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Sample records for critically ill elderly

  1. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in critically ill elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun-yun; Xu, Fan; Chu, Ming; Bi, Li-qing

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the incidence, possible risk factors and prognosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in critically ill elderly patients. Methods: We selected 122 cases admitted to the ICU, ages 60–93 years old. An echocardiography examination was performed within four days after admission to the ICU. PAH is usually suspected if the patient’s pulmonary artery systolic pressure ≥ 40 mmHg. We collected echocardiography data, relevant clinical data and routine laboratory data; we then used a statistical method to analyze the risk factors for PAH in critically ill elderly patients and examined its impact on the prognosis. Results: Total 51 patients were diagnosed with PAH. The prevalence of critically ill elderly patients with PAH was 41.8%. The ANOVA analysis showed that if patients had COPD (P = 0.031) and/or respiratory failure (P = 0.021), they were more prone to PAH. An enlarged left atrium (P = 0.038) and/or right ventricle (P = 0.029), a declining left ventricle fractional shortening rate (P = 0.038), and an elevated amount of the brain natriuretic peptides (P = 0.046) were all associated with the occurrence of PAH. Multivariate regression analysis showed that the left atrial diameter (P = 0.045) was the risk factor in critically ill elderly patients with PAH. The 30-day mortality rate was 33.3% for elderly patients with PAH, which is statistically significant (P = 0.035) when compared with the mortality rate of patients with normal pulmonary artery pressure. Our multivariate regression analysis also showed that, for critically ill elderly patients admitted in the ICU, PAH (P = 0.039) is risk factor for increased mortality. Conclusions: A higher incidence of PAH occurs in critically ill elderly patients. PAH is more likely to occur in patients with an enlarged left atrium, and these problems adversely impact the prognosis. PMID:28367167

  2. Sarcopenia and critical illness: a deadly combination in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Joseph S

    2015-03-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-associated loss of lean skeletal muscle mass. It is the result of multiple physiologic derangements, ultimately resulting in an insidious functional decline. Frailty, the clinical manifestation of sarcopenia and physical infirmity, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the elderly population. The underlying pathology results in a disruption of the individual's ability to tolerate internal and external stressors such as injury or illness. This infirmity results in a markedly increased risk of falls and subsequent morbidity and mortality from the resulting traumatic injury, as well as an inability to recover from medical insults, resulting in critical illness. The increasing prevalence of sarcopenia and critical illness in the elderly has resulted in a deadly intersection of disease processes. The lethality of this combination appears to be the result of altered muscle metabolism, decreased mitochondrial energetics needed to survive critical illness, and a chronically activated catabolic state likely mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α. Furthermore, these underlying derangements are independently associated with an increased incidence of critical illness, resulting in a progressive downward spiral. Considerable evidence has been gathered supporting the role of aggressive nutrition support and physical therapy in improving outcomes. Critical care practitioners must consider sarcopenia and the resulting frailty phenotype a comorbid condition so that the targeted interventions can be instituted and research efforts focused.

  3. Frailty prior to Critical Illness and Mortality for Elderly Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Aluko A.; Gong, Michelle N.; Guerra, Carmen; Wunsch, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Background Health categories of elderly patients prior to critical illness may explain differences in mortality during and after admission to intensive care units (ICUs). Objectives To estimate the effect of pre-ICU health categories on mortality during and after critical illness, focusing specifically on the effect of pre-ICU frailty on short- and long-term mortality. Design Retrospective cohort study using linked Medicare claims data from 2004–2008. Participants A nationally representative sample of elderly Medicare beneficiaries who were admitted to an ICU in 2005. Measurements Patients were classified into four pre-ICU health categories (Robust; Cancer; Chronic Organ Failure; Frailty) using claims data from the year prior to admission, allowing for assignment to multiple categories. We assessed the association between pre-ICU health categories and hospital and 3-year mortality using multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional Hazards models. Results Among 47,427 elderly ICU patients, 18.8% were Robust; 28.6% had pre-ICU Cancer; 68.1% Chronic Organ Failure and 34.0% Frailty; 41.3% qualified for multiple categories. Overall hospital mortality was 12.6%, with the lowest mortality for Robust patients (9.7%). Patients with pre-ICU Frailty had a higher hospital mortality compared to patients with the same pre-ICU health categories without frailty (adjusted Odds Ratios ranged from 1.27 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10–1.47) to 1.52 (95% CI 1.35–1.63)). Robust hospital survivors had the lowest 3-year mortality (24.6%). Pre-ICU Frailty conferred a higher 3-year mortality compared to pre-ICU categories without frailty (adjusted Hazard Ratios ranged from 1.54 (95% CI 1.45–1.64) to 1.84 (95% CI 1.70–1.99). Conclusion Critically ill elderly patients can be categorized by Pre-ICU health categories. These categories, particularly pre-ICU Frailty, may be important for understanding risk of death during and after critical illness. PMID:26096386

  4. [Blood lactic acid level and APACHE II score on prognosis of critically ill elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Bao, Bin; Li, Zhi-gang; Sun, Xiao-lin

    2012-04-01

    To analyze the relevance between blood lactic acid level and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score in order to provide guideline for clinical treatment. Retrospective analyses on 537 critically ill elderly patients who were hospitalized in the ICU with their blood lactic acid level tested and APACHE II scores calculated. The overall death rate was 35.75% (192/537) with the APACHE II score as (22.6±12.8), and blood lactic acid level as (6.84±2.01) mmol/L. The blood lactic acid level among deaths was obviously higher than in the control group, with significant differences (P<0.05). The level of blood lactic acid was positively related to APACHE II score (r=0.572, P<0.05) while the death rate was both positively related to APACHE II score (r=0.475, P<0.05) and the level of blood lactic acid (r=0.506, P<0.05). There seemed a positive correlation between blood lactic acid level and the APACHE II score. Both of them showed good relevance with the prognosis of the disease.

  5. Effectiveness of long-term acute care hospitalization in elderly patients with chronic critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Jeremy M.; Werner, Rachel M.; David, Guy; Have, Thomas R. Ten; Benson, Nicole M.; Asch, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Background For patients recovering from severe acute illness, admission to a long-term acute care hospital (LTAC) is an increasingly common alternative to continued management in an intensive care unit. Objective To examine the effectiveness of LTAC transfer in patients with chronic critical illness. Research Design Retrospective cohort study in United States hospitals from 2002 to 2006. Subjects Medicare beneficiaries with chronic critical illness, defined as mechanical ventilation and at least 14 days of intensive care. Measures Survival, costs and hospital readmissions. We used multivariate analyses and instrumental variables to account for differences in patient characteristics, the timing of LTAC transfer and selection bias. Results A total of 234,799 patients met our definition of chronic critical illness. Of these, 48,416 (20.6%) were transferred to an LTAC. In the instrumental variable analysis, patients transferred to an LTAC experienced similar survival compared to patients who remained in an intensive care unit (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.96 to 1.01, p=0.27). Total hospital-related costs in the 180 days following admission were lower among patients transferred to LTACs (adjusted cost difference = -$13,422, 95% CI: -26,662 to -223, p=0.046). This difference was attributable to a reduction in skilled nursing facility admissions (adjusted admission rate difference = -0.591 (95% CI: -0.728 to -0.454, p <0.001). Total Medicare payments were higher (adjusted cost difference = $15,592, 95% CI: 6,343 to 24,842, p=0.001). Conclusions Patients with chronic critical illness transferred to LTACs experience similar survival compared with patients who remain in intensive care units, incur fewer health care costs driven by a reduction in post-acute care utilization, but invoke higher overall Medicare payments. PMID:22874500

  6. Outcome and quality of life of elderly critically ill patients: an Italian prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Pavoni, Vittorio; Gianesello, Lara; Paparella, Laura; Buoninsegni, Laura Tadini; Mori, Emanuele; Gori, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    The demand of critical care admissions to intensive care unit (ICU) is projected to rise in the next decade. The aim of this study was to evaluate short and long-term mortality and quality of life (QoL) of elderly patients (80 years and older) admitted to two ICUs for medical conditions, abdominal surgery (planned and unplanned) and orthopedic surgery for hip fractures, over a 6-year period. Three months and one year after ICU discharge, patients or family members were contacted by telephone to obtain follow-up information using the EuroQoL questionnaire. The data were compared with an age-matched of the Italian population. Two hundred eighty-eight patients were included in the study. ICU mortality of medical (14.8%) and unplanned surgical patients (26.4%) was higher than that of planned surgical (5.0%) and orthopedic patients (2.5%), as was hospital mortality (27.7% vs. 50.0% vs. 5.0% vs. 14.3%). Three months and 12 months mortality rates after ICU discharge were 40.7% and 61.1% in medical patients, 70.5% and 76.4% in unplanned surgical patients, 20.0% and 30.0% in planned surgical patients, 36.2% and 46.2% in orthopedic patients. QoL measures revealed that, one year after ICU discharge, medical and orthopedic patients had significantly more severe problems vis-à-vis mobility, self-care and activity than abdominal surgical patients and control population. Type of admission was the independent risk factor associated with ICU and long-term mortality, whereas age 90 year and older was associated with long-term mortality. Orthopedic surgery for hip fractures seems to influence QoL similar to medical diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Prognostic Model for 6-Month Mortality in Elderly Survivors of Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Narain, Wazim R.; Wunsch, Hannah; Schluger, Neil W.; Cooke, Joseph T.; Maurer, Mathew S.; Rowe, John W.; Lederer, David J.; Bach, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although 1.4 million elderly Americans survive hospitalization involving intensive care annually, many are at risk for early mortality following discharge. No models that predict the likelihood of death after discharge exist explicitly for this population. Therefore, we derived and externally validated a 6-month postdischarge mortality prediction model for elderly ICU survivors. Methods: We derived the model from medical record and claims data for 1,526 consecutive patients aged ≥ 65 years who had their first medical ICU admission in 2006 to 2009 at a tertiary-care hospital and survived to discharge (excluding those patients discharged to hospice). We then validated the model in 1,010 patients from a different tertiary-care hospital. Results: Six-month mortality was 27.3% and 30.2% in the derivation and validation cohorts, respectively. Independent predictors of mortality (in descending order of contribution to the model’s predictive power) were a do-not-resuscitate order, older age, burden of comorbidity, admission from or discharge to a skilled-care facility, hospital length of stay, principal diagnoses of sepsis and hematologic malignancy, and male sex. For the derivation and external validation cohorts, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.80 (SE, 0.01) and 0.71 (SE, 0.02), respectively, with good calibration for both (P = 0.31 and 0.43). Conclusions: Clinical variables available at hospital discharge can help predict 6-month mortality for elderly ICU survivors. Variables that capture elements of frailty, disability, the burden of comorbidity, and patient preferences regarding resuscitation during the hospitalization contribute most to this model’s predictive power. The model could aid providers in counseling elderly ICU survivors at high risk of death and their families. PMID:23632902

  8. [Phenomenology of serial homicide of critically ill elderly patients by patient care personnel].

    PubMed

    Maisch, H

    1996-01-01

    The study represents a completely new criminological phenomenon among homicide offenses: the killing of many very old terminally or incurably ill patients in hospitals and sometimes nursing homes. These homicides are a worldwide phenomenon. Six distinguishing indications of this phenomenon are differentiated from the traditional homicide criminology. Some statistical data of 11 nurses are presented, sentenced between 1976 and 1993 in the Federal Republic of Germany, Austria, Norway, the Netherlands, and in the United States of America. Centerpiece of this description is the differentiation of ten important characteristics of these homicidal acts. It is not possible to discuss the motives of this crime in detail.

  9. Assessing nutrition in the critically ill elderly patient: A comparison of two screening tools.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Swagata; Mishra, J C

    2015-09-01

    Few malnutrition screening tests are validated in the elderly Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patient. Having previously established malnutrition as a cause of higher mortality in this population, we compared two screening tools in elderly patients. For this prospective study, 111 consecutive patients admitted to the ICU and > 65 years underwent the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), and the Geriatric Nutrition Risk Index (GNRI) screening tests. Standard definition of malnutrition risk was taken as the gold standard to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of the tools. The k statistic was calculated to measure the agreement between the tools. The Shrout classification was used to interpret its values. The mean age of the patients screened was 74.7 ± 8.4 (65-97 years). The standard definition, MUST and GNRI identified 52.2%, 65.4%, and 64.9% to be malnourished, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the tests were 96.5% computed tomography (CI) (87.9-99.5%) and 72.3% CI (57.5-84.5%) for MUST and 89.5% CI (75.2-96.7%) and 55.0% CI (75.2-96.9%) for GNRI, respectively. Screening was not possible by GNRI and MUST tool in 31% versus 4% of patients, respectively. The agreement between the tools was moderate for Standard-MUST k = 0.65 and MUST-GNRI k = 0.60 and fair for Standard-GNRI k = 0.43. The risk of malnutrition is high among our patients as identified by all the tools. Both GNRI and MUST showed a high sensitivity with MUST showing a higher specificity and greater applicability.

  10. Assessing nutrition in the critically ill elderly patient: A comparison of two screening tools

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Swagata; Mishra, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Few malnutrition screening tests are validated in the elderly Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patient. Aim: Having previously established malnutrition as a cause of higher mortality in this population, we compared two screening tools in elderly patients. Subjects and Methods: For this prospective study, 111 consecutive patients admitted to the ICU and > 65 years underwent the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), and the Geriatric Nutrition Risk Index (GNRI) screening tests. Statistical Analysis: Standard definition of malnutrition risk was taken as the gold standard to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of the tools. The k statistic was calculated to measure the agreement between the tools. The Shrout classification was used to interpret its values. Results: The mean age of the patients screened was 74.7 ± 8.4 (65–97 years). The standard definition, MUST and GNRI identified 52.2%, 65.4%, and 64.9% to be malnourished, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the tests were 96.5% computed tomography (CI) (87.9–99.5%) and 72.3% CI (57.5–84.5%) for MUST and 89.5% CI (75.2–96.7%) and 55.0% CI (75.2–96.9%) for GNRI, respectively. Screening was not possible by GNRI and MUST tool in 31% versus 4% of patients, respectively. The agreement between the tools was moderate for Standard-MUST k = 0.65 and MUST-GNRI k = 0.60 and fair for Standard-GNRI k = 0.43. Conclusions: The risk of malnutrition is high among our patients as identified by all the tools. Both GNRI and MUST showed a high sensitivity with MUST showing a higher specificity and greater applicability. PMID:26430337

  11. Critical illness myopathy.

    PubMed

    Latronico, Nicola; Tomelleri, Giuliano; Filosto, Massimiliano

    2012-11-01

    To describe the incidence, major risk factors, and the clinical, electrophysiological, and histological features of critical illness myopathy (CIM). Major pathogenetic mechanisms and long-term consequences of CIM are also reviewed. CIM is frequently associated with critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP), and may have a relevant impact on patients' outcome. CIM has an earlier onset than CIP, and recovery is faster. Loss of myosin filaments on muscle biopsy is important to diagnose CIM, and has a good prognosis. Critical illness, use of steroids, and immobility concur in causing CIM. A rationale diagnostic approach to CIM using clinical, electrophysiological, and muscle biopsy investigations is important to plan adequate therapy and to predict recovery.

  12. Platelets in Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    In patients with critical illness, thrombocytopenia is a frequent laboratory abnormality. However frequent this may occur, a low platelet count is not an epiphenomenon, but a marker with further significance. It is always important to assess the proper cause for thrombocytopenia in critically ill patients because different underlying disorders may precipitate different diagnostic and therapeutic management strategies. Platelets are part of the first-line defense of the body against bleeding; hence, thrombocytopenia may increase the risk of hemorrhage. In case of systemic inflammatory syndromes, such as the response to sepsis, disseminated intravascular platelet activation may occur. This will contribute to microvascular failure and thereby play a role in the development of organ dysfunction. Platelets are circulating blood cells that will normally not interact with the intact vessel wall but that may swiftly respond to endothelial disruption (which is often part of the pathogenesis of critical illness) by adhering to subendothelial structures, followed by interaction with each other, thereby forming a platelet aggregate. The activated platelet (phospholipid) membrane may form a suitable surface on which further coagulation activation may occur. A low platelet count is a strong and independent predictor of an adverse outcome in critically ill patients, thereby facilitating a simple and practically risk assessment in these patients and potentially guiding the use of complex or expensive treatment strategies.

  13. Delirium in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Slooter, A J C; Van De Leur, R R; Zaal, I J

    2017-01-01

    Delirium is common in critically ill patients and associated with increased length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and long-term cognitive impairment. The pathophysiology of delirium has been explained by neuroinflammation, an aberrant stress response, neurotransmitter imbalances, and neuronal network alterations. Delirium develops mostly in vulnerable patients (e.g., elderly and cognitively impaired) in the throes of a critical illness. Delirium is by definition due to an underlying condition and can be identified at ICU admission using prediction models. Treatment of delirium can be improved with frequent monitoring, as early detection and subsequent treatment of the underlying condition can improve outcome. Cautious use or avoidance of benzodiazepines may reduce the likelihood of developing delirium. Nonpharmacologic strategies with early mobilization, reducing causes for sleep deprivation, and reorientation measures may be effective in the prevention of delirium. Antipsychotics are effective in treating hallucinations and agitation, but do not reduce the duration of delirium. Combined pain, agitation, and delirium protocols seem to improve the outcome of critically ill patients and may reduce delirium incidence. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Chronically Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Sara L.; Daly, Barbara J.; Kelley, Carol Genet; O’Toole, Elizabeth; Montenegro, Hugo

    2007-01-01

    Background Chronically critically ill patients often have high costs of care and poor outcomes and thus might benefit from a disease management program. Objectives To evaluate how adding a disease management program to the usual care system affects outcomes after discharge from the hospital (mortality, health-related quality of life, resource use) in chronically critically ill patients. Methods In a prospective experimental design, 335 intensive care patients who received more than 3 days of mechanical ventilation at a university medical center were recruited. For 8 weeks after discharge, advanced practice nurses provided an intervention that focused on case management and interdisciplinary communication to patients in the experimental group. Results A total of 74.0% of the patients survived and completed the study. Significant predictors of death were age (P = .001), duration of mechanical ventilation (P = .001), and history of diabetes (P = .04). The disease management program did not have a significant impact on health-related quality of life; however, a greater percentage of patients in the experimental group than in the control group had “improved” physical health-related quality of life at the end of the intervention period (P = .02). The only significant effect of the intervention was a reduction in the number of days of hospital readmission and thus a reduction in charges associated with readmission. Conclusion The intervention was not associated with significant changes in any outcomes other than duration of readmission, but the supportive care coordination program could be provided without increasing overall charges. PMID:17724242

  15. [Nutrition in critical illness].

    PubMed

    Ökrös, Ilona

    2014-12-21

    Critically ill patients are often unable to eat by themselves over a long period of time, sometimes for weeks. In the acute phase, serious protein-energy malnutrition may develop with progressive muscle weakness, which may result in assisted respiration of longer duration as well as longer stay in intensive care unit and hospital. In view of the metabolic processes, energy and protein intake targets should be defined and the performance of metabolism should be monitored. Enteral nutrition is primarily recommended. However, parenteral supplementation is often necessary because of the disrupted tolerance levels of the gastrointestinal system. Apparently, an early parenteral supplementation started within a week would be of no benefit. Some experts believe that muscle loss can be reduced by increased target levels of protein. Further studies are needed on the effect of immune system feeding, fatty acids and micronutrients.

  16. The microbiome and critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    The central role of the microbiome in critical illness is supported by a half century of experimental and clinical study. The physiological effects of critical illness and the clinical interventions of intensive care substantially alter the microbiome. In turn, the microbiome predicts patients’ susceptibility to disease, and manipulation of the microbiome has prevented or modulated critical illness in animal models and clinical trials. This Review surveys the microbial ecology of critically ill patients, presents the facts and unanswered questions surrounding gut-derived sepsis, and explores the radically altered ecosystem of the injured alveolus. The revolution in culture-independent microbiology has provided the tools needed to target the microbiome rationally for the prevention and treatment of critical illness, holding great promise to improve the acute and chronic outcomes of the critically ill. PMID:26700442

  17. Protein requirement in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2016-05-01

    How much protein do critically ill patients require? For the many decades that nutritional support has been used there was a broad consensus that critically ill patients need much more protein than required for normal health. Now, however, some clinical investigators recommend limiting all macronutrient provision during the early phase of critical illness. How did these conflicting recommendations emerge? Which of them is correct? This review explains the longstanding recommendation for generous protein provision in critical illness, analyzes the clinical trials now being claimed to refute it, and concludes with suggestions for clinical investigation and practice.

  18. Using Simulation to Isolate Physician Variation in ICU Admission Decision Making for Critically Ill Elders with End-Stage Cancer: A Pilot Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Barnato, Amber E.; Hsu, Heather E.; Bryce, Cindy L.; Lave, Judith R.; Emlet, Lillian L.; Angus, Derek C.; Arnold, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility of high-fidelity simulation for studying variation in ICU admission decision making for critically ill elders with end-stage cancer. Design Mixed qualitative and quantitative analysis of physician subjects participating in a simulation scenario using a hospital set, actors, medical chart, and vital signs tracings. The simulation depicted a 78 year-old man with metastatic gastric cancer, life-threatening hypoxia most likely attributable to cancer progression, and stable preferences to avoid ICU admission and intubation. Two independent raters assesed the simulations and subjects completed a post-simulation web-based survey and debriefing interview. Setting Peter M. Winter Institute for Simulation Education and Research at the University of Pittsburgh. Subjects 27 hospital-based attending physicians, including 6 emergency physicians, 13 hospitalists, and 8 intensivists. Measurements and Main Results Outcomes included qualitative report of clinical verisimilitude during the debriefing interview, survey-reported diagnosis and prognosis, and observed treatment decisions. Independent variables included physician demographics, risk attitude, and reactions to uncertainty. All (100%) reported that the case and simulation were highly realistic, and their diagnostic and prognostic assessments were consistent with our intent. Eight (29.6%) physicians admitted the patient to the ICU. Among the 8 physicians who admitted the patient to the ICU, 3 (37%) initiated palliation, 2 (25%) documented the patient’s code status (DNI/DNR), and 1 intubated the patient. Among the 19 physicians not admitting to the ICU, 13 (68%) initiated palliation and 5 (42%) documented code status. Intensivists and emergency physicians (P=0.048) were more likely to admit the patient to the ICU. Years since medical school graduation were inversely associated with the initiation of palliative care (P=0.043). Conclusions Simulation can reproduce the decision context of

  19. Experiencing Art with the Ill, the Elderly, and Their Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Terry

    2011-01-01

    This article is a personal narrative of a teaching artist reaching out to persons ill, elderly, and their caregivers because of his own experiences with cancer. As a teaching artist, the author serves schools and communities as an art critic, that is, one who facilitates discussions about works of art made by the learners or by established…

  20. Experiencing Art with the Ill, the Elderly, and Their Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Terry

    2011-01-01

    This article is a personal narrative of a teaching artist reaching out to persons ill, elderly, and their caregivers because of his own experiences with cancer. As a teaching artist, the author serves schools and communities as an art critic, that is, one who facilitates discussions about works of art made by the learners or by established…

  1. Swallowing Dysfunction After Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    White, S. David; Moss, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Critical care practitioners must frequently make decisions about their patients’ ability to swallow food, liquids, and pills. These decisions can be particularly difficult given the incompletely defined epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, and prognostic features of swallowing disorders in critically ill patients. Furthermore, the consequences of improper decisions—namely, aspiration, malnutrition, hunger, and thirst—can be devastating to patients and their families. This review outlines the problem of swallowing dysfunction in critically ill patients and then addresses the most clinically relevant questions that critical care practitioners face today. First, we review the epidemiology of swallowing dysfunction in critically ill patients. Next, we describe the different diagnostic tests for swallowing dysfunction and describe a general approach to the initial assessment for swallowing disorders. Finally, we explore the existing treatments for swallowing dysfunction. Given the burden of swallowing dysfunction in patients recovering from critical illness, enabling critical care practitioners to manage these disorders, while stimulating new investigation into their pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management, will enhance our care of critically ill patients. PMID:25451355

  2. Effects of a new device to guide venous puncture in elderly critically ill patients: results of a pilot randomized study.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Torricelli, Gionatan; Massi, Marta; Calvani, Silvia; Boni, Serena; Roberts, Anna T; Accarigi, Elisabetta; Manetti, Stefania; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2017-04-01

    Novel devices based on the emission of near-infrared electromagnetic radiation (NIR) have been developed to minimize venous puncture failures. These instruments produce an "augmented reality" image, in which subcutaneous veins are depicted on a LCD display. We compared the new technique with standard venipuncture in a population of elderly patients. Patients admitted in Intensive Care Unit were randomized to standard or to NIR assisted procedure. In the 103 enrolled patients (age 74 ± 12 years; standard venipuncture-N = 56; NIR-N = 47), no differences were found in procedure length, number of attempts, and referred pain. With NIR there was a lower incidence of hematomas and fewer anxiety and depressive symptoms. The use of the novel NIR-based device is safer and more psychologically tolerable, and it is not associated to an increase of procedure length or number of attempts.

  3. Nutrition of critically ill horses.

    PubMed

    Carr, Elizabeth A; Holcombe, Susan J

    2009-04-01

    Nutritional supplementation is becoming the standard of practice in equine medicine, although there are minimal data on nutritional support in critically ill horses and its association or effect on morbidity and mortality or length of hospital stay. Horses can be fed orally and when that is not possible, intravenously or parenterally. Enteral feeding is less expensive, more physiologic, improves immunity, and is easier and safer. This article reviews available information on the development of a nutritional plan for critically ill horses, and describes methods for and complications of enteral and parenteral feeding.

  4. Polyneuropathy in critically ill patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, C F; Gilbert, J J; Hahn, A F; Sibbald, W J

    1984-01-01

    Five patients developed a severe motor and sensory polyneuropathy at the peak of critical illness (sepsis and multiorgan dysfunction complicating a variety of primary illnesses). Difficulties in weaning from the ventilator as the critical illness subsided and the development of flaccid and areflexic limbs were early clinical signs. However, electrophysiological studies, especially needle electrode examination of skeletal muscle, provided the definite evidence of polyneuropathy. The cause is uncertain, but the electrophysiological and morphological features indicate a primary axonal polyneuropathy with sparing of the central nervous system. Nutritional factors may have played a role, since the polyneuropathy improved in all five patients after total parenteral nutrition had been started, including the three patients who later died of unrelated causes. The features allow diagnosis during life, and encourage continued intensive management since recovery from the polyneuropathy may occur. Images PMID:6094735

  5. The critically ill immunosuppressed patient

    SciTech Connect

    Parrillo, J.E.; Masur, H. )

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the papers on the diagnosis and management of immunosuppressed patient. Some of the topics are: life-threatening organ failure in immunosuppressed patients; diagnosis and therapy of respiratory disease in the immunosuppressed patient; CNS complication of immunosuppression; infections; antineoplastic therapy of immunosuppressed patient; radiation therapy-issues in critically ill patient; AIDS; and management of bone marrow transplant patients.

  6. Diarrhoea in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Reintam Blaser, Annika; Deane, Adam M; Fruhwald, Sonja

    2015-04-01

    To summarize existing evidence on definition, epidemiology, mechanisms, risk factors, consequences, outcome and management of diarrhoea in the critically ill. In health, diarrhoea is defined as the passage of three or more loose or liquid stools per day. In the critically ill, the diagnosis is yet to be formalized and reported prevalence of diarrhoea varies according to the definition used. Recent studies estimate the prevalence between 14 and 21% and describe risk factors for diarrhoea in critically ill patients. The precipitant of diarrhoea always needs to be identified, as targeted therapies are important for several causes. Although the majority of patients with diarrhoea require only supportive care, it is always essential to exclude, or confirm and treat infectious diarrhoea. There is little evidence to support delaying or withdrawing provision of enteral nutrition in patients with diarrhoea, and we recommend continuing enteral nutrition whenever possible. However, the consequences of diarrhoea - hypovolaemia, electrolyte disturbances, malnutrition, skin lesions and contamination of wounds - should be avoided or at least recognized promptly. A definition of diarrhoea and a practical approach to identify the precipitant and to manage diarrhoea in critically ill patients are proposed.

  7. Communication About Chronic Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Judith E.; Mercado, Alice F.; Camhi, Sharon L.; Tandon, Nidhi; Wallenstein, Sylvan; August, Gary I.; Morrison, R. Sean

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite poor outcomes, life-sustaining treatments including mechanical ventilation are continued for a large and growing population of patients with chronic critical illness. This may be owing in part to a lack of understanding resulting from inadequate communication between clinicians and patients and families. Our objective was to investigate the informational needs of patients with chronic critical illness and their families and the extent to which these needs are met. Methods In this prospective observational study conducted at 5 adult intensive care units in a large, university-affiliated hospital in New York, New York, 100 patients with chronic critical illness (within 3–7 days of elective tracheotomy for prolonged mechanical ventilation) or surrogates for incapacitated patients were surveyed using an 18-item questionnaire addressing communication about chronic critical illness. Main outcome measures included ratings of importance and reports of whether information was received about questionnaire items. Results Among 125 consecutive, eligible patients, 100 (80%) were enrolled; questionnaire respondents included 2 patients and 98 surrogates. For all items, more than 78% of respondents rated the information as important for decision making (>98% for 16 of 18 items). Respondents reported receiving no information for a mean (SD) of 9.0 (3.3) of 18 items, with 95% of respondents reporting not receiving information for approximately one-quarter of the items. Of the subjects rating the item as important, 77 of 96 (80%) and 69 of 74 (93%) reported receiving no information about expected functional status at hospital discharge and prognosis for 1-year survival, respectively. Conclusions Many patients and their families may lack important information for decision making about continuation of treatment in the chronic phase of critical illness. Strategies for effective communication in this clinical context should be investigated and implemented. PMID

  8. Hypernatremia in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Gregor; Funk, Georg-Christian

    2013-04-01

    Hypernatremia is common in intensive care units. It has detrimental effects on various physiologic functions and was shown to be an independent risk factor for increased mortality in critically ill patients. Mechanisms of hypernatremia include sodium gain and/or loss of free water and can be discriminated by clinical assessment and urine electrolyte analysis. Because many critically ill patients have impaired levels of consciousness, their water balance can no longer be regulated by thirst and water uptake but is managed by the physician. Therefore, the intensivists should be very careful to provide the adequate sodium and water balance for them. Hypernatremia is treated by the administration of free water and/or diuretics, which promote renal excretion of sodium. The rate of correction is critical and must be adjusted to the rapidity of the development of hypernatremia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Probiotics in critically ill children

    PubMed Central

    Singhi, Sunit C.; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Gut microflora contribute greatly to immune and nutritive functions and act as a physical barrier against pathogenic organisms across the gut mucosa. Critical illness disrupts the balance between host and gut microflora, facilitating colonization, overgrowth, and translocation of pathogens and microbial products across intestinal mucosal barrier and causing systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis. Commonly used probiotics, which have been developed from organisms that form gut microbiota, singly or in combination, can restore gut microflora and offer the benefits similar to those offered by normal gut flora, namely immune enhancement, improved barrier function of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and prevention of bacterial translocation. Enteral supplementation of probiotic strains containing either Lactobacillus alone or in combination with Bifidobacterium reduced the incidence and severity of necrotizing enterocolitis and all-cause mortality in preterm infants. Orally administered Lactobacillus casei subspecies rhamnosus, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus were effective in the prevention of late-onset sepsis and GIT colonization by Candida in preterm very low birth weight infants. In critically ill children, probiotics are effective in the prevention and treatment of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Oral administration of a mix of probiotics for 1 week to children on broad-spectrum antibiotics in a pediatric intensive care unit decreased GIT colonization by Candida, led to a 50% reduction in candiduria, and showed a trend toward decreased incidence of candidemia. However, routine use of probiotics cannot be supported on the basis of current scientific evidence. Safety of probiotics is also a concern; rarely, probiotics may cause bacteremia, fungemia, and sepsis in immunocompromised critically ill children. More studies are needed to answer questions on the effectiveness of a mix versus single-strain probiotics, optimum dosage regimens

  10. Seizures in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Ch'ang, J; Claassen, J

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill patients with seizures are either admitted to the intensive care unit because of uncontrolled seizures requiring aggressive treatment or are admitted for other reasons and develop seizures secondarily. These patients may have multiorgan failure and severe metabolic and electrolyte disarrangements, and may require complex medication regimens and interventions. Seizures can be seen as a result of an acute systemic illness, a primary neurologic pathology, or a medication side-effect and can present in a wide array of symptoms from convulsive activity, subtle twitching, to lethargy. In this population, untreated isolated seizures can quickly escalate to generalized convulsive status epilepticus or, more frequently, nonconvulsive status epileptics, which is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Status epilepticus (SE) arises from a failure of inhibitory mechanisms and an enhancement of excitatory pathways causing permanent neuronal injury and other systemic sequelae. Carrying a high 30-day mortality rate, SE can be very difficult to treat in this complex setting, and a portion of these patients will become refractory, requiring narcotics and anesthetic medications. The most significant factor in successfully treating status epilepticus is initiating antiepileptic drugs as soon as possible, thus attentiveness and recognition of this disease are critical.

  11. Delirium in the Critically Ill Child.

    PubMed

    Norman, Sharon; Taha, Asma A; Turner, Helen N

    The purposes of this article are to describe the scientific literature on assessment, prevention, and management of delirium in critically ill children and to articulate the implications for clinical nurse specialists, in translating the evidence into practice. A literature search was conducted in 4 databases-OvidMEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsychINFO, and Web of Science-using the terms "delirium," "child," and "critically ill" for the period of 2006 to 2016. The scientific literature included articles on diagnosis, prevalence, risk factors, adverse outcomes, screening tools, prevention, and management. The prevalence of delirium in critically ill children is up to 30%. Risk factors include age, developmental delay, severity of illness, and mechanical ventilation. Adverse outcomes include increased mortality, hospital length of stay, and cost for the critically ill child with delirium. Valid and reliable delirium screening tools are available for critically ill children. Prevention and management strategies include interventions to address environmental triggers, sleep disruption, integrated family care, and mobilization. Delirium is a common occurrence for the critically ill child. The clinical nurse specialist is accountable for leading the implementation of practice changes that are based on evidence to improve patient outcomes. Screening and early intervention for delirium are key to mitigating adverse outcomes for critically ill children.

  12. Toward an Integrated Research Agenda for Critical Illness in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Milbrandt, Eric B.; Eldadah, Basil; Nayfield, Susan; Hadley, Evan; Angus, Derek C.

    2010-01-01

    Aging brings an increased predisposition to critical illness. Patients older than 65 years of age account for approximately half of all intensive care unit (ICU) admissions in the United States, a proportion that is expected to increase considerably with the aging of the population. Emerging research suggests that elderly survivors of intensive care suffer significant long-term sequelae, including accelerated age-related functional decline. Existing evidence-based interventions are frequently underused and their efficacy untested in older subjects. Improving ICU outcomes in the elderly will require not only better methods for translating sound science into improved ICU practice but also an enhanced understanding of the underlying molecular, physiological, and pathophysiological interactions of critical illness with the aging process itself. Yet, significant barriers to research for critical illness in aging exist. We review the state of knowledge and identify gaps in knowledge, research opportunities, and barriers to research, with the goal of promoting an integrated research agenda for critical illness in aging. PMID:20558632

  13. Critical care nurses' perspectives on elder abuse.

    PubMed

    Daly, Jeanette M; Schmeidel Klein, Amy N; Jogerst, Gerald J

    2012-01-01

    To explore through interviews of critical care nurses their perspectives on elder abuse to achieve a better understanding of the problems of reporting and generate ideas for improving the process. In 44 states and the District of Columbia health care providers are required by law to report elder abuse but the patient, patient's family and health care providers all have barriers to reporting allegations of elder abuse. This study design is qualitative. Through a mailed survey, critical care nurses were invited to participate in a taped in-depth qualitative interview. Ten nurses were interviewed. A thematic analysis was used to describe the following core themes: types of elder abuse, suspicions of elder abuse, reporting of elder abuse, barriers to reporting elder abuse, legislation and improvement in practice. Critical care nurses are aware of elder abuse and somewhat systematically evaluate for abuse at admission to their unit. They recognize signs and symptoms of abuse and are suspicious when it is warranted. They are aware of why an older person does not want to report abuse and take this into consideration when soliciting information. Facts, values and experience influence personally defining abuse, suspicion and dependence for each individual health care professional. Critical care unit protocols and/or policies and procedure for reporting elder abuse are needed in critical care settings and are warranted for providing quality of care. © 2012 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care © 2012 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  14. Antiphospholipid antibodies in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Vassalo, Juliana; Spector, Nelson; de Meis, Ernesto; Soares, Márcio; Salluh, Jorge Ibrain Figueira

    2014-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies are responsible for a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Venous, arterial and microvascular thrombosis and severe catastrophic cases account for a large morbidly/mortality. Through the connection between the immune, inflammatory and hemostatic systems, it is possible that these antibodies may contribute to the development of organ dysfunction and are associated with poor short and long-term prognoses in critically ill patients. We performed a search of the PubMed/MedLine database for articles written during the period from January 2000 to February 2013 to evaluate the frequency of antiphospholipid antibodies in critically ill patients and their impact on the outcomes of these patients. Only eight original studies involving critically ill patients were found. However, the development of antiphospholipid antibodies in critically ill patients seems to be frequent, but more studies are necessary to clarify their pathogenic role and implications for clinical practice. PMID:25028953

  15. Hypocalcemia and hypercalcitoninemia in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, B; Trachtman, H; Di Carmine, F; Urivetsky, M; Tobash, J; Chasalow, F; Walco, G; Schaeffer, J

    1990-11-01

    To study Ca metabolism in critically ill children, we measured ionized Ca (Ca2+), parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, 25 hydroxycholecalciferol (25[OH] D3), 1-25 dihydroxycholecalciferol (1-25[OH]2D3, and gastrin levels in critically ill children and in healthy controls. Patients were considered hypocalcemic if Ca2+ was less than 1.1 mmol/L. Six (14%) of 45 patients were hypocalcemic. Five hypocalcemic patients were studied and were found to have higher calcitonin levels than normocalcemic patients and healthy controls and higher PTH levels than healthy controls. 25(OH)D3 and 1-25(OH)2D3 were not significantly different in the three groups of patients. Gastrin levels were low in critically ill patients, whether or not they were hypocalcemic. We conclude that hypocalcemia occurs frequently in critically ill children. It is associated with raised levels of calcitonin and PTH. The mechanism for the increase in calcitonin is unknown.

  16. Corticosteroid replacement in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Judith

    2006-04-01

    This review addresses the use of corticosteroid replacement in critically ill patients. Low-dose corticosteroid replacement for critically ill patients with septic shock has been shown to reduce the duration of vasopressor-dependent shock, to shorten ICU length of stay, and, in recent trials, to reduce mortality. Numerous questions remain to be fully answered about patient selection, corticotropin-stimulation testing methods, and interpretation of results.

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Lindell K

    2011-07-01

    To review aspects of hyperbaric medicine pertinent to treating critically ill patients with hyperbaric oxygen in both monoplace and multiplace chambers. Literature review of online databases, research repositories, and clinical trial registries. The search of these resources produced information regarding technical considerations, feasibility, risk, and patient management. Hyperbaric oxygen is used in treating a number of disorders that occur in critically ill patients, including acute carbon monoxide poisoning, arterial gas embolism, severe decompression sickness, clostridial gas gangrene, necrotizing fasciitis, and acute crush injury. Most chambers in the United States treat outpatients with problem nonhealing wounds, and many chambers are not hospital-based. Only a few hyperbaric medicine centers have intensive care unit-level staffing, specialized equipment, a 24/7 schedule, and experience in treating critically ill patients. Not all intensive care unit-related equipment can be subjected to hyperbaric pressurization, and some equipment may increase the risk for fire inside the chamber. Treating critically ill patients with hyperbaric oxygen requires specialized equipment and personnel with intensive care unit skills and knowledge of the physiology and risks unique to hyperbaric oxygen exposure. Like with all medical interventions, it is important to consider the risk vs. the benefit of hyperbaric oxygen for any given critical care disorder, but hyperbaric oxygen can be delivered safely to critically ill patients. Many critical care environments without present hyperbaric oxygen capability may wish to consider offering hyperbaric oxygen to patients with hyperbaric oxygen-approved indications.

  18. Nutritional support of the critically ill child.

    PubMed

    Huddleston, K C; Ferraro-McDuffie, A; Wolff-Small, T

    1993-03-01

    There is a growing awareness that the nutrition an individual receives as a child may exert significant consequences later in life. The successful treatment of critically ill children influences their potential for full recovery and optimal outcome. This requires an understanding of how the child responds to stress and starvation. Daily energy needs of the child in the intensive care unit are highly variable. Specific knowledge of the nutritional assessment of these children, whether sustaining an acute or chronic illness, is required, as is an understanding of how the disease process affects the child. Further work needs to be done to evaluate how chronic illness affects the growth, development, and maturation of the child. Assessment parameters remain somewhat controversial, and recent studies indicate that, indeed, critically ill children may be overfed if standard equations are used to calculate needs. Poor clinical outcomes can occur if the child is underfed or overfed. The long-term results of specific diets, micronutrients, glutamine, and new access routes into the infant are not yet known. Research in these areas is rapidly growing, and the new knowledge will provide a greater ability to meet the individual needs of the critically ill child. Perhaps in the future the treatment of choice in patients with organ failure will involve specific micronutrients that influence the immune status and cellular degradation. In the meantime, critically ill children deserve to have their basic nutritional needs met, and nurses can do much to individualize the nutritional support required to produce optimal patient outcomes.

  19. Presumptive nonthyroidal illness syndrome in critically ill foals.

    PubMed

    Himler, M; Hurcombe, S D A; Griffin, A; Barsnick, R J; Rathgeber, R A; MacGillivray, K C; Toribio, R E

    2012-02-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis dysfunction is associated with morbidity and mortality in critically ill people. To date, investigations of HPT axis in critically ill foals are limited. To document the occurrence of low thyroid hormone concentrations (presumptive nonthyroidal illness syndrome; NTIS) in critically ill newborn foals and investigate whether NTIS is associated with severity of disease and outcome. NTIS occurs frequently in foals with sepsis and is associated with sepsis score and outcome. Reverse T3 (rT3) concentrations will be increased in septic foals and highest in nonsurvivors. Thyroid hormones (total and free thyroxine [TT4 and fT4], total and free tri-iodothyronine [TT3 and fT3], reverse T3 [rT3]) were prospectively measured in healthy, sick nonseptic and septic foals. Clinical and laboratory information was retrieved from the medical records. Hormones were measured by validated radioimmunoassays. Concentrations of all thyroid hormones except rT3 (P = 0.69) were decreased in septic and sick nonseptic foals (P < 0.01). Reductions in hormone concentrations were associated with an increased sepsis score (P < 0.01). Nonsurviving septic foals had lower TT4, fT4, TT3 and fT3 concentrations than surviving septic foals (P < 0.01). rT3 concentrations were higher in nonsurviving septic prematurefoals than surviving septic premature foals (P < 0.05). NTIS (euthyroid sick syndrome) is frequently observed in critically ill and premature foals, and associated with severity of disease and mortality. More research is needed to better understand the mechanism of this finding and determine whether manipulation of the HPT axis or thyroid replacement therapy could be beneficial.

  20. [Neurological manifestations in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, L; Hidalgo-Alquicira, F G; Mimenza-Alvarado, A J

    To describe the pathophysiology, diagnosis and clinical manifestations of the neurological complications that critically ill patients often develop in intensive care units, and to discuss their treatment and prognosis, in the light of the most significant contemporary literature. The most frequent complication suffered by critically ill patients is sepsis, with encephalopathy as the main manifestation, and this has a direct effect on their prognosis. Polyneuropathy of the critically ill patient is linked to sepsis, as the main precipitating factor, as well as to the presence of high levels of glucose, which plays an important role in deciding whether mechanical ventilation can be withdrawn or not. Myopathy of the critically ill patient is related to the use of fluorinated steroids and neuromuscular blockers, which are frequently administered to these patients. All these entities represent a significant diagnostic challenge for the physician and are accompanied by important sequelae that continue after the patient's discharge from hospital, as well as myopathies and neuropathies associated to the use of drugs that are commonly administered to critically ill patients. It is therefore necessary to be familiar with the pathophysiology of the damage and with the associated factors, if a suitable diagnostic approach is to be employed. The incidence of these pathologies and their complications makes them important conditions that require a swift, accurate diagnosis so that treatment can be established early on and a prognosis can also be determined.

  1. Hypomagnesemia in Critically Ill Sepsis Patients.

    PubMed

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Aretha, Diamanto; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg), also known as "the forgotten electrolyte", is the fourth most abundant cation overall and the second most abundant intracellular cation in the body. Mg deficiency has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases. This article is a review of the literature regarding Mg abnormalities with emphasis on the implications of hypomagnesemia in critical illness and on treatment options for hypomagnesemia in critically ill patients with sepsis. Hypomagnesemia is common in critically ill patients, and there is strong, consistent clinical evidence, largely from observational studies, showing that hypomagnesemia is significantly associated with increased need for mechanical ventilation, prolonged ICU stay and increased mortality. Although the mechanism linking hypomagnesemia with poor clinical outcomes is not known, experimental data suggest mechanisms contributing to such outcomes. However, at the present time, there is no clear evidence that magnesium supplementation improves outcomes in critically ill patients with hypomagnesemia. Large, well-designed clinical trials are needed to evaluate the role of magnesium therapy for improving outcomes in critically ill patients with sepsis.

  2. Hypomagnesemia in Critically Ill Sepsis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Aretha, Diamanto; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg), also known as “the forgotten electrolyte”, is the fourth most abundant cation overall and the second most abundant intracellular cation in the body. Mg deficiency has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases. This article is a review of the literature regarding Mg abnormalities with emphasis on the implications of hypomagnesemia in critical illness and on treatment options for hypomagnesemia in critically ill patients with sepsis. Hypomagnesemia is common in critically ill patients, and there is strong, consistent clinical evidence, largely from observational studies, showing that hypomagnesemia is significantly associated with increased need for mechanical ventilation, prolonged ICU stay and increased mortality. Although the mechanism linking hypomagnesemia with poor clinical outcomes is not known, experimental data suggest mechanisms contributing to such outcomes. However, at the present time, there is no clear evidence that magnesium supplementation improves outcomes in critically ill patients with hypomagnesemia. Large, well-designed clinical trials are needed to evaluate the role of magnesium therapy for improving outcomes in critically ill patients with sepsis. PMID:26566403

  3. Review of Critical Illness Myopathy and Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Starane; Batra, Ayush

    2016-01-01

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) and neuropathy are underdiagnosed conditions within the intensive care setting and contribute to prolonged mechanical ventilation and ventilator wean failure and ultimately lead to significant morbidity and mortality. These conditions are often further subdivided into CIM, critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP), or the combination—critical illness polyneuromyopathy (CIPNM). In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CIM, CIP, and CIPNM, along with diagnostic considerations such as detailed clinical examination, electrophysiological studies, and histopathological review of muscle biopsy specimens. We also review current available treatments and prognosis. Increased awareness and early recognition of CIM, CIP, and CIPNM in the intensive care unit setting may lead to earlier treatments and rehabilitation, improving patient outcomes. PMID:28042370

  4. Bedside echocardiography in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Casaroto, Eduardo; Mohovic, Tatiana; Pinto, Lilian Moreira; de Lara, Tais Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The echocardiography has become a vital tool in the diagnosis of critically ill patients. The use of echocardiography by intensivists has been increasing since the 1990’s. This tool has become a common procedure for the cardiovascular assessment of critically ill patients, especially because it is non-invasive and can be applied in fast and guided manner at the bedside. Physicians with basic training in echocardiography, both from intensive care unit or emergency department, can assess the left ventricle function properly with good accuracy compared with assessment made by cardiologists. The change of treatment approach based on echocardiographic findings is commonly seen after examination of unstable patient. This brief review focuses on growing importance of echocardiography as an useful tool for management of critically ill patients in the intensive care setting along with the cardiac output assessment using this resource. PMID:26761560

  5. Symptom Identification in the Chronically Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Grace B.; Happ, Mary Beth

    2010-01-01

    Ascertaining the symptom experience of chronically critically ill (CCI) patients is difficult due to communication impairment and fluctuations in patient cognition and physiological conditions. The use of checklist self report ratings is hampered by the inability of most CCI patients to respond verbally to symptom queries. In addition to the communication problems caused by mechanical ventilation, the apparently diverse idioms of symptom expression add to the potential for miscommunication regarding symptom experience. Although patient communication impairment is a major barrier to symptom identification, symptom assessment and treatment are fundamental components of nursing care for CCI. This paper reviews and describes the unique constellation of symptoms experienced by many critically ill patients. We report our observations of symptom communication among CCI patients and nurses and discuss inconsistency in the language of symptom expression among nurses and patients. Clinically applicable strategies to improve nurse-patient symptom communication and suggestions for refinement of symptom assessment in chronic critical illness are provided. PMID:20118706

  6. Diastolic dysfunction in the critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Suárez, J C; López, P; Mancebo, J; Zapata, L

    2016-11-01

    Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is a common finding in critically ill patients. It is characterized by a progressive deterioration of the relaxation and the compliance of the left ventricle. Two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography is a cornerstone in its diagnosis. Acute pulmonary edema associated with hypertensive crisis is the most frequent presentation of diastolic dysfunction critically ill patients. Myocardial ischemia, sepsis and weaning failure from mechanical ventilation also may be associated with diastolic dysfunction. The treatment is based on the reduction of pulmonary congestion and left ventricular filling pressures. Some studies have found a prognostic role of diastolic dysfunction in some diseases such as sepsis. The present review aims to analyze thoroughly the echocardiographic diagnosis and the most frequent scenarios in critically ill patients in whom diastolic dysfunction plays a key role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  7. Giving nutrition support to critically ill adults.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jane

    Patients who become critically ill can have problems maintaining nutritional intake and it can be challenging for nurses to provide nutritional support. No one assessment method can identify each patient's risk of malnutrition, so nurses need to look at different aspects in their nutritional assessment and refer for specialist help from dietitians and nutrition support teams when needed. This article focuses on how severe physiological stress affects patients who are critically ill and impacts on their nutritional requirements. A nursing nutritional assessment is explored, as are nutritional support methods that may be used to manage these patients' nutritional needs.

  8. [Metabolic emergencies in critically ill cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Namendys-Silva, Silvio A; Hernández-Garay, Marisol; García-Guillén, Francisco J; Correa-García, Paulina; Herrera Gómez, Angel; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2013-11-01

    Severe metabolic alterations frequently occur in critically ill cancer patients; hypercalcemia, hypocalcemia, hyponatremia, tumor lysis syndrome, metabolic complications of renal failure and lactic acidosis. Cancer patients with metabolic emergencies should be treated in a medical oncology department or an intensive care unit. Most metabolic emergencies can be treated properly when they are identified early. The clinician should consider that the prognosis of critically ill cancer patients depends on their primary disease, comorbidities and organ failure. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnesium homeostasis in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Ryzen, E

    1989-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) deficiency is a common finding in critically ill patients. Mg deficiency results primarily from gastrointestinal or urinary Mg losses, but malnutrition and decreased dietary Mg intake may hasten the development of Mg depletion. In our medical intensive-care unit, we have found hypomagnesemia in 65% of patients with normal serum creatinine concentrations. The prevalence of normomagnesemic Mg deficiency in critically ill patients may be even higher and may contribute to the pathogenesis of hypocalcemia, cardiac arrhythmias and other symptoms of Mg deficiency.

  10. Methionine splanchnic uptake is increased in critically ill children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During critical illness the splanchnic area is profoundly affected. There is no information on splanchnic uptake of amino acids in vivo, in critically ill children. Methionine splanchnic uptake in critically ill children will differ from estimates in healthy adults. We studied 24 critically ill chil...

  11. Psychoneuroimmunology in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    DeKeyser, Freda

    2003-02-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is the study of the interactions among behavior, neural, and endocrine functions and the immune system. The purpose of this review is to briefly summarize the evidence concerning interactions among behavior, the neuroendocrine system, and the immune system, and to show how this evidence relates to critical care patients. It has been shown that the immune function of many patients in the intensive care unit is suppressed as a result of trauma, sepsis, or profound physiologic and psychological stress. Three of the most common stressors among patients in the intensive care unit are pain, sleep deprivation, and fear or anxiety. Findings have shown each of these stressors to be associated with decreased immune functioning. Nurses have an important responsibility to protect their patients from infection and promote their ability to heal. Several actions are suggested that can help the nurse achieve these goals. It is hoped that nurses would keep these interactions in mind while caring for their patients in the intensive care unit.

  12. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shirley F; Brito, Veronica; Ghamande, Shekhar

    2015-07-01

    This article summarizes available data on the obesity hypoventilation syndrome and its pertinence to intensivists, outlines clinical and pathophysiologic aspects of the disease, discusses multidisciplinary treatments, and reviews the available literature on outcomes specific to the critically ill patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Caring for a critically ill Amish newborn.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Elizabeth A

    2008-10-01

    This article describes a neonatal nurse's personal experience in working with a critically ill newborn and his Amish family in a newborn intensive care unit in Montana. The description includes a cultural experience with an Amish family with application to Madeleine Leininger's theory of culture care diversity and universality.

  14. [Medicines reconciliation in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Lopez-Martin, C; Aquerreta, I; Faus, V; Idoate, A

    2014-01-01

    Medicines reconciliation plays a key role in patient safety. However, there is limited data available on how this process affects critically ill patients. In this study, we evaluate a program of reconciliation in critically ill patients conducted by the Intensive Care Unit's (ICU) pharmacist. Prospective study about reconciliation medication errors observed in 50 patients. All ICU patients, excluding patients without regular treatment. Reconciliation process was carried out in the first 24h after ICU admission. Discrepancies were clarified with the doctor in charge of the patient. We analyzed the incidence of reconciliation errors, their characteristics and gravity, the interventions made by the pharmacist and their acceptance by physicians. A total of 48% of patients showed at least one reconciliation error. Omission of drugs accounted for 74% of the reconciliation errors, mainly involving antihypertensive drugs (33%). An amount of 58% of reconciliation errors detected corresponded to severity category D. Pharmacist made interventions in the 98% of patients with discrepancies. A total of 81% of interventions were accepted. The incidence and characteristics of reconciliation errors in ICU are similar to those published in non-critically ill patients, and they affect drugs with high clinical significance. Our data support the importance of the stablishment of medication reconciliation proceedings in critically ill patients. The ICU's pharmacist could carry out this procedure adequately. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. Paracetamol in critical illness: a review.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Sarah; Saxena, Manoj; Young, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Paracetamol is one of the commonest medications used worldwide. This review was conceived as a consequence of evaluating the literature in the protocol development of two randomised, controlled clinical trials investigating the safety and efficacy of paracetamol in ICU patients (the HEAT [Permissive HyperthErmiA Through Avoidance of Paracetamol in Known or Suspected Infection in the Intensive Care Unit] study; the Paracetamol After traumatic Brain Injury [PARITY] Study). To provide a historical perspective on the introduction of paracetamol into clinical practice, to present the pharmacology of paracetamol in critical illness, and evaluate the current evidence for its use as an antipyretic and analgesic in intensive care. Literature searches were performed using keywords: "paracetamol", "acetaminophen", "critical illness", "intensive care", "history", "pharmacology", "antipyre*", "analgesi*", "adverse effect*", "administration and dosage", "toxicity", "animals" and "humans". Embase, MEDLINE, PubMed (1947/1950 to July 2011). The authors examined each article's title and abstract, fully reviewing relevant articles, with searching of reference lists and additional hand-searching. The most recent and highest quality available evidence was included. Limited data are available on the pharmacology of paracetamol in the critically ill. Among patients with sepsis, paracetamol may inhibit the immunological response. Among patients with neurological injury paracetamol can reduce temperature but appears not to improve outcome. When administered with opioids after major surgery, paracetamol does not reduce the incidence of pain or opioid related side-effects. Despite the widespread use of paracetamol in critical illness, there is a paucity of data supporting its utility in this setting. Further research is required to determine how paracetamol should be used in the critically ill.

  16. The interfacility transport of critically ill newborns.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Hilary Ea; Jefferies, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The practice of paediatric/neonatal interfacility transport continues to expand. Transport teams have evolved into mobile intensive care units capable of delivering state-of-the-art critical care during paediatric and neonatal transport. While outcomes are best for high-risk infants born in a tertiary care setting, high-risk mothers often cannot be safely transferred. Their newborns may then have to be transported to a higher level of care following birth. The present statement reviews issues relating to transport of the critically ill newborn population, including personnel, team competencies, skills, equipment, systems and processes. Six recommendations for improving interfacility transport of critically ill newborns are highlighted, emphasizing the importance of regionalized care for newborns.

  17. [Oxidative stress in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Andresen H, Max; Regueira H, Tomás; Leighton, Federico

    2006-05-01

    Among critically ill patients, several physio-pathological processes such as global and local hypo-perfusion, hypoxia, endothelial injury and acidosis have been associated with the production and release of large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a non regulated fashion. Although in physiologic conditions ROS influence intracellular processes and participate in the defense against infectious organism, in critically ill conditions they are associated with potential oxidative damage over cellular structures and with persistent activation of the inflammatory response. Mechanisms associated with oxidative damage are activation of the macrophage-monocyte system and neutrophils, ischemia-reperfusion events and intracellular ROS production. Endogenous compounds, mainly enzymes, and dietary components act as antioxidant. Several studies show that in critically ill patients increase levels of ROS or reduction of antioxidant levels are related to disease severity. In animal models of critical diseases, antioxidant therapy has shown to reduce mortality. Nevertheless, there are few studies in humans that only show improvements in hemodynamic variables, reduction in inflammatory mediators levels, decreases in oxidized compounds and that suggest a lower incidence of multiple organ failure.

  18. Clinical Conundrums in Management of Hypothyroidism in Critically Ill Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Vishal; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Sehgal, Rinku; Bajaj, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    Context: Articles in various international and national bibliographic indices were extensively searched with an emphasis on thyroid and hypothyroid disorders, hypothyroidism in elderly hospitalized patients, hypothyroidism in critically ill geriatric population, thyroxine in elderly hypothyroid, drug interactions and thyroid hormones, and thyroid functions in elderly. Evidence acquisition: Entrez (including PubMed), NIH.gov, Medscape.com, WebMD.com, MedHelp.org, Search Medica, MD consult, yahoo.com, and google.com were searched. Manual search was performed on various textbooks of medicine, critical care, pharmacology, and endocrinology. Results: Thyroid function tests in elderly hospitalized patients must be interpreted with circumspection. The elderly are often exposed to high iodide content and critical care settings. This may occur because of either decreased iodine excretion or very high intake of iodine. This is especially true for elderly population with underlying acute or chronic kidney diseases or both. Amiodarone, with a very high iodine content, is also often used in this set of population. Moreover, other medications including iodinated contrast are often used in the critical care settings. These may affect different steps of thyroid hormone metabolism, and thereby complicate the interpretation of thyroid function tests. Conclusions: The current review is aimed at analyzing and managing various clinical aspects of hypothyroidism in hospitalized elderly, and critically ill geriatric patients. PMID:24719636

  19. Critical illness neuromyopathy and the role of physical therapy and rehabilitation in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Fan, Eddy

    2012-06-01

    Neuromuscular complications of critical illness are common, and can be severe and persistent, with substantial impairment in physical function and long-term quality of life. While the etiology of ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is multifactorial, both direct (ie, critical illness neuromyopathy) and indirect (ie, immobility/disuse atrophy) complications of critical illness contribute to it. ICUAW is often difficult to diagnose clinically during the acute phase of critical illness, due to the frequent use of deep sedation, encephalopathy, and delirium, which impair physical examination for patient strength. Despite its limitations, physical examination is the starting point for identification of ICUAW in the cooperative patient. Given the relative cost, invasiveness, and need for expertise, electrophysiological testing and/or muscle biopsy may be reserved for weak patients with slower than expected improvement on serial clinical examination. Currently there are limited interventions to prevent or treat ICUAW, with tight glycemic control having the greatest supporting evidence. There is a paucity of clinical trials evaluating the specific role of early rehabilitation in the chronic critically ill. However, a number of studies support the benefit of intensive rehabilitation in patients receiving chronic mechanical ventilation. Furthermore, emerging data demonstrate the safety, feasibility, and potential benefit of early mobility in critically ill patients, with the need for multicenter randomized trials to evaluate potential short- and long-term benefits of early mobility, including the potential to prevent the need for prolonged mechanical ventilation and/or the development of chronic critical illness, and other novel treatments on patients' muscle strength, physical function, quality of life, and resource utilization. Finally, the barriers, feasibility, and efficacy of early mobility in both medical and other ICUs (eg, surgical, neurological, pediatric), as well as in

  20. Nutrition in critical illness: a current conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, L. John; Bistrian, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill people are unable to eat. What’s the best way to feed them? Nutrition authorities have long recommended providing generous amounts of protein and calories to critically ill patients, either intravenously or through feeding tubes, in order to counteract the catabolic state associated with this condition. In practice, however, patients in modern intensive care units are substantially underfed. Several large randomized clinical trials were recently carried out to determine the clinical implications of this situation. Contradicting decades of physiological, clinical, and observational data, the results of these trials have been claimed to justify the current practice of systematic underfeeding in the intensive care unit. This article explains and suggests how to resolve this conundrum. PMID:27803805

  1. Management of critically ill patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Perez, Livier Josefina; Benitez-Lopez, Mario Alberto; Varon, Joseph; Surani, Salim

    2017-01-01

    Disorders of glucose homeostasis, such as stress-induced hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, are common complications in patients in the intensive care unit. Patients with preexisting diabetes mellitus (DM) are more susceptible to hyperglycemia, as well as a higher risk from glucose overcorrection, that may results in severe hypoglycemia. In critically ill patients with DM, it is recommended to maintain a blood glucose range between 140-180 mg/dL. In neurological patients and surgical patients, tighter glycemic control (i.e., 110-140 mg/d) is recommended if hypoglycemia can be properly avoided. There is limited evidence that shows that critically ill diabetic patients with a glycosylated hemoglobin levels above 7% may benefit from looser glycemic control, in order to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia and significant glycemic variability. PMID:28344751

  2. Ventilatory support of the critically ill foal.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jonathan E

    2005-08-01

    Critically ill foals often have respiratory failure and benefit from respiratory support. Conventional mechanical ventilation using modem mechanical ventilators is easily adapted to foals. Establish-ing ventilator settings is a dynamic process aided by constant monitoring of blood gas values, end-tidal carbon dioxide, airway pressures, respiratory volumes, airway resistance, and respiratory compliance. Early weaning is as important as timely initiation of ventilation.

  3. Chronic critical illness: the price of survival.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Alessandro; Fantini, Riccardo; Antenora, Federico; Clini, Enrico; Fabbri, Leonardo

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of the techniques used in the intensive care setting over the past decades has led on one side to better survival rates in patients with acute conditions and severely impaired vital functions. On the other side, it has resulted in a growing number of patients who survive an acute event, but who then become dependent on one or more life support techniques. Such patients are called chronically critically ill patients. No absolute definition of the disease is currently available, although most patients are characterized by the need for prolonged mechanical ventilation. Mortality rates are still high even after dismissal from intensive care unit (ICU) and transfer to specialized rehabilitation care settings. In recent years, some studies have tried to clarify the pathophysiological characteristics underlying chronic critical illness (CCI), a disease that is also characterized by severe endocrine and inflammatory impairments, partly accounting for the almost constant set of symptoms. Currently, no specific treatment is available. However, a strategic early therapeutic approach on ICU admission might try to prevent the progress of the acute disease towards chronic critical illness. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  4. Extracorporeal Life Support in Critically Ill Adults

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) has become increasingly popular as a salvage strategy for critically ill adults. Major advances in technology and the severe acute respiratory distress syndrome that characterized the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic have stimulated renewed interest in the use of venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal to support the respiratory system. Theoretical advantages of ECLS for respiratory failure include the ability to rest the lungs by avoiding injurious mechanical ventilator settings and the potential to facilitate early mobilization, which may be advantageous for bridging to recovery or to lung transplantation. The use of venoarterial ECMO has been expanded and applied to critically ill adults with hemodynamic compromise from a variety of etiologies, beyond postcardiotomy failure. Although technology and general care of the ECLS patient have evolved, ECLS is not without potentially serious complications and remains unproven as a treatment modality. The therapy is now being tested in clinical trials, although numerous questions remain about the application of ECLS and its impact on outcomes in critically ill adults. PMID:25046529

  5. Probiotic use in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Sunit C; Baranwal, A

    2008-06-01

    Probiotics are "live microbes which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit to the host" (FAO/WHO joint group). Their potential role in bio-ecological modification of pathological internal milieu of the critically ill is under evaluation. Probiotics are available as single microbial strain (e.g., Bacillus clausii, Lactobacillus) or as a mix of multiple strains of Lactobacillus (acidophilus, sporogenes, lactis, reuteri RC-14, GG, and L. plantarum 299v), Bifidobacterium (bifidum, longum, infantis), Streptococcus (thermophillus, lactis, fecalis), Saccharomyces boulardii etc. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria are gram-positive, anaerobic, lactic acid bacteria. These are normal inhabitant of human gut and colonize the colon better than others. Critical illness and its treatment create hostile environment in the gut and alters the micro flora favoring growth of pathogens. Therapy with probiotics is an effort to reduce or eliminate potential pathogens and toxins, to release nutrients, antioxidants, growth factors and coagulation factors, to stimulate gut motility and to modulate innate and adaptive immune defense mechanisms via the normalization of altered gut flora. Scientific evidence shows that use of probiotics is effective in prevention and therapy of antibiotic associated diarrhea. However, available probiotics strains in currently used doses do not provide much needed early benefits, and need long-term administration to have clinically beneficial effects (viz, a reduction in rate of infection, severe sepsis, ICU stay, ventilation days and mortality) in critically ill surgical and trauma patients. Possibly, available strains do not adhere to intestinal mucosa early, or may require higher dose than what is used. Gap exists in our knowledge regarding mechanisms of action of different probiotics, most effective strains--single or multiple, cost effectiveness, risk-benefit potential, optimum dose, frequency and duration of treatment etc. More

  6. [Representations of illness among the elderly in Mexico City].

    PubMed

    Campos-Navarro, Roberto; Torrez, Diana; Arganis-Juarez, Elia Nora

    2002-01-01

    To examine the principle sociocultural characteristics of the illness experience in a group of senior citizens diagnosed with hypertension, diabetes, and arthritis, a total of 50 subjects over 60 years old were selected to answer an open-ended questionnaire. Using intentional non-probabilistic sampling, 25% of the sample were randomly selected, and semi-structured interviews were conducted. All individuals in the study are covered by social security institutions and receive medical care at a clinic located in southeastern Mexico City. Explanations for antecedents, causes, symptoms, and treatment of the illness relate to the individual social context. Although these seniors provided folk explanations for the causes of their illnesses, they treat themselves with a combination of biomedical and herbal resources. The authors conclude that it is necessary to analyze how the elderly live with chronic illness in order to propose effective measures to improve their quality of life and provision of health care services.

  7. Reduced Cortisol Metabolism during Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Boonen, Eva; Vervenne, Hilke; Meersseman, Philippe; Andrew, Ruth; Mortier, Leen; Declercq, Peter E.; Vanwijngaerden, Yoo-Mee; Spriet, Isabel; Wouters, Pieter J.; Perre, Sarah Vander; Langouche, Lies; Vanhorebeek, Ilse; Walker, Brian R.; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Critical illness is often accompanied by hypercortisolemia, which has been attributed to stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. However, low corticotropin levels have also been reported in critically ill patients, which may be due to reduced cortisol metabolism. METHODS In a total of 158 patients in the intensive care unit and 64 matched controls, we tested five aspects of cortisol metabolism: daily levels of corticotropin and cortisol; plasma cortisol clearance, metabolism, and production during infusion of deuterium-labeled steroid hormones as tracers; plasma clearance of 100 mg of hydrocortisone; levels of urinary cortisol metabolites; and levels of messenger RNA and protein in liver and adipose tissue, to assess major cortisol-metabolizing enzymes. RESULTS Total and free circulating cortisol levels were consistently higher in the patients than in controls, whereas corticotropin levels were lower (P<0.001 for both comparisons). Cortisol production was 83% higher in the patients (P=0.02). There was a reduction of more than 50% in cortisol clearance during tracer infusion and after the administration of 100 mg of hydrocortisone in the patients (P≤0.03 for both comparisons). All these factors accounted for an increase by a factor of 3.5 in plasma cortisol levels in the patients, as compared with controls (P<0.001). Impaired cortisol clearance also correlated with a lower cortisol response to corticotropin stimulation. Reduced cortisol metabolism was associated with reduced inactivation of cortisol in the liver and kidney, as suggested by urinary steroid ratios, tracer kinetics, and assessment of liver-biopsy samples (P≤0.004 for all comparisons). CONCLUSIONS During critical illness, reduced cortisol breakdown, related to suppressed expression and activity of cortisol-metabolizing enzymes, contributed to hypercortisolemia and hence corticotropin suppression. The diagnostic and therapeutic implications for critically

  8. Hypocaloric support in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Patiño, J F; de Pimiento, S E; Vergara, A; Savino, P; Rodríguez, M; Escallón, J

    1999-06-01

    The critically ill patient exhibits a well defined endocrine and metabolic adaptive response to stressor agents, characterized by incremented resting energy expenditure (hypermetabolism, which is believed to signify increased energy requirements), accelerated whole-body proteolysis (hypercatabolism), and lipolysis. These phenomena occur in the acute stage, which is also characterized by hyperglycemia, typically accompanied by a hyperdynamic cardiovascular reaction manifested by high cardiac output, increased oxygen consumption, high body temperature, and decrease peripheral vascular resistance. High provisions of glucose-derived calories tend to accentuate these reactions and increase the degree of hyperglycemia. We have adopted a hypocaloric-hyperproteic regimen which is provided only during the first days of the flow phase of the adaptive response to injury, sepsis, or critical illness. Our regimen includes a daily supply of 100 to 200 g of glucose and 1.5 to 2.0 g of protein (synthetic amino acids) per kilogram of ideal body weight. We have analyzed the data on 107 critically ill patients, 70 men and 37 women, who were admitted to the surgical intensive care unit and who received nutritional support by the TPN hypocaloric modality for a minimum of 3 days. We found that the high caloric loads contained in TPN regimens results in additional metabolic stress, with consequent hyperdynamic cardiorespiratory repercussion, high CO2 production, and frequently hepatic steatosis. In contrast, our hypocaloric-hyperproteic approach has resulted in a more physiologic clinical course and considerable reduction in cost. The infusion of high glucose loads, such as those used in hypercaloric TPN, does not seem to suppress the excessive endogenous production of glucose but instead markedly exacerbates the hyperglycemia of the postinjury and acute stress condition. We believe that the hypocaloric-hyperproteic regimen we utilize during the first few days of the stress situation is

  9. Reduced cortisol metabolism during critical illness.

    PubMed

    Boonen, Eva; Vervenne, Hilke; Meersseman, Philippe; Andrew, Ruth; Mortier, Leen; Declercq, Peter E; Vanwijngaerden, Yoo-Mee; Spriet, Isabel; Wouters, Pieter J; Vander Perre, Sarah; Langouche, Lies; Vanhorebeek, Ilse; Walker, Brian R; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2013-04-18

    Critical illness is often accompanied by hypercortisolemia, which has been attributed to stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. However, low corticotropin levels have also been reported in critically ill patients, which may be due to reduced cortisol metabolism. In a total of 158 patients in the intensive care unit and 64 matched controls, we tested five aspects of cortisol metabolism: daily levels of corticotropin and cortisol; plasma cortisol clearance, metabolism, and production during infusion of deuterium-labeled steroid hormones as tracers; plasma clearance of 100 mg of hydrocortisone; levels of urinary cortisol metabolites; and levels of messenger RNA and protein in liver and adipose tissue, to assess major cortisol-metabolizing enzymes. Total and free circulating cortisol levels were consistently higher in the patients than in controls, whereas corticotropin levels were lower (P<0.001 for both comparisons). Cortisol production was 83% higher in the patients (P=0.02). There was a reduction of more than 50% in cortisol clearance during tracer infusion and after the administration of 100 mg of hydrocortisone in the patients (P≤0.03 for both comparisons). All these factors accounted for an increase by a factor of 3.5 in plasma cortisol levels in the patients, as compared with controls (P<0.001). Impaired cortisol clearance also correlated with a lower cortisol response to corticotropin stimulation. Reduced cortisol metabolism was associated with reduced inactivation of cortisol in the liver and kidney, as suggested by urinary steroid ratios, tracer kinetics, and assessment of liver-biopsy samples (P≤0.004 for all comparisons). During critical illness, reduced cortisol breakdown, related to suppressed expression and activity of cortisol-metabolizing enzymes, contributed to hypercortisolemia and hence corticotropin suppression. The diagnostic and therapeutic implications for critically ill patients are unknown. (Funded by the

  10. Thyroid function in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Fliers, Eric; Bianco, Antonio C; Langouche, Lies; Boelen, Anita

    2015-10-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) typically present with decreased concentrations of plasma tri-iodothyronine, low thyroxine, and normal range or slightly decreased concentration of thyroid-stimulating hormone. This ensemble of changes is collectively known as non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). The extent of NTIS is associated with prognosis, but no proof exists for causality of this association. Initially, NTIS is a consequence of the acute phase response to systemic illness and macronutrient restriction, which might be beneficial. Pathogenesis of NTIS in long-term critical illness is more complex and includes suppression of hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone, accounting for persistently reduced secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone despite low plasma thyroid hormone. In some cases distinguishing between NTIS and severe hypothyroidism, which is a rare primary cause for admission to the ICU, can be difficult. Infusion of hypothalamic-releasing factors can reactivate the thyroid axis in patients with NTIS, inducing an anabolic response. Whether this approach has a clinical benefit in terms of outcome is unknown. In this Series paper, we discuss diagnostic aspects, pathogenesis, and implications of NTIS as well as its distinction from severe, primary thyroid disorders in patients in the ICU.

  11. Acute skeletal muscle wasting in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Puthucheary, Zudin A; Rawal, Jaikitry; McPhail, Mark; Connolly, Bronwen; Ratnayake, Gamunu; Chan, Pearl; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Phadke, Rahul; Padhke, Rahul; Dew, Tracy; Sidhu, Paul S; Velloso, Cristiana; Seymour, John; Agley, Chibeza C; Selby, Anna; Limb, Marie; Edwards, Lindsay M; Smith, Kenneth; Rowlerson, Anthea; Rennie, Michael John; Moxham, John; Harridge, Stephen D R; Hart, Nicholas; Montgomery, Hugh E

    2013-10-16

    Survivors of critical illness demonstrate skeletal muscle wasting with associated functional impairment. To perform a comprehensive prospective characterization of skeletal muscle wasting, defining the pathogenic roles of altered protein synthesis and breakdown. Sixty-three critically ill patients (59% male; mean age: 54.7 years [95% CI, 50.0-59.6 years]) with an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 23.5 (95% CI, 21.9-25.2) were prospectively recruited within 24 hours following intensive care unit (ICU) admission from August 2009 to April 2011 at a university teaching and a community hospital in England. Patients were recruited if older than 18 years and were anticipated to be intubated for longer than 48 hours, to spend more than 7 days in critical care, and to survive ICU stay. Muscle loss was determined through serial ultrasound measurement of the rectus femoris cross-sectional area (CSA) on days 1, 3, 7, and 10. In a subset of patients, the fiber CSA area was quantified along with the ratio of protein to DNA on days 1 and 7. Histopathological analysis was performed. In addition, muscle protein synthesis, breakdown rates, and respective signaling pathways were characterized. There were significant reductions in the rectus femoris CSA observed at day 10 (−17.7% [95% CI, −25.9% to 8.1%]; P < .001). In the 28 patients assessed by all 3 measurement methods on days 1 and 7, the rectus femoris CSA decreased by 10.3% (95% CI, 6.1% to 14.5%), the fiber CSA by 17.5% (95% CI, 5.8% to 29.3%), and the ratio of protein to DNA by 29.5% (95% CI, 13.4% to 45.6%). Decrease in the rectus femoris CSA was greater in patients who experienced multiorgan failure by day 7 (−15.7%; 95% CI, −27.7% to 11.4%) compared with single organ failure (−3.0%; 95% CI, −5.3% to 2.1%) (P < .001), even by day 3 (−8.7% [95% CI, −59.3% to 50.6%] vs −1.8% [95% CI, −12.3% to 10.5%], respectively; P = .03). Myofiber necrosis occurred in 20 of 37

  12. Opioid withdrawal in critically ill neonates.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Karen D; Lomako, Dawn M; Katz, Robert W; Kelly, H William

    2003-04-01

    To determine the occurrence of and risk factors for opioid withdrawal in critically ill neonates receiving continuous infusions of fentanyl. A prospective interventional cohort study was conducted in a university hospital neonatal intensive care unit with 19 neonates who received a minimum of 24 hours of fentanyl by continuous infusion. Fentanyl total dose, duration of infusion, and peak infusion rate were recorded. Patients were evaluated for withdrawal using the Neonatal Abstinence Scoring System of Finnegan. Patients with a score >/=8 were considered to have opioid withdrawal. Withdrawal was observed in 10 (53%) of 19 neonates. The fentanyl total dose (median 525 vs. 168 micro g/kg, respectively; p = 0.03) and infusion duration (median 10 vs. 7 d, respectively; p = 0.04) were significantly greater in neonates with withdrawal compared to those without withdrawal. A fentanyl total dose >/=415 micro g/kg predicted withdrawal with 70% sensitivity and 78% specificity. A fentanyl infusion duration >/=8 days predicted withdrawal with 90% sensitivity and 67% specificity. The most frequent symptoms of withdrawal were sleeping <3 hours after feeding (81%) and increased muscle tone (55%). In all neonates with withdrawal, onset occurred within 24 hours of fentanyl discontinuation. Opioid withdrawal occurs frequently in critically ill neonates who receive continuous infusions of fentanyl. Longer infusion duration and higher total dose were associated with withdrawal symptoms.

  13. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Vitrat, Virginie; Hautefeuille, Serge; Janssen, Cécile; Bougon, David; Sirodot, Michel; Pagani, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Critically ill patients with infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) would certainly benefit from timely bacterial identification and effective antimicrobial treatment. Diagnostic techniques have clearly improved in the last years and allow earlier identification of bacterial strains in some cases, but these techniques are still quite expensive and not readily available in all institutions. Moreover, the ever increasing rates of resistance to antimicrobials, especially in Gram-negative pathogens, are threatening the outcome for such patients because of the lack of effective medical treatment; ICU physicians are therefore resorting to combination therapies to overcome resistance, with the direct consequence of promoting further resistance. A more appropriate use of available antimicrobials in the ICU should be pursued, and adjustments in doses and dosing through pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have recently shown promising results in improving outcomes and reducing antimicrobial resistance. The aim of multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship programs is to improve antimicrobial prescription, and in this review we analyze the available experiences of such programs carried out in ICUs, with emphasis on results, challenges, and pitfalls. Any effective intervention aimed at improving antibiotic usage in ICUs must be brought about at the present time; otherwise, we will face the challenge of intractable infections in critically ill patients in the near future. PMID:25349478

  14. Antibiotic dose optimization in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Cotta, M O; Roberts, J A; Lipman, J

    2015-12-01

    The judicious use of existing antibiotics is essential for preserving their activity against infections. In the era of multi-drug resistance, this is of particular importance in clinical areas characterized by high antibiotic use, such as the ICU. Antibiotic dose optimization in critically ill patients requires sound knowledge not only of the altered physiology in serious infections - including severe sepsis, septic shock and ventilator-associated pneumonia - but also of the pathogen-drug exposure relationship (i.e. pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index). An important consideration is the fact that extreme shifts in organ function, such as those seen in hyperdynamic patients or those with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, can have an impact upon drug exposure, and constant vigilance is required when reviewing antibiotic dosing regimens in the critically ill. The use of continuous renal replacement therapy and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation remain important interventions in these patients; however, both of these treatments can have a profound effect on antibiotic exposure. We suggest placing emphasis on the use of therapeutic drug monitoring and dose individualization when optimizing therapy in these settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in critically ill and non-critically ill AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Chin, T W; Vandenbroucke, A; Fong, I W

    1995-01-01

    Current dosage regimens of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole used to treat Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in AIDS patients have been based on data from healthy subjects or patients without AIDS. The clearance and absorption characteristics of the drugs may potentially be different between patients with and without AIDS. This study was conducted to assess the pharmacokinetics of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in critically ill and non-critically ill AIDS patients treated for P. carinii pneumonia. Patients received trimethoprim at 15 mg/kg of body weight and sulfamethoxazole at 75 mg/kg of body weight daily intravenously in three to four divided doses and were switched to the oral route when the regimen was tolerated. Serum samples for determination of drug concentrations were obtained over 12 h after intravenous and oral dosing. The pharmacokinetics of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole were compared in eight critically ill versus nine non-critically ill male patients and were as follows, respectively: clearance, 1.88 +/- 0.44 versus 1.73 +/- 0.64 ml/min/kg for trimethoprim and 0.40 +/- 0.12 versus 0.34 +/- 0.11 ml/min/kg for sulfamethoxazole; volume of distribution, 1.6 +/- 0.5 versus 1.5 +/- 0.5 liters/kg for trimethoprim and 0.5 +/- 0.3 versus 0.4 +/- 0.1 liters/kg for sulfamethoxazole; and half-life, 10.9 +/- 7.4 versus 11.3 +/- 4.0 h for trimethoprim, and 15.5 +/- 9.5 versus 14.3 +/- 4.7 h for sulfamethoxazole. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed between patient groups, although there was wide intersubject variability. Absorption appeared to be similar between the critically ill and non-critically patients: bioavailability was 97.5% +/- 22.4% versus 101.8% +/- 22.7% for trimethoprim and 86.2% +/- 17.9% versus 99.1% +/- 20.5% for sulfamethoxazole, respectively. Because of the similar pharmacokinetics of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in critically ill and non-critically ill AIDS patients, the two groups of patients may receive similar dosages. Dosage

  16. Regional analgesia in postsurgical critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Moliner Velázquez, S; Rubio Haro, R; De Andrés Serrano, C; De Andrés Ibáñez, J

    2017-03-01

    Regional analgesia intrinsically, based on its physiological effects, is routinely used for the perioperative treatment of pain associated with surgical procedures. However, in other areas such as the non-surgical treatment of acute pain for patients in a critical condition, it has not been subjected to specific prospective studies. If we confine ourselves to the physiological effects of the nerve block, in a situation of stress, the indications for regional anaesthesia in this group of patients extend to the management of a wide variety of medical as well as postsurgical conditions, of trauma patients and of other painful procedures performed in the patient's bed. The critical patient certainly must be analyzed individually as their own primary conditions is of vital importance, as well as any associated conditions they have developed that can potentially increase the risk of systemic toxicity or morbidity, such as, coagulopathies, infection, immunosuppressive states, sedation and problems associated with mechanical ventilation. This review aims to assess the role of regional analgesia in critically ill patients, placing it within the algorithm decision tree of the professional responsible for patients in critical care units, all based on the evidence of potential benefits according to the published literature.

  17. Alcoholism and critical illness: A review

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Ashish Jitendra

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol is the most commonly used and abused drug in the world, and alcohol use disorders pose a tremendous burden to healthcare systems around the world. The lifetime prevalence of alcohol abuse in the United States is estimated to be around 18%, and the economic consequences of these disorders are staggering. Studies on hospitalized patients demonstrate that about one in four patients admitted to critical care units will have alcohol-related issues, and unhealthy alcohol consumption is responsible for numerous clinical problems encountered in intensive care unit (ICU) settings. Patients with alcohol use disorders are not only predisposed to developing withdrawal syndromes and other conditions that often require intensive care, they also experience a considerably higher rate of complications, longer ICU and hospital length of stay, greater resource utilization, and significantly increased mortality compared to similar critically ill patients who do not abuse alcohol. Specific disorders seen in the critical care setting that are impacted by alcohol abuse include delirium, pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, trauma, and burn injuries. Despite the substantial burden of alcohol-induced disease in these settings, critical care providers often fail to identify individuals with alcohol use disorders, which can have significant implications for this vulnerable population and delay important clinical interventions. PMID:26855891

  18. Lateral positioning for critically ill adult patients.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Nicky; Bucknall, Tracey; Faraone, Nardene M

    2016-05-12

    Critically ill patients require regular body position changes to minimize the adverse effects of bed rest, inactivity and immobilization. However, uncertainty surrounds the effectiveness of lateral positioning for improving pulmonary gas exchange, aiding drainage of tracheobronchial secretions and preventing morbidity. In addition, it is unclear whether the perceived risk levied by respiratory and haemodynamic instability upon turning critically ill patients outweighs the respiratory benefits of side-to-side rotation. Thus, lack of certainty may contribute to variation in positioning practice and equivocal patient outcomes. To evaluate effects of the lateral position compared with other body positions on patient outcomes (mortality, morbidity and clinical adverse events) in critically ill adult patients. (Clinical adverse events include hypoxaemia, hypotension, low oxygen delivery and global indicators of impaired tissue oxygenation.) We examined single use of the lateral position (i.e. on the right or left side) and repeat use of the lateral position (i.e. lateral positioning) within a positioning schedule. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1950 to 23 May 2015), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (1937 to 23 May 2015), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (1984 to 23 May 2015), Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (1901 to 23 May 2015), Web of Science (1945 to 23 May 2015), Index to Theses in Great Britain and Ireland (1950 to 23 May 2015), Trove (2009 to 23 May 2015; previously Australasian Digital Theses Program (1997 to December 2008)) and Proquest Dissertations and Theses (2009 to 23 May 2015; previously Proquest Digital Dissertations (1980 to 23 May 2015)). We handsearched the reference lists of potentially relevant reports and two nursing journals. We included randomized and quasi-randomized trials examining effects of

  19. Lung Ultrasound in the Critically Ill Neonate.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Daniel A; Mauriat, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Critical ultrasound is a new tool for first-line physicians, including neonate intensivists. The consideration of the lung as one major target allows to redefine the priorities. Simple machines work better than up-to-date ones. We use a microconvex probe. Ten standardized signs allow a majority of uses: the bat sign (pleural line), lung sliding and the A-line (normal lung surface), the quad sign and sinusoid sign indicating pleural effusion regardless its echogenicity, the tissue-like sign and fractal sign indicating lung consolidation, the B-line artifact and lung rockets (indicating interstitial syndrome), abolished lung sliding with the stratosphere sign, suggesting pneumothorax, and the lung point, indicating pneumothorax. Other signs are used for more sophisticated applications (distinguishing atelectasis from pneumonia for instance...). All these disorders were assessed in the adult using CT as gold standard with sensitivity and specificity ranging from 90 to 100%, allowing to consider ultrasound as a reasonable bedside gold standard in the critically ill. The same signs are found, with no difference in the critically ill neonate. Fast protocols such as the BLUE-protocol are available, allowing immediate diagnosis of acute respiratory failure using seven standardized profiles. Pulmonary edema e.g. yields anterior lung rockets associated with lung sliding, making the B-profile. The FALLS-protocol, inserted in a Limited Investigation including a simple model of heart and vessels, assesses acute circulatory failure using lung artifacts. Interventional ultrasound (mainly, thoracocenthesis) provides maximal safety. Referrals to CT can be postponed. CEURF proposes personnalized bedside trainings since 1990. Lung ultrasound opens physicians to a visual medicine.

  20. Lung Ultrasound in the Critically Ill Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, Daniel A; Mauriat, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Critical ultrasound is a new tool for first-line physicians, including neonate intensivists. The consideration of the lung as one major target allows to redefine the priorities. Simple machines work better than up-to-date ones. We use a microconvex probe. Ten standardized signs allow a majority of uses: the bat sign (pleural line), lung sliding and the A-line (normal lung surface), the quad sign and sinusoid sign indicating pleural effusion regardless its echogenicity, the tissue-like sign and fractal sign indicating lung consolidation, the B-line artifact and lung rockets (indicating interstitial syndrome), abolished lung sliding with the stratosphere sign, suggesting pneumothorax, and the lung point, indicating pneumothorax. Other signs are used for more sophisticated applications (distinguishing atelectasis from pneumonia for instance...). All these disorders were assessed in the adult using CT as gold standard with sensitivity and specificity ranging from 90 to 100%, allowing to consider ultrasound as a reasonable bedside gold standard in the critically ill. The same signs are found, with no difference in the critically ill neonate. Fast protocols such as the BLUE-protocol are available, allowing immediate diagnosis of acute respiratory failure using seven standardized profiles. Pulmonary edema e.g. yields anterior lung rockets associated with lung sliding, making the B-profile. The FALLS-protocol, inserted in a Limited Investigation including a simple model of heart and vessels, assesses acute circulatory failure using lung artifacts. Interventional ultrasound (mainly, thoracocenthesis) provides maximal safety. Referrals to CT can be postponed. CEURF proposes personnalized bedside trainings since 1990. Lung ultrasound opens physicians to a visual medicine. PMID:23255876

  1. Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunkui; Wu, Limin; Ni, Fengming; Ji, Wei; Wu, Jiang; Zhang, Hongliang

    2014-01-01

    Critical illness polyneuropathy and critical illness myopathy are frequent complications of severe illness that involve sensorimotor axons and skeletal muscles, respectively. Clinically, they manifest as limb and respiratory muscle weakness. Critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy in isolation or combination increases intensive care unit morbidity via the inability or difficulty in weaning these patients off mechanical ventilation. Many patients continue to suffer from decreased exercise capacity and compromised quality of life for months to years after the acute event. Substantial progress has been made lately in the understanding of the pathophysiology of critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy. Clinical and ancillary test results should be carefully interpreted to differentiate critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy from similar weaknesses in this patient population. The present review is aimed at providing the latest knowledge concerning the pathophysiology of critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy along with relevant clinical, diagnostic, differentiating, and treatment information for this debilitating neurological disease.

  2. Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chunkui; Wu, Limin; Ni, Fengming; Ji, Wei; Wu, Jiang; Zhang, Hongliang

    2014-01-01

    Critical illness polyneuropathy and critical illness myopathy are frequent complications of severe illness that involve sensorimotor axons and skeletal muscles, respectively. Clinically, they manifest as limb and respiratory muscle weakness. Critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy in isolation or combination increases intensive care unit morbidity via the inability or difficulty in weaning these patients off mechanical ventilation. Many patients continue to suffer from decreased exercise capacity and compromised quality of life for months to years after the acute event. Substantial progress has been made lately in the understanding of the pathophysiology of critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy. Clinical and ancillary test results should be carefully interpreted to differentiate critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy from similar weaknesses in this patient population. The present review is aimed at providing the latest knowledge concerning the pathophysiology of critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy along with relevant clinical, diagnostic, differentiating, and treatment information for this debilitating neurological disease. PMID:25206749

  3. Therapeutic apheresis in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Kimberly W; Balogun, Rasheed A

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic apheresis procedures in critically ill patients comprises of therapeutic plasma exchange in most cases but also less commonly, erythrocytapheresis (red cell exchange), thrombocytapheresis, or leukocytapheresis. These procedures present a number of challenges to the apheresis healthcare team, and there are myriad beneficial and adverse effects for patients. In this patient population, one has to weigh the risks against the benefits and especially in those situations where apheresis is requested as a treatment when other alternative therapies have failed. Therapeutic plasma exchange is capable of removing toxins, pathologic auto- and allo-antibodies but will also remove beneficial medications, clotting factors and cations which are chelated by citrate anticoagulant. Herein, we review clinically significant issues that are commonly encountered in patients that are in the intensive care unit and have conditions that require therapeutic apheresis. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Tight Glycemic Control in Critically Ill Children.

    PubMed

    Agus, Michael S D; Wypij, David; Hirshberg, Eliotte L; Srinivasan, Vijay; Faustino, E Vincent; Luckett, Peter M; Alexander, Jamin L; Asaro, Lisa A; Curley, Martha A Q; Steil, Garry M; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2017-02-23

    Background In multicenter studies, tight glycemic control targeting a normal blood glucose level has not been shown to improve outcomes in critically ill adults or children after cardiac surgery. Studies involving critically ill children who have not undergone cardiac surgery are lacking. Methods In a 35-center trial, we randomly assigned critically ill children with confirmed hyperglycemia (excluding patients who had undergone cardiac surgery) to one of two ranges of glycemic control: 80 to 110 mg per deciliter (4.4 to 6.1 mmol per liter; lower-target group) or 150 to 180 mg per deciliter (8.3 to 10.0 mmol per liter; higher-target group). Clinicians were guided by continuous glucose monitoring and explicit methods for insulin adjustment. The primary outcome was the number of intensive care unit (ICU)-free days to day 28. Results The trial was stopped early, on the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board, owing to a low likelihood of benefit and evidence of the possibility of harm. Of 713 patients, 360 were randomly assigned to the lower-target group and 353 to the higher-target group. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the median number of ICU-free days did not differ significantly between the lower-target group and the higher-target group (19.4 days [interquartile range {IQR}, 0 to 24.2] and 19.4 days [IQR, 6.7 to 23.9], respectively; P=0.58). In per-protocol analyses, the median time-weighted average glucose level was significantly lower in the lower-target group (109 mg per deciliter [IQR, 102 to 118]; 6.1 mmol per liter [IQR, 5.7 to 6.6]) than in the higher-target group (123 mg per deciliter [IQR, 108 to 142]; 6.8 mmol per liter [IQR, 6.0 to 7.9]; P<0.001). Patients in the lower-target group also had higher rates of health care-associated infections than those in the higher-target group (12 of 349 patients [3.4%] vs. 4 of 349 [1.1%], P=0.04), as well as higher rates of severe hypoglycemia, defined as a blood glucose level below 40 mg per

  5. Nutritional Assessment in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Najmeh; Mazloom, Zohreh; Zand, Farid; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Amini, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition is an important factor in the survival of critically ill patients. The purpose of the present study was to assess the nutritional status of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) on the days of admission and discharge via a detailed nutritional assessment. Methods: Totally, 125 patients were followed up from admission to discharge at 8ICUs in Shiraz, Iran. The patients’ nutritional status was assessed using subjective global assessment (SGA), anthropometric measurements, biochemical indices, and body composition indicators. Diet prescription and intake was also evaluated. Results: Malnutrition prevalence significantly increased on the day of discharge (58.62%) compared to the day of admission (28.8%) according to SGA (P<0.001). The patients’ weight, mid-upper-arm circumference, mid-arm muscle circumference, triceps skinfold thickness, and calf circumference decreased significantly as well (P<0.001). Lean mass weight and body cell mass also decreased significantly (P<0.001). Biochemical indices showed no notable changes except for magnesium, which decreased significantly (P=0.013). A negative significant correlation was observed between malnutrition on discharge day and anthropometric measurements. Positive and significant correlations were observed between the number of days without enteral feeding, days delayed from ICU admission to the commencement of enteral feeding, and the length of ICU stay and malnutrition on discharge day. Energy and protein intakes were significantly less than the prescribed diet (26.26% and 26.48%, respectively). Conclusion: Malnutrition on discharge day increased in the patients in the ICU according to SGA. Anthropometric measurements were better predictors of the nutritional outcome of our critically ill patients than were biochemical tests. PMID:27217600

  6. Nutritional support in critically ill patients.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, J P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The author reviews the newer nutritional substrates in use or under investigation for enteral and parenteral nutrition. Management of the critically ill patient remains a significant challenge to clinicians, and it is hoped that dietary manipulations, such as those outlined, may augment host barriers and immune function and improve survival. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The role of nutrition in patient well-being has long been recognized, but until the past 25 years, the technology to artificially provide nutrients when patients could not eat was not developed. With current, new methods for enteral and vascular access, patients can be fed nonvolitionally with little difficulty. Continued efforts have been directed toward identifying optimal feeding formulations, which have resulted in a multitude of commercially available products. In the past several years, attention has been turned to evaluation of four specialized nutrients and the use of other substrates as pharmacologic agents. METHODS: Pertinent laboratory and clinical data were reviewed to present the pros and cons for each nutritive substrate. CONCLUSIONS: Medium-chain fatty acids, branched-chain amino acids, and glutamine have been shown to be of clinical benefit and should be in common use in the near future. Short-chain fatty acids still are under investigation. Albumin, vitamins E and C, arginine, glutamine, and omega-3 fatty acids show great promise as pharmacologic agents to manipulate the stress response. Nucleotides remain investigational. CONTENTS SUMMARY: The application of some new nutritional substrates for use in critically ill patients, both as caloric sources and as pharmacologic agents, are reviewed. PMID:7979608

  7. Rhabdomyolysis in Critically Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmanovska, Biljana; Cvetkovska, Emilija; Kuzmanovski, Igor; Jankulovski, Nikola; Shosholcheva, Mirjana; Kartalov, Andrijan; Spirovska, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome of injury of skeletal muscles associated with myoglobinuria, muscle weakness, electrolyte imbalance and often, acute kidney injury as severe complication. The aim: of this study is to detect the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in critically ill patients in the surgical intensive care unit (ICU), and to raise awareness of this medical condition and its treatment among the clinicians. Material and methods: A retrospective review of all surgical and trauma patients admitted to surgical ICU of the University Surgical Clinic “Mother Teresa” in Skopje, Macedonia, from January 1st till December 31st 2015 was performed. Patients medical records were screened for available serum creatine kinase (CK) with levels > 200 U/l, presence of myoglobin in the serum in levels > 80 ng/ml, or if they had a clinical diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis by an attending doctor. Descriptive statistical methods were used to analyze the collected data. Results: Out of totally 1084 patients hospitalized in the ICU, 93 were diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis during the course of one year. 82(88%) patients were trauma patients, while 11(12%) were surgical non trauma patients. 7(7.5%) patients diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis developed acute kidney injury (AKI) that required dialysis. Average values of serum myoglobin levels were 230 ng/ml, with highest values of > 5000 ng/ml. Patients who developed AKI had serum myoglobin levels above 2000 ng/ml. Average values of serum CK levels were 400 U/l, with highest value of 21600 U/l. Patients who developed AKI had serum CK levels above 3000 U/l. Conclusion: Regular monitoring and early detection of elevated serum CK and myoglobin levels in critically ill surgical and trauma patients is recommended in order to recognize and treat rhabdomyolysis in timely manner and thus prevent development of AKI. PMID:27703296

  8. Transfusion therapy in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tai-Tsung

    2008-04-01

    Critically ill children in pediatric intensive care units are commonly indicated for blood transfusion due to many reasons. Children are quite different from adults during growth and development, and that should be taken into consideration. It is very difficult to establish a universal transfusion guideline for critically ill children, especially preterm neonates. Treating underlying disease and targeted replacement therapy are the most effective approaches. Red blood cells are the first choice for replacement therapy in decompensated anemic patients. The critical hemoglobin concentration may be higher in critically ill children for many reasons. Whole blood is used only in the following conditions or diseases: (1) exchange transfusion; (2) after cardiopulmonary bypass; (3) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; (4) massive transfusion, especially in multiple component deficiency. The characteristics of hemorrhagic diseases are so varied that their therapy should depend on the specific needs associated with the underlying disease. In general, platelet transfusion is not needed when a patient has platelet count greater than 10,000/mm3 and is without active bleeding, platelet functional deficiency or other risk factors such as sepsis. Patients with risk factors or age less than 4 months should be taken into special consideration, and the critical thrombocyte level will be raised. Platelet transfusion is not recommended in patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenia or thrombocytopenia due to acceleration of platelet destruction without active bleeding or life-threatening hemorrhage. There are many kinds of plasma-derived products, and recombinant factors are commonly used for hemorrhagic patients due to coagulation factor deficiency depending on the characteristics of the diseases. The most effective way to correct disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is to treat the underlying disease. Anticoagulant therapy is very important; heparin is the most common

  9. Nitrogen Balance and Protein Requirements for Critically Ill Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Roland N

    2016-04-18

    Critically ill older patients with sarcopenia experience greater morbidity and mortality than younger patients. It is anticipated that unabated protein catabolism would be detrimental for the critically ill older patient. Healthy older subjects experience a diminished response to protein supplementation when compared to their younger counterparts, but this anabolic resistance can be overcome by increasing protein intake. Preliminary evidence suggests that older patients may respond differently to protein intake than younger patients during critical illness as well. If sufficient protein intake is given, older patients can achieve a similar nitrogen accretion response as younger patients even during critical illness. However, there is concern among some clinicians that increasing protein intake in older patients during critical illness may lead to azotemia due to decreased renal functional reserve which may augment the propensity towards worsened renal function and worsened clinical outcomes. Current evidence regarding protein requirements, nitrogen balance, ureagenesis, and clinical outcomes during nutritional therapy for critically ill older patients is reviewed.

  10. Nitrogen Balance and Protein Requirements for Critically Ill Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Roland N.

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill older patients with sarcopenia experience greater morbidity and mortality than younger patients. It is anticipated that unabated protein catabolism would be detrimental for the critically ill older patient. Healthy older subjects experience a diminished response to protein supplementation when compared to their younger counterparts, but this anabolic resistance can be overcome by increasing protein intake. Preliminary evidence suggests that older patients may respond differently to protein intake than younger patients during critical illness as well. If sufficient protein intake is given, older patients can achieve a similar nitrogen accretion response as younger patients even during critical illness. However, there is concern among some clinicians that increasing protein intake in older patients during critical illness may lead to azotemia due to decreased renal functional reserve which may augment the propensity towards worsened renal function and worsened clinical outcomes. Current evidence regarding protein requirements, nitrogen balance, ureagenesis, and clinical outcomes during nutritional therapy for critically ill older patients is reviewed. PMID:27096868

  11. Nutritional assessment and enteral support of critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Ista, Erwin; Joosten, Koen

    2005-12-01

    Critical care nurses play an important role in feeding of critically ill children. Many procedures and caregiving interventions, such as placement of feeding tubes, registration of gastric retention, observation and care of the mouth, and administration of nutrition (enteral or parenteral), are within the nursing domain. This article discusses nutritional assessment techniques and enteral nutrition in critically ill children.

  12. Infections in critically ill burn patients.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, F; Mas, D; Rubio, M; Garcia-Hierro, P

    2016-04-01

    Severe burn patients are one subset of critically patients in which the burn injury increases the risk of infection, systemic inflammatory response and sepsis. The infections are usually related to devices and to the burn wound. Most infections, as in other critically ill patients, are preceded by colonization of the digestive tract and the preventative measures include selective digestive decontamination and hygienic measures. Early excision of deep burn wound and appropriate use of topical antimicrobials and dressings are considered of paramount importance in the treatment of burns. Severe burn patients usually have some level of systemic inflammation. The difficulty to differentiate inflammation from sepsis is relevant since therapy differs between patients with and those without sepsis. The delay in prescribing antimicrobials increases morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the widespread use of antibiotics for all such patients is likely to increase antibiotic resistance, and costs. Unfortunately the clinical usefulness of biomarkers for differential diagnosis between inflammation and sepsis has not been yet properly evaluated. Severe burn injury induces physiological response that significantly alters drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. These alterations impact antimicrobials distribution and excretion. Nevertheless the current available literature shows that there is a paucity of information to support routine dose recommendations.

  13. Monitoring the critically ill surgical patient.

    PubMed Central

    Holliday, R L; Doris, P J

    1979-01-01

    Critically ill surgical patients account for approximately half the patients in an active multidisciplinary critical care unit. Hypovolemia and sepsis are common in such patients and affect a number of organ systems. Monitoring these systems provides therapeutically relevant information that may decrease morbidity and improve patient survival. Circulatory hemodynamics may be assessed by direct measurement of the arterial blood pressure, central venous and pulmonary artery pressure monitoring and cardiac output determination; the data thus obtained are valuable in guiding fluid replacement in the hypovolemic individual. The respiratory status may be assessed by bedside spirometry and measurement of arterial blood gas tensions to gauge pulmonary function and the need for assisted ventilation. Renal dysfunction is common in such patients; careful analysis of both urine and blood may identify prerenal as opposed to renal and postrenal factors. Monitoring of the gastrointestinal tract, especially for hemorrhage, is important. Finally, careful attention to nutritional status and provision of adequate protein and energy intake by mouth or by vein is a vital component of the optimal care of these patients. PMID:115566

  14. Trends in Severity of Illness on ICU Admission and Mortality among the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Lior; Novack, Victor; McLennan, Stuart; Celi, Leo Anthony; Baumfeld, Yael; Park, Shinhyuk; Howell, Michael D.; Talmor, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an increase in admission rate for elderly patients to the ICU. Mortality rates are lower when more liberal ICU admission threshold are compared to more restrictive threshold. We sought to describe the temporal trends in elderly admissions and outcomes in a tertiary hospital before and after the addition of an 8-bed medical ICU. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of a comprehensive longitudinal ICU database, from a large tertiary medical center, examining trends in patients’ characteristics, severity of illness, intensity of care and mortality rates over the years 2001–2008. The study population consisted of elderly patients and the primary endpoints were 28 day and one year mortality from ICU admission. Results Between the years 2001 and 2008, 7,265 elderly patients had 8,916 admissions to ICU. The rate of admission to the ICU increased by 5.6% per year. After an eight bed MICU was added, the severity of disease on ICU admission dropped significantly and crude mortality rates decreased thereafter. Adjusting for severity of disease on presentation, there was a decreased mortality at 28- days but no improvement in one- year survival rates for elderly patient admitted to the ICU over the years of observation. Hospital mortality rates have been unchanged from 2001 through 2008. Conclusion In a high capacity ICU bed hospital, there was a temporal decrease in severity of disease on ICU admission, more so after the addition of additional medical ICU beds. While crude mortality rates decreased over the study period, adjusted one-year survival in ICU survivors did not change with the addition of ICU beds. These findings suggest that outcome in critically ill elderly patients may not be influenced by ICU admission. Adding additional ICU beds to deal with the increasing age of the population may therefore not be effective. PMID:24699251

  15. Monocyte Profiles in Critically Ill Patients With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Sepsis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-02

    Pseudomonas Infections; Pseudomonas Septicemia; Pseudomonas; Pneumonia; Pseudomonal Bacteraemia; Pseudomonas Urinary Tract Infection; Pseudomonas Gastrointestinal Tract Infection; Sepsis; Sepsis, Severe; Critically Ill

  16. Ketamine for analgosedation in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Erstad, Brian L; Patanwala, Asad E

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this narrative review is to provide practical and useful guidance for clinicians considering the use of intravenous ketamine for its analgosedative properties in adult, critically ill patients. MEDLINE was searched from inception until January 2016. Articles related to the pharmacological properties of ketamine were retrieved. Information pertaining to pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, dosing regimens, adverse effects, and outcomes was obtained from relevant studies. Although the primary mechanism for ketamine's pharmacological effects is N-methyl-d-aspartate blockade, there are several potential mechanisms of action. It has a very large volume of distribution due to its lipophilicity, which can lead to drug accumulation with sustained infusions. Ketamine has several advantages compared with conventional sedatives such as preserving pharyngeal and laryngeal protective reflexes, lowering airway resistance, increasing lung compliance, and being less likely to produce respiratory depression. It causes sympathetic stimulation, which is also unlike other sedatives and analgesics. There are psychotomimetic effects, which are a concern in terms of delirium. Dosing and monitoring recommendations are provided. Ketamine has a unique pharmacological profile compared with more traditional agents such as opioids, which makes it an appealing alternative agent for analgosedation in the intensive care unit setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Early mobilization in the management of critical illness.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Amy J

    2012-09-01

    Patients undergoing critical illness and mechanical ventilation are at risk of developing neuromuscular and neurocognitive impairments that can impact physical function and quality of life. Mobilizing patients early in the course of critical illness may improve outcomes. Recent literature on early mobilization is reviewed, suggestions for implementation are discussed, and areas for future research are identified.

  18. Lung ultrasound in the critically ill

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lung ultrasound is a basic application of critical ultrasound, defined as a loop associating urgent diagnoses with immediate therapeutic decisions. It requires the mastery of ten signs: the bat sign (pleural line), lung sliding (yielding seashore sign), the A-line (horizontal artifact), the quad sign, and sinusoid sign indicating pleural effusion, the fractal, and tissue-like sign indicating lung consolidation, the B-line, and lung rockets indicating interstitial syndrome, abolished lung sliding with the stratosphere sign suggesting pneumothorax, and the lung point indicating pneumothorax. Two more signs, the lung pulse and the dynamic air bronchogram, are used to distinguish atelectasis from pneumonia. All of these disorders were assessed using CT as the “gold standard” with sensitivity and specificity ranging from 90% to 100%, allowing ultrasound to be considered as a reasonable bedside “gold standard” in the critically ill. The BLUE-protocol is a fast protocol (<3 minutes), which allows diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. It includes a venous analysis done in appropriate cases. Pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and pneumothorax yield specific profiles. Pulmonary edema, e.g., yields anterior lung rockets associated with lung sliding, making the “B-profile.” The FALLS-protocol adapts the BLUE-protocol to acute circulatory failure. It makes sequential search for obstructive, cardiogenic, hypovolemic, and distributive shock using simple real-time echocardiography (right ventricle dilatation, pericardial effusion), then lung ultrasound for assessing a direct parameter of clinical volemia: the apparition of B-lines, schematically, is considered as the endpoint for fluid therapy. Other aims of lung ultrasound are decreasing medical irradiation: the LUCIFLR program (most CTs in ARDS or trauma can be postponed), a use in traumatology, intensive care unit, neonates (the signs are the same than

  19. Lung ultrasound in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Daniel A

    2014-01-09

    Lung ultrasound is a basic application of critical ultrasound, defined as a loop associating urgent diagnoses with immediate therapeutic decisions. It requires the mastery of ten signs: the bat sign (pleural line), lung sliding (yielding seashore sign), the A-line (horizontal artifact), the quad sign, and sinusoid sign indicating pleural effusion, the fractal, and tissue-like sign indicating lung consolidation, the B-line, and lung rockets indicating interstitial syndrome, abolished lung sliding with the stratosphere sign suggesting pneumothorax, and the lung point indicating pneumothorax. Two more signs, the lung pulse and the dynamic air bronchogram, are used to distinguish atelectasis from pneumonia. All of these disorders were assessed using CT as the "gold standard" with sensitivity and specificity ranging from 90% to 100%, allowing ultrasound to be considered as a reasonable bedside "gold standard" in the critically ill. The BLUE-protocol is a fast protocol (<3 minutes), which allows diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. It includes a venous analysis done in appropriate cases. Pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and pneumothorax yield specific profiles. Pulmonary edema, e.g., yields anterior lung rockets associated with lung sliding, making the "B-profile." The FALLS-protocol adapts the BLUE-protocol to acute circulatory failure. It makes sequential search for obstructive, cardiogenic, hypovolemic, and distributive shock using simple real-time echocardiography (right ventricle dilatation, pericardial effusion), then lung ultrasound for assessing a direct parameter of clinical volemia: the apparition of B-lines, schematically, is considered as the endpoint for fluid therapy. Other aims of lung ultrasound are decreasing medical irradiation: the LUCIFLR program (most CTs in ARDS or trauma can be postponed), a use in traumatology, intensive care unit, neonates (the signs are the same than in adults

  20. Understanding and reducing disability in older adults following critical illness.

    PubMed

    Brummel, Nathan E; Balas, Michele C; Morandi, Alessandro; Ferrante, Lauren E; Gill, Thomas M; Ely, E Wesley

    2015-06-01

    To review how disability can develop in older adults with critical illness and to explore ways to reduce long-term disability following critical illness. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science and Google Scholar for studies reporting disability outcomes (i.e., activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, and mobility activities) and/or cognitive outcomes among patients treated in an ICU who were 65 years or older. We also reviewed the bibliographies of relevant citations to identify additional citations. We identified 19 studies evaluating disability outcomes in critically ill patients who were 65 years and older. Descriptive epidemiologic data on disability after critical illness. Newly acquired disability in activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, and mobility activities was commonplace among older adults who survived a critical illness. Incident dementia and less severe cognitive impairment were also highly prevalent. Factors related to the acute critical illness, ICU practices, such as heavy sedation, physical restraints, and immobility, as well as aging physiology, and coexisting geriatric conditions can combine to result in these poor outcomes. Older adults who survive critical illness have physical and cognitive declines resulting in disability at greater rates than hospitalized, noncritically ill and community dwelling older adults. Interventions derived from widely available geriatric care models in use outside of the ICU, which address modifiable risk factors including immobility and delirium, are associated with improved functional and cognitive outcomes and can be used to complement ICU-focused models such as the ABCDEs.

  1. Optimizing testing methods and collection of reference data for differentiating critical illness polyneuropathy from critical illness MYOPATHIES.

    PubMed

    Marrero, Humberto Gonzalez; Stålberg, Erik V

    2016-04-01

    In severe acute quadriplegic myopathy in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, muscle fibers are electrically inexcitable; in critical illness polyneuropathy, the excitability remains normal. Conventional electrodiagnostic methods do not provide the means to adequately differentiate between them. In this study we aimed to further optimize the methodology for the study of critically ill ICU patients and to create a reference database in healthy controls. Different electrophysiologic protocols were tested to find sufficiently robust and reproducible techniques for clinical diagnostic applications. Many parameters show large test-retest variability within the same healthy subject. Reference values have been collected and described as a basis for studies of weakness in critical illness. Using the ratio of neCMAP/dmCMAP (response from nerve and direct muscle stimulation), refractory period, and stimulus-response curves may optimize the electrodiagnostic differentiation of patients with critical illness myopathy from those with critical illness polyneuropathy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Copeptin Predicts Mortality in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Honeder, Maria C.; Lenz, Max; Maurer, Gerald; Wojta, Johann; Heinz, Gottfried; Huber, Kurt; Speidl, Walter S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Critically ill patients admitted to a medical intensive care unit exhibit a high mortality rate irrespective of the cause of admission. Besides its role in fluid and electrolyte balance, vasopressin has been described as a stress hormone. Copeptin, the C-terminal portion of provasopressin mirrors vasopressin levels and has been described as a reliable biomarker for the individual’s stress level and was associated with outcome in various disease entities. The aim of this study was to analyze whether circulating levels of copeptin at ICU admission are associated with 30-day mortality. Methods In this single-center prospective observational study including 225 consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary medical ICU at a university hospital, blood was taken at ICU admission and copeptin levels were measured using a commercially available automated sandwich immunofluorescent assay. Results Median acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score was 20 and 30-day mortality was 25%. Median copeptin admission levels were significantly higher in non-survivors as compared with survivors (77.6 IQR 30.7–179.3 pmol/L versus 45.6 IQR 19.6–109.6 pmol/L; p = 0.025). Patients with serum levels of copeptin in the third tertile at admission had a 2.4-fold (95% CI 1.2–4.6; p = 0.01) increased mortality risk as compared to patients in the first tertile. When analyzing patients according to cause of admission, copeptin was only predictive of 30-day mortality in patients admitted due to medical causes as opposed to those admitted after cardiac surgery, as medical patients with levels of copeptin in the highest tertile had a 3.3-fold (95% CI 1.66.8, p = 0.002) risk of dying independent from APACHE II score, primary diagnosis, vasopressor use and need for mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Circulating levels of copeptin at ICU admission independently predict 30-day mortality in patients admitted to a medical ICU. PMID:28118414

  3. Oral care of the critically ill: a review of the literature and guidelines for practice.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Marianne

    2003-08-01

    Maintaining oral health in the critically ill patient is imperative in reducing the risk of nosocomial infections and improving patient comfort and discharge outcomes. Critically ill patients are at great risk for poor oral health as many are elderly, undernourished, dehydrated, immunosuppressed, have a smoking or alcohol history, are intubated or on high-flow oxygen, and are unable to mechanically remove dental plaque. Many modalities for delivering oral care have been reported in the literature. The use of the toothbrush in the mechanical removal of plaque, even in the intubated patient, has been proven to be superior to the swab. Brushing of the gums in edentulous patients is of benefit. Although electric toothbrushes are preferable, their cost, size and the potential for cross-infection limits their use. Chlorhexidine has long been the gold standard for mouthwashes and provides up to 24 hours of antimicrobial activity; therefore infrequent applications are adequate. Sodium bicarbonate and hydrogen peroxide are of limited use due to lack of convincing evidence regarding their safety and antimicrobial effects in the critically ill population. Saliva stimulants or substitutes including lemon and glycerine are also inappropriate for moistening the oral cavity in the critically ill patient. Regular oral assessment and individualized oral care, along with the use of a standardised protocol for oral care (incorporating proven modalities) is vital for optimal oral care in the critically ill patient.

  4. Diaries for recovery from critical illness.

    PubMed

    Ullman, Amanda J; Aitken, Leanne M; Rattray, Janice; Kenardy, Justin; Le Brocque, Robyne; MacGillivray, Stephen; Hull, Alastair M

    2014-12-09

    During intensive care unit (ICU) admission, patients experience extreme physical and psychological stressors, including the abnormal ICU environment. These experiences impact on a patient's recovery from critical illness and may result in both physical and psychological disorders. One strategy that has been developed and implemented by clinical staff to treat the psychological distress prevalent in ICU survivors is the use of patient diaries. These provide a background to the cause of the patient's ICU admission and an ongoing narrative outlining day-to-day activities. To assess the effect of a diary versus no diary on patients, and their caregivers or families, during the patient's recovery from admission to an ICU. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1), Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to January 2014), EBSCOhost CINAHL (1982 to January 2014), Ovid EMBASE (1980 to January 2014), PsycINFO (1950 to January 2014), Published International Literature on Traumatic Stress (PILOTS) database (1971 to January 2014); Web of Science Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science and Social Science and Humanities (1990 to January 2014); seven clinical trial registries and reference lists of identified trials. We applied no language restriction. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or clinical controlled trials (CCTs) that evaluated the effectiveness of patient diaries, when compared to no ICU diary, for patients or family members to promote recovery after admission to ICU. Outcome measures for describing recovery from ICU included the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress symptomatology, health-related quality of life and costs. We used standard methodological approaches as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two review authors independently reviewed titles for inclusion, extracted data and undertook risk of bias according to prespecified criteria. We identified three

  5. Bone physiology and therapeutics in chronic critical illness.

    PubMed

    Via, Michael A; Gallagher, Emily Jane; Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2010-11-01

    Modern medical practices allow patients to survive acute insults and be sustained by machinery and medicines for extended periods of time. We define chronic critical illness as a later stage of prolonged critical illness that requires tracheotomy. These patients have persistent elevations of inflammatory cytokines, diminished hypothalamic-pituitary function, hypercatabolism, immobilization, and malnutrition. The measurement of bone turnover markers reveals markedly enhanced osteoclastic bone resorption that is uncoupled from osteoblastic bone formation. We review the mechanisms by which these factors contribute to the metabolic bone disease of chronic critical illness and suggest potential therapeutics. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. The pharmacologic approach to the critically ill patient

    SciTech Connect

    Chernow, B. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers addressing the pharmacologic approach to the critically ill patient. Chapter topics include: Radiation injury; Red cell substitutes: a current appraisal; and Psychopharmacology in the ICU.

  7. Vitamin D metabolism and deficiency in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul

    2011-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent and has been associated with a diverse range of chronic medical conditions in the general population. In contrast, the prevalence, pathogenesis and significance of vitamin D deficiency have received little attention in acute medicine. Vitamin D deficiency is seldom considered and rarely corrected adequately, if at all, in critically ill patients. Recent recognition of the extra-skeletal, pleiotropic actions of vitamin D in immunity, epithelial function and metabolic regulation may underlie the previously under-recognized contribution of vitamin D deficiency to typical co-morbidities in critically ill patients, including sepsis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome and metabolic dysfunction. Improved understanding of vitamin D metabolism and regulation in critical illness may allow therapeutic exploitation of vitamin D to improve outcome in critically ill patients.

  8. Delirium: An Emerging Frontier in Management of Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heidi A.B.; Fuchs, D. Catherine; Pandharipande, Pratik P.; Barr, Frederick E.; Ely, E. Wesley

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Introduce pediatric delirium and provide understanding of acute brain dysfunction with its classification and clinical presentations. Understand how delirium is diagnosed and discuss current modes of delirium diagnosis in the critically ill adult population and translation to pediatrics. Understand the prevalence and prognostic significance of delirium in the adult and pediatric critically ill population. Discuss the pathophysiology of delirium as currently understood. Provide general management guidelines for delirium. PMID:19576533

  9. Prospective determination of plasma imipenem concentrations in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Eric; Moreillon, Philippe; Cotting, Jacques; Moessinger, Adrien; Bille, Jacques; Décosterd, Laurent; Zanetti, Giorgio; Majcherczyk, Paul; Bugnon, Denis

    2006-07-01

    Plasma imipenem concentrations were measured in 19 critically ill children (median age, 0.8 year; range, 0.02 to 12.9 years). Wide interindividual variations (2 to 4x at peak and >10x at trough concentrations) resulted in unpredictable plasma levels in several children. To avoid subtherapeutic drug levels, we recommend treatment with at least 100 mg/kg of body weight/day of imipenem-cilastatin for critically ill children requiring such therapy.

  10. Prospective Determination of Plasma Imipenem Concentrations in Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Giannoni, Eric; Moreillon, Philippe; Cotting, Jacques; Moessinger, Adrien; Bille, Jacques; Décosterd, Laurent; Zanetti, Giorgio; Majcherczyk, Paul; Bugnon, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Plasma imipenem concentrations were measured in 19 critically ill children (median age, 0.8 year; range, 0.02 to 12.9 years). Wide interindividual variations (2 to 4× at peak and >10× at trough concentrations) resulted in unpredictable plasma levels in several children. To avoid subtherapeutic drug levels, we recommend treatment with at least 100 mg/kg of body weight/day of imipenem-cilastatin for critically ill children requiring such therapy. PMID:16801447

  11. [Modern illnesses from the critical viewpoint].

    PubMed

    Hausotter, W

    2001-12-01

    Psychosomatic illness as "modern diseases" are of increasing interest to the public. Environmental illnesses, for example assumed intoxication with organic solvents, multiple chemical sensitivity, sick building syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, the influence of amalgam or of electromagnetic waves and ozone are often causes of anxiety. There are many hypotheses about the origin of these diseases. Some scientists emphasize an organic basis; however, this is not generally accepted. Very often with good reason a psychological cause is supposed. Objective diagnostic criteria are not available, therefore these diagnoses may only be applied after sufficient exclusion of other known organic diseases. Mostly a psychological treatment is refused by the person affected, and a scientifically based somatic concept for the therapy does not exist. The medicolegal problems are important and often the reason for prolonged forensic confrontations.

  12. Antioxidant Vitamins and Trace Elements in Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    Koekkoek, W A C Kristine; van Zanten, Arthur R H

    2016-08-01

    This comprehensive narrative review summarizes relevant antioxidant mechanisms, the antioxidant status, and effects of supplementation in critically ill patients for the most studied antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E and the enzyme cofactor trace elements selenium and zinc. Over the past 15 years, oxidative stress-mediated cell damage has been recognized to be fundamental to the pathophysiology of various critical illnesses such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and multiorgan dysfunction in sepsis. Related to these conditions, low plasma levels of antioxidant enzymes, vitamins, and trace elements have been frequently reported, and thus supplementation seems logical. However, low antioxidant plasma levels per se may not indicate low total body stores as critical illness may induce redistribution of antioxidants. Furthermore, low antioxidant levels may even be beneficial as pro-oxidants are essential in bacterial killing. The reviewed studies in critically ill patients show conflicting results. This may be due to different patient populations, study designs, timing, dosing regimens, and duration of the intervention and outcome measures evaluated. Therefore, at present, it remains unclear whether supplementation of antioxidant micronutrients has any clinical benefit in critically ill patients as some studies show clear benefits, whereas others demonstrate neutral outcomes and even harm. Combination therapy of antioxidants seems logical as they work in synergy and function as elements of the human antioxidant network. Further research should focus on defining the normal antioxidant status for critically ill patients and to study optimal supplement combinations either by nutrition enrichment or by enteral or parenteral pharmacological interventions.

  13. Brain dysfunction in patients with chronic critical illness.

    PubMed

    Girard, Timothy D

    2012-06-01

    Critically ill patients frequently experience acute brain dysfunction in the form of coma or delirium, both of which are common during acute and chronic critical illness (CCI). These manifestations of brain dysfunction are associated with numerous adverse outcomes during acute critical illness, including prolonged hospitalization, increased healthcare costs, and increased mortality. The prognosis of CCI patients with coma or delirium has not yet been thoroughly studied, but preliminary studies suggest this population is at high risk for detrimental outcomes associated with acute brain dysfunction. Additionally, a high percentage of patients who survive acute or CCI suffer from long-term brain dysfunction, which manifests primarily as memory deficits and executive dysfunction and is predicted by brain dysfunction in the ICU. Interventions directed at reducing the burden of brain dysfunction during critical illness have shown promise in studies of patients with acute critical illness, but these therapies have yet to be studied during CCI. Thus, multicenter randomized trials are needed to determine which interventions are most effective for such patients. Until these data are available, management strategies that have been proven beneficial during acute critical illness-such as reduction of sedative exposure, especially to benzodiazepines, and early use of physical and occupational therapy-should be employed during the treatment of patients with CCI. 2012 Daedalus Enterprises

  14. An Exploration of Stressful Life Events, Illness, and Coping among the Rural Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Deborah Bray; Mansfield, Phyllis Kernoff

    1984-01-01

    Explores the relationship between stressful life events, coping mechanisms, and illness in 200 rural elderly. Cluster analysis produced four groups with different degress of stress, health, and coping patterns. Groups with the highest stress experienced the poorest health. (JAC)

  15. An Exploration of Stressful Life Events, Illness, and Coping among the Rural Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Deborah Bray; Mansfield, Phyllis Kernoff

    1984-01-01

    Explores the relationship between stressful life events, coping mechanisms, and illness in 200 rural elderly. Cluster analysis produced four groups with different degress of stress, health, and coping patterns. Groups with the highest stress experienced the poorest health. (JAC)

  16. Pet therapy in elderly patients with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Francesca; De Ronchi, Diana; Bernabei, Virginia; Marchetti, Lucia; Ferrari, Barbara; Forlani, Claudia; Negretti, Francesca; Sacchetti, Cleta; Atti, Anna Rita

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of pet therapy on cognitive function, mood and perceived quality of life on elderly inpatients (mean age 84.7 years; 95.2% women) affected by dementia, depression and psychosis. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and 15-items Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) were administered to 10 patients (pet group) and 11 controls (control group) together with a self-perceived quality-of-life questionnaire, before and after a pet therapy intervention that lasted 6 weeks. MMSE and GDS mean scores were compared between and within groups by Student's t-test. Both the pet group and control group improved on GDS and MMSE. Within the pet group, GDS symptoms decreased by 50% (from 5.9 to 2.7, P= 0.013), whereas mean MMSE score increased by 4.5 (P= 0.060). The between group comparison showed a positive effect of pet therapy intervention on GDS (P= 0.070). Most of the participants reported an improvement of their perceived quality of life. Pet therapy is efficient in improving depressive symptoms and cognitive function in residents of long-term care facilities with mental illness. © 2011 The Authors; Psychogeriatrics © 2011 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  17. Protein Requirements of the Critically Ill Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Coss-Bu, Jorge A; Hamilton-Reeves, Jill; Patel, Jayshil J; Morris, Claudia R; Hurt, Ryan T

    2017-04-01

    This article includes a review of protein needs in children during health and illness, as well as a detailed discussion of protein metabolism, including nitrogen balance during critical illness, and assessment and prescription/delivery of protein to critically ill children. The determination of protein requirements in children has been difficult and challenging. The protein needs in healthy children should be based on the amount needed to ensure adequate growth during infancy and childhood. Compared with adults, children require a continuous supply of nutrients to maintain growth. The protein requirement is expressed in average requirements and dietary reference intake, which represents values that cover the needs of 97.5% of the population. Critically ill children have an increased protein turnover due to an increase in whole-body protein synthesis and breakdown with protein degradation leading to loss of lean body mass (LBM) and development of growth failure, malnutrition, and worse clinical outcomes. The results of protein balance studies in critically ill children indicate higher protein needs, with infants and younger children requiring higher intakes per body weight compared with older children. Monitoring the side effects of increased protein intake should be performed. Recent studies found a survival benefit in critically ill children who received a higher percentage of prescribed energy and protein goal by the enteral route. Future randomized studies should evaluate the effect of protein dosing in different age groups on patient outcomes, including LBM, muscle structure and function, duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit and hospital length of stay, and mortality.

  18. Generalized periodic discharges in the critically ill

    PubMed Central

    Claassen, Jan; Abou Khaled, Karine; Jirsch, Jeffrey; Alschuler, Daniel M.; Wittman, John; Emerson, Ronald G.; Hirsch, Lawrence J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Generalized periodic discharges are increasingly recognized on continuous EEG monitoring, but their relationship to seizures and prognosis remains unclear. Methods: All adults with generalized periodic discharges from 1996 to 2006 were matched 1:1 to controls by age, etiology, and level of consciousness. Overall, 200 patients with generalized periodic discharges were matched to 200 controls. Results: Mean age was 66 years (range 18–96); 56% were comatose. Presenting illnesses included acute brain injury (44%), acute systemic illness (38%), cardiac arrest (15%), and epilepsy (3%). A total of 46% of patients with generalized periodic discharges had a seizure during their hospital stay (almost half were focal), vs 34% of controls (p = 0.014). Convulsive seizures were seen in a third of both groups. A total of 27% of patients with generalized periodic discharges had nonconvulsive seizures, vs 8% of controls (p < 0.001); 22% of patients with generalized periodic discharges had nonconvulsive status epilepticus, vs 7% of controls (p < 0.001). In both groups, approximately half died or were in a vegetative state, one-third had severe disability, and one-fifth had moderate to no disability. Excluding cardiac arrest patients, generalized periodic discharges were associated with increased mortality on univariate analysis (36.8% vs 26.9%; p = 0.049). Multivariate predictors of worse outcome were cardiac arrest, coma, nonconvulsive status epilepticus, and sepsis, but not generalized periodic discharges. Conclusion: Generalized periodic discharges were strongly associated with nonconvulsive seizures and nonconvulsive status epilepticus. While nonconvulsive status epilepticus was independently associated with worse outcome, generalized periodic discharges were not after matching for age, etiology, and level of consciousness. PMID:23035068

  19. Chronic critical illness: are we saving patients or creating victims?

    PubMed Central

    Loss, Sergio Henrique; Nunes, Diego Silva Leite; Franzosi, Oellen Stuani; Salazar, Gabriela Soranço; Teixeira, Cassiano; Vieira, Silvia Regina Rios

    2017-01-01

    The technological advancements that allow support for organ dysfunction have led to an increase in survival rates for the most critically ill patients. Some of these patients survive the initial acute critical condition but continue to suffer from organ dysfunction and remain in an inflammatory state for long periods of time. This group of critically ill patients has been described since the 1980s and has had different diagnostic criteria over the years. These patients are known to have lengthy hospital stays, undergo significant alterations in muscle and bone metabolism, show immunodeficiency, consume substantial health resources, have reduced functional and cognitive capacity after discharge, create a sizable workload for caregivers, and present high long-term mortality rates. The aim of this review is to report on the most current evidence in terms of the definition, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, treatment, and prognosis of persistent critical illness. PMID:28444077

  20. Conformity with nature: a theory of Chinese American elders' health promotion and illness prevention processes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y L

    1996-12-01

    Grounded theory methodology was used to generate a substantive theory that describes and explains the beliefs and behaviors regarding health promotion and illness prevention among Chinese elders in the United States. On the basis of data collected from 21 Chinese elders, the theory, conformity with nature, emerged. Three interrelated subprocesses--harmonizing with the environment, following bliss, and listening to heaven--were identified. This theory facilitates an understanding of ways to promote health and prevent illness and offers a guide for providing quality health care to Chinese elders in the United States.

  1. Positioning critically ill patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, H; Gallimore, D

    Although moving and handling is an important aspect of nurse training, the emphasis is often more on the health and safety of the nurse than on the importance of the correct therapeutic positioning of patients. This article outlines optimum patient positioning in different critical care settings and for different medical conditions.

  2. Potentially inappropriate prescribing andthe risk of adverse drug reactions in critically ill older adults

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Thamires B.; Reis, Wálleri C.; Andrzejevski, Vânia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) use in the elderly is associated with increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), but there is limited information regarding PIM use in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Objective: The aim of the study is to describe the prevalence and factors associated with the use of PIM and the occurrence of PIM-related adverse reactions in the critically ill elderly. Methods: This study enrolled all critically ill older adults (60 years or more) admitted to medical or cardiovascular ICUs between January and December 2013, in a large tertiary teaching hospital. For all patients, clinical pharmacists listed the medications given during the ICU stay and data on drugs were analyzed using 2012 Beers Criteria, to identify the prevalence of PIM. For each identified PIM the medical records were analyzed to evaluate factors associated with its use. The frequency of ADRs and, the causal relationship between PIM and the ADRs identified were also evaluated through review of medical records. Results: According to 2012 Beers Criteria, 98.2% of elderly patients used at least one PIM (n=599), of which 24.8% were newly started in the ICUs. In 29.6% of PIMs, there was a clinical circumstance that justified their prescription. The number of PIMs was associated with ICU length of stay and total number of medications. There was at least one ADR identified in 17.8% of patients; more than 40% were attributed to PIM, but there was no statistical association. Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of PIM used in acutely ill older people, but they do not seem to be the major cause of adverse drug reactions in this population. Although many PIMs had a clinical circumstance that led to their prescription during the course of ICU hospitalization, many were still present upon hospital discharge. Therefore, prescription of PIMs should be minimized to improve the safety of elderly patients. PMID:28042352

  3. [Problems and strategies in the treatment of mental disorders in elderly patients with physical illness].

    PubMed

    Wada, H

    2000-11-01

    There is a high prevalence of mental disorders in the community population of older adults, especially in medical treatment facilities. Therefore, clinicians who treat geriatric patients cannot neglect the psychiatric vulnerability of the elderly population. The fragility of psychological functioning of the elderly is caused not only by psychological contributors, such as various kinds of experiences of loss, but also by biological factors such as decreases in neurotransmitters and in the number of neurons. Another point geriatric clinicians should pay attention to is the powerful mind-body connection in the elderly. Recent psychoneuroimmunological research demonstrates that depression or other types of emotional stress damages the immune system, which can induce some physical diseases. This is especially true for the elderly, who have weakened cell-mediated immune function and are more susceptible to influence by the damaged immune function caused by such psychiatric dysfunction. Also, depression in the elderly can often lead to malnutrition or dehydration, which can induce various kinds of physical illness. On the other hand, physical illness in the elderly can induce depression, because of the psychological vulnerability of the elderly. Due to the strong mind-body connection in the elderly, the availability of psychiatric care is essential. When providing psychiatric care for the elderly, the clinician should attend to all symptoms, not minimizing the importance of biological treatment, while also trying to support the elderly patients psychologically through acceptance of their need for interdependency and respect for their narcissism.

  4. Adiponectin in pulmonary disease and critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Pablo; Sood, Akshay

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin is a predominantly anti-inflammatory protein produced by adipose tissue with possible signalling activity in the lung. It is increasingly associated with inflammatory pulmonary diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and in critical illness. Although mouse studies indicate causative associations between adiponectin and asthma and COPD, the human literature in this regard is inconclusive. Some, but not all, studies demonstrate that serum adiponectin concentrations are inversely associated with asthma prevalence among premenopausal women and peripubertal girls. On the other hand, serum adiponectin concentrations are associated with lower asthma severity among boys but greater severity among men. Further, case-control studies demonstrate higher systemic and airway adiponectin concentrations in primarily male COPD patients than controls. Systemic adiponectin is positively associated with lung function in healthy adults but inversely associated in studies of male subjects with COPD. Murine and human studies further show contradictory associations of systemic adiponectin with critical illness. Higher premorbid systemic adiponectin concentrations are associated with improved survival from sepsis in mice. On the other hand, higher systemic adiponectin concentrations on day 1 of critical illness are associated with lower survival in critically ill patients with respiratory failure. In the absence of adequate longitudinal data, it is not possible to determine whether the adiponectin derangements are the consequence or the cause of the disease studied. Future research will determine whether modulation of adiponectin, independent of BMI, may be helpful in the prevention or treatment of asthma, COPD or critical illness. PMID:22876927

  5. Early Mobilization and Rehabilitation of Patients Who Are Critically Ill.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Mohamed D; Parker, Ann M; Needham, Dale M

    2016-09-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are increasingly recognized as a cause of both short- and long-term physical morbidity in survivors of critical illness. This recognition has given rise to research aimed at better understanding the risk factors and mechanisms associated with neuromuscular dysfunction and physical impairment associated with critical illness, as well as possible interventions to prevent or treat these issues. Among potential risk factors, bed rest is an important modifiable risk factor. Early mobilization and rehabilitation of patients who are critically ill may help prevent or mitigate the sequelae of bed rest and improve patient outcomes. Research studies and quality improvement projects have demonstrated that early mobilization and rehabilitation are safe and feasible in patients who are critically ill, with potential benefits including improved physical functioning and decreased duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care, and hospital stay. Despite these findings, early mobilization and rehabilitation are still uncommon in routine clinical practice, with many perceived barriers. This review summarizes potential risk factors for neuromuscular dysfunction and physical impairment associated with critical illness, highlights the potential role of early mobilization and rehabilitation in improving patient outcomes, and discusses some of the commonly perceived barriers to early mobilization and strategies for overcoming them.

  6. Glutamine and antioxidants: status of their use in critical illness.

    PubMed

    van Zanten, Arthur R H

    2015-03-01

    Many studies in critically ill patients have addressed enteral or parenteral supplementation of glutamine and antioxidants to counteract assumed deficiencies and induce immune-modulating effects to reduce infections and improve outcome. Older studies showed marked reductions in mortality, infectious morbidity and length of stay. Recent studies no longer show beneficial effects and in contrast even demonstrated increased mortality. This opiniating review focuses on the latest information and the consequences for the use of glutamine and antioxidants in critically ill patients. Positive effects in systematic reviews and meta-analyses are based on results from older, smaller and mainly single-centre studies. New information has challenged the conditional deficiency hypothesis concerning glutamine in critically ill patients. The recent REDOXS and MetaPlus trials studying the effects of glutamine, selenium and other antioxidants have shown no benefits and increased mortality. Given that the first dictum in medicine is to do no harm, we cannot be confident that immune-modulating nutrient supplementation with glutamine and antioxidants is effective and well tolerated for critically ill patients. Until more data are available, it is probably better not to routinely administer glutamine and antioxidants in nonphysiological doses to mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.

  7. Health status of critically ill trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Leanne M; Chaboyer, Wendy; Schuetz, Michael; Joyce, Christopher; Macfarlane, Bonnie

    2014-03-01

    To describe the recovery of trauma intensive care patients up to six months posthospital discharge. Injury is a leading cause of preventable mortality and morbidity worldwide, with approximately 10% of hospitalised trauma patients being admitted to intensive care. Intensive care patients experience significant ongoing physical and psychological burden after discharge; however, the patterns of recovery and the subgroups of intensive care patients who experience the greatest burden are not described. This prospective cohort study was conducted in one tertiary referral hospital in south-east Queensland, Australia. Following ethics approval, injured patients who required admission to intensive care provided consent. Participants completed questionnaires prior to hospital discharge (n = 123) and one (n = 93) and six months (n = 88) later. Data included demographic and socioeconomic details, pre-injury health, injury characteristics, acute care factors, postacute factors [self-efficacy, illness perception, perceived social support and psychological status as measured by the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10) and the PTSD Civilian Checklist] and health status (SF-36). All participants required ongoing support from healthcare providers in the six months after discharge from hospital, and approximately half required support services such as accommodation and home modifications. Approximately 20% of participants reported post-traumatic stress symptoms, while approximately half the participants reported psychological distress. Average quality of life scores were significantly below the Australian norms both one and six months postdischarge. Trauma intensive care patients rely on ongoing healthcare professional and social support services. Compromised health-related quality of life and psychological health persists at six months. Effective discharge planning and communication across the care continuum is essential to facilitate access to healthcare providers and other

  8. [Progress and living situations among the elderly with severe mental illness: perspectives of psychosocial services].

    PubMed

    Dallaire, Bernadette; McCubbin, Michael; Provost, Mélanie; Carpentier, Normand; Clément, Michèle

    2010-06-01

    Services for elders with severe mental illness (SMI) have major deficiencies, among them a lack of adequate psychosocial services. Some analysts have attributed this situation to "double stigmatization" targeting both ageing and mental illness in our societies. Using qualitative methods (23 semi-directed interviews, theme-based content analysis), our exploratory research aims to understand better the perceptions of psychosocial practitioners working in community and institutional settings about the elderly with SMI and their living situations. Our informants evoke living situations marked by a lack of support (isolation), of resources (financial precariousness/poverty) and of power (learned passivity), traits that are related not only to mental illness per se, but also to long term psychiatric institutionalization. For them, the current situation of elders with SMI is the end product of biographies in which life-course, illness-course and life in services and/or institutions join and, sometimes, become indistinguishable. Implications for psychosocial practices are discussed.

  9. Oxidative Stress in Critically Ill Children with Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Derek S

    2011-10-07

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit. Sepsis accounts for significant morbidity and mortality in critically ill children as well. The pathophysiology of sepsis is characterized by a complex systemic inflammatory response, endothelial dysfunction, and alterations in the coagulation system, which lead to perturbations in the delivery of oxygen and metabolic substrates to the tissues, end-organ dysfunction, and ultimately death. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role as both a promoter and mediator of the systemic inflammatory response, suggesting potential targets for the treatment of critically ill children with the sepsis syndrome. Herein, we will provide a brief review of the role of oxidative and nitrosative stress in the pathophysiology of sepsis.

  10. Enterocutaneous fistulas in the setting of trauma and critical illness.

    PubMed

    Dubose, Joseph J; Lundy, Jonathan B

    2010-09-01

    One of the most devastating complications to develop in the general surgical patient is an enterocutaneous fistula (ECF). Critically ill patients suffering trauma, thermal injury, infected necrotizing pancreatitis, and other acute intraabdominal pathology are at unique risk for this complication as well. By using decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome and leaving the abdomen open temporarily for other acute processes, survival in some instances may be improved. However, the exposed viscera are at risk for fistulization in the presence of an open abdomen, a newly defined entity termed the enteroatmospheric fistula (EAF). The purpose of this article is to describe the epidemiology of ECF in the setting of trauma and critical illness, nutrition in injured/critically ill patients with ECF, pharmacologic adjuncts to decrease fistula effluent, wound care, surgical management of the EAF/ECF, and techniques for prevention of these dreaded complications in patients with an open abdomen.

  11. Assessment and treatment of hyperglycemia in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Marina Verçoza; Moraes, Rafael Barberena; Fabbrin, Amanda Rodrigues; Santos, Manoella Freitas; Gerchman, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a commonly encountered issue in critically ill patients in the intensive care setting. The presence of hyperglycemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, regardless of the reason for admission (e.g., acute myocardial infarction, status post-cardiovascular surgery, stroke, sepsis). However, the pathophysiology and, in particular, the treatment of hyperglycemia in the critically ill patient remain controversial. In clinical practice, several aspects must be taken into account in the management of these patients, including blood glucose targets, history of diabetes mellitus, the route of nutrition (enteral or parenteral), and available monitoring equipment, which substantially increases the workload of providers involved in the patients' care. This review describes the epidemiology, pathophysiology, management, and monitoring of hyperglycemia in the critically ill adult patient. PMID:24770692

  12. Human factors in the management of the critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Bion, J F; Abrusci, T; Hibbert, P

    2010-07-01

    Unreliable delivery of best practice care is a major component of medical error. Critically ill patients are particularly susceptible to error and unreliable care. Human factors analysis, widely used in industry, provides insights into how interactions between organizations, tasks, and the individual worker impact on human behaviour and affect systems reliability. We adopt a human factors approach to examine determinants of clinical reliability in the management of critically ill patients. We conducted a narrative review based on a Medline search (1950-March 2010) combining intensive/critical care (units) with medical errors, patient safety, or delivery of healthcare; keyword and Internet search 'human factors' or 'ergonomics'. Critical illness represents a high-risk, complex system spanning speciality and geographical boundaries. Substantial opportunities exist for improving the safety and reliability of care of critically ill patients at the level of the task, the individual healthcare provider, and the organization or system. Task standardization (best practice guidelines) and simplification (bundling or checklists) should be implemented where scientific evidence is strong, or adopted subject to further research ('dynamic standardization'). Technical interventions should be embedded in everyday practice by the adjunctive use of non-technical (behavioural) interventions. These include executive 'adoption' of clinical areas, systematic methods for identifying hazards and reflective learning from error, and a range of techniques for improving teamworking and communication. Human factors analysis provides a useful framework for understanding and rectifying the causes of error and unreliability, particularly in complex systems such as critical care.

  13. The recognition and early management of critical illness.

    PubMed

    Ridley, Saxon

    2005-09-01

    Critical illness is an emergency because the inflammatory response has redundant multiple pathways; once triggered, it is difficult to control or suppress. Infection is a potent precursor of critical illness and increasing organ dysfunction has a synergistic, rather than purely additive, adverse effect on mortality. The longer the inflammatory process continues unabated, the more advanced and unrecoverable the pathophysiological processes become resulting in a high mortality. The review is a statement of the author's opinion supported by selected references. The content of the review was presented as the Tutor Edwards Lecture at The Royal College of Surgeons of England in December 2004. Critical illness is preceded by prodromal signs warning of impending physiological catastrophe. These simple physiological signs, the most sensitive of which is the respiratory rate can be quantified using Early Warning Scores. If patients trigger the Early Warning Score, emergency management is required to reverse the abnormal physiological decline or to prompt admission to a critical care area. The emergency management principles include removal or reversal of the cause so shutting down the inflammatory response, appropriate antibiotic therapy and general organ support. Formalising measurement of physiological (in)stability on the general ward using Early Warning Scores improves recognition of unstable and potentially critically ill patients. Prompt intervention will either reverse further physiological decline or facilitate timely referral to the critical care service for further, more invasive, organ support.

  14. Echocardiographic approach to cardiac tamponade in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    McCanny, Peter; Colreavy, Frances

    2016-12-24

    Cardiac tamponade should be considered in a critically ill patient in whom the cause of haemodynamic shock is unclear. When considering tamponade, transthoracic echocardiography plays an essential role and is the initial investigation of choice. Diagnostic sensitivity of transthoracic echocardiography is dependent on image quality, and in some cases a transoesophageal approach may be required to confirm the diagnosis. Knowledge of the pathophysiology and echocardiographic features of cardiac tamponade are essential for the practicing Intensivist. This review presents an approach to the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiac tamponade in critically ill patients.

  15. Fish Oil in Critical Illness: Mechanisms and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Renee D.; Martin, Julie M.; Mayer, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Fish oil is rich in omega-3 fatty acids which have been shown to be beneficial in multiple disease states that involve an inflammatory process. It is now hypothesized that omega-3 fatty acids may decrease the inflammatory response and be beneficial in critical illness. After a review of the mechanisms of omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation, research using enteral nutrition formulas and parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions fortified with fish oil are examined. The results of this research to date are inconclusive for both enteral and parenteral omega-3 fatty acid administration. More research is required before definitive recommendations can be made on fish oil supplementation in critical illness. PMID:20643303

  16. Critical illness associated neuromuscular disorders -- keep them in mind.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Réka; Molnár, Levente; Fülep, Zoltán; Fekete, Kálra; Berhés, Mariann; Fülesdi, Béla

    2014-11-30

    Neuromuscular disorders complicating sepsis and critical illness are not new and scarce phenomena yet they receive little attention in daily clinical practice. Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy affect nearly half of the patients with sepsis. The difficult weaning from the ventilator, the prolonged intensive care unit and hospital stay, the larger complication and mortality rate these disorders predispose to, put a large burden on the patient and the health care system. The aim of this review is to give an insight into the pathophysiological background, diagnostic possibilities and potential preventive and therapeutic measures in connection with these disorders to draw attention to their significance and underline the importance of preventive approach.

  17. Nursing observations on ward patients at risk of critical illness.

    PubMed

    Chellel, Annie; Fraser, Jayne; Fender, Veronica; Higgs, Debbie; Buras-Rees, Stefa; Hook, Lorraine; Mummery, Lucy; Cook, Claire; Parsons, Sara; Thomas, Claire

    Research findings and anecdotal evidence from outreach nurses across the country have suggested that key indicators of critical illness (respiratory rate and fluid balance) are being missed on the wards and that critically ill patients are not being fed adequately. A group of outreach nurses in Kent carried out a survey to confirm or refute these claims and to ascertain the variation in outreach provision in Kent. The survey found widespread deficiencies in nursing care and observations, which represent a serious threat to patients' safety.

  18. Nursing the critically ill surgical patient in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Carter, Chris; Snell, David

    2016-11-10

    Critical illness in the developing world is a substantial burden for individuals, families, communities and healthcare services. The management of these patients will depend on the resources available. Simple conditions such as a fractured leg or a strangulated hernia can have devastating effects on individuals, families and communities. The recent Lancet Commission on Global Surgery and the World Health Organization promise to strengthen emergency and essential care will increase the focus on surgical services within the developing world. This article provides an overview of nursing the critically ill surgical patient in Zambia, a lower middle income country (LMIC) in sub-Saharan Africa.

  19. Use of inotropes and vasopressor agents in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Bangash, Mansoor N; Kong, Ming-Li; Pearse, Rupert M

    2012-04-01

    Inotropes and vasopressors are biologically and clinically important compounds that originate from different pharmacological groups and act at some of the most fundamental receptor and signal transduction systems in the body. More than 20 such agents are in common clinical use, yet few reviews of their pharmacology exist outside of physiology and pharmacology textbooks. Despite widespread use in critically ill patients, understanding of the clinical effects of these drugs in pathological states is poor. The purpose of this article is to describe the pharmacology and clinical applications of inotropic and vasopressor agents in critically ill patients. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. Protocols and Hospital Mortality in Critically Ill Patients: The United States Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group Critical Illness Outcomes Study.

    PubMed

    Sevransky, Jonathan E; Checkley, William; Herrera, Phabiola; Pickering, Brian W; Barr, Juliana; Brown, Samuel M; Chang, Steven Y; Chong, David; Kaufman, David; Fremont, Richard D; Girard, Timothy D; Hoag, Jeffrey; Johnson, Steven B; Kerlin, Mehta P; Liebler, Janice; O'Brien, James; O'Keefe, Terence; Park, Pauline K; Pastores, Stephen M; Patil, Namrata; Pietropaoli, Anthony P; Putman, Maryann; Rice, Todd W; Rotello, Leo; Siner, Jonathan; Sajid, Sahul; Murphy, David J; Martin, Greg S

    2015-10-01

    Clinical protocols may decrease unnecessary variation in care and improve compliance with desirable therapies. We evaluated whether highly protocolized ICUs have superior patient outcomes compared with less highly protocolized ICUs. Observational study in which participating ICUs completed a general assessment and enrolled new patients 1 day each week. A total of 6,179 critically ill patients. Fifty-nine ICUs in the United States Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group Critical Illness Outcomes Study. None. The primary exposure was the number of ICU protocols; the primary outcome was hospital mortality. A total of 5,809 participants were followed prospectively, and 5,454 patients in 57 ICUs had complete outcome data. The median number of protocols per ICU was 19 (interquartile range, 15-21.5). In single-variable analyses, there were no differences in ICU and hospital mortality, length of stay, use of mechanical ventilation, vasopressors, or continuous sedation among individuals in ICUs with a high versus low number of protocols. The lack of association was confirmed in adjusted multivariable analysis (p = 0.70). Protocol compliance with two ventilator management protocols was moderate and did not differ between ICUs with high versus low numbers of protocols for lung protective ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome (47% vs 52%; p = 0.28) and for spontaneous breathing trials (55% vs 51%; p = 0.27). Clinical protocols are highly prevalent in U.S. ICUs. The presence of a greater number of protocols was not associated with protocol compliance or patient mortality.

  1. Transthoracic echocardiography in obstetric anaesthesia and obstetric critical illness.

    PubMed

    Dennis, A T

    2011-04-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is a powerful non-invasive diagnostic, monitoring and measurement device in medicine. In addition to cardiologists, many other specialised groups, including emergency and critical care physicians and cardiac anaesthetists, have recognised its ability to provide high quality information and utilise TTE in the care of their patients. In obstetric anaesthesia and management of obstetric critical illness, the favourable characteristics of pregnant women facilitate TTE examination. These include anterior and left lateral displacement of the heart, frequent employment of the left lateral tilted position to avoid aortocaval compression, spontaneous ventilation and wide acceptance of ultrasound technology by women. Of relevance to obstetric anaesthetists is that maternal morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease is significant worldwide. This makes TTE an appropriate, important and applicable device in pregnant women. Clinician-performed TTE enables differentiation between the life-threatening causes of hypotension. In the critically ill woman this improves diagnostic accuracy and allows treatment interventions to be instituted and monitored at the point of patient care. This article outlines the application of TTE in the specialty of obstetric anaesthesia and in the management of obstetric critical illness. It describes the importance of TTE education, quality assurance and outcome recording. It also discusses how barriers to the routine implementation of TTE in obstetric anaesthesia and management of obstetric critical illness can be overcome.

  2. Initial ventilator settings for critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Kilickaya, Oguz; Gajic, Ognjen

    2013-03-12

    The lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategy has been standard practice for management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for more than a decade. Observational data, small randomized studies and two recent systematic reviews suggest that lung protective ventilation is both safe and potentially beneficial in patients who do not have ARDS at the onset of mechanical ventilation. Principles of lung-protective ventilation include: a) prevention of volutrauma (tidal volume 4 to 8 ml/kg predicted body weight with plateau pressure<30 cmH2O); b) prevention of atelectasis (positive end-expiratory pressure≥5 cmH2O, as needed recruitment maneuvers); c) adequate ventilation (respiratory rate 20 to 35 breaths per minute); and d) prevention of hyperoxia (titrate inspired oxygen concentration to peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels of 88 to 95%). Most patients tolerate lung protective mechanical ventilation well without the need for excessive sedation. Patients with a stiff chest wall may tolerate higher plateau pressure targets (approximately 35 cmH2O) while those with severe ARDS and ventilator asynchrony may require a short-term neuromuscular blockade. Given the difficulty in timely identification of patients with or at risk of ARDS and both the safety and potential benefit in patients without ARDS, lung-protective mechanical ventilation is recommended as an initial approach to mechanical ventilation in both perioperative and critical care settings.

  3. [Role of voriconazole in critically ill patients with invasive mycoses].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Lerma, Francisco

    2007-09-30

    This observational study of the use of voriconazole conducted in Spain has identified reasons, characteristics, and forms of use of voriconazole in critically ill patients admitted to the ICU. Voriconale was used for directed treatment (63%), by the intravenous route (75%), as rescue treatment (41%) in severely ill patients (APACHE 21) with high need of resources and therapeutic interventions. Satisfactory clinical response was obtained in 50% of cases, related adverse events were scarce (16%), and withdrawal of voriconazole was not necessary. Clinical indications included empirical, etiologic, and rescue treatment of infections caused by Aspergillus, Candida albicans and most species different than C. albicans. Voriconazole can be used for preemptive therapy in patients at risk of invasive candidasis. When selecting voriconazole, liver function, renal function (i.v. formulation) and history of azoles use should be considered, although none of these circumstances is an absolute contraindication for the prescription of voriconazole in critically ill patients.

  4. Nutrition therapy in critically ill infants and children.

    PubMed

    Skillman, Heather E; Wischmeyer, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Infants and children are susceptible to the profound metabolic effects of critical illness. In addition, preexisting malnutrition and obesity have adverse consequences during the intensive care unit stay. Early enteral and parenteral feeding can improve nutrition deficits, but neither has been sufficiently studied to show an effect on clinical outcomes in pediatric critical care. Indirect calorimetry is a useful technique that identifies patients receiving inadequate or excessive nutrition, but this technique is underused.

  5. Real Time Free Cortisol Quantification Among Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Jerry J.; Donaldson, Amy; Barker, Ruth M.; Meert, Kathleen L.; Harrison, Rick; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Berger, John; Willson, Douglas F.; Jack, Rhona; Nicholson, Carol; Dean, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Ascertainment of adrenal function assessing free (FC) rather that total (TC) cortisol may be beneficial for the diagnosis of critical illness related cortisol insufficiency (CIRCI). We hypothesized that centrifugal ultrafiltration (CUF) would provide timely FC data that highly correlated with the gold standard, but logistically cumbersome, equilibrium dialysis (EQD) technique when the FC fractions were identically quantified by chemiluminescence immunoassay. We also hypothesized that FC would correlate with illness severity in a large cohort of critically ill children. Design Prospective, multi-institutional, observational cohort investigation. Setting Seven pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) within the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network. Patients 165 critically ill children across the spectrum of illness severity. Interventions Blood sampling. Measurements and main results Time to derive plasma FC concentrations following CUF or EQD fractionation with chemiluminescence immunoassay was ~2 versus ~24 hours, respectively. Utilizing CUF, mean plasma FC was 4.1 ± 6.7 ug/dL (median 1.6, range 0.2-43.6), representing an average of 15.2 ± 9.4% of total cortisol. Nearly 60% of subjects exhibited FC < 2 and 30% < 0.8 ug/dL, previously suggested threshold concentrations for defining CIRCI. Plasma FC concentrations comparing CUF versus EQD fractionation demonstrated a strong correlation (R2 = 0.97). For FC < 2 ug/dL Bland-Altman analysis revealed minimal negative bias for the CUF technique. Illness severity assessed by PRISM III correlated moderately with FC and percent TC as FC. Conclusions Determination of CUF fractionated FC was fast and results correlated highly with EQD fractionated FC. Many children exhibited FC < 2 and < 0.8 ug/dL, but did not demonstrate clinical evidence of CIRCI. This study ascertains that real time FC quantification is feasible to

  6. Pulmonary penetration of piperacillin and tazobactam in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Felton, TW; McCalman, K; Malagon, I; Isalska, B; Whalley, S; Goodwin, J; Bentley, AM; Hope, WW

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary infections in critically ill patients are common and associated with high morbidity and mortality. Piperacillin-tazobactam is a frequently used therapy in critically ill patients with pulmonary infection. Antibiotic concentrations in the lung reflect target site antibiotic concentrations in patients with pneumonia. The aim of this study was to assess the plasma and intra-pulmonary pharmacokinetics (PK) of piperacillin-tazobactam in critically ill patients administered standard piperacillin-tazobactam regimens. A population PK model was developed to describe plasma and intra-pulmonary piperacillin and tazobactam concentrations. The probability of piperacillin exposures reaching pharmacodynamic endpoints and the impact of pulmonary permeability on piperacillin and tazobactam pulmonary penetration was explored. The median piperacillin and tazobactam pulmonary penetration ratio was 49.3% and 121.2%, respectively. Pulmonary piperacillin and tazobactam concentration were unpredictable and negatively correlated to pulmonary permeability. Current piperacillin-tazobactam regimens may be insufficient to treat pneumonia caused by piperacillin-tazobactam susceptible organisms in some critically ill patients. PMID:24926779

  7. OBESITY AND CRITICAL ILLNESS: INSIGHTS FROM ANIMAL MODELS.

    PubMed

    Mittwede, Peter N; Clemmer, John S; Bergin, Patrick F; Xiang, Lusha

    2016-04-01

    Critical illness is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world. While obesity is often detrimental in the context of trauma, it is paradoxically associated with improved outcomes in some septic patients. The reasons for these disparate outcomes are not well understood. A number of animal models have been used to study the obese response to various forms of critical illness. Just as there have been many animal models that have attempted to mimic clinical conditions, there are many clinical scenarios that can occur in the highly heterogeneous critically ill patient population that occupies hospitals and intensive care units. This poses a formidable challenge for clinicians and researchers attempting to understand the mechanisms of disease and develop appropriate therapies and treatment algorithms for specific subsets of patients, including the obese. The development of new, and the modification of existing animal models, is important in order to bring effective treatments to a wide range of patients. Not only do experimental variables need to be matched as closely as possible to clinical scenarios, but animal models with pre-existing comorbid conditions need to be studied. This review briefly summarizes animal models of hemorrhage, blunt trauma, traumatic brain injury, and sepsis. It also discusses what has been learned through the use of obese models to study the pathophysiology of critical illness in light of what has been demonstrated in the clinical literature.

  8. OBESITY AND CRITICAL ILLNESS: INSIGHTS FROM ANIMAL MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Mittwede, Peter N.; Clemmer, John S.; Bergin, Patrick F.; Xiang, Lusha

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world. While obesity is often detrimental in the context of trauma, it is paradoxically associated with improved outcomes in some septic patients. The reasons for these disparate outcomes are not well understood. A number of animal models have been used to study the obese response to various forms of critical illness. Just as there have been many animal models that have attempted to mimic clinical conditions, there are many clinical scenarios that can occur in the highly heterogeneous critically ill patient population that occupies hospitals and intensive care units. This poses a formidable challenge for clinicians and researchers attempting to understand the mechanisms of disease and develop appropriate therapies and treatment algorithms for specific subsets of patients, including the obese. The development of new, and the modification of existing animal models is important in order to bring effective treatments to a wide range of patients. Not only do experimental variables need to be matched as closely as possible to clinical scenarios, but animal models with pre-existing comorbid conditions need to be studied. This review briefly summarizes animal models of hemorrhage, blunt trauma, traumatic brain injury, and sepsis. It also discusses what has been learned through the use of obese models to study the pathophysiology of critical illness in light of what has been demonstrated in the clinical literature. PMID:26513706

  9. Screening and Management of Delirium in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Nicholas; Smithburger, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is highly prevalent in the critically ill population and has been associated with numerous negative outcomes including increased mortality. The presentation of a delirious patient in the intensive care unit (ICU) is characterized by a fluctuating cognitive status and inattention that varies dramatically among patients. Delirium can present in 3 different motoric subtypes: hyperactive, hypoactive, and mixed. Two tools, the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist and Confusion Assessment ICU, are validated and recommended for the detection of delirium in critically ill patients. The identification of delirium in a critically ill patient should be facilitated using one of these tools. An intermediate form of delirium known as subsyndromal delirium also exists, although the significance of this syndrome is largely unknown. Another phenomenon known as sedation-related delirium has been recently described, although more research is needed to understand its significance. Patients in the ICU are exposed to many risk factors for developing delirium; controlling these risk factors is essential for preventing delirium development in critically ill patients. Nonpharmacologic interventions have been shown to prevent patients from developing delirium. Prevention is crucial because once delirium develops pharmacologic therapy is limited. PMID:26715799

  10. Bicarbonate kinetics and predicted energy expenditure in critically ill children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To determine nutrient requirements by the carbon oxidation techniques, it is necessary to know the fraction of carbon dioxide produced during the oxidative process but not excreted. This fraction has not been described in critically ill children. By measuring the dilution of (13)C infused by metabol...

  11. Nonconvulsive seizures are common in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Abend, N S; Gutierrez-Colina, A M; Topjian, A A; Zhao, H; Guo, R; Donnelly, M; Clancy, R R; Dlugos, D J

    2011-03-22

    Retrospective studies have reported the occurrence of nonconvulsive seizures in critically ill children. We aimed to prospectively determine the incidence and risk factors of nonconvulsive seizures in critically ill children using predetermined EEG monitoring indications and EEG interpretation terminology. Critically ill children (non-neonates) with acute encephalopathy underwent continuous EEG monitoring if they met institutional clinical practice criteria. Study enrollment and data collection were prospective. Logistic regression analysis was utilized to identify risk factors for seizure occurrence. One hundred children were evaluated. Electrographic seizures occurred in 46 and electrographic status epilepticus occurred in 19. Seizures were exclusively nonconvulsive in 32. The only clinical risk factor for seizure occurrence was younger age (p=0.03). Of patients with seizures, only 52% had seizures detected in the first hour of monitoring, while 87% were detected within 24 hours. Seizures were common in critically ill children with acute encephalopathy. Most were nonconvulsive. Clinical features had little predictive value for seizure occurrence. Further study is needed to confirm these data in independent high-risk populations, to clarify which children are at highest risk for seizures so limited monitoring resources can be allocated optimally, and to determine whether seizure detection and management improves outcome. © 2011 by AAN Enterprises, Inc.

  12. Nonconvulsive seizures are common in critically ill children

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Colina, A.M.; Topjian, A.A.; Zhao, H.; Guo, R.; Donnelly, M.; Clancy, R.R.; Dlugos, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Retrospective studies have reported the occurrence of nonconvulsive seizures in critically ill children. We aimed to prospectively determine the incidence and risk factors of nonconvulsive seizures in critically ill children using predetermined EEG monitoring indications and EEG interpretation terminology. Methods: Critically ill children (non-neonates) with acute encephalopathy underwent continuous EEG monitoring if they met institutional clinical practice criteria. Study enrollment and data collection were prospective. Logistic regression analysis was utilized to identify risk factors for seizure occurrence. Results: One hundred children were evaluated. Electrographic seizures occurred in 46 and electrographic status epilepticus occurred in 19. Seizures were exclusively nonconvulsive in 32. The only clinical risk factor for seizure occurrence was younger age (p = 0.03). Of patients with seizures, only 52% had seizures detected in the first hour of monitoring, while 87% were detected within 24 hours. Conclusions: Seizures were common in critically ill children with acute encephalopathy. Most were nonconvulsive. Clinical features had little predictive value for seizure occurrence. Further study is needed to confirm these data in independent high-risk populations, to clarify which children are at highest risk for seizures so limited monitoring resources can be allocated optimally, and to determine whether seizure detection and management improves outcome. PMID:21307352

  13. Parenteral amino acid intakes in critically ill children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Parenteral amino acid formulas used in parenteral nutrition have a variable composition. To determine the amino acid intake of parenterally fed, critically ill children, and compare it with recommended dietary allowances (RDA) established by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), we retrospectively review...

  14. Renal tubular acidosis is highly prevalent in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Richard; Drolz, Andreas; Scherzer, Thomas-Matthias; Staufer, Katharina; Fuhrmann, Valentin; Zauner, Christian; Holzinger, Ulrike; Schneeweiß, Bruno

    2015-04-06

    Hyperchloremic acidosis is frequent in critically ill patients. Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) may contribute to acidemia in the state of hyperchloremic acidosis, but the prevalence of RTA has never been studied in critically ill patients. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the prevalence, type, and possible risk factors of RTA in critically ill patients using a physical-chemical approach. This prospective, observational trial was conducted in a medical ICU of a university hospital. One hundred consecutive critically ill patients at the age ≥18, expected to stay in the ICU for ≥24 h, with the clinical necessity for a urinary catheter and the absence of anuria were included. Base excess (BE) subset calculation based on a physical-chemical approach on the first 7 days after ICU admission was used to compare the effects of free water, chloride, albumin, and unmeasured anions on the standard base excess. Calculation of the urine osmolal gap (UOG)--as an approximate measure of the unmeasured urine cation NH4(+)--served as determinate between renal and extrarenal bicarbonate loss in the state of hyperchloremic acidosis. During the first week of ICU stay 43 of the patients presented with hyperchloremic acidosis on one or more days represented as pronounced negative BEChloride. In 31 patients hyperchloremic acidosis was associated with RTA characterized by a UOG ≤150 mosmol/kg in combination with preserved renal function. However, in 26 of the 31 patients with RTA metabolic acidosis was neutralized by other acid-base disturbances leading to a normal arterial pH. RTA is highly prevalent in critically ill patients with hyperchloremic acidosis, whereas it is often neutralized by the simultaneous occurrence of other acid-base disturbances. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02392091. Registered 17 March 2015.

  15. Management of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Artificial nutrition (AN) is necessary to meet the nutritional requirements of critically ill patients at nutrition risk because undernutrition determines a poorer prognosis in these patients. There is debate over which route of delivery of AN provides better outcomes and lesser complications. This review describes the management of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients. The first aim is to discuss what should be done in order that the PN is safe. The second aim is to dispel “myths” about PN-related complications and show how prevention and monitoring are able to reach the goal of “near zero” PN complications. Finally, in this review is discussed the controversial issue of the route for delivering AN in critically ill patients. The fighting against PN complications should consider: (1) an appropriate blood glucose control; (2) the use of olive oil- and fish oil-based lipid emulsions alternative to soybean oil-based ones; (3) the adoption of insertion and care bundles for central venous access devices; and (4) the implementation of a policy of targeting “near zero” catheter-related bloodstream infections. Adopting all these strategies, the goal of “near zero” PN complications is achievable. If accurately managed, PN can be safely provided for most critically ill patients without expecting a relevant incidence of PN-related complications. Moreover, the use of protocols for the management of nutritional support and the presence of nutrition support teams may decrease PN-related complications. In conclusion, the key messages about the management of PN in critically ill patients are two. First, the dangers of PN-related complications have been exaggerated because complications are uncommon; moreover, infectious complications, as mechanical complications, are more properly catheter-related and not PN-related complications. Second, when enteral nutrition is not feasible or tolerated, PN is as effective and safe as enteral nutrition. PMID

  16. Management of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2017-02-04

    Artificial nutrition (AN) is necessary to meet the nutritional requirements of critically ill patients at nutrition risk because undernutrition determines a poorer prognosis in these patients. There is debate over which route of delivery of AN provides better outcomes and lesser complications. This review describes the management of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients. The first aim is to discuss what should be done in order that the PN is safe. The second aim is to dispel "myths" about PN-related complications and show how prevention and monitoring are able to reach the goal of "near zero" PN complications. Finally, in this review is discussed the controversial issue of the route for delivering AN in critically ill patients. The fighting against PN complications should consider: (1) an appropriate blood glucose control; (2) the use of olive oil- and fish oil-based lipid emulsions alternative to soybean oil-based ones; (3) the adoption of insertion and care bundles for central venous access devices; and (4) the implementation of a policy of targeting "near zero" catheter-related bloodstream infections. Adopting all these strategies, the goal of "near zero" PN complications is achievable. If accurately managed, PN can be safely provided for most critically ill patients without expecting a relevant incidence of PN-related complications. Moreover, the use of protocols for the management of nutritional support and the presence of nutrition support teams may decrease PN-related complications. In conclusion, the key messages about the management of PN in critically ill patients are two. First, the dangers of PN-related complications have been exaggerated because complications are uncommon; moreover, infectious complications, as mechanical complications, are more properly catheter-related and not PN-related complications. Second, when enteral nutrition is not feasible or tolerated, PN is as effective and safe as enteral nutrition.

  17. Association of Influenza Vaccination Coverage in Younger Adults With Influenza-Related Illness in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Taksler, Glen B; Rothberg, Michael B; Cutler, David M

    2015-11-15

    Older adults have the highest influenza-related morbidity and mortality risk, but the influenza vaccine is less effective in the elderly. It is unknown whether influenza vaccination of nonelderly adults confers additional disease protection on the elderly population. We examined the association between county-wide influenza vaccination coverage among 520 229 younger adults (aged 18-64 years) in the Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System Survey and illnesses related to influenza in 3 317 709 elderly Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥65 years, between 2002 and 2010 (13 267 786 person-years). Results were stratified by documented receipt of a seasonal influenza vaccine in each Medicare beneficiary. Increases in county-wide vaccine coverage among younger adults were associated with lower adjusted odds of illnesses related to influenza in the elderly. Compared with elderly residents of counties with ≤15% of younger adults vaccinated, the adjusted odds ratio for a principal diagnosis of influenza among elderly residents was 0.91 (95% confidence interval, .88-.94) for counties with 16%-20% of younger adults vaccinated, 0.87 (.84-.90) for counties with 21%-25% vaccinated, 0.80 (.77-.83) for counties with 26%-30% vaccinated, and 0.79 (.76-.83) for counties with ≥31% vaccinated (P for trend <.001). Stronger associations were observed among vaccinated elderly adults, in peak months of influenza season, in more severe influenza seasons, in influenza seasons with greater antigenic match to influenza vaccine, and for more specific definitions of influenza-related illness. In a large, nationwide sample of Medicare beneficiaries, influenza vaccination among adults aged 18-64 years was inversely associated with illnesses related to influenza in the elderly. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Nonprofessional Care in Chronic Critically Ill Patient: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Dehkordi, Leila Mardanian; Babashahi, Monireh; Irajpour, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Decision-making about patients with critical condition transfer from Intensive Care Unit to the general wards be delegated to their families. The aim of the study was explaining the experiences of family caregiver's about care of chronic critically ill patient. Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative content analysis using unstructured interview. Participants were selected purposively from May 2014 to May 2015 and data collection continued until data saturation. Analysis was based on conventional content analysis. Results: Participants’ experiences classified into three main categories as following: nonprofessional care, enhancing factors of care, and inhibiting factors of care. Conclusions: Finding of the current study showed different aspects of care. Care of chronic critically ill patients is a long-term process that affected by different factors. It seems that the exploration of caregivers needs and planning supportive interventions based on their needs improve the quality of care. PMID:28028426

  19. Disability and quality of life among elderly persons with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Ramaprasad, Dharitri; Rao, N Suryanarayana; Kalyanasundaram, S

    2015-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to understand the level of disability and quality of life of elderly persons with chronic and persistent mental illnesses and to compare it with those who were elderly but well with no illness. For the purpose 200 elderly persons with mental illness (PMI), attending psychiatric services were included in the study. A comparison group of 103 well elderly persons was drawn from the same study area as control group (CG). They were assessed using WHO-DAS and WHOQOL-BREF. Results revealed that PMI experienced higher disability compared to the CG. Deficits in the domain of moving around, getting along with people, engaging in life activities and participation in society contributed most to the high level of disability in the PMI group. PMI from rural area had higher disability compared to the urban group. As for QOL, elderly PMI had a poor quality of life compared to the CG. Quality of life was found to be negatively associated with level of disability. Higher the level of disability, lower was the quality of life. The authors opine that persons with chronic mental illness continue to experience psychiatric disability in old age and this cannot be attributed to normal aging. Level of disability has a negative impact on their quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessing nutritional status in chronically critically ill adult patients.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Patricia A; Daly, Barbara J; Lipson, Amy R; Guo, Su-Er

    2006-03-01

    Numerous methods are used to measure and assess nutritional status of chronically critically ill patients. To discuss the multiple methods used to assess nutritional status in chronically critically ill patients, describe the nutritional status of chronically critically ill patients, and assess the relationship between nutritional indicators and outcomes of mechanical ventilation. A descriptive, longitudinal design was used to collect weekly data on 360 adult patients who required more than 72 hours of mechanical ventilation and had a hospital stay of 7 days or more. Data on body mass index and biochemical markers of nutritional status were collected. Patients' nutritional intake compared with physicians' orders, dieticians' recommendations, and indirect calorimetry and physicians' orders compared with dieticians' recommendations were used to assess nutritional status. Relationships between nutritional indicators and variables of mechanical ventilation were determined. Inconsistencies among nurses' implementation, physicians' orders, and dieticians' recommendations resulted in wide variations in patients' calculated nutritional adequacy. Patients received a mean of 83% of the energy intake ordered by their physicians (SD 33%, range 0%-200%). Patients who required partial or total ventilator support upon discharge had a lower body mass index at admission than did patients with spontaneous respirations (Mann-Whitney U = 8441, P = .001). In this sample, the variability in weaning progression and outcomes most likely reflects illness severity and complexity rather than nutritional status or nutritional therapies. Further studies are needed to determine the best methods to define nutritional adequacy and to evaluate nutritional status.

  1. Glucocorticoid Receptor Expression in Peripheral WBCs of Critically Ill Children.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Audrey R Ogawa; Troster, Eduardo J; Wong, Hector R

    2015-06-01

    To characterize glucocorticoid receptor expression in peripheral WBCs of critically ill children using flow cytometry. Prospective observational cohort. A university-affiliated, tertiary PICU. Fifty-two critically ill children. Samples collected for measurement of glucocorticoid receptor expression and parallel cortisol levels. Subjects with cardiovascular failure had significantly lower glucocorticoid receptor expression both in CD4 lymphocytes (mean fluorescence intensity, 522 [354-787] vs 830 [511-1,219]; p = 0.036) and CD8 lymphocytes (mean fluorescence intensity, 686 [350-835] vs 946 [558-1,511]; p = 0.019) compared with subjects without cardiovascular failure. Subjects in the upper 50th percentile of Pediatric Risk of Mortality III scores and organ failure also had significantly lower glucocorticoid receptor expression in CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes. There was no linear correlation between cortisol concentrations and glucocorticoid receptor expression. Our study suggests that patients with shock and increased severity of illness have lower glucocorticoid receptor expression in CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes. Glucocorticoid receptor expression does not correlate well with cortisol levels. Future studies could focus on studying glucocorticoid receptor expression variability and isoform distribution in the pediatric critically ill population as well as on different strategies to optimize glucocorticoid response.

  2. Describing and measuring recovery and rehabilitation after critical illness.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Bronwen

    2015-10-01

    Rehabilitation is the cornerstone of management of postcritical illness morbidity. Selection of appropriate tools to measure response to rehabilitation therapy is vital to accurately document trajectory of change across the recovery continuum. In the context of physical-based strategies to redress critical illness associated muscle wasting and dysfunction, this review will discuss a framework to guide assessment of physical recovery in the critical illness population, clinimetric measurement properties for instruments and evidence for their implementation, and recent interventional trial data. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) model is a useful framework to guide selection of outcome measures representing physical function at the level of impairment, activity limitation and participation restriction. Clinimetric data are emerging to support a number of physical function outcome measures in the ICU, albeit further research is required to corroborate tools used beyond ICU discharge. Factors associated with outcome measure selection have contributed to interpreting findings from recent interventional trials of physical rehabilitation. Determining the future design, conduct and impact of physical therapy interventions for critically ill patients will rely on further development of clinimetrically robust metrics to capture individual patient response spanning the recovery pathway. This approach should be similarly applied to rehabilitation interventions addressing other postintensive care syndrome domains.

  3. Management of candidaemia and invasive candidiasis in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Chahoud, Jad; Kanafani, Zeina A; Kanj, Souha S

    2013-06-01

    Critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are at increased risk of encountering bloodstream infections (BSIs) with Candida spp., associated with an elevated crude mortality rate. This supports the significance of early detection of infection and identification of the most effective management approach. A review of the various antifungal treatments and an evaluation of the diverse management approaches for invasive candidiasis in critically ill patients is necessary for guiding evidence-based decision-making. Different early detection schemes for invasive candidiasis are well documented in the literature. Other than the common use of blood cultures, new methods entail the use of risk prediction scores and biomarker tests. Regarding management strategies, different options are currently supported. These include prophylaxis, empirical therapy, pre-emptive therapy, and treatment of culture-documented infections. The choice of treatment is greatly dependent on several factors related to the patient and/or to the surrounding environment. Attention needs to be given to previous exposure to azoles, epidemiological data on dominant Candida spp. in local ICUs, severity of illness and associated morbidities. This paper summarises the most recent literature as well as the guidelines issued by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The objective is to identify the best diagnosis and management approaches for serious Candida infections in critically ill patients. In addition, this article addresses an important aspect associated with managing candidaemia in critically ill patients pertaining to the decision for intravenous catheter removal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  4. Return Migration among Elderly, Chronically Ill Bosnian Refugees: Does Health Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Olwig, Karen Fog; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Kristiansen, Maria; Norredam, Marie Louise

    2015-01-01

    Elderly migrants constitute a considerable share of global return migration; nevertheless, literature on the health aspects of the return migration among these migrants is still scarce. This study explores the significance of return migration among elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees from Denmark and the role of health issues in their decision to return. It is based on semi-structured interviews with 33 elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees who have moved back to Bosnia and Herzegovina, and 10 elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees who have remained in Denmark. The interviews show that physical health, in the sense of the absence of illness and easy access to necessary health-care services and medicines, was not highly prioritized when the decision was made whether or not to return. However, if health is regarded more broadly as involving more than mere physical health and the absence of illness, health did matter. Viewed as physical, social and mental well-being in line with WHO’s definition of health, health was indeed one of the most important factors when the decision to return was made. PMID:26473899

  5. Treating nonthyroidal illness syndrome in the critically ill patient: still a matter of controversy.

    PubMed

    Bello, G; Paliani, G; Annetta, M G; Pontecorvi, A; Antonelli, M

    2009-08-01

    The nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is a clinical condition of abnormal thyroid function tests observed in patients with acute or chronic systemic illnesses. The laboratory parameters of NTIS usually include low serum levels of triiodothyronine, with normal or low levels of thyroxine and normal or low levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone. It is still a matter of controversy whether the NTIS represents a protective adaptation of the organism to a stressful event or a maladaptive response to illness that needs correction. Multiple studies have investigated the effect of thyroid hormone replacement therapy in certain clinical situations, such as caloric restriction, cardiac disease, acute renal failure, brain-dead potential donors, and burn patients. Treating patients with NTIS seems not to be harmful, but there is no persuasive evidence that it is beneficial. The administration of hypothalamic releasing factors in patients with NTIS appears to be safe and effective in improving metabolism and restoring the anterior pituitary pulsatile secretion in the chronic phase of critical illness. However, also this promising strategy needs to be explored further. Anyhow, an extremely prudent approach is needed if treatment is given. Much of the data appearing in the literature on the treatment of NTIS encourage further randomized controlled trials on large number of patients. At present, however, we believe that there is no indication for treating thyroid hormone abnormalities in critically ill patients until convincing proof of efficacy and safety is provided.

  6. African American Elders' Serious Illness Experiences: Narratives of "God Did," "God Will," and "Life Is Better".

    PubMed

    Coats, Heather; Crist, Janice D; Berger, Ann; Sternberg, Esther; Rosenfeld, Anne G

    2017-04-01

    The foundation of culturally sensitive patient-centered palliative care is formed from one's social, spiritual, psychological, and physical experiences of serious illness. The purpose of this study was to describe categories and patterns of psychological, social, and spiritual healing from the perspectives of aging seriously ill African American (AA) elders. Using narrative analysis methodology, 13 open-ended interviews were collected. Three main patterns were "prior experiences," "I changed," and "across past, present experiences and future expectations." Themes were categorized within each pattern: been through it . . . made me strong, I thought about . . . others, went down little hills . . . got me down, I grew stronger, changed priorities, do things I never would have done, quit doing, God did and will take care of me, close-knit relationships, and life is better. "Faith" in God helped the aging seriously ill AA elders "overcome things," whether their current illness or other life difficulties.

  7. Intrahospital transports of critically ill patients: critical care nurses' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Ringdal, Mona; Chaboyer, Wendy; Warrén Stomberg, Margareta

    2016-05-01

    Between 30% and 70% of intrahospital transports is associated with some form of adverse event, compromising patient safety. (1) To describe critical care nurses' perceptions of intrahospital transport problems, including the stress associated with transport and their perceived ability to respond appropriately to these problems; (2) to determine if there were associations between problems and responses. This survey was conducted in three intensive care units. Descriptive data and correlations between perceived problems and responses and correlations between perceptions of the problems and ability to respond appropriately were calculated. Results from the open-ended item were categorised. Eighty-six nurses completed the web survey, a response rate of 57%. Two-thirds said their intensive care Units had written transport guidelines, and two-thirds of the transports were performed by nurses without physicians. Circulatory failure was the most frequently perceived problem (4·2 ± 2·8) followed by decreased levels of consciousness (3·5 ± 2·9). Positive correlations between two perceived patient problems, circulatory failure and neurological deterioration and nurses' perceptions of how to respond appropriately to them, were identified. Failure in pulse oximetry and equipment-related problems were positively correlated to nurses' responses. Nurses described the transports as an unsafe and stressful task: 'It's like a marathon race'. Nurses report that undertaking transports were a stressful activity, but they perceived transport problems to be an infrequent occurrence. They stated that they respond appropriately to the problem. Nurses reported they were alert to the potential risks patients face during transport. Because fewer staff remained in the intensive care units, these remaining patients are also at risk during intrahospital transport. © 2015 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  8. Are critically ill older patients treated differently than similarly ill younger patients?

    PubMed Central

    Stillman, A E; Braitman, L E; Grant, R J

    1998-01-01

    Our goal was to determine whether critically ill older patients are treated differently than middle-aged patients. If so, what factors besides age contribute to that difference? Internal medicine residents (n = 46) and practicing internists (n = 41) received 8 clinical vignettes of 4 critically ill 85-year-old patients and 4 critically ill 50-year-old patients. Each patient had a distinct premorbid mental and physical state. Each respondent selected from 4 levels of therapeutic aggressiveness for each patient. The main outcome measure was the proportion of physicians who intended to treat the older of each matched pair of patients less aggressively than the younger one (that is, downgraded for age). Eight physicians (9%) treated a previously unimpaired 85-year-old patient less aggressively than a comparable 50-year-old patient. When the matched patients were either premorbidly mentally or physically impaired (but not both), about 20% of physicians downgraded for age. Most downgraded for age in matched patients who were premorbidly both mentally and physically impaired. We conclude that age alone does not engender much therapeutic bias against older patients as long as they are physically and mentally intact before the onset of their acute illness. As premorbid disabilities multiply, older patients may be treated less aggressively than younger ones with similar impairments and clinical presentations. PMID:9771155

  9. [Evaluation and treatment of the critically ill cirrhotic patient].

    PubMed

    Fernández, Javier; Aracil, Carles; Solà, Elsa; Soriano, Germán; Cinta Cardona, Maria; Coll, Susanna; Genescà, Joan; Hombrados, Manoli; Morillas, Rosa; Martín-Llahí, Marta; Pardo, Albert; Sánchez, Jordi; Vargas, Victor; Xiol, Xavier; Ginès, Pere

    2016-11-01

    Cirrhotic patients often develop severe complications requiring ICU admission. Grade III-IV hepatic encephalopathy, septic shock, acute-on-chronic liver failure and variceal bleeding are clinical decompensations that need a specific therapeutic approach in cirrhosis. The increased effectiveness of the treatments currently used in this setting and the spread of liver transplantation programs have substantially improved the prognosis of critically ill cirrhotic patients, which has facilitated their admission to critical care units. However, gastroenterologists and intensivists have limited knowledge of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of these complications and of the prognostic evaluation of critically ill cirrhotic patients. Cirrhotic patients present alterations in systemic and splanchnic hemodynamics, coagulation and immune dysfunction what further increase the complexity of the treatment, the risk of developing new complications and mortality in comparison with the general population. These differential characteristics have important diagnostic and therapeutic implications that must be known by general intensivists. In this context, the Catalan Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology requested a group of experts to draft a position paper on the assessment and treatment of critically ill cirrhotic patients. This article describes the recommendations agreed upon at the consensus meetings and their main conclusions.

  10. Associations Between Fluid Balance and Outcomes in Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Alobaidi, Rashid; Morgan, Catherine; Basu, Rajit K.; Stenson, Erin; Featherstone, Robin; Majumdar, Sumit R.; Bagshaw, Sean M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Fluid therapy is a mainstay during the resuscitation of critically ill children. After initial stabilization, excessive fluid accumulation may lead to complications of fluid overload, which has been independently associated with increased risk for mortality and major morbidity in critically ill children. Objectives: Perform an evidence synthesis to describe the methods used to measure fluid balance, define fluid overload, and evaluate the association between fluid balance and outcomes in critically ill children. Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Measurements: Fluid balance, fluid accumulation, and fluid overload as defined by authors. Methods: We will search Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and ProQuest, Dissertations and Theses. In addition, we will search www.clinicaltrials.gov, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and the proceedings of selected key conferences for ongoing and completed studies. Search strategy will be done in consultation with a research librarian. Clinical trials and observational studies (from database inception to present) in patients (<25 years) admitted to pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) reporting fluid balance, fluid accumulation, or fluid overload, and associated outcomes will be included. Language will not be restricted. Two reviewers will independently screen studies and extract data. Primary outcome is mortality, and secondary outcomes encompass critical care resource utilization. Quality of evidence and risk of bias will be assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Results will be synthesized qualitatively and pooled for meta-analysis if possible. Limitations: Quality of the included studies; lack of randomized trials; high degrees of expected heterogeneity; and variations in definitions of fluid balance and fluid overload between studies. Conclusion: We will comprehensively appraise and summarize the evidence of the association between

  11. Sedation in Critically Ill Children with Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Vet, Nienke J; Kleiber, Niina; Ista, Erwin; de Hoog, Matthijs; de Wildt, Saskia N

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the rationale of sedation in respiratory failure, sedation goals, how to assess the need for sedation as well as effectiveness of interventions in critically ill children, with validated observational sedation scales. The drugs and non-pharmacological approaches used for optimal sedation in ventilated children are reviewed, and specifically the rationale for drug selection, including short- and long-term efficacy and safety aspects of the selected drugs. The specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of sedative drugs in the critically ill child and consequences for dosing are presented. Furthermore, we discuss different sedation strategies and their adverse events, such as iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome and delirium. These principles can guide clinicians in the choice of sedative drugs in pediatric respiratory failure.

  12. Managing critically Ill hematology patients: Time to think differently.

    PubMed

    Azoulay, Elie; Pène, Frédéric; Darmon, Michael; Lengliné, Etienne; Benoit, Dominique; Soares, Marcio; Vincent, Francois; Bruneel, Fabrice; Perez, Pierre; Lemiale, Virginie; Mokart, Djamel

    2015-11-01

    The number of patients living with hematological malignancies (HMs) has increased steadily over time. This is the result of intensive and effective treatments that also increase the probability of infiltrative, infectious or toxic life threatening event. Over the last two decades, the number of patients with HMs admitted to the ICU increased and their mortality has dropped sharply. ICU patients with HMs require an extensive diagnostic workup and the optimal use of ICU treatments to identify the reason for ICU admission and the nature of the complication that explains organ dysfunctions. Mortality of ARDS or septic shock is up to 50%, respectively. In this review, the authors share their experience with managing critically ill patients with HMs. They discuss the main aspects of the diagnostic and therapeutic management of critically ill patients with HMs and argue that outcomes have improved over time and that many classic determinants of mortality have become irrelevant.

  13. Hematologic and oncologic complications in the critically ill child.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, S.

    1984-01-01

    Admission of a patient to an intensive care unit for management of direct consequences of a hematologic or oncologic disease is occasionally necessary. Such problems included exchange transfusion, sepsis, compression of vital structures by malignant tumor, metabolic derangements, leukostasis, post-operative care, major sickling episodes in vital organs, and disseminated coagulopathy. More often, however, hematologic complications arise in the child critically ill from other causes, such as trauma or infections. The first two sections of this review address blood transfusion and hemostasis, topics likely to have wide application in the care of critically ill children. The last portion discusses problems unique to patients with sickling or malignant disease. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:6382836

  14. The medical officer's role in critical illness insurance product development.

    PubMed

    Keymer, Marjorie

    2005-01-01

    Critical illness insurance is a new (to the US), medically sophisticated insurance product that is tantalizing some US insurers. Few have brought a product to market, but many opine that a US breakthrough is in the offing. Would you rise to the challenge and craft an opportunity to participate in the development of a new product concept? How do medical officers bring value to the product development world? Do medical officers belong in the domain of product actuaries and consultants who bring new product ideas to life? Dr. Jan von Overbeck and I presented a workshop at the 2004 AAIM meeting to discuss the role of the medical officer in the development and evaluation of critical illness insurance. This article summarizes that discussion for the Journal's readers.

  15. Sedation in Critically Ill Children with Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vet, Nienke J.; Kleiber, Niina; Ista, Erwin; de Hoog, Matthijs; de Wildt, Saskia N.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the rationale of sedation in respiratory failure, sedation goals, how to assess the need for sedation as well as effectiveness of interventions in critically ill children, with validated observational sedation scales. The drugs and non-pharmacological approaches used for optimal sedation in ventilated children are reviewed, and specifically the rationale for drug selection, including short- and long-term efficacy and safety aspects of the selected drugs. The specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of sedative drugs in the critically ill child and consequences for dosing are presented. Furthermore, we discuss different sedation strategies and their adverse events, such as iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome and delirium. These principles can guide clinicians in the choice of sedative drugs in pediatric respiratory failure. PMID:27606309

  16. Coping strategies of rural families of critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hunsucker, S; Flannery, J; Frank, D

    2000-04-01

    This study explored the coping strategies of families of critically ill patients in a rural Southern Appalachian setting. A convenience sample of 30 family members of 22 critically ill patients in two rural hospitals completed the Jaloweic Coping Scale. The five most frequently used coping methods were helping, thinking positively, worrying about the problem, trying to find out more about the problem and trying to handle things one step at a time. The five most effective coping strategies were talking the problem over with friends, praying, thinking about the good things in life, trying to handle things one step at a time and trying to see the good side of the situation. Findings contradicted many of the more "negative" descriptions of Appalachian people in the literature. Similarities outweighed differences when comparing the coping styles of rural and urban populations. Findings suggest that coping strategies must be considered for positive outcomes in the delivery of care to such a rural population.

  17. Implementation of Discharge Plans for Chronically Ill Elders Discharged Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Enola K.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the extent to which discharge plans for elderly patients with congestive heart failure were implemented as planned, tested the consequences of implementation problems, and identified factors associated with implementation problems. Implications for hospital discharge planners and home health care are discussed. (KW)

  18. Nursing students identify fears regarding working with diverse critically ill patients: development of guidelines for caring for diverse critically ill older adults.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate students need to gain more exposure to communicating, assessing, and planning appropriate care and evaluating outcomes of care with diverse critically ill geriatric patients. This project developed teaching strategies that facilitated additional opportunities for gaining these valuable learning experiences for students. Nurse educators can use the Guidelines for Caring for Diverse Critically Ill Older Adults, the case study and simulation examples, and topical outline to assist them in teaching critical care students and nurses about diverse critically ill older adults.

  19. Bicarbonate kinetics and predicted energy expenditure in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Sy, Jama; Gourishankar, Anand; Gordon, William E; Griffin, Debra; Zurakowski, David; Roth, Rachel M; Coss-Bu, Jorge; Jefferson, Larry; Heird, William; Castillo, Leticia

    2008-08-01

    To determine nutrient requirements by the carbon oxidation techniques, it is necessary to know the fraction of carbon dioxide produced during the oxidative process but not excreted. This fraction has not been described in critically ill children. By measuring the dilution of (13)C infused by metabolically produced carbon dioxide, the rates of carbon dioxide appearance can be estimated. Energy expenditure can be determined by bicarbonate dilution kinetics if the energy equivalents of carbon dioxide (food quotient) from the diet ingested are known. We conducted a 6-h, primed, continuous tracer infusion of NaH(13)CO(3) in critically ill children fed parenterally or enterally or receiving only glucose and electrolytes, to determine bicarbonate fractional recovery, bicarbonate rates of appearance, and energy expenditure. Thirty-one critically ill children aged 1 mo-20 y who were admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit at a tertiary-care center were studied. Patients were stratified by age, BMI, and severity score (PRISM III). Fractional bicarbonate recovery was 0.69, 0.70, and 0.63, respectively, for the parenterally fed, enterally fed, and glucose-electrolytes groups, and it correlated with the severity of disease in the parenteral (P < 0.01) and glucose-electrolytes (P < 0.05) groups. Rates of appearance varied between 0.17 and 0.19 micromol . kg(-1) . h(-1) With these data and estimates of the energy equivalents of carbon dioxide (a surrogate for respiratory quotient), energy expenditure was determined. The 2001 World Health Organization and Schofield predictive equations overestimated and underestimated, respectively, energy requirements compared with those obtained by bicarbonate dilution kinetics. Bicarbonate kinetics allows accurate determination of energy needs in critically ill children.

  20. Physiological and Management Implications of Obesity in Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Renee D.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is highly prevalent in the United States and is becoming increasingly common worldwide. The anatomic and physiological changes that occur in obese individuals may have an impact across the spectrum of critical illness. Obese patients may be more susceptible to hypoxemia and hypercapnia. During mechanical ventilation, elevated end-expiratory pressures may be required to improve lung compliance and to prevent ventilation–perfusion mismatch due to distal airway collapse. Several studies have shown an increased risk of organ dysfunction such as the acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury in obese patients. Predisposition to ventricular hypertrophy and increases in blood volume should be considered in fluid management decisions. Obese patients have accelerated muscle losses in critical illness, making nutrition essential, although the optimal predictive equation to estimate nutritional needs or formulation for obese patients is not well established. Many common intensive care unit medications are not well studied in obese patients, necessitating understanding of pharmacokinetic concepts and consultation with pharmacists. Obesity is associated with higher risk of deep venous thrombosis and catheter-associated bloodstream infections, likely related to greater average catheter dwell times. Logistical issues such as blood pressure cuff sizing, ultrasound assistance for procedures, diminished quality of some imaging modalities, and capabilities of hospital equipment such as beds and lifts are important considerations. Despite the physiological alterations and logistical challenges involved, it is not clear whether obesity has an effect on mortality or long-term outcomes from critical illness. Effects may vary by type of critical illness, obesity severity, and obesity-associated comorbidities. PMID:25172506

  1. Reduced nocturnal ACTH-driven cortisol secretion during critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Boonen, Eva; Meersseman, Philippe; Vervenne, Hilke; Meyfroidt, Geert; Guïza, Fabian; Wouters, Pieter J.; Veldhuis, Johannes D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, during critical illness, cortisol metabolism was found to be reduced. We hypothesize that such reduced cortisol breakdown may suppress pulsatile ACTH and cortisol secretion via feedback inhibition. To test this hypothesis, nocturnal ACTH and cortisol secretory profiles were constructed by deconvolution analysis from plasma concentration time series in 40 matched critically ill patients and eight healthy controls, excluding diseases or drugs that affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Blood was sampled every 10 min between 2100 and 0600 to quantify plasma concentrations of ACTH and (free) cortisol. Approximate entropy, an estimation of process irregularity, cross-approximate entropy, a measure of ACTH-cortisol asynchrony, and ACTH-cortisol dose-response relationships were calculated. Total and free plasma cortisol concentrations were higher at all times in patients than in controls (all P < 0.04). Pulsatile cortisol secretion was 54% lower in patients than in controls (P = 0.005), explained by reduced cortisol burst mass (P = 0.03), whereas cortisol pulse frequency (P = 0.35) and nonpulsatile cortisol secretion (P = 0.80) were unaltered. Pulsatile ACTH secretion was 31% lower in patients than in controls (P = 0.03), again explained by a lower ACTH burst mass (P = 0.02), whereas ACTH pulse frequency (P = 0.50) and nonpulsatile ACTH secretion (P = 0.80) were unchanged. ACTH-cortisol dose response estimates were similar in patients and controls. ACTH and cortisol approximate entropy were higher in patients (P ≤ 0.03), as was ACTH-cortisol cross-approximate entropy (P ≤ 0.001). We conclude that hypercortisolism during critical illness coincided with suppressed pulsatile ACTH and cortisol secretion and a normal ACTH-cortisol dose response. Increased irregularity and asynchrony of the ACTH and cortisol time series supported non-ACTH-dependent mechanisms driving hypercortisolism during critical illness. PMID:24569590

  2. Enteral nutrition with simultaneous gastric decompression in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Gentilello, L M; Cortes, V; Castro, M; Byers, P M

    1993-03-01

    Early enteral nutrition is an important adjunct in the care of critically ill patients. A double-lumen gastrostomy tube with a duodenal extension has been reported to enable early enteral feeding with simultaneous gastroduodenal decompression. We tested the ability of this device to achieve these goals in critically ill patients. Noncomparative, descriptive case series. Surgical intensive care unit in a university hospital. Fifteen consecutive critically ill patients, who, at the time of laparotomy, were assessed likely to need long-term nutritional support and gastric decompression, underwent tube placement. Mean age was 47 +/- 21 yrs. Mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) and Therapeutic Intervention Scores were 15 +/- 7.3 (SD) and 29 +/- 10.2, respectively, and the mean Injury Severity Score of 11 trauma patients in the group was 27 +/- 7.4. Correct tube positioning was verified by radiograph or endoscopy. Caloric and protein requirements, nutritional parameters, and problems encountered with the device were recorded. The correlation between the volume of feeding port input and suction port output was noted, and this correlation was considered significant if r2 was > or = .5. Only three (20%) of 15 patients reached full enteral nutritional support via the enteral route. None of these patients achieved this level of nutritional support within the first postoperative week. In 67% of the patients, large quantities of enteral feeding solution appeared in the gastroduodenal suction port effluent. When feeding port input was plotted against effluent volume, a correlation coefficient of > .71 (r2 = > or = .5) was found in 40% of the patients. Other complications included: a) excessive gastroduodenal drainage requiring fluid/electrolyte replacement in eight (53.3%) patients; and b) skin ulceration at the tube entrance site in seven (46.7%) patients. These data do not support the use of this device for early enteral feeding and simultaneous

  3. Hyperglycemia in Critically Ill Patients: Management and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Godinjak, Amina; Iglica, Amer; Burekovic, Azra; Jusufovic, Selma; Ajanovic, Anes; Tancica, Ira; Kukuljac, Adis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hyperglycemia is a common complication of critical illness. Patients in intensive care unit with stress hyperglycemia have significantly higher mortality (31%) compared to patients with previously confirmed diabetes (10%) or normoglycemia (11.3%). Stress hyperglycemia is associated with increased risk of critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) and prolonged mechanical ventilation. Intensive monitoring and insulin therapy according to the protocol are an important part of the treatment of critically ill patients. Objective: To evaluate the incidence of stress hyperglycemia, complications and outcome in critically ill patients in our Medical intensive care unit. Materials and methods: This study included 100 patients hospitalized in Medical intensive care unit during the period January 2014–March 2015 which were divided into three groups: Diabetes mellitus, stress-hyperglycemia and normoglycemia. During the retrospective-prospective observational clinical investigation the following data was obtained: age, gender, SAPS, admission diagnosis, average daily blood glucose, highest blood glucose level, glycemic variability, vasopressor and corticosteroid therapy, days on mechanical ventilation, total days of hospitalization in Medical intensive care unit, and outcome. Results: Patients with DM treated with a continuous insulin infusion did not have significantly more complications than patients with normoglycemia, unlike patients with stress hyperglycemia, which had more severe prognosis. There was a significant difference between the maximum level of blood glucose in recovered and patients with adverse outcome (p = 0.0277). Glycemic variability (difference between max. and min. blood glucose) was the strongest predictor of adverse outcome. The difference in glycemic variability between the stress-hyperglycemia and normoglycemic group was statistically significant (p = 0.0066). There was no statistically significant difference in duration of mechanical

  4. Extreme Obesity and Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Jenny L.; Wang, Miao; Day, Andrew G.; Cahill, Naomi E.; Dixon, Anne E.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Heyland, Daren K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recent literature suggests that obese critically ill patients do not have worse outcomes than patients who are normal weight. However, outcomes in extreme obesity (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2) are unclear. We sought to determine the association between extreme obesity and ICU outcomes. Methods: We analyzed data from a multicenter international observational study of ICU nutrition practices that occurred in 355 ICUs in 33 countries from 2007 to 2009. Included patients were mechanically ventilated adults ≥ 18 years old who remained in the ICU for > 72 h. Using generalized estimating equations and Cox proportional hazard modeling with clustering by ICU and adjusting for potential confounders, we compared extremely obese to normal-weight patients in terms of duration of mechanical ventilation (DMV), ICU length of stay (LOS), hospital LOS, and 60-day mortality. Results: Of the 8,813 patients included in this analysis, 3,490 were normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2), 348 had BMI 40 to 49.9 kg/m2, 118 had BMI 50 to 59.9 kg/m2, and 58 had BMI ≥ 60 kg/m2. Unadjusted analyses suggested that extremely obese critically ill patients have improved mortality (OR for death, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.62-0.94), but this association was not significant after adjustment for confounders. However, an adjusted analysis of survivors found that extremely obese patients have a longer DMV and ICU LOS, with the most obese patients (BMI ≥ 60 kg/m2) also having longer hospital LOS. Conclusions: During critical illness, extreme obesity is not associated with a worse survival advantage compared with normal weight. However, among survivors, BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2 is associated with longer time on mechanical ventilation and in the ICU. These results may have prognostic implications for extremely obese critically ill patients. PMID:21816911

  5. An Overview of Hypoglycemia in the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Lacherade, Jean-Claude; Jacqueminet, Sophie; Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2009-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common and serious problem among patients with diabetes mellitus. It is also perceived as the most important obstacle to tight glucose control using intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients. Because glucose is an obligatory metabolic fuel for the brain, hypoglycemia always represents an emergency that signals the inability of the brain to meet its energy needs. When left untreated, hypoglycemia can result in permanent brain damage and ultimately, death. In the context of critical illness that limits endogenous glucose production and increases glucose utilization, inadequate nutrition, or insufficient provision of glucose, intensive insulin therapy is the most frequent cause of hypoglycemia. Neurogenic and neuroglycopenic symptoms of hypoglycemia can remain unknown because of the underlying critical illness and sedation. Thus, close and reliable monitoring of the glycemic level is crucial in detecting hypoglycemia. In prospective randomized controlled studies comparing the effects of two glucose regimens, intensive insulin therapy aimed to reach strict glucose control (<110 mg/dl) but increased the incidence of severe hypoglycemia (<40 mg/dl) by four- to sixfold. Severe hypoglycemia is statistically associated with adverse outcomes in intensive care unit patients, although a direct causal relationship has not been demonstrated. PMID:20144377

  6. Venous Thromboembolism in Critical Illness and Trauma: Pediatric Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chima, Ranjit S.; Hanson, Sheila J.

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill children and those sustaining severe traumatic injuries are at higher risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) than other hospitalized children. Multiple factors including the need for central venous catheters, immobility, surgical procedures, malignancy, and dysregulated inflammatory state confer this increased risk. As well as being at higher risk of VTE, this population is frequently at an increased risk of bleeding, making the decision of prophylactic anticoagulation even more nuanced. The use of pharmacologic and mechanical prophylaxis remains variable in this high-risk cohort. VTE pharmacologic prophylaxis is an accepted practice in adult trauma and intensive care to prevent VTE development and associated morbidity, but it is not standardized in critically ill or injured children. Given the lack of pediatric specific guidelines, prevention strategies are variably extrapolated from the successful use of mechanical and pharmacologic prophylaxis in adults, despite the differences in developmental hemostasis and thrombosis risk between children and adults. Whether the burden of VTE can be reduced in the pediatric critically ill or injured population is not known given the lack of robust data. There are no trials in children showing efficacy of mechanical compression devices or prophylactic anticoagulation in reducing the rate of VTE. Risk stratification using clinical factors has been shown to identify those at highest risk for VTE and allows targeted prophylaxis. It remains unproven if such a strategy will mitigate the risk of VTE and its potential sequelae. PMID:28349046

  7. Chloride toxicity in critically ill patients: What's the evidence?

    PubMed

    Soussi, Sabri; Ferry, Axelle; Chaussard, Maité; Legrand, Matthieu

    2016-07-28

    Crystalloids have become the fluid of choice in critically ill patients and in the operating room both for fluid resuscitation and fluid maintenance. Among crystalloids, NaCl 0.9% has been the most widely used fluid. However, emerging evidence suggests that administration of 0.9% saline could be harmful mainly through high chloride content and that the use of fluid with low chloride content may be preferable in major surgery and intensive care patients. Administration of NaCl 0.9% is the leading cause of metabolic hyperchloraemic acidosis in critically ill patients and side effects might target coagulation, renal function, and ultimately increase mortality. More balanced solutions therefore may be used especially when large amount of fluids are administered in high-risk patients. In this review, we discuss physiological background favouring the use of balanced solutions as well as the most recent clinical data regarding the use of crystalloid solutions in critically ill patients and patients undergoing major surgery.

  8. Gastroesophageal Reflux in Critically Ill Children: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Solana García, Maria José; López-Herce Cid, Jesús; Sánchez Sánchez, César

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is very common in children due to immaturity of the antireflux barrier. In critically ill patients there is also a high incidence due to a partial or complete loss of pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter though other factors, such as the use of nasogastric tubes, treatment with adrenergic agonists, bronchodilators, or opiates and mechanical ventilation, can further increase the risk of GER. Vomiting and regurgitation are the most common manifestations in infants and are considered pathological when they have repercussions on the nutritional status. In critically ill children, damage to the esophageal mucosa predisposes to digestive tract hemorrhage and nosocomial pneumonia secondary to repeated microaspiration. GER is mainly alkaline in children, as is also the case in critically ill pediatric patients. pH-metry combined with multichannel intraluminal impedance is therefore the technique of choice for diagnosis. The proton pump inhibitors are the drugs of choice for the treatment of GER because they have a greater effect, longer duration of action, and a good safety profile. PMID:23431462

  9. Gastroesophageal reflux in critically ill children: a review.

    PubMed

    Solana García, Maria José; López-Herce Cid, Jesús; Sánchez Sánchez, César

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is very common in children due to immaturity of the antireflux barrier. In critically ill patients there is also a high incidence due to a partial or complete loss of pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter though other factors, such as the use of nasogastric tubes, treatment with adrenergic agonists, bronchodilators, or opiates and mechanical ventilation, can further increase the risk of GER. Vomiting and regurgitation are the most common manifestations in infants and are considered pathological when they have repercussions on the nutritional status. In critically ill children, damage to the esophageal mucosa predisposes to digestive tract hemorrhage and nosocomial pneumonia secondary to repeated microaspiration. GER is mainly alkaline in children, as is also the case in critically ill pediatric patients. pH-metry combined with multichannel intraluminal impedance is therefore the technique of choice for diagnosis. The proton pump inhibitors are the drugs of choice for the treatment of GER because they have a greater effect, longer duration of action, and a good safety profile.

  10. Forget glucose: what about lipids in critical illness?

    PubMed

    Kruger, Peter S

    2009-12-01

    A high serum cholesterol level is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and has commonly been linked with worse outcomes. It is now well recognised that, in many critically ill patients, the opposite is true, with hypocholesterolaemia being associated with poor outcomes. In critical illness, particularly sepsis, total and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels are commonly decreased, with varying changes in triglyceride levels. The magnitude of the changes seems to reflect the severity of inflammation. Plausible biological explanations exist to explain these associations, including an interaction of lipoproteins with endotoxin and the regulation of cytokine production. It remains unclear whether these observed alterations in lipid profile are a consequence of the physiological disturbance or whether they have a more causative role, worsening organ dysfunction or predisposing to infection. Lipid emulsions provide a vehicle for drug delivery, have become an important part of nutrition, and are emerging as a therapy for specific intoxications. The nature, dietary source and amount of lipid provided to critically ill patients may be enormously important and warrant more rigorous investigation. Further understanding of the alterations in lipid metabolism may have therapeutic implications in treatment of sepsis with specific compounds that manipulate lipid profiles, such as fibrates, statins, niacin and even reconstituted HDL.

  11. Lung ultrasound in critically ill patients: a new diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Dexheimer Neto, Felippe Leopoldo; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth; Teixeira, Cassiano; Beltrami, Flávia Gabe

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of critically ill patients using lung ultrasound, even if performed by nonspecialists, has recently garnered greater interest. Because lung ultrasound is based on the fact that every acute illness reduces lung aeration, it can provide information that complements the physical examination and clinical impression, the main advantage being that it is a bedside tool. The objective of this review was to evaluate the clinical applications of lung ultrasound by searching the PubMed and the Brazilian Virtual Library of Health databases. We used the following search terms (in Portuguese and English): ultrasound; lung; and critical care. In addition to the most relevant articles, we also reviewed specialized textbooks. The data show that lung ultrasound is useful in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates, having good accuracy in identifying consolidations and interstitial syndrome. In addition, lung ultrasound has been widely used in the evaluation and treatment of pleural effusions, as well as in the identification of pneumothorax. This technique can also be useful in the immediate evaluation of patients with dyspnea or acute respiratory failure. Other described applications include monitoring treatment response and increasing the safety of invasive procedures. Although specific criteria regarding training and certification are still lacking, lung ultrasound is a fast, inexpensive, and widely available tool. This technique should progressively come to be more widely incorporated into the care of critically ill patients.

  12. [Impact of early elective tracheotomy in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Correia, Isabel Araújo Marques; Sousa, Vítor; Pinto, Luis Marques; Barros, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Tracheotomy is one of the most frequent surgical procedures performed in critically ill patients hospitalized at intensive care units. The ideal timing for a tracheotomy is still controversial, despite decades of experience. To determine the impact of performing early tracheotomies in critically ill patients on duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit stay, overall hospital stay, morbidity, and mortality. Retrospective and observational study of cases subjected to elective tracheotomy at one of the intensive care units of this hospital during five consecutive years. The patients were stratified into two groups: early tracheotomy group (tracheotomy performed from day one up to and including day seven of mechanical ventilation) and late tracheotomy group (tracheotomy performed after day seven). The outcomes of the groups were compared. In the early tracheotomy group, there was a statistically significant reduction in duration of mechanical ventilation (6 days vs. 19 days; p<0.001), duration of intensive care unit stay (10 days vs. 28 days; p=0.001), and incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (1 case vs. 44 cases; p=0.001). Early tracheotomy has a significant positive impact on critically ill patients hospitalized at this intensive care unit. These results support the tendency to balance the risk-benefit analysis in favor of early tracheotomy. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Increased incidence of diuretic use in critically ill obese patients.

    PubMed

    de Louw, Emma J; Sun, Pepijn O; Lee, Joon; Feng, Mengling; Mark, Roger G; Celi, Leo Anthony; Mukamal, Kenneth J; Danziger, John

    2015-06-01

    Sodium retention occurs commonly in cardiac and liver disease, requiring the administration of diuretics to restore fluid balance. Whether obesity is associated with sodium retention has not been fully evaluated. In a large single-center cohort of critically ill patients, we evaluated whether admission body mass index was associated with the administration of either oral or intravenous diuretics during the intensive care unit (ICU) stay. Of 7724 critically ill patients, 3946 (51.1%) were prescribed diuretics during the ICU stay. Overweight, class I obesity, and class II/III obesity were associated with a 1.35 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-1.53; P < .001), 1.56 (95% CI, 1.35-1.80; P < .001), and 1.91 (95% CI, 1.61-2.26; P < .001) adjusted risk of receiving diuretics within the ICU, respectively. In adjusted analysis, a 5-kg/m(2) increment of body mass index was associated with a 1.19 (95% CI, 1.14-1.23; P < .001) increased adjusted risk of within-ICU diuretics. Among those patients receiving loop diuretics, obese patients received significantly larger daily diuretic doses. Critically ill obese patients are more likely to receive diuretics during their stay in the ICU and to receive higher dosages of diuretics. Our data suggest that obesity is an independent risk factor for sodium retention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The nonthyroidal illness syndrome in the non-critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Pappa, Theodora A; Vagenakis, Apostolos G; Alevizaki, Maria

    2011-02-01

    The nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is a very common clinical entity among hospitalized patients and has been reported in practically every severe illness and acute or chronic stressful event. There is a large body of data associating the presence of NTIS with the severity of the underlying disease. Most of these studies concern intensive care unit (ICU) patients, whereas the non-critically ill patients outside the ICU setting are less well studied. We provide a review of the existing literature focusing on studies examining NTIS in non-critically ill patients and attempt to summarize the pathophysiological pathways underlying the syndrome, its prognostic role, as well as the current intervention studies mainly from a clinical standpoint. The aetiology of the NTIS is multifactorial and varies among different groups of patients. Experimental and clinical findings suggest that inflammatory cytokines are implicated in the pathogenesis of the syndrome, whereas recent evidence re-evaluate the role of deiodinases in thyroid hormone metabolism not only in the periphery but also in the hypothalamus and the pituitary and thus in the alterations accompanying NTIS. Clinical data examining the effectiveness of thyroid hormone supplementation in NTIS remain controversial. As long as there is no clear evidence of benefit from thyroid hormone replacement and until well-designed studies confirm its efficacy, thyroxine supplementation should not be recommended for the treatment of NTIS. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2010 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  15. Extreme Dysbiosis of the Microbiome in Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Daniel; Ackermann, Gail; Khailova, Ludmila; Baird, Christine; Heyland, Daren; Kozar, Rosemary; Lemieux, Margot; Derenski, Karrie; King, Judy; Vis-Kampen, Christine; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Critical illness is hypothesized to associate with loss of “health-promoting” commensal microbes and overgrowth of pathogenic bacteria (dysbiosis). This dysbiosis is believed to increase susceptibility to nosocomial infections, sepsis, and organ failure. A trial with prospective monitoring of the intensive care unit (ICU) patient microbiome using culture-independent techniques to confirm and characterize this dysbiosis is thus urgently needed. Characterizing ICU patient microbiome changes may provide first steps toward the development of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions using microbiome signatures. To characterize the ICU patient microbiome, we collected fecal, oral, and skin samples from 115 mixed ICU patients across four centers in the United States and Canada. Samples were collected at two time points: within 48 h of ICU admission, and at ICU discharge or on ICU day 10. Sample collection and processing were performed according to Earth Microbiome Project protocols. We applied SourceTracker to assess the source composition of ICU patient samples by using Qiita, including samples from the American Gut Project (AGP), mammalian corpse decomposition samples, childhood (Global Gut study), and house surfaces. Our results demonstrate that critical illness leads to significant and rapid dysbiosis. Many taxons significantly depleted from ICU patients versus AGP healthy controls are key “health-promoting” organisms, and overgrowth of known pathogens was frequent. Source compositions of ICU patient samples are largely uncharacteristic of the expected community type. Between time points and within a patient, the source composition changed dramatically. Our initial results show great promise for microbiome signatures as diagnostic markers and guides to therapeutic interventions in the ICU to repopulate the normal, “health-promoting” microbiome and thereby improve patient outcomes. IMPORTANCE Critical illness may be associated with the loss of

  16. Delirium in Critically Ill Children: An International Point Prevalence Study.

    PubMed

    Traube, Chani; Silver, Gabrielle; Reeder, Ron W; Doyle, Hannah; Hegel, Emily; Wolfe, Heather A; Schneller, Christopher; Chung, Melissa G; Dervan, Leslie A; DiGennaro, Jane L; Buttram, Sandra D W; Kudchadkar, Sapna R; Madden, Kate; Hartman, Mary E; deAlmeida, Mary L; Walson, Karen; Ista, Erwin; Baarslag, Manuel A; Salonia, Rosanne; Beca, John; Long, Debbie; Kawai, Yu; Cheifetz, Ira M; Gelvez, Javier; Truemper, Edward J; Smith, Rebecca L; Peters, Megan E; O'Meara, A M Iqbal; Murphy, Sarah; Bokhary, Abdulmohsen; Greenwald, Bruce M; Bell, Michael J

    2017-04-01

    To determine prevalence of delirium in critically ill children and explore associated risk factors. Multi-institutional point prevalence study. Twenty-five pediatric critical care units in the United States, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Australia, and Saudi Arabia. All children admitted to the pediatric critical care units on designated study days (n = 994). Children were screened for delirium using the Cornell Assessment of Pediatric Delirium by the bedside nurse. Demographic and treatment-related variables were collected. Primary study outcome measure was prevalence of delirium. In 159 children, a final determination of mental status could not be ascertained. Of the 835 remaining subjects, 25% screened positive for delirium, 13% were classified as comatose, and 62% were delirium-free and coma-free. Delirium prevalence rates varied significantly with reason for ICU admission, with highest delirium rates found in children admitted with an infectious or inflammatory disorder. For children who were in the PICU for 6 or more days, delirium prevalence rate was 38%. In a multivariate model, risk factors independently associated with development of delirium included age less than 2 years, mechanical ventilation, benzodiazepines, narcotics, use of physical restraints, and exposure to vasopressors and antiepileptics. Delirium is a prevalent complication of critical illness in children, with identifiable risk factors. Further multi-institutional, longitudinal studies are required to investigate effect of delirium on long-term outcomes and possible preventive and treatment measures. Universal delirium screening is practical and can be implemented in pediatric critical care units.

  17. Focus on peripherally inserted central catheters in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Venous access devices are of pivotal importance for an increasing number of critically ill patients in a variety of disease states and in a variety of clinical settings (emergency, intensive care, surgery) and for different purposes (fluids or drugs infusions, parenteral nutrition, antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, procedures of dialysis/apheresis). However, healthcare professionals are commonly worried about the possible consequences that may result using a central venous access device (CVAD) (mainly, bloodstream infections and thrombosis), both peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs). This review aims to discuss indications, insertion techniques, and care of PICCs in critically ill patients. PICCs have many advantages over standard CICCs. First of all, their insertion is easy and safe -due to their placement into peripheral veins of the arm- and the advantage of a central location of catheter tip suitable for all osmolarity and pH solutions. Using the ultrasound-guidance for the PICC insertion, the risk of hemothorax and pneumothorax can be avoided, as well as the possibility of primary malposition is very low. PICC placement is also appropriate to avoid post-procedural hemorrhage in patients with an abnormal coagulative state who need a CVAD. Some limits previously ascribed to PICCs (i.e., low flow rates, difficult central venous pressure monitoring, lack of safety for radio-diagnostic procedures, single-lumen) have delayed their start up in the intensive care units as common practice. Though, the recent development of power-injectable PICCs overcomes these technical limitations and PICCs have started to spread in critical care settings. Two important take-home messages may be drawn from this review. First, the incidence of complications varies depending on venous accesses and healthcare professionals should be aware of the different clinical performance as well as of the different risks

  18. Drinking water turbidity and gastrointestinal illness in the elderly of Philadelphia

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, J.; Levin, R.; Goldstein, R.

    2000-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE—To investigate the association between drinking water quality and gastrointestinal illness in the elderly of Philadelphia.
DESIGN—Within the general population, children and the elderly are at highest risk for gastrointestinal disease. This study investigates the potential association between daily fluctuations in drinking water turbidity and subsequent hospital admissions for gastrointestinal illness of elderly persons, controlling for time trends, seasonal patterns, and temperature using Poisson regression analysis.
SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS—All residents of Philadelphia aged 65 and older in 1992-1993 were studied through their MEDICARE records.
MAIN RESULTS—For Philadelphia's population aged 65 and older, we found water quality 9 to 11 days before the visit was associated with hospital admissions for gastrointestinal illness, with an interquartile range increase in turbidity being associated with a 9% increase (95% CI 5.3%, 12.7%). In the Belmont service area, there was also an association evident at a lag of 4 to 6 days (9.1% increase, 95% CI 5.2, 13.3). Both associations were stronger in those over 75 than in the population aged 65-74. This association occurred in a filtered water supply in compliance with US standards.
CONCLUSIONS—Elderly residents of Philadelphia remain at risk of waterborne gastrointestinal illness under current water treatment practices. Hospitalisations represent a very small percentage of total morbidity.


Keywords: waterborne disease; drinking water; gastrointestinal illness; elderly PMID:10692962

  19. Feeding the critically ill obese patient: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Secombe, Paul; Harley, Simon; Chapman, Marianne; Aromataris, Edoardo

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this review is to identify effective enteral nutritional regimens targeting protein and calorie delivery for the critically ill obese patient on morbidity and mortality.More specifically, the review question is:In the critically ill obese patient, what is the optimal enteral protein and calorie target that improves mortality and morbidity? The World Health Organization (WHO) defines obesity as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that may impair health, or, empirically, as a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m. Twenty-eight percent of the Australian population is obese with the prevalence rising to 44% in rural areas, and there is evidence that rates of obesity are increasing. The prevalence of obese patients in intensive care largely mirrors that of the general population. There is concern, however, that this may also be rising. A recently published multi-center nutritional study of critically ill patients reported a mean BMI of 29 in their sample, suggesting that just under 50% of their intensive care population is obese. It is inevitable, therefore, that the intensivist will care for the critically ill obese patient.Managing the critically ill obese patient is challenging, not least due to the co-morbid diseases frequently associated with obesity, including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, dyslipidaemia, sleep disordered breathing and respiratory insufficiency, hepatic steatohepatitis, chronic kidney disease and hypertension. There is also evidence that metabolic processes differ in the obese patient, particularly those with underlying insulin resistance, itself a marker of the metabolic syndrome, which may predispose to futile cycling, altered fuel utilization and protein catabolism. These issues are compounded by altered drug pharmacokinetics, and the additional logistical issues associated with prophylactic, therapeutic and diagnostic interventions.It is entirely plausible that the altered metabolic processes observed in the obese

  20. Feasibility of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Segers, Johan; Hermans, Greet; Bruyninckx, Frans; Meyfroidt, Geert; Langer, Daniel; Gosselink, Rik

    2014-12-01

    Critically ill patients often develop intensive care unit-acquired weakness. Reduction in muscle mass and muscle strength occurs early after admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). Although early active muscle training could attenuate this intensive care unit-acquired weakness, in the early phase of critical illness, a large proportion of patients are unable to participate in any active mobilization. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) could be an alternative strategy for muscle training. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and feasibility of NMES in critically ill patients. This is an observational study. The setting is in the medical and surgical ICUs of a tertiary referral university hospital. Fifty patients with a prognosticated prolonged stay of at least 6 days were included on day 3 to 5 of their ICU stay. Patients with preexisting neuromuscular disorders and patients with musculoskeletal conditions limiting quadriceps contraction were excluded. Twenty-five minutes of simultaneous bilateral NMES of the quadriceps femoris muscle. This intervention was performed 5 days per week (Monday-Friday). Effective muscle stimulation was defined as a palpable and visible contraction (partial or full muscle bulk). The following parameters, potentially affecting contraction upon NMES, were assessed: functional status before admission to the ICU (Barthel index), type and severity of illness (Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II score and sepsis), treatments possibly influencing the muscle contraction (corticosteroids, vasopressors, inotropes, aminoglycosides, and neuromuscular blocking agents), level of consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale, score on 5 standardized questions evaluating awakening, and sedation agitation scale), characteristics of stimulation (intensity of the NMES, number of sessions per patient, and edema), and neuromuscular electrophysiologic characteristics. Changes in heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation

  1. Indications and Effects of Plasma Transfusions in Critically Ill Children.

    PubMed

    Karam, Oliver; Demaret, Pierre; Shefler, Alison; Leteurtre, Stéphane; Spinella, Philip C; Stanworth, Simon J; Tucci, Marisa

    2015-06-15

    Plasma transfusions are frequently prescribed for critically ill children, although their indications lack a strong evidence base. Plasma transfusions are largely driven by physician conceptions of need, and these are poorly documented in pediatric intensive care patients. To identify patient characteristics and to characterize indications leading to plasma transfusions in critically ill children, and to assess the effect of plasma transfusions on coagulation tests. Point-prevalence study in 101 pediatric intensive care units in 21 countries, on 6 predefined weeks. All critically ill children admitted to a participating unit were included if they received at least one plasma transfusion. During the 6 study weeks, 13,192 children were eligible. Among these, 443 (3.4%) received at least one plasma transfusion and were included. The primary indications for plasma transfusion were critical bleeding in 22.3%, minor bleeding in 21.2%, planned surgery or procedure in 11.7%, and high risk of postoperative bleeding in 10.6%. No bleeding or planned procedures were reported in 34.1%. Before plasma transfusion, the median international normalized ratio (INR) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) values were 1.5 and 48, respectively. After plasma transfusion, the median INR and aPTT changes were -0.2 and -5, respectively. Plasma transfusion significantly improved INR only in patients with a baseline INR greater than 2.5. One-third of transfused patients were not bleeding and had no planned procedure. In addition, in most patients, coagulation tests are not sensitive to increases in coagulation factors resulting from plasma transfusion. Studies assessing appropriate plasma transfusion strategies are urgently needed.

  2. Alcohol-Use Disorders in the Critically Ill Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Drew G.; Sessler, Curtis N.; Zilberberg, Marya D.; Weaver, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol abuse and dependence, referred to as alcohol-use disorders (AUDs), affect 76.3 million people worldwide and account for 1.8 million deaths per year. AUDs affect 18.3 million Americans (7.3% of the population), and up to 40% of hospitalized patients have AUDs. This review discusses the development and progression of critical illness in patients with AUDs. In contrast to acute intoxication, AUDs have been linked to increased severity of illness in a number of studies. In particular, surgical patients with AUDs experience higher rates of postoperative hemorrhage, cardiac complications, sepsis, and need for repeat surgery. Outcomes from trauma are worse for patients with chronic alcohol abuse, whereas burn patients who are acutely intoxicated may not have worse outcomes. AUDs are linked to not only a higher likelihood of community-acquired pneumonia and sepsis but also a higher severity of illness and higher rates of nosocomial pneumonia and sepsis. The management of sedation in patients with AUDs may be particularly challenging because of the increased need for sedatives and opioids and the difficulty in diagnosing withdrawal syndrome. The health-care provider also must be watchful for the development of dangerous agitation and violence, as these problems are not uncommonly seen in hospital ICUs. Despite studies showing that up to 40% of hospitalized patients have AUDs, relatively few guidelines exist on the specific management of the critically ill patient with AUDs. AUDs are underdiagnosed, and a first step to improving patient outcomes may lie in systematically and accurately identifying AUDs. PMID:20923804

  3. [Current aspects of diagnostics of hepatic dysfunction in critically ill].

    PubMed

    Gonnert, F; Bauer, M; Kortgen, A

    2012-10-01

    Hepatic dysfunction may develop in critically ill patients in the course of extrahepatic diseases such as sepsis and is frequently limiting prognosis. Conventional "static" laboratory parameters assess hepatocellular damage, synthetic function or cholestasis, providing informations about (differential) diagnostic aspects, while their significance to assess rapid changes in flow and function in the critical care setting is limited. In contrast, quantitative (or "dynamic") liver function tests, such as measurement of plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green (PDRICG) or 13C-methacetin metabolism, assess specific metabolic and/or excretory function of the liver together with sinusoidal perfusion at the time of measurement and can detect liver dysfunction early in the course of critical illness. In addition, PDRICG demonstrated prognostic significance, albeit, severity of canalicular excretory dysfunction might be underestimated. For chronic liver disease, scoring systems, such as the Child-Turcotte-Pugh-score or the MELD, were developed to assess severity of disease and probability of survival. Scoring systems are also used for graft allocation. Combining scoring systems with dynamic tests holds the potential to improve predictive value, e.g. in the transplant setting.

  4. Family needs of critically ill patients in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ping-Ru; Redley, Bernice; Hsiao, Ya-Chu; Lin, Chun-Chih; Han, Chin-Yen; Lin, Hung-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Family members' experience a range of physiological, psychological and emotional impacts when accompanying a critically ill relative in the emergency department. Family needs are influenced by their culture and the context of care, and accurate clinician understanding of these needs is essential for patient- and family-centered care delivery. The aim of this study was to describe the needs of Taiwanese family members accompanying critically ill patients in the emergency department while waiting for an inpatient bed and compare these to the perceptions of emergency nurses. A prospective cross-sectional survey was conducted in a large medical center in Taiwan. Data were collected from 150 family members and 150 emergency nurses who completed a Chinese version of the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory. Family members ranked needs related to 'communication with family members,' as most important, followed by 'family member participation in emergency department care', 'family member support' and 'organizational comfort'; rankings were similar to those of emergency nurses. Compared to nurses, family members reported higher scores for the importance of needs related to 'communication with family members' and 'family members' participation in emergency department care'. Family members place greater importance than emergency nurses on the need for effective communication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nutritional status in chronically-ill elderly patients. Is it related to quality of life?

    PubMed

    Artacho, R; Lujano, C; Sanchez-Vico, A B; Vargas Sánchez, C; González Calvo, J; Bouzas, P R; Ruiz-López, M D

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the quality of life in chronically-ill elderly patients and its relationship with parameters concerning the patients' nutritional status. A cross-sectional study. Primary health-care centres in Jaen, Spain. A total of 168 chronically-ill elderly outpatients aged from 65 to 89 years. Quality of life was measured using the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire. A nutritional assessment was undertaken including socio-demographic variables, anthropometric measurements (body-mass index and calf circumference), functional evaluation (Barthel index and Folstein mini-mental status test) and a dietetic questionnaire. The mini-nutritional assessment test was used as an assessment tool to detect nutritional risk. Quality of life in chronically-ill elderly subjects, as determined by the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire, which diminishes with age, is independent of anthropometric parameters and a statistically significant difference was found between gender, socio-demographic characteristics, functional capacity, nutritional status and the kind of chronic disease (p<0.05). The relationship between the quality of life with the patients' socio-demographic characteristics, functional capacity and nutritional status underlines the importance of taking these factors into account in the management of chronically ill patients, especially women.

  6. Predictors of hippocampal atrophy in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Lindlau, A; Widmann, C N; Putensen, C; Jessen, F; Semmler, A; Heneka, M T

    2015-02-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is presumably one morphological sign of critical illness encephalopathy; however, predictors have not yet been determined. The data for this report derived from patients treated at the intensive care units (ICUs) of the University Hospital in Bonn in the years 2004-2006. These patients underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging 6-24 months after discharge. Volumes (intracranial, whole brain, white matter, grey matter, cerebral spinal fluid, bilateral hippocampus) were compared with healthy controls. Pro-inflammatory parameters and ICU scoring systems were explored in conjunction with brain volumes. Cut-scores were defined to differentiate patients with high from those with low inflammatory response. Hippocampal and white matter volume were reduced in critically ill patients compared with healthy controls. Procalcitonin showed a very strong correlation (r = -0.903, P = 0.01) and interleukin-6 a moderate correlation (r = -0.538, P = 0.031) with hippocampal volume, but not with other brain volumes. C-reactive protein was linked to grey matter volume. There was no correlation with systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria (body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, white blood cell count) or for hippocampal or whole brain volume. Furthermore, parameters representing severity of disease (APACHE II score, SOFA score, duration of stay and duration of mechanical ventilation) were not associated with hippocampal or other brain volumes. This analysis suggests that high levels of procalcitonin and interleukin-6 in the blood serum of critically ill patients are associated with a high likelihood of hippocampal atrophy irrespective of the severity of disease measured by ICU scoring systems and other inflammatory parameters. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  7. Patients' recovery after critical illness at early follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michelle A; McKinley, Sharon

    2010-03-01

    To determine the quality of life, particularly physical function, of intensive care survivors during the early recovery process. Survivors of critical illness face ongoing challenges after discharge from the intensive care unit and on returning home. Knowledge about health issues during early phases of recovery after hospital discharge is emerging, yet still limited. Descriptive study where the former critically ill patients completed instruments on general health and quality of life (SF-36) in the first six months of recovery. Participants responded to the SF-36 questionnaire and questions about problems, one to six months after intensive care, either face-to-face or by telephone. Thirty-nine participants had a mean age of 60 years; of them, 59% were men and had been in intensive care for 1-69 days (median = 5). Most participants (69%) rated their health as good or fair, but 54% rated general health as worse than a year ago. Mean quality of life scores for all scales ranged from 25-65.5%, with particularly low scores for Role-Physical (25) and Pain (45.1). Half the participants reported difficulty with mobility, sleep and concentration, and 72% that their responsibilities at home had changed. No relationships were found between SF-36 scores and admission diagnosis, gender, age or length of intensive care stay. These survivors of critical illness and hospitalisation in an intensive care unit perceive their general health to be good despite experiencing significant physical limitations and disturbed sleep during recovery. Knowledge of issues in these early phases of recovery and discussion and resolution of patient problems could normalise the experience for the patient and help to facilitate better quality of life.

  8. Transition From Intravenous to Subcutaneous Insulin in Critically Ill Adults.

    PubMed

    Doolin, Meagan K; Walroth, Todd A; Harris, Serena A; Whitten, Jessica A; Fritschle-Hilliard, Andrew C

    2016-07-01

    Glycemic control decreases morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. However, limited guidance exists regarding the transition from intravenous (IV) to subcutaneous insulin therapy. A validated protocol for transition is necessary since glycemic variability, hyperglycemia, and hypoglycemia adversely impact patient outcomes. The objective was to determine the safest and most effective method to transition critically ill adults from IV to subcutaneous insulin. This single-center, retrospective, observational study included adults admitted to the burn, medical, or surgical/trauma intensive care units from January 1, 2011, to September 30, 2014. A computer-based program provided a reflection of the patient's total daily IV insulin requirements. This information was then utilized to stratify patients into groups according to their initial dose of subcutaneous insulin as a percentage of the prior 24-hour IV requirements (group stratification: 0-49%, 50-59%, 60-69%, 70-79%, ≥80%). The primary endpoint was the percentage of blood glucose (BG) concentrations within target range (70-150 mg/dL) 48 hours following transition. One hundred patients with 1394 BG concentrations were included. The 50-59% group achieved the highest rate of BG concentrations in goal range (68%) (P < .001). The 0-49% group, which was the transition method utilized most often, resulted in the lowest rate of goal achievement (46%). This retrospective study suggests critically ill adults may be safely transitioned to 50-59% of their 24-hour IV insulin requirements. A dosing protocol will be implemented to transition to 50-70% subcutaneous insulin. Follow-up data will be reviewed to assess the protocol's safety and efficacy. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  9. A Multinational Study of Thromboprophylaxis Practice in Critically Ill Children*

    PubMed Central

    Faustino, Edward Vincent S.; Hanson, Sheila; Spinella, Philip C.; Tucci, Marisa; O'Brien, Sarah H.; Nunez, Antonio Rodriguez; Yung, Michael; Truemper, Edward; Qin, Li; Li, Simon; Marohn, Kimberly; Randolph, Adrienne G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although critically ill children are at increased risk for developing deep venous thrombosis, there are few pediatric studies establishing the prevalence of thrombosis or the efficacy of thromboprophylaxis. We tested the hypothesis that thromboprophylaxis is infrequently used in critically ill children even for those in whom it is indicated. Design Prospective multinational cross-sectional study over four study dates in 2012. Setting Fifty-nine PICUs in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, and the United States. Patients All patients less than 18 years old in the PICU during the study dates and times were included in the study, unless the patients were 1) boarding in the unit waiting for a bed outside the PICU or 2) receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Of 2,484 children in the study, 2,159 (86.9%) had greater than or equal to 1 risk factor for thrombosis. Only 308 children (12.4%) were receiving pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis (e.g., aspirin, low-molecular-weight heparin, or unfractionated heparin). Of 430 children indicated to receive pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis based on consensus recommendations, only 149 (34.7%) were receiving it. Mechanical thromboprophylaxis was used in 156 of 655 children (23.8%) 8 years old or older, the youngest age for that device. Using nonlinear mixed effects model, presence of cyanotic congenital heart disease (odds ratio, 7.35; p < 0.001) and spinal cord injury (odds ratio, 8.85; p = 0.008) strongly predicted the use of pharmacologic and mechanical thromboprophylaxis, respectively. Conclusions Thromboprophylaxis is infrequently used in critically ill children. This is true even for children at high risk of thrombosis where consensus guidelines recommend pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis. PMID:24351371

  10. A multinational study of thromboprophylaxis practice in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Edward Vincent S; Hanson, Sheila; Spinella, Philip C; Tucci, Marisa; O'Brien, Sarah H; Nunez, Antonio Rodriguez; Yung, Michael; Truemper, Edward; Qin, Li; Li, Simon; Marohn, Kimberly; Randolph, Adrienne G

    2014-05-01

    Although critically ill children are at increased risk for developing deep venous thrombosis, there are few pediatric studies establishing the prevalence of thrombosis or the efficacy of thromboprophylaxis. We tested the hypothesis that thromboprophylaxis is infrequently used in critically ill children even for those in whom it is indicated. Prospective multinational cross-sectional study over four study dates in 2012. Fifty-nine PICUs in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, and the United States. All patients less than 18 years old in the PICU during the study dates and times were included in the study, unless the patients were 1) boarding in the unit waiting for a bed outside the PICU or 2) receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. None. Of 2,484 children in the study, 2,159 (86.9%) had greater than or equal to 1 risk factor for thrombosis. Only 308 children (12.4%) were receiving pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis (e.g., aspirin, low-molecular-weight heparin, or unfractionated heparin). Of 430 children indicated to receive pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis based on consensus recommendations, only 149 (34.7%) were receiving it. Mechanical thromboprophylaxis was used in 156 of 655 children (23.8%) 8 years old or older, the youngest age for that device. Using nonlinear mixed effects model, presence of cyanotic congenital heart disease (odds ratio, 7.35; p < 0.001) and spinal cord injury (odds ratio, 8.85; p = 0.008) strongly predicted the use of pharmacologic and mechanical thromboprophylaxis, respectively. Thromboprophylaxis is infrequently used in critically ill children. This is true even for children at high risk of thrombosis where consensus guidelines recommend pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis.

  11. [Thromboprophylaxis in critically ill children in Spain and Portugal].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Núñez, A; Fonte, M; Faustino, E V S

    2015-03-01

    Although critically ill children may be at risk from developing deep venous thrombosis (DVT), data on its incidence and effectiveness of thromboprophylaxis are lacking. To describe the use of thromboprophylaxis in critically ill children in Spain and Portugal, and to compare the results with international data. Secondary analysis of the multinational study PROTRACT, carried out in 59 PICUs from 7 developed countries (4 from Portugal and 6 in Spain). Data were collected from patients less than 18 years old, who did not receive therapeutic thromboprophylaxis. A total of 308 patients in Spanish and Portuguese (Iberian) PICUS were compared with 2176 admitted to international PICUs. Risk factors such as femoral vein (P=.01), jugular vein central catheter (P<.001), cancer (P=.03), and sepsis (P<.001), were more frequent in Iberian PICUs. The percentage of patients with pharmacological thromboprophylaxis was similar in both groups (15.3% vs. 12.0%). Low molecular weight heparin was used more frequently in Iberian patients (P<.001). In treated children, prior history of thrombosis (P=.02), femoral vein catheter (P<.001), cancer (P=.02) and cranial trauma or craniectomy (P=.006), were more frequent in Iberian PICUs. Mechanical thromboprophylaxis was used in only 6.8% of candidates in Iberian PICUs, compared with 23.8% in the international PICUs (P<.001). Despite the presence of risk factors for DVT in many patients, thromboprophylaxis is rarely prescribed, with low molecular weight heparin being the most used drug. Passive thromboprophylaxis use is anecdotal. There should be a consensus on guidelines of thromboprophylaxis in critically ill children. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Predictors of nonconvulsive seizures among critically ill children.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Bláthnaid; Sharma, Rohit; Ochi, Ayako; Go, Cristina; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Hutchison, James S; Atenafu, Eshetu G; Hahn, Cecil D

    2011-11-01

    Continuous electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring is a valuable tool for the detection of seizures among critically ill children, in particular when these seizures occur without clinical signs: termed nonconvulsive seizures. Continuous EEG monitoring is a limited resource in many centers. We sought to identify which critically ill children most frequently experience nonconvulsive seizures, and thus may particularly benefit from continuous EEG monitoring. Single-center review was undertaken of consecutive diagnostic continuous EEG (cEEG) recordings performed in our pediatric and neonatal intensive care units (ICUs). We examined the indications for monitoring, the clinical characteristics of monitored patients, the occurrence and timing of seizures, and clinical and EEG characteristics associated with nonconvulsive seizures. One hundred twenty-one patients underwent diagnostic continuous EEG monitoring, for a mean duration of 26 h. Seizures were detected in 32% of these patients, of which 90% experienced some nonconvulsive seizures, and 72% experienced exclusively nonconvulsive seizures. Patients with nonconvulsive seizures had significantly greater odds of having acute epilepsy, acute structural brain injury, prior in-hospital convulsive seizures, and the presence of interictal epileptiform abnormalities on EEG. Seizures are common among critically ill children undergoing diagnostic cEEG monitoring. The great majority of these seizures are nonconvulsive, requiring EEG for their detection. Predictors of nonconvulsive seizures include acute epilepsy, acute structural brain injury, prior in-hospital convulsive seizures, and interictal epileptiform abnormalities on EEG. These findings can help inform future allocation of limited cEEG monitoring resources to those patients at greatest risk for nonconvulsive seizures. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. Thromboprophylaxis in critically ill children in Spain and Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Nñnez, A. Rodríguez; Fonte, M.; Faustino, E.V.S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although critically ill children may be at risk from developing deep venous thrombosis (DVT), data on its incidence and effectiveness of thromboprophylaxis are lacking. Objective To describe the use of thromboprophylaxis in critically ill children in Spain and Portugal, and to compare the results with international data. Material and methods Secondary analysis of the multinational study PROTRACT, carried out in 59 PICUs from 7 developed countries (4 from Portugal and 6 in Spain). Data were collected from patients less than 18 years old, who did not receive therapeutic thromboprophylaxis. Results A total of 308 patients in Spanish and Portuguese (Iberian) PICUS were compared with 2176 admitted to international PICUs. Risk factors such as femoral vein (P = .01), jugular vein central catheter (P < .001), cancer (P = .03), and sepsis (P < .001), were more frequent in Iberian PICUs. The percentage of patients with pharmacological thromboprophylaxis was similar in both groups (15.3% vs. 12.0%). Low molecular weight heparin was used more frequently in Iberian patients (P < .001). In treated children, prior history of thrombosis (P = .02), femoral vein catheter (P < .001), cancer (P = .02) and cranial trauma or craniectomy (P = .006), were more frequent in Iberian PICUs. Mechanical thromboprophylaxis was used in only 6.8% of candidates in Iberian PICUs, compared with 23.8% in the international PICUs (P < .001). Conclusions Despite the presence of risk factors for DVT in many patients, thromboprophylaxis is rarely prescribed, with low molecular weight heparin being the most used drug. Passive thromboprophylaxis use is anecdotal. There should be a consensus on guidelines of thromboprophylaxis in critically ill children. PMID:24907863

  14. Management Issues in Critically Ill Pediatric Patients with Trauma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Omar Z; Burd, Randall S

    2017-10-01

    The management of critically ill pediatric patients with trauma poses many challenges because of the infrequency and diversity of severe injuries and a paucity of high-level evidence to guide care for these uncommon events. This article discusses recent recommendations for early resuscitation and blood component therapy for hypovolemic pediatric patients with trauma. It also highlights the specific types of injuries that lead to severe injury in children and presents challenges related to their management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cytomegalovirus Reactivation in Critically-Ill Immunocompetent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Ajit P.; Kirby, Katharine A.; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Neff, Margaret J.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Huang, Meei-Li; Santo, Tracy K.; Corey, Lawrence; Boeckh, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is associated with adverse clinical outcomes in immunosuppressed persons, but the incidence and association of CMV reactivation with adverse outcomes in persons lacking evidence of immunosuppression (“immunocompetent”) with critical illness have not been well-defined. Objective To determine the association of CMV reactivation with intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay in critically-ill immunocompetent persons. Methods We prospectively assessed CMV plasma DNAemia by real-time PCR twice weekly and clinical outcomes in a cohort of CMV seropositive, immunocompetent adults admitted to an ICU. Clinical parameters were assessed by personnel blinded to CMV PCR results. Risk factors for CMV reactivation and association with hospital and ICU length of stay (LOS) were assessed by multivariable logistic regression and proportional odds models. Setting Six ICU’s at two separate hospitals at a large tertiary care academic medical center between 2004–2006. Participants A total of 120 critically-ill, CMV seropositive adults lacking evidence of immunosuppression. Main Outcome Measures Association of CMV reactivation with prolonged hospital length of stay or death. Results The primary composite endpoint of continued hospitalization (n=35) or death (n=10) at 30 days occurred in 45 (35%) of the 120 patients. CMV viremia at any level or > 1,000 copies/ml occurred in 33% (39 of 120, 95% confidence interval [CI] 24%–41%) and 20% (24 of 120, 95% CI 13%–28%), at a median of 12 days (range 3–57) and 26 days (range 9–56), respectively. By logistic regression, CMV infection at any level (adjusted OR: 4.3 [1.6–11.9], p = 0.005), >1,000 copies/ml (adjusted OR 13.9 [3.2–60], p < 0.001), or average CMV area under the curve [AUC] (adjusted OR 2.1 [1.3–3.2], p < 0.001), was independently associated with hospitalization or death by 30 days. In multivariable partial proportional odds models, both CMV seven-day moving

  16. Enteral nutrition in the hemodynamically unstable critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Flordelís Lasierra, J L; Pérez-Vela, J L; Montejo González, J C

    2015-01-01

    The benefit of enteral nutrition in critically ill patients has been demonstrated by several studies, especially when it is started early, in the first 24-48h of stay in the Intensive Care Unit, and this practice is currently advised by the main clinical guidelines. The start of enteral nutrition is controversial in patients with hemodynamic failure, since it may trigger intestinal ischemia. However, there are data from experimental studies in animals, as well as from observational studies in humans that allow for hypotheses regarding its beneficial effect and safety. Interventional clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  17. Biomarkers in critical illness: have we made progress?

    PubMed Central

    Honore, Patrick M; Jacobs, Rita; Hendrickx, Inne; De Waele, Elisabeth; Van Gorp, Viola; Joannes-Boyau, Olivier; De Regt, Jouke; Boer, Willem; Spapen, Herbert D

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers have emerged as exemplary key players in translational medicine. Many have been assessed for timely recognition, early treatment, and adequate follow-up for a variety of pathologies. Biomarker sensitivity has improved considerably over the last years but specificity remains poor, in particular when two “marker-sensitive” conditions overlap in one patient. Biomarker research holds an enormous potential for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in postoperative and critically ill patients who present varying degrees of inflammation, infection, and concomitant (sub)acute organ dysfunction or failure. Despite a remarkable progress in development and testing, biomarkers are not yet ready for routine use at the bedside. PMID:27799811

  18. Hypocalcemia of critical illness in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Holowaychuk, Marie K

    2013-11-01

    Hypocalcemia occurs in critically ill dogs and cats and is associated with medications, treatments, and underlying diseases such as acute kidney disease, pancreatitis, parathyroid disease, sepsis, and trauma. Possible underlying mechanisms include hypovitaminosis D, acquired or relative hypoparathyroidism, hypomagnesemia, and alterations in the ionized fraction of calcium caused by changes in chelated or protein-bound calcium. If severe or acute, hypocalcemia can cause obvious clinical signs related to muscle or neurologic hyperexcitability or more subtle signs of cardiovascular dysfunction. Emergency treatment with calcium gluconate administration is recommended when clinical signs are present or if there is moderate to severe ionized hypocalcemia.

  19. The chronic critical illness: a new disease in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Desarmenien, Marine; Blanchard-Courtois, Anne Laure; Ricou, Bara

    2016-01-01

    Advances in intensive care medicine have created a new disease called the chronic critical illness. While a significant proportion of severely ill patients who twenty years ago would have died survive the acute phase, they remain heavily dependent on intensive care for a prolonged period of time. These patients, who can be called "Patient Long Séjour" in French (PLS) or Prolonged Length of Stay patients in English, develop specific health issues that are still poorly recognised. They require special care, which differs from treatments that are given during the acute phase of their illness. A multidisciplinary team dedicated to ensuring their management and follow-up acquired a wide range of knowledge and expertise about these PLSs. Many new monitoring tools and diverse human approaches were implemented to ensure that care was targeted to these patients' needs. This multimodal care management aims to optimise the patients' and their families' quality of life during and following intensive care, whilst maintaining the motivation of the healthcare team of the unit. The purpose of this article is to present new management techniques to hospital and ambulatory caregivers, physicians and nurses, who may be taking care of such patients.

  20. Endocrine and metabolic considerations in critically ill patients 4

    PubMed Central

    Fliers, Eric; Bianco, Antonio C; Langouche, Lies; Boelen, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) typically present with decreased concentrations of plasma tri-iodothyronine, low thyroxine, and normal range or slightly decreased concentration of thyroid-stimulating hormone. This ensemble of changes is collectively known as non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). The extent of NTIS is associated with prognosis, but no proof exists for causality of this association. Initially, NTIS is a consequence of the acute phase response to systemic illness and macronutrient restriction, which might be beneficial. Pathogenesis of NTIS in long-term critical illness is more complex and includes suppression of hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone, accounting for persistently reduced secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone despite low plasma thyroid hormone. In some cases distinguishing between NTIS and severe hypothyroidism, which is a rare primary cause for admission to the ICU, can be difficult. Infusion of hypothalamic-releasing factors can reactivate the thyroid axis in patients with NTIS, inducing an anabolic response. Whether this approach has a clinical benefit in terms of outcome is unknown. In this Series paper, we discuss diagnostic aspects, pathogenesis, and implications of NTIS as well as its distinction from severe, primary thyroid disorders in patients in the ICU. PMID:26071885

  1. Neostigmine in the treatment of refractory constipation in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    González, Rafael; López-Herce, Jesús; García, Ana; Botrán, Marta; Solana, Maria Jose; Urbano, Javier

    2011-08-01

    Constipation is a common complication in critically ill children and it is occasionally resistant to the drugs typically used in treatment. Neostigmine has been used in some cases of refractory constipation in critically ill adults. There is no reference to its use in critically ill children. We describe 3 cases of refractory constipation in critically ill children treated with intravenous neostigmine by continuous infusion. Two patients responded well. There were no adverse effects. We conclude that continuous intravenous neostigmine can be effective in critically ill children with refractory constipation. Further studies are necessary to determine the dose and safety of the treatment.

  2. Update in the management of critically ill burned patients.

    PubMed

    Lorente, J A; Amaya-Villar, R

    2016-01-01

    The management of critically ill burn patients is challenging. These patients have to be managed in specialized centers, where the expertise of physicians and nursing personnel guarantees the best treatment. Mortality of burn patients has improved over the past decades due to a better understanding of burn shock pathophysiology, optimal surgical management, infection control and nutritional support. Indeed, a more aggressive resuscitation, early excision and grafting, the judicious use of topical antibiotics, and the provision of an adequate calorie and protein intake are key to attain best survival results. General advances in critical care have also to be implemented, including protective ventilation, glycemic control, selective decontamination of the digestive tract, and implementation of sedation protocols.

  3. Association between recognizing dementia as a mental illness and dementia knowledge among elderly Chinese Americans.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xin; Woo, Benjamin K P

    2016-06-22

    To investigate whether older Chinese Americans perceive dementia as a mental illness and the relationship between such perception and their general understanding of dementia remains unclear. Our study aims to understand this relationship and its future implication on improving dementia literacy among ethnic minorities. Elderly Chinese American participants from the Greater Los Angeles were asked to complete an 11-item dementia questionnaire, following a community health seminar. Cross-sectional survey data was analyzed using standard statistical methods. The questionnaire received an 88.3% response rate. Among 316 responders, only 28.8% (n = 91) of elderly Chinese Americans identified dementia as a mental illness, and 71.2% (n = 225) did not recognize its mental disease origin. Furthermore, in comparison between these two groups, the first group demonstrated significantly higher level of baseline knowledge of the disease. This study reveals that only approximately 1 out of 4 older Chinese Americans recognized dementia as a mental illness, consistent with previous studies on Asian Americans. Our study however showed that when dementia was being perceived as a mental illness, such perception was associated with a higher level of baseline dementia understanding. The current study suggested the potential of improving older Chinese Americans dementia literacy by increasing awareness of its mental illness origin.

  4. Association between recognizing dementia as a mental illness and dementia knowledge among elderly Chinese Americans

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xin; Woo, Benjamin K P

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether older Chinese Americans perceive dementia as a mental illness and the relationship between such perception and their general understanding of dementia remains unclear. Our study aims to understand this relationship and its future implication on improving dementia literacy among ethnic minorities. METHODS: Elderly Chinese American participants from the Greater Los Angeles were asked to complete an 11-item dementia questionnaire, following a community health seminar. Cross-sectional survey data was analyzed using standard statistical methods. RESULTS: The questionnaire received an 88.3% response rate. Among 316 responders, only 28.8% (n = 91) of elderly Chinese Americans identified dementia as a mental illness, and 71.2% (n = 225) did not recognize its mental disease origin. Furthermore, in comparison between these two groups, the first group demonstrated significantly higher level of baseline knowledge of the disease. CONCLUSION: This study reveals that only approximately 1 out of 4 older Chinese Americans recognized dementia as a mental illness, consistent with previous studies on Asian Americans. Our study however showed that when dementia was being perceived as a mental illness, such perception was associated with a higher level of baseline dementia understanding. The current study suggested the potential of improving older Chinese Americans dementia literacy by increasing awareness of its mental illness origin. PMID:27354966

  5. Dexmedetomidine Use in Critically Ill Children With Acute Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Grant, Mary Jo C; Schneider, James B; Asaro, Lisa A; Dodson, Brenda L; Hall, Brent A; Simone, Shari L; Cowl, Allison S; Munkwitz, Michele M; Wypij, David; Curley, Martha A Q

    2016-12-01

    Care of critically ill children includes sedation but current therapies are suboptimal. To describe dexmedetomidine use in children supported on mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure. Secondary analysis of data from the Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure clinical trial. Thirty-one PICUs. Data from 2,449 children; 2 weeks to 17 years old. Sedation practices were unrestrained in the usual care arm. Patients were categorized as receiving dexmedetomidine as a primary sedative, secondary sedative, periextubation agent, or never prescribed. Dexmedetomidine exposure and sedation and clinical profiles are described. Of 1,224 usual care patients, 596 (49%) received dexmedetomidine. Dexmedetomidine as a primary sedative patients (n = 138; 11%) were less critically ill (Pediatric Risk of Mortality III-12 score median, 6 [interquartile range, 3-11]) and when compared with all other cohorts, experienced more episodic agitation. In the intervention group, time in sedation target improved from 28% to 50% within 1 day of initiating dexmedetomidine as a primary sedative. Dexmedetomidine as a secondary sedative usual care patients (n = 280; 23%) included more children with severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome or organ failure. Dexmedetomidine as a secondary sedative patients experienced more inadequate pain (22% vs 11%) and sedation (31% vs 16%) events. Dexmedetomidine as a periextubation agent patients (n = 178; 15%) were those known to not tolerate an awake, intubated state and experienced a shorter ventilator weaning process (2.1 vs 2.3 d). Our data support the use of dexmedetomidine as a primary agent in low criticality patients offering the benefit of rapid achievement of targeted sedation levels. Dexmedetomidine as a secondary agent does not appear to add benefit. The use of dexmedetomidine to facilitate extubation in children intolerant of an awake, intubated state may abbreviate ventilator weaning. These data

  6. Cytokines and Metabolic Patterns in Pediatric Patients with Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Briassoulis, George; Venkataraman, Shekhar; Thompson, Ann

    2010-01-01

    It is not known if cytokines, which are cell-derived mediators released during the host immune response to stress, affect metabolic response to stress during critical illness. The aim of this prospective study was to determine whether the metabolic response to stress is related to the inflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6), 10 (IL-10), and other stress mediators' responses and to assess their relationships with different feeding patterns, nutritional markers, the severity of illness as assessed by the Multiple Organ System Failure (MOSF), the Pediatric Risk of Mortality Score (PRISM), systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and mortality in critically ill children. Patients were classified as hypermetabolic, normometabolic, and hypometabolic when the measured resting energy expenditures (REE) were >110%, 90–110% and, <90% of the predicted basal metabolic rate, respectively. The initial predominance of the hypometabolic pattern (48.6%) declined within 1 week of acute stress (20%), and the hypermetabolic patterns dominated only after 2 weeks (60%). Only oxygen consumption (VO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) (P < .0001) but none of the cytokines and nutritional markers, were independently associated with a hypometabolic pattern. REE correlated with the IL-10 but not PRISM. In the presence of SIRS or sepsis, CRP, IL-6, IL-10, Prognostic Inflammatory and Nutritional Index (NI), and triglycerides—but not glucose, VO2, or VCO2 increased significantly. High IL-10 levels (P = .0000) and low measured REE (P = .0000) were independently associated with mortality (11.7%), which was higher in the hypometabolic compared to other metabolic patterns (P < .005). Our results showed that only VO2 and VCO2, but not IL-6 or IL-10, were associated with a hypometabolic pattern which predominated the acute phase of stress, and was associated with increased mortality. Although in SIRS or sepsis, the cytokine response was reliably reflected by increases in NI and

  7. Dynamic neuroendocrine changes in critically ill patients with polytrauma.

    PubMed

    Galusova, Andrea; Pauliny, Matus; Majek, Milan; Mackova, Jaroslava; Meskova, Milada; Vlcek, Miroslav; Imrich, Richard; Penesova, Adela

    2015-01-01

    Acute multiple-trauma induces activation of neuroendocrine system. Nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is considered to be associated with adverse outcome in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. This study was aimed to assess dynamic changes of neuroendocrine hormones in patients with polytrauma and their association with the polytrauma score (PTS). Blood samples from 24 critically ill patients with polytrauma were obtained on 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 7th day after admission to ICU for analysis of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), total triiodothyronine (T3); free triiodothyronine (fT3), total thyroxine (T4), free thyroxine (fT4), growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL) and procalcitonin levels. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 16±5 points on average at the admission to ICU. All patients had normal baseline TSH, T4, fT4, but low T3, and fT3 levels were found in 20% and 33% ICU patients, respectively. On the 7th day after admission to ICU TSH had tendency to increase (p=0.07) and fT4 significantly decreased (p=0.03). The PRL level significantly increased on the 3rd day after admission as compared to 1st day (p=0.04). PTS positively correlated with fT3 (r=0.582, p=0.004) and negatively with fT4 (r=-0.422, p=0.04) at the 1st day in ICU. Critical illness in patients with polytrauma leaded to trauma severity-dependent alterations of the thyroid axis response early after injury. Our findings suggest that detection of dynamic hormonal response is more appropriate than single measurement. However supplemental therapy for NTIS should be used after more detailed studies are completed.

  8. Population Pharmacokinetics of Fentanyl in the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Leena; Ferrell, Benjamin A; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Heltsley, Rebecca; Ely, E Wesley; Stein, C Michael; Girard, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    Objective To characterize fentanyl population pharmacokinetics in patients with critical illness and identify patient characteristics associated with altered fentanyl concentrations. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Medical and surgical ICUs in a large tertiary care hospital in the United States. Patients Patients with acute respiratory failure and/or shock who received fentanyl during the first five days of their ICU stay. Measurements and Main Results We collected clinical and hourly drug administration data and measured fentanyl concentrations in plasma collected once daily for up to five days after enrollment. Among 337 patients, the mean duration of infusion was 58 hours at a median rate of 100 µg/hr. Using a nonlinear mixed-effects model implemented by NONMEM, we found fentanyl pharmacokinetics were best described by a two-compartment model in which weight, severe liver disease, and congestive heart failure most affected fentanyl concentrations. For a patient population with a mean weight of 92 kg and no history of severe liver disease or congestive heart failure, the final model, which performed well in repeated 10-fold cross-validation, estimated total clearance (CL), intercompartmental clearance (Q), and volumes of distribution for the central (V1) and peripheral compartments (V2) to be 35 (95% confidence interval: 32 to 39) L/hr, 55 (42 to 68) L/hr, 203 (140 to 266) L, and 523 (428 to 618) L, respectively. Severity of illness was marginally associated with fentanyl pharmacokinetics but did not improve the model fit after liver and heart disease were included. Conclusions In this study, fentanyl pharmacokinetics during critical illness were strongly influenced by severe liver disease, congestive heart failure, and weight, factors that should be considered when dosing fentanyl in the ICU. Future studies are needed to determine if data-driven fentanyl dosing algorithms can improve outcomes for ICU patients. PMID:26491862

  9. Total and ionized serum magnesium in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Escuela, Maria Paz; Guerra, Manuel; Añón, José M; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Zapatero, María Dolores; García-Jalón, Angel; Celaya, Sebastian

    2005-01-01

    To assess the alterations in total serum magnesium (tsMg) and ionized serum magnesium (Mg(2+)) and their association with prognosis in critically ill patients. Prospective, cohort study in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a university teaching hospital. Adult patients admitted to the ICU without previous factors influencing magnesium homeostasis were included during a 6-month period. One hundred forty four patients were included. Mean age was 60.6+/-15.4 years; mean APACHE II score was 12.6+/-6.9. Blood samples were collected in the first 24 h after ICU admission and again on the second, third, and last days of stay in the ICU. At ICU admission 52.5% had total hypomagnesemia and 13.5% total hypermagnesemia; with respect to the Mg(2+) 9.7% showed ionized hypomagnesemia and 23.6% ionized hypermagnesemia. Patients who developed ionized hypermagnesemia had higher mortality than patients without ionized hypermagnesemia development (P=0.04). A moderate correlation between tsMg and Mg(2+) concentrations was found; however, a number of patients with total hypomagnesemia (69-85% during the study) had ionized normomagnesemia. The measure of agreement between tsMg and Mg(2+) levels was poor. Magnesium alterations are frequently found in critically ill patients. The usually determined tsMg levels are not a reflection of Mg(2+) levels. Development of ionized hypermagnesemia is associated with prognosis.

  10. Blood Glucose Variability and Outcomes in Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Naranje, Kirti Mahadeorao; Poddar, Banani; Bhriguvanshi, Arpita; Lal, Richa; Azim, Afzal; Singh, Ratender K.; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To find the incidence of hyperglycemia (blood glucose [BG] ≥150 mg/dl), hypoglycemia (BG ≤60 mg/dl), and variability (presence of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia) in critically ill children in the 1st week of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay and their association with mortality, length of ICU stay, and organ dysfunction. Materials and Methods: The design was a retrospective observational cohort study. Consecutive children ≤18 years of age admitted from March 2003 to April 2012 in a combined adult and pediatric closed ICU. Relevant data were collected from chart review and hospital database. Results: Out of 258 patients included, isolated hyperglycemia was seen in 139 (53.9%) and was unrelated to mortality and morbidity. Isolated variability in BG was noted in 76 (29.5%) patients and hypoglycemia was seen in 9 (3.5%) patients. BG variability was independently associated with multiorgan dysfunction syndrome on multivariate analysis (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 7.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6–31.1). Those with BG variability had longer ICU stay (11 days vs. 4 days, on log-rank test, P = 0.001). Insulin use was associated with the occurrence of variability (adjusted OR: 3.6; 95% CI: 1.8–7.0). Conclusion: Glucose disorders were frequently observed in critically ill children. BG variability was associated with multiorgan dysfunction and increased ICU stay.

  11. Measured energy expenditure in critically ill infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Chwals, W J; Lally, K P; Woolley, M M; Mahour, G H

    1988-05-01

    Technological limitations have impeded accurate energy expenditure assessment in critically ill infants and young children. Instead, a predicted energy expenditure (PEE) is derived based on weight, heat loss, activity, growth requirements, and degree of stress. This study compared actual measured energy expenditure (MEE) with conventional predicted values in 20 critically ill infants and children using a validated metabolic cart designed for use in this age group. All patients were studied either within 4 days of major surgery or during an acute disease process necessitating intensive care. All were severely stressed clinically and were studied while mechanically ventilated in a temperature-controlled environment. The study interval ranged from 1 to 12 hr and averaged 4 hr after a stabilization period of 30 min. The mean MEE was significantly lower than the mean PEE (52.2 +/- 16 kcal/kg/day vs 101.8 +/- 17 kcal/kg/day, P less than 0.001) with a mean MEE/PEE of 52.6 +/- 17% (range 26 to 92%). In a subgroup of 7 paralyzed patients, the mean MEE was significantly lower than in the 13 nonparalyzed patients when compared with PEE and predicted basal metabolic rate (PBMR). The coefficient of variance, conventionally recognized to be approximately 15% for PEE, averaged 6.35% for MEE in this study. These data indicate that if PEE is used as the sole guide for caloric repletion in the stressed infant or child, these patients will be substantially overfed.

  12. Inter-hospital transport of critically ill patients; expect surprises

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Inter-hospital transport of critically ill patients is increasing. When performed by specialized retrieval teams there are less adverse events compared to transport by ambulance. These transports are performed with technical equipment also used in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). As a consequence technical problems may arise and have to be dealt with on the road. In this study, all technical problems encountered while transporting patients with our mobile intensive care unit service (MICU) were evaluated. Methods From March 2009 until August 2011 all transports were reviewed for technical problems. The cause, solution and, where relevant, its influence on protocol were stated. Results In this period of 30 months, 353 patients were transported. In total 55 technical problems were encountered. We provide examples of how they influenced transport and how they may be resolved. Conclusion The use of technical equipment is part of intensive care medicine. Wherever this kind of equipment is used, technical problems will occur. During inter-hospital transports, without extra personnel or technical assistance, the transport team is dependent on its own ability to resolve these problems. Therefore, we emphasize the importance of having some technical understanding of the equipment used and the importance of training to anticipate, prevent and resolve technical problems. Being an outstanding intensivist on the ICU does not necessarily mean being qualified for transporting the critically ill as well. Although these are lessons derived from inter-hospital transport, they may also apply to intra-hospital transport. PMID:22326110

  13. Use of inotropes and vasopressor agents in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Bangash, Mansoor N; Kong, Ming-Li; Pearse, Rupert M

    2012-01-01

    Inotropes and vasopressors are biologically and clinically important compounds that originate from different pharmacological groups and act at some of the most fundamental receptor and signal transduction systems in the body. More than 20 such agents are in common clinical use, yet few reviews of their pharmacology exist outside of physiology and pharmacology textbooks. Despite widespread use in critically ill patients, understanding of the clinical effects of these drugs in pathological states is poor. The purpose of this article is to describe the pharmacology and clinical applications of inotropic and vasopressor agents in critically ill patients. LINKED ARTICLES This article is commented on by Bracht et al., pp. 2009–2011 and De Backer and Scolletta, pp. 2012–2014 of this issue. To view Bracht et al. visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01776.x and to view De Backer and Scolletta visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01746.x PMID:21740415

  14. Experiences of critically ill patients in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Hofhuis, José G M; Spronk, Peter E; van Stel, Henk F; Schrijvers, Augustinus J P; Rommes, Johannes H; Bakker, Jan

    2008-10-01

    Experiences of critically ill patients are an important aspect of the quality of care in the intensive care (ICU). The aims of the study were firstly, to evaluate the perceptions of patients regarding nursing care in the ICU, and secondly, to explore patients' perceptions and experiences of ICU stay. A qualitative approach using a semi-structured focused interview in 11 patients was used (phase 1), followed by a quantitative approach using a self-reported questionnaire in 100 patients, 62 were returned and 50 could be evaluated (phase 2). A number of themes emerged from the interviews (phase 1), although support dominated as an important key theme. This was experienced as a continuum from the feeling being supported by the nurse to not being supported. This key theme was central to each of the three categories emerging from the data pertaining to: (1) providing the seriously ill patient with information and explanation, (2) placing the patient in a central position and (3) personal approach by the nurse. The responders to the subsequent questionnaire (phase 2) predominantly experienced sleeping disorders (48%), mostly related to the presence of noise (54%). Psychological problems after ICU stay were reported by 11% of the patients, i.e. fear, inability to concentrate, complaints of depression and hallucinations. Although the nurses' expertise and technical skills are considered important, caring behaviour, relieving the patient of fear and worries were experienced as most valuable in bedside critical care.

  15. Thrombosis in the critically ill neonate: incidence, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Veldman, Alex; Nold, Marcel F; Michel-Behnke, Ina

    2008-01-01

    Among children, newborn infants are most vulnerable to development of thrombosis and serious thromboembolic complications. Amongst newborns, those neonates who are critically ill, both term and preterm, are at greatest risk for developing symptomatic thromboembolic disease. The most important risk factors are inflammation, DIC, impaired liver function, fluctuations in cardiac output, and congenital heart disease, as well as exogenous risk factors such as central venous or arterial catheters. In most clinically symptomatic infants, diagnosis is made by ultrasound, venography, or CT or MRI angiograms. However, clinically asymptomatic vessel thrombosis is sometimes picked up by screening investigations or during routine imaging for other indications. Acute management of thrombosis and thromboembolism comprises a variety of approaches, including simple observation, treatment with unfractionated or low molecular weight heparin, as well as more aggressive interventions such as thrombolytic therapy or catheter-directed revascularization. Long-term follow-up is dependent on the underlying diagnosis. In the majority of infants, stabilization of the patients’ general condition and hemodynamics, which allows removal of indwelling catheters, renders long-term anticoagulation superfluous. Nevertheless, in certain types of congenital heart disease or inherited thrombophilia, long-term prophylaxis may be warranted. This review article focuses on pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute and long-term management of thrombosis in critically ill term and preterm neonates. PMID:19337547

  16. Increased serum bicarbonate in critically ill patients: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Libório, Alexandre Braga; Noritomi, Danilo Teixeira; Leite, Tacyano Tavares; de Melo Bezerra, Candice Torres; de Faria, Evandro Rodrigues; Kellum, John A

    2015-03-01

    Although metabolic alkalosis is a common occurrence, no study has evaluated its prevalence, associated factors or outcomes in critically ill patients. This is a retrospective study from the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II database. From 23,529 adult patient records, 18,982 patients met the inclusion criteria. Serum bicarbonate levels demonstrated a U-shaped association with mortality with knots at 25 and 30 mEq/l. Of the total included patients, 5,565 (29.3 %) had at least one serum bicarbonate level measurement >30 mEq/l. The majority were exposed to multiple factors that are classically associated with metabolic alkalosis (mainly diuretic use, hypernatremia, hypokalemia and high gastric output). Patients with increased serum bicarbonate exhibited increased ICU LOS, more days on mechanical ventilation and higher hospital mortality. After multivariate adjustment, each 5-mEq/l increment in the serum bicarbonate level above 30 mEq/l was associated with an odds ratio of 1.21 for hospital mortality. The association between increased serum bicarbonate levels and mortality occurs independently of its possible etiologies. An increased serum bicarbonate level is common in critically ill patients; this can be attributed to multiple factors in the majority of cases, and its presence and duration negatively influence patient outcomes.

  17. Tetraparetic critically ill patients show electrophysiological signs of myopathy.

    PubMed

    Crone, Clarissa

    2017-09-01

    Critically ill patients often develop tetraparesis. It has been debated whether this is caused by neuropathy, myopathy, or both. The aim was to determine the incidence of myopathy and neuropathy in weak patients in the intensive care unit by performing several electrophysiological examinations, including quantitative electromyography (qEMG). Forty-nine patients referred for electrophysiological examination because of suspected critical illness-related weakness underwent qEMG, nerve conduction studies, and direct muscle stimulation. The qEMG showed signs of myopathy in 33 of 35 patients. Direct muscle stimulation was consistent with myopathy in 31 of 34 patients. Amplitudes of compound muscle action potentials were decreased in all patients. Four patients also had signs of sensory neuropathy, which could not be explained by preexisting medical conditions. When combined, the results are compatible with muscle dysfunction in all patients. This will help to direct future studies of the pathophysiology of this serious condition. Muscle Nerve 56: 433-440, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Practice of strict glycemic control in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Marcus J; de Graaff, Mart J; Royakkers, Annic A N M; van Braam Houckgeest, Floris; van der Sluijs, Johannes P; Kieft, Hans; Spronk, Peter E

    2008-11-01

    Blood glucose control aiming at normoglycemia, frequently referred to as "strict glycemic control", decreases mortality and morbidity of critically ill patients. We searched the medical literature for export opinions, surveys, and clinical reports on blood glucose control in intensive care medicine. While strict glycemic control has been recommended standard of care for critically ill patients, the risk of severe hypoglycemia with strict glycemic control is frequently mentioned by experts. Some rationalize this risk, though others strongly point out the high incidence of hypoglycemia to be (one) reason not to perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete in intensive care units across the world. Frequently local guidelines accept higher blood glucose levels than those with strict glycemic control. Only a minority of retrieved manuscripts are on blood glucose regimens with the lower targets as with strict glycemic control. Hypoglycemia certainly is encountered with blood glucose control, in particular with strict glycemic control. Reports show intensive care-nurses can adequately and safely perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete, at least in part because of the feared risks of hypoglycemia. The preference for hyperglycemia over intermittent hypoglycemia is irrational, however, because there is causal evidence of harm for the former but only associative evidence of harm for the latter. For several reasons it is wise to have strict glycemic control being a nurse-based strategy.

  19. Factors associated with vancomycin nephrotoxicity in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, T P; Kotapati, C; Roberts, M J; Rowland, J; Lipman, J; Roberts, J A; Udy, A

    2015-09-01

    Vancomycin is a glycopeptide antibiotic commonly used in the management of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. The recent increase in prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin has prompted experts to advocate for higher target trough serum concentrations. This study aimed to evaluate the potential consequences of more aggressive vancomycin therapy, by examining the association between higher serum concentrations and acute kidney injury (AKI) in a population of critically ill patients. We collected data for all patients who received vancomycin over a five-year period and evaluated the prevalence of new-onset AKI using the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage (RIFLE) kidney disease criteria. One-hundred and fifty-nine patients provided complete data, with 8.8% manifesting new onset AKI while receiving vancomycin. The median age was 57 (44 to 68) years, while the median trough serum concentration was 16 (10 to 19) mg/l. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified mean trough concentration (OR=1.174, P=0.024), APACHE II score (OR=1.141, P=0.012) and simultaneous aminoglycoside prescription (OR=18.896, P=0.002) as significant predictors of AKI. These data suggest higher trough vancomycin serum concentrations are associated with greater odds of AKI in the critically ill.

  20. Magnesium levels in critically ill patients. What should we measure?

    PubMed

    Huijgen, H J; Soesan, M; Sanders, R; Mairuhu, W M; Kesecioglu, J; Sanders, G T

    2000-11-01

    We studied the relation between ionized magnesium, total magnesium, and albumin levels in serum of 115 critically ill patients and the role of extracellular and intracellular magnesium in outcome prediction. Levels of serum total and ionized magnesium, serum albumin, and magnesium in mononuclear blood cells and erythrocytes were measured and the APACHE II score and 1-month mortality recorded. Of all patients, 51.3% had a serum total magnesium concentration below the reference range. In 71% of these hypomagnesemic patients, a normal serum ionized magnesium concentration was measured. None of the patients had an intracellular magnesium concentration below the reference limit. Except for serum total and ionized magnesium, none of the magnesium parameters correlated significantly with each other. A significantly negative correlation was found between serum albumin and the fraction ionized magnesium. There was no association between low extracellular or intracellular magnesium and clinical outcome. The observation of hypomagnesemia in critically ill patients depends on which magnesium fraction is measured. The lack of correlation with clinical outcome suggests hypomagnesemia to be merely an epiphenomenon. Reliable concentrations of serum ionized magnesium can be obtained only by direct measurement and not by calculation from serum total magnesium and albumin.

  1. Semiology of subtle motor phenomena in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Florea, Bogdan; Beniczky, Simona Alexandra; Demény, Helga; Beniczky, Sándor

    2017-05-01

    to investigate the semiology of subtle motor phenomena in critically ill patients, with- versus without nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). 60 consecutive comatose patients, in whom subtle motor phenomena were observed in the intensive care unit (ICU), were analysed prospectively. The semiology of the subtle phenomena was described from video-recordings, blinded to all other data. For each patient, the type, location and occurrence-pattern/duration were described. EEGs recorded in the ICU were classified using the Salzburg criteria for NCSE. only 23% (14/60) of the patients had NCSE confirmed by EEG. None of the semiological features could distinguish between patients with NCSE and those without. In both groups, the following phenomena were most common: discrete myoclonic muscle twitching and discrete tonic muscle activation. Besides these, automatisms and eye deviation were observed in both groups. subtle motor phenomena in critically ill patients can raise the suspicion of NCSE. Nevertheless, EEG is needed to confirm the diagnosis, since none of the semiological features are specific. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Systemic Corticosteroids and Transition to Delirium in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Annemiek E; Veldhuijzen, Dieuwke S; Zaal, Irene J; Peelen, Linda M; van Dijk, Diederik; Devlin, John W; Slooter, Arjen J C

    2015-12-01

    Corticosteroids are frequently used in critically ill patients. We investigated whether systemic corticosteroid use increases the probability of transitioning to delirium in a large population of mixed medical-surgical ICU patients. Prospective cohort study. A 32-bed medical-surgical ICU at an academic medical center. Critically ill adults (n = 1,112), admitted to the ICU for more than 24 hours without a condition that could hamper delirium assessment. None. Systemic corticosteroid exposure was measured daily and converted to prednisone equivalents (milligrams). Daily mental status was classified as coma, delirium, or an awake without delirium state. Transitions between states were analyzed using a first-order Markov multinomial logistic regression model with 11 different covariables, with the transition from an awake without delirium state to delirium as a primary interest. Among the 1,112 patients, corticosteroids were administered on 35% (3,483/9,867) of the ICU days at a median dose of 50 mg (interquartile range, 25-75 mg) prednisone equivalent. Administration of a corticosteroid, and any increase in the dose of the corticosteroid given on exposure days, was not significantly associated with the transition to delirium (adjusted odds ratio, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.89-1.32 and adjusted odds ratio, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.99-1.01, per 10 mg increase in prednisone equivalent). In a large population of mixed medical-surgical ICU patients, systemic corticosteroid use was not associated with an increased probability of transitioning to delirium.

  3. Acute rehabilitation practices in critically ill children: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Choong, Karen; Foster, Gary; Fraser, Douglas D; Hutchison, James S; Joffe, Ari R; Jouvet, Philippe A; Menon, Kusum; Pullenayegum, Eleanor; Ward, Roxanne E

    2014-07-01

    -specific research is essential to identify patients at risk and to understand treatment priorities and rehabilitation strategies to improve functional recovery in critically ill children.

  4. Parenteral glutamine supplementation in critical illness: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The potential benefit of parenteral glutamine (GLN) supplementation has been one of the most commonly studied nutritional interventions in the critical care setting. The aim of this systematic review was to incorporate recent trials of traditional parenteral GLN supplementation in critical illness with previously existing data. Methods All randomized controlled trials of parenterally administered GLN in critically ill patients conducted from 1997 to 2013 were identified. Studies of enteral GLN only or combined enteral/parenteral GLN were excluded. Methodological quality of studies was scored and data was abstracted by independent reviewers. Results A total of 26 studies involving 2,484 patients examining only parenteral GLN supplementation of nutrition support were identified in ICU patients. Parenteral GLN supplementation was associated with a trend towards a reduction of overall mortality (relative risk (RR) 0.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.75, 1.03, P = 0.10) and a significant reduction in hospital mortality (RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.51, 0.90, P = 0.008). In addition, parenteral GLN was associated with a strong trend towards a reduction in infectious complications (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.73, 1.02, P = 0.09) and ICU length of stay (LOS) (WMD –1.91, (95% CI -4.10, 0.28, P = 0.09) and significant reduction in hospital LOS (WMD -2.56, 95% CI -4.71, -0.42, P = 0.02). In the subset of studies examining patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN), parenteral GLN supplementation was associated with a trend towards reduced overall mortality (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.71, 1.01, P = 0.07). Conclusions Parenteral GLN supplementation given in conjunction with nutrition support continues to be associated with a significant reduction in hospital mortality and hospital LOS. Parenteral GLN supplementation as a component of nutrition support should continue to be considered to improve outcomes in critically ill patients. PMID:24745648

  5. Distinct Features of Nonthyroidal Illness in Critically Ill Patients With Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Kyung; Hwang, Sena; Kim, Daham; Lee, Seul Gi; Jeong, Seonhyang; Seol, Mi-Youn; Kim, Hyunji; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Shin, Dong Yeop; Chung, Woong Youn; Lee, Eun Jig; Lee, Jandee; Jo, Young Suk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nonthyroidal illness (NTI), often observed in critically ill patients, arises through diverse alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. However, the causal relationship between underlying disease and NTI diversity in critically ill patients is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to examine NTI severity and adverse outcomes in critically ill patients with respect to their underlying disease(s). The medical records of 616 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) between January 2009 and October 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with known diseases or taking medications that affect thyroid function were excluded. All-cause mortality (ACM) and length of stay (LOS) in the ICU were assessed as adverse outcomes. The enrolled patients (n = 213) were divided into the following 4 groups according to the severity of NTI at the nadir of their thyroid function test (TFT): normal (n = 11, 5.2%), mild NTI (n = 113, 53.1%), moderate NTI (n = 78, 36.6%), and severe NTI (n = 11, 5.2%). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of age and gender. NTI severity showed a significantly strong association with ACM (P < 0.0001) and a significant positive association with LOS in the ICU (P = 0.031). After adjusting for age, gender, and current medications affecting TFT, increasing NTI severity led to increased ACM (odds ratio = 3.101; 95% confidence interval = 1.711–5.618; P < 0.0001). Notably, the prevalence of moderate-to-severe NTI was markedly higher in patients with infectious disease than in those with noninfectious disease (P = 0.012). Consistent with this, serum C-reactive protein levels were higher in patients with moderate-to-severe NTI (P = 0.016). NTI severity is associated with increased ACM, LOS, and underlying infectious disease. Future studies will focus on the biological and clinical implications of infectious disease on the HPT axis. PMID

  6. Nutritional risk assessment in critically ill cancer patients: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fruchtenicht, Ana Valéria Gonçalves; Poziomyck, Aline Kirjner; Kabke, Geórgia Brum; Loss, Sérgio Henrique; Antoniazzi, Jorge Luiz; Steemburgo, Thais; Moreira, Luis Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the main methods for nutritional risk assessment used in critically ill cancer patients and present the methods that better assess risks and predict relevant clinical outcomes in this group of patients, as well as to discuss the pros and cons of these methods according to the current literature. Methods The study consisted of a systematic review based on analysis of manuscripts retrieved from the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases by searching for the key words “nutritional risk assessment”, “critically ill” and “cancer”. Results Only 6 (17.7%) of 34 initially retrieved papers met the inclusion criteria and were selected for the review. The main outcomes of these studies were that resting energy expenditure was associated with undernourishment and overfeeding. The high Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment score was significantly associated with low food intake, weight loss and malnutrition. In terms of biochemical markers, higher levels of creatinine, albumin and urea were significantly associated with lower mortality. The worst survival was found for patients with worse Eastern Cooperative Oncologic Group - performance status, high Glasgow Prognostic Score, low albumin, high Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment score and high alkaline phosphatase levels. Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index values < 87 were significantly associated with mortality. A high Prognostic Inflammatory and Nutritional Index score was associated with abnormal nutritional status in critically ill cancer patients. Among the reviewed studies that examined weight and body mass index alone, no significant clinical outcome was found. Conclusion None of the methods reviewed helped to define risk among these patients. Therefore, assessment by a combination of weight loss and serum measurements, preferably in combination with other methods using scores such as Eastern Cooperative Oncologic Group - performance status, Glasgow Prognostic

  7. The association between obesity and outcomes in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Wardell, Stephan; Wall, Alastair; Bryce, Rhonda; Gjevre, John A; Laframboise, Karen; Reid, John Kilpatrick

    2015-01-01

    Obesity rates are increasing worldwide, particularly in North America. The impact of obesity on the outcome of critically ill patients is unclear. A prospective observational cohort study of consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary critical care unit in Canada between January 10, 2008 and March 31, 2009 was conducted. Exclusion criteria were age <18 years, admission <24 h, planned cardiac surgery, pregnancy, significant ascites, unclosed surgical abdomen and brain death on admission. Height, weight and abdominal circumference were measured at the time of intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Coprimary end points were ICU mortality and a composite of ICU mortality, reintubation, ventilator-associated pneumonia, line sepsis and ICU readmission. Subjects were stratified as obese or nonobese, using two separate metrics: body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m(2) and a novel measurement of 75th percentile for waist-to-height ratio (WHR). Among 449 subjects with a BMI ≥ 18.5 kg/m(2), both BMI and WHR were available for comparative analysis in 348 (77.5%). Neither measure of obesity was associated with the primary end points. BMI ≥ 3 0 kg/m(2) was associated with a lower odds of six-month mortality than the BMI <30 kg/m(2) group (adjusted OR 0.59 [95% CI 0.36 to 0.97]; P=0.04) but longer intubation times (adjusted RR 1.56 [95% CI 1.17 to 2.07]; P=0.003) and longer ICU length of stay (adjusted RR 1.67 [95% CI 1.21 to 2.31]; P=0.002). Conversely, measurement of 75th percentile for WHR was associated only with decreased ICU readmission (OR 0.23 [95% CI 0.07 to 0.79]; P=0.02). Obesity was not necessarily associated with worse outcomes in critically ill patients.

  8. Planning for death but not serious future illness: qualitative study of housebound elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrese, Joseph A; Mullaney, Jamie L; Faden, Ruth R; Finucane, Thomas E

    2002-01-01

    Objective To understand how elderly patients think about and approach future illness and the end of life. Design Qualitative study conducted 1997-9. Setting Physician housecall programme affiliated to US university. Participants 20 chronically ill housebound patients aged over 75 years who could participate in an interview. Participants identified through purposive and random sampling. Main outcome measures In-depth semistructured interviews lasting one to two hours. Results Sixteen people said that they did not think about the future or did not in general plan for the future. Nineteen were particularly reluctant to think about, discuss, or plan for serious future illness. Instead they described a “one day at a time,” “what is to be will be” approach to life, preferring to “cross that bridge” when they got to it. Participants considered end of life matters to be in the hands of God, though 13 participants had made wills and 19 had funeral plans. Although some had completed advance directives, these were not well understood and were intended for use only when death was near and certain. Conclusions The elderly people interviewed for this study were resistant to planning in advance for the hypothetical future, particularly for serious illness when death is possible but not certain. What is already known on this topicAdvance care planning is widely endorsed as a means to improve quality of care for patients near the end of lifeWhat this study addsElderly housebound patients described a world view that does not easily accommodate advance care planning: they live life a day at a time, preferring not to consider problems until they occurThese patients resisted planning for the hypothetical futureThey most resisted planning for those situations when the most difficult decisions often arise, such as for serious illness when death is possible but not certain PMID:12130597

  9. Outcomes of critically ill cancer patients with Acinetobacter baumannii infection

    PubMed Central

    Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A; Correa-García, Paulina; García-Guillén, Francisco J; González-Herrera, María O; Pérez-Alonso, Américo; Texcocano-Becerra, Julia; Herrera-Gómez, Angel; Cornejo-Juárez, Patricia; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe the intensive care unit (ICU) outcomes of critically ill cancer patients with Acinetobacter baumannii (AB) infection. METHODS: This was an observational study that included 23 consecutive cancer patients who acquired AB infections during their stay at ICU of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico (INCan), located in Mexico City. Data collection took place between January 2011, and December 2012. Patients who had AB infections before ICU admission, and infections that occurred during the first 2 d of ICU stay were excluded. Data were obtained by reviewing the electronic health record of each patient. This investigation was approved by the Scientific and Ethics Committees at INCan. Because of its observational nature, informed consent of the patients was not required. RESULTS: Throughout the study period, a total of 494 critically ill patients with cancer were admitted to the ICU of the INCan, 23 (4.6%) of whom developed AB infections. Sixteen (60.9%) of these patients had hematologic malignancies. Most frequent reasons for ICU admission were severe sepsis or septic shock (56.2%) and postoperative care (21.7%). The respiratory tract was the most frequent site of AB infection (91.3%). The most common organ dysfunction observed in our group of patients were the respiratory (100%), cardiovascular (100%), hepatic (73.9%) and renal dysfunction (65.2%). The ICU mortality of patients with 3 or less organ system dysfunctions was 11.7% (2/17) compared with 66.6% (4/6) for the group of patients with 4 or more organ system dysfunctions (P = 0.021). Multivariate analysis identified blood lactate levels (BLL) as the only variable independently associated with in-ICU death (OR = 2.59, 95%CI: 1.04-6.43, P = 0.040). ICU and hospital mortality rates were 26.1% and 43.5%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The mortality rate in critically ill patients with both HM, and AB infections who are admitted to the ICU is high. The variable most associated with increased mortality was

  10. Complications of central venous catheterization in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Karapinar, Bulent; Cura, Alphan

    2007-10-01

    Placement of central venous catheter is essential in the management of critically ill children. The purpose of the present paper was to evaluate the success rate, mechanical and thrombotic complications and risk factors associated with these complications from different central venous access sites in critically ill children. A prospective study was undertaken from February 2000 to March 2005 of 369 central venous catheterizations in children in a pediatric intensive care unit. The veins most frequently used were femoral vein (45%), subclavian vein (32.2%), and internal jugular vein (22.8%). Mean +/- SD duration of catheterization was 9.5 +/- 6.5 days. The procedure was performed under emergency conditions in 18% of patients with an overall success rate of 92.4%. The success rate was significantly lower in younger patients with subclavian catheterization. Insertion-related complications were noted, including 33 arterial punctures (8.9%), 27 cases of malposition (7.3%), 19 hematomas (5.2%), 12 cases of minor bleeding (3.3%), and three cases of pneumothorax (0.8%), and they were more common in the subclavian vein than in the internal jugular and femoral vein. Multiple attempts and failed attempts significantly correlated with higher incidence of complications. Maintenance-related complications included obstruction (n = 26; 7%), accidental removal (n = 14; 3.8%), central venous thrombosis (n = 8; 2.2%), subcutaneous extravasation (n = 14; 3.8%), dislodgment (n = 1; 0.25%), and extravascular infusion (n = 1; 0.25%). The frequency of catheter maintenance-related complications was significantly higher in femoral catheterizations and increased significantly with an increase in the duration of catheterization. A total of five serious complications were seen (pneumothorax in three, dislodgment in one and extravascular infusion in one) in the present series. Central venous catheterization in critically ill children is a relatively safe procedure, with a 1.3% rate of serious

  11. Liver dysfunction associated with artificial nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Teodoro; Bonet, Alfonso; Rubio, Mercedes; Mateo, Dolores; Farré, Mercé; Acosta, José Antonio; Blesa, Antonio; Montejo, Juan Carlos; de Lorenzo, Abelardo García; Mesejo, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Liver dysfunction associated with artificial nutrition in critically ill patients is a complication that seems to be frequent, but it has not been assessed previously in a large cohort of critically ill patients. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of incidence in 40 intensive care units. Different liver dysfunction patterns were defined: (a) cholestasis: alkaline phosphatase of more than 280 IU/l, gamma-glutamyl-transferase of more than 50 IU/l, or bilirubin of more than 1.2 mg/dl; (b) liver necrosis: aspartate aminotransferase of more than 40 IU/l or alanine aminotransferase of more than 42 IU/l, plus bilirubin of more than 1.2 mg/dl or international normalized ratio of more than 1.4; and (c) mixed pattern: alkaline phosphatase of more than 280 IU/l or gamma-glutamyl-transferase of more than 50 IU/l, plus aspartate aminotransferase of more than 40 IU/l or alanine aminotransferase of more than 42 IU/l. Results Seven hundred and twenty-five of 3,409 patients received artificial nutrition: 303 received total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and 422 received enteral nutrition (EN). Twenty-three percent of patients developed liver dysfunction: 30% in the TPN group and 18% in the EN group. The univariate analysis showed an association between liver dysfunction and TPN (p < 0.001), Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score on admission (p < 0.001), sepsis (p < 0.001), early use of artificial nutrition (p < 0.03), and malnutrition (p < 0.01). In the multivariate analysis, liver dysfunction was associated with TPN (p < 0.001), sepsis (p < 0.02), early use of artificial nutrition (p < 0.03), and calculated energy requirements of more than 25 kcal/kg per day (p < 0.05). Conclusion TPN, sepsis, and excessive calculated energy requirements appear as risk factors for developing liver dysfunction. Septic critically ill patients should not be fed with excessive caloric amounts, particularly when TPN is employed. Administering artificial nutrition in the first 24 hours

  12. Nutritional Status and Mortality in the Critically Ill.

    PubMed

    Mogensen, Kris M; Robinson, Malcolm K; Casey, Jonathan D; Gunasekera, Nicole S; Moromizato, Takuhiro; Rawn, James D; Christopher, Kenneth B

    2015-12-01

    The association between nutritional status and mortality in critically ill patients is unclear based on the current literature. To clarify this relation, we analyzed the association between nutrition and mortality in a large population of critically ill patients and hypothesized that mortality would be impacted by nutritional status. Retrospective observational study. Single academic medical center. Six thousand five hundred eighteen adults treated in medical and surgical ICUs between 2004 and 2011. None. All cohort patients received a formal, in-person, standardized evaluation by a registered dietitian. The exposure of interest, malnutrition, was categorized as nonspecific malnutrition, protein-energy malnutrition, or well nourished and determined by data related to anthropometric measurements, biochemical indicators, clinical signs of malnutrition, malnutrition risk factors, and metabolic stress. The primary outcome was all-cause 30-day mortality determined by the Social Security Death Master File. Associations between nutrition groups and mortality were estimated by bivariable and multivariable logistic regression models. Adjusted odds ratios were estimated with inclusion of covariate terms thought to plausibly interact with both nutrition status and mortality. We used propensity score matching on baseline characteristics to reduce residual confounding of the nutrition status category assignment. In the cohort, nonspecific malnutrition was present in 56%, protein-energy malnutrition was present in 12%, and 32% were well nourished. The 30-day and 90-day mortality rates for the cohort were 19.1% and 26.6%, respectively. Nutritional status is a significant predictor of 30-day mortality following adjustment for age, gender, race, medical versus surgical patient type, Deyo-Charlson index, acute organ failure, vasopressor use, and sepsis: nonspecific malnutrition 30-day mortality odds ratio, 1.17 (95% CI, 1.01-1.37); protein-energy malnutrition 30-day mortality odds

  13. Bacteriological culture of blood from critically ill neonatal calves.

    PubMed Central

    Fecteau, G; Van Metre, D C; Paré, J; Smith, B P; Higgins, R; Holmberg, C A; Jang, S; Guterbock, W

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of bacteremia in critically ill, neonatal calves with severe diarrhea or depression, and to describe the variety of bacteria involved. Two studies were conducted in the summers of 1991 and 1993 involving 190 neonatal calves, 1-day to 19-days-old. Bacteremia was detected by blood culture in 31% (28/90) of calves in study 1, and in 24% (19/79) of ill calves and 0% (0/21) of control calves in study 2. Bacteria cultured from blood included Escherichia coli (51% of all isolates), other gram-negative enterics (25.5%), gram-negative anaerobes (5.9%), gram-positive cocci (11.8%), and gram-positive rods (5.9%). Among clinically ill calves, the average age was significantly lower in the blood culture-negative group (5.5 d) than in the blood culture-positive group (7.5 d) (P = 0.004). Mean serum IgG concentration was significantly (P = 0.0001) lower in blood culture-positive calves (1.146 g/L) than in blood culture-negative calves (3.077 g/L). The mortality rate was significantly (P < 0.0001) higher in the blood culture-positive group (57.4%) than in the blood culture-negative group (15.1%). Bacteremia appeared to be a frequent entity in this particular rearing situation. Early recognition of the problem, as well as appropriate treatment, may be beneficial in increasing survival rates. Results also support the need to address the failure of passive transfer of maternal antibodies to prevent bacteremia in calves. Images Figure 1. PMID:9028592

  14. Insurance status and mortality in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Lucinda E K; Bailey, Michael J; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Stow, Peter; Orford, Neil; McGain, Forbes; Santamaria, John; Scheinkestel, Carlos; Pilcher, David V

    2016-03-01

    The association between insurance status and outcome in critically ill patients is uncertain. We aimed to determine if there was an independent relationship between the presence or absence of compensable insurance status and mortality, after admission to the intensive care unit. We performed a retrospective cohort study in five public hospitals in Victoria, comprising adult patients admitted to the ICU between 2007 and 2012. We obtained data on demographics, severity of illness, chronic health status, insurance category, length of stay (LOS) and mortality. We matched socio-economic indices (collected from the Australian Bureau of Statistics) to postcodes. The primary outcome measured was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were ICU mortality, and ICU and hospital LOS, measured in days. We studied 33 306 patients. Compensable patients comprised 21.2% of the study population (7046). Personal private insurance accounted for 13.4% (4451) and Transport Accident Commission insurance for 5.1% (1701) of compensable patients. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality was higher in publicly insured patients (13.4% v 10.6%, P < 0.0001). After adjusting for age, severity of illness, diagnosis and socio-economic status, being a compensable patient in a public hospital ICU was independently associated with a reduction in mortality (odds ratio, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.65-0.80; P < 0.001). Among ICU patients treated in public hospitals in Victoria, being a compensable patient appears to be independently associated with a reduction in mortality. Further studies are needed to confirm and validate these findings elsewhere in Australia.

  15. The Critically Ill Kidney Transplant Recipient: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Canet, Emmanuel; Zafrani, Lara; Azoulay, Élie

    2016-06-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most common solid organ transplantation performed worldwide. Up to 6% of kidney transplant recipients experience a life-threatening complication that requires ICU admission, chiefly in the late posttransplantation period (≥ 6 months). Acute respiratory failure and septic shock are the main reasons for ICU admission. Cardiac pulmonary edema, bacterial pneumonia, acute graft pyelonephritis, and bloodstream infections account for the vast majority of diagnoses in the ICU. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia is the most common opportunistic infection, and one-half of the patients so infected require mechanical ventilation. The incidence of cytomegalovirus visceral infections in the era of preemptive therapy has dramatically decreased. Drug-related neutropenia, sirolimus-related pneumonitis, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome are among the most common immunosuppression-associated toxic effects. Importantly, the impact of critical illness on graft function is worrisome. Throughout the ICU stay, acute kidney injury is common, and about 40% of the recipients require renal replacement therapy. One-half of the patients are discharged alive and free from dialysis. Hospital mortality can reach 30% and correlates with acute illness severity and reason for ICU admission. Transplant characteristics are not predictors of short-term survival. Graft survival depends on pre-ICU graft function, disease severity, and renal toxicity of ICU investigations and treatments.

  16. From Data Patterns to Mechanistic Models in Acute Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Jean-Marie; Haddad, Wassim M.; An, Gary; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the physiologic and inflammatory response in acute critical illness has stymied the accurate diagnosis and development of therapies. The Society for Complex Acute Illness was formed a decade ago with the goal of leveraging multiple complex systems approaches in order to address this unmet need. Two main paths of development have characterized the Society’s approach: i) data pattern analysis, either defining the diagnostic/prognostic utility of complexity metrics of physiological signals or multivariate analyses of molecular and genetic data, and ii) mechanistic mathematical and computational modeling, all being performed with an explicit translational goal. Here, we summarize the progress to date on each of these approaches, along with pitfalls inherent in the use of each approach alone. We suggest that the next decade holds the potential to merge these approaches, connecting patient diagnosis to treatment via mechanism-based dynamical system modeling and feedback control, and allowing extrapolation from physiologic signals to biomarkers to novel drug candidates. As a predicate example, we focus on the role of data-driven and mechanistic models in neuroscience, and the impact that merging these modeling approaches can have on general anesthesia. PMID:24768566

  17. Protein for the critically ill patient--what and when?

    PubMed

    Plank, L D

    2013-05-01

    Critical illness is characterised by catabolism of the skeletal muscle that releases amino acids for protein synthesis to support tissue repair, immune defence and inflammatory and acute-phase responses. Protein requirements for these patients have generally been based on levels that result in the lowest catabolic rates or most favourable nitrogen balance. The definition of these levels, in particular, in relation to indexing to a measure of patient weight or lean body mass, is controversial. Furthermore, optimal nitrogen balance may not necessarily equate to best clinical outcome. There is some evidence that administration of specific amino acids may be advantageous at least during the early or most catabolic phases of illness, in order to support the specific amino acid requirements of the metabolic pathways activated by the injury or infection. Current widely used guidelines differ in the protein prescription they recommend and in the timing of administration in relation to intensive care admission. A pressing need exists for well-designed randomised trials that compare differing levels of protein or amino acid provision, and the timing of this provision, for their effects on clinical endpoints.

  18. Controversies in the temperature management of critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yasufumi

    2016-10-01

    Although body temperature is a classic primary vital sign, its value has received little attention compared with the others (blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate). This may result from the fact that unlike the other primary vital signs, aging and diseases rarely affect the thermoregulatory system. Despite this, when humans are exposed to various anesthetics and analgesics and acute etiologies of non-infectious and infectious diseases in perioperative and intensive care settings, abnormalities may occur that shift body temperature up and down. A recent upsurge in clinical evidence in the perioperative and critical care field resulted in many clinical trials in temperature management. The results of these clinical trials suggest that aggressive body temperature modifications in comatose survivors after resuscitation from shockable rhythm, and permissive fever in critically ill patients, are carried out in critical care settings to improve patient outcomes; however, its efficacy remains to be elucidated. A recent, large multicenter randomized controlled trial demonstrated contradictory results, which may disrupt the trends in clinical practice. Thus, updated information concerning thermoregulatory interventions is essential for anesthesiologists and intensivists. Here, recent controversies in therapeutic hypothermia and fever management are summarized, and their relevance to the physiology of human thermoregulation is discussed.

  19. Diagnosis and treatment delays among elderly breast cancer patients with pre-existing mental illness.

    PubMed

    Iglay, Kristy; Santorelli, Melissa L; Hirshfield, Kim M; Williams, Jill M; Rhoads, George G; Lin, Yong; Demissie, Kitaw

    2017-07-19

    This study aimed to compare diagnosis and treatment delays in elderly breast cancer patients with and without pre-existing mental illness. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare data including 16,636 women 68+ years, who were diagnosed with stage I-IIIa breast cancer in the United States from 2005 to 2007. Mental illness was identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes recorded on inpatient and outpatient claims during the 3 years prior to breast cancer diagnosis. Patients were classified as having no mental illness, anxiety, depression, anxiety and depression, or severe mental illness (bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and other psychotic disorder). Multivariable binomial regression was used to assess the association between mental illness and delays of ≥60 and ≥90 days after adjustment for confounders. Patients with comorbid anxiety and depression had an increased risk for diagnosis delay of ≥90 days from symptom recognition (RR 1.11; 95% CI 1.00, 1.23), and those with severe mental illness had an increased risk for initial treatment delay of ≥60 days from diagnosis (RR 1.36; 95% CI 1.06, 1.74). Patients with any mental illness experienced an increased risk for adjuvant chemotherapy delay of ≥90 days from last operation (RR 1.13; 95% CI 1.01, 1.26) and each category of mental illness, except depression, showed a non-significant trend for this association. Breast cancer patients with mental illness should be closely managed by a cross-functional care team, including a psychiatrist, a primary care physician, and an oncologist, to ensure adequate care is received within an appropriate timeframe.

  20. Evolution of an Early Illness Warning System to Monitor Frail Elders in Independent Living

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Gregory L.; Rantz, Marilyn; Skubic, Marjorie; Koopman, Richelle J.; Phillips, Lorraine J.; Guevara, Rainer D.; Miller, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of an early illness warning system used by an interdisciplinary team composed of clinicians and engineers in an independent living facility. The early illness warning system consists of algorithms which analyze resident activity patterns obtained from sensors embedded in residents’ apartments. The engineers designed an automated reasoning system to generate clinically relevant alerts which are sent to clinicians when significant changes occur in the sensor data, for example declining activity levels. During January 2010 through July 2010, clinicians and engineers conducted weekly iterative review cycles of the early illness warning system to discuss concerns about the functionality of the warning system, to recommend solutions for the concerns, and to evaluate the implementation of the solutions. A total of 45 concerns were reviewed during this period. Iterative reviews resulted in greater efficiencies and satisfaction for clinician users who were monitoring elder activity patterns. PMID:22211161

  1. Isotonic and hypertonic crystalloid solutions in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Michael; Kortgen, Andreas; Hartog, Christiane; Riedemann, Niels; Reinhart, Konrad

    2009-06-01

    Disorders of fluid and electrolyte balance in the critically ill are volume-related, compositional, or both. Targeting 'normal' values for plasma volume, osmolality and electrolytes might not be optimal in conditions as diverse as intracranial trauma/haemorrhage, hepatic encephalopathy, abdominal hypertension, or major surgery, because a hyperosmolar state seems to favourably affect tissue (brain and intestinal) oedema formation. However, adequately powered studies regarding the impact of hypertonic saline on outcome are lacking. Isotonic crystalloids are the cornerstone of resuscitation and must be balanced against natural or artificial colloids and vasopressors. Crystalloid resuscitation is superior to vasopressors in shock associated with blunt trauma, and is at least not inferior to colloids in septic shock. Traditional rules of thumb indicating the need for three to four times the amount of crystalloids for the plasma volume to be replaced are probably erroneous and might have contributed to association of overly aggressive crystalloid resuscitation with poor outcome.

  2. Optimizing use of quinolones in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jenny C; Tsuji, Brian T; Forrest, Alan

    2007-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are broad spectrum, concentration dependent, bactericidal antimicrobials that have been commonly utilized to treat severe nosocomial infections. FQ activity is derived from their ability to inhibit DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV; resistance has been shown to develop in target site mutations, alterations in efflux pump systems, and incorporation of plasmids. The probability of preventing emergence of resistance and achieving maximal rates of kill are best related to the ratio of free-drug in the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) to minimum inhibitory concentration (AUC:MIC). Major dosage adjustments for FQs are not necessary in hepatic insufficiency, accumulation of extracellular fluids, and burn patients. Appropriate dosage adjustments in renal function should be taken into consideration. FQ optimization in the critically ill is a multifactorial process that should be individualized to each patient and should take into account the MIC of the pathogen, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of the FQ, and the patient's pathophysiological state.

  3. Echocardiographic Hemodynamic Monitoring in the Critically Ill Patient

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Guerrero-De-Mier, Manuel; López-Álvaro, Julián

    2011-01-01

    Echocardiography has shown to be an essential diagnostic tool in the critically ill patient's assessment. In this scenario the initial fluid therapy, such as it is recommended in the actual clinical guidelines, not always provides the desired results and maintains a considerable incidence of cardiorrespiratory insufficiency. Echocardiography can council us on these patients' clinical handling, not only the initial fluid therapy but also on the best-suited election of the vasoactive/inotropic treatment and the early detection of complications. It contributes as well to improving the etiological diagnosis, allowing one to know the heart performance with more precision. The objective of this manuscript is to review the more important parameters that can assist the intensivist in theragnosis of hemodynamically unstable patients. PMID:22758613

  4. Compound muscle action potential duration in critical illness neuromyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Christopher L; Boon, Andrea J; Harper, C Michel; Goodman, Brent P

    2017-06-23

    We sought to determine the specificity of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) durations and amplitudes in a large critical illness neuromyopathy (CINM) cohort relative to controls with other neuromuscular conditions. Fifty-eight patients with CINM who had been seen over a 17-year period were retrospectively studied. Electrodiagnostic findings of the CINM cohort were compared with patients with axonal peripheral neuropathy and myopathy due to other causes. Mean CMAP durations were prolonged, and mean CMAP amplitudes were severely reduced both proximally and distally in all nerves studied in the CINM cohort relative to the control groups. The specificity of prolonged CMAP durations for CINM approached 100% if they were encountered in more than 1 nerve. Prolonged, low-amplitude CMAPs occur more frequently and with greater severity in CINM patients than in neuromuscular controls with myopathy and axonal neuropathy and are highly specific for the diagnosis of CINM. Muscle Nerve, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Caring for critically ill oldest old patients: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Nicola; Tibullo, Loredana; Landi, Emanuela; Carifi, Giovanni; Pirone, Alfonso; Pippo, Antonio; Alviggi, Immacolata; Tizzano, Renato; Salsano, Elisa; Di Grezia, Francesco; Vargas, Maria

    2016-10-19

    Despite technological advances, the mortality rate for critically ill oldest old patients remains high. The intensive caring should be able to combine technology and a deep humanity considering that the patients are living the last part of their lives. In addition to the traditional goals of ICU of reducing morbidity and mortality, of maintaining organ functions and restoring health, caring for seriously oldest old patients should take into account their end-of-life preferences, the advance or proxy directives if available, the prognosis, the communication, their life expectancy and the impact of multimorbidity. The aim of this review was to focus on all these aspects with an emphasis on some intensive procedures such as mechanical ventilation, noninvasive mechanical ventilation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, renal replacement therapy, hemodynamic support, evaluation of delirium and malnutrition in this heterogeneous frail ICU population.

  6. Drug dosage in continuous venoveno hemofiltration in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Assadi, Farahnak; Shahrbaf, Fatemeh Ghane

    2016-01-01

    The dosage of drugs in patients requiring continuous renal replacement therapy need to be adjusted based on a number of variables that that affect pharmacokinetics (PK) including patient weight, CRRT modality (convention, vs. diffusion), blood and/or effluent flow, hemofilter characteristics, physiochemical drug properties, volume of distribution, protein binding and half-life as well as residual renal function. There is a paucity of data on PK studies in children with acute kidney injury requiring CRRT. When possible, therapeutic drug monitoring should be utilized for those medications where serum drug concentrations can be obtained in a clinically relevant time frame. Also, a patient-centered team approach that includes an intensive care unit pharmacist is recommended to prevent medication-related errors and enhance safe and effective medication use is highly recommended. The aim of this article is to review the current guidelines for drug dosing in critically ill children who require continuous venovenous hemofiltration.

  7. How many calories are necessary during critical illness?

    PubMed

    Caba, David; Ochoa, Juan B

    2007-10-01

    Several nutritional alternatives exist to provide critically ill patients sufficient calories to meet metabolic demands. Intuitively, investigators, nutritionists, and clinicians have pursued the goal of providing high-calorie nutrition support, believing that this would improve outcomes. There is little evidence, however, that meeting caloric goals is of significant benefit. In fact, accumulating data suggest that feeding patients below previously described caloric goals is associated with better outcomes, including decreases in hospital stay, ventilator dependence, use of antibiotics, and even mortality. This suggests that permissive underfeeding could replace the paradigm of meeting measured caloric goals. Prospective evidence to support adoption of permissive underfeeding is lacking, however. Appropriate clinical studies are necessary to prove its safety and efficacy.

  8. Powered intraosseous device (EZ-IO) for critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Oksan, Derinoz; Ayfer, Keles

    2013-07-01

    We reviewed the charts of 25 patients who underwent powered intraosseous line insertion between July 1, 2008 and August 31, 2010 to determine its users, indications, procedural details, success rates, and complications. Intraosseous (IO) line was inserted in the anteromedial aspect of the proximal tibia in all patients. The first attempt was successful in 80%, and the median duration for insertion of the IO line was 4 hours. Extravasation was the most common complication. Ninety-six percent of the physicians had undergone prior training in IO insertion. Because of its high success and short procedure time, IO access should be the first alternative to failed vascular access in critically ill children. Training in IO should be extended to all who care for pediatric patients in inpatient as well as in prehospital and emergency department settings.

  9. Challenges for the endocrine laboratory in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Clark, P M S; Gordon, K

    2011-10-01

    The endocrine laboratory must provide accurate and timely results for the critically ill patient. A number of pathophysiological factors affect assay systems for adrenal, thyroid and gonadal function tests. The effects are primarily on estimates of 'free hormone' concentration through abnormal binding protein concentrations and the effects of drugs and metabolites on hormone-protein binding. The limitations of the principal analytical techniques (immunoassay and chromatography-mass spectrometry) include drug effects, endogenous antibody interference and ion suppression. These effects are not always easily identified. Analytical specificity and standardisation result in differences in bias between assays and thus a requirement for assay specific decision limits and reference ranges. Good communication between clinician and laboratory is needed to minimise these effects. Developments in mass spectrometry should lead to greater sensitivity and wider applicability of the technique. International efforts to develop higher order reference materials and reference method procedures should lead to greater comparability of results. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Volume replacement therapy options for critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, C J

    2011-09-01

    For critically ill patients with hypovolemia, volume replacement therapy is important to maintain sufficient tissue perfusion and oxygenation. Nearly all patients receive crystalloids and often additionally colloids. The advantages of the former are low costs, immediate availability, the ability to fill both the intravascular and extravascular fluid spaces and a non-allergenic potential. Administration of excessive fluid with extravasation can, however, be a problem with crystalloids and promotes the formation of tissue edema, particularly with large volumes. Colloids are more efficient volume expanders and tissue edema can be avoided. The disadvantages compared to crystalloids are the higher costs and the risk of rare but potentially severe anaphylactic reactions. Artificial colloids (hydroxyethyl starch) are cheaper than the natural colloid albumin but the safety profile is less favorable.

  11. Enteral nutritional support of the critically ill older adult.

    PubMed

    Finoccchiaro, Darlene; Hook, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition continues to be a concern for the older adult in the intensive care setting despite widespread knowledge of the benefits of adequate nutrition and existing evidence-based protocols. The incidence of malnutrition in hospitalized patients ranges between 22% and 43% with the highest probability of occurrence, 50% or more, in the intensive care unit patient. The deleterious effects of malnutrition for the critically ill older adult are described with suggested and accepted screening tools for existing or acquired malnutrition. A discussion of early oral and enteral feeding interventions and strategies for overcoming barriers is explored. Enteral feeding complications are delineated, and perceived barriers or risks are disputed. This paper concludes with suggestions for future research and a definitive role for advanced nursing nutrition champions.

  12. [Tissue oxygen saturation in the critically ill patient].

    PubMed

    Gruartmoner, G; Mesquida, J; Baigorri, F

    2014-05-01

    Hemodynamic resuscitation seeks to correct global macrocirculatory parameters of pressure and flow. However, current evidence has shown that despite the normalization of these global parameters, microcirculatory and regional perfusion alterations can persist, and these alterations have been independently associated with a poorer patient prognosis. This in turn has lead to growing interest in new technologies for exploring regional circulation and microcirculation. Near infra-red spectroscopy allows us to monitor tissue oxygen saturation, and has been proposed as a noninvasive, continuous and easy-to-obtain measure of regional circulation. The present review aims to summarize the existing evidence on near infra-red spectroscopy and its potential clinical role in the resuscitation of critically ill patients in shock. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  13. Cost-of-illness studies: a guide to critical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Larg, Allison; Moss, John R

    2011-08-01

    Cost-of-illness (COI) studies aim to assess the economic burden of health problems on the population overall, and they are conducted for an ever widening range of health conditions and geographical settings. While they attract much interest from public health advocates and healthcare policy makers, inconsistencies in the way in which they are conducted and a lack of transparency in reporting have made interpretation difficult, and have ostensibly limited their usefulness. Yet there is surprisingly little in the literature to assist the non-expert in critically evaluating these studies. This article aims to provide non-expert readers with a straightforward guide to understanding and evaluating traditional COI studies. The intention is to equip a general audience with an understanding of the most important issues that influence the validity of a COI study, and the ability to recognize the most common limitations in such work.

  14. [How much insulin does the critical ill need?].

    PubMed

    Mayer, Konstantin; Weigand, Markus A; Seeger, Werner

    2011-04-01

    Metabolism and nutrition of the critical ill are dynamic parameters of the severe disease influencing the blood glucose concentration. After the finding of increased survival in an initial study in tight glucose control, further large multicenter trials could not show such a benefit and even an increased mortality has been found. Hyperglycemia may be a feature of the stress metabolism and is possibly an adaptive process. Next to the endogenous response, therapy with catecholamines and glucosteroids impacts the response to insulin and the glucose metabolism. Hypo- and hypercaloric nutrition also interact with the insulin therapy. Nutritional therapy should be adapted to the actual state of the patient avoiding hypercaloric feeding and an energy deficit. Using this framework, therapy with insulin may be used to achieve a targeted range of glucose avoiding an increased risk of hypoglycaemia. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  15. A correlational study of illness knowledge, self-care behaviors, and quality of life in elderly patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min-Hui; Wang, Chao-Hung; Huang, Yu-Yen; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Wang, Kai-Wei Katherine

    2014-06-01

    these patients about heart failure illness and symptom management. Assisting elderly patients with heart failure to promote and maintain physical functions to handle activities of daily living independently is critical to improving patient quality of life.

  16. Continuous infusion of antibiotics in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Smuszkiewicz, Piotr; Szałek, Edyta; Tomczak, Hanna; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2013-02-01

    Antibiotics are the most commonly used drugs in intensive care unit patients and their supply should be based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic rules. The changes that occur in septic patients who are critically ill may be responsible for subtherapeutic antibiotic concentrations leading to poorer clinical outcomes. Evolving in time the disturbed pathophysiology in severe sepsis (high cardiac output, glomerular hyperfiltration) and therapeutic interventions (e.g. haemodynamically active drugs, mechanical ventilation, renal replacement therapy) alters antibiotic pharmacokinetics mainly through an increase in the volume of distribution and altered drug clearance. The lack of new and efficacious drugs and increased bacterial resistance are current problems of contemporary antibiotic therapy. Although intermittent administration is a standard clinical practice, alternative methods of antibiotic administration are sought, which may potentialise effects and reduce toxicity as well as contribute to inhibition of bacterial resistance. A wide range of studies prove that the application of continuous infusion of time-dependent antibiotics (beta-lactams, glycopeptides) is more rational than standard intermittent administration. However, there are also studies which do not confirm the advantage of one method over the other. In spite of controversy the continuous administration of this group of antibiotics is common practice, because the results of both studies point to the higher efficacy of this method in critically ill patients. Authors reviewed the literature to determine whether any clinical benefits exist for administration of time-dependent antibiotics by continuous infusion. Definite specification of the clinical advantage of administration this way over standard dosage requires a large-scale multi-centre randomised controlled trial.

  17. Nutrition Support among Critically Ill Children with AKI

    PubMed Central

    Akcan-Arikan, Ayse; Orellana, Renán A.; Coss-Bu, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Critically ill children are at high risk of underfeeding and AKI, which may lead to further nutritional deficiencies. This study aimed to determine the adequacy of nutrition support during the first 5 days of intensive care unit (ICU) stay. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A chart review of pediatric patients admitted to the pediatric ICU for >72 hours between August 2007 and March 2008 was conducted. Patients were classified as having no AKI versus AKI by modified pediatric RIFLE criteria. All nutrition was analyzed. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) was estimated by the Schofield equation and protein needs by American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition guidelines. Results Of the 167 patients, 102 were male and 65 were female (median age 1.4 years). Using the RIFLE criteria, 102 (61%) patients had no AKI, whereas 44 (26%) were classified as category R (risk), 12 (7%) as category I (injury), and 9 (5%) as category F (failure). The median 5-day energy intake was lower relative to estimated BMR. Overall protein provision (19%) was lower than energy provision (55%) compared with estimated needs (P<0.001). I/F patients were more likely to be fasted versus receiving enteral/parenteral nutrition (n=813 patient days) and to receive <90% of BMR (n=832 patient days) than No AKI/R patients. Conclusions Underfeeding, common in critically ill children, was accentuated in AKI. Protein underfeeding was greater than energy underfeeding in the first 5 days of PICU stay. Efforts should be made to provide adequate nutrition in ICU patients with AKI. PMID:23293125

  18. Anidulafungin dosing in critically ill patients with continuous venovenous haemodiafiltration.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Gerardo; Azanza, José Ramón; Carbonell, José A; Ferrando, Carlos; Badenes, Rafael; Parra, María Asunción; Sadaba, Belén; Navarro, David; Puig, Jaume; Miñana, Amanda; Garcia-Marquez, Carlos; Gencheva, Gergana; Gutierrez, Andrea; Marti, Francisco J; Belda, F Javier

    2014-06-01

    Anidulafungin is indicated as a first-line treatment for invasive candidiasis in critically ill patients. In the intensive care unit, sepsis is the main cause of acute renal failure, and treatment with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) has increased in recent years. Antimicrobial pharmacokinetics is affected by CRRT, but few studies have addressed the optimal dosage for anidulafungin during CRRT. We included 12 critically ill patients who received continuous venovenous haemodiafiltration to treat acute renal failure. Anidulafungin was infused on 3 consecutive days, starting with a loading dose (200 mg) on Day 1, and doses of 100 mg on Days 2 and 3. Blood and ultradiafiltrate samples were collected on Day 3 (during steady-state) before, and at regular intervals after, the infusion had started. Anidulafungin concentrations were determined with HPLC. On Day 3, peak plasma concentrations with the 100 mg dose were 6.2 ± 1.7 mg/L and 7.1 ± 1.9 mg/L in the arterial and venous samples, respectively. The mean, pre-filter trough concentration was 3.0 ± 0.6 mg/L. The mean AUC0-24 values for plasma anidulafungin were 93.9 ± 19.4 and 104.1 ± 20.3mg·h/L in the arterial and venous samples, respectively. There was no adsorption to synthetic surfaces, and the anidulafungin concentration in the ultradiafiltrate was below the limit of detection. The influence of CRRT on anidulafungin elimination appeared to be negligible. Therefore, we recommend no adjustments to the anidulafungin dose for patients receiving CRRT. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. IGF-I concentration and changes in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Hajsadeghi, Shokoufeh; Khamseh, Mohammad Ebrahim; Gholami, Saeid; Kerman, Scott Reza Jafarian; Gohardehi, Golnar; Moghadam, Negar Seifi; Sabet, Azade Shafiee; Moradi, Masoud; Mollahoseini, Reza; Najafi, Mehri; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) is an anabolic growth factor that affects nitrogen balance and its changing trend is not clearly understood in critically ill patients. This study was carried out to evaluate the association between serum IGF-I levels and its changing trend in critically ill patients. METHODS: In this nested case-control study, all consecutive patients admitted to the medical ICU of Rasoul-e-Akram and Firuzgar hospital (Tehran, Iran) from January through October 2008 were included. IGF1 concentration was measured within the first 24h of ICU admission and the fourth, seventh and tenth day since admission. Patients were followed until discharge from ICU or expiration. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 90 patients (mean age: 58.01 ± 22.56), 31 (34.4%) of who died and 59 (65.6%) were discharged. On admission, 43 patients (47.7%) had low IGF-I levels, whereas 47 (52.3%) had normal or high levels. The concentration of IGF-I was not significantly different in every 4 measurements between expired and discharged patients. Significant decrease was seen between first to fourth day IGF-I concentration (p = 0.005). Changing trend was not statistically different in two groups of patients. CONCLUSIONS: There was no relation between low IGF-I concentration on admission day and increased adverse outcome, but overall these patients had lower IGF1. No clear association was found between changing trend of IGF1 and mortality. Stress on admission time may cause decreasing pattern of IGF-I in the first 4 days of admission. PMID:22091227

  20. Percutaneous transhepatic cholecystostomy and delayed laparoscopic cholecystectomy in critically ill patients with acute calculus cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Spira, Ram M; Nissan, Aviran; Zamir, Oded; Cohen, Tzeela; Fields, Scott I; Freund, Herbert R

    2002-01-01

    The ultimate therapy for acute cholecystitis is cholecystectomy. However, in critically ill elderly patients the mortality of emergency cholecystectomy may reach up to 30%. Open cholecystostomy performed under local anesthesia was considered to be the procedure of choice for treatment of acute cholecystitis in high-risk patients. In recent years, ultrasound- or computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous transhepatic cholecystostomy (PTHC) replaced open cholecystostomy for the treatment of acute cholecystitis in critically ill patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the results of a 5-year protocol using PTHC followed by delayed laparoscopic cholecystectomy for the treatment of acute cholecystitis in critically ill patients. We reviewed the charts of 55 patients who underwent PTHC at the Hadassah University Hospital Mount Scopus during the years 1994 to 1999. The main indications for PTHC among this group of severely sick and high-risk patients was biliary sepsis and septic shock in 23 patients (42%); and severe comorbidities in 32 patients (58%). The median age was 74 (32 to 98) years, 33 were female and 22 male. Successful biliary drainage by PTHC was achieved in 54 of 55 (98%) of the patients. The majority of the patients (31 of 55) were drained transhepaticlly under CT guidance. The rest, (24 of 55) were drained using ultrasound guidance followed by cholecystography for verification. Complications included hepatic bleeding that required surgical intervention in 1 patient and dislodgment of the catheter in 9 patients that was reinserted in 2 patients. Three patients died of multisystem organ failure 12 to 50 days following the procedure. The remaining 52 patients recovered well with a mean hospital stay of 15.5 plus minus 11.4 days. Thirty-one patients were able to undergo delayed surgery: 28 underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy of whom 4 (14%) were converted to open cholecystectomy. This was compared with a 1.9% conversion rate in 1

  1. Risk Factors for Delayed Enteral Nutrition in Critically Ill Children.

    PubMed

    Canarie, Michael F; Barry, Suzanne; Carroll, Christopher L; Hassinger, Amanda; Kandil, Sarah; Li, Simon; Pinto, Matthew; Valentine, Stacey L; Faustino, E Vincent S

    2015-10-01

    Delayed enteral nutrition, defined as enteral nutrition started 48 hours or more after admission to the PICU, is associated with an inability to achieve full enteral nutrition and worse outcomes in critically ill children. We reviewed nutritional practices in six medical-surgical PICUs and determined risk factors associated with delayed enteral nutrition in critically ill children. Retrospective cross-sectional study using medical records as source of data. Six medical-surgical PICUs in northeastern United States. Children less than 21 years old admitted to the PICU for 72 hours or more excluding those awaiting or recovering from abdominal surgery. A total of 444 children with a median age of 4.0 years were included in the study. Enteral nutrition was started at a median time of 20 hours after admission to the PICU. There was no significant difference in time to start enteral nutrition among the PICUs. Of those included, 88 children (19.8%) had delayed enteral nutrition. Risk factors associated with delayed enteral nutrition were noninvasive (odds ratio, 3.37; 95% CI, 1.69-6.72) and invasive positive-pressure ventilation (odds ratio, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.15-3.69), severity of illness (odds ratio for every 0.1 increase in pediatric index of mortality 2 score, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.14-1.71), procedures (odds ratio, 3.33; 95% CI, 1.67-6.64), and gastrointestinal disturbances (odds ratio, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.14-3.68) within 48 hours after admission to the PICU. Delayed enteral nutrition was associated with failure to reach full enteral nutrition while in the PICU (odds ratio, 4.09; 95% CI, 1.97-8.53). Nutrition consults were obtained in less than half of the cases, and none of the PICUs used tools to assure the adequacy of energy and protein nutrition. Institutions in this study initiated enteral nutrition for a high percentage of patients by 48 hours of admission. Noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation was most strongly associated with delay enteral nutrition. A better

  2. Physician Reimbursement for Critical Care Services Integrating Palliative Care for Patients Who Are Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Judith E.; Weissman, David E.; Hays, Ross M.; Mosenthal, Anne C.; Mulkerin, Colleen; Puntillo, Kathleen A.; Ray, Daniel E.; Bassett, Rick; Boss, Renee D.; Brasel, Karen J.; Campbell, Margaret L.; Cortez, Therese B.; Curtis, J. Randall

    2012-01-01

    Patients with advanced illness often spend time in an ICU, while nearly one-third of patients with advanced cancer who receive Medicare die in hospitals, often with failed ICU care. For most, death occurs following the withdrawal or withholding of life-sustaining treatments. The integration of palliative care is essential for high-quality critical care. Although palliative care specialists are becoming increasingly available, intensivists and other physicians are also expected to provide basic palliative care, including symptom treatment and communication about goals of care. Patients who are critically ill are often unable to make decisions about their care. In these situations, physicians must meet with family members or other surrogates to determine appropriate medical treatments. These meetings require clinical expertise to ensure that patient values are explored for medical decision making about therapeutic options, including palliative care. Meetings with families take time. Issues related to the disease process, prognosis, and treatment plan are complex, and decisions about the use or limitation of intensive care therapies have life-or-death implications. Inadequate reimbursement for physician services may be a barrier to the optimal delivery of high-quality palliative care, including effective communication. Appropriate documentation of time spent integrating palliative and critical care for patients who are critically ill can be consistent with the Current Procedural Terminology codes (99291 and 99292) for critical care services. The purpose of this article is to help intensivists and other providers understand the circumstances in which integration of palliative and critical care meets the definition of critical care services for billing purposes. PMID:22396564

  3. Physician reimbursement for critical care services integrating palliative care for patients who are critically ill.

    PubMed

    Lustbader, Dana R; Nelson, Judith E; Weissman, David E; Hays, Ross M; Mosenthal, Anne C; Mulkerin, Colleen; Puntillo, Kathleen A; Ray, Daniel E; Bassett, Rick; Boss, Renee D; Brasel, Karen J; Campbell, Margaret L; Cortez, Therese B; Curtis, J Randall

    2012-03-01

    Patients with advanced illness often spend time in an ICU, while nearly one-third of patients with advanced cancer who receive Medicare die in hospitals, often with failed ICU care. For most, death occurs following the withdrawal or withholding of life-sustaining treatments. The integration of palliative care is essential for high-quality critical care. Although palliative care specialists are becoming increasingly available, intensivists and other physicians are also expected to provide basic palliative care, including symptom treatment and communication about goals of care. Patients who are critically ill are often unable to make decisions about their care. In these situations, physicians must meet with family members or other surrogates to determine appropriate medical treatments. These meetings require clinical expertise to ensure that patient values are explored for medical decision making about therapeutic options, including palliative care. Meetings with families take time. Issues related to the disease process, prognosis, and treatment plan are complex, and decisions about the use or limitation of intensive care therapies have life-or-death implications. Inadequate reimbursement for physician services may be a barrier to the optimal delivery of high-quality palliative care, including effective communication. Appropriate documentation of time spent integrating palliative and critical care for patients who are critically ill can be consistent with the Current Procedural Terminology codes (99291 and 99292) for critical care services. The purpose of this article is to help intensivists and other providers understand the circumstances in which integration of palliative and critical care meets the definition of critical care services for billing purposes.

  4. Critical Pertussis Illness in Children, A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Berger, John T.; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Shanley, Thomas P.; Wessel, David L.; Clark, Amy; Holubkov, Richard; Meert, Kathleen L.; Newth, Christopher J.L.; Berg, Robert A.; Heidemann, Sabrina; Harrison, Rick; Pollack, Murray; Dalton, Heidi; Harvill, Eric; Karanikas, Alexia; Liu, Teresa; Burr, Jeri S.; Doctor, Allan; Dean, J. Michael; Jenkins, Tammara L.; Nicholson, Carol E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Pertussis persists in the United States despite high immunization rates. The present report characterizes the presentation and acute course of critical pertussis by quantifying demographic data, laboratory findings, clinical complications, and critical care therapies required among children requiring admission to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Eight PICUs comprising the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network and 17 additional PICUs across the United States. Patients Eligible patients had laboratory confirmation of pertussis infection, were < 18 years of age, and died in the PICU or were admitted to the PICU for at least 24 hours between June 2008 and August 2011. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results 127 patients were identified. Median age was 49 days, and 105 (83%) patients were < 3 months of age. Fifty-five (43%) required mechanical ventilation. Twelve (9.4%) died during initial hospitalization. Pulmonary hypertension was found in 16 patients (12.5%), and was present in 75% of patients who died, compared with 6% of survivors (p< 0.001). Median white blood cell count (WBC) was significantly higher in those requiring mechanical ventilation (p<0.001), those with pulmonary hypertension (p<0.001) and non-survivors (p<0.001). Age, sex and immunization status did not differ between survivors and non-survivors. Fourteen patients received leukoreduction therapy (exchange transfusion (12), leukopheresis (1) or both (1)). Survival benefit was not apparent. Conclusions Pulmonary hypertension may be associated with mortality in pertussis critical illness. Elevated WBC is associated with the need for mechanical ventilation, pulmonary hypertension, and mortality risk. Research is indicated to elucidate how pulmonary hypertension, immune responsiveness, and elevated WBC contribute to morbidity and mortality

  5. [The interarm blood pressure difference in the critically ill patient].

    PubMed

    Valls Matarín, Josefa; del Cotillo Fuente, Mercedes; Quintana Riera, Salvador; de la Sierra Iserte, Alejandro

    2014-02-04

    To evaluate the prevalence of a difference in systolic blood pressure (SBPd) ≥ 10 mmHg between arms in patients admitted in a Critical Care Unit and to examine the clinical characteristics associated with such blood pressure difference. Observational cross-sectional study. Two blood pressure measurements in each arm were carried out at unit admission. The firstly measured arm was chosen at random. One-hundred and sixty-eight patients were studied, with a mean age of 61 (SD=16), 67.3% male and 45% with a previous hypertension diagnosis. On admission, 27.4% presented SBPd ≥ 10 mmHg. Among them, 54% had higher SBP in the right arm and 46% in the left one. A SBPd ≥ 10 mmHg was associated with a previous hypertension diagnosis (67.4 versus 36.9%; P<.001) and with reduced consciousness (76.1 versus 52.5%; P=.006). Over a quarter of critically ill patients have a SBPd ≥ 10 mmHg between arms. This feature is associated with a previous hypertension diagnosis and reduced consciousness. It should be assessed in the future if the choice of a control arm would help improve patient's care as it would become a more accurate guide for hemodynamic management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Hormonal supplementation in endocrine dysfunction in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Duława, Anna; Bułdak, Łukasz; Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2007-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for a physician is a critically ill patient. Regardless of the reason for an admission to the Intensive Care Units (ICU) (e.g. myocardial infarction, severe pneumonia, trauma or many others) each of the above-mentioned conditions impairs homeostasis including instability of the endocrine system. The observed alterations in serum glucose level or clinical signs of hormonal imbalance alarm practitioners and prompt them to an intervention. However, side-effects of administered drugs have to be always considered, because every intervention in the endocrine system may have various consequences or prove itself maleficent. Since critical condition causes numerous changes in the hormonal system, the definition of endocrine gland failure in the ICU patients should differ from the definition related to the general population. This review is aimed at describing alterations, diagnosis and treatment options for an impaired carbohydrate metabolism and inadequate response of the adrenal and thyroid endocrine axis. It has been written in order to aid the choice between "the watch and wait strategy" and aggressive pharmacological intervention. Furthermore, several standard and innovative therapeutic procedures were described and, if possible, compared. Recent articles have been included in order to show current views on the up-to-date clinical approach.

  7. The impact of music on hypermetabolism in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Aaron; Hartl, Wolfgang; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Fricchione, Gregory L; Benson, Herbert; Warshaw, Andrew L; Conrad, Claudius

    2008-11-01

    Although the literature on complementary therapy, including music, is vast, there are few studies conducted in a scientific fashion exploring physiologic mechanisms. This review summarizes recent evidence on the effects of music on the hypermetabolic response of critical illness. Music may restore some of the distorted homeostasis observed in ICU patients, as well as reducing pain and the need for sedation. Music likely reduces alterations in the hypothalamic-anterior pituitary-peripheral hormone axes that produce cortisol and growth hormone. Music may also increase growth hormone levels, which can induce decreased production of cytokines such as IL-6 by white blood cells. Further, ovarian steroid secretion may paradoxically protect women by increasing baseline circulating stress hormones, providing an opportunity for music therapy to intervene effectively. Dopaminergic neurotransmission has been implicated as a means by which music can modulate the central nervous system. Music may play an important role as an adjunct therapy in critical care. However, further studies are necessary to elucidate how music can be further integrated clinically and the precise underlying mechanisms of its beneficial effects.

  8. Mechanical Signaling in the Pathophysiology of Critical Illness Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kalamgi, Rebeca C.; Larsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The complete loss of mechanical stimuli of skeletal muscles, i.e., the loss of external strain, related to weight bearing, and internal strain, related to the contraction of muscle cells, is uniquely observed in pharmacologically paralyzed or deeply sedated mechanically ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The preferential loss of myosin and myosin associated proteins in limb and trunk muscles is a significant characteristic of critical illness myopathy (CIM) which separates CIM from other types of acquired muscle weaknesses in ICU patients. Mechanical silencing is an important factor triggering CIM. Microgravity or ground based microgravity models form the basis of research on the effect of muscle unloading-reloading, but the mechanisms and effects may differ from the ICU conditions. In order to understand how mechanical tension regulates muscle mass, it is critical to know how muscles sense mechanical information and convert stimulus to intracellular biochemical actions and changes in gene expression, a process called cellular mechanotransduction. In adult skeletal muscles and muscle fibers, this process may differ, the same stimulus can cause divergent response and the same fiber type may undergo opposite changes in different muscles. Skeletal muscle contains multiple types of mechano-sensors and numerous structures that can be affected differently and hence respond differently in distinct muscles. PMID:26869939

  9. Acquired weakness, handgrip strength, and mortality in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, Naeem A; O'Brien, James M; Hoffmann, Stephen P; Phillips, Gary; Garland, Allan; Finley, James C W; Almoosa, Khalid; Hejal, Rana; Wolf, Karen M; Lemeshow, Stanley; Connors, Alfred F; Marsh, Clay B

    2008-08-01

    ICU-acquired paresis (ICUAP) is common in survivors of critical illness. There is significant associated morbidity, including prolonged time on the ventilator and longer hospital stay. However, it is unclear whether ICUAP is independently associated with mortality, as sicker patients are more prone and existing studies have not adjusted for this. To test the hypothesis that ICUAP is independently associated with increased mortality. Secondarily, to determine if handgrip dynamometry is a concise measure of global strength and is independently associated with mortality. A prospective multicenter cohort study was conducted in intensive care units (ICU) of five academic medical centers. Adults requiring at least 5 days of mechanical ventilation without evidence of preexisting neuromuscular disease were followed until awakening and were then examined for strength. We measured global strength and handgrip dynamometry. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality and secondary outcomes were hospital and ICU-free days, ICU readmission, and recurrent respiratory failure. Subjects with ICUAP (average MRC score of < 4) had longer hospital stays and required mechanical ventilation longer. Handgrip strength was lower in subjects with ICUAP and had good test performance for diagnosing ICUAP. After adjustment for severity of illness, ICUAP was independently associated with hospital mortality (odds ratio [OR], 7.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.4-25.3; P = 0.001). Separately, handgrip strength was independently associated with hospital mortality (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 1.5-13.6; P = 0.007). ICUAP is independently associated with increased hospital mortality. Handgrip strength is also independently associated with poor hospital outcome and may serve as a simple test to identify ICUAP. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00106665).

  10. Critical Illness Neuromyopathy Complicating Akinetic Crisis in Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Margherita; De Angelis, Maria Vittoria; Di Muzio, Antonio; Anzellotti, Francesca; Bonanni, Laura; Thomas, Astrid; Onofrj, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Akinetic crisis (AC) is a life-threatening complication of parkinsonism characterized by an acute severe akinetic-hypertonic state, consciousness disturbance, hyperthermia, and muscle enzymes elevation. Injectable dopaminomimetic drugs, high-dose methylprednisolone, and dantrolene are advocated as putative specific treatments. The course of the illness is frequently complicated by infections, pulmonary embolism, renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and cardiac arrhythmias. Critical illness neuromyopathy (CINM) is an acquired neuromuscular disorder characterized by flaccid quadriparesis and muscle enzyme elevation, often occurring in intensive care units and primarily associated with inactivity, sepsis, multiorgan failure, neuromuscular blocking agents, and steroid treatment. In 3 parkinsonian patients, during the course of AC we observed disappearance of rigidity but persistent hypoactivity. In all, neurological examination showed quadriparesis with loss of tendon reflexes and laboratory investigation disclosed a second peak of muscle enzymes elevation, following the first increment due to AC. Electrophysiological studies showed absent or reduced sensory nerve action potentials and compound muscular action potentials, myopathic changes, and fibrillation potentials at electromyography recordings, and reduced excitability or inexcitability of tibialis anterior at direct muscle stimulation, leading to a diagnosis of CINM in all 3 patients. In 1 patient, the diagnosis was also confirmed by muscle biopsy. Outcome was fatal in 2 of the 3 patients. Although AC is associated with most of the known risk factors for CINM, the cooccurrence of the 2 disorders may be difficult to recognize and has never been reported. We found that CINM can occur as a severe complication of AC, and should be suspected when hypertonia-rigidity subsides despite persistent akinesia. Strict monitoring of muscle enzyme levels may help diagnosis. This finding addresses

  11. Planning with elderly outpatients for contingencies of severe illness: a survey and clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Finucane, T E; Shumway, J M; Powers, R L; D'Alessandri, R M

    1988-01-01

    The authors examined whether elderly patients would report positive or adverse emotional effects after their doctor, during a routine clinic visit, asked them to begin planning for future serious illness. Seventy-four patients, 65 years old or older, who were followed at a university hospital medical clinic were randomly allocated to an intervention or a control group. The intervention was a detailed discussion with the patient's physician of the patient's wishes about decision making and life support therapy in the event of extreme or incapacitating illness. A blinded interviewer then asked all consenting patients how they felt about the physician, the clinic visit, and their medical care. Intervention-group patients were questioned about their reactions to the physician and the discussion. Four important findings emerged: 1) Some emotional uncertainty was created when doctors raised these questions unexpectedly: one patient became visibly upset during the discussion, and three who gave consent to be interviewed afterward said that the discussion had made them wonder about their health. Nonetheless, all patients who received the intervention and completed the study were pleased that their doctor had asked. 2) Only 44% of all consenting patients reported having discussed these issues previously; only one had done so with a doctor. 3) 97% of patients who responded wanted to be kept informed by the doctor about their medical situations in times of serious illness. 4) Patients' replies to specific questions about life-sustaining therapy in the event of their own severe illnesses were quite variable. During routine clinic visits doctors can encourage most elderly patients to begin specific planning for potential severe illnesses.

  12. Community Trial on Heat Related-Illness Prevention Behaviors and Knowledge for the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Noriko; Nakao, Rieko; Ueda, Kayo; Ono, Masaji; Kondo, Masahide; Honda, Yasushi; Hashizume, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore whether broadcasting heat health warnings (HHWs), to every household and whether the additional home delivery of bottled water labeled with messages will be effective in improving the behaviors and knowledge of elderly people to prevent heat-related illness. A community trial on heat-related-illness-prevention behaviors and knowledge for people aged between 65 and 84 years was conducted in Nagasaki, Japan. Five hundred eight subjects were selected randomly from three groups: heat health warning (HHW), HHW and water delivery (HHW+W), and control groups. Baseline and follow-up questionnaires were conducted in June and September 2012, respectively. Of the 1524 selected subjects, the 1072 that completed both questionnaires were analyzed. The HHW+W group showed improvements in nighttime AC use (p = 0.047), water intake (p = 0.003), cooling body (p = 0.002) and reduced activities in heat (p = 0.047) compared with the control, while the HHW group improved hat or parasol use (p = 0.008). An additional effect of household water delivery was observed in water intake (p = 0.067) and cooling body (p = 0.095) behaviors. HHW and household bottled water delivery improved heat-related-illness-prevention behaviors. The results indicate that home water delivery in addition to a HHW may be needed to raise awareness of the elderly. PMID:25789456

  13. Vancomycin clearance during continuous venovenous haemofiltration in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Boereboom, F T; Ververs, F F; Blankestijn, P J; Savelkoul, T J; van Dijk, A

    1999-10-01

    To study the pharmacokinetics of vancoymcin in critically ill patients with acute renal failure treated with continuous venovenous haemofiltration (CVVHF). Open-label study. Hospital pharmacy centre and medical intensive care unit of the University Medical Centre Utrecht. In a laboratory setting, the sieving coefficient (s) of vancomycin by polyacrilonitrile (PAN) haemofilters of different surface areas was studied. In one patient, the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin were studied following a single dose of vancomycin. Another patient was treated with a vancomycin dosing regimen based on data from the literature, but high trough concentrations made dose reduction necessary after 24 h of withholding therapy. After two doses of 250 mg, serum and ultrafiltrate samples were collected for pharmacokinetic evaluation. INTERVENTIONS++: CVVHF with the following operational characteristics: blood flow 200 ml/min, ultrafiltrate flow 25 ml/min, postdilution, PAN 06 hollow fibre haemofilter. The average sieving coefficient in vitro was 0.73 +/- 0.06, 0.86 +/- 0.11, and 0.80 +/- 0.06 for the PAN 03, 06, and 10 haemofilters, respectively. Changes in the sieving coefficient by increasing the ultrafiltration rate were not clinically significant. The first patient was given a single dose of vancomycin, 1000 mg by intravenous infusion. The following pharmacokinetic data were obtained: apparent volume of distribution (Vd) 55.8 l, terminal half-life time (t(1/2 term)) 15.4 h, total clearance (Cl(tot)) 2.5 l/h, CVVHF clearance (CL(CVVHF, form 1)) 1.4 l/h, and body clearance (Cl(body)) 1.1 l/h. The average sieving coefficient during the study period was 0.89 +/- 0.03. In the second patient, the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin were studied following dose reduction: Vd 41.7 l, (1/2 term) 20.3 h, Cl(tot) 1.4 l/h, Cl(CVVHF, form 1) 1.4 l/h, and Cl(body) < 0.1 l/h. The average sieving coefficient during the study period was 0.88 +/- 0. 03. The cumulative amount of vancomycin removed by means of

  14. Steady-state pharmacokinetic simulation of intermittent vs. continuous infusion valproic acid therapy in non-critically ill and critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Van Matre, Edward T; Cook, Aaron M

    2016-09-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug used for a variety of neurologic disorders. The relatively short half-life seen with intermittent intravenous bolus doing may lead to serum concentration variability. Continuous infusion VPA therapy is an approach to mitigate these effects. The objective of this study is to characterize the pharmacokinetics of continuous infusion of VPA in acutely ill patients and to determine dosing regimens that most frequently obtain goal steady-state serum concentrations. This is a retrospective pharmacokinetics study in adult patients receiving continuous infusion VPA per institutional protocol for seizure or status migrainosus. Pharmacokinetic parameters were reviewed for 234 patients (25 critically ill) and compared between the two groups (non-critically ill vs. critically ill). Intermittent and continuous infusion dosing strategies were modeled utilizing Monte Carlo simulations for both cohorts. Frequencies of serum concentration attainment were reported. The percent target attainment for the non-critically ill group and critically ill group were 69.4 and 58.3% (p = 0.282) post-loading dose and 69.7 and 37.5% (p = 0.004) steady state, respectively. The volume of distribution was significantly different between the two groups (0.35 vs. 0.68 L/kg, p = < 0.0001). Highest frequency of target attainment (50-100 mcg/ml) occurred in the continuous infusion 2 mg/kg/h simulation for both critically ill (45.19%) and acutely ill (48.16%) groups. Critically ill patients have an increased volume of distribution. Increasing the volume of distribution requires higher loading doses of VPA to obtain desired therapeutic concentrations. Continuous infusion VPA provides more consistent serum steady-state concentrations while mitigating pharmacokinetic variability.

  15. The impact of disability in survivors of critical illness.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Carol L; Udy, Andrew A; Bailey, Michael; Barrett, Jonathan; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Bucknall, Tracey; Gabbe, Belinda J; Higgins, Alisa M; Iwashyna, Theodore J; Hunt-Smith, Julian; Murray, Lynne J; Myles, Paul S; Ponsford, Jennie; Pilcher, David; Walker, Craig; Young, Meredith; Cooper, D J

    2017-07-01

    To use the World Health Organisation's International Classification of Functioning to measure disability following critical illness using patient-reported outcomes. A prospective, multicentre cohort study conducted in five metropolitan intensive care units (ICU). Participants were adults who had been admitted to the ICU, received more than 24 h of mechanical ventilation and survived to hospital discharge. The primary outcome was measurement of disability using the World Health Organisation's Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0. The secondary outcomes included the limitation of activities and changes to health-related quality of life comparing survivors with and without disability at 6 months after ICU. We followed 262 patients to 6 months, with a mean age of 59 ± 16 years, and of whom 175 (67%) were men. Moderate or severe disability was reported in 65 of 262 (25%). Predictors of disability included a history of anxiety/depression [odds ratio (OR) 1.65 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22, 2.23), P = 0.001]; being separated or divorced [OR 2.87 (CI 1.35, 6.08), P = 0.006]; increased duration of mechanical ventilation [OR 1.04 (CI 1.01, 1.08), P = 0.03 per day]; and not being discharged to home from the acute hospital [OR 1.96 (CI 1.01, 3.70) P = 0.04]. Moderate or severe disability at 6 months was associated with limitation in activities, e.g. not returning to work or studies due to health (P < 0.002), and reduced health-related quality of life (P < 0.001). Disability measured using patient-reported outcomes was prevalent at 6 months after critical illness in survivors and was associated with reduced health-related quality of life. Predictors of moderate or severe disability included a prior history of anxiety or depression, separation or divorce and a longer duration of mechanical ventilation. NCT02225938.

  16. [Vitamin D deficiency and morbimortality in critically ill paediatric patients].

    PubMed

    García-Soler, Patricia; Morales-Martínez, Antonio; Rosa-Camacho, Vanessa; Lillo-Muñoz, Juan Antonio; Milano-Manso, Guillermo

    2017-08-01

    To determine the prevalence and risks factors of vitamin D deficiency, as well as its relationship with morbidity and mortality in a PICU. An observational prospective study in a tertiary children's University Hospital PICU conducted in two phases: i: cohorts study, and ii: prevalence study. The study included 340 critically ill children with ages comprising 6 months to 16 years old. Chronic kidney disease, known parathyroid disorders, and vitamin D supplementation. Total 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] was measured in the first 48hours of admission to a PICU. Parathormone, calcium, phosphate, blood gases, blood count, C-reactive protein, and procalcitonin were also analysed. A record was also made of demographic features, characteristics of the episode, and complications during the PICU stay. The overall prevalence rate of vitamin D deficiency was 43.8%, with a mean of 22.28 (95% CI 21.15-23.41) ng/ml. Patients with vitamin D deficiency were older (61 vs 47 months, P=.039), had parents with a higher level of academic studies (36.5% vs 20%, P=.016), were admitted more often in winter and spring, had a higher PRISM-III (6.8 vs 5.1, P=.037), a longer PICU stay (3 vs 2 days, P=.001), and higher morbidity (61.1% vs 30.4%, P<001) than the patients with sufficient levels of 25(OH)D. Patients who died had lower levels of 25(OH)D (14±8.81ng/ml versus 22.53±10.53ng/ml, P=.012). Adjusted OR for morbidity was 5.44 (95%CI; 2.5-11.6). Vitamin D deficiency is frequent in critically ill children, and it is related to both morbidity and mortality, although it remains unclear whether it is a causal relationship or it is simply a marker of severity in different clinical situations. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Posttraumatic stress disorder in critical illness survivors: a metaanalysis.

    PubMed

    Parker, Ann M; Sricharoenchai, Thiti; Raparla, Sandeep; Schneck, Kyle W; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Needham, Dale M

    2015-05-01

    To conduct a systematic review and metaanalysis of the prevalence, risk factors, and prevention/treatment strategies for posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in critical illness survivors. PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Library from inception through March 5, 2014. Eligible studies met the following criteria: 1) adult general/nonspecialty ICU, 2) validated posttraumatic stress disorder instrument greater than or equal to 1 month post-ICU, and 3) sample size greater than or equal to 10 patients. Duplicate independent review and data abstraction from all eligible titles/abstracts/full-text articles. The search identified 2,817 titles/abstracts, with 40 eligible articles on 36 unique cohorts (n = 4,260 patients). The Impact of Event Scale was the most common posttraumatic stress disorder instrument. Between 1 and 6 months post-ICU (six studies; n = 456), the pooled mean (95% CI) Impact of Event Scale score was 20 (17-24), and the pooled prevalences of clinically important posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (95% CI) were 25% (18-34%) and 44% (36-52%) using Impact of Event Scale thresholds greater than or equal to 35 and greater than or equal to 20, respectively. Between 7 and 12 months post-ICU (five studies; n = 698), the pooled mean Impact of Event Scale score was 17 (9-24), and pooled prevalences of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms were 17% (10-26%) and 34% (22-50%), respectively. ICU risk factors for posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms included benzodiazepine administration and post-ICU memories of frightening ICU experiences. Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms were associated with worse quality of life. In European-based studies: 1) an ICU diary was associated with a significant reduction in posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, 2) a self-help rehabilitation manual was associated with significant posttraumatic stress disorder symptom reduction at 2 months, but not 6 months; and 3) a nurse-led ICU follow-up clinic did not reduce

  18. Total plasma magnesium in healthy and critically ill foals.

    PubMed

    Mariella, J; Isani, G; Andreani, G; Freccero, F; Carpenè, E; Castagnetti, C

    2016-01-15

    Abnormalities in total Mg (tMg) concentration in plasma and/or serum are common in critically ill humans, and the association with increased mortality has been documented in several clinical studies in adults and newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Abnormalities in tMg were studied in hospitalized dogs, cats, and adult horses. Newborn foals were scarcely studied with regard to Mg concentration. The aims of the present study were: (1) to compare two analytical methods for the determination of tMg in plasma: the automated colorimetric method and the atomic absorption spectrometry; (2) to measure plasma tMg in healthy foals during the first 72 hours after birth and in sick foals during the first 72 hours of hospitalization; (3) to compare total plasma Mg concentration among healthy foals, foals affected by perinatal asphyxia syndrome (PAS), prematurity and/or dismaturity, and sepsis; (4) to evaluate tMg plasma concentration in surviving and non-surviving foals. One hundred seventeen foals were included in the study: 20 healthy and 97 sick foals. The automated method used in clinical practice probably overestimates plasma tMg. Due to its higher sensitivity and specificity, the atomic absorption spectrometry should be considered the method of choice from an analytical point of view, but requires an instrumentation not easily available in any laboratory and specific technical skills and competencies. Plasma tMg in healthy foals were included in the range 0.52 to 1.01 mmol/L and did not show any time-dependent change during the first 72 hours of life. In sick foals, tMg evaluated at T0 was statistically higher than tMg measured at subsequent times. Foals affected by PAS had a tMg at T0 significantly higher (P < 0.01) than healthy, septic, and premature and/or dysmature foals. The t test found significantly higher (P < 0.01) plasma tMg measured at T0 in non-surviving than in surviving foals. Plasma tMg could be a useful parameter for the diagnosis of PAS

  19. Critical illness research involving collection of genomic data: the conundrum posed by low levels of genomic literacy among surrogate decision makers for critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Ellen; Celious, Aaron; Shehane, Erica; Oerke, Mandy; Warren, Victoria; Eastman, Alexander; Kennedy, Carie R; Freeman, Bradley D

    2013-07-01

    Critical illness clinical trials that entail genomic data collection pose unique challenges. In this qualitative study, we found that surrogate decision makers (SDMs) for critically ill individuals, such as those who would be approached for study participation, appeared to have a limited grasp of genomic principles. We argue that low levels of genomic literacy should neither preclude nor be in conflict with the conduct of ethically rigorous clinical trials.

  20. [Social representations and living conditions of the mentally ill and mentally retarded elderly in nursing homes.].

    PubMed

    Dorvil, H; Benoit, M

    1999-01-01

    The aging of the population in Québec as in the rest of the western world, brings to the fore people who until now were greatly marginalized. This is the case of mentally ill and mentally retarded elderly who until recently, lived their aging in the shadow of psychiatric institutions. Have these people now found with deinstitutionalization, the possibility of growing old within society ? This article analyses the conditions of integration and support networks, in sum a collective responsability of these aging people in nursing homes.

  1. Making decisions about medications in critically ill children: a survey of Canadian pediatric critical care clinicians.

    PubMed

    Duffett, Mark; Choong, Karen; Vanniyasingam, Thuva; Thabane, Lehana; Cook, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    Changing clinician practice in pediatric critical care is often difficult. Tailored knowledge translation interventions may be more effective than other types of interventions. To inform the design of tailored interventions, the primary objective of this survey was to describe the importance of specific factors that influence physicians and pharmacists when they make decisions about medications in critically ill children. In this postal survey, respondents used 7-point scales to rate the importance of specific factors that influence their decisions in the following scenarios: corticosteroids for shock, intensive insulin therapy, stress ulcer prophylaxis, surfactant for acute respiratory distress syndrome, and sedation interruption. We used generalized estimating equations to examine the association between the importance of specific factors influencing decision making and the scenario and respondents' practice, views, and demographics. Canadian PICUs. One hundred and seventeen physicians and pharmacists practicing in 18 PICUs. None. The response rate was 61%. The three factors reported to most strongly influence clinician decision making overall were: severity of illness (mean [SD] 5.8 [1.8]), physiologic rationale (5.2 [1.3]), and adverse effects (5.1 [1.9]). Factors least likely to influence decision making were drug costs (2.0 [1.5]), unit policies (2.9 [1.9]), and non-critical care randomized controlled trials (3.1 [1.9]). The relative importance of 8 of the 10 factors varied significantly among the five scenarios: only randomized controlled trials in critically ill children and other clinical research did not vary. Clinician characteristics associated with the greatest difference in importance ratings were: frequent use of the intervention in that scenario (seven factors), profession (five factors), and respondents' assessment of the quality of evidence (five factors). The relative importance of many factors that clinicians consider when making decisions about

  2. Enteral nutrition therapy for critically ill adult patients; critical review and algorithm creation.

    PubMed

    Araújo-Junqueira, L; De-Souza, Daurea A

    2012-01-01

    Undernutrition directly affects critically ill patient's clinical outcome and mortality rates. Interdisciplinar algorithm creation aiming to optimize the enteral nutrition therapy for critically ill adult patients. Pubmed, SciELO, Scholar Google, Web of Science, Scopus, with research of these key words: protocols, enteral nutrition, nutritional support, critical care, undernutrition, fasting. Intensive Care Unit, Hospital de Clínicas, Federal University of Uberlándia, MG, Brazil. Were established in the algorithm a following sequential steps: After a clinical-surgical diagnosis, including the assessment of hemodynamic stability, were requested passage of a feeding tube in post-pyloric position and a drainage tube in gastric position. After hemodynamic stability it should be done the nutritional status diagnosis, calculated nutritional requirements, as well as chosen formulation of enteral feeding. Unless contraindicated, aiming to increase tolerance was started infusion with small volumes (15 ml/h) of a semi-elemental diet, normocaloric, hypolipidic (also hyperproteic, with addition of glutamine). To ensure infusion of the diet, as well as the progressive increase of infusion rates, the patient was monitored for moderate or severe intestinal intolerance. The schedule and infusion rates were respected and diet was not routinely suspended for procedures and diagnostic tests, unless indicated by the medical team. For nutrition therapy success it is essential routine monitoring and extensive interaction between the professionals involved. Nutritional conducts should be reevaluated and improved, seeking complete and specialized care to the critically ill patients. Adherence to new practices is challenging, though instruments such as protocols and algorithms help making information more accessible and comprehensible.

  3. Stress ulcer prophylaxis in critical illness: a Canadian survey.

    PubMed

    Shears, Melissa; Alhazzani, Waleed; Marshall, John C; Muscedere, John; Hall, Richard; English, Shane W; Dodek, Peter M; Lauzier, François; Kanji, Salmaan; Duffett, Mark; Barletta, Jeffrey; Alshahrani, Mohammed; Arabi, Yaseen; Deane, Adam; Cook, Deborah J

    2016-06-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) using histamine-2-receptor antagonists has been a standard of care in intensive care units (ICUs) for four decades. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are increasingly used despite apparently lower background rates of gastrointestinal bleeding and growing concerns about PPI-associated complications. Our objective was to understand the views and prescribing habits amongst Canadian physicians regarding SUP in the ICU and to gauge interest in a future randomized-controlled trial (RCT). We created a short self-administered survey about SUP for critically ill adults, evaluated its clinical sensibility, and pilot tested the instrument. We surveyed all physician members of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group (CCCTG) by e-mail and sent reminders three and five weeks later. We received 94 of 111 (85%) surveys from the validated respondent pool between May and June, 2015. Respondents reported use of SUP most commonly in patients 1) receiving invasive mechanical ventilation (62, 66%), 2) expected to be ventilated for ≥ two days (25, 27%), or 3) receiving mechanical ventilation but nil per os (NPO) (20, 21%). Stress ulcer prophylaxis is discontinued when patients no longer receive mechanical ventilation (75%), no longer are NPO (22%), or are discharged from the ICU (19%). Stress ulcer prophylaxis involves PPIs in 68% of centres. Most respondents endorsed the need for a large rigorous RCT of PPI vs placebo to understand the risks and benefits of this practice. Stress ulcer prophylaxis is reportedly used primarily for the duration of mechanical ventilation. The CCCTG physicians believe that a placebo-controlled RCT is needed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of contemporary SUP with PPIs.

  4. When Is It Appropriate to Use Glutamine in Critical Illness?

    PubMed

    Mundi, Manpreet S; Shah, Meera; Hurt, Ryan T

    2016-08-01

    Glutamine is a nonessential amino acid, which under trauma or critical illness can become essential. A number of historic small single-center randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated positive treatment effects on clinical outcomes with glutamine supplementation. Meta-analyses based on these trials demonstrated a significant reduction in hospital mortality, intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS), and hospital LOS with intravenous (IV) glutamine. Similar results were not noted in 2 large multicenter RCTs (REDOXS and MetaPlus) assessing the efficacy of glutamine supplementation in ventilated ICU patients. The REDOXS trial of 40 ICUs randomized 1223 ventilated ICU patients to glutamine (IV and enteral), antioxidants, both glutamine and antioxidants, or placebo. The main conclusions were a trend toward increased 28-day mortality and significant increased hospital and 6-month mortality in those who received glutamine. The MetaPlus trial of 14 ICUs, which randomized 301 ventilated ICU patients to glutamine-enriched enteral vs an isocaloric diet, noted increased 6-month mortality in the glutamine-supplemented group. Newer RCTs have focused on specific populations and have demonstrated benefits in burn and elective surgery patients with glutamine supplementation. Whether larger studies will confirm these findings is yet to be determined. Recent American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition guidelines recommend that IV and enteral glutamine should not be used in the critical care setting based on the moderate quality of evidence available. We agree with these recommendations and would encourage larger multicenter studies to evaluate the risks and benefits of glutamine in burn and elective surgery patients. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  5. [Family involvement in the critically ill patient basic care].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Martínez, María del Carmen; Rodríguez Morilla, Felipe; Roncero del Pino, Angeles; Morgado Almenara, María Isabel; Theodor Bannik, Johannes; Flores Caballero, Luis Juan; Cortés Macías, Germán; Aparcero Bernet, Luis; Almeida González, Carmen

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. Implementation and valuation of the family member participation in the critically ill patient care.Methodology. Experimental, longitudinal and prospective study, temporal series, with a random control group. This family implication program will be valued according to three dependent parameters: patient, family carer and nursing staff. cognitive state, measured by using the Mini-mental state examination test. Family visitor: family principal carer anxiety state levels, measured using STAI test. Nursing staff: nurses' beliefs about changes introduced in the ICU, valued using attitude Likert type scale.Hypothesis. A family participation program design and implementation in the basic care in the critic patient has positive and significantly influence in the patient, family career and nursing staff.Results. The sample was of 117 cases; 49 in control group, 49 in experimental group and 19 no valid. The STAI test obtained in the experimental group a mean of 23.57 against control group of 31.22 (p <.005). Minimental test was a mean of 23.43 for control group and 24.61 for experimental group. Nursing staff thinks the open visit provides emotional support (p =.005). Although they think the pain perception is great with the family presence (p =.013). The family satisfaction grows up (p =.026). Nursing staff thinks they are more prepared to have a better relationship with the family (p =.021). The belief that the open visit produces a bigger physics and psychic burden is decreasing (p =.03).Conclusions. The anxiety levels are decreasing significantly. The cognitive state is not modified in the experimental group against the control group after the intervention. The nursing staff believes are better respect the open visit.

  6. Enteral nutrition intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients.

    PubMed

    Lavrentieva, Athina; Kontakiotis, Theodore; Bitzani, Militsa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of enteral feeding intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients, the effect of enteral feeding intolerance on the efficacy of feeding, the correlation between the infection marker (procalcitonin [PCT]) and the nutrition status marker (prealbumin) and the impact of feeding intolerance on the outcome of septic burn patients. From January 2009 to December 2012 the data of all burn patients with the diagnosis of sepsis who were placed on enteral nutrition were analyzed. Septic patients were divided into two groups: group A, septic patients who developed feeding intolerance; group B, septic patients who did not develop feeding intolerance. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients were analyzed and compared. The diagnosis of sepsis was applied to 29% of all patients. Of these patients 35% developed intolerance to enteral feeding throughout the septic period. A statistically significant increase in mean PCT level and a decrease in prealbumin level was observed during the sepsis period. Group A patients had statistically significant lower mean caloric intake, higher PCT:prealbumin ratio, higher pneumonia incidence, higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Maximum Score, a longer duration of mechanical ventilation, and a higher mortality rate in comparison with the septic patients without gastric feeding intolerance. The authors concluded that a high percentage of septic burn patients developed enteral feeding intolerance. Enteral feeding intolerance seems to have a negative impact on the patients' nutritional status, morbidity, and mortality.

  7. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in critically ill surgical patients.

    PubMed

    McCredie, J A

    1980-10-01

    A population of lymphocytes attacks nucleated target cells in the presence of antitarget cell antibody. The cells are known as "killer" (K) cells and the reaction is known as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. We determined K-cell activity in 70 critically ill surgical patients in order to determine its value in predicting death or survival. Lymphocytes were obtained from the peripheral blood of the patients; murine P-815 mastocytoma cells were used as target cells and antimastocytoma cell IgG antibody was prepared in the rabbit. The initial value of K-cell activity was decreased by 58% in patients who later died; the value was normal in survivors. In septic patients, the decrease was the same in those who lived and those who died. The final value was 64% lower than the initial value in those who died. Therefore, a low initial value and further decrease signified the likelihood of death. Peripheral nutritional alimentation had no effect on K-cell activity. Central alimentation produced a sixfold increase in patients who had > 50% decrease before treatment, but had no effect in those who had normal activity initially. It was concluded that K-cell activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes is a sensitive indicator of the immune status of surgical patients, that it is useful in monitoring the course of the disease, and that central alimentation causes an increase in immunosuppressed patients.

  8. Obesity, Acute Kidney Injury, and Mortality in Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Danziger, John; Chen, Ken; Lee, Joon; Feng, Mengling; Mark, Roger G.; Celi, Leo Anthony; Mukamal, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although obesity is associated with risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and improved survival, less is known about the associations of obesity with risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) and post-AKI mortality. Methods In a single-center inception cohort of almost 15,000 critically ill patients, we evaluated the association of obesity with AKI and AKI severity, as well as in-hospital and one-year survival. AKI was defined using the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative criteria. Results The AKI incidence rates for normal, overweight, Class I, II, and III Obesity were 18.6, 20.6, 22.5, 24.3 and 24.0 percent respectively, and the adjusted odds ratios of AKI were 1.18 [95% CI 1.06–1.31], 1.35 [1.19–1.53], 1.47 [1.25–1.73], 1.59 [1.31–1.87], compared to normal weight, respectively. Each 5 kg/m2 increase in body mass index (BMI) was associated with a 10% risk [95% CI 1.06–1.24; p<0.001] of more severe AKI. Within-hospital and one-year survival rates associated with the AKI episodes were similar across BMI categories. In conclusion, obesity is a risk factor for AKI injury, which is associated with increased short- and long-term mortality. PMID:26496453

  9. The immunocompromised oncohematological critically ill patient: considerations in severe infections

    PubMed Central

    Lagunes, Leonel; Morales-Codina, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock remain a major cause of mortality among critically ill patient. This is particularly relevant among cancer patients as highlighted by different series showing that up to one in five patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) with sepsis have cancer, and also, sepsis is a leading reason for ICU admission in patients with cancer. The classic predictors of mortality among these patients (such as cancer lineage, neutropenia degree, or bone marrow transplantation history) have changed during the last decades, and they should no longer be used to rule out ICU admission. Instead, a newer approach to these patients should be performed taking into account organ failure assessment and prior performance status. When a doubt exists about the criteria for ICU admission, not only a trial of ICU management should be proposed to assert that no patients are withhold of the opportunity for recovering from the acute condition, but also an early admission, to prevent more derangement, and thus impact on mortality. PMID:27713885

  10. Caloric requirement of the critically ill septic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Shizgal, H.M.; Martin, M.F.

    1988-04-01

    The caloric requirement of the critically ill septic patient was determined by measuring body composition, by multiple isotope dilution, before and at 2-wk intervals while receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in 86 septic and 57 nonseptic malnourished patients. All patients received a TPN solution containing 25% dextrose and 2.75% crystalline amino acids. The body composition of the nonseptic patients, who received 51.9 +/- 1.5 kcal/kg.day, improved significantly, while that of the septic patients, receiving 46.8 +/- 1.1 kcal/kg.day was only maintained. The relationship between caloric intake and the restoration of a malnourished body cell mass (BCM) was determined for each group by correlating, using multiple linear regression, the mean daily change in the BCM with the caloric intake and the nutritional state, as determined by body composition. According to the resultant regressions, an intake of 35.1 and 50.7 kcal/kg.day was required to maintain the BCM of the septic and nonseptic patients, respectively. To restore a depleted BCM, caloric intakes in excess of this amount are required.

  11. Electroencephalogram monitoring in critically ill children: indications and strategies.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Colina, Ana M; Topjian, Alexis A; Dlugos, Dennis J; Abend, Nicholas S

    2012-03-01

    Continuous electroencephalographic monitoring often detects nonconvulsive seizures in critically ill children, but it is resource-intense and has not been demonstrated to improve outcomes. As institutions develop clinical pathways for monitoring, they should consider how seemingly minor variations may exert substantial impacts on resource utilization and cost. In our 1-month prospective observational study, each patient in a 45-bed pediatric intensive care unit was screened for potential monitoring indications. We screened 247 patients. Minor differences in monitoring indications would exert substantial impact on resource utilization. We then calculated the number of monitoring days required each month, based on two strategies that differed in monitoring duration. The prolonged-targeted and brief-targeted strategies would have required 106 and 33 monitoring days, respectively. Based on nonconvulsive seizure occurrence data, these strategies would detect 0.14, and 0.43 patients with seizures per monitoring day performed, respectively. A brief-targeted strategy provides a high yield for nonconvulsive seizure identification, but would fail to diagnose some patients with seizures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultrasonographic Assessment of Diaphragm Function in Critically Ill Subjects.

    PubMed

    Umbrello, Michele; Formenti, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    The majority of patients admitted to the ICU require mechanical ventilation as a part of their process of care. However, mechanical ventilation itself or the underlying disease can lead to dysfunction of the diaphragm, a condition that may contribute to the failure of weaning from mechanical ventilation. However, extended time on the ventilator increases health-care costs and greatly increases patient morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, symptoms and signs of muscle disease in a bedridden (or bed rest-only) ICU patient are often difficult to assess because of concomitant confounding factors. Conventional assessment of diaphragm function lacks specific, noninvasive, time-saving, and easily performed bedside tools or requires patient cooperation. Recently, the use of ultrasound has raised great interest as a simple, noninvasive method of quantification of diaphragm contractile activity. In this review, we discuss the physiology and the relevant pathophysiology of diaphragm function, and we summarize the recent findings concerning the evaluation of its (dys)function in critically ill patients, with a special focus on the role of ultrasounds. We describe how to assess diaphragm excursion and diaphragm thickening during breathing and the meaning of these measurements under spontaneous or mechanical ventilation as well as the reference values in health and disease. The spread of ultrasonographic assessment of diaphragm function may possibly result in timely identification of patients with diaphragm dysfunction and to a potential improvement in the assessment of recovery from diaphragm weakness. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  13. CONTRA: Hydroxyethyl starch solutions are unsafe in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Christiane; Reinhart, Konrad

    2009-08-01

    To describe the risk-benefit profile of hydroxyethyl starch (HES). Narrative review. (1) EFFICACY: no single clinical study or systemic review has shown that administration of any HES solution confers a clinically relevant benefit compared to crystalloids in critically ill patients or surgical patients in need of volume replacement. Contrary to beliefs expecting a ratio of 4:1 or more for crystalloid to colloid volume need, recent studies of goal-directed resuscitation observed much lower ratios of between 1 and 1.6. (2) SAFETY: HES administration is associated with coagulopathy, nephrotoxicity, pruritus and increased long-term mortality. Clinical studies claiming that modern HES 130/0.4 is safe have serious methodological drawbacks and do not adequately address the safety concerns. Given the complete lack of superiority in clinical utility studies and the wide spectrum of severe side effects, the use of HES in the ICU should be stopped. The belief that four times as much crystalloid as colloid fluid volume is needed for successful resuscitation is being seriously questioned.

  14. How could we reduce antibiotic use in critically ill patients?

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Giulia; Restuccia, Giovanni; Cauda, Roberto; Tacconelli, Evelina

    2011-08-01

    The role of antibiotic pressure in the selection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is still under debate in the scientific community and often confounded by scarce data on antibiotic usage. Several studies demonstrated that prior antibiotic exposure is likely to increase patient's colonization and infection by antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. Of even more concern is the significant mortality associated with these infections, in particular in critically ill patients. Therefore, the control of antibiotic usage in intensive care units (ICUs) is of paramount importance. Antibiotic stewardship programmes (ASP) have been demonstrated to represent a useful intervention to reduce the inappropriate antibiotic usage in hospitalized patients. A few trials were performed in ICU population with positive results. The major risk we foresee for the implementation of ASP for ICU patients is the lack of consideration of local ecology and strict quality indicators. The development of new pattern of antimicrobial resistance might be ascribed to an inappropriate ASP. European networks to define best strategies and antibiotic-care bundles need to be supported at national and international level. To optimize antibiotic use in the ICU and to fight against the spread of resistance, it is extremely important to adopt a multifaceted approach including ASP.

  15. Daptomycin Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Septic and Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    D'Avolio, Antonio; Pensi, Debora; Baietto, Lorena; Pacini, Giovanni; Di Perri, Giovanni; De Rosa, Francesco Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Infections, including sepsis, are associated with high mortality rates in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Appropriate antibiotic selection and adequate dosing are important for improving patient outcomes. Daptomycin is bactericidal in bloodstream infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus and other Gram-positive pathogens cultured in ICU patients. The drug has concentration-dependent activity, and the area under the curve/minimum inhibitory concentration ratio is the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) index that best correlates with daptomycin activity, whereas toxicity correlates well with daptomycin plasma trough concentrations (or minimum concentration [C min]). Adequate daptomycin exposure can be difficult to achieve in ICU patients; multiple PK alterations can result in highly variable plasma concentrations, which are difficult to predict. For this reason, therapeutic drug monitoring could help clinicians optimize daptomycin dosing, thus improving efficacy while decreasing the likelihood of serious adverse events. This paper reviews the literature on daptomycin in ICU patients with sepsis, focusing on dosing and PK and PD parameters.

  16. Gastrointestinal disorders of the critically ill. Systemic consequences of ileus.

    PubMed

    Madl, Christian; Druml, Wilfred

    2003-06-01

    Ileus refers to the partial or complete blockage of the small and/or large intestine either by functional (adynamic or paralytic ileus) or mechanical bowel obstruction. The diffuse gastrointestinal dysmotility during functional and mechanical ileus may result in intestinal dilatation, increased luminal pressure and gut wall ischaemia which may lead to increased intra-abdominal pressure (IAP). Any type of ileus may promote abdominal fluid sequestration with severe systemic hypovolaemia, intestinal bacterial overgrowth with the evolution of bacterial translocation and systemic invasive infections and inflammation of the intestinal wall with concomitant release of cytokines and the development of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The most serious complications of ileus are mediated by an increase in IAP. Intra-abdominal hypertension has been found in up to 20% of critically ill patients and may lead to a broad pattern of systemic consequences with multiple organ dysfunction, including cardiovascular, hepatic, pulmonary, renal and neurological function. The abdominal compartment syndrome is an emergency condition which is defined as elevation of IAP above 20 to 25 mmHg and the presence of systemic consequences. Therapeutic considerations include the maintenance of adequate hydration status, avoidance of drugs known to impair intestinal perfusion, stimulation of gastric and intestinal motility and various nutritional aspects. Colonic tube placement after decompressive colonoscopy may be effective in reducing intestinal dilatation. In the abdominal compartment syndrome the 'open abdominal approach' with decompressive laparotomy by opening the peritoneal cavity and temporary abdominal closure is the therapy of choice.

  17. Metabolic response to the stress of critical illness.

    PubMed

    Preiser, J-C; Ichai, C; Orban, J-C; Groeneveld, A B J

    2014-12-01

    The metabolic response to stress is part of the adaptive response to survive critical illness. Several mechanisms are well preserved during evolution, including the stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system, the release of pituitary hormones, a peripheral resistance to the effects of these and other anabolic factors, triggered to increase the provision of energy substrates to the vital tissues. The pathways of energy production are altered and alternative substrates are used as a result of the loss of control of energy substrate utilization by their availability. The clinical consequences of the metabolic response to stress include sequential changes in energy expenditure, stress hyperglycaemia, changes in body composition, and psychological and behavioural problems. The loss of muscle proteins and function is a major long-term consequence of stress metabolism. Specific therapeutic interventions, including hormone supplementation, enhanced protein intake, and early mobilization, are investigated. This review aims to summarize the pathophysiological mechanisms, the clinical consequences, and therapeutic implications of the metabolic response to stress. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Enteral nutrition discontinuation and outcomes in general critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Marco Antonio; da Graça Freitas dos Santos, Saionara; Tomasi, Cristiane Damiani; da Luz, Gabrielle; da Silva Paula, Marcos Marques; Pizzol, Felipe Dal; Ritter, Cristiane

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship between enteral nutrition discontinuation and outcome in general critically ill patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients admitted to a mixed intensive care unit in a tertiary care hospital from May-August 2009 were screened for an indication for enteral nutrition. Patients were followed up until leaving the intensive care unit or a maximum of 28 days. The gastrointestinal failure score was calculated daily by adding values of 0 if the enteral nutrition received was identical to the nutrition prescribed, 1 if the enteral nutrition received was at least 75% of that prescribed, 2 if the enteral nutrition received was between 50-75% of that prescribed, 3 if the enteral nutrition received was between 50-25% of that prescribed, and 4 if the enteral nutrition received was less than 25% of that prescribed. RESULTS: The mean, worst, and categorical gastrointestinal failure scores were associated with lower survival in these patients. Age, categorical gastrointestinal failure score, type of admission, need for mechanical ventilation, sequential organ failure assessment, and Acute Physiologic and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores were selected for analysis with binary regression. In both models, the categorical gastrointestinal failure score was related to mortality. CONCLUSION: The determination of the difference between prescribed and received enteral nutrition seemed to be a useful prognostic marker and is feasible to be incorporated into a gastrointestinal failure score. PMID:23525312

  19. Factors affecting sleep in the critically ill: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Rosalind; Rai, Tapan; McKinley, Sharon

    2014-10-01

    The aims of the current study were to describe the extrinsic and intrinsic factors affecting sleep in critically ill patients and to examine potential relationships with sleep quality. Sleep was recorded using polysomnography (PSG) and self-reports collected in adult patients in intensive care. Sound and illuminance levels were recorded during sleep recording. Objective sleep quality was quantified using total sleep time divided by the number of sleep periods (PSG sleep period time ratio). A regression model was specified using the "PSG sleep period time ratio" as a dependent variable. Sleep was highly fragmented. Patients rated noise and light as the most sleep disruptive. Continuous equivalent sound levels were 56 dB (A). Median daytime illuminance level was 74 lux, and nighttime levels were 1 lux. The regression model explained 25% of the variance in sleep quality (P = .027); the presence of an artificial airway was the only statistically significant predictor in the model (P = .007). The presence of an artificial airway during sleep monitoring was the only significant predictor in the regression model and may suggest that although potentially uncomfortable, an artificial airway may actually promote sleep. This requires further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Abdominal CT scanning in critically ill surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Norwood, S H; Civetta, J M

    1985-01-01

    Clinical parameters, intensive care unit (ICU) course, abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans, and the clinical decisions of 53 critically ill patients were reviewed to determine the influence of the CT scan. No scans were positive before the eighth day. Sensitivity was 48% and specificity, 64%. Seventeen (23%) scans of the 72 provided beneficial results: eight localized abscesses that were drained; nine were negative and not operated on. Five (7%) scans provided detrimental information: scan negative with abscess discovered or scan positive but negative laparotomy. Fifty (70%) scans were either of no help or not used in management. The mortality rate was 50% when CT led to an intervention, and 47% in the entire group. Hospital charges were +33,408. Personnel time and cost were 497 hours and +3658; of the total +37,066, 77% (+28,541) could be considered wasted. From these data, it was concluded that CT scans should be used to confirm abscesses, not to search for a source of sepsis. PMID:4015222

  1. Tracheostomy in the critically ill: the myth of dead space.

    PubMed

    Joseph, M J; Khoury, A; Mendoza, A E; Adams, S; Short, K A; Charles, A G

    2013-03-01

    Benefits and advantages of tracheostomy have been vigorously debated. There is a lack of consensus as to whether perceived clinical improvement is attributable to fundamental changes in respiratory dynamics. We compare the effect of tracheostomy versus endotracheal tube on dead space, airway resistance and other lung parameters in critically ill ventilated patients. Data collected included patients who were admitted to surgical, burn and neurosurgical intensive care units at the University of North Carolina. Twenty-four intubated patients were included in our analysis with various aetiologies of respiratory failure. Tracheostomy was deemed necessary either for severe neurological devastation or failure to wean from the ventilator. The diameter of the endotracheal tubes ranged from 6-8 mm and the tracheostomy tube diameters were from 6.4-8.9 mm. Internal diameters between endotracheal tube and tracheostomy tubes, ventilator settings and sedation were kept consistent throughout the study. Respiratory parameters were measured using the Respironics' non-invasive cardiac output 2 device (Phillips, Andover, MA) immediately prior to tracheostomy and repeated within 24 hours of tracheostomy. Only two (8%) of the patients had slight improvement (>6% decrease in dead space). The average dead space of endotracheal versus tracheostomy tubes was 41±12.6% and 40±14.6%, respectively (P=0.75). The remaining 22 patients (92%) had no significant change in dead space, compliance or other respiratory parameters. This study shows that there is no significant difference in respiratory mechanics and dead space with a tracheostomy versus endotracheal tube.

  2. Cefepime-associated thrombocytopenia in a critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Lim, Phin Phin; Chong, Chee Ping; Aziz, Noorizan Abdul

    2011-12-01

    Cefepime-induced thrombocytopenia is a rare adverse event (incidence <1.0%), based on data from clinical trials. However, there is limited post-marketing surveillance documentation on thrombocytopenia associated with cefepime. We describe a 45-year-old male who was admitted to the intensive care unit after allegedly being hit by a large metal bar in the right upper chest and shoulder. Rhabdomyolysis secondary to the trauma, pneumothorax, acute renal failure, and nosocomial sepsis were subsequently diagnosed. Four days after intravenous cefepime initiation, the patient developed thrombocytopenia with platelet count dropping from 102 × 10(3)/μL to 15 × 10(3)/μL. Cefepime was discontinued and the platelet count normalized to 140 × 10(3)/μL after 6 days. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a possible relationship between the patient's thrombocytopenia and cefepime therapy. Although cefepime-induced thrombocytopenia is rare, clinicians should be alert to this potential adverse effect among critically ill patients.

  3. Vitamin B1 in critically ill patients: needs and challenges.

    PubMed

    Collie, Jake T B; Greaves, Ronda F; Jones, Oliver A H; Lam, Que; Eastwood, Glenn M; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2017-04-22

    Thiamine has a crucial role in energy production, and consequently thiamine deficiency (TD) has been associated with cardiac failure, neurological disorders, oxidative stress (lactic acidosis and sepsis) and refeeding syndrome (RFS). This review aims to explore analytical methodologies of thiamine compound quantification and highlight similarities, variances and limitations of current techniques and how they may be relevant to patients. An electronic search of Medline, PubMed and Embase databases for original articles published in peer-reviewed journals was conducted. MethodsNow was used to search for published analytical methods of thiamine compounds. Keywords for all databases included "thiamine and its phosphate esters", "thiamine methodology" and terms related to critical illness. Enquiries were also made to six external quality assurance (EQA) programme organisations for the inclusion of thiamine measurement. A total of 777 published articles were identified; 122 were included in this review. The most common published method is HPLC with florescence detection. Two of the six EQA organisations include a thiamine measurement programme, both measuring only whole-blood thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). No standard measurement procedure for thiamine compound quantification was identified. Overall, there is an absence of standardisation in measurement methodologies for thiamine in clinical care. Consequently, multiple variations in method practises are prohibiting the comparison of study results as they are not traceable to any higher order reference. Traceability of certified reference materials and reference measurement procedures is needed to provide an anchor to create the link between studies and help bring consensus on the clinical importance of thiamine.

  4. Illness acceptance, pain perception and expectations for physicians of the elderly in Poland.

    PubMed

    Cybulski, Mateusz; Cybulski, Lukasz; Krajewska-Kulak, Elzbieta; Cwalina, Urszula

    2017-02-08

    Ageing of society is a significant challenge to public health, both socially and health wise. Adaptation to illness and its acceptance play an important role in control and patients' self-control in many diseases of old age. The right attitude of doctors to patients, especially, geriatric patients determines, among others, a patient's quality of life and acceptance of illness. Recently, there has been observed the rapid development of research on interactions between pain as a physiological process and its perception by an individual. The aim of the study was to evaluate the acceptance of illness, perception of pain and expectations of geriatric patients for physicians among the inhabitants of Bialystok (Poland) over the age of 60. The study included 300 people, inhabitants of Bialystok and the surrounding area - aged over 60: 100 elderly residents of a nursing home, 100 students of the University of the Third Age in Bialystok and 100 students of the University of Healthy Senior. The study used three standardised psychometric scales: Patient Request Form (PRF), Acceptance of Illness Scale (AIS) and The Beliefs about Pain Control Questionnaire (BPCQ). The median of the overall score of AIS was 26 points, which is considered average in terms of acceptance of illness. The median value of the influence of internal factors on the control of pain in case of BPCQ scale was generally16 of 30 points, the influence of physicians - 15 of 24 points, while random events - 14 of 24 points. The overall result for PRF scale proved that the respondents were the least expected to look for emotional support (5 of 12 points). It was established that the group affiliation significantly affected the result of AIS (p < 0.001). There was also noted a negative relation between AIS and the search for emotional support (PRF) depending on the group. The higher the AIS value, the lower the score in case of search for emotional support (PRF). Neither gender nor age played a significant role

  5. "Stuck in the ICU": Caring for Children With Chronic Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Carrie M; Williams, Erin P; Shapiro, Miriam C; Hahn, Emily; Wright-Sexton, Laura; Hutton, Nancy; Boss, Renee D

    2017-09-15

    Neonatal ICUs and PICUs increasingly admit patients with chronic critical illness: children whose medical complexity leads to recurrent and prolonged ICU hospitalizations. We interviewed participants who routinely care for children with chronic critical illness to describe their experiences with ICU care for pediatric chronic critical illness. Semi-structured interviews. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed for themes. Stakeholders came from five regions (Seattle, WA; Houston, TX; Jackson, MS; Baltimore, MD; and Philadelphia, PA). Fifty-one stakeholders including: 1) interdisciplinary providers (inpatient, outpatient, home care, foster care) with extensive chronic critical illness experience; or 2) parents of children with chronic critical illness. Telephone or in-person interviews. Stakeholders identified several key issues and several themes emerged after qualitative analysis. Issues around chronic critical illness patient factors noted that patients are often relocated to the ICU because of their medical needs. During extended ICU stays, these children require longitudinal relationships and developmental stimulation that outstrip ICU capabilities. Family factors can affect care as prolonged ICU experience leads some to disengage from decision-making. Clinician factors noted that parents of children with chronic critical illness are often experts about their child's disease, shifting the typical ICU clinician-parent relationship. Comprehensive care for children with chronic critical illness can become secondary to needs of acutely ill patients. Lastly, with regard to system factors, stakeholders agreed that achieving consistent ICU care goals is difficult for chronic critical illness patients. ICU care is poorly adapted to pediatric chronic critical illness. Patient, family, clinician, and system factors highlight opportunities for targeted interventions toward improvement in care.

  6. [The Technology Acceptance Model and Its Application in a Telehealth Program for the Elderly With Chronic Illnesses].

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Ping

    2015-06-01

    Many technology developments hold the potential to improve the quality of life of people and make life easier and more comfortable. New technologies have been well accepted by most people. Information sharing in particular is a major catalyst of change in our current technology-based society. Technology has widely innovated life and drastically changed lifestyles. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), a model developed to address the rapid advances in computer technology, is used to explain and predict user acceptance of new information technology. In the past, businesses have used the TAM as an assessment tool to predict user acceptance when introducing new technology products. They have also used external factors in the model to influence user perceptions and beliefs and to ensure the successful spread of new technologies. Informatization plays a critical role in healthcare services. Due to the rapid aging of populations and upward trends in the incidence of chronic illness, requirements for long-term care have increased in both quality and quantity. Therefore, there has been an increased emphasis on integrating healthcare and information technology. However, most elderly are significantly less adept at technology use than the general population. Therefore, we reexamined the effect that the essential concepts in a TAM exerted on technology acceptance. In the present study, the technology acceptance experience with regard to telehealth of the elderly was used as an example to explain how the revised technology acceptance model (TAM 2) may be effectively applied to enhance the understanding of technology care among nurses. The results may serve as a reference for future research on healthcare-technology use in long-term care or in elderly populations.

  7. Intravenous levetiracetam in critically ill children with status epilepticus or acute repetitive seizures

    PubMed Central

    Abend, Nicholas S.; Monk, Heather M.; Licht, Daniel J.; Dlugos, Dennis J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Intravenous (IV) levetiracetam (LEV) is approved for use in patients older than 16 years and may be useful in critically ill children, although there is little data available regarding pharmacokinetics. We aim to investigate the safety, an appropriate dosing, and efficacy of IV LEV in critically ill children. Design We describe a cohort of critically ill children who received IV LEV for status epilepticus, including refractory or nonconvulsive status, or acute repetitive seizures. Results There were no acute adverse effects noted. Children had temporary cessation of ongoing refractory status epilepticus, termination of ongoing nonconvulsive status epilepticus, cessation of acute repetitive seizures, or reduction in epileptiform discharges with clinical correlate. Conclusions IV LEV was effective in terminating status epilepticus or acute repetitive seizures and well tolerated in critically ill children. Further study is needed to elucidate the role of IV LEV in critically ill children. PMID:19325512

  8. Colloids versus crystalloids for fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Perel, Pablo; Roberts, Ian; Ker, Katharine

    2013-02-28

    Colloid solutions are widely used in fluid resuscitation of critically ill patients. There are several choices of colloid, and there is ongoing debate about the relative effectiveness of colloids compared to crystalloid fluids. To assess the effects of colloids compared to crystalloids for fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register (17 October 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library) (Issue 10, 2012), MEDLINE (Ovid) 1946 to October 2012, EMBASE (Ovid) 1980 to October 2012, ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (1970 to October 2012), ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (1990 to October 2012), PubMed (October 2012), www.clinical trials.gov and www.controlled-trials.com. We also searched the bibliographies of relevant studies and review articles. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of colloids compared to crystalloids, in patients requiring volume replacement. We excluded cross-over trials and trials involving pregnant women and neonates. Two review authors independently extracted data and rated quality of allocation concealment. We analysed trials with a 'double-intervention', such as those comparing colloid in hypertonic crystalloid to isotonic crystalloid, separately. We stratified the analysis according to colloid type and quality of allocation concealment. We identified 78 eligible trials; 70 of these presented mortality data.COLLOIDS COMPARED TO CRYSTALLOIDS: Albumin or plasma protein fraction - 24 trials reported data on mortality, including a total of 9920 patients. The pooled risk ratio (RR) from these trials was 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93 to 1.10). When we excluded the trial with poor-quality allocation concealment, pooled RR was 1.00 (95% CI 0.92 to 1.09). Hydroxyethyl starch - 25 trials compared hydroxyethyl starch with crystalloids and included 9147 patients. The pooled RR was 1.10 (95% CI 1

  9. Colloids versus crystalloids for fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Perel, Pablo; Roberts, Ian

    2012-06-13

    Colloid solutions are widely used in fluid resuscitation of critically ill patients. There are several choices of colloid and there is ongoing debate about the relative effectiveness of colloids compared to crystalloid fluids. To assess the effects of colloids compared to crystalloids for fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register (searched 16 March 2012), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials 2011, issue 3 (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (Ovid) 1946 to March 2012, Embase (Ovid) 1980 to March 2012, ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (1970 to March 2012), ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (1990 to March 2012), PubMed (searched 16 March 2012), www.clinical trials.gov and www.controlled-trials.com. We also searched the bibliographies of relevant studies and review articles. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of colloids compared to crystalloids, in patients requiring volume replacement. We excluded cross-over trials and trials in pregnant women and neonates. Two authors independently extracted data and rated quality of allocation concealment. We analysed trials with a 'double-intervention', such as those comparing colloid in hypertonic crystalloid to isotonic crystalloid, separately. We stratified the analysis according to colloid type and quality of allocation concealment. We identified 74 eligible trials; 66 of these presented mortality data.Colloids compared to crystalloids Albumin or plasma protein fraction - 24 trials reported data on mortality, including a total of 9920 patients. The pooled relative risk (RR) from these trials was 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93 to 1.10). When we excluded the trial with poor quality allocation concealment, pooled RR was 1.00 (95% CI 0.92 to 1.09). Hydroxyethyl starch - 21 trials compared hydroxyethyl starch with crystalloids, n = 1385 patients. The pooled RR was 1.10 (95% CI 0.91 to 1.32). Modified

  10. Colloids versus crystalloids for fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Perel, Pablo; Roberts, Ian

    2011-03-16

    Colloid solutions are widely used in fluid resuscitation of critically ill patients. There are several choices of colloid and there is ongoing debate about the relative effectiveness of colloids compared to crystalloid fluids. To assess the effects of colloids compared to crystalloids for fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 3), MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S), and The Controlled Trials metaRegister (www.controlled-trials.com). Reference lists of relevant studies and review articles were searched for further trials. The searches were last updated in September 2008. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of colloids compared to crystalloids, in patients requiring volume replacement. We excluded cross-over trials and trials in pregnant women and neonates. Two authors independently extracted data and rated quality of allocation concealment. We analysed trials with a 'double-intervention', such as those comparing colloid in hypertonic crystalloid to isotonic crystalloid, separately. We stratified the analysis according to colloid type and quality of allocation concealment. We identified 65 eligible trials; 56 of these presented mortality data.Colloids compared to crystalloidsAlbumin or plasma protein fraction - 23 trials reported data on mortality, including a total of 7754 patients. The pooled relative risk (RR) from these trials was 1.01 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.92 to 1.10). When we excluded the trial with poor quality allocation concealment, pooled RR was 1.00 (95% CI 0.91 to 1.09). Hydroxyethyl starch - 17 trials compared hydroxyethyl starch with crystalloids, n = 1172 patients. The pooled RR was 1.18 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.44). Modified gelatin - 11 trials compared modified gelatin with crystalloid, n = 506 patients. The

  11. Adaptation to different noninvasive ventilation masks in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Silva, Renata Matos da; Timenetsky, Karina Tavares; Neves, Renata Cristina Miranda; Shigemichi, Liane Hirano; Kanda, Sandra Sayuri; Maekawa, Carla; Silva, Eliezer; Eid, Raquel Afonso Caserta

    2013-01-01

    To identify which noninvasive ventilation (NIV) masks are most commonly used and the problems related to the adaptation to such masks in critically ill patients admitted to a hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. An observational study involving patients ≥ 18 years of age admitted to intensive care units and submitted to NIV. The reason for NIV use, type of mask, NIV regimen, adaptation to the mask, and reasons for non-adaptation to the mask were investigated. We evaluated 245 patients, with a median age of 82 years. Acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use (in 71.3%). Total face masks were the most commonly used (in 74.7%), followed by full face masks and near-total face masks (in 24.5% and 0.8%, respectively). Intermittent NIV was used in 82.4% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to the mask was found in 76% of the patients. Masks had to be replaced by another type of mask in 24% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to total face masks and full face masks was found in 75.5% and 80.0% of the patients, respectively. Non-adaptation occurred in the 2 patients using near-total facial masks. The most common reason for non-adaptation was the shape of the face, in 30.5% of the patients. In our sample, acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use, and total face masks were the most commonly used. The most common reason for non-adaptation to the mask was the shape of the face, which was resolved by changing the type of mask employed.

  12. Early glycemic control in critically ill patients with burn injury.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Claire V; Coffey, Rebecca; Cook, Charles H; Gerlach, Anthony T; Miller, Sidney F

    2011-01-01

    Glucose management in patients with burn injury is often difficult because of their hypermetabolic state with associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Recent studies suggest that time to glycemic control is associated with improved outcomes. The authors sought to determine the influence of early glycemic control on the outcomes of critically ill patients with burn injury. A retrospective analysis was performed at the Ohio State University Medical Center. Patients hospitalized with burn injury were enrolled if they were admitted to the intensive care unit between March 1, 2006, and February 28, 2009. Early glycemic control was defined as the achievement of a mean daily blood glucose of ≤150 mg/dl for at least two consecutive days by postburn day 3. Forty-six patients made up the study cohort with 26 achieving early glycemic control and 20 who did not. The two groups were similar at baseline with regard to age, pre-existing diabetes, APACHE II score and burn size and depth. There were no differences in number of surgical interventions, infectious complications, or length of stay between patients who achieved or failed early glycemic control. Failure of early glycemic control was, however, associated with significantly higher mortality both by univariate (35.0 vs 7.7%, P = .03) and multivariate analyses (hazard ratio 6.754 [1.16-39.24], P = .03) adjusting for age, TBSA, and inhalation injury. Failure to achieve early glycemic control in patients with burn injury is associated with an increased risk of mortality. However, further prospective controlled trials are needed to establish causality of this association.

  13. Microbial colonization of open abdomen in critically ill surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Rasilainen, Suvi Kaarina; Juhani, Mentula Panu; Kalevi, Leppäniemi Ari

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to describe the time-course and microbiology of colonization of open abdomen in critically ill surgical patients and to study its association with morbidity, mortality and specific complications of open abdomen. A retrospective cohort analysis was done. One hundred eleven consecutive patients undergoing vacuum-assisted closure with mesh as temporary abdominal closure method for open abdomen were analyzed. Microbiological samples from the open abdomen were collected. Statistical analyses were performed using Fisher's exact test for categorical variables. Mann-Whitney U test was used when comparing number of temporary abdominal closure changes between colonized and sterile patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis was done to calculate cumulative estimates for colonization. Cox regression analyses were performed to analyze risk factors for colonization. Microbiological samples were obtained from 97 patients. Of these 76 (78 %) were positive. Sixty-one (80 %) patients were colonized with multiple micro-organisms and 27 (36 %) were cultured positive for candida species. The duration of open abdomen treatment adversely affected the colonization rate. Thirty-three (34 %) patients were colonized at the time of laparostomy. After one week of open abdomen treatment 69, and after two weeks 76 patients were colonized with cumulative colonization estimates of 74 % and 89 %, respectively. Primary fascial closure rate was 80 % (61/76) and 86 % (18/21) for the colonized and sterile patients, respectively. The rate of wound complications did not significantly differ between these groups. Microbial colonization of open abdomen is associated with the duration of open abdomen treatment. Wound complications are common after open abdomen, but colonization does not seem to have significant effect on these. The high colonization rate described herein should be taken into account when primarily sterile conditions like acute pancreatitis and aortic aneurysmal rupture

  14. Alteration of the sublingual microvascular glycocalyx in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Donati, Abele; Damiani, Elisa; Domizi, Roberta; Romano, Rocco; Adrario, Erica; Pelaia, Paolo; Ince, Can; Singer, Mervyn

    2013-11-01

    Glycocalyx degradation may contribute to microvascular dysfunction and tissue hypoperfusion during systemic inflammation and sepsis. In this observational study we evaluated the alteration of the sublingual microvascular glycocalyx in 16 healthy volunteers and 50 critically ill patients. Sidestream Dark Field images of the sublingual microcirculation were automatically analyzed by dedicated software. The Perfused Boundary Region (PBR) was calculated as the dimensions of the permeable part of the glycocalyx allowing the penetration of circulating red blood cells, providing an index of glycocalyx damage. The PBR was increased in ICU patients compared to healthy controls (2.7 [2.59-2.88] vs. 2.46 [2.37-2.59]μm, p<0.0001) and tended to be higher in the 32 septic patients compared to non-septics (2.77 [2.62-2.93] vs. 2.67 [2.55-2.75]μm, p=0.05), suggesting more severe glycocalyx alterations. A PBR of 2.76 showed the best discriminative ability towards the presence of sepsis (sensitivity: 50%, specificity: 83%; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.67, 95% CI 0.52-0.82, p=0.05). A weak positive correlation was found between PBR and heart rate (r=0.3, p=0.03). In 17 septic patients, a correlation was found between PBR and number of rolling leukocytes in post-capillary venules (RL/venule) (r=0.55, p=0.02), confirming that glycocalyx shedding enhances leukocyte-endothelium interaction.

  15. Adaptation to different noninvasive ventilation masks in critically ill patients*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Renata Matos; Timenetsky, Karina Tavares; Neves, Renata Cristina Miranda; Shigemichi, Liane Hirano; Kanda, Sandra Sayuri; Maekawa, Carla; Silva, Eliezer; Eid, Raquel Afonso Caserta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify which noninvasive ventilation (NIV) masks are most commonly used and the problems related to the adaptation to such masks in critically ill patients admitted to a hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: An observational study involving patients ≥ 18 years of age admitted to intensive care units and submitted to NIV. The reason for NIV use, type of mask, NIV regimen, adaptation to the mask, and reasons for non-adaptation to the mask were investigated. RESULTS: We evaluated 245 patients, with a median age of 82 years. Acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use (in 71.3%). Total face masks were the most commonly used (in 74.7%), followed by full face masks and near-total face masks (in 24.5% and 0.8%, respectively). Intermittent NIV was used in 82.4% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to the mask was found in 76% of the patients. Masks had to be replaced by another type of mask in 24% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to total face masks and full face masks was found in 75.5% and 80.0% of the patients, respectively. Non-adaptation occurred in the 2 patients using near-total facial masks. The most common reason for non-adaptation was the shape of the face, in 30.5% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: In our sample, acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use, and total face masks were the most commonly used. The most common reason for non-adaptation to the mask was the shape of the face, which was resolved by changing the type of mask employed. PMID:24068269

  16. Antivenom for critically ill children with neurotoxicity from scorpion stings.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Leslie V; Theodorou, Andreas A; Berg, Robert A; Mallie, Joanne; Chávez-Méndez, Ariana; García-Ubbelohde, Walter; Hardiman, Stephen; Alagón, Alejandro

    2009-05-14

    Clinically significant scorpion envenomation by Centruroides sculpturatus produces a dramatic neuromotor syndrome and respiratory insufficiency that often necessitate intensive supportive care. We hypothesized that a scorpion-specific F(ab')(2) antivenom would promptly resolve clinical symptoms in children with this syndrome. In a randomized, double-blind study, the efficacy of scorpion-specific F(ab')(2) antivenom, as compared with placebo, was assessed in 15 children 6 months to 18 years of age who were admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit with clinically significant signs of scorpion envenomation. The primary end point was the resolution of the clinical syndrome within 4 hours after administration of the study drug. Secondary end points included the total dose of concomitant midazolam for sedation and quantitative plasma venom levels, before and after treatment. The clinical syndrome resolved more rapidly among recipients of the antivenom than among recipients of placebo, with a resolution of symptoms in all eight antivenom recipients versus one of seven placebo recipients within 4 hours after treatment (P=0.001). More midazolam was administered in the placebo recipients than in the antivenom recipients (mean cumulative dose, 4.61 vs. 0.07 mg per kilogram of body weight; P=0.01). Plasma venom concentrations were undetectable in all eight antivenom recipients but in only one placebo recipient 1 hour after treatment (P=0.001). Among critically ill children with neurotoxic effects of scorpion envenomation, intravenous administration of scorpion-specific F(ab')(2) antivenom resolved the clinical syndrome within 4 hours, reduced the need for concomitant sedation with midazolam, and reduced the levels of circulating unbound venom. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00685230.) 2009 Massachusetts Medical Society

  17. Candida glabrata candidemia: An emerging threat in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashish; Gupta, Anu; Varma, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Candidemia is an important nosocomial blood stream infection in critically ill patients. Although several studies have addressed candidemia, very few have reviewed the impact of Candida glabrata candidemia in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Materials and Methods: The medical records of ICU patients between 2006 and 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. The epidemiology, clinical features and mortality related risk factors among our adult ICU patients were seen. Results: Among 144 episodes of candidemia, C. glabrata (n = 26; 18.05%) was the third most common species isolated. The incidence of C. glabrata candidemia was 0.21/1000 ICU admissions. The most common risk factors were prior exposure to broad spectrum antibiotics (100%), central venous catheter (100%), mechanical ventilation (76.9%), diabetes mellitus (50%), age >65 years (46.15%). Urine (23%) was the most common source of C. glabrata candidemia. Overall in hospital 30 days mortality rate due to C. glabrata fungemia was 53.8%. Patients who were treated with fluconazole showed better outcome than patients treated with amphotericin B. Renal failure requiring hemodialysis was the significantly associated with mortality in our study. Conclusion: Candida glabrata was the 3rd most common Candida causing candidemia in our ICUs with a incidence of 0.21/1000 ICU admissions. The outcome of ICU acquired C. glabrata candidemia was poor with 30 days mortality rate of 53.8%. Renal failure requiring hemodialysis was the only risk factor associated with mortality. Further studies are required to identify the other risk factors associated with mortality in C. glabrata candidemia. PMID:25810610

  18. Classifying transfusions related to the anemia of critical illness in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Posluszny, Joseph A; Conrad, Peggie; Halerz, Marcia; Shankar, Ravi; Gamelli, Richard L

    2011-07-01

    Critically ill patients require transfusions because of acute blood loss and the anemia of critical illness. In critically ill burn patients, typically, no distinction is made between transfusions related to acute surgical blood loss and those related to the anemia of critical illness. We sought to identify the percentage of blood transfusions due to the anemia of critical illness and the clinical characteristics associated with these transfusions in severely burned patients. Sixty adult patients with ≥20% total body surface area (TBSA) burn who were transfused at least 1 unit of packed red blood cells during their hospitalization were studied. Clinical variables including age, %TBSA burn, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, number of ventilator days, inhalation injury, and number of operative events were correlated with the total number of packed red blood cell units and percentage of nonsurgical transfusions in these patients. Nonsurgical transfusions were defined as transfusions occurring after postoperative day 1 for each distinct operative event and were classified as being caused by the anemia of critical illness. Patients were transfused an average of 16.6 units ± 21.2 units. Nonsurgical transfusions accounted for 52% of these transfusions. APACHE II score, %TBSA burn, number of ventilator days, and number of operative events, all correlated with total transfusions. However, nonsurgical transfusions correlated with only APACHE II score (p = 0.01) and number of ventilator days (p = 0.03). There was no correlation between nonsurgical transfusions and other clinical variables. The anemia of critical illness is responsible for >50% of all transfusions in severely burned patients. The initial severity of critical illness (APACHE II score) and duration of the critical illness (number of ventilator days) correlated with transfusions related to anemia of critical illness. Further investigation into the specific risk factors for these

  19. Classifying Transfusions Related to the Anemia of Critical Illness in Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Posluszny, Joseph A.; Conrad, Peggie; Halerz, Marcia; Shankar, Ravi; Gamelli, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Critically ill patients require transfusions because of acute blood loss and the anemia of critical illness. In critically ill burn patients, typically, no distinction is made between transfusions related to acute surgical blood loss and those related to the anemia of critical illness. We sought to identify the percentage of blood transfusions due to the anemia of critical illness and the clinical characteristics associated with these transfusions in severely burned patients. Methods Sixty adult patients with ≥20% total body surface area (TBSA) burn who were transfused at least 1 unit of packed red blood cells during their hospitalization were studied. Clinical variables including age, %TBSA burn, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, number of ventilator days, inhalation injury, and number of operative events were correlated with the total number of packed red blood cell units and percentage of nonsurgical transfusions in these patients. Nonsurgical transfusions were defined as transfusions occurring after postoperative day 1 for each distinct operative event and were classified as being caused by the anemia of critical illness. Results Patients were transfused an average of 16.6 units ± 21.2 units. Nonsurgical transfusions accounted for 52% of these transfusions. APACHE II score, %TBSA burn, number of ventilator days, and number of operative events, all correlated with total transfusions. However, nonsurgical transfusions correlated with only APACHE II score (p = 0.01) and number of ventilator days (p = 0.03). There was no correlation between nonsurgical transfusions and other clinical variables. Conclusion The anemia of critical illness is responsible for >50% of all transfusions in severely burned patients. The initial severity of critical illness (APACHE II score) and duration of the critical illness (number of ventilator days) correlated with transfusions related to anemia of critical illness. Further investigation

  20. 'Intensive care unit survivorship' - a constructivist grounded theory of surviving critical illness.

    PubMed

    Kean, Susanne; Salisbury, Lisa G; Rattray, Janice; Walsh, Timothy S; Huby, Guro; Ramsay, Pamela

    2017-10-01

    To theorise intensive care unit survivorship after a critical illness based on longitudinal qualitative data. Increasingly, patients survive episodes of critical illness. However, the short- and long-term impact of critical illness includes physical, psychological, social and economic challenges long after hospital discharge. An appreciation is emerging that care needs to extend beyond critical illness to enable patients to reclaim their lives postdischarge with the term 'survivorship' being increasingly used in this context. What constitutes critical illness survivorship has, to date, not been theoretically explored. Longitudinal qualitative and constructivist grounded theory. Interviews (n = 46) with 17 participants were conducted at four time points: (1) before discharge from hospital, (2) four to six weeks postdischarge, (3) six months and (4) 12 months postdischarge across two adult intensive care unit setting. Individual face-to-face interviews. Data analysis followed the principles of Charmaz's constructivist grounded theory. 'Intensive care unit survivorship' emerged as the core category and was theorised using concepts such as status passages, liminality and temporality to understand the various transitions participants made postcritical illness. Intensive care unit survivorship describes the unscheduled status passage of falling critically ill and being taken to the threshold of life and the journey to a life postcritical illness. Surviving critical illness goes beyond recovery; surviving means 'moving on' to life postcritical illness. 'Moving on' incorporates a redefinition of self that incorporates any lingering intensive care unit legacies and being in control of one's life again. For healthcare professionals and policymakers, it is important to realise that recovery and transitioning through to survivorship happen within an individual's time frame, not a schedule imposed by the healthcare system. Currently, there are no care pathways or policies in

  1. [Fish oil containing lipid emulsions in critically ill patients: Critical analysis and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Manzanares, W; Langlois, P L

    2016-01-01

    Third-generation lipid emulsions (LE) are soybean oil sparing strategies with immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory effects. Current evidence supporting the use of intravenous (i.v) fish oil (FO) LE in critically ill patients requiring parenteral nutrition or receiving enteral nutrition (pharmaconutrient strategy) mainly derives from small phase ii clinical trials in heterogenous intensive care unit patient's population. Over the last three years, there have been published different systematic reviews and meta-analyses evaluating the effects of FO containing LE in the critically ill. Recently, it has been demonstrated that i.v FO based LE may be able to significantly reduce the incidence of infections as well as mechanical ventilation days and hospital length of stay. Nonetheless, more robust evidence is required before giving a definitive recommendation. Finally, we strongly believe that a dosing study is required before new phase iii clinical trials comparing i.v FO containing emulsions versus other soybean oil strategies can be conducted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  2. Making sense of illness: late-in-life migration as point of departure for elderly Iranian immigrants' explanatory models of illness.

    PubMed

    Emami, Azita; Torres, Sandra

    2005-07-01

    This article is based on data gathered through 60 qualitative interviews conducted within the realm of three research projects that have used "culture-appropriate lenses" to study the postmigration situation of late-in-life Iranian immigrants to Sweden. The findings gathered through these studies were interpreted against the backdrop that culturally appropriate nursing theories provide. This meant that it was, at times, these elders' backgrounds as cultural "others" that were implicitly used to make sense of the various issues that were brought to the fore by these studies. The particular issue with which this article is concerned is the "unusualness" of these elders' explanatory models of illness. Inspired by the concept "definition of situation" in the symbolic interactionist perspective and by the feeling that this perspective might bring about a different interpretation of the original findings regarding their understandings of illness and disease, we set out to conduct a secondary analysis of these elders' explanatory models of illness. The findings presented in this article will show how the elderly Iranian immigrants interviewed in these three studies utilize the process of "late in life migration" as a point of reference for their understandings of what has caused the illnesses from which they suffered. Hereby we will suggest that the "unusualness" of their explanatory models of illness might be best understood if we focus on what they shared as immigrants (i.e., the fact that the process of late-in-life migration has made their culture obsolete) as opposed to what they shared as Iranians (i.e., their culture of origin).

  3. Increasing glucose load while maintaining normoglycemia does not evoke neuronal damage in prolonged critically ill rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sonneville, Romain; den Hertog, Heleen M; Derde, Sarah; Güiza, Fabian; Derese, Inge; Van den Berghe, Greet; Vanhorebeek, Ilse

    2013-12-01

    Preventing severe hyperglycemia with insulin reduced the neuropathological alterations in frontal cortex during critical illness. We investigated the impact of increasing glucose load under normoglycemia on neurons and glial cells. Hyperinflammatory critically ill rabbits were randomized to fasting or combined parenteral nutrition containing progressively increasing amounts of glucose (low, intermediate, high) within the physiological range but with a similar amount of amino acids and lipids. In all groups, normoglycemia was maintained with insulin. On day 7, we studied the neuropathological alterations in frontal cortex neurons, astrocytes and microglia, and MnSOD as marker of oxidative stress. The percentage of damaged neurons was comparable among all critically ill and healthy rabbits. Critical illness induced an overall 1.8-fold increase in astrocyte density and activation status, largely irrespective of the nutritional intake. The percentage of microglia activation in critically ill rabbits was comparable with that in healthy rabbits, irrespective of glucose load. Likewise, MnSOD expression was comparable in critically ill and healthy rabbits without any clear impact of the nutritional interventions. During prolonged critical illness, increasing intravenous glucose infusion while strictly maintaining normoglycemia appeared safe for neuronal integrity and did not substantially affect glial cells in frontal cortex. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of thyroid dysfunction in the critically ill: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bello, G; Ceaichisciuc, I; Silva, S; Antonelli, M

    2010-11-01

    During critical illness, patients with no known history of thyroid disorders may experience multiple alterations in their serum thyroid hormone levels. Such alterations have been termed sick euthyroid syndrome or, more recently, non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). The laboratory parameters of NTIS usually include low serum levels of triiodothyronine (T3), normal or low serum levels of thyroxine (T4) and normal or low serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). The magnitude of the alteration in thyroid function correlates with the severity of the illness and its outcomes in critically ill patients with NTIS. The pathogenetic mechanisms involved in NTIS include a decreased conversion of T4 to T3 in extrathyroidal tissues and alterations in thyroid hormones' binding to serum proteins. In cases of protracted critical illness, a decrease in the pulsatile frequency of TSH secretion, resulting from reduced thyrotropin-re leasing hormone (TRH) release by the hypothalamus, may also occur. Several medications or clinical conditions that are commonly present in critically ill patients may be responsible for lowering serum concentrations of thyroid hormone. Among those who study the condition, the question of whether NTIS is a protective adaptation of the organism to illness or a maladaptive response to a stressful insult remains unanswered. In either case, thyroid hormone abnormalities are likely to play a role in the critically ill patient.However, there is currently no convincing evidence to suggest that restoring physiological thyroid hormone concentrations in unselected patients with NTIS would be beneficial.

  5. Hydroxyethyl starch for fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Bagshaw, Sean M; Chawla, Lakhmir S

    2013-07-01

    Intravenous fluid therapy is one of the most frequent interventions provided to patients in the intensive care unit; however, the type of fluid (i.e., crystalloid or colloid) used for resuscitation remains controversial. The most common type of colloid administered to resuscitate critically ill patients is hydroxyethyl starch (HES); however, its safety and efficacy have not been rigorously evaluated in large pragmatic randomized trials, and emerging data have accumulated to question its potential for toxic adverse effects. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of HES for fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients with a focus on survival and kidney function. Multicentre (32 sites in Australia and New Zealand) blinded randomized controlled parallel-group trial. Seven thousand eligible adult patients (age - ≥ 18 yr) admitted to an intensive care unit and judged by their treating clinician to require fluid resuscitation were included in the study. Study treatment allocation used encrypted Web-based randomization stratified by site and an admission diagnosis of trauma. Randomized patients were assigned to receive either 6% HES with a molecular weight of 130 kD and molar substitution ratio of 0.4 (130/0.4; Voluven(®), Fresenius Kabi) in 0.9% sodium chloride or 0.9% sodium chloride (saline) in indistinguishable Free flex 500 mL bags until intensive care unit (ICU) discharge, death, or 90 days after randomization. According to registration guidelines, the study fluid was administered to a maximum dose of 50 mL kg(-1) body weight per day and followed, if necessary, by open-label saline during the remaining 24-hr period. The primary efficacy outcome was death within 90 days after randomization. The key secondary outcomes were incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI), defined by the RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, Endstage) criteria; treatment with renal replacement therapy(RRT); development of new organ dysfunction, defined by the sequential organ failure assessment

  6. Sleep Deprivation in Critical Illness: Its Role in Physical and Psychological Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Kamdar, Biren B.; Needham, Dale M.; Collop, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    Critically ill patients frequently experience poor sleep, characterized by frequent disruptions, loss of circadian rhythms, and a paucity of time spent in restorative sleep stages. Factors that are associated with sleep disruption in the intensive care unit (ICU) include patient-ventilator dysynchrony, medications, patient care interactions, and environmental noise and light. As the field of critical care increasingly focuses on patients' physical and psychological outcomes following critical illness, understanding the potential contribution of ICU-related sleep disruption on patient recovery is an important area of investigation. This review article summarizes the literature regarding sleep architecture and measurement in the critically ill, causes of ICU sleep fragmentation, and potential implications of ICU-related sleep disruption on patients' recovery from critical illness. With this background information, strategies to optimize sleep in the ICU are also discussed. PMID:21220271

  7. One-on-One Therapeutic Recreation Intervention with Elderly, Mentally Ill Nursing Home Residents: Does It Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Card, Jaclyn A.; Chamberland, Lee R.

    The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of one-on-one therapeutic recreation intervention on independence in leisure behavior of elderly, mentally ill residents residing in a nursing home. The researchers employed an experimental design and used the Comprehensive Leisure Rating Scale (CLEIRS) to measure independence in leisure…

  8. Terminally ill African American elders' access to and use of hospice care.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hyunjin; Schroepfer, Tracy A

    2015-05-01

    The underuse of hospice care by terminally ill African American elders suggests they are suffering when hospice care could offer quality end of life care. Guided by the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations, this study sought understanding of structural barriers faced when seeking access to hospice care and reasons for using it when access is possible. Data was collected through interviews with 28 African American hospice patients. Themes from directed content analysis provide insights into strategies used to overcome access barriers posed by income, health insurance and administrative procedure, as well as the role religion, family, information and health beliefs played in using it. Distributing educational materials and addressing spiritual/religious concerns in choosing hospice care are key in promoting African Americans' use of hospice care.

  9. [Influenza-related respiratory illnesses and associated causes among the elderly in a city in Northeast Brazil].

    PubMed

    Gomes, Aline de Andrade; Nunes, Marco Antônio Prado; Oliveira, Cristiane Costa da Cunha; Lima, Sônia Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Nationwide influenza vaccination campaigns are held annually in Brazil during the same time of the year. This study aimed to analyze deaths from respiratory illnesses and influenza-related causes among the elderly in the city of Aracaju, capital of Sergipe State, Brazil. Data were analyzed from the following databases: Information System on Influenza Epidemiological Surveillance (SIVEP_GRIPE), Hospital Information System (SIH), Mortality Information System (SIM), and Health Informatics Department (DATASUS), from 1998 to 2007, Sergipe State Central Laboratory (LACEN-SE), and rainfall data from the National Meteorology Institute (INMET). The year 2007 showed the highest mortality rate from influenza and related causes in elderly individuals. From 1998 to 2007, mortality rates from influenza-related respiratory illnesses and associated causes in Aracaju city were higher than in the States of Brazil, indicating the need to reformulate the influenza vaccination schedule in elderly residents of this city.

  10. Surfactant therapy for bronchiolitis in critically ill infants.

    PubMed

    Jat, Kana R; Chawla, Deepak

    2015-08-24

    the included studies to be at low risk or unclear risk across all risk of bias categories; we did not judge any of the studies to be at high risk of bias in any category. Our pooled analysis of the three trials revealed that duration of mechanical ventilation was not significantly different between the groups (mean difference (MD) -63.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) -130.43 to 4.35 hours) but duration of intensive care unit (ICU) stay was less in the surfactant group compared to the control group: MD -3.31, 95% CI -6.38 to -0.25 days. After excluding one trial which produced significant heterogeneity, the duration of mechanical ventilation and duration of ICU stay were significantly lower in the surfactant group compared to the control group: MD -28.99, 95% CI -40.10 to -17.87 hours; and MD -1.81, 95% CI -2.42 to -1.19 days, respectively. Use of surfactant had favourable effects on oxygenation and CO2 elimination. No adverse effects and no complications were observed in any of the three included studies. The level of evidence for duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of intensive care unit stay, oxygenation parameters, and carbon dioxide parameters was of moderate quality. Use of surfactant had favourable effects on duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of ICU stay, oxygenation, and CO2 elimination. However, the studies are few and small (n = 79) so available evidence is insufficient to establish the effectiveness of surfactant therapy for bronchiolitis in critically ill infants who require mechanical ventilation. There is a need for larger trials with adequate power and a cost-effectiveness analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of exogenous surfactant therapy for infants with bronchiolitis who require intensive care management.

  11. Special populations: care of the critically ill and injured during pandemics and disasters: CHEST consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Dries, David; Reed, Mary Jane; Kissoon, Niranjan; Christian, Michael D; Dichter, Jeffrey R; Devereaux, Asha V; Upperman, Jeffrey S

    2014-10-01

    Past disasters have highlighted the need to prepare for subsets of critically ill, medically fragile patients. These special patient populations require focused disaster planning that will address their medical needs throughout the event to prevent clinical deterioration. The suggestions in this article are important for all who are involved in large-scale disasters or pandemics with multiple critically ill or injured patients, including frontline clinicians, hospital administrators, and public health or government officials. Key questions regarding the care of critically ill or injured special populations during disasters or pandemics were identified, and a systematic literature review (1985-2013) was performed. No studies of sufficient quality were identified. Therefore, the panel developed expert opinion-based suggestions using a modified Delphi process. The panel did not include pediatrics as a separate special population because pediatrics issues are embedded in each consensus document. Fourteen suggestions were formulated regarding the care of critically ill and injured patients from special populations during pandemics and disasters. The suggestions cover the following areas: defining special populations for mass critical care, special population planning, planning for access to regionalized service for special populations, triage and resource allocation of special populations, therapeutic considerations, and crisis standards of care for special populations. Chronically ill, technologically dependent, and complex critically ill patients present a unique challenge to preparing and implementing mass critical care. There are, however, unique opportunities to engage patients, primary physicians, advocacy groups, and professional organizations to lessen the impact of disaster on these special populations.

  12. Forging a critical alliance: Addressing the research needs of the United States critical illness and injury community.

    PubMed

    Cobb, J Perren; Ognibene, Frederick P; Ingbar, David H; Mann, Henry J; Hoyt, David B; Angus, Derek C; Thomas, Alvin V; Danner, Robert L; Suffredini, Anthony F

    2009-12-01

    Discuss the research needs of the critical illness and injury communities in the United States. Workshop session held during the 5 National Institutes of Health Symposium on the Functional Genomics of Critical Illness and Injury (November 15, 2007). The current clinical research infrastructure misses opportunities for synergy and does not address many important needs. In addition, it remains challenging to rapidly and properly implement system-wide changes based upon reproducible evidence from clinical research. Author presentations, panel discussion, attendee feedback. The critical illness and injury research communities seek better communication and interaction, both of which will improve the breadth and quality of acute care research. Success in meeting these needs should come from cooperative and strategic actions that favor collaboration, standardization of protocols, and strong leadership. An alliance framed on common goals will foster collaboration among experts to better promote clinical trials within the critically ill or injured patient population. The U.S. Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group was funded to create a clinical research framework that can reduce the barriers to investigation using an investigator-initiated, evidence-driven, inclusive approach that has proven successful elsewhere. This alliance will provide an annual venue for systematic review and strategic planning that will include framing the research agenda, raising awareness for the value of acute care research, gathering and promoting best practices, and bolstering the critical care workforce.

  13. Relatives perception of writing diaries for critically ill. A phenomenological hermeneutical study.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Anne H; Angel, Sanne

    2015-09-28

    Diaries written by nurses for the critically ill patient help the relatives cope and support the patient. Relatives may participate in writing a diary for the critically ill and when they do this is appreciated by the patients. However, the relative's perception of writing a diary has not previously been explored. To explore how relatives perceive writing a diary for the critically ill patient. In a phenomenological-hermeneutic study building on the theory of Ricoeur interviews with seven relatives were conducted and interpreted. When relatives wrote a diary for the critically patients, they experienced that writing and reading the diary allowed for the unloading of emotions and expression of feelings. Writing a diary was a meaningful activity while enduring a situation of uncertainty and furthermore it created a distance that allowed understanding of the critical situation. Involving relatives in writing a diary may support relatives and help them cope with the critical situation. Relatives are distressed and struggle to understand what is happening during the patient's course of illness. Involving relatives in writing a diary for the critically ill could be one way to meet their needs in the critical situation. © 2015 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  14. Defining Pediatric Chronic Critical Illness for Clinical Care, Research, and Policy.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Miriam C; Henderson, Carrie M; Hutton, Nancy; Boss, Renee D

    2017-04-01

    Chronically critically ill pediatric patients represent an emerging population in NICUs and PICUs. Chronic critical illness has been recognized and defined in the adult population, but the same attention has not been systematically applied to pediatrics. This article reviews what is currently known about pediatric chronic critical illness, highlighting the unique aspects of chronic critical illness in infants and children, including specific considerations of prognosis, outcomes, and decision-making. We propose a definition that incorporates NICU versus PICU stays, recurrent ICU admissions, dependence on life-sustaining technology, multiorgan dysfunction, underlying medical complexity, and the developmental implications of congenital versus acquired conditions. We propose a research agenda, highlighting existing knowledge gaps and targeting areas of improvement in clinical care, research, and policy.

  15. Immediate intralipid clearance from plasma in critically ill patients after a single-dose injection

    SciTech Connect

    Lindh, A.; Roessner, S.

    1987-09-01

    Plasma fractional removal rates (k2) of Intralipid injected in parallel with /sup 125/I albumin were analyzed in five healthy males and nine critically ill patients. The k2 values of critically ill patients were similar to those of healthy subjects. However, the initial plasma concentrations of Intralipid calculated by extrapolation to zero-time (y0) were markedly different. The mean y0 value in the critically ill patients was 43% that of healthy subjects. No plasma loss of /sup 125/I albumin occurred throughout the test. Intralipid to /sup 125/I albumin plasma concentration ratios during the removal phase paralleled the curves obtained from the iv fat tolerance test. This suggests that these ratios depend on Intralipid clearance rather than leakage from the circulation. The immediate loss of Intralipid suggests that the pulmonary vasculature, the first capillary bed through which the emulsion passes, could be the site where a substantial uptake of the emulsion occurs in critically ill patients.

  16. Immunoinflammatory Response in Critically Ill Patients: Severe Sepsis and/or Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Nada; Djordjevic, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Immunoinflammatory response in critically ill patients is very complex. This review explores some of the new elements of immunoinflammatory response in severe sepsis, tumor necrosis factor-alpha in severe acute pancreatitis as a clinical example of immune response in sepsis, immune response in severe trauma with or without secondary sepsis, and genetic aspects of host immuno-inflammatory response to various insults in critically ill patients. PMID:24371374

  17. Postpyloric enteral nutrition in the critically ill child with shock: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    López-Herce, Jesús; Mencía, Santiago; Sánchez, César; Santiago, Maria J; Bustinza, Amaya; Vigil, Dolores

    2008-01-31

    Tolerance to enteral nutrition in the critically ill child with shock has not been studied. The purpose of the study was to analyze the characteristics of enteral nutrition and its tolerance in the critically ill child with shock and to compare this with non-shocked patients. A prospective, observational study was performed including critically ill children with shock who received postpyloric enteral nutrition (PEN). The type of nutrition used, its duration, tolerance, and gastrointestinal complications were assessed. The 65 children with shock who received PEN were compared with 461 non-shocked critically ill children who received PEN. Sixty-five critically ill children with shock, aged between 21 days and 22 years, received PEN. 75.4% of patients with shock received PEN exclusively. The mean duration of the PEN was 25.2 days and the maximum calorie intake was 79.4 kcal/kg/day. Twenty patients with shock (30.7%) presented gastrointestinal complications, 10 (15.4%) abdominal distension and/or excessive gastric residue, 13 (20%) diarrhoea, 1 necrotising enterocolitis, and 1 duodenal perforation due to the postpyloric tube. The frequency of gastrointestinal complications was significantly higher than in the other 461 critically ill children (9.1%). PEN was suspended due to gastrointestinal complications in 6 patients with shock (9.2%). There were 18 deaths among the patients with shock and PEN (27.7%). In only one patient was the death related to complications of the nutrition. Although most critically ill children with shock can tolerate postpyloric enteral nutrition, the incidence of gastrointestinal complications is higher in this group of patients than in other critically ill children.

  18. RBC Storage Effect on Coagulation, Microparticles and Microchimerism in Critically Ill Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    mechanisms of adverse effects related to RBC storage age in critically ill patients. To date we have enrolled 130 patients at the three clinical sites in...Prospective clinical studies investigating the mechanisms and clinical outcomes associated with increased or decreased RBC storage age in critically ill...patients including traumatic injury have not been performed. The ABLE study presents a unique and probably one-time opportunity to investigate mechanisms

  19. 'Right' way to 'do' illness? Thinking critically about positive thinking.

    PubMed

    McGrath, C; Jordens, C F C; Montgomery, K; Kerridge, I H

    2006-10-01

    Exhortations to 'be positive' accompany many situations in life, either as a general injunction or in difficult situations where people are facing pressure or adversity. It is particularly evident in health care, where positive thinking has become an aspect of the way people are expected to 'do' illness in developed society. Positive thinking is framed both as a moral injunction and as a central belief system. It is thought to help patients cope emotionally with illness and to provide a biological benefit. Yet, the meanings, expectations and outcomes of positive thinking are infrequently questioned and the risks of positive thinking are rarely examined. We outline some of the latter and suggest that health professionals should exercise caution in both 'prescribing' positive thinking and in responding to patients and carers whose belief systems and feelings of obligation rest on it.

  20. Thyroid Function in Critical Illness and Burn Injury,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    difficult to characterize the bidity or mortality. T4 treatment of septic rats effects of altered thyroid hormone levels as ad- may have worsened their...condition.63 verse or deleterious. Nevertheless, the patterns of thyroid hormone Thyroid Hormone Disposal changes and the plethora of conditions in...pothyroidism exists at the tissue level in NTI. greater severity of illness, T 3 and free T 3 are even Thyroid hormone kinetic studies have shown re- more

  1. A critical appraisal of point-of-care coagulation testing in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Levi, M; Hunt, B J

    2015-11-01

    Derangement of the coagulation system is a common phenomenon in critically ill patients, who may present with severe bleeding and/or conditions associated with a prothrombotic state. Monitoring of this coagulopathy can be performed with conventional coagulation assays; however, point-of-care tests have become increasingly attractive, because not only do they yield a more rapid result than clinical laboratory testing, but they may also provide a more complete picture of the condition of the hemostatic system. There are many potential areas of study and applications of point-of-care hemostatic testing in critical care, including patients who present with massive blood loss, patients with a hypercoagulable state (such as in disseminated intravascular coagulation), and monitoring of antiplatelet treatment for acute arterial thrombosis, mostly acute coronary syndromes. However, the limitations of near-patient hemostatic testing has not been fully appreciated, and are discussed here. The currently available evidence indicates that point-of-care tests may be applied to guide appropriate blood product transfusion and the use of hemostatic agents to correct the hemostatic defect or to ameliorate antithrombotic treatment. Disappointingly, however, only in cardiac surgery is there adequate evidence to show that application of near-patient thromboelastography leads to an improvement in clinically relevant outcomes, such as reductions in bleeding-related morbidity and mortality, and cost-effectiveness. More research is required to validate the utility and cost-effectiveness of near-patient hemostatic testing in other areas, especially in traumatic bleeding and postpartum hemorrhage.

  2. Improving risk classification of critical illness with biomarkers: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Christopher W.; Cooke, Colin R.; Wang, Zheyu; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Yealy, Donald M.; Angus, Derek C.; Rea, Thomas D.; Kahn, Jeremy M.; Pepe, Margaret S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Optimal triage of patients at risk of critical illness requires accurate risk prediction, yet little data exists on the performance criteria required of a potential biomarker to be clinically useful. Materials and Methods We studied an adult cohort of non-arrest, non-trauma emergency medical services encounters transported to a hospital from 2002–2006. We simulated hypothetical biomarkers increasingly associated with critical illness during hospitalization, and determined the biomarker strength and sample size necessary to improve risk classification beyond a best clinical model. Results Of 57,647 encounters, 3,121 (5.4%) were hospitalized with critical illness and 54,526 (94.6%) without critical illness. The addition of a moderate strength biomarker (odds ratio=3.0 for critical illness) to a clinical model improved discrimination (c-statistic 0.85 vs. 0.8, p<0.01), reclassification (net reclassification improvement=0.15, 95%CI: 0.13,0.18), and increased the proportion of cases in the highest risk categoryby+8.6% (95%CI: 7.5,10.8%). Introducing correlation between the biomarker and physiological variables in the clinical risk score did not modify the results. Statistically significant changes in net reclassification required a sample size of at least 1000 subjects. Conclusions Clinical models for triage of critical illness could be significantly improved by incorporating biomarkers, yet, substantial sample sizes and biomarker strength may be required. PMID:23566734

  3. Proximal gastric motility in critically ill patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam Q; Fraser, Robert J; Bryant, Laura K; Chapman, Marianne; Holloway, Richard H

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the proximal gastric motor response to duodenal nutrients in critically ill patients with long-standing type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: Proximal gastric motility was assessed (using a barostat) in 10 critically ill patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (59 ± 3 years) during two 60-min duodenal infusions of Ensure® (1 and 2 kcal/min), in random order, separated by 2 h fasting. Data were compared with 15 non-diabetic critically ill patients (48 ± 5 years) and 10 healthy volunteers (28 ± 3 years). RESULTS: Baseline proximal gastric volumes were similar between the three groups. In diabetic patients, proximal gastric relaxation during 1 kcal/min nutrient infusion was similar to non-diabetic patients and healthy controls. In contrast, relaxation during 2 kcal/min infusion was initially reduced in diabetic patients (p < 0.05) but increased to a level similar to healthy humans, unlike non-diabetic patients where relaxation was impaired throughout the infusion. Duodenal nutrient stimulation reduced the fundic wave frequency in a dose-dependent fashion in both the critically ill diabetic patients and healthy subjects, but not in critically ill patients without diabetes. Fundic wave frequency in diabetic patients and healthy subjects was greater than in non-diabetic patients. CONCLUSION: In patients with diabetes mellitus, proximal gastric motility is less disturbed than non-diabetic patients during critical illness, suggesting that these patients may not be at greater risk of delayed gastric emptying. PMID:17226907

  4. Implementing Evidenced Based Oral Care for Critically Ill Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-28

    critical care nursing education was conducted over a two- week period using the conceptual underpinning of the Iowa Model, the Diffusion of Innovation...every 4 hours during 2 six- week sessions. This was followed by a six- week sustainment period and the collection of OC compliance and nurse knowledge...program, using the Iowa Model. Methods: Evidence-based Oral Care (EB OC) critical care nursing education was conducted over a two- week period using

  5. [The optimal blood glucose target in critically ill patient: comparison of two intensive insulin therapy protocols].

    PubMed

    Raurell Torredà, Marta; del Llano Serrano, César; Almirall Solsona, Dolors; Catalan Ibars, Rosa María; Nicolás Arfelis, José María

    2014-03-04

    Recent studies in critically ill patients receiving insulin intravenous therapy (IIT) have shown an increased incidence of severe hypoglycemia, while intermittent subcutaneous insulin «sliding scales» (conventional insulin therapy [CIT]) is associated with hyperglycemia. The objective of this study is to assess whether glycemic control range IIT can affect glucose levels and their variability and to compare it with CIT. Prospective comparative cohort study in intensive care unit, with 2 study periods: Period 1, IIT with glycemic target range 110-140 mg/dL, and Period 2, IIT of 140-180 mg/dL. In both periods CIT glycemic target was 110-180 mg/dL. We assessed severe hypoglycemia (< 50 mg/dL), moderate hypoglycemia (51-79 mg/dL), hyperglycemia (> 216 mg/L) and the variability of blood glucose. We studied 221 patients with 12.825 blood glucose determinations. Twenty-six and 17% of patients required IIT for glycemic control in Period 1 and 2, respectively. Hypoglycemia was associated with a discontinuous nutritional intake, glycemic target 110-140 mg/dL and low body mass index (BMI) (P = .002). Hyperglycemia was exclusively associated with a history of diabetes mellitus (OR 2.6 [95% CI 1.6 to 4.5]). Glycemic variability was associated with a discontinuous nutritional intake, low BMI, CIT insulinization, diabetes mellitus, elderly and high APACHE II (P < .001). The use of IIT is useful to reduce the variability of blood glucose. Although the 140-180 mg/dL range would be more secure as to presenting greater variability and hyperglycemia, the 110-140 mg/dL range is most suitable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of virtual reality gaming systems for children who are critically ill.

    PubMed

    Salem, Yasser; Elokda, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Children who are critically ill are frequently viewed as "too sick" to tolerate physical activity. As a result, these children often fail to develop strength or cardiovascular endurance as compared to typically developing children. Previous reports have shown that early participation in physical activity in is safe and feasible for patients who are critically ill and may result in a shorter length of stay and improved functional outcomes. The use of the virtual reality gaming systems has become a popular form of therapy for children with disabilities and has been supported by a growing body of evidence substantiating its effectiveness with this population. The use of the virtual reality gaming systems in pediatric rehabilitation provides the children with opportunity to participate in an exercise program that is fun, enjoyable, playful, and at the same time beneficial. The integration of those systems in rehabilitation of children who are critically ill is appealing and has the potential to offer the possibility of enhancing physical activities. The lack of training studies involving children who are critically ill makes it difficult to set guidelines on the recommended physical activities and virtual reality gaming systems that is needed to confer health benefits. Several considerations should be taken into account before recommended virtual reality gaming systems as a training program for children who are critically ill. This article highlighted guidelines, limitations and challenges that need to be considered when designing exercise program using virtual reality gaming systems for critically ill children. This information is helpful given the popular use of virtual reality gaming systems in rehabilitation, particularly in children who are critically ill.

  7. Diaphragm muscle fiber weakness and ubiquitin-proteasome activation in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hooijman, Pleuni E; Beishuizen, Albertus; Witt, Christian C; de Waard, Monique C; Girbes, Armand R J; Spoelstra-de Man, Angelique M E; Niessen, Hans W M; Manders, Emmy; van Hees, Hieronymus W H; van den Brom, Charissa E; Silderhuis, Vera; Lawlor, Michael W; Labeit, Siegfried; Stienen, Ger J M; Hartemink, Koen J; Paul, Marinus A; Heunks, Leo M A; Ottenheijm, Coen A C

    2015-05-15

    The clinical significance of diaphragm weakness in critically ill patients is evident: it prolongs ventilator dependency, and increases morbidity and duration of hospital stay. To date, the nature of diaphragm weakness and its underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesized that diaphragm muscle fibers of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients display atrophy and contractile weakness, and that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is activated in the diaphragm. We obtained diaphragm muscle biopsies from 22 critically ill patients who received mechanical ventilation before surgery and compared these with biopsies obtained from patients during thoracic surgery for resection of a suspected early lung malignancy (control subjects). In a proof-of-concept study in a muscle-specific ring finger protein-1 (MuRF-1) knockout mouse model, we evaluated the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in the development of contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. Both slow- and fast-twitch diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients had approximately 25% smaller cross-sectional area, and had contractile force reduced by half or more. Markers of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway were significantly up-regulated in the diaphragm of critically ill patients. Finally, MuRF-1 knockout mice were protected against the development of diaphragm contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. These findings show that diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients display atrophy and severe contractile weakness, and in the diaphragm of critically ill patients the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is activated. This study provides rationale for the development of treatment strategies that target the contractility of diaphragm fibers to facilitate weaning.

  8. Diaphragm Muscle Fiber Weakness and Ubiquitin–Proteasome Activation in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hooijman, Pleuni E.; Beishuizen, Albertus; Witt, Christian C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Girbes, Armand R. J.; Spoelstra-de Man, Angelique M. E.; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Manders, Emmy; van Hees, Hieronymus W. H.; van den Brom, Charissa E.; Silderhuis, Vera; Lawlor, Michael W.; Labeit, Siegfried; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Hartemink, Koen J.; Paul, Marinus A.; Heunks, Leo M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The clinical significance of diaphragm weakness in critically ill patients is evident: it prolongs ventilator dependency, and increases morbidity and duration of hospital stay. To date, the nature of diaphragm weakness and its underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood. Objectives: We hypothesized that diaphragm muscle fibers of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients display atrophy and contractile weakness, and that the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway is activated in the diaphragm. Methods: We obtained diaphragm muscle biopsies from 22 critically ill patients who received mechanical ventilation before surgery and compared these with biopsies obtained from patients during thoracic surgery for resection of a suspected early lung malignancy (control subjects). In a proof-of-concept study in a muscle-specific ring finger protein-1 (MuRF-1) knockout mouse model, we evaluated the role of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway in the development of contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. Measurements and Main Results: Both slow- and fast-twitch diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients had approximately 25% smaller cross-sectional area, and had contractile force reduced by half or more. Markers of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway were significantly up-regulated in the diaphragm of critically ill patients. Finally, MuRF-1 knockout mice were protected against the development of diaphragm contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. Conclusions: These findings show that diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients display atrophy and severe contractile weakness, and in the diaphragm of critically ill patients the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway is activated. This study provides rationale for the development of treatment strategies that target the contractility of diaphragm fibers to facilitate weaning. PMID:25760684

  9. [Urinary tract colonization and infection in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    López, M J; Cortés, J A

    2012-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) account for 20-50% of all hospital-acquired infections occurring in the intensive care unit (ICU). In some reports UTI was found to be more frequent than hospital-acquired pneumonia and intravascular device bacteremia, with a greater incidence in developing countries. The risk factors associated with the appearance of UTI include the severity of illness at the time of admission to the ICU, female status, prolonged urinary catheterization or a longer ICU stay and poor urinary catheter management - mainly disconnection of the closed system. about the present study offers data on the epidemiology of UTI in the ICU, the identified risk factors, etiology, diagnosis, impact upon morbidity and mortality, and the measures to prevent its appearance.

  10. [Cytokine imbalance in critically ill patients: SIRS and CARS].

    PubMed

    Murata, A; Kikuchi, M; Mishima, S; Sakaki, S; Goto, H; Matsuoka, T; Tanaka, H; Yukioka, T; Shimazaki, S

    1999-07-01

    It remains difficult to treat severely ill patients, especially those who have sepsis and subsequent multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. We propose the hypothesis that the pathophysiology in the sequential sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome may be strongly related to the imbalance between inflammatory cytokines and antiinflammatory cytokines induced for the host defense to active neutrophils and endothelial cells. Thus we attempted to develop cytokine modulation therapy to normalize the cytokine balance in the host defense system. In this review, we elucidate the relationship between cytokine imbalance and SIRS/CARS in patients with severe burn injury. Furthermore, we examine the possible usage of G-CSF to amplify neutrophil function, and clarify the reasons why various innovative therapies against sepsis have failed.

  11. Altered gonadal steroidogenesis in critical illness: is treatment with anabolic steroids indicated?

    PubMed

    Spratt, D I

    2001-12-01

    The physiology of the reproductive system changes dramatically with the onset of major illness. The serum testosterone concentrations fall to pre-pubertal levels secondary to a decreased secretion of gonadotropins and a decreased Leydig cell response to luteinizing hormone. At the same time, the serum oestrogen concentration rises as the result of an increased rate of peripheral aromatization. The clinical consequences of these marked changes are not yet well understood. One line of evidence argues for the administration of anabolic steroids (derivatives of testosterone) to critically ill patients to improve their catabolic state. Another line of evidence in animal models suggests that testosterone may suppress the immune system and myocardial function in critical illness. No clinical trials of oestrogen administration to critically ill patients have been reported, although two animal studies suggest that oestrogen may have a positive effect on survival. This chapter reviews changes in the physiology of the reproductive system in major illness as well as current evidence regarding the clinical effects of androgens and oestrogens in critical illness and their potential therapeutic roles.

  12. Does artificial nutrition improve outcome of critical illness? An alternative viewpoint!

    PubMed

    Heyland, Daren K; Wischmeyer, Paul E

    2013-08-27

    Recent studies challenge the beneficial role of artificial nutrition provided to critically ill patients and point out the limitations of existing studies in this area. We take a differing view of the existing data and refute many of the arguments put forward by previous authors. We review the mechanistic, observational, and experimental data supporting a role for early enteral nutrition in the critically ill patient. We conclude without question that more, high-quality research is needed to better define the role of artificial nutrition in the critical care setting, but until then early and adequate delivery of enteral nutrition is a legitimate, evidence-based treatment recommendation and we see no evidence-based role for restricting enteral nutrition in critically ill patients. The role of early supplemental parenteral nutrition continues to be defined as new data emerge.

  13. Testing nasogastric tube positioning in the critically ill: exploring the evidence.

    PubMed

    May, Sarah

    Nutritional support in the critically ill is commonly delivered via a nasogastric tube. Correct positioning in the stomach must first be confirmed as inadvertent feeding into the lungs carries a high risk of mortality. The National Patient Safety Agency (2005) recommends the method of pH testing nasogastric tube aspirates to verify tube position. This article critically analyses the research supporting this method, and questions its reliability in critically ill patients whose gastric pH may well be altered due to prophylactic stress ulcer medications and continuous feeding regimens. There is a lack of quality research testing this method in the critically ill population. The theory-practice gap is addressed, and preliminary research behind use of techniques such as capnography and capnometry is also examined.

  14. Detecting critical illness outside the ICU: the role of track and trigger systems.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jan O; Cuthbertson, Brian H

    2010-06-01

    Critical illness is often preceded by physiological deterioration. Track and trigger systems are intended to facilitate the timely recognition of patients with potential or established critical illness outside critical care areas. The aim of this article is to review the evidence for the use of such systems. Existing track and trigger systems have low sensitivity, low positive predictive values, and high specificity. They often fail to identify patients who need additional care and have not been shown to improve outcomes. The development of such systems must be based on robust methodological and statistical principles. At present, few track and trigger systems meet these standards. Although track and trigger systems, combined with appropriate response algorithms, have the potential to improve the recognition and management of critical illness, further work is required to validate their utility.

  15. Neuromuscular Disorders and Sleep in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Irfan, Muna; Selim, Bernardo; Rabinstein, Alejandro A.

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is a frequent presenting manifestation of neuromuscular disorders and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. If not promptly recognized and addressed early in the clinical course, SDB can lead to clinical deterioration with respiratory failure. In this article, we review the pathophysiologic basis of SDB in neuromuscular disorders, clinical features encountered in specific neuromuscular diseases, and diagnostic and management strategies for SDB in neuromuscular patients in the critical care setting. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPV) has been a crucial advance in critical care management, improving sleep quality and often preventing or delaying mechanical ventilation and improving survival in neuromuscular patients. PMID:26118919

  16. Neuromuscular disorders and sleep in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Irfan, Muna; Selim, Bernardo; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; St Louis, Erik K

    2015-07-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is a frequent presenting manifestation of neuromuscular disorders and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. If not recognized and addressed early in the clinical course, SDB can lead to clinical deterioration with respiratory failure. The pathophysiologic basis of SDB in neuromuscular disorders, clinical features encountered in specific neuromuscular diseases, and diagnostic and management strategies for SDB in neuromuscular patients in the critical care setting are reviewed. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation has been a crucial advance in critical care management, improving sleep quality and often preventing or delaying mechanical ventilation and improving survival in neuromuscular patients.

  17. In-hospital death according to dementia diagnosis in acutely ill elderly patients: the REPOSI study.

    PubMed

    Marengoni, A; Corrao, S; Nobili, A; Tettamanti, M; Pasina, L; Salerno, F; Iorio, A; Marcucci, M; Bonometti, F; Mannucci, P M

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the association of dementia with in-hospital death in acutely ill medical patients. Thirty-four internal medicine and 4 geriatric wards in Italy participated in the Registro Politerapie SIMI-REPOSI-study during 2008. One thousand three hundred and thirty two in-patients aged 65 years or older were enrolled. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association of dementia with in-hospital death. Socio-demographic characteristics, morbidity (single diseases and the Charlson Index), number of drugs, and adverse clinical events during hospitalization were considered as potential confounders. One hundred and seventeen participants were diagnosed as being affected by dementia. Patients with dementia were more likely to be women, older, to have cerebrovascular diseases, pneumonia, and a higher number of adverse clinical events during hospitalization. The percentage of patients affected by dementia who died during hospitalization was higher than that of patients without dementia (9.4 versus 4.9%). After multiadjustment, the diagnosis of dementia was associated with in-hospital death (OR = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.0-4.5). Having dementia and at least one adverse clinical event during hospitalization showed an additive effect on in-hospital mortality (OR = 20.7; 95% CI = 6.9-61.9). Acutely ill elderly patients affected by dementia are more likely to die shortly after hospital admission. Having dementia and adverse clinical events during hospital stay increases the risk of death. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Overview of the endocrine response to critical illness: how to measure it and when to treat.

    PubMed

    Hassan-Smith, Zaki; Cooper, Mark S

    2011-10-01

    The assessment and manipulation of the endocrine system in patients with critical illness is one of the most complex and controversial areas in endocrinology. Severe acute illness causes dramatic changes in most endocrine systems. This can lead to considerable difficulty in recognising pre-existing endocrine disorders in severely ill patients. Critical care itself might also induce types of endocrine dysfunction not seen outside the critical care unit. It is important to clarify whether or not such endocrine dysfunction occurs. Where it does occur it is also important to determine whether endocrine intervention is useful in improving outcome. There is also the issue of whether endocrine manipulation in critically ill patients without endocrine dysfunction could benefit from endocrine intervention, e.g. to improve haemodynamics or reverse a catabolic state. This review will discuss some of these contentious issues. It will highlight how endocrine assessment of a patient with critical illness differs from that in other types of patient. It will emphasise the added need to place the biochemical assessment and its interpretation in the context of the patients underlying condition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sleep of critically ill children in the pediatric intensive care unit: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kudchadkar, Sapna R; Aljohani, Othman A; Punjabi, Naresh M

    2014-04-01

    Critically ill children in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) are exposed to multiple physical, environmental and pharmacologic factors which increase the propensity for sleep disruption and loss and may, in turn, play a role in short-term recovery from critical illness and long-term neurocognitive outcomes. Mechanically ventilated children receive sedative and analgesic medications, often at high doses and for long durations, to improve comfort and synchrony with mechanical ventilation. Sedatives and analgesics can decrease slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep. Paradoxically, sedative medication doses are often increased in critically ill children to improve the subjective assessment of sedation and sleep, leading to further agitation and deterioration of sleep quality. The heterogeneity in age and critical illness encountered in the PICU pose several challenges to research on sleep in this setting. The present article reviews the available evidence on sleep in critically ill children admitted to the PICU, with an emphasis on subjective and objective methods of sleep assessment used and special populations studied, including mechanically ventilated children and children with severe burns.

  20. Intensive care unit acquired weakness in children: Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kukreti, Vinay; Shamim, Mosharraf; Khilnani, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Intensive care unit acquired weakness (ICUAW) is a common occurrence in patients who are critically ill. It is most often due to critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) or to critical illness myopathy (CIM). ICUAW is increasingly being recognized partly as a consequence of improved survival in patients with severe sepsis and multi-organ failure, partly related to commonly used agents such as steroids and muscle relaxants. There have been occasional reports of CIP and CIM in children, but little is known about their prevalence or clinical impact in the pediatric population. This review summarizes the current understanding of pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of CIP and CIM in general with special reference to published literature in the pediatric age group. Subjects and Methods: Studies were identified through MedLine and Embase using relevant MeSH and Key words. Both adult and pediatric studies were included. Results: ICUAW in children is a poorly described entity with unknown incidence, etiology and unclear long-term prognosis. Conclusions: Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy is relatively rare, but clinically significant sequelae of multifactorial origin affecting morbidity, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay and possibly mortality in critically ill children admitted to pediatric ICU. PMID:24678152

  1. Models of Care Delivery for Families of Critically Ill Children: An Integrative Review of International Literature.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kate; Foster, Kim; Mitchell, Rebecca; Van, Connie

    2016-01-01

    Critical illness in children is a life changing event for the child, their parents, caregivers and wider family. There is a need to design and evaluate models of care that aim to implement family-centred care to support more positive outcomes for critically ill children and their families. Due to a gap in knowledge on the impact of such models, the present review was conducted. Primary research articles written in English that focused on children hospitalised for an acute, unexpected, sudden critical illness, such as that requiring an intensive care admission; and addressed the implementation of a model of care in a paediatric acute care hospital setting. Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. The models of care implemented were associated with positive changes such as reduced parental anxiety and improved communication between parents/caregivers and health professionals. However, no model provided intervention throughout each phase of care to (or post) hospital discharge. Models of care applying family-centred care principles targeting critically ill children and their families can create positive changes in care delivery for the family. However a model which provides continuity across the span of care is required. There is need to describe how best to design, implement and sustain models of care for critically ill children and their families. The success of any intervention implementation will be dependent on the comprehensiveness of the strategy for implementation, the relevance to the context and setting, and engagement with key stakeholders. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anakinra for the treatment of acute severe gout in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Thueringer, Jessica T; Doll, Natalie K; Gertner, Elie

    2015-08-01

    To report on the efficacy and safety of anakinra for treatment of acute gouty arthritis in medically complex, critically ill patients. Retrospective chart review of 13 critically ill hospitalized patients treated with anakinra for 20 episodes of acute gouty arthritis between 2009 and 2014 at a single health plan and institution (HealthPartners Medical Group and Regions Hospital) in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Data was obtained on baseline characteristics, medical comorbidities, reason for hospitalization, prior gout treatment, reason for choosing anakinra over standard therapy, anakinra dosing, response to treatment, and adverse outcomes. A total of 10 patients were in the Intensive Care Unit, 1 was in the Burn Unit for extensive 3rd degree burns, 1 was critically ill with a new diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, and 1 was critically ill in isolation with active disseminated multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Of these patients, 85% had active infections and 92% had renal insufficiency. All patients had a significant response to anakinra treatment: 50% (10/20 episodes) within 24h, an additional 40% (8/20 episodes) by 48h, and the remaining 10% (2/20 episodes) by 72h. Anakinra was well tolerated with only 1 case of leukopenia and 1 possible infectious complication. Anakinra is a safe and efficacious treatment for acute gouty arthritis in medically complex, critically ill patients when standard treatment modalities cannot be used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Noninvasive ventilation during the weaning process in chronically critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Jesus; Servera, Emilio; Jara-Palomares, Luis; Barrot, Emilia; Sanchez-Oro-Gómez, Raquel; Gómez de Terreros, F Javier; Martín-Vicente, M Jesús; Utrabo, Isabel; Núñez, M Belen; Binimelis, Alicia; Sala, Ernest; Zamora, Enrique; Segrelles, Gonzalo; Ortega-Gonzalez, Angel; Masa, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Chronically critically ill patients often undergo prolonged mechanical ventilation. The role of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) during weaning of these patients remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the value of NIV and whether a parameter can predict the need for NIV in chronically critically ill patients during the weaning process. We conducted a prospective study that included chronically critically ill patients admitted to Spanish respiratory care units. The weaning method used consisted of progressive periods of spontaneous breathing trials. Patients were transferred to NIV when it proved impossible to increase the duration of spontaneous breathing trials beyond 18 h. 231 chronically critically ill patients were included in the study. 198 (85.71%) patients achieved weaning success (mean weaning time 25.45±16.71 days), of whom 40 (21.4%) needed NIV during the weaning process. The variable which predicted the need for NIV was arterial carbon dioxide tension at respiratory care unit admission (OR 1.08 (95% CI 1.01-1.15), p=0.013), with a cut-off point of 45.5 mmHg (sensitivity 0.76, specificity 0.67, positive predictive value 0.76, negative predictive value 0.97). NIV is a useful tool during weaning in chronically critically ill patients. Hypercapnia despite mechanical ventilation at respiratory care unit admission is the main predictor of the need for NIV during weaning.

  4. Noninvasive ventilation during the weaning process in chronically critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Servera, Emilio; Barrot, Emilia; Sanchez-Oro-Gómez, Raquel; Gómez de Terreros, F. Javier; Martín-Vicente, M. Jesús; Utrabo, Isabel; Núñez, M. Belen; Binimelis, Alicia; Sala, Ernest; Zamora, Enrique; Segrelles, Gonzalo; Ortega-Gonzalez, Angel; Masa, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Chronically critically ill patients often undergo prolonged mechanical ventilation. The role of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) during weaning of these patients remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the value of NIV and whether a parameter can predict the need for NIV in chronically critically ill patients during the weaning process. We conducted a prospective study that included chronically critically ill patients admitted to Spanish respiratory care units. The weaning method used consisted of progressive periods of spontaneous breathing trials. Patients were transferred to NIV when it proved impossible to increase the duration of spontaneous breathing trials beyond 18 h. 231 chronically critically ill patients were included in the study. 198 (85.71%) patients achieved weaning success (mean weaning time 25.45±16.71 days), of whom 40 (21.4%) needed NIV during the weaning process. The variable which predicted the need for NIV was arterial carbon dioxide tension at respiratory care unit admission (OR 1.08 (95% CI 1.01–1.15), p=0.013), with a cut-off point of 45.5 mmHg (sensitivity 0.76, specificity 0.67, positive predictive value 0.76, negative predictive value 0.97). NIV is a useful tool during weaning in chronically critically ill patients. Hypercapnia despite mechanical ventilation at respiratory care unit admission is the main predictor of the need for NIV during weaning. PMID:28053973

  5. Building trustworthy relationships with critically ill patients and families.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Cynda Hylton; Reina, Michelle L; Reina, Dennis S

    2007-01-01

    A difficult case study involving repeated health crises and irreversible organ dysfunction illustrates the challenges critical care professionals face in caring for patients and their families. In such cases, trust is especially fragile, and coexists with its counterpart, betrayal. The Reina Trust & Betrayal Model defines 3 types of Transactional Trust. The first, Competence Trust, or the Trust of Capability, requires that clinicians practice humility, engage in inquiry, honor the patient's choices, and express compassion. The second, Contractual Trust, or the Trust of Character, demands that clinicians keep agreements, manage expectations, establish boundaries, and encourage mutually serving expectations. The third, Communication Trust, or the Trust of Disclosure, must be rooted in respect and based on truth-telling. Particularly in life-and-death situations, communication requires honesty and clarity. Each type of trust involves specific behaviors that build trust and can guide critical care professionals as they interact with patients and their families.

  6. Does RBC Storage Age Effect Inflammation, Immune Function and Susceptibility to Transfusion Associated Microchimerism in Critically Ill Patients? Adverse Effects of RBC Storage in Critically Ill Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The study aim is to investigate specific mechanisms of...the mechanisms and clinical outcomes associated with increased or decreased RBC storage age in critically ill patients including traumatic injury have...not been performed. The ABLE study presents a unique and probably one-time opportunity to investigate mechanisms in the context of clinical

  7. Long-term psychosocial impact reported by childhood critical illness survivors: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Joseph C; Hemingway, Pippa; Redsell, Sarah A

    2014-01-01

    Aim To undertake a qualitative systematic review that explores psychological and social impact, reported directly from children and adolescents at least 6 months after their critical illness. Background Significant advances in critical care have reduced mortality from childhood critical illness, with the majority of patients being discharged alive. However, it is widely reported that surviving critical illness can be traumatic for both children and their family. Despite a growing body of literature in this field, the psychological and social impact of life threatening critical illness on child and adolescent survivors, more than 6 months post event, remains under-reported. Data sources Searches of six online databases were conducted up to February 2012. Review methods Predetermined criteria were used to select studies. Methodological quality was assessed using a standardized checklist. An adapted version of the thematic synthesis approach was applied to extract, code and synthesize data. Findings Three studies met the inclusion criteria, which were all of moderate methodological quality. Initial coding and synthesis of data resulted in five descriptive themes: confusion and uncertainty, other people's narratives, focus on former self and normality, social isolation and loss of identity, and transition and transformation. Further synthesis culminated in three analytical themes that conceptualize the childhood survivors' psychological and social journey following critical illness. Conclusions Critical illness in childhood can expose survivors to a complex trajectory of recovery, with enduring psychosocial adversity manifesting in the long term. Nurses and other health professionals must be aware and support the potential multifaceted psychosocial needs that may arise. Parents and families are identified as fundamental in shaping psychological and social well-being of survivors. Therefore intensive care nurses must take opportunities to raise parents' awareness of the

  8. Intravenous fish oil in critically ill and surgical patients - Historical remarks and critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Kreymann, K Georg; Heyland, Daren K; de Heer, Geraldine; Elke, Gunnar

    2017-07-13

    The purpose of this review is to explain the historical and clinical background for intravenous fish oil administration, to evaluate its results by using a product specific metaanalysis, and to stimulate further research in the immune-modulatory potential of fish oil. Concerning the immune-modulatory effects of fatty acids, a study revealed that ω-3 as well as ω-6 fatty acids would prolong transplant survival, and only a mixture with an ω-6:ω-3 ratio of 2.1:1 would give immune-neutral results. In 1998, the label of a newly registered fish oil emulsion also acknowledged this immune-neutral ratio in conjunction with ω-6 lipids. Also, two fish oil-supplemented fat emulsions, registered in 2004, used a similar ω-6:ω-3 ratio. Such an immune-neutral ω-6:ω-3 ratio denoted progress for most patients compared to pure ω-6 lipid emulsions. However, this immune-neutrality might on the other hand be responsible for the limited positive clinical results gained so far in critically ill and surgical patients where in most cases significance could only be shown for the pooled effect of numerous trials. Our product specific metaanalysis also did not reveal any differences, neither in infections rates nor in ICU or hospital length of stay. To evaluate the immune-modulatory effect of fish oil administered alone, new dose finding studies, reporting relevant clinical outcome parameters, are required. Precise mechanistic or physiological biomarkers for the indication of such a therapy should also be developed and validated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  9. Nighttime Intensivist Staffing and Mortality among Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David J.; Angus, Derek C.; Barnato, Amber E.; Kramer, Andrew A.; Kahn, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hospitals are increasingly adopting 24-hour intensivist physician staffing as a strategy to improve intensive care unit (ICU) outcomes. However, the degree to which nighttime intensivists are associated with improvements in the quality of ICU care is unknown. METHODS We conducted a retrospective cohort study involving ICUs that participated in the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) clinical information system from 2009 through 2010, linking a survey of ICU staffing practices with patient-level outcomes data from adult ICU admissions. Multivariate models were used to assess the relationship between nighttime intensivist staffing and in-hospital mortality among ICU patients, with adjustment for daytime intensivist staffing, severity of illness, and case mix. We conducted a confirmatory analysis in a second, population-based cohort of hospitals in Pennsylvania from which less detailed data were available. RESULTS The analysis with the use of the APACHE database included 65,752 patients admitted to 49 ICUs in 25 hospitals. In ICUs with low-intensity daytime staffing, nighttime intensivist staffing was associated with a reduction in risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio for death, 0.62; P = 0.04). Among ICUs with high-intensity daytime staffing, nighttime intensivist staffing conferred no benefit with respect to risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 1.08; P = 0.78). In the verification cohort, there was a similar relationship among daytime staffing, nighttime staffing, and in-hospital mortality. The interaction between nighttime staffing and daytime staffing was not significant (P = 0.18), yet the direction of the findings were similar to those in the APACHE cohort. CONCLUSIONS The addition of nighttime intensivist staffing to a low-intensity daytime staffing model was associated with reduced mortality. However, a reduction in mortality was not seen in ICUs with high-intensity daytime staffing. (Funded by the

  10. Critical issues in hematology: anemia, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, and blood product transfusions in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Drews, Reed E

    2003-12-01

    Systematic evaluations of anemia, thrombocytopenia, and coagulopathy are essential to identifying and managing their causes successfully. In all cases, clinicians should evaluate RBC measurements alongside WBC and platelet counts and WBC differentials. Multiple competing factors may coexist; certain factors affect RBCs independent of those that affect WBCs or platelets. Ideally, clinicians should examine the peripheral blood smear for morphologic features of RBCs, WBCs, and platelets that provide important clues to the cause of the patient's hematologic disorder. Thrombocytopenia arises from decreased platelet production, increased platelet destruction, or dilutional or distributional causes. Drug-induced thrombocytopenias present diagnostic challenges, because many medicines can cause thrombocytopenia and critically ill patients often receive multiple medications. If they suspect type II HIT, clinicians must promptly discontinue all heparin sources, including LMWHs, without awaiting laboratory confirmation, to avoid thrombotic sequelae. Because warfarin anticoagulation induces acquired protein C deficiency, thereby exacerbating the prothrombotic state of type II HIT, warfarin should be withheld until platelet counts increase to more than 100,000/microL and type II HIT is clearly resolving. The presence of a consumptive coagulopathy in the setting of thrombocytopenia supports a diagnosis of DIC, not TTP-HUS, and is demonstrated by decreasing serum fibrinogen levels, and increasing TTs, PTs, aPTTs, and fibrin degradation products. Increasing D-dimer, levels are the most specific DIC parameter and reflect fibrinolysis of cross-linked fibrin. Elevated PTs or a PTTs can result from the absence of factors or the presence of inhibitors. Clinicians should suspect factor inhibitors when the prolonged PT or aPTT does not correct or only partially corrects following an immediate assay of a 1:1 mix of patient and normal plasma. In addition to factor inhibitors

  11. Respiratory complications in critical illness of small animals.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Vicki Lynne

    2011-07-01

    The percentage of emergency patients with respiratory problems treated at veterinary emergency and critical care facilities is poorly defined. Regardless of whether an animal has a primary lung disease or develops a secondary lung disease during hospitalization, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common sequela to the failing lung. ARDS is a frequent sequela to sepsis, systemic inflammatory response (SIRS), and disseminated intravascular coagulation and is frequently the pulmonary manifestation of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). ARDS, acute lung injury, SIRS, sepsis, and MODS are serious syndromes with grave consequences. Understanding the pathophysiology and consequences of these syndromes is imperative to early recognition.

  12. Evaluation of the Decisional Fatigue Scale Among Surrogate Decision Makers of the Critically Ill.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Ronald L; Pignatiello, Grant A; Tahir, Sadia

    2017-08-01

    Intense emotional distress and impaired information processing have been implicated in reducing a surrogate decision maker's ability to formulate informed health care decisions for a critically ill patient. The heightened intensity of negative emotions, mental effort, and impaired judgment is consistent with the manifestation of decision fatigue. The aim of this article is to describe the validity and reliability of the Decision Fatigue Scale (DFS) among surrogate decision makers of the critically ill. A convenience sample of 101 surrogate decision makers were administered the DFS and a battery of psychosocial instruments at two time points. The DFS was specified as a unidimensional measure with adequate internal consistency (Cronbach's αs = .87, .90) and stability reliability. Discriminant validity was established with measures of emotion regulation, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. The DFS is the first subjective measure of decision fatigue for surrogate decision makers of the critically ill that demonstrates satisfactory psychometric properties.

  13. Nonconvulsive seizures: developing a rational approach to the diagnosis and management in the critically ill population.

    PubMed

    Jirsch, J; Hirsch, L J

    2007-08-01

    Originally described in patients with chronic epilepsy, nonconvulsive seizures (NCSs) are being recognized with increasing frequency, both in ambulatory patients with cognitive change, and even more so in the critically ill. In fact, the majority of seizures that occur in the critically ill are nonconvulsive and can only be diagnosed with EEG monitoring. The semiology of NCSs and the associated EEG findings are quite variable. There are a number of periodic, rhythmic or stimulation-related EEG patterns in the critically ill of unclear significance and even less clear treatment implications. The field struggles to develop useful diagnostic criteria for NCSs, to standardize nomenclature for the numerous equivocal patterns, and to devise studies that will help determine which patterns should be treated and how aggressively. This review surveys the evidence for and against NCSs causing neuronal injury, and attempts to develop a rational approach to the diagnosis and management of these seizures, particularly in the encephalopathic population.

  14. Feasibility and safety of virtual-reality-based early neurocognitive stimulation in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Turon, Marc; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Sol; Jodar, Mercè; Gomà, Gemma; Montanya, Jaume; Hernando, David; Bailón, Raquel; de Haro, Candelaria; Gomez-Simon, Victor; Lopez-Aguilar, Josefina; Magrans, Rudys; Martinez-Perez, Melcior; Oliva, Joan Carles; Blanch, Lluís

    2017-12-01

    Growing evidence suggests that critical illness often results in significant long-term neurocognitive impairments in one-third of survivors. Although these neurocognitive impairments are long-lasting and devastating for survivors, rehabilitation rarely occurs during or after critical illness. Our aim is to describe an early neurocognitive stimulation intervention based on virtual reality for patients who are critically ill and to present the results of a proof-of-concept study testing the feasibility, safety, and suitability of this intervention. Twenty critically ill adult patients undergoing or having undergone mechanical ventilation for ≥24 h received daily 20-min neurocognitive stimulation sessions when awake and alert during their ICU stay. The difficulty of the exercises included in the sessions progressively increased over successive sessions. Physiological data were recorded before, during, and after each session. Safety was assessed through heart rate, peripheral oxygen saturation, and respiratory rate. Heart rate variability analysis, an indirect measure of autonomic activity sensitive to cognitive demands, was used to assess the efficacy of the exercises in stimulating attention and working memory. Patients successfully completed the sessions on most days. No sessions were stopped early for safety concerns, and no adverse events occurred. Heart rate variability analysis showed that the exercises stimulated attention and working memory. Critically ill patients considered the sessions enjoyable and relaxing without being overly fatiguing. The results in this proof-of-concept study suggest that a virtual-reality-based neurocognitive intervention is feasible, safe, and tolerable, stimulating cognitive functions and satisfying critically ill patients. Future studies will evaluate the impact of interventions on neurocognitive outcomes. Trial registration Clinical trials.gov identifier: NCT02078206.

  15. Biomarkers increase detection of active smoking and secondhand smoke exposure in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, S. Jean; Ware, Lorraine B.; Eisner, Mark D.; Yu, Lisa; Jacob, Peyton; Havel, Christopher; Goniewicz, Maciej L.; Matthay, Michael A.; Benowitz, Neal L.; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The association between tobacco smoke exposure and critical illness is not well studied, largely because obtaining an accurate smoking history from critically ill patients is difficult. Biomarkers can provide quantitative data on active and secondhand cigarette smoke exposure. We sought to compare cigarette smoke exposure as measured by biomarkers to exposure by self-report in a cohort of critically ill patients and to determine how well biomarkers of cigarette smoke exposure correlate with each other in this population. Design, Setting, and Patients Serum and urine cotinine and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine, urine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol, and hair and nail nicotine levels were measured in 60 subjects enrolled in an observational cohort of critically ill subjects at a tertiary academic medical center in Tennessee. Smoking history was obtained from patients, their surrogates, or the medical chart. Cigarette smoke exposure as measured by biomarkers was compared to exposure by history. Measurements and Main Results By smoking history, 29 subjects were identified as smokers, 28 were identified as nonsmokers, and 3 were identified as unknown. The combination of serum cotinine and urine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol identified 27 of the 28 nonsmokers by history either as active smokers (n = 6, 21%) or as exposed to secondhand smoke (n = 21, 75%). All biomarker levels were strongly correlated with each other (r = .69–.95, p < .0001). Conclusions The combination of serum cotinine and urine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol identified considerably more active smokers than did smoking history and detected a high prevalence of secondhand smoke exposure in a critically ill population. These markers will be important for future studies investigating the relationship between active smoking and secondhand smoke exposure and critical illness. PMID:20935560

  16. [Hyperglycemia in critically ill patients. Sample of choice, controls and values: literature review].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gangoso, L; Fuentes-Pumarola, C

    2014-01-01

    The hyperglycemia is one of the most common problems in the critically ill patient, hence the importance of a good control of it in the ICUs. To identify the sample of choice for glycemic control in the critically ill patient; To distinguish the necessary controls to ensure the correct levels of glucose in the critically ill patient; To determine the range of blood glucose values suitable for the critically ill patient. This review was made in different databases: MEDLINE with the assistance of specific search PubMed and ProQuest, CUIDEN-PLUS and ELSEVIER Publishing website. 24 articles were collected: descriptive, analytic and cohort studies, and also literature reviews. The golden sample for the glucose determination in this patient is the arterial one, and can be also used the venous one, excluding the capillary sample. The analysis should be carried out in a clinical laboratory. However, glucometers can be used to provide instantaneous measurements. Blood glucose controls in the critically ill patient are initially set each hour until their stabilization, and then, they are spaced to periods of two-three hours. The glycemic index is moderate, with values between 140-180 mg/dl. The arterial sample is the chosen one for glucose determination in this patient. Blood glucose controls should be initially set each hour, until their stabilization, and then they are spaced to periods of two-three hours. The glycemia in the critically ill patient should be included in a index of 140-180 mg/dl, which is considered a moderate control.

  17. Risk factors for early invasive fungal disease in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurmeet; Pitoyo, Ceva Wicaksono; Aditianingsih, Dita; Rumende, Cleopas Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of invasive fungal disease (IFD) is increasing worldwide in the past two to three decades. Critically ill patients in Intensive Care Units are more vulnerable to fungal infection. Early detection and treatment are important to decrease morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Objective: Our study aimed to assess factors associated with early IFD in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study was conducted in critically ill patients, from March to September 2015. Total number of patients (74) in this study was drawn based on one of the risk factors (human immunodeficiency virus). Specimens were collected on day 5–7 of hospitalization. Multivariate analysis with logistic regression was performed for factors, with P < 0.25 in bivariate analysis. Results: Two hundred and six patients were enrolled in this study. Seventy-four patients were with IFD, majority were males (52.7%), mean age was 58 years (range 18–79), mean Leon's score was 3 (score range 2–5), majority group was nonsurgical/nontrauma (72.9%), and mean fungal isolation was positive on day 5. Candida sp. (92.2%) is the most frquently isolated fungal infection. Urine culture yielded the highest number of fungal isolates (70.1%). Mortality rate in this study was 50%. In multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus (DM) (P = 0.018, odds ratio 2.078, 95% confidence interval 1.135–3.803) was found as an independent factor associated with early IFD critically ill patients. Conclusion: DM is a significant factor for the incidence of early IFD in critically ill patients. PMID:27994377

  18. Red blood cell transfusion in critically ill children: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Istaphanous, George K; Wheeler, Derek S; Lisco, Steven J; Shander, Aryeh

    2011-03-01

    To review the pathophysiology of anemia, as well as transfusion-related complications and indications for red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, in critically ill children. Although allogeneic blood has become increasingly safer from infectious agents, mounting evidence indicates that RBC transfusions are associated with complications and unfavorable outcomes. As a result, there has been growing interest and efforts to limit RBC transfusion, and indications are being revisited and revamped. Although a so-called restrictive RBC transfusion strategy has been shown to improve morbidity and mortality in critically ill adults, there have been relatively few studies on RBC transfusion performed in critically ill children. Published literature on transfusion medicine and outcomes of RBC transfusion. STUDY SELECTION, DATA EXTRACTION, AND SYNTHESIS: After a brief overview of physiology of oxygen transportation, anemia compensation, and current transfusion guidelines based on available literature, risks and outcomes of transfusion in general and in critically ill children are summarized in conjunction with studies investigating the safety of restrictive transfusion strategies in this patient population. The available evidence does not support the extensive use of RBC transfusions in general or critically ill patients. Transfusions are still associated with risks, and although their benefits are established in limited situations, the associated negative outcomes in many more patients must be closely addressed. Given the frequency of anemia and its proven negative outcomes, transfusion decisions in the critically ill children should be based on individual patient's characteristics rather than generalized triggers, with consideration of potential risks and benefits, and available blood conservation strategies that can reduce transfusion needs.

  19. Concept of Care, Caring Expectations, and Caring Frustrations of the Elderly Suffering from Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Santos, Charisse Izobelle Q.; Santos, Ivan Benedict A.; Santos, Jedda A.; Santos, Justin E.; Santos, Justo Martin S.; Santos, Vincent Emmanuelle E.

    2012-01-01

    While it is true that elderly concepts of care and caring expectations have been ascertained in previous literatures, little is known about how the elderly population views caring frustrations--particularly that of the Filipino elderly. This study purports to surface the lebenswelt of healthcare expectations and frustrations based on the…

  20. Concept of Care, Caring Expectations, and Caring Frustrations of the Elderly Suffering from Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Santos, Charisse Izobelle Q.; Santos, Ivan Benedict A.; Santos, Jedda A.; Santos, Justin E.; Santos, Justo Martin S.; Santos, Vincent Emmanuelle E.

    2012-01-01

    While it is true that elderly concepts of care and caring expectations have been ascertained in previous literatures, little is known about how the elderly population views caring frustrations--particularly that of the Filipino elderly. This study purports to surface the lebenswelt of healthcare expectations and frustrations based on the…

  1. Failure of lorazepam to treat alprazolam withdrawal in a critically ill patient

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Gaurav; Gesin, Gail; Christmas, A Britton; Sing, Ronald F

    2014-01-01

    Management of sedation in the critical care unit is an ongoing challenge. Benzodiazepines have been commonly used as sedatives in critically ill patients. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties that make benzodiazepines effective and safe in critical care sedation include rapid onset of action and decreased respiratory depression. Alprazolam is a commonly used benzodiazepine that is prescribed for anxiety and panic disorders. It is frequently prescribed in the outpatient setting. Its use has been reported to result in a relatively high rate of dependence and subsequent withdrawal symptoms. Symptoms of alprazolam withdrawal can be difficult to recognize and treat in the critical care setting. In addition, other benzodiazepines may also be ineffective in treating alprazolam withdrawal. We present a case of alprazolam withdrawal in a critically ill trauma patient who failed treatment with lorazepam and haloperidol. Subsequent replacement with alprazolam resulted in significant improvement in the patient’s medication use and clinical status. PMID:24834401

  2. Role of Transitional Care Measures in the Prevention of Readmission After Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jessica S

    2017-02-01

    Transitioning from the critical care unit to the medical-surgical care area is vital to patients' recovery and resolution of critical illness. Such transitions are necessary to optimize use of available hospital resources to meet patient care needs. One in 10 patients discharged from the intensive care unit are readmitted to the unit during their hospitalization. Critical care readmission is associated with significant increases in illness acuity, overall length of stay, and health care costs as well as a potential 4-fold increased risk of mortality. Patients with complex illness, multiple comorbid conditions, and a prolonged initial stay in the critical care unit are at an increased risk of being readmitted to the critical care unit and experiencing poor outcomes. Implementing nurse-driven measures that support continuity of care and consistent communication practices such as critical care outreach services, transitional communication tools, discharge planning, and transitional care units improves transitions of patients from the critical care environment and reduces readmission rates. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  3. Institutional Care Utilization by the Elderly: A Critical Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingard, Deborah L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Defines institutional care and estimates institutional care by the elderly. Reviewed are prospective and cross-sectional studies in which utilization was estimated, along with studies in which factors are identified that influence long-term care utilization such as age, sex, availability of caregivers, and functional status. (Author/ABB)

  4. Transferring critically ill patients home to die: developing a clinical guidance document.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Maureen A; Darlington, Anne-Sophie; Long-Sutehall, Tracy; Richardson, Alison

    2015-09-01

    With preferred place of care at the time of death a key consideration in end of life care, it is important that transfer home be considered for critically ill patients who want this as part of their end of life care. However, there is limited guidance available to inform the transfer of critically ill patients home to die. To develop clinical guidance on the practice of transferring patients home to die for doctors and nurses in critical care. Consensus methodology. At a one-day national event, stakeholders from cross-community and hospital settings engaged in group work wherein 'virtual clinical teams' mapped out, and agreed on, the processes involved in transferring critically ill patients home to die. Using two clinical cases and nominal group technique, factors were identified that promoted and inhibited transfer home and areas in need of development. Findings from the day informed development of a clinical guidance document. Eighty-five stakeholders attended the event from across England. The majority of stakeholders strongly agreed that transfer of critically ill patients home to die was a good idea in principle. Stakeholders identified 'access to care in the community' (n = 22, 31.4%) and 'unclear responsibility for care of patient' (n = 17, 24.3%) as the most important barriers. Consensus was reached on the processes and decision-making required for transfer home and was used to inform content of a clinical practice guidance document. This underwent further refinement following review by 14 clinicians. A final document in the form of a flow chart was developed. Transferring critically ill patients home to die is a complex, multifactorial process involving health care agencies across the primary and secondary care interface. The guidance developed from this consensus event will enable staff to actively consider the practice of transferring home to die in appropriate patients. © 2015 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  5. Increased Dicarbonyl Stress as a Novel Mechanism of Multi-Organ Failure in Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    van Bussel, Bas C. T.; van de Poll, Marcel C. G.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Bergmans, Dennis C. J. J.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular pathological pathways leading to multi-organ failure in critical illness are progressively being unravelled. However, attempts to modulate these pathways have not yet improved the clinical outcome. Therefore, new targetable mechanisms should be investigated. We hypothesize that increased dicarbonyl stress is such a mechanism. Dicarbonyl stress is the accumulation of dicarbonyl metabolites (i.e., methylglyoxal, glyoxal, and 3-deoxyglucosone) that damages intracellular proteins, modifies extracellular matrix proteins, and alters plasma proteins. Increased dicarbonyl stress has been shown to impair the renal, cardiovascular, and central nervous system function, and possibly also the hepatic and respiratory function. In addition to hyperglycaemia, hypoxia and inflammation can cause increased dicarbonyl stress, and these conditions are prevalent in critical illness. Hypoxia and inflammation have been shown to drive the rapid intracellular accumulation of reactive dicarbonyls, i.e., through reduced glyoxalase-1 activity, which is the key enzyme in the dicarbonyl detoxification enzyme system. In critical illness, hypoxia and inflammation, with or without hyperglycaemia, could thus increase dicarbonyl stress in a way that might contribute to multi-organ failure. Thus, we hypothesize that increased dicarbonyl stress in critical illness, such as sepsis and major trauma, contributes to the development of multi-organ failure. This mechanism has the potential for new therapeutic intervention in critical care. PMID:28178202

  6. Increased Dicarbonyl Stress as a Novel Mechanism of Multi-Organ Failure in Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    van Bussel, Bas C T; van de Poll, Marcel C G; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Bergmans, Dennis C J J

    2017-02-07

    Molecular pathological pathways leading to multi-organ failure in critical illness are progressively being unravelled. However, attempts to modulate these pathways have not yet improved the clinical outcome. Therefore, new targetable mechanisms should be investigated. We hypothesize that increased dicarbonyl stress is such a mechanism. Dicarbonyl stress is the accumulation of dicarbonyl metabolites (i.e., methylglyoxal, glyoxal, and 3-deoxyglucosone) that damages intracellular proteins, modifies extracellular matrix proteins, and alters plasma proteins. Increased dicarbonyl stress has been shown to impair the renal, cardiovascular, and central nervous system function, and possibly also the hepatic and respiratory function. In addition to hyperglycaemia, hypoxia and inflammation can cause increased dicarbonyl stress, and these conditions are prevalent in critical illness. Hypoxia and inflammation have been shown to drive the rapid intracellular accumulation of reactive dicarbonyls, i.e., through reduced glyoxalase-1 activity, which is the key enzyme in the dicarbonyl detoxification enzyme system. In critical illness, hypoxia and inflammation, with or without hyperglycaemia, could thus increase dicarbonyl stress in a way that might contribute to multi-organ failure. Thus, we hypothesize that increased dicarbonyl stress in critical illness, such as sepsis and major trauma, contributes to the development of multi-organ failure. This mechanism has the potential for new therapeutic intervention in critical care.

  7. Issues affecting the delivery of physical therapy services for individuals with critical illness.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Amy J; Kress, John P

    2013-02-01

    Research supports the provision of physical therapy intervention and early mobilization in the management of patients with critical illness. However, the translation of care from that of well-controlled research protocols to routine practice can be challenging and warrants further study. Discussions in the critical care and physical therapy communities, as well as in the published literature, are investigating factors related to early mobilization such as transforming culture in the intensive care unit (ICU), encouraging interprofessional collaboration, coordinating sedation interruption with mobility sessions, and determining the rehabilitation modalities that will most significantly improve patient outcomes. Some variables, however, need to be investigated and addressed specifically by the physical therapy profession. They include assessing and increasing physical therapist competence managing patients with critical illness in both professional (entry-level) education programs and clinical settings, determining and providing an adequate number of physical therapists for a given ICU, evaluating methods of prioritization of patients in the acute care setting, and adding to the body of research to support specific functional outcome measures to be used with patients in the ICU. Additionally, because persistent weakness and functional limitations can exist long after the critical illness itself has resolved, there is a need for increased awareness and involvement of physical therapists in all settings of practice, including outpatient clinics. The purpose of this article is to explore the issues that the physical therapy profession needs to address as the rehabilitation management of the patient with critical illness evolves.

  8. Psychological Outcomes in Parents of Critically Ill Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Stremler, Robyn; Haddad, Summer; Pullenayegum, Eleanor; Parshuram, Christopher

    2017-03-05

    Parents of children in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) are subjected to significant psychological stress. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of, and factors associated with anxiety, depressive symptoms and decisional conflict in parents of children hospitalized in the PICU. The study employed a descriptive, cross-sectional design to investigate the psychological status of 118 parents of 91 children (74 mothers and 44 fathers) admitted to the PICU, using measures of anxiety (STAI), depression (CES-D), and decisional conflict (DCS). Using hospital data and self-administered questionnaires, information on child and parent characteristics and psychological outcomes were collected. Objective measures of parental sleep also were examined using actigraphy and sleep diaries. The research findings indicated that 24% of parents achieved scores characteristic of severe anxiety. Proportions of parents with symptoms indicative of major depression and significant decisional conflict were 51% and 26% respectively. For all psychological outcomes, higher levels of social support were protective. Inconsistency in sleep schedule and sleep location affected psychological outcomes and are possible targets for future interventions. Given evidence that parents of children admitted to the PICU are at risk for developing post-traumatic stress symptoms, future studies should examine the effects of hospitalization on long-term parental psychological outcomes. Screening for those at risk and implementing interventions to promote coping strategies and reduce decisional conflict may be beneficial. Pediatric nurses have a critical role in assessing parents' psychological distress and promoting family health during a child's hospitalization.

  9. Economics of fluid therapy in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Peter F; Murphy, David J

    2014-08-01

    Fluid therapy practices are an ongoing debate in critical care as evidence continues to emerge on the clinical effectiveness of different fluids and regimens. Although fluid therapy is a frequent and often costly treatment in the ICU, cost considerations have been largely absent from these studies. To facilitate a more structured approach to understanding fluid therapy costs and their role in clinical practice, we summarize currently available options and describe a framework for identifying and organizing relevant costs. Fluid therapy is a complex area of care that has been rarely studied from a cost-effectiveness perspective. We identify seven cost areas that capture fluid therapy-related costs during preutilization, point-of-utilization, and postutilization periods. These costs are driven by decisions on the type of fluid and administration strategy. Although estimates for some cost areas could be informed by medical literature, other cost areas remain unclear and require further investigation. Given the growing emphasis on the value of care, providers must recognize the important cost consequences of clinical decisions in fluid therapy. Future research into fluid therapy costs is needed and can be guided by this framework. Developing a complete cost picture is an initial and necessary step for improving values for patients, hospitals, and healthcare systems.

  10. Perceived barriers to anthropometric measurements in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Irving, Sharon Y; Seiple, Stephanie; Nagle, Monica; Falk, Shiela; Mascarenhas, Maria; Srinivasan, Vijay

    2015-11-01

    Anthropometric measurements are vital for safe care in pediatric intensive care units. To identify barriers to anthropometric measurements and determine if perceptions of barriers differ between ordering providers and nurses. A 21-item survey to elicit perceptions of barriers to obtaining anthropometric measurements was distributed via e-mail to societies with members who provide care in pediatric intensive care units. Most of the 258 eligible respondents (46% ordering providers) were from North America (90%). Although 84% agreed that anthropometric measurements are important, only 3% knew if these measurements were obtained upon admission to their unit. Estimates of patients' measurements by parents or caregivers were commonly used (72%) when actual measurements were not obtained. Leading barriers were presence of medical devices (57%), use of extracorporeal life support (54%), and unstable hemodynamic status (52%). More ordering providers than nurses considered osteopenia/fragile bones as a barrier to weight measurement (46% vs 29%; P = .007) and traumatic brain injury a barrier to measurement of head circumference (42% vs 24%; P = .002). More nurses than ordering providers perceived dialysis (21% vs 9%; P = .01) and obesity (26% vs 15%; P = .04) as barriers to measurement of stature. Ordering providers more than nurses perceived nurses' workload (51% vs 33%; P < .001) and lack of importance (43% vs 20%; P < .001) as barriers. Barriers to obtaining anthropometric measurements exist in pediatric intensive care units; ordering providers and nurses have different perceptions of what constitutes a barrier. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  11. Bench-to-bedside review: Chloride in critical illness

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Chloride is the principal anion in the extracellular fluid and is the second main contributor to plasma tonicity. Its concentration is frequently abnormal in intensive care unit patients, often as a consequence of fluid therapy. Yet chloride has received less attention than any other ion in the critical care literature. New insights into its physiological roles have emerged together with progress in understanding the structures and functions of chloride channels. In clinical practice, interest in a physicochemical approach to acid-base physiology has directed renewed attention to chloride as a major determinant of acid-base status. It has also indirectly helped to generate interest in other possible effects of disorders of chloraemia. The present review summarizes key aspects of chloride physiology, including its channels, as well as the clinical relevance of disorders of chloraemia. The paper also highlights current knowledge on the impact of different types of intravenous fluids on chloride concentration and the potential effects of such changes on organ physiology. Finally, the review examines the potential intensive care unit practice implications of a better understanding of chloride. PMID:20663180

  12. The influence of frailty syndrome on acceptance of illness in elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Jankowska-Polanska, Beata; Chabowski, Mariusz; Uchmanowicz, Bartosz; Fal, Andrzej M

    2016-01-01

    COPD is one of the most debilitating diseases. Frailty syndrome and advanced age may decrease the acceptance of illness, quality of life, and worsen health conditions in these patients, as well as lead to an increase in health care expenses. The aim of the study was to assess how the level of frailty affects the acceptance of illness in elderly patients with COPD. We also aimed to evaluate the associations between sociodemographic and clinical factors and the level of acceptance of illness, anxiety, and frailty in this group of patients. The study included 102 COPD patients with a mean age of 63.2 (standard deviation =6.5) years and grades I (3%), II (37%), III (52%), and IV (8%) by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease. The Polish versions of the Acceptance of Illness Scale and Tilburg frailty indicator were used. Frailty syndrome was found in 77 (75.5%) patients, with an average score of 7.42 (standard deviation =2.24). Coexisting diseases such as hypertension (46.07%), coronary artery disease (32.35%), heart failure (28.43%), diabetes (18.63%), and heart arrhythmia (9.8%) were found among the subjects. The overall level of acceptance of illness was 20.6 (standard deviation =7.62). A lower level of acceptance of illness was associated with a higher level of frailty, especially in the physical and social domain. Elderly patients with severe COPD are more prone to frailty and decreased acceptance of their disease in comparison to patients with other chronic diseases. Assessment and management of frailty in the care of older COPD patients are likely to improve risk stratification significantly and help personalize management, leading to better patient outcomes.

  13. The influence of frailty syndrome on acceptance of illness in elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Jankowska-Polanska, Beata; Chabowski, Mariusz; Uchmanowicz, Bartosz; Fal, Andrzej M

    2016-01-01

    COPD is one of the most debilitating diseases. Frailty syndrome and advanced age may decrease the acceptance of illness, quality of life, and worsen health conditions in these patients, as well as lead to an increase in health care expenses. The aim of the study was to assess how the level of frailty affects the acceptance of illness in elderly patients with COPD. We also aimed to evaluate the associations between sociodemographic and clinical factors and the level of acceptance of illness, anxiety, and frailty in this group of patients. The study included 102 COPD patients with a mean age of 63.2 (standard deviation =6.5) years and grades I (3%), II (37%), III (52%), and IV (8%) by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease. The Polish versions of the Acceptance of Illness Scale and Tilburg frailty indicator were used. Frailty syndrome was found in 77 (75.5%) patients, with an average score of 7.42 (standard deviation =2.24). Coexisting diseases such as hypertension (46.07%), coronary artery disease (32.35%), heart failure (28.43%), diabetes (18.63%), and heart arrhythmia (9.8%) were found among the subjects. The overall level of acceptance of illness was 20.6 (standard deviation =7.62). A lower level of acceptance of illness was associated with a higher level of frailty, especially in the physical and social domain. Elderly patients with severe COPD are more prone to frailty and decreased acceptance of their disease in comparison to patients with other chronic diseases. Assessment and management of frailty in the care of older COPD patients are likely to improve risk stratification significantly and help personalize management, leading to better patient outcomes. PMID:27729781

  14. Prealbumin is Not Sensitive Indicator of Nutrition and Prognosis in Critical Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seung Hui; Lee, Jong Seok; Chae, Sang Hee; Ahn, Bo Sook; Chang, Dong Jin

    2005-01-01

    It was reported that 30-50% of inpatients are in a malnutrition status. Measuring the prealbumin level is a sensitive and cost-effective method for assessing the severity of illness in critically or chronically ill patients. However it is uncertain whether or not the prealbumin level correlates with the level of nutrition support and outcomes in critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum prealbumin level as an indicator of the effectiveness of nutrition support and the prognosis in critically ill patients. Forty-four patients who received total parenteral nutrition for more than 7 days at an intensive care unit (ICU) were studied. The serum prealbumin was measured at the initial time of nutrition support and at the almost seventh day since the first measurement. The patients were allocated into two groups. In Group 1 (n=31) and 2 (n=13), the prealbumin level increased and decreased, respectively. Age, APACHE II score, nutrition status, nutritional requirement and amount of supply, mortality, hospital day and ICU day in the two groups were compared. The serum prealbumin level increased in 31 out of the 44 patients. The average calorie intake was 1334 Kcal/day (83% of energy requirement) in Group 1 and 1170 kcal/day (76% of energy requirement) in Group 2 (p=0.131). The mortality was 42% in Group 1 and 54% in Group 2 (p=0.673). The average hospital day/ ICU day in Groups 1 and 2 were 80 days/38 days and 60 days/31 days respectively. In conclusion, in critically ill patients, the serum prealbumin level did not respond sensitively to nutritional support. In addition an increase in the prealbumin level dose not indicate a better prognosis for critically ill patients. PMID:15744801

  15. Measuring health and health state preferences among critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Badia, X; Díaz-Prieto, A; Rué, M; Patrick, D L

    1996-12-01

    a) to examine the EuroQol instrument's ability to assess a patient's state of health prior to admission to an ICU; b) to describe a patient's health-related quality of life (HRQoL) before the onset of the condition leading to admission to the ICU, and prior to discharge; c) to compare patients' preferences for a "common core" of EuroQol health states with preferences from healthy individuals. Patients in a step-down unit (SDU) retrospectively rated their health states prior to admission to the ICU, their current states of health and the "common core" of hypothetical EuroQol states of health. Proxies rated the patients' health states prior to admission to the ICU. Patients' preferences for EuroQol states of health were compared with the preferences obtained from a retrospective cohort of healthy individuals. An SDU at the University Hospital of Bellvitge, Barcelona, Spain. 103 critical medical and surgical patients were interviewed. The EuroQol questionnaire, a non-disease specific instrument to evaluate HRQoL. Agreement between patients and proxies regarding their prior health state was moderate to good in physical and pain areas (kappa: 0.43-0.58), fair for mood (kappa: 0.38) and almost identical for prior overall health (65.9 vs 66.3). Compared with their prior HRQoL, patients had deteriorated in all physical areas and overall health at discharge from the SDU. Preferences for the worst health states varied significantly between patients and healthy individuals. The EuroQol can be reliably used with proxies to determine the state of health of patients prior to admission to the ICU. Preferences between healthy individuals and ICU patients differed.

  16. Lung Ultrasound for Diagnosing Pneumothorax in the Critically Ill Neonate.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Francesco; Rodriguez Fanjul, Javier; Aversa, Salvatore; Chirico, Gaetano; Yousef, Nadya; De Luca, Daniele; Corsini, Iuri; Dani, Carlo; Grappone, Lidia; Orfeo, Luigi; Migliaro, Fiorella; Vallone, Gianfranco; Capasso, Letizia

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of lung ultrasound for the diagnosis of pneumothorax in the sudden decompensating patient. In an international, prospective study, sudden decompensation was defined as a prolonged significant desaturation (oxygen saturation <65% for more than 40 seconds) and bradycardia or sudden increase of oxygen requirement by at least 50% in less than 10 minutes with a final fraction of inspired oxygen ≥0.7 to keep stable saturations. All eligible patients had an ultrasound scan before undergoing a chest radiograph, which was the reference standard. Forty-two infants (birth weight = 1531 ± 812 g; gestational age = 31 ± 3.5 weeks) were enrolled in 6 centers; pneumothorax was detected in 26 (62%). Lung ultrasound accuracy in diagnosing pneumothorax was as follows: sensitivity 100%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, and negative predictive value 100%. Clinical evaluation of pneumothorax showed sensitivity 84%, specificity 56%, positive predictive value 76%, and negative predictive value 69%. After sudden decompensation, a lung ultrasound scan was performed in an average time of 5.3 ± 5.6 minutes vs 19 ± 11.7 minutes required for a chest radiography. Emergency drainage was performed after an ultrasound scan but before radiography in 9 cases. Lung ultrasound shows high accuracy in detecting pneumothorax in the critical infant, outperforming clinical evaluation and reducing time to imaging diagnosis and drainage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Stress Induced Hyperglycemia and the Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Survivors of Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, Mark P.; Finnis, Mark E.; Phillips, Liza K.; Kar, Palash; Bihari, Shailesh; Biradar, Vishwanath; Moodie, Stewart; Horowitz, Michael; Shaw, Jonathan E.; Deane, Adam M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Stress induced hyperglycemia occurs in critically ill patients who have normal glucose tolerance following resolution of their acute illness. The objective was to evaluate the association between stress induced hyperglycemia and incident diabetes in survivors of critical illness. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting All adult patients surviving admission to a public hospital intensive care unit (ICU) in South Australia between 2004 and 2011. Patients Stress induced hyperglycemia was defined as a blood glucose ≥ 11.1 mmol/L (200 mg/dL) within 24 hours of ICU admission. Prevalent diabetes was identified through ICD-10 coding or prior registration with the Australian National Diabetes Service Scheme (NDSS). Incident diabetes was identified as NDSS registration beyond 30 days after hospital discharge until July 2015. The predicted risk of developing diabetes was described as sub-hazard ratios using competing risk regression. Survival was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Main Results Stress induced hyperglycemia was identified in 2,883 (17%) of 17,074 patients without diabetes. The incidence of type 2 diabetes following critical illness was 4.8% (821 of 17,074). The risk of diabetes in patients with stress induced hyperglycemia was approximately double that of those without (HR 1.91 (95% CI 1.62, 2.26), p<0.001) and was sustained regardless of age or severity of illness. Conclusions Stress induced hyperglycemia identifies patients at subsequent risk of incident diabetes. PMID:27824898

  18. Sarcopenia and malnutrition in acutely ill hospitalized elderly: Prevalence and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cerri, Anna Paola; Bellelli, Giuseppe; Mazzone, Andrea; Pittella, Francesca; Landi, Francesco; Zambon, Antonella; Annoni, Giorgio

    2015-08-01

    Data about the prevalence of sarcopenia among hospitalized patients is lacking and it is unclear whether the diagnostic criteria commonly used in community-dwellers is applicable in acutely ill subjects. The aims of this report are: (i) to assess the prevalence of sarcopenia among hospitalized patients; (ii) to assess whether the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) criteria are applicable in an acute care setting; and (iii) to assess the mortality rate at 3 months. 103 patients admitted to the Acute Geriatric Clinic were enrolled. Inclusion criteria were: age ≥65 years and malnutrition or risk of malnutrition, according to the Mini Nutritional Assessment Short Form. Sarcopenia was diagnosed using the EWGSOP criteria by means of bioimpedance analysis, handgrip strength and gait speed, within 72 h of admission. Information on deaths was obtained by telephone interview at 3 months following discharge. Sarcopenia was diagnosed in 22 patients (21.4%). Twenty-three patients (22.3%) were not able to perform the gait speed and/or the handgrip strength because bedridden or requiring intensive treatments. In this group, a definite diagnosis of sarcopenia was not possible, lacking at least one EWGSOP criteria. Eleven (10.7%) patients died within the 3 months post-discharge period. Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that sarcopenic patients died significantly more frequently than others (log-rank p ≤ 0.001). In a population of hospitalized elderly malnourished or at risk of malnutrition, sarcopenia is highly prevalent and associated with an increased risk to die in the short-term. Furthermore, the EWGSOP criteria cannot be satisfactorily applied in a relevant proportion of patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  19. Subsyndromal delirium and its determinants in elderly patients hospitalized for acute medical illness.

    PubMed

    Zuliani, Giovanni; Bonetti, Francesco; Magon, Stefania; Prandini, Stefano; Sioulis, Fotini; D'Amato, Marco; Zampi, Elena; Gasperini, Beatrice; Cherubini, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    In older individuals, acute medical illnesses and admission to hospital are often associated with a deterioration of cognitive status, also in the absence of dementia and full-blown delirium. We evaluated the prevalence of subsyndromal delirium (SSD) and its correlates in a sample of elderly medical inpatients. From 763 consecutive inpatients, 325 participants with known dementia or delirium were excluded, whereas 438 (mean age: 80.6 years; female participants: 60.1%) were enrolled. SSD was diagnosed within 48 hour from admission, when at least two DSM-IV delirium criteria including disorientation, attention or memory deficit, altered level of consciousness, or perceptual disturbances were present. Cognitive performance was evaluated by Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE). General, clinical, and laboratory parameters were also registered. One hundred and sixty-six patients (37%) had SSD. Compared with controls, SSD patients were older individuals, had less formal education, higher comorbidity, lower hemoglobin/lymphocytes counts, and higher creatinine levels. A trend toward higher prevalence of previous stroke and widowhood was observed. A MMSE score of less than 24/30 identified SSD with 88% sensitivity and 78% specificity. In SSD patients, MMSE independently correlated with years of education, high-sensitivity C reactive protein levels, and O2 arterial saturation (model adjusted r (2) = 0.30, p = .001); conversely, only years of education were associated with MMSE in controls (adjusted r (2) = 0.06, p = .01). Our data suggest that SSD is common in hospitalized older medical inpatients, and low MMSE score might be useful for identification of participants at risk of SSD. Current inflammatory response and reduced O2 arterial saturation were the only independent determinants of cognitive performance in SSD patients.

  20. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the corticotropin receptor gene is associated with a blunted cortisol response during pediatric critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Jardine, David; Emond, Mary; Meert, Kathleen L.; Harrison, Rick; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.; Berger, John; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Willson, Douglas F.; Nicholson, Carol; Dean, J. Michael; Zimmerman, Jerry J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The cortisol response during critical illness varies widely among patients. Our objective was to examine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes regulating cortisol synthesis, metabolism, and activity to determine if genetic differences were associated with variability in the cortisol response among critically ill children. Design This was a prospective observational study employing tag SNP methodology to examine genetic contributions to the variability of the cortisol response in critical illness. Thirty-one candidate genes and 31 ancestry markers were examined. Setting Patients were enrolled from 7 pediatric critical care units that constitute the Eunice Kennedy Shriver Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network. Subjects Critically ill children (n=92), ages 40 weeks gestation to 18 years of age were enrolled. Interventions Blood samples were obtained from all patients for serum cortisol measurements and DNA isolation. Demographic and illness severity data were collected. Measurements and Main Results SNPs were tested for association with serum free cortisol (FC) concentrations in context of higher illness severity as quantified by PRISM III score > 7. A SNP (rs1941088) in the MC2R gene was strongly associated (p =0.0005) with a low FC response to critical illness. Patients with the AA genotype were over seven times more likely to have a low FC response to critical illness than those with a GG genotype. Patients with the GA genotype exhibited an intermediate FC response to critical illness. Conclusions The A allele at rs1941088 in the MC2R gene, that encodes the ACTH (corticotropin) receptor, is associated with a low cortisol response in critically ill children. These data provide evidence for a genetic basis for a portion of the variability in cortisol production during critical illness. Independent replication of these findings will be important and could facilitate development of personalized treatment for patients with

  1. [Metabolic control in the critically ill patient an update: hyperglycemia, glucose variability hypoglycemia and relative hypoglycemia].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Calatayud, Ángel Augusto; Guillén-Vidaña, Ariadna; Fraire-Félix, Irving Santiago; Anica-Malagón, Eduardo Daniel; Briones Garduño, Jesús Carlos; Carrillo-Esper, Raúl

    Metabolic changes of glucose in critically ill patients increase morbidity and mortality. The appropriate level of blood glucose has not been established so far and should be adjusted for different populations. However concepts such as glucose variability and relative hypoglycemia of critically ill patients are concepts that are changing management methods and achieving closer monitoring. The purpose of this review is to present new data about the management and metabolic control of patients in critical areas. Currently glucose can no longer be regarded as an innocent element in critical patients; both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia increase morbidity and mortality of patients. Protocols and better instruments for continuous measurement are necessary to achieve the metabolic control of our patients. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  2. Critically Ill patients with 2009 influenza A(H1N1) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Cherit, Guillermo; Lapinsky, Stephen E; Macias, Alejandro E; Pinto, Ruxandra; Espinosa-Perez, Lourdes; de la Torre, Alethse; Poblano-Morales, Manuel; Baltazar-Torres, Jose A; Bautista, Edgar; Martinez, Abril; Martinez, Marco A; Rivero, Eduardo; Valdez, Rafael; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo; Hernández, Martín; Stewart, Thomas E; Fowler, Robert A

    2009-11-04

    In March 2009, novel 2009 influenza A(H1N1) was first reported in the southwestern United States and Mexico. The population and health care system in Mexico City experienced the first and greatest early burden of critical illness. To describe baseline characteristics, treatment, and outcomes of consecutive critically ill patients in Mexico hospitals that treated the majority of such patients with confirmed, probable, or suspected 2009 influenza A(H1N1). Observational study of 58 critically ill patients with 2009 influenza A(H1N1) at 6 hospitals between March 24 and June 1, 2009. Demographic data, symptoms, comorbid conditions, illness progression, treatments, and clinical outcomes were collected using a piloted case report form. The primary outcome measure was mortality. Secondary outcomes included rate of 2009 influenza (A)H1N1-related critical illness and mechanical ventilation as well as intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay. Critical illness occurred in 58 of 899 patients (6.5%) admitted to the hospital with confirmed, probable, or suspected 2009 influenza (A)H1N1. Patients were young (median, 44.0 [range, 10-83] years); all presented with fever and all but 1 with respiratory symptoms. Few patients had comorbid respiratory disorders, but 21 (36%) were obese. Time from hospital to ICU admission was short (median, 1 day [interquartile range {IQR}, 0-3 days]), and all patients but 2 received mechanical ventilation for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and refractory hypoxemia (median day 1 ratio of Pao(2) to fraction of inspired oxygen, 83 [IQR, 59-145] mm Hg). By 60 days, 24 patients had died (41.4%; 95% confidence interval, 28.9%-55.0%). Patients who died had greater initial severity of illness, worse hypoxemia, higher creatine kinase levels, higher creatinine levels, and ongoing organ dysfunction. After adjusting for a reduced opportunity of patients dying early to receive neuraminidase inhibitors, neuraminidase inhibitor treatment (vs

  3. Therapeutic monitoring of amikacin and gentamicin in critically and noncritically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Kovačević, Tijana; Avram, Sanja; Milaković, Dragana; Špirić, Nikolina; Kovačević, Pedja

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) enables individualization in the treatment to optimize clinical benefit and minimize drugs' side effects. Critically ill septic patients represent a challenge for antimicrobial treatment because of pathophysiological impact of sepsis on pharmacokinetics of drugs. The aim of this study was to assess the appropriateness of gentamicin and amikacin dosing in critically and noncritically ill patients, as well as to estimate the need for its regular therapeutic monitoring. Subjects and Methods: It was a prospective study which included 31 patients on gentamicin and 16 patients on amikacin from four different units who met the inclusion criteria. Trough concentrations of drugs were measured in serum just before third or fourth dose of antibiotic, whereas peak concentrations were measured in serum 1 h after the completion of drug administration (steady state). Relevant data on patients' clinical course of disease, comorbidities, and concomitant medication were collected from medical charts in order to identify their possible influence on drugs' concentrations. Results: Peak concentrations of amikacin were in reference range in 81.8% critically ill and in 80% of noncritically ill patients (P = 0.931). Peak concentrations of gentamicin were in reference range in 88.9% critically ill and in 77.3% of noncritically ill patients (P = 0.457). Conclusion: Serum concentrations of aminoglycosides (amikacin and gentamicin) were in reference range in most of the patients in our study, suggesting that dosing of these drugs in the University Hospital Clinical Center, Banja Luka, was adequate. In patients without kidney or liver disease, regular TDM of aminoglycosides is not necessary. PMID:27330257

  4. Early fluid overload is associated with acute kidney injury and PICU mortality in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhong; Wang, Jian; Bai, Zhenjiang; Chen, Jiao; Wang, Xueqin; Pan, Jian; Li, Xiaozhong; Feng, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Fluid overload (FO) has been associated with an increased risk for adverse outcomes in critically ill patients. Information on the impact of FO on mortality in a general population of pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is limited. We aimed to determine the association of early FO with the development of acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality during PICU stay and evaluate whether early FO predicts mortality, even after adjustment for illness severity assessed by pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) III. This prospective study enrolled 370 critically ill children. The early FO was calculated based on the first 24-h total of fluid intake and output after admission and defined as cumulative fluid accumulation ≥5% of admission body weight. Of the patients, 64 (17.3 %) developed early FO during the first 24 h after admission. The PICU mortality rate of the whole cohort was 18 of 370 (4.9%). The independent factors significantly associated with early FO were PRISM III, age, AKI, and blood bicarbonate level. The early FO was associated with AKI (odds ratio [OR] = 1.34, p < 0.001) and mortality (OR = 1.36, p < 0.001). The association of early FO with mortality remained significant after adjustment for potential confounders including AKI and illness severity. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of early FO for predicting mortality was 0.78 (p < 0.001). This result, however, was not better than PRISM III (AUC = 0.85, p < 0.001). Early FO was associated with increased risk for AKI and mortality in critically ill children. Fluid overload is associated with an increased risk for adverse outcomes in specific clinical settings of pediatric population. What is New: Early fluid overload during the first 24 h after PICU admission is independently associated with increased risk for acute kidney injury and mortality in critically ill children.

  5. Ontogeny of methionine utilization and splanchnic uptake in critically ill children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To determine the rates of methionine splanchnic uptake and utilization in critically ill pediatric patients, we used two kinetic models: the plasma methionine enrichment,and the "intracellular" homocysteine enrichment. Twenty-four patients, eight infants, eight children, and eight adolescents, were ...

  6. Surviving a critical illness through mutually being there with each other: a grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Vico C L

    2011-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to conduct a theoretical analysis of the critically ill patients' perceptions of the impact of informal support and care from their main family carer (MFC) during the time of their stay in the hospital (ICU) and thereafter (and vice versa). RESEARCH DESIGN AND SETTING: The grounded theory method was used to investigate the target phenomenon in the ICU of a large general hospital, and three months later in the community after the patients were discharged. Qualitative data were collected through participant observation and interviews for constant comparative analysis until theoretical saturation. A substantive theory emerged and it illustrated and described the dynamic actions and interactions between critically ill patients and their MFC during the process of recovery. Three categories, 1) being there with, 2) coping and 3) self-relying, comprise the essential components of this theory. The theory represents the core process of 'surviving a critical illness through mutually being there with each other' in which both the patients and their MFC are involved. Implications and recommendations were proposed to provide a basis for further research and nursing practice on the phenomenon of informal support and care of critically ill patients and their recovery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Elevated Omentin Serum Levels Predict Long-Term Survival in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Luedde, Mark; Benz, Fabian; Niedeggen, Jennifer; Vucur, Mihael; Hippe, Hans-Joerg; Spehlmann, Martina E.; Schueller, Florian; Loosen, Sven; Frey, Norbert; Trautwein, Christian; Koch, Alexander; Luedde, Tom; Tacke, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Omentin, a recently described adipokine, was shown to be involved in the pathophysiology of inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, its role in critical illness and sepsis is currently unknown. Materials and Methods. Omentin serum concentrations were measured in 117 ICU-patients (84 with septic and 33 with nonseptic disease etiology) admitted to the medical ICU. Results were compared with 50 healthy controls. Results. Omentin serum levels of critically ill patients at admission to the ICU or after 72 hours of ICU treatment were similar compared to healthy controls. Moreover, circulating omentin levels were independent of sepsis and etiology of critical illness. Notably, serum concentrations of omentin could not be linked to concentrations of inflammatory cytokines or routinely used sepsis markers. While serum levels of omentin were not predictive for short term survival during ICU treatment, low omentin concentrations were an independent predictor of patients' overall survival. Omentin levels strongly correlated with that of other adipokines (e.g., leptin receptor or adiponectin), which have also been identified as prognostic markers in critical illness. Conclusions. Although circulating omentin levels did not differ between ICU-patients and controls, elevated omentin levels were predictive for an impaired patients' long term survival. PMID:27867249

  8. Rationale and design of the pediatric critical illness stress-induced immune suppression (CRISIS) prevention trial.

    PubMed

    Carcillo, Joseph; Holubkov, Richard; Dean, J Michael; Berger, John; Meert, Kathleen L; Anand, K J S; Zimmerman, Jerry; Newth, Christopher J L; Harrison, Rick; Willson, Douglas F; Nicholson, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Despite implementation of CDC recommendations and bundled interventions for preventing catheter-associated blood stream infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, or urinary catheter-associated infections, nosocomial infections and sepsis remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Recent studies suggest that acquired critical illness stress-induced immune suppression (CRISIS) plays a role in the development of nosocomial infection and sepsis. This condition can be related to inadequate zinc, selenium, and glutamine levels, as well as hypoprolactinemia, leading to stress-induced lymphopenia, a predominant T(H)2 monocyte/macrophage state, and subsequent immune suppression. Prolonged immune dysfunction increases the likelihood of nosocomial infections associated with invasive devices. Although strategies to prevent common complications of critical illness are routinely employed (eg, prophylaxis for gastrointestinal bleeding, thrombophlebitis), no prophylactic strategy is used to prevent stress-induced immune suppression. This is the authors' rationale for the pediatric CRISIS prevention trial (NCT00395161), designed as a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical investigation to determine if daily enteral supplementation with zinc, selenium, and glutamine as well as parenteral metoclopramide (a dopamine 2 receptor antagonist that reverses hypoprolactinemia) prolongs the time until onset of nosocomial infection or sepsis in critically ill children compared to enteral supplementation with whey protein. If effective, this combined nutritional and pharmacologic approach may lessen the excess morbidity and mortality as well as resource utilization associated with nosocomial infections and sepsis in this population. The authors present the design and analytic plan for the CRISIS prevention trial.

  9. Changes within the thyroid axis during the course of critical illness.

    PubMed

    Mebis, Liese; Debaveye, Yves; Visser, Theo J; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2006-12-01

    This article reviews the mechanisms behind the observed changes in plasma thyroid hormone levels in the acute phase and the prolonged phase of critical illness. It focuses on the neuroendocrinology of the low triiodothyronine syndrome and on thyroid hormone metabolism by deiodination and transport.

  10. Plasma glutamine deficiency is associated with multiple organ failure in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Ekmark, Leif; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan; Fläring, Urban

    2015-03-01

    A low plasma glutamine concentration (<420 µmol/L) is an independent risk factor for mortality in critically ill adult patients. Glutamine metabolism in children is less well characterized. However, pediatric ICU (PICU) mortality is low and, therefore, mortality is difficult to use as an endpoint. Here we evaluated if plasma glutamine concentration at admission to the PICU, relates to the development of multiple organ failure, using pediatric logistic organ dysfunction score (PELOD)-score. In this observational study, consecutive critically ill children (n = 149) admitted to the PICU of a tertiary university hospital as well as a reference group of healthy children (n = 60) were included. Plasma glutamine concentration and the PELOD were determined at admission for all patients and at day 5 for those patients still in the PICU. Plasma glutamine concentration at admission was low in the PICU patients as compared to controls (p = 0.00002) and patients with a low plasma glutamine concentration had more organ failure as compared to patients with higher plasma glutamine concentration (p = 0.0001). Plasma glutamine concentration normalized in patients staying >5 days in the PICU. Plasma glutamine depletion was present in 40 % of patients at PICU admission and it was associated with the development of multiple organ failure. Furthermore, the majority of the critically ill children normalized their plasma glutamine concentration within 5 days, which is different from adult ICU patients. The study suggests that an initial plasma glutamine deficiency is associated with multiple organ failure in critically ill children.

  11. Critical illness--a lived reality for patients and their families.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jan

    2004-10-01

    This case study tells of one family's experience surrounding the diagnosis of rare cancer, where both the medical system and family struggle with a critical, largely unknown illness. The experience was complicated by communication issues between the medical profession and family, support from counselling services, and lack of information--compounded by a health system concentrated in metropolitan areas.

  12. Effects of acute critical illnesses on the performance of interferon-gamma release assay.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Ruan, Sheng-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Kuo, Ping-Hung; Ku, Shih-Chi; Lee, Pei-Lin; Kuo, Lu-Cheng; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Chun-Kai; Yang, Ching-Yao; Chien, Ying-Chun; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-25

    Performance of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) is influenced by preanalytical, laboratory and host factors. The data regarding how critical illnesses influence IGRA results are limited. This study aimed to investigate IGRA performance among critically ill patients. Patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) were prospectively enrolled, and underwent QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube testing on admission and discharge. The associations between patient factors and IGRA results were explored. In total, 118 patients were included. IGRA results on admission were positive, negative and indeterminate for 10 (9%), 36 (31%) and 72 (61%) patients. All indeterminate results were due to a low mitogen response. Indeterminate results were associated with higher disease severity and lower serum albumin levels. Ninety (76%) patients survived to ICU discharge and had repeat IGRA testing 13.3 ± 10.1 days after first ones. Of those, 43 (48%) had indeterminate results, and no IGRA conversion or reversion was observed. The majority (35/51, 69%) of ICU survivors with initial indeterminate results still had indeterminates on follow-up testing. Acute critical illnesses exert a significant impact on IGRA performance and a high proportion of indeterminate results was seen in ICU patients. This study highlights limitation of IGRAs in the critically ill and judicious selection of patients to be tested should be considered.

  13. Rehabilitation of Critical Illness Polyneuropathy and Myopathy Patients: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Primoz; Vidmar, Gaj; Kuret, Zala; Bizovicar, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy (CIPNM) frequently develops in patients hospitalized in intensive care units. The number of patients with CIPNM admitted to inpatient rehabilitation is increasing. The aim of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the outcome of their rehabilitation. Twenty-seven patients with CIPNM were included in…

  14. A new approach to defining and diagnosing malnutrition in adult critical illness

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This review will highlight a new approach to defining malnutrition syndromes for critically ill adults that incorporates a modern understanding of the contributions of inflammatory response. A systematic approach to nutrition assessment is described to help support diagnosis. Recent findings sugges...

  15. Gut Microbial Translocation in Critically Ill Children and Effects of Supplementation with Pre- and Pro Biotics

    PubMed Central

    Papoff, Paola; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Cerasaro, Carla; Caresta, Elena; Midulla, Fabio; Moretti, Corrado

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial translocation as a direct cause of sepsis is an attractive hypothesis that presupposes that in specific situations bacteria cross the intestinal barrier, enter the systemic circulation, and cause a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Critically ill children are at increased risk for bacterial translocation, particularly in the early postnatal age. Predisposing factors include intestinal obstruction, obstructive jaundice, intra-abdominal hypertension, intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury and secondary ileus, and immaturity of the intestinal barrier per se. Despite good evidence from experimental studies to support the theory of bacterial translocation as a cause of sepsis, there is little evidence in human studies to confirm that translocation is directly correlated to bloodstream infections in critically ill children. This paper provides an overview of the gut microflora and its significance, a focus on the mechanisms employed by bacteria to gain access to the systemic circulation, and how critical illness creates a hostile environment in the gut and alters the microflora favoring the growth of pathogens that promote bacterial translocation. It also covers treatment with pre- and pro biotics during critical illness to restore the balance of microbial communities in a beneficial way with positive effects on intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation. PMID:22934115

  16. Massive nitrogen loss in critical surgical illness: effect on cardiac mass and function.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, A A; Plank, L D; Finn, P J; Whalley, G A; Sharpe, N; Clark, M A; Hill, G L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors measured cardiac mass and function to determine whether these changed in patients who were critically ill who were losing large amounts of nitrogen from the body. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The large losses of body nitrogen that occur in patients with protein-energy malnutrition are associated with a loss of cardiac mass and function. It is not known if this also occurs in patients who were critically ill who are losing massive amounts of nitrogen. METHODS: Once hemodynamically stable, 13 patients who were critically ill underwent sequential measurements of left ventricular mass (LVM) and function, total body nitrogen (TBN), total body potassium, body weight, fat-free mass, and limb muscle mass. RESULTS: Over a 21-day study period, there was no change in LVM or function despite falls of 14% and 21% in TBN and total body potassium, respectively, a 21% fall in limb muscle mass, and a deterioration in skeletal muscle function by approximately 40%. CONCLUSIONS: In patients who were critically ill, cardiac mass does not decrease and function does not deteriorate after hemodynamic stability has been achieved despite massive losses of protein from the body. PMID:9296513

  17. Continuous renal replacement therapy amino acid, trace metal and folate clearance in critically ill children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We hypothesized that continuous veno-venous hemodialysis (CVVHD) results in amino acid, trace metals, and folate losses, thereby adversely impacting nutrient balance. Critically ill children receiving CVVHD were studied prospectively for 5 days. Blood concentrations, amino acids, copper, zinc, man...

  18. Enteral Glutamine Administration in Critically Ill Nonseptic Patients Does Not Trigger Arginine Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Mechteld A. R.; Brinkmann, Saskia J. H.; Buijs, Nikki; Beishuizen, Albertus; Bet, Pierre M.; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine supplementation in specific groups of critically ill patients results in favourable clinical outcome. Enhancement of citrulline and arginine synthesis by glutamine could serve as a potential mechanism. However, while receiving optimal enteral nutrition, uptake and enteral metabolism of glutamine in critically ill patients remain unknown. Therefore we investigated the effect of a therapeutically relevant dose of L-glutamine on synthesis of L-citrulline and subsequent L-arginine in this group. Ten versus ten critically ill patients receiving full enteral nutrition, or isocaloric isonitrogenous enteral nutrition including 0.5 g/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, were studied using stable isotopes. A cross-over design using intravenous and enteral tracers enabled splanchnic extraction (SE) calculations. Endogenous rate of appearance and SE of glutamine citrulline and arginine was not different (SE controls versus alanyl-glutamine: glutamine 48 and 48%, citrulline 33 versus 45%, and arginine 45 versus 42%). Turnover from glutamine to citrulline and arginine was not higher in glutamine-administered patients. In critically ill nonseptic patients receiving adequate nutrition and a relevant dose of glutamine there was no extra citrulline or arginine synthesis and glutamine SE was not increased. This suggests that for arginine synthesis enhancement there is no need for an additional dose of glutamine when this population is adequately fed. This trial is registered with NTR2285. PMID:27200186

  19. Rationale and Design of the Pediatric Critical Illness Stress-Induced Immune Suppression (CRISIS) Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Carcillo, Joseph; Holubkov, Richard; Dean, J. Michael; Berger, John; Meert, Kathleen L.; Anand, K. J. S.; Zimmerman, Jerry; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Harrison, Rick; Willson, Douglas F.; Nicholson, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Despite implementation of CDC recommendations and bundled interventions for preventing catheter-associated blood stream infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, or urinary catheter–associated infections, nosocomial infections and sepsis remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Recent studies suggest that acquired critical illness stress-induced immune suppression (CRISIS) plays a role in the development of nosocomial infection and sepsis. This condition can be related to inadequate zinc, selenium, and glutamine levels, as well as hypoprolactinemia, leading to stress-induced lymphopenia, a predominant TH2 monocyte/macrophage state, and subsequent immune suppression. Prolonged immune dysfunction increases the likelihood of nosocomial infections associated with invasive devices. Although strategies to prevent common complications of critical illness are routinely employed (eg, prophylaxis for gastrointestinal bleeding, thrombophlebitis), no prophylactic strategy is used to prevent stress-induced immune suppression. This is the authors’ rationale for the pediatric CRISIS prevention trial (NCT00395161), designed as a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical investigation to determine if daily enteral supplementation with zinc, selenium, and glutamine as well as parenteral metoclopramide (a dopamine 2 receptor antagonist that reverses hypoprolactinemia) prolongs the time until onset of nosocomial infection or sepsis in critically ill children compared to enteral supplementation with whey protein. If effective, this combined nutritional and pharmacologic approach may lessen the excess morbidity and mortality as well as resource utilization associated with nosocomial infections and sepsis in this population. The authors present the design and analytic plan for the CRISIS prevention trial. PMID:19380753

  20. Rehabilitation of Critical Illness Polyneuropathy and Myopathy Patients: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Primoz; Vidmar, Gaj; Kuret, Zala; Bizovicar, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy (CIPNM) frequently develops in patients hospitalized in intensive care units. The number of patients with CIPNM admitted to inpatient rehabilitation is increasing. The aim of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the outcome of their rehabilitation. Twenty-seven patients with CIPNM were included in…

  1. Clinical review: Adiponectin biology and its role in inflammation and critical illness

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine first described just over a decade ago. Produced almost exclusively by adipocytes, adiponectin circulates in high concentrations in human plasma. Research into this hormone has revealed it to have insulin-sensitizing, anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective roles. This review discusses the history, biology and physiological role of adiponectin and explores its role in disease, with specific focus on adiponectin in inflammation and sepsis. It appears that an inverse relationship exists between adiponectin and inflammatory cytokines. Low levels of adiponectin have been found in critically ill patients, although data are limited in human subjects at this stage. The role of adiponectin in systemic inflammation and critical illness is not well defined. Early data suggest that plasma levels of adiponectin are decreased in critical illness. Whether this is a result of the disease process itself or whether patients with lower levels of this hormone are more susceptible to developing a critical illness is not known. This observation of lower adiponectin levels then raises the possibility of therapeutic options to increase circulating adiponectin levels. The various options for modulation of serum adiponectin (recombinant adiponectin, thiazolidinediones) are discussed. PMID:21586104

  2. How much does it cost to identify a critically ill child experiencing electrographic seizures?

    PubMed Central

    Abend, Nicholas S.; Topjian, Alexis A; Williams, Sankey

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Electrographic seizures in critically ill children may be identified by continuous electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of four electrographic seizure identification strategies (no EEG monitoring and EEG monitoring for 1 hour, 24 hours, or 48 hours). Methods We created a decision tree to model the relationships among variables from a societal perspective. To provide input for the model, we estimated variable costs directly related to EEG monitoring from their component parts, and we reviewed the literature to estimate the probabilities of outcomes. We calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios to identify the tradeoff between cost and effectiveness at different willingness-to-pay values. Results Our analysis found that the preferred strategy was EEG monitoring for 1 hour, 24 hours, and 48 hours if the decision maker was willing to pay <$1,666, $1,666–$22,648, and >$22,648 per critically ill child identified with electrographic seizures, respectively. The 48 hour strategy only identified 4% more children with electrographic seizures at substantially higher cost. Sensitivity analyses found that all three strategies were acceptable at lower willingness-to-pay values when children with higher electrographic seizure risk were monitored. Conclusions Our results support monitoring of critically ill children for 24 hours because the cost to identify a critically ill child with electrographic seizures is modest. Further study is needed to predict better which children may benefit from 48 hours of EEG monitoring since the costs are much higher. PMID:25626776

  3. Bench-to-bedside review: the gut as an endocrine organ in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Deane, Adam; Chapman, Marianne J; Fraser, Robert J L; Horowitz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In health, hormones secreted from the gastrointestinal tract have an important role in regulating gastrointestinal motility, glucose metabolism and immune function. Recent studies in the critically ill have established that the secretion of a number of these hormones is abnormal, which probably contributes to disordered gastrointestinal and metabolic function. Furthermore, manipulation of endogenous secretion, physiological replacement and supra-physiological treatment (pharmacological dosing) of these hormones are likely to be novel therapeutic targets in this group. Fasting ghrelin concentrations are reduced in the early phase of critical illness, and exogenous ghrelin is a potential therapy that could be used to accelerate gastric emptying and/or stimulate appetite. Motilin agonists, such as erythromycin, are effective gastrokinetic drugs in the critically ill. Cholecystokinin and peptide YY concentrations are elevated in both the fasting and postprandial states, and are likely to contribute to slow gastric emptying. Accordingly, there is a rationale for the therapeutic use of their antagonists. So-called incretin therapies (glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide) warrant evaluation in the management of hyperglycaemia in the critically ill. Exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (or its analogues) may be a potential therapy because of its intestinotropic properties.

  4. Critically Ill Patients and End-of-Life Decision-Making: The Senior Medical Resident Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahern, Stephane P.; Doyle, Tina K.; Marquis, Francois; Lesk, Corey; Skrobik, Yoanna

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the understanding of educational needs among residents caring for the critically ill, narrative accounts of 19 senior physician trainees participating in level of care decision-making were analyzed. In this multicentre qualitative study involving 9 university centers in Canada, in-depth interviews were conducted in either…

  5. Kinetic Patterns of Candida albicans Germ Tube Antibody in Critically Ill Patients: Influence on Mortality▿

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Rafael; Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo; Iruretagoyena, Jose R.; Cuétara, María S.; Ramírez, Paula; Gómez, Maria D.; Camarena, Juan J.; Viudes, Angel; Pontón, José

    2009-01-01

    The influence of kinetic patterns of Candida albicans germ tube antibodies (CAGTA) on mortality was analyzed in six intensive care units. Statistically significant lower mortality rates were found in patients with patterns of increasing CAGTA titers who had been treated with antifungal agents. Thus, antifungal treatment should be considered when CAGTA titers are increasing in critically ill patients. PMID:19675223

  6. Frequency and predictors of nonconvulsive seizures during continuous electroencephalographic monitoring in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Jette, Nathalie; Claassen, Jan; Emerson, Ronald G; Hirsch, Lawrence J

    2006-12-01

    To determine the incidence, predictors, and timing of nonconvulsive seizures (NCSz) during continuous electroencephalographic monitoring (cEEG) in critically ill children. We identified critically ill children who underwent cEEG during a 4-year period. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine variables associated with NCSz. Among 117 monitored children, 44% had seizures on cEEG and 39% had NCSz. The majority of patients with seizures (75%) had purely NCSz, and 23% of patients had status epilepticus, which was purely nonconvulsive in 89% of cases. Seizures occurred immediately on cEEG initiation in 15%, within 1 hour in 50%, and within 24 hours in 80%. Those with clinical seizures prior to cEEG were more likely to have NCSz on cEEG (83%) than those without prior seizures (17%). On multivariate analysis, NCSz were associated with periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges and absence of background reactivity. Seizures, the majority being NCSz, are common during cEEG in critically ill children (seen in 44% of patients). Half are detected in the first hour of recording, whereas 20% are not detected until after more than 24 hours of recording. Nonconvulsive seizures are associated with periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges and absence of reactivity on cEEG. This study confirms the importance of prolonged cEEG for critically ill children as a means to detect NCSz.

  7. Transformations of self: a phenomenological investigation into the lived experience of survivors of critical illness.

    PubMed

    Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth D E; Patiraki, Elizabeth I

    2003-01-01

    Based on the hermeneutical, phenomenological perspective, this study explored the lived experience of individuals with a past hospitalization in an intensive care unit, with focus on their dreams. The purpose was to explore how it is to have been critically ill. Dreams are the language of the unconscious and can symbolically convey meanings. Eight participants recounted their experiences with critical illness through semi-structured phenomenological interviews and dream-telling. An interplay between the 'factual-external' world and the 'internal' world appeared to be the basis of their perception of the situation. Participants' narratives were immensely rich in symbols of transformation, transcendence and rebirth. Transformations in perception, in lived-body, and in lived time and space were some of the themes emerging as part of both conscious and dreaming experiences. Attitudes towards death were altered, and elements of heightened spirituality were evident in the aftermath of critical illness. Critical illness was conceptualized as a 'cocooning phase' leading to transformation of self, spiritual arousal and personal growth. Nurses may be able to alleviate suffering by supporting this process while in the ICU, as well as after discharge.

  8. Clinical review: Use of helium-oxygen in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Gainnier, Marc; Forel, Jean-Marie

    2006-01-01

    Use of helium-oxygen (He/O2) mixtures in critically ill patients is supported by a reliable and well understood theoretical rationale and by numerous experimental observations. Breathing He/O2 can benefit critically ill patients with severe respiratory compromise mainly by reducing airway resistance in obstructive syndromes such as acute asthma and decompensated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the benefit from He/O2 in terms of respiratory mechanics diminishes rapidly with increasing oxygen concentration in the gaseous mixture. Safe use of He/O2 in the intensive care unit requires specific equipment and supervision by adequately experienced personnel. The available clinical data on inhaled He/O2 mixtures are insufficient to prove that this therapy has benefit with respect to outcome variables. For these reasons, He/O2 is not currently a standard of care in critically ill patients with acute obstructive syndromes, apart from in some, well defined situations. Its role in critically ill patients must be more precisely defined if we are to identify those patients who could benefit from this therapeutic approach. PMID:17210068

  9. Stress Hyperglycemia in Pediatric Critical Illness: The Intensive Care Unit Adds to the Stress!

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Stress hyperglycemia (SH) commonly occurs during critical illness in children. The historical view that SH is beneficial has been questioned in light of evidence that demonstrates the association of SH with worse outcomes. In addition to intrinsic changes in glucose metabolism and development of insulin resistance, specific intensive care unit (ICU) practices may influence the development of SH during critical illness. Mechanical ventilation, vasoactive infusions, renal replacement therapies, cardiopulmonary bypass and extracorporeal life support, therapeutic hypothermia, prolonged immobility, nutrition support practices, and the use of medications are all known to mediate development of SH in critical illness. Tight glucose control (TGC) to manage SH has emerged as a promising therapy to improve outcomes in critically ill adults, but results have been inconclusive. Large variations in ICU practices across studies likely resulted in inconsistent results. Future studies of TGC need to take into account the impact of commonly used ICU practices and, ideally, standardize protocols in an attempt to improve the accuracy of conclusions from such studies. PMID:22401321

  10. Vitamin D deficiency in critically ill children: A roadmap to interventional research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two studies published this month in Pediatrics provide new and unique information regarding the relationship between vitamin D status and critical illnesses in children admitted to PICUs in the United States and Canada. These two studies, from Boston Children's Hospital and six PICUs in Canada, demo...

  11. Impact of supplementation with amino acids or their metabolites on muscle wasting in patients with critical illness or other muscle wasting illness: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wandrag, L; Brett, S J; Frost, G; Hickson, M

    2015-08-01

    Muscle wasting during critical illness impairs recovery. Dietary strategies to minimise wasting include nutritional supplements, particularly essential amino acids. We reviewed the evidence on enteral supplementation with amino acids or their metabolites in the critically ill and in muscle wasting illness with similarities to critical illness, aiming to assess whether this intervention could limit muscle wasting in vulnerable patient groups. Citation databases, including MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, EMBASE, the meta-register of controlled trials and the Cochrane Collaboration library, were searched for articles from 1950 to 2013. Search terms included 'critical illness', 'muscle wasting', 'amino acid supplementation', 'chronic obstructive pulmonary disease', 'chronic heart failure', 'sarcopenia' and 'disuse atrophy'. Reviews, observational studies, sport nutrition, intravenous supplementation and studies in children were excluded. One hundred and eighty studies were assessed for eligibility and 158 were excluded. Twenty-two studies were graded according to standardised criteria using the GRADE methodology: four in critical care populations, and 18 from other clinically relevant areas. Methodologies, interventions and outcome measures used were highly heterogeneous and meta-analysis was not appropriate. Methodology and quality of studies were too varied to draw any firm conclusion. Dietary manipulation with leucine enriched essential amino acids (EAA), β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate and creatine warrant further investigation in critical care; EAA has demonstrated improvements in body composition and nutritional status in other groups with muscle wasting illness. High-quality research is required in critical care before treatment recommendations can be made.