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Sample records for critical success factors

  1. 2012 Critical Success Factors Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community College System (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Critical Success Factors Report is the North Carolina Community College System's major accountability document. This annual performance report is based on data compiled from the previous year and serves to inform colleges and the public on the performance of North Carolina's 58 community colleges. In 1993, the State Board of Community Colleges…

  2. 2011 Critical Success Factors Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community College System (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Critical Success Factors Report is the North Carolina Community College System's major accountability document. This annual performance report serves to inform colleges and the public on the performance of North Carolina's 58 community colleges. In 1993, the State Board of Community Colleges began monitoring performance data on specific…

  3. Critical Success Factors in Online Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberth

    2011-01-01

    With the proliferation of online courses nowadays, it is necessary to ask what defines the success of teaching and learning in these new learning environments exactly. This paper identifies and critically discusses a number of factors for successful implementation of online delivery, particularly as far as online language learning is concerned.…

  4. Process Mapping: Tools, Techniques, & Critical Success Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Howard K.

    2002-01-01

    Explains process mapping as an analytical tool and a process intervention that performance technologists can use to improve human performance by reducing error variance. Highlights include benefits of process mapping; and critical success factors, including organizational readiness, time commitment by participants, and the availability of a…

  5. Critical Success Factors for Should Cost Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    Discriminant Analysis of Research Objective 63 . . A...:.: Three. Question 9 follaws" 9. The Should Cost planning process proved essential for a...the group. The researchers felt that it was important to investigate the questions because - of their impact on the planning process . Question means and...8217 ", ", ’ I.o ’ , " ,%.., " ,".- " " , , ’° " " , " . J .*.~*..,* U,• success of the Should Cost. The researchers employed a five step process to determine the

  6. Critical Success Factors of Internet Shopping: The Case of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchariyachanvanich, Kanokwan; Okada, Hitoshi; Sonehara, Noboru

    This paper presents the results from a study conducted on the effect of differing factors on a customer's attitude towards using Internet shopping in Japan. The research model used was an extended version of the consumers' acceptance of virtual stores model with the addition of a new factor, need specificity, and a grouping of critical success factors based on their customer-centric and website-centric viewpoints sources. It examines how differences in the individual characteristics of customers affect the actual use of Internet shopping. According to an online questionnaire filled out by 1,215 online customers used to conduct a multiple regression analysis and a structural equation modeling analysis, the participant's gender, education level, innovativeness, net-orientation, and need specificity, which are the factors for the customer-centric viewpoints, have a positive impact on the actual use of Internet shopping. The implication also shows that Japanese online customers do not worry about the quality of service of Internet shopping, a factor in the website-centric viewpoint, as significantly as offline customers do.

  7. Theory of sampling: four critical success factors before analysis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Claas; Esbensen, Kim H

    2015-01-01

    Food and feed materials characterization, risk assessment, and safety evaluations can only be ensured if QC measures are based on valid analytical data, stemming from representative samples. The Theory of Sampling (TOS) is the only comprehensive theoretical framework that fully defines all requirements to ensure sampling correctness and representativity, and to provide the guiding principles for sampling in practice. TOS also defines the concept of material heterogeneity and its impact on the sampling process, including the effects from all potential sampling errors. TOS's primary task is to eliminate bias-generating errors and to minimize sampling variability. Quantitative measures are provided to characterize material heterogeneity, on which an optimal sampling strategy should be based. Four critical success factors preceding analysis to ensure a representative sampling process are presented here.

  8. A Synthesis and Survey of Critical Success Factors for Computer Technology Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ross A.

    2012-01-01

    The author investigated the existence of critical success factors for computer technology projects. Current research literature and a survey of experienced project managers indicate that there are 23 critical success factors (CSFs) that correlate with project success. The survey gathered an assessment of project success and the degree to which…

  9. Critical Success Factors for E-Learning Acceptance: Confirmatory Factor Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selim, Hassan M.

    2007-01-01

    E-learning, one of the tools emerged from information technology, has been integrated in many university programs. There are several factors that need to be considered while developing or implementing university curriculums that offer e-learning based courses. This paper is intended to specify e-learning critical success factors (CSFs) as…

  10. Critical success factors for competitiveness of construction companies: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanafi, Abdul Ghafur; Nawi, Mohd Nasrun Mohd

    2016-08-01

    Making progress basically, a fundamental issue for the construction companies to get by in a highly competitive industry. From time to time, industry players are facing stiff and tough competition due to large number of players, whether existing or new players involved from various background and track record. Furthermore, the large numbers of component deciding the competitiveness of contractors, whose organization structures and governance have turned out to be more muddled. Different construction companies have their own unique criteria which may differ from one to another. The enormous amount of issues needs to bring down to manageable numbers so that measures can be identified and scrutinized to enhance competitiveness. This paper discusses the result from the critical investigation from past studies in the Asian countries, namely China, India, Thailand, Singapore and Malaysia. Several fundamental factors have been identified as CSFs in construction companies in respective country. Also highlighted a critical survey based upon various literatures written on this subject where critical success factors (CSFs) as a yardstick to gauge the relationship among CSFs in various construction companies in the Asian region. Far reaching estimation of an organization's performance and resulting input to its supervision is crucial for business change. Estimation additionally empowers organizations to be contrasted from one another on the premise of institutionalized data, permitting best practices to be distinguished and connected more widely. Different countries have their own set of critical success factors (CSFs) which may differ in term of priority and at the same time share common elements of success factor in accomplishment as a construction companies. The study, which is exploratory in nature, embraced the content investigation and inductive technique to accomplish its objectives.

  11. Growth factor choice is critical for successful functionalization of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pinkernelle, Josephine; Raffa, Vittoria; Calatayud, Maria P.; Goya, Gerado F.; Riggio, Cristina; Keilhoff, Gerburg

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) show new characteristics compared to the corresponding bulk material. These nanoscale properties make them interesting for various applications in biomedicine and life sciences. One field of application is the use of magnetic NPs to support regeneration in the nervous system. Drug delivery requires a functionalization of NPs with bio-functional molecules. In our study, we functionalized self-made PEI-coated iron oxide NPs with nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Next, we tested the bio-functionality of NGF in a rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12) and the bio-functionality of GDNF in an organotypic spinal cord culture. Covalent binding of NGF to PEI-NPs impaired bio-functionality of NGF, but non-covalent approach differentiated PC12 cells reliably. Non-covalent binding of GDNF showed a satisfying bio-functionality of GDNF:PEI-NPs, but turned out to be unstable in conjugation to the PEI-NPs. Taken together, our study showed the importance of assessing bio-functionality and binding stability of functionalized growth factors using proper biological models. It also shows that successful functionalization of magnetic NPs with growth factors is dependent on the used binding chemistry and that it is hardly predictable. For use as therapeutics, functionalization strategies have to be reproducible and future studies are needed. PMID:26388717

  12. 2010 Critical Success Factors for the North Carolina Community College System. Twenty First Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community College System (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    First mandated by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1989 (S.L. 1989; C. 752; S. 80), the Critical Success Factors report has evolved into the major accountability document for the North Carolina Community College System. This twenty first annual report on the critical success factors is the result of a process undertaken to streamline and…

  13. A Cross-Industry Review of B2B Critical Success Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eid, Riyad; Trueman, Myfanwy; Ahmed, Abdel Moneim

    2002-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive review of B2B (business-to- business) international Internet marketing and identifies 21 critical success factors in five categories: marketing strategy, including management support, strategic goals, and collaboration; Web site factors, including Web site design; global factors, including multilanguage sites and cultural…

  14. Student Satisfaction with Learning Management Systems: A Lens of Critical Success Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naveh, Gali; Tubin, Dorit; Pliskin, Nava

    2012-01-01

    Institutions of higher education have invested heavily in learning management systems (LMS) for creating course websites. Yet, how to assess LMS effectiveness is not fully agreed upon. Based on institutional theory, this article considers student satisfaction as indicative of LMS success and proposes a lens of critical success factors (CSF) as a…

  15. Critical Success Factors: How One Multinational Company Develops Global E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathan, Edward Pavel

    2011-01-01

    This research study examined how a multinational company determined what the critical success factors (CSFs) were for developing global e-learning. The study analyzed how these CSFs were grouped together to make their management more efficient. There were 21 participants in the study who were key stakeholders from the United States, Europe, Latin…

  16. Critical Success Factors in Crafting Strategic Architecture for E-Learning at HP University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Kunal; Pandit, Pallvi; Pandit, Parul

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to outline the critical success factors for crafting a strategic architecture for e-learning at HP University. Design/methodology/approach: A descriptive survey type of research design was used. An empirical study was conducted on students enrolled with the International Centre for Distance and Open Learning…

  17. Organisational Issues for E-Learning: Critical Success Factors as Identified by HE Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Maggie; Nunes, Miguel Baptista

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a research project that identified organisational critical success factors (CSFs) for e-learning implementation in higher education (HE). These CSFs can be used as a theoretical foundation upon which to base decision-making and strategic thinking about e-learning. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  18. Critical Success Factors: How One Multinational Company Develops Global E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathan, Edward Pavel

    2009-01-01

    This research study examined how a multinational company determined what the critical success factors (CSFs) were for developing global e-learning. The study analyzed how these CSFs were grouped together in order to make their management more efficient. There were 21 participants in the study who were key stakeholders and came from one of four…

  19. Transferring disease management and health promotion programs to other countries: critical success factors.

    PubMed

    Azarmina, Pejman; Prestwich, Graham; Rosenquist, Joel; Singh, Debbie

    2008-12-01

    Governments and health service providers around the world are under pressure to improve health outcomes while containing rising healthcare costs. In response to such challenges, many regions have implemented services that have been successful in other countries-but 'importing' initiatives has many challenges. This article summarizes factors found to be critical to the success of adapting a US disease management and health promotion programme for use in Italy and the UK. Using three illustrative case studies, it describes how in each region the programme needed to adapt (i) the form and content of the disease management service, (ii) the involvement and integration with local clinicians and services and (iii) the evaluation of programme outcomes. We argue that it is important to implement evidence-based practice by learning lessons from other countries and service initiatives, but that it is equally important to take into consideration the '3Ps' that are critical for successful service implementation: payers, practitioners and patients.

  20. Examination of the relationship between project management critical success factors and project success of oil and gas drilling projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagba, Tonye J.

    Oil and gas drilling projects are the primary means by which oil companies recover large volumes of commercially available hydrocarbons from deep reservoirs. These types of projects are complex in nature, involving management of multiple stakeholder interfaces, multidisciplinary personnel, complex contractor relationships, and turbulent environmental and market conditions, necessitating the application of proven project management best practices and critical success factors (CSFs) to achieve success. Although there is some practitioner oriented literature on project management CSFs for drilling projects, none of these is based on empirical evidence, from research. In addition, the literature has reported alarming rates of oil and gas drilling project failure, which is attributable not to technical factors, but to failure of project management. The aim of this quantitative correlational study therefore, was to discover an empirically verified list of project management CSFs, which consistent application leads to successful implementation of oil and gas drilling projects. The study collected survey data online, from a random sample of 127 oil and gas drilling personnel who were members of LinkedIn's online community "Drilling Supervisors, Managers, and Engineers". The results of the study indicated that 10 project management factors are individually related to project success of oil and gas drilling projects. These 10 CSFs are namely; Project mission, Top management support, Project schedule/plan, Client consultation, Personnel, Technical tasks, Client acceptance, Monitoring and feedback, Communication, and Troubleshooting. In addition, the study found that the relationships between the 10 CSFs and drilling project success is unaffected by participant and project demographics---role of project personnel, and project location. The significance of these findings are both practical, and theoretical. Practically, application of an empirically verified CSFs list to oil

  1. Prioritizing critical success factors for reverse logistics implementation using fuzzy-TOPSIS methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Saurabh; Singh, Rajesh K.; Murtaza, Qasim

    2016-11-01

    Electronics industry is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. In India also, there are high turnovers and growing demand of electronics product especially after post liberalization in early nineties. These products generate e-waste which has become big environmental issue. Industries can handle these e-waste and product returns efficiently by developing reverse logistics (RL) system. A thorough study of critical success factors (CSFs) and their ordered implementation is essential for successful RL implementation. The aim of the study is to review the CSFs, and to prioritize them for RL implementation in Indian electronics industry. Twelve CSFs were identified through literature review, and discussion with the experts from the Indian electronics industry. Fuzzy-Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) approach is proposed for prioritizing these CSFs. Perusal of literature indicates that fuzzy-TOPSIS has not been applied earlier for prioritization of CSFs in Indian electronics industry. Five Indian electronics companies were selected for evaluation of this methodology. Results indicate that most of the identified factors are crucial for the RL implementation. Top management awareness, resource management, economic factors, and contracts terms and conditions are top four prioritized factor, and process capabilities and skilled workers is the least prioritized factor. The findings will be useful for successful RL implementation in Indian electronics industry.

  2. Identifying Critical Success Factors for TQM and Employee Performance in Malaysian Automotive Industry: A Literature Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadia Dedy, Aimie; Zakuan, Norhayati; Zaidi Bahari, Ahamad; Ariff, Mohd Shoki Md; Chin, Thoo Ai; Zameri Mat Saman, Muhamad

    2016-05-01

    TQM is a management philosophy embracing all activities through which the needs and expectations of the customer and the community and the goals of the companies are satisfied in the most efficient and cost effective way by maximizing the potential of all workers in a continuing drive for total quality improvement. TQM is very important to the company especially in automotive industry in order for them to survive in the competitive global market. The main objective of this study is to review a relationship between TQM and employee performance. Authors review updated literature on TQM study with two main targets: (a) evolution of TQM considering as a set of practice, (b) and its impacts to employee performance. Therefore, two research questions are proposed in order to review TQM constructs and employee performance measure: (a) Is the set of critical success factors associated with TQM valid as a whole? (b) What is the critical success factors should be considered to measure employee performance in automotive industry?

  3. Health Information Exchange Implementation: Lessons Learned and Critical Success Factors From a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    implementation of a health system to the statewide HIE were found. The most significant perceived success was accomplishing the implementation, although many interviewees also underscored the value of a project champion with decision-making power. In terms of lessons learned, social reasons were found to be very significant motivators for early implementation, frequently outweighing economic motivations. It was clear that understanding the guides early in the project would have mitigated some of the challenges that emerged, and early communication with the electronic health record vendor so that they have a solid understanding of the undertaking was critical. An HIE implementations evaluation framework was found to be useful for assessing challenges, motivations, value propositions for participating, and success factors to consider for future implementations. Conclusions This case study illuminates five critical success factors for implementation of a health system onto a statewide HIE. This study also reveals that organizations have varied motivations and value proposition perceptions for engaging in the exchange of health information, few of which, at the early stages, are economically driven. PMID:25599991

  4. Implementing system-wide risk stratification approaches: A review of critical success and failure factors.

    PubMed

    Huckel Schneider, Carmen; Gillespie, James A; Wilson, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Risk stratification has become a widely used tool for linking people identified at risk of health deterioration to the most appropriate evidence-based care. This article systematically reviews recent literature to determine key factors that have been identified as critical enablers and/or barriers to successful implementation of risk stratification tools at a system level. A systematic search found 23 articles and four promising protocols for inclusion in the review, covering the use to 20 different risk stratification tools. These articles reported on only a small fraction of the risk stratification tools used in health systems; suggesting that while the development and statistical validation of risk stratification algorithms is widely reported, there has been little published evaluation of how they are implemented in real-world settings. Controlled studies provided some evidence that the use of risk stratification tools in combination with a care management plan offer patient benefits and that the use of a risk stratification tool to determine components of a care management plan may contribute to reductions in hospital readmissions, patient satisfaction and improved patient outcomes. Studies with the strongest focus on implementation used qualitative and case study methods. Among these, the literature converged on four key areas of implementation that were found to be critical for overcoming barriers to success: the engagement of clinicians and safeguarding equity, both of which address barriers of acceptance; the health system context to address administrative, political and system design barriers; and data management and integration to address logistical barriers.

  5. Critical Success Factors for E-Learning in Developing Countries: A Comparative Analysis between ICT Experts and Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhuasiri, Wannasiri; Xaymoungkhoun, Oudone; Zo, Hangjung; Rho, Jae Jeung; Ciganek, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    This study identifies the critical success factors that influence the acceptance of e-learning systems in developing countries. E-learning is a popular mode of delivering educational materials in higher education by universities throughout the world. This study identifies multiple factors that influence the success of e-learning systems from the…

  6. The Management Academy for Public Health: program design and critical success factors.

    PubMed

    Orton, Stephen; Umble, Karl E; Rosen, Benson; McIver, Jacqueline; Menkens, Anne J

    2006-01-01

    The Management Academy for Public Health is a team-based training program jointly offered by the School of Public Health and the Kenan-Flagler Business School at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This 9-month program teaches public health managers how to better manage people, information, and finances. Participants learn how to work in teams with community partners, and how to think and behave as social entrepreneurs. To practice and blend their new skills, teams develop a business plan that addresses a local public health issue. This article describes the program and explains the findings of the process evaluation, which has examined how best to structure and deploy a team-based method to create more effective, more entrepreneurial public health managers. Findings indicate that recruitment and retention are strong, program elements are relevant to learners' needs, and learners are satisfied with and value the program. Several specific benefits of the program model are identified, as well as several elements that support business plan success and skills' application on the job. On the basis of these findings, four success factors critical for developing similar programs are identified.

  7. Identifying critical success factors (CSFs) of implementing building information modeling (BIM) in Malaysian construction industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaakob, Mazri; Ali, Wan Nur Athirah Wan; Radzuan, Kamaruddin

    2016-08-01

    Building Information Modeling (BIM) is defined as existing from the earliest concept to demolition and it involves creating and using an intelligent 3D model to inform and communicate project decisions. This research aims to identify the critical success factors (CSFs) of BIM implementation in Malaysian construction industry. A literature review was done to explore previous BIM studies on definitions and history of BIM, construction issues, application of BIM in construction projects as well as benefits of BIM. A series of interviews with multidisciplinary Malaysian construction experts will be conducted purposely for data collection process guided by the research design and methodology approach of this study. The analysis of qualitative data from the process will be combined with criteria identified in the literature review in order to identify the CSFs. Finally, the CSFs of BIM implementation will be validated by further Malaysian industrialists during a workshop. The validated CSFs can be used as a term of reference for both Malaysian practitioners and academics towards measuring BIM effectiveness level in their organizations.

  8. Analysis on critical success factors for agile manufacturing evaluation in original equipment manufacturing industry-an AHP approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajay Guru Dev, C.; Senthil Kumar, V. S.

    2016-09-01

    Manufacturing industries are facing challenges in the implementation of agile manufacturing in their products and processes. Agility is widely accepted as a new competitive concept in the manufacturing sector in fulfilling varying customer demand. Thus, evaluation of agile manufacturing in industries has become a necessity. The success of an organisation depends on its ability to manage finding the critical success factors and give them special and continued attention in order to bring about high performance. This paper proposes a set of critical success factors (CSFs) for evaluating agile manufacturing considered appropriate for the manufacturing sector. The analytical hierarchy process (AHP) method is applied for prioritizing the success factors, by summarizing the opinions of experts. It is believed that the proposed CSFs enable and assist manufacturing industries to achieve a higher performance in agile manufacturing so as to increase competitiveness.

  9. The Occupational Success of the Retarded: Critical Factors, Predictive Tests and Remedial Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laradon Hall Occupational Center, Denver, CO.

    A job success rating scale was developed by use with 60 mentally retarded young adults (IQ's under 80, ages from 18 to 30), their parents, and employers. Interviews and job histories were analyzed; an experimental test battery measuring 101 aptitude and personality variables was administered. By factor analysis and statistical procedures, 17 tests…

  10. Reshaping Computer Literacy Teaching in Higher Education: Identification of Critical Success Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Estelle; Goede, Roelien; Steyn, Tjaart

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Acquiring computer skills is more important today than ever before, especially in a developing country. Teaching of computer skills, however, has to adapt to new technology. This paper aims to model factors influencing the success of the learning of computer literacy by means of an e-learning environment. The research question for this…

  11. Critical Success Factors in the Curriculum Alignment Process: The Case of the College of Business at Abu Dhabi University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camba, Pitzel; Krotov, Vlad

    2015-01-01

    The main goals of this article are to (a) assist business schools in understanding the curriculum alignment process, and (b) uncover critical success factors in curriculum alignment. Based on a case study conducted at the College of Business at Abu Dhabi University, a detailed curriculum alignment process description is provided. The process…

  12. Critical Success Factors for an Effective Security Risk Management Program in an Organization: An Exploratory Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zafar, Humayun

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates differences in perception between layers of management (executive, middle, and lower) and staff with regard to the influence of critical success factors (CSFs) on security risk management (SRM) effectiveness. This is an in-depth case study conducted at a Fortune 500 company. Rockart's (1979) CSF method is modified through…

  13. A Systematic Investigation on Barriers and Critical Success Factors for Clinical Information Systems in Integrated Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives Clinical Information Systems (CIS) have ever since the introduction of information technology in healthcare played an important role to support healthcare professionals and the process of treatment. With the rise of the concept of integrated care organizational borders, the sole focus on data aggregation or healthcare professionals as users disappear more and more. The manuscript discusses the concept of CISs and investigates critical success factors for CISs in the context of integrated care and in the course of time. Methods In order to identify critical success factors and barriers for CISs a systematic literature review was conducted based on the results from PubMed and Cochrane, using MaxQDA. Search results were thereby limited to reviews or meta-analysis. Results We have found 1919 references of which 40 met the inclusion criteria. The analysis of the manuscripts resulted in a comprehensive list of success factors and barriers related to CISs in integrated care settings. Most barriers were user-related whereas for the success factors an even distribution of organizational, technical and user-related factors was observed. The vast majority of publications was focused on healthcare professionals. Conclusion It is important to incorporate experiences made/collected over time, as the problems encountered seem to remain almost unvaried. In order to support further systematic investigations on the topic it is necessary to rethink existing concepts and definitions to realign them with the ideas of integrated care. PMID:26293853

  14. An Analytic Hierarchy Process-based Method to Rank the Critical Success Factors of Implementing a Pharmacy Barcode System.

    PubMed

    Alharthi, Hana; Sultana, Nahid; Al-Amoudi, Amjaad; Basudan, Afrah

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacy barcode scanning is used to reduce errors during the medication dispensing process. However, this technology has rarely been used in hospital pharmacies in Saudi Arabia. This article describes the barriers to successful implementation of a barcode scanning system in Saudi Arabia. A literature review was conducted to identify the relevant critical success factors (CSFs) for a successful dispensing barcode system implementation. Twenty-eight pharmacists from a local hospital in Saudi Arabia were interviewed to obtain their perception of these CSFs. In this study, planning (process flow issues and training requirements), resistance (fear of change, communication issues, and negative perceptions about technology), and technology (software, hardware, and vendor support) were identified as the main barriers. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP), one of the most widely used tools for decision making in the presence of multiple criteria, was used to compare and rank these identified CSFs. The results of this study suggest that resistance barriers have a greater impact than planning and technology barriers. In particular, fear of change is the most critical factor, and training is the least critical factor.

  15. A Quantitative Examination of Critical Success Factors Comparing Agile and Waterfall Project Management Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Mitra

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the rate of success for IT projects using agile and standard project management methodologies. Any successful project requires use of project methodology. Specifically, large projects require formal project management methodologies or models, which establish a blueprint of processes and project planning activities. This…

  16. Design for Deconstruction (DfD): Critical success factors for diverting end-of-life waste from landfills.

    PubMed

    Akinade, Olugbenga O; Oyedele, Lukumon O; Ajayi, Saheed O; Bilal, Muhammad; Alaka, Hafiz A; Owolabi, Hakeem A; Bello, Sururah A; Jaiyeoba, Babatunde E; Kadiri, Kabir O

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify Critical Success Factors (CSF) needed for effective material recovery through Design for Deconstruction (DfD). The research approach employed in this paper is based on a sequential exploratory mixed method strategy. After a thorough review of literature and conducting four Focus Group Discussion (FGDs), 43 DfD factors were identified and put together in a questionnaire survey. Data analyses include Cronbach's alpha reliability analysis, mean testing using significance index, and exploratory factor analysis. The result of the factor analysis reveals that an underlying factor structure of five DfD factors groups that include 'stringent legislation and policy', 'deconstruction design process and competencies', 'design for material recovery', 'design for material reuse', and 'design for building flexibility'. These groups of DfD factor groups show that the requirements for DfD goes beyond technical competencies and that non-technical factors such as stringent legislation and policy and design process and competency for deconstruction are key in designing deconstructable buildings. Paying attention to the factors identified in all of these categories will help to tackle impediments that could hinder the effectiveness of DfD. The results of this study would help design and project managers to understand areas of possible improvement in employing DfD as a strategy for diverting waste from landfills.

  17. What Keeps Science Spiralling? Unravelling the Critical Success Factors of Knowledge Creation in University Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travaille, A. Markus; Hendriks, Paul H. J.

    2010-01-01

    Based on Nonaka's knowledge spiral, this paper examines how processes of knowledge creation contribute to success in academia. It presents the outcomes of an in-depth exploration of the workings of the knowledge spiral in a university research institute. The research shows the outstanding but undervalued importance of socialization processes. It…

  18. Method of evaluating the impact of ERP implementation critical success factors - a case study in oil and gas industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajic, Gordana; Stankovski, Stevan; Ostojic, Gordana; Tesic, Zdravko; Miladinovic, Ljubomir

    2014-01-01

    The so far implemented enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems have in many cases failed to meet the requirements regarding the business process control, decrease of business costs and increase of company profit margin. Therefore, there is a real need for an evaluation of the influence of ERP on the company's performance indicators. Proposed in this article is an advanced model for the evaluation of the success of ERP implementation on organisational and operational performance indicators in oil-gas companies. The recommended method establishes a correlation between a process-based method, a scorecard model and ERP critical success factors. The method was verified and tested on two case studies in oil-gas companies using the following procedure: the model was developed, tested and implemented in a pilot gas-oil company, while the results were implemented and verified in another gas-oil company.

  19. Critical Success Factors for Adoption of Web-Based Learning Management Systems in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lwoga, Edda Tandi

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines factors that predict students' continual usage intention of web-based learning content management systems in Tanzania, with a specific focus at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Science (MUHAS). This study sent a questionnaire surveys to 408 first year undergraduate students, with a rate of return of 66.7. This study…

  20. Critical Success Factors for eLearning in Saudi Arabian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhabeeb, Abdullah; Rowley, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to offer insights into the development of eLearning systems and the perceptions of key players in the management of eLearning systems in three large universities in Saudi Arabia. It establishes the relative importance of different factors and compares these findings with studies conducted elsewhere in the…

  1. The Critical Success Factor Method: Establishing a Foundation for Enterprise Security Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    importance.                                                                13  SWOT   analysis  is a commonly used strategic planning technique.  It identifies...24  Figure 11:  Relationship Between Enterprise and Operational Unit CSFs ............... 28  Figure 12:  Affinity  Analysis  for Determining...ISRM Scope ....................................... 36  Figure 13:  Affinity  Analysis  for Determining Critical Assets

  2. L-FABP is a critical host factor for successful malaria liver stage development.

    PubMed

    Mikolajczak, Sebastian A; Jacobs-Lorena, Vanessa; MacKellar, Drew C; Camargo, Nelly; Kappe, Stefan H I

    2007-04-01

    The malaria parasite liver stage produces tens of thousands of red cell-infectious forms within its host hepatocyte. It is thought that the vacuole-enclosed parasite completely depends on the host cell for successful development but the molecular parasite-host cell interactions underlying this remarkable growth have remained elusive. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen and a yeast overexpression system we show that UIS3, a parasite protein essential for liver stage development, interacts directly with liver-fatty acid binding protein, L-FABP. Down-regulation of L-FABP expression in hepatocytes severely impairs parasite growth and overexpression of L-FABP promotes growth. This is the first identified direct liver stage-host cell protein interaction, providing a possible explanation for the importance of UIS3 in liver infection.

  3. Occupational health information systems, do we need them? What are the critical success factors?

    SciTech Connect

    Granhus, B.; Heid, S.

    1996-12-31

    Den norske statsoljeselskap a.s. (Statoil) which is a major Norwegian oil company has used a mainframe (VM/CMS) based occupational health information system (OHIS) since 1991. The system is distributed among 11 offshore platforms, two refineries and three office centers. It contains medical (25000) workplace (1500) and 6500 material safety data sheet (MSDS) records. The paper deals with the experiences and challenges met during the development of this system and a new client/server based version for Windows{reg_sign}. In 1992 the Norwegian Data Inspectorate introduced new legislation setting extremely strict standards for data protection and privacy. This demanded new solutions not yet utilized for systems of this scale. The solution implements a fully encrypted data flow between the user of the medical modules, while the non sensitive data from the other modules are not encrypted. This involves the use of a special {open_quotes}smart-card{close_quotes} containing the user privileges as well as the encryption key. The system will combine the advantages of a local system together with the integration force of a centralized system. The new system was operational by February 1996. The paper also summarizes the experiences we have had with our OHIS, areas of good and bad cost/benefit, development pitfalls, and which factors are most important for customer satisfaction. This is very important because of the ever increasing demand for efficiency together with company reorganization and changing technology.

  4. "In the Middle of Difficulty Lies Opportunity"--Using a Case Study to Identify Critical Success Factors Contributing to the Initiation of International Collaborative Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ian M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper identifies factors that contribute to the successful initiation of international collaborative projects intended to support the development of education for librarianship and information sciences. It discusses the widespread failure to analyse the Critical Success Factors in international collaborative projects and proposes a case study…

  5. The use of a modified pairwise comparison method in evaluating critical success factors for community-based rural homestay programmes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daud, Shahidah Md; Ramli, Razamin; Kasim, Maznah Mat; Kayat, Kalsom; Razak, Rafidah Abd

    2014-12-01

    Tourism industry has become the highlighted sector which has amazingly increased the national income level. Despite the tourism industry being one of the highest income generating sectors, Homestay Programme as a Community-Based Tourism (CBT) product in Malaysia does not absorbed much of the incoming wealth. Homestay Programme refers to a programme in a community where a tourist stays together with a host family and experiences the everyday way of life of the family in both direct and indirect manner. There are over 100 Homestay Programme currently being registered with the Ministry of Culture and Tourism Malaysia which mostly are located in rural areas, but only a few excel and enjoying the fruit of the booming industry. Hence, this article seeks to identify the critical success factors for a Community-Based Rural Homestay Programme in Malaysia. A modified pairwise method is utilized to further evaluate the identified success factors in a more meaningful way. The findings will help Homestay Programme function as a community development tool that manages tourism resources. Thus, help the community in improving local economy and creating job opportunities.

  6. Information needs assessment of medical equipment offices based on Critical Success Factors (CSF) and Business System Planning (BSP) methods.

    PubMed

    Khorrami, F; Ahmadi, M; Alizadeh, A; Roozbeh, N; Mohseni, S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Given the ever-increasing importance and value of information, providing the management with a reliable information system, which can facilitate decision-making regarding planning, organization and control, is vitally important. This study aimed to analyze and evaluate the information needs of medical equipment offices. Methods: This descriptive applied cross-sectional study was carried out in 2010. The population of the study included the managers of statistic and medical records at the offices of vice-chancellor for treatment in 39 medical universities in Iran. Data were collected by using structured questioners. With regard to different kinds of designing information systems, sampling was done by two methods, BSP (based on processes of job description) and CSF method (based on critical success factors). The data were analyzed by SPSS-16. Results: Our study showed that 41% of information needs were found to be critical success factors of managers of office. The first priority of managers was "the number of bed and bed occupancy in hospitals". Of 29 identified information needs, 62% were initial information needs of managers (from the viewpoints of managers). Of all, 4% of the information needs were obtained through the form, 14% through both the form and database, 11% through the web site, and 71% had no sources (forms, databases, web site). Conclusion: Since 71% of the information needs of medical equipment offices managers had no information sources, the development of information system in these offices seems to be necessary. Despite the important role of users in designing the information systems (identifying 62% of information needs), other scientific methods is also needed to be utilized in designing the information systems.

  7. Information needs assessment of medical equipment offices based on Critical Success Factors (CSF) and Business System Planning (BSP) methods

    PubMed Central

    Khorrami, F; Ahmadi, M; Alizadeh, A; Roozbeh, N; Mohseni, S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Given the ever-increasing importance and value of information, providing the management with a reliable information system, which can facilitate decision-making regarding planning, organization and control, is vitally important. This study aimed to analyze and evaluate the information needs of medical equipment offices. Methods: This descriptive applied cross-sectional study was carried out in 2010. The population of the study included the managers of statistic and medical records at the offices of vice-chancellor for treatment in 39 medical universities in Iran. Data were collected by using structured questioners. With regard to different kinds of designing information systems, sampling was done by two methods, BSP (based on processes of job description) and CSF method (based on critical success factors). The data were analyzed by SPSS-16. Results: Our study showed that 41% of information needs were found to be critical success factors of managers of office. The first priority of managers was “the number of bed and bed occupancy in hospitals”. Of 29 identified information needs, 62% were initial information needs of managers (from the viewpoints of managers). Of all, 4% of the information needs were obtained through the form, 14% through both the form and database, 11% through the web site, and 71% had no sources (forms, databases, web site). Conclusion: Since 71% of the information needs of medical equipment offices managers had no information sources, the development of information system in these offices seems to be necessary. Despite the important role of users in designing the information systems (identifying 62% of information needs), other scientific methods is also needed to be utilized in designing the information systems.

  8. Executive Beliefs About the Critical Success Factors In Defining, Designing, Developing and Delivering e-Learning For Adult Professional Development in Corporations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Ann W.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of what e-Learning executives believe are the critical success factors for companies to successfully deliver training and education over the world-wide web. The study was a qualitative, multiple-case study design including in-depth, semi-structured interviews that incorporated verbal critical…

  9. Parent genotype and environmental factors influence introduction success of the critically endangered Savannas Mint (Dicerandra immaculata var. savannarum).

    PubMed

    Peterson, Cheryl L; Kaufmann, Gregory S; Vandello, Christopher; Richardson, Matthew L

    2013-01-01

    Species previously unknown to science are continually discovered and some of these species already face extinction at the time of their discovery. Conserving new and rare species in these cases becomes a trial-and-error process and conservationists will attempt to manage them by using knowledge of closely related species, or those that fill the same ecological niche, and then adapting the management program as needed. Savannas Mint (Dicerandra immaculata Lakela var. savannarum Huck) is a perennial plant that was discovered in Florida scrub habitat at two locations in 1995, but is nearly extinct at these locations. We tested whether shade, leaf litter, propagation method, parent genotype, parent collection site, planting date, and absorbent granules influenced survival, reproduction, and recruitment of Savannas Mint in a population of 1,614 plants that we introduced between June 2006 and July 2009 into a state protected site. Survival and reproduction of introduced plants, and recruitment of new plants, was higher in microhabitats in full sun and no leaf litter and lower in partially shaded habitats. The two sites from which parent plants were collected differentially influenced survival and reproduction of introduced plants. These differences in survival and reproduction are likely due to underlying genetic differences. Differential survival of progeny from different parent genotypes further supports the idea that underlying genetics is an important consideration when restoring plant populations. The most successful progeny of parent genotypes had survival rates nearly 12 times higher than the least successful progeny. We speculate that many of these environmental and genetic factors are likely to influence allopatric congeners and other critically endangered gap specialists that grow in Florida scrub and our results can be used to guide their conservation.

  10. Harnessing Information Technology to Improve the Process of Students' Evaluations of Teaching: An Exploration of Students' Critical Success Factors of Online Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevo, Dorit; McClean, Ron; Nevo, Saggi

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the relative advantage offered by online Students' Evaluations of Teaching (SET) and describes a study conducted at a Canadian university to identify critical success factors of online evaluations from students' point of view. Factors identified as important by the students include anonymity, ease of use (of both SET survey…

  11. Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Development and Global Competitiveness of US Space Transportation Industry: Critical Success Factors Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enyinda, Chris I.

    2002-01-01

    In response to the unrelenting call in both public and private sectors fora to reduce the high cost associated with space transportation, many innovative partially or fully RLV (Reusable Launch Vehicles) designs (X-34-37) were initiated. This call is directed at all levels of space missions including scientific, military, and commercial and all aspects of the missions such as nonrecurring development, manufacture, launch, and operations. According to Wertz, tbr over thirty years, the cost of space access has remained exceedingly high. The consensus in the popular press is that to decrease the current astronomical cost of access to space, more safer, reliable, and economically viable second generation RLVs (SGRLV) must be developed. Countries such as Brazil, India, Japan, and Israel are now gearing up to enter the global launch market with their own commercial space launch vehicles. NASA and the US space launch industry cannot afford to lag behind. Developing SGRLVs will immeasurably improve the US's space transportation capabilities by helping the US to regain the global commercial space markets while supporting the transportation capabilities of NASA's space missions, Developing the SGRLVs will provide affordable commercial space transportation that will assure the competitiveness of the US commercial space transportation industry in the 21st century. Commercial space launch systems are having difficulty obtaining financing because of the high cost and risk involved. Access to key financial markets is necessary for commercial space ventures. However, public sector programs in the form of tax incentives and credits, as well as loan guarantees are not yet available. The purpose of this paper is to stimulate discussion and assess the critical success factors germane for RLVs development and US global competitiveness.

  12. USAR Recruiting Success Factors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    recruiters. Conventional multi. * variate statistical techniques have not prov ed-adequate in identifying successful recruiters, largely because of the...statistical techniques to the problem of identifying the relative importance of factors affecting recruiter success. Me t hod This study applies a...recruiters; background characteristics, suggestions about recruiter training, the value of various prospecting and selling techniques , workload, attitudes

  13. An Analysis of Factors Affecting Mature Age Students' Academic Success in Undergraduate Nursing Programs: A Critical Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Lisa J; Jeong, Sarah Y; Norton, Carol A

    2016-01-01

    The population of mature age students entering university nursing programs has steadily increased in both Australia and worldwide. The objective of the literature review was to explore how mature age students perform academically and to analyse the factors associated with their academic performance in nursing programs. A literature search was conducted in the following databases: CINAHL, ProQuest, Medline, Cochrane, Mosby's Index, Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI), and Scopus. Twenty-six (26) research papers published between 2000 and 2014 have met the selection criteria of this review. The key themes identified include; 1) ambiguity in definition of mature age and academic success, 2) age and academic success, 3) intrinsic factors (life experiences, emotional intelligence, and motivation and volition), and 4) extrinsic factors (peer, academic and family support; and learning style, components of the modules and mode of delivery). Current literature provides evidence that mature age nursing students perform at a higher level within the methodological issues discussed in this paper. Future research is warranted to advance the understanding of the complex relationship between extrinsic and intrinsic factors of mature age students and their academic success in higher education. Nursing educators will benefit from novel evidence, ideas and opportunities to explore and implement in nursing education.

  14. Identifying critical success factors for designing selection processes into postgraduate specialty training: the case of UK general practice.

    PubMed

    Plint, Simon; Patterson, Fiona

    2010-06-01

    The UK national recruitment process into general practice training has been developed over several years, with incremental introduction of stages which have been piloted and validated. Previously independent processes, which encouraged multiple applications and produced inconsistent outcomes, have been replaced by a robust national process which has high reliability and predictive validity, and is perceived to be fair by candidates and allocates applicants equitably across the country. Best selection practice involves a job analysis which identifies required competencies, then designs reliable assessment methods to measure them, and over the long term ensures that the process has predictive validity against future performance. The general practitioner recruitment process introduced machine markable short listing assessments for the first time in the UK postgraduate recruitment context, and also adopted selection centre workplace simulations. The key success factors have been identified as corporate commitment to the goal of a national process, with gradual convergence maintaining locus of control rather than the imposition of change without perceived legitimate authority.

  15. Critical Success Factors for the Implementation of PeopleSoft Enterprise Resource Planning in a Public Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukkamala, Hemanth K.

    2013-01-01

    Organizations of different sizes are changing their information technology (IT) strategies in order to achieve efficiency and effectiveness in today's global economy and to integrate their internal and external information by implementing PeopleSoft Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems. The literature has case studies of successful and…

  16. Global Training's Critical Success Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Cynthia L.

    1998-01-01

    Suggests that many corporate efforts to impart their own culture, leadership style, and business practices in other parts of the world are producing less than optimum results. Provides examples of how to adapt training for multicultural settings. (JOW)

  17. Personalized Boutique Service: Critical to Academic Library Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    An academic library that focuses on delivering a personalized service is examined within the context of the boutique library model. It is suggested that a critical success factor in adopting a personalized, boutique-style service is acquiring knowledge and insight of our users. This, together with appropriate evaluation, will assist with providing…

  18. Factors Influencing College Science Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tai, Robert H.; Sadler, Philip M.; Mintzes, Joel J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the authors report some of the salient findings of a large-scale, four-year national study, conducted at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, entitled "Factors Influencing College Science Success" (FICSS), which surveyed college students who enrolled in first-year biology, chemistry, and physics courses…

  19. [Success factors in hospital management].

    PubMed

    Heberer, M

    1998-12-01

    The hospital environment of most Western countries is currently undergoing dramatic changes. Competition among hospitals is increasing, and economic issues have become decisive factors for the allocation of medical care. Hospitals therefore require management tools to respond to these changes adequately. The balanced scorecard is a method of enabling development and implementation of a business strategy that equally respects the financial requirements, the needs of the customers, process development, and organizational learning. This method was used to derive generally valid success factors for hospital management based on an analysis of an academic hospital in Switzerland. Strategic management, the focus of medical services, customer orientation, and integration of professional groups across the hospital value chain were identified as success factors for hospital management.

  20. Exploring Mobile Learning Success Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a comparative account and analysis of three mobile Web 2.0 projects instigated within a tertiary learning environment during 2008. Following the successful instigation of a mobile Web 2.0 project in the third year of a Bachelor of Product Design course during semester one, similar projects were initiated in semester two within the…

  1. Superintendent Succession: Prearrival and Postarrival Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Flora Ida; Kalbus, Joanna

    1998-01-01

    Explores leadership succession by studying an elected county school superintendent's experience. Extends the Gordon and Rosen theoretical model by identifying factors triggering succession, examining interim appointments, and identifying succession and organizational elements affected by the nature of elected leadership positions. The…

  2. Alarm guided critical function and success path monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1994-01-01

    The use of alarm indication on the overview (IPSO) display to initiate diagnosis of challenges to critical functions or unavailability of success paths, and further alarm-based guidance toward ultimate diagnosis.

  3. Academic Success Factors: An IT Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Aimao; Aasheim, Cheryl L.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies have identified causal factors for academic success. Factors vary from personal factors, such as cognitive style (McKenzie & Schweitzer, 2001), to social factors, such as culture differences (Aysan, Tanriogen, & Tanriogen, 1996). However, in these studies it is re-searchers who theorized the causal dimensions and…

  4. Developing Critical Thinking Skills for Information Seeking Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Elise D.; Jefferson, Renee N.

    2013-01-01

    Critical thinking skills are required to successfully navigate the overwhelming amount of information sources available today. To address the challenge of developing critical thinking skills, this empirical study examines the effectiveness of exercises in developing thinking skills in college freshmen students. The workbook exercises were designed…

  5. Critical Success Factors in a TRIDEM Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauck, Mirjam

    2007-01-01

    Computer-mediated-communication (CMC) tools allowing learners to be in contact with native speakers of their target language in other locations are becoming increasingly flexible, often combining different modes of communication in a single web- and internet-based environment. The literature on telecollaborative exchanges reveals, however, that…

  6. European Female Expatriate Careers: Critical Success Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linehan, Margaret; Scullion, Hugh

    2001-01-01

    Interviews with 50 female expatriate managers revealed that many were disadvantaged in their careers by lack of access to organizational supports such as mentors, interpersonal networks, assistance for spouses' careers, the glass ceiling, and other barriers. Women will remain a minority in management until organizations address these barriers in…

  7. Aging Successfully: A Four-Factor Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Pai-Lin; Lan, William; Yen, Tung-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The study was designed to validate a model for a successful aging process and examine the gender differences in the aging process. Three hundred twelve participants who were 65 or older completed a Taiwan Social Change Survey that measures four factors that define successful aging process: including physical, psychological, social support, and…

  8. Managerial Success Factors: A Chinese Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stivers, Bonnie P.; Adams, Janet S.; Liu, Bin

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory study conducted in the People's Republic of China (PRC) to identify the managerial success factors perceived by Chinese managers to be important in their market economy. The study also looked at how these factors are exhibited by recent graduates of Chinese universities now working in Chinese firms.…

  9. Factors favorable to public participation success

    SciTech Connect

    Peelle, E.; Schweitzer, M.; Munro, J.; Carnes, S.; Wolfe, A.

    1996-05-01

    Categories of factors linked to successful public participation (PP) program outcomes include PP process, organizational context, sociopolitical context, strategic considerations and unique (special circumstances) factors. We re-order the long list factors according to how essential, important, and unique they are and discuss their significance and interrelationships. It is argued that bureacratic structure and operational modes are basically in conflict with features of successful PP programs (openness, two-way education, communication with nonexpert outsiders). If this is so, then it is not surprising that the factors essential for PP success in bureacracies involve extraordinary management efforts by agencies to bypass, compensate for, or overcome structural constraints. We conclude by speculating about the long-term viability of PP practices in the agency setting as well as the consequences for agencies that attempt the problematic task of introducing PP into their complex, mission-oriented organizations.

  10. Review of critical factors for SEA implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jie Christensen, Per; Kornov, Lone

    2013-01-15

    The implementation process involved in translating Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) intention into action is vital to an effective SEA. Many factors influence implementation and thus the effectiveness of an SEA. Empirical studies have identified and documented some factors influencing the implementation of an SEA. This research is fragmented, however, and it is still not clear what are the most critical factors of effective SEA performance, and how these relate to different stages of the implementation process or other contextual circumstances. The paper takes its point of departure in implementation theory. Firstly, we introduce implementation theory, and then use it in practice to establish a more comprehensive model related to the stages in the implementation process. Secondly, we identify the critical factors in order to see how they are related to the different stages of SEA or are more general in character. Finally we map the different critical factors and how they influence the overall results of an SEA. Based on a literature review, we present a comprehensive picture of the critical factors and where they are found in the process. We conclude that most of the critical factors identified are of a more general character influencing the SEA process as such, while only one out of four of these factors relates to the specific stages of the SEA. Based on this mapping we can sketch a picture of the totality of critical factors. In this study 266 notions of critical factors were identified. Seen at the level of notions of critical factors, only 24% of these relate to specific stages while for 76% the critical factors are of a more general nature. These critical factors interact in complex ways and appear in different combinations in different stages of the implementation process so tracing the cause and effect is difficult. The pervasiveness of contextual and general factors also clearly suggests that there is no single way to put SEA into practice. The

  11. Successful Black Farmers: Factors in Their Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Minnie M.; Larson, Olaf F.

    This paper identifies individual and institutional factors which have facilitated or inhibited the achievement of successful black farmers. The information derived from the case studies is used to develop a model which can be used in working effectively with black farmers. The thirteen case studies discussed focus on the following: (1) reasons for…

  12. Tailoring and Critical Thinking - Key Principles for Acquisition Success

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    needed to be given a high de- gree of autonomy while unhampered from the normal acquisi- tion program bureaucracy . Therefore, we wanted the LDO to...absolutely essential to the daily progress and success of the program. We did not treat ‘empowerment’ as a cliché. Rather, leadership challenged the...team to make decisions and solve problems using a critical thinking approach. Our job as leadership was, in turn, to engage the team members on

  13. A Critical Analysis of Anesthesiology Podcasts: Identifying Determinants of Success

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Devin; Matava, Clyde

    2016-01-01

    Background Audio and video podcasts have gained popularity in recent years. Increasingly, podcasts are being used in the field of medicine as a tool to disseminate information. This format has multiple advantages including highly accessible creation tools, low distribution costs, and portability for the user. However, despite its ongoing use in medical education, there are no data describing factors associated with the success or quality of podcasts. Objective The goal of the study was to assess the landscape of anesthesia podcasts in Canada and develop a methodology for evaluating the quality of the podcast. To achieve our objective, we identified the scope of podcasts in anesthesia specifically, constructed an algorithmic model for measuring success, and identified factors linked to both successful podcasts and a peer-review process. Methods Independent reviewers performed a systematic search of anesthesia-related podcasts on iTunes Canada. Data and metrics recorded for each podcast included podcast’s authorship, number posted, podcast series duration, target audience, topics, and social media presence. Descriptive statistics summarized mined data, and univariate analysis was used to identify factors associated with podcast success and a peer-review process. Results Twenty-two podcasts related to anesthesia were included in the final analysis. Less than a third (6/22=27%) were still active. The median longevity of the podcasts’ series was just 13 months (interquartile range: 1-39 months). Anesthesiologists were the target audience for 77% of podcast series with clinical topics being most commonly addressed. We defined a novel algorithm for measuring success: Podcast Success Index. Factors associated with a high Podcast Success Index included podcasts targeting fellows (Spearman R=0.434; P=.04), inclusion of professional topics (Spearman R=0.456-0.603; P=.01-.03), and the use of Twitter as a means of social media (Spearman R=0.453;P=.03). In addition, more

  14. Women's Career Success: A Factor Analytic Study of Contributing Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaskill, LuAnn Ricketts

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 466 women employed in retailing received 205 responses identifying (1) factors influencing the success and advancement of women in retailing and (2) how those factors differ for women in upper versus middle positions. Upper-level executives placed more importance on ambition and abilities; midlevel executives credited opportunity and…

  15. Factors Related to Successful Engineering Team Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowaczyk, Ronald H.; Zang, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    The perceptions of a sample of 49 engineers and scientists from NASA Langley Research Center toward engineering design teams were evaluated. The respondents rated 60 team behaviors in terms of their relative importance for team success. They also completed a profile of their own perceptions of their strengths and weaknesses as team members. Behaviors related to team success are discussed in terms of those involving the organizational culture and commitment to the team and those dealing with internal team dynamics. The latter behaviors included the level and extent of debate and discussion regarding methods for completing the team task and the efficient use of team time to explore and discuss methodologies critical to the problem. Successful engineering teams may find their greatest challenges occurring during the early stages of their existence. In contrast to the prototypical business team, members on an engineering design share expertise and knowledge which allows them to deal with task issues sooner. However, discipline differences among team members can lead to conflicts regarding the best method or approach to solving the engineering problem.

  16. Supply Chain: Wake Up; It is Critical to Military Success

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-13

    with a cDIIection of Information If It does not disDOav a currenUv valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1...CONTRACT NUMBER Supply Chain: Wake Up; It is Critic a l t o Military Success 6. AUTHOR Colonel Christopher E. Dexter , USA 7. PERFORMING...The DOD needs t o maintai n the viability of its global supply chain in Order to provide the best support possible, operate within fiscal constraints

  17. Partnering for Learnware: Critical Success Factors in the Use of Learnware by Human Resources Sector Councils and Industry Associations in Canada = Partenariats pour les technologies d'apprentissage: Facteurs critiques de succes dans l'utilisation des technologies d'apprentissage par les conseils sectoriels des ressources humaines et les associations industrielles au Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahmer, Anna; Green, Lyndsay

    The use of learnware by human resources sector councils and industry associations in Canada was examined to identify critical success factors in the use of technology-based training. Eight case studies--four involving sector councils and four involving industry associations that either have national mandates or distribute their products across…

  18. Wealth Accumulation and Factors Accounting for Success.

    PubMed

    Pawasutipaisit, Anan; Townsend, Robert M

    2011-03-01

    We use detailed income, balance sheet, and cash flow statements constructed for households in a long monthly panel in an emerging market economy, and some recent contributions in economic theory, to document and better understand the factors underlying success in achieving upward mobility in the distribution of net worth. Wealth inequality is decreasing over time, and many households work their way out of poverty and lower wealth over the seven year period. The accounts establish that, mechanically, this is largely due to savings rather than incoming gifts and remittances. In turn, the growth of net worth can be decomposed household by household into the savings rate and how productively that savings is used, the return on assets (ROA). The latter plays the larger role. ROA is, in turn, positively correlated with higher education of household members, younger age of the head, and with a higher debt/asset ratio and lower initial wealth, so it seems from cross-sections that the financial system is imperfectly channeling resources to productive and poor households. Household fixed effects account for the larger part of ROA, and this success is largely persistent, undercutting the story that successful entrepreneurs are those that simply get lucky. Persistence does vary across households, and in at least one province with much change and increasing opportunities, ROA changes as households move over time to higher-return occupations. But for those households with high and persistent ROA, the savings rate is higher, consistent with some micro founded macro models with imperfect credit markets. Indeed, high ROA households save by investing in their own enterprises and adopt consistent financial strategies for smoothing fluctuations. More generally growth of wealth, savings levels and/or rates are correlated with TFP and the household fixed effects that are the larger part of ROA.

  19. Wealth Accumulation and Factors Accounting for Success

    PubMed Central

    Pawasutipaisit, Anan; Townsend, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    We use detailed income, balance sheet, and cash flow statements constructed for households in a long monthly panel in an emerging market economy, and some recent contributions in economic theory, to document and better understand the factors underlying success in achieving upward mobility in the distribution of net worth. Wealth inequality is decreasing over time, and many households work their way out of poverty and lower wealth over the seven year period. The accounts establish that, mechanically, this is largely due to savings rather than incoming gifts and remittances. In turn, the growth of net worth can be decomposed household by household into the savings rate and how productively that savings is used, the return on assets (ROA). The latter plays the larger role. ROA is, in turn, positively correlated with higher education of household members, younger age of the head, and with a higher debt/asset ratio and lower initial wealth, so it seems from cross-sections that the financial system is imperfectly channeling resources to productive and poor households. Household fixed effects account for the larger part of ROA, and this success is largely persistent, undercutting the story that successful entrepreneurs are those that simply get lucky. Persistence does vary across households, and in at least one province with much change and increasing opportunities, ROA changes as households move over time to higher-return occupations. But for those households with high and persistent ROA, the savings rate is higher, consistent with some micro founded macro models with imperfect credit markets. Indeed, high ROA households save by investing in their own enterprises and adopt consistent financial strategies for smoothing fluctuations. More generally growth of wealth, savings levels and/or rates are correlated with TFP and the household fixed effects that are the larger part of ROA. PMID:21643466

  20. Success factors in hospital network performance: evidence from Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Jum; Burns, Lawton R

    2007-08-01

    Collaborative networks have become a common organizational strategy to deal with uncertain and dynamic environments. Like their counterparts in the USA, Korean hospitals are establishing cooperative relationships with one another, with varying performance results. This paper analyses some of the sources of variation in hospital network performance and identifies some of the possible success factors. The study finds that the quality of cooperation and information sharing between network partners are critical. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications for researchers and practitioners.

  1. Success Factors of E-Learning Projects: A Technical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhomod, Sami; Shafi, Mohd Mudasir

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the success factors of e learning programs in King Saud University from an engineer and technician's point of view. An extensive study of existing literature was done to determine the 11 success factors of e learning program. The factors identified as success factors are: Sufficient Users Training,…

  2. The use of arithmetic average method in identifying critical success criteria for Homestay Programmes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daud, Shahidah Md; Ramli, Razamin; Kasim, Maznah Mat; Kayat, Kalsom; Razak, Rafidah Abd

    2015-12-01

    Malaysian Homestay is very unique. It is classified as Community Based Tourism (CBT). Homestay Programme which is a community events where a tourist stays together with a host family for a period of time and enjoying cultural exchange besides having new experiences. Homestay programme has booming the tourism industry since there is over 100 Homestay Programme currently being registered with the Ministry of Culture and Tourism Malaysia. However, only few Homestay Programme enjoying the benefits of success Homestay Programme. Hence, this article seeks to identify the critical success factors for a Homestay Programme in Malaysia. An Arithmetic Average method is utilized to further evaluate the identified success factors in a more meaningful way. The findings will help Homestay Programme function as a community development tool that manages tourism resources. Thus, help the community in improving local economy and creating job opportunities.

  3. Factors Identifying Successful Adolescent Career Awareness Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polanco, Mary Liz

    Helping adolescents make successful career decisions has been the concern of the education system, with a variety of methods being tried over the years. A literature review indicated that there are a number of successful programs giving adolescents a good basis from which to make career choices. State and national levels contribute funding and…

  4. Workplace Factors That Shape Information Technology Project Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Dan Schilling

    2013-01-01

    Information technology (IT) project success depends on having a project manager with effective decision making, leadership, and project management skills. Project success also depends on completing the project in a given budget, time, and scope. Despite these critical qualities of a successful project manager, little research has explored the…

  5. Social and cultural factors in the successful control of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rubel, A J; Garro, L C

    1992-01-01

    The burden of tuberculosis on the public health is staggering. Worldwide, annual incidence of new cases is estimated to be about 8 million. Almost 3 million deaths occur yearly. Early case identification and adherence to treatment regimens are the remaining barriers to successful control. In many nations, however, fewer than half those with active disease receive a diagnosis, and fewer than half those beginning treatment complete it. The twin problems of delay in seeking treatment and abandonment of a prescribed regimen derive from complex factors. People's confusion as to the implications of the tuberculosis symptoms, costs of transportation to clinic services, the social stigma that attaches to tuberculosis, the high cost of medication, organizational problems in providing adequate followup services, and patients' perception of clinic facilities as inhospitable all contribute to the complexity. Sociocultural factors are emphasized in this report because hitherto they have not been adequately explored. Salient among those sociocultural factors is the health culture of the patients. That is, the understanding and information people have from family, friends, and neighbors as to the nature of a health problem, its cause, and its implications. A knowledge of the health culture of their patients has become a critical tool if tuberculosis control programs are to be successful. Several anthropological procedures are recommended to help uncover the health culture of people served by tuberculosis clinics.

  6. Social and cultural factors in the successful control of tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rubel, A J; Garro, L C

    1992-01-01

    The burden of tuberculosis on the public health is staggering. Worldwide, annual incidence of new cases is estimated to be about 8 million. Almost 3 million deaths occur yearly. Early case identification and adherence to treatment regimens are the remaining barriers to successful control. In many nations, however, fewer than half those with active disease receive a diagnosis, and fewer than half those beginning treatment complete it. The twin problems of delay in seeking treatment and abandonment of a prescribed regimen derive from complex factors. People's confusion as to the implications of the tuberculosis symptoms, costs of transportation to clinic services, the social stigma that attaches to tuberculosis, the high cost of medication, organizational problems in providing adequate followup services, and patients' perception of clinic facilities as inhospitable all contribute to the complexity. Sociocultural factors are emphasized in this report because hitherto they have not been adequately explored. Salient among those sociocultural factors is the health culture of the patients. That is, the understanding and information people have from family, friends, and neighbors as to the nature of a health problem, its cause, and its implications. A knowledge of the health culture of their patients has become a critical tool if tuberculosis control programs are to be successful. Several anthropological procedures are recommended to help uncover the health culture of people served by tuberculosis clinics. PMID:1454974

  7. Factors Related to Women's Undergraduate Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Tanya Michelle

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative study examined the relationships and effects of women's learning styles and achievement and success at a Midwestern, private, Catholic, liberal arts women's undergraduate program. The primary focus was on first-year female students' learning styles and how these learning styles may affect their GPAs and decisions to persist to…

  8. Critical Questions for Space Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolford, Barbara; Bagian, Tandi

    2000-01-01

    Traditional human factors contributions to NASA's crewed space programs have been rooted in the classic approaches to quantifying human physical and cognitive capabilities and limitations in the environment of interest, and producing recommendations and standards for the selection or design of mission equipment. Crews then evaluate the interfaces, displays, or equipment, and with the assistance of human factors experts, improvements are made as funds, time, control documentation, and weight allow. We have come a long way from the early spaceflight days, where men with the ' right stuff were the solution to operating whatever equipment was given to them. The large and diverse Shuttle astronaut corps has impacted mission designs to accommodate a wide range of human capabilities and preferences. Yet with existing long duration experience, we have seen the need to address a different set of dynamics when designing for optimal crew performance: critical equipment and mission situations degrade, and human function changes with mission environment, situation, and duration. Strategies for quantifying the critical nature of human factors requirements are being worked by NASA. Any exploration-class mission will place new responsibilities on mission designers to provide the crew with the information and resources to accomplish the mission. The current duties of a Mission Control Center to monitor system status, detect degradation or malfunction, and provide a proven solution, will need to be incorporated into on-board systems to allow the crew autonomous decision-making. The current option to resupply and replace mission systems and resources, including both vehicle equipment and human operators, will be removed, so considerations of maintenance, onboard training, and proficiency assessment are critical to providing a self-sufficient crew. As we 'move in' to the International Space Station, there are tremendous opportunities to investigate our ability to design for autonomous

  9. Development of an Instrument to Measure Student Use of Academic Success Skills: An Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, John; Brigman, Greg; Webb, Linda; Villares, Elizabeth; Harrington, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of the Student Engagement in School Success Skills instrument including item development and exploratory factor analysis. The instrument was developed to measure student use of the skills and strategies identified as most critical for long-term school success that are typically taught by school counselors.

  10. Examining Success Factors Related to ERP Implementations in Higher Education Shared Services Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoyanoff, Dawn Galadriel Pfeiffer

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementations that utilized a shared services model in higher education. The purpose of this research was to examine the critical success factors which were perceived to contribute to project success. This research employed a quantitative non-experimental correlational design and the…

  11. Personality Factors and Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Initial License Success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVita-Cochrane, Cynthia

    Commercial nuclear power utilities are under pressure to effectively recruit and retain licensed reactor operators in light of poor candidate training completion rates and recent candidate failures on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license exam. One candidate failure can cost a utility over $400,000, making the successful licensing of new operators a critical path to operational excellence. This study was designed to discover if the NEO-PI-3, a 5-factor measure of personality, could improve selection in nuclear utilities by identifying personality factors that predict license candidate success. Two large U.S. commercial nuclear power corporations provided potential participant contact information and candidate results on the 2014 NRC exam from their nuclear power units nation-wide. License candidates who participated (n = 75) completed the NEO-PI-3 personality test and results were compared to 3 outcomes on the NRC exam: written exam, simulated operating exam, and overall exam result. Significant correlations were found between several personality factors and both written and operating exam outcomes on the NRC exam. Further, a regression analysis indicated that personality factors, particularly Conscientiousness, predicted simulated operating exam scores. The results of this study may be used to support the use of the NEO-PI-3 to improve operator selection as an addition to the current selection protocol. Positive social change implications from this study include support for the use of a personality measure by utilities to improve their return-on-investment in candidates and by individual candidates to avoid career failures. The results of this study may also positively impact the public by supporting the safe and reliable operation of commercial nuclear power utilities in the United States.

  12. Success factors in merging teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Thier, Samuel O; Kelley, William N; Pardes, Herbert; Knight, Amy Wimpey; Wietecha, Mark

    2014-02-01

    Merger has served as a major strategy for the leaders of academic medical centers (i.e., teaching hospitals) who are pursuing health system development for their institutions. Applying hindsight to their personal experience, the authors explore common themes in several mergers that have survived the test of time. Although many elements influence merger outcomes, experience suggests several of unique importance. These include effective leadership in the areas of creating trust, managing uncertainty, ensuring medical staff stability, and bridging cultural divides across the organizations. While a quantitative business case should support any merger, the authors' experiences underscore the importance of successfully assessing and managing organizational and individual dynamics when bringing together major teaching hospitals.

  13. The Circle of Courage: Critical Indicators of Successful Life Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendtro, Larry K.; Mitchell, Martin L.; Jackson, William C.

    2014-01-01

    In the behavioral science literature, successful childhood socialization is termed Positive Youth Development (PYD). Young people themselves are active agents in charting their own life course (Jackson, in press). However, the responsibility for socialization begins with families and is shared by neighbors, faith communities, educators, youth…

  14. Dyslexic Students: Success Factors for Support in a Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorklund, Maria

    2011-01-01

    This study examines possible success factors when developing technical solutions for dyslexic students. Findings in the literature, in a web survey answered by students and in the experiences from the development process at the Medical Faculty Library, Lund University, were used to find out potential success factors and difficulties. The…

  15. Colorectal anastomosis: factors influencing success1

    PubMed Central

    Tagart, R E B

    1981-01-01

    Preservation of the anal sphincters is now consistent with adequate extirpation of the majority of rectal neoplasms. However, there is still a troublesome incidence of leakage through colorectal anastomoses. A number of different factors, working in combination, are responsible for this. Although most problems have been solved, and the mortality is low, the anastomotic leak rate described in the present series, and in the hands of most surgeons, remains high. Efficient suturing without tension, adequate filling and drainage of the presacral space, and antimicrobial prophylaxis effective enough to abolish abdominal wound sepsis, have been applied. The large vessel arterial blood supply to the suture line is good but the microcirculation of the left colon and rectum, upon which suture line healing ultimately depends, is suspect. Reduction of blood viscosity by deliberate lowering of the haemoglobin level before operation has been practised in the hope of improving the microcirculatory flow. The results so far are encouraging and suggest that the method is worth a continued trial. PMID:7009860

  16. Critical Components of Successful Inclusion of Students with Severe Disabilities: Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alquraini, Turki; Gut, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the critical components of successful inclusion for students with severe disabilities. This review sets out to provide an overview of literature regarding effective practices for inclusion with a focus on critical components of successful inclusion that assist in preparing the stakeholders worldwide to work and engage…

  17. Defining Advancement Career Paths and Succession Plans: Critical Human Capital Retention Strategies for High-Performing Advancement Divisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croteau, Jon Derek; Wolk, Holly Gordon

    2010-01-01

    There are many factors that can influence whether a highly talented staff member will build a career within an institution or use it as a stepping stone. This article defines and explores the notions of developing career paths and succession planning and why they are critical human capital investment strategies in retaining the highest performers…

  18. Successful ageing: a historical overview and critical analysis of a successful concept.

    PubMed

    Bülow, Morten Hillgaard; Söderqvist, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Since the late 1980s, the concept of 'successful ageing' has set the frame for discourse about contemporary ageing research. Through an analysis of the reception to John W. Rowe and Robert L. Kahn's launch of the concept of 'successful ageing' in 1987, this article maps out the important themes and discussions that have emerged from the interdisciplinary field of ageing research. These include an emphasis on interdisciplinarity; the interaction between biology, psycho-social contexts and lifestyle choices; the experiences of elderly people; life-course perspectives; optimisation and prevention strategies; and the importance of individual, societal and scientific conceptualisations and understandings of ageing. By presenting an account of the recent historical uses, interpretations and critiques of the concept, the article unfolds the practical and normative complexities of 'successful ageing'.

  19. Factors Associated with Successful Functioning in American Indian Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silmere, Hile; Stiffman, Arlene Rubin

    2006-01-01

    This study examines environmental and cultural factors related to successful functioning in a stratified random sample of 401 American Indian youths. The success index included seven indicators: good mental health, being alcohol and drug free, absence of serious misbehavior, clean police record, good grades, positive psychosocial functioning, and…

  20. California Report Card, 2001: Factors for School Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Jayleen; Dominguez-Arms, Amy

    Noting that children's educational success is a high priority for California parents, voters, public officials, and business leaders, this report card documents how economic, health, and other conditions affect California children's learning and well-being. The report's introduction discusses factors influencing educational success, including…

  1. Psychosocial Factors Predicting First-Year College Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumrei-Mancuso, Elizabeth J.; Newton, Fred B.; Kim, Eunhee; Wilcox, Dan

    2013-01-01

    This study made use of a model of college success that involves students achieving academic goals and life satisfaction. Hierarchical regressions examined the role of six psychosocial factors for college success among 579 first-year college students. Academic self-efficacy and organization and attention to study were predictive of first semester…

  2. Assessing Factors Influencing Student Academic Success in Law School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Detwiler, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    The literature on student academic success of law students is limited to mostly single institution studies, and as such, a nationwide, multi-institutional empirical study of the factors that predict student academic success is greatly needed by higher education scholars, law school admission officers, faculty, and administrators. This dissertation…

  3. Factors associated with critical thinking abilities in psychotherapists.

    PubMed

    Gaudiano, Brandon A; Brown, Lily A; Miller, Ivan W

    2011-01-01

    Critical thinking is assumed to be an important factor in the promotion of evidence-based treatment practices. However, little is known about attitudinal and other dispositional factors that may influence critical thinking in psychotherapists specifically. The aim of the current study was to identify factors associated with critical thinking abilities in psychotherapists. A total of 143 licensed psychotherapists completed an Internet-based survey that assessed their critical thinking ability. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that critical thinking ability was associated with theoretical orientation, reliance on intuition in decision-making, and endorsement of erroneous beliefs about health. Implications for improving critical thinking skills in psychotherapists are discussed.

  4. E-Content Development for Languages: Success Factors and Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Paepe, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the success factors and pitfalls in development of e-content for languages. The factors discussed draw on several years of experience in developing and implementing 95% distance courses for Dutch as a second language in the adult education sector in Flanders and on PhD research at VUB. The CEFR [Common European Framework of…

  5. Desire: A Key Factor for Successful Online GED Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Donita; Tham, Yuen San Sarah; Hogle, Julie; Koch, Jody

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the experiences of 12 adult online General Educational Development (GED) students to determine the role of program and personal factors that influenced their successful passing of the GED or their dropping-out of the program. Through surveys and interviews, we discovered that desire was the key factor for…

  6. Rethinking the Factors of Success: Social Support and Community Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haithcox-Dennis, Melissa; DeWeese, Amanda; Goodman, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coalitions are often the strategy of choice when needs are great, resources are few, and individual efforts have proven unsuccessful in addressing serious health issues. Despite the widespread use of coalitions and extensive research, no definitive list of factors predicting coalition success has been identified. One factor, social…

  7. Three Success Factors for Simulation Based Construction Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Moonseo; Chan, Swee Lean; Ingawale-Verma, Yashada

    2003-01-01

    Factors in successful implementation of simulation in construction education are as follows: (1) considering human factors and feedback effects; (2) focusing on tradeoffs between with managerial decisions and construction policies; and (3) developing a standalone tool that runs on any platform. Case studies demonstrated the effectiveness of these…

  8. Success with Informational Text Comprehension: An Examination of Underlying Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebfreund, Meghan D.

    2014-01-01

    This purpose of this study was to develop a clearer understanding of the complex, interrelated factors that lead to successful informational text comprehension and to determine if or how these factors vary for higher and lower comprehenders. Participants (N = 177) were in grades three through five and were predominately African American (61%) and…

  9. Factors Driving Learner Success in Online Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vu, Phu; Cao, Vien; Vu, Lan; Cepero, Jude

    2014-01-01

    This study examined factors that contributed to the success of online learners in an online professional development course. Research instruments included an online survey and learners' activity logs in an online professional development course for 512 in-service teachers. The findings showed that there were several factors affecting online…

  10. An Investigation of Institutional Enhancement Factors on Student College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwaokoro, Amaechi Nkemakolem

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the importance of students' hard work and institutional factors--technology, advising, mentoring, and tutoring on student's academic performance. It is important for institutions to emphasize both students' hard work and effective institutional factors that will have positive impact on student success.

  11. Post-graduation factors predicting NCLEX-RN success.

    PubMed

    Beeman, Pamela Butler; Waterhouse, Julie Keith

    2003-01-01

    The academic and nonacademic factors that influence nursing students' success on the licensure exam have been widely reported. However, many questions remain as to why certain candidates fail the exam. This pilot study explores postgraduation influences on the NCLEX-RN.(R) Factors such as length and type of study, work hours, review course participation, sleep, and stress were recorded using the newly developed NCLEX Preparation Survey. Results suggest both expected and unexpected relationships between these factors and NCLEX-RN mastery.

  12. Temperamental Predictive Factors for Success in Korean Professional Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyoung Doo; Hannon, James C.; Hall, Morgan S.; Choi, Jae Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this five-year cohort study, we hypothesize that factors of temperament and character in professional baseball players predict the speed of obtaining success and the quality of success as well as anxiety control. Methods Participants included 120 male rookie players from the Korea Baseball Organization (KBO) and 107 male non-players with no history of playing baseball. The personality/characters and state/trait anxieties of participants were assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) and Spielberg's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Y (STAI-Y). Over the duration of five years, all the players were subsequently classified into either a success group (major leaguers) or a non-success group (non-major leaguers), depending on their status in the professional baseball league in Korea. Results The players in the group of starters had higher novelty seeking (NS) scores than those of non-starters. The reward dependence (RD) scores of the success group were higher than those of the non-success group. The state anxiety scores in the starter group were negatively correlated with NS scores. The state and trait anxieties in the non-success group were positively correlated with RD scores. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that predictive temperamental factors for success in baseball players include traits of novelty seeking and reward dependence. PMID:26508956

  13. A Strategic Planning Approach to Technology Integration: Critical Success Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Sam; Zabudsky, Jeff

    Within most institutions of higher learning, the typical approach to the integration of new information and communications technologies into the teaching and learning process has involved a heavy reliance on early adopters. This path of least resistance approach has provided organizations with the opportunity to quickly claim a presence in the…

  14. "Comfort" as a Critical Success Factor in Blended Learning Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Futch, Linda S.; deNoyelles, Aimee; Thompson, Kelvin; Howard, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    There are substantial quantitative research and anecdotal reports on blended learning and blended learning courses. However, few research studies focus on what happens at the classroom level. This research study aims to consider the highly contextual environment of effective blended learning courses by identifying the strategies instructors use to…

  15. Critical Student Factors in Successful Partnership Training: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, William A.; Blankenstein, Ronald G.

    A program is being conducted by New Hampshire Vocational-Technical College in partnership with Sanders Associates, Inc., a rapidly growing electronics company, to retrain Sanders employees as electronic technicians. The program, requiring 720 hours and taking 13 months to complete, allows students to acquire more than half the credits needed for…

  16. Small Business Programs: Benefits, Barriers, Bridges and Critical Success Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    State University, 2003. Patton , Michael Quinn . (2002). “ Qualitative Research & Evaluation Methods .” Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications...those circumstances because it provides depth and insight into little known phenomenon” and “ qualitative methods are preferred because they provide a...concluded by explaining the strategy and methods exercised to realize reliability and validity. Restatement of the Research Objective The research

  17. Examining the Critical Factors of Success in Virtual Team Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Brent

    2011-01-01

    Virtual teams are a burgeoning presence in the corporate environment today. Research shows that virtual teams have begun to surpass conventional teams in meeting the demands of organizations that are increasingly called on to apply and respond to new technologies that support, and in some cases, require a virtual teamwork approach. In order to…

  18. Prevention of Placement: Critical Factors in Program Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, William J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined placement prevention programs intended to help troubled families stay together. Contrasted programs which terminated with continuance of family care with programs that ended in placement of children. Found that in the placed cases, problems were worse and more numerous, and family attitudes toward therapists and agencies were less…

  19. Success Factors Identified by Academically Successful African-American Students of Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooler, Meredith

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore why some low-income minority students were academically successful in school using a three-tiered approach to research including individual student interviews, classroom observations, and photographs and follow up interviews on photographs to identify factors contributing to academic…

  20. Critical perspectives on successful aging: does it "appeal more than it illuminates"?

    PubMed

    Katz, Stephen; Calasanti, Toni

    2015-02-01

    "Successful aging" is one of gerontology's most successful ideas. Applied as a model, a concept, an approach, an experience, and an outcome, it has inspired researchers to create affiliated terms such as "healthy," "positive," "active," "productive," and "effective" aging. Although embraced as an optimistic approach to measuring life satisfaction and as a challenge to ageist traditions based on decline, successful aging as defined by John Rowe and Robert Kahn has also invited considerable critical responses. This article takes a critical gerontological perspective to explore such responses to the Rowe-Kahn successful aging paradigm by summarizing its empirical and methodological limitations, theoretical assumptions around ideas of individual choice and lifestyle, and inattention to intersecting issues of social inequality, health disparities, and age relations. The latter point is elaborated with an examination of income, gender, racial, ethnic, and age differences in the United States. Conclusions raise questions of social exclusion and the future of successful aging research.

  1. Factors affecting the reproductive success of dominant male meerkats.

    PubMed

    Spong, Göran F; Hodge, Sarah J; Young, Andrew J; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

    2008-05-01

    Identifying traits that affect the reproductive success of individuals is fundamental for our understanding of evolutionary processes. In cooperative breeders, a dominant male typically restricts mating access to the dominant female for extended periods, resulting in pronounced variation in reproductive success among males. This may result in strong selection for traits that increase the likelihood of dominance acquisition, dominance retention and reproductive rates while dominant. However, despite considerable research on reproductive skew, few studies have explored the factors that influence these three processes among males in cooperative species. Here we use genetic, behavioural and demographic data to investigate the factors affecting reproductive success in dominant male meerkats (Suricata suricatta). Our data show that dominant males sire the majority of all offspring surviving to 1 year. A male's likelihood of becoming dominant is strongly influenced by age, but not by weight. Tenure length and reproductive rate, both important components of dominant male reproductive success, are largely affected by group size and composition, rather than individual traits. Dominant males in large groups have longer tenures, but after this effect is controlled, male tenure length also correlates negatively to the number of adult females in the group. Male reproductive rate also declines as the number of intra- and extra-group competitors increases. As the time spent in the dominant position and reproductive rate while dominant explain > 80% of the total variance in reproductive success, group composition thus has major implications for male reproductive success.

  2. English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) nursing student success: a critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Olson, Mary Angela

    2012-01-01

    Many English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) nursing students struggle in nursing school for a multitude of reasons. The purpose of this critical review of the literature is to identify barriers and discover bridges to ESL nursing student success. Twenty-five articles were identified for the review. Language barriers were identified as the single most significant obstacle facing the ESL nursing student. Bridges to ESL nursing student success include enhancing language development and acculturation into the American mainstream culture. A broad range of strategies to promote student success are outlined and the role of the nurse educator in ESL nursing student success is also addressed.

  3. Personal Factors that Influence Deaf College Students' Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertini, John A.; Kelly, Ronald R.; Matchett, Mary Karol

    2012-01-01

    Research tells us that academic preparation is key to deaf students' success at college. Yet, that is not the whole story. Many academically prepared students drop out during their first year. This study identified entering deaf college students' personal factors as assessed by their individual responses to both the "Noel-Levitz College…

  4. DSS in perspective: an examination of essential success factors

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, R.W.; Emrich, M.L.

    1986-10-10

    A variety of approaches to the development and use of decision making information has been advocated and labeled DSS. This study examines a number of reported examples of decision support system methodologies and applications, and identifies certain significant differentiating characteristics. By analyzing managerial roles and styles in conjunction with DSS characteristics, essential success factors are determined. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. Graduate Entrepreneurship Incubation Environments: A Framework of Key Success Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Dajani, Haya; Dedoussis, Evangelos; Watson, Erika; Tzokas, Nikalaos

    2014-01-01

    The benchmarking framework developed in this study is specifically designed for higher education institutions to consider when developing environments to encourage entrepreneurship among their students, graduates and staff. The objective of the study was to identify key success factors of Graduate Entrepreneurship Incubator Environments (GEIEs)…

  6. Student Success Factors in Graduate Psychology Professional Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newhouse, Noelle K.; Cerniak, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Research examining factors contributing to online students' success typically focuses on a single point in time or completion of a single course, as well as individual difference variables, such as learning style or motivation, that may predispose a student to succeed. However, research concerning longer term online student outcomes, such as…

  7. Success Factors of Minority Academic Leadership in American Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littana, P. Paul

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how factors such as demographics, leadership skills, intrinsic motivation and attitudes, and life experiences contribute to the success of minority academic leaders in the American higher education system. A qualitative research method, using the phenomenological approach was selected for this research.…

  8. Factors Affecting the Success of Hmong College Students in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiong, Soua; Lam, Sarah K. Y.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores barriers and success factors of Hmong students in American colleges by interviewing five Hmong graduate students from refugee families in the US. Emerging themes revolve around academic, cultural and financial barriers. Professors, advisors, classmates, academic support programmes, family, financial aid and their own…

  9. Epilepsy characteristics and psychosocial factors associated with ketogenic diet success.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Nancy A; Carbone, Loretta A; Shellhaas, Renée A

    2013-10-01

    The ketogenic diet is an effective therapy for childhood epilepsy, but its important impacts on families could affect successful treatment. We assessed medical and psychosocial factors associated with successful ketogenic diet treatment. A total of 23 families of patients treated with ketogenic diet completed questionnaires (30% response), including inquiries about challenges to successful dietary treatments and validated family functioning scales. Of these, 14 were considered successful (diet discontinued once the child was seizure-free or continued as clinically indicated). Family-identified challenges were food preparation time (n = 11) and that the diet was too restrictive (n = 9). Neither Medicaid insurance nor family functioning scale scores were significantly associated with successful treatment. Lower seizure frequency prior to ketogenic diet initiation (P = .02) and postdiet seizure improvement (P = .01) were associated with increased odds of success. Effective ketogenic diet treatment is dictated both by psychosocial and epilepsy-related influences. A focus on understanding the psychosocial issues may help to improve families' experiences and success with the ketogenic diet.

  10. Predictive factors of successful microdissection testicular sperm extraction.

    PubMed

    Bernie, Aaron M; Ramasamy, Ranjith; Schlegel, Peter N

    2013-01-01

    Azoospermia in men requires microsurgical reconstruction or a procedure for sperm retrieval with assisted reproduction to allow fertility. While the chance of successful retrieval of sperm in men with obstructive azoospermia approaches >90%, the chances of sperm retrieval in men with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) are not as high. Conventional procedures such as fine needle aspiration of the testis, testicular biopsy and testicular sperm extraction are successful in 20-45% of men with NOA. With microdissection testicular sperm extraction (micro-TESE), the chance of successful retrieval can be up to 60%. Despite this increased success, the ability to counsel patients preoperatively on their probability of successful sperm retrieval has remained challenging. A combination of variables such as age, serum FSH and inhibin B levels, testicular size, genetic analysis, history of Klinefelter syndrome, history of cryptorchidism or varicocele and histopathology on diagnostic biopsy have provided some insight into the chance of successful sperm retrieval in men with NOA. The goal of this review was to evaluate the preoperative factors that are currently available to predict the outcome for success with micro-TESE.

  11. Organizational Factors' Effects on the Success of E-Learning Systems and Organizational Benefits: An Empirical Study in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ying Chieh; Huang, Yu-An; Lin, Chad

    2012-01-01

    E-learning development for enterprises is still in its infancy in that scholars are still working on identifying the critical success factors for e-learning in organizational contexts. This study presents a framework considering how organizational factors affect the quality and service of e-learning systems and how these factors influence…

  12. Structural and Cultural Factors in Successful Aging Among Older Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Successful or healthful aging are terms that draw attention to life course issues related to individual, physical, and psychologic development and maturation, but they also draw attention to the material basis of successful aging and the social structures that determine one’s place in the social hierarchy. This article focuses on barriers to optimal aging for Hispanics, especially those of Mexican origin, and argues that cultural factors and social class are closely associated. The reduction of health disparities and equity in medical and long-term care requires an understanding of both cultural and material sources of differential health levels. PMID:19065093

  13. Personal factors that influence deaf college students' academic success.

    PubMed

    Albertini, John A; Kelly, Ronald R; Matchett, Mary Karol

    2012-01-01

    Research tells us that academic preparation is key to deaf students' success at college. Yet, that is not the whole story. Many academically prepared students drop out during their first year. This study identified entering deaf college students' personal factors as assessed by their individual responses to both the Noel-Levitz College Student Inventory Form B and the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory, second edition (LASSI). Entering students in 3 successive cohorts (total n =437) participated in this study. Results show that in addition to entry measurements of reading and mathematic skills, personal factors contributed to the academic performance of students in their first quarter in college. The Noel-Levitz provided the comparatively better predictive value of academic performance: Motivation for Academic Study Scale (e.g., desire to finish college). The LASSI also showed statistically significant predictors, the Self-Regulation Component (e.g., time management) and Will Component (e.g., self-discipline), but accounted for relatively less variability in the students' initial grade point averages. For this group of underprepared students, results show that personal factors can play a significant role in academic success. Deaf students' personal factors are discussed as they relate to other first-year college students and to their subsequent academic performance and persistence.

  14. Physiological and morphological factors associated with successful fencing performance.

    PubMed

    Stewart, K J; Peredo, A R; Williams, C M

    1977-09-01

    The relation between fencing success during a season of intercollegiate competition and various physiological and morphological variables were determined in 14 fencers. Bivariate and multiple regression analysis was used to determine the extent to which the independent variables, individually and collectively, accounted for the variance in two measures of fencing success. The fencing scores correlated significantly with VE max, Vo2 max, the 2 km run, and weight, while there was no significant correlation between the fencing scores and submaximal heart rate at 6 mph, and 1 min steptest score, or other morphological measurements. Cardiorespiratory fitness variables of Vo2 max and VE max accounted for the greatest variance in each of the two fencing scores (57.7 and 58.1%, respectively). Although morphological factors play a role in fencing success, their influence is small when physiological factors are accounted for. Future energy-cost studies are suggested to determine the physiological basis for the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness and fencing success.

  15. Rx-to-OTC switches: trends and factors underlying success.

    PubMed

    Mahecha, Laura A

    2006-05-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration defines an Rx-to-OTC switch as over-the-counter (OTC) marketing of a drug product that was once a prescription (Rx) drug for the same indication, with the same strength, dose, duration of use, dosage form, population and route of administration. Here, we examine the rationale behind switches, the process of switches and historical case studies of switches in the United States to understand the factors for success and expected future trends.

  16. Board and Superintendent Perceptions of the Illinois Professional Standards for School Leaders Critical for Superintendent Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockwood, Pamela Rhea

    2010-01-01

    This quantitative study focused on the differences in perceptions between Illinois K-12 unit district public school superintendents and board presidents as to those performance competency indicators in the "Illinois Professional Standards for School Leaders" that they perceived as being most critical for superintendent success. Via a…

  17. The Psychology of Groups: Why Quality and Impartial Leadership Is Critical to a Group's Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Richard

    Many decisions made by outdoor leaders are critical to the well-being of an entire group. Understanding the psychology of groups is important to successful leadership. This paper presents ways that individuals are motivated in groups, how groups respond, some symptoms of problems, and strategies to divert problems that can overwhelm a group.…

  18. Determining the Critical Skills Beginning Agriculture Teachers Need to Successfully Teach Welding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Michael L.; Warnick, Brian K.; Meyers, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    Using the Delphi technique, agriculture teachers with significant experience teaching welding were asked to help determine the critical skills beginning agriculture teachers need to successfully teach welding. The study's objectives sought to (1) identify the knowledge and technical skill competencies that beginning agriculture teachers need to…

  19. Factors influencing breeding success, ovarian cyclicity, and cub survival in zoo-managed tigers (Panthera tigris).

    PubMed

    Saunders, Sarah P; Harris, Tara; Traylor-Holzer, Kathy; Beck, Karen Goodrowe

    2014-01-10

    Understanding factors that influence reproduction and offspring survival in zoo populations is critical for management of threatened and endangered species. Examination of long-term data (1989-2011) compiled from the Association of Zoos and Aquarium's zoo-managed tiger breeding program provides the basis for a more thorough understanding of reproduction and scientifically based decisions for effective population management in this endangered felid. Biological and management-related factors that could influence tiger breeding success and cub survival were evaluated using logistic mixed models. Breeding success improved with female age until approximately age five, then declined thereafter. Experienced female breeders had greater breeding success than inexperienced females. Litter size was most predictive of cub survival, with average-sized litters (3-4 cubs) experiencing the highest proportional survival. Management-related factors, such as whether the breeding institution had a recent tiger litter and whether both animals were already located at the same institution, also influenced breeding success and cub survival. These results highlight the importance of institutional husbandry experience and the need to retain knowledge through staff turnovers to achieve optimal reproductive success. Using fecal estrogen data, frequency of ovarian cyclicity and mean cycle length did not differ by female age or parity; thus, lack of cyclicity and/or increased cycle duration are not likely explanations for declining breeding success with age. These results provide valuable reproductive information that should improve scientific management of zoo-based tiger populations.

  20. Lessons for public health campaigns from analysing commercial food marketing success factors: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Commercial food marketing has considerably shaped consumer food choice behaviour. Meanwhile, public health campaigns for healthier eating have had limited impact to date. Social marketing suggests that successful commercial food marketing campaigns can provide useful lessons for public sector activities. The aim of the present study was to empirically identify food marketing success factors that, using the social marketing approach, could help improve public health campaigns to promote healthy eating. Methods In this case-study analysis, 27 recent and successful commercial food and beverage marketing cases were purposively sampled from different European countries. The cases involved different consumer target groups, product categories, company sizes and marketing techniques. The analysis focused on cases of relatively healthy food types, and nutrition and health-related aspects in the communication related to the food. Visual as well as written material was gathered, complemented by semi-structured interviews with 12 food market trend experts and 19 representatives of food companies and advertising agencies. Success factors were identified by a group of experts who reached consensus through discussion structured by a card sorting method. Results Six clusters of success factors emerged from the analysis and were labelled as "data and knowledge", "emotions", "endorsement", "media", "community" and "why and how". Each cluster subsumes two or three success factors and is illustrated by examples. In total, 16 factors were identified. It is argued that the factors "nutritional evidence", "trend awareness", "vertical endorsement", "simple naturalness" and "common values" are of particular importance in the communication of health with regard to food. Conclusions The present study identified critical factors for the success of commercial food marketing campaigns related to the issue of nutrition and health, which are possibly transferable to the public health

  1. Critical Perspectives on Successful Aging: Does It “Appeal More Than It Illuminates”?

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Stephen; Calasanti, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Successful aging” is one of gerontology’s most successful ideas. Applied as a model, a concept, an approach, an experience, and an outcome, it has inspired researchers to create affiliated terms such as “healthy,” “positive,” “active,” “productive,” and “effective” aging. Although embraced as an optimistic approach to measuring life satisfaction and as a challenge to ageist traditions based on decline, successful aging as defined by John Rowe and Robert Kahn has also invited considerable critical responses. This article takes a critical gerontological perspective to explore such responses to the Rowe–Kahn successful aging paradigm by summarizing its empirical and methodological limitations, theoretical assumptions around ideas of individual choice and lifestyle, and inattention to intersecting issues of social inequality, health disparities, and age relations. The latter point is elaborated with an examination of income, gender, racial, ethnic, and age differences in the United States. Conclusions raise questions of social exclusion and the future of successful aging research. PMID:24747713

  2. Key factors of successful JIT integration with IBS - An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asri, Mohammad Azwanie Naim Mohammad; Nawi, Mohd Nasrun Mohd; Nadarajan, Santhirasegaran

    2016-08-01

    The Just-In-Time (JIT) philosophy has been used for many decades to increase productivity through waste elimination process. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the knowledge by addressing the transportation and material delivery activities in Industrialized Building System (IBS) and integrating JIT to improve the performance of those activities. The literature review has been conducted through relevant database. It was found that there is a need for more holistic approach to be adopted to integrate JIT in IBS project. This paper discusses the key success factors for effective integration between JIT and IBS in the context of transportation and material delivery activities.

  3. Human factors in the management of the critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Bion, J F; Abrusci, T; Hibbert, P

    2010-07-01

    Unreliable delivery of best practice care is a major component of medical error. Critically ill patients are particularly susceptible to error and unreliable care. Human factors analysis, widely used in industry, provides insights into how interactions between organizations, tasks, and the individual worker impact on human behaviour and affect systems reliability. We adopt a human factors approach to examine determinants of clinical reliability in the management of critically ill patients. We conducted a narrative review based on a Medline search (1950-March 2010) combining intensive/critical care (units) with medical errors, patient safety, or delivery of healthcare; keyword and Internet search 'human factors' or 'ergonomics'. Critical illness represents a high-risk, complex system spanning speciality and geographical boundaries. Substantial opportunities exist for improving the safety and reliability of care of critically ill patients at the level of the task, the individual healthcare provider, and the organization or system. Task standardization (best practice guidelines) and simplification (bundling or checklists) should be implemented where scientific evidence is strong, or adopted subject to further research ('dynamic standardization'). Technical interventions should be embedded in everyday practice by the adjunctive use of non-technical (behavioural) interventions. These include executive 'adoption' of clinical areas, systematic methods for identifying hazards and reflective learning from error, and a range of techniques for improving teamworking and communication. Human factors analysis provides a useful framework for understanding and rectifying the causes of error and unreliability, particularly in complex systems such as critical care.

  4. Factors influencing brown trout reproductive success in Ozark tailwater rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pender, D.R.; Kwak, T.J.

    2002-01-01

    The reproductive success of brown trout Salmo trutta in White River, Arkansas, tailwater reaches is highly variable, resulting in the need for supplemental stocking. A better understanding of the physical and biotic factors affecting reproduction and survival would enhance the contribution of wild fish. We compared fecundity, reproductive chronology, physical habitat, water quality, trout density, food availability, diet, predation, and competitive interactions among four tailwater reaches to identify factors influencing brown trout reproductive success. The fecundity and condition factor of prespawning brown trout were significantly lower at Beaver Tailwater, a reach known for reproductive failure, than at other sites, among which no differences were found. Brown trout spawning was observed from 11 October to 23 November 1996, and juvenile emergence began on 28 February 1997. Significant among-site differences were detected for spawning and juvenile microhabitat variables, but the variables fell within or near suitable or optimal ranges reported in the literature for this species. Age-0 brown trout density differed significantly among sites, but growth and condition did not. Predation by Ozark sculpin Cottus hypselurus on trout eggs or age-0 trout of any species was not observed among the 418 stomachs examined. Ozark sculpin density and diet overlap with age-0 brown trout were highest and invertebrate food availability and water fertility were lowest at Beaver Tailwater relative to the other reaches. Our findings indicate that differences in trophic conditions occur among tailwater reaches, and a lower system productive capacity was identified at Beaver Tailwater. We suggest that management efforts include refining the multispecies trout stocking regime to improve production efficiency, enhancing flow regulation, and increasing habitat complexity to increase invertebrate and fish productivity. Such efforts may lead to improved natural reproduction and the

  5. A critical examination of factors that might encourage secrecy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tough, Allen

    1987-10-01

    Seven factors that may encourage a government to keep secret a signal from extraterrestrial intelligence are critically examined. These factors are: (1) belief that people may panic; (2) fear of a negative impact on religion, science, and culture; (3) embarrassment; (4) individual and national competitive urges; (5) avoiding a harmful premature reply; (6) a national trade or military advantage; and (7) fear of a Trojan horse. Steps that can be taken to alleviate the most significant of these factors are considered.

  6. Which Factors Affect the Success or Failure of Eradication Campaigns against Alien Species?

    PubMed Central

    Pluess, Therese; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Pyšek, Petr; Cannon, Ray; Pergl, Jan; Breukers, Annemarie; Bacher, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Although issues related to the management of invasive alien species are receiving increasing attention, little is known about which factors affect the likelihood of success of management measures. We applied two data mining techniques, classification trees and boosted trees, to identify factors that relate to the success of management campaigns aimed at eradicating invasive alien invertebrates, plants and plant pathogens. We assembled a dataset of 173 different eradication campaigns against 94 species worldwide, about a half of which (50.9%) were successful. Eradications in man-made habitats, greenhouses in particular, were more likely to succeed than those in (semi-)natural habitats. In man-made habitats the probability of success was generally high in Australasia, while in Europe and the Americas it was higher for local infestations that are easier to deal with, and for international campaigns that are likely to profit from cross-border cooperation. In (semi-) natural habitats, eradication campaigns were more likely to succeed for plants introduced as an ornamental and escaped from cultivation prior to invasion. Averaging out all other factors in boosted trees, pathogens, bacteria and viruses were most, and fungi the least likely to be eradicated; for plants and invertebrates the probability was intermediate. Our analysis indicates that initiating the campaign before the extent of infestation reaches the critical threshold, starting to eradicate within the first four years since the problem has been noticed, paying special attention to species introduced by the cultivation pathway, and applying sanitary measures can substantially increase the probability of eradication success. Our investigations also revealed that information on socioeconomic factors, which are often considered to be crucial for eradication success, is rarely available, and thus their relative importance cannot be evaluated. Future campaigns should carefully document socioeconomic factors to

  7. Which factors affect the success or failure of eradication campaigns against alien species?

    PubMed

    Pluess, Therese; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Pyšek, Petr; Cannon, Ray; Pergl, Jan; Breukers, Annemarie; Bacher, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Although issues related to the management of invasive alien species are receiving increasing attention, little is known about which factors affect the likelihood of success of management measures. We applied two data mining techniques, classification trees and boosted trees, to identify factors that relate to the success of management campaigns aimed at eradicating invasive alien invertebrates, plants and plant pathogens. We assembled a dataset of 173 different eradication campaigns against 94 species worldwide, about a half of which (50.9%) were successful. Eradications in man-made habitats, greenhouses in particular, were more likely to succeed than those in (semi-)natural habitats. In man-made habitats the probability of success was generally high in Australasia, while in Europe and the Americas it was higher for local infestations that are easier to deal with, and for international campaigns that are likely to profit from cross-border cooperation. In (semi-) natural habitats, eradication campaigns were more likely to succeed for plants introduced as an ornamental and escaped from cultivation prior to invasion. Averaging out all other factors in boosted trees, pathogens, bacteria and viruses were most, and fungi the least likely to be eradicated; for plants and invertebrates the probability was intermediate. Our analysis indicates that initiating the campaign before the extent of infestation reaches the critical threshold, starting to eradicate within the first four years since the problem has been noticed, paying special attention to species introduced by the cultivation pathway, and applying sanitary measures can substantially increase the probability of eradication success. Our investigations also revealed that information on socioeconomic factors, which are often considered to be crucial for eradication success, is rarely available, and thus their relative importance cannot be evaluated. Future campaigns should carefully document socioeconomic factors to

  8. Key success factors behind electronic medical record adoption in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Narattharaksa, Kanida; Speece, Mark; Newton, Charles; Bulyalert, Damrongsak

    2016-09-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the elements that health care personnel in Thailand believe are necessary for successful adoption of electronic medical record (EMR) systems. Design/methodology/approach Initial qualitative in-depth interviews with physicians to adapt key elements from the literature to the Thai context. The 12 elements identified included things related to managing the implementation and to IT expertise. The nationwide survey was supported by the Ministry of Public Health and returned 1,069 usable questionnaires (response rate 42 percent) from a range of medical personnel. Findings The key elements clearly separated into a managerial dimension and an IT dimension. All were considered fairly important, but managerial expertise was more critical. In particular, there should be clear EMR project goals and scope, adequate budget allocation, clinical staff must be involved in implementation, and the IT should facilitate good electronic communication. Research limitations/implications Thailand is representative of middle-income developing countries, but there is no guarantee findings can be generalized. National policies differ, as do economic structures of health care industries. The focus is on management at the organizational level, but future research must also examine macro-level issues, as well as gain more depth into thinking of individual health care personnel. Practical implications Technical issues of EMR implementation are certainly important. However, it is clear actual adoption and use of the system also depends very heavily on managerial issues. Originality/value Most research on EMR implementation has been in developed countries, and has often focussed more on technical issues rather than examining managerial issues closely. Health IT is also critical in developing economies, and management of health IT implementation must be well understood.

  9. Motivational and adaptational factors of successful women engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornsen, Susan Edith

    It is no surprise that there is a shortage of women engineers. The reasons for the shortage have been researched and discussed in myriad papers, and suggestions for improvement continue to evolve. However, there are few studies that have specifically identified the positive aspects that attract women to engineering and keep them actively engaged in the field. This paper examines how women engineers view their education, their work, and their motivation to remain in the field. A qualitative research design was used to understand the motivation and adaptability factors women use to support their decision to major in engineering and stay in the engineering profession. Women engineers were interviewed using broad questions about motivation and adaptability. Interviews were transcribed and coded, looking for common threads of factors that suggest not only why women engineers persist in the field, but also how they thrive. Findings focus on the experiences, insights, and meaning of women interviewed. A grounded theory approach was used to describe the success factors found in practicing women engineers. The study found categories of attraction to the field, learning environment, motivation and adaptability. Sub-categories of motivation are intrinsic motivational factors such as the desire to make a difference, as well as extrinsic factors such as having an income that allows the kind of lifestyle that supports the family. Women engineers are comfortable with and enjoy working with male peers and when barriers arise, women learn to adapt in the male dominated field. Adaptability was indicated in areas of gender, culture, and communication. Women found strength in the ability to 'read' their clients, and provide insight to their teams. Sufficient knowledge from the field advances theory and offers strategies to programs for administrators and faculty of schools of engineering as well as engineering firms, who have interest in recruitment, and retention of female students

  10. Expecting success: Factors influencing ninth graders' science self-efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Elizabeth

    What factors influence ninth grade students' expectations for success in science? Using social cognitive theory and bioecological systems theory as theoretical frameworks, this dissertation employs data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) to examine the relative impact of teacher practices and their perceived attitudes on students' science self-efficacy. Further, as they relate to this broader issue, the relative impact of student subjective task value and teacher characteristics is also investigated. It has been well documented that U.S. students are not achieving at satisfactory levels in science. Education policy has focused on improving science teacher quality as one way to address this problem. Teacher effectiveness has been primarily measured by student achievement on standardized tests. However, not enough attention has been given to the social cognitive factors that can lead to increased achievement and persistence in science as well as how teachers may influence these factors. This study interrogates the relationship between student and teacher variables and the social cognitive construct of self-efficacy, which has proven to have a significant impact on student achievement and persistence in science. Findings add to the current literature surrounding ways that educators may increase student performance in science by employing policies and practices that benefit the development of student science self-efficacy.

  11. Decay accelerating factor is essential for successful corneal engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Andrew; Suedekum, Brandon; Liu, Jinbo; An, Fengqi; Lass, Jonathan; Strainic, Michael G; Lin, Feng; Heeger, Peter; Medof, M. Edward

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to immune restrictions that pertain for solid organ transplants, the tolerogenic milieu of the eye permits successful corneal transplantation without systemic immunosuppression, even across a fully MHC disparate barrier. Here we show that recipient and donor expression of decay accelerating factor (DAF or CD55), a cell surface C3/C5 convertase regulator recently shown to modulate T cell responses, is essential to sustain successful corneal engraftment. Whereas wild type (WT) corneas transplanted into multiple minor histocompatibility antigen (mH), or HY disparate WT recipients were accepted, DAF’s absence on either the donor cornea or in the recipient bed induced rapid rejection. Donor or recipient DAF deficiency led to expansion of donor-reactive IFN-γ producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, as well as inhibition of antigen induced IL-10 and TGF-β, together demonstrating that DAF deficiency precludes immune tolerance. In addition to demonstrating a requisite role for DAF in conferring ocular immune privilege, these results raise the possibility that augmenting DAF levels on corneal endothelium and/or the recipient bed could have therapeutic value for transplants that clinically are at high risk for rejection. PMID:20055803

  12. Sex-biased inbreeding effects on reproductive success and home range size of the critically endangered black rhinoceros.

    PubMed

    Cain, Bradley; Wandera, Antony B; Shawcross, Susan G; Edwin Harris, W; Stevens-Wood, Barry; Kemp, Stephen J; Okita-Ouma, Benson; Watts, Phillip C

    2014-04-01

    A central premise of conservation biology is that small populations suffer reduced viability through loss of genetic diversity and inbreeding. However, there is little evidence that variation in inbreeding impacts individual reproductive success within remnant populations of threatened taxa, largely due to problems associated with obtaining comprehensive pedigree information to estimate inbreeding. In the critically endangered black rhinoceros, a species that experienced severe demographic reductions, we used model selection to identify factors associated with variation in reproductive success (number of offspring). Factors examined as predictors of reproductive success were age, home range size, number of nearby mates, reserve location, and multilocus heterozygosity (a proxy for inbreeding). Multilocus heterozygosity predicted male reproductive success (p< 0.001, explained deviance >58%) and correlated with male home range size (p < 0.01, r(2) > 44%). Such effects were not apparent in females, where reproductive success was determined by age (p < 0.01, explained deviance 34%) as females raise calves alone and choose between, rather than compete for, mates. This first report of a 3-way association between an individual male's heterozygosity, reproductive output, and territory size in a large vertebrate is consistent with an asymmetry in the level of intrasexual competition and highlights the relevance of sex-biased inbreeding for the management of many conservation-priority species. Our results contrast with the idea that wild populations of threatened taxa may possess some inherent difference from most nonthreatened populations that necessitates the use of detailed pedigrees to study inbreeding effects. Despite substantial variance in male reproductive success, the increased fitness of more heterozygous males limits the loss of heterozygosity. Understanding how individual differences in genetic diversity mediate the outcome of intrasexual competition will be

  13. Effects of people-centred factors on enterprise resource planning implementation project success: empirical evidence from Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Vathsala; Gunawardena, Vathsala

    2010-08-01

    Extant literature suggests people-centred factors as one of the major areas influencing enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementation project success. Yet, to date, few empirical studies attempted to validate the link between people-centred factors and ERP implementation project success. The purpose of this study is to empirically identify people-centred factors that are critical to ERP implementation projects in Sri Lanka. The study develops and empirically validates a framework for people-centred factors that influence the success of ERP implementation projects. Survey research methodology was used and collected data from 74 ERP implementation projects in Sri Lanka. The people-centred factors of 'project team competence', 'rewards' and 'communication and change' were found to predict significantly the ERP implementation project success.

  14. Factors affecting initial training success of blood glucose testing in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Reamer, Lisa A; Haller, Rachel L; Thiele, Erica J; Freeman, Hani D; Lambeth, Susan P; Schapiro, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes can be a problem for captive chimpanzees. Accurate blood glucose (BG) readings are necessary to monitor and treat this disease. Thus, obtaining voluntary samples from primates through positive reinforcement training (PRT) is critical. The current study assessed the voluntary participation of 123 chimpanzees in BG sampling and investigated factors that may contribute to individual success. All subjects participate in regular PRT sessions as part of a comprehensive behavioral management program. Basic steps involved in obtaining BG values include: voluntarily presenting a finger/toe; allowing digit disinfection; holding for the lancet device; and allowing blood collection onto a glucometer test strip for analysis. We recorded the level of participation (none, partial, or complete) when each chimpanzee was first asked to perform the testing procedure. Nearly 30% of subjects allowed the entire procedure in one session, without any prior specific training for the target behavior. Factors that affected this initial successful BG testing included sex, personality (chimpanzees rated higher on the factor "openness" were more likely to participate with BG testing), and past training performance for "present-for-injection" (chimpanzees that presented for their most recent anesthetic injection were more likely to participate). Neither age, rearing history, time since most recent anesthetic event nor social group size significantly affected initial training success. These results have important implications for captive management and training program success, underlining individual differences in training aptitude and the need for developing individual management plans in order to provide optimal care and treatment for diabetic chimpanzees in captivity.

  15. Navy Contracting: Analyzing Critical Success Factors and Perceived Impact on Success within an Organization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    HOLDINGS INC. 3,967 $1,519,667,910.49 FINMECCANICA SPA 2,904 $1,500,809,378.99 Table 3. Top 50 Navy Contractors (From Government Executive...209,576,892.87 FINMECCANICA SPA 511 203,557,443.02 ALION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION 584 202,246,021.41 CHUGACH ALASKA CORPORATION 1,142

  16. Critical Word Factor in Texts for Beginning Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiebert, Elfrieda H.; Fisher, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    "The Critical Word Factor," based on word recognition demands of texts, is a measure of text difficulty designed specifically for texts used by beginning readers. The measure is a function of the number of new, unique words per 100 running words of text that fall outside a designated curriculum. The authors investigated the validity of the…

  17. Critical Factors in Mobile Learning: A Quasi-Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, Sergio Assis; dos Santos, Rodrigo Pereira; Arnaud, Lucas; de Souza, Jano Moreira

    2013-01-01

    The advance of mobile industry and research has expanded e-learning in order to support an efficient and effective educational process. However, the promised benefits are as much attractive as the existing difficulties and barriers. In this paper, we intend to identify and summarize the critical factors in mobile learning through a…

  18. Critical Factors in Data Governance for Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elouazizi, Noureddine

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies some of the main challenges of data governance modelling in the context of learning analytics for higher education institutions, and discusses the critical factors for designing data governance models for learning analytics. It identifies three fundamental common challenges that cut across any learning analytics data…

  19. Gastrointestinal Factors in Autistic Disorder: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Craig A.; Stigler, Kimberly A.; Corkins, Mark R.; Posey, David J.; Fitzgerald, Joseph F.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in the gastrointestinal (GI) factors of autistic disorder (autism) has developed from descriptions of symptoms such as constipation and diarrhea in autistic children and advanced towards more detailed studies of GI histopathology and treatment modalities. This review attempts to critically and comprehensively analyze the literature as it…

  20. Critical Factors for Improving Social Sustainability of Urban Renewal Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Edwin; Lee, Grace K. L.

    2008-01-01

    This study reviews the sustainable urban design concept and identifies critical factors for enhancing social sustainability of urban renewal projects. Through a questionnaire survey carried out in Hong Kong, the opinions of architects, planners, property development managers, and local citizens were sought and evaluated. The results derived from…

  1. Small Business Success Factors: the Role of Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Mike; Tuck, Nicki; Bellamy, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Interest in successful small businesses continues to grow, but is influenced by the different ways in which small businesses are categorised and the difficulty of defining ?success?. There is a range of criteria associated with success in terms of individual owner characteristics, organisational values and performance measures. However, few…

  2. Goals, Success Factors, and Barriers for Simulation-Based Learning: A Qualitative Interview Study in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dieckmann, Peter; Friis, Susanne Molin; Lippert, Anne; Ostergaard, Doris

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This study describes (a) process goals, (b) success factors, and (c) barriers for optimizing simulation-based learning environments within the simulation setting model developed by Dieckmann. Methods: Seven simulation educators of different experience levels were interviewed using the Critical Incident Technique. Results: (a) The…

  3. Clinical Factors Associated with Successful Discharge from Assertive Community Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bromley, Elizabeth; Mikesell, Lisa; Whelan, Fiona; Hellemann, Gerhard; Hunt, Marcia; Cuddeback, Gary; Bradford, Daniel W; Young, Alexander S

    2017-01-23

    We sought to explore clinical factors associated with successful transition from Assertive Community Treatment to less intensive clinical services. Mixed-method observational follow up study of veterans discharged from three VA-affiliated ACT teams to less intensive clinical services. Of the 240 veterans in ACT, 9% (n = 21) were discharged during the study period. Among the 11 of 21 discharged veterans who enrolled in the follow up study, reason for discharge, designated by the veteran's primary clinician at the time of discharge, predicted outcomes (p = 0.02) at 9 months, with "disengagement" as a reason for discharge predicting poorer outcomes. Six of 11 veterans experienced poor outcomes at 9 months, including incarceration and substance use relapse. ACT clinicians rarely discharge clients. Many clients may experience negative clinical events following ACT discharge, and clients may be difficult to follow post-discharge. Client disengagement from ACT may indicate higher likelihood of poor outcomes following discharge to less intensive clinical services.

  4. Success factors for reducing maternal and child mortality.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, Shyama; Schweitzer, Julian; Bishai, David; Chowdhury, Sadia; Caramani, Daniele; Frost, Laura; Cortez, Rafael; Daelmans, Bernadette; de Francisco, Andres; Adam, Taghreed; Cohen, Robert; Alfonso, Y Natalia; Franz-Vasdeki, Jennifer; Saadat, Seemeen; Pratt, Beth Anne; Eugster, Beatrice; Bandali, Sarah; Venkatachalam, Pritha; Hinton, Rachael; Murray, John; Arscott-Mills, Sharon; Axelson, Henrik; Maliqi, Blerta; Sarker, Intissar; Lakshminarayanan, Rama; Jacobs, Troy; Jack, Susan; Jacks, Susan; Mason, Elizabeth; Ghaffar, Abdul; Mays, Nicholas; Presern, Carole; Bustreo, Flavia

    2014-07-01

    Reducing maternal and child mortality is a priority in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and will likely remain so after 2015. Evidence exists on the investments, interventions and enabling policies required. Less is understood about why some countries achieve faster progress than other comparable countries. The Success Factors for Women's and Children's Health studies sought to address this knowledge gap using statistical and econometric analyses of data from 144 low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) over 20 years; Boolean, qualitative comparative analysis; a literature review; and country-specific reviews in 10 fast-track countries for MDGs 4 and 5a. There is no standard formula--fast-track countries deploy tailored strategies and adapt quickly to change. However, fast-track countries share some effective approaches in addressing three main areas to reduce maternal and child mortality. First, these countries engage multiple sectors to address crucial health determinants. Around half the reduction in child mortality in LMICs since 1990 is the result of health sector investments, the other half is attributed to investments made in sectors outside health. Second, these countries use strategies to mobilize partners across society, using timely, robust evidence for decision-making and accountability and a triple planning approach to consider immediate needs, long-term vision and adaptation to change. Third, the countries establish guiding principles that orient progress, align stakeholder action and achieve results over time. This evidence synthesis contributes to global learning on accelerating improvements in women's and children's health towards 2015 and beyond.

  5. In vitro fertilisation treatment and factors affecting success.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jack Yu Jen; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2012-12-01

    The efficacy of assisted reproductive technologies has improved significantly over the past decades. The main indications for in vitro fertilisation include tubal obstruction, severe male-factor infertility, severe endometriosis, ovulatory dysfunction, diminished ovarian reserve, and infertility of unexplained cause. In vitro fertilisation has also become an effective treatment option for couples wishing to undergo pre-implantation genetic diagnosis or screening, and for those wishing to cryopreserve their oocytes or embryos for preservation of fertility. The management of women in late reproductive age poses a major challenge; the optimum in vitro fertilisation treatment for poor responders remains elusive. The success of in vitro fertilisation treatment can be optimised by taking an individualised, patient-centered approach to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. Key components involve selection of an appropriate controlled ovarian protocol, close-cycle monitoring, adjustment of gonadotropin dosage to avoid hyper-response, and individualised timing of human chorionic gonadotropin injection. Future directions of assisted reproductive technologies include development of non-invasive embryo selection methods, use of transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and time-lapse imaging technologies.

  6. Gastrointestinal factors in autistic disorder: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Craig A; Stigler, Kimberly A; Corkins, Mark R; Posey, David J; Fitzgerald, Joseph F; McDougle, Christopher J

    2005-12-01

    Interest in the gastrointestinal (GI) factors of autistic disorder (autism) has developed from descriptions of symptoms such as constipation and diarrhea in autistic children and advanced towards more detailed studies of GI histopathology and treatment modalities. This review attempts to critically and comprehensively analyze the literature as it applies to all aspects of GI factors in autism, including discussion of symptoms, pathology, nutrition, and treatment. While much literature is available on this topic, a dearth of rigorous study was found to validate GI factors specific to children with autism.

  7. Are away rotations critical for a successful match in orthopaedic surgery?

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Keith; Weidner, Zachary; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir

    2009-12-01

    Surveys have suggested one of the most important determinants of orthopaedic resident selection is completion of an orthopaedic clerkship at the program director's institution. The purpose of this study was to further elucidate the significance of visiting externships on the resident selection process. We retrospectively reviewed data for all medical students applying for orthopaedic surgery residency from six medical schools between 2006 and 2008, for a total of 143 applicants. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to compare students who matched successfully versus those who did not in terms of number of away rotations, United States Medical Licensing Examination scores, class rank, and other objective factors. Of the 143 medical students, 19 did not match in orthopaedics (13.3%), whereas the remaining 124 matched. On multiple logistic regression analysis, whether a student did more than one home rotation, how many away rotations a student performed, and United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score were factors in the odds of match success. Orthopaedic surgery is one of the most competitive specialties in medicine; the away rotation remains an important factor in match success.

  8. High Enrollment Course Success Factors in Virtual School: Factors Influencing Student Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Feng; Cavanaugh, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a study of success factors in high enrollment courses in a K-12 virtual school learning environment. The influence of variables: time student spent in the learning management system (LMS), number of times logged into the LMS, teacher comment, participation in free or reduced lunch programs, student status in the virtual school…

  9. Factors Influencing Academic Success and Retention following a 1st-Year Post-Secondary Success Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennett, Deborah J.; Reed, Maureen J.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the psycho-social factors predicting performance and retention following a post-secondary success course that was developed after Rosenbaum's (1990, 2000) model of self-control and the academic success literature. Before and after the course, students completed measures assessing general and academic resourcefulness, academic…

  10. Identifying Sociological Factors for the Success of Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, C. A.; Tarter, D.; Coleman, A.

    Astrosociology factors relevant to success of future space exploration may best be identified through studies of sociological circumstances of past successful explorations, such as the Apollo-Lunar Missions. These studies benefit from access to primary records of the past programs. The Archives and Special Collections Division of the Salmon Library at the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH) houses large collections of material from the early periods of the space age. The Huntsville campus of the University of Alabama System had its birth in the mid-1950s at the time when the von Braun rocket team was relocated from Texas to Huntsville. The University, the City of Huntsville and the US Government rocket organizations developed in parallel over subsequent years. As a result, the University has a significant space heritage and focus. This is true not only for the engineering and science disciplines, but also for the social sciences. The life of the University spans the period when Huntsville government and industrial organizations were responsible for producing the rocket vehicles to first take mankind to the Moon. That endeavor was surely as significant sociologically as technologically. In the 1980s, Donald E. Tarter, conducted a series of video interviews with some leading members of the original von Braun team. Although the interviews ranged over many engineering subjects, they also recorded personal features of people involved in the Apollo lunar exploration program and the interactions between these people. Such knowledge was of course an objective. These interviews are now in the collections of the UAH Library Archives, along with extensive documentation from the same period. Under sponsorship of the Archives and the NASA-Marshall Retiree Association, the interview series was restarted in 2006 to obtain comparable oral-history interviews with more than fifty US born members of the rocket team from the 1960s. Again these video interviews are rich with

  11. Success factors for reducing maternal and child mortality

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, Julian; Bishai, David; Chowdhury, Sadia; Caramani, Daniele; Frost, Laura; Cortez, Rafael; Daelmans, Bernadette; de Francisco, Andres; Adam, Taghreed; Cohen, Robert; Alfonso, Y Natalia; Franz-Vasdeki, Jennifer; Saadat, Seemeen; Pratt, Beth Anne; Eugster, Beatrice; Bandali, Sarah; Venkatachalam, Pritha; Hinton, Rachael; Murray, John; Arscott-Mills, Sharon; Axelson, Henrik; Maliqi, Blerta; Sarker, Intissar; Lakshminarayanan, Rama; Jacobs, Troy; Jacks, Susan; Mason, Elizabeth; Ghaffar, Abdul; Mays, Nicholas; Presern, Carole; Bustreo, Flavia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Reducing maternal and child mortality is a priority in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and will likely remain so after 2015. Evidence exists on the investments, interventions and enabling policies required. Less is understood about why some countries achieve faster progress than other comparable countries. The Success Factors for Women’s and Children’s Health studies sought to address this knowledge gap using statistical and econometric analyses of data from 144 low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) over 20 years; Boolean, qualitative comparative analysis; a literature review; and country-specific reviews in 10 fast-track countries for MDGs 4 and 5a. There is no standard formula – fast-track countries deploy tailored strategies and adapt quickly to change. However, fast-track countries share some effective approaches in addressing three main areas to reduce maternal and child mortality. First, these countries engage multiple sectors to address crucial health determinants. Around half the reduction in child mortality in LMICs since 1990 is the result of health sector investments, the other half is attributed to investments made in sectors outside health. Second, these countries use strategies to mobilize partners across society, using timely, robust evidence for decision-making and accountability and a triple planning approach to consider immediate needs, long-term vision and adaptation to change. Third, the countries establish guiding principles that orient progress, align stakeholder action and achieve results over time. This evidence synthesis contributes to global learning on accelerating improvements in women’s and children’s health towards 2015 and beyond. PMID:25110379

  12. Promoting Student Academic Success: Paying Attention to Learning Environmental Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Nan

    2012-01-01

    Achievement gaps become greater for schools with high-poverty and high-minority school population in the United States in recent years (Dillon, 2005; Lee & Slaughter-Defoe, 2004). The academic success of minority students is important because the nation cannot successfully compete in a global market when a considerable portion of its school…

  13. Intrapersonal Factors in New Zealand School Leadership Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notman, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to share New Zealand findings from the International Successful School Principalship Project (ISSPP) which relate to intrapersonal dimensions of leadership that promote principals' sustained success over time. Design/methodology/approach: Multi-site case study methods were used to describe the ongoing success…

  14. Social Factors That Predict Fear of Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Jonathan S.; Thomas, Jessica; Jones, Stevy; Mahoney, Lauren; Dukes, Kristina; Treadway, Jodi

    2016-01-01

    Fear of academic success is ultimately a fear of social exclusion. Therefore, various forms of social inclusion may alleviate this fear. Three studies tested the hypothesis that social inclusion variables negatively predict fear of success. In Study 1, middle and high school students (n = 129) completed surveys of parental involvement, parental…

  15. Successful Pregnancy in a Patient with Combined Deficiency of Factor V and Factor VIII.

    PubMed

    El Adib, Ahmed Ghassan; Majdi, Farah; Dilai, Mohamed Othmane; Asmouki, Hamid; Bassir, Ahlam; Harou, Karam; Soumani, Abderraouf; Younous, Said; Mahmal, Lahoucine

    2014-01-01

    Inherited combined factor V and factor VIII deficiency (F5F8D) is autosomal recessive transmission disorder. Epistaxis, postsurgical bleeding, and menorrhagia are the most common symptoms. The risk of miscarriage and placental abruption is consequent. We report a case of successful pregnancy in a patient with F5F8D. 20-year-old woman, born of consanguineous parents, third gestate, first parity, two miscarriages, admitted for child birth of a spontaneous pregnancy estimated at 38 weeks and was diagnosed with F5F8D. At admission, patient was hemodynamically stable, with good obstetric conditions. The biologic results showed low levels of PT (52%), factor V (7%), and factor VIII (5%), and the activated partial thromboplastin time was prolonged (68,6%). Parturient was admitted in intensive care unit, maternal and fetal monitoring was performed. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and factor VIII concentrates were perfused at the induction of labor. Analgesia used fentanyl titration. The delivery gave birth to a newborn male, with Apgar 10/10 and 3000 g. The puerperium was simple without any important bleeding. Laboratory tests for the newborn were acceptable. Little literature is available on this subject and there are no guidelines available concerning pregnancy; we chose to prescribe a combination of factor VIII concentrate and FFP in pre-, per- and postpartum. The same protocol was successfully used in a patient before dental extraction and prostatectomy. Vaginal delivery is possible, as our case. Management by multidisciplinary team is recommended.

  16. Critical factors for sustainable food procurement in zoological collections.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Food procurement can play an important role in sustainable food supply chain management by zoos, linking organizational operations to the biodiversity conservation and sustainability mission of zoological collections. This study therefore examines the critical factors that shape sustainable food procurement in zoo and aquariums. Using a web-based survey data was collected from 41 members of the British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquariums (BIAZA). This included information on the sustainable food procurement practices of these institutions for both their human and animal food supply chains, as well as profile information and data on the factors contributing to and inhibiting sustainable procurement practices. Zoological collections operated by charities, and those with a certified sustainability standard, were found to have significantly higher levels of sustainable food procurement. Zoos and aquariums whose human food operations were not contracted to an external party were also found to have significantly higher levels of sustainable food procurement in their human food supply chain. The most important drivers of sustainable food procurement were cost savings, adequate financial support and improved product quality. The highest ranking barriers were higher costs, other issues taking priority and a lack of alternative suppliers. The results suggest that a number of critical factors shape sustainable food procurement in zoological collections in the British Isles. Financial factors, such as cost savings, were important considerations. The significance of mission-related factors, such as charity status, indicated that core values held by zoos and aquariums can also influence their food procurement practices.

  17. Critical factors and paths influencing construction workers' safety risk tolerances.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiayuan; Zou, Patrick X W; Li, Penny P

    2016-08-01

    While workers' safety risk tolerances have been regarded as a main reason for their unsafe behaviors, little is known about why different people have different risk tolerances even when confronting the same situation. The aim of this research is to identify the critical factors and paths that influence workers' safety risk tolerance and to explore how they contribute to accident causal model from a system thinking perceptive. A number of methods were carried out to analyze the data collected through interviews and questionnaire surveys. In the first and second steps of the research, factor identification, factor ranking and factor analysis were carried out, and the results show that workers' safety risk tolerance can be influenced by four groups of factors, namely: (1) personal subjective perception; (2) work knowledge and experiences; (3) work characteristics; and (4) safety management. In the third step of the research, hypothetical influencing path model was developed and tested by using structural equation modeling (SEM). It is found that the effects of external factors (safety management and work characteristics) on risk tolerance are larger than that of internal factors (personal subjective perception and work knowledge & experiences). Specifically, safety management contributes the most to workers' safety risk tolerance through its direct effect and indirect effect; while personal subjective perception comes the second and can act as an intermedia for work characteristics. This research provides an in-depth insight of workers' unsafe behaviors by depicting the contributing factors as shown in the accident causal model developed in this research.

  18. The formation, elements of success, and challenges in managing a critical care program: Part I.

    PubMed

    St Andre, Arthur

    2015-04-01

    Leaders of critical care programs have significant responsibility to develop and maintain a system of intensive care. At inception, those clinician resources necessary to provide and be available for the expected range of patient illness and injury and throughput are determined. Simultaneously, non-ICU clinical responsibilities and other expectations, such as education of trainees and participation in hospital operations, must be understood. To meet these responsibilities, physicians must be recruited, mentored, and retained. The physician leader may have similar responsibilities for nonphysician practitioners. In concert with other critical care leaders, the service adopts a model of care and assembles an ICU team of physicians, nurses, nonphysician providers, respiratory therapists, and others to provide clinical services. Besides clinician resources, leaders must assure that services such as radiology, pharmacy, the laboratory, and information services are positioned to support the complexities of ICU care. Metrics are developed to report success in meeting process and outcomes goals. Leaders evolve the system of care by reassessing and modifying practice patterns to continually improve safety, efficacy, and efficiency. Major emphasis is placed on the importance of continuity, consistency, and communication by expecting practitioners to adopt similar practices and patterns. Services anticipate and adapt to evolving expectations and resource availability. Effective services will result when skilled practitioners support one another and ascribe to a service philosophy of care.

  19. Memory destabilization is critical for the success of the reactivation–extinction procedure

    PubMed Central

    Piñeyro, Marcelo E.; Ferrer Monti, Roque I.; Alfei, Joaquín M.; Bueno, Adrián M.; Urcelay, Gonzalo P.

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that, unlike pure extinction which typically results in the return of the fear response under a variety of circumstances, memory reactivation followed by extinction can attenuate the reemergence of conditioned fear. The reactivation–extinction procedure has attracted the attention of basic and clinical researchers due to its potential clinical value for the treatment of psychiatric conditions, such as anxiety and drug abuse disorders. However, mixed results have been achieved so far in replicating and understanding this paradigm. It has been proposed that memory destabilization could be critical in this sense. Using contextual fear conditioning in rats and midazolam as an amnesic agent, we first determined what reactivation conditions are necessary to destabilize the mnemonic trace. After establishing the conditions for memory destabilization, a series of experiments was conducted to determine if destabilization is critical for the success of the reactivation–extinction procedure. Data confirmed the importance of memory destabilization prior to extinction inside the reconsolidation window to attenuate spontaneous recovery and retard reacquisition of conditioned fear. The present report offers a candidate explanation of the discrepancy in results obtained with the reactivation–extinction procedure by different laboratories. PMID:24353292

  20. Girls and science: A qualitative study on factors related to success and failure in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Paula Denise

    This qualitative study sought to determine how girls perceived factors that contribute to their success in science programs designed to maximize their achievement. The sample consisted of 20 students in 9th and 12th grades attending a school of choice. Respondents were interviewed using a structured interview protocol. The National Council for Research on Women study (Thom, 2001) found that girls are more successful in math and science programs that incorporate a cooperative, hands-on approach than in programs that stress competition and individual learning. This finding was supported by this study among 20 high school girls in a school whose mission is to improve the access of girls who study and choose careers in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines. Related studies on the subject of the underrepresentation of girls and women in science and related disciplines raise the question why so few girls choose STEM careers. Qualitative inductive analysis was used to discover critical themes that emerged from the data. The initial results were presented within the context of the following five themes: (1) learning styles, (2) long-term goals, (3) subject matter, (4) classroom climate/environment, and (5) evaluation. After further analysis, the researcher found that factors cited by the girls as contributing to their success in science programs specifically designed to maximize their achievement were: (a) cooperative learning, (b) a custom-tailored curriculum, and (c) positive influences of mentors.

  1. The formation, elements of success, and challenges in managing a critical care program: part II.

    PubMed

    St Andre, Arthur

    2015-05-01

    Leaders of critical care services require knowledge and skills not typically acquired during their medical education and training. Leaders possess personality characteristics and evolve and adopt behaviors and knowledge in addition to those useful in the care of patients and rounding with an ICU team. Successful leaders have impeccable integrity, possess a service mentality, are decisive, and speak the truth consistently and accurately. Effective leaders are thoughtful listeners, introspective, develop a range of relationships, and nurture others. They understand group psychology, observe, analyze assumptions, decide, and improve the system of care and the performance of their team members. A leader learns to facilely adapt to circumstance, generate new ideas, and be a catalyst of change. Those most successful further their education as a leader and learn when and where to seek mentorship. Leaders understand their organization and its operational complexities. Leaders learn to participate and knowledgeably contribute to the fiscal aspects of income, expense, budget, and contracts from an institutional and department perspective. Clinician compensation must be commensurate with expectations and be written to motivate and make clear duties that are clinical and nonclinical. A leader understands and plans to address the evolving challenges facing healthcare, especially resource constraints, the emotions and requirements of managing the end of life, the complexities of competing demands and motivations, the bureaucracy of healthcare practice, and reimbursement. Responsibilities to manage and evolve must be met with intelligence, sensitivity, and equanimity.

  2. Critical factors in assessing risk from exposure to nasal carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Bogdanffy, M S; Mathison, B H; Kuykendall, J R; Harman, A E

    1997-10-31

    Anatomical, physiological, biochemical and molecular factors that contribute to chemical-induced nasal carcinogenesis are either largely divergent between test species and humans, or we know very little of them. These factors, let alone the uncertainty associated with our knowledge gap, present a risk assessor with the formidable task of making judgments about risks to human health from exposure to chemicals that have been identified in rodent studies to be nasal carcinogens. This paper summarizes some of the critical attributes of the hazard identification and dose-response aspects of risk assessments for nasal carcinogens that must be accounted for by risk assessors in order to make informed decisions. Data on two example compounds, dimethyl sulfate and hexamethylphosphoramide, are discussed to illustrate the diversity of information that can be used to develop informed hypotheses about mode of action and decisions on appropriate dosimeters for interspecies extrapolation. Default approaches to interspecies dosimetry extrapolation are described briefly and are followed by a discussion of a generalized physiologically based pharmacokinetic model that, unlike default approaches, is flexible and capable of incorporating many of the critical species-specific factors. Recent advancements in interspecies nasal dosimetry modeling are remarkable. However, it is concluded that without the development of research programs aimed at understanding carcinogenic susceptibility factors in human and rodent nasal tissues, development of plausible modes of action will lag behind the advancements made in dosimetry modeling.

  3. Project Manager Personality as a Factor for Success

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    factors (John and Srivastava, 1999). 20 Based on Cattell’s (1945) effort, Tupes and Christal (1961) studied eight samples including Air Force...more of any consequence" (Tupes and Christal , 1961, p. 245). Their five factor model has been replicated by numerous researchers and includes the...represent the aggregate of five main factors that seem to correlate the most in repeated studies (Tupes and Christal , 1961; John and Srivastava, 1999

  4. Factors of Success for Newspapers in Intracity Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Karen F.

    Focusing on variables controlled by the newspaper but with emphasis on basic priorities for success rather than specific changes within a department, a study examined intracity battles between newspapers in several cities. A saturation sample of 58 newspapers that competed in various cities with no joint operating agreement or joint ownership was…

  5. Learner and Instructor Identified Success Factors in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menchaca, Michael P.; Bekele, Teklu Abate

    2008-01-01

    To better understand their perceptions of optimal tools and strategies for success, this research analyzed the experiences of learners and instructors in an online distance education environment. A qualitative constant comparative analysis methodology supported by an appropriate conceptual framework guided the study. Data were collected over…

  6. Factors affecting larval tick feeding success: host, density and time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Ectoparasites rely on blood feeding to sustain activity, support development and produce offspring. Blood feeding is also a route for transmission of diverse vector-borne pathogens. The likelihood of successfully feeding is thus an important aspect of ectoparasite population dynamics and...

  7. Investigating Academic Success Factors for Undergraduate Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaighobadi, Mehdi; Allen, Marcus T.

    2008-01-01

    Student academic performance is of major interest to all stakeholders of higher education institutions. This study questions whether or not statistical analysis of information that is readily available in most universities' official records system can be used to predict overall academic success. In particular, this study is an attempt to…

  8. An exploratory review on critical factors of IBS formwork implementation for Malaysian construction stakeholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baharuddin, Mohd Nurfaisal; Bahardin, Nur Fadhilah; Zaidi, Mohd Azian; Lokman, Ikhwan; Nawi, Mohd Nasrun Mohd

    2016-08-01

    The goals of this paper is to analysed the critical factors of driving or hindering the used of Industrialised Building System (IBS) formwork system in the Malaysian construction industry. Based on the reviews of a previous research and related literature, this paper was identified four (4) critical factor that classified as a difficulties to the success of IBS formwork system application; The issues related to the lack of knowledge and awareness, high cost and financial barriers, lack of incentive and promotion and lack of enforcement for government policy were highlight as a key dimension for the uses of IBS formwork system to success. The objective of this paper is to determine the importance factors in implementing IBS formwork in Malaysia. A preliminary survey which qualitative research approach has been adopted for this study as to validate the factors which found in the literature study. Based on the result analysis, it can be confirmed that the entire factors in literature review are strongly related with challenges in construction industry.

  9. Factors associated with successful laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rattner, D W; Ferguson, C; Warshaw, A L

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article determined which preoperative data correlated with successful completion of a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in patients with acute cholecystitis. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the procedure of choice in chronic cholecystitis, its use in acute cholecystitis may be associated with higher costs and complication rates. It is not known which patients with acute cholecystitis are likely to require conversion to open cholecystectomy based on preoperative data or if a cooling-off period with medical therapy can diminish inflammation and increase the chance of successful laparoscopic cholecystectomy. METHODS: All laparoscopic cholecystectomies done by the authors between 10/90 and 2/92 were reviewed. Data on cases of acute cholecystitis were prospectively collected on standardized data forms. RESULTS: Twenty of 281 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were done for acute cholecystitis; 7/20 patients with acute cholecystitis required conversion to open cholecystectomy compared with 6/281 patients undergoing elective operation for chronic cholecystitis. In patients with acute cholecystitis the interval from admission to cholecystectomy in the successful cases was 0.6 days vs. 5 days in the cases requiring conversion to open cholecystectomy (p = .01). Cases requiring conversion to open cholecystectomy also had higher WBC (14.0 vs. 9.0, p < .05), alkaline phosphatase (206 vs. 81, p < .02, and APACHE II scores (10.6 vs. 5.1, p < .05). Ultrasonographic findings such as gallbladder distention, wall thickness, and pericholecystic fluid did not correlate with the success of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients converted from laparoscopic to open cholecystectomy required more operating room time (120 min vs. 87 min, p < .01) and more postop hospital days (6 vs. 2, p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis should be done immediately after the diagnosis is established because delaying surgery

  10. Factors Impacting the Successful Implementation of Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling Programs in Nova Scotia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehr, Ron; Sumarah, John

    2002-01-01

    Assesses factors that contribute to the successful implementation of comprehensive guidance and counseling programs at the elementary, junior, and senior high school levels in Nova Scotia. Examines counselors' perceptions of what helps or hinders successful implementation. (Contains 15 references.) (GCP)

  11. The Nitric Oxide/Cyclic GMP Pathway in Organ Transplantation: Critical Role in Successful Lung Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, David J.; Naka, Yoshifumi; Chowdhury, Nepal C.; Liao, Hui; Oz, Mehmet C.; Michler, Robert E.; Kubaszewski, Eugeniusz; Malinski, Tadeusz; Stern, David M.

    1994-12-01

    Reestablishment of vascular homeostasis following ex vivo preservation is a critical determinant of successful organ transplantation. Because the nitric oxide (NO) pathway modulates pulmonary vascular tone and leukocyte/endothelial interactions, we hypothesized that reactive oxygen intermediates would lead to decreased NO (and hence cGMP) levels following pulmonary reperfusion, leading to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and leukostasis. Using an orthotopic rat model of lung transplantation, a porphyrinic microsensor was used to make direct in vivo measurements of pulmonary NO. NO levels measured at the surface of the transplanted lung plummeted immediately upon reperfusion, with levels moderately increased by topical application of superoxide dismutase. Because cGMP levels declined in preserved lungs after reperfusion, this led us to buttress the NO pathway by adding a membrane-permeant cGMP analog to the preservation solution. Compared with grafts stored in its absence, grafts stored with supplemental 8-Br-cGMP and evaluated 30 min after reperfusion demonstrated lower pulmonary vascular resistances with increased graft blood flow, improved arterial oxygenation, decreased neutrophil infiltration, and improved recipient survival. These beneficial effects were dose dependent, mimicked by the type V phosphodiesterase inhibitor 2-o-propoxyphenyl-8-azapurin-6-one, and inhibited by a cGMP-dependent protein kinase antagonist, the R isomer of 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate. Augmenting the NO pathway at the level of cGMP improves graft function and recipient survival following lung transplantation.

  12. Critical factors in fatal collisions of adult cyclists with automobiles.

    PubMed

    Bíl, Michal; Bílová, Martina; Müller, Ivo

    2010-11-01

    This article evaluates, by means of multivariate regression, critical factors influencing the collisions of motor vehicles with adult (over 17 years) cyclists that result in fatal injury of cyclists. The analysis is based on the database of the Traffic Police of Czech Republic from the time period 1995-2007. The results suggest that the most consequential categories of factors under study are: inappropriate driving speed of automobile; the head-on crash; and night-time traffic in places without streetlights. The cyclists' faults are of most serious consequence on crossroads when cyclists deny the right of way. Males are more likely to suffer a fatal injury due to a collision with a car than females. The most vulnerable age group are cyclists above 65 years. A fatal injury of a cyclist is more often driver's fault than cyclist's (598 vs. 370). In order to reduce the fatal risk, it is recommended to separate the road traffic of motor vehicles from bicyclists in critical road-sections; or, at least, to reduce speed limits there.

  13. Environmental factors limiting fertilisation and larval success in corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Rachael M.; Baird, Andrew H.; Mizerek, Toni L.; Madin, Joshua S.

    2016-12-01

    Events in the early life history of reef-building corals, including fertilisation and larval survival, are susceptible to changes in the chemical and physical properties of sea water. Quantifying how changes in water quality affect these events is therefore important for understanding and predicting population establishment in novel and changing environments. A review of the literature identified that levels of salinity, temperature, pH, suspended sediment, nutrients and heavy metals affect coral early life-history stages to various degrees. In this study, we combined published experimental data to determine the relative importance of sea water properties for coral fertilisation success and larval survivorship. Of the water properties manipulated in experiments, fertilisation success was most sensitive to suspended sediment, copper, salinity, phosphate and ammonium. Larval survivorship was sensitive to copper, lead and salinity. A combined model was developed that estimated the joint probability of both fertilisation and larval survivorship in sea water with different chemical and physical properties. We demonstrated the combined model using water samples from Sydney and Lizard Island in Australia to estimate the likelihood of larvae surviving through both stages of development to settlement competency. Our combined model could be used to recommend targets for water quality in coastal waterways as well as to predict the potential for species to expand their geographical ranges in response to climate change.

  14. Age and Achievement: The Age Factor in Predicting Academic Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Sung-Mook

    1982-01-01

    In recent years a dramatic increase in enrollments of mature age students has occurred in courses of arts, social sciences, and humanities. The main objective of this study was to examine the predictive value of the age factor in the academic performance of behavioral science students at a regional college of advanced education in Australia. (SSH)

  15. Factors for Successful E-Learning: Does Age Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Julie; Becker, Karen; Newton, Cameron

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors affecting employees' overall acceptance, satisfaction and future use of e-learning, specifically exploring the impact that age has on the intended future use of e-learning relative to the other potential predictors. Design/Methodology/Approach: The project developed an online survey and…

  16. Critical Components of a Successful Undergraduate Research Experience in the Geosciences for Minority Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou-Mark, J.; Blake, R.; Chukuigwe, C.

    2013-12-01

    For the past five years, the New York City College of Technology has administered a successful National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. The program provides rich, substantive, academic and life-transformative STEM educational experiences for students who would otherwise not pursue STEM education altogether or would not pursue STEM education through to the graduate school level. The REU Scholars are provided with an opportunity to conduct intensive satellite and ground-based remote sensing research at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology Center (NOAA-CREST). Candidates for the program are recruited from the City University of New York's twenty-three separate campuses. These students engage in a research experience that spans the summer and the fall and spring semesters. Eighty-four percent (84%) of the program participants are underrepresented minorities in STEM, and they are involved in a plethora of undergraduate research best practice activities that include: training courses in MATLAB programming, Geographic Information Systems, and Remote Sensing; workshops in Research Ethics, Scientific Writing, and Oral and Poster Research Presentations; national, regional, and local conference presentations; graduate school support; and geoscience exposure events at national laboratories, agencies, and research facilities. To enhance their success in the program, the REU Scholars are also provided with a comprehensive series of safety nets that include a multi-tiered mentoring design specifically to address critical issues faced by this diverse population. Since the inception of the REU program in 2008, a total of 61 undergraduate students have finished or are continuing with their research or are pursuing their STEM endeavors. All the REU Scholars conducted individual satellite and ground-based remote sensing research projects that ranged from the study of

  17. Software technology insertion: A study of success factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lydon, Tom

    1990-01-01

    Managing software development in large organizations has become increasingly difficult due to increasing technical complexity, stricter government standards, a shortage of experienced software engineers, competitive pressure for improved productivity and quality, the need to co-develop hardware and software together, and the rapid changes in both hardware and software technology. The 'software factory' approach to software development minimizes risks while maximizing productivity and quality through standardization, automation, and training. However, in practice, this approach is relatively inflexible when adopting new software technologies. The methods that a large multi-project software engineering organization can use to increase the likelihood of successful software technology insertion (STI), especially in a standardized engineering environment, are described.

  18. Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Factors that Affect Retrieval Success

    SciTech Connect

    Geisbuesch, Philipp Benenati, James F.; Pena, Constantino S.; Couvillon, Joseph; Powell, Alex; Gandhi, Ripal; Samuels, Shaun; Uthoff, Heiko

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To report and analyze the indications, procedural success, and complications of retrievable inferior vena cava filters (rIVCF) placement and to identify parameters that influence retrieval attempt and failure. Methods: Between January 2005 and December 2010, a total of 200 patients (80 men, median age 67 years, range 11-95 years) received a rIVCF with the clinical possibility that it could be removed. All patients with rIVCF were prospectively entered into a database and followed until retrieval or a decision not to retrieve the filter was made. A retrospective analysis of this database was performed. Results: Sixty-one percent of patients had an accepted indication for filter placement; 39% of patients had a relative indication. There was a tendency toward a higher retrieval rate in patients with relative indications (40% vs. 55%, P = 0.076). Filter placement was technically successful in all patients, with no procedure-related mortality. The retrieval rate was 53%. Patient age of >80 years (odds ratio [OR] 0.056, P > 0.0001) and presence of malignancy (OR 0.303, P = 0.003) was associated with a significantly reduced probability for attempted retrieval. Retrieval failure occurred in 7% (6 of 91) of all retrieval attempts. A time interval of > 90 days between implantation and attempted retrieval was associated with retrieval failure (OR 19.8, P = 0.009). Conclusions: Patient age >80 years and a history of malignancy are predictors of a reduced probability for retrieval attempt. The rate of retrieval failure is low and seems to be associated with a time interval of >90 days between filter placement and retrieval.

  19. Do Other Factors Associate to Graduate School Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Davia

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to identify association of factors other than the GRE and GPA scores. The sample size is 50 students with age ranges from 22-45 at college entry ranges average age 27, 32 female (Majority), and 18 males with over-all grade points from 3.20 - 3.94. An on-line data base was utilized. Data will be analyzed by using…

  20. Simulation: Moving from Technology Challenge to Human Factors Success

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Derek A.; Chalmers, Nicholas; Johnson, Sheena J.; Kilkenny, Caroline; White, Mark D.; Bech, Bo; Lonn, Lars; Bello, Fernando

    2012-06-15

    Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable performance assessments. Human factors research is central to simulator model development that is relevant to real-world imaging-guided interventional tasks and to the credentialing programs in which it would be used.

  1. Success and failure of biological treatment in systemic lupus erythematosus: A critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Mariele; Saccon, Francesca; Zen, Margherita; Bettio, Silvano; Iaccarino, Luca; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Patients affected with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) still display increased mortality and decreased quality of life in respect to general population. The major determinant of poor long term prognosis is organ damage, which is predictive of more damage and death. Damage is in turn triggered by uncontrolled disease activity and especially by the long-standing corticosteroid use which often accompanies SLE patients over their disease course, owing both to the need of reaching disease remission and to the habit of keeping patients on a small steroid dose for an indefinite period of time. Hence, the need for new drugs and therapeutic strategies aiming at minimizing damage accrual through a better control of disease activity and a steroid-sparing potential is paramount. So far, however, the therapeutic strategy in SLE requires a multitarget approach which is not devoid of widespread immunesuppression. In fact, several studies have been carried out in recent years targeting both the adaptive and the innate immune system, the majority of which did not achieve their primary endpoint, being often divergent from successful clinical experience and thereby committing physician to off-label use of targeted therapies in face of refractory SLE manifestations. The study designs and the chosen endpoints were often blamed for inadequacy, being at least in part responsible for study failures. In this review, we go over major clinical trials conducted in SLE by analyzing any critical aspects related to study design, predefined endpoints and biological activity of novel compounds that may have hampered study outcome, despite the great effort of providing less toxic drugs within a targeted, pathogenic-based approach.

  2. Understanding critical factors for the quality and shelf-life of MAP fresh meat: a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Preeti; Wani, Ali Abas; Saengerlaub, Sven; Langowski, Horst-Christian

    2011-02-01

    Due to increased demands for greater stringency in relation to hygiene and safety issues associated with fresh food products, coupled with ever-increasing demands by retailers for cost-effective extensions to product shelf-lives and the requirement to meet consumer expectations in relation to convenience and quality, the food packaging industry has rapidly developed to meet and satisfy expectations. One of the areas of research that has shown promise, and had success, is modified atmosphere packaging (MAP). The success of MAP-fresh meat depends on many factors including good initial product quality, good hygiene from the source plants, correct packaging material selection, the appropriate gas mix for the product, reliable packaging equipment, and maintenance of controlled temperatures and humidity levels. Advances in plastic materials and equipment have propelled advances in MAP, but other technological and logistical considerations are needed for successful MAP systems for raw chilled meat. Although several parameters critical for the quality of MA packed meat have been studied and each found to be crucial, understanding of the interactions between the parameters is needed. This review was undertaken to present the most comprehensive and current overview of the widely available, scattered information about the various integrated critical factors responsible for the quality and shelf life of MA packed meat with an interest to stimulate further research to optimize different quality parameters.

  3. Factors promoting or potentially impeding school success: disparities and state variations for children with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Bethell, Christina; Forrest, Christopher B; Stumbo, Scott; Gombojav, Narangerel; Carle, Adam; Irwin, Charles E

    2012-04-01

    School success predicts many pathways for health and well-being across the life span. Factors promoting or potentially impeding school success are critical to understand for all children and for children with special health care needs (CSHCN), whose life course trajectories are already impacted by their chronic health problems. The 2007 National Survey of Children's Health was used (1) to estimate national and state prevalence and within and across states disparities in factors promoting school success (engagement, participation, safety) or potentially impeding success (missing school, grade repetition, school identified problems) for all children and CSHCN and (2) to evaluate associations with CSHCN service need complexity and presence of emotional, behavioral or developmental problems (EBD) as well as with school case management policies in states. Among school age children, 60 % experienced all three factors promoting school success (49.3-73.8 % across states), dropping to 51.3 % for CSHCN (39.4-64.7 % across states) and to 36.2 % for the 40 % of all CSHCN who have both more complex service needs and EBD. CSHCN were more likely to experience factors potentially impeding school success. After accounting for child factors, CSHCN living in states requiring case management in schools for children with disabilities were less likely to experience grade repetition (OR 0.65). Within-state disparities between non-CSHCN and CSHCN varied across states. Threats to school success for US children are pervasive and are especially pronounced for CSHCN with more complex needs and EBD. Findings support broad, non-condition specific efforts to promote school success for CSHCN and consideration of state school policies, such as case management.

  4. Factors influencing nesting success of burrowing owls in southeastern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, R.S.; Johnson, D.R.

    1985-01-31

    A burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) population nesting on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho utilized burrows excavated by badgers (Taxidea taxus) or natural cavities in lava flows as nesting sites. The size of the population was small (N = 13-14 pairs) in relation to the number of available nesting sites, suggesting that factors other than burrow availability limited this population. Rodents and Jerusalem crickets (Stenopelmatus fuscus) represented the primary prey utilized during the nesting season. This population demonstrated both a numerical (brood size) and functional (dietary) response to a decrease in the density of three species of rodents on the INEL during a drought in 1977. 11 references, 1 figure, 2 table.

  5. Success factors of Black science, technology, engineering and mathematics faculty at predominantly White institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Michelle A.

    Black faculty at predominantly White institutions (PWIs) have historically been underrepresented and made to endure with academic isolation, scholarship marginalization and other challenges to the tenure process. When it comes to science, technology, engineering and math, also known as STEM, as it relates to race and success, little is known of how tenured Black STEM faculty have developed an interest in STEM, navigated the unfamiliar waters of academia and maintained longevity at their respective postsecondary institutions. The purpose of this study is to look at the similar experiences of this population and provide insight regarding any factors and or influences that have impacted their success. Grounded in critical race theory (CRT), this qualitative study will utilize a Delphi technique to determine the similar experiences and influences of 17 Black STEM, tenured (and tenure-track) faculty working at PWIs in a Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) states. The study highlighted the importance of: mentoring in college, graduate school and as a junior faculty and; STEM related opportunities such as summer camps or programs, internships, and research.

  6. Intrinsic Motivating Factors for Academic Success of Young At-Risk Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowan, Tanyia Perry

    2012-01-01

    Motivation as a factor in academic success is well documented in the literature and an important construct in educational planning. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore motivating factors for at-risk students who successfully graduated from high school. The framework for this study was based on Maslow's hierarchy of needs…

  7. Factors Leading to Success in Diversified Occupation: A Livelihood Analysis in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saha, Biswarup; Bahal, Ram

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Livelihood diversification is a sound alternative for higher economic growth and its success or failure is conditioned by the interplay of a multitude of factors. The study of the profile of the farmers in which they operate is important to highlight the factors leading to success in diversified livelihoods. Design/Methodology/Approach: A…

  8. Factors Influencing the Educational Success of Minority Pre-Service Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mary Ann; Brooks, Michael; Lee, Sang Min; Daley, Lauren Pasquarella; Crawford, Yashica; Maxis, Sophie

    2007-01-01

    A mixed methods study surveying minority pre-service educators to examine the factors deemed to be important in their educational success was conducted. Forty-three scholarship studies in a College of Education provided quantitative and qualitative data on their perceptions of factors that contributed to their journey to success in college and/or…

  9. Online, Instructional Television and Traditional Delivery: Student Characteristics and Success Factors in Business Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotterweich, Douglas P.; Rochelle, Carolyn F.

    2012-01-01

    Distance education has surged in recent years while research on student characteristics and factors leading to successful outcomes has not kept pace. This study examined characteristics of regional university students in undergraduate Business Statistics and factors linked to their success based on three modes of delivery - Online, Instructional…

  10. Factors of Success and Failure in the Acquisition of Grammatical Gender in Dutch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornips, Leonie; Hulk, Aafke

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine the factors that are proposed in the literature to explain the success--failure in the child L2 (second language) acquisition of grammatical gender in Dutch definite determiners. Focusing on four different groups of bilingual children, we discuss four external success factors put forward in the literature:…

  11. Factors That Affect the Academic Success of Foreign Students at Cardinal Stritch University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annor, Peter

    2010-01-01

    There are limited studies in the literature on the factors that affect the academic success of foreign students in the United States. This ex post facto mixed method study investigated the factors that affect the academic success of foreign students at Cardinal Stitch University (CSU), a medium size, private university located in the Midwestern…

  12. 21 CFR 113.89 - Deviations in processing, venting, or control of critical factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... critical factors. 113.89 Section 113.89 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH..., venting, or control of critical factors. Whenever any process is less than the scheduled process or when critical factors are out of control for any low-acid food or container system as disclosed from records...

  13. Interdisciplinary collaboration: the slogan that must be achieved for models of delivering critical care to be successful.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Richard S; Flaherty, Helen M; French, Cynthia T; Cody, Shawn; Chandler, M Willis; Connolly, Ann; Lilly, Craig M

    2012-12-01

    There is wide acceptance of the concept that interdisciplinary collaboration is an essential building block for successful health-care teams. This belief is grounded in our understanding of how teams function to address complex care needs that change with acute illness or injury. This general agreement has been validated in studies that have reported favorable outcomes associated with successfully implementing interdisciplinary models of health-care delivery in non-critical care settings. The very short time frames over which the care needs of critically ill or injured adults change and the team approach taken by nearly all ICUs strongly suggest that interdisciplinary collaboration is also beneficial in this setting. In this commentary, we define interdisciplinary collaboration and share the story of how we successfully redesigned and transformed our system-wide, interdisciplinary collaborative model for delivering critical care in order to share the lessons we learned as the process evolved with those who are about to embark on a similar challenge. We anticipate that those health-care systems that successfully implement interdisciplinary collaboration will be ahead of the curve in providing high-quality care at as low a cost as possible. Such institutions will also potentially be better positioned for improving teaching and providing a better foundation for critical care research in their institutions.

  14. Charting the pipeline: Identifying the critical elements in the development of successful African American scientists, engineers, and mathematicians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian Anthony

    Many educational researchers are concerned with the apparent poor performance of different racial and ethnic groups in the fields of science, engineering, and mathematics in the United States. Despite improvements in the performance of African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans in these areas over the past decade, these groups are still less likely to enroll in advanced math and science courses or score at or above the proficient level in mathematics. Furthermore, these groups continue to be underrepresented in the nation's technical and scientific workforce. The purpose of this study was to identify the critical elements related to the success of African Americans in science, engineering, and mathematics. Specifically, this study was designed to answer the following questions as they pertained to African American graduate students: What factors were perceived to have contributed to the students' initial interest in science, engineering, or mathematics? What factors were perceived to have contributed to the students' decisions to continue their studies in their specific areas of interest? What factors, associated with the K--12 schooling experience, were perceived to have contributed to the students' success in science, engineering, or mathematics? The data for the study were acquired from interviews with 32 African American students (16 males and 16 females) who were engaged in graduate work in science, engineering, or mathematics. Four major themes emerged from the analysis of the interview data. The first was that all students were involved in experiences that allowed a significant level of participation in science, engineering, and mathematics. Second, all of the students experienced some form of positive personal intervention by another person. Third, all students possessed perceptions of these fields that involved some sort of positive outcome. Finally, all of the of the students believed they possessed intrinsic qualities that qualified and

  15. The Relationship between Iranian EFL Teachers' Critical Thinking Ability and Their Professional Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birjandi, Parviz; Bagherkazemi, Marzieh

    2010-01-01

    In the face of too much incoming information and too many people trying to convince us in today's world, the ability to think critically gains an ever greater saliency as a prime goal of student and teacher education. The present study aimed at substantiating the relationship between EFL teachers' critical thinking ability and their…

  16. Critical Resilience, Schooling Processes, and the Academic Success of Mexican Americans in a Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campa, Blanca

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study adds new dimensions to the traditional paradigm of resilience through the lives of five Mexican American community college students. The term "critical resilience" emerges as a result of using ideology from a feminist critical perspective. In-depth interviews, classroom observations, and focus groups were used to learn how…

  17. Successful Leadership in Urban Schools: Principals and Critical Spirituality, a New Approach to Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dantley, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    This article offers an alternative perspective on educational leadership based on the tenets of critical spirituality. It offers an educational leadership grounded in critical theory and African American spirituality. The two coalesce to provide school leaders with a conceptual frame that not only centers on academic achievement but academic…

  18. Patterns for Success: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving (P3). Workforce 2000 Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enterprise State Junior Coll., AL.

    This curriculum package on critical thinking and problem solving is a product of the Workforce 2000 Partnership, which combined the resources of four educational partners and four industrial partners in Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina to provide education and training in communication, computation, and critical thinking to employees in the…

  19. T-lymphocyte homing: an underappreciated yet critical hurdle for successful cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sackstein, Robert; Schatton, Tobias; Barthel, Steven R

    2017-03-27

    Advances in cancer immunotherapy have offered new hope for patients with metastatic disease. This unfolding success story has been exemplified by a growing arsenal of novel immunotherapeutics, including blocking antibodies targeting immune checkpoint pathways, cancer vaccines, and adoptive cell therapy (ACT). Nonetheless, clinical benefit remains highly variable and patient-specific, in part, because all immunotherapeutic regimens vitally hinge on the capacity of endogenous and/or adoptively transferred T-effector (Teff) cells, including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, to home efficiently into tumor target tissue. Thus, defects intrinsic to the multi-step T-cell homing cascade have become an obvious, though significantly underappreciated contributor to immunotherapy resistance. Conspicuous have been low intralesional frequencies of tumor-infiltrating T-lymphocytes (TILs) below clinically beneficial threshold levels, and peripheral rather than deep lesional TIL infiltration. Therefore, a Teff cell 'homing deficit' may arguably represent a dominant factor responsible for ineffective immunotherapeutic outcomes, as tumors resistant to immune-targeted killing thrive in such permissive, immune-vacuous microenvironments. Fortunately, emerging data is shedding light into the diverse mechanisms of immune escape by which tumors restrict Teff cell trafficking and lesional penetrance. In this review, we scrutinize evolving knowledge on the molecular determinants of Teff cell navigation into tumors. By integrating recently described, though sporadic information of pivotal adhesive and chemokine homing signatures within the tumor microenvironment with better established paradigms of T-cell trafficking under homeostatic or infectious disease scenarios, we seek to refine currently incomplete models of Teff cell entry into tumor tissue. We further summarize how cancers thwart homing to escape immune-mediated destruction and raise awareness of the potential impact of immune

  20. [Treatment of chronic bovine endometritis and factors for treatment success].

    PubMed

    Feldmann, M; Tenhagen genannt Emming, S; Hoedemaker, M

    2005-01-01

    In a controlled field trial, 178 dairy cows with chronic endometritis and at least 21 days in lactation were randomly assigned to four different treatment groups: prostaglandin F2alpha intramuscularly (PG, 5 mg dinoprost (5 ml Dinolytic), n = 51), intrauterine antibiotics (AB; 400 mg ampicillin + 800 oxacillin (20 ml Totocillin), n = 49), intrauterine antiseptics (AS; 100 ml 4% Lotagen, n = 50); control (C, no initial treatment, n = 28). Before treatment, uterine swabs for bacteriologic examination and blood samples for determination of serum progesterone concentrations were collected. Two weeks following the first treatment, cows were reexamined. In case no clinical cure was diagnosed, treatment was repeated and control cows were treated for the first time with one of the three treatments mentioned above. The four treatment groups did not differ with respect to the clinical cure or reproductive performance. Therefore, factors that might have an influence on clinical cure and fertility were evaluated. With increasing duration of lactation, the clinical cure after a single treatment increased significantly over all treatment groups from 59.5% (treatment before day 42 postpartum) to 79.6% (treatment following day 42 postpartum) (P < 0.05). Within the PG group, a statistically significantly higher cure rate after a single treatment and first service conception rate and a lower pregnancy index were obtained when the treatment was performed following day 42 postpartum (P < 0.05). This was not the case in the other treatment groups. A retarded involution of the uterus based on the size had a negative effect on clinical cure over all groups (first treatment clinical cure: 68.2% (small uteri) vs 44.4% (large uteri); P < 0.05). Within groups, this effect was also detected, but only as a trend (P > 0.05). Isolation of Arcanobacterium (A.) pyogenes negatively influenced first treatment clinical cure over all treatment groups (79.0% vs 31.5%) and within treatment groups (P < 0

  1. "STEMulating" success factors: An investigation of the academic talents of successful Black male college graduates from STEM programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Jill T.

    This phenomenological research study explored the contributing factors experienced by Black males that epitomized their academic success in a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) area of study. During this investigative project, eleven Black male students were interviewed to determine how they were able to successfully navigate and complete a STEM degree. The data was collected through a qualitative inquiry, which involved interviewing students and collecting the data and organizing their perspectives into common themes. The principal findings in this study suggest that Black males can excel when primary influential people establish high expectations and believe and encourage Black males to succeed by providing the essential educational support models requisite to warrant success; the Black male maintains and affirms a self-assured self-worth in himself; the Black male is exposed to these fields and professions early on in their educational quest to enable them to witness first hand powerful and productive opportunities and pathways to academic success; exposure to other Black successful male role models who can mentor and show positive proof that with effort, these fields can become a reality; increase in academic motivation and recommendations from educators and counselors who direct and guide students into and away from these rigorous career fields. An analysis of the students' individual stories gave a revealing look into the pathways of their consciousness, emotional growth, and perspectives about being a successful STEM major. This kind of insight can be a constructive diagnostic tool for students, educators, counselors, and administrators who want to motivate and influence future students to major in STEM fields of study.

  2. Beyond Health Information Technology: Critical Factors Necessary for Effective Diabetes Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Ciemins, Elizabeth L.; Coon, Patricia J.; Fowles, Jinnet Briggs; Min, Sung-joon

    2009-01-01

    Background Electronic health records (EHRs) have been implemented throughout the United States with varying degrees of success. Past EHR implementation experiences can inform health systems planning to initiate new or expand existing EHR systems. Key “critical success factors,” e.g., use of disease registries, workflow integration, and real-time clinical guideline support, have been identified but not fully tested in practice. Methods A pre/postintervention cohort analysis was conducted on 495 adult patients selected randomly from a diabetes registry and followed for 6 years. Two intervention phases were evaluated: a “low-dose” period targeting primary care provider (PCP) and patient education followed by a “high-dose” EHR diabetes management implementation period, including a diabetes disease registry and office workflow changes, e.g., diabetes patient preidentification to facilitate real-time diabetes preventive care, disease management, and patient education. Results Across baseline, “low-dose,” and “high-dose” postintervention periods, a significantly greater proportion of patients (a) achieved American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines for control of blood pressure (26.9 to 33.1 to 43.9%), glycosylated hemoglobin (48.5 to 57.5 to 66.8%), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (33.1 to 44.4 to 56.6%) and (b) received recommended preventive eye (26.2 to 36.4 to 58%), foot (23.4 to 40.3 to 66.9%), and renal (38.5 to 53.9 to 71%) examinations or screens. Conclusions Implementation of a fully functional, specialized EHR combined with tailored office workflow process changes was associated with increased adherence to ADA guidelines, including risk factor control, by PCPs and their patients with diabetes. Incorporation of previously identified “critical success factors” potentially contributed to the success of the program, as did use of a two-phase approach. PMID:20144282

  3. Patient and miniscrew implant factors influence the success of orthodontic miniscrew implants.

    PubMed

    Afrashtehfar, Kelvin I

    2016-12-01

    .ConclusionsThe results of this meta-analysis based on non-randomised clinical studies showed that jaw of insertion, age, MI length and MI diameter are critical risk factors to the success of MIs, whereas sex was not influential.Source of FundingThe Basic Science Research Program of the National Research Foundation of Korea was stated as the source of funding.

  4. Success factors for strategic change initiatives: a qualitative study of healthcare administrators' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kash, Bita Arbab; Spaulding, Aaron; Johnson, Christopher E; Gamm, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Success factors related to the implementation of change initiatives are well documented and discussed in the management literature, but they are seldom studied in healthcare organizations engaged in multiple strategic change initiatives. The purpose of this study was to identify key success factors related to implementation of change initiatives based on rich qualitative data gathered from health leader interviews at two large health systems implementing multiple change initiatives. In-depth personal interviews with 61 healthcare leaders in the two large systems were conducted and inductive qualitative analysis was employed to identify success factors associated with 13 change initiatives. Results from this analysis were compared to success factors identified in the literature, and generalizations were drawn that add significantly to the management literature, especially to that in the healthcare sector. Ten specific success factors were identified for the implementation of change initiatives. The top three success factors were (1) culture and values, (2) business processes, and (3) people and engagement. Two of the identified success factors are unique to the healthcare sector and not found in the literature on change models: service quality and client satisfaction (ranked fourth of 10) and access to information (ranked ninth). Results demonstrate the importance of human resource functions, alignment of culture and values with change, and business processes that facilitate effective communication and access to information to achieve many change initiatives. The responses also suggest opportunities for leaders of healthcare organizations to more formally recognize the degree to which various change initiatives are dependent on one another.

  5. The human factor: the critical importance of effective teamwork and communication in providing safe care.

    PubMed

    Leonard, M; Graham, S; Bonacum, D

    2004-10-01

    Effective communication and teamwork is essential for the delivery of high quality, safe patient care. Communication failures are an extremely common cause of inadvertent patient harm. The complexity of medical care, coupled with the inherent limitations of human performance, make it critically important that clinicians have standardised communication tools, create an environment in which individuals can speak up and express concerns, and share common "critical language" to alert team members to unsafe situations. All too frequently, effective communication is situation or personality dependent. Other high reliability domains, such as commercial aviation, have shown that the adoption of standardised tools and behaviours is a very effective strategy in enhancing teamwork and reducing risk. We describe our ongoing patient safety implementation using this approach within Kaiser Permanente, a non-profit American healthcare system providing care for 8.3 million patients. We describe specific clinical experience in the application of surgical briefings, properties of high reliability perinatal care, the value of critical event training and simulation, and benefits of a standardised communication process in the care of patients transferred from hospitals to skilled nursing facilities. Additionally, lessons learned as to effective techniques in achieving cultural change, evidence of improving the quality of the work environment, practice transfer strategies, critical success factors, and the evolving methods of demonstrating the benefit of such work are described.

  6. Alliance for a Healthy Border: factors related to weight reduction and glycemic success.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Ghaddar, Suad; Brown, Cynthia; Pagán, José A; Balboa, Marvelia

    2012-04-01

    We examined the factors related to success in achieving weight reduction and glycemic control in Alliance for a Healthy Border (AHB), a chronic disease prevention program implemented from 2006 to 2009 through 12 federally qualified community health centers serving primarily Hispanics in communities located along the US-Mexico border region. We analyzed data from Phase I of AHB using logistic regression to examine the determinants of success in achieving weight reduction and glycemic control among the participants in AHB programs. Factors affecting weight reduction success were sex, age, employment status, income, insurance, diabetes, baseline body mass index (BMI), smoking status, family history of diabetes, session type, program duration, and physical activity changes. Factors affecting achievement of glycemic success included sex, age, employment status, diabetes, baseline BMI, family history of diabetes, program duration, and physical activity changes. We found that the AHB interventions were more successful in reducing participants' HbA1c level than BMI. In addition to sociodemographic factors, participants with better baseline health conditions (ie, participants without diabetes or family history of diabetes, normal BMI, former smokers) were more likely to achieve success after the interventions. Of the 4 key features defining each of the 12 interventions, session type and program duration were associated with success. Within a relatively short time period, physical activity improvements had a stronger effect on weight reduction and glycemic success than improvements in dietary habits. The effectiveness of diabetes and cardiovascular disease prevention programs can be improved substantially by considering these factors during program design and structure.

  7. Learning the Art of Networking: A Critical Skill for Enhancing Social Capital and Career Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Janasz, Suzanne C.; Forret, Monica L.

    2008-01-01

    In this era of boundaryless careers, with individuals making frequent career moves and needing to get up-to-speed quickly, networking is seen as a critical competency. Developing and maintaining relationships with others for the purpose of mutual benefit can help individuals search for and secure employment opportunities, gain access to needed…

  8. HBCUs and Writing Programs: Critical Hip Hop Language Pedagogy and First-Year Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Brian J.; Stewart, Shawanda

    2016-01-01

    In the 2015-16 school year, the authors of this article developed an innovative research and assessment project on a new first year composition curriculum based on a pedagogy they call Critical Hip Hop Rhetoric Pedagogy (CHHRP), an educational approach built upon the classroom-based research of linguistic anthropologist H. Samy Alim…

  9. Defining and Measuring Parenting for Educational Success: A Critical Discourse Analysis of the Parent Education Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, Esther; Toso, Blaire Willson

    2008-01-01

    The Parent Education Profile (PEP) is an instrument used by family literacy programs to rate parents' support for children's literacy development. This article uses Critical Discourse Analysis to examine how the PEP constructs the ideal parent, the text's underlying assumptions about parenting and education, and its ideological effects. The…

  10. Critical Compassionate Pedagogy and the Teacher's Role in First-Generation Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hao, Richie Neil

    2011-01-01

    Informed by Rosenberg's (2003) concept of nonviolent communication, the author's pedagogical perspective encourages educators to criticize institutional and classroom practices that ideologically place underserved students at disadvantaged positions. At the same time, this perspective urges teachers to be self-reflective of their actions through…

  11. Breeding biology and success of a reintroduced population of the critically endangered Puaiohi (Myadestes palmeri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tweed, E.J.; Foster, J.T.; Woodworth, B.L.; Monahan, W.B.; Kellerman, J.L.; Lieberman, A.

    2006-01-01

    The ultimate success of reintroduction programs for endangered species depends on the ability of reintroduced animals to breed in the wild. We studied the nesting success and breeding biology of a reintroduced population of Puaiohi (Myadestes palmeri) on the island of Kaua'i, Hawaii. Thirty-four captive-bred Puaiohi were released into the Alaka'i Swamp in 1999-2001 and monitored using radiotelemetry. Ten females and two males paired with wild and other released birds, including one polygynous trio. From March to September, 31 nests were built. Mean clutch size was 2.0 eggs, daily nest survival was 0.97 ?? 0.01 (mean ?? SE) and overall nest success was 0.40 ?? 0.02. We confirmed predation, most probably by rats (Rattus spp.), as the greatest cause of nest failure, occurring at 38% of active nests with known fates, and causing the death of two nesting adult females. Ground-based rodent control proved ineffective at protecting nest attempts. Successful nests fledged an average of 1.4 young each (n = 10), and 85% of fledglings survived at least two weeks. Importantly, breeding behavior and success were comparable to those of wild Puaiohi. This is the first record of breeding in the wild from captive-bred endangered Hawaiian passerines. The ability of captive-bred Puaiohi to survive and breed successfully in the wild bodes well for future releases of this and other endangered passerines, but high predation rates on nests and nesting females highlights the importance of maintaining and restoring safe habitat for recovery. ?? The American Ornithologists' Union, 2006.

  12. Factors that Impact Software Project Success in Offshore Information Technology (IT) Companies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edara, Venkatarao

    2011-01-01

    Information technology (IT) projects are unsuccessful at a rate of 65% to 75% per year, in spite of employing the latest technologies and training employees. Although many studies have been conducted on project successes in U.S. companies, there is a lack of research studying the impact of various factors on software project success in offshore IT…

  13. Factors Determining the Career Success of Doctorate Holders: Evidence from the Spanish Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canal-Domínguez, J. F.; Wall, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the determining factors of PhDs' career success. Earnings have been used as an objective measure, and a subjective measure of success was constructed based on the individuals' assessments of broader aspects of their job position. When analysing the data by field of knowledge and gender, it was found that males and PhD holders…

  14. Time Diary and Questionnaire Assessment of Factors Associated with Academic and Personal Success among University Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Darren; Dixon, Sinikka; Stansal, Emory; Gelb, Shannon Lund; Pheri, Tabitha

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: A sample of 231 students attending a private liberal arts university in central Alberta, Canada, completed a 5-day time diary and a 71-item questionnaire assessing the influence of personal, cognitive, and attitudinal factors on success. Methods: The authors used 3 success measures: cumulative grade point average (GPA),…

  15. Listening to the Student Voice: Understanding the School-Related Factors that Limit Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segedin, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Literature on social inequalities in schooling reveals that the school curriculum, streaming, and teacher expectations are school-related factors that limit student success. This study asks: How do the school curriculum, streaming and teacher expectations limit students who have been designated "at risk" from finding success in school?…

  16. What African American College Students Perceive as Contributive Factors in Their Academic Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ransom, Brandi S.

    2016-01-01

    This study explored what African American college students perceives as contributing to their Academic success. This study moved to determine what factors significantly influence or impact how African American college students advance in their academic journey, which was hypothesized as an important component related to academic success and degree…

  17. Virtual Knowledge-Sharing Communities of Practice at Caterpillar: Success Factors and Barriers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardichvili, Alexander; Page, Vaughn; Wentling, Tim

    2002-01-01

    Reports the results of a qualitative study of success factors and barriers to the development of virtual knowledge-sharing communities of practice at Caterpillar Inc. Identified prerequisites for successful knowledge management through virtual communities of practice, as well as barriers to virtual community development, and discusses future…

  18. Students' Perceptions of Factors That Contribute to Risk and Success in Accelerated High School Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaunessy-Dedrick, Elizabeth; Suldo, Shannon M.; Roth, Rachel A.; Fefer, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we investigated 15 successful and 15 struggling high school students, perceived stressors, coping strategies, and intrapersonal and environmental factors that students perceive to influence their success in college-level courses. We found that students' primary sources of stress involved meeting numerous academic demands…

  19. Exploring Learner to Content Interaction as a Success Factor in Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Tekeisha Denise

    2012-01-01

    Interaction plays a critical role in the learning process. For online course participants, interaction with the course content (learner-content interaction) is especially important because it can contribute to successful learning outcomes and course completion. This study aims to examine the relationship between learner-content interaction and…

  20. A Critical Incident Study of Preservice Teachers' Beliefs about Teaching Success and Nonsuccess.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Placek, Judith H.; Dodds, Patt

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of the attitudes of prospective physical education teachers toward what they consider salient features of their own successful and nonsuccessful teaching revealed that their focus was upon student behavior. The need for reflective teaching which focuses on teacher behaviors and leadership responsibilities is discussed. (JD)

  1. Critical Moments and Second-Chance Education Constructing Socially Excluded Women's Stories of Career Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulhall, Sue

    2016-01-01

    This study narrates the role of education/training in the career success stories of twelve women on an Irish active labour market programme, Community Employment (CE). All from lower socio-economic groups, having early school-leaving backgrounds, and, prior to CE, were long-term unemployed. CE enhances the employability of the long-term unemployed…

  2. Dispossessing Educational Equity: A Critical Exploration of California's Community College Student Success Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigorieff, Matt

    2016-01-01

    As a result of the economic recession, the State of California has set in motion new policies for its community college system known as the Student Success Act, fundamentally altering open-access (Yamagata-Noji, 2014; Bennett et. al. 2013). Individuals most vulnerable to the policy shift are under-represented college students who constitute the…

  3. Familial Factors: A Critical Dimension of Early Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Mona

    This paper briefly discusses the effects of home environment, parenting, family configuration (number spacing of children) and nutrition on young children's mental development and subsequent school success. Variety and richness of home stimulation are identified as crucial to the child's later academic success. The quality of mothering and…

  4. Succession planning and leadership development: critical business strategies for healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; Collins, Kevin S

    2007-01-01

    As labor shortages intensify, succession planning and leadership development have become strategic initiatives requiring rigorous consideration. Traditional methods of replacing personnel will not accommodate the vacancies expected to plague healthcare organizations. Managers should focus on identifying potential gaps of key personnel and adapting programs to accommodate organizational need. Attention should be placed on capturing the intellectual capital existent in the organization and developing diverse groups of leadership candidates.

  5. Critical dosimetry measures and surrogate tools that can facilitate clinical success in PDT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Davis, Scott C.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Maytin, Edward V.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Palanisami, Akilan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy can be a highly complex treatment with more than one parameter to control, or in some cases it is easily implemented with little control other than prescribed drug and light values. The role of measured dosimetry as related to clinical adoption has not been as successful as it could have been, and part of this may be from the conflicting goals of advocating for as many measurements as possible for accurate control, versus companies and clinical adopters advocating for as few measurements as possible, to keep it simple. An organized approach to dosimetry selection is required, which shifts from mechanistic measurements in pre-clinical and early phase I trials, towards just those essential dose limiting measurements and a focus on possible surrogate measures in phase II/III trials. This essential and surrogate approach to dosimetry should help successful adoption of clinical PDT if successful. The examples of essential dosimetry points and surrogate dosimetry tools which might be implemented in phase II and higher trials are discussed for solid tissue PDT with verteporfin and skin lesion treatment with aminolevulinc acid.

  6. Analyzing the Factors Affecting the Success in University Entrance Examination through the use of Artificial Neural Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agdelen, Zafer; Haydar, Ali; Kanani, Andisheh

    2007-01-01

    There are many factors that affect the success of students in university entrance examination. These factors can be mainly categorized as follows; social factors, environmental factors, economical factors etc. The main aim of this study is to find whether there is a relation between these factors and the success in the university entrance…

  7. Factors influencing territorial occupancy and reproductive success in a Eurasian Eagle-owl (Bubo bubo) population.

    PubMed

    León-Ortega, Mario; Jiménez-Franco, María V; Martínez, José E; Calvo, José F

    2017-01-01

    Modelling territorial occupancy and reproductive success is a key issue for better understanding the population dynamics of territorial species. This study aimed to investigate these ecological processes in a Eurasian Eagle-owl (Bubo bubo) population in south-eastern Spain during a seven-year period. A multi-season, multi-state modelling approach was followed to estimate the probabilities of occupancy and reproductive success in relation to previous state, time and habitat covariates, and accounting for imperfect detection. The best estimated models showed past breeding success in the territories to be the most important factor determining a high probability of reoccupation and reproductive success in the following year. In addition, alternative occupancy models suggested the positive influence of crops on the probability of territory occupation. By contrast, the best reproductive model revealed strong interannual variations in the rates of breeding success, which may be related to changes in the abundance of the European Rabbit, the main prey of the Eurasian Eagle-owl. Our models also estimated the probabilities of detecting the presence of owls in a given territory and the probability of detecting evidence of successful reproduction. Estimated detection probabilities were high throughout the breeding season, decreasing in time for unsuccessful breeders but increasing for successful breeders. The probability of detecting reproductive success increased with time, being close to one in the last survey. These results suggest that reproduction failure in the early stages of the breeding season is a determinant factor in the probability of detecting occupancy and reproductive success.

  8. Psycho-Social Factors as Predictors of Success in a Work-Release Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brahen, Leonard S.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the significance of social and environmental factors as predictors of the rehabilitative potential of an inmate. Work history must be used as a whole. The more recent a good history, the more successful an inmate's jail record. Work factors may aid in selecting narcotics-addicted inmates for work-release programs. (Author/BEF)

  9. Teacher Perceptions of Factors for Successful Inclusive Early Childhood Education in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Frances Lai Mui; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Barker, Katrina; Tracey, Danielle; Fan, Jesmond C. M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study the authors aimed to examine the differentiability of 5 factors that preschool teachers may perceive as essential for successful implementation of inclusive education in regular classrooms. The 5 hypothetically influential factors were teamwork, curriculum, school support, government support, and stakeholders' attitudes. Teachers…

  10. Successful Implementation Factors for Using Computers in Iranian Schools during One Decade (1995-2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamani, Bibi Eshrat

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to identify factors and conditions that are important for successful implementation of computers in Iranian schools during one decade from 1995 to 2005. The second focus of this paper is to examine how these factors relate to models of implementation in other countries such as developed countries. This paper is…

  11. A Study of the Factors That Predict Academic Success and Retention of Student-Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brecht, April A.

    2014-01-01

    Institutions across the country and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) are continuously looking for ways to improve the academic success and retention of students. Most research focuses on the use of cognitive factors as predictors; however, there has been an increase in the use of non-cognitive factors in this research. This…

  12. Longitudinal Analysis of Factors Associated with Successful Outcomes for Transition-Age Youths with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Elyse; Curtis, Amy; Emerson, Robert Wall; Dormitorio, Benedict

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Transition-age youths with visual impairments have higher rates of unemployment than their peers without impairment, and factors associated with success after graduation have been examined; however, it is unknown whether these factors remain influential across the first decade after exiting high school. Methods: Five waves of the…

  13. Assessment of successful smoking cessation by psychological factors using the Bayesian network approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaorong; Li, Suyun; Pan, Lulu; Wang, Qiang; Li, Huijie; Han, Mingkui; Zhang, Nan; Jiang, Fan; Jia, Chongqi

    2016-07-01

    The association between psychological factors and smoking cessation is complicated and inconsistent in published researches, and the joint effect of psychological factors on smoking cessation is unclear. This study explored how psychological factors jointly affect the success of smoking cessation using a Bayesian network approach. A community-based case control study was designed with 642 adult male successful smoking quitters as the cases, and 700 adult male failed smoking quitters as the controls. General self-efficacy (GSE), trait coping style (positive-trait coping style (PTCS) and negative-trait coping style (NTCS)) and self-rating anxiety (SA) were evaluated by GSE Scale, Trait Coping Style Questionnaire and SA Scale, respectively. Bayesian network was applied to evaluate the relationship between psychological factors and successful smoking cessation. The local conditional probability table of smoking cessation indicated that different joint conditions of psychological factors led to different outcomes for smoking cessation. Among smokers with high PTCS, high NTCS and low SA, only 36.40% successfully quitted smoking. However, among smokers with low pack-years of smoking, high GSE, high PTCS and high SA, 63.64% successfully quitted smoking. Our study indicates psychological factors jointly influence smoking cessation outcome. According to different joint situations, different solutions should be developed to control tobacco in practical intervention.

  14. Pilot Critical Incident Reports as a Means to Identify Human Factors of Remotely Piloted Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Alan; Cardoza, Colleen; Null, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    It has been estimated that aviation accidents are typically preceded by numerous minor incidents arising from the same causal factors that ultimately produced the accident. Accident databases provide in-depth information on a relatively small number of occurrences, however incident databases have the potential to provide insights into the human factors of Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) operations based on a larger volume of less-detailed reports. Currently, there is a lack of incident data dealing with the human factors of unmanned aircraft systems. An exploratory study is being conducted to examine the feasibility of collecting voluntary critical incident reports from RPAS pilots. Twenty-three experienced RPAS pilots volunteered to participate in focus groups in which they described critical incidents from their own experience. Participants were asked to recall (1) incidents that revealed a system flaw, or (2) highlighted a case where the human operator contributed to system resilience or mission success. Participants were asked to only report incidents that could be included in a public document. During each focus group session, a note taker produced a de-identified written record of the incident narratives. At the end of the session, participants reviewed each written incident report, and made edits and corrections as necessary. The incidents were later analyzed to identify contributing factors, with a focus on design issues that either hindered or assisted the pilot during the events. A total of 90 incidents were reported. Human factor issues included the impact of reduced sensory cues, traffic separation in the absence of an out-the-window view, control latencies, vigilance during monotonous and ultra-long endurance flights, control station design considerations, transfer of control between control stations, the management of lost link procedures, and decision-making during emergencies. Pilots participated willingly and enthusiastically in the study

  15. Correlation of Fracture Mode Transition of Ceramic Particle with Critical Velocity for Successful Deposition in Vacuum Kinetic Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyungkwon; Kim, Jinyoung; Lee, Sung Bo; Lee, Changhee

    2017-02-01

    Vacuum kinetic spraying (VKS) is a promising room-temperature process to fabricate dense ceramic films. However, unfortunately, the deposition mechanism is still not clearly understood. In this respect, the critical conditions for successful deposition were investigated. Based on simulation and microstructural analysis, it was found that as the particle velocity increased, fracture mode transition from tensile fracture to shear fracture occurred and particle did not bounce off anymore above a certain velocity. Simultaneously, particle underwent shock-induced plasticity and dynamic fragmentation. The plasticity assisted to prevent the fragments from rebounding by spending the excessive kinetic energy and fragmentation is essential for fragment bonding and film growth considering that the deposition rate increased as the fraction of fragmentation increased. Accordingly, plasticity and fragmentation take a crucial role for particle deposition. In this respect, the velocity that fracture mode transition occurs is newly defined as critical velocity. Consequently, for successful deposition, the particle should at least exceed the critical velocity and thus it is very crucial for film fabrication in VKS process at room temperature.

  16. Correlation of Fracture Mode Transition of Ceramic Particle with Critical Velocity for Successful Deposition in Vacuum Kinetic Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyungkwon; Kim, Jinyoung; Lee, Sung Bo; Lee, Changhee

    2016-12-01

    Vacuum kinetic spraying (VKS) is a promising room-temperature process to fabricate dense ceramic films. However, unfortunately, the deposition mechanism is still not clearly understood. In this respect, the critical conditions for successful deposition were investigated. Based on simulation and microstructural analysis, it was found that as the particle velocity increased, fracture mode transition from tensile fracture to shear fracture occurred and particle did not bounce off anymore above a certain velocity. Simultaneously, particle underwent shock-induced plasticity and dynamic fragmentation. The plasticity assisted to prevent the fragments from rebounding by spending the excessive kinetic energy and fragmentation is essential for fragment bonding and film growth considering that the deposition rate increased as the fraction of fragmentation increased. Accordingly, plasticity and fragmentation take a crucial role for particle deposition. In this respect, the velocity that fracture mode transition occurs is newly defined as critical velocity. Consequently, for successful deposition, the particle should at least exceed the critical velocity and thus it is very crucial for film fabrication in VKS process at room temperature.

  17. Feasibility, Efficacy, and Predictive Factors for the Technical Success of Endoscopic Nasogallbladder Drainage: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Yane, Kei; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Katanuma, Akio; Takahashi, Kuniyuki; Osanai, Manabu; Kin, Toshifumi; Takaki, Ryo; Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Gon, Katsushige; Matsumori, Tomoaki; Tomonari, Akiko; Nojima, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Several studies have shown the usefulness of endoscopic nasogallbladder drainage (ENGBD) in patients with acute cholecystitis. However, the procedure is difficult, and factors that affect technical success have not yet been clarified. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the technical feasibility, efficacy, and predictive factors for the technical success of ENGBD in patients with acute cholecystitis. Methods All patients with moderate or severe acute cholecystitis who were enrolled underwent ENGBD between April 2009 and April 2011. Patients with surgically altered anatomy or pancreatobiliary malignancies were excluded. The primary outcomes included technical success, clinical success, and complications. Factors that could affect the technical success were also examined. Results Of the 27 patients who underwent ENGBD during the study period, technical success was achieved in 21 (78%) and clinical improvement was achieved in 20 (95%). Early complications were encountered in four patients (15%). Gallbladder wall thickness (odds ratio [OR], 1.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08 to 2.47) and age (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.35) were effective predictors of technical failure. Conclusions ENGBD was effective in resolving acute cholecystitis; however, this modality was technically challenging and had a limited success rate. Because of technical difficulties, ENGBD should be reserved for limited indications. PMID:25287172

  18. Influence factors for successful corneal donation among Chinese adults: data from Nanjing between 2001 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Xun; Liu, Qing-Huai

    2014-01-01

    AIM To investigate the factors that may influence the successful corneal donation among adults in China. METHODS This retrospective study was conducted in 2012. The eligible participants were all the adults registered in Nanjing Red Cross Eye Bank to donate their corneas after death during the period of 2001 and 2012. Multivariate logistic regression models were applied to investigate the influence factors for successful donation, the outcome events. RESULTS Totally, 210 of 328 (64.0%) registered potential donors successfully donated their corneas after death. The mean (SD) age at registration was 64.7 (12.5) for all participants, with 65.5 (10.1) and 63.2 (15.8) for successful and unsuccessful donors, respectively. With multivariate logistic regression analysis, five factors, the willingness of donation, age, education level, residence area, and cause of death were identified to be associated with successful corneal donation. CONCLUSION The willingness of donation and some socio-demographic factors might substantially affect their successful donation after death for people who registered to donate corneas. PMID:25540751

  19. Factors associated with successful vaginal birth after cesarean section and outcomes in rural area of Anatolia.

    PubMed

    Senturk, Mehmet Baki; Cakmak, Yusuf; Atac, Halit; Budak, Mehmet Sukru

    2015-01-01

    Successful vaginal birth after cesarean section is more comfortable than repeat emergency or elective cesarean section. Antenatal examinations are important in selection for trial of labor, while birth management can be difficult when the patients present at emergency condition. But there is an increased chance of vaginal birth with advanced cervical dilation. This study attempts to evaluate factors associated with success of vaginal birth after cesarean section and to compare the maternal and perinatal outcomes between vaginal birth after cesarean section and intrapartum cesarean section in patients who were admitted to hospital during the active or second stage of labor. A retrospective evaluation was made from the results of 127 patients. Cesarean section was performed in 57 patients; 70 attempted trial of labor. The factors associated with success of vaginal birth after cesarean section were investigated. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were compared between the groups. Vaginal birth after cesarean section was successful in 55% of cases. Advanced cervical opening, effacement, gravidity, parity, and prior vaginal delivery were factors associated with successful vaginal birth. The vaginal birth group had more complications (P<0.01), but these were minor. The rate of blood transfusion and prevalence of changes in hemoglobin level were similar in both groups (P>0.05). In this study, cervical opening, effacement, gravidity, parity, and prior vaginal delivery were important factors for successful vaginal birth after cesarean section. The patients' requests influenced outcome. Trial of labor should take into consideration the patient's preference, together with the proper setting.

  20. Factors associated with hunter success for ducks on state-owned lands in Illinios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stafford, Joshua D.; Pearse, Aaron T.; Hine, Christopher S.; Yetter, Aaron P.; Horath, Michelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Factors that influence hunter success for waterfowl are subject to varying levels of control by managers. The relative influence of these factors is poorly understood, but such information may be valuable to guide management actions intended to promote successful hunting and communicate management decisions to constituents. We used bag-check data to investigate factors influencing hunter success for mallards Anas platyrhynchos and other dabbling ducks (tribe Anatini) during the period 1981-2000 and 2002 at Illinois public waterfowl areas. Competing models of hunter success for mallards and other dabbling ducks included a negative association with average low temperature during the duck season (uncontrollable by managers) and positive associations with estimates of local and continental duck abundance, factors which we considered partially controllable by managers. Although a certain proportion of variation in hunter success for ducks cannot be directly influenced by managers, we suggest that programs and management efforts, which promote larger continental duck populations (e.g. Conservation Reserve Program) and local duck abundance (e.g. provide quality wetland foraging habitats), may positively influence hunter success.

  1. Critical factors affecting laccase-mediated biobleaching of pulp in paper industry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gursharan; Kaur, Kavleen; Puri, Sanjeev; Sharma, Prince

    2015-01-01

    Next to xylanases, laccases from fungi and alkali-tolerant bacteria are the most important biocatalysts that can be employed for eco-friendly biobleaching of hard and soft wood pulps in the paper industry. Laccases offer a potential alternative to conventional, environmental-polluting chlorine and chlorine-based bleaching and has no reductive effect on the final yield of pulp as compared to hemicellulases (xylanases and mannanases). In the last decade, reports on biobleaching with laccases are based on laboratory observations only. There are several critical challenges before this enzyme can be implemented for pulp bleaching at the industrial scale. This review discusses significant factors like redox potential, laccase mediator system (LMS)-synthetic or natural, pH, temperature, stability of enzyme, unwanted grafting reactions of laccase, and cost-intensive production at large scale which constitute a great hitch for the successful implementation of laccases at industrial level.

  2. Understanding Career Success and Its Contributing Factors for Clinical and Translational Investigators

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Georgeanna F.W.B.; Schwartz, Lisa S.; DiMeglio, Linda A.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.; Gabrilove, Janice L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To understand the factors that facilitate career success for career development awardees in clinical and translational science and to reconceptualize understanding of career success for this population. Method In 2013–2014, the authors conducted semi-structured interviews with former NIH KL2 or K12 scholars from nine Clinical and Translational Science Award-funded institutions. Participants either had or had not secured independent funding at least two years after the end of their last K award. Questions covered the factors that facilitate or hinder junior investigators’ transition to independent funding. Interviews were recorded and transcribed and the transcripts analyzed thematically. Results Forty individuals participated, with equal representation by men and women and by independently and not independently funded investigators. Personal factors that facilitated success included: networks, persistence and resilience, initiative, autonomy, and personal and professional balance. Organizational factors included: appropriate mentorship, protected research time, and institutional resources and support. Even independently funded participants described challenges regarding career direction. Five participants without independent funding modeled a broad spectrum of successful career paths, having assumed leadership positions not reliant on grant funding. Alternative definitions of career success included: improving public health, enjoying work, seeing mentees succeed, and receiving external acknowledgement of successes. Conclusions Awareness of the factors that facilitate or hinder career success can help junior faculty, mentors, and institutional leaders support career development in clinical and translational science. New definitions of career success are needed, as are career paths for faculty who want to engage in research in roles other than principal investigator. PMID:26509600

  3. Donde Estan los Estudiantes Puertorriquenos/os Exitosos? [Where Are the Academically Successful Puerto Rican Students?]: Success Factors of High-Achieving Puerto Rican High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antrop-Gonzalez, Rene; Velez, William; Garrett, Tomas

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the 4 success factors that 10 working class Puerto Rican urban high school students attributed to their high academic achievement. These success factors were (a) the acquisition of social capital through religiosity and participation in school and community-based extracurricular activities, (b) having a strong Puerto Rican…

  4. SPATIAL ACCURACY: A CRITICAL FACTOR IN GIS-RELATED ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Onsite analyses are critical to making timely decisions. The results of these decisions may not be realized for many years. In order to increase the value of onsite analyses and to create and utilize meaningful environmental models, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) dev...

  5. The critical compressibility factor value: Associative fluids and liquid alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Kulinskii, V. L.

    2014-08-07

    We show how to obtain the critical compressibility factor Z{sub c} for simple and associative Lennard-Jones fluids using the critical characteristics of the Ising model on different lattices. The results show that low values of critical compressibility factor are correlated with the associative properties of fluids in critical region and can be obtained on the basis of the results for the Ising model on lattices with more than one atom per cell. An explanation for the results on the critical point line of the Lennard-Jones fluids and liquid metals is proposed within the global isomorphism approach.

  6. Clinical factors correlated with the success rate of miniscrews in orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Topouzelis, Nikolaos; Tsaousoglou, Phoebus

    2012-03-01

    Miniscrews offer a reliable alternative for anchorage during orthodontic treatment, particularly for non-cooperative patients or periodontal patients with alveolar bone loss. The study aims at assessing the correlation of various clinical indicators with the success or failure of miniscrews used for anchorage during orthodontic treatment. Thirty-four consecutive patients with a cumulative total of 82 miniscrews implanted participated in the study. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to assess the correlation of various factors with success rates. The miniscrew was considered the unit of analysis clustered within site and within patient. The overall success rate of miniscrews was 90.2%. For every additional miniscrew used in a patient's oral cavity, the success rate was reduced by 67%. Retromandibular triangle and palatal placement and in movable mucosa resulted in lower success rate. The miniscrew length and diameter were found to correlate with success rates. Orthodontic force applied on miniscrews for uprighting purposes showed a lower success rate than that used for retraction. This study revealed that miniscrews present high success rates. The number of miniscrews used per patient, the miniscrew site placement, the soft tissue type of placement, the miniscrew length and diameter as well as the orthodontic force applied on the miniscrew showed significant correlation with success rates.

  7. Brief Report: Immune Factors in Autism: A Critical Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Ilan; He, Ziao-Song; Gershwin, M. Eric; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews studies linking autistic disorder with various immune factors. It concludes that although various immune system abnormalities have been reported in children with autism, previous studies are largely association based and it remains difficult to draw conclusions regarding the role of immune factors in the etiopathogenesis of…

  8. Social Disorganization as a Critical Factor in "Crowding."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCain, Garvin; And Others

    This paper discusses factors related to negative psychological and physiological reactions (i.e., violent deaths, psychiatric commitments, self-mutilations, attempted suicides, disciplinary infractions, etc.) to life in institutional environments such as prisons, schools, off-shore oil rigs, and homes for the aged. Factors discussed are: (1)…

  9. Strong spatial genetic structure reduces reproductive success in the critically endangered plant genus Pseudomisopates.

    PubMed

    Amat, María E; Silvertown, Jonathan; Vargas, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Clonal growth can be a double-edged sword for endangered species, because the short-term insurance against extinction may incur a longer-term hazard of creating small inbred populations with low fecundity. In the present study, we quantify the advantages and disadvantages of clonal growth regarding the fitness of the central Iberian monotypic endangered genus Pseudomisopates. Preliminary studies showed that the species is self-incompatible and exhibits extensive clonal growth with plants flowering profusely. However, seeds at many sites seemed to be unviable, and no seedlings have been observed in the field. A fully replicated nested sampling design (n = 100) was conducted to explore genetic (using seven SSR loci) and environmental factors potentially affecting seed viability, such as: 1) clonal and genetic diversity, 2) spatial genetic structure, and 3) environmental factors (shrub cover and grazing). Generalized Linear Mixed Models were fitted relating genetic and environmental variables to reproductive variables (seed viability and flower display). Our results indicate that the relatively low genotypic diversity of the population (PD = 0.23), as quantified by SSRs, and the strong spatial genetic structure observed are congruent with intense clonal growth. This clonal growth is enhanced by unfavorable environmental conditions, such as canopy closure and grazing. Under these circumstances, both flower display and mate availability decrease, thus hindering sexual reproduction. Indeed, a mixed reproductive system (clonal and sexual) to escape environmental stochasticity is crucial for the survival of Pseudomisopates, a species inhabiting a disturbance-prone ecosystem.

  10. Critical research gaps and translational priorities for the successful prevention and treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer remains a significant scientific, clinical and societal challenge. This gap analysis has reviewed and critically assessed enduring issues and new challenges emerging from recent research, and proposes strategies for translating solutions into practice. Methods More than 100 internationally recognised specialist breast cancer scientists, clinicians and healthcare professionals collaborated to address nine thematic areas: genetics, epigenetics and epidemiology; molecular pathology and cell biology; hormonal influences and endocrine therapy; imaging, detection and screening; current/novel therapies and biomarkers; drug resistance; metastasis, angiogenesis, circulating tumour cells, cancer ‘stem’ cells; risk and prevention; living with and managing breast cancer and its treatment. The groups developed summary papers through an iterative process which, following further appraisal from experts and patients, were melded into this summary account. Results The 10 major gaps identified were: (1) understanding the functions and contextual interactions of genetic and epigenetic changes in normal breast development and during malignant transformation; (2) how to implement sustainable lifestyle changes (diet, exercise and weight) and chemopreventive strategies; (3) the need for tailored screening approaches including clinically actionable tests; (4) enhancing knowledge of molecular drivers behind breast cancer subtypes, progression and metastasis; (5) understanding the molecular mechanisms of tumour heterogeneity, dormancy, de novo or acquired resistance and how to target key nodes in these dynamic processes; (6) developing validated markers for chemosensitivity and radiosensitivity; (7) understanding the optimal duration, sequencing and rational combinations of treatment for improved personalised therapy; (8) validating multimodality imaging biomarkers for minimally invasive diagnosis and monitoring of responses in primary and metastatic disease

  11. Other Shades of Diversity: Identifying Factors that Facilitate Critical Thought

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    of Tactical Air Power in World War II (New York: The Free Press, 1995), 22. 53 and his “ big Pollock coal miner” teammates to take advantage of...for him. In addition, Pete realized he did not possess the requisite skills to be successful in the big leagues. Therefore, he returned the $1000...seems Quesada did a bang -up job. Cannon reported that Pete displayed the traits of a self-confident officer with an engaging personality during his

  12. Two-scale-factor universality near the critical point of fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengers, J. V.; Moldover, M. R.

    1978-01-01

    Thermodynamic data from interferometric density profile studies and light-scattering experiments near the critical isochore of Xe, CO2 and SF6 provide a basis for examining the hypothesized two-scale-factor universality for the correlation function of fluids near the gas-liquid critical point. For the investigation, three-scale-factor universality is assumed, with Ising-like critical exponent values obtained through the renormalization group technique. The two thermodynamic scale factors are found from the density profiles, while the scale factor for the correlation length is obtained from the light-scattering data.

  13. Factors associated with vancomycin nephrotoxicity in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, T P; Kotapati, C; Roberts, M J; Rowland, J; Lipman, J; Roberts, J A; Udy, A

    2015-09-01

    Vancomycin is a glycopeptide antibiotic commonly used in the management of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. The recent increase in prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin has prompted experts to advocate for higher target trough serum concentrations. This study aimed to evaluate the potential consequences of more aggressive vancomycin therapy, by examining the association between higher serum concentrations and acute kidney injury (AKI) in a population of critically ill patients. We collected data for all patients who received vancomycin over a five-year period and evaluated the prevalence of new-onset AKI using the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage (RIFLE) kidney disease criteria. One-hundred and fifty-nine patients provided complete data, with 8.8% manifesting new onset AKI while receiving vancomycin. The median age was 57 (44 to 68) years, while the median trough serum concentration was 16 (10 to 19) mg/l. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified mean trough concentration (OR=1.174, P=0.024), APACHE II score (OR=1.141, P=0.012) and simultaneous aminoglycoside prescription (OR=18.896, P=0.002) as significant predictors of AKI. These data suggest higher trough vancomycin serum concentrations are associated with greater odds of AKI in the critically ill.

  14. Critical care nurses' experiences: "a good relationship with the patient is a prerequisite for successful pain relief management".

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Jan-Olov; Engström, Åsa

    2011-09-01

    There is a lack of studies describing how critical care nurses experience assessing and treating pain in patients receiving postoperative care in an intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of this study was to describe those experiences. Qualitative personal interviews with six critical care nurses in an ICU in northern Sweden were conducted during 2009. The interview texts were subjected to qualitative content analysis, which resulted in the formulation of one theme and four categories. It was important to be able to recognize signs of pain in patients unable to communicate verbally. In older patients, anxiety could be interpreted as an indication of pain. Pain was primarily assessed by means of a visual analog scale. Being unable to treat pain successfully was experienced as failing in one's work. Pharmacologic treatment was always the first choice for relief. The environment was experienced as a hindrance to optimal nursing care, because all postoperative patients shared a room with only curtains between them. The work of assessing and treating pain in patients receiving postoperative care is an important and frequent task for critical care nurses, and knowledge in the field is essential if the patients are to receive optimal nursing care and treatment. Patients cared for in an ICU might benefit from nonpharmacologic treatment. Being without pain after surgery implies increased well-being and shorter hospitalization for the patient.

  15. [Factors of success in the implementation of the technologies of the information and the communication in the health systems. The human factor].

    PubMed

    Roman-Viñas, Ramón

    2010-02-01

    In this work some of the fundamentals of change management techniques to ensure the introduction of information and communication technologies in health organizations are analized. Managing change is aimed at redirecting the impact of any transformation process in the organizations towards a positive attitude and enthusiasm of those involved. That is, this paper analyzes the most important of all factors that must be managed in any project for change: the human factor. If a proper change management is a critical success factor in implementing new processes and systems of information and communication technologies (ICT) in an organization, when we faced with the introduction of new processes and interoperability systems between different organizations, cooperation, leadership and motivation of individuals focused on a common goal is absolutely imperative. This is the case of the new ICT systems being introduced in the Catalan Health System. Indeed, by definition of the model itself, in Catalonia, continuity of care, increased efficiency and effectiveness and quality improvement of projects as the clinical history shared, electronic prescriptions, or scanning medical imaging, require necessarily the definition of processes in which a large number of different health organizations, different in their law status, and whose own interests should converge towards the ICT systems and processes of health care so that the contribution of all parties can make a whole. The success of these projects, a reality nowadays, is due largely to the management of the human factor conducted continuously since its inception.

  16. A critical examination of factors that might encourage secrecy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tough, Allen

    If a signal is detected someday from extraterrestrial intelligence, several factors might encourage complete and immediate secrecy. As a result, all data might be restricted to the receiving facility or nation instead of being shared promptly with SETI scientists around the world. Seven factors seem particularly like to encourage secrecy: (1) the belief that people may panic; (2) the fear of a negative impact on religion, science, and culture; (3) embarrassment; (4) the individual and national competitive urge; (5) avoiding a harmful premature reply; (6) a national trade or military advantage; and (7) the fear of a Trojan Horse. Three steps might alleviate the particularly difficult factors (numbers 4, 5, 6): an international treaty for immediate sharing of possible signals with SETI scientists in several other countries; implementation and frequent use of an actual network of scientists for such sharing; and further study of the possible need for partial restriction of data about the location and channel of a suspected signal.

  17. Movement Patterns for a Critically Endangered Species, the Leatherback Turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), Linked to Foraging Success and Population Status

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Helen; Fossette, Sabrina; Bograd, Steven J.; Shillinger, George L.; Swithenbank, Alan M.; Georges, Jean-Yves; Gaspar, Philippe; Strömberg, K. H. Patrik; Paladino, Frank V.; Spotila, James R.; Block, Barbara A.; Hays, Graeme C.

    2012-01-01

    Foraging success for pelagic vertebrates may be revealed by horizontal and vertical movement patterns. We show markedly different patterns for leatherback turtles in the North Atlantic versus Eastern Pacific, which feed on gelatinous zooplankton that are only occasionally found in high densities. In the Atlantic, travel speed was characterized by two modes, indicative of high foraging success at low speeds (<15 km d−1) and transit at high speeds (20–45 km d−1). Only a single mode was evident in the Pacific, which occurred at speeds of 21 km d−1 indicative of transit. The mean dive depth was more variable in relation to latitude but closer to the mean annual depth of the thermocline and nutricline for North Atlantic than Eastern Pacific turtles. The most parsimonious explanation for these findings is that Eastern Pacific turtles rarely achieve high foraging success. This is the first support for foraging behaviour differences between populations of this critically endangered species and suggests that longer periods searching for prey may be hindering population recovery in the Pacific while aiding population maintenance in the Atlantic. PMID:22615767

  18. Movement patterns for a critically endangered species, the leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), linked to foraging success and population status.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Helen; Fossette, Sabrina; Bograd, Steven J; Shillinger, George L; Swithenbank, Alan M; Georges, Jean-Yves; Gaspar, Philippe; Strömberg, K H Patrik; Paladino, Frank V; Spotila, James R; Block, Barbara A; Hays, Graeme C

    2012-01-01

    Foraging success for pelagic vertebrates may be revealed by horizontal and vertical movement patterns. We show markedly different patterns for leatherback turtles in the North Atlantic versus Eastern Pacific, which feed on gelatinous zooplankton that are only occasionally found in high densities. In the Atlantic, travel speed was characterized by two modes, indicative of high foraging success at low speeds (<15 km d(-1)) and transit at high speeds (20-45 km d(-1)). Only a single mode was evident in the Pacific, which occurred at speeds of 21 km d(-1) indicative of transit. The mean dive depth was more variable in relation to latitude but closer to the mean annual depth of the thermocline and nutricline for North Atlantic than Eastern Pacific turtles. The most parsimonious explanation for these findings is that Eastern Pacific turtles rarely achieve high foraging success. This is the first support for foraging behaviour differences between populations of this critically endangered species and suggests that longer periods searching for prey may be hindering population recovery in the Pacific while aiding population maintenance in the Atlantic.

  19. Factors Associated With Success in an Occupational Rehabilitation Program for Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hardison, Mark E.

    2017-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are a significant burden; however, no consensus has been reached on how to maximize occupational rehabilitation programs for people with these disorders, and the impact of simulating work tasks as a mode of intervention has not been well examined. In this retrospective cohort study, the authors used logistic regression to identify client and program factors predicting success for 95 clients in a general occupational rehabilitation program and 71 clients in a comprehensive occupational rehabilitation program. The final predictive model for general rehabilitation included gender, number of sessions completed, and performance of work simulation activities. Maximum hours per session was the only significant predictor of success in the comprehensive rehabilitation program. This study identifies new factors associated with success in occupational rehabilitation, specifically highlighting the importance of intensity (i.e., session length and number of sessions) of therapy and occupation-based activities for this population. PMID:28027046

  20. Factors Associated With Success in an Occupational Rehabilitation Program for Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hardison, Mark E; Roll, Shawn C

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are a significant burden; however, no consensus has been reached on how to maximize occupational rehabilitation programs for people with these disorders, and the impact of simulating work tasks as a mode of intervention has not been well examined. In this retrospective cohort study, the authors used logistic regression to identify client and program factors predicting success for 95 clients in a general occupational rehabilitation program and 71 clients in a comprehensive occupational rehabilitation program. The final predictive model for general rehabilitation included gender, number of sessions completed, and performance of work simulation activities. Maximum hours per session was the only significant predictor of success in the comprehensive rehabilitation program. This study identifies new factors associated with success in occupational rehabilitation, specifically highlighting the importance of intensity (i.e., session length and number of sessions) of therapy and occupation-based activities for this population.

  1. The Success Factors to Defeat Insurgency in the Philippines and Its Applicability in the Colombian Context

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Thesis Advisor: Camber Warren Second Reader: Heather S. Gregg THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No...Comendador Approved by: Camber Warren Thesis Advisor Heather S. Gregg Second Reader John Arquilla Chair, Department of Defense Analysis...INSURGENCY .......27 F. QUANTITATIVE INDICATORS IN BOHOL...........................................34 G. LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE SUCCESS FACTORS OF

  2. Personal Appearance: Is Attractiveness a Factor in Organizational Survival and Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nykodym, Nick; Simonetti, Jack L.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses general impact of personal appearance. Identifies personal appearance as one of the key factors in organizational survival and success. Presents ranking of personal appearance items such as dress, hair style, and speech related to projecting acceptable corporate image. Recommends understanding importance of personal appearance as a…

  3. Psychometric Properties and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Student Engagement in School Success Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigman, Greg; Wells, Craig; Webb, Linda; Villares, Elizabeth; Carey, John C.; Harrington, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the confirmatory factor analysis of the Student Engagement in School Success Skills (SESSS) instrument. The results of this study confirm that the SESSS has potential to be a useful self-report measure of elementary students' use of strategies and skills associated with enhanced academic learning and achievement.

  4. Factors Influencing Fundraising Success in Church-Related Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohu, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and examine factors leading to fundraising success in church-related colleges and universities that have not secularized their Christian mission, governance, and denominational relationships. This study posed research questions concerning both the specific strategies and leadership behaviors used by…

  5. Agri-Environmental Resource Management by Large-Scale Collective Action: Determining KEY Success Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uetake, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Large-scale collective action is necessary when managing agricultural natural resources such as biodiversity and water quality. This paper determines the key factors to the success of such action. Design/Methodology/Approach: This paper analyses four large-scale collective actions used to manage agri-environmental resources in Canada and…

  6. Acceptance and Success Factors for M-Learning of ERP Systems Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholtz, Brenda; Kapeso, Mando

    2014-01-01

    The effective training of users is a key factor of the success of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system projects. This need for ERP system training is exacerbated by a demand for quality ERP consultants which is evident in Europe and in African countries, particularly in South Africa where science and technology education has been identified…

  7. FACTORS RELATING TO SUCCESS OF COPING WITH CRISIS. IMPACT OF FATHER ABSENCE IN MILITARY FAMILIES, II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FAGEN, STANLEY A.; AND OTHERS

    THE PATTERN OF PREDISPOSITIONAL AND MEDIATIONAL FACTORS RELATING TO DIFFERENTIAL MATERNAL SUCCESS IN COPING WITH THE CRISIS CREATED BY FATHER ABSENCE IN MILITARY FAMILIES WAS EXAMINED. MOTHERS IN 23 FAMILIES WHOSE HUSBANDS WERE ABSENT ON EXTENDED MILITARY TOURS, WERE ADMINISTERED AN EXTENSIVE BATTERY OF SOCIOMETRIC AND PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS PRIOR TO…

  8. Contributing Factors to Student Success in Anatomy and Physiology: Lower outside Workload and Better Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, David E.; Hannum, Lynn; Gupta, Sat

    2004-01-01

    A study of students of a traditional two-semester Anatomy and Physiology class was made to determine factors that contributed to success in the coursework. The test established a co-relation between the amount of study in mathematics and science done previously in school and final grades in the subject.

  9. A Prospective Study of Mexican American Adolescents' Academic Success: Considering Family and Individual Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roosa, Mark W.; O'Donnell, Megan; Cham, Heining; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Zeiders, Katherine H.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Knight, George P.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Mexican American youth are at greater risk of school failure than their peers. To identify factors that may contribute to academic success in this population, this study examined the prospective relationships from 5th grade to 7th grade of family (i.e., human capital [a parent with at least a high school education], residential stability,…

  10. Factors Affecting Business-to-Business Electronic Commerce Success: An Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chun-I Philip

    2010-01-01

    It is generally believed that Business to Business (B2B) e-commerce has a great impact on business performance improvement. Considerable research also shows that another dependent variable, B2B e-commerce success, can be a good overall measure of B2B systems. This paper investigated and examined the impact of several factors, which are either…

  11. Overcoming Obstacles and Academic Hope: An Examination of Factors Promoting Effective Academic Success Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Michele Joann; Trujillo, Daniel J.; Boland, Donna L.; MacKinnon, Joyce L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the underlying non-cognitive processes and institutional factors that allowed first-year students to enact effective strategies for attaining academic success and persisting despite obstacles. The varying levels of academic preparation and unique obstacles faced by the student participants…

  12. Business Success and Its Factors as Perceived by Business School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soboleva, N. E.

    2012-01-01

    The author presents a typology of students in business education programs, and analyzes the characteristics of students' perceptions of business success that may result from their training. The factors that students try to maximize are a mix of financial, personal, and life-style issues. (Contains 3 tables.) [This article was translated by Kim…

  13. Examining the Success Factors of High-Achieving Puerto Rican Male High-School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Tomas; Antrop-Gonzalez, Rene; Velez, William

    2010-01-01

    This article works to dispel the myth that Latino urban high-school students are not capable of performing at high academic levels. Whereas much educational research emphasizes the academic underachievement of urban Latino students, this article counteracts this research by describing the four success factors that three working-class Puerto Rican…

  14. The Relationship of Factors of Academic Success and Psychological Well-Being for College Honors Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: This study was concerned with perceptions of academic facilitators, academic obstacles, and psychological well-being of college honors students. Differences in the way factors of academic success are perceived, and the relationship these perceptions have with psychological well-being were examined. College honors…

  15. The Psychosocial Factors of the Abortion Experience: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shusterman, Lisa Roseman

    1976-01-01

    Due to faulty methodology no general statements can be made about psychosocial factors for women receiving illegal abortions. Women receiving therapeutic abortions experienced favorable psychological consequences more often than negative consequences. New abortion patients are mostly young, unmarried women who are not in a social position to care…

  16. Factors Critical to the Adoption of Career Guidance Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kester, Ralph J.; Howard, John, Jr.

    The study endeavors to describe, assess, and trace the progress of six high schools as the faculty and staff responded to the adoption of an innovative career guidance system. The study provides a model, a method, and some generalizations about factors influencing the process. The document is organized according to: (1) definitions of basic…

  17. Success rate and risk factors of failure of the induced membrane technique in children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Aurégan, Jean-Charles; Bégué, Thierry; Rigoulot, Guillaume; Glorion, Christophe; Pannier, Stéphanie

    2016-12-01

    The induced membrane technique was designed by Masquelet et al. to address segmental bone defects of critical size in adults. It has been used after bone defects of traumatic, infectious and tumoral origin with satisfactory results. Recently, it has been used in children but, after an initial enthusiasm, several cases of failure have been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the success rate and the risk factors of failure of the induced membrane for children. We conducted a systematic review of all the studies reporting the results of the induced membrane technique to address bone defects of critical size in children. Our primary outcome was the success rate of the technique defined as a bone union before any iterative surgery. Our secondary outcomes were the complications and the risk factors of failure. We searched Medline via Pubmed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. Twelve studies, including 69 patients, met the inclusion criteria. There were 41 boys and 28 girls. Mean age at surgery was 10 years. Mean size of resection was 12.38 cm and the mean time between the two stages was 5.86 months. Mean rate of bone union after the two stages of the induced membrane technique was 58% (40/69) but this rate increased to 87% after revision surgeries (60/69). Main complications were non-unions (19/69), lysis of the graft (6/69) and fractures of the bone graft (6/69). Only 1/69 deep infection was reported. Other non specific complications were regularly reported such limb length discrepancies, joint stiffness and protruding wires. Risk factor of failure that could be suspected comprised the resection of a malignant tumour, a bone defect located at the femur, a wide resection, a long time between the two stages, an unstable osteosynthesis and a bone graft associating autograft to other graft materials. The induced membrane technique is suitable for bone defects of critical size in children. It is a reliable technique with no need of micro vascular surgery

  18. Factors related to successful teaching by outstanding professors: an interpretive study.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Jeanette; Fox, Patricia G

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe factors associated with successful university teaching within the cultural norms of a public university in the midwestern United States. An interpretive analysis was conducted using the educational philosophy and goal statements of 35 university professors who received Presidential Teaching Awards from the university. The professors' diverse disciplines included nursing, curriculum and instruction, accountancy, music, and political science. The authors offer nursing educators the opportunity to increase their confidence and effectiveness by "learning" from faculty members who have been recognized as exceptionally successful in teaching. Four main relevant themes associated with successful university teaching were identified: Presence, Promotion of Learning, Teachers as Learners, and Enthusiasm. The narratives of the professors helped define the meaning of successful teaching across disciplines and offer nursing faculty additional perspectives and experiences.

  19. Key success factors for clinical knowledge management systems: Comparing physician and hospital manager viewpoints.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sho-Fang; Hsieh, Ping-Jung; Chen, Hui-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The study explores the perceptions of physicians and hospital managers regarding the key success factors (KSFs) of a clinical knowledge management system (CKMS). It aims to eliminate the perception gap and gain more insights for a successful CKMS.A survey was conducted in four medical centers in Taiwan. A total of 340 questionnaires, including 15 for hospital managers and 70 for physicians in each hospital, were administered. The effective response rates are 78.3% and 56.1% respectively. Partial least square (PLS) were used to analyze the data.The results identified six KSFs of CKMS including system software and hardware, knowledge quality, system quality, organizational factors, user satisfaction, and policy factors. User satisfaction and policy factors have direct effects on perceived CKMS performance. Knowledge quality is regarded as an antecedent to user satisfaction, while system quality is the antecedent to both user satisfaction and policy factors. System software and hardware was supported only by managers, and organizational factors were supported only by physicians.Among the factors, this study highlighted the policy factor. Besides, the study provides hospital managers additional insights into physician requirements for organizational support. Third, more physician participation and involvement are recommended when introducing and developing a CKMS.

  20. A critical review on factors influencing fermentative hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Richa; Kumar, Virendra; Pathak, Vinayak V; Ahmad, Shamshad; Aoyi, Ochieng; Tyagi, V V

    2017-03-01

    Biohydrogen production by dark fermentation of different waste materials is a promising approach to produce bio-energy in terms of renewable energy exploration. This communication has reviewed various influencing factors of dark fermentation process with detailed account of determinants in biohydrogen production. It has also focused on different factors such as improved bacterial strain, reactor design, metabolic engineering and two stage processes to enhance the bioenergy productivity from substrate. The study also suggest that complete utilization of substrates for biological hydrogen production requires the concentrated research and development for efficient functioning of microorganism with integrated application for energy production and bioremediation. Various studies have been taken into account here, to show the comparative efficiency of different substrates and operating conditions with inhibitory factors and pretreatment option for biohydrogen production. The study reveals that an extensive research is needed to observe field efficiency of process using low cost substrates and integration of dark and photo fermentation process. Integrated approach of fermentation process will surely compete with conventional hydrogen process and replace it completely in future.

  1. The perils of meta-regression to identify clinical decision support system success factors.

    PubMed

    Fillmore, Christopher L; Rommel, Casey A; Welch, Brandon M; Zhang, Mingyuan; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2015-08-01

    Clinical decision support interventions are typically heterogeneous in nature, making it difficult to identify why some interventions succeed while others do not. One approach to identify factors important to the success of health information systems is the use of meta-regression techniques, in which potential explanatory factors are correlated with the outcome of interest. This approach, however, can result in misleading conclusions due to several issues. In this manuscript, we present a cautionary case study in the context of clinical decision support systems to illustrate the limitations of this type of analysis. We then discuss implications and recommendations for future work aimed at identifying success factors of medical informatics interventions. In particular, we identify the need for head-to-head trials in which the importance of system features is directly evaluated in a prospective manner.

  2. Two-factor theory, the actor-critic model, and conditioned avoidance.

    PubMed

    Maia, Tiago V

    2010-02-01

    Two-factor theory (Mowrer, 1947, 1951, 1956) remains one of the most influential theories of avoidance, but it is at odds with empirical findings that demonstrate sustained avoidance responding in situations in which the theory predicts that the response should extinguish. This article shows that the well-known actor-critic model seamlessly addresses the problems with two-factor theory, while simultaneously being consistent with the core ideas that underlie that theory. More specifically, the article shows that (1) the actor-critic model bears striking similarities to two-factor theory and explains all of the empirical phenomena that two-factor theory explains, in much the same way, and (2) there are subtle but important differences between the actor-critic model and two-factor theory, which result in the actor-critic model predicting the persistence of avoidance responses that is found empirically.

  3. Factors affecting hatch success of hawksbill sea turtles on Long Island, Antigua, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Ditmer, Mark Allan; Stapleton, Seth Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Current understanding of the factors influencing hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) hatch success is disparate and based on relatively short-term studies or limited sample sizes. Because global populations of hawksbills are heavily depleted, evaluating the parameters that impact hatch success is important to their conservation and recovery. Here, we use data collected by the Jumby Bay Hawksbill Project (JBHP) to investigate hatch success. The JBHP implements saturation tagging protocols to study a hawksbill rookery in Antigua, West Indies. Habitat data, which reflect the varied nesting beaches, are collected at egg deposition, and nest contents are exhumed and categorized post-emergence. We analyzed hatch success using mixed-model analyses with explanatory and predictive datasets. We incorporated a random effect for turtle identity and evaluated environmental, temporal and individual-based reproductive variables. Hatch success averaged 78.6% (SD: 21.2%) during the study period. Highly supported models included multiple covariates, including distance to vegetation, deposition date, individual intra-seasonal nest number, clutch size, organic content, and sand grain size. Nests located in open sand were predicted to produce 10.4 more viable hatchlings per clutch than nests located >1.5 m into vegetation. For an individual first nesting in early July, the fourth nest of the season yielded 13.2 more viable hatchlings than the initial clutch. Generalized beach section and inter-annual variation were also supported in our explanatory dataset, suggesting that gaps remain in our understanding of hatch success. Our findings illustrate that evaluating hatch success is a complex process, involving multiple environmental and individual variables. Although distance to vegetation and hatch success were inversely related, vegetation is an important component of hawksbill nesting habitat, and a more complete assessment of the impacts of specific vegetation types on hatch

  4. Risk factors for agitation in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Thiago Miranda Lopes; de Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes; Nosé, Paulo Maurício Garcia; de Freitas, Flavio Geraldo Resende; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence of agitation in the first 7 days after intensive care unit admission, its risk factors and its associations with clinical outcomes. Methods This single-center prospective cohort study included all patients older than 18 years with a predicted stay > 48 hours within the first 24 hours of intensive care unit admission. Agitation was defined as a Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale score ≥ +2, an episode of agitation or the use of a specific medication recorded in patient charts. Results Agitation occurred in 31.8% of the 113 patients. Multivariate analysis showed that delirium [OR = 24.14; CI95% 5.15 - 113.14; p < 0.001], moderate or severe pain [OR = 5.74; CI95% 1.73 - 19.10; p = 0.004], mechanical ventilation [OR = 10.14; CI95% 2.93 - 35.10; p < 0.001], and smoking habits [OR = 4.49; CI95% 1.33 - 15.17; p = 0.015] were independent factors for agitation, while hyperlactatemia was associated with a lower risk [OR = 0.169; CI95% 0.04 - 0.77; p = 0.021]. Agitated patients had fewer mechanical ventilation-free days at day 7 (p = 0.003). Conclusion The incidence of agitation in the first 7 days after admission to the intensive care unit was high. Delirium, moderate/severe pain, mechanical ventilation, and smoking habits were independent risk factors. Agitated patients had fewer ventilator-free days in the first 7 days. PMID:28099638

  5. Factors Influencing the Success of Women in the Geosciences: An Example from the U.S. Geological Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundersen, Linda C. S.

    2010-05-01

    A review of my education and 30 year career at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), starting as a field assistant in 1979 to becoming Chief Scientist for Geology in 2001, reveals some of the critical success factors for women in the geosciences as well as factors that inhibit success. Women comprised 5% of the geosciences workforce when I started as an undergraduate in 1975, so why did I pursue the geosciences? A high school course covering earth and biological field science was taught by an excellent teacher who encouraged me to pursue geology. In college, several factors influenced my continuation in geology: two supportive mentors, an earth science department providing a broad diversity of courses; opportunities to take graduate courses, interaction with graduate students, and doing an undergraduate thesis. Most important was the individual attention given to undergraduates by both faculty and graduates regardless of gender. The summer intern program sponsored by the National Association of Geology Teachers and the USGS was a deciding factor to my becoming a geoscientist in the public service. Family and job concerns made it difficult to complete a doctorate however, and there existed gender bias against women conducting field work. Critical factors for success at USGS included: dealing ethically, openly, and immediately with gender-biased behavior, taking on responsibilities and science projects out of my "comfort zone", having the support of mentors and colleagues, and always performing at the highest level. In the past 15 years, there have been many "first" women in various leadership roles within the USGS, and now, after 131 years, we have the first woman Director. It is important to note that as gender barriers are broken at the upper levels in an organization, it paves the way for others. Statistics regarding women are improving in terms of percentage of enrollment in degrees and jobs in the private, public, and academic sectors. Women, however, still bear

  6. Incidence and risk factors of recurrence of overactive bladder symptoms after discontinuation of successful medical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Aram; Lee, Kyu-Sung; Kim, Tae Beom; Kim, Hyung Joon; Yoo, Eun Sang; Yun, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Duk Yoon; Jung, Suk Gun; Lee, Jun Taik; Kim, Jung Man; Oh, Cheol Kyu; Shin, Ju Hyun; Jeon, Seung Hyun; Lee, Seong Ho; Han, Chang Hee; Lee, Dong Hwan; Cho, Hyuk Jin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To identify incidence and risk factors of recurrence after discontinuation of successful antimuscarinic therapy in patients with overactive bladder (OAB). Materials and Methods This was a prospective, multicenter trial. Patients who had antimuscarinic agents for more than 12 weeks and showed successful response were enrolled. Successful response was defined as answering 'benefit' for patient perception of treatment benefit and answer lesser than 3 points in patient's perception of bladder condition (PPBC). The enrolled patients discontinued the antimuscarinics, and we evaluated their recurrence with PPBC and OAB symptom score (OABSS) at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Primary purpose was to identify the recurrence rate and secondary purpose was to reveal risk factors. Results Four hundred forty-one patients enrolled and 371 patients completed 6-month follow-up. The enrolled patients showed 1.6 points in PPBC, 2.9 points in OABSS and 1.4 points in IPSS (quality of life) which represented successful response after using antimuscarinics. The cumulative rates of recurrence were 25.6%, 42.3%, and 52.2% at 1, 3, 6 months, respectively. Among 177 patients who did not show recurrence at 6 months, 41 patients were followed up and 4 patients of the 41 patients (9.7%) showed recurrence at 12 months. On univariate and multivariate analyses of recurrence, OAB wet was the risk factor for recurrence after 6 months of discontinuation. Conclusions Discontinuation of antimuscarinic therapy after successful treatment resulted in high recurrence rate with time and OAB wet was the independent risk factor for recurrence. PMID:28097267

  7. What factors contribute to successful appeals of nursing homes’ deficiencies in the informal dispute resolution process?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Weimer, David L.; Spector, William D.; Bailey, Lauren; Harrington, Charlene

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine what factors contribute to successful appeals of nursing home deficiencies in the Informal Dispute Resolution (IDR) process. Design We merged CMS data about IDRs with OSCAR data about nursing home characteristics. We performed multivariate statistical analyses to predict successful appeals as a function of characteristics of the deficiency being appealed, the survey that triggered the deficiency, characteristics of the nursing home, and the state. Setting All nursing homes nationally in the period 2005–2008. Measurements Successful appeals were defined as those in which the deficiency was removed or its severity or scope reduced. Independent variables included the CMS measures of severity and scope of deficiency, abuse and neglect, substandard care, total number of deficiencies in the survey, whether the IDR was triggered by a survey or complaint, facility ownership and reputation, and state stringency of regulation. Results 26% of submitted IDRs were successful in 2005–2008. Success was more likely for less severe deficiencies, when deficiencies were triggered by a survey rather than a complaint, and when fewer deficiencies were included in the appeal. Facility ownership and state stringency of regulation were not significantly associated with the IDR success. Conclusions Overall, 2.6% of deficiencies issued were overturned through the IDR process. Further study is required to determine the appropriateness of these overturned cases and the opportunities they offer to improve the survey process. PMID:23141210

  8. Popliteal blocks for foot and ankle surgery: success rate and contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Hegewald, Kenneth; McCann, Kevin; Elizaga, Andrew; Hutchinson, Byron L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the factors contributing to the success of popliteal nerve blocks performed by podiatric surgical residents in various stages of training. A retrospective review was conducted of 143 consecutively performed blocks during a 2-year period. A total of 29 blocks using a lateral approach and 114 blocks using a modified posterior approach were performed. The intrinsic and extrinsic variables contributing to block outcome were analyzed. A total of 109 successful blocks were performed, for an overall success rate of 76.2%. Significant differences (p < .002) were found between the success and failure groups with respect to the patients body mass index and age. No differences were observed between the success and failure groups with respect to the block approach or months of resident training. In conclusion, podiatric surgical residents in all stages of training can safely and effectively perform popliteal nerve blocks for peri- and postoperative analgesia. Surgeons should be aware of the potential influence of patients body mass index and age on the overall block success rates.

  9. Perinatal Depression and Patterns of Attachment: A Critical Risk Factor?

    PubMed Central

    Meuti, Valentina; Aceti, Franca; Giacchetti, Nicoletta; Carluccio, Giuseppe Mattia; Zaccagni, Michela; Marini, Isabella; Giancola, Orazio; Ciolli, Paola; Biondi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study aims to verify if the presence and severity of perinatal depression are related to any particular pattern of attachment. Methods. The study started with a screening of a sample of 453 women in their third trimester of pregnancy, who were administered a survey data form, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Experience in Close Relationship (ECR). A clinical group of subjects with perinatal depression (PND, 89 subjects) was selected and compared with a control group (C), regarding psychopathological variables and attachment patterns. Results. The ECR showed a prevalence of “Fearful-Avoidant” attachment style in PND group (29.2% versus 1.1%, p < 0.001); additionally, the EPDS average score increases with the increasing of ECR dimensions (Avoidance and Anxiety). Conclusion. The severity of depression increases proportionally to attachment disorganization; therefore, we consider attachment as both an important risk factor as well as a focus for early psychotherapeutic intervention. PMID:26798510

  10. Total analysis of clinical factors for surgical success of adenotonsillectomy in pediatric OSAS.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ting-So; Chiang, Rayleigh Ping-Ying

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is the total evaluation of most common clinical factors influencing the successful rate of adenotonsillectomy for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Retrospectively, 63 pediatric patients ranged from 2 to 16 years old were included. Syndromics and patients who had received orthodontic treatment or orthognathic surgery were excluded. All patients received pre-operative and postoperative polysomnography and cephalometry. Each patient received adenotonsillectomy by single surgeon. Surgical success was defined as apneahypopnea index (AHI) decreased ≧50 % or post-operative AHI <5. Total evaluated clinical factors related to success of adenotonsillectomy for pediatric OSAS include age, gender, body mass index (BMI), tonsil size, adenoid/nasopharynx ratio (A/N Ratio), pre-operative data of polysomnography, including AHI, apnea index (AI), hypopnea index (HI), mean O2 saturation and nadir O2 saturation, and 18 cephalometry parameters. Mean age of the total 63 patients was 7.78 years old. Mean BMI of the patients was 19.02. The proportion of obese patients was 25.4% (16/63). Surgical success was achieved in 42 out of 63 patients (66.7%). The surgical success was not statistically significant related to all pre-operative cephalometric parameters, age, gender, BMI and adenoid size by multiple logistic regression model. However, the surgical success was significantly related to pre-operative AHI and tonsil size. In addition, all patients who received adenotonsillectomy showed improved polysomnography parameters, including AHI, AI, HI, mean O2 saturation and nadir O2 saturation which all reached statistically significant improvement. Although adenotonsillectomy cannot cure pediatric OSAS in our research, all patients showed significant improvement of polysomnography parameters after this procedure. Pre-operative cephalometry parameters, BMI and age did not show significant correlation with surgical success, however, pre-op AHI and

  11. Some critical factors for engineering and environmental microgravity investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debeglia, N.; Dupont, F.

    2002-07-01

    The gravity method is one of the geophysical tools used for engineering and environmental investigations where the detection of cavities, karst phenomena, subsoil irregularities, or landfills is essential. In many cases, deep or small-scale heterogeneities generating low-amplitude anomalies have to be detected and the reliability of further interpretation requires highly accurate measurements, carefully corrected for any quantifiable disturbing effects. The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors likely to limit measurement quality and how to make improvements. Calibrations of a Scintrex gravimeter were made between French relative and absolute base stations, and the relative uncertainties on the calibration factors were estimated for these links. Ranging from 10 -3, for calibration on an old gravity net, to 10 -4, for a high amplitude absolute base line, this accuracy will be generally sufficient for microgravity surveys. Continuous gravity recordings of Scintrex gravimeters, installed at the same stable site, enabled the estimation of the stability and accuracy of the instruments and revealed that some of the time variations of g measurements, such as instrumental drift, tidal effects and seismic noise, are not entirely removed by standard processing procedures. The accuracy of corrected gravity measurements is mainly limited by inadequate corrections of tidal effects and by a poor estimation of ocean loading effects. In comparison with residual defaults in tidal corrections, instrumental and seismic noises are taken more properly into account by statistical data processing. In field operation, residual tidal effects are generally integrated into an experimental terrain drift estimated on the basis of frequent repeated measurements. A differential gravity approach, based on a fixed gravimeter reference whose recordings are used to correct measurements made with a mobile gravimeter, has also been investigated at a test site. Compared to standard

  12. Critical factors in chitin production by fermentation of shrimp biowaste.

    PubMed

    Rao, M S; Muñoz, J; Stevens, W F

    2000-12-01

    Factors affecting Lactobacillus fermentation of shrimp waste for chitin and protein liquor production were determined. The objective of the fermentation is medium conditioning by Lactobacillus through production of proteases and lowering of the pH. The efficiency was tested by conducting fermentation of biowaste in 1-1 beakers with or without pH adjustment using different acids. Addition of 5% glucose to the biowaste supported the growth of lactic acid bacteria and led to better fermentation. Among four acids tested to control pH at the start and during fermentation, acetic acid and citric acid proved to be the most effective. In biowaste fermented with 6.7% L. plantarum inoculum, 5% glucose, and pH 6.0 adjusted with acetic acid, 75% deproteination and 86% demineralization was achieved. Replacement of acetic acid by citric acid gave 88% deproteination and 90% demineralization. The fermentation carried out in the presence of acetic acid resulted in a protein fraction that smelled good and a clean chitin fraction.

  13. Success Factors in Higher Education-Industry Collaboration: A Case Study of Collaboration in the Engineering Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thune, Taran

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of what potential success factors are relevant when developing and managing higher education-business partnerships. To shed light on this question, the paper presents a review of research literature on the possible success factors in university-industry relations. To shed further light on the factors identified in…

  14. Analysis of Pre-Analytic Factors Affecting the Success of Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing of Solid Organ Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Goswami, Rashmi S; Singh, Rajesh R; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita

    2015-08-28

    Application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to routine clinical practice has enabled characterization of personalized cancer genomes to identify patients likely to have a response to targeted therapy. The proper selection of tumor sample for downstream NGS based mutational analysis is critical to generate accurate results and to guide therapeutic intervention. However, multiple pre-analytic factors come into play in determining the success of NGS testing. In this review, we discuss pre-analytic requirements for AmpliSeq PCR-based sequencing using Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) (Life Technologies), a NGS sequencing platform that is often used by clinical laboratories for sequencing solid tumors because of its low input DNA requirement from formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tissue. The success of NGS mutational analysis is affected not only by the input DNA quantity but also by several other factors, including the specimen type, the DNA quality, and the tumor cellularity. Here, we review tissue requirements for solid tumor NGS based mutational analysis, including procedure types, tissue types, tumor volume and fraction, decalcification, and treatment effects.

  15. Women of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics: A qualitative exploration into factors of success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olund, Jeanine K.

    Although the number of women entering science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines has increased in recent years, overall there are still more men than women completing four-year degrees in these fields, especially in physics, engineering, and computer science. At higher levels of education and within the workplace, the number of women declines even further and the attrition rate is high. Studies to explain this phenomenon abound and remedial action has been taken in many institutions. Nonetheless, the problem remains. There are women who have entered this environment, however, who are not only surviving but thriving. Through the lens of positive scholarship, this qualitative study explores characteristics of twelve high-achieving women of STEM to discover if there are common factors that have contributed to their success. The data show that successful women of STEM are enterprising, relational, self-aware, and have a positive perspective. These results suggest that the four factors, particularly through their juxtaposition, are foundational to the success of STEM women within the current culture of science. Furthermore, the behaviors, responses, and values of these women have likely contributed to systemic changes within their immediate environments and perhaps even beyond. Research has shown that positive behaviors and values can be adopted by others and integrated deeply into their psyches. Therefore, the women of this study, and others like them, could serve as role models for colleagues and peers to support the development of these factors of success in others. Women, and men, of STEM may thereby learn new ways to approach difficulties, to create new avenues for success, and to bring forth positive change within themselves and their environments.

  16. Women with doctorates in science: Perceptions of facilitative factors and obstacles to their success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimond, Pamela S.

    In the past thirty years there has been a significant increase in the number of women pursuing careers in the biological sciences, yet similar increases have not been seen in the physical sciences or engineering. Research suggests that societal, educational, and personal factors may be the cause. This study was designed to validate factors previously identified as being influential on the learning of science by women, as well as to discover factors not previously identified and to gain an understanding of the degree to which each of these factors is perceived to relate to their academic success. Quantitative and qualitative methodologies were used to identify factors that facilitated the success of or presented obstacles to women as they pursued doctoral degrees in physical science and engineering. Sixty-four women scientists completed surveys. Of these, twelve participated in telephone interviews. The data collected from these methodologies, when taken together, allowed for both a generalizability of results and in-depth understanding of the factors identified. Three major themes were identified. First was the importance of people in these women's lives. Second was each woman's expression of personality traits including passion, determination, and resilience. Third was the importance of support from a variety of sources. All of the scientists considered support necessary for their success. Implications for practice include: providing girls with a wide variety of experiences in mathematics and science, including both in-school and out-of-school activities; providing girls with role models and mentors; utilizing a variety of teaching strategies aimed at girls' preferred learning styles; providing a variety of kinds of support girls need to feel welcome and valued; developing in girls personal characteristics associated with the culture of science; minimizing the use of high-stakes exams; and maximizing schedule flexibility so women can combine scientific careers and

  17. Success factors for implementation of the balanced scorecard in a NHS multi-agency setting.

    PubMed

    Radnor, Zoe; Lovell, Bill

    2003-01-01

    Even though the balanced scorecard (BSC) has become a highly popular performance management tool, usage in local public sector National Health Service (NHS) organisations is still rare. This paper conditionally outlines some grounds in supporting such usage. In particular underlying conceptual concerns with the BSC system and its implementation pitfalls require full consideration. This paper then outlines some factors to be taken into account for "successful" BSC implementation in a NHS multi-agency setting. These findings emerged from a series of focus groups that took place with contributors drawn from all the key organisations within the Bradford Health Action Zone. Finally, this paper argues that if key criteria are met, successful implementation of the BSC may then proceed. However, "blind" BSC implementation without consideration of these factors may result in potential "failure".

  18. Viewpoints on Factors for Successful Employment for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the key factors for successful employment from the viewpoints of adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and employers. Two groups of individuals participated in this study, 40 adults with ASD and 35 employers. Q method was used to understand and contrast the viewpoints of the two groups. Data were analysed using by-person varimax rotation factor analysis. Results showed that although both groups appear committed to the employment process, the difference in their understanding regarding the type of workplace support required, job expectations and productivity requirements continues to hinder successful employment. These results highlight the need to facilitate communication between employees and employers to ensure a clear understanding of the needs of both groups are met. The use of an ASD-specific workplace tool may assist in facilitating the necessary communication between these two groups. PMID:26462234

  19. Implementation evaluation of the Telephone Lifestyle Coaching (TLC) program: organizational factors associated with successful implementation.

    PubMed

    Damschroder, Laura J; Reardon, Caitlin M; Sperber, Nina; Robinson, Claire H; Fickel, Jacqueline J; Oddone, Eugene Z

    2016-09-29

    The Telephone Lifestyle Coaching (TLC) program provided telephone-based coaching for six lifestyle behaviors to 5321 Veterans at 24 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical facilities. The purpose of the study was to conduct an evaluation of the TLC program to identify factors associated with successful implementation. A mixed-methods study design was used. Quantitative measures of organizational readiness for implementation and facility complexity were used to purposively select a subset of facilities for in-depth evaluation. Context assessments were conducted using interview transcripts. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) was used to guide qualitative data collection and analysis. Factors most strongly correlated with referral rates included having a skilled implementation leader who used effective multi-component strategies to engage primary care clinicians as well as general clinic structures that supported implementation. Evaluation findings pointed to recommendations for local and national leaders to help anticipate and mitigate potential barriers to successful implementation.

  20. Do the factors associated with successful contact tracing of patients with gonorrhoea and Chlamydia differ?

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J. D.; Sukthankar, A.; Radcliffe, K. W.; Andre, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess and compare factors which may be associated with successful contact tracing in patients with gonorrhoea and chlamydia. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective observational study of patients attending a genitourinary medicine clinic with a diagnosis of gonorrhoea or chlamydia. Multivariate analysis model including demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioural variables. RESULTS: The attendance of at least one sexual contact was associated with naming more contacts for patients with gonorrhoea (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.04-2.01). A history of gonorrhoea was associated with successful contact tracing for patients with chlamydia (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.12-1.9). Successful contact tracing, as defined by at least one confirmed contact attendance after the index case, was not associated with age, sex, sexual orientation, history of chlamydia, use of condoms, marital status, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status for either gonorrhoea or chlamydia. CONCLUSIONS: Differences in the composition of the core groups infected with gonorrhoea and chlamydia are not explained by differences in contact tracing success. In the clinic setting studied, the outcome of contact tracing was not associated with a variety of demographic, socioeconomic, and behaviour factors. 


 PMID:10448364

  1. Risk factors for cesarean section and instrumental vaginal delivery after successful external cephalic version.

    PubMed

    de Hundt, Marcella; Vlemmix, Floortje; Bais, Joke M J; de Groot, Christianne J; Mol, Ben Willem; Kok, Marjolein

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this article is to examine if we could identify factors that predict cesarean section and instrumental vaginal delivery in women who had a successful external cephalic version. We used data from a previous randomized trial among 25 hospitals and their referring midwife practices in the Netherlands. With the data of this trial, we performed a cohort study among women attempting vaginal delivery after successful ECV. We evaluated whether maternal age, gestational age, parity, time interval between ECV and delivery, birth weight, neonatal gender, and induction of labor were predictive for a vaginal delivery on one hand or a CS or instrumental vaginal delivery on the other hand. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios were calculated with univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Among 301 women who attempted vaginal delivery after a successful external cephalic version attempt, the cesarean section rate was 13% and the instrumental vaginal delivery rate 6%, resulting in a combined instrumental delivery rate of 19%. Nulliparity increased the risk of cesarean section (OR 2.7 (95% CI 1.2-6.1)) and instrumental delivery (OR 4.2 (95% CI 2.1-8.6)). Maternal age, gestational age at delivery, time interval between external cephalic version and delivery, birth weight and neonatal gender did not contribute to the prediction of failed spontaneous vaginal delivery. In our cohort of 301 women with a successful external cephalic version, nulliparity was the only one of seven factors that predicted the risk for cesarean section and instrumental vaginal delivery.

  2. [Factors associated with academic success of medical students at Buenos Aires University].

    PubMed

    Borracci, Raúl A; Pittaluga, Roberto D; Álvarez Rodríguez, Juan E; Arribalzaga, Eduardo B; Poveda Camargo, Ricardo L; Couto, Juan L; Provenzano, Sergio L

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify common factors relating to the academic success of medical students who were distinguished with honors at the Buenos Aires University. In 2011, 142 graduates were surveyed; the questionnaire included 59 questions on their sociodemographic environment, living conditions and social integration, motivation to study, learning capacity and health quality during their career. Compared to other students, these distinguished students more often lived in the city, far from their families; had been educated at private or universitary high schools, their economic needs were financed by their parents, who were on the whole professionals. Most of them were single and childless. The possibility of future employment oportunities (work) did not influence their choice of a medical career, academic success was important to them and they believed that success depended largely on personal effort; they knew how to handle anxiety, were sociable but independent and preferred solid experience to abstract conceptuality in order to obtain information. Our conclusion, within the current system of candidate selection, these results serve to calculate the covert self-selection mechanisms during the career, or in a more restrictive regime, to select those likely to reach academic success due to their privileged ambience. The analysis of demographic factors indicates some degree of inequality for socially disadvantaged students. Perhaps, a selection system based only on intellectual abilities would help identify and support the best candidates regardless of their social context.

  3. Bleeding associated with acquired factor V inhibitor in a patient on warfarin treated successfully with prednisolone

    PubMed Central

    Khalafallah, Alhossain; Grabek, Julian; Hayes, Robert; Mohamed, Muhajir

    2013-01-01

    An 85-year-old man on warfarin for atrial fibrillation presented with skin bleeding. International normalised ratio (INR) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were elevated and did not correct even after warfarin reversal with vitamin K, prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) and fresh frozen plasma. Mixing coagulation studies with normal plasma suggested the presence of an inhibitor rather than the multiple coagulation factor deficiencies expected with warfarin. Assays of the common-pathway coagulation factors revealed factor V concentration <2% with inhibitor level elevated to 11 Bethesda units. The bleeding resolved following a course of corticosteroids. Coagulation studies and factor V level returned to normal along with resolution of the inhibitor. We report the case of the diagnostic dilemma posed and successful therapy implemented despite the limited evidence-based data being available for the treatment of this rare condition. PMID:23921688

  4. Success Factors of European Syndromic Surveillance Systems: A Worked Example of Applying Qualitative Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ziemann, Alexandra; Fouillet, Anne; Brand, Helmut; Krafft, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Syndromic surveillance aims at augmenting traditional public health surveillance with timely information. To gain a head start, it mainly analyses existing data such as from web searches or patient records. Despite the setup of many syndromic surveillance systems, there is still much doubt about the benefit of the approach. There are diverse interactions between performance indicators such as timeliness and various system characteristics. This makes the performance assessment of syndromic surveillance systems a complex endeavour. We assessed if the comparison of several syndromic surveillance systems through Qualitative Comparative Analysis helps to evaluate performance and identify key success factors. Materials and Methods We compiled case-based, mixed data on performance and characteristics of 19 syndromic surveillance systems in Europe from scientific and grey literature and from site visits. We identified success factors by applying crisp-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis. We focused on two main areas of syndromic surveillance application: seasonal influenza surveillance and situational awareness during different types of potentially health threatening events. Results We found that syndromic surveillance systems might detect the onset or peak of seasonal influenza earlier if they analyse non-clinical data sources. Timely situational awareness during different types of events is supported by an automated syndromic surveillance system capable of analysing multiple syndromes. To our surprise, the analysis of multiple data sources was no key success factor for situational awareness. Conclusions We suggest to consider these key success factors when designing or further developing syndromic surveillance systems. Qualitative Comparative Analysis helped interpreting complex, mixed data on small-N cases and resulted in concrete and practically relevant findings. PMID:27182731

  5. Methods for detrending success metrics to account for inflationary and deflationary factors*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, A. M.; Penner, O.; Stanley, H. E.

    2011-01-01

    Time-dependent economic, technological, and social factors can artificially inflate or deflate quantitative measures for career success. Here we develop and test a statistical method for normalizing career success metrics across time dependent factors. In particular, this method addresses the long standing question: how do we compare the career achievements of professional athletes from different historical eras? Developing an objective approach will be of particular importance over the next decade as major league baseball (MLB) players from the "steroids era" become eligible for Hall of Fame induction. Some experts are calling for asterisks (*) to be placed next to the career statistics of athletes found guilty of using performance enhancing drugs (PED). Here we address this issue, as well as the general problem of comparing statistics from distinct eras, by detrending the seasonal statistics of professional baseball players. We detrend player statistics by normalizing achievements to seasonal averages, which accounts for changes in relative player ability resulting from a range of factors. Our methods are general, and can be extended to various arenas of competition where time-dependent factors play a key role. For five statistical categories, we compare the probability density function (pdf) of detrended career statistics to the pdf of raw career statistics calculated for all player careers in the 90-year period 1920-2009. We find that the functional form of these pdfs is stationary under detrending. This stationarity implies that the statistical regularity observed in the right-skewed distributions for longevity and success in professional sports arises from both the wide range of intrinsic talent among athletes and the underlying nature of competition. We fit the pdfs for career success by the Gamma distribution in order to calculate objective benchmarks based on extreme statistics which can be used for the identification of extraordinary careers.

  6. A Review of Communications Satellites and Related Spacecraft for Factors Influencing Mission Success. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-17

    satellite and related spacecraft programs to identify factors influencing mission success. Includes a summary of military and commercial programs to date... commercial Japanese CS. Simi- larly, there is some design commonality evident in Intelsat IV, Intelsat IVA, and the AT&T COMSTAR. (These...generation Intelsat commercial satellites. DSCS II is also known as Program 777. The DSCS II satellite was designed and fabricated by the TRW Systems

  7. Ureteral wall thickness at the impacted ureteral stone site: a critical predictor for success rates after SWL.

    PubMed

    Sarica, Kemal; Kafkasli, Alper; Yazici, Özgür; Çetinel, Ali Cihangir; Demirkol, Mehmet Kutlu; Tuncer, Murat; Şahin, Cahit; Eryildirim, Bilal

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the possible predictive value of certain patient- and stone-related factors on the stone-free rates and auxiliary procedures after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with impacted proximal ureteral calculi. A total of 111 patients (86 male, 25 females M/F: 3.44/1) with impacted proximal ureteral stones treated with shock wave lithotripsy were evaluated. Cases were retrieved from a departmental shock wave lithotripsy database. Variables analyzed included BMI of the case, diameter of proximal ureter and renal pelvis, stone size and Hounsfield unit, ureteral wall thickness at the impacted stone site. Stone-free status on follow-up imaging at 3 months was considered a successful outcome. All patients had a single impacted proximal ureteral stone. While the mean age of the cases was 46 ± 13 years (range 26-79 years), mean stone size was 8.95 mm (5.3-15.1 mm). Following shock wave lithotripsy although 87 patients (78.4%) were completely stone-free at 3-month follow-up visit, 24 (21.6%) cases had residual fragments requiring further repeat procedures. Prediction of the final outcome of SWL in patients with impacted proximal ureteral stones is a challenging issue and our data did clearly indicate a highly significant relationship between ureteral wall thickness and the success rates of shock wave lithotripsy particularly in cases requiring additional procedures. Of all the evaluated stone- and patient-related factors, only ureteral wall thickness at the impacted stone site independently predicted shock wave lithotripsy success.

  8. So You're Thinking of Trying Problem Based Learning?: Three Critical Success Factors for Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Tim O.

    2004-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) shifts the traditional teaching paradigm. Rather than being teacher centered, PBL is student centered. Rather than presenting content first, PBL presents the problem first. Rather than presenting the students with a well-structured problem with a clear answer, PBL presents the students with an ill-structured problem…

  9. Instructor Support Services: An Inevitable Critical Success Factor in Blended Learning in Higher Education in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raphael, Christina; Mtebe, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of blended learning to widen access, reduce cost, and improve the quality of education is becoming prevalent in higher education in sub-Saharan Africa and Tanzania in particular. University of Dar es Salaam and the Open University of Tanzania offer various blended learning courses using Moodle system via regional centres scattered…

  10. Strategic Planning with Critical Success Factors and Future Scenarios: An Integrated Strategic Planning Framework

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    Implementing the Process by David Fogg [ Fogg 1994]. 6 Strategic goals typically reflect the primary goals of an organization or enterprise and imply a...method, such as the one described by Fogg in Team-Based Strategic Planning: A Com- plete Guide to Structuring, Facilitating, and Implementing the...Process, can provide ready recep- tors for non-CSF oriented information [ Fogg 1994]. If an organization is not adept at strategic planning, it is highly

  11. Critical Factors That Influence the Success of Cultivating Seed Teachers in Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsueh, Sung-Lin; Su, Fu-Long

    2016-01-01

    Taiwan is a densely populated industrialized country with high-polluting industries. In particular, petrochemical, steel, thermal power, and electronics plants consume a high level of energy. Furthermore, vehicle exhaust emissions are a major contributor to pollution. Collectively, these problems have resulted in high levels of greenhouse gas…

  12. Determination of Critical Success Factors Affecting Mobile Learning: A Meta-Analysis Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alrasheedi, Muasaad; Capretz, Luiz Fernando

    2015-01-01

    With rapid technological advancements, mobile learning (m-Learning) offers incredible opportunities, especially in the area of higher education. However, while interest in this area has been significant and several pilot studies have been conducted within universities, relatively less is known about how higher educational institutions can make…

  13. Implementing an Online Curriculum for Medical Education: Examining the Critical Factors for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Bradley G.; Mata, Marvin; Koszalka, Tiffany A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The Department of Pediatrics at SUNY Upstate Medical University in collaboration with the Instructional Design, Development, and Evaluation Department in Syracuse University's School of Education recently undertook a curricular reform effort that included translation of the residency program's annual core didactic lecture series to an…

  14. Do the Critical Success Factors from Learning Analytics Predict Student Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strang, Kenneth David

    2016-01-01

    This article starts with a detailed literature review of recent studies that focused on using learning analytics software or learning management system data to determine the nature of any relationships between online student activity and their academic outcomes within university-level business courses. The article then describes how data was…

  15. The Dissertation Examination: Identifying Critical Factors in the Success of Indigenous Australian Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Neil; Trudgett, Michelle; Page, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Indigenous Australians represent 2.2% of the working age population, yet account for only 1.4% of all university enrolments. In relation to higher degree research students, Indigenous Australians account for 1.1% of enrolments, but only 0.8% of all higher degree research completions. This paper reports on findings that emerged from an Australian…

  16. Collaboration in Special Education: Its History, Evolution, and Critical Factors Necessary for Successful Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Collaboration in education is seen as a legal mandate, best practice in teacher practice, and necessary for the inclusion of children with special needs. Over the years, there have been a number of evolutionary incarnations of the collaborative model, each possessing various ingredients identified as important, if not essential, components of a…

  17. Analysis of Turkish Communications Sector and Determination of Critical Success Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, etc. (Marketline, 2013). Also, Turkey signed the Kyoto Protocol in 2008 and is updating its...position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. IRB Protocol number ____N/A____. 12a. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT...market includes Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), and Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP). In

  18. Evaluation of Cardiopulmonary Factors Critical to Successful Emergency Perinatal Air Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    fetus (9,16). In the specific instances of paralytic ileus or bowel obstruction in the HRPW, transport in unpressurized aircraft .s contraindicated (9,16...pneumomediastinum, aspiration syndrome, dia- phragmatic hernia, ileus, bowel obstruction , esophageal atresia, and tracheo- esophageal fistula, the use of a

  19. Examining Health Information Technology Implementation Success Factors in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monkman, Blake D.

    2016-01-01

    As the role of information technology increases throughout the world, healthcare providers in the United States face industry and governmental pressures to implement health information technology (HIT) as a tool to improve healthcare costs, quality, and safety. The problem addressed in this study was the relatively low HIT implementation success…

  20. Cloud Implementation in Organizations: Critical Success Factors, Challenges, and Impacts on the IT Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suo, Shuguang

    2013-01-01

    Organizations have been forced to rethink business models and restructure facilities through IT innovation as they have faced the challenges arising from globalization, mergers and acquisitions, big data, and the ever-changing demands of customers. Cloud computing has emerged as a new computing paradigm that has fundamentally shaped the business…

  1. Predicting factors for success of vaginal delivery in preterm induction with prostaglandin E2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo Min; Park, Ju Young; Sung, Ji-Hee; Choi, Suk-Joo; Roh, Cheong-Rae; Kim, Jong-Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of prostaglandin (PG) E2 for preterm labor induction and to investigate the predictive factors for the success of vaginal delivery. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed in women (n=155) at 24+0 to 36+6 weeks of gestation who underwent induction of labor using a PGE2 vaginal pessary (10 mg, Propess) from January 2009 to December 2015. Success rates of vaginal delivery according to gestational age at induction and incidence of intrapartum complications such as tachysystole and nonreassuring fetal heart rate were investigated. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the predictive factors for success of labor induction. Results The vaginal delivery rate was 57% (n=89) and the rate of cesarean delivery after induction was 43% (n=66). According to gestational age, labor induction was successful in 16.7%, 50.0%, and 62.8% of patients at 24 to 31, 32 to 33, and 34 to 36 weeks, showing a stepwise increase (P=0.006). There were 18 cases (11%) of fetal distress, 9 cases (5.8%) of tachysystole, and 6 cases (3.8%) of massive postpartum bleeding (>1,000 mL). After adjusting for confounding factors, multiparity (odds ratio [OR], 8.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.10 to 23.14), younger maternal age (OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.75 to 0.94), advanced gestational age at induction (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.09), rupture of membranes (OR, 11.83; 95% CI, 3.55 to 39.40), and the Bishop score change after removal of PGE2 (OR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.0 to 4.8) were significant predictors of successful preterm vaginal delivery. Conclusion An understanding of the principal predictive factors of successful preterm labor induction, as well as the safety of PGE2, will provide useful information when clinicians consult with preterm pregnant women requiring premature delivery. PMID:28344957

  2. Microcystis genotype succession and related environmental factors in Lake Taihu during cyanobacterial blooms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingyu; Sun, Mengjia; Wang, Jinmei; Yang, Letian; Luo, Lan; Li, Pengfu; Kong, Fanxiang

    2012-11-01

    From spring to autumn, heavy Microcystis blooms always occur in Lake Taihu, although environmental conditions vary markedly. We speculated that Microcystis genotype succession could play an important role in adaptation to environmental changes and long-term maintenance of the high Microcystis biomass. In this study, we investigated Microcystis genotype succession pattern and the related environmental variables in Lake Taihu during cyanobacterial blooms. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of polymerase chain reaction -amplified the genus-specific cpcBA and mcyJ gene fragments was used to monitor the variations of Microcystis genotype and potential microcystin (MC)-producing Microcystis genotype compositions during blooms biweekly in three sites (Meiliang Bay, lake center, and Gonghu Bay) and CANOCO 4.5 for Windows were used for the multivariate statistical analysis of their relationships to environmental variables. DGGE patterns indicated that the number of dominant cpcBA genotype per sample increased from spring to autumn. Principal component analysis ordination plots of DGGE profiles showed clear temporal distribution pattern, but not spatial distribution pattern based on both cpcBA and mcyJ genotype compositions. These results indicated there were relatively gradual successions of Microcystis cpcBA and mcyJ genotype compositions in each site, and no distinct spatial difference among the three sites. Redundancy analyses of the gel patterns showed that, in all the three sites, three environmental factors (nitrate, pH, and chemical oxygen demand) were correlated significantly to successions of both cpcBA and mcyJ genotypes except for mcyJ genotype in the lake center. Spearman's correlations indicated that the three environmental variables were also strongly correlated with chl a and MC concentrations. These results suggested that the environmental factors affecting succession of Microcystis community composition might also influence the growth of

  3. Perceived relative importance of psychological and physical factors in successful athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, D M

    2000-02-01

    Ratings of the perceived relative importance of psychological and physical factors for successful athletic performance were obtained from 29 men and 53 women in sports of track, swimming, soccer, volleyball, basketball, gymnastics, baseball or softball, tennis, diving, and golf, by level of competition (high school, college, and professional), and sex of athlete. The over-all rating of the relative importance of psychological factors was 39%. Significant differences in the ratings of the relative importance of psychological factors were found for sport, level, sex, sport x level, and level x sex. Ratings of the relative importance of psychological factors for successful performance in various sports increased in the order listed above. The significant effect for level and interaction of sport x level were accounted for primarily by the higher ratings given to professional golf. The significant effect of sex and the interaction of sex x level were attributable to higher ratings of the importance of psychological variables for high school women athletes as compared to high school men athletes.

  4. Preparing for Fellowship in Internal Medicine. Steps for Success with a Focus on Pulmonary and/or Critical Care Programs.

    PubMed

    Bosslet, Gabriel T; Burkart, Kristin M; Miles, Matthew C; Lenz, Peter H; Huebert, Candace A; McCallister, Jennifer W

    2015-04-01

    This paper outlines specific tips for those applying to pulmonary and/or critical care medicine fellowship training in the United States using the PAIR-Match steps: preparation, application, interview, ranking, and match. Preparation for fellowship begins long before the application process with an assessment of one's long-term goals (to the extent that these are known). The cornerstone of the application is the curriculum vitae, which should highlight applicants' pulmonary and critical care-related experiences and scholarly work. Applicants should obtain letters of recommendation from faculty members who know them well and can write a letter that speaks to their strengths in clinical, scholarly, or leadership areas. The personal statement is an opportunity to share experiences not otherwise shared in the application and is an opportunity to explain any breaks in training or performance lapses. When selecting programs to which they will apply, applicants should pay close attention to the areas of education and curriculum, clinical experience, scholarly opportunity, and personal factors. Preparing for interviews should include a review of the program at which one is interviewing and development of relevant questions regarding details of the program. The interview day is the applicant's opportunity to see the "personality" of the program by meeting with the program director, faculty, and current fellows and to assess whether the program is a good fit for their goals. Applicants should only rank those programs they are willing to attend, in order of preference; they should be aware that the match process is binding.

  5. Factors that promote success in women enrolled in STEM disciplines in rural North Carolina community colleges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kincaid, Shannon D.

    Women have historically been underrepresented in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM fields). The underrepresentation of women in STEM may be attributable to a variety of factors. These may include different choices men and women typically make in response to incentives in STEM education. For example, STEM career paths may be less accommodating to people who are less resilient. Another factor may be that there are relatively few female STEM role models. Perhaps strong gender stereotypes discourage women from pursuing STEM education and STEM jobs. The factors that contribute to success and the barriers that impeded success must be identified before any steps can be taken to improve the educational outcomes for women in STEM disciplines. Consequently, relatively little is known about the role of resilience in academically successful adult women in rural community colleges enrolled in STEM disciplines and the mechanisms that underlie the performance deficits that occur as a result of stereotype threat effect. This mixed method study addressed those knowledge gaps by determining: (1) if high resilience is positively correlated to high grade point average for women enrolled in STEM disciplines in rural community colleges in North Carolina, and (2) if stereotype threat effect is a risk factor for these women. Quantitative data were collected by using "The Resilience Scale" (Wagnild & Young, 1987) and through examination of grade point average of students from Datatel data management software. Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured focus group interviews. Findings from this study indicate high resilience is positively correlated to high grade point average for women enrolled in STEM disciplines in rural community colleges in North Carolina, and stereotype threat effect was a risk factor for low-scoring women (i.e. those women who reported resilience scores less than 121 and grade point averages lower than 2.70) and was not a

  6. Analysis of environmental factors determining development and succession in biological soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Lan, Shubin; Wu, Li; Zhang, Delu; Hu, Chunxiang

    2015-12-15

    Biological soil crusts play important ecological functions in arid and semi-arid regions, while different crust successional patterns appeared in different regions. Therefore in this study, the environmental conditions between Shapotou (with cyanobacterial, lichen and moss crusts) and Dalate Banner (with only cyanobacterial and moss crusts) regions of China were compared to investigate why lichen crusts only appeared in Shapotou; at the same time, artificial moss inoculation was conducted to find out the environmental factors promoting crust succession to moss stage. The results showed lichen crusts always developed from cyanobacterial crusts, which provide not only the stable soil surface, but also the biomass basis for lichen formation; furthermore, addition of crust physicochemical characteristics (primarily silt content) play a facilitating effect on lichen emergence (R(2)=0.53). The inoculation experiment demonstrated early crust soil surface and enough water holding content (>4%) provided the essential guarantee for moss germination. Our results show that there is heterogeneity in crust succession in different regions, which may be mainly affected by the ambient soil microenvironments. It is concluded that a positive feedback mechanism is expected between crust succession and ambient soil microenvironments; while a negative feedback mechanism forms between crust succession and free living cyanobacteria and algae.

  7. Mouse models for studying genetic influences on factors determining smoking cessation success in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hall, F. Scott; Markou, Athina; Levin, Edward D.; Uhl, George R.

    2014-01-01

    Humans differ in their ability to quit using addictive substances, including nicotine, the major psychoactive ingredient in tobacco. For tobacco smoking, a substantial body of evidence, largely derived from twin studies, indicates that approximately half of these individual differences in ability to quit are heritable [1, 2], genetic influences that likely overlap with those for other addictive substances [3]. Both twin and molecular genetic studies support overlapping influences on nicotine addiction vulnerability and smoking cessation success, although there is little formal analysis of the twin data that supports this important point [2, 3]. None of the current datasets provides clear data concerning which heritable factors might provide robust dimensions around which individuals differ in ability to quit smoking. One approach to this problem is to test mice with genetic variations in genes that contain human variants that alter quit-success. This review considers which features of quit success should be included in a comprehensive approach to elucidating the genetics of quit success, and how those features may be modeled in mice. PMID:22304675

  8. Factors affecting student success in a first-year mathematics course: a South African experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizito, Rita; Munyakazi, Justin; Basuayi, Clement

    2016-01-01

    In spite of sustained efforts tertiary institutions implement to try and improve student academic performance, the number of students succeeding in first-year mathematics courses remains disturbingly low. For most students, the gap between their mathematical capability and the competencies they are expected and need to develop to function effectively in these courses persists even after course instruction. In this study, an instrument for identifying and examining factors affecting student performance and success in a first-year Mathematics university course was developed and administered to 86 students. The overall Cronbach's Alpha coefficient for the questionnaire was found to be 0.916. Having identified variables from prior research known to affect student performance, factor analysis was used to identify variables exhibiting the greatest impact on student performance. The variables included prior academic knowledge, workload, student approaches to learning, assessment, student support teaching quality, methods and resources. From the analysis, students' perceptions of their workload emerged as the factor having the greatest impact on student's performance, followed by the matriculation examination score. The findings are discussed and strategies that can be used to improve teaching and contribute to student success in a first-year mathematics course in a South African context are presented.

  9. Genetic and non-genetic factors related to the success of artificial insemination in dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Furstoss, V; David, I; Fatet, A; Boissard, K; Clément, V; Bodin, L

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate genetic and non-genetic factors influencing artificial insemination (AI) success in French dairy goats. Data analysis, on a total of 584 676 and 386 517 AI records for Alpine and Saanen breed, respectively, collected from 1992 to 2009, was conducted separately on each breed. We used a linear simple repeatability animal model which combined male and female random effect and environmental fixed effects. The most important environmental factor identified was the period within year effect due to the European heat wave of 2003. The estimated values of the annual fertility exhibited a negative trend of 1% loss of AI success per 10 years for Alpine breed only. The range of variation for the flock×within years random effect was 70% and 65% for Alpine and Saanen breeds. The negative effect on AI success of antibody production after repetitive hormonal treatment was confirmed. We observed an important positive relationship between fertility and protein yield expressed as quartile within flock×years of protein 250-day yield for female with lactation number over 1, while this trend was negative for primiparous females. We detected a negative effect of the duration of conservation of semen with a difference of about 4% of AI success between extreme values (2 to 8+ or 9+ years). Heritability estimates for male fertility were 0.0037 and 0.0043 for Alpine and Saanen breed respectively, while estimates for female fertility was 0.040 and 0.049. Repeatability estimates for males were 0.008 and 0.010 for Alpine and Saanen, respectively, and 0.097 and 0.102 for females. With such low values of heritability, selection can hardly affect fertility.

  10. Three Factors Are Critical in Order to Synthesize Intelligible Noise-Vocoded Japanese Speech.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Takuya; Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Ueda, Kazuo; Remijn, Gerard B

    2016-01-01

    Factor analysis (principal component analysis followed by varimax rotation) had shown that 3 common factors appear across 20 critical-band power fluctuations derived from spoken sentences of eight different languages [Ueda et al. (2010). Fechner Day 2010, Padua]. The present study investigated the contributions of such power-fluctuation factors to speech intelligibility. The method of factor analysis was modified to obtain factors suitable for resynthesizing speech sounds as 20-critical-band noise-vocoded speech. The resynthesized speech sounds were used for an intelligibility test. The modification of factor analysis ensured that the resynthesized speech sounds were not accompanied by a steady background noise caused by the data reduction procedure. Spoken sentences of British English, Japanese, and Mandarin Chinese were subjected to this modified analysis. Confirming the earlier analysis, indeed 3-4 factors were common to these languages. The number of power-fluctuation factors needed to make noise-vocoded speech intelligible was then examined. Critical-band power fluctuations of the Japanese spoken sentences were resynthesized from the obtained factors, resulting in noise-vocoded-speech stimuli, and the intelligibility of these speech stimuli was tested by 12 native Japanese speakers. Japanese mora (syllable-like phonological unit) identification performances were measured when the number of factors was 1-9. Statistically significant improvement in intelligibility was observed when the number of factors was increased stepwise up to 6. The 12 listeners identified 92.1% of the morae correctly on average in the 6-factor condition. The intelligibility improved sharply when the number of factors changed from 2 to 3. In this step, the cumulative contribution ratio of factors improved only by 10.6%, from 37.3 to 47.9%, but the average mora identification leaped from 6.9 to 69.2%. The results indicated that, if the number of factors is 3 or more, elementary linguistic

  11. Effective Doctoral Education: Interpreting Factors and Outcomes of Success through a New Framework, Autoethnography, and Quantitative Study of Passion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Nathan Charles

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this disquisition is to increase knowledge about the factors and outcomes of success in doctoral education. Enhanced understanding about the factors and outcomes of success could help optimize effectiveness of the complex systems that educate doctoral students. To achieve the purpose of this disquisition, three manuscripts were…

  12. Success factors impacting Latina/o persistence in higher education leading to STEM opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Claudia; Caspary, Melissa; Boothe, Diane

    2013-12-01

    This study investigates how Latina/Latino youth resist, conform to, and persist in schooling, and explores their preparation for an education in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. Using Latino Critical Race Theory as a framework, evidence of the "sticky mess" of racial inequalities (Espinoza and Harris in Calif Law Rev 10:499-559, 1997) and the concept of community cultural wealth (Yosso in Race Ethn Educ 8:69-91, 2005) will be used to understand how Latina/o students successfully persist in college. Quantitative and qualitative findings collected at two public universities in 2007-2012 show that Latina/o parents play a significant role in influencing their children's decision to attend college; family, friend and community support and hard work have also been instrumental in college success. This is evident through parents' encouragement to persist, expectations to do well and students serving as role models for siblings and peers. As policy makers in the educational arena emphasize STEM fields, there is a significant opportunity for Latino students to make valuable contributions.

  13. Parameters for successful implant integration revisited part II: algorithm for immediate loading diagnostic factors.

    PubMed

    Bahat, Oded; Sullivan, Richard M

    2010-05-01

    Immediate loading of dental implants has become a widely reported practice with success rates ranging from 70.8% to 100%. Although most studies have considered implant survival to be the only measure of success, a better definition includes the long-term stability of the hard and soft tissues around the implant(s) and other adjacent structures, as well as the long-term stability of all the restorative components. The parameters identified in 1981 by Albrektsson and colleagues as influencing the establishment and maintenance of osseointegration have been reconsidered in relation to immediate loading to improve the chances of achieving such success. Two of the six parameters (status of the bone/implant site and implant loading conditions) have preoperative diagnostic implications, whereas three (implant design, surgical technique, and implant finish) may compensate for less-than-ideal site and loading conditions. Factors affecting the outcome of immediate loading are reviewed to assist clinicians attempting to assess its risks and benefits.

  14. Factors Contributing to the Educational Success of Single-Mother Welfare Recipients at an Urban Southwestern Community College Case Studies of Six Success Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faul, Rhonda

    2012-01-01

    This study gave voice to the issues, needs, and concerns of economically disadvantaged single mothers and determined the motivational and institutional factors that helped lead them to their successful completion of a community college degree or certificate program while at the same time coping with the challenges of financially surviving on…

  15. Factors of ecologic succession in oligotrophic fish communities of the Laurentian Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Stanford H.

    1972-01-01

    Oligotrophic fish communities of the Great Lakes have undergone successive disruptions since the mid-1800s. Major contributing factors have been intensive selective fisheries, extreme modification of the drainage, invasion of marine species, and progressive physical–chemical changes of the lake environments. Lake Ontario was the first to be affected as its basin was settled and industrialized earliest, and it was the first to be connected by canals to the mid-Atlantic where the alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) which ultimately became established in the Great Lakes were abundant. Oligotrophic fish communities were successively disrupted in Lakes Erie, Huron, Michigan, and Superior as the affects of population growth, industrialization, and marine invaders spread upward in the Laurentian drainage.The degree and sequence of response of families offish and species within families differed for each factor, but the sequence of change among families and species has been the same in response to each factor as it affected various lakes at different times. The ultimate result of the disruption of fish communities has been a reduction of productivity of oligotrophic species that ranges from extreme in Lake Ontario to moderate in Lake Superior, and which has reached a state of instability and rapid change in the upper three Great Lakes by the rnid-1900s similar to the situation in Lake Ontario in the mid-1800s. Since oligotrophic species (primarily salmonines, coregonines, and deepwater cottids) are the only kinds of fish that fully occupied the entire volume of the deepwater Great Lakes (Ontario, Huron, Michigan, and Superior), the fish biomass of these lakes has been reduced as various species declined or disappeared. In Lake Erie, which is shallow, and in the shallow bays of the deep lakes, oligotrophic species were replaced by mesotrophic species, primarily percids, which have successively increased and declined. All oligotrophic

  16. Statistical iterative reconstruction using fast optimization transfer algorithm with successively increasing factor in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shiyu; Zhang, Zhenxi; Chen, Ying

    2014-03-01

    Statistical iterative reconstruction exhibits particularly promising since it provides the flexibility of accurate physical noise modeling and geometric system description in transmission tomography system. However, to solve the objective function is computationally intensive compared to analytical reconstruction methods due to multiple iterations needed for convergence and each iteration involving forward/back-projections by using a complex geometric system model. Optimization transfer (OT) is a general algorithm converting a high dimensional optimization to a parallel 1-D update. OT-based algorithm provides a monotonic convergence and a parallel computing framework but slower convergence rate especially around the global optimal. Based on an indirect estimation on the spectrum of the OT convergence rate matrix, we proposed a successively increasing factor- scaled optimization transfer (OT) algorithm to seek an optimal step size for a faster rate. Compared to a representative OT based method such as separable parabolic surrogate with pre-computed curvature (PC-SPS), our algorithm provides comparable image quality (IQ) with fewer iterations. Each iteration retains a similar computational cost to PC-SPS. The initial experiment with a simulated Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) system shows that a total 40% computing time is saved by the proposed algorithm. In general, the successively increasing factor-scaled OT exhibits a tremendous potential to be a iterative method with a parallel computation, a monotonic and global convergence with fast rate.

  17. Use of Social Media by Spanish Hospitals: Perceptions, Difficulties, and Success Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez-Tamayo, Clara; Jiménez-Pernett, Jaime; García Gutiérrez, José-Francisco; Traver-Salcedo, Vicente; Yubraham-Sánchez, David

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This exploratory study has two aims: (1) to find out if and how social media (SM) applications are used by hospitals in Spain and (2) to assess hospital managers' perception of these applications in terms of their evaluation of them, reasons for use, success factors, and difficulties encountered during their implementation. A cross-sectional survey has been carried out using Spanish hospitals as the unit of analysis. Geographical differences in the use of SM were found. Social networks are used most often by larger hospitals (30% by medium-size, 28% by large-size). They are also more frequently used by public hospitals (19%, p<0.01) than by private ones. Respondents with a negative perception of SM felt that there is a chance they may be abused by healthcare professionals, whereas those with a positive perception believed that they can be used to improve communication both within and outside the hospital. Reasons for the use of SM include the idea of maximizing exposure of the hospital. The results show that Spanish hospitals are only just beginning to use SM applications and that hospital type can influence their use. The perceptions, reasons for use, success factors, and difficulties encountered during the implementation of SM mean that it is very important for healthcare professionals to use SM correctly and adequately. PMID:23368890

  18. Human Factors Engineering Requirements for the International Space Station - Successes and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, M.; Blume, J.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced technology coupled with the desire to explore space has resulted in increasingly longer human space missions. Indeed, any exploration mission outside of Earth's neighborhood, in other words, beyond the moon, will necessarily be several months or even years. The International Space Station (ISS) serves as an important advancement toward executing a successful human space mission that is longer than a standard trip around the world or to the moon. The ISS, which is a permanently occupied microgravity research facility orbiting the earth, will support missions four to six months in duration. In planning for the ISS, the NASA developed an agency-wide set of human factors standards for the first time in a space exploration program. The Man-Systems Integration Standard (MSIS), NASA-STD-3000, a multi-volume set of guidelines for human-centered design in microgravity, was developed with the cooperation of human factors experts from various NASA centers, industry, academia, and other government agencies. The ISS program formed a human factors team analogous to any major engineering subsystem. This team develops and maintains the human factors requirements regarding end-to-end architecture design and performance, hardware and software design requirements, and test and verification requirements. It is also responsible for providing program integration across all of the larger scale elements, smaller scale hardware, and international partners.

  19. Successes and challenges of measuring and modeling atmospheric mercury at the part per quadrillion level: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexauer Gustin, M.; Amos, H. M.; Huang, J.; Miller, M. B.; Heidecorn, K.

    2015-02-01

    Measurements of atmospheric mercury (Hg) are being increasingly incorporated into monitoring networks worldwide. These data are expected to support and inform regulatory decision making aimed at protecting human and wildlife health. Here we critically review current efforts to measure Hg concentrations in the atmosphere and interpret these data with Hg models. There are three operationally defined forms of atmospheric Hg: Gaseous Elemental (GEM), Gaseous Oxidized (GOM), and Particulate Bound (PBM). While there is relative confidence in GEM measurements, GOM and PBM are less well understood. Field and laboratory investigations suggest the methods to measure GOM and PBM are impacted by analytical interferences that vary with environmental setting (e.g., ozone, relative humidity) and GOM concentrations can be biased low by a factor of 1.6-12 times depending on the chemical compound. Importantly, efforts to understand the fundamental limitations of atmospheric Hg measurement methods have provided clear evidence that the composition of GOM (e.g., HgBr2, HgCl2, HgBrOH) varies across space and time. This has significant implications for refining existing measurement methods and developing new ones, model/measurement comparisons, model development, and assessing trends. In addition, unclear features of previously published data may now be re-examined and possibly explained, which we present as a case study. Lastly, we outline recommendations for needed research directions as the Hg field moves forward. Priorities include GOM and PBM calibration systems, identification of GOM compounds in ambient air, and identification of redox mechanisms and associated rate coefficients. Determination of a quantitative correction factor for biased GOM and PBM data is also needed to facilitate model-measurement comparisons.

  20. Predicting College Success: The Relative Contributions of Five Social/Personality Factors, Five Cognitive/Learning Factors, and SAT Scores

    PubMed Central

    Hannon, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    To-date, studies have examined simultaneously the relative predictive powers of two or three factors on GPA. The present study examines the relative powers of five social/personality factors, five cognitive/learning factors, and SAT scores to predict freshmen and non-freshmen (sophomores, juniors, seniors) academic success (i.e., GPA). The results revealed many significant predictors of GPA for both freshmen and non-freshmen. However, subsequent regressions showed that only academic self-efficacy, epistemic belief of learning, and high-knowledge integration explained unique variance in GPA (19%-freshmen, 23.2%-non-freshmen). Further for freshmen, SAT scores explained an additional unique 10.6% variance after the influences attributed to these three predictors was removed whereas for non-freshmen, SAT scores failed to explain any additional variance. These results highlight the unique and important contributions of academic self-efficacy, epistemic belief of learning and high-knowledge integration to GPA beyond other previously-identified predictors. PMID:25568884

  1. Risk factors for early invasive fungal disease in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurmeet; Pitoyo, Ceva Wicaksono; Aditianingsih, Dita; Rumende, Cleopas Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of invasive fungal disease (IFD) is increasing worldwide in the past two to three decades. Critically ill patients in Intensive Care Units are more vulnerable to fungal infection. Early detection and treatment are important to decrease morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Objective: Our study aimed to assess factors associated with early IFD in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study was conducted in critically ill patients, from March to September 2015. Total number of patients (74) in this study was drawn based on one of the risk factors (human immunodeficiency virus). Specimens were collected on day 5–7 of hospitalization. Multivariate analysis with logistic regression was performed for factors, with P < 0.25 in bivariate analysis. Results: Two hundred and six patients were enrolled in this study. Seventy-four patients were with IFD, majority were males (52.7%), mean age was 58 years (range 18–79), mean Leon's score was 3 (score range 2–5), majority group was nonsurgical/nontrauma (72.9%), and mean fungal isolation was positive on day 5. Candida sp. (92.2%) is the most frquently isolated fungal infection. Urine culture yielded the highest number of fungal isolates (70.1%). Mortality rate in this study was 50%. In multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus (DM) (P = 0.018, odds ratio 2.078, 95% confidence interval 1.135–3.803) was found as an independent factor associated with early IFD critically ill patients. Conclusion: DM is a significant factor for the incidence of early IFD in critically ill patients. PMID:27994377

  2. Engineering success: Persistence factors of African American doctoral recipients in engineering and applied science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Tiffany Monique

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify factors that influence African Americans to pursue and complete doctoral degrees in engineering and applied science disciplines. Critical race theory (CRT), two models of doctoral student persistence, and graduate student persistence literature guided the conceptual framework of this study. In-depth and focus group interviews were conducted to learn the key factors that positively impacted the persistence of 19 African Americans who earned doctoral degrees in engineering and applied science. The following two factors were found to significantly contribute to the decision to pursue the doctorate: encouragement from others and participation in a research or internship program. Key factors impacting doctoral degree completion included: peer support, faculty adviser support, support from university administrators, and family support. In addition to identifying factors that influenced 19 African Americans to pursue and complete doctoral degrees in engineering and applied science, this study was about the importance of diversity and inclusion of multiple perspectives in education research and scholarship. To this end, the study served to promote and include the expert knowledge of African American doctoral degree recipients in engineering and applied science in the scholarly discourse on the issue of low participation rates of African Americans in engineering and applied science disciplines. Such knowledge will challenge traditional views on this issue and hopefully inspire new ways of addressing and remedying this issue. With African Americans and other minority populations growing at an exponential rate, people of color are quickly becoming the majority in key states across the nation. Therefore, it is imperative that all Americans have an opportunity to develop skills necessary to compete for professional positions in the science and engineering workforce. This mandate is required for the United States to maintain

  3. Factors Affecting Student Retention in Online Courses: Overcoming This Critical Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaytan, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what a panel of 15 experts would identify as critical factors affecting student retention in online courses that will serve as implications for educational leaders to guide their student retention strategies, online organizational structures, institutional policies, and online instructional activities. A…

  4. 9 CFR 318.303 - Critical factors and the application of the process schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Critical factors and the application of the process schedule. 318.303 Section 318.303 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND...) Minimum headspace; and (2) Retort reel speed. (c) Hydrostatic retorts. (1) Chain or conveyor speed....

  5. 9 CFR 381.303 - Critical factors and the application of the process schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Critical factors and the application of the process schedule. 381.303 Section 381.303 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND...) Retort reel speed. (c) Hydrostatic retorts. (1) Chain or conveyor speed. (d) Steam/air retorts. (1)...

  6. 9 CFR 381.303 - Critical factors and the application of the process schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Critical factors and the application of the process schedule. 381.303 Section 381.303 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND...) Retort reel speed. (c) Hydrostatic retorts. (1) Chain or conveyor speed. (d) Steam/air retorts. (1)...

  7. 9 CFR 318.303 - Critical factors and the application of the process schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Critical factors and the application of the process schedule. 318.303 Section 318.303 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND...) Minimum headspace; and (2) Retort reel speed. (c) Hydrostatic retorts. (1) Chain or conveyor speed....

  8. 9 CFR 381.303 - Critical factors and the application of the process schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Critical factors and the application of the process schedule. 381.303 Section 381.303 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND...) Retort reel speed. (c) Hydrostatic retorts. (1) Chain or conveyor speed. (d) Steam/air retorts. (1)...

  9. 9 CFR 381.303 - Critical factors and the application of the process schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Critical factors and the application of the process schedule. 381.303 Section 381.303 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND...) Retort reel speed. (c) Hydrostatic retorts. (1) Chain or conveyor speed. (d) Steam/air retorts. (1)...

  10. 9 CFR 318.303 - Critical factors and the application of the process schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Critical factors and the application of the process schedule. 318.303 Section 318.303 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND...) Minimum headspace; and (2) Retort reel speed. (c) Hydrostatic retorts. (1) Chain or conveyor speed....

  11. 9 CFR 318.303 - Critical factors and the application of the process schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Critical factors and the application of the process schedule. 318.303 Section 318.303 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND...) Minimum headspace; and (2) Retort reel speed. (c) Hydrostatic retorts. (1) Chain or conveyor speed....

  12. Exploring Critical Factors of Self Concept among High Income Community College Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Nor, Ahmad Rosli Mohd; Amat, Salleh; Rauf, Rose Amnah Abdul

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to explore the critical factors influencing the self-concept of community college graduates in the development of their careers. Individuals with a positive self-concept are often associated with a good career choices and a well-panned career development path. Hence community college students should be girded with a…

  13. Critical Multicultural Citizenship Education among Black Immigrant Youth: Factors and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumi-Yeboah, Alex; Smith, Patriann

    2016-01-01

    This study uses qualitative interviews with 18 participants across five states to examine the factors that promote enhancement of critical multicultural education for Black immigrant youth. Findings suggest that class discussion, influence of social media and technology, non-educational practices, and cultural and language differences are the…

  14. 21 CFR 113.89 - Deviations in processing, venting, or control of critical factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... that portion of the production involved, keeping full records of the reprocessing conditions or... critical factors are out of control for any low-acid food or container system as disclosed from records by... destroyed. A record shall be made of the evaluation procedures used and the results. Either upon...

  15. 21 CFR 113.89 - Deviations in processing, venting, or control of critical factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... that portion of the production involved, keeping full records of the reprocessing conditions or... critical factors are out of control for any low-acid food or container system as disclosed from records by... destroyed. A record shall be made of the evaluation procedures used and the results. Either upon...

  16. 21 CFR 113.89 - Deviations in processing, venting, or control of critical factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... that portion of the production involved, keeping full records of the reprocessing conditions or... critical factors are out of control for any low-acid food or container system as disclosed from records by... destroyed. A record shall be made of the evaluation procedures used and the results. Either upon...

  17. 21 CFR 113.89 - Deviations in processing, venting, or control of critical factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... that portion of the production involved, keeping full records of the reprocessing conditions or... critical factors are out of control for any low-acid food or container system as disclosed from records by... destroyed. A record shall be made of the evaluation procedures used and the results. Either upon...

  18. Exploration of Factors Affecting Success of Undergraduate Engineering Majors at a Historically Black University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igbinoba, Egheosa P.

    Blacks are underrepresented amongst persons who earn college degrees in the United States and Black males attend and complete college at a lower rate than Black females (Toldson, Fry Brown, & Sutton, 2009). According to Toldson et al. (2009), this quandary may be attributed to Black males' apathy toward education in general, waning support and ideological challenges toward Pell Grants and affirmative action, cultural incompetency on the part of the 90% White, ethnic makeup of the U.S. teaching force, and the relatively high numbers of Black males who are held back in school. In spite of the dismal statistics regarding Black male academic achievement and matriculation, there are those Black males who do participate in postsecondary education. While many studies have highlighted reasons that Black males do not achieve success in attending and persisting through college, few have adopted the anti-deficit research framework suggested by Harper (2010), identifying reasons Black males do persist in higher education. Although science, technology, engineering, and mathematics careers are identified as those most imperative to the economic competitiveness of the United States, few studies have concentrated solely on engineering majors and fewer, if any, solely on Black male engineering majors at an historically Black college and university. The aim of this study was to address an apparent gap in the literature and invoke theories for recruitment, retention, and success of Black males in engineering degree programs by employing an anti-deficit achievement framework for research of students of color in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Data garnered from the study included insight into participants' definitions of success, precollege experiences, factors contributing to the persistence during undergraduate study, and perceptions of attending a historically Black college and university versus a primarily White institution.

  19. Success Factors in Human Space Programs - Why Did Apollo Succeed Better Than Later Programs?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    The Apollo Program reached the moon, but the Constellation Program (CxP) that planned to return to the moon and go on to Mars was cancelled. Apollo is NASA's greatest achievement but its success is poorly understood. The usual explanation is that President Kennedy announced we were going to the moon, the scientific community and the public strongly supported it, and Congress provided the necessary funding. This is partially incorrect and does not actually explain Apollo's success. The scientific community and the public did not support Apollo. Like Apollo, Constellation was announced by a president and funded by Congress, with elements that continued on even after it was cancelled. Two other factors account for Apollo's success. Initially, the surprise event of Uri Gagarin's first human space flight created political distress and a strong desire for the government to dramatically demonstrate American space capability. Options were considered and Apollo was found to be most effective and technically feasible. Political necessity overrode both the lack of popular and scientific support and the extremely high cost and risk. Other NASA human space programs were either canceled, such as the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), repeatedly threatened with cancellation, such as International Space Station (ISS), or terminated while still operational, such as the space shuttle and even Apollo itself. Large crash programs such as Apollo are initiated and continued if and only if urgent political necessity produces the necessary political will. They succeed if and only if they are technically feasible within the provided resources. Future human space missions will probably require gradual step-by-step development in a more normal environment.

  20. The successful management of programs for human factors certification of advanced aviation technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Rod

    1994-01-01

    In recent years there have been immense pressures to enact changes on the air traffic control organizations of most states. In addition, many of these states are or have been subject to great political, sociological and economic changes. Consequently, any new schemes must be considered within the context of national or even international changes. Europe has its own special problems, and many of these are particularly pertinent when considering human factors certification programs. Although these problems must also be considered in the wider context of change, it is usually very difficult to identify which forces are pressing in support of human factors aspects and which forces are resisting change. There are a large number of aspects which must be taken into account if human factors certification programs are to be successfully implemented. Certification programs would be new ventures, and like many new ventures it will be essential to ensure that managers have the skills, commitment and experience to manage the programs effectively. However, they must always be aware of the content and the degree of certainty to which the human factors principles can be applied - as Debons and Horne have carefully described. It will be essential to avoid the well known pitfalls which occur in the implementation of performance appraisal schemes. While most appraisal schemes are usually extremely well thought out, they often do not produce good results because they are not implemented properly and staff therefore do not have faith in them. If the manager does not have the commitment and interest in his/her staff as human beings, then the schemes will not be effective. Thus, one aspect of considering human factors certification schemes is within the context of a managed organization. This paper outlines some of the management factors which need to be considered for the air traffic control services. Many of the points received attention during the plenary sessions while others were

  1. [Patient satisfaction-subjective quality assessment by patients and success factor for clinics].

    PubMed

    Olandt, H; Krentz, H

    1998-12-01

    In the field of measuring patient satisfaction (in other words, the quality perceived subjectively by hospital patients) there is still a great need for more knowledge. Therefore, the Institute of Medical Computer Science and Biometry of the University of Rostock carried out a questioning of 497 patients at the Hospital for Internal Medicine of the University Rostock to measure the patient satisfaction with the hospital. In addition, an employee questioning was performed in order to gain further information. In addition to univariate and bivariate analyses a special focus was set on the analysis of the hospitals' competitive situation, to take into account the importance of patient satisfaction as strategic success factor within the competitive situation. A competition analysis and a Key-Issue Analysis were performed. Finally, focus is on the problems of external hospital comparison and a comparison of trends of patient satisfaction at hospitals in Hamburg and Rostock was made.

  2. Factors influencing success of clinical genome sequencing across a broad spectrum of disorders.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jenny C; Martin, Hilary C; Lise, Stefano; Broxholme, John; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Rimmer, Andy; Kanapin, Alexander; Lunter, Gerton; Fiddy, Simon; Allan, Chris; Aricescu, A Radu; Attar, Moustafa; Babbs, Christian; Becq, Jennifer; Beeson, David; Bento, Celeste; Bignell, Patricia; Blair, Edward; Buckle, Veronica J; Bull, Katherine; Cais, Ondrej; Cario, Holger; Chapel, Helen; Copley, Richard R; Cornall, Richard; Craft, Jude; Dahan, Karin; Davenport, Emma E; Dendrou, Calliope; Devuyst, Olivier; Fenwick, Aimée L; Flint, Jonathan; Fugger, Lars; Gilbert, Rodney D; Goriely, Anne; Green, Angie; Greger, Ingo H; Grocock, Russell; Gruszczyk, Anja V; Hastings, Robert; Hatton, Edouard; Higgs, Doug; Hill, Adrian; Holmes, Chris; Howard, Malcolm; Hughes, Linda; Humburg, Peter; Johnson, David; Karpe, Fredrik; Kingsbury, Zoya; Kini, Usha; Knight, Julian C; Krohn, Jonathan; Lamble, Sarah; Langman, Craig; Lonie, Lorne; Luck, Joshua; McCarthy, Davis; McGowan, Simon J; McMullin, Mary Frances; Miller, Kerry A; Murray, Lisa; Németh, Andrea H; Nesbit, M Andrew; Nutt, David; Ormondroyd, Elizabeth; Oturai, Annette Bang; Pagnamenta, Alistair; Patel, Smita Y; Percy, Melanie; Petousi, Nayia; Piazza, Paolo; Piret, Sian E; Polanco-Echeverry, Guadalupe; Popitsch, Niko; Powrie, Fiona; Pugh, Chris; Quek, Lynn; Robbins, Peter A; Robson, Kathryn; Russo, Alexandra; Sahgal, Natasha; van Schouwenburg, Pauline A; Schuh, Anna; Silverman, Earl; Simmons, Alison; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Taylor, John; Thakker, Rajesh V; Tomlinson, Ian; Trebes, Amy; Twigg, Stephen R F; Uhlig, Holm H; Vyas, Paresh; Vyse, Tim; Wall, Steven A; Watkins, Hugh; Whyte, Michael P; Witty, Lorna; Wright, Ben; Yau, Chris; Buck, David; Humphray, Sean; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Bell, John I; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Bentley, David; Donnelly, Peter; McVean, Gilean

    2015-07-01

    To assess factors influencing the success of whole-genome sequencing for mainstream clinical diagnosis, we sequenced 217 individuals from 156 independent cases or families across a broad spectrum of disorders in whom previous screening had identified no pathogenic variants. We quantified the number of candidate variants identified using different strategies for variant calling, filtering, annotation and prioritization. We found that jointly calling variants across samples, filtering against both local and external databases, deploying multiple annotation tools and using familial transmission above biological plausibility contributed to accuracy. Overall, we identified disease-causing variants in 21% of cases, with the proportion increasing to 34% (23/68) for mendelian disorders and 57% (8/14) in family trios. We also discovered 32 potentially clinically actionable variants in 18 genes unrelated to the referral disorder, although only 4 were ultimately considered reportable. Our results demonstrate the value of genome sequencing for routine clinical diagnosis but also highlight many outstanding challenges.

  3. Factors influencing success of clinical genome sequencing across a broad spectrum of disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lise, Stefano; Broxholme, John; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Rimmer, Andy; Kanapin, Alexander; Lunter, Gerton; Fiddy, Simon; Allan, Chris; Aricescu, A. Radu; Attar, Moustafa; Babbs, Christian; Becq, Jennifer; Beeson, David; Bento, Celeste; Bignell, Patricia; Blair, Edward; Buckle, Veronica J; Bull, Katherine; Cais, Ondrej; Cario, Holger; Chapel, Helen; Copley, Richard R; Cornall, Richard; Craft, Jude; Dahan, Karin; Davenport, Emma E; Dendrou, Calliope; Devuyst, Olivier; Fenwick, Aimée L; Flint, Jonathan; Fugger, Lars; Gilbert, Rodney D; Goriely, Anne; Green, Angie; Greger, Ingo H.; Grocock, Russell; Gruszczyk, Anja V; Hastings, Robert; Hatton, Edouard; Higgs, Doug; Hill, Adrian; Holmes, Chris; Howard, Malcolm; Hughes, Linda; Humburg, Peter; Johnson, David; Karpe, Fredrik; Kingsbury, Zoya; Kini, Usha; Knight, Julian C; Krohn, Jonathan; Lamble, Sarah; Langman, Craig; Lonie, Lorne; Luck, Joshua; McCarthy, Davis; McGowan, Simon J; McMullin, Mary Frances; Miller, Kerry A; Murray, Lisa; Németh, Andrea H; Nesbit, M Andrew; Nutt, David; Ormondroyd, Elizabeth; Oturai, Annette Bang; Pagnamenta, Alistair; Patel, Smita Y; Percy, Melanie; Petousi, Nayia; Piazza, Paolo; Piret, Sian E; Polanco-Echeverry, Guadalupe; Popitsch, Niko; Powrie, Fiona; Pugh, Chris; Quek, Lynn; Robbins, Peter A; Robson, Kathryn; Russo, Alexandra; Sahgal, Natasha; van Schouwenburg, Pauline A; Schuh, Anna; Silverman, Earl; Simmons, Alison; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Taylor, John; Thakker, Rajesh V; Tomlinson, Ian; Trebes, Amy; Twigg, Stephen RF; Uhlig, Holm H; Vyas, Paresh; Vyse, Tim; Wall, Steven A; Watkins, Hugh; Whyte, Michael P; Witty, Lorna; Wright, Ben; Yau, Chris; Buck, David; Humphray, Sean; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Bell, John I; Wilkie, Andrew OM; Bentley, David; Donnelly, Peter; McVean, Gilean

    2015-01-01

    To assess factors influencing the success of whole genome sequencing for mainstream clinical diagnosis, we sequenced 217 individuals from 156 independent cases across a broad spectrum of disorders in whom prior screening had identified no pathogenic variants. We quantified the number of candidate variants identified using different strategies for variant calling, filtering, annotation and prioritisation. We found that jointly calling variants across samples, filtering against both local and external databases, deploying multiple annotation tools and using familial transmission above biological plausibility contributed to accuracy. Overall, we identified disease causing variants in 21% of cases, rising to 34% (23/68) for Mendelian disorders and 57% (8/14) in trios. We also discovered 32 potentially clinically actionable variants in 18 genes unrelated to the referral disorder, though only four were ultimately considered reportable. Our results demonstrate the value of genome sequencing for routine clinical diagnosis, but also highlight many outstanding challenges. PMID:25985138

  4. Factors Affecting Student Success with a Google Earth-Based Earth Science Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, Lisa M.; Almquist, Heather; Estrada, Jen; Crews, Jeff

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated to what extent the implementation of a Google Earth (GE)-based earth science curriculum increased students' understanding of volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, scientific reasoning abilities, and science identity. Nine science classrooms participated in the study. In eight of the classrooms, pre- and post-assessments of earth science content, scientific reasoning, and science identity were completed. In one classroom, a staggered implementation of the curriculum was completed to control for student and teacher variables. In all nine classrooms, implementation of the GE curriculum advanced students' science identity, earth science understanding, and science reasoning, but the curriculum was most transformative in terms of scientific reasoning. Two factors were identified related to student success. Students with strong science identities and high reading proficiencies demonstrated greater science learning outcomes. Math proficiency and gender did not affect learning outcomes.

  5. The African honey bee: factors contributing to a successful biological invasion.

    PubMed

    Scott Schneider, Stanley; DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Smith, Deborah Roan

    2004-01-01

    The African honey bee subspecies Apis mellifera scutellata has colonized much of the Americas in less than 50 years and has largely replaced European bees throughout its range in the New World. The African bee therefore provides an excellent opportunity to examine the factors that influence invasion success. We provide a synthesis of recent research on the African bee, concentrating on its ability to displace European honey bees. Specifically, we consider (a) the genetic composition of the expanding population and the symmetry of gene flow between African and European bees, (b) the mechanisms that favor the preservation of the African genome, and (c) the possible range and impact of the African bee in the United States.

  6. Cytological Sampling Versus Forceps Biopsy During Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage and Analysis of Factors Predicting Success

    SciTech Connect

    Tapping, C. R.; Byass, O. R.; Cast, J. E. I.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of cytological sampling and forceps biopsy in obstructing biliary lesions and to identify factors predictive of success. Methods: Consecutive patients (n = 119) with suspected malignant inoperable obstructive jaundice treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage during 7 years were included (60 male; mean age 72.5 years). All patients underwent forceps biopsy plus cytological sampling by washing the forceps device in cytological solution. Patient history, procedural and pathological records, and clinical follow-up were reviewed. Statistical analysis included chi-square test and multivariate regression analysis. Results: Histological diagnosis after forceps biopsy was more successful than cytology: Sensitivity was 78 versus 61%, and negative predictive value was 30 versus 19%. Cytology results were never positive when the forceps biopsy was negative. The cytological sample was negative and forceps sample positive in 2 cases of cholangiocarcinoma, 16 cases of pancreatic carcinoma, and 1 case of benign disease. Diagnostic accuracy was predicted by low bilirubin (p < 0.001), aspartate transaminase (p < 0.05), and white cell count (p {<=} 0.05). Conclusions: This technique is safe and effective and is recommended for histological diagnosis during PTBD in patients with inoperable malignant biliary strictures. Diagnostic yield is greater when bilirubin levels are low and there is no sepsis; histological diagnosis by way of forceps biopsy renders cytological sampling unnecessary.

  7. Factors affecting reproductive success in three entomophilous orchid species in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Vojtkó, Anna E; Sonkoly, Judit; Lukács, Balázs András; Molnár V, Attila

    2015-06-01

    The reproductive success of orchids is traditionally estimated by determining the fruit-set of individuals. Here, we investigated both the fruit and the seed production of three orchid species and the factors that may affect individual fruit-set, like pollination strategy, individual traits or the annual amount of precipitation. The species [Dactylorhiza sambucina (L.) Soó, Dactylorhiza majalis (Rchb.) P. F. Hunt & Summerhayes and Platanthera bifolia (L.) L. C. M. Richard] were studied in three consecutive years (2010-2012) in the Bükk Mountains, Hungary. All three species were proved to be non-autogamous by a bagging experiment. Data analyses showed significant differences between seed numbers but not between fruit-sets of species. There was no statistical difference in individual reproductive success between wet and dry years, however, the effect of the annual amount of precipitation is significant on the population level. Comparison of published fruit-set data revealed accordance with our results in P. bifolia, but not in D. sambucina and D. majalis. We assume that the surprisingly high fruit-set values of the two Dactylorhiza species may be due to the fact that the pollination crisis reported from Western European countries is not an actual problem in the Bükk Mountains, Hungary.

  8. Understanding Policy Intentions Is Critical for Successful Policy Implementation within the Technical and Vocational Education and Training College's Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebele, Ntlantla

    2015-01-01

    Public policy implementation is frequently regarded as problematic globally and reasons for these vary. In particular, the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) sector has been criticized for lack of delivery and most of the criticism is directed towards the non-implementation of government policy. In South Africa managers of TVET…

  9. Factors Associated with the Success of In Vitro Fertilization in Women with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Sveta Shah; Pabby, Vikas; Dodge, Laura E.; Hacker, Michele R.; Fox, Janis H.; Moragianni, Vasiliki A.; Correia, Katharine; Missmer, Stacey A.; Ibrahim, Yetunde; Penzias, Alan S.; Burakoff, Robert; Friedman, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Background It is unknown whether certain factors are associated with the success of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Aim This study assessed whether certain characteristics are associated with greater success of live birth following IVF. Methods In a cohort study of 8684 women with IBD seen at two tertiary care centers, we identified 121 women with IBD who underwent IVF. We assessed the effect of numerous factors on likelihood of achieving live birth after IVF. Results Seventy-one patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 49 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) were analyzed. Patients with UC who achieved a live birth were younger (p = 0.03), had a shorter duration of disease (p = 0.01), and were more likely to be in remission (p = 0.03) versus those who did not achieve live birth. Patients with CD who achieved live birth were younger (p < 0.001), had lower body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.02), and had lower cycle day 3 follicle-stimulating hormone levels (p = 0.02). There was no difference in likelihood of achieving live birth among patients in remission and those with mild or unknown disease status (p = 0.69), though most CD patients (79.5 %) were in remission. Prior surgery was not associated with live birth in patients with UC (p = 0.31) or CD (p = 0.62). Conclusions As in the general infertility population, younger patients and those with lower BMI were more likely to achieve live birth. History of surgery was not associated with live birth among IBD patients. This is important information for practitioners counseling IBD patients. PMID:26888767

  10. Factors impacting the success of post-mortem sperm rescue in the rhinoceros.

    PubMed

    Roth, T L; Stoops, M A; Robeck, T R; O'Brien, J K

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to identify factors that influenced the ability to successfully rescue sperm post-mortem from rhinoceroses maintained in North American zoos. Factors considered included procedural technicalities, individual rhinoceros characteristics and timing. Gross testicular pathology was noted in 17.4% of males (4/23) but did not impact sperm recovery except in one case of azoospermia (4.3%). Of the males in which sperm recovery was attempted (n=21), 62% yielded quality samples considered adequate for cryopreservation (≥ 30% motility with ≥ 2.0 forward progressive status). A high percentage of males (70.6%; 12/17) from which reproductive tissue was removed an d cooled ≤ 4 h after death yielded quality sperm samples, whereas only 25% (1/4) of males from which tissue was removed>4h after death yielded quality samples. Quality samples were recovered 1-51 h post-mortem from rhinoceroses 8 to 36 years old. Neither type of illness (prolonged or acute), or method of death (euthanasia or natural) affected the ability to harvest quality samples (P > 0.05). The Indian rhinoceros yielded significantly more sperm on average (40 × 10(9)) than the African black rhinoceros (3.6 × 10(9); P < 0.01) and the African white rhinoceros (3.2 × 10(9); P < 0.05). Across all species and samples assessed (n = 11), mean post-thaw sperm motility (41%), was only 15% less than pre-freeze motility (56%) and only decreased to 22% during the 6h post-thaw assessment period. Rhinoceros sperm rescue post-mortem is relatively successful across a wide range of variables, especially when tissues are removed and cooled promptly after death, and should be considered standard practice among zoos.

  11. Factors of trainability and predictability associated with military physical fitness test success.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, John S; Slivka, Dustin R; Hailes, Walter S; Ruby, Brent C

    2011-12-01

    Cuddy, JS, Slivka, DR, Hailes, WS, and Ruby, BC. Factors of trainability and predictability associated with military physical fitness test success. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3486-3494, 2011-The purpose of this study was to determine the trainability of college-aged men using varied training programs and to assess factors associated with successfully passing a Special Operations Forces (SOF) physical fitness test (PFT). One hundred thirty-five male subjects were stratified into 3 training groups (run focused, calisthenic focused, or combined run and calisthenic) and were trained 3 times·per week for 12 weeks. Body composition and accelerometer activity patterns were measured pretraining and posttraining. The PFT performance (pull-ups, sit-ups, push-ups, and 1.5-mile run time) was measured weekly throughout the study period. The subjects exhibited reduced body fat (18.4 ± 7.7 to 16.9 ± 7.3), increased fat-free mass (66.1 ± 8.2 to 67.4 ± 7.9), reduced fat mass (15.8 ± 9.2 to 14.6 ± 8.9) from pretraining to posttraining, respectively (p < 0.05). All groups improved in each component of PFT performance with training (p < 0.05). There was a significant 20 ± 35% increase in 6-day average daily activity for the run-focused training group from pretraining and posttraining. The key indicators of a candidate's potential to successfully reach SOF PFT standards (in 12 weeks) were determined to be as follows: enter the pipeline being able to run 2.4 km in ≤10:41 minutes, have a body fat percentage of ≤12.9%, and participate in a minimum of 30 min·d of vigorous physical activity. Training an individual's relative run or calisthenic deficiency did not prove to be a better training approach compared with a program that emphasizes training both running and calisthenic activities.

  12. Soil physical properties: Key factors for successful reclamation of disturbed landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krümmelbein, Julia; Raab, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The practice of open cast mining, e.g. for lignite, results in major landscape disturbances and especially affects soils because relocation and subsequent mixing of naturally developed soil horizons leads to areas with extremely altered soil properties compared to the undisturbed conditions. Various reclamation measures are applied to recover the reconstructed landscape for different land use options. Major parts of the post mining landscapes are used for agriculture, agroforestry or silviculture, the remaining voids of the coal mines fill successively with groundwater after mine closure and are or will be used mainly for touristic and leisure purposes. Small proportions of the post mining areas are left for natural succession, or habitats for endangered flora and fauna are initiated. In reclamation research, many studies have focused on soil chemical and biological constraints of post mining substrates and investigated factors such as unsuitable pH, in many cases very low pH, (poor) nutrient contents and (poor) biological activity. But the initial and developing soil physical parameters and functions are also key factors for the success of reclamation practices. The soil water and gas balance influence strongly the suitability of a site for the intended future land use. The mechanical stability of the soil determines the rigidity of the pore system against deforming forces and thereby the persistence of soil functions, such as water and air permeability over time. The amendment of unfavourable (initial) soil physical properties is in most cases more complex and time-consuming than e.g. optimization of pH or fertilization with nutrients. Moreover, regarding the suitability of a site e.g. as a habitat for plants or microorganisms, poor physical pre-conditions can turn substrates with perfect nutrient contents and composition and pH into infertile locations of very low productivity. We show results of an on-going field study where the effects of different

  13. Interviewing in Virtual Worlds: A Phenomenological Study Exploring the Success Factors of Job Applicants Utilizing Second Life to Gain Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koufoudakis-Whittington, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the phenomenon of success factors of job applicants utilizing Second Life to gain employment. The study focused on identifying the perception of what qualified as a successful interview through the lived common experiences of 16 employment recruiters. The research problem was that a gap existed in scholarly research on…

  14. Public and Private School Distinction, Regional Development Differences, and Other Factors Influencing the Success of Primary School Students in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulku, Seher Nur; Abdioglu, Zehra

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the factors influencing the success of students in primary schools in Turkey. TIMSS 2011 data for Turkey, measuring the success of eighth-grade students in the field of mathematics, were used in an econometric analysis, performed using classical linear regression models. Two hundred thirty-nine schools participated in the…

  15. Factors Impacting Student Service Utilization at Ontario Colleges: Key Performance Indicators as a Measure of Success: A Niagara College View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veres, David

    2015-01-01

    Student success in Ontario College is significantly influenced by the utilization of student services. At Niagara College there has been a significant investment in student services as a strategy to support student success. Utilizing existing KPI data, this quantitative research project is aimed at measuring factors that influence both the use of…

  16. A Longitudinal Cohort Study of Student Motivational Factors Related to Academic Success and Retention Using the College Student Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slanger, William D.; Berg, Emily A.; Fisk, Paul S.; Hanson, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    Ten years of College Student Inventory (CSI) data from one Midwestern public land-grant university were used to study the role of motivational factors in predicting academic success and college student retention. Academic success was defined as cumulative grade point average (GPA), cumulative course load capacity (i.e., the number of credits…

  17. Testing a Model of Environmental Risk and Protective Factors to Predict Middle and High School Students' Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, S. Colby; Woolley, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Data from the School Success Profile generated by 19,228 middle and high school students were organized into three broad categories of risk and protective factors--control, support, and challenge--to examine the relative and combined power of aggregate scale scores in each category so as to predict academic success. It was hypothesized that higher…

  18. Measuring the Education Pipeline: Critical Data Elements Indicating Readiness, Transition and Success. "High School to Postsecondary Education and Work"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Data Quality Campaign (DQC) has identified a common set of data that capture students' progress through the education pipeline at three key transition points: high school readiness, high school success/postsecondary readiness, and postsecondary and workforce success. For each of these transition points, key questions to be addressed by…

  19. NF-κB Transcription Factor p50 Critically Regulates Tissue Factor in Deep Vein Thrombosis*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Dan; Ye, Bu-Qing; Zheng, Sheng-Xi; Wang, Jin-Tao; Wang, Jian-Guo; Chen, Ming; Liu, Ji-Guo; Pei, Xin-Hui; Wang, Li-Jing; Lin, Zhi-Xin; Gupta, Kalpna; Mackman, Nigel; Slungaard, Arne; Key, Nigel S.; Geng, Jian-Guo

    2009-01-01

    NF-κB transcription factors regulate the expression of tissue factor (TF), a principal initiator of the coagulation cascade. Dominant among them is the p50/p65 heterodimer. Here we report that Andrographolide (Andro; a p50 inhibitor) and genetic deletion of p50 attenuated TF activity in stimulated endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages. Results of the electrophoretic mobility “supershift” assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated the direct interaction of the p50/p65 heterodimer with the NF-κB site of the human TF promoter. Andro-treated and p50 null mice both exhibited blunted TF expression and reduced venous thrombosis, which were recapitulated by an anti-murine TF antibody in vivo. Our findings thus indicate that regulation of TF by NF-κB transcription factor p50 is essential for the pathogenesis of deep vein thrombosis and suggest that specific inhibitors of p50, such as Andro, may be therapeutically valuable for preventing and perhaps treating venous thrombosis. PMID:19095643

  20. NF-kappaB transcription factor p50 critically regulates tissue factor in deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Dan; Ye, Bu-Qing; Zheng, Sheng-Xi; Wang, Jin-Tao; Wang, Jian-Guo; Chen, Ming; Liu, Ji-Guo; Pei, Xin-Hui; Wang, Li-Jing; Lin, Zhi-Xin; Gupta, Kalpna; Mackman, Nigel; Slungaard, Arne; Key, Nigel S; Geng, Jian-Guo

    2009-02-13

    NF-kappaB transcription factors regulate the expression of tissue factor (TF), a principal initiator of the coagulation cascade. Dominant among them is the p50/p65 heterodimer. Here we report that Andrographolide (Andro; a p50 inhibitor) and genetic deletion of p50 attenuated TF activity in stimulated endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages. Results of the electrophoretic mobility "supershift" assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated the direct interaction of the p50/p65 heterodimer with the NF-kappaB site of the human TF promoter. Andro-treated and p50 null mice both exhibited blunted TF expression and reduced venous thrombosis, which were recapitulated by an anti-murine TF antibody in vivo. Our findings thus indicate that regulation of TF by NF-kappaB transcription factor p50 is essential for the pathogenesis of deep vein thrombosis and suggest that specific inhibitors of p50, such as Andro, may be therapeutically valuable for preventing and perhaps treating venous thrombosis.

  1. Surface water acidification and critical loads: exploring the F-factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, L.; Bishop, K.

    2009-05-01

    As acid deposition decreases, uncertainties in methods for calculating critical loads become more important when judgements have to be made about whether or not further emission reductions are needed. An important aspect of one type of model that has been used to calculate surface water critical loads is the empirical F-factor which estimates the degree to which acid deposition is neutralised before it reaches a lake at any particular point in time relative to the pre-industrial, steady-state water chemistry conditions. In this paper we will examine how well the empirical F-functions are able to estimate pre-industrial lake chemistry as lake chemistry changes during different phases of acidification and recovery. To accomplish this, we use the dynamic, process-oriented biogeochemical model SAFE to generate a plausible time series of annual runoff chemistry for ca 140 Swedish catchments between 1800 and 2100. These annual hydrochemistry data are then used to generate empirical F-factors that are compared to the "actual" F-factor seen in the SAFE data for each lake and year in the time series. The dynamics of the F-factor as catchments acidify, and then recover are not widely recognised. Our results suggest that the F-factor approach worked best during the acidification phase when soil processes buffer incoming acidity. However, the empirical functions for estimating F from contemporary lake chemistry are not well suited to the recovery phase when the F-factor turns negative due to recovery processes in the soil. Therefore, the empirical estimates of the F-factor are a significant source of uncertainty in the estimate of surface water critical loads and related calculations for quantifying lake acidification status, especially now that acid deposition has declined across large areas of Europe and North America.

  2. Ares I-X Flight Test Development Challenges and Success Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askins, Bruce; Davis, Steve; Olsen, Ronald; Taylor, James

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Constellation Program's Ares I-X rocket launched successfully on October 28, 2009 collecting valuable data and providing risk reduction for the Ares I project. The Ares I-X mission was formulated and implemented in less than four years commencing with the Exploration Systems Architecture Study in 2005. The test configuration was founded upon assets and processes from other rocket programs including Space Shuttle, Atlas, and Peacekeeper. For example, the test vehicle's propulsion element was a Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor. The Ares I-X rocket comprised a motor assembly, mass and outer mold line simulators of the Ares I Upper Stage, Orion Spacecraft and Launch Abort System, a roll control system, avionics, and other miscellaneous components. The vehicle was 327 feet tall and weighed approximately 1,800,000 pounds. During flight the rocket reached a maximum speed of Mach 4.8 and an altitude of 150,000 feet. The vehicle demonstrated staging at 130,000 feet, tested parachutes for recovery of the motor, and utilized approximately 900 sensors for data collection. Developing a new launch system and preparing for a safe flight presented many challenges. Specific challenges included designing a system to withstand the environments, manufacturing large structures, and re-qualifying heritage hardware. These and other challenges, if not mitigated, may have resulted in test cancellation. Ares I-X succeeded because the mission was founded on carefully derived objectives, led by decisive and flexible management, implemented by an exceptionally talented and dedicated workforce, and supported by a thorough independent review team. Other major success factors include the use of proven heritage hardware, a robust System Integration Laboratory, multi-NASA center and contractor team, concurrent operations, efficient vehicle assembly, effective risk management, and decentralized element development with a centralized control board. Ares I-X was a technically complex test that

  3. DIETFITS study (diet intervention examining the factors interacting with treatment success) - Study design and methods.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Michael V; Robinson, Jennifer L; Kirkpatrick, Susan M; Farzinkhou, Sarah; Avery, Erin C; Rigdon, Joseph; Offringa, Lisa C; Trepanowski, John F; Hauser, Michelle E; Hartle, Jennifer C; Cherin, Rise J; King, Abby C; Ioannidis, John P A; Desai, Manisha; Gardner, Christopher D

    2017-02-01

    Numerous studies have attempted to identify successful dietary strategies for weight loss, and many have focused on Low-Fat vs. Low-Carbohydrate comparisons. Despite relatively small between-group differences in weight loss found in most previous studies, researchers have consistently observed relatively large between-subject differences in weight loss within any given diet group (e.g., ~25kg weight loss to ~5kg weight gain). The primary objective of this study was to identify predisposing individual factors at baseline that help explain differential weight loss achieved by individuals assigned to the same diet, particularly a pre-determined multi-locus genotype pattern and insulin resistance status. Secondary objectives included discovery strategies for further identifying potential genetic risk scores. Exploratory objectives included investigation of an extensive set of physiological, psychosocial, dietary, and behavioral variables as moderating and/or mediating variables and/or secondary outcomes. The target population was generally healthy, free-living adults with BMI 28-40kg/m(2) (n=600). The intervention consisted of a 12-month protocol of 22 one-hour evening instructional sessions led by registered dietitians, with ~15-20 participants/class. Key objectives of dietary instruction included focusing on maximizing the dietary quality of both Low-Fat and Low-Carbohydrate diets (i.e., Healthy Low-Fat vs. Healthy Low-Carbohydrate), and maximally differentiating the two diets from one another. Rather than seeking to determine if one dietary approach was better than the other for the general population, this study sought to examine whether greater overall weight loss success could be achieved by matching different people to different diets. Here we present the design and methods of the study.

  4. Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty with 1-year follow-up: factors predictive of success

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Nava, G.; Galvao, M.; Bautista-Castaño, I.; Fernandez-Corbelle, J. P.; Trell, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Bariatric endoscopy has emerged as an aid in the nonsurgical treatment of obesity. The objective of this study is to critically provide the results and follow-up of endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty 1 year after the procedure. Patients and methods: Prospective single-center follow-up study of 25 patients (5 men, 20 women) who underwent flexible endoscopic suturing for endoluminal gastric volume reduction. A multidisciplinary team provided post-procedure care. Patient outcomes were recorded at 1 year after the procedure. Linear regression analysis was done to evaluate the variables associated with best results at 1 year of follow-up. Results: Mean body mass index (BMI) was 38.5 ± 4.6 kg/m2 (range 30 – 47) and mean age 44.5 ± 8.2 years (range 29 – 60). At 1 year, 22 patients continued with the follow-up (2 dropped out at 6 months and 1 at 3 months). There were no major intra-procedural, early, or delayed adverse events. Mean BMI loss was 7.3 ± 4.2 kg/m2, and mean percentage of total body weight loss was 18.7 ± 10.7 at 1 year. In the linear regression analysis, adjusted by initial BMI, variables associated with %TBWL involved the frequency of nutritional (β = 0.563, P = 0.014) and psychological contacts (β = 0.727, P = 0.025). The number of nutritional and psychological contacts were predictive of good weight loss results. Conclusions: Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty is a feasible, reproducible, and effective procedure to treat obesity. Nutritional and psychological interaction are predictive of success. PMID:26878054

  5. Surface water acidification and critical loads: exploring the F-factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, L.; Bishop, K.

    2009-11-01

    As acid deposition decreases, uncertainties in methods for calculating critical loads become more important when judgements have to be made about whether or not further emission reductions are needed. An important aspect of one type of model that has been used to calculate surface water critical loads is the empirical F-factor which estimates the degree to which acid deposition is neutralised before it reaches a lake at any particular point in time relative to the pre-industrial, steady-state water chemistry conditions. In this paper we will examine how well the empirical F-functions are able to estimate pre-industrial lake chemistry as lake chemistry changes during different phases of acidification and recovery. To accomplish this, we use the dynamic, process-oriented biogeochemical model SAFE to generate a plausible time series of annual runoff chemistry for ca. 140 Swedish catchments between 1800 and 2100. These annual hydrochemistry data are then used to generate empirical F-factors that are compared to the "actual" F-factor seen in the SAFE data for each lake and year in the time series. The dynamics of the F-factor as catchments acidify, and then recover are not widely recognised. Our results suggest that the F-factor approach worked best during the acidification phase when soil processes buffer incoming acidity. However, the empirical functions for estimating F from contemporary lake chemistry are not well suited to the recovery phase when the F-factor turns negative due to recovery processes in the soil. This happens when acid deposition has depleted the soil store of BC, and then acid deposition declines, reducing the leaching of base cations to levels below those in the pre-industrial era. An estimate of critical load from water chemistry during recovery and empirical F functions would therefore result in critical loads that are too low. Therefore, the empirical estimates of the F-factor are a significant source of uncertainty in the estimate of surface

  6. Factors Related to the Success of New Mexico Vocational Agriculture Teachers as FFA Advisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Paul R.

    1976-01-01

    A study to identify characteristics which are related to the degree of success of an FFA advisor, and to identify competencies in which a teacher's perceived proficiency are related to his success as an FFA advisor. (HD)

  7. Study on the limiting factor of critical current in Ag-Bi2223 tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Ding, S. Y.; Luo, H.; Leng, X.; Lin, J. W.

    2003-04-01

    The silver sheathed tapes of Ag-Bi 2- xPb xSr 2Ca 2-Cu 3O 7- y (Ag-Bi2223) were fabricated by usual process. The limiting factor of the critical current density jc of the tapes was studied. V- I characteristic was performed for the tapes immersed in liquid nitrogen with and without magnetic fields. Hysteresis loop of V- I curve was observed. A model based on polycrystalline superconductors was proposed to account for this kind of hysteresis. The result shows that in our Ag-Bi2223 tapes the weak link is the key factor limiting the global critical current. The measurement of V- I loop can be an effective method to check whether there exist harmful weak links in polycrystalline samples.

  8. Success Factors for e-Learning in a Developing Country: A Case Study of Serbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raspopovic, Miroslava; Jankulovic, Aleksandar; Runic, Jovana; Lucic, Vanja

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, DeLone and McLean's updated information system model was used to evaluate the success of an e-Learning system and its courses in a transitional country like Serbia. In order to adapt this model to an e-Learning system, suitable success metrics were chosen for each of the evaluation stages. Furthermore, the success metrics for…

  9. A Case Study of Factors Leading to Student Success in an Accelerated Licensed Practical Nurse to Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sherry T.

    2012-01-01

    This case study attempted to discover and comprehend the relationship of students and contributing factors of success, of one Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program, to formulate an understanding of which contributing factors are most beneficial to enable students to persist to graduation and/or successfully…

  10. Key Factors in the Success of an Organization's Information Security Culture: A Quantitative Study and Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    This research study reviewed relative literature on information security and information security culture within organizations to determine what factors potentially assist an organization in implementing, integrating, and maintaining a successful organizational information security culture. Based on this review of literature, five key factors were…

  11. [Psychotherapy of borderline personality disorder: critical factors and proposals of intervention].

    PubMed

    Bellino, Silvio; Brunetti, Chiara; Bozzatello, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) represents a significant therapeutic challenge. Critical factors in psychotherapeutic treatment of patients with BPD are noticeable and strictly related to the psychopathological dimensions of this disorder: affective and relational instability, behavioral impulsivity and precarious definition of identity. These features are emphasized by therapeutic intervention and become evident during the course of the treatment. Psychotherapeutic setting induces BPD patient to actualize the dysfunctional relational patterns that have been acquired during childhood. Specific critical factors concern the characteristics of the patient (risk of suicide, aggressive behaviors, chronic course of the disorder, disorganized attachment style), of the therapist (therapeutic skills, training, countertransference, risk of burnout) and of the setting of psychotherapy (patients selection, therapeutic alliance, need to set limits, duration and end of therapy). In Otto Kernberg's and Marsha Linehan's models of psychotherapy specific for DBP the authors identify substantially overlapping objectives and modalities of intervention. In particular, therapists should take care of patient safety, maintain boundaries of therapeutic setting and promote the development of psychotherapeutic process. The aim of this article is to analyze the main critical factors affecting psychotherapeutic process in patients with BPD. Objectives and priorities that therapist should consider to address these issues will be discussed. We will also try to make clear why interpersonal psychotherapy adapted to DBP can represent one of the therapeutic models that may be useful to manage and resolve these difficulties.

  12. Lessons from NASA Applied Sciences Program: Success Factors in Applying Earth Science in Decision Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, L. A.; Cox, L.

    2008-12-01

    The NASA Applied Sciences Program collaborates with organizations to discover and demonstrate applications of NASA Earth science research and technology to decision making. The desired outcome is for public and private organizations to use NASA Earth science products in innovative applications for sustained, operational uses to enhance their decisions. In addition, the program facilitates the end-user feedback to Earth science to improve products and demands for research. The Program thus serves as a bridge between Earth science research and technology and the applied organizations and end-users with management, policy, and business responsibilities. Since 2002, the Applied Sciences Program has sponsored over 115 applications-oriented projects to apply Earth observations and model products to decision making activities. Projects have spanned numerous topics - agriculture, air quality, water resources, disasters, public health, aviation, etc. The projects have involved government agencies, private companies, universities, non-governmental organizations, and foreign entities in multiple types of teaming arrangements. The paper will examine this set of applications projects and present specific examples of successful use of Earth science in decision making. The paper will discuss scientific, organizational, and management factors that contribute to or impede the integration of the Earth science research in policy and management. The paper will also present new methods the Applied Sciences Program plans to implement to improve linkages between science and end users.

  13. [Factors influencing the hunting success of a predator: a model with sighthounds].

    PubMed

    Shubkina, A V; Severtsov, A S; Chepeleva, K V

    2012-01-01

    Using microbiological criteria (the number of CFU in nose prints on agar medium), it has been shown that the proportion of individuals with a high CFU count is significantly higher among brown hares caught by sighthounds or exposed to immobilization stress than among shot hares. A hypothesis is proposed that metabolites of the body surface microflora in animals exposed to long-term stress account for their specific stress odor. Observations on wild hare coursing with the use of GPS tracking (1-s update rate) provide evidence that hunting success is not directly dependent on the absolute and relative coursing speeds, the number of sighthounds, and the distance, duration, and number of coursingevents. An analysis has been performed of stress odor as a universal criterion allowing the predator to estimate the vulnerability of potential prey. Selective elimination of unhealthy (stressed) individuals by predators is a mechanism of natural selection for increased adaptation of populations and species to the effects of a broad spectrum of environmental factors.

  14. Planktonic Rotifers in a Subtropical Shallow Lake: Succession, Relationship to Environmental Factors, and Use as Bioindicators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianyun; Wang, Liqing

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the density and species composition of planktonic rotifers as well as their relationship to several environmental variables were studied at Dadian Lake, a shallow subtropical lake, which was completely dredged and reconstructed. Samples were taken monthly (2006–2009) at five stations. The total rotifer abundance exponentially declined and reached a relatively stable stage in 2009. Polyarthra dolichoptera and Trichocerca pusilla dominated the rotifer community in most seasons. TN, TP, and CODMn went down at the beginning of the monitoring period, rebounded in the second winter, and then decreased and reached a stable state in 2009. CCA showed that the most significant variations were caused by fluctuations in temperature, CODMn, SRP, and NO2-N. The rotifer community experienced a two-stage succession and the difference of species between the stages was exhibited during warm seasons. GAMs indicated that the selected factors were responsible for 64.8% of the total rotifer abundance variance and 16.5~64.3% of the variances of individual species abundance. Most of the environmental parameters had effects on rotifer abundance that could only be described by complicated curves, characterised by unimodality and bimodality instead of linearity. Our study highlighted the temperature influence on rotifer species composition and total abundance in subtropical lakes. PMID:23864829

  15. Economic incentives to promote healthier food purchases: exploring acceptability and key factors for success.

    PubMed

    Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Eyles, Helen; Dixon, Robyn; Matoe, Leonie; Teevale, Tasileta; Meagher-Lundberg, Patricia

    2012-09-01

    Despite increasing interest, little is known about the beliefs and views of the public in relation to the use of economic incentives as a means to promote healthy eating. This study explores views of ethnically and socioeconomically diverse shoppers regarding acceptability of economic incentives to promote healthier food purchases, and factors likely to affect the success of such schemes. Six focus groups (n = 36 participants; 14 Māori, 12 Pacific, 10 non-ethnic specific low income), were held in Auckland, New Zealand, in October 2009. A general inductive approach was used to identify common themes. The single most important reported food purchasing influence was cost. Focus group participants viewed the concept of economic incentives to promote healthy eating positively, as long as such schemes provided worthwhile incentives, and were simple and convenient to use. The preferred option for delivery was a pre-loaded electronic swipe card. Fruit and vegetables were the food group most participants said they would like to see incentivized. There was marked variability in the incentive amount thought sufficient to promote participation in such a scheme. Our findings suggest economic incentives hold promise as a means to promote healthier household food purchases, and their effectiveness should be evaluated using robust, randomized trials.

  16. Nerve growth factor serum concentrations rise after successful cognitive-behavioural therapy of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Jockers-Scherübl, Maria C; Zubraegel, Doris; Baer, Thomas; Linden, Michael; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi; Schulte-Herbrüggen, Olaf; Neu, Peter; Hellweg, Rainer

    2007-01-30

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a chronic stress disease with permanent physical tension and cognitive strain. Raised nerve growth factor (NGF) serum levels were reported as an acute stress reaction in soldiers before their first parachute jump even before the rise in cortisol. Taking GAD as a clinical model of chronic stress, we measured NGF in the serum of 22 patients with GAD before and after cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and compared them to those of healthy normal controls. Treatment response was tested by the values of the State and Trait of Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A) as treatment outcome variables. The NGF values of patients and controls were similar at baseline (p=0.8941); however, with successful treatment, corresponding to a mean reduction in the HAM-A by more than 50% and a reduction in the clinical global impression scale (CGI) median from 4 to 1, the patients' NGF serum concentrations rose significantly (p=0.0006) which might correspond to an altered stress reaction, possibly contributing to good therapeutic response with CBT. There were 3 patients with a HAM-A decrease of less than 15%. In those patients NGF rose only marginally. Hence, the increase in serum NGF seems to indicate good treatment response.

  17. Identifying the Factors Leading to Success: How an Innovative Science Curriculum Cultivates Student Motivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scogin, Stephen C.

    2016-06-01

    PlantingScience is an award-winning program recognized for its innovation and use of computer-supported scientist mentoring. Science learners work on inquiry-based experiments in their classrooms and communicate asynchronously with practicing plant scientist-mentors about the projects. The purpose of this study was to identify specific factors contributing to the program's effectiveness in engaging students. Using multiple data sources, grounded theory (Strauss and Corbin in Basics of qualitative research. Sage, Newbury Park, 1990) was used to develop a conceptual model identifying the central phenomenon, causal conditions, intervening conditions, strategies, contexts, and student outcomes of the project. Student motivation was determined to be the central phenomenon explaining the success of the program, with student empowerment, online mentor interaction, and authenticity of the scientific experiences serving as causal conditions. Teachers contributed to student motivation by giving students more freedom, challenging students to take projects deeper, encouraging, and scaffolding. Scientists contributed to student motivation by providing explanations, asking questions, encouraging, and offering themselves as partners in the inquiry process. Several positive student outcomes of the program were uncovered and included increased positivity, greater willingness to take projects deeper, better understanding of scientific concepts, and greater commitments to collaboration. The findings of this study provide relevant information on how to develop curriculum, use technology, and train practitioners and mentors to utilize strategies and actions that improve learners' motivation to engage in authentic science in the classroom.

  18. What Helps and Hinders Indigenous Student Success in Higher Education Health Programmes: A Qualitative Study Using the Critical Incident Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Elana; Wikaire, Erena; Kool, Bridget; Honey, Michelle; Kelly, Fiona; Poole, Phillippa; Barrow, Mark; Airini; Ewen, Shaun; Reid, Papaarangi

    2015-01-01

    Tertiary institutions aim to provide high quality teaching and learning that meet the academic needs for an increasingly diverse student body including indigenous students. "Tatou Tatou" is a qualitative research project utilising Kaupapa "Maori" research methodology and the Critical Incident Technique interview method to…

  19. Women, Poverty, and Educational Success: A Critical Exploration of Low-Income Women's Experience in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Kate R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to critically explore low-income women's experience as they negotiate post secondary education in community colleges. Three research questions explore the context through which low-income women have entered the college experience, what that experience is like for them, and how the community college experience has…

  20. Identifying critical factors influencing the disposal of dead pigs by farmers in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linhai; Xu, Guoyan; Wang, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Disposal of dead pigs by pig farmers may have a direct impact on pork safety, public health, and the ecological environment in China. Drawing on the existing literature, this study analyzed and summarized the main factors that could affect the disposal of dead pigs by pig farmers by conducting a survey of 654 pig farmers in Funing County, Jiangsu Province, China. The purpose of this analysis was to investigate the disposal of dead pigs in China and provide useful regulatory strategies for the government. The interrelationships among dimensions and factors that affect the disposal of dead pigs by farmers were analyzed, and critical factors were identified by a hybrid multi-criteria decision-making method, which is a combination of decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL) and analytic network process (ANP). Our results demonstrated that production characteristics were the most important dimensions and that costs and profits, scale of farming, pattern of farming, knowledge of relevant laws and regulations, and knowledge of pig disease and prevention were the five most critical factors affecting the disposal of dead pigs by farmers in China at this stage. The significance of this study lies in further discussing some management policies for the Chinese government regarding strengthen regulation of disposing dead pigs.

  1. Systematic investigation of transcription factors critical in the protection against cerebral ischemia by Danhong injection

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Junying; Zhang, Yanqiong; Jia, Qiang; Liu, Mingwei; Li, Defeng; Zhang, Yi; Song, Lei; Hu, Yanzhen; Xian, Minghua; Yang, Hongjun; Ding, Chen; Huang, Luqi

    2016-01-01

    Systematic investigations of complex pathological cascades during ischemic brain injury help to elucidate novel therapeutic targets against cerebral ischemia. Although some transcription factors (TFs) involved in cerebral ischemia, systematic surveys of their changes during ischemic brain injury have not been reported. Moreover, some multi-target agents effectively protected against ischemic stroke, but their mechanisms, especially the targets of TFs, are still unclear. Therefore, a comprehensive approach by integrating network pharmacology strategy and a new concatenated tandem array of consensus transcription factor response elements method to systematically investigate the target TFs critical in the protection against cerebral ischemia by a medication was first reported, and then applied to a multi-target drug, Danhong injection (DHI). High-throughput nature and depth of coverage, as well as high quantitative accuracy of the developed approach, make it more suitable for analyzing such multi-target agents. Results indicated that pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factor 1 and cyclic AMP-dependent transcription factor 1, along with six other TFs, are putative target TFs for DHI-mediated protection against cerebral ischemia. This study provides, for the first time, a systematic investigation of the target TFs critical to DHI-mediated protection against cerebral ischemia, as well as reveals more potential therapeutic targets for ischemic stroke. PMID:27431009

  2. Spatial attention, preview, and popout: which factors influence critical spacing in crowded displays?

    PubMed

    Scolari, Miranda; Kohnen, Andrew; Barton, Brian; Awh, Edward

    2007-02-14

    Crowding refers to the phenomenon in which nearby distractors impede target processing. This effect is reduced as target-distractor distance increases, and it is eliminated entirely at a distance that is labeled the critical spacing point. Attention, distractor preview, and popout are each known to facilitate processing in crowded displays. Eight experiments examined whether this is accomplished via a reduction in critical spacing. Attention was manipulated via spatial cueing, whereby a peripheral cue elicited a stimulus-driven shift of attention. Distractor preview was examined by manipulating whether the crowding distractors were presented prior to or simultaneous with the target. Popout was examined by manipulating whether there was a salient color difference between the target and distractors. As demonstrated in previous studies, we found robust benefits of spatial cueing, preview, and popout in crowded displays. However, although spatial cueing led to robust improvements in target discrimination, there was no reduction in critical spacing for attended stimuli. By contrast, both preview and popout caused large reductions in critical spacing. These disparate results indicate that attention improves target discrimination in crowded displays in a qualitatively different manner than do the other factors.

  3. Mosquito species succession and physicochemical factors affecting their abundance in rice fields in Mwea, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Muturi, Ephantus J; Mwangangi, Joseph; Shililu, Josephat; Muriu, Simon; Jacob, Benjamin; Kabiru, Ephantus; Gu, Weidong; Mbogo, Charles; Githure, John; Novak, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The succession of mosquito species and abiotic factors affecting their distribution and abundance in rice (Oryza spp.) fields was investigated over a 16-wk rice growing cycle covering the period between January and May 2006. Fifteen experimental rice plots were sampled for mosquito larvae and characterized based on rice height, number of tillers, floating vegetation cover, water depth, water temperature, turbidity, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, total dissolved solids, and conductivity. Microscopic identification of 3,025 larvae yielded nine mosquito species predominated by Anopheles arabiensis Patton (45.0%), Culex quinquefasciatus Say (35.8%), Anopheles pharoensis Theobald (9.0%) and Ficalbia splendens Theobald (7.1%). Other species, including Anopheles rufipes Gough, Anopheles coustani Laveran, Anonopheles maculipalpis Giles, Culex annulioris Theobald, and Culex poicilipes Theobald made up 3.1% of the total collection. Anopheles gambiae s.l., Cx. quinquefasciatus, and An. pharoensis occurred throughout the cycle, but they were more abundant up to 4 wk posttransplanting with peaks after fertilizer application. As rice plants became established, three groups of mosquitoes were recognized: the first groups included An. rufipes, Fl. splendens, and Cx. annulioris, which occurred throughout much of the second half of the rice cycle, whereas the second group included Cx. poicilipes, which was found in the middle of the rice cycle. An. coustani and An. maculipalpis formed the third group occurring toward the end of the cycle. Dissolved oxygen, number of tillers, and rice height were negatively associated with the abundance ofAn. arabiensis and Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae. In addition, Cx. quinquefasciatus also was associated with water depth (-ve) and turbidity (+ve). Abundance of An. pharoensis larvae was significantly associated with water temperature (+ve), the number of tillers (-ve), and rice height (-ve), whereas Fl. splendens was significantly associated with

  4. 50 Years in the sun of Bürgenstock--on the success factors of a famous conference.

    PubMed

    Müller, Klaus

    2015-04-20

    The secret of success: This year the famous "Bürgenstock Conference" will take place for the 50th time. This conference has become internationally one of the, if not the, most highly regarded conference in chemistry, chemical biology, and physical chemistry. What are the success factors of this conference? These as well as a number of perhaps more hidden figures and facts are discussed.

  5. One-Year Weight Losses in the Look AHEAD Study: Factors Associated with Success

    PubMed Central

    Wadden, Thomas A.; West, Delia S.; Neiberg, Rebecca; Wing, Rena R.; Ryan, Donna H.; Johnson, Karen C.; Foreyt, John; Hill, James O.; Trence, Dace; Vitolins, Mara

    2009-01-01

    This report provides a further analysis of the first year weight losses in the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) study and identifies factors associated with success. Participants were a total of 5,145 men and women with type 2 diabetes who were recruited at 16 sites and randomly assigned to an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) or a control condition, Diabetes Support and Education (DSE). During year 1, participants in ILI received comprehensive diet and physical activity counseling in 42 group and individual sessions, compared with 3 educational sessions for DSE participants. As reported previously, at the end of the year, ILI participants lost 8.6% of initial weight, compared to 0.7% for DSE (p < 0.001). Within the ILI group, all racial/ethnic groups achieved clinically significant weight losses (≥ 5.5%), although there were significant differences among groups. For the year, ILI participants attended an average of 35.4 treatment sessions and reported exercising a mean of 136.6 min/week and consuming a total of 360.9 meal replacement products. Greater self-reported physical activity was the strongest correlate of weight loss, followed by treatment attendance and consumption of meal replacements. The use of orlistat, during the second half of the year, increased weight loss only marginally in those ILI participants who had lost < 5% of initial weight during the first 6 months and chose to take the medication thereafter as a toolbox option. The lifestyle intervention was clinically effective in all subsets of an ethnically and demographically diverse population. PMID:19180071

  6. One-year weight losses in the Look AHEAD study: factors associated with success.

    PubMed

    Wadden, Thomas A; West, Delia S; Neiberg, Rebecca H; Wing, Rena R; Ryan, Donna H; Johnson, Karen C; Foreyt, John P; Hill, James O; Trence, Dace L; Vitolins, Mara Z

    2009-04-01

    This report provides a further analysis of the first year weight losses in the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) study and identifies factors associated with success. Participants were a total of 5,145 men and women with type 2 diabetes who were recruited at 16 sites and randomly assigned to an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) or a control condition, Diabetes Support and Education (DSE). During year 1, participants in ILI received comprehensive diet and physical activity counseling in a total of 42 group and individual sessions, compared with three educational sessions for DSE participants. As reported previously, at the end of the year, ILI participants lost 8.6% of initial weight, compared to 0.7% for DSE (P < 0.001). Within the ILI group, all racial/ethnic groups achieved clinically significant weight losses (>5.5%), although there were significant differences among groups. For the year, ILI participants attended an average of 35.4 treatment sessions and reported exercising a mean of 136.6 min/week and consuming a total of 360.9 meal replacement products. Greater self-reported physical activity was the strongest correlate of weight loss, followed by treatment attendance and consumption of meal replacements. The use of orlistat, during the second half of the year, increased weight loss only marginally in those ILI participants who had lost <5% of initial weight during the first 6 months and chose to take the medication thereafter as a toolbox option. The lifestyle intervention was clinically effective in all subsets of an ethnically and demographically diverse population.

  7. A Framework for Achieving e-Business Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, U.; Maheshwari, M.; Kumar, V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of an empirical study of critical factors associated with e-business success. An a priori model relating the success factors to e-business success is developed. The study uses the "balanced scorecard" methodology to measure the success of e-business organizations, as the authors believe that financial measures are…

  8. Risk factors for shoulder pain and injury in swimmers: A critical systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hill, Lee; Collins, Malcolm; Posthumus, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Swimming is one of the most popular recreational and competitive sporting activities. In the 2013/2014 swimming season, 9630 men and 12,333 women were registered with the National Collegiate Athletics Association in the USA. The repetitive nature of the swimming stroke and demanding training programs of its athletes raises a number of concerns regarding incidence and severity of injuries that a swimmer might experience during a competitive season. A number of risk factors have previously been identified but the level of evidence from individual studies, as well as the level of certainty that these factors predispose a swimmer to pain and injury, to our knowledge has yet to be critically evaluated in a systematic review. Therefore, the primary objective of this review is to conduct a systematic review to critically assess the published evidence for risk factors that may predispose a swimmer to shoulder pain and injury. Three electronic databases, ScienceDirect, PubMed and SpringerLink, were searched using keywords "(Injury OR pain) AND (Swim*)" and "(Shoulder) AND (Swim*)". Based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 2731 unique titles were identified and were analyzed to a final 29 articles. Only articles with a level of evidence of I, II and III were included according to robust study design and data analysis. The level of certainty for each risk factor was determined. No studies were determined to have a high level of certainty, clinical joint laxity and instability, internal/external rotation, previous history of pain and injury and competitive level were determined to have a moderate level of certainty. All other risk factors were evaluated as having a low level of certainty. Although several risk factors were identified from the reviewed studies, prospective cohort studies, larger sample sizes, consistent and robust measures of risk should be employed in future research.

  9. Four-Year Weight Losses in the Look AHEAD Study: Factors Associated with Long-Term Success

    PubMed Central

    Wadden, Thomas A.; Neiberg, Rebecca H.; Wing, Rena R.; Clark, Jeanne M.; Delahanty, Linda M.; Hill, James O.; Krakoff, Jonathan; Otto, Amy; Ryan, Donna H.; Vitolins, Mara Z.

    2011-01-01

    This report provides a further analysis of the year 4 weight losses in the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) study and identifies factors associated with long-term success. A total of 5145 overweight/obese men and women with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) or a usual care group, referred to as Diabetes Support and Education (DSE). ILI participants were provided approximately weekly group or individual treatment in year 1; continued but less frequent contact was provided in years 2–4. DSE participants received three group educational sessions in all years. As reported previously, at year 4, ILI participants lost an average of 4.7% of initial weight, compared with 1.1% for DSE (p<0.0001). More ILI than DSE participants lost ≥5% (46% vs 25%, p<0.0001) and ≥10% (23% vs 10%, p<0.0001) of initial weight. Within the ILI, acheivement of both the 5% and 10% categorical weight losses at year 4 was strongly related to meeting these goals at year 1. A total of 887 participants in ILI lost ≥10% at year 1, of whom 374 (42.2%) achieved this loss at year 4. Participants who maintained the loss, compared with those who did not, attended more treatment sessions and reported more favorable physical activity and food intake at year 4. These results provide critical evidence that a comprehensive lifestyle intervention can induce clinically significant weight loss (i.e., ≥5%) in overweight/obese participants with type 2 diabetes and maintain this loss in more than 45% of patients at 4 years. PMID:21779086

  10. Four-year weight losses in the Look AHEAD study: factors associated with long-term success.

    PubMed

    Wadden, Thomas A; Neiberg, Rebecca H; Wing, Rena R; Clark, Jeanne M; Delahanty, Linda M; Hill, James O; Krakoff, Jonathan; Otto, Amy; Ryan, Donna H; Vitolins, Mara Z

    2011-10-01

    This report provides a further analysis of the year 4 weight losses in the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) study and identifies factors associated with long-term success. A total of 5,145 overweight/obese men and women with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) or a usual care group, referred to as Diabetes Support and Education (DSE). ILI participants were provided approximately weekly group or individual treatment in year 1; continued but less frequent contact was provided in years 2-4. DSE participants received three group educational sessions in all years. As reported previously, at year 4, ILI participants lost an average of 4.7% of initial weight, compared with 1.1% for DSE (P < 0.0001). More ILI than DSE participants lost ≥ 5% (46% vs. 25%, P < 0.0001) and ≥ 10% (23% vs. 10%, P < 0.0001) of initial weight. Within the ILI, achievement of both the 5% and 10% categorical weight losses at year 4 was strongly related to meeting these goals at year 1. A total of 887 participants in ILI lost ≥ 10% at year 1, of whom 374 (42.2%) achieved this loss at year 4. Participants who maintained the loss, compared with those who did not, attended more treatment sessions and reported more favorable physical activity and food intake at year 4. These results provide critical evidence that a comprehensive lifestyle intervention can induce clinically significant weight loss (i.e., ≥ 5%) in overweight/obese participants with type 2 diabetes and maintain this loss in more than 45% of patients at 4 years.

  11. The Fulfillment of Promise Revisited: A Discriminant Analysis of Factors Predicting Success in the Terman Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyryt, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    A multivariate approach reexamined Lewis Terman's longitudinal study data comparing the 100 most successful and 100 least successful men identified in the 1920s as having very high intelligence. Results reaffirmed the importance of educational attainment in vocational achievement, though intelligence and amount of early acceleration also predicted…

  12. Business process re-engineering in the logistics industry: a study of implementation, success factors, and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chien-wen; Chou, Ching-Chih

    2010-02-01

    As business process re-engineering (BPR) is an important foundation to ensure the success of enterprise systems, this study would like to investigate the relationships among BPR implementation, BPR success factors, and business performance for logistics companies. Our empirical findings show that BPR companies outperformed non-BPR companies, not only on information processing, technology applications, organisational structure, and co-ordination, but also on all of the major logistics operations. Comparing the different perceptions of the success factors for BPR, non-BPR companies place greater emphasis on the importance of employee involvement while BPR companies are more concerned about the influence of risk management. Our findings also suggest that management attitude towards BPR success factors could affect performance with regard to technology applications and logistics operations. Logistics companies which have not yet implemented the BPR approach could refer to our findings to evaluate the advantages of such an undertaking and to take care of those BPR success factors affecting performance before conducting BPR projects.

  13. Critical parameters governing energy density of Li-storage cathode materials unraveled by confirmatory factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Kee-Sun; Han, Su Cheol; Park, Woon Bae; Pyo, Myoungho

    2016-03-01

    Despite extensive effort during the past few decades, a comprehensive understanding of the key variables governing the electrochemical properties of cathode materials in Li-ion batteries is still far from complete. To elucidate the critical parameters affecting energy density (ED) and capacity (Q) retention in layer and spinel cathodes, we data-mine the existing experimental data via confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) based on a structural equation model (SEM), which is a proven, versatile tool in understanding complex problems in the social science. The data sets are composed of 18 and 15 parameters extracted from 38 layer and 33 spinel compounds, respectively. CFA reveals the irrelevance of Q retention to all the parameters we adopt, but it also reveals the sensitive variations of ED with specific parameters. We validate the usefulness of CFA in material science and pinpointed critical parameters for high-ED cathodes, hoping to suggest a new insight in materials design.

  14. Successful carbon dioxide angiography guided endovascular thrombectomy of the superficial femoral artery in a young patient with critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Giusca, Sorin; Eisele, Tom; Raupp, Dorothea; Eisenbach, Christoph; Korosoglou, Grigorios

    2017-03-01

    Currently, the treatment of thromboembolic ischemia of the lower extremities includes percutaneous rotational thrombectomy and aspiration devices. However, the standard approach for endovascular treatment requires the administration of iodine contrast agents, which is problematic in patients with pre-existing renal disease and diabetes. Herein, we describe a case of a CO2 angiography guided endovascular thrombectomy of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) in a young patient with critical limb ischemia. Mechanical thrombectomy using the Rotarex system, catheter aided aspiration and subsequent stent placement in the SFA was entirely guided using CO2 angiography.

  15. The role of habitat factors in successful invasion of alien plant Acer negundo in riparian zones.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikorski, Piotr; Sikorska, Daria

    2016-04-01

    Ash-leaved maple (Acer negundo) is one of the most invasive species occurring in riparian zones. The invasion is especially effective in disturbed areas, as the plant favours anthropogenic sites. The plant was also observed to be able to penetrate into sandy bars, also those separated from the land, inaccessible to people. It's removal is time-consuming and laborious, often involves damage done to sensitive vegetation and the results are doubtful, as the plant quickly regenerates. The invasion patterns and establishment of ash-leaved maple in natural ecosystems are poorly investigated. The aim of this study was to test how habitat factors such as: light availability, soil characteristics and competition contribute to ash-leaved maple effective colonization of natural sand bars free from anthropogenic pressure. In 2014 sand bars located in Vistula River Valley in Warsaw were inventoried and classified basing on their development stage as 1 - initial, 2 - unstable, 3 - stable. Apart from the occurrence of the invasive ash-leaved maple the plants competing with it were recognized and the percentage of the shoots of shrubs and herbaceous plants was estimated. PAR was measured at ground level and 1 meter above ground, the thickness of organic layer formed on the top of the sand was also measured as the indicator of sand bar development stage. The maple's survival in extremely difficult conditions resembles the strategy of willows and poplars naturally occurring in the riparian zones, which are well adapted to this environment. The success of invasion strongly depends on the plants establishment during sand bars initial stage of development. The seedlings growth correlates with the age of the sand bar (r1=0,41, r2=0,42 i r3=0,57). The colonization lasts for 4-6 years and the individuals start to cluster in bigger parches. After that period the maple turns into the phase of competition for space. Habitat factors such as shading (r2=0,41 i r3=0,51) and organic layer

  16. Incidence and risk factors of injuries and their impact on academic success: A prospective study in PETE students.

    PubMed

    Bliekendaal, S; Goossens, L; Stubbe, J H

    2017-01-30

    Injuries can have a major impact on the physical performance and academic career of physical education teacher education (PETE) students. To investigate the injury problem, risk factors, and the impact of injuries on academic success, 252 PETE students were followed during their first semester. Risk factor analysis was conducted by means of logistic regression analysis with a differentiation for upper body, lower body, acute, overuse, and severe injuries. An incidence of 1.26 injuries/student/semester was found. Most injuries involved the lower body (61%), were new injuries (76%), occurred acutely (66%), and were sustained during curricular gymnastics (25%) or extracurricular soccer (28%). Significant risk factors for lower body acute injuries were age (OR=2.14; P=.01), previous injury (OR=2.23; P=.01), and an injury at the start of the year (OR=2.56; P=.02). For lower body overuse injuries, gender (OR=2.85; P=.02) and the interval shuttle run test score (OR=2.44; P=.04) were significant risk factors. Previous injury (OR=2.59; P=.04) and injury at the start of the year (upper body: OR=4.57; P=.02; lower body: OR=3.75; P<.01) were risk factors for severe injuries. Injury-related time loss was positively related to total academic success (r=.20; P=.02) and success in theoretical courses (r=.24; P=<.01). No association was found between time loss and academic success for sport courses.

  17. Critical factors influencing hospitals' adoption of HL7 version 2 standards: an empirical investigation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Hung; Lin, I-Chun; Roan, Jin-Sheng; Yeh, Jehn-Shan

    2012-06-01

    Industry predictions focus on future e-hospitals that will integrate all stakeholders into a seamless network, allowing data to be shared. The Health Level Seven (HL7) is a standard for the interchange of data within the healthcare industry. It simplifies communication interfaces and allows the interoperability among heterogeneous applications. Although the benefits of adopting HL7 are well known, only a few hospitals in Taiwan have actually adopted it. What are the reasons behind the hospitals' lack of intention to adopt HL7? Most prior studies on HL7 have focused on technical issues and general overlooked the managerial side. This has caused a lack of understanding of factors influencing hospitals' decision on HL7 adoption. In fact, main reasons behind a hospital's decision on whether to adopt an innovative technology are more often related to organizational than purely technical issues. Hence, we pay our attention to these organizational considerations over HL7 adoption. Based on the Innovation Diffusion Theory, we proposed a research model to explore the critical factors influencing Taiwan hospitals' adoption intention of HL7. 472 questionnaires were distributed to all accredited hospitals in Taiwan and 122 were returned. The valid response rate was 25.21% (119). Factor analysis, logistic regression and Pearson Chi-square test were conducted to verify the research model. The results showed that environmental pressure, top management attitude towards HL7, staff's technology capability, system integrity, and hospital's scale were critical factors influencing hospitals' intention on whether to adopt HL7. The research findings provided the government, the healthcare industry, the hospital administrators and the academia with practical and theoretical references. These factors should be considered in planning promotion plan to encourage hospital adoption of HL7. This study also opens up a new research direction as well as a new viewpoint, and consequentially

  18. Factors influencing nesting success of king eiders on northern Alaska's Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bentzen, R.L.; Powell, A.N.; Suydam, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    King eider (Somateria spectabilis) populations have declined markedly in recent decades for unknown reasons. Nest survival is one component of recruitment, and a female's chance of reproductive success increases with her ability to choose an appropriate nesting strategy. We estimated variation in daily nest survival of king eiders at 2 sites, Teshekpuk and Kuparuk, Alaska, USA, 2002-2005. We evaluated both a priori and exploratory competing models of nest survival that considered importance of nest concealment, seclusion, and incubation constancy as strategies to avoid 2 primary egg predators, avian (Larus spp., Stercorarius spp., and Corvus corax) and fox (Alopex lagopus). We used generalized nonlinear techniques to examine factors affecting nest survival rates and information-theoretic approaches to select among competing models. Estimated nest survival, accounting for a nest visitation effect, varied considerably across sites and years (0.21-0.57); however, given our small sample size, much of this variation maybe attributable to sampling variation (??process = 0.007, 95% CI: 0.003-0.070). Nest survival was higher at Kuparuk than Teshekpuk in all years; however, due to the correlative nature of our data, we cannot determine the underlying causes with any certainty. We found mixed support for the concealed breeding strategy, females derived no benefit from nesting in areas with more willow (Salix spp.; measure of concealment) except that the observer effect diminished as willow cover increased. We suggest these patterns are due to conflicting predation pressures. Nest survival was not higher on islands (measure of seclusion) or with increased incubation constancy but was higher post-fox removal, indicating that predator control on breeding grounds could be a viable management option. Nest survival was negatively affected by our nest visitations, most likely by exposing the nest to avian scavengers. We recommend precautions be taken to limit the effects of nest

  19. Determining of Factors Influencing the Success and Failure of Hospital Information System and Their Evaluation Methods: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Kimiafar, Khalil; Ahmadi, Maryam; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, using new information technology (IT) has provided remarkable opportunities to decrease medical errors, support health care specialist, increase the efficiency and even the quality of patient’s care and safety. Objectives: The purpose of this study was the identification of Hospital Information System (HIS) success and failure factors and the evaluation methods of these factors. This research emphasizes the need to a comprehensive evaluation of HISs which considers a wide range of success and failure factors in these systems. Materials and Methods: We searched for relevant English language studies based on keywords in title and abstract, using PubMed, Ovid Medline (by applying MeSH terms), Scopus, ScienceDirect and Embase (earliest entry to march 17, 2012). Studies which considered success models and success or failure factors, or studied the evaluation models of HISs and the related ones were chosen. Since the studies used in this systematic review were heterogeneous, the combination of extracted data was carried out by using narrative synthesis method. Results: We found 16 articles which required detailed analysis. Finally, the suggested framework includes 12 main factors (functional, organizational, behavioral, cultural, management, technical, strategy, economy, education, legal, ethical and political factors), 67 sub factors, and 33 suggested methods for the evaluation of these sub factors. Conclusions: The results of the present research indicates that the emphasis of the HIS evaluation moves from technical subjects to human and organizational subjects, and from objective to subjective issues. Therefore, this issue entails more familiarity with more qualitative evaluation methods. In most of the reviewed studies, the main focus has been laid on the necessity of using multi-method approaches and combining methods to obtain more comprehensive and useful results. PMID:24693386

  20. An acoustic key to eight languages/dialects: Factor analyses of critical-band-filtered speech

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kazuo; Nakajima, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    The peripheral auditory system functions like a frequency analyser, often modelled as a bank of non-overlapping band-pass filters called critical bands; 20 bands are necessary for simulating frequency resolution of the ear within an ordinary frequency range of speech (up to 7,000 Hz). A far smaller number of filters seemed sufficient, however, to re-synthesise intelligible speech sentences with power fluctuations of the speech signals passing through them; nevertheless, the number and frequency ranges of the frequency bands for efficient speech communication are yet unknown. We derived four common frequency bands—covering approximately 50–540, 540–1,700, 1,700–3,300, and above 3,300 Hz—from factor analyses of spectral fluctuations in eight different spoken languages/dialects. The analyses robustly led to three factors common to all languages investigated—the low & mid-high factor related to the two separate frequency ranges of 50–540 and 1,700–3,300 Hz, the mid-low factor the range of 540–1,700 Hz, and the high factor the range above 3,300 Hz—in these different languages/dialects, suggesting a language universal. PMID:28198405

  1. An acoustic key to eight languages/dialects: Factor analyses of critical-band-filtered speech.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Kazuo; Nakajima, Yoshitaka

    2017-02-15

    The peripheral auditory system functions like a frequency analyser, often modelled as a bank of non-overlapping band-pass filters called critical bands; 20 bands are necessary for simulating frequency resolution of the ear within an ordinary frequency range of speech (up to 7,000 Hz). A far smaller number of filters seemed sufficient, however, to re-synthesise intelligible speech sentences with power fluctuations of the speech signals passing through them; nevertheless, the number and frequency ranges of the frequency bands for efficient speech communication are yet unknown. We derived four common frequency bands-covering approximately 50-540, 540-1,700, 1,700-3,300, and above 3,300 Hz-from factor analyses of spectral fluctuations in eight different spoken languages/dialects. The analyses robustly led to three factors common to all languages investigated-the low &mid-high factor related to the two separate frequency ranges of 50-540 and 1,700-3,300 Hz, the mid-low factor the range of 540-1,700 Hz, and the high factor the range above 3,300 Hz-in these different languages/dialects, suggesting a language universal.

  2. Computation of cross sections and dose conversion factors for criticality accident dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Devine, R T

    2004-01-01

    In the application of criticality accident dosemeters the cross sections and fluence-to-dose conversion factors have to be computed. The cross section and fluence-to-dose conversion factor for the thermal and epi-thermal contributions to neutron dose are well documented; for higher energy regions (>100 keV) these depend on the spectrum assumed. Fluence is determined using threshold detectors. The cross sections require the folding of an expected spectrum with the reaction cross sections. The fluence-to-dose conversion factors also require a similar computation. The true and effective thresholds are used to include the information on the expected spectrum. The spectra can either be taken from compendia or measured at the facility at which the exposures are to be expected. The cross sections can be taken from data computations or analytic representations and the fluence-to-dose conversion factors are determined by various standards making bodies. The problem remaining is the method of computation. The purpose of this paper is to compare two methods for computing these factors: analytic and Monte Carlo.

  3. Factors determining success of awake and asleep magnetic resonance imaging scans in nonsedated children.

    PubMed

    Vannest, Jennifer; Rajagopal, Akila; Cicchino, Nicole D; Franks-Henry, Julie; Simpson, Sarah M; Lee, Gregory; Altaye, Mekibib; Sroka, Claire; Holland, Scott K

    2014-12-01

    Effective techniques that allow children to complete magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans without sedation are high priority for the imaging community. We used behavioral approaches to scan 64 sleeping infants and toddlers younger than 4 years, and 156 awake children aged 2.5 to 18 years, for a neuroimaging research protocol. Infants and their families participated in a desensitization protocol for several days, then scanning was performed at the child's bedtime during natural sleep. For awake young children, a behavioral protocol was used that included tangible reinforcers, exploration of the scanner environment and a brief practice session. Two scan sessions were targeted for awake children. Success rates by participant were quantified in terms of the proportion of requisite scans in each session that were successfully acquired. The average success rate in sleeping infants and toddlers was 0.461. For awake children aged 2.5 to 6 years, success rates for each session were 0.739 and 0.847. For children aged 7 years and older, success rates were over 0.900 for both the sessions. Overall, though success was lower later in a scan session for both sleeping infants and awake young children, our results demonstrate that it is feasible to collect high-quality imaging data using standard imaging sequences in infants and children without sedation.

  4. A Critical Review of the Incidence and Risk Factors for Finger Injuries in Rock Climbing.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gareth; Johnson, Mark I

    Rock climbing is a popular sporting activity and indoor sport climbing has been accepted for inclusion in the 2020 Olympic Games. The aim of this article is to critically review research on the incidence and risk factors associated with injuries during rock climbing. A semisystematic approach in reviewing literature on incidence and prevalence was applied. Articles were identified after searches of the following electronic databases: Discover, Academic Search Complete (EBSCO), PubMed, Embase, SPORTDiscus, and ScienceDirect. Despite methodological shortcomings of the studies contained within the review, the frequency of climbing-related injuries is high and can be challenging to diagnose. The fingers are the most common site of injury with previous injury a significant risk factor for reinjury. The annular pulleys of the fingers are the most commonly injured structure and evidence suggests epiphyseal fractures in adolescent sport climbers is increasing. A diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for climbing-related finger injuries is proposed.

  5. Group Dynamics as a Critical Component of Successful Space Exploration: Conceptual Theory and Insights from the Biosphere 2 Closure Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark; Allen, John P.

    As space exploration and eventually habitation achieves longer durations, successfully managing group dynamics of small, physically isolated groups will become vital. The paper summarizes important underlying research and conceptual theory and how these manifested in a well-documented example: the closure experiments of Biosphere 2. Key research breakthroughs in discerning the operation of small human groups comes from the pioneering work of W.R. Bion. He discovered two competing modalities of behavior. The first is the “task-oriented” or work group governed by shared acceptance of goals, reality-thinking in relation to time, resources and rational, and intelligent management of challenges presented. The opposing, usually unconscious, modality is what Bion called the “basic-assumption” group and alternates between three “group animal” groups: dependency/kill the leader; fight/flight and pairing. If not dealt with, these dynamics work to undermine and defeat the conscious task group’s goal achievement. The paper discusses crew training and selection, various approaches to structuring the work and hierarchy of the group, the importance of contact with a larger population through electronic communication and dealing with the “us-them” syndrome frequently observed between crew and Mission Control. The experience of the first two year closure of Biosphere 2 is drawn on in new ways to illustrate vicissitudes and management of group dynamics especially as both the inside team of biospherians and key members of Mission Control had training in working with group dynamics. Insights from that experience may help mission planning so that future groups in space cope successfully with inherent group dynamics challenges that arise.

  6. Nerve growth factor preserves a critical motor period in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Wolansky, M J; Paratcha, G C; Ibarra, G R; Azcurra, J M

    1999-01-01

    We previously found the occurrence of a critical motor period during rat postnatal development where circling training starting the 7-day schedule at 30 days-but not before or after-induces a lifetime drop in the binding to cholinergic muscarinic receptors (mAChRs) in striatum. Here, we studied whether nerve growth factor (NGF) participates in this restricted period of muscarinic sensitivity. For this purpose, we administered mouse salival gland 2.5S NGF (1.4 or 0.4 microg/day, infused by means of ALZA minipumps) by intrastriatal unilateral route between days 25 and 39, and then trained rats starting at 40 days. Under these conditions, NGF induced a long-term reduction in the striatal [3H] quinuclidilbenzylate (QNB) binding sites despite the fact that motor training was carried out beyond the natural critical period. Thus, at day 70, measurement of specific QNB binding in infused striata of trained rats showed decreases of 42% (p < .0004) and 33% (p < .02) after administration of the higher and lower NGF doses, respectively, with respect to trained rats treated with cytochrome C, for control. Noncannulated striata of the NGF-treated rats also showed a decrease in QNB binding sites (44%; p < .0001) only at the higher infusion rate. This effect was not found in the respective control groups. Our observations show that NGF modulates the critical period in which activity-dependent mAChR setting takes place during rat striatal maturation.

  7. Success Factors for International Postgraduate Students' Adjustment: Exploring the Roles of Intercultural Competence, Language Proficiency, Social Contact and Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Tony J.; Sercombe, Peter G.; Sachdev, Itesh; Naeb, Rola; Schartner, Alina

    2013-01-01

    The growth in the number of 'international' students in higher education is a phenomenon of increasing importance to educators, researchers and policymakers worldwide. This multi-methodological study explored factors associated with their adjustment, successful or otherwise. It integrated associations across three domains of enquiry which had…

  8. Accreditation-Related Self-Study as a Planned Change Process: Factors Relating to Its Success in Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casserly, Mary F.

    1987-01-01

    This discussion of the potential relationship between the accreditation process and organizational change in academic libraries includes the presentation of models of planned change and self-study. A study designed to determine which factors in the models relate to successful accreditation-related self-study processes is described and the results…

  9. An Exploration of Factors That Impact the Satisfaction and Success of Low Socioeconomic Status Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Damon A.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation explored multiple factors that impact the satisfaction and success of low socioeconomic status students at a California community college. In an effort to illuminate this impact, a quantitative study investigating extant data collected from a campus climate survey was conducted. The researcher was specifically interested in…

  10. Self-Reported Factors that Contribute to the Success of the Nontraditional Student in a Five Semester Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joann K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological study was to describe factors that nontraditional nursing students reported as helpful in their success in the nursing program. Two men and eight women took part in structured one-time interviews. Structured interviews were conducted with the participants in settings that were chosen by the…

  11. Creating Digital Games as Interactive Learning Environments: Factors That Affect Palestinian Teachers' Success in Modifying Video Games for Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younis, Bilal Khaleel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors that might predict Palestinian teachers' success in modding games for instruction. An instructional game design model named Game Modding for Non-Professionals (GMNP) was created specifically for the training of Palestinian teachers during this study. This study addressed the question: To…

  12. Undergraduate Latina/o Students: A Systematic Review of Research Identifying Factors Contributing to Academic Success Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Gloria; Taggart, Amanda; Nora, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to produce an up-to-date and comprehensive summary of qualitative and quantitative evidence specific to the factors related to undergraduate Latina/o student academic success outcomes during college. The purpose of the study was to make sense of and provide critique to this rapidly growing body of research, as…

  13. Native American Student Perceptions of the Cultural Environment and Factors for Academic Success at the University of South Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grignon, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    Considering the high retention rates for Native American students in 2009 and 2008 in the two semesters at the University of South Dakota, there is a need to know the Native student perceptions of factors for their academic success. Native professors and administrators would benefit to know this information to continue to make improvements in…

  14. The Social, Educational and Cognitive Factors of Success in the First Year of University: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morlaix, Sophie; Suchaut, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study, which evaluated a sample of first-year students enrolled at the University of Burgundy, France, in 2010-2011, is to understand the factors determining success in the first year of university. The originality of this research lies in the inclusion of specific indicators of students' skills when they start…

  15. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Home Environment and Home Social Behavior Data from the Elementary School Success Profile for Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegmann, Kate M.; Thompson, Aaron M.; Bowen, Natasha K.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to test the factor structure and scale quality of data provided by caregivers about the home environment and child behavior at home using the Elementary School Success Profile (ESSP) for Families. The ESSP for Families is one component of the ESSP, an online social-environmental assessment that also collects…

  16. Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors for Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual and Average Member of Critical Group

    SciTech Connect

    K. Montague

    2000-02-23

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop additional Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for a reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) for the periods 10,000 years and 1,000,000 years after the repository closure. In addition, Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors for the average member of a critical group are calculated for those additional radionuclides postulated to reach the environment during the period after 10,000 years and up to 1,000,000 years. After the permanent closure of the repository, the engineered systems within the repository will eventually lose their abilities to contain radionuclide inventory, and the radionuclides will migrate through the geosphere and eventually enter the local water table moving toward inhabited areas. The primary release scenario is a groundwater well used for drinking water supply and irrigation, and this calculation takes these postulated releases and follows them through various pathways until they result in a dose to either a member of critical group or a reasonably maximally exposed individual. The pathways considered in this calculation include inhalation, ingestion, and direct exposure.

  17. Autoactivation by a Candida glabrata copper metalloregulatory transcription factor requires critical minor groove interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, K A; Thiele, D J

    1996-01-01

    Rapid transcriptional autoactivation of the Candida glabrata AMT1 copper metalloregulatory transcription factor gene is essential for survival in the presence of high extracellular copper concentrations. Analysis of the interactions between purified recombinant AMT1 protein and the AMT1 promoter metal regulatory element was carried out by a combination of missing-nucleoside analysis, ethylation interference, site-directed mutagenesis, and quantitative in vitro DNA binding studies. The results of these experiments demonstrate that monomeric AMT1 binds the metal regulatory element with very high affinity and utilizes critical contacts in both the major and minor grooves. A single adenosine residue in the minor groove, conserved in all known yeast Cu metalloregulatory transcription factor DNA binding sites, plays a critical role in both AMT1 DNA binding in vitro and Cu-responsive AMT1 gene transcription in vivo. Furthermore, a mutation in the AMT1 Cu-activated DNA binding domain which converts a single arginine, found in a conserved minor groove binding domain, to lysine markedly reduces AMT1 DNA binding affinity in vitro and results in a severe defect in the ability of C. glabrata cells to mount a protective response against Cu toxicity. PMID:8552101

  18. Project design factors that affect student perceptions of the success of a science research project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, Doris R.

    Throughout the United States, various summer science programs for precollege students are conducted with an aim toward increasing the involvement of young people in science. Most of these programs are perceived as successful by teachers and scientists because they involve students in hands-on science activities, improve their scientific skills and confidence, and allow them the opportunity to use science to answer questions and solve problems. The work described here involves a detailed assessment of a summer National Science Foundation (NSF) Young Scholars Program, which was carried out over 2 summers. Student participants were entering 9th and 10th grade. The data used for this assessment included journals kept by teaching assistants, questionnaires administered to the participants and parents, and interviews with the participants. Analysis revealed that students perceived program success differently from teachers and program organizers. Their perception of the success of a program is directly related to whether or not their individual research project met its goals, regardless of other project activities. Designing projects that have a high likelihood of success from this perspective can be complex, but this work identified six variables that must be incorporated appropriately into the design of a project to ensure its success: (1) extent of project structure and who structures the project, faculty or student; (2) project relevance; (3) project flexibility; (4) project background research; (5) tangible results; and (6) project introduction.Received: 5 March 1993; Revised: 20 October 1993;

  19. Successful Strategies to Engage Research Partners for Translating Evidence into Action in Community Health: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Salsberg, Jon; Parry, David; Pluye, Pierre; Macridis, Soultana; Herbert, Carol P.; Macaulay, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To undertake a critical review describing key strategies supporting development of participatory research (PR) teams to engage partners for creation and translation of action-oriented knowledge. Methods. Sources are four leading PR practitioners identified via bibliometric analysis. Authors' publications were identified in January 1995–October 2009 in PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science and CAB databases, and books. Works were limited to those with a process description describing a research project and practitioners were first, second, third, or last author. Results. Adapting and applying the “Reliability Tested Guidelines for Assessing Participatory Research Projects” to retained records identified five key strategies: developing advisory committees of researchers and intended research users; developing research agreements; using formal and informal group facilitation techniques; hiring co-researchers/partners from community; and ensuring frequent communication. Other less frequently mentioned strategies were also identified. Conclusion. This review is the first time these guidelines were used to identify key strategies supporting PR projects. They proved effective at identifying and evaluating engagement strategies as reported by completed research projects. Adapting these guidelines identified gaps where the tool was unable to assess fundamental PR elements of power dynamics, equity of resources, and member turnover. Our resulting template serves as a new tool to measure partnerships. PMID:25815016

  20. Problem list completeness in electronic health records: a multi-site study and assessment of success factors

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; McCoy, Allison B.; Hickman, Thu-Trang T.; St Hilaire, Daniel; Borbolla, Damian; Bowes, Len; Dixon, William G.; Dorr, David A.; Krall, Michael; Malholtra, Sameer; Bates, David W.; Sittig, Dean F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess problem list completeness using an objective measure across a range of sites, and to identify success factors for problem list completeness. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of electronic health record data and interviews at ten healthcare organizations within the United States, United Kingdom, and Argentina who use a variety of electronic health record systems: four self-developed and six commercial. At each site, we assessed the proportion of patients who have diabetes recorded on their problem list out of all patients with a hemoglobin A1c elevation >= 7.0%, which is diagnostic of diabetes. We then conducted interviews with informatics leaders at the four highest performing sites to determine factors associated with success. Finally, we surveyed all the sites about common practices implemented at the top performing sites to determine whether there was an association between problem list management practices and problem list completeness. Results Problem list completeness across the ten sites ranged from 60.2% to 99.4%, with a mean of 78.2%. Financial incentives, problem-oriented charting, gap reporting, shared responsibility, links to billing codes, and organizational culture were identified as success factors at the four hospitals with problem list completeness at or near 90.0%. Discussion Incomplete problem lists represent a global data integrity problem that could compromise quality of care and put patients at risk. There was a wide range of problem list completeness across the healthcare facilities. Nevertheless, some facilities have achieved high levels of problem list completeness, and it is important to better understand the factors that contribute to success to improve patient safety. Conclusion Problem list completeness varies substantially across healthcare facilities. In our review of EHR systems at ten healthcare facilities, we identified six success factors which may be useful for healthcare organizations seeking to

  1. Success Factors of Human Resource Profession in Malaysia: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Choi Sang

    2013-01-01

    Human Resource (HR) profession is moving toward being more aligned with business outcomes. To function constructively and to play critical roles more effectively, HR professionals must master the necessary competencies. The competencies that are examined in this study are business knowledge, strategy architect, HR delivery, credible activist and…

  2. Success Factors Impacting Latina/o Persistence in Higher Education Leading to STEM Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Claudia; Caspary, Melissa; Boothe, Diane

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates how Latina/Latino youth resist, conform to, and persist in schooling, and explores their preparation for an education in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. Using Latino Critical Race Theory as a framework, evidence of the "sticky mess" of racial inequalities (Espinoza and Harris in"…

  3. An Integrative Literature Review of Organisational Factors Associated with Admission and Discharge Delays in Critical Care

    PubMed Central

    Peltonen, Laura-Maria; McCallum, Louise; Siirala, Eriikka; Haataja, Marjaana; Lundgrén-Laine, Heljä; Salanterä, Sanna; Lin, Frances

    2015-01-01

    The literature shows that delayed admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and discharge delays from the ICU are associated with increased adverse events and higher costs. Identifying factors related to delays will provide information to practice improvements, which contribute to better patient outcomes. The aim of this integrative review was to explore the incidence of patients' admission and discharge delays in critical care and to identify organisational factors associated with these delays. Seven studies were included. The major findings are as follows: (1) explanatory research about discharge delays is scarce and one study on admission delays was found, (2) delays are a common problem mostly due to organisational factors, occurring in 38% of admissions and 22–67% of discharges, and (3) redesigning care processes by improving information management and coordination between units and interdisciplinary teams could reduce discharge delays. In conclusion, patient outcomes can be improved through efficient and safe care processes. More exploratory research is needed to identify factors that contribute to admission and discharge delays to provide evidence for clinical practice improvements. Shortening delays requires an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the whole patient flow process. Conclusions should be made with caution due to the limited number of articles included in this review. PMID:26558286

  4. Critical Factors Influencing Decision to Adopt Human Resource Information System (HRIS) in Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Md Golam Rabiul; Masum, Abdul Kadar Muhammad; Beh, Loo-See; Hong, Choong Seon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to explore factors influencing the management decisions to adopt human resource information system (HRIS) in the hospital industry of Bangladesh—an emerging developing country. To understand this issue, this paper integrates two prominent adoption theories—Human-Organization-Technology fit (HOT-fit) model and Technology-Organization-Environment (TOE) framework. Thirteen factors under four dimensions were investigated to explore their influence on HRIS adoption decisions in hospitals. Employing non-probability sampling method, a total of 550 copies of structured questionnaires were distributed among HR executives of 92 private hospitals in Bangladesh. Among the respondents, usable questionnaires were 383 that suggesting a valid response rate of 69.63%. We classify the sample into 3 core groups based on the HRIS initial implementation, namely adopters, prospectors, and laggards. The obtained results specify 5 most critical factors i.e. IT infrastructure, top management support, IT capabilities of staff, perceived cost, and competitive pressure. Moreover, the most significant dimension is technological dimension followed by organisational, human, and environmental among the proposed 4 dimensions. Lastly, the study found existence of significant differences in all factors across different adopting groups. The study results also expose constructive proposals to researchers, hospitals, and the government to enhance the likelihood of adopting HRIS. The present study has important implications in understanding HRIS implementation in developing countries. PMID:27494334

  5. Factors associated with success in a calculus course: an examination of personal variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubuz, Behiye

    2011-01-01

    This study examined relationships between students' personal variables (gender, prior achievements, age and academic major) and their success in the first year undergraduate calculus course. The study sample consisted of 59 first year undergraduate students taking Math 154 Calculus II course. A written test about integral, sequence and series including demographic survey items was used to gather data. The test was administered prior to and upon the completion of the calculus course. Multiple regression analysis result indicated that there is relationship between students' personal variables (gender and prior achievements) and their success. Gender differences favouring males typically occurred on Riemann sum and Riemann integral.

  6. Improving clinical practice using clinical decision support systems: a systematic review of trials to identify features critical to success

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Houlihan, Caitlin A; Balas, E Andrew; Lobach, David F

    2005-01-01

    Objective To identify features of clinical decision support systems critical for improving clinical practice. Design Systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Data sources Literature searches via Medline, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register up to 2003; and searches of reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews. Study selection Studies had to evaluate the ability of decision support systems to improve clinical practice. Data extraction Studies were assessed for statistically and clinically significant improvement in clinical practice and for the presence of 15 decision support system features whose importance had been repeatedly suggested in the literature. Results Seventy studies were included. Decision support systems significantly improved clinical practice in 68% of trials. Univariate analyses revealed that, for five of the system features, interventions possessing the feature were significantly more likely to improve clinical practice than interventions lacking the feature. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified four features as independent predictors of improved clinical practice: automatic provision of decision support as part of clinician workflow (P < 0.00001), provision of recommendations rather than just assessments (P = 0.0187), provision of decision support at the time and location of decision making (P = 0.0263), and computer based decision support (P = 0.0294). Of 32 systems possessing all four features, 30 (94%) significantly improved clinical practice. Furthermore, direct experimental justification was found for providing periodic performance feedback, sharing recommendations with patients, and requesting documentation of reasons for not following recommendations. Conclusions Several features were closely correlated with decision support systems' ability to improve patient care significantly. Clinicians and other stakeholders should implement clinical decision support systems that incorporate these

  7. Aquaporins Are Critical for Provision of Water during Lactation and Intrauterine Progeny Hydration to Maintain Tsetse Fly Reproductive Success

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Joshua B.; Hansen, Immo A.; Attardo, Geoffrey M.; Michalková, Veronika; Mireji, Paul O.; Bargul, Joel L.; Drake, Lisa L.; Masiga, Daniel K.; Aksoy, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Tsetse flies undergo drastic fluctuations in their water content throughout their adult life history due to events such as blood feeding, dehydration and lactation, an essential feature of the viviparous reproductive biology of tsetse. Aquaporins (AQPs) are transmembrane proteins that allow water and other solutes to permeate through cellular membranes. Here we identify tsetse aquaporin (AQP) genes, examine their expression patterns under different physiological conditions (blood feeding, lactation and stress response) and perform functional analysis of three specific genes utilizing RNA interference (RNAi) gene silencing. Ten putative aquaporins were identified in the Glossina morsitans morsitans (Gmm) genome, two more than has been previously documented in any other insect. All organs, tissues, and body parts examined had distinct AQP expression patterns. Two AQP genes, gmmdripa and gmmdripb ( = gmmaqp1a and gmmaqp1b) are highly expressed in the milk gland/fat body tissues. The whole-body transcript levels of these two genes vary over the course of pregnancy. A set of three AQPs (gmmaqp5, gmmaqp2a, and gmmaqp4b) are expressed highly in the Malpighian tubules. Knockdown of gmmdripa and gmmdripb reduced the efficiency of water loss following a blood meal, increased dehydration tolerance and reduced heat tolerance of adult females. Knockdown of gmmdripa extended pregnancy length, and gmmdripb knockdown resulted in extended pregnancy duration and reduced progeny production. We found that knockdown of AQPs increased tsetse milk osmolality and reduced the water content in developing larva. Combined knockdown of gmmdripa, gmmdripb and gmmaqp5 extended pregnancy by 4–6 d, reduced pupal production by nearly 50%, increased milk osmolality by 20–25% and led to dehydration of feeding larvae. Based on these results, we conclude that gmmDripA and gmmDripB are critical for diuresis, stress tolerance and intrauterine lactation through the regulation of water and/or other

  8. Identification of genes encoding critical factors regulating B-cell terminal differentiation in torafugu (Takifugu rubripes).

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Maki; Miyadai, Toshiaki; Hiroishi, Shingo

    2006-03-01

    Many transcription factors, and associated co-factors, are involved in the regulation of B-cell terminal differentiation in mammals. In the teleost and cartilaginous fish, although evidence has strongly suggested the existence of B-cell like lymphocytes, the mechanism of terminal differentiation of B-cells remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we searched for the nucleotide and amino acid sequences similar to the critical regulatory factors facilitating the terminal differentiation of B-cells using the fugu BLAST server. We cloned the following cDNAs from Takifugu rubripes: (1) B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1), which plays a major role in promoting plasma cell differentiation by repressing the transcription of many genes that participate in maintaining the differentiation of mature B-cells; (2) Bcl-6, which facilitates germinal center formation and represses Blimp-1 expression; (3) X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1), which operates Ig secretion by activating transcription of the ER-stress responsible genes; (4) Pax-5, which suppresses XBP-1 and enhances the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), an inducer of somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination of the immunoglobulin gene; and (5) TLE-3, one of the Groucho family proteins, a co-factor for Blimp-1. We also identified other co-factors and many target genes of Blimp-1 by in silico and/or cDNA cloning. These finding indicates that the basal process of B-cell terminal differentiation in fish is controlled by factors identical to those in mammals.

  9. Prognostic factors of successful on-purpose tumor biopsies in metastatic cancer patients included in the SHIVA prospective clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Desportes, Emilie; Wagner, Mathilde; Kamal, Maud; Salomon, Anne Vincent; Deniziaut, Gabrielle; Pierron, Gaëlle; Rouleau, Etienne; Jouffroy, Thomas; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Paoletti, Xavier; Servois, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To identify patient/tumor characteristics associated with success of biopsy in patients who received multiple lines of chemotherapy. METHODS Patients with refractory cancer from our center, who were included in a prospective randomized phase II trial comparing targeted therapies based on molecular profile of tumors versus conventional chemotherapy, were retrospectively included in this IRB-approved study. All patients had a biopsy of a tumor lesion performed during surgery, or using CT/palpation/endoscopic guidance. A biopsy was considered successful if the neoplastic cellularity was greater than 30%. Primary lesion, size and location of biopsied lesion, on-going chemotherapy and the differential attenuation between non-enhanced and venous phase (HU) for CT-guided biopsied lesions were recorded. RESULTS 228 patients (age=59±15yo; M/F=1.9) were included. One hundred and sixty biopsies (72%) of the 221 biopsies performed were successful. Prognostic factors of biopsy success were: no ongoing chemotherapy, surgical or palpation-guided biopsy, lymph nodes/soft tissue location(P <0.01). Among the 221 performed biopsies, 122 (55%) were performed using CT guidance and 82 (67%) were successful. In this subgroup, biopsied lesions located in lymph nodes/soft tissue were associated with a higher success rate while lung location was associated with failure (P <0.01). The mean differential attenuation was significantly higher in lesions with a successful biopsy (P <0.001). CONCLUSION Success of biopsy was less frequent with CT guidance than with surgical or palpation-guided biopsy and was higher in soft tissues and lymph nodes than that in visceral metastasis. Ongoing chemotherapy decreased tumor cell content and consequently the success of the biopsy samples for molecular profiling. PMID:27655703

  10. Critical-Thinking Grudge Match: Biology vs. Chemistry--Examining Factors That Affect Thinking Skill in Nonmajors Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quitadamo, Ian J.; Kurtz, Martha J.; Cornell, Caitlyn Nicole; Griffith, Lindsay; Hancock, Julie; Egbert, Brandi

    2011-01-01

    Chemistry students appear to bring significantly higher critical-thinking skill to their nonmajors course than do biology students. Knowing student preconceptions and thinking ability is essential to learning growth and effective teaching. Of the factors investigated, ethnicity and high school physics had the largest impact on critical-thinking…

  11. The social, educational and cognitive factors of success in the first year of university: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlaix, Sophie; Suchaut, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    The main objective of this study, which evaluated a sample of first-year students enrolled at the University of Burgundy, France, in 2010-2011, is to understand the factors determining success in the first year of university. The originality of this research lies in the inclusion of specific indicators of students' skills when they start university within the explanatory models of educational achievement. These indicators include measures of academic performance (written comprehension skills) and cognitive abilities. While the impact of cognitive abilities on educational success has been examined at primary level in France, the present study is among the first to do this at higher education level, with the additional consideration of students' educational and social backgrounds. The results show the significant impact of educational background (repeated years, type of baccalaureate and baccalaureate grade) on success. The researchers also found that written comprehension skills and cognitive abilities alone play a limited role in explaining success, since the impacts of these variables are apparent throughout a student's educational career (and not just in higher education). Another finding was that subject choice based on specific career aspirations is an important factor associated with success - a significant insight which qualifies the impact of educational background.

  12. Factors Associated with Success in a Calculus Course: An Examination of Personal Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ubuz, Behiye

    2011-01-01

    This study examined relationships between students' personal variables (gender, prior achievements, age and academic major) and their success in the first year undergraduate calculus course. The study sample consisted of 59 first year undergraduate students taking Math 154 Calculus II course. A written test about integral, sequence and series…

  13. Factors Influencing Success in a School-University-Industry Partnership for Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Richard J.

    A three-year partnership between the University of Massachusetts (Amherst), a group of school systems, the Massachusetts High Technology Corporation, and Digital Equipment Corporation achieved the goal of recruiting outstanding BA and BS graduates, with majors in math or science, into teacher education and teaching. The success of the…

  14. Success Factors of Black Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Faculty at Predominantly White Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    Black faculty at predominantly White institutions (PWIs) have historically been underrepresented and made to endure with academic isolation, scholarship marginalization and other challenges to the tenure process. When it comes to science, technology, engineering and math, also known as STEM, as it relates to race and success, little is known of…

  15. Enhancing Professional Self-Efficacy: Factors Contributing to Successful Implementation of Articulated Workplace Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kile, Kimberly S.

    2012-01-01

    Competency-based education programs foster participants' abilities to perform or implement a skill taught within the curriculum. A competency-based course enhances a participant's professional self-efficacy by imparting in them the confidence to successfully implement one or more of the skills taught within the course. The Career…

  16. Factors Associated with Successful Learning in Pupils with Dyslexia: A Motivational Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burden, Robert; Burdett, Julia

    2005-01-01

    In 2002, Neil Humphrey and Patricia Mullins published their research into personal constructs and attribution for academic success and failure in dyslexia in BJSE's "Research Section". Their work suggested that pupils with dyslexia, in a range of settings, experience real challenges to their self-esteem and that dyslexia leads to "negative…

  17. Environmental Factors Associated with Success Rates of Australian Stock Herding Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Arnott, Elizabeth R.; Early, Jonathan B.; Wade, Claire M.; McGreevy, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the current management practices associated with stock herding dogs on Australian farms. A parallel goal was to determine whether these practices and the characteristics of the dog handlers were associated with success rates. Success rate refers to the proportion of dogs acquired by the farmer that were retained as working dogs. Data on a total of 4,027 dogs were obtained through The Farm Dog Survey which gathered information from 812 herding dog owners around Australia. Using logistic regression, significant associations were identified between success rate and seven variables: dog breed, housing method, trial participation, age of the dog at acquisition, electric collar use, hypothetical maximum treatment expenditure and the conscientiousness score of the owner's personality. These findings serve as a guide to direct further research into ways of optimising herding dog performance and welfare. They emphasise the importance of not only examining the genetic predispositions of the working dog but also the impact the handler can have on a dog's success in the workplace. PMID:25136828

  18. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, and Successive Cognitive Processing Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naglieri, Jack A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examined relationships among experimental tasks to measure planning, attention, simultaneous, and successive (PASS) cognitive processing following from Luria's theoretical model. Compared PASS model with null, memory-reasoning, verbal-nonverbal, and verbal-spatial-speed models. Results from students in grades K-2 (n=75) and 5-12 (n=132) indicated…

  19. Focus and Motivation: Two Contributing Factors That Lead a Student to Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuown, Adrienne

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether or not a student's focus and motivation during a lesson is a contributor in their educational success rate. Six fifth grade students in an enrichment room from Cambria Elementary School, in Ebensburg, Pennsylvania, participated in the study that spanned through April to June of 2011. These students…

  20. Success of Developmental Readers: An Examination of Factors Affecting Attrition and Institutional Practices Which Support Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Katherine F.

    2013-01-01

    Students who enter higher education requiring reading remediation have poor institutional persistence. This study examined the course success and first-year institutional persistence of six women enrolled in a developmental reading course at a regional campus of a state university. Data sets were comprised of classroom observation, review of…

  1. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH SUCCESSFUL CANDIDACY IN CERTAIN FIELDS OF GRADUATE STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SANTOS, SEVERINO R.

    A TOTAL OF 179 GRADUATE STUDENTS WHO WERE CANDIDATES FOR EITHER A MASTER'S OR A DOCTORATE DEGREE IN THE AREAS OF FARM MANAGEMENT, RURAL SOCIOLOGY, EXTENSION EDUCATION, AND AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION WERE STUDIED--(1) TO DETERMINE WHAT CONSTITUTES SUCCESS IN GRADUATE CANDIDACY BASED ON THE OPINION OF A PANEL OF PROFESSORS, (2) TO DESCRIBE THE STUDENTS…

  2. The Effects of Institutional Factors on the Success of Community College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Thomas; Calcagno, Juan Carlos; Jenkins, Davis; Kienzl, Greg; Leinbach, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this report is to measure the institutional characteristics that affect the success of community college students, particularly low-income and minority students. While there is a growing literature on this topic for baccalaureate institutions, few researchers have attempted to address the issue for community colleges. Since this line…

  3. Effect of biological factors on successful measurements with skeletal-muscle 1H-MRS

    PubMed Central

    Isobe, Tomonori; Okamoto, Yoshikazu; Hirano, Yuji; Ando, Hiroki; Takada, Kenta; Sato, Eisuke; Shinoda, Kazuya; Tadano, Kiichi; Takei, Hideyuki; Kamizawa, Satoshi; Mori, Yutaro; Suzuki, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Our purpose in this study was to clarify whether differences in subject group attributes could affect data acquisition in proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Methods Subjects without diabetes mellitus (DM) were divided into two groups (group A, in their 20s; group B, 30–60 years old). Subjects with DM formed group C (30–60 years old). The numbers of subjects were 19, 27, and 22 for group A, B, and C respectively. For all subjects, 1H-MRS measurements were taken of the soleus muscle (SOL) and the anterior tibial muscle (AT). We defined the success of the measurements by the detection of intramyocellular lipids. Moreover, we also measured the full width at half maximum of the water peaks for all subjects. Results The success rate was significantly higher for the AT (100%) than for the SOL (81.6%) (P<0.01). For the SOL, the success rate was 100% in group A, 85.2% in group B, and 77.3% in group C. There was a significant difference (P<0.05) between groups A and B, as well as between groups A and C. In all subjects, there was a significant difference (P<0.01) in the full width at half maximum (Hz) of the water peak between the AT and SOL measurements. Conclusion We conclude that differences in the age and DM history of subjects could affect the probability of successful 1H-MRS data acquisition. PMID:27499626

  4. Rowe and Kahn's Model of Successful Aging Revisited: Positive Spirituality--The Forgotten Factor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Martha R.; Parker, Michael W.; Achenbaum, W. A.; Larimore, Walter L.; Koenig, Harold G.

    2002-01-01

    Explains the concept of positive spirituality and offers evidence that links positive spirituality with health. Describes effective partnerships between health professionals and religious communities and summarized the information as a basis for strengthening the existing successful aging model proposed by Rowe and Kahn. (Contains 59 references…

  5. Belize's Rural Education and Agriculture Programme: Some Factors that Have Contributed to Its Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Zellynne D.; Edmond, Daniel

    Belize (formerly British Honduras) has achieved a good deal of success with its Rural Education and Agriculture Programme (REAP). REAP was initiated in 1976 to create the attitudes and provide the skills necessary for rural youth to make meaningful contributions to the country's agricultural development. Initiated by an intraministerial and…

  6. Factors Influencing Successful Student Outcomes between Transfer and Native Populations in a Postsecondary Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinney, Tina Molero

    2012-01-01

    Institutions of higher education have experienced increased scrutiny. Legislative and policy developments rapidly impact institutional accountability and student access. While various accountability measures are available to assess institutional quality and student success, information currently collected is not sufficient for a broader…

  7. Emotional Intelligence: A Quantitative Study of the Relationship among Academic Success Factors and Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannucci, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have found a correlation between emotional intelligence (EI) and success in the workplace. As a result, many companies have invested a large amount of resources into EI testing during their hiring process. In the United States, corporations are spending over $33 billion on hiring, training, and development. In addition to the increase…

  8. Factors Associated with Young People's Successful Resolution of Distressing Electronic Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenaughty, John; Harre, Niki

    2013-01-01

    Electronic harassment is a pervasive phenomenon among young people, however relatively little is known about actions that targets of harassment may undertake to manage such abuse, and whether particular actions and personal characteristics are associated with successful resolution of such harassment. This mixed methods research identified whether…

  9. An Analysis of Successful Pronunciation Learners: In Search of Effective Factors in Pronunciation Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tominaga, Yuko

    2009-01-01

    In order to discover some clues to and make suggestions for better teaching English pronunciation to learners in English as a Foreign Language (henceforth abbreviated as EFL) settings, the paper attempts to analyze Successful Foreign Language Learners (SFLL), focusing on their study history. The subjects were 24 junior high school students, who…

  10. Reasons and predictive factors for discontinuation of PDE-5 inhibitors despite successful intercourse in erectile dysfunction patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-C; Lee, Y-S; Seo, K-K; Jung, G-W; Kim, T-H

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to identify characteristics of ED patients who discontinued PDE5i despite successful intercourse. Data were collected using a questionnaire from 34 urologic clinics regardless of the effect (success or failure) of PDE5i treatment by visiting the clinics (717), e-mail (64) or post (101) for 882 ED patients who had previously taken any kind of PDE5i on demand four or more times. Discontinuation of PDE5i was defined if the patient had never taken PDE5i for the previous 1 year despite successful intercourse. Of the 882 patients, 485 were included in the final analysis. Difference in the socio-demographic, ED- and partner-related data between the continuation and discontinuation group and factors influencing discontinuation of the PDE5i were analyzed. Among 485 respondents (mean age, 53.6), 116 (23.9%) had discontinued PDE5i use despite successful intercourse. Most common reasons for the discontinuation were 'reluctant medication-dependent intercourse' (31.0%), 'spontaneous recovery of erectile function without further treatment' (30.2%), and 'high cost' (26.7%). In multiple logistic regression analysis, independent factors influencing discontinuation of the drug were cause of ED (psychogenic), short duration of ED, low education (⩽ middle school), and religion (Catholic). In partner-related compliance, only partner's religion (Catholic) was a significant factor.

  11. Factors controlling accumulation of soil organic carbon along vegetation succession in a typical karst region in Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shujuan; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Kelin; Pan, Fujing; Yang, Shan; Shu, Shiyan

    2015-07-15

    Vegetation succession enhances the accumulation of carbon in the soil. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying soil organic carbon (SOC) accumulation in different vegetation types in the karst region of Southwest China. The goal of this study was to identify and prioritize the effects of environmental parameters, including soil physico-chemical properties, microbial biomass, enzyme activities, and litter characteristics, on SOC accumulation along a vegetation succession sere (grassland, shrubland, secondary forest, and primary forest) in the karst landscape of Southwest China. Relationships between these parameters and SOC were evaluated by redundancy analysis. The results showed that SOC accumulation was significantly different among vegetation types (P<0.01) and increased with vegetation succession (from 29.10g·kg(-1) in grassland to 73.92g·kg(-1) in primary forest). Soil biochemistry and physical characteristics significantly affected the accumulation of SOC. Soil microbial biomass showed a predominant effect on SOC in each of the four vegetation types. In addition, the soil physical property (especially the silt content) was another controlling factor in the early stages (grassland), and urease activity and saccharase activity were important controlling factors in the early-middle and middle-late stages, respectively. Litter characteristics only showed mild effects on SOC accumulation. Variation partitioning analysis showed that the contribution of sole main factors to SOC variation decreased, while the interaction effect among parameters increased along the succession gradient.

  12. Reintegration Success and Failure: Factors Impacting Reintegration among Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobbina, Jennifer E.

    2010-01-01

    Criminologists have explored the reentry experience of formerly incarcerated adults, documented the pressing challenges of reentry, the correlates of recidivism, and the causes of desistance. Given scholars' focus on reentry to explain what factors impact criminal outcome, this raises the interesting question of whether and how such factors shape…

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Critical Factors for the Climate Impact of Landfill Mining.

    PubMed

    Laner, David; Cencic, Oliver; Svensson, Niclas; Krook, Joakim

    2016-07-05

    Landfill mining has been proposed as an innovative strategy to mitigate environmental risks associated with landfills, to recover secondary raw materials and energy from the deposited waste, and to enable high-valued land uses at the site. The present study quantitatively assesses the importance of specific factors and conditions for the net contribution of landfill mining to global warming using a novel, set-based modeling approach and provides policy recommendations for facilitating the development of projects contributing to global warming mitigation. Building on life-cycle assessment, scenario modeling and sensitivity analysis methods are used to identify critical factors for the climate impact of landfill mining. The net contributions to global warming of the scenarios range from -1550 (saving) to 640 (burden) kg CO2e per Mg of excavated waste. Nearly 90% of the results' total variation can be explained by changes in four factors, namely the landfill gas management in the reference case (i.e., alternative to mining the landfill), the background energy system, the composition of the excavated waste, and the applied waste-to-energy technology. Based on the analyses, circumstances under which landfill mining should be prioritized or not are identified and sensitive parameters for the climate impact assessment of landfill mining are highlighted.

  14. A critical examination of the U.S. nursing shortage: contributing factors, public policy implications.

    PubMed

    Fox, Rebekah L; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Despite short-lived periods of adequacy in nurse availability, the nursing shortage has endured. In order to better understand the myriad factors that influence the current shortage of nurses, as well as possible solutions, this project addresses the influence of social factors and government policy on nurse staffing inadequacy. When the government intervenes in a philosophically free-market economy, the assumption is that a problem, such as the current nursing shortage, could not be solved without such intervention. PURPOSE. Nursing care arguably falls into the realm of protecting the common good, and therefore requires government oversight. We provide a critical analysis of policy intervention efforts into the nursing shortage debate by examining the passage of legislation, the provision of educational assistance, and the establishment of minimum staffing requirements and minimum quality standards for reimbursement, which all impact nursing supply and demand. RESULTS. Arguments supporting and opposing policy intervention in general, and its impact on the overall provision of nursing care in the United States, were examined. Without policy incentive to place financial value on the quality of care provided by nurses, a simple increase in the number of available nurses is unlikely to solve the current problem. IMPLICATIONS. Important considerations that should be factored into policy creation include measurement and compensation for quality care, the nature of recruitment efforts of new nurses, and the complex nature of a nursing work.

  15. After the Appraisal: A Systematic Survey of Process Improvement, its Benefits, and Factors that Influence Success.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-08-01

    assessor training: Members of the CBA Project. CMM-Based Appraisal for Internal Process Improvement (CBA IPI) Lead Assessor’s Guide v1.0. Pittsburgh...possible about why some improvement efforts are more successful than others 3. to learn more about the relationship between process maturity and...for more guidance, mentoring, and assistance in implementing the improvements suggested by the appraisals. We need to learn more about how to make

  16. Factors influencing successful eradication of nonnative brook trout from four small Rocky Mountain streams using electrofishing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shepard, Bradley B.; Nelson, Lee M.; Taper, Mark L.; Zale, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    We successfully eradicated nonnative Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis by electrofishing from 2.4- to 3.0-km treatment reaches of four Rocky Mountain streams in Montana to conserve sympatric populations of native Westslope Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi. At least 6, and as many as 14, removal treatments of two to four electrofishing passes per treatment were required to successfully eradicate Brook Trout from these treatment reaches. We increased success by modifying our treatment efforts during this study from single annual treatments to several treatments a year to take advantage of autumn spawning and winter aggregating behavior. Eradication by electrofishing cost US \\$3,500 to \\$5,500 per kilometer where no riparian vegetation or woody debris clearing was necessary, increasing to \\$8,000 to \\$9,000 per kilometer where clearing was needed. Treatment costs without stream clearing were similar to costs of eradication using piscicides. Eradication by electrofishing may be preferable where native fish occur in sympatry with nonnative fish in smaller streams (base flow wetted widths

  17. Supporting college success in foster care alumni: salient factors related to postsecondary retention.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Amy M

    2012-01-01

    The current study aimed to identify factors associated with postsecondary disengagement for young people with foster care experience using survey data from a cross-sectional sample of foster care alumni scholarship recipients. Bivariate and multivariate analyses revealed several factors that differentiated those who did and did not disengage from college. Recommendations are given for improving service provision for youth transitioning from foster care who are considering pursuing higher education.

  18. Critical role of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema in mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masaki; Ouchi, Hiroshi; Ikegame, Satoshi; Harada, Eiji; Matsumoto, Takemasa; Uchino, Junji; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    COPD is a major cause of chronic morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Although tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has a critical role in the development of COPD, the role of different TNF receptors (TNFRs) in pulmonary emphysema has not been resolved. We aimed to clarify the role of TNFRs in the development of pulmonary emphysema. TNF-α transgenic mice, a murine model of COPD in which the mice spontaneously develop emphysema with a large increase in lung volume and pulmonary hypertension, were crossed with either TNFR1-deficient mice or TNFR2-deficient mice. After 6 months, the gross appearance of the lung, lung histology, and pulmonary and cardiac physiology were determined. In addition, the relationship between apoptosis and emphysema was investigated. Pulmonary emphysema-like changes disappeared with deletion of TNFR1. However, slight improvements were attained with deletion of TNFR2. Apoptotic cells in the interstitium of the lung were observed in TNF-α transgenic mice. The apoptotic signals through TNFR1 appear critical for the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. In contrast, the inflammatory process has a less important role for the development of emphysema.

  19. Influence of time-dependent factors in the evaluation of critical infrastructure protection measures.

    SciTech Connect

    Buehring, W. A.; Samsa, M. E.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-03-28

    The examination of which protective measures are the most appropriate to be implemented in order to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from attacks on critical infrastructures and key resources typically involves a comparison of the consequences that could occur when the protective measure is implemented to those that could occur when it is not. This report describes a framework for evaluation that provides some additional capabilities for comparing optional protective measures. It illustrates some potentially important time-dependent factors, such as the implementation rate, that affect the relative pros and cons associated with widespread implementation of protective measures. It presents example results from the use of protective measures, such as detectors and pretrained responders, for an illustrative biological incident. Results show that the choice of an alternative measure can depend on whether or not policy and financial support can be maintained for extended periods of time. Choice of a time horizon greatly influences the comparison of alternatives.

  20. Ergonomic tridimensional analysis: critical ergonomic factors identification in a commercial environmental.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, I F; Leão, C P; Arezes, P M

    2012-01-01

    The Ergonomic tridimensional analysis (ETdA) was developed to be used as an auxiliary tool on the ergonomic intervention. It was specially designed for commercial areas with free circulation of people. Due to that, the client, the third ETdA dimension, becomes an important element and their opinions relevant in the ergonomic analysis. The remains two ETdA dimensions, professionals and analyst, play an identical role as in the traditional occupational ergonomic analysis. For each of these dimensions, specific observation tools were assembled: an ETdA questionnaire, an evaluation form and a checklist for direct and indirect observations. The variables that allow the ETdA operability are identified as Ergonomic Factors (EFs). A case study is presented identifying, for each dimension, the critical EFs. This will allow the design of the weighting table, where the influence of each dimensions results is measured, stressing the important role of clients on ergonomic issues.