution, and preferences for method of administration. The primary study outcomes were attitudes of IDUs to use of naloxone for peer administration (categorized on a five-point scale ranging from “very good idea” to “very bad idea”) and preferred mode of administration (intravenous, intramuscular, and intranasal). The majority of the sample reported positive attitudes toward naloxone distribution (good to very good idea: 89%) and 92% said they were willing to participate in a related training program. Some participants raised concerns about peer administration including the competence of IDUs to administer naloxone in an emergency, victim response on wakening and legal implications. Most (74%) preferred intranasal administration in comparison to other administration methods (21%). There was no association with age, sex, or heroin practice. There appears to be strong support among Australian IDU for naloxone distribution to peers. Intranasal spray is the preferred route of administration. PMID:18347990

  7. Attitudes of Australian heroin users to peer distribution of naloxone for heroin overdose: perspectives on intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Debra; Dietze, Paul; Kelly, Anne-Maree; Jolley, Damien

    2008-05-01

    Naloxone distribution to injecting drug users (IDUs) for peer administration is a suggested strategy to prevent fatal heroin overdose. The aim of this study was to explore attitudes of IDUs to administration of naloxone to others after heroin overdose, and preferences for method of administration. A sample of 99 IDUs (median age 35 years, 72% male) recruited from needle and syringe programs in Melbourne were administered a questionnaire. Data collected included demographics, attitudes to naloxone distribution, and preferences for method of administration. The primary study outcomes were attitudes of IDUs to use of naloxone for peer administration (categorized on a five-point scale ranging from "very good idea" to "very bad idea") and preferred mode of administration (intravenous, intramuscular, and intranasal). The majority of the sample reported positive attitudes toward naloxone distribution (good to very good idea: 89%) and 92% said they were willing to participate in a related training program. Some participants raised concerns about peer administration including the competence of IDUs to administer naloxone in an emergency, victim response on wakening and legal implications. Most (74%) preferred intranasal administration in comparison to other administration methods (21%). There was no association with age, sex, or heroin practice. There appears to be strong support among Australian IDU for naloxone distribution to peers. Intranasal spray is the preferred route of administration.

  8. Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Shari; Camerini, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Provides background information on the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service Asylum office. Uses the perspective of two movie producers as they filmed a documentary film, "Well-founded Fear", about asylum and refugee protection. Includes information on how to order a classroom aid and the film. (CMK)

  9. Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarone, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    The topic of this "Perspectives" column is "Requiring a Proficiency Level as a Requirement for U.S. K-12 Teacher Licensure." In 1998, the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) began to work with the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), which accredits teacher education programs…

  10. Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarone, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    The topic of this "Perspectives" column is "Requiring a Proficiency Level as a Requirement for U.S. K-12 Teacher Licensure." In 1998, the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) began to work with the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), which accredits teacher education programs…

  11. A crowd of pedestrian dynamics - The perspective of physics. Comment on "Human behaviours in evacuation crowd dynamics: From modelling to "big data" toward crisis management" by Nicola Bellomo et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, António F.

    2016-09-01

    Walking is the most basic form of transportation. A good understanding of pedestrian's dynamics is essential in meeting the mobility and accessibility needs of people by providing a safe and quick walking flow [1]. Advances in the dynamics of pedestrians in crowds are of great theoretical and practical interest, as they lead to new insights regarding the planning of pedestrian facilities, crowd management, or evacuation analysis. Nicola Bellomo's et al. article [2] is a very timely review of the related research on modelling approaches, computational simulations, decision-making and crisis response. It also includes an attempt to accurately define commonly used terms, as well as a critical analysis of crowd dynamics and safety problems. As noted by the authors, ;models and simulations offer a virtual representation of real dynamics; that are essential to understand and predict the ;behavioural dynamics of crowds; [2]. As a physicist, I would like to put forward some additional theoretical and practical contributions that could be interesting to explore, regarding the perspective of physics on about human crowd dynamics (panic as a specific form of behaviour excluded).

  12. An analytical framework for delirium research in palliative care settings: integrated epidemiologic, clinician-researcher, and knowledge user perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Peter G; Davis, Daniel H J; Ansari, Mohammed; Hosie, Annmarie; Kanji, Salmaan; Momoli, Franco; Bush, Shirley H; Watanabe, Sharon; Currow, David C; Gagnon, Bruno; Agar, Meera; Bruera, Eduardo; Meagher, David J; de Rooij, Sophia E J A; Adamis, Dimitrios; Caraceni, Augusto; Marchington, Katie; Stewart, David J

    2014-08-01

    Delirium often presents difficult management challenges in the context of goals of care in palliative care settings. The aim was to formulate an analytical framework for further research on delirium in palliative care settings, prioritize the associated research questions, discuss the inherent methodological challenges associated with relevant studies, and outline the next steps in a program of delirium research. We combined multidisciplinary input from delirium researchers and knowledge users at an international delirium study planning meeting, relevant literature searches, focused input of epidemiologic expertise, and a meeting participant and coauthor survey to formulate a conceptual research framework and prioritize research questions. Our proposed framework incorporates three main groups of research questions: the first was predominantly epidemiologic, such as delirium occurrence rates, risk factor evaluation, screening, and diagnosis; the second covers pragmatic management questions; and the third relates to the development of predictive models for delirium outcomes. Based on aggregated survey responses to each research question or domain, the combined modal ratings of "very" or "extremely" important confirmed their priority. Using an analytical framework to represent the full clinical care pathway of delirium in palliative care settings, we identified multiple knowledge gaps in relation to the occurrence rates, assessment, management, and outcome prediction of delirium in this population. The knowledge synthesis generated from adequately powered, multicenter studies to answer the framework's research questions will inform decision making and policy development regarding delirium detection and management and thus help to achieve better outcomes for patients in palliative care settings. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quality of perinatal care services from the user's perspective: a Dutch study applies the World Health Organization's responsiveness concept.

    PubMed

    van der Kooy, Jacoba; Birnie, Erwin; Valentine, Nicole B; de Graaf, Johanna P; Denktas, Semiha; Steegers, Eric A P; Bonsel, Gouke J

    2017-09-29

    The concept of responsiveness was introduced by the World Health Organization (WHO) to address non-clinical aspects of service quality in an internationally comparable way. Responsiveness is defined as aspects of the way individuals are treated and the environment in which they are treated during health system interactions. The aim of this study is to assess responsiveness outcomes, their importance and factors influencing responsiveness outcomes during the antenatal and delivery phases of perinatal care. The Responsiveness in Perinatal and Obstetric Health Care Questionnaire was developed in 2009/10 based on the eight-domain WHO concept and the World Health Survey questionnaire. After ethical approval, a total of 171 women, who were 2 weeks postpartum, were recruited from three primary care midwifery practices in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, using face-to-face interviews. We dichotomized the original five ordinal response categories for responsiveness attainment as 'poor' and good responsiveness and analyzed the ranking of the domain performance and importance according to frequency scores. We used a series of independent variables related to health services and users' personal background characteristics in multiple logistic regression analyses to explain responsiveness. Poor responsiveness outcomes ranged from 5.9% to 31.7% for the antenatal phase and from 9.7% to 27.1% for the delivery phase. Overall for both phases, 'respect for persons' (Autonomy, Dignity, Communication and Confidentiality) domains performed better and were judged to be more important than 'client orientation' domains (Choice and Continuity, Prompt Attention, Quality of Basic Amenities, Social Consideration). On the whole, responsiveness was explained more by health-care and health related issues than personal characteristics. To improve responsiveness outcomes caregivers should focus on domains in the category 'client orientation'.

  14. An Analytical Framework for Delirium Research in Palliative Care Settings: Integrated Epidemiologic, Clinician-Researcher, and Knowledge User Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohammed; Hosie, Annmarie; Kanji, Salmaan; Momoli, Franco; Bush, Shirley H.; Watanabe, Sharon; Currow, David C.; Gagnon, Bruno; Agar, Meera; Bruera, Eduardo; Meagher, David J.; de Rooij, Sophia E.J.A.; Adamis, Dimitrios; Caraceni, Augusto; Marchington, Katie; Stewart, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Context Delirium often presents difficult management challenges in the context of goals of care in palliative care settings. Objectives The aim was to formulate an analytical framework for further research on delirium in palliative care settings, prioritize the associated research questions, discuss the inherent methodological challenges associated with relevant studies, and outline the next steps in a program of delirium research. Methods We combined multidisciplinary input from delirium researchers and knowledge users at an international delirium study planning meeting, relevant literature searches, focused input of epidemiologic expertise, and a meeting participant and coauthor survey to formulate a conceptual research framework and prioritize research questions. Results Our proposed framework incorporates three main groups of research questions: the first was predominantly epidemiologic, such as delirium occurrence rates, risk factor evaluation, screening, and diagnosis; the second covers pragmatic management questions; and the third relates to the development of predictive models for delirium outcomes. Based on aggregated survey responses to each research question or domain, the combined modal ratings of “very” or “extremely” important confirmed their priority. Conclusion Using an analytical framework to represent the full clinical care pathway of delirium in palliative care settings, we identified multiple knowledge gaps in relation to the occurrence rates, assessment, management, and outcome prediction of delirium in this population. The knowledge synthesis generated from adequately powered, multicenter studies to answer the framework’s research questions will inform decision making and policy development regarding delirium detection and management and thus help to achieve better outcomes for patients in palliative care settings. PMID:24726762

  15. Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis for fetal sex determination: benefits and disadvantages from the service users' perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Celine; Hill, Melissa; Skirton, Heather; Chitty, Lyn S

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal fetal sex determination is clinically indicated for women who are at risk of having a child with a serious genetic disorder affecting a particular sex. Ultrasound has been the traditional method used, but early fetal sex determination using non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) can now be performed using cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma. The study aim was to assess the views and experiences of service users who had used NIPD for fetal sex determination. In this paper, we report on the perceived benefits and disadvantages. A qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews was used. A total of 44 participants (38 women and 6 partners of participating women) were recruited. Participants' views and experiences of NIPD were overwhelmingly positive. Concerning benefits over traditional methods, three themes emerged: (1) technical aspects of technology; (2) timing; and (3) enhanced decision-making. Practical advantages of NIPD included avoiding miscarriage, and there were a number of psychological advantages associated with timing such as perceived control, early re-engagement, normalization of pregnancy and peace of mind. Participants also valued NIPD as it enabled a stepwise approach to decision-making. A number of disadvantages were discussed including concerns about social sexing and increased bonding at a time in pregnancy when miscarriage risk is high. However, participants felt these were fairly minor in comparison with the advantages of NIPD. Until definitive genetic diagnosis using NIPD is available, NIPD for fetal sex determination is perceived as a good interim measure with a number of notable advantages over traditional methods. PMID:22453293

  16. The implementation of psychiatric advance directives: experiences from a Dutch crisis card initiative.

    PubMed

    van der Ham, Alida J; Voskes, Yolande; van Kempen, Nel; Broerse, Jacqueline E W; Widdershoven, Guy A M

    2013-06-01

    The crisis card is a specific form of psychiatric advance directive, documenting mental clients' treatment preferences in advance of a potential psychiatric crisis. In this paper, we aim to provide insight into implementation issues surrounding the crisis card. A Dutch crisis-card project formed the scope of this study. Data were collected through interviews with 15 participants from six stakeholder groups. Identified implementation issues are: (a) The role of the crisis-card counselor, (b) lack of distribution and familiarity, (c) care professionals' routines, and (d) client readiness. The crisis-card counselor appears to play a key role in fostering benefits of the crisis card by supporting clients' perspectives. More structural integration of the crisis card in care processes may enhance its impact, but should be carefully explored. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. On the Epistemological Crisis in Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Edward R

    2008-01-01

    There is an epistemological crisis in genomics. At issue is what constitutes scientific knowledge in genomic science, or systems biology in general. Does this crisis require a new perspective on knowledge heretofore absent from science or is it merely a matter of interpreting new scientific developments in an existing epistemological framework? This paper discusses the manner in which the experimental method, as developed and understood over recent centuries, leads naturally to a scientific epistemology grounded in an experimental-mathematical duality. It places genomics into this epistemological framework and examines the current situation in genomics. Meaning and the constitution of scientific knowledge are key concerns for genomics, and the nature of the epistemological crisis in genomics depends on how these are understood. PMID:19440447

  18. Educational Technology in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fainholc, Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    The presentation of the historical epistemological path is needed to understand and reconsider the discipline of Educational Technology in articulation to contributions of rupturistic theorists in order to reach to a critical proposal and a revision of its field. This field is facing a deep crisis within a time of world crisis, specially in the…

  19. Creativity in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roff, Glenn

    This paper suggests that educational resources and opportunities currently in operation in rural Australia are brought forward during times of crisis. The paper discusses five aspects of education in rural Australia that are a response to the perceived sense of crisis and that have improved the general and comparative quality of rural education,…

  20. Crisis Management Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    In this column, Crisis Management in the Schools Interest Group members summarize recent crisis management publications. The first article summarized was a meta-analysis of the risk factors associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among adults. The second study looked at the presence of life stressors among students who were expelled…

  1. When a Crisis Strikes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keebler, Barbara A.

    1989-01-01

    Urges Catholic educators to develop a crisis communication plan to ensure that all communication with the press and public is handled promptly and thoroughly by a designated spokesperson. Describes workshops which simulate real-life challenges as a means of testing crisis management plans. Offers guidelines for the development of a crisis…

  2. Maintenance Crisis vs Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggard, Susie

    Industrial maintenance in Northeast Georgia is facing an acute crisis. Contributing factors are economic development that is depleting the work force, aging of the population, downsizing of the military, and lack of technical school graduates. Solutions to the crisis fall into three categories: short-term, mid-term, and long-term. For short-term…

  3. Maintenance Crisis vs Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggard, Susie

    Industrial maintenance in Northeast Georgia is facing an acute crisis. Contributing factors are economic development that is depleting the work force, aging of the population, downsizing of the military, and lack of technical school graduates. Solutions to the crisis fall into three categories: short-term, mid-term, and long-term. For short-term…

  4. Crisis Management Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    In this column, Crisis Management in the Schools Interest Group members summarize recent crisis management publications. The first article summarized was a meta-analysis of the risk factors associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among adults. The second study looked at the presence of life stressors among students who were expelled…

  5. When Crisis Strikes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caudle, Melissa

    1994-01-01

    School crises may be categorized as emergency situations, human-made crises, natural events, medical emergencies, and mechanical crises. Central to any successful crisis-management plan are onsite and district-level crisis response teams. Plans should specify staff responsibilities; provide for communication codes, devices, and procedures;…

  6. Educational Technology in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fainholc, Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    The presentation of the historical epistemological path is needed to understand and reconsider the discipline of Educational Technology in articulation to contributions of rupturistic theorists in order to reach to a critical proposal and a revision of its field. This field is facing a deep crisis within a time of world crisis, specially in the…

  7. Crisis, grief and loss.

    PubMed

    Evans, J V

    1993-09-01

    At one time or another, many of us experience a life-threatening crisis that proves to be a turning point in our lives. I had such a crisis while working as a medic on the oil-rig Vinland, offshore of Nova Scotia, in 1984.

  8. Creativity in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roff, Glenn

    This paper suggests that educational resources and opportunities currently in operation in rural Australia are brought forward during times of crisis. The paper discusses five aspects of education in rural Australia that are a response to the perceived sense of crisis and that have improved the general and comparative quality of rural education,…

  9. Water crisis: ending the policy drought

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    When competition developed for water, property rights were overturned as water users turned to the government for guaranteed access. The costs and benefits of water use were separated, and demand increased faster than supply. Today these problems are growing more severe, and political conflict over water is increasing. Anderson explains how a new set of market-oriented institutions could head off the water crisis and reduce political conflicts. 180 references, 4 figures, 9 tables.

  10. Crisis Communication and Management: Surviving a Public Relations Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eramo, Eric M.

    2009-01-01

    Crisis management, or crisis communication, is never a good thing for a business to experience. It is, however, a public relations' professional moment to shine and put their honed skills to good use. A good crisis management plan is not only action during the crisis but preparation and reflection. Hiring a PR firm that deals with crisis…

  11. Investigating Users' Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Deborah S.; Lee, Wen-Yu; Skov, Neil M.; Berger, Carl F.; Athley, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: User data and information about anatomy education were used to guide development of a learning environment that is efficient and effective. The research question focused on how to design instructional software suitable for the educational goals of different groups of users of the Visible Human data set. The ultimate goal of the study was to provide options for students and teachers to use different anatomy learning modules corresponding to key topics, for course work and professional training. Design: The research used both qualitative and quantitative methods. It was driven by the belief that good instructional design must address learning context information and pedagogic content information. The data collection emphasized measurement of users' perspectives, experience, and demands in anatomy learning. Measurement: Users' requirements elicited from 12 focus groups were combined and rated by 11 researchers. Collective data were sorted and analyzed by use of multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis. Results: A set of functions and features in high demand across all groups of users was suggested by the results. However, several subgroups of users shared distinct demands. The design of the learning modules will encompass both unified core components and user-specific applications. The design templates will allow sufficient flexibility for dynamic insertion of different learning applications for different users. Conclusion: This study describes how users' requirements, associated with users' learning experiences, were systematically collected and analyzed and then transformed into guidelines informing the iterative design of multiple learning modules. Information about learning challenges and processes was gathered to define essential anatomy teaching strategies. A prototype instrument to design and polish the Visible Human user interface system is currently being developed using ideas and feedback from users. PMID:12087112

  12. Husserl's Crisis as a crisis of psychology.

    PubMed

    Feest, Uljana

    2012-06-01

    This paper places Husserl's mature work, The Crisis of the European Sciences, in the context of his engagement with--and critique of--experimental psychology at the time. I begin by showing (a) that Husserl accorded psychology a crucial role in his philosophy, i.e., that of providing a scientific analysis of subjectivity, and (b) that he viewed contemporary psychology--due to its naturalism--as having failed to pursue this goal in the appropriate manner. I then provide an analysis of Husserl's views about naturalism and scientific philosophy. Some central themes of the Crisis are traced back to Husserl's earlier work and to his relationship with his teacher, Franz Brentano, with whom he disagreed about the status of "inner perception" as the proper scientific method for a phenomenological analysis. The paper then shows that Husserl was well aware of at least one publication about the crisis of psychology (Bühler's 1927 book), and it teases out some aspects of the complicated relationship between Husserl and members of the Würzburg School of thought psychology: The latter had drawn on Husserl's writings, but Husserl felt that they had misunderstood his central thesis. I conclude by placing Husserl's work in the wider context of scientific, cultural, and political crisis-discourses at the time.

  13. VCSEL reliability: a user's perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElfresh, David K.; Lopez, Leoncio D.; Melanson, Robert; Vacar, Dan

    2005-03-01

    VCSEL arrays are being considered for use in interconnect applications that require high speed, high bandwidth, high density, and high reliability. In order to better understand the reliability of VCSEL arrays, we initiated an internal project at SUN Microsystems, Inc. In this paper, we present preliminary results of an ongoing accelerated temperature-humidity-bias stress test on VCSEL arrays from several manufacturers. This test revealed no significant differences between the reliability of AlGaAs, oxide confined VCSEL arrays constructed with a trench oxide and mesa for isolation. This test did find that the reliability of arrays needs to be measured on arrays and not be estimated with the data from singulated VCSELs as is a common practice.

  14. Computational Control Workstation: Users' perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roithmayr, Carlos M.; Straube, Timothy M.; Tave, Jeffrey S.

    1993-01-01

    A Workstation has been designed and constructed for rapidly simulating motions of rigid and elastic multibody systems. We examine the Workstation from the point of view of analysts who use the machine in an industrial setting. Two aspects of the device distinguish it from other simulation programs. First, one uses a series of windows and menus on a computer terminal, together with a keyboard and mouse, to provide a mathematical and geometrical description of the system under consideration. The second hallmark is a facility for animating simulation results. An assessment of the amount of effort required to numerically describe a system to the Workstation is made by comparing the process to that used with other multibody software. The apparatus for displaying results as a motion picture is critiqued as well. In an effort to establish confidence in the algorithms that derive, encode, and solve equations of motion, simulation results from the Workstation are compared to answers obtained with other multibody programs. Our study includes measurements of computational speed.

  15. Crisis intervention for nurses.

    PubMed

    Chase, Emily

    2013-06-01

    Cancer diagnoses and treatments can be crisis-causing events that overwhelm the usual coping abilities of patients and their families. Oncology nurses constantly are observing and attending to patients' diverse needs, ranging from biomedical to emotional, social, and psychological. Nurses have the chance to be first responders in times of patient crises, as they are in the position to recognize the crisis, respond effectively, and transform the crisis into a pivotal learning experience. This article discusses a way to think about patient and family crises that empowers nurses to respond in a manner appropriate to the cultural context and respectful of the individual space of the patient.

  16. Crisis intervention: program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Simington, J A; Cargill, L; Hill, W

    1996-11-01

    Crisis intervention is based upon crisis theory and is defined as a short-term active mode of therapy that focuses on solving the client's immediate problem and reestablishing psychological equilibrium. The crisis intervention program was the first phase in the development of a broader mental health program with advancement decisions being based upon evaluation results of this initial phase. An evaluation methodology using the Stufflebeam Goal-Stakeholder Model (1980) was designed and implemented. A satisfaction survey was conducted to develop a database relative to the program's process. The Mental Health Category Measure, and the Crisis Call Outcome Rating Scale were used to capture outcome data. Analysis of the qualitative and quantitative data indicate that stakeholders are satisfied with the program. outcome data demonstrates that the program produces the intended outcomes. Triangulation, a method of comparing the qualitative and quantitative findings revealed consistency, and thus provides confidence in the accuracy of the findings.

  17. Midlife crisis: a debate.

    PubMed

    Freund, Alexandra M; Ritter, Johannes O

    2009-01-01

    Without doubt, the midlife crisis is the most popular concept describing middle adulthood. Facing the limitation of the time until death, men in particular are believed to pause from actively pursuing their goals and review their achievements, take stock of what they have and have not yet accomplished, at times taking drastic measures to fulfill their dreams. This paper critically discusses the concept of a midlife crisis and the relevant empirical evidence, presenting arguments for and against a strict, a moderate, and a lenient conceptualization of the midlife crisis. Although a strict and even moderate definition of the midlife crisis does not seem tenable on empirical and theoretical grounds, a lenient conceptualization has the potential to stimulate new research directions exemplifying processes of the interaction of social expectations on the one hand and personal goals on the other, and their importance for developmental regulation.

  18. Phaeochromocytoma [corrected] crisis.

    PubMed

    Whitelaw, B C; Prague, J K; Mustafa, O G; Schulte, K-M; Hopkins, P A; Gilbert, J A; McGregor, A M; Aylwin, S J B

    2014-01-01

    Phaeochromocytoma [corrected] crisis is an endocrine emergency associated with significant mortality. There is little published guidance on the management of phaeochromocytoma [corrected] crisis. This clinical practice update summarizes the relevant published literature, including a detailed review of cases published in the past 5 years, and a proposed classification system. We review the recommended management of phaeochromocytoma [corrected] crisis including the use of alpha-blockade, which is strongly associated with survival of a crisis. Mechanical circulatory supportive therapy (including intra-aortic balloon pump or extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation) is strongly recommended for patients with sustained hypotension. Surgical intervention should be deferred until medical stabilization is achieved. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Literature of Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Mark S.

    1971-01-01

    Examines current books and articles on educational problems, which the author refers to as literature of crisis," and concludes that these works should be read along with other genres of literature which examine human problems of communication and commitment. (VJ)

  20. Trust, confidence, and the 2008 global financial crisis.

    PubMed

    Earle, Timothy C

    2009-06-01

    The 2008 global financial crisis has been compared to a "once-in-a-century credit tsunami," a disaster in which the loss of trust and confidence played key precipitating roles and the recovery from which will require the restoration of these crucial factors. Drawing on the analogy between the financial crisis and environmental and technological hazards, recent research on the role of trust and confidence in the latter is used to provide a perspective on the former. Whereas "trust" and "confidence" are used interchangeably and without explicit definition in most discussions of the financial crisis, this perspective uses the TCC model of cooperation to clearly distinguish between the two and to demonstrate how this distinction can lead to an improved understanding of the crisis. The roles of trust and confidence-both in precipitation and in possible recovery-are discussed for each of the three major sets of actors in the crisis, the regulators, the banks, and the public. The roles of trust and confidence in the larger context of risk management are also examined; trust being associated with political approaches, confidence with technical. Finally, the various stances that government can take with regard to trust-such as supportive or skeptical-are considered. Overall, it is argued that a clear understanding of trust and confidence and a close examination of the specific, concrete circumstances of a crisis-revealing when either trust or confidence is appropriate-can lead to useful insights for both recovery and prevention of future occurrences.

  1. Crisis -- A Leadership Opportunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    true. Crisis develops as an organization’s values, beliefs, culture, or behavior becomes incongruent with its operating environment. A leader, who is...an organization’s values, beliefs, culture, and behaviors ; while the other reflects its changing environment. In the beginning, as the plates...a random, cataclysmic event that can strike without warning. However, crisis occurs when an organization’s values, beliefs, culture, or behaviors

  2. Mental health in the foreclosure crisis.

    PubMed

    Houle, Jason N

    2014-10-01

    Current evidence suggests that the rise in home foreclosures that began in 2007 created feelings of stress, vulnerability, and sapped communities of social and economic resources. Minority and low SES communities were more likely to be exposed to predatory lending and hold subprime mortgages, and were the hardest hit by the foreclosure crisis. Little research has examined whether and how the foreclosure crisis has undermined population mental health. I use data from 2245 counties in 50 U.S. states to examine whether living in high foreclosure areas is associated with residents' mental health and whether the foreclosure crisis has the potential to exacerbate existing disparities in mental health during the recessionary period. I use county-level data from RealtyTrac and other data sources, and individual-level data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey from 2006 to 2011. I find that - net of time invariant unobserved between-county differences, national time trends, and observed confounders - a rise in a county's foreclosure rate is associated with a decline in residents' mental health. This association is especially pronounced in counties with a high concentration of low SES and minority residents, which supports the perspective that the foreclosure crisis has the potential to exacerbate existing social disparities in mental health.

  3. Crisis management strategies.

    PubMed

    Koster, Maria C; Politis-Norton, Helen

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the different facets of crisis as experienced within the pharmaceutical industry but which are also prevalent throughout other industries. It highlights the importance of early identification and management of crises and issues, which in return are strongly intertwined with a fundamental positive internal corporate climate. A corporate philosophy should always embrace crisis management with the attitude of 'when' and not 'if'; therefore, a company should act today and not tomorrow once a crisis is on its doorstep. Preparation is of utmost importance and there are several items that can be addressed even before a crisis has arisen. Further, this paper also provides guidance on how to deal with the media, what to do and what not to do, and how to appoint the appropriate spokesperson. In this era of fast exchange of information, crisis, which previously may have stayed behind corporate doors, may not do so any longer. Image is very important and should therefore not be risked. Crisis and issue management should therefore be integrated in every company's philosophy and standard operating procedures.

  4. Exploiting social media for Army operations: Syrian crisis use case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Sue E.; Bowman, Elizabeth K.; Al Amin, Tanvir; Abdelzaher, Tarek

    2014-05-01

    Millions of people exchange user-generated information through online social media (SM) services. The prevalence of SM use globally and its growing significance to the evolution of events has attracted the attention of the Army and other agencies charged with protecting national security interests. The information exchanged in SM sites and the networks of people who interact with these online communities can provide value to Army intelligence efforts. SM could facilitate the Military Decision Making Process by providing ongoing assessment of military actions from a local citizen perspective. Despite potential value, there are significant technological barriers to leveraging SM. SM collection and analysis are difficult in the dynamic SM environment and deception is a real concern. This paper introduces a credibility analysis approach and prototype fact-finding technology called the "Apollo Fact-finder" that mitigates the problem of inaccurate or falsified SM data. Apollo groups data into sets (or claims), corroborating specific observations, then iteratively assesses both claim and source credibility resulting in a ranking of claims by likelihood of occurrence. These credibility analysis approaches are discussed in the context of a conflict event, the Syrian civil war, and applied to tweets collected in the aftermath of the Syrian chemical weapons crisis.

  5. [Development of a Crisis Management Manual for Occupational Health Experts].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Juri; Tateishi, Seiichiro; Igarashi, Yu; Ide, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Hara, Tatsuhiko; Kobashi, Masaki; Inoue, Megumi; Kawashima, Megumi; Okada, Takeo; Mori, Koji

    2015-12-01

    When crises such as natural disasters or industrial accidents occur in workplaces, not only the workers who are injured, but also those who engage in emergency or recovery work may be exposed to various health hazards. We developed a manual to enable occupational health (OH) experts to prevent health hazards. The manual includes detailed explanations of the characteristics and necessary actions for each need in the list of "OH Needs During Crisis Management" developed after an analysis of eight cases in our previous research. We changed the endings of explanatory sentences so that users could learn how often each need occurred in these eight cases. We evaluated the validity of the manual using two processes: 1) Providing the manual to OH physicians during an industrial accident; 2) Asking crisis management experts to review the manual. We made improvements based on their feedback and completed the manual. The manual includes explanations about 99 OH needs, and users can learn how and what to do for each need during various crisis cases. Because additional OH needs may occur in other crises, it is necessary to collect information about new cases and to improve the comprehensiveness of the manual continuously. It is critical that this crisis management manual be available when a crisis occurs. We need to inform potential users of the manual through various media, as well as by posting it on our website.

  6. An analysis of the Research Team-Service User relationship from the Service User perspective: a consideration of 'The Three Rs' (Roles, Relations, and Responsibilities) for healthcare research organisations.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Melanie; Rowley, Emma; Morriss, Richard; Manning, Nick

    2015-12-01

    This article debates interview data from service users who engaged with the work of a Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC). The evidence base, to date, concerning the nature of CLAHRC work at the frontline (i.e. What is it actually like to do CLAHRC work?) is meagre; thus, this article represents an original contribution to that literature. Further, this article analyses service users' participation in research - as members of the research team - and so contributes to the body of developing literature regarding involvement too. This article explores the nature of the Research Team-Service User relationship, plus associated roles, relations and responsibilities of collaborative health research. Qualitative social science research was undertaken in a health-care research organization utilizing interview method and a medical sociology and organizational sociology theoretical framework for analysis. Data utilized originate from a larger evaluation study that focuses on the CLAHRC as an iterative organization and explores members' experiences. There can be a disparity between initial expectations and actual experiences of involvement for service users. Therefore, as structured via 'The Three Rs' (Roles, Relations and Responsibilities), aspects of the relationship are evaluated (e.g. motivation, altruism, satisfaction, transparency, scope, feedback, communication, time). Regarding the inclusion of service users in health research teams, a careful consideration of 'The Three Rs' is required to ensure expectations match experiences. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Behavioral and Emotional Crisis Management in Adventure Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Dene S.; Davis-Berman, Jennifer; Gillen, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Defines emotional crises in an adventure education context. Discusses crisis intervention from a mental-health perspective and presents nonviolent intervention techniques for anxiety, disruptive behavior, and harmful behavior. Describes two techniques--critical incident stress debriefing and traumatic stress defusing--aimed at managing traumatic…

  8. Failing Boys! Beyond Crisis, Moral Panic and Limiting Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    For some time now, school boards, Ministries of Education, and the popular media have been expressing concerns about failing boys and how best to meet their needs, framing these concerns in terms of a crisis in which boys are the "new disadvantaged". This perspective does not provide an accurate representation of the problem and, in fact, detracts…

  9. A Cylindrical Model of Communication Behavior in Crisis Negotiations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Paul J.

    2002-01-01

    Integrates existing theoretical perspectives on message content and negotiator motivation to formulate a comprehensive definitional model of the interrelationships among communication behaviors in crisis negotiation. Finds that the intensity of communication plays a polarizing role in the cylinder, with intense, functionally discrete behaviors…

  10. Failing Boys! Beyond Crisis, Moral Panic and Limiting Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    For some time now, school boards, Ministries of Education, and the popular media have been expressing concerns about failing boys and how best to meet their needs, framing these concerns in terms of a crisis in which boys are the "new disadvantaged". This perspective does not provide an accurate representation of the problem and, in fact, detracts…

  11. Impact of bankruptcy through asset portfolios. Network analytic solution unveils 1990s Japanese banking crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Vodenska, I.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the Japanese banking crisis in the late 1990s with a simple network based mathematical model, which allows us to simulate the crisis as well as to obtain new perspective through analytic solution of our network model. We effectively identify the actual bankrupted banks and the robustness of the banking system using a simulation model based on properties of a bi-partite bank-asset network. We show the mean time property and analytical solution of the model revealing aggregate time dynamics of bank asset prices throughout the banking crisis. The results disclose simple but fundamental property of asset growth, instrumental for understanding the bank crisis. We also estimate the selling pressure for each asset type, derived from a Cascading Failure Model (CFM), offering new perspective for investigating the phenomenon of banking crisis.

  12. The Roman Empire - The Third Century Crisis and Crisis Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-04

    Tacitus. Hoboken: John Wiley And Sons, 2012. Putra , Fadillah. "Crisis Management In Public Administration." Planning Forum. 12, (2009, January 01...Fadillah Putra , "Crisis Management In Public Administration," Planning Forum 12, (2009, January 01). 12. "Crisis Of The Third Century: Ad 200-285

  13. Crisis resolution and home treatment: structure, process, and outcome - a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sjølie, H; Karlsson, B; Kim, H S

    2010-12-01

    • During the last ten years there has been a major change in developing mental health services generally, and crisis resolution and home treatment (CRHT) services especially. Many Western countries have made a shift in perspective from in-hospital care to home treatment. The new approach is based on treating people who experience mental health crises in their homes instead of through hospitalization. • Most of the published articles on CRHT focus on structural issues pertaining to the development of home treatment services, and on macro-level outcomes such as cost-effectiveness and admission rates. These have political, economic, and practical implications. Few articles describe clinical intervention methods used in home treatment. • This paper explores how home treatment is described as an essential intervention method in crisis resolution at home in relation to three key characteristics of CRHT, which are being mobile, working in the service user's home, and working together with the person's family and network. • There remains a need for further research describing specific characteristics of home treatment, different clinical interventions that are used by CRHT teams, and the directions with which clinical interventions need to be developed further. It is critical to investigate what makes the interventions of the CRHT teams different from the hospital care, and how this affects the service users, the family and the networks, and the professionals. The objective of this paper is to explore and systematize the existing knowledge regarding the structure, process, and outcome of crisis resolution and home treatment (CRHT) as a form of community mental health service. Data sources are published peer-reviewed articles. Our study selection is systematic search for peer-reviewed articles written in English and Norwegian published between January 2000 and December 2008. Data are extracted from review of published articles on the subject of CRHT team and home

  14. Evolutionary Perspectives on Diversity of Lignocellulose Decay Mechanisms in Basidionycetes (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Hibbett, David [Clark University

    2016-07-12

    David Hibbett from Clark University on "Evolutionary Perspectives on Diversity of Lignocellulose Decay Mechanisms in Basidiomycetes" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  15. Evolutionary Perspectives on Diversity of Lignocellulose Decay Mechanisms in Basidionycetes (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbett, David

    2012-03-21

    David Hibbett from Clark University on "Evolutionary Perspectives on Diversity of Lignocellulose Decay Mechanisms in Basidiomycetes" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  16. When Crisis Strikes on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Wendy Ann, Ed.

    This handbook aids in planning for effective crisis communication at institutions of higher education. The book opens with a behind-the-scenes look at a particular crisis--the 1990 murders of five students at the University of Florida. This first section offers tested advice from a campus communicator, an account of the crisis and the…

  17. When Crisis Strikes on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Wendy Ann, Ed.

    This handbook aids in planning for effective crisis communication at institutions of higher education. The book opens with a behind-the-scenes look at a particular crisis--the 1990 murders of five students at the University of Florida. This first section offers tested advice from a campus communicator, an account of the crisis and the…

  18. Crisis Management in Catholic Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batsis, Thomas M.

    The way in which a school community deals with a crisis situation is a test of its sense of community. This guidebook, intended for Catholic-school principals, presents a detailed plan to help schools establish crisis-management teams and offers directions for their operation. Chapter 1 presents an overview of crisis management and focuses on how…

  19. Keeping Cool in a Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padgett, Raven

    2006-01-01

    Many schools are able to avoid disasters by creating a strong, deliberate crisis plan and knowing how to implement it effectively. Good crisis preparedness requires leadership from the top, a critical mass of trained staff members, careful planning, and excellent communication. This article discusses how to prepare for a crisis.

  20. Developing the knowledge base about carers and personalisation: contributions made by an exploration of carers' perspectives on personal budgets and the carer-service user relationship.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Mary

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore an under-researched issue within the emerging body of research about carers and personalisation - the carer-service user relationship. It was carried out across 11 English local authorities between 2011 and 2012 and focused on the impact of a change in the service user's social care arrangements to a personal budget on this relationship. Using purposive sampling and explicit inclusion criteria, data were gathered through semi-structured in-depth interviews with 23 carers in long-term dyadic relationships with an adult in receipt of social care who had changed to a personal budget. The interviews explored carers' perceptions of the carer-service user relationship before and after the advent of the personal budget and changes that had occurred. The findings were thematically analysed and reflect the fact that in addition to the effects of the move to a personal budget on the carer-service user relationship, the interviewees talked at length about a range of other effects of this move. Just over half of those interviewed felt that the personal budget had enhanced the carer-service user relationship. The other effects were both positive and negative. Three quarters reported positive outcomes, such as feeling happier, healthier and having more control over their lives. Although two thirds experienced negative feelings about having less involvement in the service user's care, these feelings eased over time and if they had confidence in the quality of the care. Over half found administering the personal budget stressful. Further analysis of these findings showed the study contributes not only to existing knowledge about the carer-service user relationship within personalisation but also to knowledge about the effects of personalisation on carers more generally. It therefore simultaneously develops the emergent knowledge base about carers and personalisation. Recommendations based on this analysis are made about future practice and

  1. Service user perspectives on psychosocial assessment following self-harm and its impact on further help-seeking: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Cheryl; Chantler, Khatidja; Kapur, Navneet; Cooper, Jayne

    2013-03-05

    Psychosocial assessment is a central aspect of managing self-harm in hospitals, designed to encompass needs and risk, and to lead to further care. However, little is known about service user experiences of assessment, or what aspects of assessment service users value. The aim of this study was to explore service user experiences of assessment, and examine the short-term and longer-term meanings of assessment for service users. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was applied to 13 interviews with service users following hospital attendance, and seven follow-up interviews conducted 3 months later. Few participants had a clear understanding of assessment's purpose. Assessment had the potential to promote or challenge hope, dependent on whether it was experienced as accepting or critical. If follow-up care did not materialise, this reinforced hopelessness and promoted disengagement from services. The study sample was small and the participants heterogeneous in terms of self-harm history, method and intent, which may limit the transferability of the findings to other settings. Only self-report data on clinical diagnosis were collected. This was the first study to utilise an in-depth qualitative approach to investigate service user experiences of assessment and follow-up. The findings suggest that re-conceptualising psychosocial assessment as primarily an opportunity to engage service users therapeutically may consequently affect how health services are perceived. In order to maintain benefits established during the hospital experience, follow-up needs to be timely and integrated with assessment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Coming Accounting Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Tim V.

    2007-01-01

    The accounting profession is facing a potential crisis not only from the overall shortage of accounting faculty driven by smaller numbers of new faculty entering the profession as many existing faculty retire but also from changes that have been less well documented. This includes: (1) changes in attitude towards the roles of teaching, service and…

  3. Crisis in Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Solomon J.

    1990-01-01

    The health care crisis faced by African Americans must be addressed by the nation as a whole with the same energy that erupts when a natural disaster occurs. On an individual basis, blacks can improve their own health with attention to child nurturing and personal nutrition. (SLD)

  4. Crisis Management Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Zhe, Elizabeth; Torem, Chris; Comeaux, Natashia; Dempsey, Allison

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a summary of recent crisis management publications. The first research report summarized, "Predictors of PTSD," was a study of predictor variables for responses to the World Trade Center attack. The second paper, "Effective Mental Health Response to Catastrophic Events," looked at effective responses following Hurricane…

  5. Ghosts of Crisis Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopfer, Leopold E.; Champagne, Audrey B.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the history of school science curriculum reform from the Sputnik era to 1990. The relationship between the crisis in the 1950s and 1990 is addressed. A list of curriculum development programs for all levels and special needs students is included. (KR)

  6. Nursing in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Roxanne

    2007-01-01

    Both the nation's health-care and nursing education systems are in crisis. While the care provided by registered nurses (RNs) is essential to patients' recovery from acute illness and to the effective management of their chronic conditions, the United States is experiencing a nursing shortage that is anticipated to increase as baby boomers age and…

  7. Crisis in the Cafeteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    Because schools are entrusted with children's safety, any crisis (particularly food poisoning) affecting that inviolable trust is fodder for a ravenous media. Proactive school business officials and food-service personnel work together to publicize the school nutrition department's good work. Communicating clearly and assigning a food-service…

  8. Wanted: Crisis President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Paul

    2007-01-01

    As the events of Virginia Tech tragedy recede in time, leaders of other colleges and universities are sure to look at Virginia Tech president Charles W. Steger's performance and question the readiness of presidents to act like corporate executives, take visible control of a campus in crisis, manage the onslaught of cameras and microphones, and…

  9. Coping with Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akenhead, James; Andreani, Alan

    2002-01-01

    School officials put a crisis communications plan into action after two Ohio students died and a third became critically ill from meningitis in May 2001. A mass immunization program prevented a major outbreak, and rumor control helped calm the public's fears. Recounts things learned from the experience. (MLF)

  10. Rape: A Family Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Priscilla N.; Rollins, Judith C.

    1981-01-01

    Rape is a crisis shared by the victim and her family. The family's reaction is influenced by cultural views such as viewing rape as sex rather than violence. Adaptive responses can be supported by open expression, education, and family, as well as individual counseling. (JAC)

  11. Crisis in the Cafeteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    Because schools are entrusted with children's safety, any crisis (particularly food poisoning) affecting that inviolable trust is fodder for a ravenous media. Proactive school business officials and food-service personnel work together to publicize the school nutrition department's good work. Communicating clearly and assigning a food-service…

  12. The Phony Funding Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, James W.; Peng, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    If one relies on newspaper headlines for education funding information, one might conclude that America's schools suffer from a perpetual fiscal crisis, every year perched precariously on the brink of financial ruin, never knowing whether there will be sufficient funding to continue operating. Budgetary shortfalls, school district bankruptcies,…

  13. Crisis Management Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Zhe, Elizabeth; Torem, Chris; Comeaux, Natashia; Dempsey, Allison

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a summary of recent crisis management publications. The first research report summarized, "Predictors of PTSD," was a study of predictor variables for responses to the World Trade Center attack. The second paper, "Effective Mental Health Response to Catastrophic Events," looked at effective responses following Hurricane…

  14. Crisis Counseling: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandoval, Jonathan; Scott, Amy Nicole; Padilla, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Psychologists working in schools are often the first contacts for children experiencing a potentially traumatizing event or change in status. This article reviews basic concepts in crisis counseling and describes the components of psychological first aid. This form of counseling must be developmentally and culturally appropriate as well as…

  15. The Phony Funding Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, James W.; Peng, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    If one relies on newspaper headlines for education funding information, one might conclude that America's schools suffer from a perpetual fiscal crisis, every year perched precariously on the brink of financial ruin, never knowing whether there will be sufficient funding to continue operating. Budgetary shortfalls, school district bankruptcies,…

  16. Crisis Counseling: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandoval, Jonathan; Scott, Amy Nicole; Padilla, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Psychologists working in schools are often the first contacts for children experiencing a potentially traumatizing event or change in status. This article reviews basic concepts in crisis counseling and describes the components of psychological first aid. This form of counseling must be developmentally and culturally appropriate as well as…

  17. Scleroderma Renal Crisis.

    PubMed

    Guillevin, Loïc; Mouthon, Luc

    2015-08-01

    Scleroderma renal crisis is a rare complication of systemic sclerosis (SSc) that remains severe. Prompt recognition and initiation of therapy with an angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor offer the best chance to achieve a good outcome. SSc prevalence is poorly known, with disparities among countries.

  18. Coping with Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akenhead, James; Andreani, Alan

    2002-01-01

    School officials put a crisis communications plan into action after two Ohio students died and a third became critically ill from meningitis in May 2001. A mass immunization program prevented a major outbreak, and rumor control helped calm the public's fears. Recounts things learned from the experience. (MLF)

  19. Coping with Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ries, Eric

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways to manage crises such as homicides, suicides, natural calamities, and improprieties to minimize their negative impact and enhance the school's reputation. Suggestions include developing and practicing a crisis plan, keeping people informed, remembering the victims, and dealing with the media. (JOW)

  20. Ghosts of Crisis Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopfer, Leopold E.; Champagne, Audrey B.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the history of school science curriculum reform from the Sputnik era to 1990. The relationship between the crisis in the 1950s and 1990 is addressed. A list of curriculum development programs for all levels and special needs students is included. (KR)

  1. Crisis, Meaning and Consciousness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amini, Bijan

    This paper suggests that all life is polar because polarity is the underlying context of life. The idea of polarity is based on two halves that originally belonged together to form a whole. These two halves are constantly trying to come together to regain their wholeness. The philosophical view of crisis presented in this paper is that the…

  2. The Mythical "Boy Crisis"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husain, Muna; Millimet, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    The popular press has put forth the idea that the US educational system is experiencing a "boy crisis," where boys are losing ground to girls across multiple dimensions. Here, we analyze these claims in the context of math and reading achievement during early primary school. We reach two conclusions. First, white boys outperform white girls in…

  3. Wanted: Crisis President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Paul

    2007-01-01

    As the events of Virginia Tech tragedy recede in time, leaders of other colleges and universities are sure to look at Virginia Tech president Charles W. Steger's performance and question the readiness of presidents to act like corporate executives, take visible control of a campus in crisis, manage the onslaught of cameras and microphones, and…

  4. 'They can't solve the problem without us': a qualitative study of stakeholder perspectives on user involvement in drug treatment services in England.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Sue; Weaver, Tim; Agath, Kostas; Albert, Eliot; Rhodes, Timothy; Rutter, Deborah; Crawford, Mike

    2009-02-01

    Providers of public health care are under pressure to involve service-users in service development. This pressure emanates from legislators and the public who promote user involvement (UI), as a 'means to an end' and/or 'an end in itself'. Case studies in six English commissioning areas explored the process and purpose of UI in drug treatment services. In-depth interviews with 139 respondents who commission, manage, deliver or use services were conducted. We identified 'non-', 'passive-' and 'active participant' users. Active users were commonly motivated by a desire for social justice, a social conscience and personal development. UI was evidently influenced by multiple social organizational and personal factors. Some 'generic' factors have been reported in other settings. However, the illegality of drug use powerfully affects all stakeholders creating a context unique to drug treatment settings. Stigma and power imbalances were pervasive, and strong tensions concerning the goal and purpose of UI were apparent. Within the UK context, we identified five organizational approaches to UI. Based on rationale and objectives of UI, and the scope of influence accorded users, organizations could be characterised as protagonists, pragmatists, sceptics, abstainers or avoiders. We conclude that many tensions apparent in local level UI have roots in UI policy, which is ambiguous about: (1) benefit and rights, and (2) the promotion of healthcare objectives within a UK drug strategy driven by a crime reduction agenda. This duality must be resolved for UI to flourish at local level.

  5. Perspectives of the Continuing Education Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Huey B.

    1974-01-01

    The article discusses the Continuing Education Unit's chameleon-like nature by focusing on its definition and background and possible perceptions from the academic perspective, the user group perspective and the individual learner's perspective. (AG)

  6. [Crisis intervention with elderly people].

    PubMed

    Etzersdorfer, E

    2008-02-01

    This paper gives an overview about the most important aspects of crisis intervention, with special emphasis on crisis intervention with elderly people. First a review of the development of crisis intervention is given, including of some of the major concepts, with particular emphasis on psychoanalytic aspects of crisis intervention. Then a clinical case example of a crisis intervention with an elderly woman following a suicide attempt is given and discussed. The focus lies on the description of the transference-countertransference relationship, with attempts of pressing the therapist to comply with superficial, denying and minimizing fantasies. Peculiarities of crisis intervention with elderly people are highlighted: it is necessary to emphasize that elderly people are underrepresented in most crisis services, whereby they represent the group with the highest suicide risk. Peculiarities of elderly people still are not sufficiently met and they are created by a particularly wide range of aspects.

  7. Complex Network for a Crisis Contagion on AN Interbank System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirado, Mariano

    2012-09-01

    The main focus of this research is the contagion of a financial crisis on an interbank debt network. In order to simulate the crisis propagation a weighted community complex network based on growth strategy has been created. The contagion is described by a new way of disease propagation perspective based on the concept of a financial virus. The model reproduces the existence of TBTF banks and shows the impact that an initial TBTF bank crash produces in the interbank network depending on the magnitude of the initial crash and on the resistance that the network offers against the contagion propagation.

  8. An Examination of Leaders' Perceptions and Strategies in Addressing Faculty Recruitment, Retention and Support in Times of Economic Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little-Wiles, Julie M.

    2012-01-01

    Using the embedded case study method, this investigation described the experiences, relationships, and perspectives of administrative leaders within the higher education environment during the most recent economic crisis, specifically attempting to answer the question of, "How does an economic crisis, like the most current recession, impact a…

  9. Active involvement of learning disabilities service users in the development and delivery of a teaching session to pre-registration nurses: Students' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Smith, Penny; Ooms, Ann; Marks-Maran, Di

    2016-01-01

    A teaching session about service users' experiences of accessing and receiving health and social care was designed and delivered by service users to first year BSc Nursing students. The aim was to enhance students' knowledge, skills and confidence in caring for people with a learning disability. An evaluation research study was undertaking at one university in London into the perceived effectiveness of the teaching session, including students' perceptions of the extent to which the service users' teaching session was useful, the impact of the session, its benefits and challenges and the sustainability of teaching sessions delivered by service users. Data were collected through an online questionnaire. Quantitative analysis was undertaken of Likert-style questions and qualitative analysis was undertaken using the Framework Method. The session impacted on students' knowledge and understanding of people with a learning disability. Students reported that they felt more comfortable and confident interacting with people with a learning disability. In addition, they reflected on their feelings about caring for people with a learning disability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Legal, social, cultural and political developments in mental health care in the UK: the Liverpool black mental health service users' perspective.

    PubMed

    Pierre, S A

    2002-02-01

    Documentary evidence suggests that attitudes among local health and social services professionals towards the concept of user involvement in health and social care remain deeply polarized, a position characterized by commentators simultaneously as praise and damnation. Perhaps user involvement in health and social care will enhance, and it appears to resonate with the logic of, participatory democracy, in localities where the centralization of power has posed questions as to the nature and purpose of local governance in public services provision. The problems experienced by Britain's black and ethnic minorities within the mental health system have been the subject of exhaustive social inquiry. This essay attempts to explore the way in which legal, social, cultural, and political developments interface with mental health care practice in the UK, in order to assist those responsible for mental health services provision to deliver services that are in line with the Government's expectation of a modernized mental health service that is safe, sound, and supportive. An exploration of these developments within the European, national (UK), and local (Liverpool) contexts is undertaken. An appropriate local response to national priorities will ostensibly cut a swathe through the barriers confronted by the ethnic minority mental health service user in the cross-cultural context, an important prerequisite for the implementation of genuine user involvement.

  11. Social media as a space for support: Young adults' perspectives on producing and consuming user-generated content about diabetes and mental health.

    PubMed

    Fergie, Gillian; Hunt, Kate; Hilton, Shona

    2016-12-01

    Social media offer opportunities to both produce and consume content related to health experiences. However, people's social media practices are likely to be influenced by a range of individual, social and environmental factors. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore how engagement with user-generated content can support people with long-term health conditions, and what limits users' adoption of these technologies in the everyday experience of their health condition. Forty semi-structured interviews were conducted with young adults, aged between 18 and 30 years, with experience of diabetes or a common mental health disorder (CMHD). We found that the online activities of these young adults were diverse; they ranged from regular production and consumption ('prosumption') of health-related user-generated content to no engagement with such content. Our analysis suggested three main types of users: 'prosumers'; 'tacit consumers' and 'non-engagers'. A key determinant of participants' engagement with resources related to diabetes and CMHDs in the online environment was their offline experiences of support. Barriers to young adults' participation in online interaction, and sharing of content related to their health experiences, included concerns about compromising their presentation of identity and adherence to conventions about what content is most appropriate for specific social media spaces. Based on our analysis, we suggest that social media do not provide an unproblematic environment for engagement with health content and the generation of supportive networks. Rather, producing and consuming user-generated content is an activity embedded within individuals' specific health experiences and is impacted by offline contexts, as well as their daily engagement with, and expectations, of different social media platforms. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. User Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) impact of frequency change of user and spacecraft antenna gain and size; (2) basic personal terminal antennas (impact of 20/30 GHz frequency separation; parametric studies - gain, size, weight; gain and figure of merit (G/T); design data for selected antenna concepts; critical technologies and development goals; and recommendations); and (3) user antenna radiation safety concerns.

  13. Alternatives to seclusion and restraint in psychiatry and in long-term care facilities for the elderly: perspectives of service users and family members.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Desmartis, Marie; Dipankui, Mylène Tantchou; Gagnon, Johanne; St-Pierre, Michèle

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest in involving patients in decisions regarding healthcare technologies. This research project was conducted in collaboration with decision makers and health technology assessment agents in order to involve healthcare service users (and their loved ones) in the assessment of alternatives to seclusion and restraint in short-term psychiatric wards and long-term care facilities for the elderly. This paper explores the viewpoints and suggestions of service users and service users' families about alternatives to restraint and seclusion, as well as conditions under which they could be used among adults in short-term psychiatric care and residents in long-term care facilities. Using a semi-structured guide, we held eight focus groups: five with mental health service users and three with family members of elderly people in long-term care facilities. Focus group discussions were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim, and we performed content analysis using NVivo 8 software. In both care environments, participants emphasized the importance of communicating with service users, as well as assessing their needs and their particular situation, for reducing the use of restraint and seclusion. A better welcome and accompaniment of people admitted for short-term psychiatric care emerged also as key approaches to reduce the use of restraint and seclusion. Long-term care facilities could also reduce the need for restraint and seclusion by creating a stimulating home environment and individualized occupational therapy programs. Participants in both groups suggested that caregivers other than healthcare staff could be more involved, especially peer-support workers in the case of psychiatric care and volunteers in the case of long-term care facilities. Participants suggested that changes were needed at a broader and more systemic level than simply replacing current measures of restraint and seclusion with alternative techniques. They favored an approach

  14. Poland in Crisis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    between the regime and Solidarity; simultaneously, the Church’s institutional prerogatives expanded. In the wake of Solidarity’s activism , much of the...Solidarity, meeting in its own Congress in September, to assume a more active approach to a solution of the crisis. Solidarity’s leaders also responded to...by Polish security and military forces on December 13, 1981, was largely bloodless, in part because Solidarity was not prepared for active resistance

  15. Solving the Antibiotic Crisis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gerard D

    2015-02-13

    Antibiotics are essential for both treating and preventing infectious diseases. Paradoxically, despite their importance as pillars of modern medicine, we are in danger of losing antibiotics because of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms throughout all pathogenic microbes. This fact, coupled with an inability to bring new drugs to market at a pace that matches resistance, has resulted in a crisis of global proportion. Solving this crisis requires the actions of many stakeholders, but chemists, chemical biologists, and microbiologists must drive the scientific innovation that is required to maintain our antibiotic arsenal. This innovation requires (1) a deep understanding of the evolution and reservoirs of resistance; (2) full knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic action and resistance; (3) the discovery of chemical and genetic probes of antibiotic action and resistance; (4) the integration of systems biology into antibiotic discovery; and (5) the discovery of new antimicrobial chemical matter. Addressing these pressing scientific gaps will ensure that we can meet the antibiotic crisis with creativity and purpose.

  16. Nivolumab induced myxedema crisis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Uqba; Rizvi, Humaira; Sano, Dahlia; Chiu, Jane; Hadid, Tarik

    2017-01-01

    Nivolumab is an anti-programmed cell death (anti-PD-1) monoclonal antibody that is approved by Food and Drug Administration for treatment of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer, metastatic melanoma, relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma and advanced renal cell cancer. We report a rare case of myxedema crisis induced by nivolumab in a patient with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of lung. Fifty three-year old woman with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma currently on treatment with nivolumab presented with diffuse facial and tongue swelling, slurred speech, depressed mentation, fatigue and weakness. Initial evaluation revealed severe hypothyroidism with thyroid stimulating hormone of 237 micro Unit/mL (Normal Reference range: 0.27-4.20 micro unit/mL) and undetectable free T4. Patient was diagnosed with nivolumab induced myxedema crisis. She was treated successfully with levothyroxine with complete resolution of her symptoms. Nivolumab was safely restarted once the symptoms of myxedema resolved. Nivolumab can cause immune-mediated endocrinopathies including thyroiditis, hypophysitis, adrenal insufficiency and type 1 diabetes mellitus. High index of suspicion and periodic measurement of thyroid function tests are recommended in patients receiving nivolumab therapy. Our case also suggests that once the myxedema crisis is treated and symptoms are resolved, nivolumab can be safely re-challenged.

  17. Clinical users' perspective on telemonitoring of patients with long term conditions: understood through concepts of Giddens's structuration theory & consequence of modernity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Urvashi; Barnett, Julie; Clarke, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    This study involves conducting focus group discussions with clinical users (nurses and technicians) prior to the launch of telehealth service in Nottingham, UK, to elicit their initial perceptions about the service. It describes the findings from preliminary phase of otherwise a larger longitudinal study. Using Giddens's concepts from structuration theory and consequence of modernity, we were able to acknowledge trust and sense of security as two very salient aspects that govern adoption of new technological innovation. Unattended, these aspects contribute to arousal of conflict and contradiction within a system. In order for successful telehealth implementations in health care setting, providers of the service, need to focus on ways in which clinical users' trust can be gained and sense of security can be promoted while using the telehealth service and technology.

  18. [The health-disease-care process from the perspective of the users of a primary care clinic in Montevideo, Uruguay: An analysis of therapeutic trajectories].

    PubMed

    Evia Bertullo, Victoria

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze, using an ethnographic approach, the health-disease-care experiences of the users of a multi-specialty clinic that forms part of the Metropolitan Primary Health Care Network of Uruguay's Public Health Services. The fieldwork was carried out in the northeast of Montevideo from July 2012 to November 2013, combining participant observation in social and care spaces and interviews with more than 20 users. In our analysis of care trajectories we found that people incorporate different practices and beliefs when facing their health problems. The use of biomedical health care services is predominant in Uruguay; nevertheless, people engage in self-care practices and in some cases, in the use of folk, religious/magical or alternative remedies. Medical pluralism is therefore observed in facing certain common ailments or significant experiences of disease.

  19. The value of involvement from the perspective of service users and carers engaged in practitioner education: not just a cash nexus.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Mick; Malihi-Shoja, Lisa; Hogarth, Russell; Jones, Fiona; Holt, Keith; Sullivan, Peter; Lunt, John; Vella, Jacqui; Hough, Graham; Rawcliffe, Lou; Mather, Marie

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents qualitative findings emergent from a participatory action research (PAR) study focused on developing service user and carer involvement in a university setting. The involvement of these experts by experience in practitioner education for health and social care, and nursing in particular, is now an international phenomenon. Adhering to the philosophy and practices of PAR, the project and the writing of this paper have been collectively produced. Data has been organised using simple thematic analysis into three broad themes accounting for different ways in which participating service users and carers obtain a sense of value from their involvement. We have titled these themes: a more positive sense of self; social and relational benefits; altruism in activism. Drawing on these participant narratives we develop an understanding of the relationship between involvement and reward that does not simply reflect value in payment.

  20. The influence of environmental and personal factors on participation of lower-limb prosthetic users in low-income countries: prosthetists' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kam, Season; Kent, Mallory; Khodaverdian, Alin; Daiter, Liane; Njelesani, Janet; Cameron, Debra; Andrysek, Jan

    2015-05-01

    To examine the environmental and personal factors in low-income countries (LICs) that influence prosthetic rehabilitation of adults with lower-limb (LL) amputations and their ability to participate in daily activities. In this qualitative descriptive study, 11 prosthetists participated in semi-structured interviews by telephone or Skype. Qualitative thematic analysis was guided by the International Classification of Function. Facilitating continuity of care, consideration of physical environments and usage, prosthetic quality including durability and socket fit, and minimizing the visibility of disability, were found to be important factors affecting the provision of prosthetic services in LICs. Environmental and personal factors must be considered when providing prosthetic rehabilitation for adults with LL amputations in LICs in order to optimize participation in activities. Results from this study provide new insights about some of the factors that influence the ability of individuals with LL amputations to rehabilitate to a level where they are able to participate in meaningful activities within their communities. There are unique environmental and personal components that can influence activity and participation of lower-limb (LL) prosthetic users in low-income countries (LICs). These components are often overlooked in the design of prosthetic devices and provision of prosthetic services. Continuity of care, condition of the post-surgical residuum, outdoor environments of common occupations, aesthetics and durability of prostheses, and user comfort should all be considered when providing prosthetic rehabilitation to adults with LL amputations in LICs to promote activity and participation. Results of our study can inform the practice of prosthetists in LICs by highlighting their contributions in enabling participation for LL prosthetic users. Our results can also inform the design of durable and comfortable prostheses and the provision of more appropriate

  1. A fire safety engineering perspective on crowd evacuation dynamics. Comment on "Human behaviours in evacuation crowd dynamics: From modelling to "big data" toward crisis management" by Nicola Bellomo et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchi, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    The review presented by Bellomo et al. [1] addresses the modelling approaches employed to represent human behaviour in evacuation in a comprehensive manner. The authors discuss crowd evacuation modelling in light of crisis management, a relevant and current topic given the recent escalation of terrorist threats all over the world. The need for designing buildings for rapid evacuation using crowd evacuation models has been recently raised in important forums [2]. This research area is strictly linked to the field of Fire Safety Engineering.

  2. Perspectives on the Massachusetts Community Health Information Profile (MassCHIP): developing an online data query system to target a variety of user needs and capabilities.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Bruce B; Franklin, Saul; West, James K

    2006-01-01

    The Massachusetts Community Health Information Profile (MassCHIP) has many distinctive features. These features evolved to maximize the usefulness of this query system for a broad group of users with varied needs, differing levels of knowledge about public health, and diverse experience using public health data. Three major features of MassCHIP help target our large user population. These features are as follows: (1) multiple avenues of entry to initiate queries ranging from an alphabetical list of simple topics to detailed International Classification of Disease codes; (2) the inclusion of data sets from other state agencies in addition to those of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health to reflect a broad view of public health; and (3) the capacity to retrieve data for multiple levels of geography, from the neighborhood through the state, including planning districts and hospitals. In this article, we discuss the history and design of MassCHIP, and focus on the features of MassCHIP that target a great variety of user needs and capabilities, and which are distinctive among Web-based data query systems.

  3. Crisis Management Systems: A Case Study for Aspect-Oriented Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienzle, Jörg; Guelfi, Nicolas; Mustafiz, Sadaf

    The intent of this document is to define a common case study for the aspect-oriented modeling research community. The domain of the case study is crisis management systems, i.e., systems that help in identifying, assessing, and handling a crisis situation by orchestrating the communication between all parties involved in handling the crisis, by allocating and managing resources, and by providing access to relevant crisis-related information to authorized users. This document contains informal requirements of crisis management systems (CMSs) in general, a feature model for a CMS product line, use case models for a car crash CMS (CCCMS), a domain model for the CCCMS, an informal physical architecture description of the CCCMS, as well as some design models of a possible object-oriented implementation of parts of the CCCMS backend. AOM researchers who want to demonstrate the power of their AOM approach or technique can hence apply the approach at the most appropriate level of abstraction.

  4. Advanced techniques for the analysis of crisis stability, deterrence, and latency

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-12-01

    Studies on crisis stability, deterrence, and latency are presented in chronological order, which also reflects their logical order of development, captures the main features of stability analysis; relates first strike, crisis, and arms control stability as seen from US and Russian perspective; and addresses questions such as whether uncertainty in damage preference or defense deployment can be destabilizing. It illustrates the problems with alternative metrics, latency and reconstitution, and deep unilateral and proportional force reductions.

  5. [Crisis Cards for the Prevention of Compulsory Hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Drack-Schönenberger, Thekla; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Blank, Christina; Rössler, Wulf; Lay, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    To assess early signs of mental-health crises, treatment-specific demands and individual coping strategies from the subjective patients' perspective, and to categorize these specifications on the patients' crisis cards. A sample of 108 psychiatric patients with severe mental disorders is currently taking part in an intervention programme targeting the reduction of compulsory re-admission to psychiatry. As part of the programme, patients fill in a crisis card. Data are analysed by a qualitative approach using content analysis. A variety of early signs of a crisis was specified by the psychiatric patients, most often negative emotions/thoughts (48 %). Likewise, the analysis revealed a wide range of treatment-specific preferences and individual strategies to cope with mental-health crises. Drawing up a crisis card in collaboration with a patient and discussing its contents might be used as a treatment resource and be beneficial to increase the patient's empowerment. Essential for the long-term prevention of mental-health crises and relapses is the regular reflection of the contents of a patient's crisis card. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Before Crisis Hits: Building a Strategic Crisis Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Larry L.; Millar, Dan P.

    This guide offers suggestions to college administrators for dealing with a variety of emergency or crisis situations that could affect a community college's effectiveness. The authors used the Institute for Crisis Management's (ICM) four types of crises in higher education as the framework for the guide. The four types of crises are: (1) sudden;…

  7. Developing brain-computer interfaces from a user-centered perspective: Assessing the needs of persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, caregivers, and professionals.

    PubMed

    Liberati, Giulia; Pizzimenti, Alessia; Simione, Luca; Riccio, Angela; Schettini, Francesca; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Mattia, Donatella; Cincotti, Febo

    2015-09-01

    By focus group methodology, we examined the opinions and requirements of persons with ALS, their caregivers, and health care assistants with regard to developing a brain-computer interface (BCI) system that fulfills the user's needs. Four overarching topics emerged from this analysis: 1) lack of information on BCI and its everyday applications; 2) importance of a customizable system that supports individuals throughout the various stages of the disease; 3) relationship between affectivity and technology use; and 4) importance of individuals retaining a sense of agency. These findings should be considered when developing new assistive technology. Moreover, the BCI community should acknowledge the need to bridge experimental results and its everyday application.

  8. Toward a safer working environment on psychiatric wards: service users' delayed perspectives of aggression and violence-related situations and development ideas.

    PubMed

    Kontio, Raija; Anttila, Minna; Lantta, Tella; Kauppi, Kaisa; Joffe, Grigori; Välimäki, Maritta

    2014-10-01

    To explore service users' (n = 9) delayed perceptions of and suggestions for improvement of management of aggression/violence in psychiatry. Focus group interviews, inductive content analysis. Participants reported aggression/violence-related negative perceptions (including loneliness, boredom, excessive control, and fear) but also memories of humane and caring personnel. The suggestions included meaningful activities and humane, interactive nursing. Delayed perceptions and proposals resembled the proximate ones. Perceptions may persist for years. Such perceptions and proposals, if taken into account from the beginning of treatment, may prevent negative long-term consequences of witnessed or experienced aggression/violence. Humane, interactive nursing models should be studied and disseminated. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The mental health focus in rape crisis services: tensions and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Woody, Jane D; Beldin, Kerry L

    2012-01-01

    In the evolution of rape crisis services, tensions persist between rape crisis service programs and mental health professionals. Changes within these programs and professions have brought the embedded concerns to the surface, but they remain unexamined and unresolved. Recent research on rape trauma and survivors' mental health needs has added to tensions by calling for description and evaluation of rape crisis services and timely psychological treatment for survivors. This article offers a new perspective by discussing the tensions in an open but balanced way so as to promote discussion and solutions. Recommendations and action steps are offered for promoting constructive dialogue and change to improve direct services for survivors.

  10. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) in vocational rehabilitation and disability assessment in Slovenia: state of law and users' perspective.

    PubMed

    Ptyushkin, Pavel; Vidmar, Gaj; Burger, Helena; Marinček, Crt; Escorpizo, Reuben

    2011-01-01

    This study illustrates the use of the ICF in vocational rehabilitation and disability assessment in Slovenia. A review of the Slovenian law about vocational rehabilitation was performed. A survey was developed and group and individual interviews were conducted with professionals involved in vocational rehabilitation who use the ICF. The vast majority of the respondents believe that ICF helps to create a common language for multidisciplinary communication. The main advantages of the ICF identified by the respondents are that it provides a holistic view of the person, assesses complexities of functioning, provides a unified language and offers a quick and easy insight into functioning. The disadvantages of ICF are complicated terminology and subjectivity of the assessor. A difficulty encountered by the users is that by law, only body functions of the ICF are assessed. Additional qualitative analysis of the users' understanding of ICF and its purpose revealed heterogeneity. Significant differences between public and private organisations were found. ICF is a promising tool for use in vocational rehabilitation and disability assessment in Slovenia. A major challenge is the lack of interface between ICF and policies on vocational rehabilitation in Slovenia.

  11. [Crisis in medical ethics].

    PubMed

    Stellamor, K

    1996-01-01

    There is a disproportion between diagnostic and therapeutic medical achievements and the doctor/patient relationship. Are we allowed to do everything we are able to do in medicine? People are concerned and worried (genetic technology, invasive medicine, embryos in test tubes etc.). The crisis of ethics in medicine is evident. The analysis of the situation shows one of the causes in the shift of the paradigma-modern times to postmodern following scientific positivism-but also a loss of ethics in medicine due to an extreme secularism and to modern philosophical trends (Hans Jonas and the responsibility for the future and on the other hand modern utilitarism).

  12. QMRPACK user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, R.W.; Nachtigal, N.M.; Reeb, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    QMRPACK is a library of FORTRAN 77 subroutines that may be used to solve linear systems of equations with the quasi-minimal residual (QMR) method and to compute eigenvalue approximations. This User`s Guide is designed to be an overview of the codes contained in QMRPACK. Installation information is provided, and the example matrix format is discussed. The relative merits of each algorithm, as well as usage criterion are described. The authors also provide instructions for making the test drivers, as well as test output from several machines.

  13. School Buildings in Today's Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blyth, Alastair

    2009-01-01

    To get a picture of the impact of the current economic and financial crisis on educational building programmes so far, the OECD Centre for Effective Learning Environments (CELE) has been conducting a survey of member countries and regions. The survey focuses on three main issues: the impact of the crisis on publicly funded projects, the impact on…

  14. A Crisis of Legendary Proportions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    Describes the activities of Indiana University's crisis communications team during the Bob Knight controversy. Discusses how the school's response was based on four crisis communications principles: create a plan, appoint a single spokesperson, respond with open and continuous communications, and expect the unexpected. (EV)

  15. A Crisis of Legendary Proportions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    Describes the activities of Indiana University's crisis communications team during the Bob Knight controversy. Discusses how the school's response was based on four crisis communications principles: create a plan, appoint a single spokesperson, respond with open and continuous communications, and expect the unexpected. (EV)

  16. Organizational Learning and Crisis Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jia

    2007-01-01

    The impact of crises on organizations has been stronger than ever. This article explores the role of organizational learning in crisis management, an area that has received little attention from HRD community. Recognizing the dynamics and interconnectedness of crisis management, organizational learning, and organizational change, the article…

  17. Crisis Intervention: A Model Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folsom, Clyde H. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A model workshop for training campus personnel in crisis intervention skills is described. This workshop combined theoretical presentations with interventions in crises simulated by student actors and actresses. The crisis interventions were videotaped and processed. Problems and issues that arose are discussed. (Author)

  18. School Buildings in Today's Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blyth, Alastair

    2009-01-01

    To get a picture of the impact of the current economic and financial crisis on educational building programmes so far, the OECD Centre for Effective Learning Environments (CELE) has been conducting a survey of member countries and regions. The survey focuses on three main issues: the impact of the crisis on publicly funded projects, the impact on…

  19. Connections and consequences in complex systems: insights from a case study of the emergence and local impact of crisis resolution and home treatment services.

    PubMed

    Hannigan, Ben

    2013-09-01

    In this article the broad contours of a complexity perspective are outlined. Complexity ideas are then drawn on to frame an empirical examination of the connections running between different levels of organisation in health and social care, and to underpin investigation into the intended and unintended local system consequences of service development. Data are used from a study conducted in the UK's mental health field. Here, macro-level policy has led to the supplementing of longstanding community mental health teams by newer, more specialised, services. An example includes teams providing crisis resolution and home treatment (CRHT) care as an alternative to hospital admission. Using an embedded case study design, where 'the case' examined was a new CRHT team set in its surrounding organisational environment, ethnographic data (with interviews predominating) were generated in a single site in Wales over 18 months from the middle of 2007. In a large-scale context favourable to local decision-making, and against a background of a partial and disputed evidence base, the move to establish the new standalone service was contested. Whilst users valued the work of the team, and local practitioners recognised the quality of its contribution, powerful effects were also triggered across the locality's horizontal interfaces. Participants described parts of the interconnected system being closed to release resources, staff gravitating to new crisis services leaving holes elsewhere, and the most needy service users being cared for by the least experienced workers. Some community mental health team staff described unexpected increases in workload, and disputes over eligibility for crisis care with implications for system-wide working relations. Detailed data extracts are used to illustrate these connections and consequences. Concluding lessons are drawn on the use of evidence to inform policy, on the significance of local contexts and system interfaces, and on anticipating the

  20. Thyrotoxic crisis presenting with jaundice.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, R D S S; Luke, W A N V; Sebastiampillai, B S; Gunathilake, M P M L; Premaratna, R

    2016-06-23

    Thyrotoxic crisis is a medical emergency requiring early diagnosis and urgent management, which can be challenging due to its diverse clinical presentations. While common presentations include fever, sweating, palpitations, tremors and confusion, presence of jaundice is rare. We report a 35-year-old male who presented with jaundice due to cholestasis along with other features of thyrotoxic crisis due to Graves' disease. He had a good clinical recovery with resolution of cholestasis following treatment for thyrotoxic crisis. Jaundice can be a rare manifestation of thyrotoxic crisis, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis when other clinical features of thyrotoxic crisis are present. However secondary causes of jaundice should be looked into and excluded.

  1. The UN in crisis?

    PubMed

    Anstee, M J

    2001-01-01

    The United Nations (UN), the principal role of which is dealing with crises, has been in almost perpetual crisis since its foundation. The situation has become worse in the 1990s, a time when the need for an effective UN has been greater than ever, to cope with issues such as climate-change, pollution and the consequences of globalization. The current crisis has various aspects. Politically there have been widely publicized failures in peacekeeping, largely due to the Security Council being a body of compromise, while successes in peacekeeping have been largely ignored. In the economic and social field, influence has passed to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank. Development aid has plummeted, despite its key role in peace and security, and so an integrated approach to development and security is urgently needed. The UN has been constantly under-funded, with the failure of the United States (US) to pay its dues a key factor. Reform of the UN is vital, but the vested interests of member states make root-and-branch reform virtually impossible. Public pressure for reform can come from non-governmental organizations, perhaps coordinated through the Internet.

  2. The Mediterranean salinity crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Hsue, K.J.

    1988-08-01

    That the Mediterranean Sea underwent a salinity crisis during the Miocene (Messinian) is proven by the 1970 JOIDES deep sea drilling expedition. Subsequent work by ocean drilling and by studies on land have recorded the history of this crisis. Based upon the deep desiccated-basin model, the use of event-stratigraphy, calibrated by strontium-isotope dating and magnetostratigraphy, has enabled them to decipher the following events between 6.0 and 5.1 Ma: (1) deposition of marine diatom-rich sediments in a partially restricted basin, (2) first desiccation of the Mediterranean when Calcare di base was deposited at a time of isolation from the Atlantic because of a glacial eustatic drop of sea level, (3) influx of marine waters through southern Spanish basins to furnish brines for the deposition of the main salt, (4) Intra-Messinian desiccation, as evidenced by the erosional unconformity above the lower evaporite, (5) Intra-Messinian denudation, when reefs grew on Cyprus and marine sediments were deposited in basins, (6) frequency isolations due to oscillating sea level, when the upper evaporite was deposited, (7) Lago mare, formation of freshwater and brackish lakes due to influx of Paratethys water, (8) opening of the Gibraltar and Pliocene inundation of the Mediterranean.

  3. The malpractice liability crisis.

    PubMed

    Brenner, R James; Smith, John J

    2004-01-01

    Most medical malpractice cases are tried under the civil tort of negligence and are often triggered by adverse outcomes. These proceedings are aimed primarily at determining whether the conduct of a health care provider was reasonable. Such legal actions have mostly been subject to state jurisdiction. Increasingly, a number of factors are converging that are threatening the continued practice of medicine in some states and hence patients' access to care. These include higher amounts of monetary damages awarded to successful plaintiffs, consequent rising malpractice premiums, and the threatened economic insolvency of medical liability insurance carriers as a result of the broader economic downturn. The result is a serious public health dilemma. The national scope of the problem has been considered a crisis, which has prompted unprecedented federal legislative proposals directed toward providing new and preemptive parameters for capitated noneconomic damages, restrictions on certain civil procedures affecting lawsuit outcomes, and methods for attorney compensation, which some states have either not previously addressed or found unconstitutional. A survey of different states' problems and common issues should assist the reader in understanding the nature of the crisis and proposed solutions.

  4. Enlisting User Community Perspectives to Inform Development of a Semantic Web Application for Discovery of Cross-Institutional Research Information and Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, E. M.; Mayernik, M. S.; Boler, F. M.; Corson-Rikert, J.; Daniels, M. D.; Gross, M. B.; Khan, H.; Maull, K. E.; Rowan, L. R.; Stott, D.; Williams, S.; Krafft, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Researchers seek information and data through a variety of avenues: published literature, search engines, repositories, colleagues, etc. In order to build a web application that leverages linked open data to enable multiple paths for information discovery, the EarthCollab project has surveyed two geoscience user communities to consider how researchers find and share scholarly output. EarthCollab, a cross-institutional, EarthCube funded project partnering UCAR, Cornell University, and UNAVCO, is employing the open-source semantic web software, VIVO, as the underlying technology to connect the people and resources of virtual research communities. This study will present an analysis of survey responses from members of the two case study communities: (1) the Bering Sea Project, an interdisciplinary field program whose data archive is hosted by NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL), and (2) UNAVCO, a geodetic facility and consortium that supports diverse research projects informed by geodesy. The survey results illustrate the types of research products that respondents indicate should be discoverable within a digital platform and the current methods used to find publications, data, personnel, tools, and instrumentation. The responses showed that scientists rely heavily on general purpose search engines, such as Google, to find information, but that data center websites and the published literature were also critical sources for finding collaborators, data, and research tools.The survey participants also identify additional features of interest for an information platform such as search engine indexing, connection to institutional web pages, generation of bibliographies and CVs, and outward linking to social media. Through the survey, the user communities prioritized the type of information that is most important to display and describe their work within a research profile. The analysis of this survey will inform our further development of a platform that will

  5. [Reforms and demographic crisis].

    PubMed

    Velichkovskiĭ, B T

    2002-01-01

    During reformation years all basic medical and demographic indices have undergone negative changes in Russia. Since 1992 there has been a steady-state decrease in the population due to the fact that mortality rates are extremely greater than birth ones. In 2001, the Russian population reduced in number by nearly a million. The birth rates are twice less than that requires for a simple reproduction of generations. Extremely high death rates remain among the population, in able-bodied males. The main reasons for the demographic crisis are the negative consequences of the implemented reforms rather than the transition from traditional to the new present-day reproduction of the population. It is problematic now to correct the situation via active migration of Russian-speaking persons. This requires enormous funds to provide comers with jobs and dwelling. It is unreal to diminish annual departure of 100 thousand persons, mainly young educated professionals from the country, though it is joust not only a demographic, but a strategic problem. In 2001 there was a some rise in birth rates. But this is the most illusive way of solving the demographic crisis. Just in the USSR, the high educational level of the population, the socioeconomic emancipation of females and progress in medicine gave rise to the transition to the present-day reproduction of the population, which is characterized by low birth and death rates. So the population is unlikely to be replenished by high birth rates. The main way of overcoming the demographic crisis is to reduce mortality and not to allow young people to die prematurely. For this it is necessary to know the biological mechanisms responsible for extremely high mortality. It is most likely to be due to breakdown in the dynamic stereotype of higher nervous performance, as stated by I. P. Pavlov. Today it is insufficient to control alcoholism, traumatism, and smoking by healthy lifestyle propaganda in order to reduce death rates in Russian. All

  6. Worldwide spreading of economic crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garas, Antonios; Argyrakis, Panos; Rozenblat, Céline; Tomassini, Marco; Havlin, Shlomo

    2010-11-01

    We model the spreading of a crisis by constructing a global economic network and applying the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) epidemic model with a variable probability of infection. The probability of infection depends on the strength of economic relations between a given pair of countries and the strength of the target country. It is expected that a crisis that originates in a large country, such as the USA, has the potential to spread globally, such as the recent crisis. Surprisingly, we also show that countries with a much lower GDP, such as Belgium, are able to initiate a global crisis. Using the k-shell decomposition method to quantify the spreading power (of a node), we obtain a measure of 'centrality' as a spreader of each country in the economic network. We thus rank the different countries according to the shell they belong to, and find the 12 most central ones. These countries are the most likely to spread a crisis globally. Of these 12, only six are large economies, while the other six are medium/small ones, a result that could not have been otherwise anticipated. Furthermore, we use our model to predict the crisis spreading potential of countries belonging to different shells according to the crisis magnitude.

  7. School Crisis Management: A Model of Dynamic Responsiveness to Crisis Life Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Yi-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to analyze a school's crisis management and explore emerging aspects of its response to a school crisis. Traditional linear modes of analysis often fail to address complex crisis situations. The present study applied a dynamic crisis life cycle model that draws on chaos and complexity theory to a crisis management case,…

  8. School Crisis Management: A Model of Dynamic Responsiveness to Crisis Life Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Yi-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to analyze a school's crisis management and explore emerging aspects of its response to a school crisis. Traditional linear modes of analysis often fail to address complex crisis situations. The present study applied a dynamic crisis life cycle model that draws on chaos and complexity theory to a crisis management case,…

  9. Initial performance evaluation of a high resolution Albira small animal positron emission tomography scanner with monolithic crystals and depth-of-interaction encoding from a user's perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzyk, Marcin; Kontaxakis, George; Delgado, Mercedes; Garcia-Garcia, Luis; Correcher, Carlos; Gonzalez, Antonio J.; Gonzalez, Aurora; Rubio, Jose L.; Benlloch, Jose M.; Pozo, Miguel A.

    2009-10-01

    The user evaluation of the Albira small animal positron emission tomography scanner is presented. The system has a \\varnothing80 mm × 40 mm field of view. In the center of the field of view, it has 2.49% sensitivity, with 33% solid angle coverage, and 0.88% sensitivity for a mouse phantom. The maximum of noise equivalent counts is 14.6 kcps at 6.0 MBq for a mouse phantom. The scanner employs an innovative crystal design of eight 40(50) × 40(50) × 9.8 mm3 LYSO tapered monolithic crystals forming detector modules read by position-sensitive photomultipliers. This design allows for easy depth-of-interaction readout. The system saturates at 6.7 MBq for the mouse phantom. As an example of the application of the Albira system, some preliminary results from a study of ischemic stroke on animal models with 18-FDG co-registered with MRI images are shown.

  10. LINK User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-21

    This section describes the scope of this manual and includes an overview of the Logistics Information Network (LINK), a document overview and the conventions used in this manual. The Logistics Information Network System, or LINK as it is known, provides the capability to access multiple computer systems for information on material in place and material in transportation in a timely manner. LINK provides a solution that satisfies the mission requirement to fulfill insufficiencies in times of war, crisis or peacetime. LINK operates in times of both war and peace to obtain logistics information from existing computer systems and to present this information to decision makers in an understandable format. LM provides a set of customized Gateway applications. Gateway (sometimes referred to as the Intelligent Gateway) provides the necessary capabilities for automated access and data retrieval from remote computer systems. The LINK applications make it easy for users to access remote computers and to retrieve information from databases and other applications running on remote computer systems.

  11. [After the crisis is before the crisis: Coping-strategies for public health emergency situations on different levels--experiences of the German E. coli outbreak 2011].

    PubMed

    Auschra, Carolin; Kielstein, Jan T; Tecklenburg, Andreas; Müller-Seitz, Gordon

    2014-12-15

    The German E. coli crisis in 2011 posed multifaceted challenges to the actors of the German health care system. This paper analyzes the outbreak from a multidisciplinary perspective. It offers best practices and general recommendations for future public health emergencies for hospitals as well as at the federal and local level, addressing medical practitioners as well as health care managers.

  12. Unrelieved pain: a crisis.

    PubMed

    Sessle, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Despite many recent advances in the past 40 years in the understanding of pain mechanisms, and in pain diagnosis and management, considerable gaps in knowledge remain, with chronic pain present in epidemic proportions in most countries. It is often unrelieved and is associated with significant socioeconomic burdens. Several opportunities and approaches to address this crisis are identified in the present article. Most crucial is the need to increase pain awareness, enhance pain education, improve access to pain care and increase pain research resources. Given the variability among countries in health care policies and programs, resources and educational programs, many of the approaches and strategies outlined will need to be tailored to each country's socioeconomic and educational situation.

  13. A qualitative systematic review of service user and service provider perspectives on the acceptability, relative benefits, and potential harms of art therapy for people with non-psychotic mental health disorders.

    PubMed

    Scope, Alison; Uttley, Lesley; Sutton, Anthea

    2017-03-01

    This systematic review aimed to synthesize qualitative evidence relating to user and service provider perspective on the acceptability and relative benefits and potential harms of art therapy for people with non-psychotic mental disorders. A comprehensive literature search was conducted in 13 major bibliographic databases from May to July 2013. A qualitative evidence synthesis was conducted using thematic framework synthesis. The searches identified 10,270 citations from which 12 studies were included. Ten studies included data from 183 service users, and two studies included data from 16 service providers. The evidence demonstrated that art therapy was an acceptable treatment. The benefits associated with art therapy included the following: the development of relationships with the therapist and other group members; understanding the self/own illness/the future; gaining perspective; distraction; personal achievement; expression; relaxation; and empowerment. Small numbers of patients reported varying reasons for not wanting to take part, and some highlighted potentially negative effects of art therapy which included the evoking of feelings which could not be resolved. The findings suggest that for the majority of respondents art therapy was an acceptable intervention, although this was not the case for all respondents. Therefore, attention should be focussed on both identifying those who are most likely to benefit from art therapy and ensuring any potential harms are minimized. The findings provide evidence to commissioners and providers of mental health services about the value of future art therapy services. Art therapy was reported to be an acceptable treatment for the majority of respondents. Art therapy may not be a preferred treatment option for a small number of patients, emphasizing the importance of considering patient preference in choice of treatment, and selection of the most suitable patients for art therapy. Consideration should be made of adjustments

  14. The Role of Social Media in Crisis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Past Crisis • The Role of ICT in Crisis • The iSAR + Way: an Approach for Social Media in Crisis – The THEO Methodological Approach – iSAR ...The Role of Social Media in Crisis Agenda • Contributors List • Definitions • Lessons From Past Crisis • The Role of ICT in Crisis • The iSAR + Way...an Approach for Social Media in Crisis – The THEO Methodological Approach – iSAR + Platform and Services • Conclusions Best Paper Award Paper

  15. The Impending Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Raymond L.; Burgess, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    When you are ill and consult a physician for his or her expertise, many times laboratory testing is part of the clinical workup. This testing is critical to the physician’s ability to diagnose the patient’s condition. What if testing was not available … because there was no one to do the testing? Although seemingly far-fetched, this scenario could play itself out in the next ten years due to an impending manpower crisis in laboratory medicine. The profession of Medical Technology, also known as Clinical Laboratory Science, is experiencing a shortage of qualified individuals for a variety of reasons – not the least of which is the closure of almost 70% of the schools teaching this critical profession. Health care workers (HCW) rely on accurate and timely clinical laboratory results in order to make decisions for their patients. Because ∼ 70% of patient care decisions are based on clinical laboratory results, it is important to have a well-trained supply of laboratory professionals. This article will give an overview of the situation and the possible causes of this shortage, and pose challenges to our profession as to how this crisis can be averted. Visibility of this profession must be a prime focus of this effort in order for the population in general to be aware of the role Clinical Laboratory Scientists play in the health care consortium. This effort should begin early in the educational process, potentially as early as Middle School (junior high school), bringing awareness of the profession not only to students but to educators as well. PMID:23653714

  16. Unresolved crisis in medical education.

    PubMed

    Monif, G R; Severin, M J

    1994-01-01

    A crisis exists in medical education. Changes in methodology have diverted attention from synthesis to mass accumulation of factual data. The response to this crisis has been largely focused on a shell game involving new pathways and curriculum changes without addressing the critical issue of what constitutes education. The ultimate problem in medical education is a crisis of leadership. Until education is given a priority status and the obligations to teach on the part of medical educators and to learn on the part of students are translated into a creative policy by those who can lead, the wheels of learning will continue to spin without significant progress.

  17. Water shortages: the next energy crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, B.

    1983-04-01

    Water shortages in the late 1980s could rival the energy crisis of the 70s because of world demand for irrigation to feed a growing population. The environmental and energy costs of new systems for water transfer and irrigation will be enormous for each of the major food-producing countries. Competition between urban and agricultural water users and preservationists will be intense. As with the discovery that wasted energy can be a potential resource, society must recycle wasted water to reverse the trend of drawing down ground-water reserves. Current estimates are that the Herculean water projects of the US, Soviet Union, China, and India barely achieve a 50% efficiency. A shift in philosophy from supply to demand management will be helped by higher prices and new irrigation techniques. (DCK)

  18. A User and Their Family's Perspective of The Use of a Low-Tech Vs A High-Tech AAC System.

    PubMed

    Borg, S; Agius, M; Agius, L

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative case study describes a 9-year-old child, diagnosed with homonymous hemianopia, left side weakness and seizures that has been followed by Access to Communication and Technology Unit in Malta for 5 years. The child previously used a communication book and now uses an iPad as a speech generating device. A semi-structured interview was utilised with the parent to explore preference for each AAC system and the reasons for it. The impact of each AAC system on the family and on the child's communication skills, and perceived barriers in the implementation of the AACs were also explored. The child's own experience using the AAC systems was also investigated using a structured interview format. Talking Mats was used to support the child's understanding of the questions and to explore her perspectives on the two AAC systems using Yes-No responses. The parent interview was analysed thematically and represented visually using a thematic network. This was compared with child responses. Four organising themes emerged including barriers, benefits, facilitators, and expectations. Specific barriers included self-funding in order to provide the child with the best fit high-tech AAC. Perceived benefits for both AAC systems were that it increased her communicative intent. The child's mother perceived access to increased vocabulary and capacity for sentence building, operational autonomy as well as voice output as a benefit of the SGD. The child's results indicated a preference for the high-tech AAC because she found it easier to navigate than the low-tech AAC.

  19. Reframing for Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepko, Robert; Douglas, Brian

    1998-01-01

    The "balanced scorecard" approach for making holistic decisions about organizational change offers a framework for analyzing four critical organizational perspectives (financial, customer, internal business, learning/innovation), using specific indicators of success that focus on the organization's vision or mission. It can be used…

  20. Crisis Intervention in an Earthquake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaufarb, Herbert; Levine, Jules

    1972-01-01

    This article describes the crisis intervention techniques used by the San Fernanco Valley Child Guidance Clinic to help families deal with the traumatic events experienced in the 1971 earthquake in California. (Author)

  1. Technology Education Tackles Energy Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutshall, Sandy

    2002-01-01

    Describes the solar-hydrogen technologies at the East Valley Institute of Technology, the only technology center in the nations that offers this class. Describes its focus on solving the energy crisis. (JOW)

  2. Technology Education Tackles Energy Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutshall, Sandy

    2002-01-01

    Describes the solar-hydrogen technologies at the East Valley Institute of Technology, the only technology center in the nations that offers this class. Describes its focus on solving the energy crisis. (JOW)

  3. [The user, a stakeholder in the functioning of the hospital].

    PubMed

    Brun, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    The French commission for relations with users and the quality of patient management (CruqPC) is a body which favours, in hospitals, the joint perspective of medical staff, nurses, administrative representatives and users regarding issues relating to the reception of users and the quality and safety of care. Its functioning is however disparate. Its place and its missions need to evolve.

  4. Pulmonary Edema in Myasthenic Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Uttara Swati; Arulneyam, Jayanthi

    2013-01-01

    We report a previously asymptomatic 50-year-old lady who came with myasthenic crisis as initial presentation of myasthenia gravis. She developed pulmonary edema following intravenous immunoglobulin administration and had ischemic changes in ECG and left ventricular dysfunction on echocardiography. She improved with diuretics, dobutamine, and fluid restriction alone. This is the first report in English-language medical literature describing the association between myasthenic crisis and likely takotsubo cardiomyopathy-related pulmonary edema following intravenous immunoglobulin administration. PMID:24829832

  5. [From crisis to adjustment disorder: a medicalization of a concept?].

    PubMed

    Gil, Tsvi

    2013-01-01

    This review aimed to compare two concepts in the psychiatric literature: crisis and adjustment disorder. The two concepts stem from different theoretical perspectives, rely upon different (though relatively loose) bodies of data, and may serve different purposes. The concept of crisis originated from an approach that could be considered psychodynamic, humanistic, and community oriented. Treatment, according to this approach, is known as crisis intervention and is characterized as being principally psychological, social, humanistic, and systemic. The generic approach to crisis calls for immediate aid rather than for a diagnosis and regular appointments, as is customary in psychiatric practice. The concept of adjustment disorder, on the other hand, is a rather medical nosological approach, which strives to achieve a phenomenological and objective description of the patient, and which may lead to ordinary psychiatric treatment, such as pharmacotherapy. Herein we present a review of literature on both approaches, with an emphasis on theoretical and empirical data. The findings appear to provide rather weak empirical support for both concepts. Some theoretical resolutions are proposed in an attempt to link the two concepts, such as a continuum of severity. We conclude that practitioners should decide for themselves, according to one's own theoretical framework and purpose of usage. Nonetheless, as formal psychiatric diagnosis demands more extensive scientific support and bears further implications (such as stigma), the current use of the diagnosis of adjustment disorder may seems less justified.

  6. Leadership in a (permanent) crisis.

    PubMed

    Heifetz, Ronald; Grashow, Alexander; Linsky, Marty

    2009-01-01

    The current economic crisis is not just another rough spell. Today's mix of urgency, high stakes, and uncertainty will continue even after the recession ends. The immediate crisis--which we will get through with policy makers' expert technical adjustments--sets the stage for a sustained, or even permanent, crisis, a relentless series of challenges no one has encountered before. Instead of hunkering down and relying on their familiar expertise to deal with the sustained crisis, people in positions of authority--whether they are CEOs or managers heading up a company initiative--must practice what the authors call adaptive leadership. They must, of course, tackle the underlying causes of the crisis, but they must also simultaneously make the changes that will allow their organizations to thrive in turbulent environments. Adaptive leadership is an improvisational and experimental art, requiring some new practices. Like Julie Gilbert, who overcame internal resistance to reorient Best Buy toward female purchasers, adaptive leaders get things done to meet today's challenges and then modify those things to thrive in tomorrow's world. They also embrace disequilibrium, using turbulence as an opportunity to build crucial new capacities, as Paul Levy did to rescue Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center from a profound financial crisis. Finally, adaptive leaders, such as Egon Zehnder, the founder of an executive search firm, draw out the leadership skills that reside deep in the organization, recognizing the interdependence of all employees and mobilizing everyone to generate solutions.

  7. Robotics for waste storage inspection: A user`s perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, F.B.

    1994-06-23

    Self-navigating robotic vehicles are now commercially available, and the technology supporting other important system components has also matured. Higher reliability and the obtainability of system support now make it practical to consider robotics as a way of addressing the growing operational requirement for the periodic inspection and maintenance of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste inventories. This paper describes preparations for the first field deployment of an autonomous container inspection robot at a Department of Energy (DOE) site. The Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI) is presently being completed by engineers at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It is a modified version of a commercially available robot. It has been outfitted with sensor suites and cognition that allow it to perform inspections of drum inventories and their storage facilities.

  8. Robotics for waste storage inspection: A user`s perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, F.B.

    1994-12-31

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), located near Cincinati, Ohio, produced uranium metal for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for over 30 yr. In 1989, Fernald`s mission changed to site remediation and waste management. Thousands of drums of mixed and low-level radioactive waste are now stored on-site. Weekly inspections of stored hazardous- and mixed-waste containers are required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Similar inspections are conducted for drums holding non-hazardous, radioactive material. The FEMP is interested in utilizing mobile robots to perform these inspections. Besides increasing worker and environmental safety, robots could assist with documentation and inventory management while inspecting drums with superior diligence and consistency.

  9. The global snakebite crisis--a public health issue misunderstood, not neglected.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Ian D; Norris, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    The global problem of venomous snakebite continues to attract attention despite it being described as a "neglected" issue. The current focus of the World Health Organization (WHO) remains anti-snake venom quality, although "availability and sustainability" of supply are consistently described as the key issues. Sustainability of antivenom supply has been elusive, with cost and pricing in developing countries being cited as the major reasons. The current WHO approach fails to explore the cost issue, but rather focuses on quality improvements, which may well adversely affect the costs of a product already perceived to be 'unaffordable.' The reference to cost and price indicates a marketing-based perspective may well give more relevant solutions to the snakebite crisis. This paper introduces a marketing model to examine global snakebite and to identify if the current approach is relevant and effective. The "4 Ps" model examines if the correct products are available, whether sufficient information exists concerning estimated market size, whether the assumptions frequently made about the costs of the product are correct and fully understood, if the product is promoted properly, and whether the method by which the product reaches the end user is optimum. The resulting analysis demonstrates that the current approach is characterized by a misunderstanding of the nature of the global snakebite problem. Further, a lack of implementation of key solutions, such as training doctors in developing countries with relevant protocols, has inevitably led to a lack of improvement in the snakebite arena over the last 30 years.

  10. Neighborhood Reputation and Resident Sentiment in the Wake of the Las Vegas Foreclosure Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Jeremy; Batson, Christie D.; Monnat, Shannon M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how two major components of a neighborhood’s reputation—perceived disorder and collective efficacy—shape individuals’ sentiments toward their neighborhoods during the foreclosure crisis triggered by the Great Recession. Of central interest are whether neighborhood reputations are durable in the face of a crisis (neighborhood resiliency hypothesis) or whether neighborhood reputations wane during times of duress (foreclosure crisis hypothesis). Geo-coded individual-level data from the Las Vegas Metropolitan Area Social Survey merged with data on census tract foreclosure rates are used to address this question. The results provide qualified support for both perspectives. In support of the neighborhood resiliency hypothesis, collective efficacy is positively associated with how residents feel about the quality of their neighborhoods, and this relationship is unaltered by foreclosure rates. In support of the foreclosure crisis hypothesis, foreclosure rates mediate the effects of neighborhood disorder on resident sentiment. The implications of these findings for community resiliency are discussed. PMID:25678735

  11. [From violence to bonding: constructing new meanings for attention to the crisis].

    PubMed

    Willrich, Janaína Quinzen; Kantorski, Luciane Prado; Antonacci, Milena Hohmann; Cortes, Jandro Moraes; Chiavagatti, Fabieli Gopinger

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to know the meanings present in the discursive practices of the Centers for Psychosocial Care's professionals, produced by new ways to cope and relate to the subject in severe psychological crisis. This is a qualitative research, based on the theoretical perspective of social constructionism. It was analyzed 27 interviews of professionals from the identification of interpretative repertoires and construction of Association of Ideas Maps. Data were organized into themes: Difficulties of contention in service; Senses built around this practice; Professionals placements regarding that practice; Participation of the Military Police in the care of the crisis; Sense of responsibility of the nursing staff in caring for the crisis. It was demonstrated the need for discussion and construction of crisis care practices that are more collective and contract based on solid relationships that respect the uniqueness and subjectivity of the subject.

  12. Neighborhood Reputation and Resident Sentiment in the Wake of the Las Vegas Foreclosure Crisis.

    PubMed

    Pais, Jeremy; Batson, Christie D; Monnat, Shannon M

    2014-09-01

    This study examines how two major components of a neighborhood's reputation-perceived disorder and collective efficacy-shape individuals' sentiments toward their neighborhoods during the foreclosure crisis triggered by the Great Recession. Of central interest are whether neighborhood reputations are durable in the face of a crisis (neighborhood resiliency hypothesis) or whether neighborhood reputations wane during times of duress (foreclosure crisis hypothesis). Geo-coded individual-level data from the Las Vegas Metropolitan Area Social Survey merged with data on census tract foreclosure rates are used to address this question. The results provide qualified support for both perspectives. In support of the neighborhood resiliency hypothesis, collective efficacy is positively associated with how residents feel about the quality of their neighborhoods, and this relationship is unaltered by foreclosure rates. In support of the foreclosure crisis hypothesis, foreclosure rates mediate the effects of neighborhood disorder on resident sentiment. The implications of these findings for community resiliency are discussed.

  13. Thyroid crisis in the maxillofacial trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Robert J; Lewis, Tashorn; Miller, Jared; Clarkson, Earl I

    2014-11-01

    Thyroid crisis, also known as thyroid storm, is a rare complication of thyrotoxicosis that results in a hypermetabolic and hyperadrenergic state. This condition requires prompt recognition and treatment because the mortality from thyroid crisis approaches 30%. Thyrotoxicosis alone will usually not progress to thyroid crisis. Thyroid crisis will typically be precipitated by some concomitant event such as infection, iodine-containing contrast agents, medications such as amiodarone, pregnancy, or surgery. Trauma is a rare precipitator of thyroid crisis. Several published studies have reported thyroid crisis resulting from blunt or penetrating neck trauma. Significant systemic trauma, such as motor vehicle accidents, has also been reported to precipitate thyroid crisis. It is very unusual for minor trauma to precipitate thyroid crisis. In the present study, we report the case of a patient who had incurred relatively minor maxillofacial trauma and developed thyroid crisis 2 weeks after the initial trauma.

  14. Interactive pediatric emergency checklists to the palm of your hand - How the Pedi Crisis App traveled around the world.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Jorge A; Lockman, Justin L; Schleelein, Laura E; Simpao, Allan F; Ahumada, Luis M; Wolf, Bryan A; Shah, Maully J; Heitmiller, Eugenie; Rehman, Mohamed

    2017-08-01

    Cognitive aids help clinicians manage critical events and have been shown to improve outcomes by providing critical information at the point of care. Critical event guidelines, such as the Society of Pediatric Anesthesia's Critical Events Checklists described in this article, can be distributed globally via interactive smartphone apps. From October 1, 2013 to January 1, 2014, we performed an observational study to determine the global distribution and utilization patterns of the Pedi Crisis cognitive aid app that the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia developed. We analyzed distribution and utilization metrics of individuals using Pedi Crisis on iOS (Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA) devices worldwide. We used Google Analytics software (Google Inc., Mountain View, CA) to monitor users' app activity (eg, screen views, user sessions). The primary outcome measurement was the number of user-sessions and geographic locations of Pedi Crisis user sessions. Each user was defined by the use of a unique Apple ID on an iOS device. Google Analytics correlates session activity with geographic location based on local Internet service provider logs. Pedi Crisis had 1 252 active users (both new and returning) and 4 140 sessions across 108 countries during the 3-month study period. Returning users used the app longer and viewed significantly more screens that new users (mean screen views: new users 1.3 [standard deviation +/-1.09, 95% confidence interval 1.22-1.55]; returning users 7.6 [standard deviation +/-4.19, 95% confidence interval 6.73-8.39]P<.01) CONCLUSIONS: Pedi Crisis was used worldwide within days of its release and sustained utilization beyond initial publication. The proliferation of handheld electronic devices provides a unique opportunity for professional societies to improve the worldwide dissemination of guidelines and evidence-based cognitive aids. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Coral reefs in crisis.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, D

    1997-01-01

    This article reports on the crisis facing reefs throughout the world and the struggle to save them. Coral reefs, one of the biological wonders of the world, are among the largest and oldest living communities of plants and animals on earth, having been evolved between 200 and 450 million years ago. Located mostly in the Pacific region, most established coral reefs are now dead and only the upper layer is covered by a thin changeable skin of living coral. Reefs, over the years, have been the main source of animal protein for over 1 billion people in Asia. Countries near the coastlines, which relied on the seas, have resorted to dynamite fishing, poisoning and other illegal and dangerous techniques. Overpopulation and pollution has caused the deteriorating conditions of the 600,000 sq. km of coral reefs worldwide. Despite these conditions, the government has ignored this problem as they struggle to develop their economies at the expense of common resources. In addition, this article narrates the efforts that are exerted by governments in promoting coral reef protection and management of these coastal resources, setting the Apo Island in the Philippines as an example of good management and sustainability.

  16. Coasts in Crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Hinrichsen, D.

    1996-11-01

    Coastal areas are staggering under an onslaught of human activity. We are presently in the process of destroying 70 percent of the world`s 600,000 square kilometers of coral reefs, an ecosystem containing some 200,000 different species and rivaling tropical rain forests in biodiversity. A combination of pollution, habitat destruction, and gross overfishing has led to the collapse of major fisheries and paved the way for malnutrition and disease in regions where people fish for subsistence. Globally, little is being done to manage the crisis of our coasts. Management strategies, if they exist at all, often deal with economic development along a wafer-thin strip of coastal land. Resource degradation is ignored, and watershed management is mostly rhetoric. Although some 55 countries have drawn up coastal management plans, only a handful have been properly implemented. Coasts must be managed in an integrated manner that takes into account the full range of human activities. Initiating this process is costly, time-consuming, and difficult. Yet we have more than three decades of accumulated experience to draw on.

  17. The freshwater biodiversity crisis.

    PubMed

    Brautigam, A

    1999-01-01

    This article concerns the threat on freshwater ecosystems, which harbor a disproportionate amount of the world's biodiversity. In many parts of the world, freshwater ecosystems are already degraded from a range of human activities, including water extraction, pollution and physical alteration. The data that showed a biodiversity crisis in ecosystems included species loss and breakdown of the ecological processes and resources. Furthermore, several case studies were cited to illustrate the status of freshwater diversity. Numerous reasons for freshwater biodiversity loss were mentioned, which included pollution from pesticides and agricultural and mine run-off, and physical alteration through channelization and impoundments that affected the hydrology and benthic habitat. Despite the successful establishment of institutions to conserve water birds and wetland habitats, there was a lower priority for conservation of freshwater biodiversity in terms of species and habitats. This bias has had important and serious implications for allocation of resources to increase the knowledge and understanding of freshwater ecosystems, as well as for the adequacy of impact assessments for development projects affecting them.

  18. Justine user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.

    1995-10-01

    Justine is the graphical user interface to the Los Alamos Radiation Modeling Interactive Environment (LARAMIE). It provides LARAMIE customers with a powerful, robust, easy-to-use, WYSIWYG interface that facilitates geometry construction and problem specification. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with LARAMIE, and the transport codes available, i.e., MCNPTM and DANTSYSTM. No attempt is made in this manual to describe these codes in detail. Information about LARAMIE, DANTSYS, and MCNP are available elsewhere. It i also assumed that the reader is familiar with the Unix operating system and with Motif widgets and their look and feel. However, a brief description of Motif and how one interacts with it can be found in Appendix A.

  19. Illness careers and continuity of care in mental health services: a qualitative study of service users and carers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ian Rees; Ahmed, Nilufar; Catty, Jocelyn; McLaren, Susan; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til; Burns, Tom

    2009-08-01

    Continuity of care is considered by patients and clinicians as an essential feature of good quality care in long-term disorders, yet there is general agreement that it is a complex concept and the lack of clarity in its conceptualisation and operationalisation has been linked to a deficit of user involvement. In this paper we utilise the concept of the 'patient career' to frame patient accounts of their experiences of the mental health care system. We aimed to capture the experiences and views of users and carers focusing on the meanings associated with particular (dis)continuities and transitional episodes that occurred over their illness career. As part of a large longitudinal study of continuity of care in mental health a sub-sample of 31 users was selected together with 14 of their carers. Qualitative interviews framed around the service user's illness career explored general experiences of relationship with services, care, continuity and transition from both user and carer perspectives. Five key themes emerged: relational (dis)continuity; depersonalised transitions; invisibility and crisis; communicative gaps and social vulnerability. One of the important findings was the fragility of continuity and its relationship to levels of satisfaction. Supportive, long-term relationships could be quickly undermined by a range of factors and satisfaction levels were often closely related to moments of transition where these relationships were vulnerable. Examples of continuity and well managed transitions highlighted the importance of professionals personalising transitions and situating them in the context of the daily life of service users. Further research is required to identify how best to negotiate these key points of transition in the future.

  20. The Crisis in Oregon School Finance: Implications for Future Funding of Elementary and Secondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crampton, Faith E.

    Is there a crisis in Oregon school finance? Before policymakers can formulate answers, assessment and definition of the problem are necessary. This paper examines the current state of Oregon school finance, including reform efforts over the last 20 years from policy and grass roots level perspectives. It then assesses the current school funding…