Science.gov

Sample records for critical loading configurations

  1. A Set of Critical Loading Configurations of the IPEN/MB-01 Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Adimir dos; Fanaro, Leda C.C.B.; Siqueira, Pauloj D.; Jerez, Rogerio; Fuga, Rinaldo

    2005-05-24

    A new set of critical loading configurations has been performed at the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility. The configurations were submitted to ICSBEP and have been approved for publication in the coming September edition, 2004. The final keff uncertainty is judged to be 100 pcm for all configurations and suitable for a benchmark experiment. The keff results using the currently released nuclear data libraries ENDF/B-VI.8 and JEF3.0 are in very good agreement with the experimental values. JENDL3.3 overestimates keff by around 200 pcm.

  2. CRITICAL LOADS METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    I summarize the results of an interagency project that 1) defines a generic approach to quantifying and reporting critical loads, and 2) exercises that generic approach by examining a data rich system -- the critical loads of sulfur deposition and it's effect on the chronic acidi...

  3. Compensator configurations for load currents' symmetrization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusinaru, D.; Manescu, L. G.; Dinu, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    This paper approaches aspects regarding the mitigation effects of asymmetries in 3-phase 3-wire networks. The measure consisting in connecting of load current symmetrization devices at the load coupling point is presented. A time-variation of compensators parameters is determined as a function of the time-recorded electrical values. The general sizing principle of the load current symmetrization reactive components is based on a simple equivalent model of the unbalanced 3-phase loads. By using these compensators a certain control of the power components transits is ensured in the network. The control is based on the variations laws of the compensators parameters as functions of the recorded electrical values: [B] = [T]·[M]. The link between compensator parameters and measured values is ensured by a transformation matrix [T] for each operation conditions of the supply network. Additional conditions for improving of energy and efficiency performance of the compensator are considered: i.e. reactive power compensation. The compensator sizing algorithm was implemented into a MATLAB environment software, which generate the time-evolution of the parameters of load current symmetrization device. The input data of application takes into account time-recording of the electrical values. By using the compensator sizing software, some results were achieved for the case of a consumer connected at 20 kV busbar of a distribution substation, during 24 hours measurement session. Even the sizing of the compensators aimed some additional network operation aspects (power factor correction) correlated with the total or major load symmetrizations, the harmonics aspects of the network values were neglected.

  4. Unsteady loads due to propulsive lift configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, J. B.; Haviland, J. K.; Catalano, G. D.; Herling, W. W.

    1975-01-01

    The flow of a jet over an airfoil representative of upper surface blowing was studied using laser techniques. Experimental techniques were developed for the investigation of unsteady pressures behind a cold model jet. Construction of a 1/4 scale model of the 'Beach' test configuration was completed along with construction of a portable detector. The portable detector is used in conjunction with a laser to measure jet flows during tests on the 'Beach' facility. The detector incorporates both optical and electronic components.

  5. Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Richard F

    2015-03-24

    Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

  6. Acoustic-loads research for powered-lift configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenster, J. A.; Willis, C. M.; Schroeder, J. C.; Mixson, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    Data presented from large-scale model tests with jet engines having thrusts of 9 kN (2000 lb) and 36 kN (8000 lb) include acoustic loads for an externally blown wing and flap induced by a TF34 jet engine, an upper surface blown (USB) aircraft model in a wind tunnel, and two USB models in static tests. Comparisons of these results with results from acoustic loads studies on configurations of other sizes are made and the implications of these results on interior noise and acoustic fatigue are discussed.

  7. Transportability Tests of Various Combat Configured Loads (CCLs) on the Palletized Loading System (PLS) Truck/Trailer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    AD-A259 615 FINAL REPORT JANUARY 1992 REPORT NO. 91-02 TRANSPORTABILITY TESTS OF VARIOUS COMBAT CONFIGURED LOADS (CCLs) ON THE PALLETIZED LOADING...Transportability Test of Various Combat Configured Loads (CCLs) on the Palletized Loading System (PLS) Tuck/Trailer 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) A. C...Transportation Engineering Division (SMCAC-DET), to test various Combat Configured Loads (CCLs) on the Palletized Loading System (PLS) truck/trailer. The test

  8. Nitrogen critical loads using biodiversity-related critical limits.

    PubMed

    Posch, Maximilian; Aherne, Julian; Hettelingh, Jean-Paul

    2011-10-01

    Critical loads are widely used in the effects-based assessment of emission reduction policies. While the impacts of acidification have diminished, there is increasing concern regarding the effects of nitrogen deposition on terrestrial ecosystems. In this context much attention has been focussed on empirical critical loads as well as simulations with linked geochemistry-vegetation models. Surprisingly little attention has been paid to adapt the widely used simple mass balance approach. This approach has the well-established benefit of easy regional applicability, while incorporating specified critical chemical criteria to protect specified receptors. As plant occurrence/biodiversity is related to both the nutrient and acidity status of an ecosystem, a single abiotic factor (chemical criterion) is not sufficient. Rather than an upper limit for deposition (i.e., critical load), linked nutrient nitrogen and acidity chemical criteria for plant occurrence result in an 'optimal' nitrogen and sulphur deposition envelope. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Critical Configurations of Hard Disks on the Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.

    2013-04-16

    CCHDT constructs and classifies various arrangements of hard disks of a single radius places on the unit square with periodic boundary conditions. Specifially, a given configuration is evolved to the nearest critical point on a smoothed hard disk energy fuction, and is classified by the adjacency matrix of the canonically labelled contact graph.

  10. Configuration and Sizing of a Test Fixture for Panels Under Combined Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2006-01-01

    Future air and space structures are expected to utilize composite panels that are subjected to combined mechanical loads, such as bi-axial compression/tension, shear and pressure. Therefore, the ability to accurately predict the buckling and strength failures of such panels is important. While computational analysis can provide tremendous insight into panel response, experimental results are necessary to verify predicted performances of these panels to judge the accuracy of computational methods. However, application of combined loads is an extremely difficult task due to the complex test fixtures and set-up required. Presented herein is a comparison of several test set-ups capable of testing panels under combined loads. Configurations compared include a D-box, a segmented cylinder and a single panel set-up. The study primarily focuses on the preliminary sizing of a single panel test configuration capable of testing flat panels under combined in-plane mechanical loads. This single panel set-up appears to be best suited to the testing of both strength critical and buckling critical panels. Required actuator loads and strokes are provided for various square, flat panels.

  11. Disposal criticality analysis for immobilized Pu: External configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, P.; Goluoglu, S.; Cloke, P.L.

    1998-03-01

    The problem of potential external criticality is defined according to the following features and issues: The environment outside the waste package is most conveniently divided into 3 zones: (1) Near-field, in the drift, external to the waste package; (2) Near far-field, several meters into the host rock immediately adjacent to the drift; (3) Far far-field, everything beyond the near far-field. These zones have different mechanisms for accumulating a critical mass from the passing waste package outflow. Fissile material can be transported outside of the waste package thereby becoming separated from the neutron absorber. Descriptions of uranium mineral deposits imply that concentrations sufficient for criticality can be accumulated by natural processes, particularly if the uranium is highly enriched. Some configurations of fissile material in the external environment have been identified as having the potential for autocatalytic criticality behavior, but without examining the likelihood of the processes necessary to achieve such configurations. The following factors limit the possibility of external criticality: absence of geologic formations in Yucca Mountain which can cause sufficient concentration, and length of time required to form the typical geologic mineral deposit. The paper summarizes the approach used to analyze criticality and gives results and conclusions of the analysis.

  12. Configuration selection study for isolated loads using parabolic dish modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revere, W.; Bowyer, J.; Fujita, T.; Awaya, H.

    1981-01-01

    A configuration tradeoff study has been conducted to determine optimum solar thermal parabolic dish power systems for isolated load applications. The specific application of an essentially constant power demand as required for MX missile shelters is treated. Supplying a continuous level of power with high reliability is shown to require a power system comprising modular parabolic dish power units where the heat engines of the modular power units can be driven by fossil fuels as well as solar-derived heat. Since constraints on reliability result in the provision of a power generating capability that exceeds the constant demand level, efficient utilization of the power system requires battery storage. Tradeoffs regarding the optimum size of storage are investigated as a function of the number of power modules and the cost of the fossil fuel which is used to meet the demand when insolation is unavailable and storage is depleted.

  13. Configuration selection study for isolated loads using parabolic dish modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revere, W.; Bowyer, J.; Fujita, T.; Awaya, H.

    1982-01-01

    A configuration tradeoff study was conducted to determine optimum solar thermal parabolic dish power systems for isolated load applications. The specific application of an essentially constant power demand as required for MX missile shelters is treated. Supplying a continuous level of power with high reliability is shown to require a power system comprising modular parabolic dish power units where the heat engines of the modular power units can be driven by fossil fuels as well as solar-derived heat. Since constraints on reliability result in the provision of a power generating capability that exceeds the constant demand level, efficient utilization of the power system requires battery storage. Tradeoffs regarding the optimum size of storage are investigated as a function of the number of power modules and the cost of the fossil fuel.

  14. Silicon Nitride Creep Under Various Specimen-Loading Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Holland, Frederic A.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive creep testing of a hot-pressed silicon nitride (NC 132) was performed at 1300 C in air using five different specimen-loading configurations: (1) pure tension, (2) pure compression, (3) four-point uniaxial flexure, (4) ball-on-ring biaxial flexure, and (5) ring-on-ring biaxial flexure. This paper reports experimental results as well as test techniques developed in this work. Nominal creep strain and its rate for a given nominal applied stress were greatest in tension, least in compression, and intermediate in uniaxial and biaxial flexure. Except for the case of compression loading, nominal creep strain generally decreased with time, resulting in a less-defined steady-state condition. Of the four creep formulations-power-law, hyperbolic sine, step, and redistribution--the conventional power-law formulation still provides the most convenient and reasonable estimation of the creep parameters of the NC 132 material. The data base to be obtained will be used to validate the NASA Glenn-developed design code CARES/Creep (ceramics analysis and reliability evaluation of structures and creep).

  15. Critical configurations for a system of semidegenerate fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argüelles, Carlos R.; Ruffini, Remo; Fraga, Bernardo M. O.

    2014-09-01

    We study an isothermal system of semidegenerate self-gravitating fermions in general relativity. Such systems present mass density solutions with a central degenerate core, a plateau and a tail, this last following a power law behavior r -2. The different solutions are governed by the free parameters of the model: the degeneracy and the temperature parameters at the center and the particle mass m. We then analyze in detail the free parameter space for a fixed m in the keV region, by studying the one-parameter sequences of equilibrium configurations up to the critical point, which is represented by the maximum in a central density ( ρ 0) vs. core mass ( M c ) diagram. We show that for fully degenerate cores, the known expression for the critical core mass M {/c cr } ∝ m {/pl 3}/ m 2 is obtained, while for low degenerate cores, the critical core mass increases, showing temperature effects in a nonlinear way. The main result of this work is that when applying this theory to model the distribution of dark matter in galaxies from the very center to the outer halos, we do not find any critical corehalo configuration of self-gravitating fermions that would be able to explain the super-massive dark object in their centers and the outer halo simultaneously.

  16. Detection of Critical Camera Configurations for Structure from Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelini, M.; Mayer, H.

    2014-03-01

    This paper deals with the detection of critical, i.e., poor or degenerate camera configurations, with a poor or undefined intersection geometry between views. This is the basis for a calibrated Structure from Motion (SfM) approach employing image triplets for complex, unordered image sets, e.g., obtained by combining terrestrial images and images from small Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS). Poor intersection geometry results from a small ratio between the baseline length and the depth of the scene. If there is no baseline between views, the intersection geometry becomes undefined. Our approach can detect image pairs without or with a very weak baseline (motion degeneracy). For the detection we have developed various metrics and evaluated them by means of extensive experiments with about 1500 image pairs. The metrics are based on properties of the reconstructed 3D points, such as the roundness of the error ellipsoid. The detection of weak baselines is formulated as a classification problem using the metrics as features. Machine learning techniques are applied to improve the classification. By taking into account the critical camera configurations during the iterative composition of the image set, a complete, metric 3D reconstruction of the whole scene could be achieved also in this case. We sketch our approach for the orientation of unordered image sets and finally demonstrate that the approach is able to produce very accurate and reliable orientations.

  17. An Investigation of the Inertial Properties of Backpacks Loaded in Various Configurations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    and Richard C. Nelson, Ph.D. S. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT, TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS Biomechanics ...backpacks loads backpack system load carrying military clothing human backpack system military equipment loading configurations inertial properties 2i04...configuration, a 12.00-kg load, consisting of military clothing and equip- ment, was placed in the packs. The locations of the items were manipulated

  18. Criticality Benchmark Analysis of the HTTR Annular Startup Core Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2009-11-01

    One of the high priority benchmarking activities for corroborating the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project and Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Program is evaluation of Japan's existing High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The HTTR is a 30 MWt engineering test reactor utilizing graphite moderation, helium coolant, and prismatic TRISO fuel. A large amount of critical reactor physics data is available for validation efforts of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). Previous international reactor physics benchmarking activities provided a collation of mixed results that inaccurately predicted actual experimental performance.1 Reevaluations were performed by the Japanese to reduce the discrepancy between actual and computationally-determined critical configurations.2-3 Current efforts at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) involve development of reactor physics benchmark models in conjunction with the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) for use with verification and validation methods in the VHTR Program. Annular cores demonstrate inherent safety characteristics that are of interest in developing future HTGRs.

  19. Load support system analysis high speed input pinion configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gassel, S. S.; Pirvics, J.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis and a series of computerized calculations were carried out to explore competing prototype design concepts of a shaft and two taper-roller bearings systems to support the high-speed input pinion of an advanced commercial helicopter transmission. The results were used to evaluate designs both for a straddle arrangement where the pinion gear is located between the bearings and for a cantilever arrangement where the pinion is outboard of the two bearings. Effects of varying parameters including applied gear load, preload, wall thickness, interference fits, bearing spacing and pinion gear location on system rigidity, load distribution and bearing rating life were assessed. A comparison of the bearing load distributions for these designs demonstrated that the straddle more equally distributes both radial and axial loads. The performance of these designs over a range of shaft rotational speeds, with lubrication and friction effects included, is also discussed.

  20. Biomechanical Modeling Analysis of Loads Configuration for Squat Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.; Lewandowski, Beth E.; Jagodnik, Kathleen; De Witt, John K.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Long duration space travel will expose astronauts to extended periods of reduced gravity. Since gravity is not present to assist loading, astronauts will use resistive and aerobic exercise regimes for the duration of the space flight to minimize loss of bone density, muscle mass and aerobic capacity that occurs during exposure to a reduced gravity environment. Unlike the International Space Station (ISS), the area available for an exercise device in the next generation of spacecraft for travel to the Moon or to Mars is limited and therefore compact resistance exercise device prototypes are being developed. The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) currently on the ISS is being used as a benchmark for the functional performance of these new devices. Biomechanical data collection and computational modeling aid the device design process by quantifying the joint torques and the musculoskeletal forces that occur during exercises performed on the prototype devices. METHODS The computational models currently under development utilize the OpenSim [1] software platform, consisting of open source code for musculoskeletal modeling, using biomechanical input data from test subjects for estimation of muscle and joint loads. The OpenSim Full Body Model [2] is used for all analyses. The model incorporates simplified wrap surfaces, a new knee model and updated lower body muscle parameters derived from cadaver measurements and magnetic resonance imaging of young adults. The upper body uses torque actuators at the lumbar and extremity joints. The test subjects who volunteer for this study are instrumented with reflective markers for motion capture data collection while performing squat exercising on the Hybrid Ultimate Lifting Kit (HULK) prototype device (ZIN Technologies, Middleburg Heights, OH). Ground reaction force data is collected with force plates under the feet, and device loading is recorded through load cells internal to the HULK. Test variables include

  1. Comparative study of bearing loads for different twin screw compressor rotor configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckney, D.; Anderson, C.

    2017-08-01

    Designing rotor geometry is a critical stage in the design of a twin screw compressor which has a significant impact on: capacity; leakage characteristics; thermodynamics; rotor stiffness; dynamics; and loading on the bearings. The focus of this paper is on bearing loads. In order to design screw compressors that can operate at higher pressures the bearings quickly become a limiting factor. With the need to house the bearings adjacent to one another on each of the parallel rotor shafts at a given centre distance there is an inherent limit to the bearing geometry envelope. In this investigation the ‘rotor configuration’ refers to the rotor lobe combination, length to diameter ratio (L/D), and wrap angle. The geometry of the transverse rotor profiles is kept constant, as far as possible, allowing conclusions to be drawn based on a manageable number of variables. A procedure to calculate bearing specific loads based on results from a thermodynamic chamber model is presented and results for a range of rotor configurations are discussed.

  2. Photovoltaic power converter system with a controller configured to actively compensate load harmonics

    DOEpatents

    de Rooij, Michael Andrew; Steigerwald, Robert Louis; Delgado, Eladio Clemente

    2008-12-16

    Photovoltaic power converter system including a controller configured to reduce load harmonics is provided. The system comprises a photovoltaic array and an inverter electrically coupled to the array to generate an output current for energizing a load connected to the inverter and to a mains grid supply voltage. The system further comprises a controller including a first circuit coupled to receive a load current to measure a harmonic current in the load current. The controller includes a second circuit to generate a fundamental reference drawn by the load. The controller further includes a third circuit for combining the measured harmonic current and the fundamental reference to generate a command output signal for generating the output current for energizing the load connected to the inverter. The photovoltaic system may be configured to compensate harmonic currents that may be drawn by the load.

  3. Cognitive Load for Configuration Comprehension in Computer-Supported Geometry Problem Solving: An Eye Movement Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, John Jr-Hung; Lin, Sunny S. J.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated (a) whether the perceived cognitive load was different when geometry problems with various levels of configuration comprehension were solved and (b) whether eye movements in comprehending geometry problems showed sources of cognitive loads. In the first investigation, three characteristics of geometry configurations…

  4. Cognitive Load for Configuration Comprehension in Computer-Supported Geometry Problem Solving: An Eye Movement Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, John Jr-Hung; Lin, Sunny S. J.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated (a) whether the perceived cognitive load was different when geometry problems with various levels of configuration comprehension were solved and (b) whether eye movements in comprehending geometry problems showed sources of cognitive loads. In the first investigation, three characteristics of geometry configurations…

  5. On Critical Buckling Loads of Columns under End Load Dependent on Direction

    PubMed Central

    Başbük, Musa; Eryılmaz, Aytekin; Atay, M. Tarık

    2014-01-01

    Most of the phenomena of various fields of applied sciences are nonlinear problems. Recently, various types of analytical approximate solution techniques were introduced and successfully applied to the nonlinear differential equations. One of the aforementioned techniques is the Homotopy analysis method (HAM). In this study, we applied HAM to find critical buckling load of a column under end load dependent on direction. We obtained the critical buckling loads and compared them with the exact analytic solutions in the literature. PMID:27379303

  6. Loads analysis and testing of flight configuration solid rocket motor outer boot ring segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Rafiq

    1990-01-01

    The loads testing on in-house-fabricated flight configuration Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) outer boot ring segments. The tests determined the bending strength and bending stiffness of these beams and showed that they compared well with the hand analysis. The bending stiffness test results compared very well with the finite element data.

  7. Study of void sizes and loading configurations effects on shock initiation due to void collapse in heterogeneous energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sidhartha; Rai, Nirmal; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2015-06-01

    In heterogeneous energetic materials, presence of porosity has been seen to increase its sensitivity towards shock initiation and ignition. Under the application of shock load, the viscoplastic deformation of voids and its collapse leads to the formation of local high temperature regions known as hot spots. The chemical reaction triggers at the hot spot depending on the local temperature and grows eventually leading to ignition and formation of detonation waves in the material. The temperature of the hot spot depends on various factors such as shock strength, void size, void arrangements, loading configuration etc. Hence, to gain deeper understanding on shock initiation and ignition study due to void collapse, a parametric study involving various factors which can affect the hot spot temperature is desired. In the current work, effects of void sizes, shock strength and loading configurations has been studied for shock initiation in HMX using massively parallel Eulerian code, SCIMITAR3D. The chemical reaction and decomposition for HMX has been modeled using Henson-Smilowitz multi step mechanism. The effect of heat conduction has also been taken into consideration. Ignition threshold criterion has been established for various factors as mentioned. The critical hot spot temperature and its size which can lead to ignition has been obtained from numerical experiments.

  8. Joint interaction with embedded concretions: joint loading configurations inferred from propagation paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConaughy, David T.; Engelder, Terry

    1999-11-01

    The interaction between propagating joints and embedded concretions in a Devonian black shale near Seneca Lake, NY, permits identification of the loading configurations responsible for two joint sets of different ages striking at nearly the same orientation. The earlier set consists of systematic joints cut by later Alleghanian joints of the Appalachian Plateau. The later set consists of non-systematic curving cross joints that abut these same Alleghanian joints. Field evidence shows that concretions functioned as stiff inclusions in a compliant black shale. As a consequence of this elastic contrast, local perturbations in the remote stress field persisted around the concretions during burial, tectonic deformation, and exhumation. These stress perturbations influenced joint propagation paths of both joint sets. Our conclusions about loading configurations are based on finite-element modeling of the effect of the local stress perturbation on concretion-modified joint propagation. Modeling shows that the local stress perturbation from a thermoelastic loading was responsible for deflecting cross joints away from concretions in a curved propagation path near the concretion. This load configuration also led to arrest of cross joints before they penetrated the shale-concretion interface. At greater distances from the concretion, the propagation path of cross joints was controlled by the contemporary tectonic stress field. The interface between concretions and the surrounding shale was strongly bonded, as indicated by the crossing of the interface by some of the systematic ENE joints. Higher compressive stress levels within the concretions relative to the shale suppressed joint development in the concretion, causing the arrest of those joints once they had driven across the interface and a short distance into the concretion. Numerical modeling shows that interface penetration by the systematic ENE joints is consistent with a fluid load, the same loading configuration

  9. Pitch difference and belt tooth configuration effect on load distribution of timing belt using FEM analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Takanao; Furukawa, Yoshihisa; Tomono, Kiyohisa; Takahashi, Hideaki

    1996-09-01

    A timing belt used for an automotive engine`s camshaft consists of a facing fabric, elastoeric body and glass fiber cords. These materials show significant non-linear characteristics. Therefore, a model of the timing belt was analyzed using ABAQUS (a general non-linear finite element program). As a result, the mechanism that generates the belt load distribution was successfully confirmed by calculation. It was found that the pitch difference existing between the timing belt and pulley, and belt tooth configuration both have a large affect on load distribution of toothed belts. This paper reports the development of an analytical model which shows the effects of pitch difference and pulley tooth configuration on belt contact pressure.

  10. Aerothermal loads analysis for high speed flow over a quilted surface configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, G. C.; Smith, R. E.

    1984-08-01

    Attention is given to hypersonic laminar flow over a quilted surface configuration that simulates an array of Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System panels bowed in a spherical shape as a result of thermal gradient through the panel thickness. Pressure and heating loads to the surface are determined. The flow field over the configuration was mathematically modeled by means of time-dependent, three-dimensional conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations. A boundary mapping technique was then used to obtain a rectangular, parallel piped computational domain, and an explicit MacCormack (1972) explicit time-split predictor corrector finite difference algorithm was used to obtain steady state solutions. Total integrated heating loads vary linearly with bowed height when this value does not exceed the local boundary layer thickness.

  11. Evaluation of an aerodynamic-load prediction method on a STOL fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional panel method was used to compute the aerodynamic loads on a large-scale, powered wind tunnel model. The size of the computation grid was selected such that turnaround times, on present computers remained satisfactory. With this constraint, the STOL aircraft configuration was modeled and the capabilities and limitations of the prediction method were investigated. After this study, a similar numerical model was established for a forward-swept-wing aircraft configuration which is planned for large-scale, low-speed testing. The resulting aerodynamic-load predictions are discussed and will be utilized, together with the future experimental results, to obtain a broader validation of this method as well as to reduce the necessary size of the matrix of the test parameters.

  12. Comparison of sensitivity and resolution load sensor at various configuration polymer optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifin, A.; Yusran, Miftahuddin, Abdullah, Bualkar; Tahir, Dahlang

    2017-01-01

    This study uses a load sensor with a macro-bending on polymer optical fiber loop model which is placed between two plates with a buffer spring. The load sensor with light intensity modulation principle is an infrared LED emits light through the polymer optical fiber then received by the phototransistor and amplifier. Output voltage from the amplifier continued to arduino sequence and displayed on the computer. Load augment on the sensor resulted in an increase of curvature on polymer optical fibers that can cause power losses gets bigger too. This matter will result in the intensity of light that received by phototransistor getting smaller, so that the output voltage that ligable on computer will be getting smaller too. The sensitivity and resolution load sensors analyzed based on configuration with various amount of loops, imperfection on the jacket, and imperfection at the cladding and core of polymer optical fiber. The results showed that the augment on the amount of load, imperfection on the jacket and imperfection on the sheath and core polymer optical fiber can improve the sensitivity and resolution of the load sensor. The best sensors resolution obtained on the number of loops 4 with imperfection 8 on the core and cladding polymer optical fiber that is 0.037 V/N and 0,026 N. The advantages of the load sensor based on polymers optical fiber are easy to make, low cost and simple to use measurement methods.

  13. Potential nitrogen critical loads for northern Great Plains grassland vegetation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symstad, Amy J.; Smith, Anine T.; Newton, Wesley E.; Knapp, Alan K.

    2015-01-01

    The National Park Service is concerned that increasing atmospheric nitrogen deposition caused by fossil fuel combustion and agricultural activities could adversely affect the northern Great Plains (NGP) ecosystems in its trust. The critical load concept facilitates communication between scientists and policy makers or land managers by translating the complex effects of air pollution on ecosystems into concrete numbers that can be used to inform air quality targets. A critical load is the exposure level below which significant harmful effects on sensitive elements of the environment do not occur. A recent review of the literature suggested that the nitrogen critical load for Great Plains vegetation is 10-25 kg N/ha/yr. For comparison, current atmospheric nitrogen deposition in NGP National Park Service (NPS) units ranges from ~4 kg N/ha/yr in the west to ~13 kg N/ha/yr in the east. The suggested critical load, however, was derived from studies far outside of the NGP, and from experiments investigating nitrogen loads substantially higher than current atmospheric deposition in the region.Therefore, to better determine the nitrogen critical load for sensitive elements in NGP parks, we conducted a four-year field experiment in three northern Great Plains vegetation types at Badlands and Wind Cave National Parks. The vegetation types were chosen because of their importance in NGP parks, their expected sensitivity to nitrogen addition, and to span a range of natural fertility. In the experiment, we added nitrogen at rates ranging from below current atmospheric deposition (2.5 kg N/ha/yr) to far above those levels but commensurate with earlier experiments (100 kg N/ha/yr). We measured the response of a variety of vegetation and soil characteristics shown to be sensitive to nitrogen addition in other studies, including plant biomass production, plant tissue nitrogen concentration, plant species richness and composition, non-native species abundance, and soil inorganic

  14. The critical loads and levels approach for nitrogen

    Treesearch

    T.A. Clair; T. Blett; J. Aherne; M.P.M. Aidar; R. Artz; W.J. Bealey; W. Budd; J.N. Cape; C.J. Curtis; L. Duan; M.E. Fenn; P. Groffman; R. Haeuber; J.R. Hall; J.-P. Hettelingh; D. López-Hernández; B. Mathieson; L. Pardo; M. Posch; R.V. Pouyat; T. Spranger; H. Sverdrup; H. van Dobben; A. van Hinsberg

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reports the findings of a Working Group to review the critical loads (CLs) and levels approach for nitrogen (N). The three main approaches to estimating CLs are empirical, mass balance and dynamic modelling. Examples are given of recent developments in Europe, North America and Asia and it is concluded that other countries should be encouraged to develop...

  15. Modeling surface water critical loads with PROFILE: possibilities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rapp, L; Bishop, K

    2003-01-01

    The critical load concept has become a valuable tool for policymakers in the European negotiations on emission reductions. Despite the international acceptance, ongoing validation of critical load methodology is of the utmost importance to avoid a situation where the calculation results are difficult to defend. In this paper we explore the potential of using the steady state soil chemistry model PROFILE as an alternative to the Steady State Water Chemistry (SSWC) method for calculating critical loads of acidity. The hypothesis is that the uncertainty in prediction of preindustrial leaching of base cations is reduced when soil properties instead of lake chemistry are used as input data. Paleolimnological reconstructions of preindustrial lake chemistry are used to test PROFILE. As PROFILE requires soil data that are not generally available on a catchment level, we used distributions of crucial parameters from soil survey data within the vicinity of five lakes for which paleoecological pH reconstructions were available. An important concern is the characterization of catchment hydrology. A calibration of the "effective" soil depth, needed to give PROFILE predictions that coincided with paleolimnology, suggested that approximately 0.6 m of the total soil depth was hydrologically active in supplying acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) to runoff through weathering. At present, there is insufficient evidence to either recommend or reject the PROFILE model for surface water critical loads. Before such a judgement can be made, the approach presented here has to be tested for other regions, and the definition of catchment hydrology needs to be investigated further.

  16. Can martial arts techniques reduce fall severity? An in vivo study of femoral loading configurations in sideways falls.

    PubMed

    van der Zijden, A M; Groen, B E; Tanck, E; Nienhuis, B; Verdonschot, N; Weerdesteyn, V

    2012-06-01

    Sideways falls onto the hip are a major cause of femoral fractures in the elderly. Martial arts (MA) fall techniques decrease hip impact forces in sideways falls. The femoral fracture risk, however, also depends on the femoral loading configuration (direction and point of application of the force). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of fall techniques, landing surface and fall height on the impact force and the loading configuration in sideways falls. Twelve experienced judokas performed sideways MA and Block ('natural') falls on a force plate, both with and without a judo mat on top. Kinematic and force data were analysed to determine the hip impact force and the loading configuration. In falls from a kneeling position, the MA technique reduced the impact force by 27%, but did not change the loading configuration. The use of the mat did not change the loading configuration. Falling from a standing changed the force direction. In all conditions, the point of application was distal and posterior to the greater trochanter, but it was less distal and more posterior in falls from standing than from kneeling position. The present decrease in hip impact force with an unchanged loading configuration indicates the potential protective effect of the MA technique on the femoral fracture risk. The change in loading configuration with an increased fall height warrant further studies to examine the effect of MA techniques on fall severity under more natural fall circumstances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Estimating Critical Nitrogen Loads for a California Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, S. B.

    2007-12-01

    Rigorously established critical nitrogen loads to protect biodiversity can be effective policy tools for addressing the insidious impacts of atmospheric N-deposition on ecosystems. This presentation describes methods for determining critical N-loads to a California grassland ecosystem by careful examination of the continuum from emissions, transport, atmospheric chemistry, deposition, ecosystem response, and impacts on biodiversity. Nutrient-poor soils derived from serpentinite bedrock support diverse native grasslands with dazzling wildflower displays and numerous threatened and endangered species, including the Bay checkerspot butterfly. Under moderate atmospheric N-deposition, these sites are rapidly invaded by introduced nitrophilous annual grasses in the absence of appropriate grazing or other management. Critical loads to this ecosystem have been approached by measurements of atmospheric concentrations of reactive N gases using Ogawa passive samplers and seasonally averaged deposition velocities. A regional-scale pollution gradient was complemented by a very local-scale pollution gradient extending a few hundred meters downwind of a heavily traveled road in a relatively unpolluted area. The local gradient suggests a critical load of 5 kg-N ha-1 a-1 or less. The passive monitor calculations largely agree with deposition calculated with the CMAQ model at 4 km scale. Emissions of NH3 from catalytic converters are the dominant N-source at the roadway site, and are a function of traffic volume and speed. Plant tissue N-content and 15N gradients support the existence of N-deposition gradients. The complexities of more detailed calculations and measurements specific to this ecosystem include seasonal changes in LAI, temporal coincidence of traffic emissions and stomatal conductance, surface moisture, changes in oxidized versus reduced N sources, and annual weather variation. The concept of a "critical cumulative load" may be appropriate over decadal time scales in

  18. Configurations of Splitter/Combiner Microstrip Sections Loaded with Stepped Impedance Resonators (SIRs) for Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lijuan; Mata-Contreras, Javier; Vélez, Paris; Martín, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, several configurations of splitter/combiner microstrip sections loaded with stepped impedance resonators (SIRs) are analyzed. Such structures are useful as sensors and comparators, and the main aim of the paper is to show that the proposed configurations are useful for the optimization of sensitivity and discrimination. Specifically, for comparison purposes, i.e., to determine anomalies, abnormalities or defects of a sample under test (SUT) in comparison to a reference sample, it is shown that up to three samples can be simultaneously tested. Simple models of the proposed structures are presented, and these models are validated through electromagnetic simulation and experiment. Finally, the principle of operation is validated through a proof-of-concept demonstrator. PMID:27999399

  19. Configurations of Splitter/Combiner Microstrip Sections Loaded with Stepped Impedance Resonators (SIRs) for Sensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Su, Lijuan; Mata-Contreras, Javier; Vélez, Paris; Martín, Ferran

    2016-12-20

    In this paper, several configurations of splitter/combiner microstrip sections loaded with stepped impedance resonators (SIRs) are analyzed. Such structures are useful as sensors and comparators, and the main aim of the paper is to show that the proposed configurations are useful for the optimization of sensitivity and discrimination. Specifically, for comparison purposes, i.e., to determine anomalies, abnormalities or defects of a sample under test (SUT) in comparison to a reference sample, it is shown that up to three samples can be simultaneously tested. Simple models of the proposed structures are presented, and these models are validated through electromagnetic simulation and experiment. Finally, the principle of operation is validated through a proof-of-concept demonstrator.

  20. An Experimental Test of How Different Community Configurations and Environmental Pressures Influence the Susceptibility of Ponds to a Critical Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory-Eaves, I.; Iacarella, J.; Giani, A.; Beisner, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past two centuries, humans have been modifying the planet at an accelerating rate and, in some cases, ecosystems have been observed to experience critical transitions. For example, shallow lakes and ponds may change abruptly from a clear-water, macrophyte-dominated state to a turbid state when exposed to minor increases in stress (e.g., nutrient loading). Yet, abrupt changes in shallow lakes and ponds are not consistently observed and considerable uncertainty remains regarding the ecological and environmental conditions that render these systems susceptible to sudden changes. To address this knowledge gap, we are conducting a mesocosm experiment to quantify how different community configurations and environmental pressures influence the susceptibility of ponds to critical transitions. This research tests the hypothesis that macrophyte density and the rate of external nutrient loading alter the trajectory of phytoplankton dynamics, thus influencing the transition to a turbid state. We supplied 18 mesocosms with field-collected sediment, phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish, and exposed them to three levels of macrophyte densities and two external nutrient loading regimes. Based on daily measurements of phytoplankton biomass (measured as chlorophyll a), we will apply early warning metrics for identifying critical transitions (e.g., http://www.early-warning-signals.org). Our preliminary results indicate that ponds with no macrophytes and the faster nutrient loading rate yield the greatest rate of increase in chlorophyll a. Key goals of this experiment are to enhance the mechanistic understanding of shallow lake and pond dynamics, and aid in the interpretation of lake sediment records as archives of historical critical transitions.

  1. Effects of different brazing and welding methods on the fracture load of various orthodontic joining configurations.

    PubMed

    Bock, Jens J; Bailly, Jacqueline; Fuhrmann, Robert A

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fracture load of different joints made by conventional brazing, tungston inert gas (TIG) and laser welding. Six standardized joining configurations of spring hard quality orthodontic wire were investigated: end-to-end, round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 6.5 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing with universal silver solder, two TIG and two laser welding devices. The fracture loads were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). Data were analysed with the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. The significance level was set at P<0.05). In all cases brazed joints were ruptured at a low level of fracture load (186-407 N). Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (P<0.05) were found. The highest mean fracture loads were observed for laser welding (826 N). No differences between the various TIG or laser welding devices were demonstrated, although it was not possible to join an orthodontic wire to an orthodontic band using TIG welding. For orthodontic purposes laser and TIG welding are solder free alternatives. TIG welding and laser welding showed similar results. The laser technique is an expensive, but sophisticated and simple method.

  2. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 3-Surry Unit 1 Cycle 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors. The analysis methodology selected for all the calculations in this report is based on the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of two reactor critical configurations for Surry Unit 1 Cycle 2. This unit and cycle were chosen for a previous analysis using a different methodology because detailed isotopics from multidimensional reactor calculations were available from the Virginia Power Company. These data permitted a direct comparison of criticality calculations using the utility-calculated isotopics with those using the isotopics generated by the SCALE-4

  3. Critical experiments supporting underwater storage of tightly packed configurations of spent fuel pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoovler, G. S.; Baldwin, M. N.; Maceda, E. L.; Welfare, F. G.

    1981-11-01

    Critical experiments were performed with low enriched UO2 arrays simulating underwater pin storage of spent pressurized water reactor fuel. Pin storage refers to a storage concept in which fuel assemblies are dismantled and the individual fuel pins from several assemblies are tightly packed into specially designed cannisters. Each critical configuration is sufficiently described and documented to permit the use of these data for validating critically calculational methods according to ANSI Standard N16.9-1975. The reactivity of each benchmark core was calculated using the AMPX-KENO IV package. The results of these analyses are also presented.

  4. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 2-Sequoyah Unit 2 Cycle 3

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors. The analysis methodology selected for all the calculations reported herein is based on the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of three reactor critical configurations for the Sequoyah Unit 2 Cycle 3. This unit and cycle were chosen because of the relevance in spent fuel benchmark applications: (1) the unit had a significantly long downtime of 2.7 years during the middle of cycle (MOC) 3, and (2) the core consisted entirely of burned fuel at the MOC restart. The first benchmark critical calculation was the MOC restart at hot, full-power (HFP) critical conditions. The

  5. Nitrogen removal from high organic loading wastewater in modified Ludzack-Ettinger configuration MBBR system.

    PubMed

    Torkaman, Mojtaba; Borghei, Seyed Mehdi; Tahmasebian, Sepehr; Andalibi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    A moving bed biofilm reactor with pre-denitrification configuration was fed with a synthetic wastewater containing high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia. By changing different variables including ammonium and COD loading, nitrification rate in the aerobic reactor and denitrification rate in the anoxic reactor were monitored. Changing the influent loading was achieved via adjusting the inlet COD (956-2,096 mg/L), inlet ammonium (183-438 mg/L), and hydraulic retention time of the aerobic reactor (8, 12, and 18 hours). The overall organic loading rate was in the range of 3.60-17.37 gCOD/m2·day, of which 18.5-91% was removed in the anoxic reactor depending on the operational conditions. Considering the complementary role of the aerobic reactor, the overall COD removal was in the range 87.3-98.8%. In addition, nitrification rate increased with influent ammonium loading, the maximum rate reaching 3.05 gNH4/m2·day. One of the most important factors affecting nitrification rate was influent C:N entering the aerobic reactor, by increasing which nitrification rate decreased asymptotically. Nitrate removal efficiency in the anoxic reactor was also controlled by the inlet nitrate level entering the anoxic reactor. Furthermore, by increasing the nitrate loading rate from 0.91 to 3.49 gNO/m3·day, denitrification rate increased from 0.496 to 2.47 gNO/m3·day.

  6. Eutrophic lichens respond to multiple forms of N: implications for critical levels and critical loads research

    Treesearch

    Sarah Jovan; Jennifer Riddell; Pamela E Padgett; Thomas Nash

    2012-01-01

    Epiphytic lichen communities are highly sensitive to excess nitrogen (N), which causes the replacement of native floras by N-tolerant, ‘‘weedy’’ eutrophic species. This shift is commonly used as the indicator of ecosystem ‘‘harm’’ in studies developing empirical critical levels (CLE) for ammonia (NH3) and critical loads (CLO) for N. To be most...

  7. Critical current density of YBCO films with different configurations of columnar defects in longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueyoshi, T.; Iwanaga, Y.; Kai, T.; Izumi, T.; Fujiyoshi, T.; Ishikawa, N.

    2017-07-01

    Critical current density (J c) properties in longitudinal magnetic fields were investigated for YBa2Cu3O y thin films with columnar defects (CDs), where different configurations of CDs were systematically installed into the films by using heavy-ion irradiation: a parallel configuration of CDs aligned along the c-axis and two bimodal splay configurations composed of CDs crossing at ±θ i relative to the c-axis, where the splay plane defined by the two irradiation angles is perpendicular or parallel to the transport current direction. The unirradiated film under the longitudinal magnetic field shows a J c peak in the magnetic field dependence of J c, which is 1.1 times higher than the self-field J c. For the irradiated films with the parallel CD configuration, on the other hand, the J c is lower than that for the unirradiated film in all magnetic fields and the value of J c decreases with increasing CD density. Such degradation effect by CDs under longitudinal magnetic field was observed even for the bimodal splay configurations. These results are attributed to local meandering of current flow induced by CDs extending through the film thickness, which deteriorates the force-free condition.

  8. Critical configurations (determinantal loci) for range and range difference satellite networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsimis, E.

    1973-01-01

    The observational modes of Geometric Satellite Geodesy are discussed. The geometrical analysis of the problem yielded a regression model for the adjustment of the observations along with a suitable and convenient metric for the least-squares criterion. The determinantal loci (critical configurations) for range networks are analyzed. An attempt is made to apply elements of the theory of variants for this purpose. The use of continuously measured range differences for loci determination is proposed.

  9. Final report for the field-reversed configuration power plant critical-issue scoping study

    SciTech Connect

    Santarius, John F.; Mogahed, Elsayed A.; Emmert, Gilbert A.; Khater, Hesham Y.; Nguyen, Canh N.; Ryzhkov, Sergei V.; Stubna, Michael D.; Steinhauer, Loren C.; Miley, George H.

    2001-03-01

    This report describes research in which a team from the Universities of Wisconsin, Washington, and Illinois performed a scoping study of critical issues for field-reversed configuration (FRC) power plants. The key tasks for this research were (1) systems analysis of deuterium-tritium (D-T) FRC fusion power plants, and (2) conceptual design of the blanket and shield module for an FRC fusion core.

  10. SCALE-4 Analysis of LaSalle Unit 1 BWR Commercial Reactor Critical Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I.C.

    2000-03-01

    Five commercial reactor criticals (CRCs) for the LaSalle Unit 1 boiling-water reactor have been analyzed using KENO V.a, the Monte Carlo criticality code of the SCALE 4 code system. The irradiated fuel assembly isotopics for the criticality analyses were provided by the Waste Package Design team at the Yucca Mountain Project in the US, who performed the depletion calculations using the SAS2H sequence of SCALE 4. The reactor critical measurements involved two beginning-of-cycle and three middle-of-cycle configurations. The CRCs involved relatively low-cycle burnups, and therefore contained a relatively high gadolinium poison content in the reactor assemblies. This report summarizes the data and methods used in analyzing the critical configurations and assesses the sensitivity of the results to some of the modeling approximations used to represent the gadolinium poison distribution within the assemblies. The KENO V.a calculations, performed using the SCALE 44GROUPNDF5 ENDF/B-V cross-section library, yield predicted k{sub eff} values within about 1% {Delta}k/k relative to reactor measurements for the five CRCs using general 8-pin and 9-pin heterogeneous gadolinium poison pin assembly models.

  11. SCALE-4 Analysis of LaSalle Unit 1 BWR Commercial Reactor Critical Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I.C.

    2000-03-16

    Five commercial reactor criticals (CRCs) for the LaSalle Unit 1 boiling-water reactor have been analyzed using KENO V.a, the Monte Carlo criticality code of the SCALE 4 code system. The irradiated fuel assembly isotopics for the criticality analyses were provided by the Waste Package Design team at the Yucca Mountain Project in the United States, who performed the depletion calculations using the SAS2H sequence of SCALE 4. The reactor critical measurements involved two beginning-of-cycle and three middle-of-cycle configurations. The CRCs involved relatively low-cycle burnups, and therefore contained a relatively high gadolinium poison content in the reactor assemblies. This report summarizes the data and methods used in analyzing the critical configurations and assesses the sensitivity of the results to some of the modeling approximations used to represent the gadolinium poison distribution within the assemblies. The KENO V.a calculations, performed using the SCALE 44GROUPNDF5 ENDF/B-V cross-section library, yield predicted k{sub eff} values within about 1% {Delta}k/k relative to reactor measurements for the five CRCs using general 8-pin and 9-pin heterogeneous gadolinium poison pin assembly models.

  12. Random-fractal Ansatz for the configurations of two-dimensional critical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ching Hua; Ozaki, Dai; Matsueda, Hiroaki

    2016-12-01

    Critical systems have always intrigued physicists and precipitated the development of new techniques. Recently, there has been renewed interest in the information contained in the configurations of classical critical systems, whose computation do not require full knowledge of the wave function. Inspired by holographic duality, we investigated the entanglement properties of the classical configurations (snapshots) of the Potts model by introducing an Ansatz ensemble of random fractal images. By virtue of the central limit theorem, our Ansatz accurately reproduces the entanglement spectra of actual Potts snapshots without any fine tuning of parameters or artificial restrictions on ensemble choice. It provides a microscopic interpretation of the results of previous studies, which established a relation between the scaling behavior of snapshot entropy and the critical exponent. More importantly, it elucidates the role of ensemble disorder in restoring conformal invariance, an aspect previously ignored. Away from criticality, the breakdown of scale invariance leads to a renormalization of the parameter Σ in the random fractal Ansatz, whose variation can be used as an alternative determination of the critical exponent. We conclude by providing a recipe for the explicit construction of fractal unit cells consistent with a given scaling exponent.

  13. Critical loads of nitrogen deposition and critical levels of atmospheric ammonia for mediterranean evergreen woodlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, P.; Theobald, M. R.; Dias, T.; Tang, Y. S.; Cruz, C.; Martins-Loução, M. A.; Máguas, C.; Sutton, M.; Branquinho, C.

    2011-11-01

    Nitrogen (N) has emerged in recent years as a key factor associated with global changes, with impacts on biodiversity, ecosystems functioning and human health. In order to ameliorate the effects of excessive N, safety thresholds have been established, such as critical loads (deposition fluxes) and levels (concentrations). For Mediterranean ecosystems, few studies have been carried out to assess these parameters. Our objective was therefore to determine the critical loads of N deposition and long-term critical levels of atmospheric ammonia for Mediterranean evergreen woodlands. For that we have considered changes in epiphytic lichen communities, which have been shown to be one of the most sensitive to excessive N. Based on a classification of lichen species according to their tolerance to N we grouped species into response functional groups, which we used as a tool to determine the critical loads and levels. This was done under Mediterranean climate, in evergreen cork-oak woodlands, by sampling lichen functional diversity and annual atmospheric ammonia concentrations and modelling N deposition downwind from a reduced N source (a cattle barn). By modelling the highly significant relationship between lichen functional groups and N deposition, the critical load was estimated to be below 26 kg (N) ha-1 yr-1, which is within the upper range established for other semi-natural ecosystems. By modelling the highly significant relationship of lichen functional groups with annual atmospheric ammonia concentration, the critical level was estimated to be below 1.9 μg m-3, in agreement with recent studies for other ecosystems. Taking into account the high sensitivity of lichen communities to excessive N, these values should be taken into account in policies that aim at protecting Mediterranean woodlands from the initial effects of excessive N.

  14. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 4-Three Mile Island Unit 1 Cycle 5

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS-8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit is to be taken for the reduced reactivity of burned or spent fuel relative to its original ''fresh'' composition, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods used in determining such reactivity worth against spent fuel reactivity measurements. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using relevant and well-documented critical configurations from commercial pressurized water reactors. The analysis methodology utilized for all calculations in this report is based on the modules and data associated with the SCALE-4 code system. Isotopic densities for spent fuel assemblies in the core were calculated using the SCALE-4 SAS2H analytical sequence. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code family was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required for SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for the critical configuration. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all calculations. This volume of the report documents a reactor critical calculation for GPU Nuclear Corporation's Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1) during hot, zero-power startup testing for the beginning of cycle 5. This unit and cycle were selected because of their relevance in spent fuel benchmark applications: (1) cycle 5 startup occurred after an especially long downtime of 6.6 years; and (2) the core consisted primarily (75%) of burned fuel, with

  15. SSME/side loads analysis for flight configuration, revision A. [structural analysis of space shuttle main engine under side load excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, W.

    1974-01-01

    This document describes the dynamic loads analysis accomplished for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) considering the side load excitation associated with transient flow separation on the engine bell during ground ignition. The results contained herein pertain only to the flight configuration. A Monte Carlo procedure was employed to select the input variables describing the side load excitation and the loads were statistically combined. This revision includes an active thrust vector control system representation and updated orbiter thrust structure stiffness characteristics. No future revisions are planned but may be necessary as system definition and input parameters change.

  16. Creep of a Silicon Nitride Under Various Specimen/Loading Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Powers, Lynn M.; Holland, Frederic A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Holland, F. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Extensive creep testing of a hot-pressed silicon nitride (NC132) was performed at 1300 C in air using five different specimen/loading configurations, including pure tension, pure compression, four-point uniaxial flexure, ball-on-ring biaxial flexure, and ring-on-ring biaxial flexure. Nominal creep strain and its rate for a given nominal applied stress were greatest in tension, least in compression, and intermediate in uniaxial and biaxial flexure. Except for the case of compressive loading, nominal creep strain generally decreased with time, resulting in less-defined steady-state condition. Of the four different creep formulations - power-law, hyperbolic sine, step, redistribution models - the conventional power-law model still provides the most convenient and reasonable means to estimate simple, quantitative creep parameters of the material. Predictions of creep deformation for the case of multiaxial stress state (biaxial flexure) were made based on pure tension and compression creep data by using the design code CARES/Creep.

  17. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 1-Summary

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit is to be taken for the reduced reactivity of burned or spent fuel relative to its original ''fresh'' composition, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods used in determining such reactivity worth against spent fuel reactivity measurements. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using critical configurations from commercial pressurized- water reactors (PWR). The analysis methodology utilized for all calculations in this report is based on the modules and data associated with the SCALE-4 code system. Isotopic densities for spent fuel assemblies in the core were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence in SCALE-4. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code sequence was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required for SCALE-4 criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for the critical configuration. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for analysis of each critical configuration. Each of the five volumes comprising this report provides an overview of the methodology applied. Subsequent volumes also describe in detail the approach taken in performing criticality calculations for these PWR configurations: Volume 2 describes criticality calculations for the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Unit 2 reactor for Cycle 3; Volume 3 documents the analysis of Virginia Power's Surry Unit 1 reactor for the

  18. Climate change impacts on forest soil critical acid loads and exceedances at a national scale

    Treesearch

    Steven G. McNulty; Erika C. Cohen; Jennifer A. Moore Myers

    2013-01-01

    Federal agencies are currently developing guidelines for forest soil critical acid loads across the United States. A critical acid load is defined as the amount of acid deposition (usually expressed on an annual basis) that an ecosystem can absorb. Traditionally, an ecosystem is considered to be at risk for health impairment when the critical acid load exceeds a level...

  19. Loading Configurations and Ground Reaction Forces During Treadmill Running in Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John; Schaffner, Grant; Blazine, Kristi; Bentley, Jason; Laughlin, Mitzi; Loehr, James; Hagan, Donald

    2003-01-01

    Studies have shown losses in bone mineral density of 1-2% per month in critical weight bearing areas such as the proximal femur during long-term space flight (Grigoriev, 1998). The astronauts currently onboard the International Space Station (ISS) use a treadmill as an exercise countermeasure to bone loss that occurs as a result of prolonged exposure to weightlessness. A crewmember exercising on the treadmill is attached by a harness and loading device. Ground reaction forces are obtained through the loading device that pulls the crewn1ember towards the treadmill surface during locomotion. McCrory et al. (2002) found that the magnitude of the peak ground reaction force (pGRF) during horizontal suspension running, or simulated weightlessness, was directly related to the load applied to the subject. It is thought that strain magnitude and strain rate affects osteogenesis, and is a function of the magnitude and rate of change of the ground reaction force. While it is not known if a minimum stimulus exists for osteogenesis, it has been hypothesized that in order to replicate the bone formation occurring in normal gravity (1 G), the exercise in weightlessness should mimic the forces that occur on earth. Specifically, the pGRF obtained in weightlessness should be comparable to that achieved in 1 G.

  20. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-09-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.”(Reference 1) The experiment studied in this evaluation was the first of the series and had the fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, , and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configurations are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4 and 1.7, respectively. Information for this

  1. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.”(Reference 1) The experiment studied in this evaluation was the first of the series and had the fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, , and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configurations are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4 and 1.7, respectively. Information for this

  2. Air Pollution Critical Loads in the U.S.: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blett, T. F.

    2012-12-01

    "Critical loads" describe the amount of air pollution initiating harmful changes in sensitive ecosystems. Critical loads generally have both a "science" component, describing the amount of deposition needed to alter chemical indicators (such as surface water acid neutralizing capacity) or biological endpoints (such as lichen biodiversity) and a "policy" component where critical loads are evaluated and utilized to help make land management or regulatory decisions. Critical loads science and policy have both made substantial headway in the U.S. over the past decade. For example, a recent review of critical loads of nitrogen cited over 300 published papers relevant to critical loads development in the U.S. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program's Critical Loads Science Subcommittee (CLAD) has recently synthesized most available U.S. critical loads data into a national-scale database and used it to develop maps for modeled surface water acidification, modeled soil acidification, and empirically derived excess nitrogen effects. Air quality regulators and land managers are increasingly using critical loads, in conjunction with policy objectives, to establish goals (target loads) for deposition reductions needed to improve sensitive resource conditions in impacted areas. These goals help focus air pollution emissions reduction efforts where they will be most effective. We will discuss critical loads history in the U.S., provide an overview of some of the most recent national-scale critical loads products, and outline future needs.

  3. The geometric configuration and morphometry of the rabbit oesophagus during luminal pressure loading.

    PubMed

    Liao, Donghua; Cassin, Jeff; Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2006-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the geometric configuration and morphometric dimensions in the rabbit oesophagus during luminal pressure loading. The geometric configuration is of fundamental importance because it is related to stress and strain and determines the resistance to flow. The oesophagus was excised from rabbits, transferred to an organ bath and stretched to the in vivo length. Cannulas were inserted into both ends and each oesophagus was subjected to a luminal pressure up to 0, 1, 2, 5 and 10 cm H(2)O. After equilibrium was reached, the oesophagus was snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Sections were cut from five locations in the oesophagus and videotaped in the frozen state. Geometric and morphometric data including perimeter, circularities, area, thickness, buckles and strains in different layers were obtained from the video images. These variables did not show axial variation in the oesophagus. All variables changed as a function of the pressure. The whole wall thickness decreased as an inverse function of the pressure. The thickness decrease was mainly due to thinning of the submucosa and muscle. The number of buckles decreased from 4.05 +/- 0.34 at 0 cm H(2)O pressure to 0.07 +/- 0.07 at 10 cm H(2)O. Circumferential Green strain-pressure curves for the various layers all showed an exponential pattern. The curve obtained at the submucosa-muscle layer interface was located to the right of the other curves, indicating that the muscle layer was softest. The data obtained in this study will be useful for further modelling of the mechanics of the oesophagus.

  4. Scale-4 analysis of pressurized water reactor critical configurations: Volume 5, North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.; Suto, T. |

    1996-10-01

    ANSI/ANS 8.1 requires that calculational methods for away-from- reactor (AFR) criticality safety analyses be validated against experiment. This report summarizes part of the ongoing effort to benchmark AFR criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial PWRs. Codes and data in the SCALE-4 code system were used. This volume documents the SCALE system analysis of one reactor critical configuration for North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5. The KENO V.a criticality calculations for the North Anna 1 Cycle 5 beginning-of-cycle model yielded a value for k{sub eff} of 1. 0040{+-}0.0005.

  5. Simulation of the ERDC Blast Load Simulator (BLS) in various test configurations using Loci/BLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mord, Clayton T.

    This thesis describes the simulation of ERDC's Blast Load Simulator (BLS) using MSU's Loci/BLAST. The BLS was created to replicate waveforms found in blast scenarios. Loci/BLAST is an explicit, unstructured CFD code that specializes in moving waveforms. ERDC conducted various tests, and a grid for each scenario was created using the SolidMesh tool. Each grid was simulated, and the results were displayed as time history plots and spatial plots. Simulations were also performed that compared 2D and 3D grids and determined the effect of the grate and striker components. There was a strong correlation between the experimental and simulation results for each case, demonstrating that Loci/BLAST is fully capable of modeling the BLS waveforms. A 2D grid produced results comparable to those on a full 3D grid. The grate and striker were critical in the simulation because they significantly affected the waveform.

  6. Moment ratios and dynamic critical behavior of a reactive system with several absorbing configurations.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, M F; Figueiredo, W

    2011-03-01

    We determine the critical behavior of a reactive model with many absorbing configurations. Monomers A and B land on the sites of a linear lattice and can react depending on the state of their nearest-neighbor sites. The probability of a reaction depends on temperature of the catalyst as well as on the energy coupling between pairs of nearest-neighbor monomers. We employ Monte Carlo simulations to calculate the moments of the order parameter of the model as a function of temperature. Some ratios between pairs of moments are independent of temperature and are in the same universality class of the contact process. We also find the dynamical critical exponents of the model and we show that they are in the directed percolation universality class whatever the values of temperature.

  7. SECOND WASTE PACKAGE PROBABILISTIC CRITICALITY ANALYSIS: GENERATION AND EVALUATION OF INTERNAL CRITICIALITY CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Gottlieb, J.R. Massari, J.K. McCoy

    1996-03-27

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development (WPD) department to provide an evaluation of the criticality potential within a waste package having sonic or all of its contents degraded by corrosion and removal of neutron absorbers. This analysis is also intended to provide an estimate of the consequences of any internal criticality, particularly in terms of any increase in radionuclide inventory. These consequence estimates will be used as part of the WPD input to the Total System Performance Assessment. The ultimate objective of this analysis is to augment the information gained from the Initial Waste Package Probabilistic Criticality Analyses (Ref. 5.8 and 5.9, hereafter referred to as IPA) to a degree which will support preliminary waste package design recommendations intended to reduce the risk of waste package criticality and the risk to total repository system performance posed by the consequences of any criticality. The IPA evaluated the criticality potential under the assumption that the waste package basket retained its structural integrity, so that the assemblies retained their initial separation, even when the neutron absorbers had been leached from the basket. This analysis is based on the more realistic condition that removal of the neutron absorbers is a consequence of the corrosion of the steel in which they are contained, which has the additional consequence of reducing the structural support between assemblies. The result is a set of more reactive configurations having a smaller spacing between assemblies, or no inter-assembly spacing at all. Another difference from the IPA is the minimal attention to probabilistic evaluation given in this study. Although the IPA covered a time horizon to 100,000 years, the lack of consideration of basket degradation modes made it primarily applicable to the first 10,000 years. In contrast, this study, by focusing on the degraded modes of the basket, is primarily

  8. The Critical Compression Load for a Universal Testing Machine When the Specimen Is Loaded Through Knife Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Eugene E; Schwartz, Edward B

    1942-01-01

    The results of a theoretical and experimental investigation to determine the critical compression load for a universal testing machine are presented for specimens loaded through knife edges. The critical load for the testing machine is the load at which one of the loading heads becomes laterally instable in relation to the other. For very short specimens the critical load was found to be less than the rated capacity given by the manufacturer for the machine. A load-length diagram is proposed for defining the safe limits of the test region for the machine. Although this report is particularly concerned with a universal testing machine of a certain type, the basic theory which led to the derivation of the general equation for the critical load, P (sub cr) = alpha L can be applied to any testing machine operated in compression where the specimen is loaded through knife edges. In this equation, L is the length of the specimen between knife edges and alpha is the force necessary to displace the upper end of the specimen unit horizontal distance relative to the lower end of the specimen in a direction normal to the knife edges through which the specimen is loaded.

  9. Uncertainties in critical loads and target loads of sulphur and nitrogen for European forests: analysis and quantification.

    PubMed

    Reinds, Gert Jan; de Vries, Wim

    2010-03-15

    An analysis of the uncertainties in critical loads and target loads of sulphur (S) and nitrogen (N) for 182 European forest soils was carried out using the Very Simple Dynamic (VSD) model. The VSD model was calibrated with a Bayesian approach using prior probability functions for model parameters based on literature data, data from 200 Dutch forest sites and from simulated denitrification rates from a detailed ecosystem model. The calibration strongly improved the fit of the model to observed soil and soil solution concentrations, especially for pH and base saturation. Calibration also narrowed down the ranges in input parameters. The uncertainty analysis showed which parameters contribute most to the uncertainty in the critical loads and target loads. Base cation weathering and deposition and the parameters describing the H-Al equilibrium in the soil solution determine the uncertainty in the maximum critical loads for S, CL(max)(S), when based on the aluminium to base cation (Al/Bc) criterion. Uncertainty in CL(max)(S) based on an acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) criterion is completely determined by base cation inputs alone. The denitrification fraction is the most important source of uncertainty for the maximum critical loads of N, CL(max)(N). N uptake and N immobilisation determine the uncertainties in the critical load for N as a nutrient, CL(nut)(N). Calibration of VSD reduced the uncertainty: the coefficient of variation (CV) was reduced for all critical loads and criteria. After calibration, the CV for CL(max)(S) was below 0.4 for almost all plots; however for CL(max)(N) high values occurred for plots with high denitrification rates. Model calibration also improved the robustness of target load estimates: after calibration, no target loads were needed in any of the simulations for 40% of the plots, with the uncalibrated model there was a positive probability for the need of a target load for almost all plots.

  10. Field-Reversed Configuration Power Plant Critical-Issue Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect

    Santarius, J. F.; Mogahed, E. A.; Emmert, G. A.; Khater, H. Y.; Nguyen, C. N.; Ryzhkov, S. V.; Stubna, M. D.

    2000-03-31

    A team from the Universities of Wisconsin, Washington, and Illinois performed an engineering scoping study of critical issues for field-reversed configuration (FRC) power plants. The key tasks for this research were (1) systems analysis for deuterium-tritium (D-T) FRC fusion power plants, and (2) conceptual design of the blanket and shield module for an FRC fusion core. For the engineering conceptual design of the fusion core, the project team focused on intermediate-term technology. For example, one decision was to use steele structure. The FRC systems analysis led to a fusion power plant with attractive features including modest size, cylindrical symmetry, good thermal efficiency (52%), relatively easy maintenance, and a high ratio of electric power to fusion core mass, indicating that it would have favorable economics.

  11. Debonding in Composite Skin/Stringer Configurations Under Multi-Axial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cvitkovich, Michael K.; Krueger, Ronald; OBrien, T.; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the damage mechanisms in composite bonded skin/stringer constructions under uniaxial and biaxial (in-plane/out-of-plane) loading conditions as typically experienced by aircraft crown fuselage panels. The specimens for all tests were identical and consisted of a tapered composite flange, representing a stringer or frame, bonded onto a composite skin. Tests were performed under monotonic loading conditions in tension, three-point bending, and combined tension/bending to evaluate the debonding mechanisms between the skin and the bonded stringer. For combined tension/bending testing, a unique servohydraulic load frame was used that was capable of applying both loads simultaneously. Microscopic investigations of the specimen edges were used to document the damage occurrence and to identify typical damage patterns. The observations showed that, for all three load cases, failure initiated in the flange near the flange tip causing the flange to almost fully debond from the skin. A two-dimensional plain-strain finite element model was developed to analyze the different test cases using a geometrically nonlinear solution. For all three loading conditions, principal stresses exceeded the transverse strength of the material in the flange area. Additionally, delaminations of various lengths were simulated in the locations where delaminations were experimentally observed. The analyses showed that unstable delamination propagation is likely to occur at the loads corresponding to matrix ply crack initiation for all three loadings.

  12. Empirical Critical Loads of Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition for Nutrient Enrichment and Acidification of Sensitive US Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical load is a “quantitative estimate of the exposure to one or more pollutants below which significant harmful effects on specified sensitive elements of the environment do not occur according to present knowledge”. Critical loads can be either modeled, or calculated empi...

  13. Estimates of critical acid loads and exceedances for forest soils across the conterminous United States

    Treesearch

    Steven G. McNulty; Erika C. Cohen; Jennifer A. Moore Myers; Timothy J. Sullivan; Harbin Li

    2007-01-01

    Concern regarding the impacts of continued nitrogen and sulfur deposition on ecosystem health has prompted the development of critical acid load assessments for forest soils. A critical acid load is a quantitative estimate of exposure to one or more pollutants at or above which harmful acidification-related effects on sensitive elements of the environment occur. A...

  14. A conceptual framework: redifining forests soil's critical acid loads under a changing climate

    Treesearch

    Steven G. McNulty; Johnny L. Boggs

    2010-01-01

    Federal agencies of several nations have or are currently developing guidelines for critical forest soil acid loads. These guidelines are used to establish regulations designed to maintain atmospheric acid inputs below levels shown to damage forests and streams. Traditionally, when the critical soil acid load exceeds the amount of acid that the ecosystem can absorb, it...

  15. Canadian experiences in development of critical loads for sulphur and nitrogen

    Treesearch

    Shaun Watmough; Julian Aherne; Paul Arp; Ian DeMerchant; Rock Ouimet

    2006-01-01

    Critical loads are a broad-scale modelling approach designed to assess the potential risk of pollutants to ecosystems. A description of the methodology for estimating critical loads (sulphur and nitrogen) for acid deposition (CL(A)) for upland forests in eastern Canada is presented, using a case study in central Ontario. In eastern Canada, CL(A) have been calculated...

  16. Empirical Critical Loads of Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition for Nutrient Enrichment and Acidification of Sensitive US Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical load is a “quantitative estimate of the exposure to one or more pollutants below which significant harmful effects on specified sensitive elements of the environment do not occur according to present knowledge”. Critical loads can be either modeled, or calculated empi...

  17. Using change-point models to estimate empirical critical loads for nitrogen in mountain ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Roth, Tobias; Kohli, Lukas; Rihm, Beat; Meier, Reto; Achermann, Beat

    2017-01-01

    To protect ecosystems and their services, the critical load concept has been implemented under the framework of the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (UNECE) to develop effects-oriented air pollution abatement strategies. Critical loads are thresholds below which damaging effects on sensitive habitats do not occur according to current knowledge. Here we use change-point models applied in a Bayesian context to overcome some of the difficulties when estimating empirical critical loads for nitrogen (N) from empirical data. We tested the method using simulated data with varying sample sizes, varying effects of confounding variables, and with varying negative effects of N deposition on species richness. The method was applied to the national-scale plant species richness data from mountain hay meadows and (sub)alpine scrubs sites in Switzerland. Seven confounding factors (elevation, inclination, precipitation, calcareous content, aspect as well as indicator values for humidity and light) were selected based on earlier studies examining numerous environmental factors to explain Swiss vascular plant diversity. The estimated critical load confirmed the existing empirical critical load of 5-15 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) for (sub)alpine scrubs, while for mountain hay meadows the estimated critical load was at the lower end of the current empirical critical load range. Based on these results, we suggest to narrow down the critical load range for mountain hay meadows to 10-15 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1).

  18. Critical loads as a policy tool for protecting ecosystems from the effects of air pollutants

    Treesearch

    Douglas A. Burns; Tamara Blett; Richard Haeuber; Linda H. Pardo

    2008-01-01

    Framing the effects of air pollutants on ecosystems in terms of a "critical load" provides a meaningful approach for research scientists to communicate policy-relevant science to air-quality policy makers and natural resource managers. A critical-loads approach has been widely used to shape air-pollutant control policy in Europe since the 1980s, yet has only...

  19. Ambiguity of the critical load for spherical shells with shear damageability of the material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, D. V.; Dorodnykh, T. I.

    2016-06-01

    The structural-probabilistic approach to the modeling of combined crack formation and material deformation processes is used to develop a technique for solving bifurcation stability problems for thin-walled structural members made of damageable materials under single and repeated loadings. The example of a uniformly compressed spherical shell is used to show that, under repeated loading, thin-walled structural members made of shear damageable materials can lose stability under loads smaller than the upper critical loads. The ambiguity of the critical loads for various damage accumulation processes in the material of thin-walled structures depends on the level and character of loading. This phenomenon can be one possible cause of the experimental data spread and the discrepancy between theoretical and experimental results used to determine the critical loads for spherical and cylindrical shells.

  20. [Mapping Critical Loads of Heavy Metals for Soil Based on Different Environmental Effects].

    PubMed

    Shi, Ya-xing; Wu, Shao-hua; Zhou, Sheng-lu; Wang, Chun-hui; Chen, Hao

    2015-12-01

    China's rapid development of industrialization and urbanization causes the growing problem of heavy metal pollution of soil, threatening environment and human health. Therefore, prevention and management of heavy metal pollution become particularly important. Critical loads of heavy metals are an important management tool that can be utilized to prevent the occurrence of heavy metal pollution. Our study was based on three cases: status balance, water environmental effects and health risks. We used the steady-state mass balance equation to calculate the critical loads of Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn at different effect levels and analyze the values and spatial variation of critical loads. In addition, we used the annual input fluxes of heavy metals of the agro-ecosystem in the Yangtze River delta and China to estimate the proportion of area with exceedance of critical loads. The results demonstrated that the critical load value of Cd was the minimum, and the values of Cu and Zn were lager. There were spatial differences among the critical loads of four elements in the study area, lower critical loads areas mainly occurred in woodland and high value areas distributed in the east and southwest of the study area, while median values and the medium high areas mainly occurred in farmland. Comparing the input fluxes of heavy metals, we found that Pb and Zn in more than 90% of the area exceeded the critical loads under different environmental effects in the study area. The critical load exceedance of Cd mainly occurred under the status balance and the water environmental effect, while Cu under the status balance and water environmental effect with a higher proportion of exceeded areas. Critical loads of heavy metals at different effect levels in this study could serve as a reference from effective control of the emissions of heavy metals and to prevent the occurrence of heavy metal pollution.

  1. Load and dynamic assessment of B-52B-008 carrier aircraft for finned configuration 1 space shuttle solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem drop test vehicle. Volume 2: Airplane flutter and load analysis results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The airplane flutter and maneuver-gust load analysis results obtained during B-52B drop test vehicle configuration (with fins) evaluation are presented. These data are presented as supplementary data to that given in Volume 1 of this document. A brief mathematical description of airspeed notation and gust load factor criteria are provided as a help to the user. References are defined which provide mathematical description of the airplane flutter and load analysis techniques. Air-speed-load factor diagrams are provided for the airplane weight configurations reanalyzed for finned drop test vehicle configuration.

  2. An analytical study of turbulence responses, including horizontal-tail loads, of a control-configured vehicle with relaxed static stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, B., III

    1976-01-01

    A static stability augmentation system (SSAS) with angle-of-attack, pitch-rate, and forward-speed feedback is used to stabilize control-configured rigid vehicles with relaxed static stability. Airplane configurations include a baseline configuration and two representative control-configured vehicle configurations. The first statically unstable configuration has baseline geometry and an aft center of gravity; the second statically unstable configuration has reduced tail length and area and a forward neutral point. Stability, flying-qualities, and maneuverability requirements are imposed on the airplane-SSAS systems. Turbulence responses of the rigid airframe and tail loads are examined in terms of configuration changes for a given control law and in terms of control law changes for a given configuration.

  3. Spatial identification of critical nutrient loads of large shallow lakes: Implications for Lake Taihu (China).

    PubMed

    Janssen, Annette B G; de Jager, Victor C L; Janse, Jan H; Kong, Xiangzhen; Liu, Sien; Ye, Qinghua; Mooij, Wolf M

    2017-08-01

    Ongoing eutrophication frequently causes toxic phytoplankton blooms. This induces huge worldwide challenges for drinking water quality, food security and public health. Of crucial importance in avoiding and reducing blooms is to determine the maximum nutrient load ecosystems can absorb, while remaining in a good ecological state. These so called critical nutrient loads for lakes depend on the shape of the load-response curve. Due to spatial variation within lakes, load-response curves and therefore critical nutrient loads could vary throughout the lake. In this study we determine spatial patterns in critical nutrient loads for Lake Taihu (China) with a novel modelling approach called Spatial Ecosystem Bifurcation Analysis (SEBA). SEBA evaluates the impact of the lake's total external nutrient load on the local lake dynamics, resulting in a map of critical nutrient loads for different locations throughout the lake. Our analysis shows that the largest part of Lake Taihu follows a nonlinear load-response curve without hysteresis. The corresponding critical nutrient loads vary within the lake and depend on management goals, i.e. the maximum allowable chlorophyll concentration. According to our model, total nutrient loads need to be more than halved to reach chlorophyll-a concentrations of 30-40 μg L(-1) in most sections of the lake. To prevent phytoplankton blooms with 20 μg L(-1) chlorophyll-a throughout Lake Taihu, both phosphorus and nitrogen loads need a nearly 90% reduction. We conclude that our approach is of great value to determine critical nutrient loads of lake ecosystems such as Taihu and likely of spatially heterogeneous ecosystems in general. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of rotor location, coning, and tilt on critical loads in large wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.; Janetzke, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Several large (1500 kW) horizontal rotor configurations were analyzed to determine the effects on dynamic loads of upwind downwind rotor locations, coned and radial blade positions, and tilted and horizontal rotor axis positions. Loads were calculated for a range of wind velocities at three locations in the structure: (1) the blade shank; (2) the hub shaft; and (3) the yaw drive. Blade axis coning and rotor axis tilt were found to have minor effects on loads. However, locating the rotor upwind of the tower significantly reduced loads at all locations analyzed.

  5. Development and Implementation of Critical Loads for Atmospheric Deposition: Federal Land Management Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, E. M.

    2004-12-01

    Critical loads for atmospheric deposition have been widely developed and used in Europe, Canada, and other countries. Critical loads are used to influence air pollution emissions reductions, thereby protecting and restoring aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. In the United States, federal land management agencies are adopting the critical load concept as a potentially valuable resource management tool. Certain parks and wilderness areas are currently being affected by anthropogenic nitrogen and sulfur deposition. Effects of excess deposition include acidification, nitrogen enrichment, toxicity, and changes in biotic communities. Streams in both Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains National Parks are experiencing chronic and episodic acidification and brook trout fisheries in Shenandoah have been affected. High elevation ecosystems in Rocky Mountain National Park are undergoing subtle changes in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems attributable to atmospheric deposition. Natural resources in many other federal areas have been affected or are at risk from deposition. Federal land managers are refining strategies for critical loads that include working with scientists to identify resources sensitive to deposition, defining resource protection criteria that will meet management objectives, and estimating and implementing critical loads. Critical loads will be used in resource management decisions and federal land management planning. They will be used to evaluate management actions and assess progress towards meeting management goals. Federal land managers will also communicate critical loads information to air pollution regulatory agencies to inform emissions management strategies for clean air.

  6. CRITICAL ASSUMPTIONS IN THE F-TANK FARM CLOSURE OPERATIONAL DOCUMENTATION REGARDING WASTE TANK INTERNAL CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hommel, S.; Fountain, D.

    2012-03-28

    The intent of this document is to provide clarification of critical assumptions regarding the internal configurations of liquid waste tanks at operational closure, with respect to F-Tank Farm (FTF) closure documentation. For the purposes of this document, FTF closure documentation includes: (1) Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the FTF PA) (SRS-REG-2007-00002), (2) Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (DOE/SRS-WD-2012-001), (3) Tier 1 Closure Plan for the F-Area Waste Tank Systems at the Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2010-00147), (4) F-Tank Farm Tanks 18 and 19 DOE Manual 435.1-1 Tier 2 Closure Plan Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2011-00015), (5) Industrial Wastewater Closure Module for the Liquid Waste Tanks 18 and 19 (SRRCWDA-2010-00003), and (6) Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis for the Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis) (SRR-CWDA-2010-00124). Note that the first three FTF closure documents listed apply to the entire FTF, whereas the last three FTF closure documents listed are specific to Tanks 18 and 19. These two waste tanks are expected to be the first two tanks to be grouted and operationally closed under the current suite of FTF closure documents and many of the assumptions and approaches that apply to these two tanks are also applicable to the other FTF waste tanks and operational closure processes.

  7. Critical loads of nitrogen deposition and critical levels of atmospheric ammonia for semi-natural Mediterranean evergreen woodlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, P.; Theobald, M. R.; Dias, T.; Tang, Y. S.; Cruz, C.; Martins-Loução, M. A.; Máguas, C.; Sutton, M.; Branquinho, C.

    2012-03-01

    Nitrogen (N) has emerged in recent years as a key factor associated with global changes, with impacts on biodiversity, ecosystems functioning and human health. In order to ameliorate the effects of excessive N, safety thresholds such as critical loads (deposition fluxes) and levels (concentrations) can be established. Few studies have assessed these thresholds for semi-natural Mediterranean ecosystems. Our objective was therefore to determine the critical loads of N deposition and long-term critical levels of atmospheric ammonia for semi-natural Mediterranean evergreen woodlands. We have considered changes in epiphytic lichen communities, one of the most sensitive comunity indicators of excessive N in the atmosphere. Based on a classification of lichen species according to their tolerance to N we grouped species into response functional groups, which we used as a tool to determine the critical loads and levels. This was done for a Mediterranean climate in evergreen cork-oak woodlands, based on the relation between lichen functional diversity and modelled N deposition for critical loads and measured annual atmospheric ammonia concentrations for critical levels, evaluated downwind from a reduced N source (a cattle barn). Modelling the highly significant relationship between lichen functional groups and annual atmospheric ammonia concentration showed the critical level to be below 1.9 μg m-3, in agreement with recent studies for other ecosystems. Modelling the highly significant relationship between lichen functional groups and N deposition showed that the critical load was lower than 26 kg (N) ha-1 yr-1, which is within the upper range established for other semi-natural ecosystems. Taking into account the high sensitivity of lichen communities to excessive N, these values should aid development of policies to protect Mediterranean woodlands from the initial effects of excessive N.

  8. To what extent can linear finite element models of human femora predict failure under stance and fall loading configurations?

    PubMed

    Schileo, Enrico; Balistreri, Luca; Grassi, Lorenzo; Cristofolini, Luca; Taddei, Fulvia

    2014-11-07

    Proximal femur strength estimates from computed tomography (CT)-based finite element (FE) models are finding clinical application. Published models reached a high in-vitro accuracy, yet many of them rely on nonlinear methodologies or internal best-fitting of parameters. The aim of the present study is to verify to what extent a linear FE modelling procedure, fully based on independently determined parameters, can predict the failure characteristics of the proximal femur in stance and sideways fall loading configurations. Fourteen fresh-frozen cadaver femora were CT-scanned. Seven femora were tested to failure in stance loading conditions, and seven in fall. Fracture was monitored with high-speed videos. Linear FE models were built from CT images according to a procedure already validated in the prediction of strains. An asymmetric maximum principal strain criterion (0.73% tensile, 1.04% compressive limit) was used to define a node-based risk factor (RF). FE-predicted failure load, mode (tensile/compressive) and location were determined from the first node reaching RF=1. FE-predicted and measured failure loads were highly correlated (R(2)=0.89, SEE=814N). In all specimens, FE models correctly identified the failure mode (tensile in stance, compressive in fall) and the femoral region where fracture started (supero-lateral neck aspect). The location of failure onset was accurately predicted in eight specimens. In summary, a simple FE model, adaptable in the future to multiple loads (e.g. including muscles), was highly correlated with experimental failure in two loading conditions on specimens ranging from normal to osteoporotic. Thus, it can be suitable for use in clinical studies.

  9. Modeling and mapping of critical loads for heavy metals in Kunshan soil.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaohua; Shi, Yaxing; Zhou, Shenglu; Wang, Chunhui; Chen, Hao

    2016-11-01

    The assessment of critical loads of metals in soil can be used as an important tool for evaluation and for risk precaution of future inputs of metal in order to avoid the occurrence of heavy metal pollution and its long-term risks for people. In this study, critical loads of Cd, Cu, and Pb in farming and non-farming areas of Kunshan were calculated based on three main effects. Two of these effects, limit value of daily metals dose and different environmental water quality criteria are new ways to calculate the critical content of heavy metals. The mean value of critical loads decreased in the order Cu>Pb>Cd when calculated using mass balance effects, child health risk effects, and adult health risk effects. Critical loads were highest in the areas near construction land, areas of low critical load were scattered throughout the city. The areal proportion of critical load exceedance is greatest for Pb based on mass balance effects, followed by Cu based on water quality effects, and Cd based on mass balance effects. Exceedances only occurred in 6% and 3% of farming areas for water quality effects for Cd and Pb when compared critical load values to the input fluxes in the Yangtze River delta. However, for these metals, values were up to 83% and 100%, respectively, based on mass balance effects. Exceedances completely covered non-farming areas for each effect for Pb. Most exceedances occurred in the north and south of the city in non-farming areas. Spatially explicit critical loads of heavy metals based on the different effects can serve as a reference for controlling the emissions of heavy metals effectively and meeting the demands of different management objectives.

  10. Highly loaded multi-stage fan drive turbine: Performance of final three configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, D. G.; Thomas, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    Results for a three-stage highly loaded fan drive turbine follow-on test program are presented. The effects of combinations of tandem and leaned bladerows on three-stage turbine performance were tested. The three-stage turbine with a tandem stator in stage two exhibited a total-to-total efficiency of approximately 0.887 as compared to 0.886 for the plain blade turbine base case.

  11. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 5 - North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor (AFR) criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark AFR criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors (PWR). The analysis methodology selected for all calculations reported herein was the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of one reactor critical configuration for North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5. This unit and cycle were chosen for a previous analysis using a different methodology because detailed isotopics from multidimensional reactor calculations were available from the Virginia Power Company. These data permitted comparison of criticality calculations directly using the utility-calculated isotopics to those using the isotopics generated by the SCALE-4 SAS2H

  12. Nitrogen critical loads and management alternatives for N-impacted ecosystems in California

    Treesearch

    M.E. Fenn; E.B. Allen; S.B. Weiss; S. Jovan; L. Geiser; G.S. Tonnesen; R.F. Johnson; L.E. Rao; B.S. Gimeno; F. Yuan; T. Meixner; A. Bytnerowicz

    2010-01-01

    Empirical critical loads for N deposition effects and maps showing areas projected to be in exceedance of the critical load (CL) are given for seven major vegetation types in California. Thirty-five percent of the land area for these vegetation types (99,639 km2) is estimated to be in excess of the N CL. Low CL values (3–8...

  13. Faculty Work Load Formulas in Nursing Education: A Critical Theory Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grams, Kathryn M.; Christ, Mary Ann

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to increase faculty awareness and understanding of the constraints and contradictions that are embedded within faculty work load formulas. An overview of critical social theory serves as a framework for the analysis of work load formulas within the context of their historical development and current usage. (Author)

  14. Influence of snow shovel shaft configuration on lumbosacral biomechanics during a load-lifting task.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Ryan T; Rouhi, Gholamreza; Robertson, D Gordon E

    2014-03-01

    Lower-back injury from snow shovelling may be related to excessive joint loading. Bent-shaft snow shovels are commonly available for purchase; however, their influence on lower back-joint loading is currently not known. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare L5/S1 extension angular impulses between a bent-shaft and a standard straight-shaft snow shovel. Eight healthy subjects participated in this study. Each completed a simulated snow-lifting task in a biomechanics laboratory with each shovel design. A standard motion analysis procedure was used to determine L5/S1 angular impulses during each trial, as well as peak L5/S1 extension moments and peak upper body flexion angle. Paired-samples t-tests (α = 0.05) were used to compare variables between shovel designs. Correlation was used to determine the relationship between peak flexion and peak moments. Results of this study show that the bent-shaft snow shovel reduced L5/S1 extension angular impulses by 16.5% (p = 0.022), decreased peak moments by 11.8% (p = 0.044), and peak flexion by 13.0% (p = 0.002) compared to the straight-shaft shovel. Peak L5/S1 extension moment magnitude was correlated with peak upper body flexion angle (r = 0.70). Based on these results, it is concluded that the bent-shaft snow shovel can likely reduce lower-back joint loading during snow shovelling, and thus may have a role in snow shovelling injury prevention.

  15. Atmospheric configurations of aerosols loading and retention over Bolgatanga-Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emetere, M. E.; Sanni, S. E.; Tunji-Olayeni, P.

    2017-05-01

    Bolgatanga is located on latitude of 10.78 °N and longitude 0.85 °W. This research is aimed to estimate the aerosols loading and retention over Bolgatanga-Ghana through a conceptual model that is made up of analytical, statistical and Matlab curve-fitting tool. The model’s accuracy was established over the aerosol optical depth for a thirteen-year satellite data set from the Multi-angle imaging specto-reflectometer (MISR). The maximum aerosol retention was 31.73%. Its atmospheric constants, tunning constants and the phase difference over Bolgatanga was found to 0.67, 0.24 and ±π/4 respectively. The phase difference expresses the different kinds of network topologies and beam forming methods for measuring devices that may be used in Bolgatanga. Therefore a good estimation of the aerosols loading and retention over Bolgatanga, we may be in the best position to controlling its effect on health, farming, rainfall pattern, cloud formation and regional climate.

  16. Pressure loads and aerodynamic force information for the -89A space shuttle orbiter configuration, volume 2. [for structural strength analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennell, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on an 0.0405 scale representation of the Rockwell -89A Light Weight Space Shuttle Orbiter. The test purpose was to obtain pressure loads data in the presence of the ground for orbiter structural strength analysis. Aerodynamic force data was also recorded to allow correlation with all pressure loads information. Angles of attack from minus 3 deg to 18 deg and angles of sideslip of 0 deg, plus or minus 50 deg, and plus or minus 10 deg were tested in the presence of the NAAL ground plane. Static pressure bugs were used to obtain a pressure loads survey of the basic configuration, elevon deflections of 5 deg, 10 deg, 15 deg, and minus 20 deg and a rudder deflection of minus 15 deg, at a tunnel dynamic pressure of 40 psi. The test procedure was to locate a maximum of 30 static pressure bugs on the model surface at various locations calculated to prevent aerodynamic and physical interference. Then by various combinations of location the pressure bugs output was to define a complete pressure survey for the fuselages, wing, vertical tail, and main landing gear door.

  17. Determining critical load in the multispan beams with the nonlinear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DemÑ-r, D. Dönmez; Sinir, B. G.; Usta, L.

    2017-01-01

    The beams which are one of the most commonly used structural members are quite important for many researchers. Mathematical models determining the response of beams under external loads are concluded from elasticity theory through a series of assumptions concerning the kinematics of deformation and constitutive behavior. In this study, the derivation of the nonlinear model is introduced to determine the critical load in the multispan beams. Since the engineering practice of this kind of problems is very common, determining the critical load is quite important. For this purpose, the nonlinear mathematical model of the multispan Euler-Bernoulli beam is firstly obtained. To be able to obtain the independent of the material and the geometry, the present model are became dimensionless. Then, the critical axial load can be determined via the nonlinear solution of the governing equation.

  18. STRUTEX: A prototype knowledge-based system for initially configuring a structure to support point loads in two dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L.; Feyock, Stefan; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research effort is to investigate the benefits that might be derived from applying artificial intelligence tools in the area of conceptual design. Therefore, the emphasis is on the artificial intelligence aspects of conceptual design rather than structural and optimization aspects. A prototype knowledge-based system, called STRUTEX, was developed to initially configure a structure to support point loads in two dimensions. This system combines numerical and symbolic processing by the computer with interactive problem solving aided by the vision of the user by integrating a knowledge base interface and inference engine, a data base interface, and graphics while keeping the knowledge base and data base files separate. The system writes a file which can be input into a structural synthesis system, which combines structural analysis and optimization.

  19. STRUTEX: A prototype knowledge-based system for initially configuring a structure to support point loads in two dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robers, James L.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1989-01-01

    Only recently have engineers begun making use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) tools in the area of conceptual design. To continue filling this void in the design process, a prototype knowledge-based system, called STRUTEX has been developed to initially configure a structure to support point loads in two dimensions. This prototype was developed for testing the application of AI tools to conceptual design as opposed to being a testbed for new methods for improving structural analysis and optimization. This system combines numerical and symbolic processing by the computer with interactive problem solving aided by the vision of the user. How the system is constructed to interact with the user is described. Of special interest is the information flow between the knowledge base and the data base under control of the algorithmic main program. Examples of computed and refined structures are presented during the explanation of the system.

  20. Criticality Analysis for Proposed Maximum Fuel Loading in a Standardized SNF Canister with Type 1a Baskets

    SciTech Connect

    Chad Pope; Larry L. Taylor; Soon Sam Kim

    2007-02-01

    This document represents a summary version of the criticality analysis done to support loading SNF in a Type 1a basket/standard canister combination. Specifically, this engineering design file (EDF) captures the information pertinent to the intact condition of four fuel types with different fissile loads and their calculated reactivities. These fuels are then degraded into various configurations inside a canister without the presence of significant moderation. The important aspect of this study is the portrayal of the fuel degradation and its effect on the reactivity of a single canister given the supposition there will be continued moderation exclusion from the canister. Subsequent analyses also investigate the most reactive ‘dry’ canister in a nine canister array inside a hypothetical transport cask, both dry and partial to complete flooding inside the transport cask. The analyses also includes a comparison of the most reactive configuration to other benchmarked fuels using a software package called TSUNAMI, which is part of the SCALE 5.0 suite of software.

  1. Empirical critical loads of atmospheric nitrogen deposition for nutrient enrichment and acidification of sensitive US lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baron, J.S.; Driscoll, C.T.; Stoddard, J.L.; Richer, E.E.

    2011-01-01

    The ecological effects of elevated atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on high-elevation lakes of the western and northeastern United States include nutrient enrichment and acidification. The nutrient enrichment critical load for western lakes ranged from 1.0 to 3.0 kilograms (kg) of N per hectare (ha) per year, reflecting the nearly nonexistent watershed vegetation in complex, snowmelt-dominated terrain. The nutrient enrichment critical load for northeastern lakes ranged from 3.5 to 6.0 kg N per ha per year. The N acidification critical loads associated with episodic N pulses in waters with low values of acid neutralizing capacity were 4.0 kg N per ha per year (western) and 8.0 kg N per ha per year (northeastern). The empirical critical loads for N-caused acidification were difficult to determine because of a lack of observations in the West, and high sulfur deposition in the East. For both nutrient enrichment and acidification, the N critical load was a function of how atmospheric N deposition was determined. ?? 2011 by American Institute of Biological Sciences. All rights reserved.

  2. Designing pinhole vacancies in graphene towards functionalization: Effects on critical buckling load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgantzinos, S. K.; Markolefas, S.; Giannopoulos, G. I.; Katsareas, D. E.; Anifantis, N. K.

    2017-03-01

    The effect of size and placement of pinhole-type atom vacancies on Euler's critical load on free-standing, monolayer graphene, is investigated. The graphene is modeled by a structural spring-based finite element approach, in which every interatomic interaction is approached as a linear spring. The geometry of graphene and the pinhole size lead to the assembly of the stiffness matrix of the nanostructure. Definition of the boundary conditions of the problem leads to the solution of the eigenvalue problem and consequently to the critical buckling load. Comparison to results found in the literature illustrates the validity and accuracy of the proposed method. Parametric analysis regarding the placement and size of the pinhole-type vacancy, as well as the graphene geometry, depicts the effects on critical buckling load. Non-linear regression analysis leads to empirical-analytical equations for predicting the buckling behavior of graphene, with engineered pinhole-type atom vacancies.

  3. Empirical critical loads of atmospheric nitrogen deposition for nutrient enrichment and acidification of sensitive US lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, J.; Driscoll, C. T.; Stoddard, J. L.; Richer, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    Ecological effects of elevated atmospheric N deposition for high elevation lakes of the western and northeastern US include nutrient enrichment and acidification. These effects are most evident in high elevation lakes, which are sensitive to atmospheric deposition and have been minimally impacted by land disturbance. Nitrogen-limited lakes will exhibit increases in productivity and shifts in the composition of phytoplankton in response to increases in atmospheric N deposition. Wet N deposition reported by NADP/NTN does not accurately depict total N deposition including dry species, and national NADP maps can misrepresent total deposition amounts in regions of complex terrain, so we calculated N deposition three different ways in order to explore critical loads. The nutrient enrichment critical load for Western lakes ranged 1.0-3.0 kg N per ha per yr, reflecting near-lack of watershed vegetation in complex, snow-melt dominated terrain. The nutrient enrichment critical load for Northeastern lakes ranged 3.5-6.0 kg N per ha per yr. The N acidification critical loads associated with episodic N pulses in waters with low values of acid neutralizing capacity were 4.0 kg N per ha per yr (western) and 8.0 kg N per ha per yr (northeastern). Empirical critical loads for N-caused acidification were difficult to determine due to lack of observations in the West, and because of the additive effects of decades of atmospheric sulfur deposition in the Northeast. For both nutrient enrichment and acidification, the N critical load was a function of how atmospheric N deposition was determined.

  4. Efficient critical design load case identification for floating offshore wind turbines with a reduced nonlinear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matha, Denis; Sandner, Frank; Schlipf, David

    2014-12-01

    Design verification of wind turbines is performed by simulation of design load cases (DLC) defined in the IEC 61400-1 and -3 standards or equivalent guidelines. Due to the resulting large number of necessary load simulations, here a method is presented to reduce the computational effort for DLC simulations significantly by introducing a reduced nonlinear model and simplified hydro- and aerodynamics. The advantage of the formulation is that the nonlinear ODE system only contains basic mathematic operations and no iterations or internal loops which makes it very computationally efficient. Global turbine extreme and fatigue loads such as rotor thrust, tower base bending moment and mooring line tension, as well as platform motions are outputs of the model. They can be used to identify critical and less critical load situations to be then analysed with a higher fidelity tool and so speed up the design process. Results from these reduced model DLC simulations are presented and compared to higher fidelity models. Results in frequency and time domain as well as extreme and fatigue load predictions demonstrate that good agreement between the reduced and advanced model is achieved, allowing to efficiently exclude less critical DLC simulations, and to identify the most critical subset of cases for a given design. Additionally, the model is applicable for brute force optimization of floater control system parameters.

  5. Prediction of the critical buckling load of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under axial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timesli, Abdelaziz; Braikat, Bouazza; Jamal, Mohammad; Damil, Noureddine

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new explicit analytical formula of the critical buckling load of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNT) under axial compression. This formula takes into account van der Waals interactions between adjacent tubes and the effect of terms involving tube radii differences generally neglected in the derived expressions of the critical buckling load published in the literature. The elastic multiple Donnell shells continuum approach is employed for modelling the multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The validation of the proposed formula is made by comparison with a numerical solution. The influence of the neglected terms is also studied.

  6. EVALUATION OF THE INITIAL CRITICAL CONFIGURATION OF THE HTR-10 PEBBLE-BED REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    William K. Terry

    2005-11-01

    This report describes the evaluation of data from the initial criticality measurement of the HTR-10 pebble-bed reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology in China to determine whether the data are of sufficient quality to use as benchmarks for reactor physics computer codes intended for pebble-bed reactor analysis. The evaluation applied the INL pebble-bed reactor physics code PEBBED to perform an uncertainty analysis on the core critical height. The overall uncertainty in k-effective was slightly over 0.5%, which is considered adequate for an experimental benchmark.

  7. Benchmark Evaluation of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment Program Critical Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2013-02-01

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were performed in 1962-1965 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) program. The MPRE was a stainless-steel clad, highly enriched uranium (HEU)-O2 fuelled, BeO reflected reactor design to provide electrical power to space vehicles. Cooling and heat transfer were to be achieved by boiling potassium in the reactor core and passing vapor directly through a turbine. Graphite- and beryllium-reflected assemblies were constructed at ORCEF to verify the critical mass, power distribution, and other reactor physics measurements needed to validate reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. The experimental series was broken into three parts, with the third portion of the experiments representing the beryllium-reflected measurements. The latter experiments are of interest for validating current reactor design efforts for a fission surface power reactor. The entire series has been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments and submitted for publication in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  8. Two Configurations for Accessing Classroom Computers: Differential Impact on Students' Critical Reflections and Their Empowerment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solhaug, T.

    2009-01-01

    The context of this article is the new technological environment and the struggle to use meaningful teaching practices in Norwegian schools. Students' critical reflections in two different technological learning environments in six upper secondary schools are compared. Three of these schools offer Internet-connected computers in special computer…

  9. Two Configurations for Accessing Classroom Computers: Differential Impact on Students' Critical Reflections and Their Empowerment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solhaug, T.

    2009-01-01

    The context of this article is the new technological environment and the struggle to use meaningful teaching practices in Norwegian schools. Students' critical reflections in two different technological learning environments in six upper secondary schools are compared. Three of these schools offer Internet-connected computers in special computer…

  10. Critical assessment of precracked specimen configuration and experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    A research program was conducted to critically assess the effects of precracked specimen configuration, stress intensity solutions, compliance relationships and other experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate. Modified compact and double beam wedge-loaded specimens were tested and analyzed to determine the threshold stress intensity factor and stress corrosion crack growth rate. Stress intensity solutions and experimentally determined compliance relationships were developed and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Crack growth data suggests that more effective crack length measurement techniques are necessary to better characterize stress corrosion crack growth. Final load determined by specimen reloading and by compliance did not correlate well, and was considered a major source of interlaboratory variability. Test duration must be determined systematically, accounting for crack length measurement resolution, time for crack arrest, and experimental interferences. This work was conducted as part of a round robin program sponsored by ASTM committees G1.06 and E24.04 to develop a standard test method for stress corrosion testing using precracked specimens.

  11. Critical assessment of precracked specimen configuration and experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    A research program was conducted to critically assess the effects of precracked specimen configuration, stress intensity solutions, compliance relationships and other experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate. Modified compact and double beam wedge-loaded specimens were tested and analyzed to determine the threshold stress intensity factor and stress corrosion crack growth rate. Stress intensity solutions and experimentally determined compliance relationships were developed and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Crack growth data suggests that more effective crack length measurement techniques are necessary to better characterize stress corrosion crack growth. Final load determined by specimen reloading and by compliance did not correlate well, and was considered a major source of interlaboratory variability. Test duration must be determined systematically, accounting for crack length measurement resolution, time for crack arrest, and experimental interferences. This work was conducted as part of a round robin program sponsored by ASTM committees G1.06 and E24.04 to develop a standard test method for stress corrosion testing using precracked specimens.

  12. Critical levels and loads and the regulation of industrial emissions in northwest British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williston, P.; Aherne, J.; Watmough, S.; Marmorek, D.; Hall, A.; de la Cueva Bueno, P.; Murray, C.; Henolson, A.; Laurence, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Northwest British Columbia, Canada, a sparsely populated and largely pristine region, is targeted for rapid industrial growth owing to the modernization of an aluminum smelter and multiple proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities. Consequently, air quality in this region is expected to undergo considerable changes within the next decade. In concert, the increase in LNG capacity driven by gas production from shale resources across North America has prompted environmental concerns and highlighted the need for science-based management decisions regarding the permitting of air emissions. In this study, an effects-based approach widely-used to support transboundary emissions policy negotiations was used to assess industrial air emissions in the Kitimat and Prince Rupert airsheds under permitted and future potential industrial emissions. Critical levels for vegetation of SO2 and NO2 and critical loads of acidity and nutrient nitrogen for terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems were estimated for both regions and compared with modelled concentration and deposition estimates to identify the potential extent and magnitude of ecosystem impacts. The critical level for SO2 was predicted to be exceeded in an area ranging from 81 to 251 km2 in the Kitimat airshed owing to emissions from an existing smelter, compared with <1 km2 in Prince Rupert under the lowest to highest emissions scenarios. In contrast, the NO2 critical level was not exceeded in Kitimat, and ranged from 4.5 to 6 km2 in Prince Rupert owing to proposed LNG related emissions. Predicted areal exceedance of the critical load of acidity for soil ranged from 1 to 28 km2 in Kitimat and 4-10 km2 in Prince Rupert, while the areal exceedance of empirical critical load for nutrient N was predicted to be greater in the Prince Rupert airshed (20-94 km2) than in the Kitimat airshed (1-31 km2). The number of lakes that exceeded the critical load of acidity did not vary greatly across emissions scenarios in the Kitimat (21

  13. An Investigation of the Validity of Wang's Formula for the Critical Load for Circular Cylindrical Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smull, Leland K.

    1943-01-01

    Four circular cylindrical grids were tested under axial compression to investigate the validity of a theoretical formula for the critical load for such structures. The chief result of the investigation was to throw light on some difficulties connected with the experimental validation of such formulas.

  14. Use of combined biogeochemical model approaches and empirical data to assess critical loads of nitrogen

    Treesearch

    Mark Fenn; Charles Driscoll; Quingtao Zhou; Leela Rao; Thomas Meixner; Edith Allen; Fengming Yuan; Timothy Sullivan

    2015-01-01

    Empirical and dynamic biogeochemical modelling are complementary approaches for determining the critical load (CL) of atmospheric nitrogen (N) or other constituent deposition that an ecosystem can tolerate without causing ecological harm. The greatest benefits are obtained when these approaches are used in combination. Confounding environmental factors can complicate...

  15. Site-specific critical acid load estimates for forest soils in the Osborn Creek watershed, Michigan

    Treesearch

    Trevor Hobbs; Jason Lynch; Randy. Kolka

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic acid deposition has the potential to accelerate leaching of soil cations, and in turn, deplete nutrients essential to forest vegetation. The critical load concept, employing a simple mass balance (SMB) approach, is often used to model this process. In an evaluation under the U.S. Forest Service Watershed Condition Framework program, soils in all 6th level...

  16. Empirical and simulated critical loads for nitrogen deposition in California mixed conifer forests

    Treesearch

    M.E. Fenn; S. Jovan; F. Yuan; L. Geiser; T. Meixner; B.S. Gimeno

    2008-01-01

    Empirical critical loads (CL) for N deposition were determined from changes in epiphytic lichen communities, elevated NO3 leaching in streamwater, and reduced fine root biomass in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) at sites with varying N deposition. The CL for lichen community impacts of 3.1 kg ha-1 year

  17. Effect of ventilation rate and board loading on formaldehyde concentration : a critical review of the literature

    Treesearch

    George E. Myers

    1984-01-01

    A critical literature review has been carried out on the influence of ventilation rate (N, hr.-1) and board loading (L, m2/m3) on steady state formaldehyde concentrations (Cs, ppm) resulting from particleboard and plywood emissions. Large differences exist among boards in the extent to which their formaldehyde concentrations change with N or L in laboratory chambers....

  18. Cognitive Load Criteria for Critical Evaluation and Selection of Web-Based Resources for Science Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemm, E. Barbara; Iding, Marie K.; Crosby, Martha E.

    This study addresses the need to develop research-based criteria for science teacher educators to use in preparing teachers to critically evaluate and select web-based resources for their students' use. The study focuses on the cognitive load imposed on the learner for tasks required in using text, illustrations, and other features of multi-…

  19. A comparison of empirical and modeled nitrogen critical loads for Mediterranean forests and shrublands in California

    Treesearch

    M.E. Fenn; H.-D. Nagel; I. Koseva; J. Aherne; S.E. Jovan; L.H. Geiser; A. Schlutow; T. Scheuschner; A. Bytnerowicz; B.S. Gimeno; F. Yuan; S.A. Watmough; E.B. Allen; R.F. Johnson; T. Meixner

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition is impacting a number of ecosystem types in California. Critical loads (CLs) for N deposition determined for mixed conifer forests and chaparral/oak woodlands in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California and the San Bernardino Mountains in southern California using empirical and various modelling approaches were compared. Models used included...

  20. Lichen-based critical loads for atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Western Oregon and Washington forests, USA

    Treesearch

    Linda H. Geiser; Sarah E. Jovan; Doug A. Glavich; Matthew K. Porter

    2010-01-01

    Critical loads (CLs) define maximum atmospheric deposition levels apparently preventative of ecosystem harm. We present first nitrogen CLs for northwestern North America's maritime forests. Using multiple linear regression, we related epiphytic-macrolichen community composition to: 1) wet deposition from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program, 2) wet, dry,...

  1. Critical loads and nitrogen availability under deposition and harvest scenarios for conifer forests in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James; Cummins, Thomas; Aherne, Julian

    2016-01-15

    In this study we calculated the critical load of nutrient nitrogen (N) for Irish forest plots (n=380) under two harvesting scenarios: conventional stem-only harvest (SOH) and stem plus branch harvest (SBH) and two deposition scenarios: current and with a 10% increase in reduced-N. In addition, current N status was assessed using the following data from forest monitoring plots: forest floor C:N, foliar N and plant root simulation (PRS™) probe N supply rate. Average critical loads were 15.3 kg N ha(-1)year(-1) under SOH and 19.5 kg N ha(-1)year(-1) under SBH. Average total (wet+dry) N deposition was 18 kg N ha(-1)year(-1), ranging from 8.6 to 26 kg Nha(-1)year(-1). As a result, critical loads were exceeded at 67% of sites under SOH and 40% of sites under SBH. However, there was little evidence of exceedance at monitored plots. Foliar and forest floor C:N data indicated that most of these sites had low to intermediate N status. There were considerable differences in N cycling between soil types. Plant root simulation (PRS™) probe data indicated that this was likely due to differences in net N-mineralization and nitrification. Our results indicate that many sites are currently N limited but critical load exceedance suggests that these systems will accumulate N over time. The findings have implications for forest management, allowing for the assessment of nutrient management under different harvest scenarios.

  2. Assessing relationships between red spruce radial growth and pollution critical load exceedance values

    Treesearch

    Benjamin J. Engel; Paul G. Schaberg; Gary J. Hawley; Shelly A. Rayback; Jennifer Pontius; Alexandra M. Kosiba; Eric K. Miller

    2016-01-01

    Acidic sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) deposition depletes cations such as calcium (Ca) from forest soils and has been linked to increases in foliar winter injury that led to the decline of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) in the northeastern United States. We used results from a 30 m resolution steady-state S and N critical load exceedance model for New...

  3. Critical acid load limits in a changing climate: implications and solutions

    Treesearch

    Steven G. McNulty

    2010-01-01

    The federal agencies of the United States are currently developing guidelines for critical nitrogen load limits for U.S. forest ecosystems. These guidelines will be used to develop regulations designed to maintain pollutant inputs below the level shown to damage specified ecosystems.

  4. Uncertainty analysis on simple mass balance model to calculate critical loads for soil acidity

    Treesearch

    Harbin Li; Steven G. McNulty

    2007-01-01

    Simple mass balance equations (SMBE) of critical acid loads (CAL) in forest soil were developed to assess potential risks of air pollutants to ecosystems. However, to apply SMBE reliably at large scales, SMBE must be tested for adequacy and uncertainty. Our goal was to provide a detailed analysis of uncertainty in SMBE so that sound strategies for scaling up CAL...

  5. Effects of nitrogen deposition and empirical nitrogen critical loads for ecoregions of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pardo, L.H.; Fenn, M.E.; Goodale, C.L.; Geiser, L.H.; Driscoll, C.T.; Allen, E.B.; Baron, J.S.; Bobbink, R.; Bowman, W.D.; Clark, C.M.; Emmett, B.; Gilliam, F.S.; Greaver, T.L.; Hall, S.J.; Lilleskov, E.A.; Liu, L.; Lynch, J.A.; Nadelhoffer, K.J.; Perakis, S.S.; Robin-Abbott, M. J.; Stoddard, J.L.; Weathers, K.C.; Dennis, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    Human activity in the last century has led to a significant increase in nitrogen (N) emissions and atmospheric deposition. This N deposition has reached a level that has caused or is likely to cause alterations to the structure and function of many ecosystems across the United States. One approach for quantifying the deposition of pollution that would be harmful to ecosystems is the determination of critical loads. A critical load is defined as the input of a pollutant below which no detrimental ecological effects occur over the long-term according to present knowledge. The objectives of this project were to synthesize current research relating atmospheric N deposition to effects on terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems in the United States, and to estimate associated empirical N critical loads. The receptors considered included freshwater diatoms, mycorrhizal fungi, lichens, bryophytes, herbaceous plants, shrubs, and trees. Ecosystem impacts included: (1) biogeochemical responses and (2) individual species, population, and community responses. Biogeochemical responses included increased N mineralization and nitrification (and N availability for plant and microbial uptake), increased gaseous N losses (ammonia volatilization, nitric and nitrous oxide from nitrification and denitrification), and increased N leaching. Individual species, population, and community responses included increased tissue N, physiological and nutrient imbalances, increased growth, altered root : shoot ratios, increased susceptibility to secondary stresses, altered fire regime, shifts in competitive interactions and community composition, changes in species richness and other measures of biodiversity, and increases in invasive species. The range of critical loads for nutrient N reported for U.S. ecoregions, inland surface waters, and freshwater wetlands is 1-39 kg N.ha -1.yr -1, spanning the range of N deposition observed over most of the country. The empirical critical loads for N tend to

  6. Criticality Safety Analysis Of As-loaded Spent Nuclear Fuel Casks

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Kaushik; Scaglione, John M

    2015-01-01

    The final safety analysis report (FSAR) or the safety analysis report (SAR) for a particular spent nuclear fuel (SNF) cask system documents models and calculations used to demonstrate that a system meets the regulatory requirements under all normal, off-normal, and accident conditions of spent fuel storage, and normal and accident conditions of transportation. FSAR/SAR calculations and approved content specifications are intended to be bounding in nature to certify cask systems for a variety of fuel characteristics with simplified SNF loading requirements. Therefore, in general, loaded cask systems possess excess and uncredited criticality margins (i.e., the difference between the licensing basis and the as-loaded calculations). This uncredited margin could be quantified by employing more detailed cask-specific evaluations that credit the actual as-loaded cask inventory, and taking into account full (actinide and fission product) burnup credit. This uncredited criticality margin could be potentially used to offset (1) uncertainties in the safety basis that needs to account for the effects of system aging during extended dry storage prior to transportation, and (2) increases in SNF system reactivity over a repository performance period (e.g., 10,000 years or more) as the system undergoes degradation and internal geometry changes. This paper summarizes an assessment of cask-specific, as-loaded criticality margins for SNF stored at eight reactor sites (215 loaded casks were analyzed) under fully flooded conditions to assess the margins available during transportation after extended storage. It is observed that the calculated keff margin varies from 0.05 to almost 0.3 Δkeff for the eight selected reactor sites, demonstrating that significant uncredited safety margins are present. In addition, this paper evaluates the sufficiency of this excess margin in applications involving direct disposal of currently loaded SNF casks.

  7. Increasing glucose load while maintaining normoglycemia does not evoke neuronal damage in prolonged critically ill rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sonneville, Romain; den Hertog, Heleen M; Derde, Sarah; Güiza, Fabian; Derese, Inge; Van den Berghe, Greet; Vanhorebeek, Ilse

    2013-12-01

    Preventing severe hyperglycemia with insulin reduced the neuropathological alterations in frontal cortex during critical illness. We investigated the impact of increasing glucose load under normoglycemia on neurons and glial cells. Hyperinflammatory critically ill rabbits were randomized to fasting or combined parenteral nutrition containing progressively increasing amounts of glucose (low, intermediate, high) within the physiological range but with a similar amount of amino acids and lipids. In all groups, normoglycemia was maintained with insulin. On day 7, we studied the neuropathological alterations in frontal cortex neurons, astrocytes and microglia, and MnSOD as marker of oxidative stress. The percentage of damaged neurons was comparable among all critically ill and healthy rabbits. Critical illness induced an overall 1.8-fold increase in astrocyte density and activation status, largely irrespective of the nutritional intake. The percentage of microglia activation in critically ill rabbits was comparable with that in healthy rabbits, irrespective of glucose load. Likewise, MnSOD expression was comparable in critically ill and healthy rabbits without any clear impact of the nutritional interventions. During prolonged critical illness, increasing intravenous glucose infusion while strictly maintaining normoglycemia appeared safe for neuronal integrity and did not substantially affect glial cells in frontal cortex. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  8. Critical Threshold for Spontaneous Failure: Macro- and Micro- Behavior of Granite Loaded to Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, O.; Reches, Z.

    2003-12-01

    The ultimate strength, time-dependence creep and associated microstructure of granite samples are examined as an attempt to characterize the critical parameters of brittle rock failure. We loaded triaxially 27 cylinders of the medium grain-size Mount Scott granite (western Oklahoma) under dry, room temperature conditions. Thirteen of the samples were loaded under confining pressure ranging from 0 to 50 MPa, and the group of 14 samples was loaded under confining pressure of 41MPa, for which the ultimate strength is Us = 586+-16 MPa. The 14 samples were loaded up to pre-selected differential stress (NDS) that ranges from 0.54 Us to 1.05 Us, and were then held under constant stroke for periods as long as six hours. The failure could be reasonably well predicted by two macroscopic parameters. One is the maximum differential stress: the eleven samples loaded under NSD <= 0.95 did not fail during the six hours of hold period, whereas the three samples loaded by NDS>0.95 failed spontaneously after a few seconds to an hour of hold time. The high Weibull parameter (m=13-22) of strength distribution of a heterogeneous rock is in agreement with this observation. The second parameter is the ``crack volumetric strain'' (CVS) that increases monotonously for NDS<=0.95, but at NDS>0.95 it reaches a critical value of ~0.001 beyond which it is poorly constrained (with CVS approaching 0.005). We mapped the microfractures in thin-sections prepared from 5 deformed samples that cover the full loading range: 0.00, 0.57, 0.88, 0.96 of the rock strength and failure. The microstructural thin-section maps provided quantitative damage intensity (approaching 0.2) and fractal dimensions of the microfractures length distribution (1.5 for unloaded sample and 2.2-2.4 for loaded samples); these maps however, provide no critical failure indicator. Which of the examined parameters could be used to determine a critical failure state in an active fault-zone? We believe that the "crack volumetric strain

  9. Unsteady loads due to propulsive lift configurations. Part D: The development of an experimental facility for the investigation of scaling effects on propulsive lift configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.; Herling, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    The design and construction of an experimental facility for the investigation of scaling effects in propulsive lift configurations are described. The facility was modeled after an existing full size NASA facility which consisted of a coaxial turbofan jet engine with a rectangular nozzle in a blown surface configuration. The flow field of the model facility was examined with and without a simulated wing surface in place at several locations downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Emphasis was placed on obtaining pressure measurements which were made with static probes and surface pressure ports connected via plastic tubing to condenser microphones for fluctuating measurements. Several pressure spectra were compared with those obtained from the NASA facility, and were used in a preliminary evaluation of scaling laws.

  10. Diuretic response to colloid and crystalloid fluid loading in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Smorenberg, Annemieke; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2015-02-01

    In the critically ill patient, fluid loading is commonly done to stabilise hemodynamics and increase diuresis, whereas the absence of diuresis may predispose to harmful overloading. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the diuretic response and determinants thereof upon crystalloid and colloid fluid loading. This is a substudy on 42 clinically hypovolemic, septic or non-septic patients without acute kidney injury, who were randomly assigned, after stratification for sepsis, to a 90-min fluid loading protocol with either 0.9% saline or a colloid solution (gelatin, hydroxyethyl starch 200/0.5 or albumin). Hemodynamics, biochemical parameters and diuresis were recorded. A response was defined by an increase in diuresis of >10% during fluid loading. Diuresis increased more during saline than colloid infusion, together with a decline in colloid osmotic pressure (COP) of plasma and less increase in plasma volume and global hemodynamics with saline, at similar fluid balance. Nine patients (82%) receiving saline had a diuretic response, compared to 13 patients (42%) receiving colloids (P = 0.04), and the response was not predicted by underlying condition, global hemodynamics, volume of fluid infused and COP. In critically ill patients with clinical hypovolemia, diuresis increases more during saline than colloid fluid loading, only partly dependent of a fall in plasma COP.

  11. New approaches to provide ride-through for critical loads in electric power distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero-Hernandez, Oscar C.

    2001-07-01

    The extensive use of electronic circuits has enabled modernization, automation, miniaturization, high quality, low cost, and other achievements regarding electric loads in the last decades. However, modern electronic circuits and systems are extremely sensitive to disturbances from the electric power supply. In fact, the rate at which these disturbances happen is considerable as has been documented in recent years. In response to the power quality concerns presented previously, this dissertation is proposing new approaches to provide ride-through for critical loads during voltage disturbances with emphasis on voltage sags. In this dissertation, a new approach based on an AC-DC-AC system is proposed to provide ride-through for critical loads connected in buildings and/or an industrial system. In this approach, a three-phase IGBT inverter with a built in Dc-link voltage regulator is suitably controlled along with static by-pass switches to provide continuous power to critical loads. During a disturbance, the input utility source is disconnected and the power from the inverter is connected to the load. The remaining voltage in the AC supply is converted to DC and compensated before being applied to the inverter and the load. After detecting normal utility conditions, power from the utility is restored to the critical load. In order to achieve an extended ride-through capability a second approach is introduced. In this case, the Dc-link voltage regulator is performed by a DC-DC Buck-Boost converter. This new approach has the capability to mitigate voltage variations below and above the nominal value. In the third approach presented in this dissertation, a three-phase AC to AC boost converter is investigated. This converter provides a boosting action for the utility input voltages, right before they are applied to the load. The proposed Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) control strategy ensures independent control of each phase and compensates for both single-phase or poly

  12. A conceptual framework: redefining forest soil's critical acid loads under a changing climate.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Steven G; Boggs, Johnny L

    2010-06-01

    Federal agencies of several nations have or are currently developing guidelines for critical forest soil acid loads. These guidelines are used to establish regulations designed to maintain atmospheric acid inputs below levels shown to damage forests and streams. Traditionally, when the critical soil acid load exceeds the amount of acid that the ecosystem can absorb, it is believed to potentially impair forest health. The excess over the critical soil acid load is termed the exceedance, and the larger the exceedance, the greater the risk of ecosystem damage. This definition of critical soil acid load applies to exposure of the soil to a single, long-term pollutant (i.e., acidic deposition). However, ecosystems can be simultaneously under multiple ecosystem stresses and a single critical soil acid load level may not accurately reflect ecosystem health risk when subjected to multiple, episodic environmental stress. For example, the Appalachian Mountains of western North Carolina receive some of the highest rates of acidic deposition in the eastern United States, but these levels are considered to be below the critical acid load (CAL) that would cause forest damage. However, the area experienced a moderate three-year drought from 1999 to 2002, and in 2001 red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) trees in the area began to die in large numbers. The initial survey indicated that the affected trees were killed by the southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis Zimm.). This insect is not normally successful at colonizing these tree species because the trees produce large amounts of oleoresin that exclude the boring beetles. Subsequent investigations revealed that long-term acid deposition may have altered red spruce forest structure and function. There is some evidence that elevated acid deposition (particularly nitrogen) reduced tree water uptake potential, oleoresin production, and caused the trees to become more susceptible to insect colonization during the drought period

  13. Efficient identification of critical stresses in structures subject to dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Watson, L. T.; Grandhi, R. V.

    1986-01-01

    Optimum structural design problems generally employ constraints which are parametric in terms of space and time variables. A parametric constraint may be replaced by equivalent critical point constraints at its local minima for optimization applications. In complex structures, accurate identification of such critical points is computationally expensive due to the cost of finite element analyses. Three techniques are described for efficiently and accurately identifying critical points for space- and time-dependent parametric constraints. An adaptive search technique and a spline interpolation technique are developed for exactly known response. A least squares spline approximation is suggested for noisy behavior. A helicopter tail-boom structure subjected to transient loading is used as an example to demonstrate the techniques described. All three techniques are shown to be computationally efficient for critical point identification and the least squares approximation also removes noise from the data. The case of multiple constraints per element is shown to be particularly suited to the use of spline techniques.

  14. The effect of critically moving loads on the vibrations of soft soils and isolated railway tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auersch, L.

    2008-02-01

    The dynamic response of the railway track is strongly influenced by the underlying soil. For a soft soil and very high train speeds or for a very soft soil and regular train speeds, the train speed can be close to the speed of elastic waves in the soil. This paper presents a detailed study of the so-called "moving-load effect", i.e. an amplification of the dynamic response due to the load movement, for the tracks on soft soil. The analysis is carried out by evaluating the related integrals in the wavenumber domain. The influence of the load speed is quantified for a large set of parameters, showing that the effect on the soil vibration is reduced with increase of the frequency, track width and inverse wave velocity. Therefore, the moving-load effect associated with vibratory train loads is negligible whereas the amplification associated with the moving dead weight of the train can be significant. The strong moving-load effect on a perfectly homogeneous soil, however, can be strongly diminished by a layered or randomly varying soil situation. This theoretical result is affirmed by measurements at a test site in Germany where the trains run on a very soft soil at a near-critical speed. The results for soft soils are compared with experimental and theoretical results for a stiff soil. It is found that the influence of the stiffness of the soil is much stronger than the moving-load effect. This holds for the soil vibration as well as for the track vibration which both show a minor dependence on the load speed but a considerable dependence on the soil stiffness in theory and experiment. Railway tracks can include soft isolation elements such as rail pads, sleeper shoes and ballast mats. For these types of isolation elements and normal soil conditions, the influence of the load speed is usually negligible. There is only one isolation measure for which the moving load may be effective: a track which is constructed as a heavy mass-spring system. The resonance of this track

  15. Critical loads and their exceedances at intensive forest monitoring sites in Europe.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Martin; Nagel, Hans-Dieter; Granke, Oliver; Kraft, Philipp

    2008-10-01

    Intensive forest monitoring by means of harmonised methods has been conducted in Europe for more than a decade. Risks of atmospheric nitrogen and sulphur deposition are assessed by means of calculations of critical loads and their exceedances. In the present study throughfall and bulk deposition of nitrate (N-NO(3)), ammonium (N-NH(4)) and sulphate (S-SO(4)) show marked spatial patterns and temporal trends. In the period of observation (1999-2004), sulphate deposition on intensive monitoring plots decreased by about one quarter. This is in line with the reduction of S deposition by 70% since 1981 in Europe as a result of successful air pollution control politics under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP). However, sulphate and especially nitrate and ammonium deposition were found to still exceed critical loads at many forest sites, indicating a continued need for further implementation of air pollution abatement strategies.

  16. Environmental burden of acid gas emissions associated with the exceedence of critical loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Bernard E. A.

    This paper demonstrates an approach to assessing environmental burdens based on optimising the integrated deposition footprints of characteristic sources, such as power stations, urban areas or poultry farms, relative to 1 km×1 km ecosystem-dependent critical loads. It makes use of a penalty function and an adjoint Green's function method describing how the deposition of acid gases and reduced nitrogen compounds compare with critical loads, from which the optimum source location in Great Britain may be found. The effect of a unit of emission from a source category can be described on a single map. This simple risk based approach to environmental burdens is compared to a more elaborate optimisation, using large combustion plant emissions as an example.

  17. Evaluation of atmospheric nitrogen deposition model performance in the context of U.S. critical load assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jason J.; Chung, Serena H.; Johansen, Anne M.; Lamb, Brian K.; Vaughan, Joseph K.; Beutel, Marc

    2017-02-01

    Air quality models are widely used to estimate pollutant deposition rates and thereby calculate critical loads and critical load exceedances (model deposition > critical load). However, model operational performance is not always quantified specifically to inform these applications. We developed a performance assessment approach designed to inform critical load and exceedance calculations, and applied it to the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S. We quantified wet inorganic N deposition performance of several widely-used air quality models, including five different Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) simulations, the Tdep model, and 'PRISM x NTN' model. Modeled wet inorganic N deposition estimates were compared to wet inorganic N deposition measurements at 16 National Trends Network (NTN) monitoring sites, and to annual bulk inorganic N deposition measurements at Mount Rainier National Park. Model bias (model - observed) and error (|model - observed|) were expressed as a percentage of regional critical load values for diatoms and lichens. This novel approach demonstrated that wet inorganic N deposition bias in the Pacific Northwest approached or exceeded 100% of regional diatom and lichen critical load values at several individual monitoring sites, and approached or exceeded 50% of critical loads when averaged regionally. Even models that adjusted deposition estimates based on deposition measurements to reduce bias or that spatially-interpolated measurement data, had bias that approached or exceeded critical loads at some locations. While wet inorganic N deposition model bias is only one source of uncertainty that can affect critical load and exceedance calculations, results demonstrate expressing bias as a percentage of critical loads at a spatial scale consistent with calculations may be a useful exercise for those performing calculations. It may help decide if model performance is adequate for a particular calculation, help assess confidence in

  18. Effects and empirical critical loads of Nitrogen for ecoregions of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pardo, Linda H.; Robin-Abbott, Molly J.; Fenn, Mark E.; Goodale, Christine L.; Geiser, Linda H.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Allen, Edith B.; Baron, Jill S.; Bobbink, Roland; Bowman, William D.; Clark, C M; Emmett, B.; Gilliam, Frank S; Greaver, Tara L.; Hall, Sharon J; Lilleskov, Erik A.; Liu, Lingli; Lynch, Jason A.; Nadelhoffer, Knute J; Perakis, Steven; Stoddard, John L; Weathers, Kathleen C.; Dennis, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    Human activity in the last century has increased nitrogen (N) deposition to a level that has caused or is likely to cause alterations to the structure and function of many ecosystems across the United States. We synthesized current research relating atmospheric N deposition to effects on terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems in the United States, and estimated associated empirical critical loads of N for several receptors: freshwater diatoms, mycorrhizal fungi, lichens, bryophytes, herbaceous plants, shrubs, and trees. Biogeochemical responses included increased N mineralization and nitrification, increased gaseous N losses, and increased N leaching. Individual species, population, and community responses included increased tissue N, physiological and nutrient imbalances, increased growth, altered root-shoot ratios, increased susceptibility to secondary stresses, altered fire regime, shifts in competitive interactions and community composition, changes in species richness and other measures of biodiversity, and increases in invasive species. The range of critical loads of nutrient N reported for U.S. ecoregions, inland surface waters, and freshwater wetlands is 1–39 kg N ha−1 yr−1, spanning the range of N deposition observed over most of the country. The empirical critical loads of N tend to increase in the following sequence: diatoms, lichens and bryophytes, mycorrhizal fungi, herbaceous plants and shrubs, trees.

  19. Vegetation community change points suggest that critical loads of nutrient nitrogen may be too high

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Kayla; Aherne, Julian; Bleasdale, Andy

    2016-12-01

    It is widely accepted that elevated nitrogen deposition can have detrimental effects on semi-natural ecosystems, including changes to plant diversity. Empirical critical loads of nutrient nitrogen have been recommended to protect many sensitive European habitats from significant harmful effects. In this study, we used Threshold Indicator Taxa Analysis (TITAN) to investigate shifts in vegetation communities along an atmospheric nitrogen deposition gradient for twenty-two semi-natural habitat types (as described under Annex I of the European Union Habitats Directive) in Ireland. Significant changes in vegetation community, i.e., change points, were determined for twelve habitats, with seven habitats showing a decrease in the number of positive indicator species. Community-level change points indicated a decrease in species abundance along a nitrogen deposition gradient ranging from 3.9 to 15.3 kg N ha-1 yr-1, which were significantly lower than recommended critical loads (Wilcoxon signed-rank test; V = 6, p < 0.05). These results suggest that lower critical loads of empirical nutrient nitrogen deposition may be required to protect many European habitats. Changes to vegetation communities may mean a loss of sensitive indicator species and potentially rare species in these habitats, highlighting how emission reductions policies set under the National Emissions Ceilings Directive may be directly linked to meeting the goal set out under the European Union's Biodiversity Strategy of "halting the loss of biodiversity" across Europe by 2020.

  20. Nitrogen Critical Loads for an Alpine Meadow Ecosystem on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Ning; Shi, Peili; Song, Minghua; Zhang, Xianzhou; Jiang, Jing; Chai, Xi

    2016-03-01

    Increasing atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has the potential to alter plant diversity and thus the function and stability of terrestrial ecosystems. N-limited alpine ecosystems are expected to be particularly susceptible to increasing N deposition. However, little is known about the critical loads and saturation thresholds of ecosystem responses to increasing N deposition on the Tibetan Plateau, despite its importance to ecosystem management. To evaluate the N critical loads and N saturation thresholds in an alpine ecosystem, in 2010, we treated an alpine meadow with five levels of N addition (0, 10, 20, 40, and 80 kg N ha-1 year-1) and characterized plant and soil responses. The results showed that plant species richness and diversity index did not statistically vary with N addition treatments, but they both changed with years. N addition affected plant cover and aboveground productivity, especially for grasses, and soil chemical features. The N critical loads and saturation thresholds, in terms of plant cover and biomass change at the community level, were 8.8-12.7 and 50 kg N ha-1 year-1 (including the ambient N deposition rate), respectively. However, pronounced changes in soil inorganic N and net N mineralization occurred under the 20 and 40 kg N ha-1 year-1 treatments. Our results indicate that plant community cover and biomass are more sensitive than soil to increasing N inputs. The plant community composition in alpine ecosystems on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau may change under increasing N deposition in the future.

  1. Load and dynamic assessment of B-52B-008 carrier aircraft for finned configuration 1 space shuttle solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem drop test vehicle. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The B-52B airplane was identified for use in solid rocket booster (RSB) parachute drop flight testing. The purpose of this study was to determine by theoretical analysis methods the compatability and structural capability of B-52B drop test vehicle configuration (with fins) to accomplish the drop test mission. This document consist of four volumes. This volume presents a summary of airplane flutter and load strength evaluation analysis results and a comparative study of the pylon loading resulting from drop test vehicle inertia and aerodynamic considerations.

  2. Biomechanical properties of orthogonal plate configuration versus parallel plate configuration using the same locking plate system for intra-articular distal humeral fractures under radial or ulnar column axial load.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Toshiya; Hara, Akira; Iwase, Hideaki; Ichihara, Satoshi; Nagao, Masashi; Maruyama, Yuichiro; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2016-10-01

    Previous reports have questioned whether an orthogonal or parallel configuration is superior for distal humeral articular fractures. In previous clinical and biomechanical studies, implant failure of the posterolateral plate has been reported with orthogonal configurations; however, the reason for screw loosening in the posterolateral plate is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate biomechanical properties and to clarify the causes of posterolateral plate loosening using a humeral fracture model under axial compression on the radial or ulnar column separately. And we changed only the plate set up: parallel or orthogonal. We used artificial bone to create an Association for the Study of Internal Fixation type 13-C2.3 intra-articular fracture model with a 1-cm supracondylar gap. We used an anatomically-preshaped distal humerus locking compression plate system (Synthes GmbH, Solothurn, Switzerland). Although this is originally an orthogonal plate system, we designed a mediolateral parallel configuration to use the contralateral medial plate instead of the posterolateral plate in the system. We calculated the stiffness of the radial and ulnar columns and anterior movement of the condylar fragment in the lateral view. The parallel configuration was superior to the orthogonal configuration regarding the stiffness of the radial column axial compression. There were significant differences between the two configurations regarding anterior movement of the capitellum during axial loading of the radial column. The posterolateral plate tended to bend anteriorly under axial compression compared with the medial or lateral plate. We believe that in the orthogonal configuration axial compression induced more anterior displacement of the capitellum than the trochlea, which eventually induced secondary fragment or screw dislocation on the posterolateral plate, or nonunion at the supracondylar level. In the parallel configuration, anterior movement of the capitellum or

  3. Surface water acidification and critical loads: exploring the F-factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, L.; Bishop, K.

    2009-11-01

    As acid deposition decreases, uncertainties in methods for calculating critical loads become more important when judgements have to be made about whether or not further emission reductions are needed. An important aspect of one type of model that has been used to calculate surface water critical loads is the empirical F-factor which estimates the degree to which acid deposition is neutralised before it reaches a lake at any particular point in time relative to the pre-industrial, steady-state water chemistry conditions. In this paper we will examine how well the empirical F-functions are able to estimate pre-industrial lake chemistry as lake chemistry changes during different phases of acidification and recovery. To accomplish this, we use the dynamic, process-oriented biogeochemical model SAFE to generate a plausible time series of annual runoff chemistry for ca. 140 Swedish catchments between 1800 and 2100. These annual hydrochemistry data are then used to generate empirical F-factors that are compared to the "actual" F-factor seen in the SAFE data for each lake and year in the time series. The dynamics of the F-factor as catchments acidify, and then recover are not widely recognised. Our results suggest that the F-factor approach worked best during the acidification phase when soil processes buffer incoming acidity. However, the empirical functions for estimating F from contemporary lake chemistry are not well suited to the recovery phase when the F-factor turns negative due to recovery processes in the soil. This happens when acid deposition has depleted the soil store of BC, and then acid deposition declines, reducing the leaching of base cations to levels below those in the pre-industrial era. An estimate of critical load from water chemistry during recovery and empirical F functions would therefore result in critical loads that are too low. Therefore, the empirical estimates of the F-factor are a significant source of uncertainty in the estimate of surface

  4. Atmospheric deposition and critical loads for nitrogen and metals in Arctic Alaska: Review and current status

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Linder, Greg L.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Neitlich, Peter; Little, Edward

    2013-01-01

    To protect important resources under their bureau’s purview, the United States National Park Service’s (NPS) Arctic Network (ARCN) has developed a series of “vital signs” that are to be periodically monitored. One of these vital signs focuses on wet and dry deposition of atmospheric chemicals and further, the establishment of critical load (CL) values (thresholds for ecological effects based on cumulative depositional loadings) for nitrogen (N), sulfur, and metals. As part of the ARCN terrestrial monitoring programs, samples of the feather moss Hylocomium splendens are being col- lected and analyzed as a cost-effective means to monitor atmospheric pollutant deposition in this region. Ultimately, moss data combined with refined CL values might be used to help guide future regulation of atmospheric contaminant sources potentially impacting Arctic Alaska. But first, additional long-term studies are needed to determine patterns of contaminant deposition as measured by moss biomonitors and to quantify ecosystem responses at particular loadings/ ranges of contaminants within Arctic Alaska. Herein we briefly summarize 1) current regulatory guidance related to CL values 2) derivation of CL models for N and metals, 3) use of mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric deposition and loadings, 4) preliminary analysis of vulnerabilities and risks associated with CL estimates for N, 5) preliminary analysis of existing data for characterization of CL values for N for interior Alaska and 6) implications for managers and future research needs.

  5. Moment measurements in dynamic and quasi-static spine segment testing using eccentric compression are susceptible to artifacts based on loading configuration.

    PubMed

    Van Toen, Carolyn; Carter, Jarrod W; Oxland, Thomas R; Cripton, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    The tolerance of the spine to bending moments, used for evaluation of injury prevention devices, is often determined through eccentric axial compression experiments using segments of the cadaver spine. Preliminary experiments in our laboratory demonstrated that eccentric axial compression resulted in "unexpected" (artifact) moments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the static and dynamic effects of test configuration on bending moments during eccentric axial compression typical in cadaver spine segment testing. Specific objectives were to create dynamic equilibrium equations for the loads measured inferior to the specimen, experimentally verify these equations, and compare moment responses from various test configurations using synthetic (rubber) and human cadaver specimens. The equilibrium equations were verified by performing quasi-static (5 mm/s) and dynamic experiments (0.4 m/s) on a rubber specimen and comparing calculated shear forces and bending moments to those measured using a six-axis load cell. Moment responses were compared for hinge joint, linear slider and hinge joint, and roller joint configurations tested at quasi-static and dynamic rates. Calculated shear force and bending moment curves had similar shapes to those measured. Calculated values in the first local minima differed from those measured by 3% and 15%, respectively, in the dynamic test, and these occurred within 1.5 ms of those measured. In the rubber specimen experiments, for the hinge joint (translation constrained), quasi-static and dynamic posterior eccentric compression resulted in flexion (unexpected) moments. For the slider and hinge joints and the roller joints (translation unconstrained), extension ("expected") moments were measured quasi-statically and initial flexion (unexpected) moments were measured dynamically. In the cadaver experiments with roller joints, anterior and posterior eccentricities resulted in extension moments, which were unexpected and expected, for those

  6. Surface water acidification and critical loads: exploring the F-factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, L.; Bishop, K.

    2009-05-01

    As acid deposition decreases, uncertainties in methods for calculating critical loads become more important when judgements have to be made about whether or not further emission reductions are needed. An important aspect of one type of model that has been used to calculate surface water critical loads is the empirical F-factor which estimates the degree to which acid deposition is neutralised before it reaches a lake at any particular point in time relative to the pre-industrial, steady-state water chemistry conditions. In this paper we will examine how well the empirical F-functions are able to estimate pre-industrial lake chemistry as lake chemistry changes during different phases of acidification and recovery. To accomplish this, we use the dynamic, process-oriented biogeochemical model SAFE to generate a plausible time series of annual runoff chemistry for ca 140 Swedish catchments between 1800 and 2100. These annual hydrochemistry data are then used to generate empirical F-factors that are compared to the "actual" F-factor seen in the SAFE data for each lake and year in the time series. The dynamics of the F-factor as catchments acidify, and then recover are not widely recognised. Our results suggest that the F-factor approach worked best during the acidification phase when soil processes buffer incoming acidity. However, the empirical functions for estimating F from contemporary lake chemistry are not well suited to the recovery phase when the F-factor turns negative due to recovery processes in the soil. Therefore, the empirical estimates of the F-factor are a significant source of uncertainty in the estimate of surface water critical loads and related calculations for quantifying lake acidification status, especially now that acid deposition has declined across large areas of Europe and North America.

  7. Supraspinatus tendon load during abduction is dependent on the size of the critical shoulder angle: A biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Christian; Snedeker, Jess G; Baumgartner, Daniel; Viehöfer, Arnd F

    2014-07-01

    Shoulders with supraspinatus (SSP) tears are associated with significantly larger critical shoulder angles (CSA) compared to disease-free shoulders. We hypothesized that larger CSAs increase the ratio of joint shear to joint compression forces (defined as "instability ratio"), requiring substantially increased compensatory supraspinatus loads. A shoulder simulator with simulated deltoid, supraspinatus, infraspinatus/teres minor, and subscapularis musculotendinous units was constructed. The model was configured to represent either a normal CSA of 33° or a CSA characteristic of shoulders with rotator cuff tears (38°), and the components of the joint forces were measured. The instability ratio increased for the 38° CSA compared with the control CSA (33°) for a range of motion between 6° to 61° of thoracohumeral abduction with the largest differences in instability observed between 33° and 37° of elevation. In this range, SSP force had to be increased by 13-33% (15-23 N) to stabilize the arm in space. Our results support the concept that a high CSA can induce SSP overload particularly at low degrees of active abduction.

  8. Simulation of Mechanical Behavior and Damage of a Large Composite Wind Turbine Blade under Critical Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarfaoui, M.; Nachtane, M.; Khadimallah, H.; Saifaoui, D.

    2017-07-01

    Issues such as energy generation/transmission and greenhouse gas emissions are the two energy problems we face today. In this context, renewable energy sources are a necessary part of the solution essentially winds power, which is one of the most profitable sources of competition with new fossil energy facilities. This paper present the simulation of mechanical behavior and damage of a 48 m composite wind turbine blade under critical wind loads. The finite element analysis was performed by using ABAQUS code to predict the most critical damage behavior and to apprehend and obtain knowledge of the complex structural behavior of wind turbine blades. The approach developed based on the nonlinear FE analysis using mean values for the material properties and the failure criteria of Tsai-Hill to predict failure modes in large structures and to identify the sensitive zones.

  9. Uncertainty analysis on simple mass balance model to calculate critical loads for soil acidity.

    PubMed

    Li, Harbin; McNulty, Steven G

    2007-10-01

    Simple mass balance equations (SMBE) of critical acid loads (CAL) in forest soil were developed to assess potential risks of air pollutants to ecosystems. However, to apply SMBE reliably at large scales, SMBE must be tested for adequacy and uncertainty. Our goal was to provide a detailed analysis of uncertainty in SMBE so that sound strategies for scaling up CAL estimates to the national scale could be developed. Specifically, we wanted to quantify CAL uncertainty under natural variability in 17 model parameters, and determine their relative contributions in predicting CAL. Results indicated that uncertainty in CAL came primarily from components of base cation weathering (BC(w); 49%) and acid neutralizing capacity (46%), whereas the most critical parameters were BC(w) base rate (62%), soil depth (20%), and soil temperature (11%). Thus, improvements in estimates of these factors are crucial to reducing uncertainty and successfully scaling up SMBE for national assessments of CAL.

  10. Controlled flame synthesis of αFe2O3 and Fe3O4 nanoparticles: effect of flame configuration, flame temperature, and additive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukhatipoglu, K.; Morss Clyne, A.

    2010-05-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are used in diverse applications, including optical magnetic recording, catalysts, gas sensors, targeted drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging, and hyperthermic malignant cell therapy. Combustion synthesis of nanoparticles has significant advantages, including improved nanoparticle property control and commercial production rate capability with minimal post-processing. In the current study, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were produced by flame synthesis using a coflow flame. The effect of flame configuration (diffusion and inverse diffusion), flame temperature, and additive loading on the final iron oxide nanoparticle morphology, elemental composition, and particle size were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HR-TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Raman spectroscopy. The synthesized nanoparticles were primarily composed of two well known forms of iron oxide, namely hematite αFe2O3 and magnetite Fe3O4. We found that the synthesized nanoparticles were smaller (6-12 nm) for an inverse diffusion flame as compared to a diffusion flame configuration (50-60 nm) when CH4, O2, Ar, and N2 gas flow rates were kept constant. In order to investigate the effect of flame temperature, CH4, O2, Ar gas flow rates were kept constant, and N2 gas was added as a coolant to the system. TEM analysis of iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized using an inverse diffusion flame configuration with N2 cooling demonstrated that particles no larger than 50-60 nm in diameter can be grown, indicating that nanoparticles did not coalesce in the cooler flame. Raman spectroscopy showed that these nanoparticles were primarily magnetite, as opposed to the primarily hematite nanoparticles produced in the hot flame configuration. In order to understand the effect of additive loading on iron oxide nanoparticle morphology, an Ar stream carrying titanium-tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) was flowed through the

  11. Comparison among model estimates of critical loads of acidic deposition using different sources and scales of input data

    Treesearch

    T.C. McDonnell; B.J. Cosby; T.J. Sullivan; S.G. McNulty; E.C. Cohen

    2010-01-01

    The critical load (CL) of acidic atmospheric deposition represents the load of acidity deposited from the atmosphere to the earth’s surface at which harmful acidification effects on sensitive biological receptors are thought to occur. In this study, the CL for forest soils was estimated for 27 watersheds throughout the United States using a steady-state mass balance...

  12. DOES CRITICAL MASS DECREASE AS TEMPERATURE INCREASES: A REVIEW OF FIVE BENCHMARK EXPERIMENTS THAT SPAN A RANGE OF ELEVATED TEMPERATURES AND CRITICAL CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, K.

    2009-06-10

    Five sets of benchmark experiments are reviewed herein that cover a diverse set of fissile system configurations. The review specifically focused on the change in critical mass of these systems at elevated temperatures and the temperature reactivity coefficient ({alpha}{sub T}) on the system. Because plutonium-based critical benchmark experiments at varying temperatures were not found at the time this review was prepared, only uranium-based systems are included, as follows: (1) HEU-SOL-THERM-010 - UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} solutions with high U{sup 235} enrichment; (2) HEU-COMP-THERM-016 - uranium-graphite blocks with low U concentration; (3) LEU-COMP-THERM-032 - water moderated lattices of UO{sub 2} with stainless steel cladding, and intermediate U{sup 235} enrichment; (4) IEU-COMP-THERM-002 - water moderated lattices of annular UO{sub 2} with/without absorbers, and intermediate U{sup 235} enrichment; and (5) LEU-COMP-THERM-026 - water moderated lattices of UO{sub 2} at different pitches, and low U{sup 235} enrichment. In three of the five benchmarks (1, 3 and 5), modeling of the critical system at room temperature is conservative compared to modeling the system at elevated temperatures, i.e., a greater fissile mass is required at elevated temperature. In one benchmark (4), there was no difference in the fissile mass between the room temperature system and the system at the examined elevated temperature. In benchmark (2), the system clearly had a negative temperature reactivity coefficient. Some of the high temperature benchmark experiments were treated with appropriate (and comprehensive) adjustments to the cross section sets and thermal expansion coefficients, while other experiments were treated with partial adjustments. Regardless of the temperature treatment, modeling the systems at room temperature was found to be conservative for the examined systems, i.e., a smaller critical mass was obtained. While the five benchmarks presented herein demonstrate that, for the

  13. A Simulation Study to Explore Configuring the New SAT® Critical Reading Section without Analogy Items. Research Report No. 2004-2. ETS RR-04-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jinghua; Feigenbaum, Miriam; Cook, Linda

    2004-01-01

    This study explored possible configurations of the new SAT® critical reading section without analogy items. The item pool contained items from SAT verbal (SAT-V) sections of 14 previously administered SAT tests, calibrated using the three-parameter logistic IRT model. Multiple versions of several prototypes that do not contain analogy items were…

  14. A modified approach for estimating the aquatic critical load of acid deposition in northern Saskatchewan, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, Colin J.; Mowat, Aidan C.; Scott, Kenneth A.; Watmough, Shaun A.

    2016-12-01

    Acid-sensitive ecosystems are found in northern Saskatchewan, which lies downwind of major sulphur (S) and nitrogen (N) emissions sources associated with the oil sands extraction industry. In order to protect these ecosystems against acidification, tolerance to acid deposition must be quantified. The suitability of the central empirical relationship used in the Steady-State Water Chemistry (SSWC) model to predict historical sulphate (SO4) concentrations was investigated, and an alternate approach for determining aquatic critical loads of acidity (CL(A)) was employed for the study lakes (n = 260). Critical loads of acidity were often low, with median values of 12-16 mmolc m-2 yr-1, with the lower value reflecting a region-specific limit for acid-neutralizing capacity identified in this study. Uncertain levels of atmospheric deposition in the region, however, are problematic for characterizing acidification risk. Accurate S and chloride (Cl) deposition are needed to identify catchment sources (and sinks) of these elements in the new approach for CL(A) calculation. Likewise, accurate depiction of atmospheric deposition levels can prove useful for evaluation of lake runoff estimates on which estimates of CL(A) are contingent. While CL(A) are low and exceedance may occur according to projected increases in S deposition in the near-term, S retention appears to be an important feature in many catchments and risk of acidification may be overstated should long-term S retention be occurring in peatlands.

  15. Acid deposition critical loads modeling for the simulation of sulfur exceedance and reduction in Guangdong, China.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Rongliang; Wang, Shizhong; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Xuemei; Liao, Jin; Zhang, Zhentian

    2009-01-01

    The current acid deposition critical loads in Guangdong, China were calculated using the PROFILE model with a 3 km x 3 km resolution. Calculations were carried out for critical loads of potential acidity, actual acidity, sulfur and nitrogen, with values in extents of 0-3.5, 0-14.0, 0-26.0 and 0-3.5 kmol/(hm2 x year), respectively. These values were comparable to previously reported results and reflected the influences of vegetation and soil characteristics on the soil acid buffering capacity. Simulations of SO2 emission and sulfur deposition in this study showed that sulfur deposition core areas mirrored SO2 emission centers. The prediction of sulfur deposition after 20% and 40% reduction of SO2 emission suggested that the reduction of area sources contributed greatly to the decrease of sulfur deposition. Thus, abatement of area source emissions could be the primary way to mitigate sulfur deposition in Guangdong to meet both the provincial and national regulations of air pollution control.

  16. Pollution Critical Load Exceedance and an Extended Growing Season as Modulators of Red Spruce Radial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosiba, A. M.; Schaberg, P. G.; Engel, B. J.; Rayback, S. A.; Hawley, G. J.; Pontius, J.; Miller, E. K.

    2016-12-01

    Acidic sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) deposition depletes cations such as calcium (Ca) from forest soils and has been linked to increases in foliar winter injury that led to the decline of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) in the northeastern United States. We used results from a 30 m resolution steady-state S and N critical load exceedance model for New England to better understand the spatial connections between Ca depletion and red spruce productivity. To calculate exceedance, atmospheric deposition was estimated for a 5-year period (1984-1988) because tree health and productivity declines were expected to be most responsive to high acid loading. We examined how radial growth (basal area increment) of 441 dominant and co-dominant red spruce trees from 37 sites across Vermont and New Hampshire was related to modeled estimates of S and N critical load exceedance. We assessed growth using statistical models with exceedance as a source of variation, but which also included "year" and "elevation class" (to help account for climatic variability) and interactions among factors. Exceedance was significantly and negatively associated with mean growth for the study period (1951-2010) overall, and particularly for the 1980s and 2000s - periods of numerous and/or severe foliar winter injury events. However, climate-related sources of variation (year and elevation) accounted for most of the differences in growth over the chronology. Interestingly, recent growth for red spruce is now the highest recorded over our dendrochronological record for the species - suggesting that the factors shaping growth may be changing. Because red spruce is a temperate conifer that has the capacity to photosynthesize year-round, it is possible that warmer temperatures may be extending the functional growing season of the species thereby fostering increased growth. Data from elevational transects on Mount Mansfield (Vermont's tallest mountain) indicate that warmer spring, summer, fall and even winter

  17. Benzo[a]pyrene in urban environments of eastern Moscow: pollution levels and critical loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasimov, Nikolay S.; Kosheleva, Natalia E.; Nikiforova, Elena M.; Vlasov, Dmitry V.

    2017-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), particularly benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), are toxic compounds emitted from various anthropogenic sources. Understanding the BaP concentrations, dynamics and decomposition in soil is required to assess the critical loads of BaP in urban environments. This study is the first attempt to evaluate all major input and output components of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) balance and to calculate the permissible load on the urban environment in different land-use zones in the Eastern district of Moscow. BaP contamination of the snow cover in the Eastern district of Moscow was related to daily BaP fallout from the atmosphere. In 2010, the mean content of the pollutant in the snow dust was 1942 ng g-1, whereas the average intensity of its fallout was 7.13 ng m-2 per day. Across the territory, BaP winter fallout intensities varied from 0.3 to 1100 ng m-2 per day. The average BaP content in the surface (0-10 cm) soil horizons was 409 ng g-1, which is 83 times higher than the local background value and 20 times higher than the maximum permissible concentration (MPC) accepted in Russia. The variations in soil and snow BaP concentrations among different land-use zones were examined. A significant contribution of BaP from the atmosphere to urban soils was identified. Based on the measurements of BaP atmospheric fallout and BaP reserves in the soils, the critical loads of BaP for the land-use zones in the Eastern district were calculated for different values of degradation intensity and different exposure times. It was established that at an annual degradation intensity of 1-10 %, ecologically safe BaP levels in the soils of all land-use zones, excluding the agricultural zone, will only be reached after many decades or centuries.

  18. Influence of the heater material on the critical heat load at boiling of liquids on surfaces with different sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anokhina, E. V.

    2010-05-01

    Data on critical heat loads q cr for the saturated and unsaturated pool boiling of water and ethanol under atmospheric pressure are reported. It is found experimentally that the critical heat load does not necessarily coincide with the heat load causing burnout of the heater, which should be taken into account. The absolute values of q cr for the boiling of water and ethanol on copper surfaces 65, 80, 100, 120, and 200 μm in diameter; tungsten surface 100 μm in diameter; and nichrome surface 100 μm in diameter are obtained experimentally.

  19. New colistin population pharmacokinetic data in critically ill patients suggesting an alternative loading dose rationale.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, N; Mimoz, O; Mégarbane, B; Comets, E; Chatelier, D; Lasocki, S; Gauzit, R; Balayn, D; Gobin, P; Marchand, S; Couet, W

    2014-12-01

    Colistin is an old antibiotic that has recently gained a considerable renewal of interest as the last-line defense therapy against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. It is administered as colistin methanesulfonate (CMS), an inactive prodrug, and it was shown that due to slow CMS conversion, colistin plasma concentrations increase very slowly after treatment initiation, which constitutes the rationale for a loading dose in critically ill patients. However, faster CMS conversion was observed in healthy volunteers but using a different CMS brand, which may also have a major impact on colistin pharmacokinetics. Seventy-three critically ill patients not undergoing dialysis received multiple doses of CMS. The CMS concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and a pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a population approach. We confirmed that CMS renal clearance and colistin concentrations at steady state are mostly governed by creatinine clearance, but we predict a typical maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) of colistin close to 2 mg/liter, occurring 3 h after an initial dose of 2 million international units (MIU) of CMS. Accordingly, the estimated colistin half-life (t1/2) was relatively short (3.1 h), with rapid attainment of steady state. Our results are only partially consistent with other recently published results. We confirm that the CMS maintenance dose should be adjusted according to renal function in critically ill patients. However, much higher than expected colistin concentrations were observed after the initial CMS dose, with rapid steady-state achievement. These discrepancies challenge the pharmacokinetic rationale for a loading dose, which may still be appropriate for rapid bacterial eradication and an improved clinical cure rate.

  20. Susceptibility of forests in the northeastern USA to nitrogen and sulfur deposition: critical load exceedance and forest health

    Treesearch

    N. Duarte; L.H. Pardo; M.J. Robin-Abbott

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess susceptibility to acidification and nitrogen (N) saturation caused by atmospheric deposition to northeastern US forests, evaluate the benefits and shortcomings of making critical load assessments using regional data, and assess the relationship between expected risk (exceedance) and forest health. We calculated the critical...

  1. Space shuttle: An investigation of the load distribution over the SRB and external tank of a 0.004 scale model of the 049 space shuttle launch configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lott, R. A.; Ramsey, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted in a trisonic wind tunnel to determine the load distribution over the external tank and solid rocket boosters of the space shuttle launch configuration. The external tank was sting-supported and the solid rocket boosters and orbiter were mounted directly on the external tank. The external tank was, instrumented with 152 pressure orifices and the solid rocket boosters contained 78 orifices. The pressure data were obtained for various combinations of the three geometric components as the gap size between the external tank and the solid rocket boosters, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip were varied. Mach numbers ranged from 0.8 to 1.96.

  2. Nitrogen critical loads and management alternatives for N-impacted ecosystems in California.

    PubMed

    Fenn, M E; Allen, E B; Weiss, S B; Jovan, S; Geiser, L H; Tonnesen, G S; Johnson, R F; Rao, L E; Gimeno, B S; Yuan, F; Meixner, T; Bytnerowicz, A

    2010-12-01

    Empirical critical loads for N deposition effects and maps showing areas projected to be in exceedance of the critical load (CL) are given for seven major vegetation types in California. Thirty-five percent of the land area for these vegetation types (99,639 km(2)) is estimated to be in excess of the N CL. Low CL values (3-8 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) were determined for mixed conifer forests, chaparral and oak woodlands due to highly N-sensitive biota (lichens) and N-poor or low biomass vegetation in the case of coastal sage scrub (CSS), annual grassland, and desert scrub vegetation. At these N deposition critical loads the latter three ecosystem types are at risk of major vegetation type change because N enrichment favors invasion by exotic annual grasses. Fifty-four and forty-four percent of the area for CSS and grasslands are in exceedance of the CL for invasive grasses, while 53 and 41% of the chaparral and oak woodland areas are in exceedance of the CL for impacts on epiphytic lichen communities. Approximately 30% of the desert (based on invasive grasses and increased fire risk) and mixed conifer forest (based on lichen community changes) areas are in exceedance of the CL. These ecosystems are generally located further from emissions sources than many grasslands or CSS areas. By comparison, only 3-15% of the forested and chaparral land areas are estimated to be in exceedance of the NO(3)(-) leaching CL. The CL for incipient N saturation in mixed conifer forest catchments was 17 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). In 10% of the CL exceedance areas for all seven vegetation types combined, the CL is exceeded by at least 10 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), and in 27% of the exceedance areas the CL is exceeded by at least 5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). Management strategies for mitigating the effects of excess N are based on reducing N emissions and reducing site N capital through approaches such as biomass removal and prescribed fire or control of invasive grasses by mowing, selective herbicides, weeding or

  3. Nitrogen critical loads for alpine vegetation and terrestrial ecosystem response: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Bowman, William D; Gartner, Julia R; Holland, Keri; Wiedermann, Magdalena

    2006-06-01

    Increases in the deposition of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) have been linked to several terrestrial ecological changes, including soil biogeochemistry, plant stress susceptibility, and community diversity. Recognizing the need to identify sensitive indicators of biotic response to N deposition, we empirically estimated the N critical load for changes in alpine plant community composition and compared this with the estimated critical load for soil indicators of ecological change. We also measured the degree to which alpine vegetation may serve as a sink for anthropogenic N and how much plant sequestration is related to changes in species composition. We addressed these research goals by adding 20, 40, or 60 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1), along with an ambient control (6 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1) total deposition), to a species-rich alpine dry meadow for an eight-year period. Change in plant species composition associated with the treatments occurred within three years of the initiation of the experiment and were significant at all levels of N addition. Using individual species abundance changes and ordination scores, we estimated the N critical loads (total deposition) for (1) change in individual species to be 4 kg N x ha(-1) yr(-1) and (2) for overall community change to be 10 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1). In contrast, increases in NO3- leaching, soil solution inorganic NO3-, and net N nitrification occurred at levels above 20 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1). Increases in total aboveground biomass were modest and transient, occurring in only one of the three years measured. Vegetative uptake of N increased significantly, primarily as a result of increasing tissue N concentrations and biomass increases in subdominant species. Aboveground vegetative uptake of N accounted for <40% of the N added. The results of this experiment indicate that changes in vegetation composition will precede detectable changes in more traditionally used soil indicators of ecosystem responses to N deposition and

  4. Effects of method of loading and specimen configuration on compressive strength of graphite/epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. K.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    Three test schemes were examined for testing graphite/epoxy (Narmco T300/5208) composite material specimens to failure in compression, including an adaptation of the IITRI "wedge grip" compression fixture, a face-supported-compression fixture, and an end-loaded-coupon fixture. The effects of specimen size, specimen support arrangement and method of load transfer on compressive behavior of graphite/epoxy were investigated. Compressive stress strain, strength, and modulus data obtained with the three fixtures are presented with evaluations showing the effects of all test parameters, including fiber orientation. The IITRI fixture has the potential to provide good stress/strain data to failure for unidirectional and quasi-isotropic laminates. The face supported fixture was found to be the most desirable for testing + or - 45 s laminates.

  5. Mapping critical loads of nitrogen deposition for aquatic ecosystems in the Rocky Mountains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nanus, Leora; Clow, David W.; Saros, Jasmine E.; Stephens, Verlin C.; Campbell, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    Spatially explicit estimates of critical loads of nitrogen (N) deposition (CLNdep) for nutrient enrichment in aquatic ecosystems were developed for the Rocky Mountains, USA, using a geostatistical approach. The lowest CLNdep estimates (-1 yr-1) occurred in high-elevation basins with steep slopes, sparse vegetation, and abundance of exposed bedrock and talus. These areas often correspond with areas of high N deposition (>3 kg N ha-1 yr-1), resulting in CLNdep exceedances ≥1.5 ± 1 kg N ha-1 yr-1. CLNdep and CLNdep exceedances exhibit substantial spatial variability related to basin characteristics and are highly sensitive to the NO3- threshold at which ecological effects are thought to occur. Based on an NO3- threshold of 0.5 μmol L-1, N deposition exceeds CLNdep in 21 ± 8% of the study area; thus, broad areas of the Rocky Mountains may be impacted by excess N deposition, with greatest impacts at high elevations.

  6. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition to China: A model analysis on nitrogen budget and critical load exceedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuanhong; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Youfan; Liu, Xuejun; Xu, Wen; Pan, Yuepeng; Duan, Lei

    2017-03-01

    We present a national-scale model analysis on the sources and processes of inorganic nitrogen deposition over China using the GEOS-Chem model at 1/2° × 1/3° horizontal resolution. Model results for 2008-2012 are evaluated with an ensemble of surface measurements of wet deposition flux and gaseous ammonia (NH3) concentration, and satellite measurements of tropospheric NO2 columns. Annual total inorganic nitrogen deposition fluxes are simulated to be generally less than 10 kg N ha-1 a-1 in western China (less than 2 kg N ha-1 a-1 over Tibet), 15-50 kg N ha-1 a-1 in eastern China, and 16.4 kg N ha-1 a-1 averaged over China. Annual total deposition to China is 16.4 Tg N, with 10.2 Tg N (62%) from reduced nitrogen (NHx) and 6.2 Tg N from oxidized nitrogen (NOy). Domestic anthropogenic sources contribute 86% of the total deposition; foreign anthropogenic sources 7% and natural sources 7%. Annually 23% of domestically emitted NH3 and 36% for NOx are exported outside the terrestrial land of China. We find that atmospheric nitrogen deposition is about half of the nitrogen input from fertilizer application (29.6 Tg N a-1), and is much higher than that from natural biological fixation (7.3 Tg N a-1) over China. A comparison of nitrogen deposition with critical load estimates for eutrophication indicates that about 15% of the land over China experiences critical load exceedances, demonstrating the necessity of nitrogen emission controls to avoid potential negative ecological effects.

  7. Critical load analysis in hazard assessment of metals using a Unit World Model.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Nilima; Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Diamond, Miriam L

    2011-09-01

    A Unit World approach has been used extensively to rank chemicals for their hazards and to understand differences in chemical behavior. Whereas the fate and effects of an organic chemical in a Unit World Model (UWM) analysis vary systematically according to one variable (fraction of organic carbon), and the chemicals have a singular ranking regardless of environmental characteristics, metals can change their hazard ranking according to freshwater chemistry, notably pH and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Consequently, developing a UWM approach for metals requires selecting a series of representative freshwater chemistries, based on an understanding of the sensitivity of model results to this chemistry. Here we analyze results from a UWM for metals with the goal of informing the selection of appropriate freshwater chemistries for a UWM. The UWM loosely couples the biotic ligand model (BLM) to a geochemical speciation model (Windermere Humic Adsorption Model [WHAM]) and then to the multi-species fate transport-speciation (Transpec) model. The UWM is applied to estimate the critical load (CL) of cationic metals Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn, using three lake chemistries that vary in trophic status, pH, and other parameters. The model results indicated a difference of four orders of magnitude in particle-to-total dissolved partitioning (K(d)) that translated into minimal differences in fate because of the short water residence time used. However, a maximum 300-fold difference was calculated in Cu toxicity among the three chemistries and three aquatic organisms. Critical loads were lowest (greatest hazard) in the oligotrophic water chemistry and highest (least hazard) in the eutrophic water chemistry, despite the highest fraction of free metal ion as a function of total metal occurring in the mesotrophic system, where toxicity was ameliorated by competing cations. Water hardness, DOC, and pH had the greatest influence on CL, because of the influence of these factors on aquatic

  8. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition to China: a model analysis on nitrogen budget and critical load exceedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Zhang, L.; Chen, Y.; Liu, X.; Xu, W.; Pan, Y.; Duan, L.

    2016-12-01

    We present a national-scale model analysis of the sources and processes of inorganic nitrogen deposition over China using the GEOS-Chem model at 1/2°×1/3° horizontal resolution. Averaged model results for 2008-2012 are evaluated with an ensemble of surface measurements of nitrogen wet deposition flux and concentration, and satellite measurements of tropospheric NO2 columns. Annual inorganic nitrogen deposition fluxes are shown to be generally less than 10 kg N ha-1 a-1 in the western China, 15-50 kg N ha-1 a-1 in the eastern China, and 15.6 kg N ha-1 a-1 averaged over China. The model simulates an annual total deposition flux of 16.4 Tg N to China, with 10.3 Tg N (63%) from reduced nitrogen (NHx) and 6.2 Tg N from oxidized nitrogen (NOy). Domestic anthropogenic sources contribute 86% of the total deposition; foreign anthropogenic sources 7% and natural sources 7%. Annually 23% of domestically emitted NH3 and 36% for NOx are exported out of China. We also find while nitrogen deposition to China is comparable to the nitrogen input from fertilizer application (16.5 Tg N a-1) on the national scale, it is much more widely distributed spatially. The deposition flux is also much higher than natural biological fixation (7.3 Tg N a-1). A comparison with estimates of nitrogen critical load for eutrophication indicates that about 40% of the land over China faces nitrogen critical load exceedances. However, 45% of the exceeding areas, mainly in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei, Central China, East China, and South China, will not occur in the absence of nitrogen deposition, demonstrating the necessity of nitrogen emission controls to avoid potential negative ecological effects over these areas.

  9. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Pitch)

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed from 1962–1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967.a The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, relative fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector” (see Reference 1). The experiment studied in this evaluation was the second of the series and had the fuel rods in a 1.506-cm-triangular pitch. One critical configuration was found (see Reference 3). Once the critical configuration had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U,bc and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configuration are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4, and 1.7, respectively.

  10. Slow Crack Growth Behavior and Life/Reliability Analysis of 96 wt % Alumina at Ambient Temperature With Various Specimen/Loading Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Powers, Lynn M.; Nemeth, Noel N.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive constant stress-rate testing for 96 wt % alumina was conducted in room-temperature distilled water using four different specimen/loading configurations: rectangular beam test specimens under four-point uniaxial flexure, square plate test specimens in ring-on-ring biaxial flexure, square plate test specimens in ball-on-ring biaxial flexure, and dog-boned tensile test specimens in pure tension. The slow crack growth (SCG) parameter n was almost independent of specimen/loading configurations, in either four-point uniaxial flexure, ring-on-ring biaxial flexure, ball-on-ring biaxial flexure, or pure tension, ranging from n = 35 to 47 with an average value of n = 41.1 +/- 4.5. The prediction of fatigue strength/reliability based on the four-point uniaxial flexure data by using the CARES/Life design code as well as a simple PIA model was in good agreement with both the ring-on-ring biaxial and the ball-on-ring biaxial flexure data. A poor prediction using the PIA model was observed for the dog-boned tensile test specimens, presumably due to different flaw population involved in the tensile test specimens.

  11. WE-A-17A-05: Differences in Applicator Configuration and Dwell Loading Between Standard and Image-Guided Tandem and Ring (T and R) HDR Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Damato, A; Cormack, R; Bhagwat, M; Buzurovic, I; Lee, L; Viswanathan, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate differences in: (i) relative location of the tandem and the ring compared to a rigid standard applicator model; and (ii) relative loading and changes in loading pattern between standard and image-guided planning. Methods: All T and R insertions performed in 2013 in our institution under CT- or MR-guidance were analyzed. Standard plans were generated using library applicator models with a fixed relationship between ring and tandem, standardized uniform dwell loading and normalization to point A. The graphic plans and the associated standard-plan dwell configurations were compared: the rings were rigidly registered, and the residual tandem shift, rotation and maximum distance between plan tandem dwell and corresponding model tandem dwell were calculated. The normalization ratio (NR = the ratio of graphic versus standard-plan total reference air kerma [TRAK]), the general loading difference (GLD = the difference between graphic and standard ratios of the tandem versus the ring TRAK), and the percent standard deviation (SD% = SD/mean) of the tandem and the ring TRAK for the graphic plan (all standard-plans SD% = 0) were calculated. Results: 71 T and R were analyzed. Residual tandem shift, rotation and maximum corresponding dwell distance were 1.2±0.8mm (0.4±0.4mm lateral, 0.9±0.8mm craniocaudal, 0.4±0.3mm anterior-posterior), 2.3±1.9deg and 3.4±2.3mm. NR was 0.86±0.11 indicating a lower overall loading of the graphic compared to the standard plans. GLD was -0.12±0.16 indicating a modest increased ring loading relative to the tandem in the graphic plans. SD% was 2.1±1.6% for tandem and 2.8±1.9% for ring, indicating small deviations from uniform loading. Conclusion: Variability in the relative locations of the tandem and the ring necessitates the independent registration of each component model for accurate digitization. Our clinical experience suggests that graphically planned T and R results on average in a lower total dose to the

  12. Degradation of organic pollutants and microorganisms from wastewater using different dielectric barrier discharge configurations--a critical review.

    PubMed

    Mouele, Emile S Massima; Tijani, Jimoh O; Fatoba, Ojo O; Petrik, Leslie F

    2015-12-01

    The growing global drinking water crisis requires the development of novel advanced, sustainable, and cost-effective water treatment technologies to supplement the existing conventional methods. One such technology is advanced oxidation based on dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). DBD such as single and double planar and single and double cylindrical dielectric barrier configurations have been utilized for efficient degradation of recalcitrant organic pollutants. The overall performance of the different DBD system varies and depends on several factors. Therefore, this review was compiled to give an overview of different DBD configurations vis-a-viz their applications and the in situ mechanism of generation of free reactive species for water and wastewater treatment. Our survey of the literature indicated that application of double cylindrical dielectric barrier configuration represents an ideal and viable route for achieving greater water and wastewater purification efficiency.

  13. Critical nitrogen deposition loads in high-elevation lakes of the western US inferred from paleolimnological records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saros, J.E.; Clow, D.W.; Blett, T.; Wolfe, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Critical loads of nitrogen (N) from atmospheric deposition were determined for alpine lake ecosystems in the western US using fossil diatom assemblages in lake sediment cores. Changes in diatom species over the last century were indicative of N enrichment in two areas, the eastern Sierra Nevada, starting between 1960 and 1965, and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, starting in 1980. In contrast, no changes in diatom community structure were apparent in lakes of Glacier National Park. To determine critical N loads that elicited these community changes, we modeled wet nitrogen deposition rates for the period in which diatom shifts first occurred in each area using deposition data spanning from 1980 to 2007. We determined a critical load of 1.4 kg N ha-1 year-1 wet N deposition to elicit key nutrient enrichment effects on diatom communities in both the eastern Sierra Nevada and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. ?? 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  14. Bone quality and the immediate loading of implants-critical aspects based on literature, research, and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Romanos, Georgios E

    2009-06-01

    Immediate loading of oral implants has been extensively described in the international literature and the requirements for long-term success are evaluated. The author presents here the critical aspects of the criteria for success as well as describes the characteristics of an implant macro- and microdesign for immediate loading to control the periimplant crestal bone loss and secure the long-term stability. Information from the literature and the clinical experience will be presented.

  15. Analysis of three idealized reactor configurations: plate, pin, and homogeneous. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    McKnight, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed Monte Carlo calculations have been performed for three distinct configurations of an idealized fast critical assembly. This idealized assembly was based on the LMFBR benchmark critical assembly ZPR-6/7. In the first configuration, the entire core was loaded with the plate unit cell of ZPR-6/7. In the second configuration, the entire core was loaded with the ZPR sodium-filled pin calandria. The actual ZPR pin calandria are loaded with mixed (U,Pu) oxide pins which closely match the composition of the ZPR-6/7 plate unit cell. For the present study, slight adjustments were made in the atom concentrations and the length of the pin calandria in order to make the core boundaries and average composition for the pin-cell configuration identical to those of the plate-cell configuration. In the third configuration, the core was homogeneous, again with identical core boundaries and average composition as the plate and pin configurations.

  16. Analysis on Reactor Criticality Condition and Fuel Conversion Capability Based on Different Loaded Plutonium Composition in FBR Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik; Saputra, Geby; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Reactor criticality condition and fuel conversion capability are depending on the fuel arrangement schemes, reactor core geometry and fuel burnup process as well as the effect of different fuel cycle and fuel composition. Criticality condition of reactor core and breeding ratio capability have been investigated in this present study based on fast breeder reactor (FBR) type for different loaded fuel compositions of plutonium in the fuel core regions. Loaded fuel of Plutonium compositions are based on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of light water reactor (LWR) for different fuel burnup process and cooling time conditions of the reactors. Obtained results show that different initial fuels of plutonium gives a significant chance in criticality conditions and fuel conversion capability. Loaded plutonium based on higher burnup process gives a reduction value of criticality condition or less excess reactivity. It also obtains more fuel breeding ratio capability or more breeding gain. Some loaded plutonium based on longer cooling time of LWR gives less excess reactivity and in the same time, it gives higher breeding ratio capability of the reactors. More composition of even mass plutonium isotopes gives more absorption neutron which affects to decresing criticality or less excess reactivity in the core. Similar condition that more absorption neutron by fertile material or even mass plutonium will produce more fissile material or odd mass plutonium isotopes to increase the breeding gain of the reactor.

  17. Assimilative Capacity Based Emissions Load Management In A Critically Polluted Industrial Cluster.

    PubMed

    Panda, Smaranika; Nagendra S M, Shiva

    2017-09-25

    In the present study, a modified approach was adopted to quantify the assimilative capacity (i.e. the maximum emission an area can take without violating the permissible pollutants standards) of a major industrial cluster (Manali, India) and to assess the effectiveness of adopted air pollution control measures at the region. Seasonal analysis of assimilative capacity was carried out corresponding to critical, high, medium and low pollution levels to know the best and worse conditions for industrial operations. Bottom up approach was employed to quantify sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and particulate matter (PM10) emissions at a fine spatial resolution of 500 × 500 m(2) in Manali industrial cluster. AERMOD, an US EPA regulatory model was used for estimating assimilative capacity. Results indicated that 22.8 tonnes/day of SO2, 7.8 tonnes/day of NO2 and 7.1 tonnes/day of PM10 were emitted from the industries of Manali. The estimated assimilative capacities for SO2, NO2 and PM10 were found to be 16.05, 17.36 and 19.78 tonnes/day, respectively. It was observed that the current SO2 emissions were exceeding the estimated safe load by 6.7 tonnes/day whereas PM10 and NO2 were within the safe limits. Seasonal analysis of assimilative capacity showed post monsoon had lowest load carrying capacity followed by winter, summer and monsoon seasons and the allowable SO2 emissions during post monsoon and winter seasons were found to be 35% and 26% lower when compared to monsoon season respectively. IMPLICATION We present a modified approach for quantitative estimation of assimilative capacity of a critically polluted Indian industrial cluster. We developed a geo coded fine resolution PM10, NO2 and SO2 emission inventory for Manali industrial area and further quantitatively estimated its season wise assimilative capacities corresponding to various pollution levels. Our quantitative representation of assimilative capacity (in terms of emissions) when compared to

  18. Exceedance of critical loads for lakes in Finland, Norway, and Sweden: Reduction requirements for acidifying nitrogen and sulfur deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Posch, M.; Kaemaeri, J.; Forsius, M.

    1997-03-01

    The main objectives of this study were to identify the regions in Fennoscandia where the critical loads of sulfur (S) and acidifying nitrogen (N) for lakes are exceeded and to investigate the consequences for deposition reductions, with special emphasis on the possible trade-offs between S and N deposition in order to achieve nonexceedance. In the steady-state model for calculating critical loads and their exceedances, all relevant processes acting as sinks for N and S are considered. The critical loads of N and S are interrelated (defining the so-called critical load function), and therefore a single critical load for one pollutant cannot be defined without making assumptions about the other. Comparing the present N and S deposition with the critical function for each lake allows determination of the percentage of lakes in the different regions of Fennoscandia where: (1) S reductions alone can achieve nonexceedance. (2) N reductions alone are sufficient, and (3) both N and S reductions are required but to a certain degree interchangeable. Secondly, deposition reduction requirements were assessed by fixing the N deposition to the present level, in this way analyzing the reductions required for S, and by computing the percentage of lakes exceeded in Finland, Norway and Sweden for every possible percent deposition reduction in S and N, in this way showing the (relative) effectiveness of reducing S and/or N deposition. The results showed clear regional patterns in the S and N reduction requirements. In practically the whole of Finland and the northern parts of Scandinavia man-made acidification of surface waters could be avoided by reducing S deposition alone. In the southern parts of Sweden some reductions in N deposition are clearly needed in addition to those for S. In southern Norway strong reductions are required for both N and S deposition. 55 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Optical feather and foil for shape and dynamic load sensing of critical flight surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Richard J.; Costa, Joannes M.; Faridian, Fereydoun; Moslehi, Behzad; Pakmehr, Mehrdad; Schlavin, Jon; Sotoudeh, Vahid; Zagrai, Andrei

    2014-04-01

    Future flight vehicles may comprise complex flight surfaces requiring coordinated in-situ sensing and actuation. Inspired by the complexity of the flight surfaces on the wings and tail of a bird, it is argued that increasing the number of interdependent flight surfaces from just a few, as is normal in an airplane, to many, as in the feathers of a bird, can significantly enlarge the flight envelope. To enable elements of an eco-inspired Dynamic Servo-Elastic (DSE) flight control system, IFOS is developing a multiple functionality-sensing element analogous to a feather, consisting of a very thin tube with optical fiber based strain sensors and algorithms for deducing the shape of the "feather" by measuring strain at multiple points. It is envisaged that the "feather" will act as a unit of sensing and/or actuation for establishing shape, position, static and dynamic loads on flight surfaces and in critical parts. Advanced sensing hardware and software control algorithms will enable the proposed DSE flight control concept. The hardware development involves an array of optical fiber based sensorized needle tubes for attachment to key parts for dynamic flight surface measurement. Once installed the optical fiber sensors, which can be interrogated over a wide frequency range, also allow damage detection and structural health monitoring.

  20. Mapping critical loads of nitrogen deposition for aquatic ecosystems in the Rocky Mountains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nanus, Leora; Clow, David W.; Saros, Jasmine E.; Stephens, Verlin C.; Campbell, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    Spatially explicit estimates of critical loads of nitrogen (N) deposition (CLNdep) for nutrient enrichment in aquatic ecosystems were developed for the Rocky Mountains, USA, using a geostatistical approach. The lowest CLNdep estimates (−1 yr−1) occurred in high-elevation basins with steep slopes, sparse vegetation, and abundance of exposed bedrock and talus. These areas often correspond with areas of high N deposition (>3 kg N ha−1 yr−1), resulting in CLNdep exceedances ≥1.5 ± 1 kg N ha−1 yr−1. CLNdep and CLNdep exceedances exhibit substantial spatial variability related to basin characteristics and are highly sensitive to the NO3− threshold at which ecological effects are thought to occur. Based on an NO3− threshold of 0.5 μmol L−1, N deposition exceeds CLNdep in 21 ± 8% of the study area; thus, broad areas of the Rocky Mountains may be impacted by excess N deposition, with greatest impacts at high elevations.

  1. Ecological risk assessment of acidification in the Northern Eurasia using critical load concept

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkin, V.; Golinets, O.

    1995-12-31

    This research presents the risk analysis of acid forming compounds input using critical loads (CL) values of sulfur, nitrogen, and acidity under the computer calculations for terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems of Northern Eurasia. The Cl values are used to set goals for future deposition rates of acidifying and eutrophication compounds so that the environment is protected. CL values for various ecosystems are determined using EM GIS approach. The most influential sources, such as nitrogen, sulfur and base cations uptake by vegetation, surface and groundwater leaching from terrestrial to freshwater ecosystems are described for the whole territory under study regarding uncertainty analysis and the level of corresponding risk assessment. This may be explained by many factors of which the most important are: the estimation of plant uptake is carried out on the basis of data on the biogeochemical cycling of various elements, for which adequate quantitative characterization for all ecosystems under study is either absent or insufficient; reliable information on the quantitative assessment of the ratio between perennial plant biomes increase and dead matter is absent for the required level of spatial and temporal resolution; reliable data on surface and underground runoff in various ecosystems are rare; the influence of hydrothermic factors on the above mentioned processes has not been quantitatively determined at required level of model resolution.

  2. Use of Combined Biogeochemical Model Approaches and Empirical Data to Assess Critical Loads of Nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Fenn, Mark E.; Driscoll, Charles; Zhou, Qingtao; Rao, Leela E.; Meixner, Tom; Allen, Edith B.; Yuan, Fengming; Sullivan, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Empirical and dynamic biogeochemical modelling are complementary approaches for determining the critical load (CL) of atmospheric nitrogen (N) or other constituent deposition that an ecosystem can tolerate without causing ecological harm. The greatest benefits are obtained when these approaches are used in combination. Confounding environmental factors can complicate the determination of empirical CLs across depositional gradients, while the experimental application of N amendments for estimating the CL does not realistically mimic the effects of chronic atmospheric N deposition. Biogeochemical and vegetation simulation models can provide CL estimates and valuable ecosystem response information, allowing for past and future scenario testing with various combinations of environmental factors, pollutants, pollutant control options, land management, and ecosystem response parameters. Even so, models are fundamentally gross simplifications of the real ecosystems they attempt to simulate. Empirical approaches are vital as a check on simulations and CL estimates, to parameterize models, and to elucidate mechanisms and responses under real world conditions. In this chapter, we provide examples of empirical and modelled N CL approaches in ecosystems from three regions of the United States: mixed conifer forest, desert scrub and pinyon- juniper woodland in California; alpine catchments in the Rocky Mountains; and lakes in the Adirondack region of New York state.

  3. Using fire risk and species loss to set critical loads for nitrogen deposition in southern California shrublands

    Treesearch

    E.B. Allen; L.E. Rao; G. Tonnesen; R.F. Johnson; M.E. Fenn; A. Bytnerowicz

    2014-01-01

    Southern California deserts and coastal sage scrub (CSS) are undergoing vegetation-type conversion to exotic annual grassland, especially in regions downwind of urban areas that receive high nitrogen (N), primarily as dry deposition. To determine critical loads (CLs) of N that cause negative impacts, we measured plant and soil responses along N deposition gradients,...

  4. Assessment of Nitrogen deposition effects and empirical critical loads of Nitrogen for ecoregions of the United States

    Treesearch

    L.H. Pardo; M.J. Robin-Abbott; C.T., eds. Driscoll

    2011-01-01

    This report synthesizes current research relating atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition to effects on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in the United States and to identify empirical critical loads for atmospheric N deposition. The report evaluates the following receptors: freshwater diatoms, mycorrhizal fungi and other soil microbes, lichens, herbaceous plants, shrubs...

  5. Computer program analyzes whirl critical speeds and bearing loads for shafts coupled by nonlinear springs to machine housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Severud, L. K.

    1969-01-01

    Computerized method of analysis predicts bearing loads, shaft deflections, and critical speeds for shafts coupled by rolling contact bearings to the machine housing. The bearing nonlinearities, casing as well as rotor dynamics, and rotor-imbalance forcing functions are all included in the system dynamics analysis.

  6. Search for critical loading condition of the spine--a meta analysis of a nonlinear viscoelastic finite element model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jaw-Lin; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Parnianpour, Mohamad

    2005-10-01

    The relative vulnerability of spinal motion segments to different loading combinations remains unknown. The meta-analysis described here using the results of a validated L2-L3 nonlinear viscoelastic finite element model was designed to investigate the critical loading and its effect on the internal mechanics of the human lumbar spine. A Box-Behnken experimental design was used to design the magnitude of seven independent variables associated with loads, rotations and velocity of motion. Subsequently, an optimization method was used to find the primary and secondary variables that influence spine mechanical output related to facet forces, disc pressure, ligament forces, annulus matrix compressive/shear stresses and anulus fibers strain. The mechanical responses with respect to the two most-relevant variables were then regressed linearly using the response surface quadratic model. Axial force and sagittal rotation were identified as the most-relevant variables for mechanical responses. The procedure developed can be used to find the critical loading for finite element models with multi input variables. The derived meta-models can be used to predict the risk associated with various loading parameters and in setting safer load limits.

  7. Combined use of VUV and UVC photoreactors for the treatment of hospital laundry wastewaters: Reduction of load parameters, detoxification and life cycle assessment of different configurations.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Schwaickhardt, Rômulo; Machado, Ênio Leandro; Lutterbeck, Carlos Alexandre

    2017-07-15

    The present research investigated the treatment of hospital laundry wastewaters by the combined use of photochemical VUV and UVC reactors. Seven different configurations were tested and the performances of each of them were evaluated based on the removal of the load parameters, detoxification and life cycle assessment (LCA). The characterization of studied wastewaters included analysis of the following parameters: COD, BOD5, TKN, total P, pH, turbidity and conductivity. Acute ecotoxicity was evaluated using Daphnia magna. Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy was performed to determine the organic fraction and chromatography coupled to the mass spectrometer (GC-MS) was used for the qualitative characterization of priority pollutants. Characterization parameters showed the presence of drugs like lidocaine and dipyrone and a high organic load with a poor biodegradability. Wastewaters presented an extreme acute toxicity against D. magna (EC50 6.7%). The ozonation process (mainly generated by the VUV reactor) obtained the best results concerning the ratio between the consumed energy and the removed COD and the UVC process presented the lowest environmental impacts for the characterization and normalization parameters of the LCA. Normalization revealed that the highest environmental burdens were associated with human toxicity, ecotoxicity and eutrophication of surface waters as well as to the use of non-renewable resources. VUV/UVC/O3 process presented the best results considering detoxification (EC50 100%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessing Bone Quality in Terms of Bone Mineral Density, Buckling Ratio and Critical Fracture Load

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, D

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone mineral density (BMD) is used as a sole parameter in the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Due to the ease of acquirement of BMD, clinical diagnosis still involves its usage although the limitations of BMD are quite well-established. Therefore, this preliminary study hoped to reduce the errors introduced by BMD alone by incorporating geometric and structural predictors simultaneously to observe if strength was implicitly dependent on the geometry and BMD. Hence, we illustrated the triadic relationship between BMD, buckling ratio (BR) and critical fracture load (Fcr). Methods The geometric predictor was the BR as it involves both the changes in the periosteum and the cortical thickness. Also, structural changes were monitored by finite element (FE) analysis-predicted Fcr. These BR and Fcr measurements were plotted with their respective femoral neck BMD values in elderly female patients (n=6) in a 3-year follow-up study, treated with ibandronate. Results In all the three-dimensional plots (baseline, mid and final year), high Fcr values were found at regions containing high BMD and low BR values. Quantitatively, this was also proven where an averaged highest Fcr across the three years had a relatively higher BMD (46%) and lower BR (19%) than that of the averaged lowest Fcr. The dependence of FE predicted strength on both the geometry and bone density was illustrated. Conclusions We conclude that use of triadic relationships for the evaluation of osteoporosis and hip fractures with the combination of strength, radiology-derived BR and bone density will lay the foundation for more accurate predictions in the future. PMID:25489572

  9. Present and future nitrogen deposition to national parks in the United States: critical load exceedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, R. A.; Jacob, D. J.; Payer, M.; Zhang, L.; Holmes, C. D.; Schichtel, B. A.; Blett, T.; Porter, E.; Pardo, L. H.; Lynch, J. A.

    2013-04-01

    National parks in the United States are protected areas wherein the natural habitat is to be conserved for future generations. Deposition of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) transported from areas of human activity (fuel combustion, agriculture) may affect these natural habitats if it exceeds an ecosystem-dependent critical load (CL). We quantify and interpret the deposition to Class I US national parks for present-day and future (2050) conditions using the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model with 1/2° × 2/3° horizontal resolution over North America. We estimate CL values in the range 2.5-5 kg N ha-1 yr-1 for the different parks with the goal of protecting the most sensitive ecosystem receptors. For present-day conditions, we find 24 out of 45 parks to be in CL exceedance and 14 more to be marginally so. Many of these are in remote areas of the West. Most (40-85%) of the deposition originates from NOx emissions (fuel combustion). We then project future changes in N deposition using the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) emission scenarios for 2050. These feature 52-73% declines in US NOx emissions relative to present but 19-50% increases in US ammonia (NH3) emissions. Nitrogen deposition at US national parks then becomes dominated by domestic NH3 emissions. While deposition decreases in the East relative to present, there is little progress in the West and increases in some regions. We find that 17-25 US national parks will have CL exceedances in 2050 based on the RCP scenarios. Even in total absence of anthropogenic NOx emissions, 14-18 parks would still have a CL exceedance. Returning all parks to N deposition below CL by 2050 will require at least a 55% decrease in anthropogenic NH3 emissions relative to RCP-projected 2050 levels.

  10. Present and future nitrogen deposition to national parks in the United States: critical load exceedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, R. A.; Jacob, D. J.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Zhang, L.; Holmes, C. D.; Schichtel, B. A.; Blett, T.; Porter, E.; Pardo, L. H.; Lynch, J. A.

    2013-09-01

    National parks in the United States are protected areas wherein the natural habitat is to be conserved for future generations. Deposition of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) transported from areas of human activity (fuel combustion, agriculture) may affect these natural habitats if it exceeds an ecosystem-dependent critical load (CL). We quantify and interpret the deposition to Class I US national parks for present-day and future (2050) conditions using the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model with 1/2° × 2/3° horizontal resolution over North America. We estimate CL values in the range 2.5-5 kg N ha-1 yr-1 for the different parks to protect the most sensitive ecosystem receptors. For present-day conditions, we find 24 out of 45 parks to be in CL exceedance and 14 more to be marginally so. Many of these are in remote areas of the West. Most (40-85%) of the deposition originates from NOx emissions (fuel combustion). We project future changes in N deposition using representative concentration pathway (RCP) anthropogenic emission scenarios for 2050. These feature 52-73% declines in US NOx emissions relative to present but 19-50% increases in US ammonia (NH3) emissions. Nitrogen deposition at US national parks then becomes dominated by domestic NH3 emissions. While deposition decreases in the East relative to present, there is little progress in the West and increases in some regions. We find that 17-25 US national parks will have CL exceedances in 2050 based on the RCP8.5 and RCP2.6 scenarios. Even in total absence of anthropogenic NOx emissions, 14-18 parks would still have a CL exceedance. Returning all parks to N deposition below CL by 2050 would require at least a 50% decrease in US anthropogenic NH3 emissions relative to RCP-projected 2050 levels.

  11. Improving Middle School Students’ Critical Thinking Skills Through Reading Infusion-Loaded Discovery Learning Model in the Science Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuryakin; Riandi

    2017-02-01

    A study has been conducted to obtain a depiction of middle school students’ critical thinking skills improvement through the implementation of reading infusion-loaded discovery learning model in science instruction. A quasi-experimental study with the pretest-posttest control group design was used to engage 55 eighth-year middle school students in Tasikmalaya, which was divided into the experimental and control group respectively were 28 and 27 students. Critical thinking skills were measured using a critical thinking skills test in multiple-choice with reason format questions that administered before and after a given instruction. The test was 28 items encompassing three essential concepts, vibration, waves and auditory senses. The critical thinking skills improvement was determined by using the normalized gain score and statistically analyzed by using Mann-Whitney U test.. The findings showed that the average of students’ critical thinking skills normalized gain score of both groups were 59 and 43, respectively for experimental and control group in the medium category. There were significant differences between both group’s improvement. Thus, the implementation of reading infusion-loaded discovery learning model could further improve middle school students’ critical thinking skills than conventional learning.

  12. Experimental study on the thorium-loaded accelerator-driven system at the Kyoto Univ. critical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Pyeon, C. H.; Yagi, T.; Lim, J. Y.; Misawa, T.

    2012-07-01

    The experimental study on the thorium-loaded accelerator-driven system (ADS) is conducted in the Kyoto Univ. Critical Assembly (KUCA). The experiments are carried out in both the critical and subcritical states for attaining the reaction rates of the thorium capture and fission reactions. In the critical system, the thorium plate irradiation experiment is carried out for the thorium capture and fission reactions. From the results of the measurements, the thorium fission reactions are obtained apparently in the critical system, and the C/E values of reaction rates show the accuracy of relative difference of about 30%. In the ADS experiments with 14 MeV neutrons and 100 MeV protons, the subcritical experiments are carried out in the thorium-loaded cores to obtain the capture reaction rates through the measurements of {sup 115}In(n, {gamma}){sup 116m}In reactions. The results of the experiments reveal the difference between the reaction rate distributions for the change in not only the neutron spectrum but also the external neutron source. The comparison between the measured and calculated reaction rate distributions demonstrates a discrepancy of the accuracy of reaction rate analyses of thorium capture reactions through the thorium-loaded ADS experiments with 14 MeV neutrons. Hereafter, kinetic experiments are planned to be carried out to deduce the delayed neutron decay constants and subcriticality using the pulsed neutron method. (authors)

  13. Determining Exercise Strength Requirements for Astronaut Critical Mission Tasks: Reaching Under G-Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffner, Grant; Bentley, Jason

    2008-01-01

    The critical mission tasks assessments effort seeks to determine the physical performance requirements that astronauts must meet in order to safely and successfully accomplish lunar exploration missions. These assessments will determine astronaut preflight strength, fitness, and flexibility requirements, and the extent to which exercise and other countermeasures must prevent the physical deconditioning associated with prolonged weightlessness. The purpose is to determine the flexibility and strength that crewmembers must possess in order to reach Crew Exploration Vehicle controls during maneuvers that result in sustained acceleration levels ranging from 3.7G to 7.8G. An industry standard multibody dynamics application was used to create human models representing a 5th percentile female, a 50th percentile male, and a 95th percentile male. The additional mass of a space suit sleeve was added to the reaching arm to account for the influence of the suit mass on the reaching effort. The human model was merged with computer models of a pilot seat and control panel for the Crew Exploration Vehicle. Three dimensional paths were created that guided the human models hand from a starting position alongside its thigh to three control targets: a joystick, a keyboard, and an overhead switch panel. The reaching motion to each target was repeated under four vehicle acceleration conditions: nominal ascent (3.7G), two ascent aborts (5.5G and 7.8G) and lunar reentry (4.6G). Elbow and shoulder joint angular excursions were analyzed to assess range of motion requirements. Mean and peak elbow and shoulder joint torques were determined and converted to equivalent resistive exercise loads to assess strength requirements. Angular excursions for the 50th and 95th percentile male models remained within joint range of motion limits. For the 5th percentile female, both the elbow and the shoulder exceeded range of motion limits during the overhead reach. Elbow joint torques ranged from 10 N

  14. Determining Exercise Strength Requirements for Astronaut Critical Mission Tasks: Reaching Under G-Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffner, Grant; Bentley, Jason

    2008-01-01

    The critical mission tasks assessments effort seeks to determine the physical performance requirements that astronauts must meet in order to safely and successfully accomplish lunar exploration missions. These assessments will determine astronaut preflight strength, fitness, and flexibility requirements, and the extent to which exercise and other countermeasures must prevent the physical deconditioning associated with prolonged weightlessness. The purpose is to determine the flexibility and strength that crewmembers must possess in order to reach Crew Exploration Vehicle controls during maneuvers that result in sustained acceleration levels ranging from 3.7G to 7.8G. An industry standard multibody dynamics application was used to create human models representing a 5th percentile female, a 50th percentile male, and a 95th percentile male. The additional mass of a space suit sleeve was added to the reaching arm to account for the influence of the suit mass on the reaching effort. The human model was merged with computer models of a pilot seat and control panel for the Crew Exploration Vehicle. Three dimensional paths were created that guided the human models hand from a starting position alongside its thigh to three control targets: a joystick, a keyboard, and an overhead switch panel. The reaching motion to each target was repeated under four vehicle acceleration conditions: nominal ascent (3.7G), two ascent aborts (5.5G and 7.8G) and lunar reentry (4.6G). Elbow and shoulder joint angular excursions were analyzed to assess range of motion requirements. Mean and peak elbow and shoulder joint torques were determined and converted to equivalent resistive exercise loads to assess strength requirements. Angular excursions for the 50th and 95th percentile male models remained within joint range of motion limits. For the 5th percentile female, both the elbow and the shoulder exceeded range of motion limits during the overhead reach. Elbow joint torques ranged from 10 N

  15. The Science and Application of Critical Loads for Deposition of Nitrogen and Sulfur Compounds in National Parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, E.

    2008-12-01

    The National Parks of the U.S. contain resources of unsurpassed beauty and ecological significance. Park managers are directed to preserve the scenery and natural resources in these parks unimpaired for future generations. However, air pollution can damage the very resources that parks were created to preserve and, often, air pollution originates from outside park boundaries and therefore beyond the National Park Service's management jurisdiction. The Clean Air Act provides a framework and certain tools for protecting park resources from air pollution, but despite these programs, air pollution impacts to national park resources are widespread, including acidification or eutrophication from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. Advances in ecosystem research and modeling have allowed national park managers to use critical loads to better evaluate ecosystem condition and set clear management goals for parks. Critical loads define the amount of deposition, usually nitrogen or sulfur compounds, below which harmful effects to a given resource are not expected. Resource protection goals based on critical loads, in turn, can be communicated to federal and State air regulatory agencies, and incorporated into air quality management planning for ecosystem protection. For example, the National Park Service, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and the Environmental Protection Agency have collaborated to use a critical load to set goals for a nitrogen deposition reduction plan to remedy ecosystem impacts in Rocky Mountain National Park. Elevated nitrogen deposition to the park has caused changes in the type and abundance of aquatic plant species, elevated levels of nitrate in surface waters, elevated levels of nitrogen in spruce needles, long-term accumulation of nitrogen in forest soils, and a shift in alpine tundra plant communities favoring sedges and grasses over the natural wildflower flora. The plan calls for nitrogen deposition to

  16. Determination of critical loads for cylindrical sandwich panels of composite materials under two-sided compression and shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubina, A. L.; Krashakov, Yu. F.

    The problem of determining the critical buckling stress of symmetric and nonsymmetric sandwich panels loaded in two-sided compression and shear is investigated analytically. The governing equation is obtained by solving equations of balance of forces and moments for an element of a sandwich structure in the case of buckling. The solution is based on the general assumptions of the theory of thin shallow shells. The results of the study can be used to optimize the structure of sandwich panels.

  17. Universal electromagnetic suspension balance with nanogramme mass resolution for measurement of sorption on small samples in top and bottom loading configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, C. G.; Petermann, M.; Fieback, T. M.

    2017-04-01

    Determination of mass increase or decrease of very small amplitude is a task which goes hand in hand with gravimetric adsorption and absorption measurement and thermogravimetry. Samples are subjected to various process conditions and as such can experience a change in mass, i.e. when adsorbing gas from the process atmosphere, or can decrease in mass, such as when being dried or when thermal decomposition takes place. Current instruments used for such analysis, especially at high pressures, are often based on magnetic suspension balances, and have a maximum mass resolution of a few 10-6 g. This necessitates more often than not quite significant sample quantities, which can sometimes not easily be manufactured, e.g. in the case of metal organic framework adsorbents, or which in other cases do not have a sufficient specific surface area resulting in low measuring effect. A new apparatus based on a high resolution thermogravimetric analyser has been developed. This new apparatus combines very high resolution of up to a few 10-8 g with a relatively high sample mass of up to 1.5 g, whilst eliminating many of the disadvantages of the microbalances previously used in magnetic suspension balances. An interface was developed which permits free configuration of the new balance as top or bottom loading. Validation measurements of known adsorbents were subsequently performed, with sample quantities up to a factor of 174 smaller than in literature.

  18. The body configuration at step contact critically determines the successfulness of balance recovery in response to large backward perturbations.

    PubMed

    Weerdesteyn, Vivian; Laing, Andrew C; Robinovitch, Stephen N

    2012-03-01

    The mechanical efficiency of stepping to recover balance can be expressed by a biomechanical model that includes the trunk inclination angle and the angle of the leg at the instant of stepping-foot contact. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that this model would accurately predict the successfulness of recovery attempts (recovery vs. falls) following large backward perturbations. Ten young participants were exposed to a series of 12 very large postural perturbations in the backward direction by means of a support-surface translation. At the instant of stepping-foot contact, we calculated the trunk inclination angle and the angle of the stepping leg with the vertical. Reaction time, step duration, step velocity and step length were also determined. A logistic regression analysis revealed that the model with leg and trunk inclination angles accurately predicted successful recovery, with a more forward tilted trunk and a further backward positioned leg increasing the probability of success. The set of spatiotemporal step variables was significantly less predictive. Over the course of the experiment, participants gradually became more successful in recovering balance, which coincided with an increase in leg but not in trunk angles. In conclusion, the body configuration at the instant of first stepping-foot contact accurately predicted successful balance recovery after a backward postural perturbation. Given the observation that participants improved their performance by increasing their leg angles, which suggests that it may be easier to improve this variable, compared to the trunk angle, by exercise interventions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The lithospheric-scale 3D structural configuration of the North Alpine Foreland Basin constrained by gravity modelling and the calculation of the 3D load distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybycin, Anna M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Schneider, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The North Alpine Foreland Basin is situated in the northern front of the European Alps and extends over parts of France, Switzerland, Germany and Austria. It formed as a wedge shaped depression since the Tertiary in consequence of the Euro - Adriatic continental collision and the Alpine orogeny. The basin is filled with clastic sediments, the Molasse, originating from erosional processes of the Alps and underlain by Mesozoic sedimentary successions and a Paleozoic crystalline crust. For our study we have focused on the German part of the basin. To investigate the deep structure, the isostatic state and the load distribution of this region we have constructed a 3D structural model of the basin and the Alpine area using available depth and thickness maps, regional scale 3D structural models as well as seismic and well data for the sedimentary part. The crust (from the top Paleozoic down to the Moho (Grad et al. 2008)) has been considered as two-parted with a lighter upper crust and a denser lower crust; the partition has been calculated following the approach of isostatic equilibrium of Pratt (1855). By implementing a seismic Lithosphere-Asthenosphere-Boundary (LAB) (Tesauro 2009) the crustal scale model has been extended to the lithospheric-scale. The layer geometry and the assigned bulk densities of this starting model have been constrained by means of 3D gravity modelling (BGI, 2012). Afterwards the 3D load distribution has been calculated using a 3D finite element method. Our results show that the North Alpine Foreland Basin is not isostatically balanced and that the configuration of the crystalline crust strongly controls the gravity field in this area. Furthermore, our results show that the basin area is influenced by varying lateral load differences down to a depth of more than 150 km what allows a first order statement of the required compensating horizontal stress needed to prevent gravitational collapse of the system. BGI (2012). The International

  20. Developing Critical Loads of acidity for streams in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, using PnET-BGC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhraei, H.

    2015-12-01

    Acid deposition has impaired acid-sensitive streams and reduced aquatic biotic integrity in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM) by decreasing pH and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC). Twelve streams in GRSM are listed by the state of Tennessee as impaired due to low stream pH (pH<6.0) under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act. A dynamic biogeochemical model, PnET-BGC, was used to evaluate past, current and potential future changes in soil and water chemistry of watersheds of GRSM in response to changes in acid deposition. Calibrating 30 stream-watersheds in GRSM (including 12 listed impaired streams) to the long-term stream chemistry observations, the model was parameterized for the Park. The calibrated model was used to evaluate the level of atmospheric deposition above which harmful effects occur, known as "critical loads", for individual study watersheds. Estimated critical loads and exceedances (levels of deposition above the critical load) of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition were depicted through geographic information system maps. Accuracy of model simulations in the presence of uncertainties in the estimated model parameters and inputs was assessed using three uncertainty and sensitivity techniques.

  1. Consequences of intensive forest harvesting on the recovery of Swedish lakes from acidification and on critical load exceedances.

    PubMed

    Moldan, Filip; Stadmark, Johanna; Fölster, Jens; Jutterström, Sara; Futter, Martyn N; Cosby, Bernard J; Wright, Richard F

    2017-12-15

    Across much of the northern hemisphere, lakes are at risk of re-acidification due to incomplete recovery from historical acidification and pressures associated with more intensive forest biomass harvesting. Critical load (CL) calculations aimed at estimating the amount of pollutants an ecosystem can receive without suffering adverse consequences are dependent on these factors. Here, we present a modelling study of the potential effects of intensified forest harvesting on re-acidification of a set of 3239 Swedish lakes based on scenarios with varying intensities of forest biomass harvest and acid deposition. There is some evidence that forestry would have caused a certain level of acidification even if deposition remained at 1860 levels. We show that all plausible harvest scenarios delay recovery due to increased rates of base cation removal. Scenario results were used to estimate critical loads for the entire population of lakes in Sweden. The forestry intensity included in critical load calculations is a political decision. After scaling calculations to the national level, it was apparent that a high but plausible forest harvest intensity would lead to an increase in the area of CL exceedances and that even after significant reductions in forest harvest intensity, there would still be areas with CL exceedances. Our results show that forest harvest intensity and regional environmental change must be carefully considered in future CL calculations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification of research relating to the critical loads concept and its potential application to the regulation of acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatti, N.

    1993-12-01

    The overwhelming majority of strategies currently implemented to regulate acidic deposition have focused on source-based or emission-control techniques. In the past few years, however, the fact that such source-based. strategies may not be sufficient to prevent adverse ecological effects and may therefore need to be supplemented with other control options, such as receptor-based strategies, has become apparent. Partly in response to this insufficiency of regulatory controls, the US Congress has required the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program to determine (1) what deposition levels are needed to prevent such ecological damage, (2) whether such safe deposition levels (i.e., critical loads) can realistically be identified, and (3) what the costs and benefits of attaining such deposition levels are. This report reviews and culls the existing research on these alternative control strategies, emphasizing the critical loads concept, to determine the advantages and limitations and the cost-benefit relationships associated with receptor-based control options. The results of this study indicate that in spite of the significant limitations associated with the critical loads concept, this strategy dominates all discussions of non-source-based control options and offers considerable advantages, including cost-effectiveness, over the more traditional source-based control methods. Summaries of 10 of the most relevant studies dealing with alternative control strategies and the costs and benefits associated with them are also presented in this report.

  3. Critical Configuration and Physics Mesaurements for Graphite Reflected Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.27-CM Pitch)

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2011-09-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950's efforts were made to study 'power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles'. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in FY 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program's effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments served as a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated 253 stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. 'The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.' The experiment studied within this evaluation was the first of the series and had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Information for this evaluation was compiled from Reference 1 and 2, reports on subsequent experiments in the series, and the experimental logbook as well as from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

  4. Consideration of multiple load cases is critical in modelling orthotropic bone adaptation in the femur.

    PubMed

    Geraldes, Diogo M; Modenese, Luca; Phillips, Andrew T M

    2016-10-01

    Functional adaptation of the femur has been investigated in several studies by embedding bone remodelling algorithms in finite element (FE) models, with simplifications often made to the representation of bone's material symmetry and mechanical environment. An orthotropic strain-driven adaptation algorithm is proposed in order to predict the femur's volumetric material property distribution and directionality of its internal structures within a continuum. The algorithm was applied to a FE model of the femur, with muscles, ligaments and joints included explicitly. Multiple load cases representing distinct frames of two activities of daily living (walking and stair climbing) were considered. It is hypothesised that low shear moduli occur in areas of bone that are simply loaded and high shear moduli in areas subjected to complex loading conditions. In addition, it is investigated whether material properties of different femoral regions are stimulated by different activities. The loading and boundary conditions were considered to provide a physiological mechanical environment. The resulting volumetric material property distribution and directionalities agreed with ex vivo imaging data for the whole femur. Regions where non-orthogonal trabecular crossing has been documented coincided with higher values of predicted shear moduli. The topological influence of the different activities modelled was analysed. The influence of stair climbing on the properties of the femoral neck region is highlighted. It is recommended that multiple load cases should be considered when modelling bone adaptation. The orthotropic model of the complete femur is released with this study.

  5. Spatial variation of atmospheric nitrogen deposition and critical loads for aquatic ecosystems in the Greater Yellowstone Area.

    PubMed

    Nanus, L; McMurray, J A; Clow, D W; Saros, J E; Blett, T; Gurdak, J J

    2017-04-01

    Current and historic atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has impacted aquatic ecosystems in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA). Understanding the spatial variation in total atmospheric deposition (wet + dry) of N is needed to estimate air pollution deposition critical loads for sensitive aquatic ecosystems. This is particularly important for areas that have an increasing contribution of ammonia dry deposition to total N (TN), such as the GYA. High resolution geostatistical models and maps of TN deposition (wet + dry) were developed using a variety of techniques including ordinary kriging in a geographic information system, to evaluate spatial variability and identify areas of elevated loading of pollutants for the GYA. TN deposition estimates in the GYA range from <1.4 to 7.5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) and show greater variability than wet inorganic N deposition. Critical loads of TN deposition (CLTNdep) for nutrient enrichment in aquatic ecosystems range from less than 1.5 ± 1.0 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) to over 4.0 ± 1.0 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) and variability is controlled by differences in basin characteristics. The lowest CLTNdep estimates occurred in high elevation basins within GYA Wilderness boundaries. TN deposition maps were used to identify critical load exceedances for aquatic ecosystems. Estimated CLTNdep exceedances for the GYA range from 17% to 48% depending on the surface water nitrate (NO3(-)) threshold. Based on a NO3(-) threshold of 1.0 μmol L(-1), TN deposition exceeds CLTNdep in approximately 30% of the GYA. These predictive models and maps can be used to help identify and protect sensitive ecosystems that may be impacted by excess atmospheric N deposition.

  6. Surface water acidification responses and critical loads of sulfur and nitrogen deposition in Loch Vale watershed, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Cosby, B. J.; Tonnessen, K. A.; Clow, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the sensitivity of The Loch, a subalpine lake in Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado, to acidification in response to increased atmospheric loading of sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) using the Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments (MAGIC). Lake water acid-base chemistry was moderately sensitive to changes in both S and N deposition. However, the loads of S deposition that would drive chronic lake water acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) to below 0 or 20 μeq L-1 were estimated to be 11 and 8 kg S ha-1 yr-1, respectively, assuming constant future N deposition at current levels. Comparable loads for N deposition, assuming constant future S deposition, were estimated to be 21 and 12 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Modeling results for Andrews Creek, an alpine tributary to The Loch, suggested critical loads for surface water acidification that averaged about one third lower. Surface water ANC = 50 μeq L-1 was projected to occur in 50 years in The Loch if S or N deposition increased by a moderate amount (<40%) but could not be achieved in Andrews Creek by reducing either S or N deposition to zero. On the basis of the results of synoptic surveys of lake water chemistry, about one fifth of the wilderness lakes in the Colorado Front Range are more acid-sensitive than The Loch. This modeling exercise suggests the need for a regional analysis of critical loads for the larger population of acid-sensitive aquatic resources in order to provide part of the scientific foundation for federally mandated land management decisions.

  7. Surface water acidification responses and critical loads of sulfur and nitrogen deposition in Loch Vale watershed, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, T.J.; Cosby, B.J.; Tonnessen, K.A.; Clow, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the sensitivity of The Loch, a subalpine lake in Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado, to acidification in response to increased atmospheric loading of sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) using the Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments (MAGIC). Lake water acid-base chemistry was moderately sensitive to changes in both S and N deposition. However, the loads of S deposition that would drive chronic lake water acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) to below 0 or 20 ??eq L-1 were estimated to be 11 and 8 kg S ha-1 yr-1, respectively, assuming constant future N deposition at current levels. Comparable loads for N deposition, assuming constant future S deposition, were estimated to be 21 and 12 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Modeling results for Andrews Creek, an alpine tributary to The Loch, suggested critical loads for surface water acidification that averaged about one third lower. Surface water ANC = 50 ??eq L-1 was projected to occur in 50 years in The Loch if S or N deposition increased by a moderate amount (<40%) but could not be achieved in Andrews Creek by reducing either S or N deposition to zero. On the basis of the results of synoptic surveys of lake water chemistry, about one fifth of the wilderness lakes in the Colorado Front Range are more acid-sensitive than The Loch. This modeling exercise suggests the need for a regional analysis of critical loads for the larger population of acid-sensitive aquatic resources in order to provide part of the scientific foundation for federally mandated land management decisions. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Streamwater acid-base chemistry and critical loads of atmospheric sulfur deposition in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, T J; Cosby, B J; Webb, J R; Dennis, R L; Bulger, A J; Deviney, F A

    2008-02-01

    A modeling study was conducted to evaluate the acid-base chemistry of streams within Shenandoah National Park, Virginia and to project future responses to sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) atmospheric emissions controls. Many of the major stream systems in the park have acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) less than 20 microeq/L, levels at which chronic and/or episodic adverse impacts on native brook trout are possible. Model hindcasts suggested that none of these streams had ANC less than 50 microeq/L in 1900. Model projections, based on atmospheric emissions controls representative of laws already enacted as of 2003, suggested that the ANC of those streams simulated to have experienced the largest historical decreases in ANC will increase in the future. The levels of S deposition that were simulated to cause streamwater ANC to increase or decrease to three specified critical levels (0, 20, and 50 microeq/L) ranged from less than zero (ANC level not attainable) to several hundred kg/ha/year, depending on the selected site and its inherent acid-sensitivity, selected ANC endpoint criterion, and evaluation year for which the critical load was calculated. Several of the modeled streams situated on siliciclastic geology exhibited critical loads <0 kg/ha/year to achieve ANC >50 microeq/L in the year 2040, probably due at least in part to base cation losses from watershed soil. The median modeled siliciclastic stream had a calculated critical load to achieve ANC >50 microeq/L in 2100 that was about 3 kg/ha/year, or 77% lower than deposition in 1990, representing the time of model calibration.

  9. A proposed procedure for expressing the behavior of a full engine cycle by identifying its critical load timings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marius Andrei, Mihalache; Gheorghe, Nagit; Gavril, Musca; Vasile, Merticaru, Jr.; Marius Ionut, Ripanu

    2016-11-01

    In the present study the authors propose a new algorithm for identifying the right loads that act upon a functional connecting rod during a full engine cycle. The loads are then divided into three categories depending on the results they produce, as static, semi-dynamic and dynamic ones Because an engine cycle extends up to 720°, the authors aim to identify a method of substitution of values that produce the same effect as a previous value of a considered angle did. In other words, the proposed method aims to pin point the critical values that produce an effect different as the one seen before during a full engine cycle. Only those values will then be considered as valid loads that act upon the connecting rod inside FEA analyses. This technique has been applied to each of the three categories mentioned above and did produced different critical values for each one of them. The whole study relies on a theoretical mechanical project which was developed in order to identify the right values that correspond to each degree of the entire engine cycle of a Daewoo Tico automobile.

  10. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH AND 7-TUBE CLUSTERS)

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-05-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950’s efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles”. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of 253 unmoderated stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.” The first two experiments in the series were evaluated in HEU-COMP-FAST-001 (SCCA-FUND-EXP-001) and HEU-COMP-FAST-002 (SCCA-FUND-EXP-002). The first experiment had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank (References 1 and 2). The second experiment in the series, performed in early 1963, had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice in a 25.96 cm OD core tank and graphite reflectors on all sides. The third set of experiments in the series, performed in mid-1963, which is studied in this evaluation, used beryllium reflectors. The beryllium reflected system was the preferred reactor configuration for this application because of the small thickness of the reflector. The two core configurations had the 253 fuel tubes

  11. Droop Control of Solar PV, Grid and Critical Load using Suppressing DC Current Injection Technique without Battery Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dama Mr., Jayachandra; (Mrs. , Lini Mathew, Dr.; Srikanth Mr., G.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents design of a sustainable solar Photo voltaic system for an Indian cities based residential/community house, integrated with grid, supporting it as supplementary sources, to meet energy demand of domestic loads. The role of renewable energy sources in Distributed Generation (DG) is increasingly being recognized as a supplement and an alternative to large conventional central power supply. Though centralized economic system that solely depends on cities is hampered due to energy deficiency, the use of solar energy in cities is never been tried widely due to technical inconvenience and high installation cost. To mitigate these problems, this paper proposes an optimized design of grid-tied PV system without storage which is suitable for Indian origin as it requires less installallation cost and supplies residential loads when the grid power is unavailable. The energy requirement is mainly fulfilled from PV energy module for critical load of a city located residential house and supplemented by grid/DG for base and peak load. The system has been developed for maximum daily household demand of 50kWp and can be scaled to any higher value as per requirement of individual/community building ranging from 50kWp to 60kWp as per the requirement. A simplified control system model has been developed to optimize and control flow of power from these sources. The simulation work, using MATLAB Simulink software for proposed energy management, has resulted in an optimal yield leading efficient power flow control of proposed system.

  12. A dynamic modelling approach for estimating critical loads of nitrogen based on plant community changes under a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Belyazid, Salim; Kurz, Dani; Braun, Sabine; Sverdrup, Harald; Rihm, Beat; Hettelingh, Jean-Paul

    2011-03-01

    A dynamic model of forest ecosystems was used to investigate the effects of climate change, atmospheric deposition and harvest intensity on 48 forest sites in Sweden (n = 16) and Switzerland (n = 32). The model was used to investigate the feasibility of deriving critical loads for nitrogen (N) deposition based on changes in plant community composition. The simulations show that climate and atmospheric deposition have comparably important effects on N mobilization in the soil, as climate triggers the release of organically bound nitrogen stored in the soil during the elevated deposition period. Climate has the most important effect on plant community composition, underlining the fact that this cannot be ignored in future simulations of vegetation dynamics. Harvest intensity has comparatively little effect on the plant community in the long term, while it may be detrimental in the short term following cutting. This study shows: that critical loads of N deposition can be estimated using the plant community as an indicator; that future climatic changes must be taken into account; and that the definition of the reference deposition is critical for the outcome of this estimate.

  13. Loading and testing a light scattering cell with a binary fluid mixture near its critical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Donald T.; Becker, James S.

    1993-01-01

    Critical phenomena has been the subject of physics research for many years. However, only in recent years has the research effort become intense. The current intensity has caused the study of critical phenomena to be grouped into a previous older era and a present contemporary era. Turbidity cell filling with methanol cyclohexane is one of the first steps toward a further understanding of critical phenomena. Work performed during the research period is outlined. During this period, research was spent developing apparatus and techniques that will make it possible to study critical phenomena through turbidity measurements on methanol cyclohexane. Topics covered range from the orientation of turbidity cell parts for assembly to the filling apparatus and procedure used when th cell is built. The last section will briefly cover some of the observations made when viewing the cell in a controlled water bath. However, before mention is made of the specifics of the summer research, a short introduction to critical phenomena and turbidity and how they relate to this experiment is provided.

  14. Loading and testing a light scattering cell with a binary fluid mixture near its critical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Donald T.; Becker, James S.

    1993-06-01

    Critical phenomena has been the subject of physics research for many years. However, only in recent years has the research effort become intense. The current intensity has caused the study of critical phenomena to be grouped into a previous older era and a present contemporary era. Turbidity cell filling with methanol cyclohexane is one of the first steps toward a further understanding of critical phenomena. Work performed during the research period is outlined. During this period, research was spent developing apparatus and techniques that will make it possible to study critical phenomena through turbidity measurements on methanol cyclohexane. Topics covered range from the orientation of turbidity cell parts for assembly to the filling apparatus and procedure used when th cell is built. The last section will briefly cover some of the observations made when viewing the cell in a controlled water bath. However, before mention is made of the specifics of the summer research, a short introduction to critical phenomena and turbidity and how they relate to this experiment is provided.

  15. Extraction Method Plays Critical Role in Antibacterial Activity of Propolis-Loaded Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Gabriel G; de Souza, Ronaldo O; Bozzi, Aline D; Poplawska, Malgorzata A; Devine, Declan M; Nugent, Michael J D

    2016-03-01

    Extracted propolis has been used for a long time as a remedy. However, if the release rate of propolis is not controlled, the efficacy is reduced. To overcome this issue, extracted propolis was added to a cryogel system. Propolis collected from southern Brazil was extracted using different methods and loaded at different concentrations into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polyacrylic acid hydrogels as carrier systems. The material properties were investigated with a focus on the propolis release profiles and the cryogel antibacterial properties against 4 different bacteria, namely: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and Pseudomonas putida. Swelling studies indicated that the swelling of the hydrogel was inversely related to propolis content. In addition, propolis release studies indicated a decreased release rate with increased propolis loading. PVA and PVA/polyacrylic acid-loaded propolis were effective against all 4 bacteria studied. These results indicate that the efficacy of propolis can be enhanced by incorporation into hydrogel carrier systems and that hydrogels with higher concentrations of propolis can be considered for use as bactericide dressing. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sandwich-type PLLA-nanosheets loaded with BMP-2 induce bone regeneration in critical-sized mouse calvarial defects.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Chin; Yano, Fumiko; Murahashi, Yasutaka; Takano, Shuta; Kitaura, Yoshiaki; Chang, Song Ho; Soma, Kazuhito; Ueng, Steve W N; Tanaka, Sakae; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Okamura, Yosuke; Moro, Toru; Saito, Taku

    2017-09-01

    To overcome serious clinical problems caused by large bone defects, various approaches to bone regeneration have been researched, including tissue engineering, biomaterials, stem cells and drug screening. Previously, we developed a free-standing biodegradable polymer nanosheet composed of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) using a simple fabrication process consisting of spin-coating and peeling techniques. Here, we loaded recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) between two 60-nm-thick PLLA nanosheets, and investigated these sandwich-type nanosheets in bone regeneration applications. The PLLA nanosheets displayed constant and sustained release of the loaded rhBMP-2 for over 2months in vitro. Moreover, we implanted the sandwich-type nanosheets with or without rhBMP-2 into critical-sized defects in mouse calvariae. Bone regeneration was evident 4weeks after implantation, and the size and robustness of the regenerated bone had increased by 8weeks after implantation in mice implanted with the rhBMP-2-loaded nanosheets, whereas no significant bone formation occurred over a period of 20weeks in mice implanted with blank nanosheets. The PLLA nanosheets loaded with rhBMP-2 may be useful in bone regenerative medicine; furthermore, the sandwich-type PLLA nanosheet structure may potentially be applied as a potent prolonged sustained-release carrier of other molecules or drugs. Here we describe sandwich-type poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanosheets loaded with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) as a novel method for bone regeneration. Biodegradable 60-nm-thick PLLA nanosheets display strong adhesion without any adhesive agent. The sandwich-type PLLA nanosheets displayed constant and sustained release of the loaded rhBMP-2 for over 2months in vitro. The nanosheets with rhBMP-2 markedly enhanced bone regeneration when they were implanted into critical-sized defects in mouse calvariae. In addition to their application for bone regeneration, PLLA

  17. Critical shimmy speed of nonswiveling landing-gear wheels subject to lateral loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plakhtienko, N. P.; Shifrin, B. M.

    2006-09-01

    The paper presents a nonlinear model describing vibration of the landing gear relative to the fuselage. The model is intended to analyze the dynamic stability of nonswiveling main-gear wheels. The model is used to show that the lateral component of the fuselage speed has a significant effect on the critical shimmy speed

  18. Critical analysis of rhinovirus RNA load quantification by real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Schibler, Manuel; Yerly, Sabine; Vieille, Gaël; Docquier, Mylène; Turin, Lara; Kaiser, Laurent; Tapparel, Caroline

    2012-09-01

    Rhinoviruses are the most frequent cause of human respiratory infections, and quantitative rhinovirus diagnostic tools are needed for clinical investigations. Although results obtained by real-time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) assays are frequently converted to viral RNA loads, this presents several limitations regarding accurate virus RNA quantification, particularly given the need to reliably quantify all known rhinovirus genotypes with a single assay. Using an internal extraction control and serial dilutions of an in vitro-transcribed rhinovirus RNA reference standard, we validated a quantitative one-step real-time PCR assay. We then used chimeric rhinovirus genomes with 5'-untranslated regions (5'UTRs) originating from the three rhinovirus species and from one enterovirus to estimate the impact of the 5'UTR diversity. Respiratory specimens from infected patients were then also analyzed. The assay quantification ability ranged from 4.10 to 9.10 log RNA copies/ml, with an estimated error margin of ±10%. This variation was mainly linked to target variability and interassay variability. Taken together, our results indicate that our assay can reliably estimate rhinovirus RNA load, provided that the appropriate error margin is used. In contrast, due to the lack of a universal rhinovirus RNA standard and the variability related to sample collection procedures, accurate absolute rhinovirus RNA quantification in respiratory specimens is currently hardly feasible.

  19. Critical Loads of Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition for Aquatic Ecosystems in Yosemite and Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanus, L.; Clow, D. W.; Sickman, J. O.

    2016-12-01

    High-elevation aquatic ecosystems in Yosemite (YOSE) and Sequoia and Kings Canyon (SEKI) National Parks are impacted by atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition associated with local and regional air pollution. Documented effects include elevated surface water nitrate concentrations, increased algal productivity, and changes in diatom species assemblages. Annual wet inorganic N deposition maps, developed at 1-km resolution for YOSE and SEKI to quantify N deposition to sensitive high-elevation ecosystems, range from 1.0 to over 5.0 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Critical loads of N deposition for nutrient enrichment of aquatic ecosystems were quantified and mapped using a geostatistical approach, with N deposition, topography, vegetation, geology, and climate as potential explanatory variables. Multiple predictive models were created using various combinations of explanatory variables; this approach allowed us to better quantify uncertainty and more accurately identify the areas most sensitive to atmospherically deposited N. The lowest critical loads estimates and highest exceedances identified within YOSE and SEKI occurred in high-elevation basins with steep slopes, sparse vegetation, and areas of neoglacial till and talus. These results are consistent with previous analyses in the Rocky Mountains, and highlight the sensitivity of alpine ecosystems to atmospheric N deposition.

  20. A national critical loads framework for atmospheric deposition effects assessment: II. Defining assessment end points, indicators, and functional subregions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunsaker, Carolyn; Graham, Robin; Turner, Robert S.; Ringold, Paul L.; Holdren, George R.; Strickland, Timothy C.

    1993-05-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency, with support from the US Department of Energy and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, has been evaluating the feasibility of an effects-based (critical loads) approach to atmospheric pollutant regulation and abatement. The rationale used to develop three of the six steps in a flexible assessment framework (Strickland and others, 1992) is presented along with a discussion of a variety of implementation approaches and their ramifications. The rationale proposes that it is necessary to provide an explicit statement of the condition of the resource that is considered valuable (assessment end point) because: (1) individual ecosystem components may be more or less sensitive to deposition, (2) it is necessary to select indicators of ecosystem condition that can be objectively measured and that reflect changes in the quality of the assessment end point, and (3) acceptable status (i.e., value of indicator and quality of assessment end point at critical load) must be defined. The rationale also stresses the importance of defining the assessment regions and subregions to improve the analysis and understanding of the indicator response to deposition. Subregional definition can be based on a variety of criteria, including informed judgment or quantitative procedures. It also depends on the geographic scale at which exposure and effects models are accurate and on data availability, resolution, and quality.

  1. Research Study to Define the Critical Failure Mechanisms in Notched Composites under Compression Fatigue Loading.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    A0-13 654 MATERIALS SCIENCES CORP SPRING HOUSE PA FGS 11/ " RESEARCH STUDY TO DEFINE THE CRITICAL FAILURE MECHANISMS IN NOT--ETC(U) MAR 81 B W ROSEN... House , PA 19477 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Naval Air Systems Command March, 1981 Washington, DC 20361 13. NUMBER OF PAGES...fatigue of a laminate containing a hole. The emphasis is upon understanding the governing physical phe- nomnena. Accordingly, the experimental tasks

  2. Factors diminishing the effectiveness of phosphorus loading from municipal effluent: critical information for TMDL analyses.

    PubMed

    Effler, Steven W; Auer, Martin T; Peng, Feng; Perkins, MaryGail; O'Donnell, Susan M; Prestigiacomo, Anthony R; Matthews, David A; DePetro, Phillip A; Lambert, Renn S; Minott, Natalie M

    2012-03-01

    Factors that diminish the effectiveness of phosphorus inputs from a municipal wastewater treatment facility (Metro) in contributing to phosphorus levels and its availability to support algae growth in a culturally eutrophic urban lake (Onondaga Lake, NY) were characterized and quantified. These factors included the bioavailability and settling characteristics of particulate phosphorus from this effluent, the dominant form (70%) of phosphorus in this input, and the plunging of the discharge to stratified layers in the lake. Supporting studies included: (1) chemical and morphometric characterization of the phosphorus-enriched particles of this effluent, compared to particle populations of the tributaries and lake, with an individual particle analysis technique; (2) conduct of algal bioavailability assays of the particulate phosphorus of the effluent; (3) conduct of multiple size class settling velocity measurements on effluent particles; and (4) determinations of the propensity of the discharge to plunge, and documentation of plunging through three-dimensional monitoring of a tracer adjoining the outfall. All of these diminishing effects were found to be operative for the Metro effluent in Onondaga Lake and will be integrated into a forthcoming phosphorus "total maximum daily load" analysis for the lake, through appropriate representation in a supporting mechanistic water quality model. The particulate phosphorus in the effluent was associated entirely with Fe-rich particles formed in the phosphorus treatment process. These particles did not contribute to concentrations in pelagic portions of the lake, due to local deposition associated with their large size. Moreover, this particulate phosphorus was found to be nearly entirely unavailable to support algae growth. While substantial differences are to be expected for various inputs, the effective loading concept and the approaches adopted here to assess the diminishing factors are broadly applicable.

  3. A perfusion bioreactor system efficiently generates cell‐loaded bone substitute materials for addressing critical size bone defects

    PubMed Central

    Kleinhans, Claudia; Mohan, Ramkumar Ramani; Vacun, Gabriele; Schwarz, Thomas; Haller, Barbara; Sun, Yang; Kahlig, Alexander; Kluger, Petra; Finne‐Wistrand, Anna; Walles, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Critical size bone defects and non‐union fractions are still challenging to treat. Cell‐loaded bone substitutes have shown improved bone ingrowth and bone formation. However, a lack of methods for homogenously colonizing scaffolds limits the maximum volume of bone grafts. Additionally, therapy robustness is impaired by heterogeneous cell populations after graft generation. Our aim was to establish a technology for generating grafts with a size of 10.5 mm in diameter and 25 mm of height, and thus for grafts suited for treatment of critical size bone defects. Therefore, a novel tailor‐made bioreactor system was developed, allowing standardized flow conditions in a porous poly(L‐lactide‐co‐caprolactone) material. Scaffolds were seeded with primary human mesenchymal stem cells derived from four different donors. In contrast to static experimental conditions, homogenous cell distributions were accomplished under dynamic culture. Additionally, culture in the bioreactor system allowed the induction of osteogenic lineage commitment after one week of culture without addition of soluble factors. This was demonstrated by quantitative analysis of calcification and gene expression markers related to osteogenic lineage. In conclusion, the novel bioreactor technology allows efficient and standardized conditions for generating bone substitutes that are suitable for the treatment of critical size defects in humans. PMID:26011163

  4. Colistin Population Pharmacokinetics after Application of a Loading Dose of 9 MU Colistin Methanesulfonate in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, Lena E.; Pontikis, Konstantinos; Ioannidis, Konstantinos; Tsagkari, Vasiliki; Galani, Lamprini; Kostakou, Eirini; Baziaka, Fotini; Paskalis, Charalambos; Koutsoukou, Antonia; Giamarellou, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Colistin has been revived, in the era of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Gram-negative infections, as the last-resort treatment in critically ill patients. Recent studies focusing on the optimal dosing strategy of colistin have demonstrated the necessity of a loading dose at treatment initiation (D. Plachouras, M. Karvanen, L. E. Friberg, E. Papadomichelakis, A. Antoniadou, I. Tsangaris, I. Karaiskos, G. Poulakou, F. Kontopidou, A. Armaganidis, O. Cars, and H. Giamarellou, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 53:3430–3436, 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01361-08; A. F. Mohamed, I. Karaiskos, D. Plachouras, M. Karvanen, K. Pontikis, B. Jansson, E. Papadomichelakis, A. Antoniadou, H. Giamarellou, A. Armaganidis, O. Cars, and L. E. Friberg, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 56:4241– 4249, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.06426-11; S. M. Garonzik, J. Li, V. Thamlikitkul, D. L. Paterson, S. Shoham, J. Jacob, F. P. Silveira, A. Forrest, and R. L. Nation, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 55:3284–3294, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01733-10). In 19 critically ill patients with suspected or microbiologically documented infections caused by XDR Gram-negative strains, a loading dose of 9 MU colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) (∼270 mg colistin base activity) was administered with a maintenance dose of 4.5 MU every 12 h, commenced after 24 h. Patients on renal replacement were excluded. CMS infusion was given over 30 min or 1 h. Repeated blood sampling was performed after the loading dose and after the 5th or 6th dose. Colistin concentrations and measured CMS, determined after hydrolization to colistin and including the partially sulfomethylated derivatives, were determined with a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted in NONMEM with the new data combined with data from previous studies. Measured colistimethate concentrations were described by 4 compartments for distribution and removal of sulfomethyl groups

  5. Colistin Population Pharmacokinetics after Application of a Loading Dose of 9 MU Colistin Methanesulfonate in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Karaiskos, Ilias; Friberg, Lena E; Pontikis, Konstantinos; Ioannidis, Konstantinos; Tsagkari, Vasiliki; Galani, Lamprini; Kostakou, Eirini; Baziaka, Fotini; Paskalis, Charalambos; Koutsoukou, Antonia; Giamarellou, Helen

    2015-12-01

    Colistin has been revived, in the era of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Gram-negative infections, as the last-resort treatment in critically ill patients. Recent studies focusing on the optimal dosing strategy of colistin have demonstrated the necessity of a loading dose at treatment initiation (D. Plachouras, M. Karvanen, L. E. Friberg, E. Papadomichelakis, A. Antoniadou, I. Tsangaris, I. Karaiskos, G. Poulakou, F. Kontopidou, A. Armaganidis, O. Cars, and H. Giamarellou, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 53:3430-3436, 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01361-08; A. F. Mohamed, I. Karaiskos, D. Plachouras, M. Karvanen, K. Pontikis, B. Jansson, E. Papadomichelakis, A. Antoniadou, H. Giamarellou, A. Armaganidis, O. Cars, and L. E. Friberg, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 56:4241- 4249, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.06426-11; S. M. Garonzik, J. Li, V. Thamlikitkul, D. L. Paterson, S. Shoham, J. Jacob, F. P. Silveira, A. Forrest, and R. L. Nation, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 55:3284-3294, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01733-10). In 19 critically ill patients with suspected or microbiologically documented infections caused by XDR Gram-negative strains, a loading dose of 9 MU colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) (∼ 270 mg colistin base activity) was administered with a maintenance dose of 4.5 MU every 12 h, commenced after 24 h. Patients on renal replacement were excluded. CMS infusion was given over 30 min or 1 h. Repeated blood sampling was performed after the loading dose and after the 5th or 6th dose. Colistin concentrations and measured CMS, determined after hydrolization to colistin and including the partially sulfomethylated derivatives, were determined with a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted in NONMEM with the new data combined with data from previous studies. Measured colistimethate concentrations were described by 4 compartments for distribution and removal of sulfomethyl groups, while

  6. A Survey on Investigating the Need for Intelligent Power-Aware Load Balanced Routing Protocols for Handling Critical Links in MANETs

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, B.; Bhalaji, N.; Sivakumar, D.

    2014-01-01

    In mobile ad hoc networks connectivity is always an issue of concern. Due to dynamism in the behavior of mobile nodes, efficiency shall be achieved only with the assumption of good network infrastructure. Presence of critical links results in deterioration which should be detected in advance to retain the prevailing communication setup. This paper discusses a short survey on the specialized algorithms and protocols related to energy efficient load balancing for critical link detection in the recent literature. This paper also suggests a machine learning based hybrid power-aware approach for handling critical nodes via load balancing. PMID:24790546

  7. A survey on investigating the need for intelligent power-aware load balanced routing protocols for handling critical links in MANETs.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, B; Bhalaji, N; Sivakumar, D

    2014-01-01

    In mobile ad hoc networks connectivity is always an issue of concern. Due to dynamism in the behavior of mobile nodes, efficiency shall be achieved only with the assumption of good network infrastructure. Presence of critical links results in deterioration which should be detected in advance to retain the prevailing communication setup. This paper discusses a short survey on the specialized algorithms and protocols related to energy efficient load balancing for critical link detection in the recent literature. This paper also suggests a machine learning based hybrid power-aware approach for handling critical nodes via load balancing.

  8. Tropical river suspended load and solute dynamics in storms within an extreme drought, Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, K. E.; Shanley, J. B.; Perdrial, N.; Scholl, M. A.; Perdrial, J. N.; Plante, A. F.; McDowell, W. H.

    2016-12-01

    Drought is projected to become more prevalent in the tropics under a changing climate. Drought affects hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in the critical zone, which in turn can affect transport of solutes and solids to marine receiving waters. To assess the effects of drought, we examined stream biogeochemistry at two montane rivers during a series of four rewetting events in late August 2015 within an extreme drought in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO), Puerto Rico. We analyzed particulate load (suspended sediment, mineralogy, particulate organic carbon, particulate nitrogen) and dissolved load (dissolved organic carbon, major solutes). Both Río Icacos and Rio Mameyes have continuous streamflow gages, and Río Icacos also had in-stream sensors for specific conductance, turbidity, and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (fDOM) for detailed insight into river behavior. Using solute concentrations and stable isotopes, we determined that new water dominated streamflow during the rewetting period, indicating the importance of rainfall during drought. Relations of suspended sediment and solute concentrations to discharge during rewetting events did not vary from the long-term record, indicating a lack of sediment and solute buildup during drought. Sources of suspended minerals varied through the rewetting events, depending on catchment geology, where particulate minerals varied between primary and secondary minerals over the hydrograph. Sources of particulate organic matter progressively shifted from in-channel sources in the first storms, to mineral soil, and vegetation and organic soil in later storms. These findings suggest that these tropical rivers in the LCZO are resilient to extreme drought.

  9. Critical loads of atmospheric deposition to Adirondack lake watersheds: A guide for policymakers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.; Sullivan, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Acid deposition is sometimes referred to as “acid rain,” although part of the acid load reaches the surface by means other than rainfall. In the eastern U.S., acid deposition consists of several forms of sulfur and nitrogen that largely originate as emissions to the atmosphere from sources such as electricity-generating facilities (coal, oil, and natural gas), diesel- and gasoline-burning vehicles, some agricultural activities, and smokestack industries. Acid deposition is known to cause deleterious effects to sensitive ecosystems of which the Adirondack region of New York State provides several well-known and well-studied examples. This largely forested region includes abundant lakes, streams, and wetlands and possesses several landscape features that result in high ecosystem sensitivity to acid deposition. These features include bedrock that weathers slowly, steep slopes, and thin, naturally acidic soils. An ecosystem is described as sensitive to, or affected by, acid deposition if prolonged exposure to acid deposition has resulted in detrimental ecosystem effects. Soils, streams, and lakes that are less sensitive are better able to buffer acid deposition. A principal reason that acidification is a concern for resource managers is because of the changes induced in native biota and their habitat on land and in water. As the chemistry of soils and surface waters in sensitive landscapes changes in response to prolonged exposure to acid deposition, organisms that cannot tolerate high acidity, such as sugar maple trees and many species of fish and aquatic insects, may be gradually eliminated from the ecosystem. Other biota such as red spruce may experience increased stress and reduced growth rates as a result of acidification, exposing these species to increased susceptibility to disease and other natural stressors and perhaps increased mortality. The ecological effects of acid deposition have been documented by extensive research that began in the U.S. in the

  10. Load and dynamic assessment of B-52B-008 carrier aircraft for finned configuration 1 space shuttle solid rocket booster deceleration subsystem drop test vehicle. Volume 4: Pylon load data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The pylon loading at the drop test vehicle and wing interface attack points is presented. The loads shown are determined using a stiffness method, which assumes the side stiffness of the forward hook guide and the fore and aft stiffness of each drag pin to be equal. The net effect of this assumption is that the forward hook guide reacts approximately 96% of the drop test vehicle yawing moment. For a comparison of these loads to previous X-15 analysis design loadings, see Volume 1 of this document.

  11. Load and dynamic assessment of B-52B-008 carrier aircraft for finned configuration 1 space shuttle solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem drop test vehicle. Volume 3: Pylon load data method 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The pylon loading at the drop test vehicle and wing interface attach points is presented. The loads shown are determined using a stiffness method, which assumes the side stiffness of the foreward hook guide to be one-fourth of the fore and aft stiffness of each drag pin. The net effect of this assumption is that the forward hook guide reacts approximately 85% of the drop test vehicle yawing moment. For a comparison of these loads to previous X-15 analysis design loadings, see Volume 1 of this document.

  12. Deriving nitrogen critical levels and loads based on the responses of acidophytic lichen communities on boreal urban Pinus sylvestris trunks.

    PubMed

    Manninen, Sirkku

    2017-09-19

    The deposition of reactive nitrogen (N) compounds currently predominates over sulphur (S) deposition in most of the cities in Europe and North America. Acidophytic lichens growing on tree trunks are known to be sensitive to both N and S deposition. Given that tree species and climatic factors affect the composition of epiphytic lichen communities and modify lichen responses to air pollution, this study focused on the impact of urban air pollution on acidophytes growing on boreal conifer trunks. The study was performed in the Helsinki metropolitan area, southern Finland, where annual mean nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations range from 4-5μgm(-3) to >50μgm(-3). In addition, background forest sites in southern and northern Finland were included. The results demonstrated elevated N contents (≥0.7%) in Hypogymnia physodes and Platismatia glauca at all the sites where the species occurred. In the Helsinki metropolitan area, a higher frequency of green algae+Scoliociosporum chlorococcum and reduced numerical frequencies of other indicator lichen species (e.g. Pseudevernia furfuracea, Bryoria spp., Usnea spp.) were associated with elevated atmospheric concentrations of NO2 and particulate matter containing N, as well as elevated concentrations of inorganic N in bark. The N isotope values (δ(15)N) of lichens supported the uptake of oxidized N mainly originating from road traffic. Sulphur dioxide (SO2) also negatively affected the most sensitive species, despite the current low levels (1-4μgm(-3)yr(-1)). Critical levels of 5μgNO2m(-3)yr(-1) and 0.5μgNH3m(-3)yr(-1), and a critical load of 2-3kgNha(-1)yr(-1) are proposed for protecting the diversity of boreal acidophytes. This study calls for measurements of the throughfall of various N fractions in urban forest ecosystems along precipitation and temperature gradients to verify the proposed critical levels and loads. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Buckling of Beams and Columns under Combined Axial and Horizontal Loading with Various Axial Loading Application Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javidinejad, Amir

    2012-12-01

    In this paper the buckling behaviour of an I-beam under combined axial and horizontal side loading is examined. It is to shown that the actual application location of the axial loading governs the buck- ling behaviour of the long I-beam. Theoretical formulation is developed to determine the critical buckling load for such combined loading configura- tion from the elastic static theory. Both, the beam deflection theoretical model and the critical load capacity are derived for this combined loading condition. The Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is utilized to apply the axial load on the beam at various configuration locations and it is shown that this application location determines the buckling behaviour and the critical load of the buckling of the I-beam. Numerical example is given.

  14. Module Configuration

    DOEpatents

    Oweis, Salah; D'Ussel, Louis; Chagnon, Guy; Zuhowski, Michael; Sack, Tim; Laucournet, Gaullume; Jackson, Edward J.

    2002-06-04

    A stand alone battery module including: (a) a mechanical configuration; (b) a thermal management configuration; (c) an electrical connection configuration; and (d) an electronics configuration. Such a module is fully interchangeable in a battery pack assembly, mechanically, from the thermal management point of view, and electrically. With the same hardware, the module can accommodate different cell sizes and, therefore, can easily have different capacities. The module structure is designed to accommodate the electronics monitoring, protection, and printed wiring assembly boards (PWAs), as well as to allow airflow through the module. A plurality of modules may easily be connected together to form a battery pack. The parts of the module are designed to facilitate their manufacture and assembly.

  15. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Beryllium Reflected Assemblies of U(93.15)O₂ Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Pitch and 7-Tube Clusters)

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Margaret A.; Bess, John D.; Briggs, J. Blair; Murphy, Michael F.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2015-03-01

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one Na

  16. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH AND 7-TUBE CLUSTERS)

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2014-03-01

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one Na

  17. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH)

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one Na

  18. Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, Grayson C.

    2002-09-01

    The restructuring of regional and national electricity markets in the U.S. and around the world has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators to control and manage the load patterns of wholesale and retail end-users they serve. Demand Response Programs, once called Load Management, have re-emerged as an important element in the fine-tuning of newly restructured electricity markets. During the summers of 1999 and 2001 they played a vital role in stabilizing wholesale markets and providing a hedge against generation shortfalls throughout the U.S.A. Demand Response Programs include ''traditional'' capacity reservation and interruptible/curtailable rates programs as well as voluntary demand bidding programs offered by either Load Serving Entities (LSEs) or regional Independent System Operators (ISOs). The Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) has been monitoring the development of new types of Demand Response Programs both in the U.S. and around the world. This paper provides a survey and overview of the technologies and program designs that make up these emerging and important new programs.

  19. Strontium folate loaded biohybrid scaffolds seeded with dental pulp stem cells induce in vivo bone regeneration in critical sized defects.

    PubMed

    Martin-Del-Campo, Marcela; Rosales-Ibañez, Raul; Alvarado, Keila; Sampedro, Jose G; Garcia-Sepulveda, Christian A; Deb, Sanjukta; San Román, Julio; Rojo, Luis

    2016-10-18

    Strontium folate (SrFO) is a recently developed bone promoting agent with interest in medical and pharmaceutical fields due to its improved features in comparison to current strontium based therapies for osteoporosis and other bone diseases. In this work SrFO derivative was synthesized and loaded into biohybrid scaffolds obtained through lyophilisation of semi-interpenetrating networks of chitosan polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate and beta tri-calcium phosphate (βTCP) fabricated using free radical polymerization. The scaffolds were seeded with pluripotent stem cells obtained from human dental pulp and their potential to regenerate bone tissues were assessed using a critical sized defect model of calvaria in rats and compared with those obtained without SrFO. The results obtained both in vitro and in vivo demonstrated excellent cyto-compatibility with resorption of scaffolds in 4-6 weeks and a total regeneration of the defect, with a more rapid and dense bone formation in the group with SrFO. Thus, the use of stem cells sourced from human dental pulp in combination with SrFO are very promising systems for their application in compromised osseous tissue regeneration.

  20. Fracture behavior under fatigue loading at room temperature and its influence on critical current of Nb-Ti/Cu composite wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojo, Masaki; Iwasaki, Naoya; Sekino, Fumiaki; Ochiai, Shojiro; Sakai, Shuji; Watanabe, Kazuo

    1999-11-01

    Fracture behavior under fatigue loading at room temperature and its influence on critical superconducting current at 4.2 K were investigated for Nb-Ti/Cu multifilamentary composite wire with a copper ratio of 7.83 and an overall diameter of 0.504 mm in which 24 Nb-Ti filaments were embedded. There was a knee in the relation between the applied maximum stress and the number of cycles to failure ( S- N relations). The fracture mechanism below and above this knee was different. When the maximum stress in the fatigue test was high, extensive multiple necking of the Nb-Ti filament occurred, and this was responsible for the final fracture of the composite wire. On the other hand, when the maximum stress in the fatigue tests was low, the fatigue crack nucleated in the copper, which grew and caused the fracture of the Nb-Ti filaments. The critical current was insensitive to fatigue loading when the maximum stress was low. When the maximum stress was high, the critical current after fatigue loading was lower than that after static loading. This was due to severe multiple necking during fatigue loading. Extracted Nb-Ti filaments were also fatigued using a specially designed fatigue testing machine. The S- N curve of filaments agreed well with the stress component of the filament calculated from the S- N relation of the composite wire.

  1. Critical Loads of Acid Deposition for Wilderness Lakes in the Sierra Nevada (California) Estimated by the Steady-State Water Chemistry Model

    Treesearch

    Glenn D. Shaw; Ricardo Cisneros; Donald Schweizer; James O. Sickman; Mark E. Fenn

    2014-01-01

    Major ion chemistry (2000-2009) from 208 lakes (342 sample dates and 600 samples) in class I and II wilderness areas of the Sierra Nevada was used in the Steady-State Water Chemistry (SSWC) model to estimate critical loads for acid deposition and investigate the current vulnerability of high elevation lakes to acid deposition. The majority of the lakes were dilute (...

  2. Critical loads of acidity for 90,000 lakes in northern Saskatchewan: A novel approach for mapping regional sensitivity to acidic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathcart, H.; Aherne, J.; Jeffries, D. S.; Scott, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric emissions of sulphur dioxide (SO2) from large point sources are the primary concern for acidic deposition in western Canada, particularly in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) where prevailing winds may potentially carry SO2 over acid-sensitive lakes in northern Saskatchewan. A novel catchment-scale regression kriging approach was used to assess regional sensitivity and critical loads of acidity for the total lake population of northern Saskatchewan (89,947 lakes). Lake catchments were delineated using Thiessen polygons, and surface water chemistry was predicted for sensitivity indicators (calcium, pH, alkalinity, and acid neutralizing capacity). Critical loads were calculated with the steady state water chemistry model using regression-kriged base cations, sulphate, and dissolved organic carbon concentrations modelled from surface water observations (n > 800) and digital landscape-scale characteristics, e.g., climate, soil, vegetation, landcover, and geology maps. A large region (>13,726 km2) of two or more indicators of acid sensitivity (pH < 6 and acid neutralizing capacity, alkalinity, calcium < 50 μeq L-1) and low critical loads < 5 meq m-2 yr-1 were predicted on the Athabasca Basin. Exceedance of critical loads under 2006 modelled total sulphate deposition was predicted for 12% of the lakes (covering an area of 3742 km2), primarily located on the Athabasca Basin, within 100 km of the AOSR. There have been conflicting scientific reports of impacts from atmospheric emissions from the AOSR; the results of this study suggest that catchments in the Athabasca Basin within 100 km of the AOSR have received acidic deposition in excess of their critical loads and many of them may be at risk of ecosystem damage owing to their sensitivity.

  3. Airborne soil dust and its importance in buffering of atmospheric acidity and critical load assessment, over the semi arid tract of northern India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Disha; Kulshrestha, Umesh

    Airborne soil dust and its importance in buffering of atmospheric acidity and critical load assessment, over the semi arid tract of northern India. The Critical Load approach alongwith integrated assessment models has been used in the European nations for policy formations to reduce acidic emissions. This unique approach was applied to assess the of vulnerability of natural systems to the present day atmospheric pollution scenario. The calculated values of critical loads of sulphur ( 225 - 275 eq/ha/yr) and nitrogen (298 - 303 eq/ha/yr), for the soil system in Delhi, were calculated with respect to Anjan grass, Hibiscus and Black siris. The present loads of sulphur (PL(S) = 26.40 eq/ha/yr) and nitrogen (PL(N) = 36.51 eq/ha/yr) were found to be much lower than their critical loads without posing any danger of atmospheric acidic deposition on the soil systems. The study indicated that the system is still protective due to high pH of soil. The nature of buffering capability of calcium derived from soil dust can be considered as a natural tool to combat acidification in the Indian region. The results showed that the pollution status in Delhi is still within the safe limits. However, at the pace at which the city is growing, it is likely that in coming decades, it may exceed these critical values. In order to set deposition limits and avoid adverse effects of acidic deposition this approach can be applied in India too. Such approach is very useful, not only in abating pollution but also in devising means of cost optimal emission abatement strategies.

  4. Photocatalytic splitting of water under visible-light irradiation over the NiOx-loaded Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} with 4f-d{sup 10}-d{sup 0} configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Xinde; Ye Hongqi; Liu Hui; Ma Chenxia; Zhao Zhi

    2010-01-15

    A new visible-light-response photocatalyst Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} with 4f-d{sup 10}-d{sup 0} configuration crystallized in a cubic system with the space group Fd3m was synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. NiOx-loaded Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} showed high photocatalytic activities for H{sub 2} evolution from pure water under visible light irradiation (lambda>400 nm). Changes in the photocatalytic activity with the calcination temperature of Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} and the amount of NiOx loaded indicated that the combination of highly crystallized Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} and a high dispersion of NiOx particles led to high photocatalytic activity. The high photocatalytic performance of NiOx-loaded Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} supported the existing view that the photocatalytic activity correlated with the lattice distortion. Density functional theory calculation indicated that strong dispersion from the hybridized In 5s 5p orbitals at the bottom of the conduction band was responsible for the high activity of photocatalyst Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7}. - Graphical abstract: A new visible-light-response photocatalyst Sm{sub 2}InTaO{sub 7} with 4f-d{sup 10}-d{sup 0} configuration was developed. DFT calculation indicated that strong dispersion from the hybridized In 5s 5p orbitals was responsible for the high photocatalytic activity.

  5. Synthesis of recent advances in critical loads research on impacts from atmospheric nitrogen deposition on terrestrial plant communities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, C.; Horn, K. J.; Thomas, R. Q.; Simkin, S.; Pardo, L. H.; Blett, T.; Lawrence, G. B.; Belyazid, S.; Phelan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition is one of the primary threats to plant biodiversity world-wide after habitat destruction and climate change. As a primary limiting nutrient and contributor to soil acidification, N inputs have the capacity to alter ecosystems through several mechanisms. Up until now, there was very little detailed information on the impacts from this stressor at the species level, or how climate and edaphic factors could alter ecosystem sensitivity. Here we summarize and synthesize four major efforts, funded by EPA, USGS, USFS, and the NPS, which greatly advance our understanding of this stressor. These include (1) a national analysis of sensitivity to N deposition for 114 tree species, (2) a national analysis of impacts from N deposition on herbaceous species and how climate and soil factors modify that sensitivity, (3) a regional dynamic modeling study of impacts and recovery from N and S deposition for a dominant northeastern forest type under a range of future climate and deposition scenarios, and (4) a large assessment of impacts to streams, soils, and vegetation along the 2000+ mile stretch of the Appalachian Trail. Here we show many responses to this stressor for all taxonomic groups, with some species decreasing, some increasing, and some unaffected by N deposition. However, dozens of tree and herb species are negatively affected and are of particular concern for conservation purposes, with vulnerability being greatly affected by regional climate and local edaphic factors. Dynamic modeling suggests that, at least in some northeastern forests, recovery across a broad range of climate change and management scenarios is unlikely by 2100. The study along the Appalachian Trail, a beloved national recreation trail, echoes these findings, with stream, soils, and vegetation impacted across large percentages of sites, and only moderate capacity for recovery by 2100. In total, this work highlights several recent advances in the area of critical loads research

  6. Critical material attributes (CMAs) of strip films loaded with poorly water-soluble drug nanoparticles: III. Impact of drug nanoparticle loading.

    PubMed

    Krull, Scott M; Moreno, Jacqueline; Li, Meng; Bilgili, Ecevit; Davé, Rajesh N

    2017-05-15

    Polymer strip films have emerged as a robust platform for poorly water-soluble drug delivery. However, the common conception is that films cannot exceed low drug loadings, mainly due to poor drug stability, slow release, and film brittleness. This study explores the ability to achieve high loadings of poorly water-soluble drug nanoparticles in strip films while retaining good mechanical properties and enhanced dissolution rate. Aqueous suspensions containing up to 30wt% griseofulvin nanoparticles were prepared via wet stirred media milling and incorporated into hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) films. Griseofulvin loading in films was adjusted to be between 9 and 49wt% in HPMC-E15 films and 30 and 73wt% in HPMC-E4M films by varying the mixing ratio of HPMC solution-to-griseofulvin suspension. All films exhibited good content uniformity and nanoparticle redispersibility up to 50wt% griseofulvin, while E4M films above 50wt% griseofulvin had slightly worse content uniformity and poor nanoparticle redispersibility. Increasing drug loading in films generally required more time to achieve 100% release during dissolution, although polymer-drug clusters dispersed from E4M films above 50wt% griseofulvin, resulting in similar dissolution profiles. While all films exhibited good tensile strength, a significant decrease in percent elongation was observed above 40-50wt% GF, resulting in brittle films. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The 2.8-Å structure of rat liver F1-ATPase: Configuration of a critical intermediate in ATP synthesis/hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Bianchet, Mario A.; Hullihen, Joanne; Pedersen, Peter L.; Amzel, L. Mario

    1998-01-01

    During mitochondrial ATP synthesis, F1-ATPase—the portion of the ATP synthase that contains the catalytic and regulatory nucleotide binding sites—undergoes a series of concerted conformational changes that couple proton translocation to the synthesis of the high levels of ATP required for cellular function. In the structure of the rat liver F1-ATPase, determined to 2.8-Å resolution in the presence of physiological concentrations of nucleotides, all three β subunits contain bound nucleotide and adopt similar conformations. This structure provides the missing configuration of F1 necessary to define all intermediates in the reaction pathway. Incorporation of this structure suggests a mechanism of ATP synthesis/hydrolysis in which configurations of the enzyme with three bound nucleotides play an essential role. PMID:9736690

  8. Influence of cyclic loading at room temperature on the critical current at 4.2 K of Nb3Sn superconducting composite wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, S.; Osamura, K.

    The influence of cyclic loading at room temperature on the critical current at 4.2 K of bronze-processed multifilamentary Nb3Sn superconducting composite wire was studied. After the first cycle, the critical current and upper critical magnetic field increased, reaching a maximum and then decreased with increasing applied stress. After the second and following cycles, the changes were small when the applied stress was not high enough to cause damage to the Nb3Sn. These results can be described well quantitatively by substituting the strain values of Nb3Sn calculated in this work into Ekin's scaling law for the strain effect. When the applied stress was high enough to cause damage to the Nb3Sn in the first cycle, the critical current decreased with increasing numbers of cycles.

  9. Investigation of space shuttle vehicle 140C configuration orbiter (model 16-0) wheel well pressure loads in the Rockwell International 7.75 x 11 foot wind tunnel (OA143)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennell, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on a sting mounted .0405-scale representation of the 140C outer mold line space shuttle orbiter configuration in the Rockwell International 7.75 x 11.00 foot low speed wind tunnel. The primary test objectives were to define the orbiter wheel well pressure loading and its effects on landing gear thermal insulation and to investigate the pressure environment experienced by both the horizontal flight nose probe and air vent door probes. Steady state and dynamic pressure values were recorded in the orbiter nose gear well, left main landing gear well, horizontal flight nose probe, and both left and right air vent door probe. All steady state pressure levels were measured by Statham differential pressure transducers while dynamic pressure levels were recorded by Kulite high frequency response pressure sensors.

  10. Greater cardiac response of colloid than saline fluid loading in septic and non-septic critically ill patients with clinical hypovolaemia

    PubMed Central

    Trof, Ronald J.; Sukul, Sharwan P.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Girbes, Armand R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objective The haemodynamics of crystalloid and colloid fluid loading may depend on underlying disease, i.e. sepsis versus non-sepsis. Design and setting A single-centre, single-blinded, randomized clinical trial was carried out on 24 critically ill sepsis and 24 non-sepsis patients with clinical hypovolaemia, assigned to loading with normal saline, gelatin 4%, hydroxyethyl starch 6% or albumin 5% in a 90-min (delta) central venous pressure (CVP)-guided fluid loading protocol. Transpulmonary thermodilution was done each 30 min, yielding, among others, global end-diastolic volume and cardiac indices (GEDVI, CI). Results Sepsis patients had hyperdynamic hypotension in spite of myocardial depression and dilatation, and greater inotropic/vasopressor requirements than non-sepsis patients. Independent of underlying disease, CVP and GEDVI increased more after colloid than saline loading (P < 0.018), so that CI increased by about 2% after saline and 12% after colloid loading (P = 0.029). The increase in preload-recruitable stroke work was also greater with colloids and did not differ among conditions. Conclusion Fluid loading with colloids results in a greater linear increase in cardiac filling, output and stroke work than does saline loading, in both septic and non-septic clinical hypovolaemia, in spite of myocardial depression and presumably increased vasopermeability potentially decreasing the effects of colloid fluid loading in the former. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00134-010-1776-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20165941

  11. Study on critical-sized ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear particles loaded with alendronate sodium: in vitro release and cell response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yumei; Shi, Feng; Gong, Kemeng; Liu, Yang; Zhi, Wei; Weng, Jie; Qu, Shuxin

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro release and the effect of RAW 264.7 macrophages of critical-sized wear particles of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with alendronate sodium (ALN), one of the most effective drugs to treat osteoporosis in clinic. The critical-sized UHMWPE-ALN 0.5 wt.% wear particles were prepared by vacuum gradient filtration combined with Pluronic F-68. In vitro release of ALN from critical-sized UHMWPE-ALN wear particles was investigated in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 37 °C with a shaker. Cell morphology, proliferation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and secretions of cytokines were evaluated after co-cultured with critical-sized UHMWPE-ALN wear particles in vitro. Results showed that ALN released from critical-sized UHMWPE-ALN wear particles included burst release and slow release in vitro. Macrophages would be chemotaxis and aggregated around the critical-sized UHMWPE-ALN or UHMWPE wear particle, which was phagocytosed with time. The proliferation of macrophages co-cultured with critical-sized UHMWPE-ALN wear particles was significantly decreased compared with that of critical-sized UHMWPE group. Meanwhile, the critical-sized UHMWPE-ALN wear particles significantly induced the LDH leakage of macrophages, which indicated the cell death. The death of macrophages induced by ALN was one of pathways to inhibit their proliferation. The secretions of cytokines (interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) in critical-sized UHMWPE-ALN group were significantly lower than those in critical-sized UHMWPE group due to the released ALN. The present results suggested that UHMWPE-ALN had the potential application in clinic to treat osteolysis induced by wear particles.

  12. The Role of Spectrum Loading in Damage-Tolerance Life-Management of Fracture Critical Turbine Engine Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-01

    expected severity of damage produced by these events, using data from the advanced nickel-base superalloy IN100. INTRODUCTION Current deployment plans by...load of appreciable magnitude. (SYB) 17-4 A second stress spectrum for a higher-temperature, nickel-base- superalloy component is show in Fig. 3a, and...for load sequence effects. The potential magnitudes of the effects of key mission usage variables were assessed using data from the superalloy INIOO

  13. Multiscale Framework for Assessing Critical Loads of Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition for Aquatic Ecosystems in Wilderness Areas of the Western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanus, Leora; Clow, David; Saros, Jasmine; McMurray, Jill; Blett, Tamara; Sickman, James

    2017-04-01

    High-elevation aquatic ecosystems in Wilderness areas of the western United States are impacted by current and historic atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition associated with local and regional air pollution. Documented effects include elevated surface water nitrate concentrations, increased algal productivity, and changes in diatom species assemblages. A predictive framework was developed for sensitive high-elevation basins across the western United States at multiple spatial scales including the Rocky Mountain Region (Rockies), the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA), and Yosemite (YOSE) and Sequoia & Kings Canyon (SEKI) National Parks. Spatial trends in critical loads of N deposition for nutrient enrichment of aquatic ecosystems were quantified and mapped using a geostatistical approach, with modeled N deposition, topography, vegetation, geology, and climate as potential explanatory variables. Multiple predictive models were created using various combinations of explanatory variables; this approach allowed for better quantification of uncertainty and identification of areas most sensitive to high atmospheric N deposition (> 3 kg N ha-1 yr-1). For multiple spatial scales, the lowest critical loads estimates (<1.5 + 1 kg N ha-1 yr-1) occurred in high-elevation basins with steep slopes, sparse vegetation, and exposed bedrock and talus. Based on a nitrate threshold of 1 μmol L-1, estimated critical load exceedances (>1.5 + 1 kg N ha-1 yr-1) correspond with areas of high N deposition and vary spatially ranging from less than 20% to over 40% of the study area for the Rockies, GYA, YOSE, and SEKI. These predictive models and maps identify sensitive aquatic ecosystems that may be impacted by excess atmospheric N deposition and can be used to help protect against future anthropogenic disturbance. The approach presented here may be transferable to other remote and protected high-elevation ecosystems at multiple spatial scales that are sensitive to adverse effects of pollutant

  14. [Tolerance test to an inspiratory resistive load and resistive training of respiratory muscles. Preliminary critical study in kyphoscoliotic patients].

    PubMed

    Vandevenne, A; Ducolone, A

    1988-01-01

    Is increased tolerance to an additional inspiratory load after resistive training always due to respiratory muscle endurance? To answer this question, 5 kyphoscoliotic subjects were subjected to ventilation through a Y-shaped tube 3.2 cm in diameter during 10 minutes three times a day for 3 months. The subjects were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 (n = 3) trained with a non-linear resistance placed in the inspiratory branch of the tube during the first and third months and without additional load during the second month. Group 2 (n = 2) trained without inspiratory resistance during the first and third months and with an additional load during the second month. The load selected for the initial tolerance test (R1) was an inspiratory orifice with a diameter 0.5 mm wider than that of the orifice not tolerated during 3 min (R2). In each subject, ventilatory mode and time of tolerance on R1 were determined. This time was 10.8 +/- 6.8 min for the whole group. The tolerance test was repeated after each month of resistive or placebo training on R1 and R2. By grouping together the results of tolerance tests at 2 months after placebo training (4 measurements) and after resistive training (5 measurements), we found that the gain in endurance was similar without concomitant changes in volumes, air flows, VO2 max and time of endurance at 70% of VO2 max.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Crystalloid or colloid fluid loading and pulmonary permeability, edema, and injury in septic and nonseptic critically ill patients with hypovolemia.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Melanie; Verheij, Joanne; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2009-04-01

    To compare crystalloid and colloid fluids in their effect on pulmonary edema in hypovolemic septic and nonseptic patients with or at risk for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. We hypothesized that 1) crystalloid loading results in more edema formation than colloid loading and 2) the differences among the types of fluid decreases at high permeability. Prospective randomized clinical trial on the effect of fluids in 24 septic and 24 nonseptic mechanically ventilated patients with clinical hypovolemia. Patients were assigned to NaCl 0.9%, gelatin 4%, hydroxyethyl starch 6%, or albumin 5% loading for 90 minutes according to changes in filling pressures. Twenty-three septic and 10 nonseptic patients had acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (p < 0.001). Septic patients had greater pulmonary capillary permeability, edema, and severity of lung injury than nonseptic patients (p < 0.01), as measured by the pulmonary leak index (PLI) for Gallium-labeled transferrin, extravascular lung water (EVLW), and lung injury score (LIS), respectively. Colloids increased plasma volume, cardiac index, and central venous pressure (CVP) more than crystalloids (p < 0.05), although more crystalloids were infused (p < 0.05). Colloid osmotic pressure (COP) increased in colloid and decreased in crystalloid groups (p < 0.001). Irrespective of fluid type or underlying disease, the pulmonary leak index increased by median 5% (p < 0.05). Regardless of fluid type or underlying disease, EVLW and LIS did not change during fluid loading and EVLW related to COP-CVP (rs = -.40, p < 0.01). Pulmonary edema and LIS are not affected by the type of fluid loading in the steep part of the cardiac function curve in both septic and nonseptic patients. Then, pulmonary capillary permeability may be a smaller determinant of pulmonary edema than COP and CVP. Safety factors may have prevented edema during a small filtration pressure-induced rise in pulmonary protein and thus fluid

  16. Load Analysis and Critical Area Stress Analysis of the 126-AR00036 and 126-AR00037 Parachute Testers when Installed on the F-4C/D Aircraft Centerline Station

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    11»»!1 LOAD ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL AREA STRESS ANALYSIS OF THE 126-AR00036 AND 126-AR00037 PARACHUTE TESTERS WHEN INSTALLED ON THE F-4C/D...LOAD ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL AREA STRESS ANALYSIS OF/ TOE f26’A|*0OÖ36 AND 126-AB0ÖO37 PARACHUTE JESTERS / WHEN INSmLED ON THE f-^/D AIRCRAFT CENTERLINE...Analysis if ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse aide II necestary and Identlly by block number) This report documents the loads and critical stress

  17. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR GRAPHITE REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH)

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-03-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950’s efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles”. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of 253 unmoderated stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.” The first experiment in the series was evaluated in HEU-COMP-FAST-001. It had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank (References 1 and 2). The second experiment in the series, performed in early 1963, which is studied in this evaluation, had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice in a 25.96 cm OD core tank and graphite reflectors on all sides. The experiment has been determined to represent an acceptable benchmark experiment. Information for this evaluation was compiled from published reports on all three parts of the experimental series (Reference 1-5) and the experimental logbook as

  18. Different effects of fluid loading with saline, gelatine, hydroxyethyl starch or albumin solutions on acid-base status in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Spoelstra-de Man, Angélique M E; Smorenberg, Annemieke; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2017-01-01

    Fluid administration in critically ill patients may affect acid-base balance. However, the effect of the fluid type used for resuscitation on acid-base balance remains controversial. We studied the effect of fluid resuscitation of normal saline and the colloids gelatine 4%, hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 6%, and albumin 5% on acid-base balance in 115 clinically hypovolemic critically ill patients during a 90 minute filling pressure-guided fluid challenge by a post-hoc analysis of a prospective randomized clinical trial. About 1700 mL was infused per patient in the saline and 1500 mL in each of the colloid groups (P<0.001). Overall, fluid loading slightly decreased pH (P<0.001) and there was no intergroup difference. This mildly metabolic acidifying effect was caused by a small increase in chloride concentration and decrease in strong ion difference in the saline- and HES-, and an increase in (uncorrected) anion gap in gelatine- and albumin-loaded patients, independent of lactate concentrations. In clinically hypovolemic, critically ill patients, fluid resuscitation by only 1500-1700 mL of normal saline, gelatine, HES or albumin, resulted in a small decrease in pH, irrespective of the type of fluid used. Therefore, a progressive metabolic acidosis, even with increased anion gap, should not be erroneously attributed to insufficient fluid resuscitation. ISRCTN Registry ISRCTN19023197.

  19. Observed Temperature Effects on Hourly Residential Electric LoadReduction in Response to an Experimental Critical Peak PricingTariff

    SciTech Connect

    Herter, Karen B.; McAuliffe, Patrick K.; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.

    2005-11-14

    The goal of this investigation was to characterize themanual and automated response of residential customers to high-price"critical" events dispatched under critical peak pricing tariffs testedin the 2003-2004 California Statewide Pricing Pilot. The 15-monthexperimental tariff gave customers a discounted two-price time-of-userate on 430 days in exchange for 27 critical days, during which the peakperiod price (2 p.m. to 7 p.m.) was increased to about three times thenormal time-of-use peak price. We calculated response by five-degreetemperature bins as the difference between peak usage on normal andcritical weekdays. Results indicatedthat manual response to criticalperiods reached -0.23 kW per home (-13 percent) in hot weather(95-104.9oF), -0.03 kW per home (-4 percent) in mild weather (60-94.9oF),and -0.07 kW per home (-9 percent) during cold weather (50-59.9oF).Separately, we analyzed response enhanced by programmable communicatingthermostats in high-use homes with air-conditioning. Between 90oF and94.9oF, the response of this group reached -0.56 kW per home (-25percent) for five-hour critical periods and -0.89 kW/home (-41 percent)for two-hour critical periods.

  20. Porphyromonas gingivalis Lipid A Phosphatase Activity Is Critical for Colonization and Increasing the Commensal Load in the Rabbit Ligature Model

    PubMed Central

    Zenobia, Camille; Hasturk, Hatice; Nguyen, Daniel; Van Dyke, Thomas E.; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a disease of polymicrobial etiology characterized by inflammation, degradation of host tissue, and bone that irreversibly destroys the supporting apparatus of teeth. Porphyromonas gingivalis contains lipid A with structural heterogeneity that has been postulated to contribute to the initiation of dysbiosis in oral communities by modulating the host response, thereby creating a permissive environment for its growth. We examined two P. gingivalis lipid A phosphatase mutants which contain different “locked” lipid A structures that induce different host cellular responses for their ability to induce dysbiosis and periodontitis in rabbits. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preparations obtained from these strains were also examined. After repeated applications of all strains and their respective LPS preparations, P. gingivalis wild type, but not the lipid A mutants, had a significant impact on both the oral commensal microbial load and composition. In contrast, in rabbits exposed to the mutant strains or the LPS preparations, the microbial load did not increase, and yet significant changes in the oral microbial composition were observed. All strains and their respective LPS preparations induced periodontitis. Therefore, the ability to alter the lipid A composition in response to environmental conditions by lipid A phosphatases is required for both colonization of the rabbit and increases in the microbial load. Furthermore, the data demonstrate that multiple dysbiotic oral microbial communities can elicit periodontitis. PMID:24478080

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis lipid A phosphatase activity is critical for colonization and increasing the commensal load in the rabbit ligature model.

    PubMed

    Zenobia, Camille; Hasturk, Hatice; Nguyen, Daniel; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Darveau, Richard P

    2014-02-01

    Periodontitis is a disease of polymicrobial etiology characterized by inflammation, degradation of host tissue, and bone that irreversibly destroys the supporting apparatus of teeth. Porphyromonas gingivalis contains lipid A with structural heterogeneity that has been postulated to contribute to the initiation of dysbiosis in oral communities by modulating the host response, thereby creating a permissive environment for its growth. We examined two P. gingivalis lipid A phosphatase mutants which contain different "locked" lipid A structures that induce different host cellular responses for their ability to induce dysbiosis and periodontitis in rabbits. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preparations obtained from these strains were also examined. After repeated applications of all strains and their respective LPS preparations, P. gingivalis wild type, but not the lipid A mutants, had a significant impact on both the oral commensal microbial load and composition. In contrast, in rabbits exposed to the mutant strains or the LPS preparations, the microbial load did not increase, and yet significant changes in the oral microbial composition were observed. All strains and their respective LPS preparations induced periodontitis. Therefore, the ability to alter the lipid A composition in response to environmental conditions by lipid A phosphatases is required for both colonization of the rabbit and increases in the microbial load. Furthermore, the data demonstrate that multiple dysbiotic oral microbial communities can elicit periodontitis.

  2. Criticality Model

    SciTech Connect

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality

  3. Analysis of Advanced Rotorcraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2000-01-01

    Advanced rotorcraft configurations are being investigated with the objectives of identifying vehicles that are larger, quieter, and faster than current-generation rotorcraft. A large rotorcraft, carrying perhaps 150 passengers, could do much to alleviate airport capacity limitations, and a quiet rotorcraft is essential for community acceptance of the benefits of VTOL operations. A fast, long-range, long-endurance rotorcraft, notably the tilt-rotor configuration, will improve rotorcraft economics through productivity increases. A major part of the investigation of advanced rotorcraft configurations consists of conducting comprehensive analyses of vehicle behavior for the purpose of assessing vehicle potential and feasibility, as well as to establish the analytical models required to support the vehicle development. The analytical work of FY99 included applications to tilt-rotor aircraft. Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) wind tunnel measurements are being compared with calculations performed by using the comprehensive analysis tool (Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD 11)). The objective is to establish the wing and wake aerodynamic models that are required for tilt-rotor analysis and design. The TRAM test in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW) produced extensive measurements. This is the first test to encompass air loads, performance, and structural load measurements on tilt rotors, as well as acoustic and flow visualization data. The correlation of measurements and calculations includes helicopter-mode operation (performance, air loads, and blade structural loads), hover (performance and air loads), and airplane-mode operation (performance).

  4. Characterizing the uncertainty in holddown post load measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J. A.; Townsend, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    In order to understand unexpectedly erratic load measurements in the launch-pad supports for the space shuttle, the sensitivities of the load cells in the supports were analyzed using simple probabilistic techniques. NASA engineers use the loads in the shuttle's supports to calculate critical stresses in the shuttle vehicle just before lift-off. The support loads are measured with 'load cells' which are actually structural components of the mobile launch platform which have been instrumented with strain gauges. Although these load cells adequately measure vertical loads, the horizontal load measurements have been erratic. The load measurements were simulated in this study using Monte Carlo simulation procedures. The simulation studies showed that the support loads are sensitive to small deviations in strain and calibration. In their current configuration, the load cells will not measure loads with sufficient accuracy to reliably calculate stresses in the shuttle vehicle. A simplified model of the holddown post (HDP) load measurement system was used to study the effect on load measurement accuracy for several factors, including load point deviations, gauge heights, and HDP geometry.

  5. Bioinspired trimodal macro/micro/nano-porous scaffolds loading rhBMP-2 for complete regeneration of critical size bone defect.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Lin, Dan; Yu, Yuanman; Niu, Haoyi; Guo, Han; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng

    2016-03-01

    Critical size bone defects raise great demands for efficient bone substitutes. Mimicking the hierarchical porous architecture and specific biological cues of natural bone has been considered as an effective strategy to facilitate bone regeneration. Herein, a trimodal macro/micro/nano-porous scaffold loaded with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was developed. With mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) as matrix, a trimodal MBG scaffold (TMS) with enhanced compressive strength (4.28 MPa, porosity of 80%) was prepared by a "viscosity controlling" and "homogeneous particle reinforcing" multi-template process. A 7.5 nm, 3D cubic (Im3m) mesoporous structure was tailored for a "size-matched entrapment" of rhBMP-2 to achieve sustained release and preserved bioactivity. RhBMP-2-loaded TMS (TMS/rhBMP-2) induced excellent cell attachment, ingrowth and osteogenesis in vitro. Further in vivo ectopic bone formation and orthotopic rabbit radius critical size defect results indicated that compared to the rhBMP-2-loaded bimodal macro/micro- and macro/nano-porous scaffolds, TMS/rhBMP-2 exhibited appealing bone regeneration capacity. Particularly, in critical size defect, complete bone reconstruction with rapid medullary cavity reunion and sclerotin maturity was observed on TMS/rhBMP-2. On the basis of these results, TMS/rhBMP-2 developed here represents a promising bone substitute for clinical application and the concepts proposed in this study might provide new thoughts on development of future orthopedic biomaterials. Limited self-regenerating capacity of human body makes the reconstruction of critical size bone defect a significant challenge. Current bone substitutes often exhibit undesirable therapeutic efficacy due to poor osteoconductivity or low osteoinductivity. Herein, TMS/rhBMP-2, an advanced mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) scaffold with osteoconductive trimodal macro/micro/nano-porosity and osteoinductive rhBMP-2 delivery was developed. The preparative

  6. A novel alginate-encapsulated system to study biological response to critical-sized wear particles of UHMWPE loaded with alendronate sodium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yumei; Shi, Feng; Bo, Lin; Zhi, Wei; Weng, Jie; Qu, Shuxin

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel alginate-encapsulated system (Alg beads) to investigate the cell response to critical-sized wear particles of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene loaded with alendronate sodium (UHMWPE-ALN), one of the most effective drugs to treat bone resorption in clinic. The extrusion method was used to prepare Alg beads encapsulating rat calvarial osteoblasts (RCOs) and critical-sized UHMWPE-ALN wear particles with spherical morphology and uniform size. The morphology, permeability and stability of Alg beads were characterized. The proliferation, ALP activity, cell apoptosis and distribution of live/dead RCOs co-cultured with wear particles in Alg beads were evaluated. RCOs and critical-sized UHMWPE-ALN wear particles distributed evenly and contacted efficiently in Alg beads. Alg beads were both permeable to trypsin and BSA, while the smaller the molecular was, the larger the diffuse was. The proliferation of RCOs in Alg beads increased with time, which indicated that Alg beads provided suitable conditions for cell culture. The long-term stability of Alg beads indicated the possibility for the longer time of co-cultured cells with wear particles. Critical-sized UHMWPE-ALN and UHMWPE wear particles both inhibited the proliferation and differentiation of RCOs, and induced the apoptosis of RCOs encapsulated in Alg beads. However, these effects could be significantly alleviated by the ALN released from the critical-sized UHMWPE-ALN wear particles. The present results suggested that this novel-developed co-culture system was feasible to evaluate the cell response to critical-sized UHMWPE-ALN wear particles for a longer time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Aquarius Main Structure Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eremenko, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D Observatory is a joint US-Argentine mission to map the salinity at the ocean surface. This information is critical to improving our understanding of two major components of Earth's climate system - the water cycle and ocean circulation. By measuring ocean salinity from space, the Aquarius/SAC-D Mission will provide new insights into how the massive natural exchange of freshwater between the ocean, atmosphere and sea ice influences ocean circulation, weather and climate. Aquarius is the primary instrument on the SAC-D spacecraft. It consists of a Passive Microwave Radiometer to detect the surface emission that is used to obtain salinity and an Active Scatterometer to measure the ocean waves that affect the precision of the salinity measurement. The Aquarius Primary Structure houses instrument electronics, feed assemblies, and supports a deployable boom with a 2.5 m Reflector, and provides the structural interface to the SAC-D Spacecraft. The key challenge for the Aquarius main structure configuration is to satisfy the needs of component accommodations, ensuring that the instrument can meet all operational, pointing, environmental, and launch vehicle requirements. This paper describes the evolution of the Aquarius main structure configuration, the challenges of balancing the conflicting requirements, and the major configuration driving decisions and compromises.

  8. Aquarius main structure configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremenko, A.

    The Aquarius/SAC-D Observatory is a joint US-Argentine mission to map the salinity at the ocean surface. This information is critical to improving our understanding of two major components of Earth's climate system - the water cycle and ocean circulation. By measuring ocean salinity from space, the Aquarius/SAC-D Mission will provide new insights into how the massive natural exchange of freshwater between the ocean, atmosphere and sea ice influences ocean circulation, weather and climate. Aquarius is the primary instrument on the SAC-D spacecraft. It consists of a Passive Microwave Radiometer to detect the surface emission that is used to obtain salinity and an Active Scatterometer to measure the ocean waves that affect the precision of the salinity measurement. The Aquarius Primary Structure houses instrument electronics, feed assemblies, and supports a deployable boom with a 2.5 m Reflector, and provides the structural interface to the SAC-D Spacecraft. The key challenge for the Aquarius main structure configuration is to satisfy the needs of component accommodations, ensuring that the instrument can meet all operational, pointing, environmental, and launch vehicle requirements. This paper describes the evolution of the Aquarius main structure configuration, the challenges of balancing the conflicting requirements, and the major configuration driving decisions and compromises.

  9. Earthquake damage potential and critical scour depth of bridges exposed to flood and seismic hazards under lateral seismic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shin-Tai; Wang, Chun-Yao; Huang, Wen-Hsiu

    2015-12-01

    Many bridges located in seismic hazard regions suffer from serious foundation exposure caused by riverbed scour. Loss of surrounding soil significantly reduces the lateral strength of pile foundations. When the scour depth exceeds a critical level, the strength of the foundation is insufficient to withstand the imposed seismic demand, which induces the potential for unacceptable damage to the piles during an earthquake. This paper presents an analytical approach to assess the earthquake damage potential of bridges with foundation exposure and identify the critical scour depth that causes the seismic performance of a bridge to differ from the original design. The approach employs the well-accepted response spectrum analysis method to determine the maximum seismic response of a bridge. The damage potential of a bridge is assessed by comparing the imposed seismic demand with the strengths of the column and the foundation. The versatility of the analytical approach is illustrated with a numerical example and verified by the nonlinear finite element analysis. The analytical approach is also demonstrated to successfully determine the critical scour depth. Results highlight that relatively shallow scour depths can cause foundation damage during an earthquake, even for bridges designed to provide satisfactory seismic performance.

  10. Application of a Loading Dose of Colistin Methanesulfonate in Critically Ill Patients: Population Pharmacokinetics, Protein Binding, and Prediction of Bacterial Kill

    PubMed Central

    Karaiskos, Ilias; Plachouras, Diamantis; Karvanen, Matti; Pontikis, Konstantinos; Jansson, Britt; Papadomichelakis, Evangelos; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Giamarellou, Helen; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Cars, Otto; Friberg, Lena E.

    2012-01-01

    A previous pharmacokinetic study on dosing of colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) at 240 mg (3 million units [MU]) every 8 h indicated that colistin has a long half-life, resulting in insufficient concentrations for the first 12 to 48 h after initiation of treatment. A loading dose would therefore be beneficial. The aim of this study was to evaluate CMS and colistin pharmacokinetics following a 480-mg (6-MU) loading dose in critically ill patients and to explore the bacterial kill following the use of different dosing regimens obtained by predictions from a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model developed from an in vitro study on Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The unbound fractions of colistin A and colistin B were determined using equilibrium dialysis and considered in the predictions. Ten critically ill patients (6 males; mean age, 54 years; mean creatinine clearance, 82 ml/min) with infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria were enrolled in the study. The pharmacokinetic data collected after the first and eighth doses were analyzed simultaneously with the data from the previous study (total, 28 patients) in the NONMEM program. For CMS, a two-compartment model best described the pharmacokinetics, and the half-lives of the two phases were estimated to be 0.026 and 2.2 h, respectively. For colistin, a one-compartment model was sufficient and the estimated half-life was 18.5 h. The unbound fractions of colistin in the patients were 26 to 41% at clinical concentrations. Colistin A, but not colistin B, had a concentration-dependent binding. The predictions suggested that the time to 3-log-unit bacterial kill for a 480-mg loading dose was reduced to half of that for the dose of 240 mg. PMID:22615285

  11. Combined impacts of precipitation and temperature on diffuse phosphorus pollution loading and critical source area identification in a freeze-thaw area.

    PubMed

    Wei, Peng; Ouyang, Wei; Hao, Fanghua; Gao, Xiang; Yu, Yongyong

    2016-05-15

    The loss of diffuse phosphorus (P) presented different characteristics in the freeze-thaw area due to the combined impacts of precipitation and temperature, which caused spatiotemporal variations of the critical source area of diffuse P (CSAP). The temperature and precipitation classification (TPC) method was proposed to identify the spatiotemporal characteristics of the CSAP in the cold area, and each year was divided into a freeze-thaw season and a growing season according to the average monthly temperature. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) provided the spatiotemporal patterns of the diffuse P loads. The years were also reclassified into dry, normal and wet years according to the annual precipitation levels. The CSAP with the 1st cumulative load level shared 9.68% of the same area between the two seasons, which had dry land as the dominant land use with direct P fertilization. The spatial distributions of the potential areas and the CSAP with the 2nd cumulative load level were more sensitive to the variation in temperature, which had 30.8%-46.1% of unvaried area between seasons. The cumulative load level analysis indicated that 14 subbasins in the freeze-thaw season and 7 subbasins in the growing season, which covered 61.2% and 48.6% of the total basin area, respectively, changed with the traditional CSAP identification among dry, normal and wet years. The fluctuation level analysis was carried out to compare the distributional difference of the CSAP and the potential areas between the TPC method and the traditional method, which highlighted the advantages of the TPC method. The results would be useful in identifying the distribution of the CSAP in cold areas, which improved the efficiency of diffuse pollution control.

  12. Nickel-hydrogen spacecraft module configurations study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, W. B.; Mcdermott, J. K.; Smith, O. B.

    1985-01-01

    The incorporation of nickel-hydrogen technology into spacecraft power system designs for low Earth orbit vehicles offers significant power system weight reductions by increasing the power storage watt-hour efficiency. Several possible module configurations exist for the power system. The module configurations were compared utilizing reliability, weight, volume and load capability as evaluation parameters.

  13. Critical Material Attributes of Strip Films Loaded With Poorly Water-Soluble Drug Nanoparticles: II. Impact of Polymer Molecular Weight.

    PubMed

    Krull, Scott M; Ammirata, Jennifer; Bawa, Sonia; Li, Meng; Bilgili, Ecevit; Davé, Rajesh N

    2017-02-01

    Recent work established polymer strip films as a robust platform for delivery of poorly water-soluble drug particles. However, a simple means of manipulating rate of drug release from films with minimal impact on film mechanical properties has yet to be demonstrated. This study explores the impact of film-forming polymer molecular weight (MW) and concentration on properties of polymer films loaded with poorly water-soluble drug nanoparticles. Nanoparticles of griseofulvin, a model Biopharmaceutics Classification System class II drug, were prepared in aqueous suspension via wet stirred media milling. Aqueous solutions of 3 viscosity grades of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (14, 21, and 88 kDa) at 3 viscosity levels (∼9500, ∼12,000, and ∼22,000 cP) were mixed with drug suspension, cast, and dried to produce films containing griseofulvin nanoparticles. Few differences in film tensile strength or elongation at break were observed between films within each viscosity level regardless of polymer MW despite requiring up to double the time to achieve 100% drug release. This suggests film-forming polymer MW can be used to manipulate drug release with little impact on film mechanical properties by matching polymer solution viscosity. In addition, changing polymer MW and concentration had no negative impact on drug content uniformity or nanoparticle redispersibility. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. LOADING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-10-01

    A device is presented for loading or charging bodies of fissionable material into a reactor. This device consists of a car, mounted on tracks, into which the fissionable materials may be placed at a remote area, transported to the reactor, and inserted without danger to the operating personnel. The car has mounted on it a heavily shielded magazine for holding a number of the radioactive bodies. The magazine is of a U-shaped configuration and is inclined to the horizontal plane, with a cap covering the elevated open end, and a remotely operated plunger at the lower, closed end. After the fissionable bodies are loaded in the magazine and transported to the reactor, the plunger inserts the body at the lower end of the magazine into the reactor, then is withdrawn, thereby allowing gravity to roll the remaining bodies into position for successive loading in a similar manner.

  15. Computational methods for predicting the response of critical as-built infrastructure to dynamic loads (architectural surety)

    SciTech Connect

    Preece, D.S.; Weatherby, J.R.; Attaway, S.W.; Swegle, J.W.; Matalucci, R.V.

    1998-06-01

    Coupled blast-structural computational simulations using supercomputer capabilities will significantly advance the understanding of how complex structures respond under dynamic loads caused by explosives and earthquakes, an understanding with application to the surety of both federal and nonfederal buildings. Simulation of the effects of explosives on structures is a challenge because the explosive response can best be simulated using Eulerian computational techniques and structural behavior is best modeled using Lagrangian methods. Due to the different methodologies of the two computational techniques and code architecture requirements, they are usually implemented in different computer programs. Explosive and structure modeling in two different codes make it difficult or next to impossible to do coupled explosive/structure interaction simulations. Sandia National Laboratories has developed two techniques for solving this problem. The first is called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), a relatively new gridless method comparable to Eulerian, that is especially suited for treating liquids and gases such as those produced by an explosive. The SPH capability has been fully implemented into the transient dynamics finite element (Lagrangian) codes PRONTO-2D and -3D. A PRONTO-3D/SPH simulation of the effect of a blast on a protective-wall barrier is presented in this paper. The second technique employed at Sandia National Laboratories uses a relatively new code called ALEGRA which is an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) wave code with specific emphasis on large deformation and shock propagation. ALEGRA is capable of solving many shock-wave physics problems but it is especially suited for modeling problems involving the interaction of decoupled explosives with structures.

  16. Enabling the Distributed Generation Market of High Temperature Fuel Cell and Absorption Chiller Systems to Support Critical and Commercial Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiMola, Ashley M.

    Buildings account for over 18% of the world's anthropogenic Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. As a result, a technology that can offset GHG emissions associated with buildings has the potential to save over 9 Giga-tons of GHG emissions per year. High temperature fuel cell and absorption chiller (HTFC/AC) technology offers a relatively low-carbon option for meeting cooling and electric loads for buildings while producing almost no criteria pollutants. GHG emissions in the state of California would decrease by 7.48 million metric tons per year if every commercial building in the State used HTFC/AC technology to meet its power and cooling requirements. In order to realize the benefits of HTFC/AC technology on a wide scale, the distributed generation market needs to be exposed to the technology and informed of its economic viability and real-world potential. This work characterizes the economics associated with HTFC/AC technology using select scenarios that are representative of realistic applications. The financial impacts of various input factors are evaluated and the HTFC/AC simulations are compared to the economics of traditional building utilities. It is shown that, in addition to the emissions reductions derived from the systems, HTFC/AC technology is financially preferable in all of the scenarios evaluated. This work also presents the design of a showcase environment, centered on a beta-test application, that presents (1) system operating data gathered using a custom data acquisition module, and (2) HTFC/AC technology in a clear and approachable manner in order to serve the target audience of market stakeholders.

  17. Wind-tunnel investigation of aerodynamic performance, steady amd vibratory loads, surface temperatures, and acoustic characteristics of a large-scale twin-engine upper-surface blown jet-flap configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Static and wind-on tests were conducted to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of and the effects of jet impingement on the wing of a large scale upper surface blown configuration powered with an actual turbine engine. The wing and flaps were instrumented with experimental dual-sensing transducer units consisting of a fluctuating pressure gage, a vibratory accelerometer, and a surface mounted alumel thermocouple. Noise directivity and spectral content measurements were obtained for various flap configurations and various engine thrust settings to provide baseline noise data for other upper surface blown configurations.

  18. Operational experience and performance characteristics of a valve-regulated lead-acid battery energy-storage system for providing the customer with critical load protection and energy-management benefits at a lead-recycling plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, G. W.

    The Power Control Division of GNB Technologies, commissioned on May 13, 1996 a new facility which houses a 5-MW battery energy-storage system (BESS) at GNB's Lead Recycling Centre in Vernon, CA. When the plant loses utility power (which typically happens two or three times a year), the BESS will provide up to 5 MW of power at 4160 VAC in support of all the plant loads. Since the critical loads are not isolated, it is necessary to carry the entire plant load (maximum of 5 MVA) for a short period immediately following an incident until non-critical loads have been automatically shed. Plant loading typically peaks at 3.5 MVA with critical loads of about 2.1 MVA. The BESS also provides the manufacturing plant with customer-side-of-the-meter energy management options to reduce its energy demand during peak periods of the day. The BESS has provided a reduction in monthly electric bills through daily peak-shaving. By design, the battery can provide up to 2.5 MWh of energy and still retain 2.5 MWh of capacity in reserve to handle the possibility of a power outage in protecting the critical loads for up to 1 h. By storing energy from the utility during off-peak hours of the night in the batteries when the cost is low (US4.5¢ per kWh), GNB can then discharge this energy during high demand periods of the day (US14.50 per kW). For example, by reducing its peak demand by 300 kW, the lead-recycling centre can save over US4000 per month in its electric bills. The BESS at Vernon represents a first large-scale use of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries in such a demanding application. This paper presents a summary of the operational experience and performance characteristics of the BESS over the past 2 years.

  19. Constrained simultaneous multi-state reconfigurable wing structure configuration optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Matthew

    A reconfigurable aircraft is capable of in-flight shape change to increase mission performance or provide multi-mission capability. Reconfigurability has always been a consideration in aircraft design, from the Wright Flyer, to the F-14, and most recently the Lockheed-Martin folding wing concept. The Wright Flyer used wing-warping for roll control, the F-14 had a variable-sweep wing to improve supersonic flight capabilities, and the Lockheed-Martin folding wing demonstrated radical in-flight shape change. This dissertation will examine two questions that aircraft reconfigurability raises, especially as reconfiguration increases in complexity. First, is there an efficient method to develop a light weight structure which supports all the loads generated by each configuration? Second, can this method include the capability to propose a sub-structure topology that weighs less than other considered designs? The first question requires a method that will design and optimize multiple configurations of a reconfigurable aerostructure. Three options exist, this dissertation will show one is better than the others. Simultaneous optimization considers all configurations and their respective load cases and constraints at the same time. Another method is sequential optimization which considers each configuration of the vehicle one after the other - with the optimum design variable values from the first configuration becoming the lower bounds for subsequent configurations. This process repeats for each considered configuration and the lower bounds update as necessary. The third approach is aggregate combination — this method keeps the thickness or area of each member for the most critical configuration, the configuration that requires the largest cross-section. This research will show that simultaneous optimization produces a lower weight and different topology for the considered structures when compared to the sequential and aggregate techniques. To answer the second question

  20. Configuration Management Policy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Policy establishes an Agency-wide Configuration Management Program and to provide responsibilities, compliance requirements, and overall principles for Configuration and Change Management processes to support information technology management.

  1. CFD Data Generation Process for Nonlinear Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arslan, Alan; Magee, Todd; Unger, Eric; Hartwich, Peter; Agrawal, Shreekant; Giesing, Joseph; Bharadvaj, Bala; Chaderjian, Neal; Murman, Scott

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a process to generate a CFD database for the non-linear loads process capability for critical loads evaluation at Boeing Long Beach. The CFD simulations were performed for wing/body configurations at high angles of attack and Reynolds numbers with transonic and elastic deflection effects. Convergence criteria had to be tailored for loads applications rather than the usual drag performance. The time-accurate approach was subsequently adopted in order to improve convergence and model possible unsteadiness in the flowfield. In addition, uncertainty issues relating to the turbulence model and grid resolution in areas of high vortical flows were addressed and investigated for one of the cases.

  2. Operational Dynamic Configuration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chok Fung; Zelinski, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    Sectors may combine or split within areas of specialization in response to changing traffic patterns. This method of managing capacity and controller workload could be made more flexible by dynamically modifying sector boundaries. Much work has been done on methods for dynamically creating new sector boundaries [1-5]. Many assessments of dynamic configuration methods assume the current day baseline configuration remains fixed [6-7]. A challenging question is how to select a dynamic configuration baseline to assess potential benefits of proposed dynamic configuration concepts. Bloem used operational sector reconfigurations as a baseline [8]. The main difficulty is that operational reconfiguration data is noisy. Reconfigurations often occur frequently to accommodate staff training or breaks, or to complete a more complicated reconfiguration through a rapid sequence of simpler reconfigurations. Gupta quantified a few aspects of airspace boundary changes from this data [9]. Most of these metrics are unique to sector combining operations and not applicable to more flexible dynamic configuration concepts. To better understand what sort of reconfigurations are acceptable or beneficial, more configuration change metrics should be developed and their distribution in current practice should be computed. This paper proposes a method to select a simple sequence of configurations among operational configurations to serve as a dynamic configuration baseline for future dynamic configuration concept assessments. New configuration change metrics are applied to the operational data to establish current day thresholds for these metrics. These thresholds are then corroborated, refined, or dismissed based on airspace practitioner feedback. The dynamic configuration baseline selection method uses a k-means clustering algorithm to select the sequence of configurations and trigger times from a given day of operational sector combination data. The clustering algorithm selects a simplified

  3. Configuration Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merwarth, P. D.

    1983-01-01

    Configuration Analysis Tool (CAT), is information storage and report generation system for aid of configuration management activities. Configuration management is discipline composed of many techniques selected to track and direct evolution of complex systems. CAT is interactive program that accepts, organizes and stores information pertinent to specific phases of project.

  4. Critical material attributes (CMAs) of strip films loaded with poorly water-soluble drug nanoparticles: I. Impact of plasticizer on film properties and dissolution.

    PubMed

    Krull, Scott M; Patel, Hardik V; Li, Meng; Bilgili, Ecevit; Davé, Rajesh N

    2016-09-20

    Recent studies have demonstrated polymer films to be a promising platform for delivery of poorly water-soluble drug particles. However, the impact of critical material attributes, for example plasticizer, on the properties of and drug release from such films has yet to be investigated. In response, this study focuses on the impact of plasticizer and plasticizer concentration on properties and dissolution rate of polymer films loaded with poorly water-soluble drug nanoparticles. Glycerin, triacetin, and polyethylene glycol were selected as film plasticizers. Griseofulvin was used as a model Biopharmaceutics Classification System class II drug and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose was used as a film-forming polymer. Griseofulvin nanoparticles were prepared via wet stirred media milling in aqueous suspension. A depression in film glass transition temperature was observed with increasing plasticizer concentration, along with a decrease in film tensile strength and an increase in film elongation, as is typical of plasticizers. However, the type and amount of plasticizer necessary to produce strong yet flexible films had no significant impact on the dissolution rate of the films, suggesting that film mechanical properties can be effectively manipulated with minimal impact on drug release. Griseofulvin nanoparticles were successfully recovered upon redispersion in water regardless of plasticizer or content, even after up to 6months' storage at 40°C and 75% relative humidity, which contributed to similar consistency in dissolution rate after 6months' storage for all films. Good content uniformity (<4% R.S.D. for very small film sample size) was also maintained across all film formulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Epiphytic bryophytes as bio-indicators of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in a subtropical montane cloud forest: Response patterns, mechanism, and critical load.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xian-Meng; Song, Liang; Liu, Wen-Yao; Lu, Hua-Zheng; Qi, Jin-Hua; Li, Su; Chen, Xi; Wu, Jia-Fu; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Chuan-Sheng

    2017-10-01

    Increasing trends of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition due to pollution and land-use changes are dramatically altering global biogeochemical cycles. Bryophytes, which are extremely vulnerable to N deposition, often play essential roles in these cycles by contributing to large nutrient pools in boreal and montane forest ecosystems. To interpret the sensitivity of epiphytic bryophytes for N deposition and to determine their critical load (CL) in a subtropical montane cloud forest, community-level, physiological and chemical responses of epiphytic bryophytes were tested in a 2-year field experiment of N additions. The results showed a significant decrease in the cover of the bryophyte communities at an N addition level of 7.4 kg ha(-1) yr(-1), which is consistent with declines in the biomass production, vitality, and net photosynthetic rate responses of two dominant bryophyte species. Given the background N deposition rate of 10.5 kg ha(-1)yr(-1) for the study site, a CL of N deposition is therefore estimated as ca. 18 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). A disordered cellular carbon (C) metabolism, including photosynthesis inhibition and ensuing chlorophyll degradation, due to the leakage of magnesium and potassium and corresponding downstream effects, along with direct toxic effects of excessive N additions is suggested as the main mechanism driving the decline of epiphytic bryophytes. Our results confirmed the process of C metabolism and the chemical stability of epiphytic bryophytes are strongly influenced by N addition levels; when coupled to the strong correlations found with the loss of bryophytes, this study provides important and timely evidence on the response mechanisms of bryophytes in an increasingly N-polluted world. In addition, this study underlines a general decline in community heterogeneity and biomass production of epiphytic bryophytes induced by increasing N deposition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Steady-state sulfur critical loads and exceedances for protection of aquatic ecosystems in the U.S. Southern Appalachian Mountains.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Todd C; Sullivan, Timothy J; Hessburg, Paul F; Reynolds, Keith M; Povak, Nicholas A; Cosby, Bernard J; Jackson, William; Salter, R Brion

    2014-12-15

    Atmospherically deposited sulfur (S) causes stream water acidification throughout the eastern U.S. Southern Appalachian Mountain (SAM) region. Acidification has been linked with reduced fitness and richness of aquatic species and changes to benthic communities. Maintaining acid-base chemistry that supports native biota depends largely on balancing acidic deposition with the natural resupply of base cations. Stream water acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) is maintained by base cations that mostly originate from weathering of surrounding lithologies. When ambient atmospheric S deposition exceeds the critical load (CL) an ecosystem can tolerate, stream water chemistry may become lethal to biota. This work links statistical predictions of ANC and base cation weathering for streams and watersheds of the SAM region with a steady-state model to estimate CLs and exceedances. Results showed that 20.1% of the total length of study region streams displayed ANC <100 μeq∙L(-1), a level at which effects to biota may be anticipated; most were 4th or lower order streams. Nearly one-third of the stream length within the study region exhibited CLs of S deposition <50 meq∙m(-2)∙yr(-1), which is less than the regional average S deposition of 60 meq∙m(-2)∙yr(-1). Owing to their geologic substrates, relatively high elevation, and cool and moist forested conditions, the percentage of stream length in exceedance was highest for mountain wilderness areas and in national parks, and lowest for privately owned valley bottom land. Exceedance results were summarized by 12-digit hydrologic unit code (subwatershed) for use in developing management goals and policy objectives, and for long-term monitoring.

  7. A new approach to configurable primary data collection.

    PubMed

    Stanek, J; Babkin, E; Zubov, M

    2016-09-01

    The formats, semantics and operational rules of data processing tasks in genomics (and health in general) are highly divergent and can rapidly change. In such an environment, the problem of consistent transformation and loading of heterogeneous input data to various target repositories becomes a critical success factor. The objective of the project was to design a new conceptual approach to configurable data transformation, de-identification, and submission of health and genomic data sets. Main motivation was to facilitate automated or human-driven data uploading, as well as consolidation of heterogeneous sources in large genomic or health projects. Modern methods of on-demand specialization of generic software components were applied. For specification of input-output data and required data collection activities, we propose a simple data model of flat tables as well as a domain-oriented graphical interface and portable representation of transformations in XML. Using such methods, the prototype of the Configurable Data Collection System (CDCS) was implemented in Java programming language with Swing graphical interfaces. The core logic of transformations was implemented as a library of reusable plugins. The solution is implemented as a software prototype for a configurable service-oriented system for semi-automatic data collection, transformation, sanitization and safe uploading to heterogeneous data repositories-CDCS. To address the dynamic nature of data schemas and data collection processes, the CDCS prototype facilitates interactive, user-driven configuration of the data collection process and extends basic functionality with a wide range of third-party plugins. Notably, our solution also allows for the reduction of manual data entry for data originally missing in the output data sets. First experiments and feedback from domain experts confirm the prototype is flexible, configurable and extensible; runs well on data owner's systems; and is not dependent on

  8. Computer Lab Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the layout and elements of an effective school computer lab. Includes configuration, storage spaces, cabling and electrical requirements, lighting, furniture, and computer hardware and peripherals. (PKP)

  9. Computer Lab Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the layout and elements of an effective school computer lab. Includes configuration, storage spaces, cabling and electrical requirements, lighting, furniture, and computer hardware and peripherals. (PKP)

  10. Equilibrium Configuration of Φ4 Oscillatons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez-Alvarado, Susana; Becerril, Ricardo; Ureña-López, L. Arturo

    2010-07-01

    We search for equilibrium configurations of the (coupled) Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations for the case of a real scalar field endowed with a quartic self-interaction potential. The resulting solutions are the generalizations of the (massive) oscillating soliton stars, the so-called oscillatons. Among other parameters, we estimate the mass curve of the configurations, and determine their critical mass for different values of the quartic interaction.

  11. PIV Logon Configuration Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Glen Alan

    2016-03-04

    This document details the configurations and enhancements implemented to support the usage of federal Personal Identity Verification (PIV) Card for logon on unclassified networks. The guidance is a reference implementation of the configurations and enhancements deployed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) by Network and Infrastructure Engineering – Core Services (NIE-CS).

  12. Cold-air investigation of a 31/2-stage fan-drive turbine with a stage loading factor of 4 designed for an integral lift engine. 2: Performance of 2-, 3- and 3 1/2-stage configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    The stage work distribution among the three stages was very close to the design value. The specific work output-mass flow characteristics of the three stages were closely matched. The efficiency of the 3 1/2 stage turbine at design specific work output and design speed was within 0.008 of the estimated value, and this agreement was felt to demonstrate the adequacy of the prediction method in the high stage loading factor regime.

  13. Self-Configuring Network Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Goujun, Jin; Berket, Karlo; Lee, Jason; Leres, Craig

    2004-05-01

    Self-Configuring Network Monitor (SCNM) is a passive monitoring that can collect packet headers from any point in a network path. SCNM uses special activation packets to automatically activate monitors deployed at the layer three ingress and egress routers of the wide-area network, and at critical points within the site networks. Monitoring output data is sent back to the application data source or destination host. No modifications are required to the application or network routing infrastructure in order to activate monitoring of traffic for an application. This ensures that the monitoring operation does not add a burden to the networks administrator.

  14. Configuration Management Process Assessment Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Thad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a strategy for assessing the development and effectiveness of configuration management systems within Programs, Projects, and Design Activities performed by technical organizations and their supporting development contractors. Scope: Various entities CM Systems will be assessed dependent on Project Scope (DDT&E), Support Services and Acquisition Agreements. Approach: Model based structured against assessing organizations CM requirements including best practices maturity criteria. The model is tailored to the entity being assessed dependent on their CM system. The assessment approach provides objective feedback to Engineering and Project Management of the observed CM system maturity state versus the ideal state of the configuration management processes and outcomes(system). center dot Identifies strengths and risks versus audit gotcha's (findings/observations). center dot Used "recursively and iteratively" throughout program lifecycle at select points of need. (Typical assessments timing is Post PDR/Post CDR) center dot Ideal state criteria and maturity targets are reviewed with the assessed entity prior to an assessment (Tailoring) and is dependent on the assessed phase of the CM system. center dot Supports exit success criteria for Preliminary and Critical Design Reviews. center dot Gives a comprehensive CM system assessment which ultimately supports configuration verification activities.*

  15. Compact Torsatron configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B. A.; Dominguez, N.; Garcia, L.; Lynch, V. E.; Lyon, J. F.; Cary, J. R.; Hanson, J. D.; Navarro, A. P.

    1987-09-01

    Low-aspect-ratio stellarator configurations can be realized by using torsatron winding. Plasmas with aspect ratios in the range of 3.5 to 5 can be confined by these Compact Torsatron configurations. Stable operation at high BETA should be possible in these devices, if a vertical field coil system is adequately designed to avoid breaking of the magnetic surfaces at finite BETA. 17 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The TPX configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.G.

    1994-11-01

    The TPX configuration has progressed since the March, 1993 Conceptual Design Review (CDR). Changes have been made to enhance operating performance and improve engineering design margins. Clearances have been added to subsystem envelopes to increase fabrication space and expand assembly tolerances; design modifications have been adopted to meet changes in physics requirements and to enhance maintenance features. Configuration details of magnet leads and services have been added and major subsystem clearance requirements for assembly/disassembly have been revisited.

  17. ION Configuration Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgen, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The configuration of ION (Inter - planetary Overlay Network) network nodes is a manual task that is complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. This program seeks to accelerate this job and produce reliable configurations. The ION Configuration Editor is a model-based smart editor based on Eclipse Modeling Framework technology. An ION network designer uses this Eclipse-based GUI to construct a data model of the complete target network and then generate configurations. The data model is captured in an XML file. Intrinsic editor features aid in achieving model correctness, such as field fill-in, type-checking, lists of valid values, and suitable default values. Additionally, an explicit "validation" feature executes custom rules to catch more subtle model errors. A "survey" feature provides a set of reports providing an overview of the entire network, enabling a quick assessment of the model s completeness and correctness. The "configuration" feature produces the main final result, a complete set of ION configuration files (eight distinct file types) for each ION node in the network.

  18. Epitope specificity is critical for high and moderate avidity cytotoxic T lymphocytes associated with control of viral load and clinical disease in horses with equine infectious anemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Mealey, Robert H.; Zhang, Baoshan; Leib, Steven R.; Littke, Matt H.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2012-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus that causes persistent infections in horses. We hypothesized that high-avidity CTL specific for nonvariable epitopes might be associated with low viral load and minimal disease in EIAV-infected horses. To test this hypothesis, memory CTL (CTLm) responses were analyzed in two infected horses with high plasma viral loads and recurrent disease (progressors), and in two infected horses with low-to-undetectable viral loads and mild disease (nonprogressors). High-avidity CTLm in one progressor recognized an envelope gp90 epitope, and the data documented for the first time in EIAV that viral variation led to CTL escape. Each of the nonprogressors had high-to-moderate avidity CTLm directed against epitopes within Rev, including the nuclear export and nuclear localization domains. These results suggested that the epitope specificity of high- and moderate-avidity CTLm was an important determinant for disease outcome in the EIAV-infected horses examined. PMID:12954220

  19. Epitope specificity is critical for high and moderate avidity cytotoxic T lymphocytes associated with control of viral load and clinical disease in horses with equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Robert H; Zhang, Baoshan; Leib, Steven R; Littke, Matt H; McGuire, Travis C

    2003-09-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus that causes persistent infections in horses. We hypothesized that high-avidity CTL specific for nonvariable epitopes might be associated with low viral load and minimal disease in EIAV-infected horses. To test this hypothesis, memory CTL (CTLm) responses were analyzed in two infected horses with high plasma viral loads and recurrent disease (progressors), and in two infected horses with low-to-undetectable viral loads and mild disease (nonprogressors). High-avidity CTLm in one progressor recognized an envelope gp90 epitope, and the data documented for the first time in EIAV that viral variation led to CTL escape. Each of the nonprogressors had high-to-moderate avidity CTLm directed against epitopes within Rev, including the nuclear export and nuclear localization domains. These results suggested that the epitope specificity of high- and moderate-avidity CTLm was an important determinant for disease outcome in the EIAV-infected horses examined.

  20. Minimum induced drag configurations with jet interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, J. L.; Lan, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented for determining the optimum camber shape and twist distribution for the minimum induced drag in the wing-alone case without prescribing the span loading shape. The same method was applied to find the corresponding minimum induced drag configuration with the upper-surface-blowing jet. Lan's quasi-vortex-lattice method and his wing-jet interaction theory was used. Comparison of the predicted results with another theoretical method shows good agreement for configurations without the flowing jet. More applicable experimental data with blowing jets are needed to establish the accuracy of the theory.

  1. Shaping scaffold structures in rapid manufacturing implants: a modeling approach toward mechano-biologically optimized configurations for large bone defect.

    PubMed

    Razi, Hajar; Checa, Sara; Schaser, Klaus-Dieter; Duda, Georg N

    2012-10-01

    Large segmental bone defects remain a clinical challenge. Titanium lattice-structured implants in combination with laser sintering technology promises to be an alternative to bone grafting in the treatment of critical sized bone defects. Laser sintering allows the rapid manufacturing of patient specific 3D-structured scaffolds with highly interconnected macroporous networks and tunable mechanical properties. Unknown remains to what degree the mechanical properties of these implants could be tuned, without leading to mechanical failure but still providing adequate mechanical stimuli for tissue ingrowth. The aim of this study was to evaluate various implant designs for their mechanical potential towards (a) optimized safety against stress failure and (b) optimal intrastructural straining for bone ingrowth. Finite element analyses of several lattice-structured configurations were performed. Results illustrated a strong influence of the configuration on the load carrying capacity of the constructs. The likelihood of mechanical failure was predicted to be highly dependent on structure configuration with little influence of implant porosity. Increasing porosity did not result in an increase in the implant intrastructural straining in all configurations; however, the lattice configuration was the determinant factor for implant load transfer capacity. This study provides a framework for the design of effective implants with open pore structures to ensure mechanical stability as well as promote mechanical stimulation and encourage in vivo osseointegration.

  2. Booster Interface Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentz, Steve; Wood, Bill; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between shock waves and the wake shed from the forward booster/core attach hardware results in unsteady pressure fluctuations, which can lead to large buffeting loads on the vehicle. This task investigates whether computational tools can adequately predict these flows, and whether alternative booster nose shapes can reduce these loads. Results from wind tunnel tests will be used to validate the computations and provide design information for future Space Launch System (SLS) configurations. The current work combines numerical simulations with wind tunnel testing to predict buffeting loads caused by the boosters. Variations in nosecone shape, similar to the Ariane 5 design (fig. 1), are being evaluated with regard to lowering the buffet loads. The task will provide design information for the mitigation of buffet loads for SLS, along with validated simulation tools to be used to assess future SLS designs.

  3. Elastomeric load sharing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isabelle, Charles J. (Inventor); Kish, Jules G. (Inventor); Stone, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An elastomeric load sharing device, interposed in combination between a driven gear and a central drive shaft to facilitate balanced torque distribution in split power transmission systems, includes a cylindrical elastomeric bearing and a plurality of elastomeric bearing pads. The elastomeric bearing and bearing pads comprise one or more layers, each layer including an elastomer having a metal backing strip secured thereto. The elastomeric bearing is configured to have a high radial stiffness and a low torsional stiffness and is operative to radially center the driven gear and to minimize torque transfer through the elastomeric bearing. The bearing pads are configured to have a low radial and torsional stiffness and a high axial stiffness and are operative to compressively transmit torque from the driven gear to the drive shaft. The elastomeric load sharing device has spring rates that compensate for mechanical deviations in the gear train assembly to provide balanced torque distribution between complementary load paths of split power transmission systems.

  4. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Analysis of Joined-Wing Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Rauno

    Aeroelastic design of joined-wing configurations is yet a relatively unexplored topic which poses several difficulties. Due to the overconstrained nature of the system combined with structural geometric nonlinearities, the behavior of Joined Wings is often counterintuitive and presents challenges not seen in standard layouts. In particular, instability observed on detailed aircraft models but never thoroughly investigated, is here studied with the aid of a theoretical/computational framework. Snap-type of instabilities are shown for both pure structural and aeroelastic cases. The concept of snap-divergence is introduced to clearly identify the true aeroelastic instability, as opposed to the usual aeroelastic divergence evaluated through eigenvalue approach. Multi-stable regions and isola-type of bifurcations are possible characterizations of the nonlinear response of Joined Wings, and may lead to branch-jumping phenomena well below nominal critical load condition. Within this picture, sensitivity to (unavoidable) manufacturing defects could have potential catastrophic effects. The phenomena studied in this work suggest that the design process for Joined Wings needs to be revisited and should focus, when instability is concerned, on nonlinear post-critical analysis since linear methods may provide wrong trend indications and also hide potentially catastrophical situations. Dynamic aeroelastic analyses are also performed. Flutter occurrence is critically analyzed with frequency and time-domain capabilities. Sensitivity to different-fidelity aeroelastic modeling (fluid-structure interface algorithm, aerodynamic solvers) is assessed showing that, for some configurations, wake modeling (rigid versus free) has a strong impact on the results. Post-flutter regimes are also explored. Limit cycle oscillations are observed, followed, in some cases, by flip bifurcations (period doubling) and loss of periodicity of the solution. Aeroelastic analyses are then carried out on a

  5. Restructured Freedom configuration characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troutman, Patrick A.; Heck, Michael L.; Kumar, Renjith R.; Mazanek, Daniel D.

    1991-01-01

    In Jan. 1991, the LaRc SSFO performed an assessment of the configuration characteristics of the proposed pre-integrated Space Station Freedom (SSF) concept. Of particular concern was the relationship of solar array operation and orientation with respect to spacecraft controllability. For the man-tended configuration (MTC), it was determined that torque equilibrium attitude (TEA) seeking Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) control laws could not always maintain attitude. The control problems occurred when the solar arrays were tracking the sun to produce full power while flying in an arrow or gravity gradient flight mode. The large solar array articulations that sometimes result from having the functions of the alpha and beta joints reversed on MTC induced large product of inertia changes that can invalidate the control system gains during an orbit. Several modified sun tracking techniques were evaluated with respect to producing a controllable configuration requiring no modifications to the CMG control algorithms. Another assessment involved the permanently manned configuration (PMC) which has a third asymmetric PV unit on one side of the transverse boom. Recommendations include constraining alpha rotations for MTC in the arrow and gravity gradient flight modes and perhaps developing new non-TEA seeking control laws. Recommendations for PMC include raising the operational altitude and moving to a symmetric configuration as soon as possible.

  6. Software Configuration Management Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The growth in cost and importance of software to NASA has caused NASA to address the improvement of software development across the agency. One of the products of this program is a series of guidebooks that define a NASA concept of the assurance processes which are used in software development. The Software Assurance Guidebook, SMAP-GB-A201, issued in September, 1989, provides an overall picture of the concepts and practices of NASA in software assurance. Lower level guidebooks focus on specific activities that fall within the software assurance discipline, and provide more detailed information for the manager and/or practitioner. This is the Software Configuration Management Guidebook which describes software configuration management in a way that is compatible with practices in industry and at NASA Centers. Software configuration management is a key software development process, and is essential for doing software assurance.

  7. Electronically configured battery pack

    SciTech Connect

    Kemper, D.

    1997-03-01

    Battery packs for portable equipment must sometimes accommodate conflicting requirements to meet application needs. An electronically configurable battery pack was developed to support two highly different operating modes, one requiring very low power consumption at a low voltage and the other requiring high power consumption at a higher voltage. The configurable battery pack optimizes the lifetime and performance of the system by making the best use of all available energy thus enabling the system to meet its goals of operation, volume, and lifetime. This paper describes the cell chemistry chosen, the battery pack electronics, and tradeoffs made during the evolution of its design.

  8. Snowflake divertor configuration studies for NSTX-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A

    2011-11-12

    Snowflake divertor experiments in NSTX provide basis for PMI development toward NSTX-Upgrade. Snowflake configuration formation was followed by radiative detachment. Significant reduction of steady-state divertor heat flux observed in snowflake divertor. Impulsive heat loads due to Type I ELMs are partially mitigated in snowflake divertor. Magnetic control of snowflake divertor configuration is being developed. Plasma material interface development is critical for NSTX-U success. Four divertor coils should enable flexibility in boundary shaping and control in NSTX-U. Snowflake divertor experiments in NSTX provide good basis for PMI development in NSTX-Upgrade. FY 2009-2010 snowflake divertor experiments in NSTX: (1) Helped understand control of magnetic properties; (2) Core H-mode confinement unchanged; (3) Core and edge carbon concentration reduced; and (4) Divertor heat flux significantly reduced - (a) Steady-state reduction due to geometry and radiative detachment, (b) Encouraging results for transient heat flux handling, (c) Combined with impurity-seeded radiative divertor. Outlook for snowflake divertor in NSTX-Upgrade: (1) 2D fluid modeling of snowflake divertor properties scaling - (a) Edge and divertor transport, radiation, detachment threshold, (b) Compatibility with cryo-pump and lithium conditioning; (2) Magnetic control development; and (3) PFC development - PFC alignment and PFC material choice.

  9. Low speed wind tunnel test of ground proximity and deck edge effects on a lift cruise fan V/STOL configuration, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, V. R.

    1979-01-01

    The characteristics were determined of a lift cruise fan V/STOL multi-mission configuration in the near proximity to the edge of a small flat surface representation of a ship deck. Tests were conducted at both static and forward speed test conditions. The model (0.12 scale) tested was a four fan configuration with modifications to represent a three fan configuration. Analysis of data showed that the deck edge effects were in general less critical in terms of differences from free air than a full deck (in ground effect) configuration. The one exception to this was when the aft edge of the deck was located under the center of gravity. This condition, representative of an approach from the rear, showed a significant lift loss. Induced moments were generally small compared to the single axis control power requirements, but will likely add to the pilot work load.

  10. Results of Experimental Investigations to Determine External Tank Protuberance Loads Using a 0.03-Scale Model of the Space Shuttle Launch Configuration (Model 47-OTS) in the NASA/ARC Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houlihan, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Data were obtained on a 3-percent model of the Space Shuttle launch vehicle in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11x11-foot and 9x7-foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels. This test series has been identified as IA19OA/B and was conducted from 7 Feb. 1980 to 19 Feb. 1980 (IA19OA) and from 17 March 1980 to 19 March 1980 and from 8 May 1980 to 30 May 1980 (IA19OB). The primary test objective was to obtain structural loads on the following external tank protuberances: (1) LO2 feedline; (2) GO2 pressure line; (3) LO2 antigeyser line; (4) GH2 pressure line; (5) LH2 tank cable tray; (6) LO2 tank cable tray; (7) Bipod; (8) ET/SRB cable tray; and (9) Crossbeam/Orbiter cable tray. To fulfill these objectives the following steps were taken: Eight 3-component balances were used to measure forces on various sections of 1 thru 6 above; 315 pressure orifices were distributed over all 9 above items. The LO2 feedline was instrumented with 96 pressure taps and was rotated to four positions to yield 384 pressure measurements. The LO2 antigeyser line was instrumented with 64 pressure taps and was rotated to two positions to yield 128 pressure measurements; Three Chrysler miniature flow direction probes were mounted on a traversing mechanism on the tank upper surface centerline to obtain flow field data between the forward and aft attach structures; and Schlieren photographs and ultraviolet flow photographs were taken at all test conditions. Data from each of the four test phases are presented.

  11. Results of experimental investigations to determine external tank protuberance loads using a 0.03-scale model of the Space Shuttle launch configuration (model 47-OTS) in the NASA/ARC unitary plan wind tunnel, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houlihan, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Data were obtained on a 3-percent model of the Space Shuttle launch vehicle in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11x11-foot and 9x7-foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels. This test series has been identified as IA190A/B and was conducted from 7 Feb. 1980 to 19 Feb. 1980 (IA190A) and from 17 March 1980 to 19 March 1980 and from 8 May 1980 to 30 May 1980 (IA190B). The primary test objective was to obtain structural loads on the following external tank protuberances: (1) LO2 feedline, (2) GO2 pressure line, (3) LO2 antigeyser line, (4) GH2 pressure line, (5) LH2 tank cable tray, (6) LO2 tank cable tray, (7) Bipod, (8) ET/SRB cable tray, and (9) Crossbeam/Orbiter cable tray. To fulfill these objectives the following steps were taken: (1) Eight 3-component balances were used to measure forces on various sections of 1 thru 6 above. (2) 315 pressure orifices were distributed over all 9 above items. The LO2 feedline was instrumented with 96 pressure taps and was rotated to four positions to yield 384 pressure measurements. The LO2 antigeyser line was instrumented with 64 pressure taps and was rotated to two positions to yield 128 pressure measurements. (3) Three Chrysler miniature flow direction probes were mounted on a traversing mechanism on the tank upper surface centerline to obtain flow field data between the forward and aft attach structures. (4) Schlieren photographs and ultraviolet flow photographs were taken at all test conditions. Data from each of the four test phases are presented.

  12. DAQMAN - A flexible configurable data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Sivertz, Michael; Larry Hoff, Seth Nemesure

    2012-08-01

    DAQMAN is a flexible configurable interface that allows the user to build and operate a VME-based data acquisition system on a Linux workstation. It consists of two parts: a Java-based Graphical User Interface to configure the system, and a C-based utility that reads out the data and creates the output ASCII data file, with two levels of diagnostic tools. The data acquisition system requires a CAEN CONET-VME Bridge to communicate between the hardware in the VME crate and the Linux workstation. Data acquisition modules, such as ADCs, TDC, Scalers, can be loaded into the system, or removed easily. The GUI allows users to activate modules, and channels within modules by clicking on icons. Running configurations are stored; data are collected and can be viewed either as raw numbers, or by charts and histograms that update as the data are accumulated. Data files are written to disk in ASCII format, with a date and time stamp.

  13. DAQMAN - A flexible configurable data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Sivertz, Michael; Larry Hoff, Seth Nemesure

    2012-08-01

    DAQMAN is a flexible configurable interface that allows the user to build and operate a VME-based data acquisition system on a Linux workstation. It consists of two parts: a Java-based Graphical User Interface to configure the system, and a C-based utility that reads out the data and creates the output ASCII data file, with two levels of diagnostic tools. The data acquisition system requires a CAEN CONET-VME Bridge to communicate between the hardware in the VME crate and the Linux workstation. Data acquisition modules, such as ADCs, TDC, Scalers, can be loaded into the system, or removed easily. The GUI allows users to activate modules, and channels within modules by clicking on icons. Running configurations are stored; data are collected and can be viewed either as raw numbers, or by charts and histograms that update as the data are accumulated. Data files are written to disk in ASCII format, with a date and time stamp.

  14. Inclusive Services Innovation Configuration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdheide, Lynn R.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher preparation to deliver inclusive services to students with disabilities is increasingly important because of changes in law and policy emphasizing student access to, and achievement in, the general education curriculum. This innovation configuration identifies the components of inclusive services that should be incorporated in teacher…

  15. Router Security Configuration Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Providing Router Security Guidance............................................................ 9 1.3. Typographic and Diagrammatic Conventions Used in this...and available software. Router Security Configuration Guide UNCLASSIFIED 10 UNCLASSIFIED Version 1.0g 1.3. Typographic and Diagrammatic... typographic conventions are used as part of presenting the examples. § Specific router and host commands are identified in the text using Courier bold

  16. Modular tokamak configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, S.L.

    1985-01-01

    This report is concerned with the modular tokamak configuration, and presents information on the following topics: modularity; external vacuum boundary; vertical maintenance; combined reactor building/biological shield with totally remote maintenance; independent TF coils; minimum TF coil bore; saddle PF coils; and heat transport system in bore.

  17. Nuclear Shuttle Logistics Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This 1971 artist's concept shows the Nuclear Shuttle in both its lunar logistics configuraton and geosynchronous station configuration. As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center Program Development persornel, the Nuclear Shuttle would deliver payloads to lunar orbits or other destinations then return to Earth orbit for refueling and additional missions.

  18. Saturn IB Vehicle Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    This 1968 chart depicts the various mission configurations for the Saturn IB launch vehicle. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's 'building block' approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the larger boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the marned lunar missions.

  19. Voyager: System Test Configuration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-05

    This archival photo shows the system test configuration for Voyager on October 1, 1976. The spacecraft's 10-sided bus is visible behind the catwalk railing in the foreground. The boom that holds several of the spacecraft's science instruments arches above the railing. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21729

  20. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    2001-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs which can be combined to determine any one of the six general load components.

  1. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components.

  2. Configurations of the amphiphilic molecules in micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, K.A.

    1982-04-29

    Several theoretic models aim to account for the properties of micelles in terms of the configurations of the constituent amphiphilic chain molecules. Recent /sup 13/C NMR measurement of one property of the configuration distribution of the the hydrocarbon chain segments allows critical evaluation of these theories. It is concluded that the interphase and singly-bent chain theories, which fully account for chain continuity and for intermolecular constraints imposed by hydrophobic and steric forces, give a more satisfactory description of micellar molecular organization than models in which chains are ordered and radially aligned, or in which they have the complete disorder characteristic of an amorphous hydrocarbon liquid.

  3. Dynamic Airspace Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloem, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    In air traffic management systems, airspace is partitioned into regions in part to distribute the tasks associated with managing air traffic among different systems and people. These regions, as well as the systems and people allocated to each, are changed dynamically so that air traffic can be safely and efficiently managed. It is expected that new air traffic control systems will enable greater flexibility in how airspace is partitioned and how resources are allocated to airspace regions. In this talk, I will begin by providing an overview of some previous work and open questions in Dynamic Airspace Configuration research, which is concerned with how to partition airspace and assign resources to regions of airspace. For example, I will introduce airspace partitioning algorithms based on clustering, integer programming optimization, and computational geometry. I will conclude by discussing the development of a tablet-based tool that is intended to help air traffic controller supervisors configure airspace and controllers in current operations.

  4. Modular small hydro configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    Smaller sites (those under 750 kilowatts) which previously were not attractive to develop using equipment intended for application at larger scale sites, were the focal point in the conception of a system which utilizes standard industrial components which are generally available within short procurement times. Such components were integrated into a development scheme for sites having 20 feet to 150 feet of head. The modular small hydro configuration maximizes the use of available components and minimizes modification of existing civil works. A key aspect of the development concept is the use of a vertical turbine multistage pump, used in the reverse mode as a hydraulic turbine. The configuration allows for automated operation and control of the hydroelectric facilities with sufficient flexibility for inclusion of potential hydroelectric sites into dispersed storage and generation (DSG) utility grid systems.

  5. Versatile composite amplifier configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gift, Stephan J. G.; Maundy, Brent

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a versatile composite amplifier in which a current feedback amplifier (CFA) drives an operational amplifier (OPA). In the conventional OPA-CFA composite amplifier, an OPA drives a CFA resulting in a composite structure that combines the DC input stability of the OPA and the high speed capability of the CFA. The proposed composite configuration combines different features of the CFA and OPA, specifically the constant bandwidth property of the CFA and the high power and high current output capacity of the OPA. The new circuit is easily implemented in the standard inverting and non-inverting configurations using commercially available devices, and the accuracy and constant bandwidth features were experimentally verified. Local feedback around the associated CFA ensures that the proposed composite amplifier possesses a higher level of bandwidth constancy than a single CFA.

  6. Williams configures the LMM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-04-18

    ISS047e066551 (04/18/2016) --- NASA astronaut Jeff Williams configures the station’s Light Microscopy Module (LMM), a modified commercial, highly flexible, state-of-the-art light imaging microscope facility that provides researchers with powerful diagnostic hardware and software. The LMM enables novel research of microscopic phenomena in microgravity, with the capability of remotely acquiring and downloading digital images and videos across many levels of magnification.

  7. Flexible heliac configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.H.; Cantrell, J.L.; Hender, T.C.; Carreras, B.A.; Morris, R.N.

    1985-04-01

    The addition of an l = 1 helical winding to the heliac central conductor adds a significant degree of flexibility to the configuration by making it possible to control the rotational transform and shear. Such control is essential for an experiment because the presence of low-order resonances in the rotational transform profile can cause breakup of the equilibrium magnetic surfaces. The use of the additional winding also permits reduction of the total central conductor current and can deepen the magnetic well.

  8. Fuel cell system configurations

    DOEpatents

    Kothmann, Richard E.; Cyphers, Joseph A.

    1981-01-01

    Fuel cell stack configurations having elongated polygonal cross-sectional shapes and gaskets at the peripheral faces to which flow manifolds are sealingly affixed. Process channels convey a fuel and an oxidant through longer channels, and a cooling fluid is conveyed through relatively shorter cooling passages. The polygonal structure preferably includes at least two right angles, and the faces of the stack are arranged in opposite parallel pairs.

  9. Inferring unstable equilibrium configurations from experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgin, L. N.; Wiebe, R.; Spottswood, S. M.; Beberniss, T.

    2016-09-01

    This research considers the structural behavior of slender, mechanically buckled beams and panels of the type commonly found in aerospace structures. The specimens were deflected and then clamped in a rigid frame in order to exhibit snap-through. That is, the initial equilibrium and the buckled (snapped-through) equilibrium configurations both co-existed for the given clamped conditions. In order to transit between these two stable equilibrium configurations (for example, under the action of an externally applied load), it is necessary for the structural component to pass through an intermediate unstable equilibrium configuration. A sequence of sudden impacts was imparted to the system, of various strengths and at various locations. The goal of this impact force was to induce relatively intermediate-sized transients that effectively slowed-down in the vicinity of the unstable equilibrium configuration. Thus, monitoring the velocity of the motion, and specifically its slowing down, should give an indication of the presence of an equilibrium configuration, even though it is unstable and not amenable to direct experimental observation. A digital image correlation (DIC) system was used in conjunction with an instrumented impact hammer to track trajectories and statistical methods used to infer the presence of unstable equilibria in both a beam and a panel.

  10. The ALICE Configuration Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccioli, M.; Carena, F.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Lechman, M.; Jusko, A.; Pinazza, O.; ALICE Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It includes 18 different sub-detectors and 5 online systems, each one made of many different components and developed by different teams inside the collaboration. The operation of a large experiment over several years to collect billions of events acquired in well defined conditions requires predictability and repeatability of the experiment configuration. The logistics of the operation is also a major issue and it is mandatory to reduce the size of the shift crew needed to operate the experiment. Appropriate software tools are therefore needed to automate daily operations. This ensures minimizing human errors and maximizing the data taking time. The ALICE Configuration Tool (ACT) is ALICE first step to achieve a high level of automation, implementing automatic configuration and calibration of the sub-detectors and online systems. This presentation describes the goals and architecture of the ACT, the web-based Human Interface and the commissioning performed before the start of the collisions. It also reports on the first experiences with real use in daily operations, and finally it presents the road-map for future developments.

  11. Role of specific amine surface configurations for grafted surfaces: implications for nanostructured CO2 adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Steven; Song, Changsik; Strano, Michael

    2011-03-15

    Amine-grafted porous materials that capture CO2 from emission streams have been considered to be potential alternatives to the more energy-intensive liquid amine systems currently employed. An underappreciated fact in the uptake mechanism of these materials is that under dry, anhydrous conditions each CO2 molecule must react with two adjacent amine groups to adsorb onto the surface, which makes the configuration of amine groups on the surface critically important. Using this chemical mechanism, we developed a semiempirical adsorption isotherm equation that allows straightforward computation of the adsorption isotherm from an arbitrary surface configuration of grafted amines for honeycomb, square, and triangular lattices. The model makes use of the fact that the distribution of amines with respect to the number of nearest neighbors, referred to as the z-histogram, along with the amine loading and equilibrium constant, uniquely determine the adsorption characteristics to a very good approximation. This model was used to predict the range of uptakes possible just through surface configuration, and it was used to fit experimental data in the literature to give a meaningful equilibrium constant and show how efficiently amines were utilized. We also demonstrate how the model can be utilized to design more efficient nanostructured adsorbents and polymer-based adsorbents. Recommendations for exploiting the role of surface configuration include the use of linear instead of branched polyamines, higher amine grafting densities, the use of flexible, less bulky, long, and rotationally free amine groups, and increased silanol densities.

  12. Ultrasonic pulsed phase locked loop interferometer for bolt load measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, S. G.; Clendenin, C. G.

    1989-01-01

    The pulsed phase-locked-loop bolt monitor (P2L2) that uses ultrasonic waves to measure bolt preload with accuracies ranging from 1 to 3 percent (depending on the specific bolt) is described. To remeasure bolt load after installation, a thermal calibration factor compensates for bolt temperature changes, and a standard reference block allows correction for acoustic phase errors due to measurement equipment configuration such as utilization of a different transducer, couplant, or cable. Some examples of critical applications including Space Shuttle landing-gear wheels and NASA wind-tunnel fan blades are discussed.

  13. GSC configuration management plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, B. Edward

    1990-01-01

    The tools and methods used for the configuration management of the artifacts (including software and documentation) associated with the Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project are described. The GCS project is part of a software error studies research program. Three implementations of GCS are being produced in order to study the fundamental characteristics of the software failure process. The Code Management System (CMS) is used to track and retrieve versions of the documentation and software. Application of the CMS for this project is described and the numbering scheme is delineated for the versions of the project artifacts.

  14. Criticality Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Scaglione

    2003-03-12

    The purpose of the ''Criticality Model Report'' is to validate the MCNP (CRWMS M&O 1998h) code's ability to accurately predict the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for a range of conditions spanned by various critical configurations representative of the potential configurations commercial reactor assemblies stored in a waste package may take. Results of this work are an indication of the accuracy of MCNP for calculating eigenvalues, which will be used as input for criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. The scope of this report is to document the development and validation of the criticality model. The scope of the criticality model is only applicable to commercial pressurized water reactor fuel. Valid ranges are established as part of the validation of the criticality model. This model activity follows the description in BSC (2002a).

  15. Evaluated benchmark experiments at critical assemblies simulating features of an HTHR at the ASTRA facility

    SciTech Connect

    Garin, V. P.; Glushkov, A. E.; Glushkov, E. S.; Gomin, E. A.; Gurevich, M. I.; Zimin, A. A.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Kukharkin, N. E.; Lobyntsev, V. A.; Nosov, V. I.; Polyakov, D. N.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Smirnov, O. N.; Tel'kovskaya, O. V.; Chunyaev, E. I.

    2010-12-15

    The design of the ASTRA facility and critical assemblies that simulate physics features of modular high-temperature reactors (HTHR-Ms) with a graphite moderator and reflectors loaded with fuel particles having multilayer ceramic coatings is described in detail. Geometrical dimensions of the main elements and regions of the critical assemblies, composition of the materials used, and experimental results for various configurations of the critical assemblies are presented. A detailed computational benchmark model allowing for the structural and compositional features of the critical assembly configurations in question is developed on the basis of all the above data. The results are to be used for verification of the neutronics codes used for calculations of high-temperature helium-cooled reactors.

  16. Configuring Battalion File Servers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    AGM Server 2008 to load on a Dell D630 laptop. Though not ideal, it did allow the battalion staff and command group to share...and install the AGM Microsoft Server 2008. The final contract included two Dell R610 1U servers with RAID 5 comprising of three 1 TB hard drives...continuity in data between garrison and deployment environ- ments. With the usage of AGM Server operating systems, the Army is

  17. Critical review of the trailing edge condition in steady and unsteady flow. Blade flutter in compressors and fans: Numerical simulation of the aerodynamic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radwan, S. F.; Rockwell, D. O.; Johnson, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Existing interpretations of the trailing edge condition, addressing both theoretical and experimental works in steady, as well as unsteady flows are critically reviewed. The work of Kutta and Joukowski on the trailing edge condition in steady flow is reviewed. It is shown that for most practical airfoils and blades (as in the case of most turbomachine blades), this condition is violated due to rounded trailing edges and high frequency effects, the flow dynamics in the trailing edge region being dominated by viscous forces; therefore, any meaningful modelling must include viscous effects. The question of to what extent the trailing edge condition affects acoustic radiation from the edge is raised; it is found that violation of the trailing edge condition leads to significant sound diffraction at the tailing edge, which is related to the problem of noise generation. Finally, various trailing edge conditions in unsteady flow are discussed, with emphasis on high reduced frequencies.

  18. Ames Optimized TCA Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Reuther, James J.; Hicks, Raymond M.

    1999-01-01

    Configuration design at Ames was carried out with the SYN87-SB (single block) Euler code using a 193 x 49 x 65 C-H grid. The Euler solver is coupled to the constrained (NPSOL) and the unconstrained (QNMDIF) optimization packages. Since the single block grid is able to model only wing-body configurations, the nacelle/diverter effects were included in the optimization process by SYN87's option to superimpose the nacelle/diverter interference pressures on the wing. These interference pressures were calculated using the AIRPLANE code. AIRPLANE is an Euler solver that uses a unstructured tetrahedral mesh and is capable of computations about arbitrary complete configurations. In addition, the buoyancy effects of the nacelle/diverters were also included in the design process by imposing the pressure field obtained during the design process onto the triangulated surfaces of the nacelle/diverter mesh generated by AIRPLANE. The interference pressures and nacelle buoyancy effects are added to the final forces after each flow field calculation. Full details of the (recently enhanced) ghost nacelle capability are given in a related talk. The pseudo nacelle corrections were greatly improved during this design cycle. During the Ref H and Cycle 1 design activities, the nacelles were only translated and pitched. In the cycle 2 design effort the nacelles can translate vertically, and pitch to accommodate the changes in the lower surface geometry. The diverter heights (between their leading and trailing edges) were modified during design as the shape of the lower wing changed, with the drag of the diverter changing accordingly. Both adjoint and finite difference gradients were used during optimization. The adjoint-based gradients were found to give good direction in the design space for configurations near the starting point, but as the design approached a minimum, the finite difference gradients were found to be more accurate. Use of finite difference gradients was limited by the

  19. Ames Optimized TCA Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Reuther, James J.; Hicks, Raymond M.

    1999-01-01

    Configuration design at Ames was carried out with the SYN87-SB (single block) Euler code using a 193 x 49 x 65 C-H grid. The Euler solver is coupled to the constrained (NPSOL) and the unconstrained (QNMDIF) optimization packages. Since the single block grid is able to model only wing-body configurations, the nacelle/diverter effects were included in the optimization process by SYN87's option to superimpose the nacelle/diverter interference pressures on the wing. These interference pressures were calculated using the AIRPLANE code. AIRPLANE is an Euler solver that uses a unstructured tetrahedral mesh and is capable of computations about arbitrary complete configurations. In addition, the buoyancy effects of the nacelle/diverters were also included in the design process by imposing the pressure field obtained during the design process onto the triangulated surfaces of the nacelle/diverter mesh generated by AIRPLANE. The interference pressures and nacelle buoyancy effects are added to the final forces after each flow field calculation. Full details of the (recently enhanced) ghost nacelle capability are given in a related talk. The pseudo nacelle corrections were greatly improved during this design cycle. During the Ref H and Cycle 1 design activities, the nacelles were only translated and pitched. In the cycle 2 design effort the nacelles can translate vertically, and pitch to accommodate the changes in the lower surface geometry. The diverter heights (between their leading and trailing edges) were modified during design as the shape of the lower wing changed, with the drag of the diverter changing accordingly. Both adjoint and finite difference gradients were used during optimization. The adjoint-based gradients were found to give good direction in the design space for configurations near the starting point, but as the design approached a minimum, the finite difference gradients were found to be more accurate. Use of finite difference gradients was limited by the

  20. SIM Configuration Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, Kim M.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is a space-based 10 m baseline Michelson interferometer. Planned for launch in 2005 aboard a Delta III launch vehicle, or equivalent, its primary objective is to measure the positions of stars and other celestial objects with an unprecedented accuracy of 4 micro arc seconds. With such an instrument, tremendous advancement can be expected in our understanding of stellar and galactic dynamics. Using triangulation from opposite sides of the orbit around the sun (i.e. by using parallax) one can measure the distance to any observable object in our galaxy. By directly measuring the orbital wobble of nearby stars, the mass and orbit of planets can be determined over a wide range of parameters. The distribution of velocity within nearby galaxies will be measurable. Observations of these and other objects will improve the calibration of distance estimators by more than an order of magnitude. This will permit a much better determination of the Hubble Constant as well as improving our overall understanding of the evolution of the universe. SIM has undergone several transformations, especially over the past year and a half since the start of Phase A. During this phase of a project, it is desirable to perform system-level trade studies, so the substantial evolution of the design that has occurred is quite appropriate. Part of the trade-off process has addressed two major underlying architectures: SIM Classic; and Son of SIM. The difference between these two architectures is related to the overall arrangement of the optical elements and the associated metrology system. Several different configurations have been developed for each architecture. Each configuration is the result of design choices that are influenced by many competing considerations. Some of the more important aspects will be discussed. The Space Interferometry Mission has some extremely challenging goals: millikelvin thermal stability, nanometer stabilization of optics

  1. AstroSat - Configuration and Realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navalgund, K. H.; Suryanarayana Sarma, K.; Gaurav, Piyush Kumar; Nagesh, G.; Annadurai, M.

    2017-06-01

    AstroSat is India's first space-based observatory satellite dedicated to astronomy. It has the capability to perform multi-wavelength and simultaneous observations of cosmic bodies in a wide band of wavelengths. This paper briefly summarizes the challenges faced in the configuration of AstroSat spacecraft, accommodation and sizing of its critical subsystems, their realization and testing of payloads and the integrated satellite.

  2. An automated approach to magnetic divertor configuration design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blommaert, M.; Dekeyser, W.; Baelmans, M.; Gauger, N. R.; Reiter, D.

    2015-01-01

    Automated methods based on optimization can greatly assist computational engineering design in many areas. In this paper an optimization approach to the magnetic design of a nuclear fusion reactor divertor is proposed and applied to a tokamak edge magnetic configuration in a first feasibility study. The approach is based on reduced models for magnetic field and plasma edge, which are integrated with a grid generator into one sensitivity code. The design objective chosen here for demonstrative purposes is to spread the divertor target heat load as much as possible over the entire target area. Constraints on the separatrix position are introduced to eliminate physically irrelevant magnetic field configurations during the optimization cycle. A gradient projection method is used to ensure stable cost function evaluations during optimization. The concept is applied to a configuration with typical Joint European Torus (JET) parameters and it automatically provides plausible configurations with reduced heat load.

  3. Critical Joints in Large Composite Primary Aircraft Structures. Volume 3: Ancillary Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunin, Bruce L.; Sagui, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technology for critical structural joints for composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The results of a comprehensive ancillary test program are summarized, consisting of single-bolt composite joint specimens tested in a variety of configurations. These tests were conducted to characterize the strength and load deflection properties that are required for multirow joint analysis. The composite material was Toray 300 fiber and Ciba-Geigy 914 resin, in the form of 0.005 and 0.01 inch thick unidirectional tape. Tests were conducted in single and double shear for loaded and unloaded hole configurations under both tensile and compressive loading. Two different layup patterns were examined. All tests were conducted at room temperature. In addition, the results of NASA Standard Toughness Test (NASA RP 1092) are reported, which were conducted for several material systems.

  4. Analyzing Static Loading of Complex Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallear, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    Critical loading conditions determined from analysis of each structural element. Automated Thrust Structures Loads and Stresses (ATLAS) system is series of programs developed to analyze elements of complex structure under static-loading conditions. ATLAS calculates internal loads, beam-bending loads, column- and web-buckling loads, beam and panel stresses, and beam-corner stresses. Programs written in FORTRAN IV and Assembler for batch execution.

  5. The Role of Spatial Configuration in Multiple Identity Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Gao, Qiyang; Ye, Yan; Zhou, Jifan; Shui, Rende; Shen, Mowei

    2014-01-01

    Background The simultaneous tracking and identification of multiple moving objects encountered in everyday life requires one to correctly bind identities to objects. In the present study, we investigated the role of spatial configuration made by multiple targets when observers are asked to track multiple moving objects with distinct identities. Methodology/Principal Findings The overall spatial configuration made by the targets was manipulated: In the constant condition, the configuration remained as a virtual convex polygon throughout the tracking, and in the collapsed condition, one of the moving targets (critical target) crossed over an edge of the virtual polygon during tracking, destroying it. Identification performance was higher when the configuration remained intact than when it collapsed (Experiments 1a, 1b, and 2). Moreover, destroying the configuration affected the allocation of dynamic attention: the critical target captured more attention than did the other targets. However, observers were worse at identifying the critical target and were more likely to confuse it with the targets that formed the virtual crossed edge (Experiments 3–5). Experiment 6 further showed that the visual system constructs an overall configuration only by using the targets (and not the distractors); identification performance was not affected by whether the distractor violated the spatial configuration. Conclusions/Significance In sum, these results suggest that the visual system may integrate targets (but not distractors) into a spatial configuration during multiple identity tracking, which affects the distribution of dynamic attention and the updating of identity-location binding. PMID:24718370

  6. Inductrack magnet configuration

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard Freeman

    2003-10-14

    A magnet configuration comprising a pair of Halbach arrays magnetically and structurally connected together are positioned with respect to each other so that a first component of their fields substantially cancels at a first plane between them, and a second component of their fields substantially adds at this first plane. A track of windings is located between the pair of Halbach arrays and a propulsion mechanism is provided for moving the pair of Halbach arrays along the track. When the pair of Halbach arrays move along the track and the track is not located at the first plane, a current is induced in the windings and a restoring force is exerted on the pair of Halbach arrays.

  7. Inductrack magnet configuration

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard Freeman

    2003-12-16

    A magnet configuration comprising a pair of Halbach arrays magnetically and structurally connected together are positioned with respect to each other so that a first component of their fields substantially cancels at a first plane between them, and a second component of their fields substantially adds at this first plane. A track of windings is located between the pair of Halbach arrays and a propulsion mechanism is provided for moving the pair of Halbach arrays along the track. When the pair of Halbach arrays move along the track and the track is not located at the first plane, a current is induced in the windings and a restoring force is exerted on the pair of Halbach arrays.

  8. Power converter connection configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Gettelfinger, Lee A.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Phillips, Mark G.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.

    2008-11-11

    EMI shielding is provided for power electronics circuits and the like via a direct-mount reference plane support and shielding structure. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support forms a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  9. Configurable Aperture Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Vassigh, Kenny; Bendek, Selman; Young, Zion W; Lynch, Dana H.

    2015-01-01

    In December 2014, we were awarded Center Innovation Fund to evaluate an optical and mechanical concept for a novel implementation of a segmented telescope based on modular, interconnected small sats (satlets). The concept is called CAST, a Configurable Aperture Space Telescope. With a current TRL is 2 we will aim to reach TLR 3 in Sept 2015 by demonstrating a 2x2 mirror system to validate our optical model and error budget, provide strawman mechanical architecture and structural damping analyses, and derive future satlet-based observatory performance requirements. CAST provides an alternative access to visible andor UV wavelength space telescope with 1-meter or larger aperture for NASA SMD Astrophysics and Planetary Science community after the retirement of HST.

  10. Software Configurable Multichannel Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.; Cornelius, Harold; Hickling, Ron; Brooks, Walter

    2009-01-01

    Emerging test instrumentation and test scenarios increasingly require network communication to manage complexity. Adapting wireless communication infrastructure to accommodate challenging testing needs can benefit from reconfigurable radio technology. A fundamental requirement for a software-definable radio system is independence from carrier frequencies, one of the radio components that to date has seen only limited progress toward programmability. This paper overviews an ongoing project to validate the viability of a promising chipset that performs conversion of radio frequency (RF) signals directly into digital data for the wireless receiver and, for the transmitter, converts digital data into RF signals. The Software Configurable Multichannel Transceiver (SCMT) enables four transmitters and four receivers in a single unit the size of a commodity disk drive, programmable for any frequency band between 1 MHz and 6 GHz.

  11. Configurable Aperture Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Bendek, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In December 2014, we were awarded Center Innovation Fund to evaluate an optical and mechanical concept for a novel implementation of a segmented telescope based on modular, interconnected small sats (satlets). The concept is called CAST, a Configurable Aperture Space Telescope. With a current TRL is 2 we will aim to reach TLR 3 in Sept 2015 by demonstrating a 2x2 mirror system to validate our optical model and error budget, provide straw man mechanical architecture and structural damping analyses, and derive future satlet-based observatory performance requirements. CAST provides an alternative access to visible and/or UV wavelength space telescope with 1-meter or larger aperture for NASA SMD Astrophysics and Planetary Science community after the retirement of HST

  12. SASSI system software configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, E.O.

    1994-08-01

    The SASSI (System for Analysis for Soil-Structure Interaction) computer program was obtained by WHC from the University of California at Berkeley for seismic structural analysis of complex embedded building configurations. SASSI was developed in the 1980`s by a team of doctoral students under the direction of Prof. J. Lysmer. The program treats three-dimensional soil-structure interaction problems with the flexible volume substructuring method. In the 1970`s, the same organization developed the FLUSH program, which has achieved widespread international usage in the seismic analysis of structures. SASSI consists of nine modules, each of which are to be run as a separate execution. The SASSI source code, dated 1989 and identified as a Cray version, was put up on the RL Cray XM/232 Unicos system in 1991. That system was removed at the end of 1993, and SASSI is now installed on the LANL Cray YMP systems.

  13. The theoretical reliability of PCR-based fish viral diagnostic methods is critically affected when they are applied to fish populations with low prevalence and virus loads.

    PubMed

    Dopazo, C P; Moreno, P; Olveira, J G; Borrego, J J

    2017-09-15

    The reliability of PCR techniques is an important issue in viral diagnosis, and it is even crucial when they must be applied for detection of viruses in asymptomatic carriers. The problems will arise when the aim is to study fish wild populations, where the viral loads and prevalence values are extremely low. We have evaluated several PCR procedures employed by two laboratories for monitoring fish captured in several oceanographic campaigns performed in the Gulf of Cádiz. To evaluate the reliability of different diagnostics test used, we have re-analyzed fish samples that had been previously subjected to diagnosis for a surveillance of viruses performed in 2010-2011 in wild fish populations. The following parameters were employed: the clinical sensitivity (Ss), the clinical specificity (Sp), the predictive positive value (PPV), the predictive negative value (PNV), and the positive and negative likelihood ratio (LR(+) and LR(-) ). For viral nervious necrosis virus (VNNV), a RT-PCR procedure supplemented by nested PCR showed the highest values (100%) for all the parameters. For viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), the highest values were provided by RT-PCR supplemented by dot blot hybridization. In the case of Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), none of the procedures yielded 100% for any parameter. The results obtained for viral prevalence indicate: (i) that the conservation of the samples at -80 °C did not affect to the capacity of detection of the virus in the tissues, and (ii) that the reproducibility of the diagnosis can be affected by factors including the staff experience and/or the materials employed. Finally, the use of a combination of procedures in advised to ensure the maximum reliability of the diagnosis when it is applied to asymptomatic fish populations. This paper describes a strategy of combining diagnostic tests for the surveillance and monitoring of wild fish populations to reduce underestimation of the prevalence of viruses this

  14. Lidar configurations for wind turbine control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei, Mahmood; Mann, Jakob

    2016-09-01

    Lidar sensors have proved to be very beneficial in the wind energy industry. They can be used for yaw correction, feed-forward pitch control and load verification. However, the current lidars are expensive. One way to reduce the price is to use lidars with few measurement points. Finding the best configuration of an inexpensive lidar in terms of number of measurement points, the measurement distance and the opening angle is the subject of this study. In order to solve the problem, a lidar model is developed and used to measure wind speed in a turbulence box. The effective wind speed measured by the lidar is compared against the effective wind speed on a wind turbine rotor both theoretically and through simulations. The study provides some results to choose the best configuration of the lidar with few measurement points.

  15. Multiplexer/Demultiplexer Loading Tool (MDMLT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Lenox Allen; Hale, Elizabeth; Martella, Robert; Gyorfi, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the MDMLT is to improve the reliability and speed of loading multiplexers/demultiplexers (MDMs) in the Software Development and Integration Laboratory (SDIL) by automating the configuration management (CM) of the loads in the MDMs, automating the loading procedure, and providing the capability to load multiple or all MDMs concurrently. This loading may be accomplished in parallel, or single MDMs (remote). The MDMLT is a Web-based tool that is capable of loading the entire International Space Station (ISS) MDM configuration in parallel. It is able to load Flight Equivalent Units (FEUs), enhanced, standard, and prototype MDMs as well as both EEPROM (Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory) and SSMMU (Solid State Mass Memory Unit) (MASS Memory). This software has extensive configuration management to track loading history, and the performance improvement means of loading the entire ISS MDM configuration of 49 MDMs in approximately 30 minutes, as opposed to 36 hours, which is what it took previously utilizing the flight method of S-Band uplink. The laptop version recently added to the MDMLT suite allows remote lab loading with the CM of information entered into a common database when it is reconnected to the network. This allows the program to reconfigure the test rigs quickly between shifts, allowing the lab to support a variety of onboard configurations during a single day, based on upcoming or current missions. The MDMLT Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI) supports a Web-based command and control interface to the user. An interface to the SDIL File Transfer Protocol (FTP) server is supported to import Integrated Flight Loads (IFLs) and Internal Product Release Notes (IPRNs) into the database. An interface to the Monitor and Control System (MCS) is supported to control the power state, and to enable or disable the debug port of the MDMs to be loaded. Two direct interfaces to the MDM are supported: a serial interface (debug port) to

  16. High-load resistance exercise with superimposed vibration and vascular occlusion increases critical power, capillaries and lean mass in endurance-trained men.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Sandro Manuel; Aguayo, David; Lunardi, Fabio; Ruoss, Severin; Boutellier, Urs; Frese, Sebastian; Petersen, Jens A; Jung, Hans H; Toigo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    It is a widely accepted premise in the scientific community and by athletes alike, that adding resistance exercise to a regular regimen of endurance training increases endurance performance in endurance-trained men. However, critical power (CP), capillarization, and myofiber size remain unaffected by this addition. Therefore, we tested whether the superimposition of resistance exercise with whole-body vibration and vascular occlusion (vibroX) would improve these variables in endurance-trained males relative to resistance exercise alone. Twenty-one young, endurance-trained males were randomly assigned either to a vibroX (n = 11) or resistance (n = 10) training group. Both groups trained in a progressive mode twice a week for 8 weeks. Pre and post training, histochemical muscle characteristics, thigh muscle size, endurance and strength parameters were determined. vibroX increased CP (P = 0.001), overall capillary-to-fiber ratio (P = 0.001) and thigh lean mass (P < 0.001), while these parameters were unaffected by resistance training. The gain in CP by vibroX was positively correlated with the gain in capillarization (R(2) = 0.605, P = 0.008), and the gain in thigh lean mass was paralleled by increases in MyHC-1 and MyHC-2 fiber cross-sectional areas and strength. Maximum voluntary torque and the finite work capacity above CP (W') increased significantly only following resistance training. We achieved a proof of concept by demonstrating that modification of resistance exercise by superimposing side-alternating whole-body vibration and sustained vascular occlusion induced further improvements in CP, capillarization and hypertrophy, all of which were not observed with resistance training alone.

  17. Effectiveness of tissue engineered chitosan-gelatin composite scaffold loaded with human platelet gel in regeneration of critical sized radial bone defect in rat.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Alidadi, Soodeh; Bigham-Sadegh, Amin; Moshiri, Ali; Kamali, Amir

    2017-05-28

    Although many strategies have been utilized to accelerate bone regeneration, an appropriate treatment strategy to regenerate a new bone with optimum morphology and mechanical properties has not been invented as yet. This study investigated the healing potential of a composite scaffold consisting of chitosan (CS), gelatin (Gel) and platelet gel (PG), named CS-Gel-PG, on a bilateral critical sized radial bone defect in rat. Eighty radial bone defects were bilaterally created in 40 Sprague-Dawley rats and were randomly divided into eight groups including untreated, autograft, CS, Gel, CS-PG, Gel-PG, CS-Gel, and CS-Gel-PG treated defects. The bone defects were evaluated clinically and radiologically during the study and their bone samples were assessed by gross and histopathology, histomorphometry, CT-scan, scanning electron microscopy, and biomechanical testing after 8weeks of bone injury. The autograft and CS-Gel-PG groups showed significantly higher new bone formation, density of osseous and cartilaginous tissues, bone volume, and mechanical performance than the defect, CS and Gel-PG groups (P˂0.05). In addition, bone volume, density of osseous and cartilaginous tissues, and numbers of osteons in the CS-Gel-PG group were significantly superior to the CS-PG, CS-Gel and Gel groups (P˂0.05). Increased mRNA levels of alkaline phosphatase, runt-related transcription factor 2, osteocalcin, collagen type 1 and CD31, vascular endothelial growth factor as osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation markers were found with the CS-Gel-PG scaffold by quantitative real-time PCR in vitro after 30days of culturing on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In conclusion, the healing potential of CS-Gel scaffold embedded with PG was comparable to autografting and therefore, it can be offered as an appropriate scaffold in bone tissue engineering and regenerative applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. CFD configurations for hydraulic turbine startup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolle, J.; Giroux, A. M.; Morissette, J. F.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents various numerical setups for modelling Francis turbine startups involving moving meshes and variable runner speed in order to help define best practices. During the accelerating phase of the startup, the flow is self-similar between channels, thus making single sector configuration appropriate. Adding the draft tube improves the results by allowing pressure recovery midway during in the startup. At the speed no-load regime, a rotating stall phenomenon occurs and can only be capted with the full runner included in the simulation. Comparison with experimental data, such as runner speed and strain gauge measurements, generally shows good agreement.

  19. Flexor tenorrhaphy tensile strength: reduction by cyclic loading: in vitro and ex vivo porcine study.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, C E R; Thompson, D; Sandow, M J

    2009-06-01

    The integrity of the repair is critical to maintain coaptation of the severed flexor tendon end until healing has advanced sufficiently. In our hospital, we use a modified Savage repair (four-strand Adelaide technique) using 3-0 Ethibond (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ, USA) for acute flexor tenorrhaphy and an active postrepair mobilization protocol. To explain the apparent differences between the theoretical and actual repair strength of a multistrand repair in a single tension test and the reduced strength of a repair subjected to cyclic loading, we compared single and cyclical tensile loading with different suture in vitro configurations of 3-0 Ethibond (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ, USA; one, two, and four strands) and an ex vivo four-strand repair of freshly divided porcine tendon to calculate the ultimate tensile strength (UTS). Mechanical testing was repeated 15 times with both single tensile and cyclical loading for each suture configuration and porcine repair. In the in vitro model, the presence of a knot in a single strand reduced the UTS by 50%. The stiffness of a knotted strand was substantially less than the unknotted strand but became identical after cyclical loading. There was no statistical significance of the UTS between single and cyclical loading with different numbers of strands in this model. In the ex vivo four-strand porcine repair model, there was a significant reduction in UTS with cyclical loading, which equated to the number of strands times the strength of the knotted strand. This discrepancy can be explained by the change in stiffness of the knotted strand after cyclical loading and has important implications for previous studies of suture tendon repair using single tensile loading where the UTS may have been overestimated. We believe that cyclical loading is more representative of physiological loading after acute flexor tendon repair and should be the testing model of choice in suture tenorrhaphy studies.

  20. Incremental full configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Paul M.

    2017-03-01

    The incremental expansion provides a polynomial scaling method for computing electronic correlation energies. This article details a new algorithm and implementation for the incremental expansion of full configuration interaction (FCI), called iFCI. By dividing the problem into n-body interaction terms, accurate correlation energies can be recovered at low n in a highly parallel computation. Additionally, relatively low-cost approximations are possible in iFCI by solving for each incremental energy to within a specified threshold. Herein, systematic tests show that FCI-quality energies can be asymptotically reached for cases where dynamic correlation is dominant as well as where static correlation is vital. To further reduce computational costs and allow iFCI to reach larger systems, a select-CI approach (heat-bath CI) requiring two parameters is incorporated. Finally, iFCI provides the first estimate of FCI energies for hexatriene with a polarized double zeta basis set, which has 32 electrons correlated in 118 orbitals, corresponding to a FCI dimension of over 1038.

  1. Total equipment parts configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrare, J.; Panzani, F.

    1989-01-01

    Florida Power Lights's (FP L's) Turkey Point units were built prior to the establishment of American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Sec. III requirements. Since that time, FP L has voluntarily committed to procuring some spare and replacement parts in compliance with the ordering requirements of ASME Sec. III. New subsystems were designed according to ASME Sec. III requirements. In 1978, 10CFR21 of the Code of Federal Regulations was federally mandated. Environmental qualification concerns and the Three Mile Island incident further complicated the stocking and ordering of spare and replacement parts. Turkey Point assembled a team of quality assurance, quality control, and engineering people and obtained permission to directly access the store department computer so that catalog descriptions could be quickly made available for use by the plant. The total equipment parts configuration (TEPC) system was designed and developed under the direction of the procurement document review team at the Turkey Point nuclear plant. The system is a network of related computer data bases that identifies the equipment at the plant. The equipment (or components that make up a piece of equipment) is identified by a tag/component code system. Each component is further broken down by the manufacturer's parts list or bill of material. A description of the data available to the user, the ways these data can be accessed and displayed, and a description of the data bases and their relation to each other are summarized in this paper.

  2. Load cell having strain gauges of arbitrary location

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry

    2007-03-13

    A load cell utilizes a plurality of strain gauges mounted upon the load cell body such that there are six independent load-strain relations. Load is determined by applying the inverse of a load-strain sensitivity matrix to a measured strain vector. The sensitivity matrix is determined by performing a multivariate regression technique on a set of known loads correlated to the resulting strains. Temperature compensation is achieved by configuring the strain gauges as co-located orthogonal pairs.

  3. A high voltage pulse generator based on silicon-controlled rectifier for field-reversed configuration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Munan; Liu, Ming; Zhu, Guanghui; Wang, Yanpeng; Shi, Peiyun; Sun, Xuan

    2017-08-01

    A high voltage pulse generator based on a silicon-controlled rectifier has been designed and implemented for a field reversed configuration experiment. A critical damping circuit is used in the generator to produce the desired pulse waveform. Depending on the load, the rise time of the output trigger signal can be less than 1 μs, and the peak amplitudes of trigger voltage and current are up to 8 kV and 85 A in a single output. The output voltage can be easily adjusted by changing the voltage on a capacitor of the generator. In addition, the generator integrates an electrically floating heater circuit so it is capable of triggering either pseudosparks (TDI-type hydrogen thyratron) or ignitrons. Details of the circuits and their implementation are described in the paper. The trigger generator has successfully controlled the discharging sequence of the pulsed power supply for a field reversed configuration experiment.

  4. A high voltage pulse generator based on silicon-controlled rectifier for field-reversed configuration experiment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Munan; Liu, Ming; Zhu, Guanghui; Wang, Yanpeng; Shi, Peiyun; Sun, Xuan

    2017-08-01

    A high voltage pulse generator based on a silicon-controlled rectifier has been designed and implemented for a field reversed configuration experiment. A critical damping circuit is used in the generator to produce the desired pulse waveform. Depending on the load, the rise time of the output trigger signal can be less than 1 μs, and the peak amplitudes of trigger voltage and current are up to 8 kV and 85 A in a single output. The output voltage can be easily adjusted by changing the voltage on a capacitor of the generator. In addition, the generator integrates an electrically floating heater circuit so it is capable of triggering either pseudosparks (TDI-type hydrogen thyratron) or ignitrons. Details of the circuits and their implementation are described in the paper. The trigger generator has successfully controlled the discharging sequence of the pulsed power supply for a field reversed configuration experiment.

  5. Criticality safety analysis on fissile materials in Fukushima reactor cores

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xudong; Lemaitre-Xavier, E.; Ahn, Joonhong; Hirano, Fumio

    2013-07-01

    The present study focuses on the criticality analysis for geological disposal of damaged fuels from Fukushima reactor cores. Starting from the basic understanding of behaviors of plutonium and uranium, a scenario sequence for criticality event is considered. Due to the different mobility of plutonium and uranium in geological formations, the criticality safety is considered in two parts: (1) near-field plutonium system and (2) far-field low enriched uranium (LEU) system. For the near-field plutonium system, a mathematical analysis for pure-solute transport was given, assuming a particular buffer material and waste form configuration. With the transport and decay of plutonium accounted, the critical mass of plutonium was compared with the initial load of a single canister. Our calculation leads us to the conclusion that our system with the initial loading being the average mass of plutonium in an assembly just before the accident is very unlikely to become critical over time. For the far-field LEU system, due to the uncertainties in the geological and geochemical conditions, calculations were made in a parametric space that covers the variation of material compositions and different geometries. Results show that the LEU system could not remain sub-critical within the entire parameter space assumed, although in the iron-rich rock, the neutron multiplicity is significantly reduced.

  6. Ground state configurations in two-mode quantum Rabi models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingaryan, Suren; Rodríguez-Lara, B. M.

    We study two models describing a single two-level system coupled to two boson field modes in either a parallel or orthogonal configuration. Both models may be feasible for experimental realization through Raman adiabatic driving in cavity QED. We study their ground state configurations; that is, we find the quantum precursors of the corresponding semi-classical phase transitions. We found that the ground state configurations of both models present the same critical coupling as the quantum Rabi model. Around this critical coupling, the ground state goes from the so-called normal configuration with no excitation, the qubit in the ground state and the fields in the quantum vacuum state, to a ground state with excitations, the qubit in a superposition of ground and excited state, while the fields are not in the vacuum anymore, for the first model. The second model shows a more complex ground state configuration landscape where we find the normal configuration mentioned above, two single-mode configurations, where just one of the fields and the qubit are excited, and a dual-mode configuration, where both fields and the qubit are excited. S A Chilingaryan acknowledges financial support from CONACYT.

  7. Hubble Space Telescope Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This illustration shows the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) major configuration elements. The spacecraft has three interacting systems: The Support System Module (SSM), an outer structure that houses the other systems and provides services such as power, communication, and control; The Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), which collects and concentrates the incoming light in the focal plane for use by the Scientific Instruments (SI); and five SIs. The SI Control and Data Handling (CDH) unit controls the five SI's, four that are housed in an aft section focal plane structure and one that is placed along the circumference of the spacecraft. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST detects objects 25 times fainter than the dimmest objects seen from Earth and provides astronomers with an observable universe 250 times larger than visible from ground-based telescopes, perhaps as far away as 14 billion light-years. The HST views galaxies, stars, planets, comets, possibly other solar systems, and even unusual phenomena such as quasars, with 10 times the clarity of ground-based telescopes. The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Cornecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors. The Lockheed Missile and Space Company of Sunnyvale, California produced the protective outer shroud and spacecraft systems, and assembled and tested the finished telescope.

  8. Recursion Formulas of Central Configurations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Fangcheng

    1993-01-01

    This paper analyzes central configurations which are special configurations leading to homothetic solutions of the n-body problem. For the planar central configurations, these solutions also provide periodic solutions of the n-body problem. Chapter 1 defines the problem and provides an overview of the area. There is historical interest in knowing the total number of these central configurations. For n >= 4 the problem remains unsolved. Furthermore, a different mass ratio between the n bodies will produce a different total number of central configurations. This paper will provide the total number of central configurations which has a special mass ratio. For the planar central configurations the total number of central configurations grows at the speed n!2n, and the three dimensional case is n!3^{n }. Chapters 2, 3 and 5 give details and proofs of the analytical continuation method. This method begins with three bodies, then creates the central configurations with four bodies with one small mass, using the implicit function theorem. If the process is repeated, the total number of central configurations for any n-body problem may be calculated, provided (n-3) masses are sufficiently small. In Chapters 4 and 7, the formulas are derived for the total number of central configurations of the n-body problem with special mass ratio (m _1,m_2,m_3,epsilon_1, ...,epsilonn) in both planar and three-dimensional cases. Examples of formulas provided are: n!(2^{n+1} + 1) , n!((n^2 - n + 4)2^{n+1 } - n - 7), and (n!/6) ((n ^3 + 11n - 12)2^{n+2} + 6n + 54). Chapter 6 solves a very special degenerate case during the continuation process. The Morse Index of these central configurations is discussed in Chapter 8.

  9. System Measures Loads In Bolts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.

    1994-01-01

    Improved technique for ultrasonic nondestructive measurement of loads in bolts involves use of pulsed phase-locked loop interferometer. Provides for correction of errors and for automatic readout of loads in bolts. Actual bolt load measured, using transducers rebonded after bolts tightened. Calibration block and thermometer added. Technique applicable to critical fasteners in aerospace applications, nuclear reactors, petroleum and other chemical processing plants, steel bridges, and other structures.

  10. 14 CFR 23.726 - Ground load dynamic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Landing Gear § 23.726 Ground load dynamic tests. (a) If compliance with the ground load requirements of...); or (2) Sufficient to develop 1.5 times the limit load factor. (b) The critical landing condition...

  11. 14 CFR 23.726 - Ground load dynamic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Landing Gear § 23.726 Ground load dynamic tests. (a) If compliance with the ground load requirements of...); or (2) Sufficient to develop 1.5 times the limit load factor. (b) The critical landing condition...

  12. Configurational subdiffusion of peptides: A network study

    SciTech Connect

    Neusius, Thomas; Diadone, Isabella; Sokolov, Igor; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of linear peptides reveals configurational subdiffusion at equilibrium extending from 10-12 to 10-8 s. Rouse chain and continuous-time random walk models of the subdiffusion are critically discussed. Network approaches to analyzing MD simulations are shown to reproduce the time dependence of the subdiffusive mean squared displacement, which is found to arise from the fractal-like geometry of the accessible volume in the configuration space. Convergence properties of the simulation pertaining to the subdiffusive dynamics are characterized and the effect on the subdiffusive properties of representing the solvent explicitly or implicitly is compared. Non-Markovianity and other factors limiting the range of applicability of the network models are examined.

  13. Air Traffic Sector Configuration Change Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterji, Gano B.; Drew, Michael

    2010-01-01

    A Mixed Integer Linear Programming method is used for creating sectors in Fort Worth, Cleveland, and Los Angeles centers based on several days of good-weather traffic data. The performance of these sectors is studied when they are subjected to traffic data from different days. Additionally, the advantage of using different sector designs at different times of day with varying traffic loads is examined. Specifically, traffic data from 10 days are used for design, and 47 other days are played back to test if the traffic-counts stay below the design values used in creating the partitions. The primary findings of this study are as follows. Sectors created with traffic from good-weather days can be used on other good-weather days. Sector configurations created with two hours of traffic can be used for 6 to 12 hours without exceeding the peak-count requirement. Compared to using a single configuration for the entire day, most of the sector-hour reduction is achieved by using two sector configurations -one during daytime hours and one during nighttime hours.

  14. Finite Element Development of Honeycomb Panel Configurations with Improved Transmission Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Klos, Jacob; Castle, William D.

    2006-01-01

    The higher stiffness-to-mass ratio of a honeycomb panel compared to a homogeneous panel results in a lower acoustic critical frequency. Above the critical frequency the panel flexural wave speed is acoustically fast and the structure becomes a more efficient radiator with associated lower sound transmission loss. Finite element models of honeycomb sandwich structures are presented featuring areas where the core is removed from the radiating face sheet disrupting the supersonic flexural and shear wave speeds that exist in the baseline honeycomb panel. These modified honeycomb panel structures exhibit improved transmission loss for a pre-defined diffuse field sound excitation. The models were validated by the sound transmission loss of honeycomb panels measured in the Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. A honeycomb core panel configuration is presented exhibiting a transmission loss improvement of 3-11 dB compared to a honeycomb baseline panel over a frequency range from 170 Hz to 1000 Hz. The improved transmission loss panel configuration had a 5.1% increase in mass over the baseline honeycomb panel, and approximately twice the deflection when excited by a static force.

  15. Cost benefit analysis on different configurations of berthing structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, G.; Saravanan, R.; Ravichandran, Vijaya; Parameswara Pandian, S.; Ramani Sujatha, Evangelin

    2017-07-01

    Port and harbors are essential for handling of the imports/exports of good transported through shipping. This paper discusses the different configuration of berthing structure, their design with respect to the site conditions and suitability. The analysis includes detailed load calculations conforming to the various codal provisions and design of the structure. The configuration of berthing structure considered are analyzed and designed using STAAD Pro for different combination of loads as per IS 4651. Bill of Quantities are prepared and final cost of construction is calculated. Factors affecting the construction and maintenance such as land availability, soil conditions, hydrodynamics of the site, dredging requirements, design ship size etc. are considered to finalize the configuration of the berthing structure. Result of the study shows that Diaphragm wall type of berthing structure is economic for Ennore port.

  16. 14 CFR 23.301 - Loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loads. 23.301 Section 23.301 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... to determine load intensities and distribution on canard and tandem wing configurations must...

  17. 14 CFR 23.301 - Loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to determine load intensities and distribution on canard and tandem wing configurations must be... must be taken into account. (d) Simplified structural design criteria may be used if they result in design loads not less than those prescribed in §§ 23.331 through 23.521. For airplane...

  18. 14 CFR 23.301 - Loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to determine load intensities and distribution on canard and tandem wing configurations must be... must be taken into account. (d) Simplified structural design criteria may be used if they result in design loads not less than those prescribed in §§ 23.331 through 23.521. For airplane...

  19. 14 CFR 23.301 - Loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to determine load intensities and distribution on canard and tandem wing configurations must be... must be taken into account. (d) Simplified structural design criteria may be used if they result in design loads not less than those prescribed in §§ 23.331 through 23.521. For airplane...

  20. 14 CFR 23.301 - Loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to determine load intensities and distribution on canard and tandem wing configurations must be... must be taken into account. (d) Simplified structural design criteria may be used if they result in design loads not less than those prescribed in §§ 23.331 through 23.521. For airplane...

  1. Computational topology for configuration spaces of hard disks.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Gunnar; Gorham, Jackson; Kahle, Matthew; Mason, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    We explore the topology of configuration spaces of hard disks experimentally and show that several changes in the topology can already be observed with a small number of particles. The results illustrate a theorem of Baryshnikov, Bubenik, and Kahle that critical points correspond to configurations of disks with balanced mechanical stresses and suggest conjectures about the asymptotic topology as the number of disks tends to infinity.

  2. Equilibrium Configuration of {Phi}{sup 4} Oscillatons

    SciTech Connect

    Valdez-Alvarado, Susana; Urena-Lopez, L. Arturo; Becerril, Ricardo

    2010-07-12

    We search for equilibrium configurations of the (coupled) Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations for the case of a real scalar field endowed with a quartic self-interaction potential. The resulting solutions are the generalizations of the (massive) oscillating soliton stars, the so-called oscillatons. Among other parameters, we estimate the mass curve of the configurations, and determine their critical mass for different values of the quartic interaction.

  3. Central configurations for -body problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Furong; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We show the existence of planar central configurations for -body problems with Newtonian potentials; in such configurations, -bodies are located at the vertices of regular -gons with a common center, where regular -gons are homothetic, and regular -gons are homothetic rotated by compared to the first set of -gons, and all masses on the same -gon are equal.

  4. Configurational entropy of glueball states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Alex E.; Braga, Nelson R. F.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2017-02-01

    The configurational entropy of glueball states is calculated using a holographic description. Glueball states are represented by a supergravity dual picture, consisting of a 5-dimensional graviton-dilaton action of a dynamical holographic AdS/QCD model. The configurational entropy is studied as a function of the glueball spin and of the mass, providing information about the stability of the glueball states.

  5. Configuration of Appalachian logging roads

    Treesearch

    John E. Baumgras; John E. Baumgras

    1971-01-01

    The configuration - the curvature and grade - of logging roads in southern Appalachia is seldom severe, according to a recent Forest Service study. To improve the efficiency of logging roads, we must first define the characteristics of these roads; and in this report we provide a quantitative description of the configuration of over 200 miles of logging roads.

  6. Multi-Body Analysis of a Tiltrotor Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghiringhelli, G. L.; Masarati, P.; Mantegazza, P.; Nixon, M. W.

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes the aeroelastic analysis of a tiltrotor configuration. The 1/5 scale wind tunnel semispan model of the V-22 tiltrotor aircraft is considered. The analysis is performed by means of a multi-body code, based on an original formulation. The differential equilibrium problem is stated in terms of first order differential equations. The equilibrium equations of every rigid body are written, together with the definitions of the momenta. The bodies are connected by kinematic constraints, applied in form of Lagrangian multipliers. Deformable components are mainly modelled by means of beam elements, based on an original finite volume formulation. Multi-disciplinar problems can be solved by adding user-defined differential equations. In the presented analysis the equations related to the control of the swash-plate of the model are considered. Advantages of a multi-body aeroelastic code over existing comprehensive rotorcraft codes include the exact modelling of the kinematics of the hub, the detailed modelling of the flexibility of critical hub components, and the possibility to simulate steady flight conditions as well as wind-up and maneuvers. The simulations described in the paper include: 1) the analysis of the aeroelastic stability, with particular regard to the proprotor/pylon instability that is peculiar to tiltrotors, 2) the determination of the dynamic behavior of the system and of the loads due to typical maneuvers, with particular regard to the conversion from helicopter to airplane mode, and 3) the stress evaluation in critical components, such as the pitch links and the conversion downstop spring.

  7. Radiant-interchange Configuration Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D C :; Morgan, W R

    1952-01-01

    A study is presented of the geometric configuration factors required for computing radiant heat transfer between opaque surfaces separated by a nonabsorbing medium and various methods of determining the configuration factors are discussed. Configuration-factor solutions available in the literature have been checked and the more complicated equations are presented as families of curves. Cases for point, line, and finite-area sources are worked out over a wide range of geometric proportions. These cases include several new configurations involving rectangles, triangles, and cylinders of finite length which are integrated and tabulated. An analysis is presented, in which configuration factors are employed of the radiant heat transfer to the rotor blades of a typical gas turbine under different conditions of temperature and pressure. (author)

  8. Structural performance of orthogonal tetrahedral truss Space-Station configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Two 150 kW space station configurations constructed with the orthogonal tetrahedral truss concept are described. One space station consists of a large central platform and two rotating solar wing arrays and the other consists of a long central keel with two rotating arrays. The dynamic characteristics of each configuration are obtained with and without nonstructural components present. The variation in frequencies and mass moments of inertia due to rotation of the two solar wing arrays are given for the long keel space station configuration. The structural performance of the solar wing array is assessed for cases where individual critical struts fail in the array support truss.

  9. Temporal and spatial variation of trace elements in atmospheric deposition around the industrial area of Puchuncaví-Ventanas (Chile) and its influence on exceedances of lead and cadmium critical loads in soils.

    PubMed

    Rueda-Holgado, F; Calvo-Blázquez, L; Cereceda-Balic, F; Pinilla-Gil, E

    2016-02-01

    Fractionation of elemental contents in atmospheric samples is useful to evaluate pollution levels for risk assessment and pollution sources assignment. We present here the main results of long-term characterization of atmospheric deposition by using a recently developed atmospheric elemental fractionation sampler (AEFS) for major and trace elements monitoring around an important industrial complex located in Puchuncaví region (Chile). Atmospheric deposition samples were collected during two sampling campaigns (2010 and 2011) at four sampling locations: La Greda (LG), Los Maitenes (LM), Puchuncaví (PU) and Valle Alegre (VA). Sample digestion and ICP-MS gave elements deposition values (Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mn, Pb, Sb, Ti, V and Zn) in the insoluble fraction of the total atmospheric deposition. Results showed that LG location, the closest location to the industrial complex, was the more polluted sampling site having the highest values for the analyzed elements. PU and LM were the next more polluted and, finally, the lowest elements concentrations were registered at VA. The application of Principal Component Analysis and Cluster Analysis identified industrial, traffic and mineral-crustal factors. We found critical loads exceedances for Pb at all sampling locations in the area affected by the industrial emissions, more significant in LG close to the industrial complex, with a trend to decrease in 2011, whereas no exceedances due to atmospheric deposition were detected for Cd. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ratcheting caused by moving loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübel, Hartwig; Vollrath, Bastian

    2017-06-01

    Progressive deformation (ratcheting) can occur as a response to variable loads as soon as the elastic limit is exceeded. If this is the case, strains and displacements accumulate in the event of cyclic loading in each load cycle. Widely known as triggers for ratcheting and already being considered in some design codes are configurations, in which a structure is subjected to at least two different types of load, namely a constant load (the primary load) and a superimposed cyclic load. In this paper, another mechanism that generates ratcheting is introduced. It can be attributed solely to the effect of a single load. In the simplest case, this can be explained by the successive activation of (an infinite number of) plastic hinges if a load of constant magnitude is moved in space. The increments of strains and displacements can decrease or increase from cycle to cycle, when the material is hardening, or if elastic foundation is present, or if the equilibrium condition is formulated for the deformed system (second-order theory) or if "large" rotations are taken into account (third-order theory).

  11. Analysis on shock attenuation in gap test configuration for characterizing energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bohoon; Park, Jungsu; Yoh, Jack J.

    2016-04-01

    A pyrotechnic system consisting of donor/acceptor pair separated by a gap relies on shock attenuation characteristics of the gap material and shock sensitivity of the donor and the acceptor charges. Despite of its common use, a numerical study of such a pyrotechnic train configuration is seldom reported because proper modeling of the full process requires precise capturing of the shock wave attenuation in the gap prior to triggering a full detonation of a high explosive and accurate description of the high strain rate dynamics of the explosively loaded inert confinements. We apply a hybrid particle level-set based multimaterial hydrocode with reactive flow models for pentolite donor and heavily aluminized cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine as the acceptor charge. The complex shock interaction, a critical gap thickness, an acoustic impedance, and go/no-go characteristics of the pyrotechnic system are quantitatively investigated.

  12. Analysis on shock attenuation in gap test configuration for characterizing energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Bohoon; Yoh, Jack J.; Park, Jungsu

    2016-04-14

    A pyrotechnic system consisting of donor/acceptor pair separated by a gap relies on shock attenuation characteristics of the gap material and shock sensitivity of the donor and the acceptor charges. Despite of its common use, a numerical study of such a pyrotechnic train configuration is seldom reported because proper modeling of the full process requires precise capturing of the shock wave attenuation in the gap prior to triggering a full detonation of a high explosive and accurate description of the high strain rate dynamics of the explosively loaded inert confinements. We apply a hybrid particle level-set based multimaterial hydrocode with reactive flow models for pentolite donor and heavily aluminized cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine as the acceptor charge. The complex shock interaction, a critical gap thickness, an acoustic impedance, and go/no-go characteristics of the pyrotechnic system are quantitatively investigated.

  13. Rosette Central Configurations, Degenerate Central Configurations and Bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, J.; Santoprete, M.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper we find a class of new degenerate central configurations and bifurcations in the Newtonian n-body problem. In particular we analyze the Rosette central configurations, namely a coplanar configuration where n particles of mass m 1 lie at the vertices of a regular n-gon, n particles of mass m 2 lie at the vertices of another n-gon concentric with the first, but rotated of an angle π / n, and an additional particle of mass m 0 lies at the center of mass of the system. This system admits two mass parameters μ = m 0/ m 1 and ɛ = m 2/ m 1. We show that, as μ varies, if n > 3, there is a degenerate central configuration and a bifurcation for every ɛ > 0, while if n = 3 there is a bifurcation only for some values of ɛ.

  14. Viscous Design of TCA Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, Steven E.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Campbell, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    The goal in this effort is to redesign the baseline TCA configuration for improved performance at both supersonic and transonic cruise. Viscous analyses are conducted with OVERFLOW, a Navier-Stokes code for overset grids, using PEGSUS to compute the interpolations between overset grids. Viscous designs are conducted with OVERDISC, a script which couples OVERFLOW with the Constrained Direct Iterative Surface Curvature (CDISC) inverse design method. The successful execution of any computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based aerodynamic design method for complex configurations requires an efficient method for regenerating the computational grids to account for modifications to the configuration shape. The first section of this presentation deals with the automated regridding procedure used to generate overset grids for the fuselage/wing/diverter/nacelle configurations analysed in this effort. The second section outlines the procedures utilized to conduct OVERDISC inverse designs. The third section briefly covers the work conducted by Dick Campbell, in which a dual-point design at Mach 2.4 and 0.9 was attempted using OVERDISC; the initial configuration from which this design effort was started is an early version of the optimized shape for the TCA configuration developed by the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group (BCAG), which eventually evolved into the NCV design. The final section presents results from application of the Natural Flow Wing design philosophy to the TCA configuration.

  15. Achieving Integrated FEA Model and Loads Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauzon, Dominick; Huf, Brian; Hagstrom, Dustin

    2012-07-01

    Recent developments in enterprise level simulation tools now enable CAE engineers and managers to keep up with today’s accelerating rate in the number and complexity of simulation models. All simulation related activities including Finite Element Models (FEM) variants and their respective results datasets can now be captured and managed. This provides valuable model pedigree from the source geometry referenced in the PDM system, spacecraft design and FEM configurations, external loads, simulation results and internal loads down to key results with the final critical design review and test correlation reports. The process presented in this paper demonstrates how simulation data capture and relationships can be achieved. Moreover, process management from conceptual design to spacecraft final proto-flight tests can now be achieved systematically and efficiently while performing and ensuring model quality, all the way from assembly level down to component level. MSC Software’s SimXpert and SimManager, two commercial off-the-shelf software codes, are used to highlight the benefits of this approach. In addition, an automation process that performs model validation per aerospace engineering best practice standards is also presented.

  16. Physics and Engineering Assessmetns of the K-DEMO Magnet Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, George H.; Brown, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Increased attention is being given now to studies of next-step fusion facilities with nuclear missions. Among these, South Korea's K DEMO is unique in its focus on a high toroidal magnetic field, large major radius, steady-state tokamak design for the core of a facility to test fusion nuclear components in Phase I and, after upgrades, produce 500 MW of electricity in a Phase II. Innovative features of the K DEMO magnet set include the use of two toroidal field (TF) coil winding packs with conductor grading and a machine configuration designed for vertical maintenance. The magnet arrangement features large TF coils and widely spaced poloidal field (PF) coils to accommodate removal of in-vessel components as large modules. Physics and engineering assessments of the pre-conceptual K-DEMO magnet configuration are reported, including: 1) design point and operating space assessment, 2) conductor assessment, and 3) structural assessment. It is found that a reference design point at 6.8 m major radius and 7.4 T toroidal field provides sufficient operating margins for the 500 MWe Phase II mission. Analyses of candidate cable-in-conduit conductors provide predictions of critical current degradation, both in the initial load cycle and an additionally with cyclic loading. A first-pass global analysis of the magnet system found minimal out-of-plane deformations of the TF coil, but an overstress condition in the inner leg of the TF coil. However an analysis taking into account elastic-plastic behavior, frictional sliding, and displacement shows that the structure can safely carry the load. Although the design evolution is still at an early stage, these assessments support the design point choices to date and the expectation that a feasible solution for the high-field K DEMO magnet system can be found.

  17. Biomechanical study of different plate configurations for distal humerus osteosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bogataj, M; Kosel, F; Norris, R; Krkovic, M; Brojan, M

    2015-05-01

    Fractures of the distal humerus are most commonly fixed by open reduction and internal fixation, using plates and screws, either in a locking or in a non-locking construct. Three different plating systems are commonly used in practice. The most important differences between them are in plate orientation, which affects both the rigidity of the osteosynthesis and invasiveness of the surgical procedure. Unfortunately, there is no common agreement between surgeons about which plate configuration brings the best clinical outcome. In this study, we investigate the theoretical rigidity of plate osteosyntheses considering two types of AO/ASIF configurations (90° angle between plates), Mayo clinic (Acumed) configuration (180° between plates) and dorsal fixation of both plates. We also compared the results for cases with and without contact between the bone fragments. In the case of no bone contact, the Mayo clinic plate configuration is found to be the most rigid, followed by both AO/ASIF plate configurations, and the least rigid system is the Korosec plate configuration. On the other hand, no significant differences between all types of fixation configurations are found in cases with contact in-between the bone fragments. Our findings show that this contact is very important and can compensate for the lack of load carrying capacity of the implants. This could therefore incite other implant fixation solutions, leading to less invasive surgical procedures and consequently improved clinical outcome.

  18. Biomechanical evaluation of various suture configurations in side-to-side tenorrhaphy.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Emilio; Ortiz, Cristian; Wagner, Pablo; Guzman, Rodrigo; Ahumada, Ximena; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-02-05

    Side-to-side tenorrhaphy is increasingly used, but its mechanical performance has not been studied. Two porcine flexor digitorum tendon segments of equal length (8 cm) and thickness (1 cm) were placed side by side. Eight tenorrhaphies (involving sixteen tendons) were performed with each of four suture techniques (running locked, simple eight, vertical mattress, and pulley suture). The resulting constructs underwent cyclic loading on a tensile testing machine, followed by monotonically increasing tensile load if failure during cyclic loading did not occur. Clamps secured the tendons on each side of the repair, and specimens were mounted vertically. Cyclic loading varied between 15 N and 35 N, with a distension rate of 1 mm/sec. Cyclic loading strength was determined by applying a force of 70 N. The cause of failure and tendon distension during loading were recorded. All failures occurred in the monotonic loading phase and resulted from tendon stripping. No suture or knot failure was observed. The mean loads resisted by the configurations ranged from 138 to 398 N. The mean load to failure, maximum load resisted prior to 1 cm of distension, and load resisted at 1 cm of distension were significantly lower for the vertical mattress suture group than for any of the other three groups (p < 0.031). All four groups sustained loads well above the physiologic loads expected to occur in tendons in the foot and ankle (e.g., in tendon transfer for tibialis posterior tendon insufficiency). None of the four side-to-side configurations distended appreciably during the cyclic loading phase. The vertical mattress suture configuration appeared to be weaker than the other configurations. For surgeons who advocate immediate loading or motion of a side-to-side tendon repair, a pulley, running locked, or simple eight suture technique appears to provide a larger safety margin compared with a vertical mattress suture technique.

  19. Effects of partial interlaminar bonding on impact resistance and loaded-hole behavior of graphite/epoxy quasi-isotropic laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illg, W.

    1986-01-01

    A partial-bonding interlaminar toughening concept was evaluated for resistance to impact and for behavior of a loaded hole. Perforated Mylar sheets were interleaved between all 24 plies of a graphite/epoxy quasi-isotropic lay-up. Specimens were impacted by aluminum spheres while under tensile or compressive loads. Impact-failure thresholds and residual strengths were obtained. Loaded-hole specimens were tested in three configurations that were critical in bearing, shear, or tension. Partial bonding reduced the tensile and compressive strengths of undamaged specimens by about one-third. For impact, partial bonding did not change the threshold for impact failure under tensile preload. However, under compressive preload, partial bonding caused serious degradation of impact resistance. Partial bonding reduced the maximum load-carrying capacity of all three types of loaded-hole specimens. Overall, partial bonding degraded both impact resistance and bearing strength of holes.

  20. Green's functions and topological configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, A.

    There are, among others, currently two important views on the non-perturbative structure of Yang- Mills theory. One is through topological configurations and one is through Green’s functions, in particular their (asymptotic) infrared behavior. Based on both views, various scenarios for confinement, chiral symmetry breaking and other non-perturbative effects have been developed. However, if both views are correct then they can only be different aspects of the same underlying physics, and it must be possible to relate them. After discussing the current status of the understanding of this connection, smeared and cooled configurations in lattice gauge theory are used to determine the properties of Green’s functions in the low-momentum regime. It is found that the qualitative properties are essentially unchanged compared to results on unsmeared configurations. This is also the case when the configurations are smeared sufficiently strongly to reach the almost (anti-)self-dual domain.

  1. Validation of Yoon's Critical Thinking Disposition Instrument.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyunsook; Park, Chang Gi; Kim, Hyojin

    2015-12-01

    The lack of reliable and valid evaluation tools targeting Korean nursing students' critical thinking (CT) abilities has been reported as one of the barriers to instructing and evaluating students in undergraduate programs. Yoon's Critical Thinking Disposition (YCTD) instrument was developed for Korean nursing students, but few studies have assessed its validity. This study aimed to validate the YCTD. Specifically, the YCTD was assessed to identify its cross-sectional and longitudinal measurement invariance. This was a validation study in which a cross-sectional and longitudinal (prenursing and postnursing practicum) survey was used to validate the YCTD using 345 nursing students at three universities in Seoul, Korea. The participants' CT abilities were assessed using the YCTD before and after completing an established pediatric nursing practicum. The validity of the YCTD was estimated and then group invariance test using multigroup confirmatory factor analysis was performed to confirm the measurement compatibility of multigroups. A test of the seven-factor model showed that the YCTD demonstrated good construct validity. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis findings for the measurement invariance suggested that this model structure demonstrated strong invariance between groups (i.e., configural, factor loading, and intercept combined) but weak invariance within a group (i.e., configural and factor loading combined). In general, traditional methods for assessing instrument validity have been less than thorough. In this study, multigroup confirmatory factor analysis using cross-sectional and longitudinal measurement data allowed validation of the YCTD. This study concluded that the YCTD can be used for evaluating Korean nursing students' CT abilities. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Structural Concepts Study of Non-circular Fuselage Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivel

    1996-01-01

    A preliminary study of structural concepts for noncircular fuselage configurations is presented. For an unconventional flying-wing type aircraft, in which the fuselage is inside the wing, multiple fuselage bays with non-circular sections need to be considered. In a conventional circular fuselage section, internal pressure is carried efficiently by a thin skin via hoop tension. If the section is non-circular, internal pressure loads also induce large bending stresses. The structure must also withstand additional bending and compression loads from aerodynamic and gravitational forces. Flat and vaulted shell structural configurations for such an unconventional, non-circular pressurized fuselage of a large flying-wing were studied. A deep honeycomb sandwich-shell and a ribbed double-wall shell construction were considered. Combinations of these structural concepts were analyzed using both analytical and simple finite element models of isolated sections for a comparative conceptual study. Weight, stress, and deflection results were compared to identify a suitable configuration for detailed analyses. The flat sandwich-shell concept was found preferable to the vaulted shell concept due to its superior buckling stiffness. Vaulted double-skin ribbed shell configurations were found to be superior due to their weight savings, load diffusion, and fail-safe features. The vaulted double-skin ribbed shell structure concept was also analyzed for an integrated wing-fuselage finite element model. Additional problem areas such as wing-fuselage junction and pressure-bearing spar were identified.

  3. Context based configuration management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawdiak, Yuri O. (Inventor); Gurram, Mohana M. (Inventor); Maluf, David A. (Inventor); Mederos, Luis A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A computer-based system for configuring and displaying information on changes in, and present status of, a collection of events associated with a project. Classes of icons for decision events, configurations and feedback mechanisms, and time lines (sequential and/or simultaneous) for related events are displayed. Metadata for each icon in each class is displayed by choosing and activating the corresponding icon. Access control (viewing, reading, writing, editing, deleting, etc.) is optionally imposed for metadata and other displayed information.

  4. Space Station reference configuration description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The data generated by the Space Station Program Skunk Works over a period of 4 months which supports the definition of a Space Station reference configuration is documented. The data were generated to meet these objectives: (1) provide a focal point for the definition and assessment of program requirements; (2) establish a basis for estimating program cost; and (3) define a reference configuration in sufficient detail to allow its inclusion in the definition phase Request for Proposal (RFP).

  5. Optimized Minimal Inductance Transmission Line Configuration for Z-Pinch Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O

    2003-10-16

    Successful dynamic Z-pinch experiments generally require good current delivery to the target load. Power flow losses through highly inductive transmission line configurations reduce the current available to the load. In this Brief Report, a variational calculus technique is used to determine the transmission line configuration that produces the least possible inductance and therefore the best possible current delivery for Z-pinch experiments.

  6. Effects of transit bus interior configuration on performance of wheeled mobility users during simulated boarding and disembarking.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Clive; Paquet, Victor; Lenker, James A; Steinfeld, Edward

    2017-07-01

    The emergence of low-floor bus designs and related regulatory standards in the U.S. have resulted in substantial improvements in public transit accessibility. However, passengers using wheeled mobility devices still experience safety concerns and inefficiencies in boarding, disembarking, and interior circulation on low-floor buses. This study investigates effects of low-floor bus interior configuration and passenger crowding on boarding and disembarking efficiency and safety. Users of manual wheelchairs (n = 18), powered wheelchairs (n = 21) and electric scooters (n = 9) simulated boarding and disembarking in three interior layout configurations at low and high passenger crowding conditions on a full-scale laboratory mock-up of a low-floor bus. Dependent measures comprised task times and critical incidents during access ramp use, fare payment, and movement to and from the doorway and wheeled mobility securement area. Individual times for unassisted boarding ranged from 15.2 to 245.3 s and for disembarking ranged from 9.1 to 164.6 s across layout and passenger crowding conditions. Nonparametric analysis of variance showed significant differences and interactions across vehicle design conditions, passenger load and mobility device type on user performance. The configuration having electronic on-board fare payment, rear-bus entrance doorways and adjacent device securement areas demonstrated greatest efficiency and safety. High passenger load adversely impacted efficiency and frequency of critical incidents during on-board circulation across all three layouts. Findings have broader implications for improving transit system efficiency and quality of service across the spectrum of transit users. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Critical behavior of gravitating sphalerons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millward, R. Steven; Hirschmann, Eric W.

    2003-07-01

    We examine the gravitational collapse of sphaleron type configurations in the Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs theory. Working in spherical symmetry, we investigate the critical behavior in this model. We provide evidence that for various initial configurations, there can be three different critical transitions between possible end states with different critical solutions sitting on the threshold between these outcomes. In addition, we show that within the dispersive and black hole regimes there are new possible end states: namely, a stable, regular sphaleron and a stable, hairy black hole.

  8. Drag of the complete configuration aerodynamic considerations, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1975-01-01

    A number of drag items are related to the performance of a complete aircraft configuration. First, the effect of fuselage camber, wing and nacelle incidence are discussed from a viewpoint of design decision making. Second, the effect of overall cruise drag on the design gross and empty weight of the airplane is discussed. Examples show that cruise drag can have a very important influence on total airplane weight. Third, the effects of usable cruise lift-to-drag ratio and wing loading are shown to be important. Finally several research needs relating to design of the complete configuration are reviewed.

  9. The ASTRO-1 preliminary design review coupled load analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghee, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    Results of the ASTRO-1 preliminary design review coupled loads analysis are presented. The M6.0Y Generic Shuttle mathematical models were used. Internal accelerations, interface forces, relative displacements, and net e.g., accelerations were recovered for two ASTRO-1 payloads in a tandem configuration. Twenty-seven load cases were computed and summarized. Load exceedences were found and recommendations made.

  10. Ultrasonic measurement and monitoring of loads in bolts used in structural joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2015-04-01

    The paper is an overview of work by the author in measuring and monitoring loads in bolts using an ultrasonic extensometer. A number of cases of bolted joints are covered. These include, a clamped joint with clearance fit between the bolt and hole, a clamped joint with bolt in an interference fit with the hole, a flanged joint which allows the flange and bolt to bend; and a shear joint in a clevis and tang configuration. These applications were initially developed for measuring and monitoring preload in National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space Shuttle Orbiter critical joints but are also applicable for monitoring loads in other critical bolted joints of structures such as transportation bridges and other aerospace structures. The papers cited here explain how to set-up a model to estimate the ultrasonic load factor and accuracy for the ultrasonic preload application in a clamped joint with clearance fit. The ultrasonic preload application for clamped joint with bolt in an interference fit can also be used to measure diametrical interference between the bolt shank and hole, as well as interference pressure on the bolt shank. Results of simulation and experimental data are given to demonstrate use of ultrasonic measurements in a shear joint. A bolt in a flanged joint experiences both tensile and bending loads. This application involves measurement of bending and tensile preload in a bolt. The ultrasonic beam bends due to bending load on the bolt. Results of a numerical technique to compute the trace of ultrasonic ray are presented.

  11. Ultrasonic Measurement and Monitoring of Loads in Bolts used in Structural Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    The paper is an overview of work by the author in measuring and monitoring loads in bolts using an ultrasonic extensometer. A number of cases of bolted joints are covered. These include, a clamped joint with clearance fit between the bolt and hole, a clamped joint with the bolt in an interference fit with the hole, a flanged joint which allows the flange and bolt to bend; and a shear joint in a clevis and tang configuration. These applications were initially developed for measuring and monitoring preload in the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter critical joints but are also applicable for monitoring loads in other critical bolted joints of structures such as transportation bridges and other aerospace structures. The paper explains how to set-up a model to estimate the load factor and accuracy for the ultrasonic preload application in a clamped joint with clearance fit. The ultrasonic preload application for clamped joint with bolt in an interference fit can also be used to measure diametrical interference between the bolt shank and hole; and interference pressure on the bolt shank. Model and experimental data are given to demonstrate use of ultrasonic measurements in a shear joint. A bolt in a flanged joint experiences both tensile and bending loads. This application involves measurement of bending and tensile preload in a bolt. The ultrasonic beam bends due to the bending load on the bolt. A numerical technique to compute the trace of ultrasonic ray is presented.

  12. Experiment Configurations for the DAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This image shows three vehicle configurations considered for the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program, conducted at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center between 1977 and 1983. The DAST project planned for three wing configurations. These were the Instrumented Standard Wing (ISW), the Aeroelastic Research Wing-1 (ARW-1), and the ARW-2. After the DAST-1 crash, project personnel fitted a second Firebee II with a rebuilt ARW-1 wing. Due to the project's ending, it never flew the ARW-2 wing. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of the structure, driven by aerodynamic

  13. Calculating the configurational entropy of a landscape mosaic

    Treesearch

    Samuel A. Cushman

    2016-01-01

    Applications of entropy and the second law of thermodynamics in landscape ecology are rare and poorly developed. This is a fundamental limitation given the centrally important role the second law plays in all physical and biological processes. A critical first step to exploring the utility of thermodynamics in landscape ecology is to define the configurational...

  14. Measurement configuration optimization for grating reconstruction by Mueller matrix polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiuguo; Liu, Shiyuan; Zhang, Chuanwei; Jiang, Hao

    2013-04-01

    As a non-imaging optical measurement technique, spectroscopic Mueller matrix polarimetry (MMP) has been introduced for critical dimension (CD) and overlay metrology with recent great success. Due to the additional information provided by the Mueller matrices when the most general conical diffraction configuration is considered, MMP has demonstrated a great potential in semiconductor manufacturing. In order to make full use of the additional information provided by the Mueller matrices, it is of great importance for MMP to optimize the measurement configuration. In this paper, we introduce the norm of a configuration error propagating matrix as the cost function to optimize the measurement configuration for spectroscopic MMP with the aim of finding an optimal combination of fixed incidence and azimuthal angles, which provides higher measurement accuracy. The optimal measurement configuration can be achieved by minimizing the norm of the configuration error propagating matrix in the available ranges of incidence and azimuthal angles. Experiments performed on a silicon grating with a dual-rotating compensator Mueller matrix polarimeter have demonstrated the validity of the proposed measurement configuration optimization method.

  15. Turbulent optimization of toroidal configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynick, H.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Faber, B.; Lucia, M.; Rorvig, M.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2014-09-01

    Recent progress in ‘turbulent optimization’ of toroidal configurations is described, using a method recently developed for evolving such configurations to ones having reduced turbulent transport. The method uses the GENE gyrokinetic code to compute the radial heat flux Qgk, and the STELLOPT optimization code with a theory-based ‘proxy’ figure of merit Qpr to stand in for Qgk for computational speed. Improved expressions for Qpr have been developed, involving further geometric quantities beyond those in the original proxy, which can also be used as ‘control knobs’ to reduce Qgk. Use of a global search algorithm has led to the discovery of turbulent-optimized configurations not found by the standard, local algorithm usually employed, as has use of a mapping capability which STELLOPT has been extended to provide, of figures of merit over the search space.

  16. Applications of Parallel Processing in Configuration Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaram, Ppchuraman; Hager, James O.; Biedron, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the recent progress made towards developing an efficient and user-friendly parallel environment for routine analysis of large CFD problems. The coarse-grain parallel version of the CFL3D Euler/Navier-Stokes analysis code, CFL3Dhp, has been ported onto most available parallel platforms. The CFL3Dhp solution accuracy on these parallel platforms has been verified with the CFL3D sequential analyses. User-friendly pre- and post-processing tools that enable a seamless transfer from sequential to parallel processing have been written. Static load balancing tool for CFL3Dhp analysis has also been implemented for achieving good parallel efficiency. For large problems, load balancing efficiency as high as 95% can be achieved even when large number of processors are used. Linear scalability of the CFL3Dhp code with increasing number of processors has also been shown using a large installed transonic nozzle boattail analysis. To highlight the fast turn-around time of parallel processing, the TCA full configuration in sideslip Navier-Stokes drag polar at supersonic cruise has been obtained in a day. CFL3Dhp is currently being used as a production analysis tool.

  17. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  18. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  19. Configuration evaluation and criteria plan. Volume 2: Evaluation criteria plan (update). Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, E. K.

    1987-01-01

    Candidate main engine configurations which enhance vehicle performance, operation and cost are identified. These candidate configurations are evaluated and the configurations which provide significant advantages over existing systems are selected for consideration for the next generation of launch vehicles. The unbiased selection of the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) configuration requires that the candidate engines be evaluated against a predetermined set of criteria which must be properly weighted to emphasize critical requirements defined prior to the actual evaluation. During a prior study of the STME a Gas Generator Cycle engine was selected for conceptual design, with emphasis on reusability, reliability and low cost while achieving good performance. In this study emphasis is on expendable application of the STME while maintaining low cost and high reliability.

  20. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  1. Electronic Configuration of Yb Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Temmerman, W.M.; Szotek, Z.; Svane, A.; Strange, P.; Winter, H.; Delin, A.; Johansson, B.; Eriksson, O.; Fast, L.; Wills, J.M.

    1999-11-01

    The total energy differences between divalent and trivalent configurations of Yb ions in a number of Yb compounds are studied. Two different band theoretical methods, which differ in the treatment of the localized f electrons, are used. The results show that in all Yb compounds the valence energy differences are equal to the energy needed to localize an f electron. These valence energy differences correlate with the number of f electrons hybridizing with the conduction bands in the trivalent configuration. For divalent YbS, the pressure induced f -electron delocalization implies an intermediate valency, as also indicated by experiment. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society }

  2. Experimental transonic flutter characteristics of supersonic cruise configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Michael H.; Cole, Stanley R.; Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Keller, Donald F.; Parker, Ellen C.; Wilkie, W. Keats

    1990-01-01

    The flutter characteristics of a generic arrow-wing supersonic transport configuration are studied. The wing configuration has a 3 percent biconvex airfoil and a leading-edge sweep of 73 deg out to a cranked tip with a 60 deg leading-edge sweep. The ground vibration tests and flutter test procedure are described. The effects of flutter on engine nacelles, fuel loading, wing-mounted vertical fin, wing angle-of-attack, and wing tip mass and stiffness distributions are analyzed. The data reveal that engine nacelles reduce the transonic flutter dynamic pressure by 25-30 percent; fuel loadings decrease dynamic pressures by 25 percent; 4-6 deg wing angles-of-attack cause steep transonic boundaries; and 5-10 percent changes in flutter dynamic pressures are the result of the wing-mounted vertical fin and wing-tip mass and stiffness distributions.

  3. 4C modeling of the supercritical helium loop HELIOS in isobaric configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guelfi, F.; Bonifetto, R.; Hoa, C.; Savoldi, L.; Zanino, R.

    2014-11-01

    Superconducting magnets for tokamak fusion reactors are subject to highly variable loads due to the intrinsically pulsed operation of the machine. The refrigerator should, on the contrary, work under conditions as stable as possible and should be sized based on the averaged loads. In this paper, the cryogenic circuit module of the 4C (Cryogenic Circuit Conductor and Coil) code is used to analyze the isobaric configuration of the HELIOS (HElium Loop for hIgh lOads Smoothing) facility at CEA Grenoble, France. The 4C model is validated against experimental data from the isobaric HELIOS configuration: the computed evolution of temperature, pressure and mass flow rate at different circuit locations shows a good agreement with the measurements for two different pulsed heat load scenarios, with and without regulation. The advantages of the (somewhat more complicated) isobaric configuration vs. the isochoric configuration in terms of heat load smoothing are highlighted. 4C simulations are used to propose a new HELIOS layout with helium charging and discharging lines located in such a way that the HELIOS performance in the isobaric configuration is optimized. The paper confirms the importance of the isobaric configuration for a tokamak cryogenic circuit, as well as the accuracy of 4C in modeling the HELIOS operation, even in the presence of complex regulation.

  4. JWST ISIM Primary Structure and Kinematic Mount Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartoszyk, Andrew; Carnahan, Tim; Hendricks, Steve; Kaprielian, Charles; Kuhn, Jonathan; Kunt, Cengiz

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation we will review the evolution of the ISIM primary structure tube topology and kinematic mount configuration to the current baseline concept. We will also show optimization procedures used and challenges resulting from complex joints under launch loads. Two additional key ISIM structure challenges of meeting thermal distortion and stability requirements and metal-composite bonded joint survivability at cryogenic temperatures are covered in other presentations.

  5. Ballistic Missile Organization (BMO) Hardware Configuration Item Specifications Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-05

    three base lines, as follows: a. Functional baseline - The initial approved functional configuration identification. b. Allocated baseline - The...iv CONTENTS Table Title I Travel requirements and axle load criteria 1-31 II Quality conformance matrix 1-32 APPENDIX Section Title Page 10 Appendix I...Actuator Assembly shall have a minimum service life of 15 years and a storage life of three years maximum. DC brushes shall have a minimum operating life

  6. Mapping HIV community viral load: space, power and the government of bodies.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Marilou; Guta, Adrian

    2012-12-01

    HIV plasma viral load testing has become more than just a clinical tool to monitor treatment response at the individual level. Increasingly, individual HIV plasma viral load testing is being reported to public health agencies and is used to inform epidemiological surveillance and monitor the presence of the virus collectively using techniques to measure 'community viral load'. This article seeks to formulate a critique and propose a novel way of theorizing community viral load. Based on the salient work of Michel Foucault, especially the governmentality literature, this article critically examines the use of community viral load as a new strategy of government. Drawing also on the work of Miller and Rose, this article explores the deployment of 'community' through the re-configuration of space, the problematization of viral concentrations in specific microlocales, and the government (in the Foucauldian sense) of specific bodies which are seen as 'risky', dangerous and therefore, in need of attention. It also examines community viral load as a necessary precondition - forming the 'conditions of possibility' - for the recent shift to high impact prevention tactics that are being scaled up across North America.

  7. Dynamic Stability Optimization of Laminated Composite Plates under Combined Boundary Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafei, Erfan; Kabir, Mohammad Zaman

    2011-12-01

    Dynamic stability and design optimization of laminated simply supported plates under planar conservative boundary loads are investigated in current study. Examples can be found in internal connecting elements of spacecraft and aerospace structures subjected to edge axial and shear loads. Designation of such elements is function of layup configuration, plate aspect ratio, loading combinations, and layup thickness. An optimum design aims maximum stability load satisfying a predefined stable vibration frequency. The interaction between compound loading and layup angle parameter affects the order of merging vibration modes and may stabilize the dynamic response. Laminated plates are assumed to be angle-plies symmetric to mid-plane surface. Dynamic equilibrium PDE has been solved using kernel integral transformation for modal frequency values and eigenvalue-based orthogonal functions for critical stability loads. The dictating dynamic stability mode is shown to be controlled by geometric stiffness distributions of composite plates. Solution of presented design optimization problem has been done using analytical approach combined with interior penalty multiplier algorithm. The results are verified by FEA approach and stability zones of original and optimized plates are stated as final data. Presented method can help designers to stabilize the dynamic response of composite plates by selecting an optimized layup orientation and thickness for prescribed design circumstances.

  8. Impact of dynamic loads on propulsion integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiner, J. M.

    1994-09-01

    Aircraft dynamic loads produced by engine exhaust plumes are examined for a class of military fighter and bomber configurations in model and full scale. The configurations examined are associated with the USAF F-15 and B-1B aircraft, and the US F-18 HARV and ASTOVL programs. The experience gained as a result of these studies is used to formulate a level of understanding concerning this phenomena that could be useful at the preliminary stage of propulsion/airframe design.

  9. A Communication Configuration of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughey, Jim D.

    A study focused on the way that image, knowledge, behavioral intent, and communicative responsiveness are configured for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The classic model of the adoption process expects that knowledge about a subject will lead to a favorable evaluation of it, which in turn will lead to a decision to act. But the…

  10. Configuration Aerodynamics: Past - Present - Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Bencze, Daniel P.; Kulfan, Robert M.; Wilson, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    The Configuration Aerodynamics (CA) element of the High Speed Research (HSR) program is managed by a joint NASA and Industry team, referred to as the Technology Integration Development (ITD) team. This team is responsible for the development of a broad range of technologies for improved aerodynamic performance and stability and control characteristics at subsonic to supersonic flight conditions. These objectives are pursued through the aggressive use of advanced experimental test techniques and state of the art computational methods. As the HSR program matures and transitions into the next phase the objectives of the Configuration Aerodynamics ITD are being refined to address the drag reduction needs and stability and control requirements of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. In addition, the experimental and computational tools are being refined and improved to meet these challenges. The presentation will review the work performed within the Configuration Aerodynamics element in 1994 and 1995 and then discuss the plans for the 1996-1998 time period. The final portion of the presentation will review several observations of the HSR program and the design activity within Configuration Aerodynamics.

  11. Configuration Effects on Liner Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Brown, Martha C.; Jones, Michael G.; Howerton, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    The acoustic performance of a duct liner depends not only on the intrinsic properties of the liner but also on the configuration of the duct in which it is used. A series of experiments is performed in the NASA Langley Research Center Curved Duct Test Rig (at Mach 0.275) to evaluate the effect of duct configuration on the acoustic performance of single degree of freedom perforate-over-honeycomb liners. The liners form the sidewalls of the duct's test section. Variations of duct configuration include: asymmetric (liner on one side and hard wall opposite) and symmetric (liner on both sides) wall treatment; inlet and exhaust orientation, in which the sound propagates either against or with the flow; and straight and curved flow path. The effect that duct configuration has on the overall acoustic performance, particularly the shift in frequency and magnitude of peak attenuation, is quantified. The redistribution of incident mode content is shown. The liners constitute the side walls of the liner test section and the scatter of incident horizontal order 1 mode by the asymmetric treatment and order 2 mode by the symmetric treatment into order 0 mode is shown. Scatter of order 0 incident modes into higher order modes is also shown. This redistribution of mode content is significant because it indicates that the liner design can be manipulated such that energy is scattered into more highly attenuated modes, thus enhancing liner performance.

  12. Configural Processing and Face Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKone, Elinor

    2008-01-01

    Configural/holistic processing, a key property of face recognition, has previously been examined only for front views of faces. Here, 6 experiments tested front (0 degree), three-quarter (45 degree), and profile views (90 degree), using composite and peripheral inversion tasks. Results showed an overall disadvantage in identifying profiles. This…

  13. NCCDS configuration management process improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, Kathy

    1993-01-01

    By concentrating on defining and improving specific Configuration Management (CM) functions, processes, procedures, personnel selection/development, and tools, internal and external customers received improved CM services. Job performance within the section increased in both satisfaction and output. Participation in achieving major improvements has led to the delivery of consistent quality CM products as well as significant decreases in every measured CM metrics category.

  14. Intelligent FRP retrofits for critical civil infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guoliang; Peters, Kara

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, the concept, modeling and preliminary testing of an intelligent FRP retrofit with self-monitoring capabilities for critical civil infrastructures are presented. This intelligent system is based on an easy-to-apply configuration of FRP pre-preg tapes with multiple stacked unidirectional layers of piezoelectric or SMA actuators and integrated optical fiber sensors. This intelligent retrofit will be able to not only monitor conditions including bonding of the FRP to the structure and opening of concrete cracks, but also minimize the crack opening and retard the progression of further FRP debonding. Towards this end, a computationally efficient two-dimensional shear stress-transfer model based on a simplified shear lag analysis is developed, with consideration of the fact that the stress transfer between the FRP, actuator and sensor layers in the intelligent system is complex. The effectiveness of this model is demonstrated through one numerical benchmark problem and one typical FRP configuration, with comparison of each to full threedimensional finite element models. The agreement between the two formulations is shown to be further improved by adjustment of the assumed shape functions. A preliminary experiment is also presented in which pre-fabricated optical fiber ribbons are embedded into the FRP strengthening of a full-scale concrete beam. Results from static loading test of the FRP strengthened beam show the feasibility of this technique for the self-monitoring FRP retrofits.

  15. LOADED WAVEGUIDES

    DOEpatents

    Mullett, L.B.; Loach, B.G.; Adams, G.L.

    1958-06-24

    >Loaded waveguides are described for the propagation of electromagnetic waves with reduced phase velocities. A rectangular waveguide is dimensioned so as to cut-off the simple H/sub 01/ mode at the operating frequency. The waveguide is capacitance loaded, so as to reduce the phase velocity of the transmitted wave, by connecting an electrical conductor between directly opposite points in the major median plane on the narrower pair of waveguide walls. This conductor may take a corrugated shape or be an aperature member, the important factor being that the electrical length of the conductor is greater than one-half wavelength at the operating frequency. Prepared for the Second U.N. International ConferThe importance of nuclear standards is duscussed. A brief review of the international callaboration in this field is given. The proposal is made to let the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) coordinate the efforts from other groups. (W.D.M.)

  16. Critical fluid light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    The objective is to measure the decay rates of critical density fluctuations in a simple fluid (xenon) very near its liquid-vapor critical point using laser light scattering and photon correlation spectroscopy. Such experiments were severely limited on Earth by the presence of gravity which causes large density gradients in the sample when the compressibility diverges approaching the critical point. The goal is to measure fluctuation decay rates at least two decades closer to the critical point than is possible on earth, with a resolution of 3 microK. This will require loading the sample to 0.1 percent of the critical density and taking data as close as 100 microK to the critical temperature. The minimum mission time of 100 hours will allow a complete range of temperature points to be covered, limited by the thermal response of the sample. Other technical problems have to be addressed such as multiple scattering and the effect of wetting layers. The experiment entails measurement of the scattering intensity fluctuation decay rate at two angles for each temperature and simultaneously recording the scattering intensities and sample turbidity (from the transmission). The analyzed intensity and turbidity data gives the correlation length at each temperature and locates the critical temperature. The fluctuation decay rate data from these measurements will provide a severe test of the generalized hydrodynamic theories of transport coefficients in the critical regions. When compared to equivalent data from binary liquid critical mixtures they will test the universality of critical dynamics.

  17. HotSpot Software Configuration Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H; Homann, S G

    2009-03-12

    This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) describes the software configuration management procedures used to ensure that the HotSpot dispersion model meets the requirements of its user base, which includes: (1) Users of the PC version of HotSpot for consequence assessment, hazard assessment and safety analysis calculations; and (2) Users of the NARAC Web and iClient software tools, which allow users to run HotSpot for consequence assessment modeling These users and sponsors of the HotSpot software and the organizations they represent constitute the intended audience for this document. This plan is intended to meet Critical Recommendations 1 and 3 from the Software Evaluation of HotSpot and DOE Safety Software Toolbox Recommendation for inclusion of HotSpot in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Toolbox. HotSpot software is maintained for the Department of Energy Office of Emergency Operations by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An overview of HotSpot and NARAC are provided.

  18. High-Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeyoung; Krall, Nicholas A.; Sieck, Paul E.; Offermann, Dustin T.; Skillicorn, Michael; Sanchez, Andrew; Davis, Kevin; Alderson, Eric; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when β (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) is of order unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configuration were too large for net power production. Grad and others theorized that at high β a sharp boundary would form between the plasma and the magnetic field, leading to substantially smaller loss rates. While not able to confirm the details of Grad's work, the current experiment does validate, for the first time, the conjecture that confinement is substantially improved at high β . This represents critical progress toward an understanding of the plasma dynamics in a high-β cusp system. We hope that these results will stimulate a renewed interest in the cusp configuration as a fusion confinement candidate. In addition, the enhanced high-energy electron confinement resolves a key impediment to progress of the Polywell fusion concept, which combines a high-β cusp configuration with electrostatic fusion for a compact, power-producing nuclear fusion reactor.

  19. Nonequilibrium dynamics of emergent field configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Rafael Cassidy

    The processes by which nonlinear physical systems approach thermal equilibrium is of great importance in many areas of science. Central to this is the mechanism by which energy is transferred between the many degrees of freedom comprising these systems. With this in mind, in this research the nonequilibrium dynamics of nonperturbative fluctuations within Ginzburg-Landau models are investigated. In particular, two questions are addressed. In both cases the system is initially prepared in one of two minima of a double-well potential. First, within the context of a (2 + 1) dimensional field theory, we investigate whether emergent spatio-temporal coherent structures play a dynamcal role in the equilibration of the field. We find that the answer is sensitive to the initial temperature of the system. At low initial temperatures, the dynamics are well approximated with a time-dependent mean-field theory. For higher temperatures, the strong nonlinear coupling between the modes in the field does give rise to the synchronized emergence of coherent spatio-temporal configurations, identified with oscillons. These are long-lived coherent field configurations characterized by their persistent oscillatory behavior at their core. This initial global emergence is seen to be a consequence of resonant behavior in the long wavelength modes in the system. A second question concerns the emergence of disorder in a highly viscous system modeled by a (3 + 1) dimensional field theory. An integro-differential Boltzmann equation is derived to model the thermal nucleation of precursors of one phase within the homogeneous background. The fraction of the volume populated by these precursors is computed as a function of temperature. This model is capable of describing the onset of percolation, characterizing the approach to criticality (i.e. disorder). It also provides a nonperturbative correction to the critical temperature based on the nonequilibrium dynamics of the system.

  20. 14 CFR 23.341 - Gust loads factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... from gusts specified in § 23.333(c). (b) The gust load for a canard or tandem wing configuration must... (slugs/cu.ft.); W/S=Wing loading (p.s.f.) due to the applicable weight of the airplane in the particular load case. W/S=Wing loading (p.s.f.); C=Mean geometric chord (ft.); g=Acceleration due to gravity...

  1. 14 CFR 23.341 - Gust loads factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... from gusts specified in § 23.333(c). (b) The gust load for a canard or tandem wing configuration must... (slugs/cu.ft.); W/S=Wing loading (p.s.f.) due to the applicable weight of the airplane in the particular load case. W/S=Wing loading (p.s.f.); C=Mean geometric chord (ft.); g=Acceleration due to gravity...

  2. 14 CFR 23.341 - Gust loads factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... from gusts specified in § 23.333(c). (b) The gust load for a canard or tandem wing configuration must... (slugs/cu.ft.); W/S=Wing loading (p.s.f.) due to the applicable weight of the airplane in the particular load case. W/S=Wing loading (p.s.f.); C=Mean geometric chord (ft.); g=Acceleration due to gravity...

  3. 14 CFR 23.341 - Gust loads factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... from gusts specified in § 23.333(c). (b) The gust load for a canard or tandem wing configuration must... (slugs/cu.ft.); W/S=Wing loading (p.s.f.) due to the applicable weight of the airplane in the particular load case. W/S=Wing loading (p.s.f.); C=Mean geometric chord (ft.); g=Acceleration due to gravity...

  4. 14 CFR 23.341 - Gust loads factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... from gusts specified in § 23.333(c). (b) The gust load for a canard or tandem wing configuration must... (slugs/cu.ft.); W/S=Wing loading (p.s.f.) due to the applicable weight of the airplane in the particular load case. W/S=Wing loading (p.s.f.); C=Mean geometric chord (ft.); g=Acceleration due to gravity...

  5. Health informatics to optimize complex laboratory developed test configurations.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Uzma; Mahmood, Tariq; Anwar, Masood; Shaikh, Zubair

    2016-11-14

    Configuration of complex Laboratory Developed Tests (LDTs) is a time-consuming and complicated task, potentially leading to inconsistent LDTs in which features constraints remain unresolved and important features could remain unselected. Our objective is to address these issues by presenting an automated, health informatics solution which autonomously optimizes feature selection in complex LDTs through Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). The optimization goal is to minimize inconsistencies and configuration time, and maximize the number of selected features. We implemented our technology in a local, secondary-care hospital in Pakistan which configures LDT for a local epidemic disease. First, a list of inconsistent LDT configurations is generated. This is used to initially estimate optimal PSO parameters, which are then used for optimization process. Results show that PSO is able to minimize 91% inconsistencies between 9 and 11 seconds. The number of selected critical features also increases by 100% in the optimized LDT configuration. We present a novel and the first application of computational optimization to solve LDT configuration issues.

  6. Configurational entropy of charged AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chong Oh

    2017-09-01

    When we consider charged AdS black holes in higher dimensional spacetime and a molecule number density along coexistence curves is numerically extended to higher dimensional cases. It is found that a number density difference of a small and large black holes decrease as a total dimension grows up. In particular, we find that a configurational entropy is a concave function of a reduced temperature and reaches a maximum value at a critical (second-order phase transition) point. Furthermore, the bigger a total dimension becomes, the more concave function in a configurational entropy while the more convex function in a reduced pressure.

  7. Split torque transmission load sharing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, T. L.; Rashidi, M.; Kish, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Split torque transmissions are attractive alternatives to conventional planetary designs for helicopter transmissions. The split torque designs can offer lighter weight and fewer parts but have not been used extensively for lack of experience, especially with obtaining proper load sharing. Two split torque designs that use different load sharing methods have been studied. Precise indexing and alignment of the geartrain to produce acceptable load sharing has been demonstrated. An elastomeric torque splitter that has large torsional compliance and damping produces even better load sharing while reducing dynamic transmission error and noise. However, the elastomeric torque splitter as now configured is not capable over the full range of operating conditions of a fielded system. A thrust balancing load sharing device was evaluated. Friction forces that oppose the motion of the balance mechanism are significant. A static analysis suggests increasing the helix angle of the input pinion of the thrust balancing design. Also, dynamic analysis of this design predicts good load sharing and significant torsional response to accumulative pitch errors of the gears.

  8. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) Description and Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Oyague, F.

    2011-11-01

    This document describes simulated turbine load cases in accordance to the IEC 61400-1 Ed.3 standard, which is representative of the typical wind turbine design process. The information presented herein is intended to provide a broad understanding of the gearbox reliability collaborative 750kW drivetrain and turbine configuration. In addition, fatigue and ultimate strength drivetrain loads resulting from simulations are presented. This information provides the bases for the analytical work of the gearbox reliability collaborative effort.

  9. Parametric study of a canard-configured transport using conceptual design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbuckle, P. D.; Sliwa, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Constrained-parameter optimization is used to perform optimal conceptual design of both canard and conventional configurations of a medium-range transport. A number of design constants and design constraints are systematically varied to compare the sensitivities of canard and conventional configurations to a variety of technology assumptions. Main-landing-gear location and canard surface high-lift performance are identified as critical design parameters for a statically stable, subsonic, canard-configured transport.

  10. Solar disk sextant optical configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y.; Maier, E.; Schatten, K. H.; Sofia, S.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper the performance of a plausible configuration for the solar disk sextant, an instrument to be used to monitor the solar diameter, is evaluated. Overall system requirements are evaluated, and tolerable uncertainties are obtained. It is concluded that by using a beam splitting wedge, a folded optics design can be used to measure the solar diameter to an accuracy of 10 to the -6th, despite the greater aberrations present in such optical systems.

  11. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  12. Predictive Modeling of Tokamak Configurations*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, T. A.; Lodestro, L. L.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Bulmer, R. H.; Jong, R. A.; Kaiser, T. B.; Moller, J. M.

    2001-10-01

    The Corsica code provides comprehensive toroidal plasma simulation and design capabilities with current applications [1] to tokamak, reversed field pinch (RFP) and spheromak configurations. It calculates fixed and free boundary equilibria coupled to Ohm's law, sources, transport models and MHD stability modules. We are exploring operations scenarios for both the DIII-D and KSTAR tokamaks. We will present simulations of the effects of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) relevant to the Quiescent Double Barrier (QDB) regime on DIII-D exploring long pulse operation issues. KSTAR simulations using ECH/ECCD in negative central shear configurations explore evolution to steady state while shape evolution studies during current ramp up using a hyper-resistivity model investigate startup scenarios and limitations. Studies of high bootstrap fraction operation stimulated by recent ECH/ECCD experiments on DIIID will also be presented. [1] Pearlstein, L.D., et al, Predictive Modeling of Axisymmetric Toroidal Configurations, 28th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics, Madeira, Portugal, June 18-22, 2001. * Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  13. Load management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Ian

    The development of the Electrical Load Management System (ELMS) for the Boeing 777 aircraft is reviewed. The discussion covers the overall design of the system, its principal components, and the functions it provides. Some of the additional system drivers, such as autoland electrical system partitioning and dispatch reliability, are outlined, and their effect on the system architecture is examined. The key technologies used in the development of the ELMS include smart high power contactors, ARING 629 data buses, the Motorola 68020 processor combined with Ada software, dedicated ASICs, and modular architecture for improved maintainability.

  14. Heat-load simulator for heat sink design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunleavy, A. M.; Vaughn, T. J.

    1968-01-01

    Heat-load simulator is fabricated from 1/4-inch aluminum plate with a contact surface equal in dimensions and configuration to those of the electronic installation. The method controls thermal output to simulate actual electronic component thermal output.

  15. Kinetic stability of field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Staudenmeier, J.L.; Hsiao, M.-Y.

    1991-01-01

    The internal tilt mode is considered to be the biggest threat to Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) global stability. The tilt stability of the FRC is studied using the MHD, Hall MHD, and the Vlasov-fluid (Vlasov ions, cold massless fluid electrons) models. Nonlinear Hall MHD calculations showed that the FRC was stable to the tilt mode when the s value of the FRC was below a critical value that was dependent on plasma length. The critical s value is larger for longer plasma equilibria. The stability of FRC's with toroidal field was studied with a linear initial value MHD code. The calculations showed an axial perturbation wavelength of the most unstable eigenfunction that was consistent with internal probe measurements made on translated FRC's. Linear Vlasov-fluid eigenvalue calculations showed that kinetic ion effects can change both the growth rate and the structure of the eigenfunctions when compared to the corresponding MHD modes. Calculations on short FRC equilibria indicate that MHD is not the appropriate small gyroradius limit of the Vlasov-fluid model because the axial transit time of a thermal ion is approximately equal to an MHD growth time for the tilt mode. Calculations were done using a small number of unstable MHD eigenfunctions as basis functions in order to reduce the dimensionality of the stability problem. The results indicated that this basis set can produce inaccurate growth rates at large value for s for some equilibria.

  16. Separating the configurational and vibrational entropy contributions in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Hillary L.; Li, Chen W.; Hoff, Andrew; Garrett, Glenn R.; Kim, Dennis S.; Yang, Fred C.; Lucas, Matthew S.; Swan-Wood, Tabitha; Lin, J. Y. Y.; Stone, M. B.; Abernathy, D. L.; Demetriou, Marios D.; Fultz, B.

    2017-09-01

    Glassy materials exist in nature and play a critical role in technology, but key differences between the glass, liquid and crystalline phases are not well understood. Over several decades there has been controversy about the specific heat absorbed as a glass transforms to a liquid--does this originate from vibrational entropy or configurational entropy? Here we report direct in situ measurements of the vibrational spectra of strong and fragile metallic glasses in the glass, liquid and crystalline phases. For both types of material, the measured vibrational entropies of the glass and liquid show a tiny excess over the crystal, representing less than 5% of the total excess entropy measured with step calorimetry. These results reveal that the excess entropy of metallic glasses is almost entirely configurational in origin, consistent with the early theories of Gibbs and co-workers describing the glass transition as a purely configurational transition.

  17. Shock wave loading of Nickel based superalloy and microstructural features of the compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. D.; Sharma, A. K.; Thakur, N.

    2015-02-01

    Explosive shock wave loading has been employed to consolidate micro-sized nickel based IN718 superalloy powder. Cylindrical geometry configuring the various critical parameters with optimized detonation pressure has been used to consolidate the powder with desirable means. The thrust on the work is to compact the powder nearer to theoretical density having almost negligible density gradient and without melting the core of the specimen. XRD study indicates that the crystal structure of the post compacts remains the same. Shock wave loading deformed the particles as has been inferred from SEM. The variation in particle size has been measured from Laser Diffraction based Particle Size Analyzer (LDPSA). It is found that this is a rapid fast technique to produce larger and crack free compacts of metal powders without their melting and with less particle size variation.

  18. Study of the dynamic behavior of a bolted joint under heavy loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daouk, Sami; Louf, François; Cluzel, Christophe; Dorival, Olivier; Champaney, Laurent; Audebert, Sylvie

    2017-03-01

    In structural dynamics, the quantification of the quality and reliability of numerical models remains a relevant issue. While the behavior of structures such as beams and plates is generally understood, a large number of industrial structures are bolted assemblies of many components with connections that are not well understood. The main reason for this lack of understanding is that the dynamical behavior of the whole assembly depends critically upon joint conditions, especially under heavy loadings. For the purpose of improving our understanding and the development of pertinent models, a dynamic test bed, based on a bolted structure, is designed and modal testing is performed. The configuration of the bolted joint and the level of the loading are the relevant parameters, related to joint conditions, that are considered in this study. The results of the experimental campaign show the variation of the dissipation in a bolted joint and its apparent stiffness as a function of joint conditions.

  19. Loads and Pressures on Axisymmetric Bodies with Cruciform Fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillenius, M. F. E.; Smith, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    NSWCDM computer program calculates aerodynamic loading and pressure distributions on supersonic configurations consisting of axisymmetric bodies with cruciform or planar canard and tail fins. Versatile program allows for configuration pitched and rolled, and fins deflected. Tail fins are interdigitated with respect to forward fins.

  20. Methods and apparatus for rotor load control in wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw

    2006-08-22

    A wind turbine having a rotor, at least one rotor blade, and a plurality of generators, of which a first generator is configured to provide power to an electric grid and a second generator is configured to provide power to the wind turbine during times of grid loss. The wind turbine is configured to utilize power provided by the second generator to reduce loads on the wind turbine during times of grid loss.

  1. Preliminary investigation of the /sup 252/Cf-source-driven noise analysis method of subcriticality measurement in LWR fuel storage and initial loading applications

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.T.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of the /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method to measure subcriticality has been demonstrated in a variety of experimental configurations of fissile materials. Calculations for an approximately 4-m-dia configuration of light water reactor (LWR) fuel elements indicated the feasibility of measuring the subcriticality of large, loosely coupled arrays of LWR fuel elements by this same method. These analysis suggested application to the initial loading of both pressurized and boiling water reactors, zero-power testing of reactors (such as shutdown margin measurements after initial loading), light water reactor refueling, and safe storage of LWR spent fuel. In the fuel storage application, direct measurement of subcriticality in the actual fuel storage facilities provides the parameter which is directly related to criticality safety.

  2. Dynamic Buckling on Rectangular Plates under Axial Step Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Bin-Bin; Han, Zhi-Jun; Lu, Guo-Yun

    2016-05-01

    Considering the effects of shear deformation and stress wave, the dynamic buckling governing equations of rectangular plates under axial step load are established. Based on the Rayleigh-Ritz method, the expression of the critical load is got. The relation curve between the critical load and critical length is described by using MATLAB software. In this paper, the influences of thickness, first-order shear deformation (FSD), and the number of modes are discussed.

  3. Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulnix, Jennifer Wilson

    2012-01-01

    As a philosophy professor, one of my central goals is to teach students to think critically. However, one difficulty with determining whether critical thinking can be taught, or even measured, is that there is widespread disagreement over what critical thinking actually is. Here, I reflect on several conceptions of critical thinking, subjecting…

  4. Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulnix, Jennifer Wilson

    2012-01-01

    As a philosophy professor, one of my central goals is to teach students to think critically. However, one difficulty with determining whether critical thinking can be taught, or even measured, is that there is widespread disagreement over what critical thinking actually is. Here, I reflect on several conceptions of critical thinking, subjecting…

  5. Results of a Pressure Loads Investigation on a 0.030-scale Model (47-OTS) of the Integrated Space Shuttle Vehicle Configuration 5 in the NASA Ames Research Center 11 by 11 Foot Leg of the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (IA81A), Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chee, E.

    1975-01-01

    Results of wind tunnel tests on a 0.030-scale model of the integrated space shuttle vehicle configuration 5 are presented. Testing was conducted in the NASA Ames Research Center 11 x 11 foot leg of the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel to investigate pressure distributions for airloads analyses at Mach numbers from 0.9 through 1.4. Angles of attack and sideslip were varied from -6 to +6 degrees.

  6. Configuration optimization of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos; Crivelli, Luis A.; Vandenbelt, David

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to develop a computer aid for the conceptual/initial design of aerospace structures, allowing configurations and shape to be apriori design variables. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: Kikuchi's homogenization method; a classical shape design problem; homogenization method steps; a 3D mechanical component design example; forming a homogenized finite element; a 2D optimization problem; treatment of volume inequality constraint; algorithms for the volume inequality constraint; object function derivatives--taking advantage of design locality; stiffness variations; variations of potential; and schematics of the optimization problem.

  7. Electromagnetic configurations of rail guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Ostashev, V. E.; Lopyrev, A. N.; Ul'Yanov, A. V.

    1993-06-01

    Some problems associated with the electromagnetic acceleration of macrobodies in a rail gun are examined. An approach to the design of rail gun configurations is proposed, and some basic rail gun schemes are synthesized. The alternative rail gun schemes are compared in terms of electrode potential and stability of the electrode gap with respect to parasitic current shunting. The effect of the ohmic resistance of the electrodes and of the additional magnetization field on the spatial structure of the discharge in the rail gun channel is discussed. A classification of rail gun modifications is presented.

  8. SSF growth concepts and configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cirillo, William M.

    1991-01-01

    There are three primary objectives for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Growth concepts and configuration study task. The first objective is the development of evolutionary SSF concept consistent with user requirements and program constraints. The second primary objective is to ensure the feasibility of the proposed SSF evolution concepts as the systems level. This includes an assessment of SSF evolution flight control analysis, logistics assessment, maintainability, and operational considerations. The final objective is to ensure compatibility of the baseline SSF design with the derived evolution requirements at both the system and element (habitat modules, power generation equipment, etc.) levels.

  9. Dimensional regularization in configuration space

    SciTech Connect

    Bollini, C.G. |; Giambiagi, J.J.

    1996-05-01

    Dimensional regularization is introduced in configuration space by Fourier transforming in {nu} dimensions the perturbative momentum space Green functions. For this transformation, the Bochner theorem is used; no extra parameters, such as those of Feynman or Bogoliubov and Shirkov, are needed for convolutions. The regularized causal functions in {ital x} space have {nu}-dependent moderated singularities at the origin. They can be multiplied together and Fourier transformed (Bochner) without divergence problems. The usual ultraviolet divergences appear as poles of the resultant analytic functions of {nu}. Several examples are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Multiple forearm robotic elbow configuration

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A dual forearmed robotic elbow configuration comprises a main arm having a double elbow from which two coplanar forearms depend, two actuators carried in the double elbow for moving the forearms, and separate, independent end effectors, operated by a cable carried from the main arm through the elbow, is attached to the distal end of each forearm. Coiling the cables around the actuators prevents bending or kinking when the forearms are rotated 360 degrees. The end effectors can have similar or different capabilities. Actuator cannisters within the dual elbow are modular for rapid replacement or maintenance. Coarse and fine resolver transducers within the actuators provide accurate position referencing information.

  11. Interface Configuration Experiment: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, Paul; Finn, Robert; Weislogel, Mark

    1994-01-01

    The Interface Configuration Experiment (ICE) was carried out on USML-1 to investigate liquid-gas interfaces in certain rotationally-symmetric containers having prescribed, mathematically derived shapes. These containers have the property that they admit an entire continuum of distinct equilibrium rotationally-symmetric interfaces for a given liquid volume and contact angle. Furthermore, it can be shown that none of these interfaces can be stable. It was found, after the containers were filled in orbit, that an initial equilibrium interface from the symmetric continuum re-oriented, when perturbed, to a stable interface that was not rotationally symmetric, in accordance with the mathematical theory.

  12. Mapping HIV community viral load: space, power and the government of bodies

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Marilou; Guta, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    HIV plasma viral load testing has become more than just a clinical tool to monitor treatment response at the individual level. Increasingly, individual HIV plasma viral load testing is being reported to public health agencies and is used to inform epidemiological surveillance and monitor the presence of the virus collectively using techniques to measure ‘community viral load’. This article seeks to formulate a critique and propose a novel way of theorizing community viral load. Based on the salient work of Michel Foucault, especially the governmentality literature, this article critically examines the use of community viral load as a new strategy of government. Drawing also on the work of Miller and Rose, this article explores the deployment of ‘community’ through the re-configuration of space, the problematization of viral concentrations in specific microlocales, and the government (in the Foucauldian sense) of specific bodies which are seen as ‘risky’, dangerous and therefore, in need of attention. It also examines community viral load as a necessary precondition — forming the ‘conditions of possibility’ — for the recent shift to high impact prevention tactics that are being scaled up across North America. PMID:23060688

  13. Blank fire configuration for automatic pistol

    DOEpatents

    Teague, Tommy L.

    1990-01-01

    A pistol configured to fire blank cartridges includes a modified barrel with a breech portion connected to an aligned inner sleeve. Around the inner sleeve, there is disposed an outer sleeve having a vent therein through which the cartridge discharges. The breech portion is connected to a barrel anchor to move backward in a slight arc when the pistol is fired. A spring retention rod projects from the barrel anchor and receives a shortened recoil spring therearound which recoil spring has one end abutting a stop on the barrel anchor and the other end in abutment with the end of a spring retaining cup. The spring retaining cup is engaged by a flange projecting from a slide so that when the pistol is fired, the slide moves rearwardly against the compression of the spring to eject the spent cartridge and then moves forwardly under the urging of the spring to load a fresh cartridge into the breech portion. The spring then returns all of the slidable elements to their initial position so that the pistol may again be fired.

  14. Cryogenics Testbed Laboratory Flange Baseline Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, Marie Lei Ysabel D.

    2013-01-01

    As an intern at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), I was involved in research for the Fluids and Propulsion Division of the NASA Engineering (NE) Directorate. I was immersed in the Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units (IGODU) project for the majority of my time at KSC, primarily with the Ground Operations Demonstration Unit Liquid Oxygen (GODU L02) branch of IGODU. This project was established to develop advancements in cryogenic systems as a part of KSC's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. The vision of AES is to develop new approaches for human exploration, and operations in and beyond low Earth orbit. Advanced cryogenic systems are crucial to minimize the consumable losses of cryogenic propellants, develop higher performance launch vehicles, and decrease operations cost for future launch programs. During my internship, I conducted a flange torque tracking study that established a baseline configuration for the flanges in the Simulated Propellant Loading System (SPLS) at the KSC Cryogenics Test Laboratory (CTL) - the testing environment for GODU L02.

  15. Relevance of aerodynamic modelling for load reduction control strategies of two-bladed wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, B.; Cheng, P. W.

    2014-06-01

    A new load reduction concept is being developed for the two-bladed prototype of the Skywind 3.5MW wind turbine. Due to transport and installation advantages both offshore and in complex terrain two-bladed turbine designs are potentially more cost-effective than comparable three-bladed configurations. A disadvantage of two-bladed wind turbines is the increased fatigue loading, which is a result of asymmetrically distributed rotor forces. The innovative load reduction concept of the Skywind prototype consists of a combination of cyclic pitch control and tumbling rotor kinematics to mitigate periodic structural loading. Aerodynamic design tools must be able to model correctly the advanced dynamics of the rotor. In this paper the impact of the aerodynamic modelling approach is investigated for critical operational modes of a two-bladed wind turbine. Using a lifting line free wake vortex code (FVM) the physical limitations of the classical blade element momentum theory (BEM) can be evaluated. During regular operation vertical shear and yawed inflow are the main contributors to periodic blade load asymmetry. It is shown that the near wake interaction of the blades under such conditions is not fully captured by the correction models of BEM approach. The differing prediction of local induction causes a high fatigue load uncertainty especially for two-bladed turbines. The implementation of both cyclic pitch control and a tumbling rotor can mitigate the fatigue loading by increasing the aerodynamic and structural damping. The influence of the time and space variant vorticity distribution in the near wake is evaluated in detail for different cyclic pitch control functions and tumble dynamics respectively. It is demonstrated that dynamic inflow as well as wake blade interaction have a significant impact on the calculated blade forces and need to be accounted for by the aerodynamic modelling approach. Aeroelastic simulations are carried out using the high fidelity multi body

  16. Dynamic Loads and Structural Criteria Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-01

    intended mission assignment from a practical standpoint, discussing possible bias in the operationa data. The Task IV objective was to identify...critical segments and conditions. Three criteria were used: high loads, high fatigue damage , and high ••’ibration. it II- Unclassified SECURITY...IDENTIFICATION OF CRITICAL SEGMENTS/ CONDITIONS 84 High Structural Loads and Fatigue Damage 84 High Vibration ^0 Causal Factors ^O

  17. Analysis of electromagnetic backscatter from an inlet cavity configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, P. H.; Huang, C. C.; Lai, C. Y.; Moffatt, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The radar cross secction of jet engine configurations on modern aircraft is a most perverse problem analytically. An ability to predict the radar cross section of loaded cavity structures, even when such structures are only very crude models of the actual engine, has been seriously lacking. At the same time it is well known that above a certain spectral range the engine configuration largely controls the radar cross section of the aircraft over a large span of noise and often stern aspects. Recently, the radar signal modulation produced by the engines has become of important analytical concern. This report is separated into two parts. Part I, Ray Analysis of EM Backscatter from a Cavity Configuration contains the major thrust of our research and basically details an asymptotic frequency domain analysis of various loaded cavity structures. Part II, Canonical Response Waveforms of Finite and Open Circular Waveguides is essentially a time domain analysis of the same types of problems. The parts are interrelated in the sense that results from one are used in the other. For example, Part II reproduces a portion of the exact Wiener-Hopf computations for an open circular waveguide. These results were used to verify a portion of the theory in Part I. Conversely, frequency computations from the analysis in Part I are used in Part II as part of a Fourier synthesis procedure to obtain canonical response waveforms.

  18. Microscopic Approaches to Nuclear Structure: Configuration Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ormand, W E

    2007-09-21

    The configuration interaction (CI) approach to solving the nuclear many-body problem, also known as the interacting shell model, has proven to be powerful tool in understanding the structure of nuclei. The principal criticism of past applications of the shell model is the reliance on empirical tuning to interaction matrix elements. If an accurate description of nuclei far from the valley of stability, where little or no data is available, a more fundamental approach is needed. This starts with recent ab initio approaches with effective interactions in the no-core shell model (NCSM). Using effective-field theory for guidance, fully ab initio descriptions of nuclei up to {sup 16}O with QCD based NN, NNN, and NNNN interactions will be possible within the next five years. An important task is then to determine how to use these NCSM results to develop effective interactions to describe heavier nuclei without the need to resort to an empirical retuning with every model space. Thus, it is likely that more traditional CI applications utilizing direct diagonalization and more fundamental interactions will be applicable to nuclei with perhaps up to one hundred constituents. But, these direct diagonalization CI applications will always be computationally limited due to the rapid increase in the number of configurations with particle number. Very recently, the shifted-contour method has been applied to the Auxiliary-field Monte Carlo approach to the Shell Model (AFMCSM), and preliminary applications exhibit a remarkable taming of the notorious sign problem. If the mitigation of the sign problem holds true, the AFMCSM will offer a method to compute quantum correlations to mean-field applications for just about all nuclei; giving exact results for CI model spaces that can approach 10{sup 20-25}. In these lectures, I will discuss modern applications of CI to the nuclear many-body problem that have the potential to guide nuclear structure theory into the next decade.

  19. Computational methods for stellerator configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Betancourt, O.

    1992-01-01

    This project had two main objectives. The first one was to continue to develop computational methods for the study of three dimensional magnetic confinement configurations. The second one was to collaborate and interact with researchers in the field who can use these techniques to study and design fusion experiments. The first objective has been achieved with the development of the spectral code BETAS and the formulation of a new variational approach for the study of magnetic island formation in a self consistent fashion. The code can compute the correct island width corresponding to the saturated island, a result shown by comparing the computed island with the results of unstable tearing modes in Tokamaks and with experimental results in the IMS Stellarator. In addition to studying three dimensional nonlinear effects in Tokamaks configurations, these self consistent computed island equilibria will be used to study transport effects due to magnetic island formation and to nonlinearly bifurcated equilibria. The second objective was achieved through direct collaboration with Steve Hirshman at Oak Ridge, D. Anderson and R. Talmage at Wisconsin as well as through participation in the Sherwood and APS meetings.

  20. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.; Kim, S.; Hwang, D.; Chen, C.C.; Chiou, Z.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of our research was to obtain fundamental information regarding the functional dependence of the diffusion coefficient of coal molecules on the ratio of molecule to pore diameter. That is, the objective of our study was to examine the effect of molecule size and configuration on hindered diffusion of coal macromolecules through as porous medium. To best accomplish this task, we circumvented the complexities of an actual porous catalyst by using a well defined porous matrix with uniform capillaric pores, i.e., a track-etched membrane. In this way, useful information was obtained regarding the relationship of molecular size and configuration on the diffusion rate of coal derived macromolecules through a pore structure with known geometry. Similar studies were performed using a pellet formed of porous alumina, to provide a link between the idealized membranes and the actual complex pore structure of real catalyst extrudates. The fundamental information from our study will be useful toward the tailoring of catalysts to minimize diffusional influences and thereby increase coal conversion and selectivity for desirable products. (VC)

  1. The configuration management program for the Emergency Management Support System

    SciTech Connect

    Probasco, K M; Stephan, E G

    1991-08-01

    Emergency response software is used increasingly by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Emergency Management Project (EMP) personnel at Hanford Site. This software must be reliable, of high quality, and capable of performing critical functions to support assessment of actual or potential consequences of any hazardous accidents onsite or events having potential offsite impacts. To better control the software and ensure its suitability for use as a tool to protect employees, the public, and environment, a method for specifying and certifying its capabilities and documenting its development and implementation was needed. A team of EMP staff, composed of personnel from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Boeing Computer Services- Richland (BCSR) under the direction of PNL EMP, responded to this need by developing a software configuration management program (CMP). This report documents the development of the CMP, including the strategies upon which the CMP is based, and describes the program as it has been implemented for EMS System software. The program relies on the integration of its three primary elements: the configuration management staff, tools, and process. Configuration management staff run the program, using specially designed configuration management forms to guide, document, and track the life cycle of the software. The configuration management process itself is reflected in the instructive forms and summarized in flowcharts representing each phase of the process -- from requirements specification through implementation and maintenance. 7 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Equilibrium Configuration in a Nematic Liquid Crystal Droplet with Homeotropic Anchoring of Finite Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanke, Masaki; Sasaki, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Equilibrium configuration of order parameter in a nematic liquid crystal droplet with homeotropic anchoring of finite strength at the surface is studied numerically by using the Landau--de Gennes approach. It is found that a hedgehog-like configuration with a disclination loop of a small radius is stable for strong anchoring while an axial configuration without defect is stable for weak anchoring. A first-order phase transition from one configuration to the other occurs as the strength of the anchoring is varied. The critical anchoring strength turns out to increase almost linearly with the inverse of the droplet radius.

  3. Critical Care

    MedlinePlus

    Critical care helps people with life-threatening injuries and illnesses. It might treat problems such as complications from surgery, ... attention by a team of specially-trained health care providers. Critical care usually takes place in an ...

  4. Testing and Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Aircraft Fuselage Structure. Part 1; Ultimate Design Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Rouse, Marshall; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2016-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aimed to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration were not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One airframe concept identified by the project as having the potential to dramatically improve aircraft performance was a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presented inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses finite element analysis and testing of a large-scale hybrid wing body center section structure developed and constructed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. Part I of the paper considers the five most critical load conditions, which are internal pressure only and positive and negative g-loads with and without internal pressure. Analysis results are compared with measurements acquired during testing. Performance of the test article is found to be closely aligned with predictions and, consequently, able to support the hybrid wing body design loads in pristine and barely visible impact damage conditions.

  5. Point and Circle Configurations; A New Theorem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorwart, Harold L.

    1988-01-01

    Point and circle configurations are not well known, so Clifford's chain of theorems and Miquel's theorem, whose diagrams exhibit such configurations, are discussed. A new theorem similar to Miquel's is then presented. (MNS)

  6. The Structure of Magnetocentrifugal Jets and Winds I. Steady Mass Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.

    2004-12-15

    We present the results of a series of time-dependent numerical simulations of cold, magnetocentrifugally launched winds from accretion disks. The goal of this study is to determine how the mass loading from the disk affects the structure and dynamics of the wind for a given distribution of magnetic field. Our simulations span four and half decades of mass loading; in the context of a disk with a launching region from 0.1 AU to 1.0 AU around a 1M{circle_dot} star and a field strength of about 20 G at the inner disk edge, this amounts to mass loss rates of 1 x 10{sup -9} - 3 x 10{sup -5} M{circle_dot} yr{sup -1} from each side of the disk. We find that, as expected intuitively, the degree of collimation of the wind increases with mass loading; however even the ''lightest'' wind simulated is significantly collimated compared with the force-free magnetic configuration of the same magnetic flux distribution at the launching surface, which becomes radial at large distances. The implication is that for flows from young stellar objects a radial field approximation is inappropriate. Surprisingly, the terminal velocity of the wind and the magnetic lever arm are still well-described by the analytical solutions for a radial field geometry. We also find that the isodensity contours and Alfven surface are very nearly self-similar in mass loading. The wind becomes unsteady above some critical mass loading rate. The exact value of the critical rate depends on the (small) velocity with which we inject the material into the wind. For a small enough injection speed, we are able to obtain the first examples of a class of heavily-loaded magnetocentrifugal winds with magnetic fields completely dominated by the toroidal component all the way to the launching surface. The stability of such toroidally dominated winds in 3D will be the subject of a future investigation.

  7. The DEMO wall load challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenninger, R.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R.; Arbeiter, F.; Aubert, J.; Bachmann, C.; Barbato, L.; Barrett, T.; Beckers, M.; Biel, W.; Boccaccini, L.; Carralero, D.; Coster, D.; Eich, T.; Fasoli, A.; Federici, G.; Firdaouss, M.; Graves, J.; Horacek, J.; Kovari, M.; Lanthaler, S.; Loschiavo, V.; Lowry, C.; Lux, H.; Maddaluno, G.; Maviglia, F.; Mitteau, R.; Neu, R.; Pfefferle, D.; Schmid, K.; Siccinio, M.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Snicker, A.; Subba, F.; Varje, J.; Zohm, H.

    2017-04-01

    For several reasons the challenge to keep the loads to the first wall within engineering limits is substantially higher in DEMO compared to ITER. Therefore the pre-conceptual design development for DEMO that is currently ongoing in Europe needs to be based on load estimates that are derived employing the most recent plasma edge physics knowledge. An initial assessment of the static wall heat load limit in DEMO infers that the steady state peak heat flux limit on the majority of the DEMO first wall should not be assumed to be higher than 1.0 MW m‑2. This compares to an average wall heat load of 0.29 MW m‑2 for the design {\\tt {EU}}{\\tt {~}}{\\tt {DEMO1}}{\\tt {~2015}} assuming a perfect homogeneous distribution. The main part of this publication concentrates on the development of first DEMO estimates for charged particle, radiation, fast particle (all static) and disruption heat loads. Employing an initial engineering wall design with clear optimization potential in combination with parameters for the flat-top phase (x-point configuration), loads up to 7 MW m‑2 (penalty factor for tolerances etc not applied) have been calculated. Assuming a fraction of power radiated from the x-point region between 1/5 and 1/3, peaks of the total power flux density due to radiation of 0.6–0.8 MW m‑2 are found in the outer baffle region. This first review of wall loads, and the associated limits in DEMO clearly underlines a significant challenge that necessitates substantial engineering efforts as well as a considerable consolidation of the associated physics basis.

  8. Preliminary design study of lunar housing configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, K. H.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary design study assesses various configurations for habitation of the lunar surface. The study assumes an initial 4-man habitation module expandable to a 48-man concept. Through the numerous coupling combinations of identical modules, five basic configuration types are identified. A design model presents each configuration in light of certain issues. The issues include circulation, internal and external spatial characteristics, functional organizations, and future growth potential. The study discusses the attributes, potentials, and unique requirements of each configuration.

  9. Archetypal Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesebro, James W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Argues that archetypal criticism is a useful way of examining universal, historical, and cross-cultural symbols in classrooms. Identifies essential features of an archetype; outlines operational and critical procedures; illustrates archetypal criticism as applied to the cross as a symbol; and provides a synoptic placement for archetypal criticism…

  10. Structure Preserving Anonymization of Router Configuration Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    regular expressions, and robustly coping with more than 200 versions of the configuration language. Conventional tools and techniques are poorly suited...regular expressions, and robustly coping with more than 200 versions of the configuration language. Conventional tools and techniques are poorly...configuration language, so conventional compiler tools and techniques are poorly suited to the problem. Third, the anonymization needs to support a

  11. 47 CFR 22.623 - System configuration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false System configuration. 22.623 Section 22.623... Paging and Radiotelephone Service Point-To-Multipoint Operation § 22.623 System configuration. This section requires a minimum configuration for point-to-multipoint systems using the channels listed in § 22...

  12. 47 CFR 22.623 - System configuration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false System configuration. 22.623 Section 22.623... Paging and Radiotelephone Service Point-To-Multipoint Operation § 22.623 System configuration. This section requires a minimum configuration for point-to-multipoint systems using the channels listed in § 22...

  13. 47 CFR 22.623 - System configuration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false System configuration. 22.623 Section 22.623... Paging and Radiotelephone Service Point-To-Multipoint Operation § 22.623 System configuration. This section requires a minimum configuration for point-to-multipoint systems using the channels listed in § 22...

  14. 47 CFR 22.623 - System configuration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false System configuration. 22.623 Section 22.623... Paging and Radiotelephone Service Point-To-Multipoint Operation § 22.623 System configuration. This section requires a minimum configuration for point-to-multipoint systems using the channels listed in § 22...

  15. 47 CFR 22.623 - System configuration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false System configuration. 22.623 Section 22.623... Paging and Radiotelephone Service Point-To-Multipoint Operation § 22.623 System configuration. This section requires a minimum configuration for point-to-multipoint systems using the channels listed in § 22...

  16. Spin configurations on a decorated square lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Mert, Gülistan; Mert, H. Şevki

    2016-06-08

    Spin configurations on a decorated square lattice are investigated using Bertaut’s microscopic method. We have obtained collinear and non-collinear (canted) modes for the given wave vectors in the ground state. We have found ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic commensurate spin configurations. We have found canted incommensurate spin configurations.

  17. Axial-Loading Circumferential Dovetail Turbine-Blade Mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Martin J.; Ward, Steven D.; Eskridge, Ronald R.

    1992-01-01

    In new configuration, retaining ring holds base of blades in circumferential dovetail slot. Blades inserted axially via loading slots into circumferential dovetail slot. Ring placed over loading slots and fastened with split ring held by arm of disk. Blades less likely to be shaken loose during operation.

  18. Molecular dynamics study on the thermal buckling of carbon nanotubes in the presence of pre-load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehralian, Fahimeh; Tadi Beni, Yaghoub; Kiani, Yaser

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a molecular dynamics (MD) study on the thermally induced buckling of pre-compressed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using AIREBO interatomic potential. CNTs are compressed at a certain ratio of their critical buckling strain and then undergo a uniform temperature rise. In order to evaluate the chirality effects, armchair and zigzag CNTs are investigated. The results demonstrate that critical buckling temperature depends strongly on the geometrical parameters such as chirality, diameter and aspect ratio. The armchair CNTs, due to their bond configuration, show higher resistance to thermal buckling than zigzag ones. Moreover, the buckling mechanism is strongly affected by the length of CNTs. At small aspect ratios, radial limit load shell buckling occurs while by increase in aspect ratio above the critical one different behaviors emerge. Due to the strong thermal oscillation of carbon atoms, increase in temperature changes perfect nanotubes to defective ones.

  19. Configurable hot spot fixing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, Masanari; Kobayashi, Sachiko; Mashita, Hiromitsu; Aburada, Ryota; Furuta, Nozomu; Kotani, Toshiya

    2014-03-01

    Hot spot fixing (HSF) method has been used to fix many hot spots automatically. However, conventional HSF based on a biasing based modification is difficult to fix many hot spots under a low-k1 lithography condition. In this paper we proposed a new HSF, called configurable hotspot fixing system. The HSF has two major concepts. One is a new function to utilize vacant space around a hot spot by adding new patterns or extending line end edges around the hot spot. The other is to evaluate many candidates at a time generated by the new functions. We confirmed the proposed HSF improves 73% on the number of fixing hot spots and reduces total fixing time by 50% on a device layout equivalent to 28nm-node. The result shows the proposed HSF is effective for layouts under the low-k1 lithography condition.

  20. Configural information in gender categorisation.

    PubMed

    Baudouin, Jean-Yves; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2006-01-01

    The role of configural information in gender categorisation was studied by aligning the top half of one face with the bottom half of another. The two faces had the same or different genders. Experiment 1 shows that participants were slower and made more errors in categorising the gender in either half of these composite faces when the two faces had a different gender, relative to control conditions where the two faces were nonaligned or had the same gender. This result parallels the composite effect for face recognition (Young et al, 1987 Perception 16 747-759) and facial-expression recognition (Calder et al, 2000 Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 26 527-551). Similarly to responses to face identity and expression, the composite effect on gender discrimination was disrupted by inverting the faces (experiment 2). Both experiments also show that the composite paradigm is sensitive to general contextual interference in gender categorisation.