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  1. Clinical Conundrums in Management of Hypothyroidism in Critically Ill Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Vishal; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Sehgal, Rinku; Bajaj, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    Context: Articles in various international and national bibliographic indices were extensively searched with an emphasis on thyroid and hypothyroid disorders, hypothyroidism in elderly hospitalized patients, hypothyroidism in critically ill geriatric population, thyroxine in elderly hypothyroid, drug interactions and thyroid hormones, and thyroid functions in elderly. Evidence acquisition: Entrez (including PubMed), NIH.gov, Medscape.com, WebMD.com, MedHelp.org, Search Medica, MD consult, yahoo.com, and google.com were searched. Manual search was performed on various textbooks of medicine, critical care, pharmacology, and endocrinology. Results: Thyroid function tests in elderly hospitalized patients must be interpreted with circumspection. The elderly are often exposed to high iodide content and critical care settings. This may occur because of either decreased iodine excretion or very high intake of iodine. This is especially true for elderly population with underlying acute or chronic kidney diseases or both. Amiodarone, with a very high iodine content, is also often used in this set of population. Moreover, other medications including iodinated contrast are often used in the critical care settings. These may affect different steps of thyroid hormone metabolism, and thereby complicate the interpretation of thyroid function tests. Conclusions: The current review is aimed at analyzing and managing various clinical aspects of hypothyroidism in hospitalized elderly, and critically ill geriatric patients. PMID:24719636

  2. Hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mail/Fax/Phone Home » Hypothyroidism Leer en Español Hypothyroidism (Underactive) Hypothyroidism is an underactive thyroid gland. Hypothyroidism ... surgical removal of the thyroid, and radiation treatment. Hypothyroidism FAQS WHAT IS THE THYROID GLAND? The thyroid ...

  3. Platelets in Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    In patients with critical illness, thrombocytopenia is a frequent laboratory abnormality. However frequent this may occur, a low platelet count is not an epiphenomenon, but a marker with further significance. It is always important to assess the proper cause for thrombocytopenia in critically ill patients because different underlying disorders may precipitate different diagnostic and therapeutic management strategies. Platelets are part of the first-line defense of the body against bleeding; hence, thrombocytopenia may increase the risk of hemorrhage. In case of systemic inflammatory syndromes, such as the response to sepsis, disseminated intravascular platelet activation may occur. This will contribute to microvascular failure and thereby play a role in the development of organ dysfunction. Platelets are circulating blood cells that will normally not interact with the intact vessel wall but that may swiftly respond to endothelial disruption (which is often part of the pathogenesis of critical illness) by adhering to subendothelial structures, followed by interaction with each other, thereby forming a platelet aggregate. The activated platelet (phospholipid) membrane may form a suitable surface on which further coagulation activation may occur. A low platelet count is a strong and independent predictor of an adverse outcome in critically ill patients, thereby facilitating a simple and practically risk assessment in these patients and potentially guiding the use of complex or expensive treatment strategies.

  4. Hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... to meet your body's needs. This condition is hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism is more common in women, people with other ... cause. Other causes include thyroid nodules, thyroiditis, congenital hypothyroidism, surgical removal of part or all of the ...

  5. [Nutrition in critical illness].

    PubMed

    Ökrös, Ilona

    2014-12-21

    Critically ill patients are often unable to eat by themselves over a long period of time, sometimes for weeks. In the acute phase, serious protein-energy malnutrition may develop with progressive muscle weakness, which may result in assisted respiration of longer duration as well as longer stay in intensive care unit and hospital. In view of the metabolic processes, energy and protein intake targets should be defined and the performance of metabolism should be monitored. Enteral nutrition is primarily recommended. However, parenteral supplementation is often necessary because of the disrupted tolerance levels of the gastrointestinal system. Apparently, an early parenteral supplementation started within a week would be of no benefit. Some experts believe that muscle loss can be reduced by increased target levels of protein. Further studies are needed on the effect of immune system feeding, fatty acids and micronutrients.

  6. The microbiome and critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    The central role of the microbiome in critical illness is supported by a half century of experimental and clinical study. The physiological effects of critical illness and the clinical interventions of intensive care substantially alter the microbiome. In turn, the microbiome predicts patients’ susceptibility to disease, and manipulation of the microbiome has prevented or modulated critical illness in animal models and clinical trials. This Review surveys the microbial ecology of critically ill patients, presents the facts and unanswered questions surrounding gut-derived sepsis, and explores the radically altered ecosystem of the injured alveolus. The revolution in culture-independent microbiology has provided the tools needed to target the microbiome rationally for the prevention and treatment of critical illness, holding great promise to improve the acute and chronic outcomes of the critically ill. PMID:26700442

  7. Protein requirement in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2016-05-01

    How much protein do critically ill patients require? For the many decades that nutritional support has been used there was a broad consensus that critically ill patients need much more protein than required for normal health. Now, however, some clinical investigators recommend limiting all macronutrient provision during the early phase of critical illness. How did these conflicting recommendations emerge? Which of them is correct? This review explains the longstanding recommendation for generous protein provision in critical illness, analyzes the clinical trials now being claimed to refute it, and concludes with suggestions for clinical investigation and practice.

  8. Thyroid function in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Fliers, Eric; Bianco, Antonio C; Langouche, Lies; Boelen, Anita

    2015-10-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) typically present with decreased concentrations of plasma tri-iodothyronine, low thyroxine, and normal range or slightly decreased concentration of thyroid-stimulating hormone. This ensemble of changes is collectively known as non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). The extent of NTIS is associated with prognosis, but no proof exists for causality of this association. Initially, NTIS is a consequence of the acute phase response to systemic illness and macronutrient restriction, which might be beneficial. Pathogenesis of NTIS in long-term critical illness is more complex and includes suppression of hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone, accounting for persistently reduced secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone despite low plasma thyroid hormone. In some cases distinguishing between NTIS and severe hypothyroidism, which is a rare primary cause for admission to the ICU, can be difficult. Infusion of hypothalamic-releasing factors can reactivate the thyroid axis in patients with NTIS, inducing an anabolic response. Whether this approach has a clinical benefit in terms of outcome is unknown. In this Series paper, we discuss diagnostic aspects, pathogenesis, and implications of NTIS as well as its distinction from severe, primary thyroid disorders in patients in the ICU.

  9. Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Chaker, Layal; Bianco, Antonio C; Jonklaas, Jacqueline; Peeters, Robin P

    2017-03-20

    Hypothyroidism is a common condition of thyroid hormone deficiency, which is readily diagnosed and managed but potentially fatal in severe cases if untreated. The definition of hypothyroidism is based on statistical reference ranges of the relevant biochemical parameters and is increasingly a matter of debate. Clinical manifestations of hypothyroidism range from life threatening to no signs or symptoms. The most common symptoms in adults are fatigue, lethargy, cold intolerance, weight gain, constipation, change in voice, and dry skin, but clinical presentation can differ with age and sex, among other factors. The standard treatment is thyroid hormone replacement therapy with levothyroxine. However, a substantial proportion of patients who reach biochemical treatment targets have persistent complaints. In this Seminar, we discuss the epidemiology, causes, and symptoms of hypothyroidism; summarise evidence on diagnosis, long-term risk, treatment, and management; and highlight future directions for research.

  10. Hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid causes high levels of "bad" (LDL) cholesterol.Mental health issues: Depression that occurs with hypothyroidism can become worse over time, especially if left untreated.Myxedema: A rare, life- ...

  11. Hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Below normal temperature Decreased breathing Low blood pressure Low blood sugar Unresponsiveness Inappropriate or uncharacteristic moods People with untreated hypothyroidism are at increased risk of: Infection Infertility , miscarriage , giving birth to a baby with birth defects Heart disease ...

  12. Chronic Critical Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... ICU) on a breathing machine (mechanical ventilator or respirator) for many days, this information about chronic critical ... a Tracheotomy? A breathing machine (mechanical ventilator or respirator) helps the lungs breathe and provides oxygen. When ...

  13. Polyneuropathy in critically ill patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, C F; Gilbert, J J; Hahn, A F; Sibbald, W J

    1984-01-01

    Five patients developed a severe motor and sensory polyneuropathy at the peak of critical illness (sepsis and multiorgan dysfunction complicating a variety of primary illnesses). Difficulties in weaning from the ventilator as the critical illness subsided and the development of flaccid and areflexic limbs were early clinical signs. However, electrophysiological studies, especially needle electrode examination of skeletal muscle, provided the definite evidence of polyneuropathy. The cause is uncertain, but the electrophysiological and morphological features indicate a primary axonal polyneuropathy with sparing of the central nervous system. Nutritional factors may have played a role, since the polyneuropathy improved in all five patients after total parenteral nutrition had been started, including the three patients who later died of unrelated causes. The features allow diagnosis during life, and encourage continued intensive management since recovery from the polyneuropathy may occur. Images PMID:6094735

  14. The critically ill immunosuppressed patient

    SciTech Connect

    Parrillo, J.E.; Masur, H. )

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the papers on the diagnosis and management of immunosuppressed patient. Some of the topics are: life-threatening organ failure in immunosuppressed patients; diagnosis and therapy of respiratory disease in the immunosuppressed patient; CNS complication of immunosuppression; infections; antineoplastic therapy of immunosuppressed patient; radiation therapy-issues in critically ill patient; AIDS; and management of bone marrow transplant patients.

  15. Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Caroline G P; Ladenson, Paul W

    2004-03-06

    Hypothyroidism is common, potentially serious, often clinically overlooked, readily diagnosed by laboratory testing, and eminently treatable. The condition is particularly prevalent in older women, in whom autoimmune thyroiditis is common. Other important causes include congenital thyroid disorders, previous thyroid surgery and irradiation, drugs such as lithium carbonate and amiodarone, and pituitary and hypothalamic disorders. Worldwide, dietary iodine deficiency remains an important cause. Hypothyroidism can present with nonspecific constitutional and neuropsychiatric complaints, or with hypercholesterolaemia, hyponatraemia, hyperprolactinaemia, or hyperhomocysteinaemia. Severe untreated hypothyroidism can lead to heart failure, psychosis, and coma. Although these manifestations are neither specific nor sensitive, the diagnosis is confirmed or excluded by measurements of serum thyrotropin and free thyroxine. Thyroxine replacement therapy is highly effective and safe, but suboptimal dosing is common in clinical practice. Patient noncompliance, drug interactions, and pregnancy can lead to inadequate treatment. Iatrogenic thyrotoxicosis can cause symptoms, and, even when mild, provoke atrial fibrillation and osteoporosis. We summarise present understanding of the history, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical diagnosis and management of hypothyroidism.

  16. Probiotics in critically ill children

    PubMed Central

    Singhi, Sunit C.; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Gut microflora contribute greatly to immune and nutritive functions and act as a physical barrier against pathogenic organisms across the gut mucosa. Critical illness disrupts the balance between host and gut microflora, facilitating colonization, overgrowth, and translocation of pathogens and microbial products across intestinal mucosal barrier and causing systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis. Commonly used probiotics, which have been developed from organisms that form gut microbiota, singly or in combination, can restore gut microflora and offer the benefits similar to those offered by normal gut flora, namely immune enhancement, improved barrier function of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and prevention of bacterial translocation. Enteral supplementation of probiotic strains containing either Lactobacillus alone or in combination with Bifidobacterium reduced the incidence and severity of necrotizing enterocolitis and all-cause mortality in preterm infants. Orally administered Lactobacillus casei subspecies rhamnosus, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus were effective in the prevention of late-onset sepsis and GIT colonization by Candida in preterm very low birth weight infants. In critically ill children, probiotics are effective in the prevention and treatment of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Oral administration of a mix of probiotics for 1 week to children on broad-spectrum antibiotics in a pediatric intensive care unit decreased GIT colonization by Candida, led to a 50% reduction in candiduria, and showed a trend toward decreased incidence of candidemia. However, routine use of probiotics cannot be supported on the basis of current scientific evidence. Safety of probiotics is also a concern; rarely, probiotics may cause bacteremia, fungemia, and sepsis in immunocompromised critically ill children. More studies are needed to answer questions on the effectiveness of a mix versus single-strain probiotics, optimum dosage regimens

  17. Delirium in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Slooter, A J C; Van De Leur, R R; Zaal, I J

    2017-01-01

    Delirium is common in critically ill patients and associated with increased length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and long-term cognitive impairment. The pathophysiology of delirium has been explained by neuroinflammation, an aberrant stress response, neurotransmitter imbalances, and neuronal network alterations. Delirium develops mostly in vulnerable patients (e.g., elderly and cognitively impaired) in the throes of a critical illness. Delirium is by definition due to an underlying condition and can be identified at ICU admission using prediction models. Treatment of delirium can be improved with frequent monitoring, as early detection and subsequent treatment of the underlying condition can improve outcome. Cautious use or avoidance of benzodiazepines may reduce the likelihood of developing delirium. Nonpharmacologic strategies with early mobilization, reducing causes for sleep deprivation, and reorientation measures may be effective in the prevention of delirium. Antipsychotics are effective in treating hallucinations and agitation, but do not reduce the duration of delirium. Combined pain, agitation, and delirium protocols seem to improve the outcome of critically ill patients and may reduce delirium incidence.

  18. Seizures in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Ch'ang, J; Claassen, J

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill patients with seizures are either admitted to the intensive care unit because of uncontrolled seizures requiring aggressive treatment or are admitted for other reasons and develop seizures secondarily. These patients may have multiorgan failure and severe metabolic and electrolyte disarrangements, and may require complex medication regimens and interventions. Seizures can be seen as a result of an acute systemic illness, a primary neurologic pathology, or a medication side-effect and can present in a wide array of symptoms from convulsive activity, subtle twitching, to lethargy. In this population, untreated isolated seizures can quickly escalate to generalized convulsive status epilepticus or, more frequently, nonconvulsive status epileptics, which is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Status epilepticus (SE) arises from a failure of inhibitory mechanisms and an enhancement of excitatory pathways causing permanent neuronal injury and other systemic sequelae. Carrying a high 30-day mortality rate, SE can be very difficult to treat in this complex setting, and a portion of these patients will become refractory, requiring narcotics and anesthetic medications. The most significant factor in successfully treating status epilepticus is initiating antiepileptic drugs as soon as possible, thus attentiveness and recognition of this disease are critical.

  19. Antiphospholipid antibodies in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Vassalo, Juliana; Spector, Nelson; de Meis, Ernesto; Soares, Márcio; Salluh, Jorge Ibrain Figueira

    2014-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies are responsible for a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Venous, arterial and microvascular thrombosis and severe catastrophic cases account for a large morbidly/mortality. Through the connection between the immune, inflammatory and hemostatic systems, it is possible that these antibodies may contribute to the development of organ dysfunction and are associated with poor short and long-term prognoses in critically ill patients. We performed a search of the PubMed/MedLine database for articles written during the period from January 2000 to February 2013 to evaluate the frequency of antiphospholipid antibodies in critically ill patients and their impact on the outcomes of these patients. Only eight original studies involving critically ill patients were found. However, the development of antiphospholipid antibodies in critically ill patients seems to be frequent, but more studies are necessary to clarify their pathogenic role and implications for clinical practice. PMID:25028953

  20. [Metabolic emergencies in critically ill cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Namendys-Silva, Silvio A; Hernández-Garay, Marisol; García-Guillén, Francisco J; Correa-García, Paulina; Herrera Gómez, Angel; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2013-11-01

    Severe metabolic alterations frequently occur in critically ill cancer patients; hypercalcemia, hypocalcemia, hyponatremia, tumor lysis syndrome, metabolic complications of renal failure and lactic acidosis. Cancer patients with metabolic emergencies should be treated in a medical oncology department or an intensive care unit. Most metabolic emergencies can be treated properly when they are identified early. The clinician should consider that the prognosis of critically ill cancer patients depends on their primary disease, comorbidities and organ failure.

  1. Endocrine and metabolic considerations in critically ill patients 4

    PubMed Central

    Fliers, Eric; Bianco, Antonio C; Langouche, Lies; Boelen, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) typically present with decreased concentrations of plasma tri-iodothyronine, low thyroxine, and normal range or slightly decreased concentration of thyroid-stimulating hormone. This ensemble of changes is collectively known as non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). The extent of NTIS is associated with prognosis, but no proof exists for causality of this association. Initially, NTIS is a consequence of the acute phase response to systemic illness and macronutrient restriction, which might be beneficial. Pathogenesis of NTIS in long-term critical illness is more complex and includes suppression of hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone, accounting for persistently reduced secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone despite low plasma thyroid hormone. In some cases distinguishing between NTIS and severe hypothyroidism, which is a rare primary cause for admission to the ICU, can be difficult. Infusion of hypothalamic-releasing factors can reactivate the thyroid axis in patients with NTIS, inducing an anabolic response. Whether this approach has a clinical benefit in terms of outcome is unknown. In this Series paper, we discuss diagnostic aspects, pathogenesis, and implications of NTIS as well as its distinction from severe, primary thyroid disorders in patients in the ICU. PMID:26071885

  2. The interrelation between hypothyroidism and glaucoma: a critical review and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Thvilum, Marianne; Brandt, Frans; Brix, Thomas Heiberg; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2017-02-16

    Data on the association between hypothyroidism and glaucoma are conflicting. We sought to shed light on this by conducting a critical review and meta-analyses. The meta-analyses were conducted in adherence with the widely accepted MOOSE guidelines. Using the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms: hypothyroidism, myxoedema and glaucoma or intraocular pressure, case-control studies, cohort studies and cross-sectional studies were identified (PubMed) and reviewed. Using meta-analysis, the relative risk (RR) of coexistence of glaucoma and hypothyroidism was calculated. Based on the literature search, thirteen studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria and could be categorized into two groups based on the exposure. The designs of the studies varied considerably, and there was heterogeneity related to lack of power, weak phenotype classifications and length of follow-up. Eight studies had glaucoma (5757 patients) as exposure and hypothyroidism as outcome. Among these, we found a non-significantly increased risk of hypothyroidism associated with glaucoma (RR 1.65; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.97-2.82). Based on five studies (168 006 patients) with hypothyroidism as exposure and glaucoma as outcome, we found the risk of glaucoma to be significantly increased (RR 1.33; 95% CI: 1.13-1.58). Based on these meta-analyses, there seems to be an association between hypothyroidism and glaucoma, which does not seem to be the case between glaucoma and hypothyroidism. However, larger scale studies with better phenotype classification, longer follow-up and taking comorbidity and other biases into consideration are needed to address a potential causal relationship.

  3. Hypomagnesemia in Critically Ill Sepsis Patients.

    PubMed

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Aretha, Diamanto; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg), also known as "the forgotten electrolyte", is the fourth most abundant cation overall and the second most abundant intracellular cation in the body. Mg deficiency has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases. This article is a review of the literature regarding Mg abnormalities with emphasis on the implications of hypomagnesemia in critical illness and on treatment options for hypomagnesemia in critically ill patients with sepsis. Hypomagnesemia is common in critically ill patients, and there is strong, consistent clinical evidence, largely from observational studies, showing that hypomagnesemia is significantly associated with increased need for mechanical ventilation, prolonged ICU stay and increased mortality. Although the mechanism linking hypomagnesemia with poor clinical outcomes is not known, experimental data suggest mechanisms contributing to such outcomes. However, at the present time, there is no clear evidence that magnesium supplementation improves outcomes in critically ill patients with hypomagnesemia. Large, well-designed clinical trials are needed to evaluate the role of magnesium therapy for improving outcomes in critically ill patients with sepsis.

  4. Review of Critical Illness Myopathy and Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Starane; Batra, Ayush

    2016-01-01

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) and neuropathy are underdiagnosed conditions within the intensive care setting and contribute to prolonged mechanical ventilation and ventilator wean failure and ultimately lead to significant morbidity and mortality. These conditions are often further subdivided into CIM, critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP), or the combination—critical illness polyneuromyopathy (CIPNM). In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CIM, CIP, and CIPNM, along with diagnostic considerations such as detailed clinical examination, electrophysiological studies, and histopathological review of muscle biopsy specimens. We also review current available treatments and prognosis. Increased awareness and early recognition of CIM, CIP, and CIPNM in the intensive care unit setting may lead to earlier treatments and rehabilitation, improving patient outcomes. PMID:28042370

  5. Diastolic dysfunction in the critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Suárez, J C; López, P; Mancebo, J; Zapata, L

    2016-11-01

    Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is a common finding in critically ill patients. It is characterized by a progressive deterioration of the relaxation and the compliance of the left ventricle. Two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography is a cornerstone in its diagnosis. Acute pulmonary edema associated with hypertensive crisis is the most frequent presentation of diastolic dysfunction critically ill patients. Myocardial ischemia, sepsis and weaning failure from mechanical ventilation also may be associated with diastolic dysfunction. The treatment is based on the reduction of pulmonary congestion and left ventricular filling pressures. Some studies have found a prognostic role of diastolic dysfunction in some diseases such as sepsis. The present review aims to analyze thoroughly the echocardiographic diagnosis and the most frequent scenarios in critically ill patients in whom diastolic dysfunction plays a key role.

  6. Bedside echocardiography in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Casaroto, Eduardo; Mohovic, Tatiana; Pinto, Lilian Moreira; de Lara, Tais Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The echocardiography has become a vital tool in the diagnosis of critically ill patients. The use of echocardiography by intensivists has been increasing since the 1990’s. This tool has become a common procedure for the cardiovascular assessment of critically ill patients, especially because it is non-invasive and can be applied in fast and guided manner at the bedside. Physicians with basic training in echocardiography, both from intensive care unit or emergency department, can assess the left ventricle function properly with good accuracy compared with assessment made by cardiologists. The change of treatment approach based on echocardiographic findings is commonly seen after examination of unstable patient. This brief review focuses on growing importance of echocardiography as an useful tool for management of critically ill patients in the intensive care setting along with the cardiac output assessment using this resource. PMID:26761560

  7. Giving nutrition support to critically ill adults.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jane

    Patients who become critically ill can have problems maintaining nutritional intake and it can be challenging for nurses to provide nutritional support. No one assessment method can identify each patient's risk of malnutrition, so nurses need to look at different aspects in their nutritional assessment and refer for specialist help from dietitians and nutrition support teams when needed. This article focuses on how severe physiological stress affects patients who are critically ill and impacts on their nutritional requirements. A nursing nutritional assessment is explored, as are nutritional support methods that may be used to manage these patients' nutritional needs.

  8. Methionine splanchnic uptake is increased in critically ill children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During critical illness the splanchnic area is profoundly affected. There is no information on splanchnic uptake of amino acids in vivo, in critically ill children. Methionine splanchnic uptake in critically ill children will differ from estimates in healthy adults. We studied 24 critically ill chil...

  9. Psychoneuroimmunology in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    DeKeyser, Freda

    2003-02-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is the study of the interactions among behavior, neural, and endocrine functions and the immune system. The purpose of this review is to briefly summarize the evidence concerning interactions among behavior, the neuroendocrine system, and the immune system, and to show how this evidence relates to critical care patients. It has been shown that the immune function of many patients in the intensive care unit is suppressed as a result of trauma, sepsis, or profound physiologic and psychological stress. Three of the most common stressors among patients in the intensive care unit are pain, sleep deprivation, and fear or anxiety. Findings have shown each of these stressors to be associated with decreased immune functioning. Nurses have an important responsibility to protect their patients from infection and promote their ability to heal. Several actions are suggested that can help the nurse achieve these goals. It is hoped that nurses would keep these interactions in mind while caring for their patients in the intensive care unit.

  10. Caring for a critically ill Amish newborn.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Elizabeth A

    2008-10-01

    This article describes a neonatal nurse's personal experience in working with a critically ill newborn and his Amish family in a newborn intensive care unit in Montana. The description includes a cultural experience with an Amish family with application to Madeleine Leininger's theory of culture care diversity and universality.

  11. The interfacility transport of critically ill newborns.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Hilary Ea; Jefferies, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The practice of paediatric/neonatal interfacility transport continues to expand. Transport teams have evolved into mobile intensive care units capable of delivering state-of-the-art critical care during paediatric and neonatal transport. While outcomes are best for high-risk infants born in a tertiary care setting, high-risk mothers often cannot be safely transferred. Their newborns may then have to be transported to a higher level of care following birth. The present statement reviews issues relating to transport of the critically ill newborn population, including personnel, team competencies, skills, equipment, systems and processes. Six recommendations for improving interfacility transport of critically ill newborns are highlighted, emphasizing the importance of regionalized care for newborns.

  12. Critical illness neuromyopathy and the role of physical therapy and rehabilitation in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Fan, Eddy

    2012-06-01

    Neuromuscular complications of critical illness are common, and can be severe and persistent, with substantial impairment in physical function and long-term quality of life. While the etiology of ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is multifactorial, both direct (ie, critical illness neuromyopathy) and indirect (ie, immobility/disuse atrophy) complications of critical illness contribute to it. ICUAW is often difficult to diagnose clinically during the acute phase of critical illness, due to the frequent use of deep sedation, encephalopathy, and delirium, which impair physical examination for patient strength. Despite its limitations, physical examination is the starting point for identification of ICUAW in the cooperative patient. Given the relative cost, invasiveness, and need for expertise, electrophysiological testing and/or muscle biopsy may be reserved for weak patients with slower than expected improvement on serial clinical examination. Currently there are limited interventions to prevent or treat ICUAW, with tight glycemic control having the greatest supporting evidence. There is a paucity of clinical trials evaluating the specific role of early rehabilitation in the chronic critically ill. However, a number of studies support the benefit of intensive rehabilitation in patients receiving chronic mechanical ventilation. Furthermore, emerging data demonstrate the safety, feasibility, and potential benefit of early mobility in critically ill patients, with the need for multicenter randomized trials to evaluate potential short- and long-term benefits of early mobility, including the potential to prevent the need for prolonged mechanical ventilation and/or the development of chronic critical illness, and other novel treatments on patients' muscle strength, physical function, quality of life, and resource utilization. Finally, the barriers, feasibility, and efficacy of early mobility in both medical and other ICUs (eg, surgical, neurological, pediatric), as well as in

  13. Nutrition in critical illness: a current conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, L. John; Bistrian, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill people are unable to eat. What’s the best way to feed them? Nutrition authorities have long recommended providing generous amounts of protein and calories to critically ill patients, either intravenously or through feeding tubes, in order to counteract the catabolic state associated with this condition. In practice, however, patients in modern intensive care units are substantially underfed. Several large randomized clinical trials were recently carried out to determine the clinical implications of this situation. Contradicting decades of physiological, clinical, and observational data, the results of these trials have been claimed to justify the current practice of systematic underfeeding in the intensive care unit. This article explains and suggests how to resolve this conundrum. PMID:27803805

  14. Management of critically ill patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Perez, Livier Josefina; Benitez-Lopez, Mario Alberto; Varon, Joseph; Surani, Salim

    2017-01-01

    Disorders of glucose homeostasis, such as stress-induced hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, are common complications in patients in the intensive care unit. Patients with preexisting diabetes mellitus (DM) are more susceptible to hyperglycemia, as well as a higher risk from glucose overcorrection, that may results in severe hypoglycemia. In critically ill patients with DM, it is recommended to maintain a blood glucose range between 140-180 mg/dL. In neurological patients and surgical patients, tighter glycemic control (i.e., 110-140 mg/d) is recommended if hypoglycemia can be properly avoided. There is limited evidence that shows that critically ill diabetic patients with a glycosylated hemoglobin levels above 7% may benefit from looser glycemic control, in order to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia and significant glycemic variability. PMID:28344751

  15. Extracorporeal Life Support in Critically Ill Adults

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) has become increasingly popular as a salvage strategy for critically ill adults. Major advances in technology and the severe acute respiratory distress syndrome that characterized the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic have stimulated renewed interest in the use of venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal to support the respiratory system. Theoretical advantages of ECLS for respiratory failure include the ability to rest the lungs by avoiding injurious mechanical ventilator settings and the potential to facilitate early mobilization, which may be advantageous for bridging to recovery or to lung transplantation. The use of venoarterial ECMO has been expanded and applied to critically ill adults with hemodynamic compromise from a variety of etiologies, beyond postcardiotomy failure. Although technology and general care of the ECLS patient have evolved, ECLS is not without potentially serious complications and remains unproven as a treatment modality. The therapy is now being tested in clinical trials, although numerous questions remain about the application of ECLS and its impact on outcomes in critically ill adults. PMID:25046529

  16. Probiotic use in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Sunit C; Baranwal, A

    2008-06-01

    Probiotics are "live microbes which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit to the host" (FAO/WHO joint group). Their potential role in bio-ecological modification of pathological internal milieu of the critically ill is under evaluation. Probiotics are available as single microbial strain (e.g., Bacillus clausii, Lactobacillus) or as a mix of multiple strains of Lactobacillus (acidophilus, sporogenes, lactis, reuteri RC-14, GG, and L. plantarum 299v), Bifidobacterium (bifidum, longum, infantis), Streptococcus (thermophillus, lactis, fecalis), Saccharomyces boulardii etc. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria are gram-positive, anaerobic, lactic acid bacteria. These are normal inhabitant of human gut and colonize the colon better than others. Critical illness and its treatment create hostile environment in the gut and alters the micro flora favoring growth of pathogens. Therapy with probiotics is an effort to reduce or eliminate potential pathogens and toxins, to release nutrients, antioxidants, growth factors and coagulation factors, to stimulate gut motility and to modulate innate and adaptive immune defense mechanisms via the normalization of altered gut flora. Scientific evidence shows that use of probiotics is effective in prevention and therapy of antibiotic associated diarrhea. However, available probiotics strains in currently used doses do not provide much needed early benefits, and need long-term administration to have clinically beneficial effects (viz, a reduction in rate of infection, severe sepsis, ICU stay, ventilation days and mortality) in critically ill surgical and trauma patients. Possibly, available strains do not adhere to intestinal mucosa early, or may require higher dose than what is used. Gap exists in our knowledge regarding mechanisms of action of different probiotics, most effective strains--single or multiple, cost effectiveness, risk-benefit potential, optimum dose, frequency and duration of treatment etc. More

  17. Antibiotic dose optimization in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Cotta, M O; Roberts, J A; Lipman, J

    2015-12-01

    The judicious use of existing antibiotics is essential for preserving their activity against infections. In the era of multi-drug resistance, this is of particular importance in clinical areas characterized by high antibiotic use, such as the ICU. Antibiotic dose optimization in critically ill patients requires sound knowledge not only of the altered physiology in serious infections - including severe sepsis, septic shock and ventilator-associated pneumonia - but also of the pathogen-drug exposure relationship (i.e. pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index). An important consideration is the fact that extreme shifts in organ function, such as those seen in hyperdynamic patients or those with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, can have an impact upon drug exposure, and constant vigilance is required when reviewing antibiotic dosing regimens in the critically ill. The use of continuous renal replacement therapy and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation remain important interventions in these patients; however, both of these treatments can have a profound effect on antibiotic exposure. We suggest placing emphasis on the use of therapeutic drug monitoring and dose individualization when optimizing therapy in these settings.

  18. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Vitrat, Virginie; Hautefeuille, Serge; Janssen, Cécile; Bougon, David; Sirodot, Michel; Pagani, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Critically ill patients with infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) would certainly benefit from timely bacterial identification and effective antimicrobial treatment. Diagnostic techniques have clearly improved in the last years and allow earlier identification of bacterial strains in some cases, but these techniques are still quite expensive and not readily available in all institutions. Moreover, the ever increasing rates of resistance to antimicrobials, especially in Gram-negative pathogens, are threatening the outcome for such patients because of the lack of effective medical treatment; ICU physicians are therefore resorting to combination therapies to overcome resistance, with the direct consequence of promoting further resistance. A more appropriate use of available antimicrobials in the ICU should be pursued, and adjustments in doses and dosing through pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have recently shown promising results in improving outcomes and reducing antimicrobial resistance. The aim of multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship programs is to improve antimicrobial prescription, and in this review we analyze the available experiences of such programs carried out in ICUs, with emphasis on results, challenges, and pitfalls. Any effective intervention aimed at improving antibiotic usage in ICUs must be brought about at the present time; otherwise, we will face the challenge of intractable infections in critically ill patients in the near future. PMID:25349478

  19. Alcoholism and critical illness: A review

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Ashish Jitendra

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol is the most commonly used and abused drug in the world, and alcohol use disorders pose a tremendous burden to healthcare systems around the world. The lifetime prevalence of alcohol abuse in the United States is estimated to be around 18%, and the economic consequences of these disorders are staggering. Studies on hospitalized patients demonstrate that about one in four patients admitted to critical care units will have alcohol-related issues, and unhealthy alcohol consumption is responsible for numerous clinical problems encountered in intensive care unit (ICU) settings. Patients with alcohol use disorders are not only predisposed to developing withdrawal syndromes and other conditions that often require intensive care, they also experience a considerably higher rate of complications, longer ICU and hospital length of stay, greater resource utilization, and significantly increased mortality compared to similar critically ill patients who do not abuse alcohol. Specific disorders seen in the critical care setting that are impacted by alcohol abuse include delirium, pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, trauma, and burn injuries. Despite the substantial burden of alcohol-induced disease in these settings, critical care providers often fail to identify individuals with alcohol use disorders, which can have significant implications for this vulnerable population and delay important clinical interventions. PMID:26855891

  20. Regional analgesia in postsurgical critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Moliner Velázquez, S; Rubio Haro, R; De Andrés Serrano, C; De Andrés Ibáñez, J

    2017-03-01

    Regional analgesia intrinsically, based on its physiological effects, is routinely used for the perioperative treatment of pain associated with surgical procedures. However, in other areas such as the non-surgical treatment of acute pain for patients in a critical condition, it has not been subjected to specific prospective studies. If we confine ourselves to the physiological effects of the nerve block, in a situation of stress, the indications for regional anaesthesia in this group of patients extend to the management of a wide variety of medical as well as postsurgical conditions, of trauma patients and of other painful procedures performed in the patient's bed. The critical patient certainly must be analyzed individually as their own primary conditions is of vital importance, as well as any associated conditions they have developed that can potentially increase the risk of systemic toxicity or morbidity, such as, coagulopathies, infection, immunosuppressive states, sedation and problems associated with mechanical ventilation. This review aims to assess the role of regional analgesia in critically ill patients, placing it within the algorithm decision tree of the professional responsible for patients in critical care units, all based on the evidence of potential benefits according to the published literature.

  1. Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunkui; Wu, Limin; Ni, Fengming; Ji, Wei; Wu, Jiang; Zhang, Hongliang

    2014-01-01

    Critical illness polyneuropathy and critical illness myopathy are frequent complications of severe illness that involve sensorimotor axons and skeletal muscles, respectively. Clinically, they manifest as limb and respiratory muscle weakness. Critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy in isolation or combination increases intensive care unit morbidity via the inability or difficulty in weaning these patients off mechanical ventilation. Many patients continue to suffer from decreased exercise capacity and compromised quality of life for months to years after the acute event. Substantial progress has been made lately in the understanding of the pathophysiology of critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy. Clinical and ancillary test results should be carefully interpreted to differentiate critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy from similar weaknesses in this patient population. The present review is aimed at providing the latest knowledge concerning the pathophysiology of critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy along with relevant clinical, diagnostic, differentiating, and treatment information for this debilitating neurological disease.

  2. Tight Glycemic Control in Critically Ill Children.

    PubMed

    Agus, Michael S D; Wypij, David; Hirshberg, Eliotte L; Srinivasan, Vijay; Faustino, E Vincent; Luckett, Peter M; Alexander, Jamin L; Asaro, Lisa A; Curley, Martha A Q; Steil, Garry M; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2017-02-23

    Background In multicenter studies, tight glycemic control targeting a normal blood glucose level has not been shown to improve outcomes in critically ill adults or children after cardiac surgery. Studies involving critically ill children who have not undergone cardiac surgery are lacking. Methods In a 35-center trial, we randomly assigned critically ill children with confirmed hyperglycemia (excluding patients who had undergone cardiac surgery) to one of two ranges of glycemic control: 80 to 110 mg per deciliter (4.4 to 6.1 mmol per liter; lower-target group) or 150 to 180 mg per deciliter (8.3 to 10.0 mmol per liter; higher-target group). Clinicians were guided by continuous glucose monitoring and explicit methods for insulin adjustment. The primary outcome was the number of intensive care unit (ICU)-free days to day 28. Results The trial was stopped early, on the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board, owing to a low likelihood of benefit and evidence of the possibility of harm. Of 713 patients, 360 were randomly assigned to the lower-target group and 353 to the higher-target group. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the median number of ICU-free days did not differ significantly between the lower-target group and the higher-target group (19.4 days [interquartile range {IQR}, 0 to 24.2] and 19.4 days [IQR, 6.7 to 23.9], respectively; P=0.58). In per-protocol analyses, the median time-weighted average glucose level was significantly lower in the lower-target group (109 mg per deciliter [IQR, 102 to 118]; 6.1 mmol per liter [IQR, 5.7 to 6.6]) than in the higher-target group (123 mg per deciliter [IQR, 108 to 142]; 6.8 mmol per liter [IQR, 6.0 to 7.9]; P<0.001). Patients in the lower-target group also had higher rates of health care-associated infections than those in the higher-target group (12 of 349 patients [3.4%] vs. 4 of 349 [1.1%], P=0.04), as well as higher rates of severe hypoglycemia, defined as a blood glucose level below 40 mg per

  3. Nutritional Assessment in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Najmeh; Mazloom, Zohreh; Zand, Farid; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Amini, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition is an important factor in the survival of critically ill patients. The purpose of the present study was to assess the nutritional status of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) on the days of admission and discharge via a detailed nutritional assessment. Methods: Totally, 125 patients were followed up from admission to discharge at 8ICUs in Shiraz, Iran. The patients’ nutritional status was assessed using subjective global assessment (SGA), anthropometric measurements, biochemical indices, and body composition indicators. Diet prescription and intake was also evaluated. Results: Malnutrition prevalence significantly increased on the day of discharge (58.62%) compared to the day of admission (28.8%) according to SGA (P<0.001). The patients’ weight, mid-upper-arm circumference, mid-arm muscle circumference, triceps skinfold thickness, and calf circumference decreased significantly as well (P<0.001). Lean mass weight and body cell mass also decreased significantly (P<0.001). Biochemical indices showed no notable changes except for magnesium, which decreased significantly (P=0.013). A negative significant correlation was observed between malnutrition on discharge day and anthropometric measurements. Positive and significant correlations were observed between the number of days without enteral feeding, days delayed from ICU admission to the commencement of enteral feeding, and the length of ICU stay and malnutrition on discharge day. Energy and protein intakes were significantly less than the prescribed diet (26.26% and 26.48%, respectively). Conclusion: Malnutrition on discharge day increased in the patients in the ICU according to SGA. Anthropometric measurements were better predictors of the nutritional outcome of our critically ill patients than were biochemical tests. PMID:27217600

  4. Rhabdomyolysis in Critically Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmanovska, Biljana; Cvetkovska, Emilija; Kuzmanovski, Igor; Jankulovski, Nikola; Shosholcheva, Mirjana; Kartalov, Andrijan; Spirovska, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome of injury of skeletal muscles associated with myoglobinuria, muscle weakness, electrolyte imbalance and often, acute kidney injury as severe complication. The aim: of this study is to detect the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in critically ill patients in the surgical intensive care unit (ICU), and to raise awareness of this medical condition and its treatment among the clinicians. Material and methods: A retrospective review of all surgical and trauma patients admitted to surgical ICU of the University Surgical Clinic “Mother Teresa” in Skopje, Macedonia, from January 1st till December 31st 2015 was performed. Patients medical records were screened for available serum creatine kinase (CK) with levels > 200 U/l, presence of myoglobin in the serum in levels > 80 ng/ml, or if they had a clinical diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis by an attending doctor. Descriptive statistical methods were used to analyze the collected data. Results: Out of totally 1084 patients hospitalized in the ICU, 93 were diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis during the course of one year. 82(88%) patients were trauma patients, while 11(12%) were surgical non trauma patients. 7(7.5%) patients diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis developed acute kidney injury (AKI) that required dialysis. Average values of serum myoglobin levels were 230 ng/ml, with highest values of > 5000 ng/ml. Patients who developed AKI had serum myoglobin levels above 2000 ng/ml. Average values of serum CK levels were 400 U/l, with highest value of 21600 U/l. Patients who developed AKI had serum CK levels above 3000 U/l. Conclusion: Regular monitoring and early detection of elevated serum CK and myoglobin levels in critically ill surgical and trauma patients is recommended in order to recognize and treat rhabdomyolysis in timely manner and thus prevent development of AKI. PMID:27703296

  5. Transfusion therapy in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tai-Tsung

    2008-04-01

    Critically ill children in pediatric intensive care units are commonly indicated for blood transfusion due to many reasons. Children are quite different from adults during growth and development, and that should be taken into consideration. It is very difficult to establish a universal transfusion guideline for critically ill children, especially preterm neonates. Treating underlying disease and targeted replacement therapy are the most effective approaches. Red blood cells are the first choice for replacement therapy in decompensated anemic patients. The critical hemoglobin concentration may be higher in critically ill children for many reasons. Whole blood is used only in the following conditions or diseases: (1) exchange transfusion; (2) after cardiopulmonary bypass; (3) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; (4) massive transfusion, especially in multiple component deficiency. The characteristics of hemorrhagic diseases are so varied that their therapy should depend on the specific needs associated with the underlying disease. In general, platelet transfusion is not needed when a patient has platelet count greater than 10,000/mm3 and is without active bleeding, platelet functional deficiency or other risk factors such as sepsis. Patients with risk factors or age less than 4 months should be taken into special consideration, and the critical thrombocyte level will be raised. Platelet transfusion is not recommended in patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenia or thrombocytopenia due to acceleration of platelet destruction without active bleeding or life-threatening hemorrhage. There are many kinds of plasma-derived products, and recombinant factors are commonly used for hemorrhagic patients due to coagulation factor deficiency depending on the characteristics of the diseases. The most effective way to correct disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is to treat the underlying disease. Anticoagulant therapy is very important; heparin is the most common

  6. Nitrogen Balance and Protein Requirements for Critically Ill Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Roland N.

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill older patients with sarcopenia experience greater morbidity and mortality than younger patients. It is anticipated that unabated protein catabolism would be detrimental for the critically ill older patient. Healthy older subjects experience a diminished response to protein supplementation when compared to their younger counterparts, but this anabolic resistance can be overcome by increasing protein intake. Preliminary evidence suggests that older patients may respond differently to protein intake than younger patients during critical illness as well. If sufficient protein intake is given, older patients can achieve a similar nitrogen accretion response as younger patients even during critical illness. However, there is concern among some clinicians that increasing protein intake in older patients during critical illness may lead to azotemia due to decreased renal functional reserve which may augment the propensity towards worsened renal function and worsened clinical outcomes. Current evidence regarding protein requirements, nitrogen balance, ureagenesis, and clinical outcomes during nutritional therapy for critically ill older patients is reviewed. PMID:27096868

  7. Infections in critically ill burn patients.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, F; Mas, D; Rubio, M; Garcia-Hierro, P

    2016-04-01

    Severe burn patients are one subset of critically patients in which the burn injury increases the risk of infection, systemic inflammatory response and sepsis. The infections are usually related to devices and to the burn wound. Most infections, as in other critically ill patients, are preceded by colonization of the digestive tract and the preventative measures include selective digestive decontamination and hygienic measures. Early excision of deep burn wound and appropriate use of topical antimicrobials and dressings are considered of paramount importance in the treatment of burns. Severe burn patients usually have some level of systemic inflammation. The difficulty to differentiate inflammation from sepsis is relevant since therapy differs between patients with and those without sepsis. The delay in prescribing antimicrobials increases morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the widespread use of antibiotics for all such patients is likely to increase antibiotic resistance, and costs. Unfortunately the clinical usefulness of biomarkers for differential diagnosis between inflammation and sepsis has not been yet properly evaluated. Severe burn injury induces physiological response that significantly alters drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. These alterations impact antimicrobials distribution and excretion. Nevertheless the current available literature shows that there is a paucity of information to support routine dose recommendations.

  8. Monitoring the critically ill surgical patient.

    PubMed Central

    Holliday, R L; Doris, P J

    1979-01-01

    Critically ill surgical patients account for approximately half the patients in an active multidisciplinary critical care unit. Hypovolemia and sepsis are common in such patients and affect a number of organ systems. Monitoring these systems provides therapeutically relevant information that may decrease morbidity and improve patient survival. Circulatory hemodynamics may be assessed by direct measurement of the arterial blood pressure, central venous and pulmonary artery pressure monitoring and cardiac output determination; the data thus obtained are valuable in guiding fluid replacement in the hypovolemic individual. The respiratory status may be assessed by bedside spirometry and measurement of arterial blood gas tensions to gauge pulmonary function and the need for assisted ventilation. Renal dysfunction is common in such patients; careful analysis of both urine and blood may identify prerenal as opposed to renal and postrenal factors. Monitoring of the gastrointestinal tract, especially for hemorrhage, is important. Finally, careful attention to nutritional status and provision of adequate protein and energy intake by mouth or by vein is a vital component of the optimal care of these patients. PMID:115566

  9. Monocyte Profiles in Critically Ill Patients With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Sepsis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-02

    Pseudomonas Infections; Pseudomonas Septicemia; Pseudomonas; Pneumonia; Pseudomonal Bacteraemia; Pseudomonas Urinary Tract Infection; Pseudomonas Gastrointestinal Tract Infection; Sepsis; Sepsis, Severe; Critically Ill

  10. Lung ultrasound in the critically ill

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lung ultrasound is a basic application of critical ultrasound, defined as a loop associating urgent diagnoses with immediate therapeutic decisions. It requires the mastery of ten signs: the bat sign (pleural line), lung sliding (yielding seashore sign), the A-line (horizontal artifact), the quad sign, and sinusoid sign indicating pleural effusion, the fractal, and tissue-like sign indicating lung consolidation, the B-line, and lung rockets indicating interstitial syndrome, abolished lung sliding with the stratosphere sign suggesting pneumothorax, and the lung point indicating pneumothorax. Two more signs, the lung pulse and the dynamic air bronchogram, are used to distinguish atelectasis from pneumonia. All of these disorders were assessed using CT as the “gold standard” with sensitivity and specificity ranging from 90% to 100%, allowing ultrasound to be considered as a reasonable bedside “gold standard” in the critically ill. The BLUE-protocol is a fast protocol (<3 minutes), which allows diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. It includes a venous analysis done in appropriate cases. Pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and pneumothorax yield specific profiles. Pulmonary edema, e.g., yields anterior lung rockets associated with lung sliding, making the “B-profile.” The FALLS-protocol adapts the BLUE-protocol to acute circulatory failure. It makes sequential search for obstructive, cardiogenic, hypovolemic, and distributive shock using simple real-time echocardiography (right ventricle dilatation, pericardial effusion), then lung ultrasound for assessing a direct parameter of clinical volemia: the apparition of B-lines, schematically, is considered as the endpoint for fluid therapy. Other aims of lung ultrasound are decreasing medical irradiation: the LUCIFLR program (most CTs in ARDS or trauma can be postponed), a use in traumatology, intensive care unit, neonates (the signs are the same than

  11. Copeptin Predicts Mortality in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Honeder, Maria C.; Lenz, Max; Maurer, Gerald; Wojta, Johann; Heinz, Gottfried; Huber, Kurt; Speidl, Walter S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Critically ill patients admitted to a medical intensive care unit exhibit a high mortality rate irrespective of the cause of admission. Besides its role in fluid and electrolyte balance, vasopressin has been described as a stress hormone. Copeptin, the C-terminal portion of provasopressin mirrors vasopressin levels and has been described as a reliable biomarker for the individual’s stress level and was associated with outcome in various disease entities. The aim of this study was to analyze whether circulating levels of copeptin at ICU admission are associated with 30-day mortality. Methods In this single-center prospective observational study including 225 consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary medical ICU at a university hospital, blood was taken at ICU admission and copeptin levels were measured using a commercially available automated sandwich immunofluorescent assay. Results Median acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score was 20 and 30-day mortality was 25%. Median copeptin admission levels were significantly higher in non-survivors as compared with survivors (77.6 IQR 30.7–179.3 pmol/L versus 45.6 IQR 19.6–109.6 pmol/L; p = 0.025). Patients with serum levels of copeptin in the third tertile at admission had a 2.4-fold (95% CI 1.2–4.6; p = 0.01) increased mortality risk as compared to patients in the first tertile. When analyzing patients according to cause of admission, copeptin was only predictive of 30-day mortality in patients admitted due to medical causes as opposed to those admitted after cardiac surgery, as medical patients with levels of copeptin in the highest tertile had a 3.3-fold (95% CI 1.66.8, p = 0.002) risk of dying independent from APACHE II score, primary diagnosis, vasopressor use and need for mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Circulating levels of copeptin at ICU admission independently predict 30-day mortality in patients admitted to a medical ICU. PMID:28118414

  12. Vitamin D metabolism and deficiency in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul

    2011-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent and has been associated with a diverse range of chronic medical conditions in the general population. In contrast, the prevalence, pathogenesis and significance of vitamin D deficiency have received little attention in acute medicine. Vitamin D deficiency is seldom considered and rarely corrected adequately, if at all, in critically ill patients. Recent recognition of the extra-skeletal, pleiotropic actions of vitamin D in immunity, epithelial function and metabolic regulation may underlie the previously under-recognized contribution of vitamin D deficiency to typical co-morbidities in critically ill patients, including sepsis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome and metabolic dysfunction. Improved understanding of vitamin D metabolism and regulation in critical illness may allow therapeutic exploitation of vitamin D to improve outcome in critically ill patients.

  13. The pharmacologic approach to the critically ill patient

    SciTech Connect

    Chernow, B. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers addressing the pharmacologic approach to the critically ill patient. Chapter topics include: Radiation injury; Red cell substitutes: a current appraisal; and Psychopharmacology in the ICU.

  14. Prospective determination of plasma imipenem concentrations in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Eric; Moreillon, Philippe; Cotting, Jacques; Moessinger, Adrien; Bille, Jacques; Décosterd, Laurent; Zanetti, Giorgio; Majcherczyk, Paul; Bugnon, Denis

    2006-07-01

    Plasma imipenem concentrations were measured in 19 critically ill children (median age, 0.8 year; range, 0.02 to 12.9 years). Wide interindividual variations (2 to 4x at peak and >10x at trough concentrations) resulted in unpredictable plasma levels in several children. To avoid subtherapeutic drug levels, we recommend treatment with at least 100 mg/kg of body weight/day of imipenem-cilastatin for critically ill children requiring such therapy.

  15. Prospective Determination of Plasma Imipenem Concentrations in Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Giannoni, Eric; Moreillon, Philippe; Cotting, Jacques; Moessinger, Adrien; Bille, Jacques; Décosterd, Laurent; Zanetti, Giorgio; Majcherczyk, Paul; Bugnon, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Plasma imipenem concentrations were measured in 19 critically ill children (median age, 0.8 year; range, 0.02 to 12.9 years). Wide interindividual variations (2 to 4× at peak and >10× at trough concentrations) resulted in unpredictable plasma levels in several children. To avoid subtherapeutic drug levels, we recommend treatment with at least 100 mg/kg of body weight/day of imipenem-cilastatin for critically ill children requiring such therapy. PMID:16801447

  16. Antioxidant Vitamins and Trace Elements in Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    Koekkoek, W A C Kristine; van Zanten, Arthur R H

    2016-08-01

    This comprehensive narrative review summarizes relevant antioxidant mechanisms, the antioxidant status, and effects of supplementation in critically ill patients for the most studied antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E and the enzyme cofactor trace elements selenium and zinc. Over the past 15 years, oxidative stress-mediated cell damage has been recognized to be fundamental to the pathophysiology of various critical illnesses such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and multiorgan dysfunction in sepsis. Related to these conditions, low plasma levels of antioxidant enzymes, vitamins, and trace elements have been frequently reported, and thus supplementation seems logical. However, low antioxidant plasma levels per se may not indicate low total body stores as critical illness may induce redistribution of antioxidants. Furthermore, low antioxidant levels may even be beneficial as pro-oxidants are essential in bacterial killing. The reviewed studies in critically ill patients show conflicting results. This may be due to different patient populations, study designs, timing, dosing regimens, and duration of the intervention and outcome measures evaluated. Therefore, at present, it remains unclear whether supplementation of antioxidant micronutrients has any clinical benefit in critically ill patients as some studies show clear benefits, whereas others demonstrate neutral outcomes and even harm. Combination therapy of antioxidants seems logical as they work in synergy and function as elements of the human antioxidant network. Further research should focus on defining the normal antioxidant status for critically ill patients and to study optimal supplement combinations either by nutrition enrichment or by enteral or parenteral pharmacological interventions.

  17. Septic shock non-thyroidal illness syndrome causes hypothyroidism and conditions for reduced sensitivity to thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Castro, Isabel; Quisenberry, Leah; Calvo, Rosa-Maria; Obregon, Maria-Jesus; Lado-Abeal, Joaquin

    2013-04-01

    Non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is part of the neuroendocrine response to stress, but the significance of this syndrome remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NTIS on thyroid hormone (TH) levels and TH molecular targets, as well as the relationship between septic shock nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kB) activation and TH receptor β (THRB) gene expression at a multi-tissue level in a pig model. Prepubertal domestic pigs were given i.v. saline or LPS for 48 h. Serum and tissue TH was measured by chemiluminescence and RIA. Expression of THRs and cofactors was measured by real-time PCR, and deiodinase (DIO) activity was measured by enzyme assays. Tissue NF-kB nuclear binding activity was evaluated by EMSA. LPS-treated pigs had decreased TH levels in serum and most tissues. DIO1 expression in liver and kidney and DIO1 activity in kidney decreased after LPS. No changes in DIO2 activity were observed between groups. LPS induced an increase in hypothalamus, thyroid, and liver DIO3 activity. Among the other studied genes, monocarboxylate transporter 8 and THRB were the most commonly repressed in endotoxemic pigs. LPS-induced NF-kB activation was associated with a decrease in THRB gene expression only in frontal lobe, adrenal gland, and kidney cortex. We conclude that LPS-induced NTIS in pigs is characterized by hypothyroidism and tissue-specific reduced TH sensitivity. The role of NF-kB in regulating THRB expression during endotoxemia, if any, is restricted to a limited number of tissues.

  18. Sarcopenia and critical illness: a deadly combination in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Joseph S

    2015-03-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-associated loss of lean skeletal muscle mass. It is the result of multiple physiologic derangements, ultimately resulting in an insidious functional decline. Frailty, the clinical manifestation of sarcopenia and physical infirmity, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the elderly population. The underlying pathology results in a disruption of the individual's ability to tolerate internal and external stressors such as injury or illness. This infirmity results in a markedly increased risk of falls and subsequent morbidity and mortality from the resulting traumatic injury, as well as an inability to recover from medical insults, resulting in critical illness. The increasing prevalence of sarcopenia and critical illness in the elderly has resulted in a deadly intersection of disease processes. The lethality of this combination appears to be the result of altered muscle metabolism, decreased mitochondrial energetics needed to survive critical illness, and a chronically activated catabolic state likely mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α. Furthermore, these underlying derangements are independently associated with an increased incidence of critical illness, resulting in a progressive downward spiral. Considerable evidence has been gathered supporting the role of aggressive nutrition support and physical therapy in improving outcomes. Critical care practitioners must consider sarcopenia and the resulting frailty phenotype a comorbid condition so that the targeted interventions can be instituted and research efforts focused.

  19. Early Mobilization and Rehabilitation of Patients Who Are Critically Ill.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Mohamed D; Parker, Ann M; Needham, Dale M

    2016-09-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are increasingly recognized as a cause of both short- and long-term physical morbidity in survivors of critical illness. This recognition has given rise to research aimed at better understanding the risk factors and mechanisms associated with neuromuscular dysfunction and physical impairment associated with critical illness, as well as possible interventions to prevent or treat these issues. Among potential risk factors, bed rest is an important modifiable risk factor. Early mobilization and rehabilitation of patients who are critically ill may help prevent or mitigate the sequelae of bed rest and improve patient outcomes. Research studies and quality improvement projects have demonstrated that early mobilization and rehabilitation are safe and feasible in patients who are critically ill, with potential benefits including improved physical functioning and decreased duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care, and hospital stay. Despite these findings, early mobilization and rehabilitation are still uncommon in routine clinical practice, with many perceived barriers. This review summarizes potential risk factors for neuromuscular dysfunction and physical impairment associated with critical illness, highlights the potential role of early mobilization and rehabilitation in improving patient outcomes, and discusses some of the commonly perceived barriers to early mobilization and strategies for overcoming them.

  20. Oxidative Stress in Critically Ill Children with Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Derek S

    2011-10-07

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit. Sepsis accounts for significant morbidity and mortality in critically ill children as well. The pathophysiology of sepsis is characterized by a complex systemic inflammatory response, endothelial dysfunction, and alterations in the coagulation system, which lead to perturbations in the delivery of oxygen and metabolic substrates to the tissues, end-organ dysfunction, and ultimately death. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role as both a promoter and mediator of the systemic inflammatory response, suggesting potential targets for the treatment of critically ill children with the sepsis syndrome. Herein, we will provide a brief review of the role of oxidative and nitrosative stress in the pathophysiology of sepsis.

  1. Human factors in the management of the critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Bion, J F; Abrusci, T; Hibbert, P

    2010-07-01

    Unreliable delivery of best practice care is a major component of medical error. Critically ill patients are particularly susceptible to error and unreliable care. Human factors analysis, widely used in industry, provides insights into how interactions between organizations, tasks, and the individual worker impact on human behaviour and affect systems reliability. We adopt a human factors approach to examine determinants of clinical reliability in the management of critically ill patients. We conducted a narrative review based on a Medline search (1950-March 2010) combining intensive/critical care (units) with medical errors, patient safety, or delivery of healthcare; keyword and Internet search 'human factors' or 'ergonomics'. Critical illness represents a high-risk, complex system spanning speciality and geographical boundaries. Substantial opportunities exist for improving the safety and reliability of care of critically ill patients at the level of the task, the individual healthcare provider, and the organization or system. Task standardization (best practice guidelines) and simplification (bundling or checklists) should be implemented where scientific evidence is strong, or adopted subject to further research ('dynamic standardization'). Technical interventions should be embedded in everyday practice by the adjunctive use of non-technical (behavioural) interventions. These include executive 'adoption' of clinical areas, systematic methods for identifying hazards and reflective learning from error, and a range of techniques for improving teamworking and communication. Human factors analysis provides a useful framework for understanding and rectifying the causes of error and unreliability, particularly in complex systems such as critical care.

  2. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in critically ill elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun-yun; Xu, Fan; Chu, Ming; Bi, Li-qing

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the incidence, possible risk factors and prognosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in critically ill elderly patients. Methods: We selected 122 cases admitted to the ICU, ages 60–93 years old. An echocardiography examination was performed within four days after admission to the ICU. PAH is usually suspected if the patient’s pulmonary artery systolic pressure ≥ 40 mmHg. We collected echocardiography data, relevant clinical data and routine laboratory data; we then used a statistical method to analyze the risk factors for PAH in critically ill elderly patients and examined its impact on the prognosis. Results: Total 51 patients were diagnosed with PAH. The prevalence of critically ill elderly patients with PAH was 41.8%. The ANOVA analysis showed that if patients had COPD (P = 0.031) and/or respiratory failure (P = 0.021), they were more prone to PAH. An enlarged left atrium (P = 0.038) and/or right ventricle (P = 0.029), a declining left ventricle fractional shortening rate (P = 0.038), and an elevated amount of the brain natriuretic peptides (P = 0.046) were all associated with the occurrence of PAH. Multivariate regression analysis showed that the left atrial diameter (P = 0.045) was the risk factor in critically ill elderly patients with PAH. The 30-day mortality rate was 33.3% for elderly patients with PAH, which is statistically significant (P = 0.035) when compared with the mortality rate of patients with normal pulmonary artery pressure. Our multivariate regression analysis also showed that, for critically ill elderly patients admitted in the ICU, PAH (P = 0.039) is risk factor for increased mortality. Conclusions: A higher incidence of PAH occurs in critically ill elderly patients. PAH is more likely to occur in patients with an enlarged left atrium, and these problems adversely impact the prognosis. PMID:28367167

  3. Echocardiographic approach to cardiac tamponade in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    McCanny, Peter; Colreavy, Frances

    2016-12-24

    Cardiac tamponade should be considered in a critically ill patient in whom the cause of haemodynamic shock is unclear. When considering tamponade, transthoracic echocardiography plays an essential role and is the initial investigation of choice. Diagnostic sensitivity of transthoracic echocardiography is dependent on image quality, and in some cases a transoesophageal approach may be required to confirm the diagnosis. Knowledge of the pathophysiology and echocardiographic features of cardiac tamponade are essential for the practicing Intensivist. This review presents an approach to the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiac tamponade in critically ill patients.

  4. Critical illness associated neuromuscular disorders -- keep them in mind.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Réka; Molnár, Levente; Fülep, Zoltán; Fekete, Kálra; Berhés, Mariann; Fülesdi, Béla

    2014-11-30

    Neuromuscular disorders complicating sepsis and critical illness are not new and scarce phenomena yet they receive little attention in daily clinical practice. Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy affect nearly half of the patients with sepsis. The difficult weaning from the ventilator, the prolonged intensive care unit and hospital stay, the larger complication and mortality rate these disorders predispose to, put a large burden on the patient and the health care system. The aim of this review is to give an insight into the pathophysiological background, diagnostic possibilities and potential preventive and therapeutic measures in connection with these disorders to draw attention to their significance and underline the importance of preventive approach.

  5. Fish Oil in Critical Illness: Mechanisms and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Renee D.; Martin, Julie M.; Mayer, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Fish oil is rich in omega-3 fatty acids which have been shown to be beneficial in multiple disease states that involve an inflammatory process. It is now hypothesized that omega-3 fatty acids may decrease the inflammatory response and be beneficial in critical illness. After a review of the mechanisms of omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation, research using enteral nutrition formulas and parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions fortified with fish oil are examined. The results of this research to date are inconclusive for both enteral and parenteral omega-3 fatty acid administration. More research is required before definitive recommendations can be made on fish oil supplementation in critical illness. PMID:20643303

  6. Nursing the critically ill surgical patient in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Carter, Chris; Snell, David

    2016-11-10

    Critical illness in the developing world is a substantial burden for individuals, families, communities and healthcare services. The management of these patients will depend on the resources available. Simple conditions such as a fractured leg or a strangulated hernia can have devastating effects on individuals, families and communities. The recent Lancet Commission on Global Surgery and the World Health Organization promise to strengthen emergency and essential care will increase the focus on surgical services within the developing world. This article provides an overview of nursing the critically ill surgical patient in Zambia, a lower middle income country (LMIC) in sub-Saharan Africa.

  7. Transthoracic echocardiography in obstetric anaesthesia and obstetric critical illness.

    PubMed

    Dennis, A T

    2011-04-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is a powerful non-invasive diagnostic, monitoring and measurement device in medicine. In addition to cardiologists, many other specialised groups, including emergency and critical care physicians and cardiac anaesthetists, have recognised its ability to provide high quality information and utilise TTE in the care of their patients. In obstetric anaesthesia and management of obstetric critical illness, the favourable characteristics of pregnant women facilitate TTE examination. These include anterior and left lateral displacement of the heart, frequent employment of the left lateral tilted position to avoid aortocaval compression, spontaneous ventilation and wide acceptance of ultrasound technology by women. Of relevance to obstetric anaesthetists is that maternal morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease is significant worldwide. This makes TTE an appropriate, important and applicable device in pregnant women. Clinician-performed TTE enables differentiation between the life-threatening causes of hypotension. In the critically ill woman this improves diagnostic accuracy and allows treatment interventions to be instituted and monitored at the point of patient care. This article outlines the application of TTE in the specialty of obstetric anaesthesia and in the management of obstetric critical illness. It describes the importance of TTE education, quality assurance and outcome recording. It also discusses how barriers to the routine implementation of TTE in obstetric anaesthesia and management of obstetric critical illness can be overcome.

  8. Real Time Free Cortisol Quantification Among Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Jerry J.; Donaldson, Amy; Barker, Ruth M.; Meert, Kathleen L.; Harrison, Rick; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Berger, John; Willson, Douglas F.; Jack, Rhona; Nicholson, Carol; Dean, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Ascertainment of adrenal function assessing free (FC) rather that total (TC) cortisol may be beneficial for the diagnosis of critical illness related cortisol insufficiency (CIRCI). We hypothesized that centrifugal ultrafiltration (CUF) would provide timely FC data that highly correlated with the gold standard, but logistically cumbersome, equilibrium dialysis (EQD) technique when the FC fractions were identically quantified by chemiluminescence immunoassay. We also hypothesized that FC would correlate with illness severity in a large cohort of critically ill children. Design Prospective, multi-institutional, observational cohort investigation. Setting Seven pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) within the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network. Patients 165 critically ill children across the spectrum of illness severity. Interventions Blood sampling. Measurements and main results Time to derive plasma FC concentrations following CUF or EQD fractionation with chemiluminescence immunoassay was ~2 versus ~24 hours, respectively. Utilizing CUF, mean plasma FC was 4.1 ± 6.7 ug/dL (median 1.6, range 0.2-43.6), representing an average of 15.2 ± 9.4% of total cortisol. Nearly 60% of subjects exhibited FC < 2 and 30% < 0.8 ug/dL, previously suggested threshold concentrations for defining CIRCI. Plasma FC concentrations comparing CUF versus EQD fractionation demonstrated a strong correlation (R2 = 0.97). For FC < 2 ug/dL Bland-Altman analysis revealed minimal negative bias for the CUF technique. Illness severity assessed by PRISM III correlated moderately with FC and percent TC as FC. Conclusions Determination of CUF fractionated FC was fast and results correlated highly with EQD fractionated FC. Many children exhibited FC < 2 and < 0.8 ug/dL, but did not demonstrate clinical evidence of CIRCI. This study ascertains that real time FC quantification is feasible to

  9. Nutrition therapy in critically ill infants and children.

    PubMed

    Skillman, Heather E; Wischmeyer, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Infants and children are susceptible to the profound metabolic effects of critical illness. In addition, preexisting malnutrition and obesity have adverse consequences during the intensive care unit stay. Early enteral and parenteral feeding can improve nutrition deficits, but neither has been sufficiently studied to show an effect on clinical outcomes in pediatric critical care. Indirect calorimetry is a useful technique that identifies patients receiving inadequate or excessive nutrition, but this technique is underused.

  10. Pulmonary penetration of piperacillin and tazobactam in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Felton, TW; McCalman, K; Malagon, I; Isalska, B; Whalley, S; Goodwin, J; Bentley, AM; Hope, WW

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary infections in critically ill patients are common and associated with high morbidity and mortality. Piperacillin-tazobactam is a frequently used therapy in critically ill patients with pulmonary infection. Antibiotic concentrations in the lung reflect target site antibiotic concentrations in patients with pneumonia. The aim of this study was to assess the plasma and intra-pulmonary pharmacokinetics (PK) of piperacillin-tazobactam in critically ill patients administered standard piperacillin-tazobactam regimens. A population PK model was developed to describe plasma and intra-pulmonary piperacillin and tazobactam concentrations. The probability of piperacillin exposures reaching pharmacodynamic endpoints and the impact of pulmonary permeability on piperacillin and tazobactam pulmonary penetration was explored. The median piperacillin and tazobactam pulmonary penetration ratio was 49.3% and 121.2%, respectively. Pulmonary piperacillin and tazobactam concentration were unpredictable and negatively correlated to pulmonary permeability. Current piperacillin-tazobactam regimens may be insufficient to treat pneumonia caused by piperacillin-tazobactam susceptible organisms in some critically ill patients. PMID:24926779

  11. Screening and Management of Delirium in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Nicholas; Smithburger, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is highly prevalent in the critically ill population and has been associated with numerous negative outcomes including increased mortality. The presentation of a delirious patient in the intensive care unit (ICU) is characterized by a fluctuating cognitive status and inattention that varies dramatically among patients. Delirium can present in 3 different motoric subtypes: hyperactive, hypoactive, and mixed. Two tools, the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist and Confusion Assessment ICU, are validated and recommended for the detection of delirium in critically ill patients. The identification of delirium in a critically ill patient should be facilitated using one of these tools. An intermediate form of delirium known as subsyndromal delirium also exists, although the significance of this syndrome is largely unknown. Another phenomenon known as sedation-related delirium has been recently described, although more research is needed to understand its significance. Patients in the ICU are exposed to many risk factors for developing delirium; controlling these risk factors is essential for preventing delirium development in critically ill patients. Nonpharmacologic interventions have been shown to prevent patients from developing delirium. Prevention is crucial because once delirium develops pharmacologic therapy is limited. PMID:26715799

  12. Bicarbonate kinetics and predicted energy expenditure in critically ill children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine nutrient requirements by the carbon oxidation techniques, it is necessary to know the fraction of carbon dioxide produced during the oxidative process but not excreted. This fraction has not been described in critically ill children. By measuring the dilution of (13)C infused by metabol...

  13. Toward an Integrated Research Agenda for Critical Illness in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Milbrandt, Eric B.; Eldadah, Basil; Nayfield, Susan; Hadley, Evan; Angus, Derek C.

    2010-01-01

    Aging brings an increased predisposition to critical illness. Patients older than 65 years of age account for approximately half of all intensive care unit (ICU) admissions in the United States, a proportion that is expected to increase considerably with the aging of the population. Emerging research suggests that elderly survivors of intensive care suffer significant long-term sequelae, including accelerated age-related functional decline. Existing evidence-based interventions are frequently underused and their efficacy untested in older subjects. Improving ICU outcomes in the elderly will require not only better methods for translating sound science into improved ICU practice but also an enhanced understanding of the underlying molecular, physiological, and pathophysiological interactions of critical illness with the aging process itself. Yet, significant barriers to research for critical illness in aging exist. We review the state of knowledge and identify gaps in knowledge, research opportunities, and barriers to research, with the goal of promoting an integrated research agenda for critical illness in aging. PMID:20558632

  14. Parenteral amino acid intakes in critically ill children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral amino acid formulas used in parenteral nutrition have a variable composition. To determine the amino acid intake of parenterally fed, critically ill children, and compare it with recommended dietary allowances (RDA) established by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), we retrospectively review...

  15. Management of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Artificial nutrition (AN) is necessary to meet the nutritional requirements of critically ill patients at nutrition risk because undernutrition determines a poorer prognosis in these patients. There is debate over which route of delivery of AN provides better outcomes and lesser complications. This review describes the management of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients. The first aim is to discuss what should be done in order that the PN is safe. The second aim is to dispel “myths” about PN-related complications and show how prevention and monitoring are able to reach the goal of “near zero” PN complications. Finally, in this review is discussed the controversial issue of the route for delivering AN in critically ill patients. The fighting against PN complications should consider: (1) an appropriate blood glucose control; (2) the use of olive oil- and fish oil-based lipid emulsions alternative to soybean oil-based ones; (3) the adoption of insertion and care bundles for central venous access devices; and (4) the implementation of a policy of targeting “near zero” catheter-related bloodstream infections. Adopting all these strategies, the goal of “near zero” PN complications is achievable. If accurately managed, PN can be safely provided for most critically ill patients without expecting a relevant incidence of PN-related complications. Moreover, the use of protocols for the management of nutritional support and the presence of nutrition support teams may decrease PN-related complications. In conclusion, the key messages about the management of PN in critically ill patients are two. First, the dangers of PN-related complications have been exaggerated because complications are uncommon; moreover, infectious complications, as mechanical complications, are more properly catheter-related and not PN-related complications. Second, when enteral nutrition is not feasible or tolerated, PN is as effective and safe as enteral nutrition. PMID

  16. Management of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2017-02-04

    Artificial nutrition (AN) is necessary to meet the nutritional requirements of critically ill patients at nutrition risk because undernutrition determines a poorer prognosis in these patients. There is debate over which route of delivery of AN provides better outcomes and lesser complications. This review describes the management of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients. The first aim is to discuss what should be done in order that the PN is safe. The second aim is to dispel "myths" about PN-related complications and show how prevention and monitoring are able to reach the goal of "near zero" PN complications. Finally, in this review is discussed the controversial issue of the route for delivering AN in critically ill patients. The fighting against PN complications should consider: (1) an appropriate blood glucose control; (2) the use of olive oil- and fish oil-based lipid emulsions alternative to soybean oil-based ones; (3) the adoption of insertion and care bundles for central venous access devices; and (4) the implementation of a policy of targeting "near zero" catheter-related bloodstream infections. Adopting all these strategies, the goal of "near zero" PN complications is achievable. If accurately managed, PN can be safely provided for most critically ill patients without expecting a relevant incidence of PN-related complications. Moreover, the use of protocols for the management of nutritional support and the presence of nutrition support teams may decrease PN-related complications. In conclusion, the key messages about the management of PN in critically ill patients are two. First, the dangers of PN-related complications have been exaggerated because complications are uncommon; moreover, infectious complications, as mechanical complications, are more properly catheter-related and not PN-related complications. Second, when enteral nutrition is not feasible or tolerated, PN is as effective and safe as enteral nutrition.

  17. Treating nonthyroidal illness syndrome in the critically ill patient: still a matter of controversy.

    PubMed

    Bello, G; Paliani, G; Annetta, M G; Pontecorvi, A; Antonelli, M

    2009-08-01

    The nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is a clinical condition of abnormal thyroid function tests observed in patients with acute or chronic systemic illnesses. The laboratory parameters of NTIS usually include low serum levels of triiodothyronine, with normal or low levels of thyroxine and normal or low levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone. It is still a matter of controversy whether the NTIS represents a protective adaptation of the organism to a stressful event or a maladaptive response to illness that needs correction. Multiple studies have investigated the effect of thyroid hormone replacement therapy in certain clinical situations, such as caloric restriction, cardiac disease, acute renal failure, brain-dead potential donors, and burn patients. Treating patients with NTIS seems not to be harmful, but there is no persuasive evidence that it is beneficial. The administration of hypothalamic releasing factors in patients with NTIS appears to be safe and effective in improving metabolism and restoring the anterior pituitary pulsatile secretion in the chronic phase of critical illness. However, also this promising strategy needs to be explored further. Anyhow, an extremely prudent approach is needed if treatment is given. Much of the data appearing in the literature on the treatment of NTIS encourage further randomized controlled trials on large number of patients. At present, however, we believe that there is no indication for treating thyroid hormone abnormalities in critically ill patients until convincing proof of efficacy and safety is provided.

  18. Nonprofessional Care in Chronic Critically Ill Patient: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Dehkordi, Leila Mardanian; Babashahi, Monireh; Irajpour, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Decision-making about patients with critical condition transfer from Intensive Care Unit to the general wards be delegated to their families. The aim of the study was explaining the experiences of family caregiver's about care of chronic critically ill patient. Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative content analysis using unstructured interview. Participants were selected purposively from May 2014 to May 2015 and data collection continued until data saturation. Analysis was based on conventional content analysis. Results: Participants’ experiences classified into three main categories as following: nonprofessional care, enhancing factors of care, and inhibiting factors of care. Conclusions: Finding of the current study showed different aspects of care. Care of chronic critically ill patients is a long-term process that affected by different factors. It seems that the exploration of caregivers needs and planning supportive interventions based on their needs improve the quality of care. PMID:28028426

  19. Are critically ill older patients treated differently than similarly ill younger patients?

    PubMed Central

    Stillman, A E; Braitman, L E; Grant, R J

    1998-01-01

    Our goal was to determine whether critically ill older patients are treated differently than middle-aged patients. If so, what factors besides age contribute to that difference? Internal medicine residents (n = 46) and practicing internists (n = 41) received 8 clinical vignettes of 4 critically ill 85-year-old patients and 4 critically ill 50-year-old patients. Each patient had a distinct premorbid mental and physical state. Each respondent selected from 4 levels of therapeutic aggressiveness for each patient. The main outcome measure was the proportion of physicians who intended to treat the older of each matched pair of patients less aggressively than the younger one (that is, downgraded for age). Eight physicians (9%) treated a previously unimpaired 85-year-old patient less aggressively than a comparable 50-year-old patient. When the matched patients were either premorbidly mentally or physically impaired (but not both), about 20% of physicians downgraded for age. Most downgraded for age in matched patients who were premorbidly both mentally and physically impaired. We conclude that age alone does not engender much therapeutic bias against older patients as long as they are physically and mentally intact before the onset of their acute illness. As premorbid disabilities multiply, older patients may be treated less aggressively than younger ones with similar impairments and clinical presentations. PMID:9771155

  20. [Evaluation and treatment of the critically ill cirrhotic patient].

    PubMed

    Fernández, Javier; Aracil, Carles; Solà, Elsa; Soriano, Germán; Cinta Cardona, Maria; Coll, Susanna; Genescà, Joan; Hombrados, Manoli; Morillas, Rosa; Martín-Llahí, Marta; Pardo, Albert; Sánchez, Jordi; Vargas, Victor; Xiol, Xavier; Ginès, Pere

    2016-11-01

    Cirrhotic patients often develop severe complications requiring ICU admission. Grade III-IV hepatic encephalopathy, septic shock, acute-on-chronic liver failure and variceal bleeding are clinical decompensations that need a specific therapeutic approach in cirrhosis. The increased effectiveness of the treatments currently used in this setting and the spread of liver transplantation programs have substantially improved the prognosis of critically ill cirrhotic patients, which has facilitated their admission to critical care units. However, gastroenterologists and intensivists have limited knowledge of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of these complications and of the prognostic evaluation of critically ill cirrhotic patients. Cirrhotic patients present alterations in systemic and splanchnic hemodynamics, coagulation and immune dysfunction what further increase the complexity of the treatment, the risk of developing new complications and mortality in comparison with the general population. These differential characteristics have important diagnostic and therapeutic implications that must be known by general intensivists. In this context, the Catalan Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology requested a group of experts to draft a position paper on the assessment and treatment of critically ill cirrhotic patients. This article describes the recommendations agreed upon at the consensus meetings and their main conclusions.

  1. Associations Between Fluid Balance and Outcomes in Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Alobaidi, Rashid; Morgan, Catherine; Basu, Rajit K.; Stenson, Erin; Featherstone, Robin; Majumdar, Sumit R.; Bagshaw, Sean M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Fluid therapy is a mainstay during the resuscitation of critically ill children. After initial stabilization, excessive fluid accumulation may lead to complications of fluid overload, which has been independently associated with increased risk for mortality and major morbidity in critically ill children. Objectives: Perform an evidence synthesis to describe the methods used to measure fluid balance, define fluid overload, and evaluate the association between fluid balance and outcomes in critically ill children. Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Measurements: Fluid balance, fluid accumulation, and fluid overload as defined by authors. Methods: We will search Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and ProQuest, Dissertations and Theses. In addition, we will search www.clinicaltrials.gov, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and the proceedings of selected key conferences for ongoing and completed studies. Search strategy will be done in consultation with a research librarian. Clinical trials and observational studies (from database inception to present) in patients (<25 years) admitted to pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) reporting fluid balance, fluid accumulation, or fluid overload, and associated outcomes will be included. Language will not be restricted. Two reviewers will independently screen studies and extract data. Primary outcome is mortality, and secondary outcomes encompass critical care resource utilization. Quality of evidence and risk of bias will be assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Results will be synthesized qualitatively and pooled for meta-analysis if possible. Limitations: Quality of the included studies; lack of randomized trials; high degrees of expected heterogeneity; and variations in definitions of fluid balance and fluid overload between studies. Conclusion: We will comprehensively appraise and summarize the evidence of the association between

  2. Managing critically Ill hematology patients: Time to think differently.

    PubMed

    Azoulay, Elie; Pène, Frédéric; Darmon, Michael; Lengliné, Etienne; Benoit, Dominique; Soares, Marcio; Vincent, Francois; Bruneel, Fabrice; Perez, Pierre; Lemiale, Virginie; Mokart, Djamel

    2015-11-01

    The number of patients living with hematological malignancies (HMs) has increased steadily over time. This is the result of intensive and effective treatments that also increase the probability of infiltrative, infectious or toxic life threatening event. Over the last two decades, the number of patients with HMs admitted to the ICU increased and their mortality has dropped sharply. ICU patients with HMs require an extensive diagnostic workup and the optimal use of ICU treatments to identify the reason for ICU admission and the nature of the complication that explains organ dysfunctions. Mortality of ARDS or septic shock is up to 50%, respectively. In this review, the authors share their experience with managing critically ill patients with HMs. They discuss the main aspects of the diagnostic and therapeutic management of critically ill patients with HMs and argue that outcomes have improved over time and that many classic determinants of mortality have become irrelevant.

  3. Hematologic and oncologic complications in the critically ill child.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, S.

    1984-01-01

    Admission of a patient to an intensive care unit for management of direct consequences of a hematologic or oncologic disease is occasionally necessary. Such problems included exchange transfusion, sepsis, compression of vital structures by malignant tumor, metabolic derangements, leukostasis, post-operative care, major sickling episodes in vital organs, and disseminated coagulopathy. More often, however, hematologic complications arise in the child critically ill from other causes, such as trauma or infections. The first two sections of this review address blood transfusion and hemostasis, topics likely to have wide application in the care of critically ill children. The last portion discusses problems unique to patients with sickling or malignant disease. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:6382836

  4. The medical officer's role in critical illness insurance product development.

    PubMed

    Keymer, Marjorie

    2005-01-01

    Critical illness insurance is a new (to the US), medically sophisticated insurance product that is tantalizing some US insurers. Few have brought a product to market, but many opine that a US breakthrough is in the offing. Would you rise to the challenge and craft an opportunity to participate in the development of a new product concept? How do medical officers bring value to the product development world? Do medical officers belong in the domain of product actuaries and consultants who bring new product ideas to life? Dr. Jan von Overbeck and I presented a workshop at the 2004 AAIM meeting to discuss the role of the medical officer in the development and evaluation of critical illness insurance. This article summarizes that discussion for the Journal's readers.

  5. Coping strategies of rural families of critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hunsucker, S; Flannery, J; Frank, D

    2000-04-01

    This study explored the coping strategies of families of critically ill patients in a rural Southern Appalachian setting. A convenience sample of 30 family members of 22 critically ill patients in two rural hospitals completed the Jaloweic Coping Scale. The five most frequently used coping methods were helping, thinking positively, worrying about the problem, trying to find out more about the problem and trying to handle things one step at a time. The five most effective coping strategies were talking the problem over with friends, praying, thinking about the good things in life, trying to handle things one step at a time and trying to see the good side of the situation. Findings contradicted many of the more "negative" descriptions of Appalachian people in the literature. Similarities outweighed differences when comparing the coping styles of rural and urban populations. Findings suggest that coping strategies must be considered for positive outcomes in the delivery of care to such a rural population.

  6. Sedation in Critically Ill Children with Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vet, Nienke J.; Kleiber, Niina; Ista, Erwin; de Hoog, Matthijs; de Wildt, Saskia N.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the rationale of sedation in respiratory failure, sedation goals, how to assess the need for sedation as well as effectiveness of interventions in critically ill children, with validated observational sedation scales. The drugs and non-pharmacological approaches used for optimal sedation in ventilated children are reviewed, and specifically the rationale for drug selection, including short- and long-term efficacy and safety aspects of the selected drugs. The specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of sedative drugs in the critically ill child and consequences for dosing are presented. Furthermore, we discuss different sedation strategies and their adverse events, such as iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome and delirium. These principles can guide clinicians in the choice of sedative drugs in pediatric respiratory failure. PMID:27606309

  7. Hyperglycemia in Critically Ill Patients: Management and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Godinjak, Amina; Iglica, Amer; Burekovic, Azra; Jusufovic, Selma; Ajanovic, Anes; Tancica, Ira; Kukuljac, Adis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hyperglycemia is a common complication of critical illness. Patients in intensive care unit with stress hyperglycemia have significantly higher mortality (31%) compared to patients with previously confirmed diabetes (10%) or normoglycemia (11.3%). Stress hyperglycemia is associated with increased risk of critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) and prolonged mechanical ventilation. Intensive monitoring and insulin therapy according to the protocol are an important part of the treatment of critically ill patients. Objective: To evaluate the incidence of stress hyperglycemia, complications and outcome in critically ill patients in our Medical intensive care unit. Materials and methods: This study included 100 patients hospitalized in Medical intensive care unit during the period January 2014–March 2015 which were divided into three groups: Diabetes mellitus, stress-hyperglycemia and normoglycemia. During the retrospective-prospective observational clinical investigation the following data was obtained: age, gender, SAPS, admission diagnosis, average daily blood glucose, highest blood glucose level, glycemic variability, vasopressor and corticosteroid therapy, days on mechanical ventilation, total days of hospitalization in Medical intensive care unit, and outcome. Results: Patients with DM treated with a continuous insulin infusion did not have significantly more complications than patients with normoglycemia, unlike patients with stress hyperglycemia, which had more severe prognosis. There was a significant difference between the maximum level of blood glucose in recovered and patients with adverse outcome (p = 0.0277). Glycemic variability (difference between max. and min. blood glucose) was the strongest predictor of adverse outcome. The difference in glycemic variability between the stress-hyperglycemia and normoglycemic group was statistically significant (p = 0.0066). There was no statistically significant difference in duration of mechanical

  8. Nursing students identify fears regarding working with diverse critically ill patients: development of guidelines for caring for diverse critically ill older adults.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate students need to gain more exposure to communicating, assessing, and planning appropriate care and evaluating outcomes of care with diverse critically ill geriatric patients. This project developed teaching strategies that facilitated additional opportunities for gaining these valuable learning experiences for students. Nurse educators can use the Guidelines for Caring for Diverse Critically Ill Older Adults, the case study and simulation examples, and topical outline to assist them in teaching critical care students and nurses about diverse critically ill older adults.

  9. Chloride toxicity in critically ill patients: What's the evidence?

    PubMed

    Soussi, Sabri; Ferry, Axelle; Chaussard, Maité; Legrand, Matthieu

    2016-07-28

    Crystalloids have become the fluid of choice in critically ill patients and in the operating room both for fluid resuscitation and fluid maintenance. Among crystalloids, NaCl 0.9% has been the most widely used fluid. However, emerging evidence suggests that administration of 0.9% saline could be harmful mainly through high chloride content and that the use of fluid with low chloride content may be preferable in major surgery and intensive care patients. Administration of NaCl 0.9% is the leading cause of metabolic hyperchloraemic acidosis in critically ill patients and side effects might target coagulation, renal function, and ultimately increase mortality. More balanced solutions therefore may be used especially when large amount of fluids are administered in high-risk patients. In this review, we discuss physiological background favouring the use of balanced solutions as well as the most recent clinical data regarding the use of crystalloid solutions in critically ill patients and patients undergoing major surgery.

  10. Lung ultrasound in critically ill patients: a new diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Dexheimer Neto, Felippe Leopoldo; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth; Teixeira, Cassiano; Beltrami, Flávia Gabe

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of critically ill patients using lung ultrasound, even if performed by nonspecialists, has recently garnered greater interest. Because lung ultrasound is based on the fact that every acute illness reduces lung aeration, it can provide information that complements the physical examination and clinical impression, the main advantage being that it is a bedside tool. The objective of this review was to evaluate the clinical applications of lung ultrasound by searching the PubMed and the Brazilian Virtual Library of Health databases. We used the following search terms (in Portuguese and English): ultrasound; lung; and critical care. In addition to the most relevant articles, we also reviewed specialized textbooks. The data show that lung ultrasound is useful in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates, having good accuracy in identifying consolidations and interstitial syndrome. In addition, lung ultrasound has been widely used in the evaluation and treatment of pleural effusions, as well as in the identification of pneumothorax. This technique can also be useful in the immediate evaluation of patients with dyspnea or acute respiratory failure. Other described applications include monitoring treatment response and increasing the safety of invasive procedures. Although specific criteria regarding training and certification are still lacking, lung ultrasound is a fast, inexpensive, and widely available tool. This technique should progressively come to be more widely incorporated into the care of critically ill patients.

  11. Gastroesophageal Reflux in Critically Ill Children: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Solana García, Maria José; López-Herce Cid, Jesús; Sánchez Sánchez, César

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is very common in children due to immaturity of the antireflux barrier. In critically ill patients there is also a high incidence due to a partial or complete loss of pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter though other factors, such as the use of nasogastric tubes, treatment with adrenergic agonists, bronchodilators, or opiates and mechanical ventilation, can further increase the risk of GER. Vomiting and regurgitation are the most common manifestations in infants and are considered pathological when they have repercussions on the nutritional status. In critically ill children, damage to the esophageal mucosa predisposes to digestive tract hemorrhage and nosocomial pneumonia secondary to repeated microaspiration. GER is mainly alkaline in children, as is also the case in critically ill pediatric patients. pH-metry combined with multichannel intraluminal impedance is therefore the technique of choice for diagnosis. The proton pump inhibitors are the drugs of choice for the treatment of GER because they have a greater effect, longer duration of action, and a good safety profile. PMID:23431462

  12. Forget glucose: what about lipids in critical illness?

    PubMed

    Kruger, Peter S

    2009-12-01

    A high serum cholesterol level is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and has commonly been linked with worse outcomes. It is now well recognised that, in many critically ill patients, the opposite is true, with hypocholesterolaemia being associated with poor outcomes. In critical illness, particularly sepsis, total and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels are commonly decreased, with varying changes in triglyceride levels. The magnitude of the changes seems to reflect the severity of inflammation. Plausible biological explanations exist to explain these associations, including an interaction of lipoproteins with endotoxin and the regulation of cytokine production. It remains unclear whether these observed alterations in lipid profile are a consequence of the physiological disturbance or whether they have a more causative role, worsening organ dysfunction or predisposing to infection. Lipid emulsions provide a vehicle for drug delivery, have become an important part of nutrition, and are emerging as a therapy for specific intoxications. The nature, dietary source and amount of lipid provided to critically ill patients may be enormously important and warrant more rigorous investigation. Further understanding of the alterations in lipid metabolism may have therapeutic implications in treatment of sepsis with specific compounds that manipulate lipid profiles, such as fibrates, statins, niacin and even reconstituted HDL.

  13. An Overview of Hypoglycemia in the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Lacherade, Jean-Claude; Jacqueminet, Sophie; Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2009-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common and serious problem among patients with diabetes mellitus. It is also perceived as the most important obstacle to tight glucose control using intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients. Because glucose is an obligatory metabolic fuel for the brain, hypoglycemia always represents an emergency that signals the inability of the brain to meet its energy needs. When left untreated, hypoglycemia can result in permanent brain damage and ultimately, death. In the context of critical illness that limits endogenous glucose production and increases glucose utilization, inadequate nutrition, or insufficient provision of glucose, intensive insulin therapy is the most frequent cause of hypoglycemia. Neurogenic and neuroglycopenic symptoms of hypoglycemia can remain unknown because of the underlying critical illness and sedation. Thus, close and reliable monitoring of the glycemic level is crucial in detecting hypoglycemia. In prospective randomized controlled studies comparing the effects of two glucose regimens, intensive insulin therapy aimed to reach strict glucose control (<110 mg/dl) but increased the incidence of severe hypoglycemia (<40 mg/dl) by four- to sixfold. Severe hypoglycemia is statistically associated with adverse outcomes in intensive care unit patients, although a direct causal relationship has not been demonstrated. PMID:20144377

  14. Venous Thromboembolism in Critical Illness and Trauma: Pediatric Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chima, Ranjit S.; Hanson, Sheila J.

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill children and those sustaining severe traumatic injuries are at higher risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) than other hospitalized children. Multiple factors including the need for central venous catheters, immobility, surgical procedures, malignancy, and dysregulated inflammatory state confer this increased risk. As well as being at higher risk of VTE, this population is frequently at an increased risk of bleeding, making the decision of prophylactic anticoagulation even more nuanced. The use of pharmacologic and mechanical prophylaxis remains variable in this high-risk cohort. VTE pharmacologic prophylaxis is an accepted practice in adult trauma and intensive care to prevent VTE development and associated morbidity, but it is not standardized in critically ill or injured children. Given the lack of pediatric specific guidelines, prevention strategies are variably extrapolated from the successful use of mechanical and pharmacologic prophylaxis in adults, despite the differences in developmental hemostasis and thrombosis risk between children and adults. Whether the burden of VTE can be reduced in the pediatric critically ill or injured population is not known given the lack of robust data. There are no trials in children showing efficacy of mechanical compression devices or prophylactic anticoagulation in reducing the rate of VTE. Risk stratification using clinical factors has been shown to identify those at highest risk for VTE and allows targeted prophylaxis. It remains unproven if such a strategy will mitigate the risk of VTE and its potential sequelae. PMID:28349046

  15. Extreme Dysbiosis of the Microbiome in Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Daniel; Ackermann, Gail; Khailova, Ludmila; Baird, Christine; Heyland, Daren; Kozar, Rosemary; Lemieux, Margot; Derenski, Karrie; King, Judy; Vis-Kampen, Christine; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Critical illness is hypothesized to associate with loss of “health-promoting” commensal microbes and overgrowth of pathogenic bacteria (dysbiosis). This dysbiosis is believed to increase susceptibility to nosocomial infections, sepsis, and organ failure. A trial with prospective monitoring of the intensive care unit (ICU) patient microbiome using culture-independent techniques to confirm and characterize this dysbiosis is thus urgently needed. Characterizing ICU patient microbiome changes may provide first steps toward the development of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions using microbiome signatures. To characterize the ICU patient microbiome, we collected fecal, oral, and skin samples from 115 mixed ICU patients across four centers in the United States and Canada. Samples were collected at two time points: within 48 h of ICU admission, and at ICU discharge or on ICU day 10. Sample collection and processing were performed according to Earth Microbiome Project protocols. We applied SourceTracker to assess the source composition of ICU patient samples by using Qiita, including samples from the American Gut Project (AGP), mammalian corpse decomposition samples, childhood (Global Gut study), and house surfaces. Our results demonstrate that critical illness leads to significant and rapid dysbiosis. Many taxons significantly depleted from ICU patients versus AGP healthy controls are key “health-promoting” organisms, and overgrowth of known pathogens was frequent. Source compositions of ICU patient samples are largely uncharacteristic of the expected community type. Between time points and within a patient, the source composition changed dramatically. Our initial results show great promise for microbiome signatures as diagnostic markers and guides to therapeutic interventions in the ICU to repopulate the normal, “health-promoting” microbiome and thereby improve patient outcomes. IMPORTANCE Critical illness may be associated with the loss of

  16. Focus on peripherally inserted central catheters in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Venous access devices are of pivotal importance for an increasing number of critically ill patients in a variety of disease states and in a variety of clinical settings (emergency, intensive care, surgery) and for different purposes (fluids or drugs infusions, parenteral nutrition, antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, procedures of dialysis/apheresis). However, healthcare professionals are commonly worried about the possible consequences that may result using a central venous access device (CVAD) (mainly, bloodstream infections and thrombosis), both peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs). This review aims to discuss indications, insertion techniques, and care of PICCs in critically ill patients. PICCs have many advantages over standard CICCs. First of all, their insertion is easy and safe -due to their placement into peripheral veins of the arm- and the advantage of a central location of catheter tip suitable for all osmolarity and pH solutions. Using the ultrasound-guidance for the PICC insertion, the risk of hemothorax and pneumothorax can be avoided, as well as the possibility of primary malposition is very low. PICC placement is also appropriate to avoid post-procedural hemorrhage in patients with an abnormal coagulative state who need a CVAD. Some limits previously ascribed to PICCs (i.e., low flow rates, difficult central venous pressure monitoring, lack of safety for radio-diagnostic procedures, single-lumen) have delayed their start up in the intensive care units as common practice. Though, the recent development of power-injectable PICCs overcomes these technical limitations and PICCs have started to spread in critical care settings. Two important take-home messages may be drawn from this review. First, the incidence of complications varies depending on venous accesses and healthcare professionals should be aware of the different clinical performance as well as of the different risks

  17. Hypothyroidism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hypothyroidism is a decreased activity of the thyroid gland which may affect all body functions. The rate ... and physical sluggishness. The most severe form of hypothyroidism is myxedema, which is a medical emergency.

  18. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Congenital Hypothyroidism March 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... Pediatric Endocrine Society MedlinePlus (NIH) What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  19. [Current aspects of diagnostics of hepatic dysfunction in critically ill].

    PubMed

    Gonnert, F; Bauer, M; Kortgen, A

    2012-10-01

    Hepatic dysfunction may develop in critically ill patients in the course of extrahepatic diseases such as sepsis and is frequently limiting prognosis. Conventional "static" laboratory parameters assess hepatocellular damage, synthetic function or cholestasis, providing informations about (differential) diagnostic aspects, while their significance to assess rapid changes in flow and function in the critical care setting is limited. In contrast, quantitative (or "dynamic") liver function tests, such as measurement of plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green (PDRICG) or 13C-methacetin metabolism, assess specific metabolic and/or excretory function of the liver together with sinusoidal perfusion at the time of measurement and can detect liver dysfunction early in the course of critical illness. In addition, PDRICG demonstrated prognostic significance, albeit, severity of canalicular excretory dysfunction might be underestimated. For chronic liver disease, scoring systems, such as the Child-Turcotte-Pugh-score or the MELD, were developed to assess severity of disease and probability of survival. Scoring systems are also used for graft allocation. Combining scoring systems with dynamic tests holds the potential to improve predictive value, e.g. in the transplant setting.

  20. A Multinational Study of Thromboprophylaxis Practice in Critically Ill Children*

    PubMed Central

    Faustino, Edward Vincent S.; Hanson, Sheila; Spinella, Philip C.; Tucci, Marisa; O'Brien, Sarah H.; Nunez, Antonio Rodriguez; Yung, Michael; Truemper, Edward; Qin, Li; Li, Simon; Marohn, Kimberly; Randolph, Adrienne G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although critically ill children are at increased risk for developing deep venous thrombosis, there are few pediatric studies establishing the prevalence of thrombosis or the efficacy of thromboprophylaxis. We tested the hypothesis that thromboprophylaxis is infrequently used in critically ill children even for those in whom it is indicated. Design Prospective multinational cross-sectional study over four study dates in 2012. Setting Fifty-nine PICUs in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, and the United States. Patients All patients less than 18 years old in the PICU during the study dates and times were included in the study, unless the patients were 1) boarding in the unit waiting for a bed outside the PICU or 2) receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Of 2,484 children in the study, 2,159 (86.9%) had greater than or equal to 1 risk factor for thrombosis. Only 308 children (12.4%) were receiving pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis (e.g., aspirin, low-molecular-weight heparin, or unfractionated heparin). Of 430 children indicated to receive pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis based on consensus recommendations, only 149 (34.7%) were receiving it. Mechanical thromboprophylaxis was used in 156 of 655 children (23.8%) 8 years old or older, the youngest age for that device. Using nonlinear mixed effects model, presence of cyanotic congenital heart disease (odds ratio, 7.35; p < 0.001) and spinal cord injury (odds ratio, 8.85; p = 0.008) strongly predicted the use of pharmacologic and mechanical thromboprophylaxis, respectively. Conclusions Thromboprophylaxis is infrequently used in critically ill children. This is true even for children at high risk of thrombosis where consensus guidelines recommend pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis. PMID:24351371

  1. Thromboprophylaxis in critically ill children in Spain and Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Nñnez, A. Rodríguez; Fonte, M.; Faustino, E.V.S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although critically ill children may be at risk from developing deep venous thrombosis (DVT), data on its incidence and effectiveness of thromboprophylaxis are lacking. Objective To describe the use of thromboprophylaxis in critically ill children in Spain and Portugal, and to compare the results with international data. Material and methods Secondary analysis of the multinational study PROTRACT, carried out in 59 PICUs from 7 developed countries (4 from Portugal and 6 in Spain). Data were collected from patients less than 18 years old, who did not receive therapeutic thromboprophylaxis. Results A total of 308 patients in Spanish and Portuguese (Iberian) PICUS were compared with 2176 admitted to international PICUs. Risk factors such as femoral vein (P = .01), jugular vein central catheter (P < .001), cancer (P = .03), and sepsis (P < .001), were more frequent in Iberian PICUs. The percentage of patients with pharmacological thromboprophylaxis was similar in both groups (15.3% vs. 12.0%). Low molecular weight heparin was used more frequently in Iberian patients (P < .001). In treated children, prior history of thrombosis (P = .02), femoral vein catheter (P < .001), cancer (P = .02) and cranial trauma or craniectomy (P = .006), were more frequent in Iberian PICUs. Mechanical thromboprophylaxis was used in only 6.8% of candidates in Iberian PICUs, compared with 23.8% in the international PICUs (P < .001). Conclusions Despite the presence of risk factors for DVT in many patients, thromboprophylaxis is rarely prescribed, with low molecular weight heparin being the most used drug. Passive thromboprophylaxis use is anecdotal. There should be a consensus on guidelines of thromboprophylaxis in critically ill children. PMID:24907863

  2. Enteral nutrition in the hemodynamically unstable critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Flordelís Lasierra, J L; Pérez-Vela, J L; Montejo González, J C

    2015-01-01

    The benefit of enteral nutrition in critically ill patients has been demonstrated by several studies, especially when it is started early, in the first 24-48h of stay in the Intensive Care Unit, and this practice is currently advised by the main clinical guidelines. The start of enteral nutrition is controversial in patients with hemodynamic failure, since it may trigger intestinal ischemia. However, there are data from experimental studies in animals, as well as from observational studies in humans that allow for hypotheses regarding its beneficial effect and safety. Interventional clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  3. Cytomegalovirus Reactivation in Critically-Ill Immunocompetent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Ajit P.; Kirby, Katharine A.; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Neff, Margaret J.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Huang, Meei-Li; Santo, Tracy K.; Corey, Lawrence; Boeckh, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is associated with adverse clinical outcomes in immunosuppressed persons, but the incidence and association of CMV reactivation with adverse outcomes in persons lacking evidence of immunosuppression (“immunocompetent”) with critical illness have not been well-defined. Objective To determine the association of CMV reactivation with intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay in critically-ill immunocompetent persons. Methods We prospectively assessed CMV plasma DNAemia by real-time PCR twice weekly and clinical outcomes in a cohort of CMV seropositive, immunocompetent adults admitted to an ICU. Clinical parameters were assessed by personnel blinded to CMV PCR results. Risk factors for CMV reactivation and association with hospital and ICU length of stay (LOS) were assessed by multivariable logistic regression and proportional odds models. Setting Six ICU’s at two separate hospitals at a large tertiary care academic medical center between 2004–2006. Participants A total of 120 critically-ill, CMV seropositive adults lacking evidence of immunosuppression. Main Outcome Measures Association of CMV reactivation with prolonged hospital length of stay or death. Results The primary composite endpoint of continued hospitalization (n=35) or death (n=10) at 30 days occurred in 45 (35%) of the 120 patients. CMV viremia at any level or > 1,000 copies/ml occurred in 33% (39 of 120, 95% confidence interval [CI] 24%–41%) and 20% (24 of 120, 95% CI 13%–28%), at a median of 12 days (range 3–57) and 26 days (range 9–56), respectively. By logistic regression, CMV infection at any level (adjusted OR: 4.3 [1.6–11.9], p = 0.005), >1,000 copies/ml (adjusted OR 13.9 [3.2–60], p < 0.001), or average CMV area under the curve [AUC] (adjusted OR 2.1 [1.3–3.2], p < 0.001), was independently associated with hospitalization or death by 30 days. In multivariable partial proportional odds models, both CMV seven-day moving

  4. Biomarkers in critical illness: have we made progress?

    PubMed Central

    Honore, Patrick M; Jacobs, Rita; Hendrickx, Inne; De Waele, Elisabeth; Van Gorp, Viola; Joannes-Boyau, Olivier; De Regt, Jouke; Boer, Willem; Spapen, Herbert D

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers have emerged as exemplary key players in translational medicine. Many have been assessed for timely recognition, early treatment, and adequate follow-up for a variety of pathologies. Biomarker sensitivity has improved considerably over the last years but specificity remains poor, in particular when two “marker-sensitive” conditions overlap in one patient. Biomarker research holds an enormous potential for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in postoperative and critically ill patients who present varying degrees of inflammation, infection, and concomitant (sub)acute organ dysfunction or failure. Despite a remarkable progress in development and testing, biomarkers are not yet ready for routine use at the bedside. PMID:27799811

  5. Hypocalcemia of critical illness in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Holowaychuk, Marie K

    2013-11-01

    Hypocalcemia occurs in critically ill dogs and cats and is associated with medications, treatments, and underlying diseases such as acute kidney disease, pancreatitis, parathyroid disease, sepsis, and trauma. Possible underlying mechanisms include hypovitaminosis D, acquired or relative hypoparathyroidism, hypomagnesemia, and alterations in the ionized fraction of calcium caused by changes in chelated or protein-bound calcium. If severe or acute, hypocalcemia can cause obvious clinical signs related to muscle or neurologic hyperexcitability or more subtle signs of cardiovascular dysfunction. Emergency treatment with calcium gluconate administration is recommended when clinical signs are present or if there is moderate to severe ionized hypocalcemia.

  6. Neostigmine in the treatment of refractory constipation in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    González, Rafael; López-Herce, Jesús; García, Ana; Botrán, Marta; Solana, Maria Jose; Urbano, Javier

    2011-08-01

    Constipation is a common complication in critically ill children and it is occasionally resistant to the drugs typically used in treatment. Neostigmine has been used in some cases of refractory constipation in critically ill adults. There is no reference to its use in critically ill children. We describe 3 cases of refractory constipation in critically ill children treated with intravenous neostigmine by continuous infusion. Two patients responded well. There were no adverse effects. We conclude that continuous intravenous neostigmine can be effective in critically ill children with refractory constipation. Further studies are necessary to determine the dose and safety of the treatment.

  7. Update in the management of critically ill burned patients.

    PubMed

    Lorente, J A; Amaya-Villar, R

    2016-01-01

    The management of critically ill burn patients is challenging. These patients have to be managed in specialized centers, where the expertise of physicians and nursing personnel guarantees the best treatment. Mortality of burn patients has improved over the past decades due to a better understanding of burn shock pathophysiology, optimal surgical management, infection control and nutritional support. Indeed, a more aggressive resuscitation, early excision and grafting, the judicious use of topical antibiotics, and the provision of an adequate calorie and protein intake are key to attain best survival results. General advances in critical care have also to be implemented, including protective ventilation, glycemic control, selective decontamination of the digestive tract, and implementation of sedation protocols.

  8. Cytokines and Metabolic Patterns in Pediatric Patients with Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Briassoulis, George; Venkataraman, Shekhar; Thompson, Ann

    2010-01-01

    It is not known if cytokines, which are cell-derived mediators released during the host immune response to stress, affect metabolic response to stress during critical illness. The aim of this prospective study was to determine whether the metabolic response to stress is related to the inflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6), 10 (IL-10), and other stress mediators' responses and to assess their relationships with different feeding patterns, nutritional markers, the severity of illness as assessed by the Multiple Organ System Failure (MOSF), the Pediatric Risk of Mortality Score (PRISM), systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and mortality in critically ill children. Patients were classified as hypermetabolic, normometabolic, and hypometabolic when the measured resting energy expenditures (REE) were >110%, 90–110% and, <90% of the predicted basal metabolic rate, respectively. The initial predominance of the hypometabolic pattern (48.6%) declined within 1 week of acute stress (20%), and the hypermetabolic patterns dominated only after 2 weeks (60%). Only oxygen consumption (VO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) (P < .0001) but none of the cytokines and nutritional markers, were independently associated with a hypometabolic pattern. REE correlated with the IL-10 but not PRISM. In the presence of SIRS or sepsis, CRP, IL-6, IL-10, Prognostic Inflammatory and Nutritional Index (NI), and triglycerides—but not glucose, VO2, or VCO2 increased significantly. High IL-10 levels (P = .0000) and low measured REE (P = .0000) were independently associated with mortality (11.7%), which was higher in the hypometabolic compared to other metabolic patterns (P < .005). Our results showed that only VO2 and VCO2, but not IL-6 or IL-10, were associated with a hypometabolic pattern which predominated the acute phase of stress, and was associated with increased mortality. Although in SIRS or sepsis, the cytokine response was reliably reflected by increases in NI and

  9. Thrombosis in the critically ill neonate: incidence, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Veldman, Alex; Nold, Marcel F; Michel-Behnke, Ina

    2008-01-01

    Among children, newborn infants are most vulnerable to development of thrombosis and serious thromboembolic complications. Amongst newborns, those neonates who are critically ill, both term and preterm, are at greatest risk for developing symptomatic thromboembolic disease. The most important risk factors are inflammation, DIC, impaired liver function, fluctuations in cardiac output, and congenital heart disease, as well as exogenous risk factors such as central venous or arterial catheters. In most clinically symptomatic infants, diagnosis is made by ultrasound, venography, or CT or MRI angiograms. However, clinically asymptomatic vessel thrombosis is sometimes picked up by screening investigations or during routine imaging for other indications. Acute management of thrombosis and thromboembolism comprises a variety of approaches, including simple observation, treatment with unfractionated or low molecular weight heparin, as well as more aggressive interventions such as thrombolytic therapy or catheter-directed revascularization. Long-term follow-up is dependent on the underlying diagnosis. In the majority of infants, stabilization of the patients’ general condition and hemodynamics, which allows removal of indwelling catheters, renders long-term anticoagulation superfluous. Nevertheless, in certain types of congenital heart disease or inherited thrombophilia, long-term prophylaxis may be warranted. This review article focuses on pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute and long-term management of thrombosis in critically ill term and preterm neonates. PMID:19337547

  10. Practice of strict glycemic control in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Marcus J; de Graaff, Mart J; Royakkers, Annic A N M; van Braam Houckgeest, Floris; van der Sluijs, Johannes P; Kieft, Hans; Spronk, Peter E

    2008-11-01

    Blood glucose control aiming at normoglycemia, frequently referred to as "strict glycemic control", decreases mortality and morbidity of critically ill patients. We searched the medical literature for export opinions, surveys, and clinical reports on blood glucose control in intensive care medicine. While strict glycemic control has been recommended standard of care for critically ill patients, the risk of severe hypoglycemia with strict glycemic control is frequently mentioned by experts. Some rationalize this risk, though others strongly point out the high incidence of hypoglycemia to be (one) reason not to perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete in intensive care units across the world. Frequently local guidelines accept higher blood glucose levels than those with strict glycemic control. Only a minority of retrieved manuscripts are on blood glucose regimens with the lower targets as with strict glycemic control. Hypoglycemia certainly is encountered with blood glucose control, in particular with strict glycemic control. Reports show intensive care-nurses can adequately and safely perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete, at least in part because of the feared risks of hypoglycemia. The preference for hyperglycemia over intermittent hypoglycemia is irrational, however, because there is causal evidence of harm for the former but only associative evidence of harm for the latter. For several reasons it is wise to have strict glycemic control being a nurse-based strategy.

  11. Factors associated with vancomycin nephrotoxicity in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, T P; Kotapati, C; Roberts, M J; Rowland, J; Lipman, J; Roberts, J A; Udy, A

    2015-09-01

    Vancomycin is a glycopeptide antibiotic commonly used in the management of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. The recent increase in prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin has prompted experts to advocate for higher target trough serum concentrations. This study aimed to evaluate the potential consequences of more aggressive vancomycin therapy, by examining the association between higher serum concentrations and acute kidney injury (AKI) in a population of critically ill patients. We collected data for all patients who received vancomycin over a five-year period and evaluated the prevalence of new-onset AKI using the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage (RIFLE) kidney disease criteria. One-hundred and fifty-nine patients provided complete data, with 8.8% manifesting new onset AKI while receiving vancomycin. The median age was 57 (44 to 68) years, while the median trough serum concentration was 16 (10 to 19) mg/l. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified mean trough concentration (OR=1.174, P=0.024), APACHE II score (OR=1.141, P=0.012) and simultaneous aminoglycoside prescription (OR=18.896, P=0.002) as significant predictors of AKI. These data suggest higher trough vancomycin serum concentrations are associated with greater odds of AKI in the critically ill.

  12. Use of inotropes and vasopressor agents in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Bangash, Mansoor N; Kong, Ming-Li; Pearse, Rupert M

    2012-01-01

    Inotropes and vasopressors are biologically and clinically important compounds that originate from different pharmacological groups and act at some of the most fundamental receptor and signal transduction systems in the body. More than 20 such agents are in common clinical use, yet few reviews of their pharmacology exist outside of physiology and pharmacology textbooks. Despite widespread use in critically ill patients, understanding of the clinical effects of these drugs in pathological states is poor. The purpose of this article is to describe the pharmacology and clinical applications of inotropic and vasopressor agents in critically ill patients. LINKED ARTICLES This article is commented on by Bracht et al., pp. 2009–2011 and De Backer and Scolletta, pp. 2012–2014 of this issue. To view Bracht et al. visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01776.x and to view De Backer and Scolletta visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01746.x PMID:21740415

  13. Inter-hospital transport of critically ill patients; expect surprises

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Inter-hospital transport of critically ill patients is increasing. When performed by specialized retrieval teams there are less adverse events compared to transport by ambulance. These transports are performed with technical equipment also used in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). As a consequence technical problems may arise and have to be dealt with on the road. In this study, all technical problems encountered while transporting patients with our mobile intensive care unit service (MICU) were evaluated. Methods From March 2009 until August 2011 all transports were reviewed for technical problems. The cause, solution and, where relevant, its influence on protocol were stated. Results In this period of 30 months, 353 patients were transported. In total 55 technical problems were encountered. We provide examples of how they influenced transport and how they may be resolved. Conclusion The use of technical equipment is part of intensive care medicine. Wherever this kind of equipment is used, technical problems will occur. During inter-hospital transports, without extra personnel or technical assistance, the transport team is dependent on its own ability to resolve these problems. Therefore, we emphasize the importance of having some technical understanding of the equipment used and the importance of training to anticipate, prevent and resolve technical problems. Being an outstanding intensivist on the ICU does not necessarily mean being qualified for transporting the critically ill as well. Although these are lessons derived from inter-hospital transport, they may also apply to intra-hospital transport. PMID:22326110

  14. Blood Glucose Variability and Outcomes in Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Naranje, Kirti Mahadeorao; Poddar, Banani; Bhriguvanshi, Arpita; Lal, Richa; Azim, Afzal; Singh, Ratender K.; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To find the incidence of hyperglycemia (blood glucose [BG] ≥150 mg/dl), hypoglycemia (BG ≤60 mg/dl), and variability (presence of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia) in critically ill children in the 1st week of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay and their association with mortality, length of ICU stay, and organ dysfunction. Materials and Methods: The design was a retrospective observational cohort study. Consecutive children ≤18 years of age admitted from March 2003 to April 2012 in a combined adult and pediatric closed ICU. Relevant data were collected from chart review and hospital database. Results: Out of 258 patients included, isolated hyperglycemia was seen in 139 (53.9%) and was unrelated to mortality and morbidity. Isolated variability in BG was noted in 76 (29.5%) patients and hypoglycemia was seen in 9 (3.5%) patients. BG variability was independently associated with multiorgan dysfunction syndrome on multivariate analysis (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 7.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6–31.1). Those with BG variability had longer ICU stay (11 days vs. 4 days, on log-rank test, P = 0.001). Insulin use was associated with the occurrence of variability (adjusted OR: 3.6; 95% CI: 1.8–7.0). Conclusion: Glucose disorders were frequently observed in critically ill children. BG variability was associated with multiorgan dysfunction and increased ICU stay.

  15. Measured energy expenditure in critically ill infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Chwals, W J; Lally, K P; Woolley, M M; Mahour, G H

    1988-05-01

    Technological limitations have impeded accurate energy expenditure assessment in critically ill infants and young children. Instead, a predicted energy expenditure (PEE) is derived based on weight, heat loss, activity, growth requirements, and degree of stress. This study compared actual measured energy expenditure (MEE) with conventional predicted values in 20 critically ill infants and children using a validated metabolic cart designed for use in this age group. All patients were studied either within 4 days of major surgery or during an acute disease process necessitating intensive care. All were severely stressed clinically and were studied while mechanically ventilated in a temperature-controlled environment. The study interval ranged from 1 to 12 hr and averaged 4 hr after a stabilization period of 30 min. The mean MEE was significantly lower than the mean PEE (52.2 +/- 16 kcal/kg/day vs 101.8 +/- 17 kcal/kg/day, P less than 0.001) with a mean MEE/PEE of 52.6 +/- 17% (range 26 to 92%). In a subgroup of 7 paralyzed patients, the mean MEE was significantly lower than in the 13 nonparalyzed patients when compared with PEE and predicted basal metabolic rate (PBMR). The coefficient of variance, conventionally recognized to be approximately 15% for PEE, averaged 6.35% for MEE in this study. These data indicate that if PEE is used as the sole guide for caloric repletion in the stressed infant or child, these patients will be substantially overfed.

  16. Distinct Features of Nonthyroidal Illness in Critically Ill Patients With Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Kyung; Hwang, Sena; Kim, Daham; Lee, Seul Gi; Jeong, Seonhyang; Seol, Mi-Youn; Kim, Hyunji; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Shin, Dong Yeop; Chung, Woong Youn; Lee, Eun Jig; Lee, Jandee; Jo, Young Suk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nonthyroidal illness (NTI), often observed in critically ill patients, arises through diverse alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. However, the causal relationship between underlying disease and NTI diversity in critically ill patients is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to examine NTI severity and adverse outcomes in critically ill patients with respect to their underlying disease(s). The medical records of 616 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) between January 2009 and October 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with known diseases or taking medications that affect thyroid function were excluded. All-cause mortality (ACM) and length of stay (LOS) in the ICU were assessed as adverse outcomes. The enrolled patients (n = 213) were divided into the following 4 groups according to the severity of NTI at the nadir of their thyroid function test (TFT): normal (n = 11, 5.2%), mild NTI (n = 113, 53.1%), moderate NTI (n = 78, 36.6%), and severe NTI (n = 11, 5.2%). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of age and gender. NTI severity showed a significantly strong association with ACM (P < 0.0001) and a significant positive association with LOS in the ICU (P = 0.031). After adjusting for age, gender, and current medications affecting TFT, increasing NTI severity led to increased ACM (odds ratio = 3.101; 95% confidence interval = 1.711–5.618; P < 0.0001). Notably, the prevalence of moderate-to-severe NTI was markedly higher in patients with infectious disease than in those with noninfectious disease (P = 0.012). Consistent with this, serum C-reactive protein levels were higher in patients with moderate-to-severe NTI (P = 0.016). NTI severity is associated with increased ACM, LOS, and underlying infectious disease. Future studies will focus on the biological and clinical implications of infectious disease on the HPT axis. PMID

  17. Effects of hypothyroidism and endocrine disruptor-dependent non-thyroidal illness syndrome on the GnRH-gonadotroph axis of the adult male rat.

    PubMed

    Toni, R; Della Casa, C; Castorina, S; Cocchi, D; Celotti, F

    2005-01-01

    Effects of primary hypothyroidism (HYPO) on the male gonadal axis are controversial, with only scanty data on the gonadotroph cell response and no information on GnRH tuberoinfundibular neurons, even in animal models. HYPO has been reported to variably induce hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a hypergonadotropic state, or to have no effects on basal levels of pituitary gonadotropins, both in adult male rats and humans. Similarly, the exogenous administration of GnRH to HYPO rats and humans may increase or decrease gonadotropin secretion. Since inhibitory effects of HYPO on the GnRH-gonadotropin axis are reversed by replacement with L-T4, it has been suggested that thyroid hormone (TH) may regulate tuberoinfundibular GnRH and pituitary gonadotropin biosynthesis and/or secretion. To shed light on this hypothesis, we conducted immunocytochemical studies on the distribution and immunostaining characteristics of hypophysiotropic GnRH neurons, LH, PRL and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) immunoreactive (IR) cells in the pituitary of adult, male rats. We show that HYPO reduces IR-GnRH in a restricted population of tuberoinfundibular perikarya and their proximal axons compared to euthyroid controls, but increases IR-VIP both in pituitary cells in direct association with LH-gonadotrophs and within IR-LH cells, itself. We propose that VIP may serve as a juxtacrine/paracrine/autocrine regulator of LH secretion and that, when GnRH biosynthesis is reduced by HYPO, gonadotropin secretion may be rescued by local activating effects of VIP. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), industry toxicants found in food and water, also have inhibitory effects on the gonadal axis, decreasing fertility and suppressing basal and GnRHinduced LH release in male rats. Since PCB may also exert endocrine disruptor-dependent (EDD) effects on the thyroid axis producing a non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) (coined EDD-NTIS), we developed a rat model of EDD-NTIS to determine whether central

  18. Parenteral glutamine supplementation in critical illness: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The potential benefit of parenteral glutamine (GLN) supplementation has been one of the most commonly studied nutritional interventions in the critical care setting. The aim of this systematic review was to incorporate recent trials of traditional parenteral GLN supplementation in critical illness with previously existing data. Methods All randomized controlled trials of parenterally administered GLN in critically ill patients conducted from 1997 to 2013 were identified. Studies of enteral GLN only or combined enteral/parenteral GLN were excluded. Methodological quality of studies was scored and data was abstracted by independent reviewers. Results A total of 26 studies involving 2,484 patients examining only parenteral GLN supplementation of nutrition support were identified in ICU patients. Parenteral GLN supplementation was associated with a trend towards a reduction of overall mortality (relative risk (RR) 0.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.75, 1.03, P = 0.10) and a significant reduction in hospital mortality (RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.51, 0.90, P = 0.008). In addition, parenteral GLN was associated with a strong trend towards a reduction in infectious complications (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.73, 1.02, P = 0.09) and ICU length of stay (LOS) (WMD –1.91, (95% CI -4.10, 0.28, P = 0.09) and significant reduction in hospital LOS (WMD -2.56, 95% CI -4.71, -0.42, P = 0.02). In the subset of studies examining patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN), parenteral GLN supplementation was associated with a trend towards reduced overall mortality (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.71, 1.01, P = 0.07). Conclusions Parenteral GLN supplementation given in conjunction with nutrition support continues to be associated with a significant reduction in hospital mortality and hospital LOS. Parenteral GLN supplementation as a component of nutrition support should continue to be considered to improve outcomes in critically ill patients. PMID:24745648

  19. Liver dysfunction associated with artificial nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Teodoro; Bonet, Alfonso; Rubio, Mercedes; Mateo, Dolores; Farré, Mercé; Acosta, José Antonio; Blesa, Antonio; Montejo, Juan Carlos; de Lorenzo, Abelardo García; Mesejo, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Liver dysfunction associated with artificial nutrition in critically ill patients is a complication that seems to be frequent, but it has not been assessed previously in a large cohort of critically ill patients. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of incidence in 40 intensive care units. Different liver dysfunction patterns were defined: (a) cholestasis: alkaline phosphatase of more than 280 IU/l, gamma-glutamyl-transferase of more than 50 IU/l, or bilirubin of more than 1.2 mg/dl; (b) liver necrosis: aspartate aminotransferase of more than 40 IU/l or alanine aminotransferase of more than 42 IU/l, plus bilirubin of more than 1.2 mg/dl or international normalized ratio of more than 1.4; and (c) mixed pattern: alkaline phosphatase of more than 280 IU/l or gamma-glutamyl-transferase of more than 50 IU/l, plus aspartate aminotransferase of more than 40 IU/l or alanine aminotransferase of more than 42 IU/l. Results Seven hundred and twenty-five of 3,409 patients received artificial nutrition: 303 received total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and 422 received enteral nutrition (EN). Twenty-three percent of patients developed liver dysfunction: 30% in the TPN group and 18% in the EN group. The univariate analysis showed an association between liver dysfunction and TPN (p < 0.001), Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score on admission (p < 0.001), sepsis (p < 0.001), early use of artificial nutrition (p < 0.03), and malnutrition (p < 0.01). In the multivariate analysis, liver dysfunction was associated with TPN (p < 0.001), sepsis (p < 0.02), early use of artificial nutrition (p < 0.03), and calculated energy requirements of more than 25 kcal/kg per day (p < 0.05). Conclusion TPN, sepsis, and excessive calculated energy requirements appear as risk factors for developing liver dysfunction. Septic critically ill patients should not be fed with excessive caloric amounts, particularly when TPN is employed. Administering artificial nutrition in the first 24 hours

  20. Bacteriological culture of blood from critically ill neonatal calves.

    PubMed Central

    Fecteau, G; Van Metre, D C; Paré, J; Smith, B P; Higgins, R; Holmberg, C A; Jang, S; Guterbock, W

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of bacteremia in critically ill, neonatal calves with severe diarrhea or depression, and to describe the variety of bacteria involved. Two studies were conducted in the summers of 1991 and 1993 involving 190 neonatal calves, 1-day to 19-days-old. Bacteremia was detected by blood culture in 31% (28/90) of calves in study 1, and in 24% (19/79) of ill calves and 0% (0/21) of control calves in study 2. Bacteria cultured from blood included Escherichia coli (51% of all isolates), other gram-negative enterics (25.5%), gram-negative anaerobes (5.9%), gram-positive cocci (11.8%), and gram-positive rods (5.9%). Among clinically ill calves, the average age was significantly lower in the blood culture-negative group (5.5 d) than in the blood culture-positive group (7.5 d) (P = 0.004). Mean serum IgG concentration was significantly (P = 0.0001) lower in blood culture-positive calves (1.146 g/L) than in blood culture-negative calves (3.077 g/L). The mortality rate was significantly (P < 0.0001) higher in the blood culture-positive group (57.4%) than in the blood culture-negative group (15.1%). Bacteremia appeared to be a frequent entity in this particular rearing situation. Early recognition of the problem, as well as appropriate treatment, may be beneficial in increasing survival rates. Results also support the need to address the failure of passive transfer of maternal antibodies to prevent bacteremia in calves. Images Figure 1. PMID:9028592

  1. [Postoperative hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Olifirova, O S; Trynov, N N

    2015-01-01

    There is a number of factors such as the thyroidectomy and limiting subtotal thyroid resection against the background of euthyroidism and initial hypothyroidism (in any extent of operation) which leads to the prediction of early postoperative hypothyroidism origin during 10 days of the postoperative peri- od. The early postoperative hypothyroidism is accompanied by activation processes of lipid peroxide oxidation and at the same time by reduction of antioxidant protection.

  2. Protein for the critically ill patient--what and when?

    PubMed

    Plank, L D

    2013-05-01

    Critical illness is characterised by catabolism of the skeletal muscle that releases amino acids for protein synthesis to support tissue repair, immune defence and inflammatory and acute-phase responses. Protein requirements for these patients have generally been based on levels that result in the lowest catabolic rates or most favourable nitrogen balance. The definition of these levels, in particular, in relation to indexing to a measure of patient weight or lean body mass, is controversial. Furthermore, optimal nitrogen balance may not necessarily equate to best clinical outcome. There is some evidence that administration of specific amino acids may be advantageous at least during the early or most catabolic phases of illness, in order to support the specific amino acid requirements of the metabolic pathways activated by the injury or infection. Current widely used guidelines differ in the protein prescription they recommend and in the timing of administration in relation to intensive care admission. A pressing need exists for well-designed randomised trials that compare differing levels of protein or amino acid provision, and the timing of this provision, for their effects on clinical endpoints.

  3. From Data Patterns to Mechanistic Models in Acute Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Jean-Marie; Haddad, Wassim M.; An, Gary; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the physiologic and inflammatory response in acute critical illness has stymied the accurate diagnosis and development of therapies. The Society for Complex Acute Illness was formed a decade ago with the goal of leveraging multiple complex systems approaches in order to address this unmet need. Two main paths of development have characterized the Society’s approach: i) data pattern analysis, either defining the diagnostic/prognostic utility of complexity metrics of physiological signals or multivariate analyses of molecular and genetic data, and ii) mechanistic mathematical and computational modeling, all being performed with an explicit translational goal. Here, we summarize the progress to date on each of these approaches, along with pitfalls inherent in the use of each approach alone. We suggest that the next decade holds the potential to merge these approaches, connecting patient diagnosis to treatment via mechanism-based dynamical system modeling and feedback control, and allowing extrapolation from physiologic signals to biomarkers to novel drug candidates. As a predicate example, we focus on the role of data-driven and mechanistic models in neuroscience, and the impact that merging these modeling approaches can have on general anesthesia. PMID:24768566

  4. The Critically Ill Kidney Transplant Recipient: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Canet, Emmanuel; Zafrani, Lara; Azoulay, Élie

    2016-06-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most common solid organ transplantation performed worldwide. Up to 6% of kidney transplant recipients experience a life-threatening complication that requires ICU admission, chiefly in the late posttransplantation period (≥ 6 months). Acute respiratory failure and septic shock are the main reasons for ICU admission. Cardiac pulmonary edema, bacterial pneumonia, acute graft pyelonephritis, and bloodstream infections account for the vast majority of diagnoses in the ICU. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia is the most common opportunistic infection, and one-half of the patients so infected require mechanical ventilation. The incidence of cytomegalovirus visceral infections in the era of preemptive therapy has dramatically decreased. Drug-related neutropenia, sirolimus-related pneumonitis, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome are among the most common immunosuppression-associated toxic effects. Importantly, the impact of critical illness on graft function is worrisome. Throughout the ICU stay, acute kidney injury is common, and about 40% of the recipients require renal replacement therapy. One-half of the patients are discharged alive and free from dialysis. Hospital mortality can reach 30% and correlates with acute illness severity and reason for ICU admission. Transplant characteristics are not predictors of short-term survival. Graft survival depends on pre-ICU graft function, disease severity, and renal toxicity of ICU investigations and treatments.

  5. Powered intraosseous device (EZ-IO) for critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Oksan, Derinoz; Ayfer, Keles

    2013-07-01

    We reviewed the charts of 25 patients who underwent powered intraosseous line insertion between July 1, 2008 and August 31, 2010 to determine its users, indications, procedural details, success rates, and complications. Intraosseous (IO) line was inserted in the anteromedial aspect of the proximal tibia in all patients. The first attempt was successful in 80%, and the median duration for insertion of the IO line was 4 hours. Extravasation was the most common complication. Ninety-six percent of the physicians had undergone prior training in IO insertion. Because of its high success and short procedure time, IO access should be the first alternative to failed vascular access in critically ill children. Training in IO should be extended to all who care for pediatric patients in inpatient as well as in prehospital and emergency department settings.

  6. Enteral nutritional support of the critically ill older adult.

    PubMed

    Finoccchiaro, Darlene; Hook, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition continues to be a concern for the older adult in the intensive care setting despite widespread knowledge of the benefits of adequate nutrition and existing evidence-based protocols. The incidence of malnutrition in hospitalized patients ranges between 22% and 43% with the highest probability of occurrence, 50% or more, in the intensive care unit patient. The deleterious effects of malnutrition for the critically ill older adult are described with suggested and accepted screening tools for existing or acquired malnutrition. A discussion of early oral and enteral feeding interventions and strategies for overcoming barriers is explored. Enteral feeding complications are delineated, and perceived barriers or risks are disputed. This paper concludes with suggestions for future research and a definitive role for advanced nursing nutrition champions.

  7. Caring for critically ill oldest old patients: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Nicola; Tibullo, Loredana; Landi, Emanuela; Carifi, Giovanni; Pirone, Alfonso; Pippo, Antonio; Alviggi, Immacolata; Tizzano, Renato; Salsano, Elisa; Di Grezia, Francesco; Vargas, Maria

    2016-10-19

    Despite technological advances, the mortality rate for critically ill oldest old patients remains high. The intensive caring should be able to combine technology and a deep humanity considering that the patients are living the last part of their lives. In addition to the traditional goals of ICU of reducing morbidity and mortality, of maintaining organ functions and restoring health, caring for seriously oldest old patients should take into account their end-of-life preferences, the advance or proxy directives if available, the prognosis, the communication, their life expectancy and the impact of multimorbidity. The aim of this review was to focus on all these aspects with an emphasis on some intensive procedures such as mechanical ventilation, noninvasive mechanical ventilation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, renal replacement therapy, hemodynamic support, evaluation of delirium and malnutrition in this heterogeneous frail ICU population.

  8. [Tissue oxygen saturation in the critically ill patient].

    PubMed

    Gruartmoner, G; Mesquida, J; Baigorri, F

    2014-05-01

    Hemodynamic resuscitation seeks to correct global macrocirculatory parameters of pressure and flow. However, current evidence has shown that despite the normalization of these global parameters, microcirculatory and regional perfusion alterations can persist, and these alterations have been independently associated with a poorer patient prognosis. This in turn has lead to growing interest in new technologies for exploring regional circulation and microcirculation. Near infra-red spectroscopy allows us to monitor tissue oxygen saturation, and has been proposed as a noninvasive, continuous and easy-to-obtain measure of regional circulation. The present review aims to summarize the existing evidence on near infra-red spectroscopy and its potential clinical role in the resuscitation of critically ill patients in shock.

  9. Echocardiographic Hemodynamic Monitoring in the Critically Ill Patient

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Guerrero-De-Mier, Manuel; López-Álvaro, Julián

    2011-01-01

    Echocardiography has shown to be an essential diagnostic tool in the critically ill patient's assessment. In this scenario the initial fluid therapy, such as it is recommended in the actual clinical guidelines, not always provides the desired results and maintains a considerable incidence of cardiorrespiratory insufficiency. Echocardiography can council us on these patients' clinical handling, not only the initial fluid therapy but also on the best-suited election of the vasoactive/inotropic treatment and the early detection of complications. It contributes as well to improving the etiological diagnosis, allowing one to know the heart performance with more precision. The objective of this manuscript is to review the more important parameters that can assist the intensivist in theragnosis of hemodynamically unstable patients. PMID:22758613

  10. Continuous infusion of antibiotics in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Smuszkiewicz, Piotr; Szałek, Edyta; Tomczak, Hanna; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2013-02-01

    Antibiotics are the most commonly used drugs in intensive care unit patients and their supply should be based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic rules. The changes that occur in septic patients who are critically ill may be responsible for subtherapeutic antibiotic concentrations leading to poorer clinical outcomes. Evolving in time the disturbed pathophysiology in severe sepsis (high cardiac output, glomerular hyperfiltration) and therapeutic interventions (e.g. haemodynamically active drugs, mechanical ventilation, renal replacement therapy) alters antibiotic pharmacokinetics mainly through an increase in the volume of distribution and altered drug clearance. The lack of new and efficacious drugs and increased bacterial resistance are current problems of contemporary antibiotic therapy. Although intermittent administration is a standard clinical practice, alternative methods of antibiotic administration are sought, which may potentialise effects and reduce toxicity as well as contribute to inhibition of bacterial resistance. A wide range of studies prove that the application of continuous infusion of time-dependent antibiotics (beta-lactams, glycopeptides) is more rational than standard intermittent administration. However, there are also studies which do not confirm the advantage of one method over the other. In spite of controversy the continuous administration of this group of antibiotics is common practice, because the results of both studies point to the higher efficacy of this method in critically ill patients. Authors reviewed the literature to determine whether any clinical benefits exist for administration of time-dependent antibiotics by continuous infusion. Definite specification of the clinical advantage of administration this way over standard dosage requires a large-scale multi-centre randomised controlled trial.

  11. Nutrition Support among Critically Ill Children with AKI

    PubMed Central

    Akcan-Arikan, Ayse; Orellana, Renán A.; Coss-Bu, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Critically ill children are at high risk of underfeeding and AKI, which may lead to further nutritional deficiencies. This study aimed to determine the adequacy of nutrition support during the first 5 days of intensive care unit (ICU) stay. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A chart review of pediatric patients admitted to the pediatric ICU for >72 hours between August 2007 and March 2008 was conducted. Patients were classified as having no AKI versus AKI by modified pediatric RIFLE criteria. All nutrition was analyzed. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) was estimated by the Schofield equation and protein needs by American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition guidelines. Results Of the 167 patients, 102 were male and 65 were female (median age 1.4 years). Using the RIFLE criteria, 102 (61%) patients had no AKI, whereas 44 (26%) were classified as category R (risk), 12 (7%) as category I (injury), and 9 (5%) as category F (failure). The median 5-day energy intake was lower relative to estimated BMR. Overall protein provision (19%) was lower than energy provision (55%) compared with estimated needs (P<0.001). I/F patients were more likely to be fasted versus receiving enteral/parenteral nutrition (n=813 patient days) and to receive <90% of BMR (n=832 patient days) than No AKI/R patients. Conclusions Underfeeding, common in critically ill children, was accentuated in AKI. Protein underfeeding was greater than energy underfeeding in the first 5 days of PICU stay. Efforts should be made to provide adequate nutrition in ICU patients with AKI. PMID:23293125

  12. IGF-I concentration and changes in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Hajsadeghi, Shokoufeh; Khamseh, Mohammad Ebrahim; Gholami, Saeid; Kerman, Scott Reza Jafarian; Gohardehi, Golnar; Moghadam, Negar Seifi; Sabet, Azade Shafiee; Moradi, Masoud; Mollahoseini, Reza; Najafi, Mehri; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) is an anabolic growth factor that affects nitrogen balance and its changing trend is not clearly understood in critically ill patients. This study was carried out to evaluate the association between serum IGF-I levels and its changing trend in critically ill patients. METHODS: In this nested case-control study, all consecutive patients admitted to the medical ICU of Rasoul-e-Akram and Firuzgar hospital (Tehran, Iran) from January through October 2008 were included. IGF1 concentration was measured within the first 24h of ICU admission and the fourth, seventh and tenth day since admission. Patients were followed until discharge from ICU or expiration. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 90 patients (mean age: 58.01 ± 22.56), 31 (34.4%) of who died and 59 (65.6%) were discharged. On admission, 43 patients (47.7%) had low IGF-I levels, whereas 47 (52.3%) had normal or high levels. The concentration of IGF-I was not significantly different in every 4 measurements between expired and discharged patients. Significant decrease was seen between first to fourth day IGF-I concentration (p = 0.005). Changing trend was not statistically different in two groups of patients. CONCLUSIONS: There was no relation between low IGF-I concentration on admission day and increased adverse outcome, but overall these patients had lower IGF1. No clear association was found between changing trend of IGF1 and mortality. Stress on admission time may cause decreasing pattern of IGF-I in the first 4 days of admission. PMID:22091227

  13. Critical Pertussis Illness in Children, A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Berger, John T.; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Shanley, Thomas P.; Wessel, David L.; Clark, Amy; Holubkov, Richard; Meert, Kathleen L.; Newth, Christopher J.L.; Berg, Robert A.; Heidemann, Sabrina; Harrison, Rick; Pollack, Murray; Dalton, Heidi; Harvill, Eric; Karanikas, Alexia; Liu, Teresa; Burr, Jeri S.; Doctor, Allan; Dean, J. Michael; Jenkins, Tammara L.; Nicholson, Carol E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Pertussis persists in the United States despite high immunization rates. The present report characterizes the presentation and acute course of critical pertussis by quantifying demographic data, laboratory findings, clinical complications, and critical care therapies required among children requiring admission to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Eight PICUs comprising the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network and 17 additional PICUs across the United States. Patients Eligible patients had laboratory confirmation of pertussis infection, were < 18 years of age, and died in the PICU or were admitted to the PICU for at least 24 hours between June 2008 and August 2011. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results 127 patients were identified. Median age was 49 days, and 105 (83%) patients were < 3 months of age. Fifty-five (43%) required mechanical ventilation. Twelve (9.4%) died during initial hospitalization. Pulmonary hypertension was found in 16 patients (12.5%), and was present in 75% of patients who died, compared with 6% of survivors (p< 0.001). Median white blood cell count (WBC) was significantly higher in those requiring mechanical ventilation (p<0.001), those with pulmonary hypertension (p<0.001) and non-survivors (p<0.001). Age, sex and immunization status did not differ between survivors and non-survivors. Fourteen patients received leukoreduction therapy (exchange transfusion (12), leukopheresis (1) or both (1)). Survival benefit was not apparent. Conclusions Pulmonary hypertension may be associated with mortality in pertussis critical illness. Elevated WBC is associated with the need for mechanical ventilation, pulmonary hypertension, and mortality risk. Research is indicated to elucidate how pulmonary hypertension, immune responsiveness, and elevated WBC contribute to morbidity and mortality

  14. Mechanical Signaling in the Pathophysiology of Critical Illness Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kalamgi, Rebeca C.; Larsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The complete loss of mechanical stimuli of skeletal muscles, i.e., the loss of external strain, related to weight bearing, and internal strain, related to the contraction of muscle cells, is uniquely observed in pharmacologically paralyzed or deeply sedated mechanically ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The preferential loss of myosin and myosin associated proteins in limb and trunk muscles is a significant characteristic of critical illness myopathy (CIM) which separates CIM from other types of acquired muscle weaknesses in ICU patients. Mechanical silencing is an important factor triggering CIM. Microgravity or ground based microgravity models form the basis of research on the effect of muscle unloading-reloading, but the mechanisms and effects may differ from the ICU conditions. In order to understand how mechanical tension regulates muscle mass, it is critical to know how muscles sense mechanical information and convert stimulus to intracellular biochemical actions and changes in gene expression, a process called cellular mechanotransduction. In adult skeletal muscles and muscle fibers, this process may differ, the same stimulus can cause divergent response and the same fiber type may undergo opposite changes in different muscles. Skeletal muscle contains multiple types of mechano-sensors and numerous structures that can be affected differently and hence respond differently in distinct muscles. PMID:26869939

  15. Hormonal supplementation in endocrine dysfunction in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Duława, Anna; Bułdak, Łukasz; Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2007-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for a physician is a critically ill patient. Regardless of the reason for an admission to the Intensive Care Units (ICU) (e.g. myocardial infarction, severe pneumonia, trauma or many others) each of the above-mentioned conditions impairs homeostasis including instability of the endocrine system. The observed alterations in serum glucose level or clinical signs of hormonal imbalance alarm practitioners and prompt them to an intervention. However, side-effects of administered drugs have to be always considered, because every intervention in the endocrine system may have various consequences or prove itself maleficent. Since critical condition causes numerous changes in the hormonal system, the definition of endocrine gland failure in the ICU patients should differ from the definition related to the general population. This review is aimed at describing alterations, diagnosis and treatment options for an impaired carbohydrate metabolism and inadequate response of the adrenal and thyroid endocrine axis. It has been written in order to aid the choice between "the watch and wait strategy" and aggressive pharmacological intervention. Furthermore, several standard and innovative therapeutic procedures were described and, if possible, compared. Recent articles have been included in order to show current views on the up-to-date clinical approach.

  16. [Fish oil containing lipid emulsions in critically ill patients: Critical analysis and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Manzanares, W; Langlois, P L

    2016-01-01

    Third-generation lipid emulsions (LE) are soybean oil sparing strategies with immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory effects. Current evidence supporting the use of intravenous (i.v) fish oil (FO) LE in critically ill patients requiring parenteral nutrition or receiving enteral nutrition (pharmaconutrient strategy) mainly derives from small phase ii clinical trials in heterogenous intensive care unit patient's population. Over the last three years, there have been published different systematic reviews and meta-analyses evaluating the effects of FO containing LE in the critically ill. Recently, it has been demonstrated that i.v FO based LE may be able to significantly reduce the incidence of infections as well as mechanical ventilation days and hospital length of stay. Nonetheless, more robust evidence is required before giving a definitive recommendation. Finally, we strongly believe that a dosing study is required before new phase iii clinical trials comparing i.v FO containing emulsions versus other soybean oil strategies can be conducted.

  17. Critical Illness Neuromyopathy Complicating Akinetic Crisis in Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Margherita; De Angelis, Maria Vittoria; Di Muzio, Antonio; Anzellotti, Francesca; Bonanni, Laura; Thomas, Astrid; Onofrj, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Akinetic crisis (AC) is a life-threatening complication of parkinsonism characterized by an acute severe akinetic-hypertonic state, consciousness disturbance, hyperthermia, and muscle enzymes elevation. Injectable dopaminomimetic drugs, high-dose methylprednisolone, and dantrolene are advocated as putative specific treatments. The course of the illness is frequently complicated by infections, pulmonary embolism, renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and cardiac arrhythmias. Critical illness neuromyopathy (CINM) is an acquired neuromuscular disorder characterized by flaccid quadriparesis and muscle enzyme elevation, often occurring in intensive care units and primarily associated with inactivity, sepsis, multiorgan failure, neuromuscular blocking agents, and steroid treatment. In 3 parkinsonian patients, during the course of AC we observed disappearance of rigidity but persistent hypoactivity. In all, neurological examination showed quadriparesis with loss of tendon reflexes and laboratory investigation disclosed a second peak of muscle enzymes elevation, following the first increment due to AC. Electrophysiological studies showed absent or reduced sensory nerve action potentials and compound muscular action potentials, myopathic changes, and fibrillation potentials at electromyography recordings, and reduced excitability or inexcitability of tibialis anterior at direct muscle stimulation, leading to a diagnosis of CINM in all 3 patients. In 1 patient, the diagnosis was also confirmed by muscle biopsy. Outcome was fatal in 2 of the 3 patients. Although AC is associated with most of the known risk factors for CINM, the cooccurrence of the 2 disorders may be difficult to recognize and has never been reported. We found that CINM can occur as a severe complication of AC, and should be suspected when hypertonia-rigidity subsides despite persistent akinesia. Strict monitoring of muscle enzyme levels may help diagnosis. This finding addresses

  18. Total plasma magnesium in healthy and critically ill foals.

    PubMed

    Mariella, J; Isani, G; Andreani, G; Freccero, F; Carpenè, E; Castagnetti, C

    2016-01-15

    Abnormalities in total Mg (tMg) concentration in plasma and/or serum are common in critically ill humans, and the association with increased mortality has been documented in several clinical studies in adults and newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Abnormalities in tMg were studied in hospitalized dogs, cats, and adult horses. Newborn foals were scarcely studied with regard to Mg concentration. The aims of the present study were: (1) to compare two analytical methods for the determination of tMg in plasma: the automated colorimetric method and the atomic absorption spectrometry; (2) to measure plasma tMg in healthy foals during the first 72 hours after birth and in sick foals during the first 72 hours of hospitalization; (3) to compare total plasma Mg concentration among healthy foals, foals affected by perinatal asphyxia syndrome (PAS), prematurity and/or dismaturity, and sepsis; (4) to evaluate tMg plasma concentration in surviving and non-surviving foals. One hundred seventeen foals were included in the study: 20 healthy and 97 sick foals. The automated method used in clinical practice probably overestimates plasma tMg. Due to its higher sensitivity and specificity, the atomic absorption spectrometry should be considered the method of choice from an analytical point of view, but requires an instrumentation not easily available in any laboratory and specific technical skills and competencies. Plasma tMg in healthy foals were included in the range 0.52 to 1.01 mmol/L and did not show any time-dependent change during the first 72 hours of life. In sick foals, tMg evaluated at T0 was statistically higher than tMg measured at subsequent times. Foals affected by PAS had a tMg at T0 significantly higher (P < 0.01) than healthy, septic, and premature and/or dysmature foals. The t test found significantly higher (P < 0.01) plasma tMg measured at T0 in non-surviving than in surviving foals. Plasma tMg could be a useful parameter for the diagnosis of PAS

  19. Critical illness research involving collection of genomic data: the conundrum posed by low levels of genomic literacy among surrogate decision makers for critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Ellen; Celious, Aaron; Shehane, Erica; Oerke, Mandy; Warren, Victoria; Eastman, Alexander; Kennedy, Carie R; Freeman, Bradley D

    2013-07-01

    Critical illness clinical trials that entail genomic data collection pose unique challenges. In this qualitative study, we found that surrogate decision makers (SDMs) for critically ill individuals, such as those who would be approached for study participation, appeared to have a limited grasp of genomic principles. We argue that low levels of genomic literacy should neither preclude nor be in conflict with the conduct of ethically rigorous clinical trials.

  20. Enteral nutrition intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients.

    PubMed

    Lavrentieva, Athina; Kontakiotis, Theodore; Bitzani, Militsa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of enteral feeding intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients, the effect of enteral feeding intolerance on the efficacy of feeding, the correlation between the infection marker (procalcitonin [PCT]) and the nutrition status marker (prealbumin) and the impact of feeding intolerance on the outcome of septic burn patients. From January 2009 to December 2012 the data of all burn patients with the diagnosis of sepsis who were placed on enteral nutrition were analyzed. Septic patients were divided into two groups: group A, septic patients who developed feeding intolerance; group B, septic patients who did not develop feeding intolerance. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients were analyzed and compared. The diagnosis of sepsis was applied to 29% of all patients. Of these patients 35% developed intolerance to enteral feeding throughout the septic period. A statistically significant increase in mean PCT level and a decrease in prealbumin level was observed during the sepsis period. Group A patients had statistically significant lower mean caloric intake, higher PCT:prealbumin ratio, higher pneumonia incidence, higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Maximum Score, a longer duration of mechanical ventilation, and a higher mortality rate in comparison with the septic patients without gastric feeding intolerance. The authors concluded that a high percentage of septic burn patients developed enteral feeding intolerance. Enteral feeding intolerance seems to have a negative impact on the patients' nutritional status, morbidity, and mortality.

  1. Daptomycin Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Septic and Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    D'Avolio, Antonio; Pensi, Debora; Baietto, Lorena; Pacini, Giovanni; Di Perri, Giovanni; De Rosa, Francesco Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Infections, including sepsis, are associated with high mortality rates in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Appropriate antibiotic selection and adequate dosing are important for improving patient outcomes. Daptomycin is bactericidal in bloodstream infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus and other Gram-positive pathogens cultured in ICU patients. The drug has concentration-dependent activity, and the area under the curve/minimum inhibitory concentration ratio is the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) index that best correlates with daptomycin activity, whereas toxicity correlates well with daptomycin plasma trough concentrations (or minimum concentration [C min]). Adequate daptomycin exposure can be difficult to achieve in ICU patients; multiple PK alterations can result in highly variable plasma concentrations, which are difficult to predict. For this reason, therapeutic drug monitoring could help clinicians optimize daptomycin dosing, thus improving efficacy while decreasing the likelihood of serious adverse events. This paper reviews the literature on daptomycin in ICU patients with sepsis, focusing on dosing and PK and PD parameters.

  2. Caloric requirement of the critically ill septic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Shizgal, H.M.; Martin, M.F.

    1988-04-01

    The caloric requirement of the critically ill septic patient was determined by measuring body composition, by multiple isotope dilution, before and at 2-wk intervals while receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in 86 septic and 57 nonseptic malnourished patients. All patients received a TPN solution containing 25% dextrose and 2.75% crystalline amino acids. The body composition of the nonseptic patients, who received 51.9 +/- 1.5 kcal/kg.day, improved significantly, while that of the septic patients, receiving 46.8 +/- 1.1 kcal/kg.day was only maintained. The relationship between caloric intake and the restoration of a malnourished body cell mass (BCM) was determined for each group by correlating, using multiple linear regression, the mean daily change in the BCM with the caloric intake and the nutritional state, as determined by body composition. According to the resultant regressions, an intake of 35.1 and 50.7 kcal/kg.day was required to maintain the BCM of the septic and nonseptic patients, respectively. To restore a depleted BCM, caloric intakes in excess of this amount are required.

  3. Obesity, Acute Kidney Injury, and Mortality in Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Danziger, John; Chen, Ken; Lee, Joon; Feng, Mengling; Mark, Roger G.; Celi, Leo Anthony; Mukamal, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although obesity is associated with risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and improved survival, less is known about the associations of obesity with risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) and post-AKI mortality. Methods In a single-center inception cohort of almost 15,000 critically ill patients, we evaluated the association of obesity with AKI and AKI severity, as well as in-hospital and one-year survival. AKI was defined using the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative criteria. Results The AKI incidence rates for normal, overweight, Class I, II, and III Obesity were 18.6, 20.6, 22.5, 24.3 and 24.0 percent respectively, and the adjusted odds ratios of AKI were 1.18 [95% CI 1.06–1.31], 1.35 [1.19–1.53], 1.47 [1.25–1.73], 1.59 [1.31–1.87], compared to normal weight, respectively. Each 5 kg/m2 increase in body mass index (BMI) was associated with a 10% risk [95% CI 1.06–1.24; p<0.001] of more severe AKI. Within-hospital and one-year survival rates associated with the AKI episodes were similar across BMI categories. In conclusion, obesity is a risk factor for AKI injury, which is associated with increased short- and long-term mortality. PMID:26496453

  4. Chronic nicotine treatment reverses hypothyroidism-induced impairment of L-LTP induction phase: critical role of CREB.

    PubMed

    Alzoubi, K H; Alkadhi, K A

    2014-06-01

    We have previously shown that adult onset hypothyroidism impairs late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) and reduces basal protein levels of cyclic-AMP response element binding protein (CREB), mutagen-activated protein kinase (MAPKp42/44), and calcium calmodulin kinase IV (CaMKIV) in area Cornu Ammonis 1 (CA1) of the hippocampus. These changes were reversed by chronic nicotine treatment. In the present study, levels of signaling molecules important for L-LTP were determined in CA1 area of the hippocampus during the induction phase. Standard multiple high-frequency stimulation (MHFS) was used to evoke L-LTP in the CA1 area of the hippocampus of hypothyroid, nicotine-treated hypothyroid, nicotine, and sham control anaesthetized adult rats. Chronic nicotine treatment reversed hypothyroidism-induced impairment of L-LTP at the induction phase. Five minutes after MHFS, Western blotting showed an increase in the levels of P-CREB, and P-MAPKp42/44 in sham-operated control, nicotine, and nicotine-treated hypothyroid animals, but not in hypothyroid animals. The protein levels of total CREB, total MAPK p42/44, BDNF, and CaMKIV were not altered in all groups 5 min after MHFS. Therefore, normalized phosphorylation of essential kinases such as P-CREB and P-MAPK p42/44 in the CA1 area of nicotine-treated hypothyroid animals plays a crucial role in nicotine-induced rescue of L-LTP induction during hypothyroidism.

  5. Medicines for Hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... f y o ro r idism What is hypothyroidism? Hypothyroidism, also called underactive thyroid, occurs when the thyroid ... by your body. What is the treatment for hypothyroidism? People who have hypothyroidism must take a pill ...

  6. Early glycemic control in critically ill patients with burn injury.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Claire V; Coffey, Rebecca; Cook, Charles H; Gerlach, Anthony T; Miller, Sidney F

    2011-01-01

    Glucose management in patients with burn injury is often difficult because of their hypermetabolic state with associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Recent studies suggest that time to glycemic control is associated with improved outcomes. The authors sought to determine the influence of early glycemic control on the outcomes of critically ill patients with burn injury. A retrospective analysis was performed at the Ohio State University Medical Center. Patients hospitalized with burn injury were enrolled if they were admitted to the intensive care unit between March 1, 2006, and February 28, 2009. Early glycemic control was defined as the achievement of a mean daily blood glucose of ≤150 mg/dl for at least two consecutive days by postburn day 3. Forty-six patients made up the study cohort with 26 achieving early glycemic control and 20 who did not. The two groups were similar at baseline with regard to age, pre-existing diabetes, APACHE II score and burn size and depth. There were no differences in number of surgical interventions, infectious complications, or length of stay between patients who achieved or failed early glycemic control. Failure of early glycemic control was, however, associated with significantly higher mortality both by univariate (35.0 vs 7.7%, P = .03) and multivariate analyses (hazard ratio 6.754 [1.16-39.24], P = .03) adjusting for age, TBSA, and inhalation injury. Failure to achieve early glycemic control in patients with burn injury is associated with an increased risk of mortality. However, further prospective controlled trials are needed to establish causality of this association.

  7. Adaptation to different noninvasive ventilation masks in critically ill patients*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Renata Matos; Timenetsky, Karina Tavares; Neves, Renata Cristina Miranda; Shigemichi, Liane Hirano; Kanda, Sandra Sayuri; Maekawa, Carla; Silva, Eliezer; Eid, Raquel Afonso Caserta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify which noninvasive ventilation (NIV) masks are most commonly used and the problems related to the adaptation to such masks in critically ill patients admitted to a hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: An observational study involving patients ≥ 18 years of age admitted to intensive care units and submitted to NIV. The reason for NIV use, type of mask, NIV regimen, adaptation to the mask, and reasons for non-adaptation to the mask were investigated. RESULTS: We evaluated 245 patients, with a median age of 82 years. Acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use (in 71.3%). Total face masks were the most commonly used (in 74.7%), followed by full face masks and near-total face masks (in 24.5% and 0.8%, respectively). Intermittent NIV was used in 82.4% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to the mask was found in 76% of the patients. Masks had to be replaced by another type of mask in 24% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to total face masks and full face masks was found in 75.5% and 80.0% of the patients, respectively. Non-adaptation occurred in the 2 patients using near-total facial masks. The most common reason for non-adaptation was the shape of the face, in 30.5% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: In our sample, acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use, and total face masks were the most commonly used. The most common reason for non-adaptation to the mask was the shape of the face, which was resolved by changing the type of mask employed. PMID:24068269

  8. Alteration of the sublingual microvascular glycocalyx in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Donati, Abele; Damiani, Elisa; Domizi, Roberta; Romano, Rocco; Adrario, Erica; Pelaia, Paolo; Ince, Can; Singer, Mervyn

    2013-11-01

    Glycocalyx degradation may contribute to microvascular dysfunction and tissue hypoperfusion during systemic inflammation and sepsis. In this observational study we evaluated the alteration of the sublingual microvascular glycocalyx in 16 healthy volunteers and 50 critically ill patients. Sidestream Dark Field images of the sublingual microcirculation were automatically analyzed by dedicated software. The Perfused Boundary Region (PBR) was calculated as the dimensions of the permeable part of the glycocalyx allowing the penetration of circulating red blood cells, providing an index of glycocalyx damage. The PBR was increased in ICU patients compared to healthy controls (2.7 [2.59-2.88] vs. 2.46 [2.37-2.59]μm, p<0.0001) and tended to be higher in the 32 septic patients compared to non-septics (2.77 [2.62-2.93] vs. 2.67 [2.55-2.75]μm, p=0.05), suggesting more severe glycocalyx alterations. A PBR of 2.76 showed the best discriminative ability towards the presence of sepsis (sensitivity: 50%, specificity: 83%; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.67, 95% CI 0.52-0.82, p=0.05). A weak positive correlation was found between PBR and heart rate (r=0.3, p=0.03). In 17 septic patients, a correlation was found between PBR and number of rolling leukocytes in post-capillary venules (RL/venule) (r=0.55, p=0.02), confirming that glycocalyx shedding enhances leukocyte-endothelium interaction.

  9. The role of thyroid dysfunction in the critically ill: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bello, G; Ceaichisciuc, I; Silva, S; Antonelli, M

    2010-11-01

    During critical illness, patients with no known history of thyroid disorders may experience multiple alterations in their serum thyroid hormone levels. Such alterations have been termed sick euthyroid syndrome or, more recently, non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). The laboratory parameters of NTIS usually include low serum levels of triiodothyronine (T3), normal or low serum levels of thyroxine (T4) and normal or low serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). The magnitude of the alteration in thyroid function correlates with the severity of the illness and its outcomes in critically ill patients with NTIS. The pathogenetic mechanisms involved in NTIS include a decreased conversion of T4 to T3 in extrathyroidal tissues and alterations in thyroid hormones' binding to serum proteins. In cases of protracted critical illness, a decrease in the pulsatile frequency of TSH secretion, resulting from reduced thyrotropin-re leasing hormone (TRH) release by the hypothalamus, may also occur. Several medications or clinical conditions that are commonly present in critically ill patients may be responsible for lowering serum concentrations of thyroid hormone. Among those who study the condition, the question of whether NTIS is a protective adaptation of the organism to illness or a maladaptive response to a stressful insult remains unanswered. In either case, thyroid hormone abnormalities are likely to play a role in the critically ill patient.However, there is currently no convincing evidence to suggest that restoring physiological thyroid hormone concentrations in unselected patients with NTIS would be beneficial.

  10. Role of Transitional Care Measures in the Prevention of Readmission After Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jessica S

    2017-02-01

    Transitioning from the critical care unit to the medical-surgical care area is vital to patients' recovery and resolution of critical illness. Such transitions are necessary to optimize use of available hospital resources to meet patient care needs. One in 10 patients discharged from the intensive care unit are readmitted to the unit during their hospitalization. Critical care readmission is associated with significant increases in illness acuity, overall length of stay, and health care costs as well as a potential 4-fold increased risk of mortality. Patients with complex illness, multiple comorbid conditions, and a prolonged initial stay in the critical care unit are at an increased risk of being readmitted to the critical care unit and experiencing poor outcomes. Implementing nurse-driven measures that support continuity of care and consistent communication practices such as critical care outreach services, transitional communication tools, discharge planning, and transitional care units improves transitions of patients from the critical care environment and reduces readmission rates.

  11. Immediate intralipid clearance from plasma in critically ill patients after a single-dose injection

    SciTech Connect

    Lindh, A.; Roessner, S.

    1987-09-01

    Plasma fractional removal rates (k2) of Intralipid injected in parallel with /sup 125/I albumin were analyzed in five healthy males and nine critically ill patients. The k2 values of critically ill patients were similar to those of healthy subjects. However, the initial plasma concentrations of Intralipid calculated by extrapolation to zero-time (y0) were markedly different. The mean y0 value in the critically ill patients was 43% that of healthy subjects. No plasma loss of /sup 125/I albumin occurred throughout the test. Intralipid to /sup 125/I albumin plasma concentration ratios during the removal phase paralleled the curves obtained from the iv fat tolerance test. This suggests that these ratios depend on Intralipid clearance rather than leakage from the circulation. The immediate loss of Intralipid suggests that the pulmonary vasculature, the first capillary bed through which the emulsion passes, could be the site where a substantial uptake of the emulsion occurs in critically ill patients.

  12. Defining Pediatric Chronic Critical Illness for Clinical Care, Research, and Policy.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Miriam C; Henderson, Carrie M; Hutton, Nancy; Boss, Renee D

    2017-04-01

    Chronically critically ill pediatric patients represent an emerging population in NICUs and PICUs. Chronic critical illness has been recognized and defined in the adult population, but the same attention has not been systematically applied to pediatrics. This article reviews what is currently known about pediatric chronic critical illness, highlighting the unique aspects of chronic critical illness in infants and children, including specific considerations of prognosis, outcomes, and decision-making. We propose a definition that incorporates NICU versus PICU stays, recurrent ICU admissions, dependence on life-sustaining technology, multiorgan dysfunction, underlying medical complexity, and the developmental implications of congenital versus acquired conditions. We propose a research agenda, highlighting existing knowledge gaps and targeting areas of improvement in clinical care, research, and policy.

  13. 'Right' way to 'do' illness? Thinking critically about positive thinking.

    PubMed

    McGrath, C; Jordens, C F C; Montgomery, K; Kerridge, I H

    2006-10-01

    Exhortations to 'be positive' accompany many situations in life, either as a general injunction or in difficult situations where people are facing pressure or adversity. It is particularly evident in health care, where positive thinking has become an aspect of the way people are expected to 'do' illness in developed society. Positive thinking is framed both as a moral injunction and as a central belief system. It is thought to help patients cope emotionally with illness and to provide a biological benefit. Yet, the meanings, expectations and outcomes of positive thinking are infrequently questioned and the risks of positive thinking are rarely examined. We outline some of the latter and suggest that health professionals should exercise caution in both 'prescribing' positive thinking and in responding to patients and carers whose belief systems and feelings of obligation rest on it.

  14. Thyroid Function in Critical Illness and Burn Injury,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    in 46. Palazzo MG, Suter PM: Delivery dependent oxygen Ingbar SH, Braverman LE (eds): Werner’s The Thyroid, consumption in patients with septic...JT, LoPresti JS: Nonthyroidal illness, in 1431-1435, 1985 Braverman LE, Utiger RD (eds): Werner and Ingbar’s The 64, Cavalieri RR, Rapoport B...circulating thyroid hormones, in Braverman Stimulation by IL-I of iodothyronine 5’deiodinatingactiv- LE, Utiger RD (eds): Werner and Ingbar’s The Thyroid

  15. Immunoinflammatory Response in Critically Ill Patients: Severe Sepsis and/or Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Nada; Djordjevic, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Immunoinflammatory response in critically ill patients is very complex. This review explores some of the new elements of immunoinflammatory response in severe sepsis, tumor necrosis factor-alpha in severe acute pancreatitis as a clinical example of immune response in sepsis, immune response in severe trauma with or without secondary sepsis, and genetic aspects of host immuno-inflammatory response to various insults in critically ill patients. PMID:24371374

  16. RBC Storage Effect on Coagulation, Microparticles and Microchimerism in Critically Ill Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    mechanisms of adverse effects related to RBC storage age in critically ill patients. To date we have enrolled 130 patients at the three clinical sites in...Prospective clinical studies investigating the mechanisms and clinical outcomes associated with increased or decreased RBC storage age in critically ill...patients including traumatic injury have not been performed. The ABLE study presents a unique and probably one-time opportunity to investigate mechanisms

  17. Proximal gastric motility in critically ill patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam Q; Fraser, Robert J; Bryant, Laura K; Chapman, Marianne; Holloway, Richard H

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the proximal gastric motor response to duodenal nutrients in critically ill patients with long-standing type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: Proximal gastric motility was assessed (using a barostat) in 10 critically ill patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (59 ± 3 years) during two 60-min duodenal infusions of Ensure® (1 and 2 kcal/min), in random order, separated by 2 h fasting. Data were compared with 15 non-diabetic critically ill patients (48 ± 5 years) and 10 healthy volunteers (28 ± 3 years). RESULTS: Baseline proximal gastric volumes were similar between the three groups. In diabetic patients, proximal gastric relaxation during 1 kcal/min nutrient infusion was similar to non-diabetic patients and healthy controls. In contrast, relaxation during 2 kcal/min infusion was initially reduced in diabetic patients (p < 0.05) but increased to a level similar to healthy humans, unlike non-diabetic patients where relaxation was impaired throughout the infusion. Duodenal nutrient stimulation reduced the fundic wave frequency in a dose-dependent fashion in both the critically ill diabetic patients and healthy subjects, but not in critically ill patients without diabetes. Fundic wave frequency in diabetic patients and healthy subjects was greater than in non-diabetic patients. CONCLUSION: In patients with diabetes mellitus, proximal gastric motility is less disturbed than non-diabetic patients during critical illness, suggesting that these patients may not be at greater risk of delayed gastric emptying. PMID:17226907

  18. A critical appraisal of point-of-care coagulation testing in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Levi, M; Hunt, B J

    2015-11-01

    Derangement of the coagulation system is a common phenomenon in critically ill patients, who may present with severe bleeding and/or conditions associated with a prothrombotic state. Monitoring of this coagulopathy can be performed with conventional coagulation assays; however, point-of-care tests have become increasingly attractive, because not only do they yield a more rapid result than clinical laboratory testing, but they may also provide a more complete picture of the condition of the hemostatic system. There are many potential areas of study and applications of point-of-care hemostatic testing in critical care, including patients who present with massive blood loss, patients with a hypercoagulable state (such as in disseminated intravascular coagulation), and monitoring of antiplatelet treatment for acute arterial thrombosis, mostly acute coronary syndromes. However, the limitations of near-patient hemostatic testing has not been fully appreciated, and are discussed here. The currently available evidence indicates that point-of-care tests may be applied to guide appropriate blood product transfusion and the use of hemostatic agents to correct the hemostatic defect or to ameliorate antithrombotic treatment. Disappointingly, however, only in cardiac surgery is there adequate evidence to show that application of near-patient thromboelastography leads to an improvement in clinically relevant outcomes, such as reductions in bleeding-related morbidity and mortality, and cost-effectiveness. More research is required to validate the utility and cost-effectiveness of near-patient hemostatic testing in other areas, especially in traumatic bleeding and postpartum hemorrhage.

  19. Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid Disease Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Hypothyroidism March 2010 Download PDFs English Espanol Hindi Editors ... NIH Mayo Clinic American Thyroid Association What is hypothyroidism? Hypothyroidism means you have too little thyroid hormone. ...

  20. Implementing Evidenced Based Oral Care for Critically Ill Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-28

    critical care nursing education was conducted over a two- week period using the conceptual underpinning of the Iowa Model, the Diffusion of Innovation...every 4 hours during 2 six- week sessions. This was followed by a six- week sustainment period and the collection of OC compliance and nurse knowledge...program, using the Iowa Model. Methods: Evidence-based Oral Care (EB OC) critical care nursing education was conducted over a two- week period using

  1. [Cytokine imbalance in critically ill patients: SIRS and CARS].

    PubMed

    Murata, A; Kikuchi, M; Mishima, S; Sakaki, S; Goto, H; Matsuoka, T; Tanaka, H; Yukioka, T; Shimazaki, S

    1999-07-01

    It remains difficult to treat severely ill patients, especially those who have sepsis and subsequent multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. We propose the hypothesis that the pathophysiology in the sequential sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome may be strongly related to the imbalance between inflammatory cytokines and antiinflammatory cytokines induced for the host defense to active neutrophils and endothelial cells. Thus we attempted to develop cytokine modulation therapy to normalize the cytokine balance in the host defense system. In this review, we elucidate the relationship between cytokine imbalance and SIRS/CARS in patients with severe burn injury. Furthermore, we examine the possible usage of G-CSF to amplify neutrophil function, and clarify the reasons why various innovative therapies against sepsis have failed.

  2. [Urinary tract colonization and infection in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    López, M J; Cortés, J A

    2012-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) account for 20-50% of all hospital-acquired infections occurring in the intensive care unit (ICU). In some reports UTI was found to be more frequent than hospital-acquired pneumonia and intravascular device bacteremia, with a greater incidence in developing countries. The risk factors associated with the appearance of UTI include the severity of illness at the time of admission to the ICU, female status, prolonged urinary catheterization or a longer ICU stay and poor urinary catheter management - mainly disconnection of the closed system. about the present study offers data on the epidemiology of UTI in the ICU, the identified risk factors, etiology, diagnosis, impact upon morbidity and mortality, and the measures to prevent its appearance.

  3. Diaphragm Muscle Fiber Weakness and Ubiquitin–Proteasome Activation in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hooijman, Pleuni E.; Beishuizen, Albertus; Witt, Christian C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Girbes, Armand R. J.; Spoelstra-de Man, Angelique M. E.; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Manders, Emmy; van Hees, Hieronymus W. H.; van den Brom, Charissa E.; Silderhuis, Vera; Lawlor, Michael W.; Labeit, Siegfried; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Hartemink, Koen J.; Paul, Marinus A.; Heunks, Leo M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The clinical significance of diaphragm weakness in critically ill patients is evident: it prolongs ventilator dependency, and increases morbidity and duration of hospital stay. To date, the nature of diaphragm weakness and its underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood. Objectives: We hypothesized that diaphragm muscle fibers of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients display atrophy and contractile weakness, and that the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway is activated in the diaphragm. Methods: We obtained diaphragm muscle biopsies from 22 critically ill patients who received mechanical ventilation before surgery and compared these with biopsies obtained from patients during thoracic surgery for resection of a suspected early lung malignancy (control subjects). In a proof-of-concept study in a muscle-specific ring finger protein-1 (MuRF-1) knockout mouse model, we evaluated the role of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway in the development of contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. Measurements and Main Results: Both slow- and fast-twitch diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients had approximately 25% smaller cross-sectional area, and had contractile force reduced by half or more. Markers of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway were significantly up-regulated in the diaphragm of critically ill patients. Finally, MuRF-1 knockout mice were protected against the development of diaphragm contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. Conclusions: These findings show that diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients display atrophy and severe contractile weakness, and in the diaphragm of critically ill patients the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway is activated. This study provides rationale for the development of treatment strategies that target the contractility of diaphragm fibers to facilitate weaning. PMID:25760684

  4. Use of virtual reality gaming systems for children who are critically ill.

    PubMed

    Salem, Yasser; Elokda, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Children who are critically ill are frequently viewed as "too sick" to tolerate physical activity. As a result, these children often fail to develop strength or cardiovascular endurance as compared to typically developing children. Previous reports have shown that early participation in physical activity in is safe and feasible for patients who are critically ill and may result in a shorter length of stay and improved functional outcomes. The use of the virtual reality gaming systems has become a popular form of therapy for children with disabilities and has been supported by a growing body of evidence substantiating its effectiveness with this population. The use of the virtual reality gaming systems in pediatric rehabilitation provides the children with opportunity to participate in an exercise program that is fun, enjoyable, playful, and at the same time beneficial. The integration of those systems in rehabilitation of children who are critically ill is appealing and has the potential to offer the possibility of enhancing physical activities. The lack of training studies involving children who are critically ill makes it difficult to set guidelines on the recommended physical activities and virtual reality gaming systems that is needed to confer health benefits. Several considerations should be taken into account before recommended virtual reality gaming systems as a training program for children who are critically ill. This article highlighted guidelines, limitations and challenges that need to be considered when designing exercise program using virtual reality gaming systems for critically ill children. This information is helpful given the popular use of virtual reality gaming systems in rehabilitation, particularly in children who are critically ill.

  5. Altered gonadal steroidogenesis in critical illness: is treatment with anabolic steroids indicated?

    PubMed

    Spratt, D I

    2001-12-01

    The physiology of the reproductive system changes dramatically with the onset of major illness. The serum testosterone concentrations fall to pre-pubertal levels secondary to a decreased secretion of gonadotropins and a decreased Leydig cell response to luteinizing hormone. At the same time, the serum oestrogen concentration rises as the result of an increased rate of peripheral aromatization. The clinical consequences of these marked changes are not yet well understood. One line of evidence argues for the administration of anabolic steroids (derivatives of testosterone) to critically ill patients to improve their catabolic state. Another line of evidence in animal models suggests that testosterone may suppress the immune system and myocardial function in critical illness. No clinical trials of oestrogen administration to critically ill patients have been reported, although two animal studies suggest that oestrogen may have a positive effect on survival. This chapter reviews changes in the physiology of the reproductive system in major illness as well as current evidence regarding the clinical effects of androgens and oestrogens in critical illness and their potential therapeutic roles.

  6. Does artificial nutrition improve outcome of critical illness? An alternative viewpoint!

    PubMed

    Heyland, Daren K; Wischmeyer, Paul E

    2013-08-27

    Recent studies challenge the beneficial role of artificial nutrition provided to critically ill patients and point out the limitations of existing studies in this area. We take a differing view of the existing data and refute many of the arguments put forward by previous authors. We review the mechanistic, observational, and experimental data supporting a role for early enteral nutrition in the critically ill patient. We conclude without question that more, high-quality research is needed to better define the role of artificial nutrition in the critical care setting, but until then early and adequate delivery of enteral nutrition is a legitimate, evidence-based treatment recommendation and we see no evidence-based role for restricting enteral nutrition in critically ill patients. The role of early supplemental parenteral nutrition continues to be defined as new data emerge.

  7. Neuromuscular disorders and sleep in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Irfan, Muna; Selim, Bernardo; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; St Louis, Erik K

    2015-07-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is a frequent presenting manifestation of neuromuscular disorders and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. If not recognized and addressed early in the clinical course, SDB can lead to clinical deterioration with respiratory failure. The pathophysiologic basis of SDB in neuromuscular disorders, clinical features encountered in specific neuromuscular diseases, and diagnostic and management strategies for SDB in neuromuscular patients in the critical care setting are reviewed. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation has been a crucial advance in critical care management, improving sleep quality and often preventing or delaying mechanical ventilation and improving survival in neuromuscular patients.

  8. Neuromuscular Disorders and Sleep in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Irfan, Muna; Selim, Bernardo; Rabinstein, Alejandro A.

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is a frequent presenting manifestation of neuromuscular disorders and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. If not promptly recognized and addressed early in the clinical course, SDB can lead to clinical deterioration with respiratory failure. In this article, we review the pathophysiologic basis of SDB in neuromuscular disorders, clinical features encountered in specific neuromuscular diseases, and diagnostic and management strategies for SDB in neuromuscular patients in the critical care setting. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPV) has been a crucial advance in critical care management, improving sleep quality and often preventing or delaying mechanical ventilation and improving survival in neuromuscular patients. PMID:26118919

  9. Sleep of critically ill children in the pediatric intensive care unit: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kudchadkar, Sapna R; Aljohani, Othman A; Punjabi, Naresh M

    2014-04-01

    Critically ill children in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) are exposed to multiple physical, environmental and pharmacologic factors which increase the propensity for sleep disruption and loss and may, in turn, play a role in short-term recovery from critical illness and long-term neurocognitive outcomes. Mechanically ventilated children receive sedative and analgesic medications, often at high doses and for long durations, to improve comfort and synchrony with mechanical ventilation. Sedatives and analgesics can decrease slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep. Paradoxically, sedative medication doses are often increased in critically ill children to improve the subjective assessment of sedation and sleep, leading to further agitation and deterioration of sleep quality. The heterogeneity in age and critical illness encountered in the PICU pose several challenges to research on sleep in this setting. The present article reviews the available evidence on sleep in critically ill children admitted to the PICU, with an emphasis on subjective and objective methods of sleep assessment used and special populations studied, including mechanically ventilated children and children with severe burns.

  10. Intensive care unit acquired weakness in children: Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kukreti, Vinay; Shamim, Mosharraf; Khilnani, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Intensive care unit acquired weakness (ICUAW) is a common occurrence in patients who are critically ill. It is most often due to critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) or to critical illness myopathy (CIM). ICUAW is increasingly being recognized partly as a consequence of improved survival in patients with severe sepsis and multi-organ failure, partly related to commonly used agents such as steroids and muscle relaxants. There have been occasional reports of CIP and CIM in children, but little is known about their prevalence or clinical impact in the pediatric population. This review summarizes the current understanding of pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of CIP and CIM in general with special reference to published literature in the pediatric age group. Subjects and Methods: Studies were identified through MedLine and Embase using relevant MeSH and Key words. Both adult and pediatric studies were included. Results: ICUAW in children is a poorly described entity with unknown incidence, etiology and unclear long-term prognosis. Conclusions: Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy is relatively rare, but clinically significant sequelae of multifactorial origin affecting morbidity, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay and possibly mortality in critically ill children admitted to pediatric ICU. PMID:24678152

  11. Oral care of the critically ill: a review of the literature and guidelines for practice.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Marianne

    2003-08-01

    Maintaining oral health in the critically ill patient is imperative in reducing the risk of nosocomial infections and improving patient comfort and discharge outcomes. Critically ill patients are at great risk for poor oral health as many are elderly, undernourished, dehydrated, immunosuppressed, have a smoking or alcohol history, are intubated or on high-flow oxygen, and are unable to mechanically remove dental plaque. Many modalities for delivering oral care have been reported in the literature. The use of the toothbrush in the mechanical removal of plaque, even in the intubated patient, has been proven to be superior to the swab. Brushing of the gums in edentulous patients is of benefit. Although electric toothbrushes are preferable, their cost, size and the potential for cross-infection limits their use. Chlorhexidine has long been the gold standard for mouthwashes and provides up to 24 hours of antimicrobial activity; therefore infrequent applications are adequate. Sodium bicarbonate and hydrogen peroxide are of limited use due to lack of convincing evidence regarding their safety and antimicrobial effects in the critically ill population. Saliva stimulants or substitutes including lemon and glycerine are also inappropriate for moistening the oral cavity in the critically ill patient. Regular oral assessment and individualized oral care, along with the use of a standardised protocol for oral care (incorporating proven modalities) is vital for optimal oral care in the critically ill patient.

  12. Noninvasive ventilation during the weaning process in chronically critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Jesus; Servera, Emilio; Jara-Palomares, Luis; Barrot, Emilia; Sanchez-Oro-Gómez, Raquel; Gómez de Terreros, F Javier; Martín-Vicente, M Jesús; Utrabo, Isabel; Núñez, M Belen; Binimelis, Alicia; Sala, Ernest; Zamora, Enrique; Segrelles, Gonzalo; Ortega-Gonzalez, Angel; Masa, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Chronically critically ill patients often undergo prolonged mechanical ventilation. The role of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) during weaning of these patients remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the value of NIV and whether a parameter can predict the need for NIV in chronically critically ill patients during the weaning process. We conducted a prospective study that included chronically critically ill patients admitted to Spanish respiratory care units. The weaning method used consisted of progressive periods of spontaneous breathing trials. Patients were transferred to NIV when it proved impossible to increase the duration of spontaneous breathing trials beyond 18 h. 231 chronically critically ill patients were included in the study. 198 (85.71%) patients achieved weaning success (mean weaning time 25.45±16.71 days), of whom 40 (21.4%) needed NIV during the weaning process. The variable which predicted the need for NIV was arterial carbon dioxide tension at respiratory care unit admission (OR 1.08 (95% CI 1.01-1.15), p=0.013), with a cut-off point of 45.5 mmHg (sensitivity 0.76, specificity 0.67, positive predictive value 0.76, negative predictive value 0.97). NIV is a useful tool during weaning in chronically critically ill patients. Hypercapnia despite mechanical ventilation at respiratory care unit admission is the main predictor of the need for NIV during weaning.

  13. Noninvasive ventilation during the weaning process in chronically critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Servera, Emilio; Barrot, Emilia; Sanchez-Oro-Gómez, Raquel; Gómez de Terreros, F. Javier; Martín-Vicente, M. Jesús; Utrabo, Isabel; Núñez, M. Belen; Binimelis, Alicia; Sala, Ernest; Zamora, Enrique; Segrelles, Gonzalo; Ortega-Gonzalez, Angel; Masa, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Chronically critically ill patients often undergo prolonged mechanical ventilation. The role of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) during weaning of these patients remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the value of NIV and whether a parameter can predict the need for NIV in chronically critically ill patients during the weaning process. We conducted a prospective study that included chronically critically ill patients admitted to Spanish respiratory care units. The weaning method used consisted of progressive periods of spontaneous breathing trials. Patients were transferred to NIV when it proved impossible to increase the duration of spontaneous breathing trials beyond 18 h. 231 chronically critically ill patients were included in the study. 198 (85.71%) patients achieved weaning success (mean weaning time 25.45±16.71 days), of whom 40 (21.4%) needed NIV during the weaning process. The variable which predicted the need for NIV was arterial carbon dioxide tension at respiratory care unit admission (OR 1.08 (95% CI 1.01–1.15), p=0.013), with a cut-off point of 45.5 mmHg (sensitivity 0.76, specificity 0.67, positive predictive value 0.76, negative predictive value 0.97). NIV is a useful tool during weaning in chronically critically ill patients. Hypercapnia despite mechanical ventilation at respiratory care unit admission is the main predictor of the need for NIV during weaning. PMID:28053973

  14. Building trustworthy relationships with critically ill patients and families.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Cynda Hylton; Reina, Michelle L; Reina, Dennis S

    2007-01-01

    A difficult case study involving repeated health crises and irreversible organ dysfunction illustrates the challenges critical care professionals face in caring for patients and their families. In such cases, trust is especially fragile, and coexists with its counterpart, betrayal. The Reina Trust & Betrayal Model defines 3 types of Transactional Trust. The first, Competence Trust, or the Trust of Capability, requires that clinicians practice humility, engage in inquiry, honor the patient's choices, and express compassion. The second, Contractual Trust, or the Trust of Character, demands that clinicians keep agreements, manage expectations, establish boundaries, and encourage mutually serving expectations. The third, Communication Trust, or the Trust of Disclosure, must be rooted in respect and based on truth-telling. Particularly in life-and-death situations, communication requires honesty and clarity. Each type of trust involves specific behaviors that build trust and can guide critical care professionals as they interact with patients and their families.

  15. Does RBC Storage Age Effect Inflammation, Immune Function and Susceptibility to Transfusion Associated Microchimerism in Critically Ill Patients? Adverse Effects of RBC Storage in Critically Ill Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The study aim is to investigate specific mechanisms of...the mechanisms and clinical outcomes associated with increased or decreased RBC storage age in critically ill patients including traumatic injury have...not been performed. The ABLE study presents a unique and probably one-time opportunity to investigate mechanisms in the context of clinical

  16. Nighttime Intensivist Staffing and Mortality among Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David J.; Angus, Derek C.; Barnato, Amber E.; Kramer, Andrew A.; Kahn, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hospitals are increasingly adopting 24-hour intensivist physician staffing as a strategy to improve intensive care unit (ICU) outcomes. However, the degree to which nighttime intensivists are associated with improvements in the quality of ICU care is unknown. METHODS We conducted a retrospective cohort study involving ICUs that participated in the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) clinical information system from 2009 through 2010, linking a survey of ICU staffing practices with patient-level outcomes data from adult ICU admissions. Multivariate models were used to assess the relationship between nighttime intensivist staffing and in-hospital mortality among ICU patients, with adjustment for daytime intensivist staffing, severity of illness, and case mix. We conducted a confirmatory analysis in a second, population-based cohort of hospitals in Pennsylvania from which less detailed data were available. RESULTS The analysis with the use of the APACHE database included 65,752 patients admitted to 49 ICUs in 25 hospitals. In ICUs with low-intensity daytime staffing, nighttime intensivist staffing was associated with a reduction in risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio for death, 0.62; P = 0.04). Among ICUs with high-intensity daytime staffing, nighttime intensivist staffing conferred no benefit with respect to risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 1.08; P = 0.78). In the verification cohort, there was a similar relationship among daytime staffing, nighttime staffing, and in-hospital mortality. The interaction between nighttime staffing and daytime staffing was not significant (P = 0.18), yet the direction of the findings were similar to those in the APACHE cohort. CONCLUSIONS The addition of nighttime intensivist staffing to a low-intensity daytime staffing model was associated with reduced mortality. However, a reduction in mortality was not seen in ICUs with high-intensity daytime staffing. (Funded by the

  17. Respiratory complications in critical illness of small animals.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Vicki Lynne

    2011-07-01

    The percentage of emergency patients with respiratory problems treated at veterinary emergency and critical care facilities is poorly defined. Regardless of whether an animal has a primary lung disease or develops a secondary lung disease during hospitalization, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common sequela to the failing lung. ARDS is a frequent sequela to sepsis, systemic inflammatory response (SIRS), and disseminated intravascular coagulation and is frequently the pulmonary manifestation of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). ARDS, acute lung injury, SIRS, sepsis, and MODS are serious syndromes with grave consequences. Understanding the pathophysiology and consequences of these syndromes is imperative to early recognition.

  18. Critical issues in hematology: anemia, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, and blood product transfusions in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Drews, Reed E

    2003-12-01

    Systematic evaluations of anemia, thrombocytopenia, and coagulopathy are essential to identifying and managing their causes successfully. In all cases, clinicians should evaluate RBC measurements alongside WBC and platelet counts and WBC differentials. Multiple competing factors may coexist; certain factors affect RBCs independent of those that affect WBCs or platelets. Ideally, clinicians should examine the peripheral blood smear for morphologic features of RBCs, WBCs, and platelets that provide important clues to the cause of the patient's hematologic disorder. Thrombocytopenia arises from decreased platelet production, increased platelet destruction, or dilutional or distributional causes. Drug-induced thrombocytopenias present diagnostic challenges, because many medicines can cause thrombocytopenia and critically ill patients often receive multiple medications. If they suspect type II HIT, clinicians must promptly discontinue all heparin sources, including LMWHs, without awaiting laboratory confirmation, to avoid thrombotic sequelae. Because warfarin anticoagulation induces acquired protein C deficiency, thereby exacerbating the prothrombotic state of type II HIT, warfarin should be withheld until platelet counts increase to more than 100,000/microL and type II HIT is clearly resolving. The presence of a consumptive coagulopathy in the setting of thrombocytopenia supports a diagnosis of DIC, not TTP-HUS, and is demonstrated by decreasing serum fibrinogen levels, and increasing TTs, PTs, aPTTs, and fibrin degradation products. Increasing D-dimer, levels are the most specific DIC parameter and reflect fibrinolysis of cross-linked fibrin. Elevated PTs or a PTTs can result from the absence of factors or the presence of inhibitors. Clinicians should suspect factor inhibitors when the prolonged PT or aPTT does not correct or only partially corrects following an immediate assay of a 1:1 mix of patient and normal plasma. In addition to factor inhibitors

  19. Risk factors for early invasive fungal disease in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurmeet; Pitoyo, Ceva Wicaksono; Aditianingsih, Dita; Rumende, Cleopas Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of invasive fungal disease (IFD) is increasing worldwide in the past two to three decades. Critically ill patients in Intensive Care Units are more vulnerable to fungal infection. Early detection and treatment are important to decrease morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Objective: Our study aimed to assess factors associated with early IFD in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study was conducted in critically ill patients, from March to September 2015. Total number of patients (74) in this study was drawn based on one of the risk factors (human immunodeficiency virus). Specimens were collected on day 5–7 of hospitalization. Multivariate analysis with logistic regression was performed for factors, with P < 0.25 in bivariate analysis. Results: Two hundred and six patients were enrolled in this study. Seventy-four patients were with IFD, majority were males (52.7%), mean age was 58 years (range 18–79), mean Leon's score was 3 (score range 2–5), majority group was nonsurgical/nontrauma (72.9%), and mean fungal isolation was positive on day 5. Candida sp. (92.2%) is the most frquently isolated fungal infection. Urine culture yielded the highest number of fungal isolates (70.1%). Mortality rate in this study was 50%. In multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus (DM) (P = 0.018, odds ratio 2.078, 95% confidence interval 1.135–3.803) was found as an independent factor associated with early IFD critically ill patients. Conclusion: DM is a significant factor for the incidence of early IFD in critically ill patients. PMID:27994377

  20. The Future Is Now: Software-Guided Intensive Insulin Therapy in the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Rattan, Rishi; Nasraway, Stanley A.

    2013-01-01

    Since the development of intensive insulin therapy for the critically ill adult, tight glycemic control (TGC) has become increasingly complicated to apply and achieve. Software-guided (SG) algorithms for insulin dosing represent a new method to achieve euglycemia in critical illness. We provide an overview of the state of SG TGC with an eye to the future. The current milieu is disorganized, with little research that incorporates newer variables of dysglycemia, such as glycemic variability. To develop and implement better algorithms, scientists, programmers, and clinicians need to standardize measurements and variables. PMID:23567013

  1. Psychological Outcomes in Parents of Critically Ill Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Stremler, Robyn; Haddad, Summer; Pullenayegum, Eleanor; Parshuram, Christopher

    2017-03-05

    Parents of children in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) are subjected to significant psychological stress. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of, and factors associated with anxiety, depressive symptoms and decisional conflict in parents of children hospitalized in the PICU. The study employed a descriptive, cross-sectional design to investigate the psychological status of 118 parents of 91 children (74 mothers and 44 fathers) admitted to the PICU, using measures of anxiety (STAI), depression (CES-D), and decisional conflict (DCS). Using hospital data and self-administered questionnaires, information on child and parent characteristics and psychological outcomes were collected. Objective measures of parental sleep also were examined using actigraphy and sleep diaries. The research findings indicated that 24% of parents achieved scores characteristic of severe anxiety. Proportions of parents with symptoms indicative of major depression and significant decisional conflict were 51% and 26% respectively. For all psychological outcomes, higher levels of social support were protective. Inconsistency in sleep schedule and sleep location affected psychological outcomes and are possible targets for future interventions. Given evidence that parents of children admitted to the PICU are at risk for developing post-traumatic stress symptoms, future studies should examine the effects of hospitalization on long-term parental psychological outcomes. Screening for those at risk and implementing interventions to promote coping strategies and reduce decisional conflict may be beneficial. Pediatric nurses have a critical role in assessing parents' psychological distress and promoting family health during a child's hospitalization.

  2. Increased Dicarbonyl Stress as a Novel Mechanism of Multi-Organ Failure in Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    van Bussel, Bas C. T.; van de Poll, Marcel C. G.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Bergmans, Dennis C. J. J.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular pathological pathways leading to multi-organ failure in critical illness are progressively being unravelled. However, attempts to modulate these pathways have not yet improved the clinical outcome. Therefore, new targetable mechanisms should be investigated. We hypothesize that increased dicarbonyl stress is such a mechanism. Dicarbonyl stress is the accumulation of dicarbonyl metabolites (i.e., methylglyoxal, glyoxal, and 3-deoxyglucosone) that damages intracellular proteins, modifies extracellular matrix proteins, and alters plasma proteins. Increased dicarbonyl stress has been shown to impair the renal, cardiovascular, and central nervous system function, and possibly also the hepatic and respiratory function. In addition to hyperglycaemia, hypoxia and inflammation can cause increased dicarbonyl stress, and these conditions are prevalent in critical illness. Hypoxia and inflammation have been shown to drive the rapid intracellular accumulation of reactive dicarbonyls, i.e., through reduced glyoxalase-1 activity, which is the key enzyme in the dicarbonyl detoxification enzyme system. In critical illness, hypoxia and inflammation, with or without hyperglycaemia, could thus increase dicarbonyl stress in a way that might contribute to multi-organ failure. Thus, we hypothesize that increased dicarbonyl stress in critical illness, such as sepsis and major trauma, contributes to the development of multi-organ failure. This mechanism has the potential for new therapeutic intervention in critical care. PMID:28178202

  3. Increased Dicarbonyl Stress as a Novel Mechanism of Multi-Organ Failure in Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    van Bussel, Bas C T; van de Poll, Marcel C G; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Bergmans, Dennis C J J

    2017-02-07

    Molecular pathological pathways leading to multi-organ failure in critical illness are progressively being unravelled. However, attempts to modulate these pathways have not yet improved the clinical outcome. Therefore, new targetable mechanisms should be investigated. We hypothesize that increased dicarbonyl stress is such a mechanism. Dicarbonyl stress is the accumulation of dicarbonyl metabolites (i.e., methylglyoxal, glyoxal, and 3-deoxyglucosone) that damages intracellular proteins, modifies extracellular matrix proteins, and alters plasma proteins. Increased dicarbonyl stress has been shown to impair the renal, cardiovascular, and central nervous system function, and possibly also the hepatic and respiratory function. In addition to hyperglycaemia, hypoxia and inflammation can cause increased dicarbonyl stress, and these conditions are prevalent in critical illness. Hypoxia and inflammation have been shown to drive the rapid intracellular accumulation of reactive dicarbonyls, i.e., through reduced glyoxalase-1 activity, which is the key enzyme in the dicarbonyl detoxification enzyme system. In critical illness, hypoxia and inflammation, with or without hyperglycaemia, could thus increase dicarbonyl stress in a way that might contribute to multi-organ failure. Thus, we hypothesize that increased dicarbonyl stress in critical illness, such as sepsis and major trauma, contributes to the development of multi-organ failure. This mechanism has the potential for new therapeutic intervention in critical care.

  4. Issues affecting the delivery of physical therapy services for individuals with critical illness.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Amy J; Kress, John P

    2013-02-01

    Research supports the provision of physical therapy intervention and early mobilization in the management of patients with critical illness. However, the translation of care from that of well-controlled research protocols to routine practice can be challenging and warrants further study. Discussions in the critical care and physical therapy communities, as well as in the published literature, are investigating factors related to early mobilization such as transforming culture in the intensive care unit (ICU), encouraging interprofessional collaboration, coordinating sedation interruption with mobility sessions, and determining the rehabilitation modalities that will most significantly improve patient outcomes. Some variables, however, need to be investigated and addressed specifically by the physical therapy profession. They include assessing and increasing physical therapist competence managing patients with critical illness in both professional (entry-level) education programs and clinical settings, determining and providing an adequate number of physical therapists for a given ICU, evaluating methods of prioritization of patients in the acute care setting, and adding to the body of research to support specific functional outcome measures to be used with patients in the ICU. Additionally, because persistent weakness and functional limitations can exist long after the critical illness itself has resolved, there is a need for increased awareness and involvement of physical therapists in all settings of practice, including outpatient clinics. The purpose of this article is to explore the issues that the physical therapy profession needs to address as the rehabilitation management of the patient with critical illness evolves.

  5. Prealbumin is Not Sensitive Indicator of Nutrition and Prognosis in Critical Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seung Hui; Lee, Jong Seok; Chae, Sang Hee; Ahn, Bo Sook; Chang, Dong Jin

    2005-01-01

    It was reported that 30-50% of inpatients are in a malnutrition status. Measuring the prealbumin level is a sensitive and cost-effective method for assessing the severity of illness in critically or chronically ill patients. However it is uncertain whether or not the prealbumin level correlates with the level of nutrition support and outcomes in critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum prealbumin level as an indicator of the effectiveness of nutrition support and the prognosis in critically ill patients. Forty-four patients who received total parenteral nutrition for more than 7 days at an intensive care unit (ICU) were studied. The serum prealbumin was measured at the initial time of nutrition support and at the almost seventh day since the first measurement. The patients were allocated into two groups. In Group 1 (n=31) and 2 (n=13), the prealbumin level increased and decreased, respectively. Age, APACHE II score, nutrition status, nutritional requirement and amount of supply, mortality, hospital day and ICU day in the two groups were compared. The serum prealbumin level increased in 31 out of the 44 patients. The average calorie intake was 1334 Kcal/day (83% of energy requirement) in Group 1 and 1170 kcal/day (76% of energy requirement) in Group 2 (p=0.131). The mortality was 42% in Group 1 and 54% in Group 2 (p=0.673). The average hospital day/ ICU day in Groups 1 and 2 were 80 days/38 days and 60 days/31 days respectively. In conclusion, in critically ill patients, the serum prealbumin level did not respond sensitively to nutritional support. In addition an increase in the prealbumin level dose not indicate a better prognosis for critically ill patients. PMID:15744801

  6. Stress Induced Hyperglycemia and the Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Survivors of Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, Mark P.; Finnis, Mark E.; Phillips, Liza K.; Kar, Palash; Bihari, Shailesh; Biradar, Vishwanath; Moodie, Stewart; Horowitz, Michael; Shaw, Jonathan E.; Deane, Adam M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Stress induced hyperglycemia occurs in critically ill patients who have normal glucose tolerance following resolution of their acute illness. The objective was to evaluate the association between stress induced hyperglycemia and incident diabetes in survivors of critical illness. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting All adult patients surviving admission to a public hospital intensive care unit (ICU) in South Australia between 2004 and 2011. Patients Stress induced hyperglycemia was defined as a blood glucose ≥ 11.1 mmol/L (200 mg/dL) within 24 hours of ICU admission. Prevalent diabetes was identified through ICD-10 coding or prior registration with the Australian National Diabetes Service Scheme (NDSS). Incident diabetes was identified as NDSS registration beyond 30 days after hospital discharge until July 2015. The predicted risk of developing diabetes was described as sub-hazard ratios using competing risk regression. Survival was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Main Results Stress induced hyperglycemia was identified in 2,883 (17%) of 17,074 patients without diabetes. The incidence of type 2 diabetes following critical illness was 4.8% (821 of 17,074). The risk of diabetes in patients with stress induced hyperglycemia was approximately double that of those without (HR 1.91 (95% CI 1.62, 2.26), p<0.001) and was sustained regardless of age or severity of illness. Conclusions Stress induced hyperglycemia identifies patients at subsequent risk of incident diabetes. PMID:27824898

  7. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the corticotropin receptor gene is associated with a blunted cortisol response during pediatric critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Jardine, David; Emond, Mary; Meert, Kathleen L.; Harrison, Rick; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.; Berger, John; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Willson, Douglas F.; Nicholson, Carol; Dean, J. Michael; Zimmerman, Jerry J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The cortisol response during critical illness varies widely among patients. Our objective was to examine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes regulating cortisol synthesis, metabolism, and activity to determine if genetic differences were associated with variability in the cortisol response among critically ill children. Design This was a prospective observational study employing tag SNP methodology to examine genetic contributions to the variability of the cortisol response in critical illness. Thirty-one candidate genes and 31 ancestry markers were examined. Setting Patients were enrolled from 7 pediatric critical care units that constitute the Eunice Kennedy Shriver Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network. Subjects Critically ill children (n=92), ages 40 weeks gestation to 18 years of age were enrolled. Interventions Blood samples were obtained from all patients for serum cortisol measurements and DNA isolation. Demographic and illness severity data were collected. Measurements and Main Results SNPs were tested for association with serum free cortisol (FC) concentrations in context of higher illness severity as quantified by PRISM III score > 7. A SNP (rs1941088) in the MC2R gene was strongly associated (p =0.0005) with a low FC response to critical illness. Patients with the AA genotype were over seven times more likely to have a low FC response to critical illness than those with a GG genotype. Patients with the GA genotype exhibited an intermediate FC response to critical illness. Conclusions The A allele at rs1941088 in the MC2R gene, that encodes the ACTH (corticotropin) receptor, is associated with a low cortisol response in critically ill children. These data provide evidence for a genetic basis for a portion of the variability in cortisol production during critical illness. Independent replication of these findings will be important and could facilitate development of personalized treatment for patients with

  8. Impact of supplementation with amino acids or their metabolites on muscle wasting in patients with critical illness or other muscle wasting illness: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wandrag, L; Brett, S J; Frost, G; Hickson, M

    2015-08-01

    Muscle wasting during critical illness impairs recovery. Dietary strategies to minimise wasting include nutritional supplements, particularly essential amino acids. We reviewed the evidence on enteral supplementation with amino acids or their metabolites in the critically ill and in muscle wasting illness with similarities to critical illness, aiming to assess whether this intervention could limit muscle wasting in vulnerable patient groups. Citation databases, including MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, EMBASE, the meta-register of controlled trials and the Cochrane Collaboration library, were searched for articles from 1950 to 2013. Search terms included 'critical illness', 'muscle wasting', 'amino acid supplementation', 'chronic obstructive pulmonary disease', 'chronic heart failure', 'sarcopenia' and 'disuse atrophy'. Reviews, observational studies, sport nutrition, intravenous supplementation and studies in children were excluded. One hundred and eighty studies were assessed for eligibility and 158 were excluded. Twenty-two studies were graded according to standardised criteria using the GRADE methodology: four in critical care populations, and 18 from other clinically relevant areas. Methodologies, interventions and outcome measures used were highly heterogeneous and meta-analysis was not appropriate. Methodology and quality of studies were too varied to draw any firm conclusion. Dietary manipulation with leucine enriched essential amino acids (EAA), β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate and creatine warrant further investigation in critical care; EAA has demonstrated improvements in body composition and nutritional status in other groups with muscle wasting illness. High-quality research is required in critical care before treatment recommendations can be made.

  9. Therapeutic monitoring of amikacin and gentamicin in critically and noncritically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Kovačević, Tijana; Avram, Sanja; Milaković, Dragana; Špirić, Nikolina; Kovačević, Pedja

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) enables individualization in the treatment to optimize clinical benefit and minimize drugs' side effects. Critically ill septic patients represent a challenge for antimicrobial treatment because of pathophysiological impact of sepsis on pharmacokinetics of drugs. The aim of this study was to assess the appropriateness of gentamicin and amikacin dosing in critically and noncritically ill patients, as well as to estimate the need for its regular therapeutic monitoring. Subjects and Methods: It was a prospective study which included 31 patients on gentamicin and 16 patients on amikacin from four different units who met the inclusion criteria. Trough concentrations of drugs were measured in serum just before third or fourth dose of antibiotic, whereas peak concentrations were measured in serum 1 h after the completion of drug administration (steady state). Relevant data on patients' clinical course of disease, comorbidities, and concomitant medication were collected from medical charts in order to identify their possible influence on drugs' concentrations. Results: Peak concentrations of amikacin were in reference range in 81.8% critically ill and in 80% of noncritically ill patients (P = 0.931). Peak concentrations of gentamicin were in reference range in 88.9% critically ill and in 77.3% of noncritically ill patients (P = 0.457). Conclusion: Serum concentrations of aminoglycosides (amikacin and gentamicin) were in reference range in most of the patients in our study, suggesting that dosing of these drugs in the University Hospital Clinical Center, Banja Luka, was adequate. In patients without kidney or liver disease, regular TDM of aminoglycosides is not necessary. PMID:27330257

  10. Enteral Glutamine Administration in Critically Ill Nonseptic Patients Does Not Trigger Arginine Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Mechteld A. R.; Brinkmann, Saskia J. H.; Buijs, Nikki; Beishuizen, Albertus; Bet, Pierre M.; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine supplementation in specific groups of critically ill patients results in favourable clinical outcome. Enhancement of citrulline and arginine synthesis by glutamine could serve as a potential mechanism. However, while receiving optimal enteral nutrition, uptake and enteral metabolism of glutamine in critically ill patients remain unknown. Therefore we investigated the effect of a therapeutically relevant dose of L-glutamine on synthesis of L-citrulline and subsequent L-arginine in this group. Ten versus ten critically ill patients receiving full enteral nutrition, or isocaloric isonitrogenous enteral nutrition including 0.5 g/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, were studied using stable isotopes. A cross-over design using intravenous and enteral tracers enabled splanchnic extraction (SE) calculations. Endogenous rate of appearance and SE of glutamine citrulline and arginine was not different (SE controls versus alanyl-glutamine: glutamine 48 and 48%, citrulline 33 versus 45%, and arginine 45 versus 42%). Turnover from glutamine to citrulline and arginine was not higher in glutamine-administered patients. In critically ill nonseptic patients receiving adequate nutrition and a relevant dose of glutamine there was no extra citrulline or arginine synthesis and glutamine SE was not increased. This suggests that for arginine synthesis enhancement there is no need for an additional dose of glutamine when this population is adequately fed. This trial is registered with NTR2285. PMID:27200186

  11. Rationale and Design of the Pediatric Critical Illness Stress-Induced Immune Suppression (CRISIS) Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Carcillo, Joseph; Holubkov, Richard; Dean, J. Michael; Berger, John; Meert, Kathleen L.; Anand, K. J. S.; Zimmerman, Jerry; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Harrison, Rick; Willson, Douglas F.; Nicholson, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Despite implementation of CDC recommendations and bundled interventions for preventing catheter-associated blood stream infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, or urinary catheter–associated infections, nosocomial infections and sepsis remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Recent studies suggest that acquired critical illness stress-induced immune suppression (CRISIS) plays a role in the development of nosocomial infection and sepsis. This condition can be related to inadequate zinc, selenium, and glutamine levels, as well as hypoprolactinemia, leading to stress-induced lymphopenia, a predominant TH2 monocyte/macrophage state, and subsequent immune suppression. Prolonged immune dysfunction increases the likelihood of nosocomial infections associated with invasive devices. Although strategies to prevent common complications of critical illness are routinely employed (eg, prophylaxis for gastrointestinal bleeding, thrombophlebitis), no prophylactic strategy is used to prevent stress-induced immune suppression. This is the authors’ rationale for the pediatric CRISIS prevention trial (NCT00395161), designed as a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical investigation to determine if daily enteral supplementation with zinc, selenium, and glutamine as well as parenteral metoclopramide (a dopamine 2 receptor antagonist that reverses hypoprolactinemia) prolongs the time until onset of nosocomial infection or sepsis in critically ill children compared to enteral supplementation with whey protein. If effective, this combined nutritional and pharmacologic approach may lessen the excess morbidity and mortality as well as resource utilization associated with nosocomial infections and sepsis in this population. The authors present the design and analytic plan for the CRISIS prevention trial. PMID:19380753

  12. Critically Ill Patients and End-of-Life Decision-Making: The Senior Medical Resident Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahern, Stephane P.; Doyle, Tina K.; Marquis, Francois; Lesk, Corey; Skrobik, Yoanna

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the understanding of educational needs among residents caring for the critically ill, narrative accounts of 19 senior physician trainees participating in level of care decision-making were analyzed. In this multicentre qualitative study involving 9 university centers in Canada, in-depth interviews were conducted in either…

  13. Ontogeny of methionine utilization and splanchnic uptake in critically ill children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the rates of methionine splanchnic uptake and utilization in critically ill pediatric patients, we used two kinetic models: the plasma methionine enrichment,and the "intracellular" homocysteine enrichment. Twenty-four patients, eight infants, eight children, and eight adolescents, were ...

  14. Rehabilitation of Critical Illness Polyneuropathy and Myopathy Patients: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Primoz; Vidmar, Gaj; Kuret, Zala; Bizovicar, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy (CIPNM) frequently develops in patients hospitalized in intensive care units. The number of patients with CIPNM admitted to inpatient rehabilitation is increasing. The aim of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the outcome of their rehabilitation. Twenty-seven patients with CIPNM were included in…

  15. Massive nitrogen loss in critical surgical illness: effect on cardiac mass and function.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, A A; Plank, L D; Finn, P J; Whalley, G A; Sharpe, N; Clark, M A; Hill, G L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors measured cardiac mass and function to determine whether these changed in patients who were critically ill who were losing large amounts of nitrogen from the body. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The large losses of body nitrogen that occur in patients with protein-energy malnutrition are associated with a loss of cardiac mass and function. It is not known if this also occurs in patients who were critically ill who are losing massive amounts of nitrogen. METHODS: Once hemodynamically stable, 13 patients who were critically ill underwent sequential measurements of left ventricular mass (LVM) and function, total body nitrogen (TBN), total body potassium, body weight, fat-free mass, and limb muscle mass. RESULTS: Over a 21-day study period, there was no change in LVM or function despite falls of 14% and 21% in TBN and total body potassium, respectively, a 21% fall in limb muscle mass, and a deterioration in skeletal muscle function by approximately 40%. CONCLUSIONS: In patients who were critically ill, cardiac mass does not decrease and function does not deteriorate after hemodynamic stability has been achieved despite massive losses of protein from the body. PMID:9296513

  16. Elevated Omentin Serum Levels Predict Long-Term Survival in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Luedde, Mark; Benz, Fabian; Niedeggen, Jennifer; Vucur, Mihael; Hippe, Hans-Joerg; Spehlmann, Martina E.; Schueller, Florian; Loosen, Sven; Frey, Norbert; Trautwein, Christian; Koch, Alexander; Luedde, Tom; Tacke, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Omentin, a recently described adipokine, was shown to be involved in the pathophysiology of inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, its role in critical illness and sepsis is currently unknown. Materials and Methods. Omentin serum concentrations were measured in 117 ICU-patients (84 with septic and 33 with nonseptic disease etiology) admitted to the medical ICU. Results were compared with 50 healthy controls. Results. Omentin serum levels of critically ill patients at admission to the ICU or after 72 hours of ICU treatment were similar compared to healthy controls. Moreover, circulating omentin levels were independent of sepsis and etiology of critical illness. Notably, serum concentrations of omentin could not be linked to concentrations of inflammatory cytokines or routinely used sepsis markers. While serum levels of omentin were not predictive for short term survival during ICU treatment, low omentin concentrations were an independent predictor of patients' overall survival. Omentin levels strongly correlated with that of other adipokines (e.g., leptin receptor or adiponectin), which have also been identified as prognostic markers in critical illness. Conclusions. Although circulating omentin levels did not differ between ICU-patients and controls, elevated omentin levels were predictive for an impaired patients' long term survival. PMID:27867249

  17. Gut Microbial Translocation in Critically Ill Children and Effects of Supplementation with Pre- and Pro Biotics

    PubMed Central

    Papoff, Paola; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Cerasaro, Carla; Caresta, Elena; Midulla, Fabio; Moretti, Corrado

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial translocation as a direct cause of sepsis is an attractive hypothesis that presupposes that in specific situations bacteria cross the intestinal barrier, enter the systemic circulation, and cause a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Critically ill children are at increased risk for bacterial translocation, particularly in the early postnatal age. Predisposing factors include intestinal obstruction, obstructive jaundice, intra-abdominal hypertension, intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury and secondary ileus, and immaturity of the intestinal barrier per se. Despite good evidence from experimental studies to support the theory of bacterial translocation as a cause of sepsis, there is little evidence in human studies to confirm that translocation is directly correlated to bloodstream infections in critically ill children. This paper provides an overview of the gut microflora and its significance, a focus on the mechanisms employed by bacteria to gain access to the systemic circulation, and how critical illness creates a hostile environment in the gut and alters the microflora favoring the growth of pathogens that promote bacterial translocation. It also covers treatment with pre- and pro biotics during critical illness to restore the balance of microbial communities in a beneficial way with positive effects on intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation. PMID:22934115

  18. Kinetic Patterns of Candida albicans Germ Tube Antibody in Critically Ill Patients: Influence on Mortality▿

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Rafael; Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo; Iruretagoyena, Jose R.; Cuétara, María S.; Ramírez, Paula; Gómez, Maria D.; Camarena, Juan J.; Viudes, Angel; Pontón, José

    2009-01-01

    The influence of kinetic patterns of Candida albicans germ tube antibodies (CAGTA) on mortality was analyzed in six intensive care units. Statistically significant lower mortality rates were found in patients with patterns of increasing CAGTA titers who had been treated with antifungal agents. Thus, antifungal treatment should be considered when CAGTA titers are increasing in critically ill patients. PMID:19675223

  19. Continuous renal replacement therapy amino acid, trace metal and folate clearance in critically ill children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that continuous veno-venous hemodialysis (CVVHD) results in amino acid, trace metals, and folate losses, thereby adversely impacting nutrient balance. Critically ill children receiving CVVHD were studied prospectively for 5 days. Blood concentrations, amino acids, copper, zinc, man...

  20. A new approach to defining and diagnosing malnutrition in adult critical illness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review will highlight a new approach to defining malnutrition syndromes for critically ill adults that incorporates a modern understanding of the contributions of inflammatory response. A systematic approach to nutrition assessment is described to help support diagnosis. Recent findings sugges...

  1. Rationale and design of the pediatric critical illness stress-induced immune suppression (CRISIS) prevention trial.

    PubMed

    Carcillo, Joseph; Holubkov, Richard; Dean, J Michael; Berger, John; Meert, Kathleen L; Anand, K J S; Zimmerman, Jerry; Newth, Christopher J L; Harrison, Rick; Willson, Douglas F; Nicholson, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Despite implementation of CDC recommendations and bundled interventions for preventing catheter-associated blood stream infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, or urinary catheter-associated infections, nosocomial infections and sepsis remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Recent studies suggest that acquired critical illness stress-induced immune suppression (CRISIS) plays a role in the development of nosocomial infection and sepsis. This condition can be related to inadequate zinc, selenium, and glutamine levels, as well as hypoprolactinemia, leading to stress-induced lymphopenia, a predominant T(H)2 monocyte/macrophage state, and subsequent immune suppression. Prolonged immune dysfunction increases the likelihood of nosocomial infections associated with invasive devices. Although strategies to prevent common complications of critical illness are routinely employed (eg, prophylaxis for gastrointestinal bleeding, thrombophlebitis), no prophylactic strategy is used to prevent stress-induced immune suppression. This is the authors' rationale for the pediatric CRISIS prevention trial (NCT00395161), designed as a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical investigation to determine if daily enteral supplementation with zinc, selenium, and glutamine as well as parenteral metoclopramide (a dopamine 2 receptor antagonist that reverses hypoprolactinemia) prolongs the time until onset of nosocomial infection or sepsis in critically ill children compared to enteral supplementation with whey protein. If effective, this combined nutritional and pharmacologic approach may lessen the excess morbidity and mortality as well as resource utilization associated with nosocomial infections and sepsis in this population. The authors present the design and analytic plan for the CRISIS prevention trial.

  2. Stress Hyperglycemia in Pediatric Critical Illness: The Intensive Care Unit Adds to the Stress!

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Stress hyperglycemia (SH) commonly occurs during critical illness in children. The historical view that SH is beneficial has been questioned in light of evidence that demonstrates the association of SH with worse outcomes. In addition to intrinsic changes in glucose metabolism and development of insulin resistance, specific intensive care unit (ICU) practices may influence the development of SH during critical illness. Mechanical ventilation, vasoactive infusions, renal replacement therapies, cardiopulmonary bypass and extracorporeal life support, therapeutic hypothermia, prolonged immobility, nutrition support practices, and the use of medications are all known to mediate development of SH in critical illness. Tight glucose control (TGC) to manage SH has emerged as a promising therapy to improve outcomes in critically ill adults, but results have been inconclusive. Large variations in ICU practices across studies likely resulted in inconsistent results. Future studies of TGC need to take into account the impact of commonly used ICU practices and, ideally, standardize protocols in an attempt to improve the accuracy of conclusions from such studies. PMID:22401321

  3. Vitamin D deficiency in critically ill children: A roadmap to interventional research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies published this month in Pediatrics provide new and unique information regarding the relationship between vitamin D status and critical illnesses in children admitted to PICUs in the United States and Canada. These two studies, from Boston Children's Hospital and six PICUs in Canada, demo...

  4. Pharmacological and Mechanical Thromboprophylaxis in Critically Ill Patients: a Network Meta-Analysis of 12 Trials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thromboprophylaxis for venous thromboembolism is widely used in critically ill patients. However, only limited evidence exists regarding the efficacy and safety of the various thromboprophylaxis techniques, especially mechanical thromboprophylaxis. Therefore, we performed meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the overall incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) for between unfractionated heparin (UFH), low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), and intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) in critically ill patients. A Bayesian random effects model for multiple treatment comparisons was constructed. The primary outcome measure was the overall incidence of DVT at the longest follow-up. The secondary outcome measure was the incidence of major bleeding, as defined by the original trials. Our analysis included 8,622 patients from 12 RCTs. The incidence of DVT was significantly lower in patients treated with UFH (OR, 0.45; 95% CrI, 0.22–0.83) or LMWH (OR, 0.38; 95% CrI, 0.18–0.72) than in patients in the control group. IPC was associated with a reduced incidence of DVT compared to the control group, but the effect was not statistically significant (OR, 0.50; 95% CrI, 0.20–1.23). The risk of DVT was similar for patients treated with UFH and LMWH (OR, 1.16; 95% CrI, 0.68–2.11). The risk of major bleeding was similar between the treatment groups in medical critically ill patients and also in critically ill patients with a high risk of bleeding. In critically ill patients, the efficacy of mechanical thromboprophylaxis in reducing the risk of DVT is not as robust as those of pharmacological thromboprophylaxis. PMID:27709864

  5. Reduced Responsiveness of Blood Leukocytes to Lipopolysaccharide Does not Predict Nosocomial Infections in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    van Vught, Lonneke A; Wiewel, Maryse A; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Scicluna, Brendon P; Belkasim-Bohoudi, Hakima; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-08-01

    Critically ill patients show signs of immune suppression, which is considered to increase vulnerability to nosocomial infections. Whole-blood stimulation is frequently used to test the function of the innate immune system. We here assessed the association between whole-blood leukocyte responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and subsequent occurrence of nosocomial infections in critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). All consecutive critically ill patients admitted to the ICU between April 2012 and June 2013 with two or more systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria and an expected length of ICU stay of more than 24 h were enrolled. Age- and sex-matched healthy individuals were included as controls. Blood was drawn the first morning after ICU admission and stimulated ex vivo with 100 ng/mL ultrapure LPS for 3 h. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 were measured in supernatants. Seventy-three critically ill patients were included, of whom 10 developed an ICU-acquired infection. Compared with healthy subjects, whole-blood leukocytes of patients were less responsive to ex vivo stimulation with LPS, as reflected by strongly reduced tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels in culture supernatants. Results were not different between patients who did and those who did not develop an ICU-acquired infection. The extent of reduced LPS responsiveness of blood leukocytes in critically ill patients on the first day after ICU admission does not relate to the subsequent development of ICU-acquired infections. These results argue against the use of whole-blood stimulation as a functional test applied early after ICU admission to predict nosocomial infection.

  6. Optimising meropenem dosing in critically ill Australian Indigenous patients with severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Danny; Stewart, Penelope; Goud, Rajendra; Gourley, Stephen; Hewagama, Saliya; Krishnaswamy, Sushena; Wallis, Steven C; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2016-11-01

    Currently there are no pharmacokinetic (PK) data to guide antibiotic dosing in critically ill Australian Indigenous patients with severe sepsis. This study aimed to determine whether the population pharmacokinetics of meropenem were different between critically ill Australian Indigenous and critically ill Caucasian patients. Serial plasma and urine samples as well as clinical and demographic data were collected over two dosing intervals from critically ill Australian Indigenous patients. Plasma meropenem concentrations were assayed by validated chromatography. Concentration-time data were analysed with data from a previous PK study in critically ill Caucasian patients using Pmetrics. The population PK model was subsequently used for Monte Carlo dosing simulations to describe optimal doses for these patients. Six Indigenous and five Caucasian subjects were included. A two-compartment model described the data adequately, with meropenem clearance and volume of distribution of the central compartment described by creatinine clearance (CLCr) and patient weight, respectively. Patient ethnicity was not supported as a covariate in the final model. Significant differences were observed for meropenem clearance between the Indigenous and Caucasian groups [median 11.0 (range 3.0-14.1) L/h vs. 17.4 (4.3-30.3) L/h, respectively; P <0.01]. Standard dosing regimens (1 g intravenous every 8 h as a 30-min infusion) consistently achieved target exposures at the minimum inhibitory concentration breakpoint in the absence of augmented renal clearance. No significant interethnic differences in meropenem pharmacokinetics between the Indigenous and Caucasian groups were detected and CLCr was found to be the strongest determinant of appropriate dosing regimens.

  7. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Lucas Lima; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the outcomes enabled by the neuromuscular electric stimulation in critically ill patients in intensive care unit assisted. Methods A systematic review of the literature by means of clinical trials published between 2002 and 2012 in the databases LILACS, SciELO, MEDLINE and PEDro using the descriptors “intensive care unit”, “physical therapy”, “physiotherapy”, “electric stimulation” and “randomized controlled trials”. Results We included four trials. The sample size varied between 8 to 33 individuals of both genders, with ages ranging between 52 and 79 years, undergoing invasive mechanical ventilation. Of the articles analyzed, three showed significant benefits of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in critically ill patients, such as improvement in peripheral muscle strength, exercise capacity, functionality, or loss of thickness of the muscle layer. Conclusion The application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation promotes a beneficial response in critically patients in intensive care. PMID:25295458

  8. The Protective Effect of Alpha 7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Activation on Critical Illness and Its Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    REN, Chao; TONG, Ya-lin; LI, Jun-cong; LU, Zhong-qiu; YAO, Yong-ming

    2017-01-01

    Critical illnesses and injuries are recognized as major threats to human health, and they are usually accompanied by uncontrolled inflammation and dysfunction of immune response. The alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR), which is a primary receptor of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP), exhibits great benefits for critical ill conditions. It is composed of 5 identical α7 subunits that form a central pore with high permeability for calcium. This putative structure is closely associated with its functional states. Activated α7nAChR exhibits extensive anti-inflammatory and immune modulatory reactions, including lowered pro-inflammatory cytokines levels, decreased expressions of chemokines as well as adhesion molecules, and altered differentiation and activation of immune cells, which are important in maintaining immune homeostasis. Well understanding of the effects and mechanisms of α7nAChR will be of great value in exploring effective targets for treating critical diseases. PMID:28123345

  9. Glucose control in critically ill patients in 2009: no alarms and no surprises.

    PubMed

    Pitrowsky, Melissa; Shinotsuka, Cassia Righy; Soares, Márcio; Salluh, Jorge Ibrain Figueira

    2009-08-01

    Glucose control is a major issue in critical care since landmark publications from the last decade leading to widespread use of strict glucose control in the clinical practice. Subsequent trials showed discordant results that lead to several questions and concerns about benefits and risks of implementing an intensive glucose control protocol. In the midst of all recent controversy, we propose that a new glycemic target -150mg/dl) should be aimed. This target glucose level could offer protection against the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia and at the same time keep patient's safety avoiding hypoglicemia. The article presents a critical review of the current literature on intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients.

  10. Myopathy in acute hypothyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Kung, A. W.; Ma, J. T.; Yu, Y. L.; Wang, C. C.; Woo, E. K.; Lam, K. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Yeung, R. T.

    1987-01-01

    Hypothyroid myopathy has so far been reported in long standing cases of hypothyroidism. We describe two adult patients with myopathy associated with acute transient hypothyroidism. Both presented with severe muscle aches and cramps, stiffness and spasms. Muscle enzymes were markedly elevated and electromyography in one patient showed myopathic features. Histological changes were absent in muscle biopsy, probably because of the short duration of metabolic disturbance. The myopathy subsided promptly when the hypothyroid state was reversed. PMID:3422868

  11. Malnutrition in the Critically Ill Child: The Importance of Enteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Marta Botrán; Cid, Jesús López-Herce

    2011-01-01

    Malnutrition affects 50% of hospitalized children and 25–70% of the critically ill children. It increases the incidence of complications and mortality. Malnutrition is associated with an altered metabolism of certain substrates, increased metabolism and catabolism depending on the severity of the lesion, and reduced nutrient delivery. The objective should be to administer individualized nutrition to the critically ill child and to be able to adjust the nutrition continuously according to the metabolic changes and evolving nutritional status. It would appear reasonable to start enteral nutrition within the first 24 to 48 hours after admission, when oral feeding is not possible. Parenteral nutrition should only be used when enteral nutrition is contraindicated or is not tolerated. Energy delivery must be individually adjusted to energy expenditure (40–65 kcal/100 calories metabolized/day) with a protein delivery of 2.5–3 g/kg/day. Frequent monitoring of nutritional and metabolic parameters should be performed. PMID:22163211

  12. An informatics strategy to assure enrollment criteria compliance in studies of the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Spragg, Roger G; Masys, Daniel R; Sergeant, David; Lawrie, Thomas; Taut, Friedemann J H

    2010-11-01

    Up to 18% of acutely ill patients randomized into multicenter clinical trials may not satisfy inclusion/exclusion criteria. To improve compliance with such criteria in an ICU-based multicenter international drug trial, we established a novel Internet/telephone-based strategy for providing rapid case approval or disapproval by centralized panels of critical care physicians. We assessed whether these panels could acquire and record accurate patient information, and whether this approach would minimize enrollment of ineligible patients and could be accomplished in a timely fashion. Analysis of the first 1000 submitted patients showed accurate data capture for 98.7% of enrolled and randomized patients. Median response time from case submission to panel member decision was 34.7 min. Over 99% of enrolled patients met critical study criteria. We conclude that, an Internet-based communications strategy appears to be a valuable adjunct to multicenter clinical trials in acutely ill patients when rapid assurance of eligibility is required.

  13. [Anemia in the critically ill child and adult: a narrative review].

    PubMed

    Demaret, P; Loeckx, I; Mulder, A; Devos, P; Lebrun, F

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is frequent in the pediatric and adult intensive care unit. Anemia decreases oxygen transport which can be harmful in the critically ill patient; it is independently associated with a poor prognosis. The major prophylactic measure against anemia is the limitation of blood draws: several approaches can be used to limit phlebotomy overdraw without harming the patient. Red blood cell transfusion is the quickest way to increase the hemoglobin level, but it is not without risk. It is therefore important to promote the use of evidence-based transfusion strategies. Iron could be useful in case of iron deficiency, but this condition is difficult to diagnose in the critically ill patient. Erythropoietin is no longer relevant in the intensive care unit in the era of restrictive transfusion practice, at least for its hematological effects. Several questions remain to be addressed in order to improve anemia management in the intensive care unit.

  14. Nomenclature for renal replacement therapy and blood purification techniques in critically ill patients: practical applications.

    PubMed

    Villa, Gianluca; Neri, Mauro; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Cerda, Jorge; De Gaudio, A Raffaele; De Rosa, Silvia; Garzotto, Francesco; Honore, Patrick M; Kellum, John; Lorenzin, Anna; Payen, Didier; Ricci, Zaccaria; Samoni, Sara; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Wendon, Julia; Zaccaria, Marta; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-10-10

    This article reports the conclusions of the second part of a consensus expert conference on the nomenclature of renal replacement therapy (RRT) techniques currently utilized to manage acute kidney injury and other organ dysfunction syndromes in critically ill patients. A multidisciplinary approach was taken to achieve harmonization of definitions, components, techniques, and operations of the extracorporeal therapies. The article describes the RRT techniques in detail with the relevant technology, procedures, and phases of treatment and key aspects of volume management/fluid balance in critically ill patients. In addition, the article describes recent developments in other extracorporeal therapies, including therapeutic plasma exchange, multiple organ support therapy, liver support, lung support, and blood purification in sepsis. This is a consensus report on nomenclature harmonization in extracorporeal blood purification therapies, such as hemofiltration, plasma exchange, multiple organ support therapies, and blood purification in sepsis.

  15. Pain management in critically ill patients: a review of multimodal treatment options.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Matthew; Chiu, Felicia; Gelber, Katherine M; Webb, Christopher Aj; Weyker, Paul D

    2016-11-01

    Pain management for critically ill patients provides physicians with the challenge of maximizing patient comfort while avoiding the risks that arise with oversedation. Preventing oversedation has become increasingly important as we better understand the negative impact it has on patients' experiences and outcomes. Current research suggests that oversedation can result in complications such as thromboembolism, pulmonary compromise, immunosuppression and delirium. Fortunately, the analgesic options available for physicians to limit these complications are growing as more treatment modalities are being researched and implemented in the intensive care unit. Our goal is to outline some of the effective and widely utilized tools available to physicians to appropriately and safely manage pain while avoiding oversedation in the critically ill population.

  16. Redox Changes Induced by General Anesthesia in Critically Ill Patients with Multiple Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Papurica, Marius; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Sandesc, Dorel; Dumache, Raluca; Nartita, Radu; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Alina Carmen; Luca, Loredana; Vernic, Corina; Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea

    2015-01-01

    The critically ill polytrauma patient is a constant challenge for the trauma team due to the complexity of the complications presented. Intense inflammatory response and infections, as well as multiple organ dysfunctions, significantly increase the rate of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Moreover, due to the physiological and biochemical imbalances present in this type of patients, the bioproduction of free radicals is significantly accelerated, thus installing the oxidative stress. In the therapeutic management of such patients, multiple surgical interventions are required and therefore they are being subjected to repeated general anesthesia. In this paper, we want to present the pathophysiological implications of oxidative stress in critically ill patients with multiple traumas and the implications of general anesthesia on the redox mechanisms of the cell. We also want to summarize the antioxidant treatments able to reduce the intensity of oxidative stress by modulating the biochemical activity of some cellular mechanisms. PMID:26693352

  17. Quality indicators on the use of antimicrobials in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Vera, P; Palomar, M; Álvarez-Lerma, F

    2014-12-01

    Quality indicators have been applied to many areas of health care in recent years, including intensive care. However, they have not been specifically developed and validated for antimicrobial use in critically ill patients. Antimicrobials play a key role in intensive care units not only in the prognosis of each individual patient, but also in the development of resistance and changes in the flora in this setting. Evaluating the use of these agents is complex in the intensive care unit, however, because the indications vary greatly and antimicrobial treatment is often changed during admission. We designed and developed specific quality indicators regarding the use of antimicrobials in critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit. These indicators are proposed as a tool for application in intensive care units to detect problems in the use of antimicrobials. Future trials are needed, however, to validate these indicators in a large population over time.

  18. The Sick and the Weak: Neuropathies/Myopathies in the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, O.; Reid, M. B.; Van den Berghe, G.; Vanhorebeek, I.; Hermans, G.; Rich, M. M.; Larsson, L.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness polyneuropathies (CIP) and myopathies (CIM) are common complications of critical illness. Several weakness syndromes are summarized under the term intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW). We propose a classification of different ICUAW forms (CIM, CIP, sepsis-induced, steroid-denervation myopathy) and pathophysiological mechanisms from clinical and animal model data. Triggers include sepsis, mechanical ventilation, muscle unloading, steroid treatment, or denervation. Some ICUAW forms require stringent diagnostic features; CIM is marked by membrane hypoexcitability, severe atrophy, preferential myosin loss, ultrastructural alterations, and inadequate autophagy activation while myopathies in pure sepsis do not reproduce marked myosin loss. Reduced membrane excitability results from depolarization and ion channel dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to energy-dependent processes. Ubiquitin proteasome and calpain activation trigger muscle proteolysis and atrophy while protein synthesis is impaired. Myosin loss is more pronounced than actin loss in CIM. Protein quality control is altered by inadequate autophagy. Ca2+ dysregulation is present through altered Ca2+ homeostasis. We highlight clinical hallmarks, trigger factors, and potential mechanisms from human studies and animal models that allow separation of risk factors that may trigger distinct mechanisms contributing to weakness. During critical illness, altered inflammatory (cytokines) and metabolic pathways deteriorate muscle function. ICUAW prevention/treatment is limited, e.g., tight glycemic control, delaying nutrition, and early mobilization. Future challenges include identification of primary/secondary events during the time course of critical illness, the interplay between membrane excitability, bioenergetic failure and differential proteolysis, and finding new therapeutic targets by help of tailored animal models. PMID:26133937

  19. Safety of daily ethanol locks for urinary catheters in critically ill children: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Teppa, Beatriz E; Stockwell, Jana A

    2015-10-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections represent a significant medical burden in critically ill children. Ethanol locks have been shown to be effective and safe for central line-associated bloodstream infection prevention and we propose utilizing this strategy for urinary catheters. Because this has never been done, we evaluated its safety with a pilot study hypothesizing that ethanol locks in urinary catheters would result in negligible alcohol absorption and negligible irritation of the bladder.

  20. [Fungal infection secondary to treatment of Escherichia coli in a critically ill patient].

    PubMed

    Maack, Kim Hovgaard; Tarp, Britta

    2012-08-27

    The incidence of nosocomial fungal infections has increased over the past 20 years. Candida albicans is the most commonly involved pathogen. Concurrently, the number of non-albicans species with decreased susceptibility to commonly used antifungal agents has increased significantly. Invasive candidiasis is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case of unusually massive infection with a number of different Candida species, which caused severe prolonged infection in a critically ill patient.

  1. Age of red blood cells and mortality in the critically ill

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In critically ill patients, it is uncertain whether exposure to older red blood cells (RBCs) may contribute to mortality. We therefore aimed to evaluate the association between the age of RBCs and outcome in a large unselected cohort of critically ill patients in Australia and New Zealand. We hypothesized that exposure to even a single unit of older RBCs may be associated with an increased risk of death. Methods We conducted a prospective, multicenter observational study in 47 ICUs during a 5-week period between August 2008 and September 2008. We included 757 critically ill adult patients receiving at least one unit of RBCs. To test our hypothesis we compared hospital mortality according to quartiles of exposure to maximum age of RBCs without and with adjustment for possible confounding factors. Results Compared with other quartiles (mean maximum red cell age 22.7 days; mortality 121/568 (21.3%)), patients treated with exposure to the lowest quartile of oldest RBCs (mean maximum red cell age 7.7 days; hospital mortality 25/189 (13.2%)) had an unadjusted absolute risk reduction in hospital mortality of 8.1% (95% confidence interval = 2.2 to 14.0%). After adjustment for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III score, other blood component transfusions, number of RBC transfusions, pretransfusion hemoglobin concentration, and cardiac surgery, the odds ratio for hospital mortality for patients exposed to the older three quartiles compared with the lowest quartile was 2.01 (95% confidence interval = 1.07 to 3.77). Conclusions In critically ill patients, in Australia and New Zealand, exposure to older RBCs is independently associated with an increased risk of death. PMID:21496231

  2. Association between lymphocyte expression of the apoptotic receptor Fas and pain in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth DE; Mpouzika, Meropi DA; Giannakopoulou, Margarita; Bozas, Evangelos; Middleton, Nicos; Tsiaousis, George; Karabinis, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Objective Lymphocyte apoptosis in critical illness is associated with immunosuppression. We explored for the first time the associations between pain ratings and expression of the apoptotic receptor Fas on B and T cells in critically ill patients and the potential mediating effects of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, and substance P (SP). Design This is an exploratory correlational study with repeated measurements (14 days followup) and cross-sectional comparisons. Setting This study was conducted in a state hospital in the metropolitan area of Athens, Greece. Participants The participants were 36 consecutive critically ill patients and 36 matched controls. Outcome measures Pain measured by the self-reported numeric rating scale [NRS], the behavioral pain scale, and the pain assessment scale was the primary outcome measure. Flow cytometry (Fas), electrochemiluminescence (ACTH and cortisol) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (SP) were used. Mixed linear models for repeated measurements and bivariable associations at discrete time points were employed. Results Significant pain at rest was noted. Pain ratings associated with Fas expression on cytotoxic T cells (P=0.041) and B cells (P=0.005), even after adjustment for a number of clinical treatment factors (P=0.006 and P=0.052, respectively). On the day that more patients were able to communicate, Fas on B cells (r=0.897, P=0.029) and cytotoxic T cells (r=0.832; P=0.037) associated with NRS ratings. Associations between pain ratings and ACTH serum levels were noted (P<0.05). When stress neuropeptide levels were added to the model, the statistical significance of the associations between pain ratings and Fas expression was attenuated (P=0.052–0.063), suggesting that stress neuropeptides may partially mediate the association. Conclusion Preliminary evidence for the association between pain and lymphocyte apoptotic susceptibility is provided. The role of pain management in maintaining immunocompetence

  3. Use of intravenous propranolol for control of a large cervicofacial hemangioma in a critically ill neonate.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Shanik J; Leitenberger, Sabra; Majerus, Matt; Krol, Alfons; MacArthur, Carol J

    2016-05-01

    Cervicofacial segmental infantile hemangiomas (IH) may result in airway obstruction requiring use of propranolol to induce hemangioma regression and reestablish the airway. We present the first case using intravenous (IV) propranolol for control of airway obstruction and rapid expansion of cervicofacial IH in the setting of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) impaired gastrointestinal function. Intravenous dosing of propranolol was tolerated well in a critically ill neonate with multisystem complications of prematurity.

  4. Use of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis for the Assessment of Nutritional Status in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoojin; Kwon, Oran; Shin, Cheung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is common in the critically ill patients and known to cause a variety of negative clinical outcomes. However, various conventional methods for nutrition assessment have several limitations. We hypothesized that body composition data, as measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), may have a significant role in evaluating nutritional status and predicting clinical outcomes in critically ill patients. We gathered clinical, biochemical, and BIA data from 66 critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit. Patients were divided into three nutritional status groups according to their serum albumin level and total lymphocyte counts. The BIA results, conventional indicators of nutrition status, and clinical outcomes were compared and analyzed retrospectively. Results showed that the BIA indices including phase angle (PhA), extracellular water (ECW), and ECW/total body water (TBW) were significantly associated with the severity of nutritional status. Particularly, PhA, an indicator of the health of the cell membrane, was higher in the well-nourished patient group, whereas the edema index (ECW/TBW) was higher in the severely malnourished patient group. PhA was positively associated with albumin and ECW/TBW was negatively associated with serum albumin, hemoglobin, and duration of mechanical ventilation. In non-survivors, PhA was significantly lower and both ECW/TBW and %TBW/fat free mass were higher than in survivors. In conclusion, several BIA indexes including PhA and ECW/TBW may be useful for nutritional assessment and represent significant prognostic factors in the care of critically ill patients. PMID:25713790

  5. Validity of bedside blood glucose measurement in critically ill patients with intensive insulin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Hamishehkar, Hadi; Shadvar, Kamran; Sanaie, Sarvin; Iranpour, Afshin; Fattahi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: There have been variable results on the practice of tight glycemic control, and studies have demonstrated that point-of-care (POC) glucometers have variable accuracy. Glucometers must be accurate, and many variables can affect blood glucose levels. The purpose of this study was to determine the difference between blood glucose concentrations obtained from POC glucometers and laboratory results in critically ill patients with intensive insulin therapy. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive study which enrolled 300 critically ill patients. Four samples of arterial blood were collected and analyzed at the bedside with the POC glucometer and also in the central laboratory to obtain the blood glucose level. To define the effect of various factors on this relation, we noted the levels of hemoglobin (Hb), PaO2, body temperature, bilirubin, history of drug usage, and sepsis. Results: There were not any significant differences between blood sugar levels using laboratory and glucometer methods of measurements. There was a good and significant correlation between glucose levels between two methods (r = 0.81, P < 0.001). Among evaluated factors (body temperature, bilirubin level, blood pressure, Hb level, PaO2, sepsis, and drugs) which added one by one in model, just drugs decreased the correlation more than others (r = 0.78). Conclusions: The results of POC glucometer differ from laboratory glucose concentrations, especially in critically ill patients with unstable hemodynamic status while receiving several drugs. This may raise the concern about using POC devices for tight glycemic control in critically ill patients. These results should be interpreted with caution because of the large variation of accuracy among different glucometer devices. PMID:27994380

  6. The Role of Time-Limited Trials in Dialysis Decision Making in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Jennifer S; Holley, Jean L

    2016-02-05

    Technologic advances, such as continuous RRT, provide lifesaving therapy for many patients. AKI in the critically ill patient, a fatal diagnosis in the past, is now often a survivable condition. Dialysis decision making for the critically ill patient with AKI is complex. What was once a question solely of survival now is nuanced by an individual's definition of quality of life, personal values, and short- and long-term prognoses. Clinical evaluation of AKI in the critically ill is multifaceted. Treatment decision making requires consideration of the natural evolution of the patient's AKI within the context of the global prognosis. Situations are often marked by prognostic uncertainty and clinical unknowns. In the face of these uncertainties, establishment of patient-directed therapies is imperative. A time-limited trial of continuous RRT in this setting is often appropriate but difficult to execute. Using patient preferences as a clinical guide, a proper time-limited trial requires assessment of prognosis, elicitation of patient values, strong communication skills, clear documentation, and often, appropriate integration of palliative care services. A well conducted time-limited trial can avoid interprofessional conflict and provide support for the patient, family, and staff.

  7. Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Centile Curves and Distributions by Age of Hospitalized Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, Danny; Goodwin, Andrew J.; Greer, Robert; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie; Laussen, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) form the basis for monitoring the physiological state of patients. Although norms have been published for healthy and hospitalized children, little is known about their distributions in critically ill children. The objective of this study was to report the distributions of these basic physiological variables in hospitalized critically ill children. Continuous data from bedside monitors were collected and stored at 5-s intervals from 3,677 subjects aged 0–18 years admitted over a period of 30 months to the pediatric and cardiac intensive care units at a large quaternary children’s hospital. Approximately 1.13 billion values served to estimate age-specific distributions for these two basic physiological variables: HR and intra-arterial BP. Centile curves were derived from the sample distributions and compared to common reference ranges. Properties such as kurtosis and skewness of these distributions are described. In comparison to previously published reference ranges, we show that children in these settings exhibit markedly higher HRs than their healthy counterparts or children hospitalized on in-patient wards. We also compared commonly used published estimates of hypotension in children (e.g., the PALS guidelines) to the values we derived from critically ill children. This is a first study reporting the distributions of basic physiological variables in children in the pediatric intensive care settings, and the percentiles derived may serve as useful references for bedside clinicians and clinical trials. PMID:28367430

  8. Recommendations for the intra-hospital transport of critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This study was conducted to provide Intensive Care Units and Emergency Departments with a set of practical procedures (check-lists) for managing critically-ill adult patients in order to avoid complications during intra-hospital transport (IHT). Methods Digital research was carried out via the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and HEALTHSTAR databases using the following key words: transferring, transport, intrahospital or intra-hospital, and critically ill patient. The reference bibliographies of each of the selected articles between 1998 and 2009 were also studied. Results This review focuses on the analysis and overcoming of IHT-related risks, the associated adverse events, and their nature and incidence. The suggested preventive measures are also reviewed. A check-list for quick execution of IHT is then put forward and justified. Conclusions Despite improvements in IHT practices, significant risks are still involved. Basic training, good clinical sense and a risk-benefit analysis are currently the only deciding factors. A critically ill patient, prepared and accompanied by an inexperienced team, is a risky combination. The development of adapted equipment and the widespread use of check-lists and proper training programmes would increase the safety of IHT and reduce the risks in the long-term. Further investigation is required in order to evaluate the protective role of such preventive measures. PMID:20470381

  9. Supplemental Parenteral Nutrition Is the Key to Prevent Energy Deficits in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Taku; Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Pichard, Claude

    2016-08-01

    This review emphasizes the role of a timely supplemental parenteral nutrition (PN) for critically ill patients. It contradicts the recommendations of current guidelines to avoid the use of PN, as it is associated with risk. Critical illness results in severe metabolic stress. During the early phase, inflammatory cytokines and mediators induce catabolism to meet the increased body energy demands by endogenous sources. This response is not suppressed by exogenous energy administration, and the early use of PN to reach the energy target leads to overfeeding. On the other hand, early and progressive enteral nutrition (EN) is less likely to cause overfeeding because of variable gastrointestinal tolerance, a factor frequently associated with significant energy deficit. Recent studies demonstrate that adequate feeding is beneficial during and after the intensive care unit (ICU) stay. Supplemental PN allows for timely adequate feeding, if sufficient precautions are taken to avoid overfeeding. Indirect calorimetry can precisely define the adequate energy prescription. Our pragmatic approach is to start early EN to progressively test the gut tolerance and add supplemental PN on day 3 or 4 after ICU admission, only if EN does not meet the measured energy target. We believe that supplemental PN plays a pivotal role in the achievement of adequate feeding in critically ill patients with intolerance to EN and does not cause harm if overfeeding is avoided by careful prescription, ideally based on energy expenditure measured by indirect calorimetry.

  10. Nutrient stimulation of mesenteric blood flow - implications for older critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu AN; Abdelhamid, Yasmine Ali; Phillips, Liza K; Chapple, Leeanne S; Horowitz, Michael; Jones, Karen L; Deane, Adam M

    2017-01-01

    Nutrient ingestion induces a substantial increase in mesenteric blood flow. In older persons (aged ≥ 65 years), particularly those with chronic medical conditions, the cardiovascular compensatory response may be inadequate to maintain systemic blood pressure during mesenteric blood pooling, leading to postprandial hypotension. In older ambulatory persons, postprandial hypotension is an important pathophysiological condition associated with an increased propensity for syncope, falls, coronary vascular events, stroke and death. In older critically ill patients, the administration of enteral nutrition acutely increases mesenteric blood flow, but whether this pathophysiological response is protective, or precipitates mesenteric ischaemia, is unknown. There are an increasing number of older patients surviving admission to intensive care units, who are likely to be at increased risk of postprandial hypotension, both during, and after, their stay in hospital. In this review, we describe the prevalence, impact and mechanisms of postprandial hypotension in older people and provide an overview of the impact of postprandial hypotension on feeding prescriptions in older critically ill patients. Finally, we provide evidence that postprandial hypotension is likely to be an unrecognised problem in older survivors of critical illness and discuss potential options for management. PMID:28224105

  11. Critically ill patients with cancer: chances and limitations of intensive care medicine—a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Schellongowski, Peter; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Wohlfarth, Philipp; Knoebl, Paul; Rabitsch, Werner; Watzke, Herbert H; Staudinger, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This narrative review deals with the challenge of defining adequate therapy goals and intensive care unit (ICU) admission criteria for critically ill patients with cancer. Several specific complications of critically ill patients with cancer require close collaborations of intensive care and cancer specialists. Intensivists require a basic understanding of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapy of common cancer-specific problems. Cancer specialists must be knowledgeable in preventing, detecting and treating imminent or manifest organ failures. In case of one or more organ dysfunctions, ICU admissions must be evaluated early. In order to properly define the therapy goals for critically ill patients with cancer, decision-makers must be aware of the short-term intensive care prognosis as well as the long-term oncological options and perspectives. Multidisciplinary teamwork is key when it comes down to decisions on ICU admission, planning of therapeutic aims, patient management in the ICU and tailored therapy limiting with smooth transition into a palliative care (PC) setting, whenever appropriate. PMID:27843637

  12. Sonographic Lobe Localization of Alveolar-Interstitial Syndrome in the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Stefanidis, Konstantinos; Dimopoulos, Stavros; Kolofousi, Chrysafoula; Cokkinos, Demosthenes D.; Chatzimichail, Katerina; Eisen, Lewis A.; Wachtel, Mitchell; Karakitsos, Dimitrios; Nanas, Serafim

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Fast and accurate diagnosis of alveolar-interstitial syndrome is of major importance in the critically ill. We evaluated the utility of lung ultrasound (US) in detecting and localizing alveolar-interstitial syndrome in respective pulmonary lobes as compared to computed tomography scans (CT). Methods. One hundred and seven critically ill patients participated in the study. The presence of diffuse comet-tail artifacts was considered a sign of alveolar-interstitial syndrome. We designated lobar reflections along intercostal spaces and surface lines by means of sonoanatomy in an effort to accurately localize lung pathology. Each sonographic finding was thereafter grouped into the respective lobe. Results. From 107 patients, 77 were finally included in the analysis (42 males with mean age = 61 ± 17 years, APACHE II score = 17.6 ± 6.4, and lung injury score = 1.0 ± 0.7). US exhibited high sensitivity and specificity values (ranging from over 80% for the lower lung fields up to over 90% for the upper lung fields) and considerable consistency in the diagnosis and localization of alveolar-interstitial syndrome. Conclusions. US is a reliable, bedside method for accurate detection and localization of alveolar-interstitial syndrome in the critically ill. PMID:22645669

  13. The evidence for small-volume resuscitation with hyperoncotic albumin in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, John A

    2008-01-01

    Small-volume resuscitation of critically ill patients with hyperoncotic albumin offers a number of theoretical advantages, such as increasing intravascular volume in excess of the volume of fluid administered and reducing interstitial edema. Whilst iso-oncotic albumin has been shown to be equi-effective to isotonic saline for the resuscitation of critically ill patients without associated traumatic brain injury, the efficacy of hyperoncotic albumin for resuscitation has not been evaluated in large-scale randomized-controlled trials. Overall, the evidence for resuscitation with hyper-oncotic albumin is limited by studies of poor methodological quality with heterogenous study populations and control regimens. There is marginal qualitative evidence of improvements in surrogate outcomes in disparate patient populations, but no evidence of any survival benefit associated with resuscitation with hyperoncotic albumin. Given the lack of evidence and clinical uncertainty about the efficacy of hyperoncotic albumin, a large-scale randomized-controlled trial is required to determine its role in the acute resuscitation of hypovolemic or hypoalbuminemic critically ill patients.

  14. Right Dose, Right Now: Customized Drug Dosing in the Critically Ill.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason A; Kumar, Anand; Lipman, Jeffrey

    2017-02-01

    Drugs are key weapons that clinicians have to battle against the profound pathologies encountered in critically ill patients. Antibiotics in particular are commonly used and can improve patient outcomes dramatically. Despite this, there are strong opportunities for further reducing the persisting poor outcomes for infected critically ill patients. However, taking these next steps for improving patient care requires a new approach to antibiotic therapy. Giving the right dose is highly likely to increase the probability of clinical cure from infection and suppress the emergence of resistant pathogens. Furthermore, in some patients with higher levels of sickness severity, reduced mortality from an optimized approach to antibiotic use could also occur. To enable optimized dosing, the use of customized dosing regimens through either evidence-based dosing nomograms or preferably through the use of dosing software supplemented by therapeutic drug monitoring data should be embedded into daily practice. These customized dosing regimens should also be given as soon as practicable as reduced time to initiation of therapy has been shown to improve patient survival, particularly in the presence of septic shock. However, robust data supporting these logical approaches to therapy, which may deliver the next step change improvement for treatment of infections in critically ill patients, are lacking. Large prospective studies of patient survival and health system costs are now required to determine the value of customized antibiotic dosing, that is, giving the right dose at the right time.

  15. [Prevention and care of ventilator-associated pneumonia in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Hu, Shu-Chin; Lee, Ru-Ping

    2012-08-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a hospital-acquired pneumonia that occurs in patients usually 48 hours or more after mechanical ventilator intubation. VAP is the most common nosocomial infection in critically ill patients. Mechanical ventilators are critical oxygenation and ventilation systems for patients. However, there is a close relationship among self-use efficacy, system settings, and VAP infection rate. VAP not only results in higher mortality, longer hospital stays, and higher medical costs, but also negatively affects patient outcomes and medical care quality. The purpose of this article was to provide reference information on VAP risk factors and prevention measures.

  16. Pitfalls in the determination of common analytes in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, J

    2000-01-01

    In the critically ill, the pre-analytical aspects of blood gas analysis still require attention from the clinician. Sampling and transport remain critical factors. Use of drugs may create analytical interferences for common analytes like glucose and protein. Icterus may falsely reduce creatinine and albumin values. Changes in the serum or plasma matrix (reduction of protein, increased covolume of solutes, ...) may furthermore cause important effects on the distribution of electrolytes. Enzyme activity measurements may be erroneous due to lack of essential oligoelements or reducing substances. Immunoassays may suffer from interferences caused by auto-antibodies. In case of hemolysis, a careful interpretation of test results is mandatory.

  17. Diastolic dysfunction and heart failure with a preserved ejection fraction: Relevance in critical illness and anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, R.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that HF with a preserved ejection fraction will become the more common form of HF which clinicians will encounter. The spectrum of diastolic disease extends from the asymptomatic phase to fulminant cardiac failure. These patients are commonly encountered in operating rooms and critical care units. A clearer understanding of the underlying pathophysiology and clinical implications of HF with a preserved ejection fraction is fundamental to directing further research and to evaluate interventions. This review highlights the impact of diastolic dysfunction and HF with a preserved ejection fraction during the perioperative period and during critical illness. PMID:23960679

  18. Critically ill patients in emergency department may be characterized by low amplitude and high variability of amplitude of pulse photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the present pilot study was to determine if pulse photoplethysmography amplitude (PPGA) could be used as an indicator of critical illness and as a predictor of higher need of care in emergency department patients. Methods This was a prospective observational study. We collected vital signs and one minute of pulse photoplethysmograph signal from 251 consecutive patients admitted to a university hospital emergency department. The patients were divided in two groups regarding to the modified Early Warning Score (mEWS): > 3 (critically ill) and ≤ 3 (non-critically ill). Photoplethysmography characteristics were compared between the groups. Results Sufficient data for analysis was acquired from 212 patients (84.5%). Patients in critically ill group more frequently required intubation and invasive hemodynamic monitoring in the ED and received more intravenous fluids. Mean pulse photoplethysmography amplitude (PPGA) was significantly lower in critically ill patients (median 1.105 [95% CI of mean 0.9946-2.302] vs. 2.476 [95% CI of mean 2.239-2.714], P = 0.0257). Higher variability of PPGA significantly correlated with higher amount of fluids received in the ED (r = 0.1501, p = 0.0296). Conclusions This pilot study revealed differences in PPGA characteristics between critically ill and non-critically ill patients. Further studies are needed to determine if these easily available parameters could help increase accuracy in triage when used in addition to routine monitoring of vital signs. PMID:23799988

  19. Hypothyroidism in Women.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Donna; Turner, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Hypothyroidism, a disease in which the thyroid gland does not make enough thyroid hormone, is the second most common endocrine disorder among women. Symptoms of hypothyroidism include fatigue, weight gain, alteration in cognition, infertility, and menstrual abnormalities. The most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States is Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The American Thyroid Association recommends an initial screening for thyroid disease at age 35years and every 5years thereafter. Thyroid-stimulating hormone is highly sensitive to thyroid dysfunction and is used to evaluate thyroid disorders. Monotherapy with levothyroxine is the standard for treating hypothyroidism. Diagnosing hypothyroidism requires appropriate diagnostic tests to facilitate prompt diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Hypothyroid acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Birewar, Sonali; Oppenheimer, Mark; Zawada, Edward T

    2004-03-01

    Muscular disorders and even hypothyroid myopathy with elevated muscle enzymes are commonly seen in hypothyroidism. In this paper, we report a case of acute renal failure in a 35-year old male patient with myalgia. His serum creatinine reached a level of 2.4 mg/dl. Later, his myalgia was found to be due to hypothyroidism with TSH of over 500 uiv/ml. With thyroid replacement therapy, myalgia and his serum creatinine stabilized and subsequently improved. Hypothyroidism, although rare, has been reported as a definite and authentic cause of rhabdomyolysis. As a result, hypothyroidism must be considered in patients presenting with acute renal failure and elevated muscle enzymes.

  1. Structure, process and annual intensive care unit mortality across 69 centers: United States Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group Critical Illness Outcomes Study (USCIITG-CIOS)

    PubMed Central

    Checkley, William; Martin, Greg S; Brown, Samuel M; Chang, Steven Y; Dabbagh, Ousama; Fremont, Richard D; Girard, Timothy D; Rice, Todd W; Howell, Michael D; Johnson, Steven B; O'Brien, James; Park, Pauline K; Pastores, Stephen M; Patil, Namrata T; Pietropaoli, Anthony P; Putman, Maryann; Rotello, Leo; Siner, Jonathan; Sajid, Sahul; Murphy, David J; Sevransky, Jonathan E

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hospital-level variations in structure and process may affect clinical outcomes in intensive care units (ICUs). We sought to characterize the organizational structure, processes of care, use of protocols and standardized outcomes in a large sample of U.S. ICUs. Design We surveyed 69 ICUs about organization, size, volume, staffing, processes of care, use of protocols, and annual ICU mortality. Setting ICUs participating in the United States Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group Critical Illness Outcomes Study (USCIITG-CIOS). Measurements and Main Results We characterized structure and process variables across ICUs, investigated relationships between these variables and annual ICU mortality, and adjusted for illness severity using APACHE II. Ninety-four ICU directors were invited to participate in the study and 69 ICUs (73%) were enrolled, of which 25 (36%) were medical, 24 were surgical (35%) and 20 (29%) were of mixed type, and 64 (93%) were located in teaching hospitals with a median number of 5 trainees per ICU. Average annual ICU mortality was 10.8%, average APACHE II score was 19.3, 58% were closed units and 41% had a 24-hour in-house intensivist. In multivariable linear regression adjusted for APACHE II and multiple ICU structure and process factors, annual ICU mortality was lower in surgical ICUs than in medical ICUs (5.6% lower, 95% CI 2.4%–8.8%) or mixed ICUs (4.5% lower, 95% CI 0.4%–8.7%). We also found a lower annual ICU mortality among ICUs that had a daily plan of care review (5.8% lower, 95% CI 1.6%–10.0%) and a lower bed-to-nurse ratio (1.8% lower when the ratio decreased from 2:1 to 1.5:1; 95% CI 0.25%–3.4%). In contrast, 24-hour intensivist coverage (p=0.89) and closed ICU status (p=0.16) were not associated with a lower annual ICU mortality. Conclusions In a sample of 69 ICUs, a daily plan of care review and a lower bed-to-nurse ratio were both associated with a lower annual ICU mortality. In contrast to 24-hour intensivist

  2. Electrical muscle stimulation prevents critical illness polyneuromyopathy: a randomized parallel intervention trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Critical illness polyneuromyopathy (CIPNM) is a common complication of critical illness presenting with muscle weakness and is associated with increased duration of mechanical ventilation and weaning period. No preventive tool and no specific treatment have been proposed so far for CIPNM. Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) has been shown to be beneficial in patients with severe chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Aim of our study was to assess the efficacy of EMS in preventing CIPNM in critically ill patients. Methods One hundred and forty consecutive critically ill patients with an APACHE II score ≥ 13 were randomly assigned after stratification to the EMS group (n = 68) (age:61 ± 19 years) (APACHE II:18 ± 4, SOFA:9 ± 3) or to the control group (n = 72) (age:58 ± 18 years) (APACHE II:18 ± 5, SOFA:9 ± 3). Patients of the EMS group received daily EMS sessions. CIPNM was diagnosed clinically with the medical research council (MRC) scale for muscle strength (maximum score 60, <48/60 cut off for diagnosis) by two unblinded independent investigators. Duration of weaning from mechanical ventilation and intensive care unit (ICU) stay were recorded. Results Fifty two patients could be finally evaluated with MRC; 24 in the EMS group and 28 in the control group. CIPNM was diagnosed in 3 patients in the EMS group as compared to 11 patients in the control group (OR = 0.22; CI: 0.05 to 0.92, P = 0.04). The MRC score was significantly higher in patients of the EMS group as compared to the control group [58 (33 to 60) vs. 52 (2 to 60) respectively, median (range), P = 0.04). The weaning period was statistically significantly shorter in patients of the EMS group vs. the control group [1 (0 to 10) days vs. 3 (0 to 44) days, respectively, median (range), P = 0.003]. Conclusions This study suggests that daily EMS sessions prevent the development of CIPNM in critically ill patients and also result in shorter duration of weaning

  3. Functional Recovery following Critical Illness in Children: the “Wee-cover” Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Karen; Al-Harbi, Samah; Siu, Katie; Wong, Katie; Cheng, Ji; Baird, Burke; Pogorzelski, David; Timmons, Brian; Gorter, Jan-Willem; Thabane, Lehana; Khetani, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility of conducting a longitudinal prospective study to evaluate functional recovery and predictors of impaired functional recovery in critically ill children. Design Prospective pilot study. Setting Single center Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) at McMaster Children’s Hospital, Hamilton, Canada. Patients Children aged 12 months to 17 years, with at least one organ dysfunction, limited mobility or bed-rest during the first 48 hours of PICU admission, and a minimum 48 hour PICU length of stay, were eligible. Patients transferred from a neonatal intensive care unit prior to ever being discharged home, already mobilizing well or at baseline functional status at time of screening, with an English language barrier, and prior enrollment into this study were excluded. Measurements The primary outcome was feasibility, as defined by the ability to screen, enroll eligible patients, and execute the study procedures and measurements on participants. Secondary outcomes included functional status at baseline, 3 and 6 months, PICU morbidity and mortality. Functional status was measured using the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI), and the Participation and Environment Measure for Children and Youth (PEM-CY). Main results Thirty-three patients were enrolled between October 2012 and April 2013. Consent rate was 85%, follow-up rates 93% at 3 months, and 71% at 6 months. We were able to execute the study procedures and measurements, demonstrating feasibility of conducting a future longitudinal study. Functional status deteriorated following critical illness. Recovery appears to be influenced by baseline health or functional status, and severity of illness. Conclusion Longitudinal research is needed to understand how children recover after a critical illness. Our results suggest factors that may influence the recovery trajectory, and were used to inform the methodology, outcomes of interest, and appropriate sample size of a

  4. The impact of early hypoglycemia and blood glucose variability on outcome in critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Bagshaw, Sean M; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Jacka, Michael J; Egi, Moritoki; Hart, Graeme K; George, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In critical illness, the association of hypoglycemia, blood glucose (BG) variability and outcome are not well understood. We describe the incidence, clinical factors and outcomes associated with an early hypoglycemia and BG variability in critically ill patients. Methods Retrospective interrogation of prospectively collected data from the Australia New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database on 66184 adult admissions to 24 intensive care units (ICUs) from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2005. Primary exposure was hypoglycemia (BG < 4.5 mmol/L) and BG variability (BG < 4.5 and ≥ 12.0 mmol/L) within 24 hours of admission. Primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Results The cumulative incidence of hypoglycemia and BG variability were 13.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 13.5 to 14.0; n = 9122) and 2.9% (95%CI = 2.8 to 3.0, n = 1913), respectively. Several clinical factors were associated with both hypoglycemia and BG variability including: co-morbid disease (P < 0.001), non-elective admissions (P < 0.001), higher illness severity (P < 0.001), and primary septic diagnosis (P < 0.001). Hypoglycemia was associated with greater odds of adjusted ICU (odds ratio (OR) = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.31 to 1.54) and hospital death (OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.27 to 1.46). Hypoglycemia severity was associated with 'dose-response' increases in mortality. BG variability was associated with greater odds of adjusted ICU (1.5, 95% CI = 1.4 to 1.6) and hospital (1.4, 95% CI = 1.3 to 1.5) mortality, when compared with either hypoglycemia only or neither. Conclusions In critically ill patients, both early hypoglycemia and early variability in BG are relatively common, and independently portend an increased risk for mortality. PMID:19534781

  5. Accuracy of Subcutaneous Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Critically Ill Adults: Improved Sensor Performance with Enhanced Calibrations

    PubMed Central

    Leelarathna, Lalantha; English, Shane W.; Thabit, Hood; Caldwell, Karen; Allen, Janet M.; Kumareswaran, Kavita; Wilinska, Malgorzata E.; Nodale, Marianna; Haidar, Ahmad; Evans, Mark L.; Burnstein, Rowan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Accurate real-time continuous glucose measurements may improve glucose control in the critical care unit. We evaluated the accuracy of the FreeStyle® Navigator® (Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA) subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device in critically ill adults using two methods of calibration. Subjects and Methods: In a randomized trial, paired CGM and reference glucose (hourly arterial blood glucose [ABG]) were collected over a 48-h period from 24 adults with critical illness (mean±SD age, 60±14 years; mean±SD body mass index, 29.6±9.3 kg/m2; mean±SD Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score, 12±4 [range, 6–19]) and hyperglycemia. In 12 subjects, the CGM device was calibrated at variable intervals of 1–6 h using ABG. In the other 12 subjects, the sensor was calibrated according to the manufacturer's instructions (1, 2, 10, and 24 h) using arterial blood and the built-in point-of-care glucometer. Results: In total, 1,060 CGM–ABG pairs were analyzed over the glucose range from 4.3 to 18.8 mmol/L. Using enhanced calibration median (interquartile range) every 169 (122–213) min, the absolute relative deviation was lower (7.0% [3.5, 13.0] vs. 12.8% [6.3, 21.8], P<0.001), and the percentage of points in the Clarke error grid Zone A was higher (87.8% vs. 70.2%). Conclusions: Accuracy of the Navigator CGM device during critical illness was comparable to that observed in non–critical care settings. Further significant improvements in accuracy may be obtained by frequent calibrations with ABG measurements. PMID:24180327

  6. Light and the outcome of the critically ill: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Light before and during acute illness has been associated with both benefit and harm in animal models and small human studies. Our objective was to determine the associations of light duration (photoperiod) and intensity (insolation) before and during critical illness with hospital mortality in ICU patients. Based on the 'winter immunoenhancement' theory, we tested the hypothesis that a shorter photoperiod before critical illness is associated with improved survival. Methods We analyzed data from 11,439 patients admitted to 8 ICUs at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center between June 30, 1999 and July 31, 2004. Daily photoperiod and insolation prior to and after ICU admission were estimated for each patient by using data provided by the United States Naval Observatory and National Aeronautics and Space Administration and direct measurement of light gradient from outside to bedside for each ICU room. Our primary outcome was hospital mortality. The association between light and risk of death was analyzed using multivariate analyses, adjusting for potential confounders, including severity of illness, case mix, and ICU type. Results The cohort had an average APACHE III of 52.9 and a hospital mortality of 10.7%. In total, 128 ICU beds were analyzed; 108 (84%) had windows. Pre-illness photoperiod ranged from 259 to 421 hours in the prior month. A shorter photoperiod was associated with a reduced risk of death: for each 1-hour decrease, the adjusted OR was 0.997 (0.994 to 0.999, p = 0.03). In the ICU, there was near complete (99.6%) degradation of natural light from outside to the ICU bed. Thus, light exposure once in the ICU approached zero; the 24-hour insolation was 0.005 ± 0.003 kWh/m2 with little diurnal variation. There was no association between ICU photoperiod or insolation and mortality. Conclusions Consistent with the winter immunoenhancement theory, a shorter photoperiod in the month before critical illness is associated with a reduced risk

  7. Hypercapnic respiratory acidosis: a protective or harmful strategy for critically ill newborn foals?

    PubMed

    Vengust, Modest

    2012-10-01

    This paper reviews both the beneficial and adverse effects of permissive hypercapnic respiratory acidosis in critically ill newborn foals. It has been shown that partial carbon dioxide pressure (PCO2) above the traditional safe range (hypercapnia), has beneficial effects on the physiology of the respiratory, cardiovascular, and nervous system in neonates. In human neonatal critical care medicine permissive hypercapnic acidosis is generally well-tolerated by patients and is more beneficial to their wellbeing than normal carbon dioxide (CO2) pressure or normocapnia. Even though adverse effects of hypercapnia have been reported, especially in patients with central nervous system pathology and/or chronic infection, critical care clinicians often artificially increase PCO2 to take advantage of its positive effects on compromised neonate tissues. This is referred to as therapeutic hypercapnia. Hypercapnic respiratory acidosis is common in critically ill newborn foals and has traditionally been considered as not beneficial. A search of online scientific databases was conducted to survey the literature on the effects of hypercapnia in neonates, with emphasis on newborn foals. The dynamic status of safety levels of PCO2 and data on the effectiveness of different carbon dioxide levels are not available for newborn foals and should be scientifically determined. Presently, permissive hypercapnia should be implemented or tolerated cautiously in compromised newborn foals and its use should be based on relevant data from adult horses and other species.

  8. Etomidate: to use or not to use for endotracheal intubation in the critically ill?

    PubMed

    Smischney, Nathan J; Kashyap, Rahul; Gajic, Ognjen

    2015-09-01

    Endotracheal intubation is frequently performed in the intensive care unit (ICU). It can be life-saving for many patients who present with acute respiratory distress. However, it is equally associated with complications that may lead to unwanted effects in this patient population. According to the literature, the rate of complications associated with endotracheal intubation is much higher in an environment such as the ICU as compared to other, more controlled environments (i.e., operating room). Thus, the conduct of performing such a procedure needs to be accomplished with the utmost care. To facilitate establishment of the breathing tube, sedation is routinely administered. Given the tenuous hemodynamic status of the critically ill, etomidate was frequently chosen to blunt further decreases in blood pressure and/or heart rate. Recently however, reports have demonstrated a possible association with the use of etomidate for endotracheal intubation and mortality in the critically ill. In addition, this association seems to be predominantly in patients diagnosed with sepsis. As a result, some have advocated against the use of this medication in septic patients. Due to the negative associations identified with etomidate and mortality, several investigators have evaluated potential alternatives to this solution (e.g., ketamine and ketamine-propofol admixture). These studies have shown promise. However, despite the evidence against using etomidate for endotracheal intubation, other studies have demonstrated no such association. This leaves the critical care clinician with uncertainty regarding the best sedative to administer in this patient population. The following editorial discusses current evidence regarding etomidate use for endotracheal intubation and mortality. In particular, we highlight a recent article with the largest population to date that found no association between etomidate and mortality in the critically ill and illustrate important findings that the

  9. Critical care nursing and delirium management in the mentally ill client.

    PubMed

    Bone, Yolanda; Smith, George Byron

    2012-03-01

    The critical care environment is an experience of stress for the patient and the practitioner. Turbulence can occur during the critical care course, which can cause exacerbation of chronic conditions. These exacerbations can lead to delirium and/or psychosis. Nursing professionals must be alert to changes in all conditions which increase morbidity and mortality in the critical care patient. Although critical care nurses may feel unable to care for the psychiatric needs of clients with a chronic mental disorder, implementing tools to aid in assessment will empower the nurses. Truly, the key to viewing all clients is wholly, rather than by diagnosis. Critical care nurses care for clients with many comorbidities and illnesses. Many conditions may be a new experience. Mental disorders should not be viewed as being out of the scope of the critical care nurse. On the contrary, mental disorders are chronic conditions, not unlike diabetes mellitus or congestive heart failure. What the critical care nurse needs is a knowledge base in order to feel more comfortable in caring for these clients. Knowledge is empowerment.

  10. Baseline Serum Concentrations of Zinc, Selenium, and Prolactin in Critically Ill Children*

    PubMed Central

    Heidemann, Sabrina M.; Holubkov, Richard; Meert, Kathleen L.; Dean, J. Michael; Berger, John; Bell, Michael; Anand, K. J. S.; Zimmerman, Jerry; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Harrison, Rick; Willson, Douglas F.; Nicholson, Carol; Carcillo, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe serum concentrations of zinc, selenium, and prolactin in critically ill children within 72 hours of PICU admission, and to investigate relationships between these immunomodulators and lymphopenia. Design An analysis of baseline data collected as part of the multicenter Critical Illness Stress Induced Immune Suppression (CRISIS) Prevention Trial. Setting PICUs affiliated with the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network. Patients All children enrolled in the CRISIS Prevention Trial that had baseline serum samples available for analysis. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Of 293 critically ill children enrolled in the CRISIS Prevention Trial, 284 had baseline serum samples analyzed for prolactin concentration, 280 for zinc concentration, and 278 for selenium concentration within 72 hours of PICU admission. Lymphocyte counts were available for 235 children. Zinc levels ranged from nondetectable (< 0.1 μg/mL) to 2.87 μg/mL (mean 0.46 μg/mL and median 0.44 μg/mL) and were below the normal reference range for 235 (83.9%) children. Selenium levels ranged from 26 to 145 ng/mL (mean 75.4 ng/mL and median 74.5 ng/mL) and were below the normal range for 156 (56.1%) children. Prolactin levels ranged from nondetectable (< 1 ng/mL) to 88 ng/mL (mean 12.2 ng/mL and median 10 ng/mL). Hypoprolactinemia was present in 68 (23.9%) children. Lymphopenia was more likely in children with zinc levels below normal than those with zinc levels within or above the normal range (82 of 193 [42.5%] vs. 10 of 39 [25.6%], p = 0.0498). Neither selenium nor prolactin concentrations were associated with lymphopenia (p = 1.0 and p = 0.72, respectively). Conclusions Serum concentrations of zinc, selenium, and prolactin are often low in critically ill children early after PICU admission. Low serum zinc levels are associated with lymphopenia, whereas low selenium and prolactin levels are not. The implications of these findings and the mechanisms by

  11. Incidence of gastric mucosal injury as measured by reactance in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Nohra E; Ceron, Ulises; Sanchez-Miranda, Gustavo; Remolina, Miguel; Godinez, Maria M; Peralta, Itzel Y; Sacristan, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Gastric reactance has been proposed as a measure of mucosal ischemic injury in the critically ill. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of gastric mucosal injury as measured by gastric reactance in different subgroups of critical patients. We studied 100 adult patients admitted to 7 different hospital intensive care units, requiring a nasogastric tube. Gastric impedance measurements were continuously obtained from each patient for 24 hours. Patients were managed based on conventional protocols by hospital staff, blinded to the changes in gastric impedance parameters. The low-frequency central reactance (X L) reflects tissue edema caused by prolonged ischemia. The previously reported threshold of X L ≥ 13 - jΩ was used to classify injured mucosa; 80% of all patients had mean X L above this threshold. No significant differences were found in the incidence of mucosal ischemia between medical versus surgical, hemodynamic versus respiratory or neurological patients. Significant lower urine output was found in patients with X L above threshold (P < .01); also, there was a significant effect of fluid balance in those patients (P < .05). More complicated patients had higher average reactance. This study shows that gastric ischemia as estimated by gastric reactance has a very high incidence in the critically ill, independently of the reason for admission. High reactance is related with higher morbidity in agreement with other reports using different methods of assessing splanchnic hypoperfusion in this patient population.

  12. Physical rehabilitation interventions for adult patients during critical illness: an overview of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Bronwen; O'Neill, Brenda; Salisbury, Lisa; Blackwood, Bronagh

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical rehabilitation interventions aim to ameliorate the effects of critical illness-associated muscle dysfunction in survivors. We conducted an overview of systematic reviews (SR) evaluating the effect of these interventions across the continuum of recovery. Methods Six electronic databases (Cochrane Library, CENTRAL, DARE, Medline, Embase, and Cinahl) were searched. Two review authors independently screened articles for eligibility and conducted data extraction and quality appraisal. Reporting quality was assessed and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach applied to summarise overall quality of evidence. Results Five eligible SR were included in this overview, of which three included meta-analyses. Reporting quality of the reviews was judged as medium to high. Two reviews reported moderate-to-high quality evidence of the beneficial effects of physical therapy commencing during intensive care unit (ICU) admission in improving critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy, quality of life, mortality and healthcare utilisation. These interventions included early mobilisation, cycle ergometry and electrical muscle stimulation. Two reviews reported very low to low quality evidence of the beneficial effects of electrical muscle stimulation delivered in the ICU for improving muscle strength, muscle structure and critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy. One review reported that due to a lack of good quality randomised controlled trials and inconsistency in measuring outcomes, there was insufficient evidence to support beneficial effects from physical rehabilitation delivered post-ICU discharge. Conclusions Patients derive short-term benefits from physical rehabilitation delivered during ICU admission. Further robust trials of electrical muscle stimulation in the ICU and rehabilitation delivered following ICU discharge are needed to determine the long-term impact on patient care. This overview provides recommendations for

  13. Molecular mechanisms autonomic dysfunction and impaired cardiac contractility in critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Ackland, Gareth L.; Whittle, John; Toner, Andrew; Machhada, Asif; Gutierrez Del Arroyo, Ana; Sciuso, Alberto; Jenkins, Nicholas; Dyson, Alex; Struthers, Richard; Sneyd, Robert; Minto, Gary; Singer, Mervyn; Shah, Ajay M.; Gourine, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Molecular mechanisms linking autonomic dysfunction with poorer clinical outcomes in critical illness remain unclear. We hypothesized that baroreflex dysfunction alone is sufficient to cause cardiac impairment through neurohormonal activation of (NADPH oxidase-dependent) oxidative stress resulting in increased expression of G-protein coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-2, a key negative regulator of cardiac function. Design: Laboratory/clinical investigations. Setting: University laboratory/medical centers. Subjects: Adult rats; wild-type/NAPDH oxidase subunit-2 (NOX-2) deficient mice; elective surgical patients. Interventions: Cardiac performance was assessed by transthoracic echocardiography following experimental baroreflex dysfunction (BD, sino-aortic denervation) in rats and mice. Immunoblots assessed GPCR recycling proteins expression in rodent cardiomyocytes and patient mononuclear leukocytes. In surgical patients, heart rate recovery after cardio-pulmonary exercise testing, time/frequency measures of parasympathetic parameters were related to the presence/absence of BD (defined by spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity of <6ms.mmHg-1). The associations of BD with intraoperative cardiac function and outcomes were assessed. Measurements and Main Results: Experimental BD in rats and mice resulted in impaired cardiac contractility and upregulation of GRK-2 expression. In mice, genetic deficiency of gp91 NADPH-oxidase (NOX-2) subunit prevented upregulation of GRK-2 expression in conditions of BD and preserved cardiac function. BD was present in 81/249 (32.5%) patients, and was characterized by lower parasympathetic tone and increased GRK-2 expression in mononuclear leukocytes. BD in patients was also associated with impaired intraoperative cardiac contractility. Critical illness and mortality were more frequent in surgical patients with BD (relative risk: 1.66 [95%CI:1.16-2.39]; p=0.006). Conclusions: Reduced baroreflex sensitivity is associated with NOX-2

  14. Daily estimation of the severity of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in critically ill children

    PubMed Central

    Leteurtre, Stéphane; Duhamel, Alain; Grandbastien, Bruno; Proulx, François; Cotting, Jacques; Gottesman, Ronald; Joffe, Ari; Wagner, Bendicht; Hubert, Philippe; Martinot, Alain; Lacroix, Jacques; Leclerc, Francis

    2010-01-01

    Background Daily evaluation of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome has been performed in critically ill adults. We evaluated the clinical course of multiple organ dysfunction over time in critically ill children using the Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction (PELOD) score and determined the optimal days for measuring scores. Methods We prospectively measured daily PELOD scores and calculated the change in scores over time for 1806 consecutive patients admitted to seven pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) between September 1998 and February 2000. To study the relationship between daily scores and mortality in the PICU, we evaluated changes in daily scores during the first four days; the mean rate of change in scores during the entire PICU stay between survivors and nonsurvivors; and Cox survival analyses using a change in PELOD score as a time-dependent covariate to determine the optimal days for measuring daily scores. Results The overall mortality among the 1806 patients was 6.4%. A high PELOD score (≥ 20 points) on day 1 was associated with an odds ratio (OR) for death of 40.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] 20.3–81.4); a medium score (10–19 points) on day 1 was associated with an OR for death of 4.2 (95% CI 2.0–8.7). Mortality was 50% when a high score on day 1 increased on day 2. The course of daily PELOD scores differed between survivors and nonsurvivors. A set of seven days (days 1, 2, 5, 8, 12, 16 and 18) was identified as the optimal period for measurement of daily PELOD scores. Interpretation PELOD scores indicating a worsening condition or no improvement over time were indicators of a poor prognosis in the PICU. A set of seven days for measurement of the PELOD score during the PICU stay provided optimal information on the progression of multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome in critically ill children. PMID:20547715

  15. Variability of piperacillin concentrations in relation to tazobactam concentrations in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Zander, Johannes; Döbbeler, Gundula; Nagel, Dorothea; Scharf, Christina; Huseyn-Zada, Mikayil; Jung, Jette; Frey, Lorenz; Vogeser, Michael; Zoller, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring for critically ill patients receiving piperacillin/tazobactam is described as a useful tool. However, the minimum inhibitory concentration of piperacillin depends on a sufficiently high concentration of tazobactam in case of β-lactamase-producing strains. Therefore, the relationship between piperacillin and tazobactam concentrations was assessed in a heterogeneous group of critically ill patients. Sixty patients with severe infections receiving 4.5 g of piperacillin/tazobactam 2-3 times daily by intermittent infusion were included in this prospective observational study (NCT01793012). Over 4 days, multiple serum samples were obtained to determine the total piperacillin and tazobactam concentrations. The target ranges were defined as trough levels >16 mg/L (>22.5 mg/L) and >4 mg/L (>5.7 mg/L) for the calculated unbound concentrations (measured total concentrations) of piperacillin and tazobactam, respectively. Despite a high correlation coefficient (r = 0.93) comparing piperacillin and tazobactam trough levels, the piperacillin/tazobactam quotients varied between ca. 1 and 10. From linear regression analysis of piperacillin versus tazobactam values, it follows that a piperacillin trough level of 22.5 mg/L might be associated with tazobactam trough levels ranging from 1.5 mg/L to 10.1 mg/L. A 70 mg/L threshold for total piperacillin trough levels would be necessary to ensure that tazobactam concentrations are >5.7 mg/L. Because of the observed variability of piperacillin/tazobactam quotients, defining the total piperacillin target range ≥70 mg/L might be useful to ensure that tazobactam concentrations do not fall below 5.7 mg/L. Further studies are necessary to confirm that the used therapeutic ranges are associated with optimal outcomes in critically ill patients.

  16. New colistin population pharmacokinetic data in critically ill patients suggesting an alternative loading dose rationale.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, N; Mimoz, O; Mégarbane, B; Comets, E; Chatelier, D; Lasocki, S; Gauzit, R; Balayn, D; Gobin, P; Marchand, S; Couet, W

    2014-12-01

    Colistin is an old antibiotic that has recently gained a considerable renewal of interest as the last-line defense therapy against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. It is administered as colistin methanesulfonate (CMS), an inactive prodrug, and it was shown that due to slow CMS conversion, colistin plasma concentrations increase very slowly after treatment initiation, which constitutes the rationale for a loading dose in critically ill patients. However, faster CMS conversion was observed in healthy volunteers but using a different CMS brand, which may also have a major impact on colistin pharmacokinetics. Seventy-three critically ill patients not undergoing dialysis received multiple doses of CMS. The CMS concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and a pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a population approach. We confirmed that CMS renal clearance and colistin concentrations at steady state are mostly governed by creatinine clearance, but we predict a typical maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) of colistin close to 2 mg/liter, occurring 3 h after an initial dose of 2 million international units (MIU) of CMS. Accordingly, the estimated colistin half-life (t1/2) was relatively short (3.1 h), with rapid attainment of steady state. Our results are only partially consistent with other recently published results. We confirm that the CMS maintenance dose should be adjusted according to renal function in critically ill patients. However, much higher than expected colistin concentrations were observed after the initial CMS dose, with rapid steady-state achievement. These discrepancies challenge the pharmacokinetic rationale for a loading dose, which may still be appropriate for rapid bacterial eradication and an improved clinical cure rate.

  17. Entropy correlates with Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ankur; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Trikha, Anjan; Rewari, Vimi; Chandralekha

    2014-04-01

    Sedation is routinely used in intensive care units. However due to absence of objective scoring systems like Bispectral Index and entropy our ability to regulate the degree of sedation is limited. This deficiency is further highlighted by the fact that agitation scores used in intensive care units (ICU) have no role in paralyzed patients. The present study compares entropy as a sedation scoring modality with Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) in mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients in an ICU. Twenty-seven, mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients of either sex, 16-65 years of age, were studied over a period of 24 h. They received a standard sedation regimen consisting of a bolus dose of propofol 0.5 mg/kg and fentanyl 1 lg/kg followed by infusions of propofol and fentanyl ranging from 1.5 to 5 mg/kg/h and 0.5 to 2.0 lg/kg/h, respectively. Clinically relevant values of RASS for optimal ICU sedation (between 0 and -3) in non-paralyzed patients were compared to corresponding entropy values, to find if any significant correlation exists between the two. These entropy measurements were obtained using the Datex-Ohmeda-M-EntropyTM module. This module is presently not approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for monitoring sedation in ICU. A total of 527 readings were obtained. There was a statistically significant correlation between the state entropy (SE) and RASS [Spearman's rho/rs = 0.334, p\\0.0001]; response entropy (RE) and RASS [Spearman's rho/rs = 0.341, p\\0.0001]). For adequate sedation as judged by a RASS value of 0 to -3, the mean SE was 57.86 ± 16.50 and RE was 67.75 ± 15.65. The present study illustrates that entropy correlates with RASS (between scores 0 and -3) when assessing the level of sedation in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.

  18. New-Onset Diabetes After Acute and Critical Illness: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jivanji, Chirag J; Asrani, Varsha M; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2017-03-13

    Hyperglycemia is commonly observed during acute and critical illness. Recent studies have investigated the risk of developing diabetes after acute and critical illness, but the relationship between degree of in-hospital hyperglycemia and new-onset diabetes has not been investigated. This study examines the evidence for the relationship between in-hospital hyperglycemia and prevalence of new-onset diabetes after acute and critical illness. A literature search was performed of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Scopus databases for relevant studies published from January 1, 2000, through August 4, 2016. Patients with no history of diabetes before hospital discharge were included in the systematic review. In-hospital glucose concentration was classified as normoglycemia, mild hyperglycemia, or severe hyperglycemia for the meta-analysis. Twenty-three studies were included in the systematic review, and 18 of these (111,078 patients) met the eligibility criteria for the meta-analysis. The prevalence of new-onset diabetes was significantly related to in-hospital glucose concentration and was 4% (95% CI, 2%-7%), 12% (95% CI, 9%-15%), and 28% (95% CI, 18%-39%) for patients with normoglycemia, mild hyperglycemia, and severe hyperglycemia, respectively. The prevalence of new-onset diabetes was not influenced by disease setting, follow-up duration, or study design. In summary, this study found stepwise growth in the prevalence of new-onset diabetes with increasing in-hospital glucose concentration. Patients with severe hyperglycemia are at the highest risk, with 28% developing diabetes after hospital discharge.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Amphotericin B Colloidal Dispersion in Critically Ill Patients with Cholestatic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Stefan; Überlacher, Elisabeth; Schöfmann, Julia; Stienecke, Eva; Dunzendorfer, Stefan; Joannidis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of lipid-bound and liberated amphotericin B (AMB) was assessed in 11 critically ill patients with cholestatic liver disease (CSLD) and in 9 subjects with normal liver function treated with AMB colloidal dispersion (ABCD). Exposure to lipid-bound AMB was higher in patients with CSLD. Levels of liberated AMB were elevated by CSLD only after the first dose, whereas its pharmacokinetics was unaffected at steady state. The standard dosage of ABCD is probably adequate for patients with CSLD. PMID:22850517

  20. Beta-lactam dosing in critically ill patients with septic shock and continuous renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although early and appropriate antibiotic therapy remains the most important intervention for successful treatment of septic shock, data guiding optimization of beta-lactam prescription in critically ill patients prescribed with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) are still limited. Being small hydrophilic molecules, beta-lactams are likely to be cleared by CRRT to a significant extent. As a result, additional variability may be introduced to the per se variable antibiotic concentrations in critically ill patients. This article aims to describe the current clinical scenario for beta-lactam dosing in critically ill patients with septic shock and CRRT, to highlight the sources of variability among the different studies that reduce extrapolation to clinical practice, and to identify the opportunities for future research and improvement in this field. Three frequently prescribed beta-lactams (meropenem, piperacillin and ceftriaxone) were chosen for review. Our findings showed that present dosing recommendations are based on studies with drawbacks limiting their applicability in the clinical setting. In general, current antibiotic dosing regimens for CRRT follow a one-size-fits-all fashion despite emerging clinical data suggesting that drug clearance is partially dependent on CRRT modality and intensity. Moreover, some studies pool data from heterogeneous populations with CRRT that may exhibit different pharmacokinetics (for example, admission diagnoses different to septic shock, such as trauma), which also limit their extrapolation to critically ill patients with septic shock. Finally, there is still no consensus regarding the %T>MIC (percentage of dosing interval when concentration of the antibiotic is above the minimum inhibitory concentration of the pathogen) value that should be chosen as the pharmacodynamic target for antibiotic therapy in patients with septic shock and CRRT. For empirically optimized dosing, during the first day a loading dose is required

  1. Frailty prior to Critical Illness and Mortality for Elderly Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Aluko A.; Gong, Michelle N.; Guerra, Carmen; Wunsch, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Background Health categories of elderly patients prior to critical illness may explain differences in mortality during and after admission to intensive care units (ICUs). Objectives To estimate the effect of pre-ICU health categories on mortality during and after critical illness, focusing specifically on the effect of pre-ICU frailty on short- and long-term mortality. Design Retrospective cohort study using linked Medicare claims data from 2004–2008. Participants A nationally representative sample of elderly Medicare beneficiaries who were admitted to an ICU in 2005. Measurements Patients were classified into four pre-ICU health categories (Robust; Cancer; Chronic Organ Failure; Frailty) using claims data from the year prior to admission, allowing for assignment to multiple categories. We assessed the association between pre-ICU health categories and hospital and 3-year mortality using multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional Hazards models. Results Among 47,427 elderly ICU patients, 18.8% were Robust; 28.6% had pre-ICU Cancer; 68.1% Chronic Organ Failure and 34.0% Frailty; 41.3% qualified for multiple categories. Overall hospital mortality was 12.6%, with the lowest mortality for Robust patients (9.7%). Patients with pre-ICU Frailty had a higher hospital mortality compared to patients with the same pre-ICU health categories without frailty (adjusted Odds Ratios ranged from 1.27 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10–1.47) to 1.52 (95% CI 1.35–1.63)). Robust hospital survivors had the lowest 3-year mortality (24.6%). Pre-ICU Frailty conferred a higher 3-year mortality compared to pre-ICU categories without frailty (adjusted Hazard Ratios ranged from 1.54 (95% CI 1.45–1.64) to 1.84 (95% CI 1.70–1.99). Conclusion Critically ill elderly patients can be categorized by Pre-ICU health categories. These categories, particularly pre-ICU Frailty, may be important for understanding risk of death during and after critical illness. PMID:26096386

  2. Clinical Associations of Early Dysnatremias in Critically Ill Neonates and Infants Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Jon; Phadke, Daniel; Tong, Suhong; Eshelman, Jennifer; Newman, Sarah; Ruzas, Christopher; da Cruz, Eduardo M; Osorio, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    Dysnatremias (DN) are common electrolyte disturbances in cardiac critical illness and are known risk factors for adverse outcomes in certain populations. Little information exists on DN in children with cardiac disease admitted to the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) after undergoing cardiac surgery, either corrective or palliative. The aim was to determine the incidence and adverse outcomes associated with DN in neonates and infants undergoing cardiac surgery. Retrospective cohort and single center study performed at Children's Hospital Colorado from May 2013 to May 2014, in children under 1 year old admitted to the CICU after undergoing surgery for congenital or acquired cardiac disease. 183 subjects were analyzed.

  3. Selenium and thyroid hormone axis in critical ill states: an overview of conflicting view points.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Roland

    2009-01-01

    In critical ill states the plasma selenium levels are low and inversely correlated with the severity and outcome of the disease. The plasma selenium levels indicate the amount of circulating selenoproteins and selenoenzymes. These are important for the maintenance of the redox system, modulating the immune system and also for thyroid hormone metabolism. Not only all three deiodinases (D1-3) are selenoenzymes, but within the thyroid gland there are several other selenoenzymes, which are important for the maintenance of normal thyroid function. In critical ill states also triodothyronine (T3) is low and reverse T3 elevated, and also TSH and thyroxin (T4) are low, correlating like low plasma selenium with the severity of the disease. Subsequently, several intervention trials had been performed to evaluate whether an adjuvant selenium supplementation might attenuate the course of the disease and improve outcome. The selenium supplementation improved outcome and even reduced mortality in some but not all prospective randomized trials. A few prospective randomized intervention trials with selenium supplementation had also been performed to evaluate the hypothesis, whether low selenium is the cause of low-T3-syndrome, however, with conflicting results and no clear evidence that low D1 activity is due to the selenium deficiency in critical illness. Because D1 catalyses the conversion of T4 to T3 and also the clearance of reverse T3, low D1 activity would sufficiently explain low plasma T3 and elevated reverse T3. It had been, however, clearly shown that cytokines are responsible for the inhibition of D1 activity, but D2 and D3 are even higher during acute inflammation in critically ill patients. One of the most important effects of selenium on the immune system seems to be the reduction of cytokine release and therefore an indirect connection between low selenium and low D1 activity has to be postulated and not a lower D1 activity due to lower availability of selenium for

  4. Superficial Temporal Artery Pseudoaneurysm: A Conservative Approach in a Critically Ill Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, Rosario Francesco Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Crucitti, Pierfilippo; Carboni, Giampiero; Coppola, Roberto; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte

    2007-04-15

    A 71-year-old man affected by cardio- and cerebrovascular disease experienced an accidental fall and trauma to the fronto-temporal area of the head. A few weeks later a growing mass appeared on his scalp. A diagnosis of superficial temporal artery pseudoaneurysm was made following CT and color Doppler ultrasound. His clinical condition favoured a conservative approach by ultrasound-guided compression and subsequent surgical resection. A conservative approach should be considered the treatment of choice in critically ill patients affected by superficial temporal artery pseudoaneurysm.

  5. [Excess mortality in critically ill patients after treatment with human albumin].

    PubMed

    Offringa, M; Gemke, R J; Henny, C P

    1998-08-15

    According to the results of a systematic review of randomized clinical studies administration of human albumin to critically ill patients is associated with excess mortality, compared with withholding albumin or administration of crystalloid fluids. The study appears to be well done. Also, there are various explanatory pathophysiological mechanisms supporting the association. However, a favourable effect of albumin in certain patient groups cannot be excluded. Alternatives to albumin are available in most clinical situations, but unfortunately, they are not completely without drawbacks. The use of albumin has to be limited; it might only be abolished when a better effect of other fluids, such as synthetic solutions, is demonstrated.

  6. Beta-lactam dosing in critically ill patients with septic shock and continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Ulldemolins, Marta; Vaquer, Sergi; Llauradó-Serra, Mireia; Pontes, Caridad; Calvo, Gonzalo; Soy, Dolors; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio

    2014-06-23

    Although early and appropriate antibiotic therapy remains the most important intervention for successful treatment of septic shock, data guiding optimization of beta-lactam prescription in critically ill patients prescribed with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) are still limited. Being small hydrophilic molecules, beta-lactams are likely to be cleared by CRRT to a significant extent. As a result, additional variability may be introduced to the per se variable antibiotic concentrations in critically ill patients. This article aims to describe the current clinical scenario for beta-lactam dosing in critically ill patients with septic shock and CRRT, to highlight the sources of variability among the different studies that reduce extrapolation to clinical practice, and to identify the opportunities for future research and improvement in this field. Three frequently prescribed beta-lactams (meropenem, piperacillin and ceftriaxone) were chosen for review. Our findings showed that present dosing recommendations are based on studies with drawbacks limiting their applicability in the clinical setting. In general, current antibiotic dosing regimens for CRRT follow a one-size-fits-all fashion despite emerging clinical data suggesting that drug clearance is partially dependent on CRRT modality and intensity. Moreover, some studies pool data from heterogeneous populations with CRRT that may exhibit different pharmacokinetics (for example, admission diagnoses different to septic shock, such as trauma), which also limit their extrapolation to critically ill patients with septic shock. Finally, there is still no consensus regarding the %T>MIC (percentage of dosing interval when concentration of the antibiotic is above the minimum inhibitory concentration of the pathogen) value that should be chosen as the pharmacodynamic target for antibiotic therapy in patients with septic shock and CRRT. For empirically optimized dosing, during the first day a loading dose is required

  7. The role of Vitamin B12 in the critically ill--a review.

    PubMed

    Romain, M; Sviri, S; Linton, D M; Stav, I; van Heerden, P V

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin B12 is an essential micronutrient, as humans have no capacity to produce the vitamin and it needs to be ingested from animal proteins. The ingested Vitamin B12 undergoes a complex process of absorption and assimilation. Vitamin B12 is essential for cellular function. Deficiency affects 15% of patients older than 65 and results in haematological and neurological disorders. Low levels of Vitamin B12 may also be an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. High levels of Vitamin B12 are associated with inflammation and represent a poor outlook for critically ill patients. Treatment of Vitamin B12 deficiency is simple, but may be lifelong.

  8. Effectiveness and safety of a protocol for promotion of early intragastric feeding in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Briassoulis, G C; Zavras, N J; Hatzis MD, T D

    2001-04-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the feasibility, adequacy, and efficacy of early poststress intragastric feeding (EPIGF) in critically ill children. DESIGN: A prospective clinical study. SETTING: Pediatric intensive care unit in a tertiary care children's hospital. PATIENTS: Seventy-one consecutively enrolled critically ill children requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation. INTERVENTIONS: Full-strength intragastric tube feedings (Nutrison Pediatric, Standard) were initiated within 12 hrs of the study-entry event. Enteral feedings were advanced to a target volume of energy intake = 1/2, 1, 5/4, 6/4, and 6/4 of the predicted basal metabolic rate (PBMR) on days 1-5, respectively. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Nutritional status by the caloric intake, recommended dietary allowances, PBMR, predicted energy expenditure (PEE), anthropometry, and clinical indices were evaluated on days 1 and 5. Safety was assessed by the clinical course of disease, laboratory findings, and occurrence of complications. Success was determined by accomplishment of the PEE target. The early success rate was 94.4% and predicted late enteral feeding success accurately (p =.0001). Caloric intake approached PBMR the second day (43 +/- 1.7 kcal/kg/day vs. 43.2 +/- 1.1 kcal/kg/day) and PEE the fifth day (66.2 +/- 2.7 kcal/kg/day vs. 67.7 +/- 6.4 kcal/kg/day). Multivariate stepwise regression analysis showed that poor outcome and a high Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System score correlated with failure of EPIGF (p <.0001). Patients who succeeded EPIGF had significantly higher myocardial ejection (65% vs. 43%; p <.0001) or shortening fractions (34% vs. 20%; p =.0001) on day 1 than those who failed. Patients tolerated EPIGF well; 9.9% developed nosocomial pneumonia, 5.6% developed diarrhea, and 8.5% needed treatment with cisapride because of a delay of gastric emptying. The mortality rate (5.6%) was different between initial and final success and failure groups (p <.0001) and was lower than predicted

  9. Lactate versus non-lactate metabolic acidosis: a retrospective outcome evaluation of critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Gunnerson, Kyle J; Saul, Melissa; He, Shui; Kellum, John A

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Acid–base abnormalities are common in the intensive care unit (ICU). Differences in outcome exist between respiratory and metabolic acidosis in similar pH ranges. Some forms of metabolic acidosis (for example, lactate) seem to have worse outcomes than others (for example, chloride). The relative incidence of each type of disorder is unknown. We therefore designed this study to determine the nature and clinical significance of metabolic acidosis in critically ill patients. Methods An observational, cohort study of critically ill patients was performed in a tertiary care hospital. Critically ill patients were selected on the clinical suspicion of the presence of lactic acidosis. The inpatient mortality of the entire group was 14%, with a length of stay in hospital of 12 days and a length of stay in the ICU of 5.8 days. Results We reviewed records of 9,799 patients admitted to the ICUs at our institution between 1 January 2001 and 30 June 2002. We selected a cohort in which clinicians caring for patients ordered a measurement of arterial lactate level. We excluded patients in which any necessary variable required to characterize an acid–base disorder was absent. A total of 851 patients (9% of ICU admissions) met our criteria. Of these, 548 patients (64%) had a metabolic acidosis (standard base excess < -2 mEq/l) and these patients had a 45% mortality, compared with 25% for those with no metabolic acidosis (p < 0.001). We then subclassified metabolic acidosis cases on the basis of the predominant anion present (lactate, chloride, or all other anions). The mortality rate was highest for lactic acidosis (56%); for strong ion gap (SIG) acidosis it was 39% and for hyperchloremic acidosis 29% (p < 0.001). A stepwise logistic regression model identified serum lactate, SIG, phosphate, and age as independent predictors of mortality. Conclusion In critically ill patients in which a measurement of lactate level was ordered, lactate and SIG were strong

  10. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital hypothyroidism congenital hypothyroidism Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hypothyroidism is a partial or complete loss of function ...

  11. Primary and secondary hypothyroidism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hypothyroidism is a decreased activity of the thyroid gland which may affect all body functions. The rate ... and physical sluggishness. The most severe form of hypothyroidism is myxedema, a medical emergency. Hypothyroidism can be ...

  12. No such thing as mental illness? Critical reflections on the major ideas and legacy of Thomas Szasz

    PubMed Central

    Benning, Tony B.

    2016-01-01

    Enfant terrible of psychiatry and widely known as one of its most indefatigable as well as iconoclastic critics, Thomas Szasz (1961–2012) had a prolific writing career that extended some 51 years beyond the publication of his first book, The Myth of Mental Illness, in 1961. This editorial identifies and critically discusses three major themes in Szasz's writings: his contention that there is no such thing as mental illness, his contention that individual responsibility is never compromised in those suffering from what is generally considered as mental illness, and his perennial interest in calling attention to the political nature of psychiatric diagnosis.

  13. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width as a Pragmatic Marker for Outcome in Pediatric Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Ramby, Alexis L.; Goodman, Denise M.; Wald, Eric L.; Weiss, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Red cell distribution width (RDW) is a routine laboratory measure associated with poor outcomes in adult critical illness. Objective We determined the utility of RDW as an early pragmatic biomarker for outcome in pediatric critical illness. Methods We used multivariable logistic regression to test the association of RDW on the first day of pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission with prolonged PICU length of stay (LOS) >48 hours and mortality. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) for RDW was compared to the Pediatric Index of Mortality (PIM)-2 score. Results Over a 13-month period, 596 unique patients had RDW measured on the first day of PICU admission. Sepsis was an effect modifier for LOS >48 hours but not mortality. In sepsis, RDW was not associated with LOS >48 hours. For patients without sepsis, each 1% increase in RDW was associated with 1.17 (95% CI 1.06, 1.30) increased odds of LOS >48 hours. In all patients, RDW was independently associated with PICU mortality (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.09, 1.43). The AUROC for RDW to predict LOS >48 hours and mortality was 0.61 (95% CI 0.56, 0.66) and 0.65 (95% CI 0.55, 0.75), respectively. Although the AUROC for mortality was comparable to PIM-2 (0.75, 95% CI 0.66, 0.83; p = 0.18), RDW did not increase the discriminative utility when added to PIM-2. Despite the moderate AUROC, RDW <13.4% (upper limit of lower quartile) had 53% risk of LOS >48 hours and 3.3% risk of mortality compared to patients with an RDW >15.7% (lower limit of upper quartile) who had 78% risk of LOS >48 hours and 12.9% risk of mortality (p<0.001 for both outcomes). Conclusions Elevated RDW was associated with outcome in pediatric critical illness and provided similar prognostic information as the more complex PIM-2 severity of illness score. Distinct RDW thresholds best discriminate low- versus high-risk patients. PMID:26057629

  14. Bench-to-bedside review: Critical illness-associated cognitive dysfunction – mechanisms, markers, and emerging therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Milbrandt, Eric B; Angus, Derek C

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is common in critically ill patients, not only during the acute illness but also long after its resolution. A large number of pathophysiologic mechanisms are thought to underlie critical illness-associated cognitive dysfunction, including neuro-transmitter abnormalities and occult diffuse brain injury. Markers that could be used to evaluate the influence of specific mechanisms in individual patients include serum anticholinergic activity, certain brain proteins, and tissue sodium concentration determination via high-resolution three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging. Although recent therapeutic advances in this area are exciting, they are still too immature to influence patient care. Additional research is needed if we are to understand better the relative contributions of specific mechanisms to the development of critical illness-associated cognitive dysfunction and to determine whether these mechanisms might be amenable to treatment or prevention. PMID:17118217

  15. Right dose, right now: using big data to optimize antibiotic dosing in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Elbers, Paul W G; Girbes, Armand; Malbrain, Manu L N G; Bosman, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics save lives and are essential for the practice of intensive care medicine. Adequate antibiotic treatment is closely related to outcome. However this is challenging in the critically ill, as their pharmacokinetic profile is markedly altered. Therefore, it is surprising that critical care physicians continue to rely on standard dosing regimens for every patient, regardless of the actual clinical situation. This review outlines the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles that underlie the need for individualized and personalized drug dosing. At present, therapeutic drug monitoring may be of help, but has major disadvantages, remains unavailable for most antibiotics and has produced mixed results. We therefore propose the AutoKinetics concept, taking decision support for antibiotic dosing back to the bedside. By direct interaction with electronic patient records, this opens the way for the use of big data for providing the right dose at the right time in each patient.

  16. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): a clinical review with emphasis on the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Benson, Alexander B; Moss, Marc; Silliman, Christopher C

    2009-11-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality world-wide. Although first described in 1983, it took two decades to develop consensus definitions, which remain controversial. The pathogenesis of TRALI is related to the infusion of donor antibodies that recognize leucocyte antigens in the transfused host or the infusion of lipids and other biological response modifiers that accumulate during the storage or processing of blood components. TRALI appears to be the result of at least two sequential events and treatment is supportive. This review demonstrates that critically ill patients are more susceptible to TRALI and require special attention by critical care specialists, haematologists and transfusion medicine experts. Further research is required into TRALI and its pathogenesis so that transfusions are safer and administered appropriately. Avoidance including male-only transfusion practises, the use of leucoreduced components, fresher blood/blood components and solvent detergent plasma are also discussed.

  17. Use of a token economy with seriously mentally ill patients: criticisms and misconceptions.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, P W

    1995-12-01

    Although use of a token economy has been shown to have significant impact on adults and children with serious mental illness who participate in inpatient and community treatment programs, the intervention has not been widely adopted. The paper presents common criticisms of token economies, which may explain the infrequent use of this treatment strategy. They include perceptions that token economies are ineffective, that their benefits do not readily generalize to other settings, that token economies do not foster individualized treatment plans, that participating in a token economy is humiliating, that token economies are abusive, that concerns about milieu management are unimportant and irrelevant to treatment delivery in the 1990s, and that effective token economies are impractical. In an effort to rekindle interest in this potent treatment technique, the author shows that many of these criticisms rest on misconceptions and provides rebuttals based on empirical research. He describes three steps in establishing a token economy.

  18. Population pharmacokinetics and haemodynamic effects of norepinephrine in hypotensive critically ill children

    PubMed Central

    Oualha, Mehdi; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Lesage, Fabrice; de Saint Blanquat, Laure; Dupic, Laurent; Hubert, Philippe; Spreux-Varoquaux, Odile; Urien, Saïk

    2014-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of norepinephrine in hypotensive critically ill children, including associated variability factors. Methods This was a prospective study in an 18-bed neonatal and paediatric intensive care unit. All children were aged less than 18 years, weighed more than 1500 g and required norepinephrine for systemic arterial hypotension. The pharmacokinetics and haemodynamic effects were described using the non-linear mixed effect modelling software MONOLIX. Results Norepinephrine dosing infusions ranging from 0.05 to 2 μg kg−1 min−1 were administered to 38 children whose weight ranged from 2 to 85 kg. A one compartment open model with linear elimination adequately described the norepinephrine concentration–time courses. Bodyweight (BW) was the main covariate influencing norepinephrine clearance (CL) and endogenous norepinephrine production rate (q0) via an allometric relationship: CL(BWi) = θCL × (BWi)3/4 and q0(BWi) = θq0 × (BWi)3/4. The increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) as a function of norepinephrine concentration was well described using an Emax model. The effects of post-conceptional age (PCA) and number of organ dysfunctions were significant on basal MAP level (MAP0i = MAP0 × PCA/9i0.166) and on the maximal increase in MAP (32 mmHg and 12 mmHg for a number of organ dysfunctions ≤3 and ≥4, respectively). Conclusion The pharmacokinetics and haemodynamic effects of norepinephrine in hypotensive critically ill children highlight the between-subject variability which is related to the substantial role of age, BW and severity of illness. Taking into account these individual characteristics may help clinicians in determining an appropriate initial a priori dosing regimen. PMID:24802558

  19. Potentially inappropriate prescribing andthe risk of adverse drug reactions in critically ill older adults

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Thamires B.; Reis, Wálleri C.; Andrzejevski, Vânia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) use in the elderly is associated with increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), but there is limited information regarding PIM use in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Objective: The aim of the study is to describe the prevalence and factors associated with the use of PIM and the occurrence of PIM-related adverse reactions in the critically ill elderly. Methods: This study enrolled all critically ill older adults (60 years or more) admitted to medical or cardiovascular ICUs between January and December 2013, in a large tertiary teaching hospital. For all patients, clinical pharmacists listed the medications given during the ICU stay and data on drugs were analyzed using 2012 Beers Criteria, to identify the prevalence of PIM. For each identified PIM the medical records were analyzed to evaluate factors associated with its use. The frequency of ADRs and, the causal relationship between PIM and the ADRs identified were also evaluated through review of medical records. Results: According to 2012 Beers Criteria, 98.2% of elderly patients used at least one PIM (n=599), of which 24.8% were newly started in the ICUs. In 29.6% of PIMs, there was a clinical circumstance that justified their prescription. The number of PIMs was associated with ICU length of stay and total number of medications. There was at least one ADR identified in 17.8% of patients; more than 40% were attributed to PIM, but there was no statistical association. Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of PIM used in acutely ill older people, but they do not seem to be the major cause of adverse drug reactions in this population. Although many PIMs had a clinical circumstance that led to their prescription during the course of ICU hospitalization, many were still present upon hospital discharge. Therefore, prescription of PIMs should be minimized to improve the safety of elderly patients. PMID:28042352

  20. Hyponatremia due to Severe Primary Hypothyroidism in an Infant.

    PubMed

    Agathis, Nickolas T; Libman, Ingrid M; Moritz, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia has been reported in the elderly with hypothyroidism and myxedema, but this has not been a universal finding in clinical studies and there have been only a few reports in children. We report a case of an infant who developed hyponatremia due to severe primary hypothyroidism. A 4-month-old ex-preterm male, who had been euthyroid on the newborn screen, developed unexplained hospital-acquired hyponatremia (serum Na 124 mEq/L) while on full oral feeds. He was euvolemic, appeared well and was without myxedema. An evaluation of hyponatremia was negative with the exception of severe primary hypothyroidism (TSH 315.4 IU/mL, repeat 540 IU/mL). The hyponatremia resolved with thyroxine supplementation. This case demonstrates that severe hypothyroidism can result in hyponatremia in infants. It is critical to consider hypothyroidism in the evaluation of an infant with unexplained hyponatremia as untreated hypothyroidism can lead to profound developmental delays.

  1. Checklist for early recognition and treatment of acute illness: International collaboration to improve critical care practice.

    PubMed

    Vukoja, Marija; Kashyap, Rahul; Gavrilovic, Srdjan; Dong, Yue; Kilickaya, Oguz; Gajic, Ognjen

    2015-02-04

    Processes to ensure world-wide best-practice for critical care delivery are likely to minimize preventable death, disability and costly complications for any healthcare system's sickest patients, but no large-scale efforts have so far been undertaken towards these goals. The advances in medical informatics and human factors engineering have provided possibility for novel and user-friendly clinical decision support tools that can be applied in a complex and busy hospital setting. To facilitate timely and accurate best-practice delivery in critically ill patients international group of intensive care unit (ICU) physicians and researchers developed a simple decision support tool: Checklist for Early Recognition and Treatment of Acute Illness (CERTAIN). The tool has been refined and tested in high fidelity simulated clinical environment and has been shown to improve performance of clinical providers faced with simulated emergencies. The aim of this international educational intervention is to implement CERTAIN into clinical practice in hospital settings with variable resources (included those in low income countries) and evaluate the impact of the tool on the care processes and patient outcomes. To accomplish our aims, CERTAIN will be uniformly available on either mobile or fixed computing devices (as well as a backup paper version) and applied in a standardized manner in the ICUs of diverse hospitals. To ensure the effectiveness of the proposed intervention, access to CERTAIN is coupled with structured training of bedside ICU providers.

  2. [Dysphagia management of acute and long-term critically ill intensive care patients].

    PubMed

    Zielske, J; Bohne, S; Axer, H; Brunkhorst, F M; Guntinas-Lichius, O

    2014-10-01

    Dysphagia is a severe complication in critically ill patients and affects more than half the patients in an intensive care unit. Dysphagia also has a strong impact on morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for the development of dysphagia are neurological diseases, age >55-70 years, intubation >7 days and sepsis. With increasing numbers of long-term survivors chronic dysphagia is becoming an increasing problem. There is not much knowledge on the influence of specific diseases, including the direct impact of sepsis on the development of dysphagia. Fiberoptic evaluation of swallowing is a standardized tool for bedside evaluation, helping to plan swallowing training during the acute phase and to decrease the rate of chronic dysphagia. For evaluation of chronic dysphagia even more extensive diagnostic tools as well as several options of stepwise rehabilitation using restitution, compensation and adaption strategies for swallowing exist. Currently it seems that these options are not being sufficiently utilized. In general, there is a need for controlled clinical trials analyzing specific swallowing rehabilitation concepts for former critically ill patients and long-term survivors.

  3. Gastrointestinal ischemia monitoring through impedance spectroscopy as a tool for the management of the critically ill

    PubMed Central

    Sacristan, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Impedance spectroscopy (IS) has been proposed as a tool for monitoring mucosal tissue ischemia and damage in the gut of critically ill patients resulting from shock and hypoperfusion. A specific device and system have been developed and tested for this specific application over the past 12 years by our research group. This paper reviews previously published studies as well as unpublished experimental results, and puts the whole in context and perspective to help understand this technology. Results presented include summaries of gastric reactance measurement understanding, in vivo measurements in animal models, clinical significance of the measurement, and future perspectives of clinical use of this technology. All of the experimental work done to date has been designed to determine the evolving device prototypes’ performance and limitations from an instrumentation point of view. Although there are still questions to be answered with regard to the IS measurement, we conclude that we have reached enough confidence in the measurement and the device’s performance and safety to begin clinically oriented research to learn how this technology may be useful in the diagnosis and management of different populations of the critically ill. PMID:25711880

  4. Evaluation of Bone Metabolism in Critically Ill Patients Using CTx and PINP

    PubMed Central

    Gavala, Alexandra; Makris, Konstantinos; Korompeli, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background. Prolonged immobilization, nutritional and vitamin D deficiency, and specific drug administration may lead to significant bone resorption. Methods and Patients. We prospectively evaluated critically ill patients admitted to the ICU for at least 10 days. Demographics, APACHE II, SOFA scores, length of stay (LOS), and drug administration were recorded. Blood collections were performed at baseline and on a weekly basis for five consecutive weeks. Serum levels of PINP, β-CTx, iPTH, and 25(OH)vitamin D were measured at each time-point. Results. We enrolled 28 patients of mean age 67.4 ± 2.3 years, mean APACHE II 22.2 ± 0.9, SOFA 10.1 ± 0.6, and LOS 31.6 ± 5.7 days. Nineteen patients were receiving low molecular weight heparin, 17 nor-epinephrine and low dose hydrocortisone, 18 transfusions, and 3 phenytoin. 25(OH)vitamin D serum levels were very low in all patients at all time-points; iPTH serum levels were increased at baseline tending to normalize on 5th week; β-CTx serum levels were significantly increased compared to baseline on 2nd week (peak values), whereas PINP levels were increased significantly after the 4th week. Conclusions. Our data show that critically ill patients had a pattern of hypovitaminosis D, increased iPTH, hypocalcaemia, and BTMs compatible with altered bone metabolism. PMID:28025639

  5. Effect of Antipyretic Therapy on Mortality in Critically Ill Patients with Sepsis Receiving Mechanical Ventilation Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Sheng; Xu, Dan; Zhang, Chenmei; Li, Mengyao

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of antipyretic therapy on mortality in critically ill patients with sepsis requiring mechanical ventilation. Methods. In this study, we employed the multiparameter intelligent monitoring in intensive care II (MIMIC-II) database (version 2.6). All patients meeting the criteria for sepsis and also receiving mechanical ventilation treatment were included for analysis, all of whom suffer from fever or hyperthermia. Logistic regression model and R language (R version 3.2.3 2015-12-10) were used to explore the association of antipyretic therapy and mortality risk in critically ill patients with sepsis receiving mechanical ventilation treatment. Results. A total of 8,711 patients with mechanical ventilator were included in our analysis, and 1523 patients died. We did not find any significant difference in the proportion of patients receiving antipyretic medication between survivors and nonsurvivors (7.9% versus 7.4%, p = 0.49). External cooling was associated with increased risk of death (13.5% versus 9.5%, p < 0.001). In our regression model, antipyretic therapy was positively associated with mortality risk (odds ratio [OR]: 1.41, 95% CI: 1.20–1.66, p < 0.001). Conclusions. The use of antipyretic therapy is associated with increased risk of mortality in septic ICU patients requiring mechanical ventilation. External cooling may even be deleterious. PMID:28386165

  6. Tolerance and Withdrawal From Prolonged Opioid Use in Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.; Willson, Douglas F.; Berger, John; Harrison, Rick; Meert, Kathleen L.; Zimmerman, Jerry; Carcillo, Joseph; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Prodhan, Parthak; Dean, J. Michael; Nicholson, Carol

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE After prolonged opioid exposure, children develop opioid-induced hyperalgesia, tolerance, and withdrawal. Strategies for prevention and management should be based on the mechanisms of opioid tolerance and withdrawal. PATIENTS AND METHODS Relevant manuscripts published in the English language were searched in Medline by using search terms “opioid,” “opiate,” “sedation,” “analgesia,” “child,” “infant-newborn,” “tolerance,” “dependency,” “withdrawal,” “analgesic,” “receptor,” and “individual opioid drugs.” Clinical and preclinical studies were reviewed for data synthesis. RESULTS Mechanisms of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance suggest important drug- and patient-related risk factors that lead to tolerance and withdrawal. Opioid tolerance occurs earlier in the younger age groups, develops commonly during critical illness, and results more frequently from prolonged intravenous infusions of short-acting opioids. Treatment options include slowly tapering opioid doses, switching to longer-acting opioids, or specifically treating the symptoms of opioid withdrawal. Novel therapies may also include blocking the mechanisms of opioid tolerance, which would enhance the safety and effectiveness of opioid analgesia. CONCLUSIONS Opioid tolerance and withdrawal occur frequently in critically ill children. Novel insights into opioid receptor physiology and cellular biochemical changes will inform scientific approaches for the use of opioid analgesia and the prevention of opioid tolerance and withdrawal. PMID:20403936

  7. The complexity of postpartum mental health and illness: a critical realist study.

    PubMed

    Sword, Wendy; Clark, Alexander M; Hegadoren, Kathleen; Brooks, Sandra; Kingston, Dawn

    2012-03-01

    The complexity of postpartum mental health and illness: a critical realist study Postpartum depression (PPD) is a major public health issue that profoundly impacts the woman, her infant and family. Although it may be linked to hormone changes, no direct hormonal aetiology has been established. A large body of evidence implicates numerous psychosocial predictors of PPD. While a history of depression predicts about 50% of cases of PPD, it remains unclear why some women with a history do not develop depression following childbirth, even taking psychosocial factors into account. The aim of this study was to identify the main mechanisms and factors associated with the presence or absence of PPD in women with a history of depression, and the presence of PPD in women without a history, using a critical realist approach. The findings indicate a number of personal and contextual factors that influence postpartum mental health and illness. In addition, and perhaps most importantly, women who did not develop depression identified goal-oriented actions that were protective. These factors and processes did not exist in isolation and the interplay among them in influencing health was apparent. More research is needed to explore the effects of these mechanisms in different contexts.

  8. Clinical associations of host genetic variations in the genes of cytokines in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Belopolskaya, O B; Smelaya, T V; Moroz, V V; Golubev, A M; Salnikova, L E

    2015-06-01

    Host genetic variations may influence a changing profile of biochemical markers and outcome in patients with trauma/injury. The objective of this study was to assess clinical associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes of cytokines in critically ill patients. A total of 430 patients were genotyped for SNPs in the genes of pro- (IL1B, IL6, IL8) and anti-inflammatory (IL4, IL10, IL13) cytokines. The main end-points were sepsis, mortality and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We evaluated the dynamic levels of bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, creatine kinase, creatinine and lactate dehydrogenase in five points of measurements (between 1 and 14 days after admission) and correlated them with SNPs. High-producing alleles of proinflammatory cytokines protected patients against sepsis (IL1B -511A and IL8 -251A) and mortality (IL1B -511A). High-producing alleles of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL4 -589T and IL13 431A (144Gln) were less frequent in ARDS patients. The carriers of IL6 -174C/C genotypes were prone to the increased levels of biochemical markers and acute kidney and liver insufficiency. Genotype-dependent differences in the levels of biochemical indicators gradually increased to a maximal value on the 14th day after admission. These findings suggest that genetic variability in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines may contribute to different clinical phenotypes in patients at high risk of critical illness.

  9. Resting energy expenditure in critically ill patients: Evaluation methods and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Ana Cláudia Soncini; Góes, Cassiana Regina de; Bufarah, Marina Nogueira Berbel; Balbi, André Luiz; Ponce, Daniela

    2016-10-01

    Patients on intensive care present systemic, metabolic, and hormonal alterations that may adversely affect their nutritional condition and lead to fast and important depletion of lean mass and malnutrition. Several factors and medical conditions can influence the energy expenditure (EE) of critically ill patients, such as age, gender, surgery, serious infections, medications, ventilation modality, and organ dysfunction. Clinical conditions that can present with EE change include acute kidney injury, a complex disorder commonly seen in critically ill patients with manifestations that can range from minimum elevations in serum creatinine to renal failure requiring dialysis. The nutritional needs of this population are therefore complex, and determining the resting energy expenditure is essential to adjust the nutritional supply and to plan a proper diet, ensuring that energy requirements are met and avoiding complications associated with overfeeding and underfeeding. Several evaluation methods of EE in this population have been described, but all of them have limitations. Such methods include direct calorimetry, doubly labeled water, indirect calorimetry (IC), various predictive equations, and, more recently, the rule of thumb (kcal/kg of body weight). Currently, IC is considered the gold standard.

  10. Candidemia in the critically ill: initial therapy and outcome in mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mortality among critically ill patients with candidemia is very high. We sought to determine whether the choice of initial antifungal therapy is associated with survival among these patients, using need for mechanical ventilatory support as a marker of critical illness. Methods Cohort analysis of outcomes among mechanically ventilated patients with candidemia from the 24 North American academic medical centers contributing to the Prospective Antifungal Therapy (PATH) Alliance registry. Patients were included if they received either fluconazole or an echinocandin as initial monotherapy. Results Of 5272 patients in the PATH registry at the time of data abstraction, 1014 were ventilated and concomitantly had candidemia, with 689 eligible for analysis. 28-day survival was higher among the 374 patients treated initially with fluconazole than among the 315 treated with an echinocandin (66% versus 51%, P < .001). Initial fluconazole therapy remained associated with improved survival after adjusting for non-treatment factors in the overall population (hazard ratio .75, 95% CI .59–.96), and also among patients with albicans infection (hazard ratio .62, 95% CI .44–.88). While not statistically significant, fluconazole appeared to be associated with higher mortality among patients infected with glabrata (HR 1.13, 95% CI .70–1.84). Conclusions Among ventilated patients with candidemia, those receiving fluconazole as initial monotherapy were significantly more likely to survive than those treated with an echinocandin. This difference persisted after adjustment for non-treatment factors. PMID:24172136

  11. Correlation between the severity of critically ill patients and clinical predictors of bronchial aspiration

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros, Gisele Chagas; Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion; Zambom, Lucas Santos; de Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the severity of non-neurological critically ill patients correlates with clinical predictors of bronchial aspiration. Methods: We evaluated adults undergoing prolonged orotracheal intubation (> 48 h) and bedside swallowing assessment within the first 48 h after extubation. We collected data regarding the risk of bronchial aspiration performed by a speech-language pathologist, whereas data regarding the functional level of swallowing were collected with the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association National Outcome Measurement System (ASHA NOMS) scale and those regarding health status were collected with the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA). Results: The study sample comprised 150 patients. For statistical analyses, the patients were grouped by ASHA NOMS score: ASHA1 (levels 1 and 2), ASHA2 (levels 3 to 5); and ASHA3 (levels 6 and 7). In comparison with the other patients, those in the ASHA3 group were significantly younger, remained intubated for fewer days, and less severe overall clinical health status (SOFA score). The clinical predictors of bronchial aspiration that best characterized the groups were abnormal cervical auscultation findings and cough after swallowing. None of the patients in the ASHA 3 group presented with either of those signs. Conclusions: Critically ill patients 55 years of age or older who undergo prolonged orotracheal intubation (≥ 6 days), have a SOFA score ≥ 5, have a Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 14, and present with abnormal cervical auscultation findings or cough after swallowing should be prioritized for a full speech pathology assessment. PMID:27167432

  12. Quality of life of critically ill patients in a developing country: a prospective longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Mafra, José Marcelo e Souza; Maria da Silva, Janete; Yamada da Silveira, Leda Tomiko; Fu, Carolina; Tanaka, Clarice

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the quality of life of critical illness survivors in a developing country over the time after hospital discharge and to assess the influence of clinical variables on quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] A prospective longitudinal study was conducted in a large, tertiary, public hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil. We included patients ≥18 years old, hospitalized in the intensive care unit with ≥24 hours of invasive mechanical ventilation. Quality of life was assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, which was applied by telephone interview at the first, third and sixth months after hospital discharge. [Results] 75 patients were included in the study. Quality of life improved progressively after hospital discharge; role-physical was the most compromised domain. The physical component was influenced by the age. Quality of life was not influenced by Apache II categorization, length of invasive mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit stay or hospital stay. [Conclusion] Survivors of critical illness in a developing country present poor quality of life, which improves over time. Age influenced the physical component of quality of life. PMID:27821961

  13. Care of critically ill newborns in India. Legal and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, K N; Paul, V K

    1995-06-01

    The nature of neonatal care in India is changing. While the quality of care will most likely improve as the economy grows, the eventual scope of change remains to be seen. Attitudinal and behavioral changes, in addition to better economic conditions, are needed to realize more appropriate interventions in neonatal care. Economic, cultural, religious, social, political, and other considerations may limit or affect neonatal care, especially for ELBW infants or infants with congenital malformations or brain injury. Various protections for critically ill newborns exist under Indian law and the Constitution of India. New laws are being enacted to enhance the level of protection conferred, including laws which ban amniocentesis for sex determination and define brain death in connection with the use of human organs for therapeutic purposes. The applicability of consumer protection laws to medical care is also being addressed. It is noted, however, that India lacks a multidisciplinary bioethics committee. An effort should be made to discuss the legal and ethical issues regarding the care of critically ill newborns, with discussions considering religious, cultural, traditional, and family values. Legal and ethical guidelines should be developed by institutions, medical councils, and society specific to newborn care, and medical, nursing, and other paramedical schools should include these issues as part of the required coursework. Physicians, nurses, philosophers, and attorneys with expertise in law and ethics should develop and teach these courses. Such measures over the long term will ensure that future health care providers are exposed to these issues, ideally with a view toward enhancing patient care.

  14. The potential role of nano- and micro-technology in the management of critical illnesses.

    PubMed

    Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2014-11-20

    In recent years nanomedicine has become an attractive concept for the targeted delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic compounds to injured or inflamed organs. Nanoscale drug delivery systems have the ability to improve the pharmacokinetics and increase the biodistribution of therapeutic agents to target organs, thereby resulting in improved efficacy and reduced drug toxicity. These systems are exploited for therapeutic purposes to carry the drug in the body in a controlled manner from the site of administration to the therapeutic target. The mortality in many of the critical illnesses such as sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome continues to remain high despite of an increased understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of these diseases. Several promising targets that have been identified as potential therapies for these devastating diseases have been limited because of difficulty with delivery systems. In particular, delivery of peptides, proteins, and miRNAs to the lung is an ongoing challenge. Hence, it is an attractive strategy to test potential targets by employing nanotechnology. Here some of the novel nanomedicine approaches that have been proposed and studied in recent years to facilitate the delivery of therapeutic agents in the setting of critical illnesses such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis and ventilator associated pneumonia are reviewed.

  15. Potential use of melatonin in sleep and delirium in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Bellapart, J; Boots, R

    2012-04-01

    Intensive care delirium is a well-recognized complication in critically ill patients. Delirium is an independent risk factor for death in the intensive care unit (ICU), leading to oversedation, increased duration of mechanical ventilation, and increased length of stay. Although there has not been a direct causal relationship shown between sleep deprivation and delirium, many studies have demonstrated that critically ill patients have an altered sleep pattern, abnormal levels of melatonin, and loss of circadian rhythms. Melatonin has a major role in control of circadian rhythm and sleep regulation and other effects on the immune system, neuroprotection, and oxidant/anti-oxidant activity. There has been interest in the use of exogenous melatonin as a measure to improve sleep. However, there are only a few studies of melatonin in ICU patients and these use heterogeneous methodologies. Therefore, it is not possible at this stage to make any clear recommendations regarding the clinical use of melatonin in this setting. There is a need for well-designed randomized controlled trials examining the role of melatonin in ICU.

  16. The role of endocrine mechanisms in ventilator-associated lung injury in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Penesova, A; Galusova, A; Vigas, M; Vlcek, M; Imrich, R; Majek, M

    2012-07-01

    The critically ill subjects are represented by a heterogeneous group of patients suffering from a life-threatening event of different origin, e.g. trauma, cardiopulmonary failure, surgery or sepsis. The majority of these patients are dependent on the artificial lung ventilation, which means a life-saving chance for them. However, the artificial lung ventilation may trigger ventilation-associated lung injury (VALI). The mechanical ventilation at higher volumes (volutrauma) and pressure (barotrauma) can cause histological changes in the lungs including impairments in the gap and adherens junctions and desmosomes. The injured lung epithelium may lead to an impairment of the surfactant production and function, and this may not only contribute to the pathophysiology of VALI but also to acute respiratory distress syndrome. Other components of VALI are atelectrauma and toxic effects of the oxygen. Collectively, all these effects may result in a lung inflammation associated with a subsequent profibrotic changes, endothelial dysfunction, and activation of the local and systemic endocrine responses such as the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The present review is aimed to describe some of the pathophysiologic aspects of VALI providing a basis for novel therapeutic strategies in the critically ill patients.

  17. Caring for critically ill children within an adult environment--an educational strategy.

    PubMed

    Offord, Rebecca J

    2010-01-01

    Within the author's workplace, a predominantly adult general Intensive Care Unit (ICU), a small number of critically ill children are admitted each year. This causes difficulties for adult nurses because they are required to utilize specialist paediatric knowledge and skills that are practised on an infrequent basis only. This can lead them to experience feelings of stress, anxiety and a lack of confidence when caring for this distinct patient group. To address these issues, an education strategy was planned and implemented, which required staff members to attend a study day, organize a one day clinical placement and achieve a personal learning objective pertaining to paediatrics. This involved collaboration between key stakeholders, links to the lead paediatric centre, incorporation of local organizational strategy and the use of effective change management skills. Written candidate evaluation and low-level quantitative data demonstrate an increase in knowledge and confidence amongst nurses following the study day. Whilst the study day forms part of a more global educational concept, and not a 'stand alone' initiative, the full benefits of the encompassing programme are yet to be fully established. The author recommends the implementation of a similar programme within other acute care areas that occasionally admit critically ill children.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Piperacillin in Critically Ill Australian Indigenous Patients with Severe Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Danny; Stewart, Penelope; Goud, Rajendra; Gourley, Stephen; Hewagama, Saliya; Krishnaswamy, Sushena; Wallis, Steven C; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2016-12-01

    There are no available pharmacokinetic data to guide piperacillin dosing in critically ill Australian Indigenous patients despite numerous reported physiological differences. This study aimed to describe the population pharmacokinetics of piperacillin in critically ill Australian Indigenous patients with severe sepsis. A population pharmacokinetic study of Indigenous patients with severe sepsis was conducted in a remote hospital intensive care unit. Plasma samples were collected over two dosing intervals and assayed by validated chromatography. Population pharmacokinetic modeling was conducted using Pmetrics. Nine patients were recruited, and a two-compartment model adequately described the data. The piperacillin clearance (CL), volume of distribution of the central compartment (Vc), and distribution rate constants from the central to the peripheral compartment and from the peripheral to the central compartment were 5.6 ± 3.2 liters/h, 14.5 ± 6.6 liters, 1.5 ± 0.4 h(-1), and 1.8 ± 0.9 h(-1), respectively, where CL and Vc were found to be described by creatinine clearance (CLCR) and total body weight, respectively. In this patient population, piperacillin demonstrated high interindividual pharmacokinetic variability. CLCR was found to be the most important determinant of piperacillin pharmacokinetics.

  19. [The impact of a better coordination between emergency and intensive care units in the care of critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Lara, Bárbara A; Cataldo, Alejandro; Castro, Ricardo; Aguilera, Pablo R; Ruiz, Carolina; Andresen, Max

    2016-07-01

    The need for critical care services is increasing in Chile. Critical care beds and specialists in this area are scarce. In this article we discuss some aspects that hamper the care of critically ill patients from their arrival to the emergency department to their transfer to the ICU. Special emphasis is given to system saturation and its multiple causes. The benefits of an integrative approach between emergency medicine and critical care specialists are highlighted and some solutions are proposed to strengthen this partnership.

  20. Free T4, Free T3, and Reverse T3 in Critically Ill, Thermally Injured Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    demonstrate many of the clinical fea- activity (38). Metabolic rate correlated closely with the tures associated with hyperthyroidism , such as elevated...TSH responses to TRH and meto- ourselves what hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism really are. clopramide in man. J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab., 44: 237

  1. Clinical review: Practical approach to hyponatraemia and hypernatraemia in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Disturbances in sodium concentration are common in the critically ill patient and associated with increased mortality. The key principle in treatment and prevention is that plasma [Na+] (P-[Na+]) is determined by external water and cation balances. P-[Na+] determines plasma tonicity. An important exception is hyperglycaemia, where P-[Na+] may be reduced despite plasma hypertonicity. The patient is first treated to secure airway, breathing and circulation to diminish secondary organ damage. Symptoms are critical when handling a patient with hyponatraemia. Severe symptoms are treated with 2 ml/kg 3% NaCl bolus infusions irrespective of the supposed duration of hyponatraemia. The goal is to reduce cerebral symptoms. The bolus therapy ensures an immediate and controllable rise in P-[Na+]. A maximum of three boluses are given (increases P-[Na+] about 6 mmol/l). In all patients with hyponatraemia, correction above 10 mmol/l/day must be avoided to reduce the risk of osmotic demyelination. Practical measures for handling a rapid rise in P-[Na+] are discussed. The risk of overcorrection is associated with the mechanisms that cause hyponatraemia. Traditional classifications according to volume status are notoriously difficult to handle in clinical practice. Moreover, multiple combined mechanisms are common. More than one mechanism must therefore be considered for safe and lasting correction. Hypernatraemia is less common than hyponatraemia, but implies that the patient is more ill and has a worse prognosis. A practical approach includes treatment of the underlying diseases and restoration of the distorted water and salt balances. Multiple combined mechanisms are common and must be searched for. Importantly, hypernatraemia is not only a matter of water deficit, and treatment of the critically ill patient with an accumulated fluid balance of 20 litres and corresponding weight gain should not comprise more water, but measures to invoke a negative cation balance. Reduction of

  2. Clinical review: practical approach to hyponatraemia and hypernatraemia in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Overgaard-Steensen, Christian; Ring, Troels

    2013-02-27

    Disturbances in sodium concentration are common in the critically ill patient and associated with increased mortality. The key principle in treatment and prevention is that plasma [Na+] (P-[Na+]) is determined by external water and cation balances. P-[Na+] determines plasma tonicity. An important exception is hyperglycaemia, where P-[Na+] may be reduced despite plasma hypertonicity. The patient is first treated to secure airway, breathing and circulation to diminish secondary organ damage. Symptoms are critical when handling a patient with hyponatraemia. Severe symptoms are treated with 2 ml/kg 3% NaCl bolus infusions irrespective of the supposed duration of hyponatraemia. The goal is to reduce cerebral symptoms. The bolus therapy ensures an immediate and controllable rise in P-[Na+]. A maximum of three boluses are given (increases P-[Na+] about 6 mmol/l). In all patients with hyponatraemia, correction above 10 mmol/l/day must be avoided to reduce the risk of osmotic demyelination. Practical measures for handling a rapid rise in P-[Na+] are discussed. The risk of overcorrection is associated with the mechanisms that cause hyponatraemia. Traditional classifications according to volume status are notoriously difficult to handle in clinical practice. Moreover, multiple combined mechanisms are common. More than one mechanism must therefore be considered for safe and lasting correction. Hypernatraemia is less common than hyponatraemia, but implies that the patient is more ill and has a worse prognosis. A practical approach includes treatment of the underlying diseases and restoration of the distorted water and salt balances. Multiple combined mechanisms are common and must be searched for. Importantly, hypernatraemia is not only a matter of water deficit, and treatment of the critically ill patient with an accumulated fluid balance of 20 litres and corresponding weight gain should not comprise more water, but measures to invoke a negative cation balance. Reduction of

  3. County-level effects of prehospital regionalization of critically ill patients: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Christopher W.; Alotaik, Osama; Wallace, David J.; Elhabashy, Ahmed E.; Chhatwal, Jagpreet; Rea, Thomas D; Angus, Derek C.; Nichol, Graham; Kahn, Jeremy M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Regionalization may improve critical care delivery, yet stakeholders cite concerns about its feasibility. We sought to determine the operational effects of prehospital regionalization of non-trauma, non-arrest critical illness. Design Discrete event simulation study Patients and setting All 2006 hospital discharge data from King County, Washington, linked to all adult, eligible patients transported by county EMS agencies. Methods We simulated active triage of high-risk patients to designated referral centers using a validated prehospital risk score; we studied three regionalization scenarios: (1) up triage, (2) up & down triage, (3) up & down triage after reducing intensive care unit (ICU) beds by 25%. We determined the effect on patient routing, ICU occupancy at referral and non-referral hospitals, and EMS transport times. Measurements and Main Results 119,117 patients were hospitalized at 11 non-referral centers and 76,817 patients were hospitalized at three referral centers. Among 20,835 EMS patients, 7,817 (43%) patients were eligible for up triage and 10,242 (57%) patients were eligible for down triage. At baseline mean daily ICU bed occupancy was 61% referral and 47% at non-referral hospitals. Up-triage increased referral ICU occupancy to 68%, up and down triage to 64%, and up and down triage with bed reduction to 74%. Mean daily non-referral ICU occupancy did not exceed 60%. Total EMS transport time increased by less than 3% with up and down triage. Conclusions Regionalization based on prehospital triage of the critically ill can allocate high-risk patients to referral hospitals without adversely affecting ICU occupancy or prehospital travel time. PMID:26102251

  4. Timing of (supplemental) parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bost, Rianne Bc; Tjan, Dave Ht; van Zanten, Arthur Rh

    2014-01-01

    Supplemental parenteral nutrition (SPN) is used in a step-up approach when full enteral support is contraindicated or fails to reach caloric targets. Recent nutrition guidelines present divergent advices regarding timing of SPN in critically ill patients ranging from early SPN (<48 h after admission; EPN) to postponing initiation of SPN until day 8 after Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission (LPN). This systematic review summarizes results of prospective studies among adult ICU patients addressing the best timing of (supplemental) parenteral nutrition (S)PN. A structured PubMed search was conducted to identify eligible articles. Articles were screened and selected using predetermined criteria and appraised for relevance and validity. After critical appraisal, four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and two prospective observational studies remained. One RCT found a higher percentage of alive discharge from the ICU at day 8 in the LPN group compared to EPN group (p = 0.007) but no differences in ICU and in-hospital mortality. None of the other RCTs found differences in ICU or in-hospital mortality rates. Contradicting or divergent results on other secondary outcomes were found for ICU length of stay, hospital length of stay, infection rates, nutrition targets, duration of mechanical ventilation, glucose control, duration of renal replacement therapy, muscle wasting and fat loss. Although the heterogeneity in quality and design of relevant studies precludes firm conclusions, it is reasonable to assume that in adult critically ill patients, there are no clinically relevant benefits of EPN compared with LPN with respect to morbidity or mortality end points, when full enteral support is contraindicated or fails to reach caloric targets. However, considering that infectious morbidity and resolution of organ failure may be negatively affected through mechanisms not yet clearly understood and acquisition costs of parenteral nutrition are higher, the early

  5. The oxygen status of the arterial blood in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Tulli, G; Vignali, G; Guadagnucci, A; Mondello, V

    1990-01-01

    In Critical Care medicine the concepts of Oxygen Delivery, Oxygen Consumption and Tissue Oxygenation have become fundamental in clinical practice but measurements of Oxygen Content and O2 Transport variables require invasive procedures that could be dangerous for critically ill patients and trigger a septic process. Derived indices obtained combining data from a Blood Gas Analyzer with the data from a multi-wavelength spectrophotometer and using the Ole Siggaard-Andersen pH/Blood Gas computerised algorithm might be the non-invasive answer. On 115 arterial blood samples from critically ill patients, we measured pH, pCO2, pO2, oxygen saturation, total hemoglobin concentration and fractions of carboxy- and methemoglobin. The new algorithm was used to calculate: active hemoglobin concentration, total oxygen concentration, actual half-saturation tension, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration, estimated functional shunt, uncompensated mixed venous pO2 (assuming an arterio-venous oxygen difference of 2.3 mmol/L based on a standard oxygen consumption of 11.2 mmol/min and a standard cardiac output of 4.9 L/min) and the cardiac oxygen compensation factor. In Intensive Care all the oxygen parameters may be determined with sufficient accuracy and precision provided the oxygen saturation level is less than 0.97 and provided the definition of oxygen saturation is properly settled and measurements are performed according to the highest state of the art. However, in critically ill patients in evolution our aim is to maintain an 'optimal' paO2 on the plateau of the Oxygen Dissociation Curve (ODC) and the use of mechanical ventilation, high FIO2, fluid challenges and the rapid improvement of the patient's conditions can cause a value for sO2 greater than or less than 0.97 and an improvement or worsening of the paO2. The p50 calculation both in simultaneously drawn arterial and venous blood permits utilisation of derived indices (pO2uv-, CQ) for sO2 greater than 0.97. The Ole Siggaard

  6. Co-enrollment of critically ill patients into multiple studies: patterns, predictors and consequences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Research on co-enrollment practices and their impact are limited in the ICU setting. The objectives of this study were: 1) to describe patterns and predictors of co-enrollment of patients in a thromboprophylaxis trial, and 2) to examine the consequences of co-enrollment on clinical and trial outcomes. Methods In an observational analysis of an international thromboprophylaxis trial in 67 ICUs, we examined the co-enrollment of critically ill medical-surgical patients into more than one study, and examined the clinical and trial outcomes among co-enrolled and non-co-enrolled patients. Results Among 3,746 patients enrolled in PROTECT (Prophylaxis for ThromboEmbolism in Critical Care Trial), 713 (19.0%) were co-enrolled in at least one other study (53.6% in a randomized trial, 37.0% in an observational study and 9.4% in both). Six factors independently associated with co-enrollment (all P < 0.001) were illness severity (odds ratio (OR) 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19 to 1.53 for each 10-point Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score increase), substitute decision-makers providing consent, rather than patients (OR 3.31, 2.03 to 5.41), experience of persons inviting consent (OR 2.67, 1.74 to 4.11 for persons with > 10 years' experience compared to persons with none), center size (all ORs > 10 for ICUs with > 15 beds), affiliation with trials groups (OR 5.59, 3.49 to 8.95), and main trial rather than pilot phase (all ORs > 8 for recruitment year beyond the pilot). Co-enrollment did not influence clinical or trial outcomes or risk of adverse events. Conclusions Co-enrollment was strongly associated with features of the patients, research personnel, setting and study. Co-enrollment had no impact on trial results, and appeared safe, acceptable and feasible. Transparent reporting, scholarly discourse, ethical analysis and further research are needed on the complex topic of co-enrollment during critical illness. PMID:23298553

  7. “RéaNet”, the Internet utilization among surrogates of critically ill patients with sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Porcher, Raphaël; Argaud, Laurent; Piquilloud, Lise; Guitton, Christophe; Tamion, Fabienne; Hraiech, Sami; Mira, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Context Health-related Internet utilization is common but its use by proxies of critically ill patients is unknown. Our objective was to describe the prevalence and the Internet utilization characteristics among surrogates of critically ill septic patients. We conducted a prospective observational study in French ICUs. Three survey instruments were used to describe ICU organization regarding information delivery, patients and surrogates characteristics. Results 169 surrogates of 146 septic patients hospitalized in 19 ICUs were included. One sixth of ICUs (n = 3, 16%) had their own website. Majority of patients were males (n = 100, 68%), aged 64±1 years old, with a SAPS2 score at 53±17 and required vasopressors (n = 117, 83%), mechanical ventilation (n = 116, 82%). More than one quarter required renal replacement therapy (n = 36, 26%). Majority of surrogates were female, in their fifties. Only one in five knew the word sepsis (n = 27, 16%). Majority of proxies internet users (n = 77; 55%) search on the internet about sepsis. The main motivation was curiosity. Majority of surrogates found the information online reliable, suitable for request and concordant. Prior use of health-related Internet (OR = 20.7 [4.30–100.1]), the presence of a nursing staff during family-physician meetings (OR = 3.33 [1.17–9.53]), a younger patient age (OR = 1.32 [1.01–1.72]) and renal replacement therapy requirement (OR = 2.58 [1.06–6.26]) were associated with health-related Internet use. Neither satisfaction with medical care or information provision, neither presence of anxiety-depression symptoms, were associated with health-related Internet use. Majority of surrogates (N = 76 (52%)) would have like receiving a list of selected websites on sepsis. Conclusions Majority of proxies of critically ill patients with sepsis use Internet to learn more about sepsis. Internet utilization is independent of satisfaction with global ICU care, perceived quality of information delivery by

  8. Urinary Biomarkers Indicative of Apoptosis and Acute Kidney Injury in the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Vaara, Suvi T.; Lakkisto, Päivi; Immonen, Katariina; Tikkanen, Ilkka; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Pettilä, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is a key mechanism involved in ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI), but its role in septic AKI is controversial. Biomarkers indicative of apoptosis could potentially detect developing AKI prior to its clinical diagnosis. Methods As a part of the multicenter, observational FINNAKI study, we performed a pilot study among critically ill patients who developed AKI (n = 30) matched to critically ill patients without AKI (n = 30). We explored the urine and plasma levels of cytokeratin-18 neoepitope M30 (CK-18 M30), cell-free DNA, and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) at intensive care unit (ICU) admission and 24h thereafter, before the clinical diagnosis of AKI defined by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes -creatinine and urine output criteria. Furthermore, we performed a validation study in 197 consecutive patients in the FINNAKI cohort and analyzed the urine sample at ICU admission for CK-18 M30 levels. Results In the pilot study, the urine or plasma levels of measured biomarkers at ICU admission, at 24h, or their maximum value did not differ significantly between AKI and non-AKI patients. Among 20 AKI patients without severe sepsis, the urine CK-18 M30 levels were significantly higher at 24h (median 116.0, IQR [32.3–233.0] U/L) than among those 20 patients who did not develop AKI (46.0 [0.0–54.0] U/L), P = 0.020. Neither urine cell-free DNA nor HSP70 levels significantly differed between AKI and non-AKI patients regardless of the presence of severe sepsis. In the validation study, urine CK-18 M30 level at ICU admission was not significantly higher among patients developing AKI compared to non-AKI patients regardless of the presence of severe sepsis or CKD. Conclusions Our findings do not support that apoptosis detected with CK-18 M30 level would be useful in assessing the development of AKI in the critically ill. Urine HSP or cell-free DNA levels did not differ between AKI and non-AKI patients. PMID:26918334

  9. Assessment of candidemia-attributable mortality in critically ill patients using propensity score matching analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Candidemia in critically ill patients is usually a severe and life-threatening condition with a high crude mortality. Very few studies have focused on the impact of candidemia on ICU patient outcome and attributable mortality still remains controversial. This study was carried out to determine the attributable mortality of ICU-acquired candidemia in critically ill patients using propensity score matching analysis. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted of all consecutive non-neutropenic adult patients admitted for at least seven days to 36 ICUs in Spain, France, and Argentina between April 2006 and June 2007. The probability of developing candidemia was estimated using a multivariate logistic regression model. Each patient with ICU-acquired candidemia was matched with two control patients with the nearest available Mahalanobis metric matching within the calipers defined by the propensity score. Standardized differences tests (SDT) for each variable before and after matching were calculated. Attributable mortality was determined by a modified Poisson regression model adjusted by those variables that still presented certain misalignments defined as a SDT > 10%. Results Thirty-eight candidemias were diagnosed in 1,107 patients (34.3 episodes/1,000 ICU patients). Patients with and without candidemia had an ICU crude mortality of 52.6% versus 20.6% (P < 0.001) and a crude hospital mortality of 55.3% versus 29.6% (P = 0.01), respectively. In the propensity matched analysis, the corresponding figures were 51.4% versus 37.1% (P = 0.222) and 54.3% versus 50% (P = 0.680). After controlling residual confusion by the Poisson regression model, the relative risk (RR) of ICU- and hospital-attributable mortality from candidemia was RR 1.298 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.88 to 1.98) and RR 1.096 (95% CI 0.68 to 1.69), respectively. Conclusions ICU-acquired candidemia in critically ill patients is not associated with an increase in either ICU or

  10. Evaluation and Management of Critically Ill Children with Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Askenazi, David

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the review Acute kidney injury (AKI) has replaced the term acute renal failure and new definitions have been proposed to allow earlier detection. Recent epidemiology data show that the etiology of pediatric AKI has changed and the indications for initiation of renal replacement therapy have evolved. This review will highlight recent studies on the diagnosis of AKI, review the differential diagnosis, highlight the importance of cumulative fluid overload and provide key management strategies for the pediatric patient with AKI. Recent findings Over the last decade serum creatinine based categorical definitions of AKI have been accepted and improve our ability to detect AKI early in the disease process. Evidence based modifications of these definitions have occurred. Higher degree of fluid overload portends poor outcomes in critically ill patients. Significant improvements in our understanding of the pathophysiology of glomerular/vascular causes of AKI have occurred. Summary Categorical definitions of AKI have shown that higher that AKI portends poor outcomes even when adjustment of severity of illness and other confounders. As higher degrees of fluid overload are independently associated with poor outcomes, strategies to prevent and/or treat fluid overload are likely to improve outcomes. PMID:21191296

  11. The circulating glycosaminoglycan signature of respiratory failure in critically ill adults.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Eric P; Li, Guoyun; Li, Lingyun; Fu, Li; Yang, Yimu; Overdier, Katherine H; Douglas, Ivor S; Linhardt, Robert J

    2014-03-21

    Systemic inflammatory illnesses (such as sepsis) are marked by degradation of the endothelial glycocalyx, a layer of glycosaminoglycans (including heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, and hyaluronic acid) lining the vascular lumen. We hypothesized that different pathophysiologic insults would produce characteristic patterns of released glycocalyx fragments. We collected plasma from healthy donors as well as from subjects with respiratory failure due to altered mental status (intoxication, ischemic brain injury), indirect lung injury (non-pulmonary sepsis, pancreatitis), or direct lung injury (aspiration, pneumonia). Mass spectrometry was employed to determine the quantity and sulfation patterns of circulating glycosaminoglycans. We found that circulating heparan sulfate fragments were significantly (23-fold) elevated in patients with indirect lung injury, while circulating hyaluronic acid concentrations were elevated (32-fold) in patients with direct lung injury. N-Sulfation and tri-sulfation of heparan disaccharides were significantly increased in patients with indirect lung injury. Chondroitin disaccharide sulfation was suppressed in all groups with respiratory failure. Plasma heparan sulfate concentrations directly correlated with intensive care unit length of stay. Serial plasma measurements performed in select patients revealed that circulating highly sulfated heparan fragments persisted for greater than 3 days after the onset of respiratory failure. Our findings demonstrate that circulating glycosaminoglycans are elevated in patterns characteristic of the etiology of respiratory failure and may serve as diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers of critical illness.

  12. Modified Augmented Renal Clearance Score Predicts Rapid Piperacillin and Tazobactam Clearance in Critically Ill Surgery and Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-24

    unit (ICU) patients re-mains high despite numerous clinical and technologic advances supporting the care of critically ill patients. Sepsis continues...From 83 subjects in both studies, 13 met the criteria for inclusion. The subjects varied in their mechanisms of injury/ illness, indication for...Characteristics of Study Subjects Receiving Piperacillin/Tazobactam Included in This Study Subject Age, y Sex Mechanism Indication Dose* eGFR** SOFA† APACHE II

  13. Computer-based consultation in "care" of the critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Siegel, J H; Fichthorn, J; Monteferrante, J; Moody, E; Box, N; Nolan, C; Ardrey, R

    1976-09-01

    Despite far-reaching progress in all areas of surgery, methods of medical data analysis and communication have not kept pace with the increased rate of data acquisition. The needs to organize and communicate these data and to provide a medium for continuing education are great in critical-care areas where the amount and the diversity of data collected are enormous, and the number of surgical team members involved in patient care has grown proportionately. The computer-based Clinical Assessment, Research, and Education System (CARE) is a time-shared computer system now available on a national basis designed to provide a management and education aid for the treatment of critically ill surgical patients. An initial clinical assessment and operative note are entered by the surgeon from which an estimation of the initial fluid, blood, and electrolyte deficits are calculated. Daily doctor's progress notes, shift nurses' summaries of vital signs, clinical information, intake and output data, and drug administration, biochemical, cardiovascular, blood gas, and respiratory information are entered for each shift. From these, a metabolic balance is calculated; fluid, electrolyte, and caloric requirements are determined; cardiorespiratory parameters are computed; and various therapuetic suggestions and cautions are given to alert the physician to problems that may be arising. The surgeon-user is assisted in making the best critical-care decisions through computer-directed, interactive prompting which focuses on the most important clinical conditions and correlations and metabolic considerations and relates the important problem to the relevant literature.

  14. The use of common continuous monitoring parameters: a quality indicator for critically ill patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Karen K; Kleinpell, Ruth

    2005-01-01

    Sepsis is a common source of morbidity and mortality among critically ill patients, and targeting measures to promote early recognition and treatment of sepsis is at the forefront of many critical care initiatives. Starting formally in 1992, with the publication of the definitions of sepsis, continuous monitoring of several common physiologic parameters, including electrocardiogram, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation, have been advocated as important in the early identification and treatment of patients with sepsis. The descriptive study detailed in this article was conducted to assess the perceptions and clinical continuous physiologic monitoring practices of experienced critical care clinicians with regard to their use of common physiologic monitoring parameters in the care of patients with sepsis. A convenience sample of 100 physicians and 517 nurses completed a 20-item survey assessing perceptions and clinical monitoring practices related to the care of patients with sepsis. Results indicated that the basic parameters of electrocardiogram, invasive blood pressure, pulmonary arterial catheter monitoring, and oxygen saturation all have value in the recognition and treatment of patients with sepsis. The majority of clinicians used these parameters routinely and felt they were necessary for patient care. These results indicate that clinical practice is in concordance with current practice recommendations.

  15. Complications during intrahospital transport of critically ill patients: Focus on risk identification and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Patrick H; Maheshwari, Neelabh; Hussain, Jafar; Scholl, Michael; Hughes, Michael; Papadimos, Thomas J; Guo, Weidun Alan; Cipolla, James; Stawicki, Stanislaw P; Latchana, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Intrahospital transportation of critically ill patients is associated with significant complications. In order to reduce overall risk to the patient, such transports should well organized, efficient, and accompanied by the proper monitoring, equipment, and personnel. Protocols and guidelines for patient transfers should be utilized universally across all healthcare facilities. Care delivered during transport and at the site of diagnostic testing or procedure should be equivalent to the level of care provided in the originating environment. Here we review the most common problems encountered during transport in the hospital setting, including various associated adverse outcomes. Our objective is to make medical practitioners, nurses, and ancillary health care personnel more aware of the potential for various complications that may occur during patient movement from the intensive care unit to other locations within a healthcare facility, focusing on risk reduction and preventive strategies. PMID:26807395

  16. [Update on invasive candidiasis in non-neutropenic critically ill adult patients].

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Rafael; Ramírez, Paula; Borges, Marcio; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis in non-neutropenic critically ill patients remains a challenge for clinicians due to its association with high morbidity and mortality rates, increased incidence, and health-care costs. It is well known that early diagnosis and treatment are associated with a better prognosis. For these reasons a thorough update has been performed in this setting focused on recent Spanish epidemiology, new predictive scores and microbiological tests such as mannan antigen, mannan antibodies, Candida albicans germ-tube antibodies or (1→3)-β-D-glucan detection, molecular techniques for the detection of fungal-specific DNA, advances in antifungal treatment and educational programs in Spain. An early diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm is proposed based on the combination of scores and microbiological test. The aim of this review is to provide physicians with the best information available in order to improve the prognosis of these patients.

  17. [Enteral access and intestinal function assessment in the critically ill patient].

    PubMed

    Mesejo, A; Juan, M; García-Simón, M

    2007-05-01

    The use of enteral nutrition (EN) in the critically-ill patient makes necessary to evaluate its effectiveness and impact on achieving the target requirements. Gastrically administered EN has a high complication rate, especially increased residue that leads to hyponutrition. The use of the small bowel (jejunum) may achieve greater administered volume, although there are three aspects that directly influence on its use: intestinal access route, motility and absorptive capability, and barrier function. The selection of the access route to the digestive tube has to be done after evaluating the underlying disease and predicted duration of EN. If it is greater than 4-6 weeks a definitive access will be performed through an invasive technique of ostomy (radiologic, endoscopic or surgical jejunostomy) and if it is shorter than 4-6 weeks, an endoscopic, fluoroscopic or ultrasonographic non-invasive or transnasal technique (naso-duodenal, or nasojejunal) will be used. By protocoling procedures and experiences, it has been shown that jejunal nutrition may achieve an increase in the amount of requirements administerd to critically-ill patients with mechanical ventilation as compared to gastric feeding, although the benefits with regards to reducing the number of infectious complications, hospital stay and mortality are not so clear-cut, so that it should be left to those cases in which gastric feeding has been clearly documented. By using the manometrich technique or the acetaminophen absorption tests it has been shown that 50% of critically-ill patients with mechanical ventilation have gastric antral hypomotility with decreased migratory motor complexes and gastric voiding, which considerably hampers nutrition. Under normal circumstances, during fasting, there are regular motor contractions, or an inter-digestive migratory motor complex which pattern prevents nutrient absorption because of being highly propulsive, so that during the nutrient phase, this pattern changes into

  18. Adolescent mothers of critically ill newborns: addressing the rights of parent and child.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Mark R

    2011-08-01

    Despite recent declines, the teen birth rate in the United States remains markedly higher than in other developed countries. Infants born to teen mothers are more likely to be preterm than those born to adult mothers and thus more likely to end up in the newborn intensive care unit (NICU). Critically ill newborns are not infrequently born to teen mothers, including those in early adolescence. The focus of this chapter is the mechanism of decision-making on behalf of those newborns and the role of the early adolescent mother as surrogate decision-maker. It is argued that the current standard in many US hospitals, and likely elsewhere, is suboptimal and inadequately addresses the rights and needs of both mother and newborn.

  19. Hemodynamic monitoring in the critically ill: an overview of current cardiac output monitoring methods

    PubMed Central

    Huygh, Johan; Peeters, Yannick; Bernards, Jelle; Malbrain, Manu L. N. G.

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill patients are often hemodynamically unstable (or at risk of becoming unstable) owing to hypovolemia, cardiac dysfunction, or alterations of vasomotor function, leading to organ dysfunction, deterioration into multi-organ failure, and eventually death. With hemodynamic monitoring, we aim to guide our medical management so as to prevent or treat organ failure and improve the outcomes of our patients. Therapeutic measures may include fluid resuscitation, vasopressors, or inotropic agents. Both resuscitation and de-resuscitation phases can be guided using hemodynamic monitoring. This monitoring itself includes several different techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages, and may range from invasive to less- and even non-invasive techniques, calibrated or non-calibrated. This article will discuss the indications and basics of monitoring, further elaborating on the different techniques of monitoring. PMID:28003877

  20. Antimicrobial pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic issues in the critically ill with severe sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Julie M; Roberts, Jason A; Lipman, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) are important considerations, particularly in critically ill patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. The pathophysiologic changes that occur in these conditions can have a major effect on pharmacokinetic parameters, which in turn could result in failure to achieve pharmacodynamic targets for antimicrobials thus adversely affecting clinical outcome. This paper discusses the pathophysiologic changes that occur during severe sepsis and septic shock and the consequent effects on antimicrobial PK and PD. The effect of PK/PD on specific antimicrobial classes is discussed and a rational framework for antimicrobial dosing is provided. Knowledge of PK/PD properties of antimicrobials can be used to personalize dosing regimens not only to maximize antimicrobial activity but also to minimize toxicity and reduce the development of antimicrobial resistance.

  1. Respiratory muscle dysfunction: a multicausal entity in the critically ill patient undergoing mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Magda C; Ospina-Tascón, Gustavo A; Salazar C, Blanca C

    2014-02-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction, particularly of the diaphragm, may play a key role in the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to difficulty in weaning patients from mechanical ventilation. The limited mobility of critically ill patients, and of the diaphragm in particular when prolonged mechanical ventilation support is required, promotes the early onset of respiratory muscle dysfunction, but this can also be caused or exacerbated by other factors that are common in these patients, such as sepsis, malnutrition, advanced age, duration and type of ventilation, and use of certain medications, such as steroids and neuromuscular blocking agents. In this review we will study in depth this multicausal origin, in which a common mechanism is altered protein metabolism, according to the findings reported in various models. The understanding of this multicausality produced by the same pathophysiological mechanism could facilitate the management and monitoring of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation.

  2. A Tool for Music Preference Assessment in Critically Ill Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilatory Support

    PubMed Central

    CHLAN, LINDA; HEIDERSCHEIT, ANNIE

    2010-01-01

    Music is an ideal intervention to reduce anxiety and promote relaxation in critically ill patients. This article reviews the research studies on music-listening interventions to manage distressful symptoms in this population, and describes the development and implementation of the Music Assessment Tool (MAT) to assist professionals in ascertaining patients’ music preferences in the challenging, dynamic clinical environment of the intensive care unit (ICU). The MAT is easy to use with these patients who experience profound communication challenges due to fatigue and inability to speak because of endotracheal tube placement. The music therapist and ICU nursing staff are encouraged to work collaboratively to implement music in a personalized manner to ensure the greatest benefit for mechanically ventilated patients. PMID:24489432

  3. Evaluation of perfusion index as a tool for pain assessment in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hasanin, Ahmed; Mohamed, Sabah Abdel Raouf; El-Adawy, Akram

    2016-09-24

    Pain is a common and undertreated problem in critically ill patients. Pain assessment in critically ill patients is challenging and relies on complex scoring systems. The aim of this work was to find out the possible role of the perfusion index (PI) measured by a pulse oximeter (Masimo Radical 7; Masimo Corp., Irvine, CA, USA) in pain assessment in critically ill patients. A prospective observational study was carried out on 87 sedated non-intubated patients in a surgical intensive care unit. In addition to routine monitoring, a Masimo pulse oximeter probe was used for PI measurement. The sedation level of the patients was assessed by using the Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS). The pain intensity was determined by applying the behavioral pain scale for non-intubated (BPS-NI) patients. The PI, arterial blood pressure, heart rate, RASS, and BPS-NI values before and after the application of a standard painful stimulus (changing the patient position) were reported. Correlation between the PI and other variables was carried out at the two measurements. Correlation between changes in the PI (delta PI) and in the hemodynamic variables, RASS, and BPS-NI was also done. Changing the patient position resulted in a significant increase in SBP (128 ± 20 vs 120.4 ± 20.6, P = 0.009), DBP (71.3 ± 11.2 vs 68.7 ± 11.3, P = 0.021), heart rate (99.5 ± 19 vs 92.7 ± 18.2, P = 0.013), and BPS-NI (7[6-8] vs 3[3-3], P < 0.001) values and a significant decrease in the PI (1[0.5-1.9] vs 2.2[0.97-3.6], P < 0.001) value compared to the baseline readings. There was no correlation between the values of the PI and the ABP, BPS-NI, and RASS at the two measurements. A good correlation was found between the delta PI and delta BPS-NI (r = -0.616, P < 0.001). A weak correlation was observed between the PI and heart rate after the patient positioning (r = -0.249, P < 0.02). In surgical critically ill non-intubated patients, the application of a painful

  4. Nutrition Support Team-Led Glycemic Control Program for Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Roland N; Maish, George O; Minard, Gayle; Brown, Rex O

    2014-08-01

    Glycemic control is an important component of the metabolic management of the critically ill patient. Nutrition support teams are frequently challenged by complicated patients who exhibit multiple concurrent etiologies for hyperglycemia. Nutrition support teams can serve in a pivotal role in the development and evaluation of safe and effective techniques for achieving glycemic control. This review describes the efforts of a nutrition support team in achieving safe and effective glycemic control at their institution. Identification of target blood glucose concentration range, development, initiation, monitoring of a continuous intravenous insulin infusion algorithm, nursing adherence to the algorithm, modification of the algorithm based on the presence of conditions that alter insulin metabolism and glucose homeostasis, and transition of the patient who receives continuous enteral nutrition from a continuous intravenous insulin infusion to intermittent subcutaneous insulin therapy are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of the pressure ulcers risk scales with critically ill patients: a prospective cohort study 1

    PubMed Central

    Borghardt, Andressa Tomazini; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; de Araújo, Thiago Moura; Rogenski, Noemi Marisa Brunet; Bringuente, Maria Edla de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: to evaluate the accuracy of the Braden and Waterlow risk assessment scales in critically ill inpatients. METHOD: this prospective cohort study, with 55 patients in intensive care units, was performed through evaluation of sociodemographic and clinical variables, through the application of the scales (Braden and Waterlow) upon admission and every 48 hours; and through the evaluation and classification of the ulcers into categories. RESULTS: the pressure ulcer incidence was 30.9%, with the Braden and Waterlow scales presenting high sensitivity (41% and 71%) and low specificity (21% and 47%) respectively in the three evaluations. The cut off scores found in the first, second and third evaluations were 12, 12 and 11 in the Braden scale, and 16, 15 and 14 in the Waterlow scale. CONCLUSION: the Braden scale was shown to be a good screening instrument, and the Waterlow scale proved to have better predictive power. PMID:25806628

  6. Open Lung Biopsy Among Critically Ill, Mechanically Ventilated Patients. A Metaanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Walkey, Allan J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Open lung biopsy may be performed to guide therapy in mechanically ventilated patients with diagnostic uncertainty regarding etiology of pulmonary infiltrates. Current evidence for open lung biopsy in mechanically ventilated patients comes from single-center case series. Objectives: We performed a metaanalysis of case series to determine diagnoses, complications, and changes in therapy after lung biopsy in critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation. Methods: We searched Medline for case series of lung biopsies in critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation. We pooled results of individual case series using random effects metaanalysis models to obtain summary proportions. Measurements and Main Results: We identified 14 case series including a total of 512 mechanically ventilated patients with 530 histopathological diagnoses. The most common diagnoses were “fibrosis/pneumonitis” (n = 155, 25%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 14–37%) and infection (n = 113, 20%; 95% CI, 15–27%). Viruses were the most commonly identified infectious etiology identified on open lung biopsy, representing 50% of potential pathogens. Diffuse alveolar damage was present in a minority of specimens (n = 100, 16%; 95% CI, 8–25%). Therapeutic changes after lung biopsy occurred in 399 patients (78%; 95% CI, 64–81%). Procedure-related complications occurred in 29% of patients (95% CI, 25–33%), most commonly persistent air leak. Mortality among mechanically ventilated patients after diagnostic open lung biopsy was 54%. Conclusions: Among mechanically ventilated patients with respiratory failure of unclear etiology, lung biopsy yielded a wide range of diagnoses and was associated with a change in therapy in most patients. PMID:26065712

  7. Furosemide is associated with acute kidney injury in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Levi, T.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Almeida, D.N.; Martins, R.T.C.; Silva, M.G.C.; Santana, N.C.P.; Sanjuan, I.T.; Cruz, C.M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in critically ill patients. Diuretics are used without any evidence demonstrating a beneficial effect on renal function. The objective of the present study is to determine the incidence of AKI in an intensive care unit (ICU) and if there is an association between the use of furosemide and the development of AKI. The study involved a hospital cohort in which 344 patients were consecutively enrolled from January 2010 to January 2011. A total of 132 patients (75 females and 57 males, average age 64 years) remained for analysis. Most exclusions were related to ICU discharge in the first 24 h. Laboratory, sociodemographic and clinical data were collected until the development of AKI, medical discharge or patient death. The incidence of AKI was 55% (95%CI = 46-64). The predictors of AKI found by univariate analysis were septic shock: OR = 3.12, 95%CI = 1.36-7.14; use of furosemide: OR = 3.27, 95%CI = 1.57-6.80, and age: OR = 1.02, 95%CI = 1.00-1.04. Analysis of the subgroup of patients with septic shock showed that the odds ratio of furosemide was 5.5 (95%CI = 1.16-26.02) for development of AKI. Age, use of furosemide, and septic shock were predictors of AKI in critically ill patients. Use of furosemide in the subgroup of patients with sepsis/septic shock increased (68.4%) the chance of development of AKI when compared to the sample as a whole (43.9%) PMID:22641414

  8. The response of the microcirculation to mechanical support of the heart in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Akin, Sakir; Kara, Atila; den Uil, Corstiaan A; Ince, Can

    2016-12-01

    Critical illness associated with cardiac pump failure results in reduced tissue perfusion in all organs and occurs in various conditions such as sepsis, cardiogenic shock, and heart failure. Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices can be used to maintain organ perfusion in patients with cardiogenic shock and decompensated chronic heart failure. However, correction of global hemodynamic parameters by MCS does not always cause a parallel improvement in microcirculatory perfusion and oxygenation of the organ systems, a condition referred to as a loss of hemodynamic coherence between macro- and microcirculation (MC). In this paper, we review the literature describing hemodynamic coherence or loss occurring during MCS of the heart. By using Embase, Medline Cochrane, Web of Science, and Google Scholar, we analyzed the literature on the response of MC and macrocirculation to MCS of the heart in critical illness. The characteristics of patients, MCS devices, and micro- and macrocirculatory parameters were very heterogenic. Short-term MCS studies (78%) described the effects of intra-aortic balloon pumps (IABPs) on the MC and macrocirculation. Improvement in MC, observed by handheld microscopy (orthogonal polarization spectral (OPS), sidestream dark-field (SDF), and Cytocam IDF imaging) in line with restored macrocirculation was found in 44% and 40% of the studies of short- and long-term MCS, respectively. In only 6 of 14 studies, hemodynamic coherence was described. It is concluded that more studies using direct visualization of the MC in short- and long-term MCS by handheld microscopy are needed, preferably randomized controlled studies, to identify the presence and clinical significance of hemodynamic coherence. It is anticipated that these further studies can enable to better identify patients who will benefit from treatment by mechanical heart support to ensure adequate organ perfusion.

  9. Hyperproteic hypocaloric enteral nutrition in the critically ill patient: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Rugeles, Saúl-Javier; Rueda, Juan-David; Díaz, Carlos-Eduardo; Rosselli, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Our aim was to evaluate the impact of hyperproteic hypocaloric enteral feeding on clinical outcomes in critically ill patients, particularly on severity of organic failure measured with the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA). Materials and Methods: In a double blind clinical trial, 80 critically ill adult patients were randomized to hyperproteic hypocaloric or to isocaloric enteral nutrition; all patients completed follow-up of at least 4 days. Prescribed caloric intake was: Hyperproteic hypocaloric enteral nutrition (15 kcal/kg with 1.7 g/kg of protein) or isocaloric enteral nutrition (25 kcal/kg with 20% of the calories as protein). The main outcome was the differences in delta SOFA at 48 h. Secondary outcomes were intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay, days on ventilator, hyperglycemic events, and insulin requirements. Results: There were no differences in SOFA score at baseline (7.5 (standard deviation (SD) 2.9) vs 6.7 (SD 2.5) P = 0.17). The total amount of calories delivered was similarly low in both groups (12 kcal/kg in intervention group vs 14 kcal/kg in controls), but proteic delivery was significantly different (1.4 vs 0.76 g/kg, respectively P ≤ 0.0001). The intervention group showed an improvement in SOFA score at 48 h (delta SOFA 1.7 (SD 1.9) vs 0.7 (SD 2.8) P = 0.04) and less hyperglycemic episodes per day (1.0 (SD 1.3) vs 1.7 (SD 2.5) P = 0.017). Discussion: Enteral hyperproteic hypocaloric nutrition therapy could be associated with a decrease in multiple organ failure measured with SOFA score. We also found decreased hyperglycemia and a trend towards less mechanical ventilation days and ICU length of stay. PMID:24501485

  10. The Effect of Nutritional Status in the Pathogenesis of Critical Illness Myopathy (CIM).

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, Hannah; Larsson, Lars

    2014-05-30

    The muscle wasting and loss of specific force associated with Critical Illness Myopathy (CIM) is, at least in part, due to a preferential loss of the molecular motor protein myosin. This acquired myopathy is common in critically ill immobilized and mechanically ventilated intensive care patients (ICU). There is a growing understanding of the mechanisms underlying CIM, but the role of nutritional factors triggering this serious complication of modern intensive care remains unknown. This study aims at establishing the effect of nutritional status in the pathogenesis of CIM. An experimental ICU model was used where animals are mechanically ventilated, pharmacologically paralysed post-synaptically and extensively monitored for up to 14 days. Due to the complexity of the experimental model, the number of animals included is small. After exposure to this ICU condition, animals develop a phenotype similar to patients with CIM. The results from this study show that the preferential myosin loss, decline in specific force and muscle fiber atrophy did not differ between low vs. eucaloric animals. In both experimental groups, passive mechanical loading had a sparing effect of muscle weight independent on nutritional status. Thus, this study confirms the strong impact of the mechanical silencing associated with the ICU condition in triggering CIM, overriding any potential effects of caloric intake in triggering CIM. In addition, the positive effects of passive mechanical loading on muscle fiber size and force generating capacity was not affected by the nutritional status in this study. However, due to the small sample size these pilot results need to be validated in a larger cohort.

  11. The ABO Histo-Blood Group and AKI in Critically Ill Patients with Trauma or Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brian J.; Mangalmurti, Nilam S.; Nguyen, Tam D.; Holena, Daniel N.; Wu, Qufei; Nguyen, Ethan T.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Lanken, Paul N.; Christie, Jason D.; Meyer, Nuala J.; Shashaty, Michael G.S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective ABO blood types are determined by antigen modifications on glycoproteins and glycolipids and associated with altered plasma levels of inflammatory and endothelial injury markers implicated in AKI pathogenesis. We sought to determine the association of ABO blood types with AKI risk in critically ill patients with trauma or sepsis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We conducted two prospective cohort studies at an urban, academic, level I trauma center and tertiary referral center; 497 patients with trauma admitted to the surgical intensive care unit between 2005 and 2010 with an injury severity score >15 and 759 patients with severe sepsis admitted to the medical intensive care unit between 2008 and 2013 were followed for 6 days for the development of incident AKI. AKI was defined by Acute Kidney Injury Network creatinine and dialysis criteria. Results Of 497 patients with trauma, 134 developed AKI (27%). In multivariable analysis, blood type A was associated with higher AKI risk relative to type O among patients of European descent (n=229; adjusted risk, 0.28 versus 0.14; risk difference, 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.03 to 0.24; P=0.02). Of 759 patients with sepsis, AKI developed in 326 (43%). Blood type A again conferred higher AKI risk relative to type O among patients of European descent (n=437; adjusted risk, 0.53 versus 0.40; risk difference, 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.04 to 0.23; P=0.01). Findings were similar when analysis was restricted to those patients who did not develop acute respiratory distress syndrome or were not transfused. We did not detect a significant association between blood type and AKI risk among individuals of African descent in either cohort. Conclusions Blood type A is independently associated with AKI risk in critically ill patients with trauma or severe sepsis of European descent, suggesting a role for ABO glycans in AKI susceptibility. PMID:26342043

  12. The benefits of tight glycemic control in critical illness: Sweeter than assumed?

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew John

    2014-12-01

    Hyperglycemia has long been observed amongst critically ill patients and associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Tight glycemic control (TGC) is the clinical practice of controlling blood glucose (BG) down to the "normal" 4.4-6.1 mmol/L range of a healthy adult, aiming to avoid any potential deleterious effects of hyperglycemia. The ground-breaking Leuven trials reported a mortality benefit of approximately 10% when using this technique, which led many to endorse its benefits. In stark contrast, the multi-center normoglycemia in intensive care evaluation-survival using glucose algorithm regulation (NICE-SUGAR) trial, not only failed to replicate this outcome, but showed TGC appeared to be harmful. This review attempts to re-analyze the current literature and suggests that hope for a benefit from TGC should not be so hastily abandoned. Inconsistencies in study design make a like-for-like comparison of the Leuven and NICE-SUGAR trials challenging. Inadequate measures preventing hypoglycemic events are likely to have contributed to the increased mortality observed in the NICE-SUGAR treatment group. New technologies, including predictive models, are being developed to improve the safety of TGC, primarily by minimizing hypoglycemia. Intensive Care Units which are unequipped in trained staff and monitoring capacity would be unwise to attempt TGC, especially considering its yet undefined benefit and the deleterious nature of hypoglycemia. International recommendations now advise clinicians to ensure critically ill patients maintain a BG of <10 mmol/L. Despite encouraging evidence, currently we can only speculate and remain optimistic that the benefit of TGC in clinical practice is sweeter than assumed.

  13. Critical COPD respiratory illness is linked to increased transcriptomic activity of neutrophil proteases genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene expression profiling (GEP) in cells obtained from peripheral blood has shown that this is a very useful approach for biomarker discovery and for studying molecular pathogenesis of prevalent diseases. While there is limited literature available on gene expression markers associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), the transcriptomic picture associated with critical respiratory illness in this disease is not known at the present moment. Findings By using Agilent microarray chips, we have profiled gene expression signatures in the whole blood of 28 COPD patients hospitalized with different degrees of respiratory compromise.12 of them needed of admission to the ICU, whilst 16 were admitted to the Respiratory Medicine Service. GeneSpring GX 11.0 software was used for performing statistical comparisons of transcript levels between ICU and non-ICU patients. Ingenuity pathway analysis 8.5 (IPA) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) were used to select, annotate and visualize genes by function and pathway (gene ontology). T-test showed evidence of 1501 genes differentially expressed between ICU and non-ICU patients. IPA and KEGG analysis of the most representative biological functions revealed that ICU patients had increased levels of neutrophil gene transcripts, being [cathepsin G (CTSG)], [elastase, neutrophil expressed (ELANE)], [proteinase 3 (PRTN3)], [myeloperoxidase (MPO)], [cathepsin D (CTSD)], [defensin, alpha 3, neutrophil-specific (DEFA3)], azurocidin 1 (AZU1)], and [bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI)] the most representative ones. Proteins codified by these genes form part of the azurophilic granules of neutrophils and are involved in both antimicrobial defence and tissue damage. This “neutrophil signature” was paralleled by the necessity of advanced respiratory and vital support, and the presence of bacterial infection. Conclusion Study of transcriptomic signatures in blood suggests an

  14. Predictors of Inadequate Linezolid Concentrations after Standard Dosing in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Taubert, Max; Maier, Barbara; Frechen, Sebastian; Scharf, Christina; Holdt, Lesca-Miriam; Frey, Lorenz; Vogeser, Michael; Fuhr, Uwe; Zander, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Adequate linezolid blood concentrations have been shown to be associated with an improved clinical outcome. Our goal was to assess new predictors of inadequate linezolid concentrations often observed in critically ill patients. Fifty-two critically ill patients with severe infections receiving standard dosing of linezolid participated in this prospective observational study. Serum samples (median, 32 per patient) were taken on four consecutive days, and total linezolid concentrations were quantified. Covariates influencing linezolid pharmacokinetics were identified by multivariate analysis and a population pharmacokinetic model. Target attainment (area under the concentration-time curve over 12 h [AUC12]/MIC ratio of >50; MIC = 2 mg/liter) was calculated for both the study patients and a simulated independent patient group (n = 67,000). Target attainment was observed for only 36% of the population on both days 1 and 4. Independent covariates related to significant decreases of linezolid concentrations included higher weight, creatinine clearance rates, and fibrinogen and antithrombin concentrations, lower concentrations of lactate, and the presence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Linezolid clearance was increased in ARDS patients (by 82%) and in patients with elevated fibrinogen or decreased lactate concentrations. In simulated patients, most covariates, including fibrinogen and lactate concentrations and weight, showed quantitatively minor effects on target attainment (difference of ≤9% between the first and fourth quartiles of the respective parameters). In contrast, the presence of ARDS had the strongest influence, with only ≤6% of simulated patients reaching this target. In conclusion, the presence of ARDS was identified as a new and strong predictor of insufficient linezolid concentrations, which might cause treatment failure. Insufficient concentrations might also be a major problem in patients with combined alterations of other covariate

  15. Accuracy of a Novel Noninvasive Transdermal Continuous Glucose Monitor in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saur, Nicole M.; England, Michael R.; Menzie, Wayne; Melanson, Ann Marie; Trieu, My-Quyen; Berlin, Jason; Hurley, James; Krystyniak, Keith; Kongable, Gail L.

    2014-01-01

    Stress hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the critically ill. Intermittent, random blood glucose (BG) measurements can miss episodes of hyper- and hypoglycemia. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of the Symphony® continuous glucose monitor (CGM) in critically ill cardiac surgery patients. Fifteen adult cardiac surgery patients were evaluated immediately postoperatively in the intensive care unit. Prelude® SkinPrep prepared the skin and a sensor was applied to 2 test sites on each subject to monitor interstitial fluid glucose. Reference BG was sampled at 30- to 60-minute intervals. The skin at the test sites was inspected for adverse effects. Accuracy of the retrospectively analyzed CGM data relative to reference BG values was determined using continuous glucose-error grid analysis (CG-EGA) and mean absolute relative difference (MARD). Using 570 Symphony CGM glucose readings paired with reference BG measurements, CG-EGA showed that 99.6% of the readings were within zones A and B. BG measurements ranged from 73 to 251 mg/dL. The MARD was 12.3%. No adverse device effects were reported. The Symphony CGM system is able to safely, continuously, and noninvasively monitor glucose in the transdermal interstitial fluid of cardiac surgery intensive care unit patients with accuracy similar to that reported with other CGM systems. Future versions of the system will need real-time data analysis, fast warm-up, and less frequent calibrations to be used in the clinical setting. PMID:24876448

  16. Augmented renal clearance in critically ill patients: incidence, associated factors and effects on vancomycin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Campassi, María Luz; Gonzalez, María Cecilia; Masevicius, Fabio Daniel; Vazquez, Alejandro Risso; Moseinco, Miriam; Navarro, Noelia Cintia; Previgliano, Luciana; Rubatto, Nahuel Paolo; Benites, Martín Hernán; Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    Objective An augmented renal clearance has been described in some groups of critically ill patients, and it might induce sub-optimal concentrations of drugs eliminated by glomerular filtration, mainly antibiotics. Studies on its occurrence and determinants are lacking. Our goals were to determine the incidence and associated factors of augmented renal clearance and the effects on vancomycin concentrations and dosing in a series of intensive care unit patients. Methods We prospectively studied 363 patients admitted during 1 year to a clinical-surgical intensive care unit. Patients with serum creatinine >1.3mg/dL were excluded. Creatinine clearance was calculated from a 24-hour urine collection. Patients were grouped according to the presence of augmented renal clearance (creatinine clearance >120mL/min/1.73m2), and possible risk factors were analyzed with bivariate and logistic regression analysis. In patients treated with vancomycin, dosage and plasma concentrations were registered. Results Augmented renal clearance was present in 103 patients (28%); they were younger (48±15 versus 65±17 years, p<0.0001), had more frequent obstetric (16 versus 7%, p=0.0006) and trauma admissions (10 versus 3%, p=0.016) and fewer comorbidities. The only independent determinants for the development of augmented renal clearance were age (OR 0.95; p<0.0001; 95%CI 0.93-0.96) and absence of diabetes (OR 0.34; p=0.03; 95%CI 0.12-0.92). Twelve of the 46 patients who received vancomycin had augmented renal clearance and despite higher doses, had lower concentrations. Conclusions In this cohort of critically ill patients, augmented renal clearance was a common finding. Age and absence of diabetes were the only independent determinants. Therefore, younger and previously healthy patients might require larger vancomycin dosing. PMID:24770684

  17. Acute Kidney Injury Classified by Serum Creatinine and Urine Output in Critically Ill Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Sánchez, Bertha M; Herrera-Gómez, Ángel; Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in critically ill patients and is associated with higher mortality. Cancer patients are at an increased risk of AKI. Our objective was to determine the incidence of AKI in our critically ill cancer patients, using the criteria of serum creatinine (SCr) and urine output (UO) proposed by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO). Methods. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of a prospectively collected database at the intensive care unit (ICU) of the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología from January 2013 to March 2015. Results. We classified AKI according to the KDIGO definition. We included 389 patients; using the SCr criterion, 192 (49.4%) had AKI; using the UO criterion, 219 (56.3%) had AKI. Using both criteria, we diagnosed AKI in 69.4% of patients. All stages were independently associated with six-month mortality; stage 1 HR was 2.04 (95% CI 1.14-3.68, p = 0.017), stage 2 HR was 2.73 (95% CI 1.53-4.88, p = 0.001), and stage 3 HR was 4.5 (95% CI 2.25-8.02, p < 0.001). Patients who fulfilled both criteria had a higher mortality compared with patients who fulfilled just one criterion (HR 3.56, 95% CI 2.03-6.24, p < 0.001). Conclusion. We diagnosed AKI in 69.4% of patients. All AKI stages were associated with higher risk of death at six months, even for patients who fulfilled just one AKI criterion.

  18. Safety of performing fiberoptic bronchoscopy in critically ill hypoxemic patients with acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Cracco, Christophe; Fartoukh, Muriel; Prodanovic, Hélène; Azoulay, Elie; Chenivesse, Cécile; Lorut, Christine; Beduneau, Gaëtan; Bui, Hoang Nam; Taille, Camille; Brochard, Laurent; Demoule, Alexandre; Maitre, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Background Safety of fibreoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) in nonintubated critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure have not been extensively evaluated. We aimed to measure the incidence of intubation and need to increase ventilatory support following FOB and to identify predictive factors of this event. Methods A prospective multicenter observational study was carried out in 8 French adult intensive care units. 169 FOB performed in patients with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio equal or less than 300 were analyzed. Our main end point was intubation rate. The secondary end point was rate of increased ventilatory support defined as greater than a 50% increase in oxygen requirement, the need to start non invasive-positive pressure ventilation (NI-PPV) or increase NI-PPV support. Results Within 24 hours, an increase in ventilatory support was required following 59 (35%) bronchoscopies, of which 25 (15%) led to endotracheal intubation. The existence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR:5.2 [1.6–17.8], p=0.007) or immunosuppression (OR : 5.4 [1.7–17.2], p=0.004) were significantly associated with the need for intubation in multivariable analysis. None of the baseline physiological parameters including the PaO2/FiO2 ratio was associated with intubation. Conclusion Bronchoscopy is often followed by an increase in ventilatory support in hypoxemic critically ill patients, but less frequently by the need for intubation. COPD, immunosuppression are associated with a need for invasive ventilation in the following 24 hours. PMID:23070123

  19. Increased total serum random cortisol levels predict mortality in critically ill trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Urmil; Polite, Nathan; Wood, Teresa; Lieber, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Dysfunction in the hypothalamopituitary adrenal axis is thought to exist; however, there continues to be controversy about what level of serum cortisol corresponds to adrenal insufficiency. Few studies have focused on the significance of serum random cortisol in the critically ill trauma patient. Trauma patients with total serum random cortisol levels drawn in the intensive care unit within the first seven days of hospitalization were retrospectively reviewed. The primary outcome measured was in-hospital mortality. Two hundred forty-two patients were analyzed. Nonsurvivors had significantly higher mean cortisol levels than survivors (28.7 ± 15.80 μg/dL vs 22.9 ± 12.35 μg/dL, P = 0.01). Patients with cortisol 30 μg/dL or greater were more likely to die with odds ratio of 2.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5 to 5). The odds ratio increased to 4.0 and 3.8 (95% CI, 1.4 to 11.4 and 1.3 to 10.9) when cortisol was drawn on hospital Day 2 and Days 3 through 7, respectively. Among nonsurvivors, patients with an injury severity score less than 25 had significantly higher cortisol levels than patients with an Injury Severity Score 25 or higher (35.3 ± 19.21 μg/dL vs 25.7 ± 13.21 μg/dL, P = 0.009). Patients with massive transfusion, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, or solid organ injury did not have significantly different cortisol levels. The covariate-adjusted area under the receiver operating characteristic curve indicated that cortisol level has a 77 per cent accuracy in differentiating survivors from nonsurvivors. Higher cortisol levels were predictive of mortality in critically ill trauma patients. Whether serum cortisol level is a marker that can be modified remains an area of interest for future study.

  20. Innate immunity gene expression changes in critically ill patients with sepsis and disease-related malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Sarnecka, Agnieszka; Dąbrowska, Aleksandra; Kosałka, Katarzyna; Wachowska, Ewelina; Bałan, Barbara J.; Jankowska, Marta; Korta, Teresa; Niewiński, Grzegorz; Kański, Andrzej; Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz, Małgorzata; Omidi, Mohammad; Majewska, Krystyna; Słotwińska, Sylwia M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was an attempt to determine whether the expression of genes involved in innate antibacterial response (TL R2, NOD 1, TRAF6, HMGB 1 and Hsp70) in peripheral blood leukocytes in critically ill patients, may undergo significant changes depending on the severity of the infection and the degree of malnutrition. The study was performed in a group of 128 patients with infections treated in the intensive care and surgical ward. In 103/80.5% of patients, infections had a severe course (sepsis, severe sepsis, septic shock, mechanical ventilation of the lungs). Clinical monitoring included diagnosis of severe infection (according to the criteria of the ACC P/SCC M), assessment of severity of the patient condition and risk of death (APACHE II and SAPS II), nutritional assessment (NRS 2002 and SGA scales) and the observation of the early results of treatment. Gene expression at the mRNA level was analyzed by real-time PCR. The results of the present study indicate that in critically ill patients treated in the IC U there are significant disturbances in the expression of genes associated with innate antimicrobial immunity, which may have a significant impact on the clinical outcome. The expression of these genes varies depending on the severity of the patient condition, severity of infection and nutritional status. Expression disorders of genes belonging to innate antimicrobial immunity should be diagnosed as early as possible, monitored during the treatment and taken into account during early therapeutic treatment (including early nutrition to support the functions of immune cells). PMID:26648775

  1. Recombinant human erythropoietin therapy in critically ill patients: a dose-response study [ISRCTN48523317

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Matamis, Dimitris; Routsi, Christina; Michalopoulos, Argiris; Maggina, Nina; Dimopoulos, George; Zakynthinos, Epaminondas; Nakos, George; Thomopoulos, George; Mandragos, Kostas; Maniatis, Alice

    2005-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of two dosing schedules of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) in increasing haematocrit (Hct) and haemoglobin (Hb) and reducing exposure to allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in critically ill patients. Method This was a prospective, randomized, multicentre trial. A total of 13 intensive care units participated, and a total of 148 patients who met eligibility criteria were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to receive intravenous iron saccharate alone (control group), intravenous iron saccharate and subcutaneous rHuEPO 40,000 units once per week (group A), or intravenous iron saccharate and subcutaneous rHuEPO 40,000 units three times per week (group B). rHuEPO was given for a minimum of 2 weeks or until discharge from the intensive care unit or death. The maximum duration of therapy was 3 weeks. Results The cumulative number of RBC units transfused, the average numbers of RBC units transfused per patient and per transfused patient, the average volume of RBCs transfused per day, and the percentage of transfused patients were significantly higher in the control group than in groups A and B. No significant difference was observed between group A and B. The mean increases in Hct and Hb from baseline to final measurement were significantly greater in group B than in the control group. The mean increase in Hct was significantly greater in group B than in group A. The mean increase in Hct in group A was significantly greater than that in control individuals, whereas the mean increase in Hb did not differ significantly between the control group and group A. Conclusion Administration of rHuEPO to critically ill patients significantly reduced the need for RBC transfusion. The magnitude of the reduction did not differ between the two dosing schedules, although there was a dose response for Hct and Hb to rHuEPO in these patients. PMID:16277712

  2. Evaluation of Altered Drug Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Adults Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ha, Michael A; Sieg, Adam C

    2017-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life-support modality used in patients with refractory cardiac and/or respiratory failure. A significant resurgence in the use ECMO has been seen in recent years as a result of substantial improvements in technology and survival benefit. With expanding ECMO use, a better understanding of how ECMO affects drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is necessary. The vast majority of PK studies in patients receiving ECMO have been conducted within neonatal or pediatric populations or within a controlled environment (e.g., in vitro or ex vivo). Because of significant differences in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, it may be inappropriate to extrapolate these PK data to adults. Thus, the aims of this review are to evaluate the changes in drug PK during ECMO and to summarize the available PK data for common drugs used in the adult critically ill patients during ECMO support. A search of the PubMed (1965-July 2016), EMBASE (1965-July 2016), and Cochrane Controlled Trial Register databases was performed. All relevant studies describing PK alterations during ECMO in ex vivo experiments and in adults were included. Evaluation of the data indicated that drug PK in adults receiving ECMO support may be significantly altered. Factors influencing these alterations are numerous and have intricate relationships with each other but can generally be classified as ECMO circuit factors, drug factors, and patient factors. Commonly used drugs in these patients include antimicrobials, sedatives, and analgesics. PK data for most of these drugs are generally lacking; however, recent research efforts in this patient population have provided some limited guidance in drug dosing. With an improved understanding of altered drug PK secondary to ECMO therapy, optimization of pharmacotherapy within this critically ill population continues to move forward.

  3. Conflicts in Learning to Care for Critically Ill Newborns: "It Makes Me Question My Own Morals".

    PubMed

    Boss, Renee D; Geller, Gail; Donohue, Pamela K

    2015-09-01

    Caring for critically ill and dying patients often triggers both professional and personal growth for physician trainees. In pediatrics, the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is among the most distressing settings for trainees. We used longitudinal narrative writing to gain insight into how physician trainees are challenged by and make sense of repetitive, ongoing conflicts experienced as part of caring for very sick and dying babies. The study took place in a 45-bed, university-based NICU in an urban setting in the United States. From November 2009 to June 2010 we enrolled pediatric residents and neonatology fellows at the beginning of their NICU rotations. Participants were asked to engage in individual, longitudinal narrative writing about their "experience in the NICU." Thematic narrative analysis was performed. Thirty-seven physician trainees participated in the study. The mean number of narratives per trainee was 12; a total of 441 narratives were available for analysis. Conflict was the most pervasive theme in the narratives. Trainees experienced conflicts with families and conflicts with other clinicians. Trainees also described multiple conflicts of identity as members of the neonatology team, as members of the medical profession, as members of their own families, and as members of society. Physician trainees experience significant conflict and distress while learning to care for critically ill and dying infants. These conflicts often led them to question their own morals and their role in the medical profession. Physician trainees should be educated to expect various types of distress during intensive care rotations, encouraged to identify their own sources of distress, and supported in mitigating their effects.

  4. Application of a modified sequential organ failure assessment score to critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Namendys-Silva, S A; Silva-Medina, M A; Vásquez-Barahona, G M; Baltazar-Torres, J A; Rivero-Sigarroa, E; Fonseca-Lazcano, J A; Domínguez-Cherit, G

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the usefulness of the Mexican sequential organ failure assessment (MEXSOFA) score for assessing the risk of mortality for critically ill patients in the ICU. A total of 232 consecutive patients admitted to an ICU were included in the study. The MEXSOFA was calculated using the original SOFA scoring system with two modifications: the PaO2/FiO2 ratio was replaced with the SpO2/FiO2 ratio, and the evaluation of neurologic dysfunction was excluded. The ICU mortality rate was 20.2%. Patients with an initial MEXSOFA score of 9 points or less calculated during the first 24 h after admission to the ICU had a mortality rate of 14.8%, while those with an initial MEXSOFA score of 10 points or more had a mortality rate of 40%. The MEXSOFA score at 48 h was also associated with mortality: patients with a score of 9 points or less had a mortality rate of 14.1%, while those with a score of 10 points or more had a mortality rate of 50%. In a multivariate analysis, only the MEXSOFA score at 48 h was an independent predictor for in-ICU death with an OR = 1.35 (95%CI = 1.14-1.59, P < 0.001). The SOFA and MEXSOFA scores calculated 24 h after admission to the ICU demonstrated a good level of discrimination for predicting the in-ICU mortality risk in critically ill patients. The MEXSOFA score at 48 h was an independent predictor of death; with each 1-point increase, the odds of death increased by 35%.

  5. Hypothyroidism and brain developmental players.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, R G

    2015-01-01

    Most of our knowledge on the mechanisms of thyroid hormone (TH) dependent brain development is based on clinical observations and animal studies of maternal/fetal hypothyroidism. THs play an essential role in brain development and hormone deficiency during critical phases in fetal life may lead to severe and permanent brain damage. Maternal hypothyroidism is considered the most common cause of fetal TH deficiency, but the problem may also arise in the fetus. In the case of congenital hypothyroidism due to defects in fetal thyroid gland development or hormone synthesis, clinical symptoms at birth are often mild as a result of compensatory maternal TH supply. TH transporters (THTs) and deiodinases (Ds) are important regulators of intracellular triiodothyronine (T3) availability and therefore contribute to the control of thyroid receptors (TRs)-dependent CNS development and early embryonic life. Defects in fetal THTs or Ds may have more impact on fetal brain since they can result in intracellular T3 deficiency despite sufficient maternal TH supply. One clear example is the recent discovery of mutations in the TH transporter (monocarboxylate transporter 8; MCT8) that could be linked to a syndrome of severe and non reversible psychomotor retardation. Even mild and transient changes in maternal TH levels can directly affect and alter the gene expression profile, and thus disturb fetal brain development. Animal studies are needed to increase our understanding of the exact role of THTs and Ds in prenatal brain development.

  6. Can Transthoracic Echocardiography Be Used to Predict Fluid Responsiveness in the Critically Ill Patient? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mandeville, Justin C.; Colebourn, Claire L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. We systematically evaluated the use of transthoracic echocardiography in the assessment of dynamic markers of preload to predict fluid responsiveness in the critically ill adult patient. Methods. Studies in the critically ill using transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) to predict a response in stroke volume or cardiac output to a fluid load were selected. Selection was limited to English language and adult patients. Studies on patients with an open thorax or abdomen were excluded. Results. The predictive power of diagnostic accuracy of inferior vena cava diameter and transaortic Doppler signal changes with the respiratory cycle or passive leg raising in mechanically ventilated patients was strong throughout the articles reviewed. Limitations of the technique relate to patient tolerance of the procedure, adequacy of acoustic windows, and operator skill. Conclusions. Transthoracic echocardiographic techniques accurately predict fluid responsiveness in critically ill patients. Discriminative power is not affected by the technique selected. PMID:22400109

  7. Genetics of congenital hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Park, S; Chatterjee, V

    2005-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is the most common neonatal metabolic disorder and results in severe neurodevelopmental impairment and infertility if untreated. Congenital hypothyroidism is usually sporadic but up to 2% of thyroid dysgenesis is familial, and congenital hypothyroidism caused by organification defects is often recessively inherited. The candidate genes associated with this genetically heterogeneous disorder form two main groups: those causing thyroid gland dysgenesis and those causing dyshormonogenesis. Genes associated with thyroid gland dysgenesis include the TSH receptor in non-syndromic congenital hypothyroidism, and Gsα and the thyroid transcription factors (TTF-1, TTF-2, and Pax-8), associated with different complex syndromes that include congenital hypothyroidism. Among those causing dyshormonogenesis, the thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin genes were initially described, and more recently PDS (Pendred syndrome), NIS (sodium iodide symporter), and THOX2 (thyroid oxidase 2) gene defects. There is also early evidence for a third group of congenital hypothyroid conditions associated with iodothyronine transporter defects associated with severe neurological sequelae. This review focuses on the genetic aspects of primary congenital hypothyroidism. PMID:15863666

  8. Nutritional management of critically ill trauma patients in the deployed military setting.

    PubMed

    Jansen, J O; Turner, S; Johnston, A McD

    2011-09-01

    The role of nutritional support in critical illness is well established. This article reviews the nutritional management of military trauma patients in the deployed setting, which poses special challenges for the surgeon and intensivist. There is little direct evidence relating to the nutritional management of trauma patients in general, and military trauma patients in particular, but much of the evidence accrued in the civilian and non-trauma critical care setting can be extrapolated to military practice. There is strong consensus that feeding should be commenced as soon possible after injury. Enteral nutrition should be used in preference to parenteral nutrition whenever possible. If available, supplemental parenteral feeding can be considered if enteral delivery is insufficient. Gastrointestinal anastomoses and repairs, including those in the upper gastrointestinal tract, are not a contraindication to early enteral feeding. Intragastric delivery is more physiological and usually more convenient than postpyloric feeding, and thus the preferred route for the initiation of nutritional support. Feeding gastrostomies or jejunostomies should not be used for short-term nutritional support. Enteral feeding of patients with an open abdomen does not delay closure and may reduce the incidence of pneumonia, and enteral nutrition should be continued for scheduled relook surgery not involving hollow viscera or airway. Glutamine supplementation may improve outcome in trauma patients, but fish-oil containing feeds, while showing some promise, should be reserved for subgroups of patients with ARDS.

  9. Prognosis of alcohol-associated lactic acidosis in critically ill patients: an 8-year study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Chieh; Chan, Khee-Siang; Tseng, Kuei-Ling; Weng, Shih-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is common in critical care; by contrast, a subtype called alcohol-associated lactic acidosis (AALA) is rarely encountered. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the prognosis of AALA in critically ill patients and the second aim was to determine whether the survival was associated to the peak blood lactate concentration. An 8-year retrospective analysis of adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with AALA between January 2007 and December 2014 was considered in a tertiary care hospital. In total, 23 patients were analyzed and the median peak blood lactate level was 15.9 mmol/L. Only 2 patients (8.7%) presented peak blood lactate levels <10 mmol/L. In this study, 21 patients survived from ICU and hospital, the mortality rate was 8.7%. The result indicted the survival of AALA was not associated with peak blood lactate concentration although survivors still had a better lactate clearance rate per hour than non-survivors. Moreover, AALA patients with coexisting sepsis presenting higher lactate clearance rate and shorter lactate clearance time than those of AALA patients with solely sepsis-related lactic acidosis. PMID:27748410

  10. North American Summit on Aspiration in the Critically Ill Patient: consensus statement.

    PubMed

    McClave, Stephen A; DeMeo, Mark T; DeLegge, Mark H; DiSario, James A; Heyland, Daren K; Maloney, James P; Metheny, Norma A; Moore, Frederick A; Scolapio, James S; Spain, David A; Zaloga, Gary P

    2002-01-01

    Aspiration is the leading cause of pneumonia in the intensive care unit and the most serious complication of enteral tube feeding (ETF). Although aspiration is common, the clinical consequences are variable because of differences in nature of the aspirated material and individual host responses. A number of defense mechanisms normally present in the upper aerodigestive system that protect against aspiration become compromised by clinical events that occur frequently in the critical care setting, subjecting the patient to increased risk. The true incidence of aspiration has been difficult to determine in the past because of vague definitions, poor assessment monitors, and varying levels of clinical recognition. Standardization of terminology is an important step in helping to define the problem, design appropriate research studies, and develop strategies to reduce risk. Traditional clinical monitors of glucose oxidase strips and blue food coloring (BFC) should no longer be used. A modified approach to use of gastric residual volumes and identification of clinical factors that predispose to aspiration allow for risk stratification and an algorhythm approach to the management of the critically ill patient on ETF. Although the patient with confirmed aspiration should be monitored for clinical consequences and receive supportive pulmonary care, ETF may be continued when accompanied by appropriate steps to reduce risk of further aspiration. Management strategies for treating aspiration pneumonia are based on degree of diagnostic certainty, time of onset, and host factors.

  11. Antithrombin III Doses Rounded to Available Vial Sizes in Critically Ill Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stockton, Winifred M.; Padilla-Tolentino, Eimeira

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Children have decreased levels of antithrombin III (AT III) compared to adults. These levels may be further decreased during acute illness. Administration of exogenous AT III can increase anticoagulant efficacy. The objective of this study was to evaluate AT III doses rounded to available vial sizes compared to partial vial doses in critically ill pediatric patients, including patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). METHOD This retrospective review evaluated pediatric patients 0–18 years of age admitted to a 24-bed medical/surgical pediatric intensive care unit between June 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014, who received plasma-derived AT III. Patients received unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, or no anticoagulation. This review included patients who received ECMO and CRRT. RESULTS Eighty doses of AT III were administered to 24 patients (38 full vial size doses and 42 partial vial size doses). The AT III level following dose administration was ≥80% for 26 full vial doses (70%) and 16 partial vial doses (41%; p = 0.010). For patients who received multiple doses of AT III, the median time between doses was 45 hours following full vial doses, and 23 hours following partial vial doses (p = 0.011). Seven patients (29%) had documentation of new or increased bleeding. The median waste prevented from rounding doses to full vial sizes was 363 units. CONCLUSIONS After receiving AT III doses rounded to full vial sizes, patients were more likely to have a therapeutic AT III level and a longer interval between administrations. Rounding AT III doses to full vial sizes reduces waste and can result in cost savings.

  12. Stratification of the severity of critically ill patients with classification trees

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Development of three classification trees (CT) based on the CART (Classification and Regression Trees), CHAID (Chi-Square Automatic Interaction Detection) and C4.5 methodologies for the calculation of probability of hospital mortality; the comparison of the results with the APACHE II, SAPS II and MPM II-24 scores, and with a model based on multiple logistic regression (LR). Methods Retrospective study of 2864 patients. Random partition (70:30) into a Development Set (DS) n = 1808 and Validation Set (VS) n = 808. Their properties of discrimination are compared with the ROC curve (AUC CI 95%), Percent of correct classification (PCC CI 95%); and the calibration with the Calibration Curve and the Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR CI 95%). Results CTs are produced with a different selection of variables and decision rules: CART (5 variables and 8 decision rules), CHAID (7 variables and 15 rules) and C4.5 (6 variables and 10 rules). The common variables were: inotropic therapy, Glasgow, age, (A-a)O2 gradient and antecedent of chronic illness. In VS: all the models achieved acceptable discrimination with AUC above 0.7. CT: CART (0.75(0.71-0.81)), CHAID (0.76(0.72-0.79)) and C4.5 (0.76(0.73-0.80)). PCC: CART (72(69-75)), CHAID (72(69-75)) and C4.5 (76(73-79)). Calibration (SMR) better in the CT: CART (1.04(0.95-1.31)), CHAID (1.06(0.97-1.15) and C4.5 (1.08(0.98-1.16)). Conclusion With different methodologies of CTs, trees are generated with different selection of variables and decision rules. The CTs are easy to interpret, and they stratify the risk of hospital mortality. The CTs should be taken into account for the classification of the prognosis of critically ill patients. PMID:20003229

  13. Role of the microbiome, probiotics, and ‘dysbiosis therapy’ in critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Wischmeyer, Paul E.; McDonald, Daniel; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Loss of ‘health-promoting’ microbes and overgrowth of pathogenic bacteria (dysbiosis) in ICU is believed to contribute to nosocomial infections, sepsis, and organ failure (multiple organ dysfunction syndrome). This review discusses new understanding of ICU dysbiosis, new data for probiotics and fecal transplantation in ICU, and new data characterizing the ICU microbiome. Recent findings ICU dysbiosis results from many factors, including ubiquitous antibiotic use and overuse. Despite advances in antibiotic therapy, infections and mortality from often multidrug-resistant organisms (i.e., Clostridium difficile) are increasing. This raises the question of whether restoration of a healthy microbiome via probiotics or other ‘dysbiosis therapies’ would be an optimal alternative, or parallel treatment option, to antibiotics. Recent clinical data demonstrate probiotics can reduce ICU infections and probiotics or fecal microbial transplant (FMT) can treat Clostridium difficile. This contributes to recommendations that probiotics should be considered to prevent infection in ICU. Unfortunately, significant clinical variability limits the strength of current recommendations and further large clinical trials of probiotics and FMT are needed. Before larger trials of ‘dysbiosis therapy’ can be thoughtfully undertaken, further characterization of ICU dysbiosis is needed. To addressing this, we conducted an initial analysis demonstrating a rapid and marked change from a ‘healthy’ microbiome to an often pathogen-dominant microbiota (dysbiosis) in a broad ICU population. Summary A growing body of evidence suggests critical illness and ubiquitous antibiotic use leads to ICU dysbiosis that is associated with increased ICU infection, sepsis, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Probiotics and FMT show promise as ICU therapies for infection. We hope future-targeted therapies using microbiome signatures can be developed to correct ‘illness

  14. Neonatologist Training to Guide Family Decision-Making for Critically Ill Infants

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Nancy; Donohue, Pamela K.; Arnold, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective A core skill for neonatologists is the ability to guide family decision-making for high-risk newborns. Families identify several critical communication skills for physicians in these scenarios. We aimed to assess neonatology fellow training in those skills. Design A web-based national survey. Setting Neonatal-Perinatal Training Programs in the United States Participants Graduating fellows in their final month of fellowship. Outcome Measures Fellow’s perceived training and preparedness to communicate with families about decision-making. Results The response rate was 72%, representing 83% of accredited training programs. Fellows had a great deal of training in the medical management of extremely premature and dying infants. However, they reported much less training to communicate and make collaborative decisions with the families of these infants. Over 40% of fellows reported no communication training in the form of didactic sessions, role play, or simulated patient scenarios, or clinical communication skills training the form of supervision and feedback of fellow-led family meetings. Fellows felt least trained to discuss palliative care, families’ religious and spiritual needs, and managing conflicts of opinion between families and staff or amongst staff. Fellows perceived communication skills training to be of a higher priority to them than to faculty. 93% of fellows feel that training in this area should be improved. Conclusions Graduating neonatology fellows are highly trained in the technical skills necessary to care for critically ill and dying neonates, but are inadequately trained in the communication skills that families identify as critically important when facing end of life decisions. PMID:19736330

  15. GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF PTU-INDUCED HYPOTHYROIDISM IN RAT HIPPOCAMPUS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propylthiouracil (PTU) exposure results in depletion of thyroid hormone by blocking its synthesis. It often is used to study the effects of hypothyroidism in the brain, where deficits during critical periods lead to neuroanatomical, molecular and neurochemical alterations. Decre...

  16. DEVELOPMENTAL HYPOTHYROIDISM IMPAIRS HIPPOCAMPAL LEARNING AND SYNAPTIC TRANSMISSION IN VIVO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of environmental chemicals have been reported to alter thyroid hormone (TH) function. It is well established that severe hypothyroidism during critical periods of brain development leads to alterations in hippocampal structure and learning deficits, yet evaluation of ...

  17. Cost effectiveness of intensive care in a low resource setting: A prospective cohort of medical critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cubro, Hajrunisa; Somun-Kapetanovic, Rabija; Thiery, Guillaume; Talmor, Daniel; Gajic, Ognjen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To calculate cost effectiveness of the treatment of critically ill patients in a medical intensive care unit (ICU) of a middle income country with limited access to ICU resources. METHODS: A prospective cohort study and economic evaluation of consecutive patients treated in a recently established medical ICU in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. A cost utility analysis of the intensive care of critically ill patients compared to the hospital ward treatment from the perspective of the health care system was subsequently performed. Incremental cost effectiveness was calculated using estimates of ICU vs non-ICU treatment effectiveness based on a formal systematic review of published studies. Decision analytic modeling was used to compare treatment alternatives. Sensitivity analyses of the key model parameters were performed. RESULTS: Out of 148 patients, seventy patients (47.2%) survived to one year after critical illness with a median quality of life index 0.64 [interquartile range(IQR) 0.49-0.76]. Median number of life years gained per patient was 30 (IQR 16-40) or 18 quality adjusted life years (QALYs) (IQR 7-28). The cost of treatment of critically ill patients varied between 1820 dollar and 20109 dollar per hospital survivor and between 100 dollar and 2514 dollar per QALY saved. Mean factors that influenced costs were: Age, diagnostic category, ICU and hospital length of stay and number and type of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio for ICU treatment was estimated at 3254 dollar per QALY corresponding to 35% of per capita GDP or a Very Cost Effective category according to World Health Organization criteria. CONCLUSION: The ICU treatment of critically ill medical patients in a resource poor country is cost effective and compares favorably with other medical interventions. Public health authorities in low and middle income countries should encourage development of critical care services. PMID:27152258

  18. Pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles in critically ill patients with bloodstream infections: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Rachel D.; Fowler, Robert A.; Rishu, Asgar H.; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Cook, Deborah; Dodek, Peter; Hall, Richard; Kumar, Anand; Lamontagne, François; Lauzier, François; Marshall, John; Martin, Claudio M.; McIntyre, Lauralyn; Muscedere, John; Reynolds, Steven; Stelfox, Henry T.; Daneman, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance is vital to guiding empirical treatment of infections. Collating and reporting routine data on clinical isolate testing may offer more timely information about resistance patterns than traditional surveillance network methods. Methods: Using routine microbiology testing data collected from the Bacteremia Antibiotic Length Actually Needed for Clinical Effectiveness retrospective cohort study, we conducted a descriptive secondary analysis among critically ill patients in whom bloodstream infections had been diagnosed in 14 intensive care units (ICUs) in Canada. The participating sites were located within tertiary care teaching hospitals and represented 6 provinces and 10 cities. More than 80% of the study population was accrued from 2011-2013. We assessed the epidemiologic features of the infections and corresponding antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. Susceptibility testing was done according to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines at accredited laboratories. Results: A total of 1416 pathogens were isolated from 1202 patients. The most common organisms were Escherichia coli (217 isolates [15.3%]), Staphylococcus aureus (175 [12.4%]), coagulase-negative staphylococci (117 [8.3%]), Klebsiella pneumoniae (86 [6.1%]) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (85 [6.0%]). The contribution of individual pathogens varied by site. For 13 ICUs, gram-negative susceptibility rates were high for carbapenems (95.4%), tobramycin (91.2%) and piperacillin-tazobactam (90.0%); however, the proportion of specimens susceptible to these agents ranged from 75.0%-100%, 66.7%-100% and 75.0%-100%, respectively, across sites. Fewer gram-negative bacteria were susceptible to fluoroquinolones (84.5% [range 64.1%-97.2%]). A total of 145 patients (12.1%) had infections caused by highly resistant microorganisms, with significant intersite variation (range 2.6%-24.0%, χ2 = 57.50, p < 0.001). Interpretation: We assessed the epidemiologic

  19. Outcome of Critically ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury using the AKIN Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Mandelbaum, Tal; Scott, Daniel J; Lee, Joon; Mark, Roger G.; Malhotra, Atul; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Howell, Michael D.; Talmor, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Objective Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 5–7% of all hospitalized patients with a much higher incidence in the critically ill. The Acute Kidney Injury Network proposed a definition in which serum creatinine rises (>0.3mg/dl) and/or oliguria (<0.5/ml/kg/h) for a period of 6 hours are used to detect AKI. Accurate urine output measurements as well as serum creatinine values from our database were used to detect patients with AKI and calculate their corresponding mortality risk and length of stay. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 7 intensive care units at, a large, academic, tertiary medical center. Patients Adult patients without evidence of end stage renal disease, with more than 2 creatinine measurements and at least a 6 hours urine output recording, who were admitted to the ICU between 2001 and 2007. Interventions Medical records of all the patients were reviewed. Demographic information, lab results, charted data, discharge diagnoses, physiological data and patient outcomes were extracted from the MIMIC-II database using a SQL query. Measurements and main results From 19,677 adult patient records, 14,524 patients met the inclusion criteria. 57% developed AKI during their ICU stay. In-hospital mortality rates were: 13.9%, 16.4%, 33.8% for AKI 1, 2 and 3 respectively compared to only 6.2% in patients without AKI (p<0.0001). After adjusting for multiple covariates AKI was associated with increased hospital mortality (OR 1.4 and 1.3 for AKI1 and AKI2 and 2.5 for AKI3; p<0.0001). Using multivariate logistic regression, we found that in patients who developed AKI, urine output alone was a better mortality predictor than creatinine alone or the combination of both. Conclusions More than 50% of our critically ill patients developed some stage of AKI resulting in stage-wise increased mortality risk. However, the mortality risk associated with AKI stages 1 and 2 does not differ significantly. In light of these findings reevaluation of the AKIN staging

  20. Critical Illness Outcome Study: An Observational Study on Protocols and Mortality in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Naeem A.; Gutteridge, David; Shahul, Sajid; Checkley, William; Sevransky, Jonathan; Martin, Greg S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many individual Intensive Care Unit (ICU) characteristics have been associated with patient outcomes, including staffing, expertise, continuity and team structure. Separately, many aspects of clinical care in ICUs have been operationalized through the development of complex treatment protocols. The United State Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group-Critical Illness Outcomes Study (USCIITG-CIOS) was designed to determine whether the extent of protocol availability and use in ICUs is associated with hospital survival in a large cohort of United States ICUs. Here, we describe the study protocol and analysis plan approved by the USCIITG-CIOS Steering Committee. Methods USCIITG-CIOS is a prospective, observational, ecological multi-centered “cohort” study of mixed ICUs in the U.S. The data collected include organizational information for the ICU (e.g., protocol availability and utilization, multi-disciplinary staffing assessment) and patient level information (e.g. demographics, acute and chronic medical conditions). The primary outcome is all-cause hospital mortality, with the objective being to determine whether there is an association between protocol number and hospital mortality for ICU patients. USCIITG-CIOS is powered to detect a 3% difference in crude hospital mortality between high and low protocol use ICUs, dichotomized according to protocol number at the median. The analysis will utilize regression modeling to adjust for outcome clustering by ICU, with secondary linear analysis of protocol number and mortality and a variety of a priori planned ancillary studies. There are presently 60 ICUs participating in USCIITG-CIOS to enroll approximately 6,000 study subjects. Conclusions USCIITG-CIOS is a large multicentric study examining the effect of ICU protocol use on patient outcomes. The primary results of this study will inform our understanding of the relationship between protocol availability, use, and patient outcomes in the ICU. Moreover

  1. Acute fluid shifts influence the assessment of serum vitamin D status in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Recent reports have highlighted the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and suggested an association with excess mortality in critically ill patients. Serum vitamin D concentrations in these studies were measured following resuscitation. It is unclear whether aggressive fluid resuscitation independently influences serum vitamin D. Methods Nineteen patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass were studied. Serum 25(OH)D3, 1α,25(OH)2D3, parathyroid hormone, C-reactive protein (CRP), and ionised calcium were measured at five defined timepoints: T1 - baseline, T2 - 5 minutes after onset of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) (time of maximal fluid effect), T3 - on return to the intensive care unit, T4 - 24 hrs after surgery and T5 - 5 days after surgery. Linear mixed models were used to compare measures at T2-T5 with baseline measures. Results Acute fluid loading resulted in a 35% reduction in 25(OH)D3 (59 ± 16 to 38 ± 14 nmol/L, P < 0.0001) and a 45% reduction in 1α,25(OH)2D3 (99 ± 40 to 54 ± 22 pmol/L P < 0.0001) and i(Ca) (P < 0.01), with elevation in parathyroid hormone (P < 0.0001). Serum 25(OH)D3 returned to baseline only at T5 while 1α,25(OH)2D3 demonstrated an overshoot above baseline at T5 (P < 0.0001). There was a delayed rise in CRP at T4 and T5; this was not associated with a reduction in vitamin D levels at these time points. Conclusions Hemodilution significantly lowers serum 25(OH)D3 and 1α,25(OH)2D3, which may take up to 24 hours to resolve. Moreover, delayed overshoot of 1α,25(OH)2D3 needs consideration. We urge caution in interpreting serum vitamin D in critically ill patients in the context of major resuscitation, and would advocate repeating the measurement once the effects of the resuscitation have abated. PMID:21110839

  2. The efficacy and safety of colloid resuscitation in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Christiane S; Bauer, Michael; Reinhart, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    Despite evidence from clinical studies and meta-analyses that resuscitation with colloids or crystalloids is equally effective in critically ill patients, and despite reports from high-quality clinical trials and meta-analyses regarding nephrotoxic effects, increased risk of bleeding, and a trend toward higher mortality in these patients after the use of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions, colloids remain popular and the use of HES solutions is increasing worldwide. We investigated the major rationales for colloid use, namely that colloids are more effective plasma expanders than crystalloids, that synthetic colloids are as safe as albumin, that HES solutions have the best risk/benefit profile among the synthetic colloids, and that the third-generation HES 130/0.4 has fewer adverse effects than older starches. Evidence from clinical studies shows that comparable resuscitation is achieved with considerably less crystalloid volumes than frequently suggested, namely, <2-fold the volume of colloids. Albumin is safe in intensive care unit patients except in patients with closed head injury. All synthetic colloids, namely, dextran, gelatin, and HES have dose-related side effects, which are coagulopathy, renal failure, and tissue storage. In patients with severe sepsis, higher doses of HES may be associated with excess mortality. The assumption that third-generation HES 130/0.4 has fewer adverse effects is yet unproven. Clinical trials on HES 130/0.4 have notable shortcomings. Mostly, they were not performed in intensive care unit or emergency department patients, had short observation periods of 24 to 48 hours, used cumulative doses below 1 daily dose limit (50 mL/kg), and used unsuitable control fluids such as other HES solutions or gelatins. In conclusion, the preferred use of colloidal solutions for resuscitation of patients with acute hypovolemia is based on rationales that are not supported by clinical evidence. Synthetic colloids are not superior in critically ill

  3. Safety and efficacy of saxagliptin for glycemic control in non-critically ill hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rajesh; Schuman, Brooke; Hurwitz, Shelley; Metzger, Cheyenne; Bhandari, Shreya

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether saxagliptin is non-inferior to basal-bolus insulin therapy for glycemic control in patients with controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) admitted to hospital with non-critical illnesses. Research design and methods This was an open-label, randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients received either saxagliptin or basal-bolus insulin, both with correctional insulin doses. The main study outcome was the mean daily blood glucose (BG) after the first day of randomization. Results Of 66 patients completing the study, 33 (age 69±10 years, 40% men) were randomized to saxagliptin and 33 (age 67±10 years, 52% men) to basal-bolus insulin therapy. The mean daily BG was 149.8±22.0 mg/dL in the saxagliptin group and 146.9±30.5 mg/dL in the insulin group (p=0.59). With an observed group difference of 2.9 mg/dL and an a priori margin of 20 mg/dL, inferiority of saxagliptin was rejected in favor of non-inferiority (p=0.007). There was no significant difference in the percentage of high or low BG values. The insulin group received a higher number of insulin injections (2.3±1.7/day vs 1.2±1.9/day; p<0.001) as well as a higher daily insulin dose (13.3±12.9 units/day vs 2.4±3.3 units/day; p<0.001) than did the saxagliptin group. Continuous BG monitoring showed that glycemic variability was lower in the saxagliptin group as compared to the insulin group. Patient satisfaction scores were similar in the two groups. Conclusions We conclude that saxagliptin use is non-inferior to basal-bolus insulin in non-critically ill hospitalized patients with T2DM controlled on 0–2 oral agents without insulin. Saxagliptin use may decrease glycemic variability in these patients. Trial registration number NCT02182895.

  4. Could dysnatremias play a role as independent factors to predict mortality in surgical critically ill patients?

    PubMed Central

    Nicolini, Edson A.; Nunes, Roosevelt S.; Santos, Gabriela V.; da Silva, Silvana Lia; Carreira, Mariana M.; Pellison, Fernanda G.; Menegueti, Mayra G.; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Feres, Marcus A.; Basile-Filho, Anibal

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have demonstrated the impact of dysnatremias on mortality of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The objective of this study was to assess whether dysnatremia is an independent factor to predict mortality in surgical critically ill patients admitted to ICU in postoperative phase. One thousand five hundred and ninety-nine surgical patients (58.8% males; mean age of 60.6 ± 14.4 years) admitted to the ICU in the postoperative period were retrospectively studied. The patients were classified according to their serum sodium levels (mmol/L) at admission as normonatremia (135–145), hyponatremia (<135), and hypernatremia (>145). APACHE II, SAPS III, and SOFA were recorded. The capability of each index to predict mortality of ICU and hospital mortality of patients was analyzed by multiple logistic regression. Hyponatremia did not have an influence on mortality in the ICU with a relative risk (RR) = 0.95 (0.43–2.05) and hospital mortality of RR = 1.40 (0.75–2.59). However, this association was greater in patients with hypernatremia mortality in the ICU (RR = 3.33 [95% confidence interval, CI 1.58–7.0]) and also in hospital mortality (RR = 2.9 [ 95% CI = 1.51–5.55). The pairwise comparison of ROC curves among the different prognostic indexes (APACHE II, SAPS III, SOFA) did not show statistical significance. The comparison of these indexes with serum sodium levels for general population, hyponatremia, and normonatremia was statistically significant (P < .001). For hypernatremia, the AUC and 95% CI for APACHE II, SAPS III, SOFA, and serum sodium level were 0.815 (0.713–0.892), 0.805 (0.702–0.885), 0.885 (0.794–0.945), and 0.663 (0.549–0.764), respectively. The comparison among the prognostic indexes was not statistically significant. Only SOFA score had a statistic difference compared with hypernatremia (P < .02). The serum sodium levels at admission, especially hypernatremia, may be used as an

  5. A longitudinal evaluation of thyroid function in critically ill surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Zaloga, G P; Chernow, B; Smallridge, R C; Zajtchuk, R; Hall-Boyer, K; Hargraves, R; Lake, C R; Burman, K D

    1985-01-01

    Thyroid hormone alterations (known as the "sick-euthyroid syndrome") are common following major surgery, but the time course for appearance and recovery from these alterations has not previously been longitudinally studied in a large group of surgical patients. The authors prospectively studied 59 patients undergoing major surgery (coronary artery bypass grafting, pneumonectomy, or subtotal colectomy). Compared with preoperative values, the mean serum T4, T3, free T3, and TSH concentrations decreased significantly (p less than 0.05) following surgery. Serum reverse T3 and T3 resin uptake index increased, while free T4 levels remained unchanged. These changes were seen within 6 hours of surgery and normalized by 1 week after surgery. Although the serum TSH response to TRH was normal before and after surgery in 56 of the 59 patients, the maximal TRH-induced increase in serum TSH and the integrated serum TSH response to TRH were suppressed in the early perioperative period. This postoperative TSH suppression correlated with elevated postoperative plasma dopamine concentrations (r = 0.57, p less than 0.05). Three patients with compensated primary hypothyroidism were detected in the study and represent the first documentation of serial thyroid hormone and TSH levels in hypothyroid patients undergoing major surgery. These patients had similar changes in thyroid hormone values compared with euthyroid patients. The serum TSH response to TRH was suppressed into the normal range in two of these patients on the day following surgery. The authors conclude that the sick-euthyroid syndrome occurs within a few hours of major surgery and remits with convalescence. Postoperative decreases in serum TSH may mask the diagnosis of hypothyroidism. Surgical consultants should be aware of these rapid postoperative changes so that thyroid function tests are properly interpreted in patients who have undergone major surgery. PMID:3872103

  6. Relatives to Critically Ill Patients Have No Sense of Coherence: A Quality Improvement Article Using Mixed Methods

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objective. To investigate the relatives' satisfaction and involvement on a general surgery ward regarding the critically ill patient. Introduction. Relatives to critically ill patients are affected both physically and mentally during the hospitalization of a family member. Research has shown that relatives do not always receive the attention they need from health professionals. There is a lack of studies that focus on relatives' satisfaction and involvement during their family members' hospitalization. Design. A mixed methods design was chosen. Methods. A quantitative study was conducted with 27 relatives to critically ill patients. All participated in a questionnaire and out of the 27 relatives, six participated in qualitative in-depth interviews. Results. The questionnaire revealed that relatives were dissatisfied with care and involvement. For further exploration of the dissatisfaction, a qualitative approach was used and the in-depth interviews revealed three themes: lack of continuity and structure, responsibility of coordination, and relatives feeling left on their own with no guiding and support. Conclusion. Health professionals' key role in relation to relatives must be guidance and support. Thereby, relatives can gain a sense of coherence during the hospitalization of a critically ill patient, which can lead to a greater satisfaction and thereby better support for the patient. PMID:27703810

  7. Hospital malnutrition and inflammatory response in critically ill children and adolescents admitted to a tertiary intensive care unit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Critical illness has a major impact on the nutritional status of both children and adults. A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the incidence of hospital malnutrition at a pediatric tertiary intensive care unit (PICU). Serum concentrations of IL-6 in subgroups of well-nourished and malnou...

  8. Should we treat fever in critically ill patients? A summary of the current evidence from three randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Serpa, Ary; Pereira, Victor Galvão Moura; Colombo, Giancarlo; Scarin, Farah Christina de la Cruz; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Rocha, Leonardo Lima

    2014-01-01

    Fever is a nonspecific response to various types of infectious or non-infectious insult and its significance in disease remains an enigma. Our aim was to summarize the current evidence for the use of antipyretic therapy in critically ill patients. We performed systematic review and meta-analysis of publications from 1966 to 2013. The MEDLINE and CENTRAL databases were searched for studies on antipyresis in critically ill patients. The meta-analysis was limited to: randomized controlled trials; adult human critically ill patients; treatment with antipyretics in one arm versus placebo or non-treatment in another arm; and report of mortality data. The outcomes assessed were overall intensive care unit mortality, changes in temperature, intensive care unit length of stay, and hospital length of stay. Three randomized controlled trials, covering 320 participants, were included. Patients treated with antipyretic agents showed similar intensive care unit mortality (risk ratio 0.91, with 95% confidence interval 0.65-1.28) when compared with controls. The only difference observed was a greater decrease in temperature after 24 hours in patients treated with antipyretics (-1.70±0.40 versus - 0.56±0.25ºC; p=0.014). There is no difference in treating or not the fever in critically ill patients. PMID:25628209

  9. Enhanced immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling is related to pathological bone resorption during critical illness.

    PubMed

    Vanhees, I; Gunst, J; Janssens, T; Wauters, A; Van Herck, E; Van Cromphaut, S; Van den Berghe, G; Owen, H C

    2013-11-01

    Prolonged critically ill patients present with distinct alterations in calcium and bone metabolism. Circulating bone formation markers are reduced and bone resorption markers are substantially elevated, indicating an uncoupling between osteoclast and osteoblast activity, possibly resulting in pronounced bone loss, impaired traumatic or surgical fracture healing, and osteoporosis. In addition, we have previously shown that increased circulating osteoclast precursors in critically ill patients result in increased osteoclastogenesis in vitro, possibly through FcγRIII signaling. In the current study, we investigated the effects of sustained critical illness on bone metabolism at the tissue level in a standardized rabbit model of prolonged (7 days), burn injury-induced critical illness. This in vivo model showed a reduction in serum ionized calcium and osteocalcin levels, as is seen in humans. Trabecular area, bone mineral content, and -density were decreased in sick rabbits [by 43% (p<0.01), 31% (p<0.01), and 29% (p<0.05), respectively], as was the trabecular gene expression of osteoblast and angiogenesis markers, indicating decreased bone formation and impaired vascularization. There was no change in the expression of osteoclast differentiation markers from the canonical RANK/RANKL/OPG pathway, however, there was an increase in expression of markers from the non-canonical, immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling pathway, FcγRIII, and DAP12 (148% and 59%, respectively; p<0.01). The current study has shown a detrimental effect of prolonged critical illness on trabecular bone integrity, possibly explained by reduced osteoblast differentiation and angiogenesis, coupled with increased osteoclastogenesis signaling that may be mediated via the non-canonical immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling pathway.

  10. Vancomycin Therapeutic Targets and Nephrotoxicity in Critically Ill Children With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Seixas, Glaucia T F; Araujo, Orlei R; Silva, Dafne C B; Arduini, Rodrigo G; Petrilli, Antonio S

    2016-03-01

    To obtain pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data for vancomycin in a cohort of critically ill pediatric oncology patients, we analyzed 256 measurements of vancomycin concentrations in 94 patients. Variables were tested as possible risk factors for vancomycin-related nephrotoxicity or death for 28 days. We found the following: mean vancomycin trough serum concentration, 15.6 ± 12.4 μg/mL; mean vancomycin clearance, 0.16 ± 0.098 L/h/kg; and mean vancomycin distribution volume, 1.04 ± 0.11 L/kg. Only 13.6% of serum trough level measurements were between 15 and 20 μg/mL. The trough levels showed a strong correlation with the AUC (area under the curve of serum concentrations vs. time over 24 h to the minimum inhibitory concentration ratio), with a 94% positive predictive value for AUC/MIC ≥ 400, but only for MIC=1. The doses that are currently used (60 mg/kg/d) attained the therapeutic target (AUC/MIC ≥ 400) in only 56% of measurements, considering MIC=1. A serum trough level of ≥ 20 μg/mL was an independent risk for nephrotoxicity (P = 0.0008; odds ratio = 17.83). Vancomycin-related nephrotoxicity was a predictor of death for up to 28 days (P = 0.003, odds ratio = 7.68). Currently administered doses of vancomycin do not reach the therapeutic target for critical cancer patients, particularly if staphylococci isolates have a MIC>1.

  11. Dosing of antibiotics in critically ill patients undergoing renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Kielstein, Jan T; Burkhardt, Olaf

    2011-12-01

    On September 11, 1945 Maria Schafstaat was the first patient who successfully underwent a dialysis treatment for acute kidney injury (AKI), formerly known as acute renal failure. Since then, the number of patients with AKI is increasing worldwide. Today AKI is generally one feature of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), which develops in response to major surgery, cardiogenic shock or sepsis. Several clinical studies have shown that early and appropriate antibiotic therapy in those patients is of utter importance, yet it remains one of the most difficult challenges to meet. Even in critically ill patients with conserved renal function a myriad of pathophysiological changes, resulting in increased volume of distribution, decreased protein binding and altered hepatic drug clearance, makes appropriate antibiotic dosin difficult. Adequate pharmacotherapy, i.e. dose of anti-infective agens is becoming even more complicated if it has to be tailored to counteract their removal by different modes and intensities of renal replacement therapy. This review summarizes our sparse knowledge about pharmacokinetic studies and dosing recommendations of drugs in patients with AKI undergoing continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRTs) such as continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) as well as extended dialysis (ED), an increasingly used method to treat patients with AKI in the intensive care setting. We reflect on failure of several large prospective controlled studies to show a survival benefit of higher doses of renal replacement therapy, a finding that might be caused by the fact that we still adhere to dosing guidelines for antibiotics which are at best ineffectual but might also lead to potentially dangerous underdosing of these life saving drugs. Lastly we address possible strategies to overcome the lack of knowledge, the lack of data and the lack of interest in this important area of critical care medicine. Improvement of clinical outcomes and reduction of

  12. Diagnosing phaeochromocytoma/paraganglioma in a patient presenting with critical illness: biochemistry versus imaging.

    PubMed

    Amar, Laurence; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2015-09-01

    Phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PPGLs) are revealed by acute cardiovascular complications involving end-organ damage in up to 20% of cases, a presentation associated with particularly high risk for mortality. Among such cases, PPGLs should be considered in patients with unexplained left ventricular failure, multi-organ failure, hypertensive crises or shock. The diagnosis of PPGL commonly relies on measurements of metanephrines in plasma or urine. However, acute critical illness is usually associated with sympathoadrenal activation. Thus, levels of metanephrines in patients in an acute emergency or intensive care setting, whether treated or not with vasoactive drugs, usually cannot be used to reliably diagnose PPGL. Delays in provision of diagnostic test results, particularly when these require 24-h urine collections, may also be incompatible for any need for rapid decisions on patient management or therapeutic interventions. The acute emergency situation therefore represents one exception to the rule where imaging studies to search for a PPGL may be undertaken without biochemical evidence of a catecholamine-producing tumour.

  13. Neurophysiological assessment of brain dysfunction in critically ill patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Azabou, Eric; Fischer, Catherine; Guerit, Jean Michel; Annane, Djillali; Mauguiere, François; Lofaso, Fréderic; Sharshar, Tarek

    2017-01-21

    The aim of this review was to provide up-to-date information about the usefulness of clinical neurophysiology testing in the management of critically ill patients. Evoked potentials (EPs) and electroencephalogram (EEG) are non-invasive clinical neurophysiology tools that allow an objective assessment of the central nervous system's function at the bedside in intensive care unit (ICU). These tests are quite useful in diagnosing cerebral complications, and establishing the vital and functional prognosis in ICU. EEG keeps a particularly privileged importance in detecting seizures phenomena such as subclinical seizures and non-convulsive status epilepticus. Quantitative EEG (QEEG) analysis techniques commonly called EEG Brain mapping can provide obvious topographic displays of digital EEG signals characteristics, showing the potential distribution over the entire scalp including filtering, frequency, and amplitude analysis and color mapping. Evidences of usefulness of QEEG for seizures detection in ICU are provided by several recent studies. Furthermore, beyond detection of epileptic phenomena, changes of some QEEG panels are early warning indicators of sedation level as well as brain damage or dysfunction in ICU. EPs offer the opportunity for assessing brainstem's functional integrity, as well as subcortical and cortical brain areas. A multimodal use, combining EEG and various modalities of EPs is recommended since this allows a more accurate functional exploration of the brain and helps caregivers to tailor therapeutic measures according to neurological worsening trends and to anticipate the prognosis in ICU.

  14. Factors influencing sleep for parents of critically ill hospitalised children: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Stremler, Robyn; Dhukai, Zahida; Wong, Lily; Parshuram, Christopher

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe factors affecting the sleep of parents of critically ill children and to determine strategies used to improve their sleep. One hundred and eighteen parents of 91 children recruited during their child's paediatric intensive care unit stay responded in writing to open-ended questions assessing their experiences with sleep and eliciting ideas for strategies to promote sleep to be used by parents and provided by hospital staff. Patterns and concepts were coded and organised into themes using a qualitative descriptive approach. Seven themes emerged related to influences on and strategies to improve sleep: (1) the child's condition; (2) being at the bedside or not; (3) difficult thoughts and feelings; (4) changes to usual sleep; (5) caring for self and family; (6) the hospital environment and (7) access to sleep locations. Parents described multiple, often competing, demands that affected their ability to achieve sleep, regardless of location. Many more factors that influenced sleep were described than strategies to improve sleep, highlighting the need for nurses to explore with parents the unique barriers and facilitators to sleep they encounter and to develop and rigorously test interventions to improve sleep.

  15. Clinical comparison of CR and screen film for imaging the critically ill neonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriole, Katherine P.; Brasch, Robert C.; Gooding, Charles A.; Gould, Robert G.; Cohen, Pierre A.; Rencken, Ingo R.; Huang, H. K.

    1996-05-01

    A clinical comparison of computed radiography (CR) versus screen-film for imaging the critically-ill neonate is performed, utilizing a modified (hybrid) film cassette containing a CR (standard ST-V) imaging plate, a conventional screen and film, allowing simultaneous acquisition of perfectly matched CR and plain film images. For 100 portable neonatal chest and abdominal projection radiographs, plain film was subjectively compared to CR hardcopy. Three pediatric radiologists graded overall image quality on a scale of one (poor) to five (excellent), as well as visualization of various anatomic structures (i.e., lung parenchyma, pulmonary vasculature, tubes/lines) and pathological findings (i.e., pulmonary interstitial emphysema, pleural effusion, pneumothorax). Results analyzed using a combined kappa statistic of the differences between scores from each matched set, combined over the three readers showed no statistically significant difference in overall image quality between screen- film and CR (p equals 0.19). Similarly, no statistically significant difference was seen between screen-film and CR for anatomic structure visualization and for visualization of pathological findings. These results indicate that the image quality of CR is comparable to plain film, and that CR may be a suitable alternative to screen-film imaging for portable neonatal chest and abdominal examinations.

  16. Alkaline phosphatase: a possible treatment for sepsis-associated acute kidney injury in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Peters, Esther; Heemskerk, Suzanne; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Pickkers, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common disease in the intensive care unit and accounts for high morbidity and mortality. Sepsis, the predominant cause of AKI in this setting, involves a complex pathogenesis in which renal inflammation and hypoxia are believed to play an important role. A new therapy should be aimed at targeting both these processes, and the enzyme alkaline phosphatase, with its dual mode of action, might be a promising candidate. First, alkaline phosphatase is able to reduce inflammation through dephosphorylation and thereby detoxification of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide), which is an important mediator of sepsis. Second, adenosine triphosphate, released during cellular stress caused by inflammation and hypoxia, has detrimental effects but can be converted by alkaline phosphatase into adenosine with anti-inflammatory and tissue-protective effects. These postulated beneficial effects of alkaline phosphatase have been confirmed in animal experiments and two phase 2a clinical trials showing that kidney function improved in critically ill patients with sepsis-associated AKI. Because renal inflammation and hypoxia also are observed commonly in AKI induced by other causes, it would be of interest to investigate the therapeutic effect of alkaline phosphatase in these nephropathies as well.

  17. Levodopa Withdrawal Presenting as Fever in a Critically Ill Patient Receiving Concomitant Enteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Craig B; Ablordeppey, Enyo; Taylor, Beth

    2016-12-01

    Nutritional protein may decrease levodopa absorption and has resulted in withdrawal and neuroleptic malignant-like syndromes in critically ill patients. A 72-year-old male was admitted with shortness of breath. His medical history included Parkinson's disease for over 30 years for which he took carbidopa/levodopa 5 times daily. The patient's home medications were continued. On day 2, he was intubated and transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU). He was extubated the next day and reintubated on day 4. Enteral nutrition was initiated at 85 mL/h overnight. The patient's carbidopa/levodopa was administered to limit coadministration with nutrition. Throughout his ICU stay, the patient did not demonstrate changes in mental status. Despite resolution of his pneumonia, he developed fever after administration of one dose overlapping with nutrition, with defervescence throughout the rest of the day. On hospital day 10, that dose was empirically increased. After this dosing change, the patient failed to develop fever during the rest of his hospital stay. On day 16, the patient was discharged to a long-term care facility without any other complications. Our case highlights the interaction between levodopa and enteral nutrition and the potential of fever as the sole sign of withdrawal.

  18. A Comparison of Predictive Equations of Energy Expenditure and Measured Energy Expenditure in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kross, Erin K.; Sena, Matthew; Schmidt, Karyn; Stapleton, Renee D.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Multiple equations exist for predicting resting energy expenditure (REE). The accuracy of these for estimating caloric requirements of critically ill patients is not clear, especially for obese patients. We sought to compare REE, calculated with published formulas, with measured REE in a cohort of mechanically-ventilated subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS We retrospectively identified all mechanically-ventilated patients with measured body mass index (BMI) who underwent indirect calorimetry (IC) in the ICU. Limits of agreement and Pitman’s test of difference in variance were performed to compare REE by equations with REE measured by IC. RESULTS 927 patients were identified, including 401 obese patients. There was bias and poor agreement between measured REE and REE predicted by the Harris-Benedict, Owen, ACCP, and Mifflin equations (p > 0.05). There was poor agreement between measured and predicted REE by the Ireton-Jones equation, stratifying by gender. Ireton-Jones was the only equation which was unbiased, for men and those in weight categories I and II. In all cases except Ireton-Jones, predictive equations underestimated measured REE. CONCLUSION None of these equations accurately estimated measured REE in this group of mechanically-ventilated patients, most underestimating caloric needs. Development of improved predictive equations for adequate assessment of energy needs is needed. PMID:22425340

  19. Manual muscle testing: a method of measuring extremity muscle strength applied to critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Nancy; Dinglas, Victor; Fan, Eddy; Kho, Michelle; Kuramoto, Jill; Needham, Dale

    2011-04-12

    Survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and other causes of critical illness often have generalized weakness, reduced exercise tolerance, and persistent nerve and muscle impairments after hospital discharge. Using an explicit protocol with a structured approach to training and quality assurance of research staff, manual muscle testing (MMT) is a highly reliable method for assessing strength, using a standardized clinical examination, for patients following ARDS, and can be completed with mechanically ventilated patients who can tolerate sitting upright in bed and are able to follow two-step commands. (7, 8) This video demonstrates a protocol for MMT, which has been taught to ≥ 43 research staff who have performed >800 assessments on >280 ARDS survivors. Modifications for the bedridden patient are included. Each muscle is tested with specific techniques for positioning, stabilization, resistance, and palpation for each score of the 6-point ordinal Medical Research Council scale. Three upper and three lower extremity muscles are graded in this protocol: shoulder abduction, elbow flexion, wrist extension, hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle dorsiflexion. These muscles were chosen based on the standard approach for evaluating patients for ICU-acquired weakness used in prior publications. (1,2).

  20. Performance of Interleukin-27 as a Sepsis Diagnostic Biomarker in Critically Ill Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hector R.; Liu, Kathleen D.; Kangelaris, Kirsten N.; Lahni, Patrick; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We recently identified interleukin-27 (IL-27) as a sepsis diagnostic biomarker in children. Here we assess IL-27 as a sepsis diagnostic biomarker in critically ill adults with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis. Methods IL-27 and procalcitonin (PCT) were measured from plasma samples in three groups: no sepsis (n = 78), pulmonary source of sepsis (n = 66), and non-pulmonary source of sepsis (n = 43). Receiver operating characteristic curves and classification and regression tree methodology were used to evaluate biomarker performance. Results IL-27 did not discriminate effectively between sepsis and sterile SIRS in unselected patients. The highest area under the curve (AUC) was 0.70 (95% C.I. 0.60 – 0.80) for IL-27 in subjects with a non-pulmonary source of sepsis. A decision tree incorporating IL-27, PCT, and age had an AUC of 0.79 (0.71 – 0.87) in subjects with a non-pulmonary source of sepsis. Compared to children with sepsis, adults with sepsis express less IL-27. Conclusions IL-27 performed overall poorly in this cohort as a sepsis diagnostic biomarker. Combining IL-27, PCT, and age reasonably estimated the risk of sepsis in subjects with a non-pulmonary source of sepsis. IL-27 may be a more reliable sepsis diagnostic biomarker in children than in adults. PMID:24848949

  1. Corticosteroids and neuromuscular blockers in development of critical illness neuromuscular abnormalities: A historical review.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Susan R

    2017-02-01

    Weakness is common in critically ill patients, associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation and increased mortality. Corticosteroids and neuromuscular blockade (NMB) administration have been implicated as etiologies of acquired weakness in the intensive care unit. Medical literature since the 1970s is replete with case reports and small case series of patients with weakness after receiving high-dose corticosteroids, prolonged NMB, or both. Several risk factors for weakness appear in the early literature, including large doses of steroids, the dose and duration of NMB, hyperglycemia, and the duration of mechanical ventilation. With improved quality of data, however, the association between weakness and steroids or NMB wanes. This may reflect changes in clinical practice, such as a reduction in steroid dosing, use of cisatracurium besylate instead of aminosteroid NMBs, improved glycemic control, or trends in minimizing mechanical ventilatory support. Thus, based on the most recent and high-quality literature, neither corticosteroids in commonly used doses nor NMB is associated with increased duration of mechanical ventilation, the greatest morbidity of weakness. Minimizing ventilator support as soon as the patient's condition allows may be associated with a reduction in weakness-related morbidity.

  2. Monitoring of cerebral blood flow and ischemia in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chad; Armonda, Rocco

    2014-12-01

    Secondary ischemic injury is common after acute brain injury and can be evaluated with the use of neuromonitoring devices. This manuscript provides guidelines for the use of devices to monitor cerebral blood flow (CBF) in critically ill patients. A Medline search was conducted to address essential pre-specified questions related to the utility of CBF monitoring. Peer-reviewed recommendations were constructed according to the GRADE criteria based upon the available supporting literature. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) and transcranial color-coded duplex sonography (TCCS) are predictive of angiographic vasospasm and delayed ischemic neurological deficits after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. TCD and TCCS may be beneficial in identifying vasospasm after traumatic brain injury. TCD and TCCS have shortcomings in identifying some secondary ischemic risks. Implantable thermal diffusion flowmetry (TDF) probes may provide real-time continuous quantitative assessment of ischemic risks. Data are lacking regarding ischemic thresholds for TDF or their correlation with ischemic injury and clinical outcomes.TCD and TCCS can be used to monitor CBF in the neurocritical care unit. Better and more developed methods of continuous CBF monitoring are needed to limit secondary ischemic injury in the neurocritical care unit.

  3. Heparin induced thrombocytopenia in critically ill: Diagnostic dilemmas and management conundrums

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath; Green, Cameron; Botha, John; Tran, Huy

    2015-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is often noted in critically ill patients. While there are many reasons for thrombocytopenia, the use of heparin and its derivatives is increasingly noted to be associated with thrombocytopenia. Heparin induced thrombocytopenia syndrome (HITS) is a distinct entity that is characterised by the occurrence of thrombocytopenia in conjunction with thrombotic manifestations after exposure to unfractionated heparin or low molecular weight heparin. HITS is an immunologic disorder mediated by antibodies to heparin-platelet factor 4 (PF4) complex. HITS is an uncommon cause of thrombocytopenia. Reported incidence of HITS in patients exposed to heparin varies from 0.2% to up to 5%. HITS is rare in ICU populations, with estimates varying from 0.39%-0.48%. It is a complex problem which may cause diagnostic dilemmas and management conundrum. The diagnosis of HITS centers around detection of antibodies against PF4-heparin complexes. Immunoassays performed by most pathology laboratories detect the presence of antibodies, but do not reveal whether the antibodies are pathological. Platelet activation assays demonstrate the presence of clinically relevant antibodies, but only a minority of laboratories conduct them. Several anticoagulants are used in management of HITS. In this review we discuss the incidence, pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of HITS. PMID:26261772

  4. Intravascular catheter-related infections: a preventable challenge in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Chatzinikolaou, I; Raad, I I

    2000-12-01

    In modem medicine, central venous catheters (CVCs) have a pivotal role in the management of critically ill patients. The most serious complication of effective CVC placement is catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). Microbial colonization and CRBSI are the byproducts of the interaction of 4 factors: (1) microbial factors (hydrophobicity and exopolysaccharide production), (2) host factors (such protein adhesins as fibrin and fibronectin that attach to the catheter surface), (3) catheter material (hydrophobicity, surface charges, thrombogenicity), and (4) iatrogenic factors (total parenteral nutrition, interleukin-2). The organisms most frequently associated with CRBSI are Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida spp. CRBSIs were traditionally diagnosed through semiquantitative or quantitative cultures of the catheter tip. However, the diagnosis can be achieved without catheter removal through cultures of blood specimens collected simultaneously though the CVC and a peripheral vein. Currently, the most effective method of preventing a CRBSI is the use of a CVC coated with antimicrobial agents. Intravenous administration of vancomycin for 7 days is adequate for an uncomplicated CRBSI caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci, and at least 10 days of therapy with beta-lactams is required for an uncomplicated infection caused by methicillin-sensitive S. aureus. CRBSI caused by Candida albicans or Candida parapsilosis can be treated with at least 14 days of therapy with fluconazole or amphotericin B. In the case of Candida krusei, only amphotericin B is effective.

  5. Effectiveness of new sedation and rehabilitation methods for critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Kouji; Takami, Akiyoshi; Wakayama, Saichi; Makino, Misato; Takeyama, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of new sedation management methods and cooperation between nurses and physical therapists on the duration of mechanical ventilation and hospitalization. [Subjects and Methods] Patients who had been treated at the study hospital 2 years before and after the implementation of the new methods were analyzed retrospectively and classified into a “control group” and an “intervention group”, respectively. Both groups were analyzed and subsequently compared regarding the effects of the new sedation and cooperative rehabilitation. [Results] A total of 70 patients met the inclusion criteria and were divided evenly into the two groups. No significant differences were found between the groups in age, APACHE II score, or duration of stay in hospital. On the other hand, significant decreases were seen in the duration of sedation and intubation, mechanical ventilation, and stay in the emergency ward, as well as time until standing. In addition, after intervention, three patients undergoing ventilator treatment were able to be ambulated. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the new sedation and cooperative rehabilitation methods for critically ill patients were effective in the early stage of treatment and shortened the duration of stay in the ward. PMID:28210060

  6. Mechanisms underlying the sparing of masticatory versus limb muscle function in an experimental critical illness model.

    PubMed

    Aare, Sudhakar; Ochala, Julien; Norman, Holly S; Radell, Peter; Eriksson, Lars I; Göransson, Hanna; Chen, Yi-Wen; Hoffman, Eric P; Larsson, Lars

    2011-12-16

    Acute quadriplegic myopathy (AQM) is a common debilitating acquired disorder in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients that is characterized by tetraplegia/generalized weakness of limb and trunk muscles. Masticatory muscles, on the other hand, are typically spared or less affected, yet the mechanisms underlying this striking muscle-specific difference remain unknown. This study aims to evaluate physiological parameters and the gene expression profiles of masticatory and limb muscles exposed to factors suggested to trigger AQM, such as mechanical ventilation, immobilization, neuromuscular blocking agents, corticosteroids (CS), and sepsis for 5 days by using a unique porcine model mimicking the ICU conditions. Single muscle fiber cross-sectional area and force-generating capacity, i.e., maximum force normalized to fiber cross-sectional area (specific force), revealed maintained masseter single muscle fiber cross-sectional area and specific-force after 5 days' exposure to all triggering factors. This is in sharp contrast to observations in limb and trunk muscles, showing a dramatic decline in specific force in response to 5 days' exposure to the triggering factors. Significant differences in gene expression were observed between craniofacial and limb muscles, indicating a highly complex and muscle-specific response involving transcription and growth factors, heat shock proteins, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, oxidative stress responsive elements, and sarcomeric proteins underlying the relative sparing of cranial vs. spinal nerve innervated muscles during exposure to the ICU intervention.

  7. A fresh look at paralytics in the critically ill: real promise and real concern.

    PubMed

    Price, David; Kenyon, Nicholas J; Stollenwerk, Nicholas

    2012-10-12

    Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs), or "paralytics," often are deployed in the sickest patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) when usual care fails. Despite the publication of guidelines on the use of NMBAs in the ICU in 2002, clinicians have needed more direction to determine which patients would benefit from NMBAs and which patients would be harmed. Recently, new evidence has shown that paralytics hold more promise when used in carefully selected lung injury patients for brief periods of time. When used in early acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), NMBAs assist to establish a lung protective strategy, which leads to improved oxygenation, decreased pulmonary and systemic inflammation, and potentially improved mortality. It also is increasingly recognized that NMBAs can cause harm, particularly critical illness polyneuromyopathy (CIPM), when used for prolonged periods or in septic shock. In this review, we address several practical considerations for clinicians who use NMBAs in their practice. Ultimately, we conclude that NMBAs should be considered a lung protective adjuvant in early ARDS and that clinicians should consider using an alternative NMBA to the aminosteroids in septic shock with less severe lung injury pending further studies.

  8. Fecal incontinence in acutely and critically ill patients: options in management.

    PubMed

    Beitz, Janice M

    2006-12-01

    Fecal incontinence presents a major challenge in the comprehensive nursing care of acutely and critically ill patients. When manifested as diarrhea, the effects of fecal incontinence can range from mild (superficial skin irritation) to profound (severe perineal dermatitis, dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, and sepsis). Fecal incontinence has many etiologies and risk factors. These include damage to the anal sphincter or pelvic floor, liquid stool consistency, abnormal colonic transport, and decreased intestinal capacity. To avoid or minimize complications, the cause of diarrhea should be addressed, fecal leakage prevented, stool contained, and skin integrity preserved. Management options addressing these goals include diet, pharmacological therapy, and the use of containment products. Management options and their respective advantages and disadvantages are presented with a special focus on safety issues. Diverse approaches are safe only if they are knowledgeably selected, carefully instituted, and constantly monitored for their effects on patient outcomes. Research to identify which options work best in selected clinical situations and which combinations of therapies are most effective is needed.

  9. Interhospital Transport System for Critically Ill Patients: Mobile Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation without a Ventilator

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Hye Ju; Cho, Woo Hyun; Park, Jong Myung; Kim, Dohyung

    2017-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been successfully used as a method for the interhospital transportation of critically ill patients. In South Korea, a well-established ECMO interhospital transport system is lacking due to limited resources. We developed a simplified ECMO transport system without mechanical ventilation for use by public emergency medical services. Methods Eighteen patients utilized our ECMO transport system from December 2011 to September 2015. We retrospectively analyzed the indications for ECMO, the patient status during transport, and the patient outcomes. Results All transport was conducted on the ground by ambulance. The distances covered ranged from 26 to 408 km (mean, 65.9±88.1 km) and the average transport time was 56.1±57.3 minutes (range, 30 to 280 minutes). All patients were transported without adverse events. After transport, 4 patients (22.2%) underwent lung transplantation because of interstitial lung disease. Eight patients who had severe acute respiratory distress syndrome showed recovery of heart and lung function after ECMO therapy. A total of 13 patients (70.6%) were successfully taken off ECMO, and 11 patients (61.1%) survived. Conclusion Our ECMO transport system without mechanical ventilation can be considered a safe and useful method for interhospital transport and could be a good alternative option for ECMO transport in Korean hospitals with limited resources. PMID:28180097

  10. Optimal Management of the Critically Ill: Anaesthesia, Monitoring, Data Capture, and Point-of-Care Technological Practices in Ovine Models of Critical Care

    PubMed Central

    Shekar, Kiran; Tung, John-Paul; Dunster, Kimble R.; Platts, David; Watts, Ryan P.; Gregory, Shaun D.; Simonova, Gabriela; McDonald, Charles; Hayes, Rylan; Bellpart, Judith; Timms, Daniel; Fung, Yoke L.; Toon, Michael; Maybauer, Marc O.; Fraser, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Animal models of critical illness are vital in biomedical research. They provide possibilities for the investigation of pathophysiological processes that may not otherwise be possible in humans. In order to be clinically applicable, the model should simulate the critical care situation realistically, including anaesthesia, monitoring, sampling, utilising appropriate personnel skill mix, and therapeutic interventions. There are limited data documenting the constitution of ideal technologically advanced large animal critical care practices and all the processes of the animal model. In this paper, we describe the procedure of animal preparation, anaesthesia induction and maintenance, physiologic monitoring, data capture, point-of-care technology, and animal aftercare that has been successfully used to study several novel ovine models of critical illness. The relevant investigations are on respiratory failure due to smoke inhalation, transfusion related acute lung injury, endotoxin-induced proteogenomic alterations, haemorrhagic shock, septic shock, brain death, cerebral microcirculation, and artificial heart studies. We have demonstrated the functionality of monitoring practices during anaesthesia required to provide a platform for undertaking systematic investigations in complex ovine models of critical illness. PMID:24783206

  11. Optimal management of the critically ill: anaesthesia, monitoring, data capture, and point-of-care technological practices in ovine models of critical care.

    PubMed

    Chemonges, Saul; Shekar, Kiran; Tung, John-Paul; Dunster, Kimble R; Diab, Sara; Platts, David; Watts, Ryan P; Gregory, Shaun D; Foley, Samuel; Simonova, Gabriela; McDonald, Charles; Hayes, Rylan; Bellpart, Judith; Timms, Daniel; Chew, Michelle; Fung, Yoke L; Toon, Michael; Maybauer, Marc O; Fraser, John F

    2014-01-01

    Animal models of critical illness are vital in biomedical research. They provide possibilities for the investigation of pathophysiological processes that may not otherwise be possible in humans. In order to be clinically applicable, the model should simulate the critical care situation realistically, including anaesthesia, monitoring, sampling, utilising appropriate personnel skill mix, and therapeutic interventions. There are limited data documenting the constitution of ideal technologically advanced large animal critical care practices and all the processes of the animal model. In this paper, we describe the procedure of animal preparation, anaesthesia induction and maintenance, physiologic monitoring, data capture, point-of-care technology, and animal aftercare that has been successfully used to study several novel ovine models of critical illness. The relevant investigations are on respiratory failure due to smoke inhalation, transfusion related acute lung injury, endotoxin-induced proteogenomic alterations, haemorrhagic shock, septic shock, brain death, cerebral microcirculation, and artificial heart studies. We have demonstrated the functionality of monitoring practices during anaesthesia required to provide a platform for undertaking systematic investigations in complex ovine models of critical illness.

  12. Vegan diets and hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Tonstad, Serena; Nathan, Edward; Oda, Keiji; Fraser, Gary

    2013-11-20

    Diets eliminating animal products have rarely been associated with hypothyroidism but may protect against autoimmune disease. Thus, we investigated whether risk of hypothyroidism was associated with vegetarian compared to omnivorous dietary patterns. The Adventist Health Study-2 was conducted among church members in North America who provided data in a self-administered questionnaire. Hypothyroidism was queried at baseline in 2002 and at follow-up to 2008. Diet was examined as a determinant of prevalent (n = 4237 of 65,981 [6.4%]) and incident cases (1184 of 41,212 [2.9%]) in multivariate logistic regression models, controlled for demographics and salt use. In the prevalence study, in addition to demographic characterstics, overweight and obesity increased the odds (OR 1.32, 95% CI: 1.22-1.42 and 1.78, 95% CI: 1.64-1.93, respectively). Vegan versus omnivorous diets tended to be associated with reduced risk (OR 0.89, 95% CI: 0.78-1.01, not statistically significant) while a lacto-ovo diet was associated with increased risk (OR 1.09, 95% CI: 1.01-1.18). In the incidence study, female gender, white ethnicity, higher education and BMI were predictors of hypothyroidism. Following a vegan diet tended to be protective (OR 0.78, 95% CI: 0.59-1.03, not statistically significant). In conclusion, a vegan diet tended to be associated with lower, not higher, risk of hypothyroid disease.

  13. The Saudi clinical practice guideline for the prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in medical and critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hameed, Fahad M.; Al-Dorzi, Hasan M.; Abdelaal, Mohamed A.; Alaklabi, Ali; Bakhsh, Ebtisam; Alomi, Yousef A.; Baik, Mohammad Al; Aldahan, Salah; Schünemann, Holger; Brozek, Jan; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Darzi, Andrea J.; Waziry, Reem; Akl, Elie A.

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) acquired during hospitalization is common, yet preventable by the proper implementation of thromboprophylaxis which remains to be underutilized worldwide. As a result of an initiative by the Saudi Ministry of Health to improve medical practices in the country, an expert panel led by the Saudi Association for Venous Thrombo Embolism (SAVTE; a subsidiary of the Saudi Thoracic Society) with the methodological guidance of the McMaster University Guideline working group, produced this clinical practice guideline to assist healthcare providers in VTE prevention. The expert part panel issued ten recommendations addressing 10 prioritized questions in the following areas: thromboprophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients (Recommendations 1-5), thromboprophylaxis in critically ill medical patients (Recommendations 6-9), and thromboprophylaxis in chronically ill patients (Recommendation 10). The corresponding recommendations were generated following the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. PMID:27761572

  14. Thromboprophylaxis patterns and determinants in critically ill patients: a multicenter audit

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Heparin is safe and prevents venous thromboembolism in critical illness. We aimed to determine the guideline concordance for thromboprophylaxis in critically ill patients and its predictors, and to analyze factors associated with the use of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), as it may be associated with a lower risk of pulmonary embolism and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia without increasing the bleeding risk. Methods We performed a retrospective audit in 28 North American intensive care units (ICUs), including all consecutive medical-surgical patients admitted in November 2011. We documented ICU thromboprophylaxis and reasons for omission. Guideline concordance was determined by adding days in which patients without contraindications received thromboprophylaxis to days in which patients with contraindications did not receive it, divided by the total number of patient-days. We used multilevel logistic regression including time-varying, center and patient-level covariates to determine the predictors of guideline concordance and use of LMWH. Results We enrolled 1,935 patients (62.3 ± 16.7 years, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation [APACHE] II score 19.1 ± 8.3). Patients received thromboprophylaxis with unfractionated heparin (UFH) (54.0%) or LMWH (27.6%). Guideline concordance occurred for 95.5% patient-days and was more likely in patients who were sicker (odds ratio (OR) 1.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17, 1.75 per 10-point increase in APACHE II), heavier (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.05, 1.65 per 10-m/kg2 increase in body mass index), had cancer (OR 3.22, 95% CI 1.81, 5.72), previous venous thromboembolism (OR 3.94, 95% CI 1.46,10.66), and received mechanical ventilation (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.32,2.52). Reasons for not receiving thromboprophylaxis were high risk of bleeding (44.5%), current bleeding (16.3%), no reason (12.9%), recent or upcoming invasive procedure (10.2%), nighttime admission or discharge (9.7%), and life

  15. Critically Ill Children During the 2009–2010 Influenza Pandemic in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Frances; Sullivan, Ryan; Rubinson, Lewis; Thompson, B. Taylor; Yoon, Grace; Smoot, Elizabeth; Rice, Todd W.; Loftis, Laura L.; Helfaer, Mark; Doctor, Allan; Paden, Matthew; Flori, Heidi; Babbitt, Christopher; Graciano, Ana Lia; Gedeit, Rainer; Sanders, Ronald C.; Giuliano, John S.; Zimmerman, Jerry; Uyeki, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) (pH1N1) virus continues to circulate worldwide. Determining the roles of chronic conditions and bacterial coinfection in mortality is difficult because of the limited data for children with pH1N1-related critical illness. METHODS: We identified children (<21 years old) with confirmed or probable pH1N1 admitted to 35 US PICUs from April 15, 2009, through April 15, 2010. We collected data on demographics, baseline health, laboratory results, treatments, and outcomes. RESULTS: Of 838 children with pH1N1 admitted to a PICU, the median age was 6 years, 58% were male, 70% had ≥1 chronic health condition, and 88.2% received oseltamivir (5.8% started before PICU admission). Most patients had respiratory failure with 564 (67.3%) receiving mechanical ventilation; 162 (19.3%) received vasopressors, and 75 (8.9%) died. Overall, 71 (8.5%) of the patients had a presumed diagnosis of early (within 72 hours after PICU admission) Staphylococcus aureus coinfection of the lung with 48% methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA). In multivariable analyses, preexisting neurologic conditions or immunosuppression, encephalitis (1.7% of cases), myocarditis (1.4% of cases), early presumed MRSA lung coinfection, and female gender were mortality risk factors. Among 251 previously healthy children, only early presumed MRSA coinfection of the lung (relative risk: 8 [95% confidence interval: 3.1–20.6]; P < .0001) remained a mortality risk factor. CONCLUSIONS: Children with preexisting neurologic conditions and immune compromise were at increased risk of pH1N1-associated death after PICU admission. Secondary complications of pH1N1, including myocarditis, encephalitis, and clinical diagnosis of early presumed MRSA coinfection of the lung, were mortality risk factors. PMID:22065262

  16. Accuracy of point-of-care blood glucose measurements in critically ill patients in shock.

    PubMed

    Garingarao, Carlo Jan Pati-An; Buenaluz-Sedurante, Myrna; Jimeno, Cecilia Alegado

    2014-09-01

    A widely used method in monitoring glycemic status of ICU patients is point-of-care (POC) monitoring devices. A possible limitation to this method is altered peripheral blood flow in patients in shock, which may result in over/underestimations of their true glycemic status. This study aims to determine the accuracy of blood glucose measurements with a POC meter compared to laboratory methods in critically ill patients in shock. POC blood glucose was measured with a glucose-1-dehydrogenase-based reflectometric meter. The reference method was venous plasma glucose measured by a clinical chemistry analyzer (glucose oxidase-based). Outcomes assessed were concordance to ISO 15197:2003 minimum accuracy criteria for glucose meters, bias in glucose measurements obtained by the 2 methods using Bland-Altman analysis, and clinical accuracy through modified error grid analysis. A total of 186 paired glucose measurements were obtained. ISO 2003 accuracy criteria were met in 95.7% and 79.8% of POC glucose values in the normotensive and hypotensive group, respectively. Mean bias for the normotensive group was -12.4 mg/dL, while mean bias in the hypotensive group was -34.9 mg/dL. POC glucose measurements within the target zone for clinical accuracy were 90.2% and 79.8% for the normotensive and hypotensive group, respectively. POC blood glucose measurements were significantly less accurate in the hypotensive subgroup of ICU patients compared to the normotensive group. We recommend a lower threshold in confirming POC blood glucose with a central laboratory method if clinically incompatible. In light of recently updated accuracy standards, we also recommend alternative methods of glucose monitoring for the ICU population as a whole regardless of blood pressure status.

  17. The Ideal Time Interval for Critical Care Severity-of-Illness Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Murray M.; Dean, J. Michael; Butler, Jerry; Holubkov, Richard; Doctor, Allan; Meert, Kathleen L.; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Berg, Robert A.; Moler, Frank; Dalton, Heidi; Wessel, David L.; Berger, John; Harrison, Rick E.; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Shanley, Thomas P.; Nicholson, Carol E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Determine if the shortest sampling interval for laboratory variables used to estimate baseline severity of illness in pediatric critical care is equivalently sensitive across multiple sites without site-specific bias, while accounting for the vast majority of dysfunction compared to the standard 0 hour to 12 hour Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM) III score. Design Prospective, random patient selection. Setting General/Medical and Cardiac/Cardiovascular pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in 8 hospitals. Patients Patients < 18 years admitted to the PICU. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results A total of 376 patients were included. Measurements for PRISM III laboratory variables (pH, PCO2, total CO2, PaO2, glucose, potassium, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, total (WBC) count, platelet count, PT/PTT) were recorded from 2 hours prior to the PICU admission through 12 hours of the PICU care except for data in the operating room. Decreasing the observation period from the 0 hour to 12 hours post-PICU admission resulted in progressive decreases in the PRISM III laboratory variables measured. However, allowing the observation period to start 2 hours prior to PICU admission to 4 hours reduced this loss to only 3.4%. Similar trends existed for each of the individual laboratory PRISM III variables. There was a nearly identical distribution of laboratory PRISM III points within the −2 hour to 4 hour period compared to the standard period. We did not detect any institutional bias using the −2 hour to 4 hour time period compared to the baseline. Conclusions Prognostically important laboratory physiologic data collected within the interval from two hours prior to PICU to admission through four hours after admission account for the vast majority of dysfunction that these variables would contribute to PRISM III scores. There was no institutional bias associated with this sampling period. PMID:23628831

  18. Relevance of non-nutritional calories in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Bousie, E; van Blokland, D; Lammers, H J W; van Zanten, A R H

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Overfeeding in critically ill patients is associated with many complications. Propofol, dextrose infusion and citrate dialysis provide non-nutritional calories (NNCs), potentially causing overfeeding. The relevance of NNCs for total caloric intake has not been systematically studied. Subjects/Methods: We retrospectively studied adult mechanically ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients receiving enteral nutrition with or without supplemental parenteral nutrition. Primary outcome was the proportion of NNCs (from dextrose, propofol and trisodium citrate) to the total energy intake during the first 7 days after ICU admission. In addition, NNC intake groups were compared. Results: In total, we identified 146 patients: 142 patients with NNC median value of 580 kcal (interquartile range 310–1043 kcal) over 7 days and 4 patients without NNC intake. The mean proportion of NNCs was larger during the first days after ICU admission (30.7–36.1%), because of the start-up phase of the nutrition. In the ‘propofol' group and the ‘dextrose' group this proportion levelled off at 6% on day 4. A more stable proportion of 18% was found during the first 7 days of ICU admission in the ‘citrate' group. Conclusions: The mean proportion of NNCs in patients who receive dextrose and/or propofol is low (6%); however, in individual patients it may comprise one-third of the total daily calories. Patients receiving trisodium citrate have higher mean non-nutritional intakes (18%). As NNC intake can be marked in individual patients, close monitoring is warranted when administering high-dose propofol or trisodium citrate anticoagulation to prevent overfeeding. PMID:27623980

  19. Cystatin C in critically ill patients treated with continuous venovenous hemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Baas, Marije C; Bouman, Catherine S C; Hoek, Frans J; Krediet, Raymond T; Schultz, Marcus J

    2006-10-01

    Assessment of residual renal function in critically ill patients with acute renal failure (ARF) treated with continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) is difficult. Cystatin C (CysC) is a low-molecular-weight protein (13.3 kDa) removed from the body by glomerular filtration. Its serum concentration has been advocated for assessment of renal function in patients with kidney disease. To investigate whether the removal of CysC by CVVH is likely to influence its serum concentration, concentrations of CysC were measured in 3 consecutive samples in 18 patients with oliguric ARF treated with CVVH (2 L/hr). Samples were taken from the afferent and efferent blood lines and from the ultrafiltrate line. Concentrations of CysC did not change during the time interval studied. The mean serum concentrations of CysC were 2.25+/-0.45 mg/L in the afferent and 2.19+/-0.56 mg/L in the efferent samples (NS); ultrafiltrate concentrations of CysC were 1.01+/-0.45 mg/L. The sieving coefficient of CysC was 0.52+/-0.20; the clearance of CysC was 17.3+/-6.6 mL/min; and the quantity of CysC removed averaged 2.13 mg/hr. During CVVH (2 L/hr), the quantity of CysC removed is less than 30% of its production and no rapid changes in its serum concentration are observed. Therefore, CVVH (2 L/hr) is unlikely to influence serum concentrations of CysC significantly, which suggests that it can be used to monitor residual renal function during CVVH.

  20. Fluconazole pharmacokinetics in a morbidly obese, critically ill patient receiving continuous venovenous hemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Natasha D; Phillips, Kristy M

    2014-09-01

    Current fluconazole dosing strategies can be described using either standardized doses (800 or 400 mg) or as weight-based dosing recommendations (12 mg/kg loading dose followed by 6 mg/kg maintenance dose). The ideal method of fluconazole dosing is still unclear for certain patient populations, such as those receiving renal replacement therapy or the morbidly obese. We describe a 48-year-old man with a body mass index of 84 kg/m(2) who was receiving continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) and was treated with fluconazole by using a weight-based dose determined by lean body weight, infused at a rate of 200 mg/hour. Blood samples were collected at hour 0 (i.e., ~24 hrs after the loading dose was administered) and at 3.5, 6.8, and 11.3 hours after the start of the 600-mg maintenance dose, infused over 3 hours. Pharmacokinetic parameters calculated were maximum serum concentration 9.64 mg/L, minimum serum concentration 5.98 mg/L, area under the serum concentration-time curve from 0-24 hours (AUC0-24 ) 184.75 mg/L•hour, elimination rate constant 0.0199 hour(-1) , elimination half-life 34.8 hours, and total body clearance 3.25 L/hour. Our data, when combined with previously published literature, do not support using a linear dose-to-AUC approximation to estimate drug dosing needs in the critically ill patient population receiving CVVH. In addition, our results suggest that morbidly obese patients are able to achieve pharmacodynamic goals defined as an AUC:MIC ratio higher than 25 by using a lean body weight for fluconazole dosing calculations.

  1. Omeprazole pharmacodynamics and gastric acid suppression in critically ill pediatric transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Olsen, K M; Bergman, K L; Kaufman, S S; Rebuck, J A; Collier, D S

    2001-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of omeprazole suspension in critically ill pediatric liver/intestinal transplant patients. DESIGN: Open-label pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic study. SETTING: Pediatric intensive care unit of an academic medical center. PATIENTS: Eleven pediatric liver and/or intestinal transplant patients. INTERVENTIONS: Extemporaneously prepared 0.5 mg/kg omeprazole suspension every 12 hrs via nasogastric tube before sequential measurements of omeprazole serum concentration and gastric pH monitoring. Gastric pH was monitored continuously for 48 hrs and plasma omeprazole concentrations were determined upon first and multiple dosing. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Mean onset of action of omeprazole in a sodium bicarbonate vehicle was 62 +/- 82 mins (range, 2-226 mins). Subjects <4 yrs of age exhibited a more variable onset of omeprazole action (range, 3-226 mins) when compared with older subjects (onset of action, 2-40 min). Omeprazole maximum concentration and area under the concentration-time curve for the dosage interval were significantly greater upon multiple dosing when compared with the first dose. Mean baseline gastric pH in this study population was 1.0 +/- 0.8. Gastric pH remained >4.0 for 78.8% +/- 18.9% of the first dosage interval and 97.8% +/- 5.4% of multiple dosage intervals regardless of age when administered twice daily as a suspension. CONCLUSION: These results support the use of omeprazole administered twice daily as a suspension to maintain gastric pH of >4.0 and to achieve maximal pharmacodynamic effect in pediatric liver and/or intestinal transplant patients.

  2. Prediction scores do not correlate with clinically adjudicated categories of pulmonary embolism in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Katsios, CM; Donadini, M; Meade, M; Mehta, S; Hall, R; Granton, J; Kutsiogiannis, J; Dodek, P; Heels-Ansdell, D; McIntyre, L; Vlahakis, N; Muscedere, J; Friedrich, J; Fowler, R; Skrobik, Y; Albert, M; Cox, M; Klinger, J; Nates, J; Bersten, A; Doig, C; Zytaruk, N; Crowther, M; Cook, DJ

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prediction scores for pretest probability of pulmonary embolism (PE) validated in outpatient settings are occasionally used in the intensive care unit (ICU). OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the correlation of Geneva and Wells scores with adjudicated categories of PE in ICU patients. METHODS: In a randomized trial of thromboprophylaxis, patients with suspected PE were adjudicated as possible, probable or definite PE. Data were then retrospectively abstracted for the Geneva Diagnostic PE score, Wells, Modified Wells and Simplified Wells Diagnostic scores. The chance-corrected agreement between adjudicated categories and each score was calculated. ANOVA was used to compare values across the three adjudicated PE categories. RESULTS: Among 70 patients with suspected PE, agreement was poor between adjudicated categories and Geneva pretest probabilities (kappa 0.01 [95% CI −0.0643 to 0.0941]) or Wells pretest probabilities (kappa −0.03 [95% CI −0.1462 to 0.0914]). Among four possible, 16 probable and 50 definite PEs, there were no significant differences in Geneva scores (possible = 4.0, probable = 4.7, definite = 4.5; P=0.90), Wells scores (possible = 2.8, probable = 4.9, definite = 4.1; P=0.37), Modified Wells (possible = 2.0, probable = 3.4, definite = 2.9; P=0.34) or Simplified Wells (possible = 1.8, probable = 2.8, definite = 2.4; P=0.30). CONCLUSIONS: Pretest probability scores developed outside the ICU do not correlate with adjudicated PE categories in critically ill patients. Research is needed to develop prediction scores for this population. PMID:24083302

  3. Functional evolution of critically ill patients undergoing an early rehabilitation protocol

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Fernanda Murata; Yamaguti, Wellington Pereira; Onoue, Mirian Akemi; Mendes, Juliana Mesti; Pedrosa, Renata Santos; Maida, Ana Lígia Vasconcellos; Kondo, Cláudia Seiko; de Salles, Isabel Chateaubriand Diniz; de Brito, Christina May Moran; Rodrigues, Miguel Koite

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluation of the functional outcomes of patients undergoing an early rehabilitation protocol for critically ill patients from admission to discharge from the intensive care unit. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted that included 463 adult patients with clinical and/or surgical diagnosis undergoing an early rehabilitation protocol. The overall muscle strength was evaluated at admission to the intensive care unit using the Medical Research Council scale. Patients were allocated to one of four intervention plans according to the Medical Research Council score, the suitability of the plan’s parameters, and the increasing scale of the plan expressing improved functional status. Uncooperative patients were allocated to intervention plans based on their functional status. The overall muscle strength and/or functional status were reevaluated upon discharge from the intensive care unit by comparison between the Intervention Plans upon admission (Planinitial) and discharge (Planfinal). Patients were classified into three groups according to the improvement of their functional status or not: responsive 1 (Planfinal > Planinitial), responsive 2 (Planfinal = Planinitial) and unresponsive (Planfinal < Planinitial). Results In total, 432 (93.3%) of 463 patients undergoing the protocol responded positively to the intervention strategy, showing maintenance and/or improvement of the initial functional status. Clinical patients classified as unresponsive were older (74.3 ± 15.1 years of age; p = 0.03) and had longer lengths of intensive care unit (11.6 ± 14.2 days; p = 0.047) and hospital (34.5 ± 34.1 days; p = 0.002) stays. Conclusion The maintenance and/or improvement of the admission functional status were associated with shorter lengths of intensive care unit and hospital stays. The results suggest that the type of diagnosis, clinical or surgical, fails to define the positive response to an early rehabilitation protocol. PMID:26340157

  4. The Association of Fever with Total Mechanical Ventilation Time in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to investigate the impact of fever on total mechanical ventilation time (TVT) in critically ill patients. Subgroup analysis was conducted using a previous prospective, multicenter observational study. We included mechanically ventilated patients for more than 24 hours from 10 Korean and 15 Japanese intensive care units (ICU), and recorded maximal body temperature under the support of mechanical ventilation (MAXMV). To assess the independent association of MAXMV with TVT, we used propensity-matched analysis in a total of 769 survived patients with medical or surgical admission, separately. Together with multiple linear regression analysis to evaluate the association between the severity of fever and TVT, the effect of MAXMV on ventilator-free days was also observed by quantile regression analysis in all subjects including non-survivors. After propensity score matching, a MAXMV ≥ 37.5°C was significantly associated with longer mean TVT by 5.4 days in medical admission, and by 1.2 days in surgical admission, compared to those with MAXMV of 36.5°C to 37.4°C. In multivariate linear regression analysis, patients with three categories of fever (MAXMV of 37.5°C to 38.4°C, 38.5°C to 39.4°C, and ≥ 39.5°C) sustained a significantly longer duration of TVT than those with normal range of MAXMV in both categories of ICU admission. A significant association between MAXMV and mechanical ventilator-free days was also observed in all enrolled subjects. Fever may be a detrimental factor to prolong TVT in mechanically ventilated patients. These findings suggest that fever in mechanically ventilated patients might be associated with worse mechanical ventilation outcome. PMID:27822946

  5. Prophylactic ranitidine treatment in critically ill children – a population pharmacokinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Hawwa, Ahmed F; Westwood, Paul M; Collier, Paul S; Millership, Jeffrey S; Yakkundi, Shirish; Thurley, Gillian; Shields, Mike D; Nunn, Anthony J; Halliday, Henry L; McElnay, James C

    2013-01-01

    Aims To characterize the population pharmacokinetics of ranitidine in critically ill children and to determine the influence of various clinical and demographic factors on its disposition. Methods Data were collected prospectively from 78 paediatric patients (n = 248 plasma samples) who received oral or intravenous ranitidine for prophylaxis against stress ulcers, gastrointestinal bleeding or the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux. Plasma samples were analysed using high-performance liquid chromatography, and the data were subjected to population pharmacokinetic analysis using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. Results A one-compartment model best described the plasma concentration profile, with an exponential structure for interindividual errors and a proportional structure for intra-individual error. After backward stepwise elimination, the final model showed a significant decrease in objective function value (−12.618; P < 0.001) compared with the weight-corrected base model. Final parameter estimates for the population were 32.1 l h−1 for total clearance and 285 l for volume of distribution, both allometrically modelled for a 70 kg adult. Final estimates for absorption rate constant and bioavailability were 1.31 h−1 and 27.5%, respectively. No significant relationship was found between age and weight-corrected ranitidine pharmacokinetic parameters in the final model, with the covariate for cardiac failure or surgery being shown to reduce clearance significantly by a factor of 0.46. Conclusions Currently, ranitidine dose recommendations are based on children's weights. However, our findings suggest that a dosing scheme that takes into consideration both weight and cardiac failure/surgery would be more appropriate in order to avoid administration of higher or more frequent doses than necessary. PMID:23016949

  6. Qualitative critical incident study of patients’ experiences leading to emergency hospital admission with advanced respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    Karasouli, Eleni; Munday, Daniel; Bailey, Cara; Staniszewska, Sophie; Hewison, Alistair; Griffiths, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The high volume of emergency admissions to hospital is a challenge for health systems internationally. Patients with lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are frequently admitted to hospital as emergency cases. While the frequency of emergency admission has been investigated, few studies report patient experiences, particularly in relation to the decision-making process prior to emergency admission. We sought to explore patient and carer experiences and those of their healthcare professionals in the period leading up to emergency admission to hospital. Setting 3 UK hospitals located in different urban and rural settings. Design Qualitative critical incident study. Participants 24 patients with advanced lung cancer and 15 with advanced COPD admitted to hospital as emergencies, 20 of their carers and 50 of the health professionals involved in the patients’ care. Results The analysis of patient, carer and professionals’ interviews revealed a detailed picture of the complex processes involved leading to emergency admission to hospital. 3 phases were apparent in this period: self-management of deteriorating symptoms, negotiated decision-making and letting go. These were dynamic processes, characterised by an often rapidly changing clinical condition, uncertainty and anxiety. Patients considered their options drawing on experience, current and earlier advice. Patients tried to avoid admission, reluctantly accepting it, albeit often with a sense of relief, as anxiety increased with worsening symptoms. Conclusions Patients with advanced respiratory illness, and their carers, try to avoid emergency admission, and use logical and complex decision-making before reluctantly accepting it. Clinicians and policy-makers need to understand this complex process when considering how to reduce emergency hospital admissions rather than focusing on identifying and labelling admissions as ‘inappropriate’. PMID:26916687

  7. Efficacy of renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients: a propensity analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although renal replacement therapy (RRT) is a common procedure in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI), its efficacy remains uncertain. Patients who receive RRT usually have higher mortality rates than those who do not. However, many differences exist in severity patterns between patients with and those without RRT and available results are further confounded by treatment selection bias since no consensus on indications for RRT has been reached so far. Our aim was to account for these biases to accurately assess RRT efficacy, with special attention to RRT timing. Methods We performed a propensity analysis using data of the French longitudinal prospective multicenter Outcomerea database. Two propensity scores for RRT were built to match patients who received RRT to controls who did not despite having a close probability of receiving the procedure. AKI was defined according to RIFLE criteria. The association between RRT and hospital mortality was examined through multivariate conditional logistic regression analyses to control for residual confounding. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to examine the impact of RRT timing. Results Among the 2846 study patients, 545 (19%) received RRT. Crude mortality rates were higher in patients with than in those without RRT (38% vs 17.5%, P < 0.001). After matching and adjustment, RRT was not associated with a reduced hospital mortality. The two propensity models yielded concordant results. Conclusions In our study population, RRT failed to reduce hospital mortality. This result emphasizes the need for randomized studies comparing RRT to conservative management in selected ICU patients, with special focus on RRT timing. PMID:23254304

  8. Continuous Electroencephalography (cEEG) Monitoring and Outcomes of Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Wang, Guoqiao; Cutter, Gary R.; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.

    2017-01-01

    Background It is not clear whether performing continuous EEG (cEEG) in critically ill patients during intensive care unit (ICU) treatment affects outcomes at discharge. Material/Methods We prospectively matched 234 patients who received cEEG (cases) by admission diagnosis and sex to 234 patients who did not receive cEEG (controls) and followed them until discharge. Patients admitted due to seizures were excluded. The primary measures of outcome were Glasgow Coma Scale at Discharge (GCSD) and disposition at discharge, and the secondary measures of outcome were AED modifications, Glasgow Outcomes Scale, and Modified-Rankin Scale. These outcomes were compared between the cases and controls. Results Some differences in primary outcome measures between the groups emerged on univariate analyses, but these differences were small and not significant after controlling for covariates. Cases had longer ICU stays (p=0.002) and lower admission GCS (p=0.01) but similar GCSD (p=0.10). Of the secondary outcome measures, the mean (SD) number of AED modifications for cases was 2.2±3.1 compared to 0.4±0.8 for controls (p<0.0001); 170 (72.6%) cases had at least 1 AED modification compared to only 56 (24.1%) of the controls (p<0.0001). Conclusions Performing cEEG did not improve discharge outcome but it significantly influenced AED prescription patterns. Further studies assessing long-term outcomes are needed to better define the role of cEEG in this patient population. PMID:28160596

  9. Prevalence and impact of late defecation in the critically ill, thermally injured adult patient.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Scott T; Lundy, Jonathan B; Chung, Kevin K; Nitzschke, Stephanie L; Burns, Christopher J; Shields, Beth A; Cancio, Leopoldo C

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of late defecation (absence of laxation for more than 6 days after admission) as an indicator of lower-gastrointestinal (GI) tract dysfunction in burn patients. In addition, the authors wanted to determine whether the addition of polyethylene glycol 3350 to the standard bowel regimen led to improvement in markers of lower-GI function and outcomes. The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of patients admitted to the burn intensive care unit during a 26-month period. Inclusion criteria were 20% or more TBSA burn, requirement for mechanical ventilation, and age over 18 years. Of 83 patients included, the prevalence of late defecation was 36.1% (n = 30). There was no association between late defecation and mortality. Patients with late defecation had more frequent episodes of constipation after first defecation (P =.03), of feeding intolerance (P =.007), and received total parenteral nutrition more frequently (P =.005). The addition of polyethylene glycol to the standard bowel regimen did not affect markers of lower-GI function. Late defecation occurs in more than one third of critically ill burn patients. Late defecation was associated with ongoing lower-GI dysfunction, feeding intolerance, and the use of total parenteral nutrition. The causal relationship between these problems has not been determined. A prospective study at the authors' institution is currently planned to attempt to validate late defecation as a marker of lower-GI tract dysfunction, determine its relationship to various outcomes, and determine risk factors for its development.

  10. Population pharmacokinetics and dose simulation of vancomycin in critically ill patients during high-volume haemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Leslie; Andresen, Max; Downey, Patricio; Gai, Maria Nella; Regueira, Tomás; Bórquez, Tamara; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to describe the population pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in critically ill patients with refractory septic shock undergoing continuous venovenous high-volume haemofiltration (HVHF) and to define appropriate dosing for these patients. This was a prospective pharmacokinetic study in the ICU of a university hospital. Eight blood samples were taken over one vancomycin dosing interval. Samples were analysed by a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Non-linear mixed-effects modelling was used to describe the population pharmacokinetics. Dosing simulations were used to define therapeutic vancomycin doses for different HVHF settings. Nine patients were included (five male). The mean weight and SOFA score were 70 kg and 11, respectively. Mean HVHF settings were: blood flow rate, 240 mL/min; and haemofiltration exchange rate, 100 mL/kg/h. A linear two-compartment model with zero-order input adequately described the data. Mean parameter estimates were: clearance, 2.9 L/h; volume of distribution of central compartment (V(1)), 11.8L; volume of distribution of peripheral compartment (V(2)), 18.0 L; and intercompartmental clearance, 9.3 L/h. HVHF intensity was strongly associated with vancomycin clearance (P < 0.05) and was a covariate in the final model. Simulations indicate that after a loading dose, vancomycin doses required for different HVHF intensities would be 750 mg every 12h (q12h) for 69 mL/kg/h, 1000 mg q12h for 100 mL/kg/h and 1500 mg q12h for 123 mL/kg/h. Continuous infusion would also be a valuable administration strategy. In conclusion, variable and much higher than standard vancomycin doses are required to achieve therapeutic concentrations during different HVHF settings.

  11. Total and unbound ceftriaxone pharmacokinetics in critically ill Australian Indigenous patients with severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Danny; Stewart, Penelope; Goud, Rajendra; Gourley, Stephen; Hewagama, Saliya; Krishnaswamy, Sushena; Wallis, Steven C; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2016-12-01

    In the absence of specific data to guide optimal dosing, this study aimed to describe the pharmacokinetics of ceftriaxone in severely septic Australian Indigenous patients and to assess achievement of the pharmacodynamic target of the regimens prescribed. A pharmacokinetic study was conducted in a remote hospital intensive care unit in patients receiving ceftriaxone dosing of 1 g every 12 h (q12h). Serial blood and urine samples were collected over one dosing interval on two consecutive days. Samples were assayed using a validated chromatography method for total and unbound concentrations. Concentration-time data collected were analysed with a non-compartmental approach. A total of 100 plasma samples were collected from five subjects. Ceftriaxone clearance, volume of distribution at steady-state, elimination half-life and elimination rate constant estimates were 0.9 (0.6-1.5) L/h, 11.2 (7.6-13.4) L, 9.5 (3.2-10.2) h and 0.07 (0.07-0.21) h(-1), respectively. The unbound fraction of ceftriaxone ranged between 14% and 43%, with a higher unbound fraction present at higher total concentrations. The unbound concentrations at 720 min from the initiation of infusion for the first and second dosing intervals were 7.2 (4.8-10.7) mg/L and 7.8 (4.7-12.1) mg/L respectively, which exceeds the minimum inhibitory concentration of all typical target pathogens. In conclusion, the regimen of ceftriaxone 1 g q12h is adequate for critically ill Australian Indigenous patients with severe sepsis caused by non-resistant pathogens.

  12. Alkalosis in Critically Ill Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Jazrawi, Allan; Miller, Jan; Baigi, Amir; Chew, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Although metabolic alkalosis is a common occurrence in intensive care units (ICUs), no study has evaluated its prevalence or outcomes in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study of critically ill patients suffering from severe sepsis and septic shock admitted to the ICUs of Halmstad and Varberg County hospitals. From 910 patient records, 627 patients met the inclusion criteria. We investigated the relationship between metabolic alkalosis and mortality. Further, we studied the relationship between metabolic alkalosis and ICU length of stay (LOS). Results Metabolic alkalosis was associated with decreased 30-day and 12-month mortalities. This effect was however lost when a multivariate analysis was conducted, correcting for age, gender, pH on admission, base excess (BE) on admission, Simplified Acute Physiology Score III (SAPS III) and acute kidney injury (AKI). We then analyzed for any dose-response effect between the severity of metabolic alkalosis and mortality and found no relationship. Bivariate analysis showed that metabolic alkalosis had a significant effect on the length of ICU stay. When adjusting for age, sex, pH at admission, BE at admission, SAPS III and AKI in a multivariate analysis, metabolic alkalosis significantly contributed to prolonged ICU length of stay. In two separate sensitivity analyses pure metabolic alkalosis and late metabolic alkalosis (time of onset >48 hours) were the only significant predictor of increased ICU length of stay. Conclusion Metabolic alkalosis did not have any effect on 30-day and 12-month mortalities after adjusting for age, sex, SAPS III-score, pH and BE on admission and AKI in a multivariate analysis. The presence of metabolic alkalosis was independently associated with an increased ICU length of stay. PMID:28045915

  13. Epidemiology and Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in the Era of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagshaw, Sean M.; Eurich, Dean T.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The impact of critical illness on survival of HIV-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy remains uncertain. We describe the epidemiology of critical illness in this population and identify predictors of mortality. Materials and Methods. Retrospective cohort of HIV-infected patients was admitted to intensive care from 2002 to 2014. Patient sociodemographics, comorbidities, case-mix, illness severity, and 30-day mortality were captured. Multivariable Cox regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of mortality. Results. Of 282 patients, mean age was 44 years (SD 10) and 169 (59%) were male. Median (IQR) CD4 count and plasma viral load (PVL) were 125 cells/mm3 (30–300) and 28,000 copies/mL (110–270,000). Fifty-five (20%) patients died within 30 days. Factors independently associated with mortality included APACHE II score (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.12; 95% CI 1.08–1.16; p < 0.001), cirrhosis (aHR 2.30; 95% CI 1.12–4.73; p = 0.024), coronary artery disease (aHR 6.98; 95% CI 2.20–22.13; p = 0.001), and duration of HIV infection (aHR 1.07 per year; 95% CI 1.02–1.13; p = 0.01). CD4 count and PVL were not associated with mortality. Conclusions. Mortality from an episode of critical illness in HIV-infected patients remains high but appears to be driven by acute illness severity and HIV-unrelated comorbid disease rather than degree of immune suppression. PMID:28348607

  14. Relationship between hyperglycemia, hormone disturbances, and clinical evolution in severely hyperglycemic post surgery critically ill children: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To study hormonal changes associated with severe hyperglycemia in critically ill children and the relationship with prognosis and length of stay in intensive care. Methods Observational study in twenty-nine critically ill children with severe hyperglycemia defined as 2 blood glucose measurements greater than 180 mg/dL. Severity of illness was assessed using pediatric index of mortality (PIM2), pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) score, and pediatric logistic organ dysfunction (PELOD) scales. Blood glucose, glycosuria, insulin, C-peptide, cortisol, corticotropin, insulinlike growth factor-1, growth hormone, thyrotropin, thyroxine, and treatment with insulin were recorded. β-cell function and insulin sensitivity and resistance were determined on the basis of the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), using blood glucose and C-peptide levels. Results The initial blood glucose level was 249 mg/dL and fell gradually to 125 mg/dL at 72 hours. Initial β-cell function (49.2%) and insulin sensitivity (13.2%) were low. At the time of diagnosis of hyperglycemia, 50% of the patients presented insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction, 46% presented isolated insulin resistance, and 4% isolated β-cell dysfunction. β-cell function improved rapidly but insulin resistance persisted. Initial glycemia did not correlate with any other factor, and there was no relationship between glycemia and mortality. Patients who died had higher cortisol and growth hormone levels at diagnosis. Length of stay was correlated by univariate analysis, but not by multivariate analysis, with C-peptide and glycemic control at 24 hours, insulin resistance, and severity of illness scores. Conclusions Critically ill children with severe hyperglycemia initially present decreased β-cell function and insulin sensitivity. Nonsurvivors had higher cortisol and growth hormone levels and developed hyperglycemia later than survivors. PMID:24628829

  15. Fibrositis and primary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Carette, S; Lefrançois, L

    1988-09-01

    The prevalence of fibrositis was determined in 100 patients with subclinical or biochemical primary hypothyroidism. Nineteen patients reported symptoms of joint and/or muscle pain with stiffness. Five of these patients presented 7 or more tender points on examination, thus allowing a diagnosis of fibrositis to be made in only 5% of the total group. Symptomatic improvement after thyroid hormone replacement occurred in 10 of the 19 patients, including 3 of those with fibrositis. There were no significant changes in tender points. Our data indicate that fibrositis is uncommon in patients with primary hypothyroidism despite the frequent occurrence of symptoms suggestive of this syndrome.

  16. Hypothyroidism and polyneuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Beghi, E; Delodovici, M L; Bogliun, G; Crespi, V; Paleari, F; Gamba, P; Capra, M; Zarrelli, M

    1989-01-01

    The prevalence and characteristics of polyneuropathy were assessed using standard clinical and electrophysiological criteria in 39 consecutive outpatients with primary hypothyroidism, 15 of whom were previously untreated. Subjective complaints, mainly paraesthesiae, were recorded from 25 cases (64%) and objective findings supporting a clinical diagnosis of polyneuropathy were present in 13 (33%). Using standard electrophysiological criteria, a definite diagnosis of polyneuropathy was made in 28 cases (72%). The commonest sites of abnormal nerve conduction were the sensory nerves, especially the sural nerve. Polyneuropathy was generally mild. None of the clinical and biochemical indicators of hypothyroidism were significantly correlated with the electrophysiological signs of peripheral nerve impairment or the diagnosis of polyneuropathy. PMID:2559162

  17. Why a second look might be worth it: immuno-modulatory therapies in the critically ill patient

    PubMed Central

    Siegler, Benedikt H.; Brenner, Thorsten; Uhle, Florian; Weiterer, Sebastian; Weigand, Markus A.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are associated with high mortality rates and remain a serious menace for the critically ill patient. Concurrent activation of pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways and an excessive cytokine release represent initial key features in the deregulation of the humoral and cellular antimicrobial defense. Research of the last decades addressed both the ebullient inflammation as well as the resulting long-term failure of the host immunity. While the reestablishment of an adequate immune-competence is still under investigation, many promising experimental trials to limit the inflammatory response during sepsis were challenged by missing beneficial effects in clinical studies. Nevertheless, due to advanced knowledge about the complex regulation of inflammatory mediators and their overlapping involvement in other potentially life-threatening diseases, further evaluation of these approaches in relevant subgroups could help to identify critically ill patients with potential benefit from anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:27293871

  18. Rhabdomyolysis case based on hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Katipoglu, Bilal; Acehan, Fatih; Meteris, Ayşenur; Yılmaz, Nisbet

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hypothyroidism is a wide clinical spectrum disorder and only a few cases in literature show this. Rhabdomyolysis and acute renal impairment can be seen concurrently in a hypothyroid state. We report a case of severe hypothyroidism with poor drug compliance leading to rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury. Learning points: Hypothyroidism is a rare cause of acute kidney injury. In this case report, we studied a rare occurrence of acute renal impairment due to hypothyroidism with poor drug compliance, which induced rhabdomyolysis. Our report emphasized that thyroid status should be evaluated in patients with unexplained acute renal impairment or presenting with the symptoms of muscle involvement. PMID:27855234

  19. Use of Daptomycin in Critically Ill Children With Bloodstream Infections and Complicated Skin and Soft-tissue Infections.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, Sara; Tumietto, Fabio; Conti, Matteo; Giannella, Maddalena; Viale, Pierluigi

    2016-02-01

    We report our clinical experience with the use of daptomycin, administered in the dosage of 8 mg/kg/d in 3 minutes, in treating 12 critically ill children younger than 12 years, with bloodstream infections (n = 9) and complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (n = 3). Mean treatment duration was 14 ± 5 days; microbiologic eradication was achieved in all patients, and no drug related adverse events occurred.

  20. Albumin concentration significantly impacts on free teicoplanin plasma concentrations in non-critically ill patients with chronic bone sepsis.

    PubMed

    Brink, A J; Richards, G A; Lautenbach, E E G; Rapeport, N; Schillack, V; van Niekerk, L; Lipman, J; Roberts, J A

    2015-06-01

    The impact of decreased serum albumin concentrations on free antibiotic concentrations in non-critically ill patients is poorly described. This study aimed to describe the pharmacokinetics of a high-dose regimen of teicoplanin, a highly protein-bound antibiotic, in non-critically ill patients with hypoalbuminaemia. Ten patients with chronic bone sepsis and decreased serum albumin concentrations (<35 g/L) receiving teicoplanin 12 mg/kg 12-hourly intravenously for 48 h followed by 12 mg/kg once daily were enrolled. Surgical debridement was performed on Day 3. Samples of venous blood were collected pre-infusion and post-infusion during the first 4 days of therapy. Total and free teicoplanin concentrations were assayed using validated chromatographic methods. The median serum albumin concentration for the cohort was 18 (IQR 15-24) g/L. After 48 h, the median (IQR) free trough (fC(min)) and total trough (tC(min)) concentrations were 2.90 (2.67-3.47) mg/L and 15.54 (10.28-19.12) mg/L, respectively, although trough concentrations declined thereafter. Clearance of the free concentrations was significantly high relative to the total fraction at 38.6 (IQR 29.9-47.8) L/h and 7.0 (IQR 6.8-9.8) L/h, respectively (P<0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that whereas total teicoplanin concentration did not impact on free concentrations (P=0.174), albumin concentration did (P<0.001). This study confirms the significant impact of hypoalbuminaemia on free concentrations of teicoplanin in non-critically ill patients, similar to that in critically ill patients. Furthermore, the poor correlation with total teicoplanin concentration suggests that therapeutic drug monitoring of free concentrations should be used in these patients.

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of nutritional support by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in critically ill patients: A self-control clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fei; Gao, Ya-Ling; Liu, Zheng-Jin; Hu, Yi-Qun

    2017-01-01

    Background & Objective: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a procedure to provide enteral nutrition for critically ill patients. It is commonly used in clinical practice; however, the widespread use of PEG is controversial. Our objective was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of nutritional support by PEG in these critically ill patients. Methods: A total of 64 critically ill patients including 41 males and 23 females (aged 23-84) were identified by the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scoring system during September 2004 to June 2012. The nutritional status before and after PEG was mainly assessed by the tricep skinfold thickness and serum albumin level. The nutritional status and pathological condition were assessed at 4, 8 and 12 weeks before and after PEG feeding. The assessment was according to the classical method of the human nutritional status. Follow-up was performed at one month, three months and 1.5 year after gastrostomy. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS 11.5 software. The incidence of inhalation pneumonia and gastroesophageal regurgitation was compared by chi square (χ2) test. P<0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Among the 64 patients, 9 patients died of their former diseases or related symptoms. Postoperative follow-up showed that both nutritional status and complications were improved after PEG in 55 patients (P<0.05). The serum albumin and tricep skinfold thickness levels were significantly increased. The incidence of hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, hypokalemia and hyponatremia were lower than pre-operation. The frequencies of complications were significantly reduced. No severe complications occurred in any patient. Conclusions: Our study confirmed that PEG was a good long-term route of nutritional supply with no serious complications for critically ill patients. PMID:28367176

  2. Acute and long-term dysphagia in critically ill patients with severe sepsis: results of a prospective controlled observational study.

    PubMed

    Zielske, Joerg; Bohne, Silvia; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Axer, Hubertus; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2014-11-01

    Dysphagia is a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs). Structured otorhinolaryngological data on dysphagia in ICU survivors with severe sepsis are missing. In a prospective study, 30 ICU patients with severe sepsis and thirty without sepsis as control group were examined using bedside fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing after 14 days in the ICU (T1) and 4 months after onset of critical illness (T2). Swallowing dysfunction was assessed using the Penetration-Aspiration Scale (PAS). The Functional Oral Intake Scale was applied to evaluate the diet needed. Primary endpoint was the burden of dysphagia defined as PAS score >5. At T1, 19 of 30 severe sepsis patients showed aspiration with a PAS score >5, compared to 7 of 30 in critically ill patients without severe sepsis (p = 0.002). Severe sepsis and tracheostomy were independent risk factors for severe dysphagia with aspiration (PAS > 5) at T1 (p = 0.042 and 0.006, respectively). 4-month mortality (T2) was 57 % in severe sepsis patients compared to 20 % in patients without severe sepsis (p = 0.006). At T2, more severe sepsis survivors were tracheostomy-dependent and needed more often tube or parenteral feeding (p = 0.014 and p = 0.040, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed tracheostomy at T1 as independent risk factor for severe dysphagia at T2 (p = 0.030). Severe sepsis appears to be a relevant risk factor for long-term dysphagia. An otorhinolaryngological evaluation of dysphagia at ICU discharge is mandatory for survivors of severe critical illness to plan specific swallowing rehabilitation programs.

  3. Pandemic influenza 2009: Impact of vaccination coverage on critical illness in children, a Canada and France observational study

    PubMed Central

    Fléchelles, Olivier; Brissaud, Olivier; Fowler, Robert; Ducruet, Thierry; Jouvet, Philippe; the Pediatric Canadian Critical Care Trials Group H1N1 Collaborative and Groupe Francophone de Réanimation et Urgences Pédiatriques

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study the impact of vaccination critical illness due to H1N1pdm09, we compared the incidence and severity of H1N1pdm09 infection in Canada and France. METHODS We studied two national cohorts that included children with documented H1N1pdm09 infection, admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) in Canada and in France between October 1, 2009 and January 31, 2010. RESULTS Vaccination coverage prior to admission to PICUs was higher in Canada than in France (21% vs 2% of children respectively, P < 0.001), and in both countries, vaccination coverage prior to admission of these critically ill patients was substantially lower than in the general pediatric population (P < 0.001). In Canada, 160 children (incidence = 2.6/100000 children) were hospitalized in PICU compared to 125 children (incidence = 1.1/100000) in France (P < 0.001). Mortality rates were similar in Canada and France (4.4% vs 6.5%, P = 0.45, respectively), median invasive mechanical ventilation duration and mean PICU length of stay were shorter in Canada (4 d vs 6 d, P = 0.02 and 5.7 d vs 8.2 d, P = 0.03, respectively). H1N1pdm09 vaccination prior to PICU admission was associated with a decreased risk of requiring invasive mechanical ventilation (OR = 0.30, 95%CI: 0.11-0.83, P = 0.02). CONCLUSION The critical illness due to H1N1pdm09 had a higher incidence in Canada than in France. Critically ill children were less likely to have received vaccination prior to hospitalization in comparison to general population and children vaccinated had lower risk of ventilation. PMID:27872826

  4. How to deal with burden of critical illness: A comparison of strategies in different areas of China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengcheng; Jiang, Liwen; Li, Chengyue; Sun, Mei; Rieger, Alexander; Hao, Mo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This article aims to introduce, compare and analyze the design and development of Critical Illness Insurance systems in different parts of China under different social and economic conditions, to explain their characteristics and similarities. It may provide references to other countries, especially developing countries, to solve the problem of high medical costs. Methods: According to the methods in Comparative Economics, 3 areas (Taicang in Jiangsu, Zhanjiang in Guangdong, Xunyi in Shanxi) which are in high, medium and low socio-economic condition respectively were chosen in China. Their critical illness insurance systems were analyzed in the study. Results: Each system shares several common points, including coordinating urban and rural medical insurance fund, financing from the basic medical insurance surplus, and exploring payment reform and so on. But in the way of management, Taicang and Zhanjiang cooperate with commercial insurance agencies, but Xunyi chooses autonomous management by government. In Xunyi, multi-channel financing is relatively more dispersed, while funds of Taicang and Zhanjiang are mainly from the basic medical insurance surplus. The specific method of payment is different among these three areas. Conclusion: Because of the differences in economic development, population structure, and sources of funds, each area took their own mode on health policy orientation, financing, payment, coverage, and fund management to design their Critical Illness Insurance systems. This might provide references to other areas in China and other developing countries in the world. PMID:24948999

  5. Echinocandin to fluconazole step-down therapy in critically ill patients with invasive, susceptible Candida albicans infections.

    PubMed

    van der Geest, Patrick J; Rijnders, Bart J A; Vonk, Alieke G; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2016-03-01

    Invasive Candida spp. infections are increasingly diagnosed in critically ill patients. For initial treatment, an echinocandin is recommended with a possible step-down to fluconazole when the patients' condition is improving and the isolate appears susceptible, but there are no data to support such policy. We studied the safety and efficacy of step-down therapy in critically ill patients with culture proven deep seated or bloodstream infections by C. albicans susceptible to fluconazole. All patients admitted into the intensive care unit from January 2010 to December 2014, who had a culture proven invasive C. albicans infection and received initial treatment with an echinocandin for at least 4 days were included. Data on patient characteristics, treatment and vital outcomes were assessed. Of the 56 patients, 32 received step-down fluconazole therapy, at median day 5, whereas the echinocandin was continued in the other 24. No differences where seen in baseline characteristics or risk factors for invasive C. albicans infection between the two groups. Response rates were similar and no difference where seen in 28-day or 90-day mortality between the groups. Step-down therapy to fluconazole may be safe and effective in critically ill patients with invasive infections by C. albicans, susceptible to fluconazole, who have clinically improved as early as 4 days after start of treatment with an echinocandin.

  6. Fluconazole dosing predictions in critically-ill patients receiving prolonged intermittent renal replacement therapy: a Monte Carlo simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Gharibian, Katherine N; Mueller, Bruce A

    2016-07-01

    Fluconazole is a renally-eliminated antifungal commonly used to treat Candida species infections. In critically-ill patients receiving prolonged intermittent renal replacement therapy (PIRRT), limited pharmacokinetic (PK) data are available to guide fluconazole dosing. We used previously-published fluconazole clearance data and PK data of critically-ill patients with acute kidney injury to develop a PK model with the goal of determining a therapeutic dosing regimen for critically-ill patients receiving PIRRT. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to create a virtual cohort of patients receiving different fluconazole dosing regimens. Plasma drug concentration-time profiles were evaluated on the probability of attaining a mean 24-hour area under the drug concentration-time curve to minimum inhibitory concentration ratio (AUC24h : MIC) of 100 during the initial 48 hours of antifungal therapy. At the susceptibility breakpoint of Candida albicans (2 mg/L), 93 - 96% of simulated subjects receiving PIRRT attained the pharmacodynamic target with a fluconazole 800-mg loading dose plus 400 mg twice daily (q12h or pre and post PIRRT) regimen. Monte Carlo simulations of a PK model of PIRRT provided a basis for the development of an informed fluconazole dosing recommendation when PK data was limited. This finding should be validated in the clinical setting.

  7. The incidence of ocular candidiasis and evaluation of routine opthalmic examination in critically ill patients with candidaemia.

    PubMed

    Gluck, S; Headdon, W G; Tang, Dws; Bastian, I B; Goggin, M J; Deane, A M

    2015-11-01

    Despite a paucity of data regarding both the incidence of ocular candidiasis and the utility of ophthalmic examination in critically ill patients, routine ophthalmic examination is recommended for critically ill patients with candidaemia. The objectives were to estimate the incidence of ocular candidiasis and evaluate whether ophthalmic examination influenced subsequent management of these patients. We conducted a ten-year retrospective observational study. Data were extracted for all ICU patients who were blood culture positive for fungal infection. Risk factors for candidaemia and eye involvement were quantified and details regarding ophthalmic examination were reviewed. Candida species were cultured in 93 patients. Risk factors for ocular candidiasis were present in 57% of patients. Forty-one percent of patients died prior to ophthalmology examination and 2% of patients were discharged before candidaemia was identified. During examination, signs of ocular candidiasis were only present in one (2.9%) patient, who had a risk factor for ocular candidiasis. Based on these findings, the duration of antifungal treatment for this patient was increased. Ocular candidiasis occurs rarely in critically ill patients with candidaemia, but because treatment regimens may be altered when diagnosed, routine ophthalmic examination is still indicated.

  8. Meanings of Being Critically Ill in a Sound-Intensive ICU Patient Room - A Phenomenological Hermeneutical Study

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Lotta; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Lindahl, Berit

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the meanings of being critically ill in a sound-intensive ICU patient room, as disclosed through patients’ narratives. Patient rooms in ICUs are filled with loud activity and studies have revealed sound levels comparable to those of a busy road above the patient’s head. There is a risk that the sound or noise is disturbing and at worst a major problem for the patient, but there is a lack of knowledge concerning the patients’ own experiences. Thirteen patients were asked to narrate their experiences of the sound environment in ICU patient rooms. The interviews were analyzed using a phenomenological- hermeneutical method inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. Six themes emerged from the analysis. Conclusion: The meanings of being a patient in a sound- intensive environment were interpreted as never knowing what to expect next regarding noise, but also of being situated in the middle of an uncontrollable barrage of noise, unable to take cover or disappear. This condition is not to be seen as static; for some patients there is movement and change over time. The meanings indicate that the unpredictable shifts between silence and disturbing sounds stress the critically ill patient and impede sleep and recovery. Our findings indicate the need to reduce disturbing and unexpected sounds and noise around critically ill patients in high-tech environments in order to facilitate wellbeing, sleep and recovery. Nurses have a vital role in developing such an environment. PMID:22977654

  9. AKI-CLIF-SOFA: a novel prognostic score for critically ill cirrhotic patients with acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dan-Qin; Zheng, Chen-Fei; Liu, Wen-Yue; Van Poucke, Sven; Mao, Zhi; Shi, Ke-Qing; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Ji-Dong; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill cirrhotic patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) are associated with high mortality rates. The aims of this study were to develop a specific prognostic score for critically ill cirrhotic patients with AKI, the acute kidney injury - Chronic Liver Failure - Sequential Organ Failure- Assessment score (AKI-CLIF-SOFA) score. This study focused on 527 cirrhotic patients with AKI admitted to intensive care unit and constructed a new scoring system, the AKI-CLIF-SOFA, which can be used to prognostically assess mortality in these patient population. Parameters included in this model were analysed by cox regression. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (auROC) of AKI-CLIF-SOFA scoring system was 0.74 in 30 days, 0.74 in 90 days, 0.72 in 270 days and 0.72 in 365 days. Additionally, this study demonstrated that the new model had more discriminatory power than chronic liver failure- sequential organ failure assessment score (CLIF-SOFA), SOFA, model for end stage liver disease (MELD), kidney disease improving global outcomes (KDIGO) and simplified acute physiology score II (SAPS II) (auROC: 0.72, 0.66, 0.64, 0.62, 0.63 and 0.65 respectively, all P < 0.05) for the prediction of the 365-days mortality. Therefore, AKI-CLIF-SOFA demonstrated a valuable discriminative ability compared with KDIGO, CLIF-SOFA, MELD, SAPS II and SOFA in critically ill cirrhotic patients with AKI. PMID:28114104

  10. Influence of Daily Fluid Balance prior to Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy on Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Han, Min Jee; Park, Ki Hyun; Shin, Jung-Ho; Kim, Su Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Positive fluid balance is a risk factor for mortality in critically ill patients, especially those requiring continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). However, the association between daily fluid balance and various organ impairments remains unclear. This study investigated the impacts of daily fluid balance prior to CRRT on organ dysfunction, as well as mortality in critically ill patients. We identified daily fluid balance between intensive care unit (ICU) admission and CRRT initiation. According to daily fluid balance, the time to CRRT initiation and the rate of organ failure based on the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score were assessed. We recruited 100 patients who experienced CRRT for acute kidney injury. CRRT was initiated within 2 [0, 4] days. The time to CRRT initiation was shortened in proportion to daily fluid balance, even after the adjustment for the renal SOFA score at ICU admission (HR 1.14, P = 0.007). Based on the SOFA score, positive daily fluid balance was associated with respiratory, cardiovascular, nervous, and coagulation failure, independent of each initial SOFA score at ICU admission (HR 1.36, 1.26, 1.24 and 2.26, all P < 0.05). Ultimately, we found that positive fluid balance was related with an increase in the rate of 28-day mortality (HR 1.14, P = 0.012). Positive daily fluid balance may accelerate the requirement for CRRT, moreover, it can be associated with an increased risk of multiple organ failure in critically ill patients.

  11. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA): a steroid with multiple effects. Is there any possible option in the treatment of critical illness?

    PubMed

    Oberbeck, R; Kobbe, P

    2010-01-01

    DHEA is the major circulating steroid in human blood and it is a central intermediate in the metabolic pathway of sex steroid hormone formation. Although the specific effect of DHEA is still unclear it was demonstrated that DHEA modulates several physiologic processes including metabolism and cardiovascular function. Furthermore, a profound immunomodulatory effect of DHEA was reported. Several data demonstrate the beneficial effect of DHEA in situations of critical illness including trauma hemorrhage and sepsis. Accordingly DHEA improved the survival rate and clinical situation in several animal models of trauma hemorrhage and systemic inflammation. This effect was paralleled by profound changes of immunologic parameters, organ function, and heat shock protein production. Therefore, it was claimed that DHEA may be a new alternative/additive in the treatment of trauma and sepsis. In line, DHEA is a frequently used drug in the field of anti-aging medicine, it is an over-the-counter drug in several countries, and it was reported that DHEA medication is free of major side effects. Therefore, DHEA could easily be used in a clinical trial investigating its effects in critical ill patients. This article reviews the reported effects of DHEA on the base of the literature with the specific focus on trauma and sepsis/critical illness including its clinical perspectives.

  12. Influence of Daily Fluid Balance prior to Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy on Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Positive fluid balance is a risk factor for mortality in critically ill patients, especially those requiring continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). However, the association between daily fluid balance and various organ impairments remains unclear. This study investigated the impacts of daily fluid balance prior to CRRT on organ dysfunction, as well as mortality in critically ill patients. We identified daily fluid balance between intensive care unit (ICU) admission and CRRT initiation. According to daily fluid balance, the time to CRRT initiation and the rate of organ failure based on the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score were assessed. We recruited 100 patients who experienced CRRT for acute kidney injury. CRRT was initiated within 2 [0, 4] days. The time to CRRT initiation was shortened in proportion to daily fluid balance, even after the adjustment for the renal SOFA score at ICU admission (HR 1.14, P = 0.007). Based on the SOFA score, positive daily fluid balance was associated with respiratory, cardiovascular, nervous, and coagulation failure, independent of each initial SOFA score at ICU admission (HR 1.36, 1.26, 1.24 and 2.26, all P < 0.05). Ultimately, we found that positive fluid balance was related with an increase in the rate of 28-day mortality (HR 1.14, P = 0.012). Positive daily fluid balance may accelerate the requirement for CRRT, moreover, it can be associated with an increased risk of multiple organ failure in critically ill patients. PMID:27478348

  13. Proceedings of the 2016 Clinical Nutrition Week Research Workshop-The Optimal Dose of Protein Provided to Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Heyland, Daren K; Rooyakers, Olav; Mourtzakis, Marina; Stapleton, Renee D

    2017-02-01

    Recent literature has created considerable confusion about the optimal amount of protein/amino acids that should be provided to the critically ill patient. In fact, the evidentiary basis that directly tries to answer this question is relatively small. As a clinical nutrition research community, there is an urgent need to develop the optimal methods to assess the impact of exogenous protein/amino acid administration in the intensive care unit setting. That assessment can be conducted at various levels: (1) impact on stress response pathways, (2) impact on muscle synthesis and protein balance, (3) impact on muscle mass and function, and (4) impact on the patient's recovery. The objective of this research workshop was to review current literature relating to protein/amino acid administration for the critically ill patient and clinical outcomes and to discuss the key measurement and methodological features of future studies that should be done to inform the optimal protein/amino acid dose provided to critically ill patients.

  14. High Mobility Group Box-1 Protein and Outcomes in Critically Ill Surgical Patients Requiring Open Abdominal Management

    PubMed Central

    Malig, Michelle S.; Jenne, Craig N.; Ball, Chad G.; Roberts, Derek J.; Xiao, Zhengwen

    2017-01-01

    Background. Previous studies assessing various cytokines in the critically ill/injured have been uninformative in terms of translating to clinical care management. Animal abdominal sepsis work suggests that enhanced intraperitoneal (IP) clearance of Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs) improves outcome. Thus measuring the responses of DAMPs offers alternate potential insights and a representative DAMP, High Mobility Group Box-1 protein (HMGB-1), was considered. While IP biomediators are being recognized in critical illness/trauma, HMGB-1 behaviour has not been examined in open abdomen (OA) management. Methods. A modified protocol for HMGB-1 detection was used to examine plasma/IP fluid samples from 44 critically ill/injured OA patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial comparing two negative pressure peritoneal therapies (NPPT): Active NPPT (ANPPT) and Barker's Vacuum Pack NPPT (BVP). Samples were collected and analyzed at the time of laparotomy and at 24 and 48 hours after. Results. There were no statistically significant differences in survivor versus nonsurvivor HMGB-1 plasma or IP concentrations at baseline, 24 hours, or 48 hours. However, plasma HMGB-1 levels tended to increase continuously in the BVP cohort. Conclusions. HMGB-1 appeared to behave differently between NPPT cohorts. Further studies are needed to elucidate the relationship of HMGB-1 and outcomes in septic/injured patients. PMID:28286376

  15. Septic versus non-septic acute kidney injury in critically ill patients: characteristics and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Marília Galvão; Dantas, João Gabriel Athayde de Oliveira; Levi, Talita Machado; Rocha, Mário de Seixas; de Souza, Sérgio Pinto; Boa-Sorte, Ney; de Moura, Carlos Geraldo Guerreiro; Cruz, Constança Margarida Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury. Methods This study evaluated an open cohort of 117 critically ill patients with acute kidney injury who were consecutively admitted to an intensive care unit, excluding patients with a history of advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, kidney transplantation, hospitalization or death in a period shorter than 24 hours. The presence of sepsis and in-hospital death were the exposure and primary variables in this study, respectively. A confounding analysis was performed using logistic regression. Results No significant differences were found between the mean ages of the groups with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury [65.30±21.27 years versus 66.35±12.82 years, respectively; p=0.75]. In the septic and non-septic acute kidney injury groups, a predominance of females (57.4% versus 52.4%, respectively; p=0.49) and Afro-descendants (81.5% versus 76.2%, respectively; p=0.49) was observed. Compared with the non-septic patients, the patients with sepsis had a higher mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [21.73±7.26 versus 15.75±5.98; p<0.001)] and a higher mean water balance (p=0.001). Arterial hypertension (p=0.01) and heart failure (p<0.001) were more common in the non-septic patients. Septic acute kidney injury was associated with a greater number of patients who required dialysis (p=0.001) and a greater number of deaths (p<0.001); however, renal function recovery was more common in this group (p=0.01). Sepsis (OR: 3.88; 95%CI: 1.51-10.00) and an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score >18.5 (OR: 9.77; 95%CI: 3.73-25.58) were associated with death in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Sepsis was an independent predictor of death. Significant differences were found between the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic versus non-septic acute kidney

  16. New Regimen for Continuous Infusion of Vancomycin in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cristallini, Stefano; Hites, Maya; Kabtouri, Hakim; Roberts, Jason A.; Beumier, Marjorie; Cotton, Frederic; Lipman, Jeffrey; Jacobs, Frédérique; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Creteur, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of new agents with activity against Gram-positive bacteria, vancomycin remains one of the primary antibiotics for critically ill septic patients. Because sepsis can alter antimicrobial pharmacokinetics, the development of an appropriate dosing strategy to provide adequate concentrations is crucial. The aim of this study was to prospectively validate a new dosing regimen of vancomycin given by continuous infusion (CI) to septic patients. We included all adult septic patients admitted to a mixed intensive care unit (ICU) between January 2012 and May 2013, who were treated with a new vancomycin CI regimen consisting of a loading dose of 35 mg/kg of body weight given as a 4-h infusion, followed by a daily CI dose adapted to creatinine clearance (CrCL), as estimated by the Cockcroft-Gault formula (median dose, 2,112 [1,500 to 2,838] mg). Vancomycin concentrations were measured at the end of the loading dose (T1), at 12 h (T2), at 24 h (T3), and the day after the start of therapy (T4). Vancomycin concentrations of 20 to 30 mg/liter at T2, T3, and T4 were considered adequate. A total of 107 patients (72% male) were included. Median age, weight, and CrCL were 59 (interquartile range [IQR], 48 to 71) years, 75 (IQR, 65 to 85) kg, and 94 (IQR, 56 to 140) ml/min, respectively. Vancomycin concentrations were 44 (IQR, 37 to 49), 25 (IQR, 21 to 32), 22 (IQR, 19 to 28), and 26 (IQR, 22 to 29) mg/liter at T1, T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Concentrations were adequate in 56% (60/107) of patients at T2, in 54% (57/105) at T3, and in 73% (41/56) at T4. This vancomycin regimen permitted rapid attainment of target concentrations in serum for most patients. Concentrations were insufficient in only 16% of patients at 12 h of treatment. PMID:27216073

  17. High dose tigecycline in critically ill patients with severe infections due to multidrug-resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The high incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria among patients admitted to ICUs has determined an increase of tigecycline (TGC) use for the treatment of severe infections. Many concerns have been raised about the efficacy of this molecule and increased dosages have been proposed. Our purpose is to investigate TGC safety and efficacy at higher than standard doses. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of prospectively collected data in the ICU of a teaching hospital in Rome. Data from all patients treated with TGC for a microbiologically confirmed infection were analyzed. The safety profile and efficacy of high dosing regimen use were investigated. Results Over the study period, 54 patients (pts) received TGC at a standard dose (SD group: 50 mg every 12 hours) and 46 at a high dose (HD group: 100 mg every 12 hours). Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter.baumannii (blaOXA-58 and blaOXA-23 genes) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (blaKPC-3 gene) were the main isolated pathogens (n = 79). There were no patients requiring TGC discontinuation or dose reduction because of adverse events. In the ventilation-associated pneumonia population (VAP) subgroup (63 patients: 30 received SD and 33 HD), the only independent predictor of clinical cure was the use of high tigecycline dose (odds ratio (OR) 6.25; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.59 to 24.57; P = 0.009) whilst initial inadequate antimicrobial treatment (IIAT) (OR 0.18; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.68; P = 0.01) and higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (OR 0.66; 95% CI 0.51 to 0.87; P = 0.003) were independently associated with clinical failure. Conclusions TGC was well tolerated at a higher than standard dose in a cohort of critically ill patients with severe infections. In the VAP subgroup the high-dose regimen was associated with better outcomes than conventional administration due to Gram-negative MDR bacteria. PMID:24887101

  18. Population Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Extended-Infusion Piperacillin and Tazobactam in Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun Kyoung; Knoderer, Chad A.; Buenger, Lauren E.; Healy, Daniel P.; Dees, Jennifer; Crumby, Ashley S.; Kays, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam in children hospitalized in an intensive care unit. Seventy-two serum samples were collected at steady state from 12 patients who received piperacillin-tazobactam at 100/12.5 mg/kg of body weight every 8 h infused over 4 h. Population pharmacokinetic analyses were performed using NONMEM, and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to estimate the piperacillin pharmacokinetic profiles for dosing regimens of 80 to 100 mg/kg of the piperacillin component given every 6 to 8 h and infused over 0.5, 3, or 4 h. The probability of target attainment (PTA) for a cumulative percentage of the dosing interval that the drug concentration exceeds the MIC under steady-state pharmacokinetic conditions (TMIC) of ≥50% was calculated at MICs ranging from 0.25 to 64 mg/liter. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age, weight, and estimated glomerular filtration rate were 5 ± 3 years, 17 ± 6.2 kg, and 118 ± 41 ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively. A one-compartment model with zero-order input and first-order elimination best fit the pharmacokinetic data for both drugs. Weight was significantly associated with piperacillin clearance, and weight and sex were significantly associated with tazobactam clearance. Pharmacokinetic parameters (mean ± SD) for piperacillin and tazobactam were as follows: clearance, 0.22 ± 0.07 and 0.19 ± 0.07 liter/h/kg, respectively; volume of distribution, 0.43 ± 0.16 and 0.37 ± 0.14 liter/kg, respectively. All extended-infusion regimens achieved PTAs of >90% at MICs of ≤16 mg/liter. Only the 3-h infusion regimens given every 6 h achieved PTAs of >90% at an MIC of 32 mg/liter. For susceptible bacterial pathogens, piperacillin-tazobactam doses of ≥80/10 mg/kg given every 8 h and infused over 4 h achieve adequate pharmacodynamic exposures in critically ill children. PMID:26552978

  19. Population Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Extended-Infusion Piperacillin and Tazobactam in Critically Ill Children.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Kristen; Chung, Eun Kyoung; Knoderer, Chad A; Buenger, Lauren E; Healy, Daniel P; Dees, Jennifer; Crumby, Ashley S; Kays, Michael B

    2015-11-09

    The study objective was to evaluate the population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam in children hospitalized in an intensive care unit. Seventy-two serum samples were collected at steady state from 12 patients who received piperacillin-tazobactam at 100/12.5 mg/kg of body weight every 8 h infused over 4 h. Population pharmacokinetic analyses were performed using NONMEM, and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to estimate the piperacillin pharmacokinetic profiles for dosing regimens of 80 to 100 mg/kg of the piperacillin component given every 6 to 8 h and infused over 0.5, 3, or 4 h. The probability of target attainment (PTA) for a cumulative percentage of the dosing interval that the drug concentration exceeds the MIC under steady-state pharmacokinetic conditions (TMIC) of ≥50% was calculated at MICs ranging from 0.25 to 64 mg/liter. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age, weight, and estimated glomerular filtration rate were 5 ± 3 years, 17 ± 6.2 kg, and 118 ± 41 ml/min/1.73 m(2), respectively. A one-compartment model with zero-order input and first-order elimination best fit the pharmacokinetic data for both drugs. Weight was significantly associated with piperacillin clearance, and weight and sex were significantly associated with tazobactam clearance. Pharmacokinetic parameters (mean ± SD) for piperacillin and tazobactam were as follows: clearance, 0.22 ± 0.07 and 0.19 ± 0.07 liter/h/kg, respectively; volume of distribution, 0.43 ± 0.16 and 0.37 ± 0.14 liter/kg, respectively. All extended-infusion regimens achieved PTAs of >90% at MICs of ≤16 mg/liter. Only the 3-h infusion regimens given every 6 h achieved PTAs of >90% at an MIC of 32 mg/liter. For susceptible bacterial pathogens, piperacillin-tazobactam doses of ≥80/10 mg/kg given every 8 h and infused over 4 h achieve adequate pharmacodynamic exposures in critically ill children.

  20. Use of Methadone for Prevention of Opioid Withdrawal in Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Sonia A; McGloin, Rumi; Pitfield, Alexander F; Carr, Roxane R

    2012-01-01

    Background Opioids are commonly administered to critically ill children for analgesia and sedation, but many patients experience opioid withdrawal upon discontinuation. The authors’ institution developed a protocol for using methadone to prevent opioid withdrawal in children who have received morphine by continuous IV infusion for 5 days or longer in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Objectives The primary objectives were to determine if opioids were tapered according to the protocol and to determine the conversion ratio for IV morphine to oral methadone that was used. Secondary objectives were to describe the methadone dosage used and the clinical outcomes, to evaluate adjustments to methadone dosing, and to report the incidence of adverse effects. Methods A retrospective analysis of charts was conducted for pediatric patients who had received morphine by continuous IV infusion for 5 days or longer followed by methadone in the PICU between May 2008 and August 2009. Validated scoring systems (the Withdrawal Assessment Tool and the State Behavioral Scale) were used to assess symptoms of withdrawal and degree of sedation, respectively. Results Forty-three patients were included in the study, with median age of 8 months (range 0.25–201 months). For 31 patients (72%), the protocol was not used, and there were no patients for whom the protocol was followed to completion. The median duration of weaning was 10 days (range 0–91 days). The conversion ratio for IV morphine to oral methadone was 1:0.78 for anticipated 5-day weaning and 1:0.98 for anticipated 10-day weaning. During the first 10 days of weaning, 18 patients (42%) experienced withdrawal symptoms. The methadone dose was increased for 11 (26%) of the 43 patients. Patients were sedated for a median of 1 day (range 0–9 days), were comfortable for a median of 6.5 days (range 1–64 days), and were agitated for a median of 2.5 days (range 0–23 days). Naloxone was required for 2 patients. Conclusions

  1. Physical rehabilitation for critical illness myopathy and neuropathy: an abridged version of Cochrane Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mehrholz, J; Pohl, M; Kugler, J; Burridge, J; Mückel, S; Elsner, B

    2015-10-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) acquired or generalised weakness due to critical illness myopathy (CIM) and polyneuropathy (CIP) are major causes of chronically impaired motor function that can affect activities of daily living and quality of life. Physical rehabilitation of those affected might help to improve activities of daily living. Our primary objective was to assess the effects of physical rehabilitation therapies and interventions for people with CIP and CIM in improving activities of daily living such as walking, bathing, dressing and eating. Secondary objectives were to assess effects on muscle strength and quality of life, and to assess adverse effects of physical rehabilitation. On 16 July 2014 we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register and on 14 July 2014 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL Plus. In July 2014, we searched the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and three trials registries for ongoing trials and further data about included studies with no language restrictions. We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings and screened reference lists to identify further trials. We planned to include randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs and randomised controlled cross-over trials of any rehabilitation intervention in people with acquired weakness syndrome due to CIP/CIM. We would have extracted data, assessed the risk of bias and classified the quality of evidence for outcomes in duplicate, according to the standard procedures of The Cochrane Collaboration. Outcome data collection would have been for activities of daily living (for example, mobility, walking, transfers and self care). Secondary outcomes included muscle strength, quality of life and adverse events. The search strategy retrieved 3587 references. After examination of titles and abstracts, we retrieved the full text of 24 potentially relevant studies. None of these studies met the inclusion criteria of our review. No data were

  2. Epidemiology of Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Children and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Kaddourah, Ahmad; Basu, Rajit K; Bagshaw, Sean M; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2017-01-05

    mortality, among critically ill children and young adults. (Funded by the Pediatric Nephrology Center of Excellence at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and others; AWARE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01987921 .).

  3. Has Stewart approach improved our ability to diagnose acid-base disorders in critically ill patients?

    PubMed

    Masevicius, Fabio D; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2015-02-04

    conventional methods. Although the introduction of the Stewart approach was a new insight into acid-base physiology, the method has not significantly improved our ability to understand, diagnose, and treat acid-base alterations in critically ill patients.

  4. Soluble CD73 in Critically Ill Septic Patients – Data from the Prospective FINNAKI Study

    PubMed Central

    Vaara, Suvi T.; Hollmén, Maija; Korhonen, Anna-Maija; Maksimow, Mikael; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Pettilä, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Background CD73 dephosphorylates adenosine monophosphate to adenosine that is an anti-inflammatory molecule inhibiting immune activation and vascular leakage. Therefore, CD73 could be an interesting mediator both in sepsis and acute kidney injury (AKI). We aimed to explore the soluble CD73 (sCD73) levels and their evolution in critically ill patients with severe sepsis and, second, to scrutinize the potential association of sCD73 levels with AKI and 90-day mortality. Methods This was a post-hoc laboratory analysis of the prospective, observational FINNAKI study conducted in 17 Finnish ICU during 5 months in 2011–2012. Plasma samples of 588 patients admitted with severe sepsis/shock or with developing severe sepsis were analyzed at 0h (ICU admission) and 24h, and additionally, on day 3 or day 5 from a subset of the patients. Results The median [IQR] sCD73 levels at 0h were 5.11 [3.29–8.28] ng/mL and they decreased significantly from 0h to 4.14 [2.88–7.11] ng/mL at 24h, P<0.001. From 24h to Day 3 (n = 132) the sCD73 levels rose to 5.18 [2.98–8.83] ng/mL (P = 0.373) and from 24h to Day 5 (n = 224) to 5.52 [3.57–8.90] ng/mL (P<0.001). Patients with AKI had higher sCD73 values at 0h and at 24h compared to those without AKI. Non-survivors with severe sepsis, but not with septic shock, had higher CD73 levels at each time-point compared to survivors. After multivariable adjustments, sCD73 levels at 0h associated independently neither with the development of AKI nor 90-day mortality. Conclusions Compared to normal population, the sCD73 levels were generally low at 0h, showed a decrease to 24h, and later an increase by day 5. The sCD73 levels do not seem useful in predicting the development of AKI or 90-day mortality among patients with severe sepsis or shock. PMID:27732656

  5. [Decisions on limiting treatment in critically-ill neonates: a multicenter study].

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    Backgrounds Some patients with a poor prognosis cause serious doubts about the real benefit of life-sustaining treatment. In some cases the possibility of limiting those treatments is raised. Such end-of-life decisions provoke ethical dilemmas and questions about procedure.ObjectivesTwo determine the frequency of end-of-life decisions in neonates, patient characteristics, and the criteria used by those taking decisions.Patients and methodsWe performed a multicenter, descriptive, prospective study. Neonates from 15 neonatal intensive care units who died during their stay in the hospital between 1999 and 2000, as well as those in whom end-of-life decisions were taken, were included. End-of-life decisions were defined as clinical decisions to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatment.ResultsA total of 330 patients were included. End-of-life decisions were taken in 171 (52 %); of these, 169 (98.8 %) died. The remaining 159 patients (48.2 %) died without treatment limitation. The main disorders involving end-of-life decisions were congenital malformation (47 %), neurologic disorders secondary to perinatal asphyxia and intracranial hemorrhage-periventricular leukomalacia (37 %). Of the 171 neonates, treatment was withheld in 80 and vital support was withdrawn in 91. The most frequently withdrawn life-sustaining treatment was mechanical ventilation (68 %). The criteria most commonly used in end-of-life decisions were poor vital prognosis (79.5 %), and current and future quality of life (37 % and 48 % respectively). The patient's external factors such as unfavorable family environment or possible negative consequences for familial equilibrium were a factor in 5 % of decisions.ConclusionsThe present study, the first of this type performed in Spain, reveals little-known aspects about the clinical practice of withholding and/or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment in critically ill neonates. End-of-life decisions were frequent (52 %) and were followed by death in most

  6. Evaluation of autonomic functions in subclinical hypothyroid and hypothyroid patients

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Aarti S.; Lal, Ram; Dhanwal, Dinesh K.; Jain, Ajay K.; Chowdhury, Veena

    2013-01-01

    Background: Autonomic dysfunction may contribute to cardiovascular morbidity in subclinical hypothyroid patients. It is controversial whether the abnormality exists in sympathetic or the parasympathetic function. It is also not known whether the severity of autonomic dysfunction is related to the degree of thyroid deficiency. Design of Study: Prospective case control. Materials and Methods: Autonomic functions based on heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses to various maneuvers were evaluated and scored in twenty two subclinical hypothyroid patients, 30-50 years and compared with twenty hypothyroid patients. Biochemical estimation of TSH, fT3, fT4, TPO antibody was done. Result: Sympathetic function abnormalities were seen in 82% subclinical hypothyroid patients and 85%hypothyroid patients when one test was abnormal. Parasympathetic dysfunction was also recorded in eight patients in both groups. When two abnormal tests were used as the selection criteria sympathetic function abnormality was observed in about 41% subclinical hypothyroid and 65% hypothyroid patients. There were no intergroup differences in autonomic functions, score and TPO levels. The TSH levels were not related to type or degree of autonomic dysfunction. Systolic BP in both groups and diastolic BP in hypothyroid patients were higher with lower thyroxine levels but the patients were normotensive. Conclusion: Autonomic dysfunction of comparable degree was seen in subclinical hypothyroid and hypothyroid patients. Sympathetic function abnormality was more common although decreased parasympathetic function reactivity was also present. These abnormalities were unrelated to TSH levels. PMID:23869303

  7. The Impact of Macro-and Micronutrients on Predicting Outcomes of Critically Ill Patients Requiring Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Somlaw, Nicha; Lakananurak, Narisorn; Dissayabutra, Thasinas; Phonork, Chayanat; Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Tiranathanagul, Khajohn; Susantithapong, Paweena; Loaveeravat, Passisd; Suwachittanont, Nattachai; Wirotwan, Thaksa-on; Praditpornsilpa, Kearkiat; Tungsanga, Kriang; Eiam-Ong, Somchai; Kittiskulnam, Piyawan

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) who receive renal replacement therapy (RRT) have very high mortality rate. During RRT, there are markedly loss of macro- and micronutrients which may cause malnutrition and result in impaired renal recovery and patient survival. We aimed to examine the predictive role of macro- and micronutrients on survival and renal outcomes in critically ill patients undergoing continuous RRT (CRRT). This prospective observational study enrolled critically ill patients requiring CRRT at Intensive Care Unit of King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital from November 2012 until November 2013. The serum, urine, and effluent fluid were serially collected on the first three days to calculate protein metabolism including dietary protein intake (DPI), nitrogen balance, and normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR). Serum zinc, selenium, and copper were measured for micronutrients analysis on the first three days of CRRT. Survivor was defined as being alive on day 28 after initiation of CRRT.Dialysis status on day 28 was also determined. Of the 70 critically ill patients requiring CRRT, 27 patients (37.5%) survived on day 28. The DPI and serum albumin of survivors were significantly higher than non-survivors (0.8± 0.2 vs 0.5 ±0.3g/kg/day, p = 0.001, and 3.2±0.5 vs 2.9±0.5 g/dL, p = 0.03, respectively) while other markers were comparable. The DPI alone predicted patient survival with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.69. A combined clinical model predicted survival with AUC of 0.78. When adjusted for differences in albumin level, clinical severity score (APACHEII and SOFA score), and serum creatinine at initiation of CRRT, DPI still independently predicted survival (odds ratio 4.62, p = 0.009). The serum levels of micronutrients in both groups were comparable and unaltered following CRRT. Regarding renal outcome, patients in the dialysis independent group had higher serum albumin levels than the dialysis dependent group, p = 0.01. In

  8. Oncologic Patients' Knowledge Expectations and Cognitive Capacities During Illness Trajectory: Analysis of Critical Moments and Factors.

    PubMed

    Heli, Vaartio-Rajalin; Helena, Leino-Kilpi; Liisa, Iire; Kimmo, Lehtonen; Heikki, Minn

    2015-01-01

    Cancer and its management affect patients' cognitive resources and education needs in several ways. The objective of this study is to identify significant factors affecting cognitive resources and knowledge expectations of adult patients with cancer during the course of their illness trajectory. Current or former patients with cancer (n = 53) were recruited to focus group interviews and individual in-depth interviews. The informants' knowledge expectations vary during their illness trajectory and are affected by personal, situational, and clinical factors. These should be acknowledged to provide person-centered, holistic nursing care and patient education.

  9. Stigma and discrimination against people with mental illness: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Lauber, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    This editorial gives an overview of the different roots and forms of discrimination and stigmatisation towards people with mental illness. It explains the differences between stereotype, prejudice and discrimination. It further highlights some research foci of stigma research in the last decade. The emphasis was mostly on investigating the attitudes of the general population, but barely addressed other groups that have probably more intensive and more crucial contact with people with mental illness. Furthermore, only very few intervention programs were evaluated. This editorial concludes that other groups than the general population, e.g., mental health professionals, should be investigated about their attitudes to people with mental illness. Moreover, intervention campaigns should be additionally evaluated after a given period as it is not well known whether effects of interventions are long-lasting. It might be that anti-stigma campaigns, as every public health campaign, must be repeated if sustainability is the goal. Furthermore, the message must be carefully chosen. One option is to replace the "traditional" messages by focussing, e.g., on symptoms of mental illness, for instance anxiety, affective symptoms or suicidal ideations. Finally, a plea for more stigma-related research is given as research in stigma-related issues is also stigmatised.

  10. Hypothyroidism: Can It Cause Peripheral Neuropathy?

    MedlinePlus

    Hypothyroidism: Can it cause peripheral neuropathy? Can hypothyroidism cause peripheral neuropathy and, if so, how is it treated? Answers from Todd B. Nippoldt, M.D. Hypothyroidism — a condition in which your ...

  11. Hypothyroidism: Does It Cause Joint Pain?

    MedlinePlus

    Hypothyroidism: Does it cause joint pain? Can hypothyroidism cause joint pain? I have hypothyroidism and have been experiencing severe arthritis-like pain in my shoulders and hips. Answers from Todd B. ...

  12. Hypothyroidism during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Nava-Ocampo, Alejandro A.; Soldin, Offie P.; Koren, Gideon

    2004-01-01

    QUESTION: I have a 27-year-old patient diagnosed with hypothyroidism in the 8th week of pregnancy. She received conflicting opinions regarding risk for her baby and wants to get more information. I also found conflicting information in the literature. How should I advise her? ANSWER: Pregnant patients with untreated hypothyroidism are at increased risk of obstetric complications. Adequate treatment with thyroid hormones greatly reduces the frequency of these complications. Observational studies suggest that children whose mothers had hypothyroxinemia in early pregnancy have lower IQs than matched controls. Another study has shown that even if levothyroxine therapy is started after the first trimester, there is an excellent chance children will have normal neuropsychologic development. PMID:15116798

  13. Utility of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in assessing fluid responsiveness in critically ill patients - a challenge for the bedside sonographer.

    PubMed

    Mielnicki, Wojciech; Dyla, Agnieszka; Zawada, Tomasz

    2016-12-05

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) has become one of the most important diagnostic tools in the treatment of critically ill patients. It allows clinicians to recognise potentially reversible life-threatening situations and is also very effective in the monitoring of the fluid status of patients, slowly substituting invasive methods in the intensive care unit. Hemodynamic assessment is based on a few static and dynamic parameters. Dynamic parameters change during the respiratory cycle in mechanical ventilation and the level of this change directly corresponds to fluid responsiveness. Most of the parameters cannot be used in spontaneously breathing patients. For these patients the most important test is passive leg raising, which is a good substitute for fluid bolus. Although TTE is very useful in the critical care setting, we should not forget the important limitations, not only technical ones but also caused by the critical illness itself. Unfortunately, this method does not allow continuous monitoring and every change in the patient's condition requires repeated examination.

  14. Incidence and risk factors of acute kidney injury associated with continuous intravenous high-dose vancomycin in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Lacave, Guillaume; Caille, Vincent; Bruneel, Fabrice; Palette, Catherine; Legriel, Stéphane; Grimaldi, David; Eurin, Mathilde; Bedos, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Abstract For vancomycin therapy of severe infections, the Infectious Diseases Society of America recommends high vancomycin trough levels, whose potential for inducing nephrotoxicity is controversial. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors of acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients given continuous intravenous vancomycin with target serum vancomycin levels of 20 to 30 mg/L. We retrospectively studied 107 continuous intravenous vancomycin treatments of ≥48 hours’ duration with at least 2 serum vancomycin levels ≥20 mg/L in critically ill patients. Nephrotoxicity was defined according to the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes Clinical Practice Guideline for AKI (ie, serum creatinine elevation by ≥26.5 μmoL/L or to ≥1.5 times baseline). Risk factors for AKI were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. AKI developed in 31 (29%) courses. Higher serum vancomycin levels were associated with AKI (P < 0.01). Factors independently associated with AKI were highest serum vancomycin ≥40 mg/L (odds ratio [OR], 3.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40–10.37; P < 0.01), higher cumulative number of organ failures (OR, 2.63 95%CI, 1.42–5.31; P < 0.01), and cirrhosis of the liver (OR, 5.58; 95%CI, 1.08–31.59; P = 0.04). In this study, 29% of critically ill patients had AKI develop during continuous intravenous vancomycin therapy targeting serum levels of 20 to 30 mg/L. Serum vancomycin level ≥40 mg/L was independently associated with AKI. PMID:28207512

  15. The validity and reliability of the Portuguese versions of three tools used to diagnose delirium in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Gusmao-Flores, Dimitri; Salluh, Jorge Ibrain Figueira; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Ritter, Cristiane; Tomasi, Cristiane Damiani; de Lima, Marco Antônio Sales Dantas; Santana, Lauro Reis; Lins, Rita Márcia Pacheco; Lemos, Patrícia Pimenta; Serpa, Gisele Vasconcelos; Oliveira, Jenisson; Chalhub, Ricardo Ávila; Pitrowsky, Melissa Tassano; Lacerda, Acioly L.T.; Koenen, Karestan C.; Quarantini, Lucas C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study are to compare the sensitivity and specificity of three diagnostic tools for delirium (the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist, the Confusion Assessment Method for Intensive Care Units and the Confusion Assessment Method for Intensive Care Units Flowsheet) in a mixed population of critically ill patients, and to validate the Brazilian Portuguese Confusion Assessment Method for Intensive Care Units. METHODS: The study was conducted in four intensive care units in Brazil. Patients were screened for delirium by a psychiatrist or neurologist using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Patients were subsequently screened by an intensivist using Portuguese translations of the three tools. RESULTS: One hundred and nineteen patients were evaluated and 38.6% were diagnosed with delirium by the reference rater. The Confusion Assessment Method for Intensive Care Units had a sensitivity of 72.5% and a specificity of 96.2%; the Confusion Assessment Method for Intensive Care Units Flowsheet had a sensitivity of 72.5% and a specificity of 96.2%; the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist had a sensitivity of 96.0% and a specificity of 72.4%. There was strong agreement between the Confusion Assessment Method for Intensive Care Units and the Confusion Assessment Method for Intensive Care Units Flowsheet (kappa coefficient = 0.96). CONCLUSION: All three instruments are effective diagnostic tools in critically ill intensive care unit patients. In addition, the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Confusion Assessment Method for Intensive Care Units is a valid and reliable instrument for the assessment of delirium among critically ill patients. PMID:22086522

  16. Is Admission Serum Sodium Concentration a Clinical Predictor for the Outcome of Therapy in Critically Ill Poisoned Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Eizadi-Mood, Nastaran; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Hosseini, Hossein; Soltaninejad, Forough; Massoumi, Gholamreza; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Yaraghi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disorders of serum sodium concentration are some of the most electrolyte abnormalities in the intensive care unit (ICU) patients. These disorders adversely affect the function of vital organs and are associated with increased hospital mortality. Purpose: In the present study we aimed to evaluate the effects of serum sodium concentration abnormalities at the time of hospital admission on the clinical outcome of therapy in a cohort of critically ill poisoned patients. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 184 critically ill poisoned patients aged >18 years and in the first 8 hours of their poisoning, hospitalized in the ICU of a tertiary care university hospital (Isfahan, Iran) between 2010-2012, were evaluated at the admission time and 24 hours later for serum sodium concentration abnormalities and its relationship with age, gender, consciousness status, ingested drugs and clinical outcome of therapy. The clinical outcome was considered as recovery and mortality. Logistic Regression analysis was performed for predictive variables including serum sodium concentration abnormalities in patients’ clinical outcome. Findings: On admission, 152 patients (82.6%) were eunatremic, 21 patients (11.4%) were hyponatremic and 11 patients (6%) were hypernatremic. In the second day eunatremia, hyponatremia and hypernatremia was observed in 84.4%, 13% and 2.2% respectively. Age (OR=1.92; CI=1.18-3.12) and severity of toxicity (OR=1.32; CI=1.12-2.41) were predicting factors of mortality in ICU poisoning patients. Conclusions: Serum sodium concentration abnormalities are prevalent in critically ill poisoned patient but do not seem to have a predictive value for the clinical outcome of therapy. PMID:26543310

  17. Usefulness of full outline of unresponsiveness score to predict extubation failure in intubated critically-ill patients: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Said, Tarek; Chaari, Anis; Hakim, Karim Abdel; Hamama, Dalia; Casey, William Francis

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the usefulness of the full outline of unresponsiveness (FOUR) score in predicting extubation failure in critically ill intubated patients admitted with disturbed level of conscious in comparison with the Glasgow coma scale (GCS). Patients and Methods: All intubated critically ill patients with a disturbed level of consciousness were assessed using both the FOUR score and the GCS. The FOUR score and the GCS were compared regarding their predictive value for successful extubation at 14 days after intubation as a primary outcome measure. The 28-day mortality and the neurological outcome at 3 months were used as secondary outcome measures. Results: Eighty-six patients were included in the study. Median age was 63 (50–77) years. Sex–ratio (M/F) was 1.46. On admission, median GCS was 7 (3–10) while median FOUR score was 8.5 (2.3–11). A GCS ≤ 7 predicted the extubation failure at 14 days after intubation with a sensitivity of 88.5% and specificity of 68.3%, whereas a FOUR score <10 predicted the same outcome with a sensitivity of 80.8% and a specificity of 81.7%. The areas under the curves was significantly higher with the FOUR score than with GCS (respectively 0.867 confidence interval [CI]: 95% [0790–0.944] and 0.832 CI: 95% [0.741–0.923]; P = 0.014). When calculated before extubation, FOUR score <12 predicted extubation failure with a sensitivity of 92.3% and a specificity of 85%, whereas a GCS <12 predicted the same outcome with a sensitivity of 73% and a specificity of 61.7%. Both scores had similar accuracy for predicting 28-day mortality and neurological outcome at 3 months. Conclusion: The FOUR score is superior to the GCS for the prediction of successful extubation of intubated critically ill patients. PMID:28149821

  18. Pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving sustained low-efficiency diafiltration.

    PubMed

    Sinnollareddy, Mahipal G; Roberts, Michael S; Lipman, Jeffrey; Robertson, Thomas A; Peake, Sandra L; Roberts, Jason A

    2015-02-01

    Fluconazole is a widely used antifungal agent in critically ill patients. It is predominantly (60-80%) excreted unchanged in urine. Sustained low-efficiency diafiltration (SLED-f) is increasingly being utilised in critically ill patients because of its practical advantages over continuous renal replacement therapy. To date, the effect of SLED-f on fluconazole pharmacokinetics and dosing has not been studied. The objective of this study was to describe the pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving SLED-f and to compare this with other forms of renal replacement therapy. Serial blood samples were collected at pre- and post-filter ports within the SLED-f circuit during SLED-f and from an arterial catheter before and after SLED-f from three patients during one session. Fluconazole concentrations were measured using a validated chromatography method. Median clearance (CL) and 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-24) were 2.1L/h and 152 mg·h/L, respectively, whilst receiving SLED-f. Moreover, 72% of fluconazole was cleared by a single SLED-f session (6h) compared with previous reports of 33-38% clearance by a 4-h intermittent haemodialysis session. CL and AUC0-24 were comparable with previous observations in a pre-dilution mode of continuous venovenous haemodiafiltration. The observed rebound concentration of fluconazole post SLED-f was <2%. Although a definitive dosing recommendation is not possible due to the small patient number, it is clear that doses >200mg daily are likely to be required to achieve the PK/PD target for common pathogens because of significant fluconazole clearance by SLED-f.

  19. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of linezolid in