Science.gov

Sample records for cross flow fan

  1. Computational studies of flow through cross flow fans - effect of blade geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govardhan, M.; Sampat, D. Lakshmana

    2005-09-01

    This present paper describes three dimensional computational analysis of complex internal flow in a cross flow fan. A commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software code CFX was used for the computation. RNG k-ɛ two equation turbulence model was used to simulate the model with unstructured mesh. Sliding mesh interface was used at the interface between the rotating and stationary domains to capture the unsteady interactions. An accurate assessment of the present investigation is made by comparing various parameters with the available experimental data. Three impeller geometries with different blade angles and radius ratio are used in the present study. Maximum energy transfer through the impeller takes place in the region where the flow follows the blade curvature. Radial velocity is not uniform through blade channels. Some blades work in turbine mode at very low flow coefficients. Static pressure is always negative in and around the impeller region.

  2. Investigation of Cross Flow Fan Propulsion for Lightweight VTOL Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-01

    the aircraft longitudinal axis due to the total length of the unit. A total fan span of 20.6 inches is required to produce 690 lbf of thrust when...which are mounted parallel to the aircraft longitudinal axis and rest perpendicular, would be actuated as required to provide yaw control and aft

  3. Viability of Cross-Flow Fan for Vertical Take-Off and Landing Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    the CFF’s thrust was through the use of the average air velocity leaving the fan. Initially, a hand-held anemometer was used to find the outlet... history for mass flow rate through the CFF. The inlet mass flow rate and outlet mass flow rate were verified to reach a steady-state value after five

  4. Autogenic dynamics of debris-flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Wilco; de Haas, Tjalling; Braat, Lisanne; Kleinhans, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    Alluvial fans develop their semi-conical shape by cyclic avulsion of their geomorphologically active sector from a fixed fan apex. These cyclic avulsions have been attributed to both allogenic and autogenic forcings and processes. Autogenic dynamics have been extensively studied on fluvial fans through physical scale experiments, and are governed by cyclic alternations of aggradation by unconfined sheet flow, fanhead incision leading to channelized flow, channel backfilling and avulsion. On debris-flow fans, however, autogenic dynamics have not yet been directly observed. We experimentally created debris-flow fans under constant extrinsic forcings, and show that autogenic dynamics are a fundamental intrinsic process on debris-flow fans. We found that autogenic cycles on debris-flow fans are driven by sequences of backfilling, avulsion and channelization, similar to the cycles on fluvial fans. However, the processes that govern these sequences are unique for debris-flow fans, and differ fundamentally from the processes that govern autogenic dynamics on fluvial fans. We experimentally observed that backfilling commenced after the debris flows reached their maximum possible extent. The next debris flows then progressively became shorter, driven by feedbacks on fan morphology and flow-dynamics. The progressively decreasing debris-flow length caused in-channel sedimentation, which led to increasing channel overflow and wider debris flows. This reduced the impulse of the liquefied flow body to the flow front, which then further reduced flow velocity and runout length, and induced further in-channel sedimentation. This commenced a positive feedback wherein debris flows became increasingly short and wide, until the channel was completely filled and the apex cross-profile was plano-convex. At this point, there was no preferential transport direction by channelization, and the debris flows progressively avulsed towards the steepest, preferential, flow path. Simultaneously

  5. Experimental Investigation of a Six Inch Diameter, Four Inch Span Cross-Flow Fan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    used to measure the mass flow rate, similar to previous tests [10]. An exhaust duct with a butterfly valve was connected to the exit of the fan...using the butterfly valve at the exhaust duct. Initial runs at 1000 RPM to 6000 RPM were conducted without the use of the butterfly valve in order to...line the initial test point was taken at an open throttle, see figure 6 (0 notch on the butterfly valve ), with the desired speed and then for each

  6. Effect of Span Variation on the Performance of a Cross Flow Fan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    reading at its throat as shown in Figure 5. Lastly, exhaust ducting was mounted to the exit section to incorporate a butterfly valve for throttling...at a given speed to determine a total performance map for this CFF. This 19 was done by advancing the exit butterfly valve through notched positions...single seat , lightweight, VTOL aircraft including two, directed- thrust, ducted fans augmented with a crossflow fan for lift. He derived the thrust

  7. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Performance Improvements of a Cross-Flow Fan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    energy Equation (6) LPC Low-pressure cavity—referred to as “Primary Vortex Cavity” in Ref [12] M Mach Number m  Mass flow rate [kg/sec...some important results from previous investigations will be referred. Cheng [9] found that the efficiency was highest with the low-pressure cavity ( LPC ...pressure cavity ( LPC ) remained the same. The inlet bellmouth for measuring the flow rate with a 82.6 mm (3.25 inches) diameter, used by Cordero [13

  8. Supersonic through-flow fan assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepler, C. E.; Champagne, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the performance potential of a supersonic through-flow fan engine for supersonic cruise aircraft. It included a mean-line analysis of fans designed to operate with in-flow velocities ranging from subsonic to high supersonic speeds. The fan performance generated was used to estimate the performance of supersonic fan engines designed for four applications: a Mach 2.3 supersonic transport, a Mach 2.5 fighter, a Mach 3.5 cruise missile, and a Mach 5.0 cruise vehicle. For each application an engine was conceptualized, fan performance and engine performance calculated, weight estimates made, engine installed in a hypothetical vehicle, and mission analysis was conducted.

  9. Supersonic axial-flow fan flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, John K.

    1988-01-01

    Lane's (1957) analytical formulation of the unsteady pressure distribution on an oscillating two-dimensional flat plate cascade in supersonic axial flow has been developed into a computer code. This unsteady aerodynamic code has shown good agreement with other published data. This code has also been incorporated into an existing aeroelastic code to analyze the NASA Lewis supersonic through-flow fan design.

  10. Meander in valley crossing a deep-ocean fan.

    PubMed

    Shepard, F P

    1966-10-21

    Seaward of most submarine canyons there are large sediment fans comparable to the fans at the base of mountain ranges. Many of the submarine fans are cut by valleys called fan-valleys which usually connect with the mouths of submarine canyons. Loop-like bends or meanders characterize the channels of rivers in their lower flood plains, but have never been found in the shallow channels that cross the alluvial fans at the base of mountain canyons. Therefore, it was surprising to find that the channel in a very deep submarine fan-valley off Monterey Bay, California, has a tight meander.

  11. Fan Stall Flutter Flow Mechanism Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Modern turbofan engines employ a highly loaded fan stage with transonic or low-supersonic velocities in the blade-tip region. The fan blades are often prone to flutter at off-design conditions. Flutter is a highly undesirable and dangerous self-excited mode of blade oscillations that can result in high-cycle fatigue blade failure. The origins of blade flutter are not fully understood yet. Experimental data that can be used to clarify the origins of blade flutter in modern transonic fan designs are very limited. The Transonic Flutter Cascade Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center was developed to experimentally study the details of flow mechanisms associated with fan flutter. The cascade airfoils are instrumented to measure high-frequency unsteady flow variations in addition to the steady flow data normally recorded in cascade tests. The test program measures the variation in surface pressure in response to the oscillation of one or more of the cascade airfoils. However, during the initial phases of the program when all airfoils were in fixed positions, conditions were found where significant time variations in the pressures near the airfoil leading edges could be observed.

  12. Sedimentology of Holocene debris flow-dominated alluvial fans, northwest Wyoming: Contributions to alluvial fan facies models

    SciTech Connect

    Cechovic, M.T.; Schmitt, J.G. . Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Facies models for debris flow-dominated alluvial fans are based exclusively upon studies of relatively few fans in the arid American southwest. Detailed geomorphic, stratigraphic, and sedimentologic analyses of several highly-active, debris flow-dominated alluvial fans in northern Yellowstone National Park, WY (temperature, semi-arid) serve to diversify and increase the usefulness of alluvial fan facies models. These fans display an intricate distributary pattern of incised active (0--6 m deep; 700--900 m long) and abandoned channels (1--4 m deep; 400 m long) with levees/levee complexes (<3 m high; <20 m wide; <750 m long) and lobes constructed by pseudoplastic to plastic debris flows. The complex pattern of debris flow deposits is due to repeated channel back filling and overtopping by debris flows behind in-channel obstructions which subsequently lead to channel abandonment. Debris-flow deposition is dominant due to: (1) small, steep (up to 35 degrees) source area catchments, (2) extensive mud rock outcrops in the source area, and (3) episodic summer rainfall events. Proximal to distal fan surfaces exhibit sheetflood deposits several cm thick and up to 70 m in lateral extent. Vertical lithofacies profiles reveal: (1) massive, matrix- and clast-supported gravel units (1--2 m thick) deposited by clast-poor and clast-rich debris flows respectively, with reworked; scoured tops overlain by thin (<0.25 m) trough cross-bedded gravel and ripple cross-laminated sand intervals, and (2) volumetrically less significant 1--2 m thick intervals comprising fining-upward sequences of interbedded cm-scale trough cross-bedded pebbly gravel, massive sand, horizontally stratified sand, and mud rock deposited by hyperconcentrated flow and stream flow during decelerating sheetflood events. Organic rich layers record periods of non-deposition. Channelized stream flow is restricted to minor reworking of in-channel debris flow and hyperconcentrated flow deposits.

  13. Through flow analysis of pumps and fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, A. N.

    1980-08-01

    Incompressible through flow calculations in axial, mixed and centrifugal flow pumps and fans are described. An iterative scheme is used. A simple blade to blade model is applied on the surfaces of revolution defined by the meridional streamlines. This defines the fluid properties and the mean stream surface (S2 surface) for the next meridional solution. A computer program is available allowing the method to be applied for design purposes. APL is used for input and output and FORTRAN IV for computation. A typical calculation requires 30 sec of Univac 1100 time.

  14. Quantitative reconstruction of late Holocene surface evolution on an alpine debris-flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schürch, Peter; Densmore, Alexander L.; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Rosser, Nick J.; Kober, Florian; Schlunegger, Fritz; McArdell, Brian; Alfimov, Vasili

    2016-12-01

    Debris-flow fans form a ubiquitous record of past debris-flow activity in mountainous areas, and may be useful for inferring past flow characteristics and consequent future hazard. Extracting information on past debris flows from fan records, however, requires an understanding of debris-flow deposition and fan surface evolution; field-scale studies of these processes have been very limited. In this paper, we document the patterns and timing of debris-flow deposition on the surface of the large and exceptionally active Illgraben fan in southwestern Switzerland. We use terrain analysis, radiocarbon dating of sediment fill in the Illgraben catchment, and cosmogenic 10Be and 36Cl exposure dating of debris-flow deposits on the fan to constrain the temporal evolution of the sediment routing system in the catchment and on the fan during the past 3200 years. We show that the fan surface preserves a set of debris-flow lobes that were predominantly deposited after the occurrence of a large rock avalanche near the fan apex at about 3200 years ago. This rock avalanche shifted the apex of the fan and impounded sediment within the Illgraben catchment. Subsequent evolution of the fan surface has been governed by both lateral and radial shifts in the active depositional lobe, revealed by the cosmogenic radionuclide dates and by cross-cutting geometrical relationships on the fan surface. This pattern of frequent avulsion and fan surface occupation provides field-scale evidence of the type of large-scale compensatory behavior observed in experimental sediment routing systems.

  15. Reverse Flow Engine Core Having a Ducted Fan with Integrated Secondary Flow Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kisska, Michael K. (Inventor); Princen, Norman H. (Inventor); Kuehn, Mark S. (Inventor); Cosentino, Gary B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Secondary air flow is provided for a ducted fan having a reverse flow turbine engine core driving a fan blisk. The fan blisk incorporates a set of thrust fan blades extending from an outer hub and a set of integral secondary flow blades extending intermediate an inner hub and the outer hub. A nacelle provides an outer flow duct for the thrust fan blades and a secondary flow duct carries flow from the integral secondary flow blades as cooling air for components of the reverse flow turbine engine.

  16. Supersonic through-flow fan engine and aircraft mission performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franciscus, Leo C.; Maldonado, Jaime J.

    1989-01-01

    A study was made to evaluate potential improvement to a commercial supersonic transport by powering it with supersonic through-flow fan turbofan engines. A Mach 3.2 mission was considered. The three supersonic fan engines considered were designed to operate at bypass ratios of 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 at supersonic cruise. For comparison a turbine bypass turbojet was included in the study. The engines were evaluated on the basis of aircraft takeoff gross weight with a payload of 250 passengers for a fixed range of 5000 N.MI. The installed specific fuel consumption of the supersonic fan engines was 7 to 8 percent lower than that of the turbine bypass engine. The aircraft powered by the supersonic fan engines had takeoff gross weights 9 to 13 percent lower than aircraft powered by turbine bypass engines.

  17. Fan organs of crayfish enhance chemical information flow.

    PubMed

    Breithaupt, T

    2001-04-01

    Animals as well as autonomous robots need to acquire environmental signals in order to adjust their activity in time and space. Some information is accessible to the sensors only as a result of specific behaviors for stimulus acquisition. Due to the slow rate of molecular diffusion, dispersal of chemical stimuli depends on fluid flow. Aquatic crustaceans can generate directed water currents by specialized appendages. Here I describe the crayfish fan organs, which are feathered flagella of the mouthparts, and their activity in sending and receiving chemical signals in environments with stagnant flow conditions. During the power-stroke, the fan opens and displaces water; during the return stroke, it collapses and thereby minimizes drag. These organs can create a variety of flow fields including water jets, and in many different directions. Bilateral upward fanning draws water horizontally from all directions toward the anterior chemoreceptors. Unilateral upward fanning draws water from only one side towards the body. The versatility of the crayfish fan organ makes it a candidate for biomimetic reconstruction and use in autonomous robots that can search chemical sources.

  18. Detailed design of a quiet high flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltau, J. D.; Orelup, M. J.; Beguhn, A. A.; Wiles, F. M.; Anderson, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    A single stage fan was designed to demonstrate the noise abatement properties of near-sonic inlet flow and long-chord stator vanes for the reduction of both upstream and downstream propagated fan source noise. It is designed to produce a pressure ratio of 1.653:1 with an adiabatic efficiency of 83.9%. The fan has a 508 mm inlet diameter with a hub/tip ratio of 0.426 and a design tip speed of 533.4 m/sec. The design inlet specific flow rate is 219.71 kg/sec sq m and there are 10 tandem stator vanes with a combined aspect ratio of 0.54.

  19. Rotor wake characteristics of a transonic axial flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Gertz, J.; Epstein, A.; Strazisar, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    State of the art turbomachinery flow analysis codes are not capable of predicting the viscous flow features within turbomachinery blade wakes. Until efficient 3D viscous flow analysis codes become a reality there is therefore a need for models which can describe the generation and transport of blade wakes and the mixing process within the wake. To address the need for experimental data to support the development of such models, high response pressure measurements and laser anemometer velocity measurements were obtained in the wake of a transonic axial flow fan rotor.

  20. Development and maintenance of a telescoping debris flow fan in response to human-induced fan surface channelization, Chalk Creek Valley Natural Debris Flow Laboratory, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasklewicz, T.; Scheinert, C.

    2016-01-01

    Channel change has been a constant theme throughout William L. Graf's research career. Graf's work has examined channel changes in the context of natural environmental fluctuations, but more often has focused on quantifying channel change in the context of anthropogenic modifications. Here, we consider how channelization of a debris flows along a bajada has perpetuated and sustained the development of 'telescoping' alluvial fan. Two-dimensional debris-flow modeling shows the importance of the deeply entrenched channelized flow in the development of a telescoping alluvial fan. GIS analyses of repeat (five different debris flows), high-resolution (5 cm) digital elevation models (DEMs) generated from repeat terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data elucidate sediment and topographic dynamics of the new telescoping portion of the alluvial fan (the embryonic fan). Flow constriction from channelization helps to perpetuate debris-flow runout and to maintain the embryonic fan and telescoping nature of the alluvial fan complex. Embryonic fan development, in response to five debris flows, proceeds with a major portion of the flows depositing on the southern portion of the embryonic fan. The third through the fifth debris flows also begin to shift some deposition to the northern portion of the embryonic. The transfer of sediment from a higher portion of the embryonic fan to a lower portion continues currently on the embryonic fan. While channelized flow has been shown to be critical to the maintenance of the telescoping fan, the flow constriction has led to higher than background levels of sediment deposition in Chalk Creek, a tributary of the Arkansas River. A majority of the sediment from each debris flow is incorporated into Chalk Creek as opposed to being stored on the embryonic fan.

  1. Experimental Measurement of Transonic Fan Wake Response to Uniform and Simulated Boundary Layer Ingesting Inlet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, Walter F.; Ferrar, Anthony M.; Arend, David

    2011-01-01

    BWB Aircraft with embedded engines and BLI inlets offer attractive advantages in terms of reduced noise from engines and increased range and fuel economy. The BLI inlet produces inlet distortion patterns that can reduce fan performance and stall margin, and can produce undesirable forced responses. Knowledge of the dynamic response of fan flow when subjected to flow distortions of the type produced by BLI inlets is important for the design of distortion tolerant fans. This project is investigating fan response to flow distortion by measuring the response of the fan of a JT15D engine to a flow pattern following the results of the NASA Inlet A BLI wind tunnel tests.

  2. Intermittent Flow Regimes in a Transonic Fan Airfoil Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; McFarland, E. R.; Chima, R. V.; Capece, V. R.; Hayden, J.

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center linear cascade on the intermittent flow on the suction surface of an airfoil section from the tip region of a modern low aspect ratio fan blade. Experimental results revealed that, at a large incidence angle, a range of transonic inlet Mach numbers exist where the leading-edge shock-wave pattern was unstable. Flush mounted high frequency response pressure transducers indicated large local jumps in the pressure in the leading edge area, which generates large intermittent loading on the blade leading edge. These measurements suggest that for an inlet Mach number between 0.9 and 1.0 the flow is bi-stable, randomly switching between subsonic and supersonic flows. Hence, it appears that the change in overall flow conditions in the transonic region is based on the frequency of switching between two stable flow states rather than on the continuous increase of the flow velocity. To date, this flow behavior has only been observed in a linear transonic cascade. Further research is necessary to confirm this phenomenon occurs in actual transonic fans and is not the byproduct of an endwall restricted linear cascade.

  3. Effectiveness of an inlet flow turbulence control device to simulate flight noise fan in an anechoic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Wazyniak, J. A.; Shaw, L. M.; Mackinnon, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    A hemispherical inlet flow control device was tested on a 50.8 cm. (20-inch) diameter fan stage in the NASA-Lewis anechoic chamber. The control device used honeycomb and wire mesh to reduce turbulence intensities entering the fan. Far field acoustic power level results show about a 5 db reduction in blade passing tone and about 10 dB reduction in multiple pure tone sound power at 90% design fan speed with the inlet device in place. Hot film cross probes were inserted in the inlet to obtain data for two components of the turbulence at 65 and 90% design fan speed. Without the flow control device, the axial intensities were below 1.0%, while the circumferential intensities were almost twice this value. The inflow control device significantly reduced the circumferential turbulence intensities and also reduced the axial length scale.

  4. Extended parametric representation of compressor fans and turbines. Volume 3: MODFAN user's manual (parametric modulating flow fan)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Converse, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    A modeling technique for single stage flow modulating fans or centrifugal compressors has been developed which will enable the user to obtain consistent and rapid off-design performnce from design point input. The fan flow modulation may be obtained by either a VIGV (variable inlet guide vane) or a VPF (variable pitch rotor) option. Only the VIGV option is available for the centrifugal compressor. The modeling technique has been incorporated into a time-sharing program to facilitate its use. Because this report contains a description of the input output data, values of typical inputs, and examples cases, it is suitable as a user's manual. This report is the last of a three volume set describing the parametric representation of compressor fans, and turbines. The titles of the three volumes are as follows: (1) Volume 1 CMGEN USER's Manual (Parametric Compressor Generator); (2) Volume 2 PART USER's Manual (Parametric Turbine); (3) Volume 3 MODFAN USER's Manual (Parametric Modulating Flow Fan).

  5. Timing and frequency of glacigenic debris flows on the Bear Island Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Ed; Talling, Peter; Hunt, James

    2015-04-01

    Trough Mouth Fans represent one of the most significant deposition systems for sediment on the planet. Trough mouth fans are found in front of bathymetric troughs that extend across continental shelves to the shelf break. It is along these troughs that large volumes of subglacial sediment are transported by fast flowing ice streams. Following initial deposition, glacially derived sediment is then often re-mobilised and re-deposited down the continental slope via gravity flow processes. Glacigenic debris flows are among the most significant of these processes, often occurring on slopes with gradients of <10. These flows commonly occur in lobes with characteristic lengths (30 - 200 km), widths (2 - 10 km) and thicknesses (10 - 50 m). The stacking of these lobes provides a significant proportion of the material making up trough mouth fans. Despite processes of sedimentation and sediment reworking being long established for these systems they are incompletely understood and there has been little work specifically dating individual events. We therefore have little information regarding the frequency of these events. This is especially true on more distal parts of trough mouth fans. Instead work has focussed primarily on upper areas of trough mouth fans in an attempt to precisely date ice retreat from these features. The Bear Island Trough Mouth Fan is situated in front of the Bear Island Trough in the Barents Sea. The cross shelf trough is about 150 km wide and 500 m deep at its mouth and served as a major drainage pathway for the Barents Sea Ice Sheet. The fan covers an area of 125,000 km2 and extends from the continental shelf edge at water depths of about 500 m to over 3000 m water depth in the Lofoten Basin. Previous studies using GLORIA have shown debris flows radiating out from near the top of the fan, extending to near its base, whilst 3.5 kHz sub-bottom profiler records show these lobes to be staked. Some dates have been produced from hemipelagic material above

  6. Measurements of inlet flow distortions in an axial flow fan (6 and 9 blade rotor)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    A large quantity of experimental data on inlet flow distortions in an axial flow fan were obtained. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of design and operating variables and the type of distortion on the response of an axial flow turbomachinery rotor. Included are background information and overall trends observed in distortion attenuation and unsteady total pressure losses.

  7. Relating the compensational stacking of debris-flow fans to characteristics of their underlying stratigraphy: Implications for geologic hazard assessment and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pederson, Christopher A.; Santi, Paul M.; Pyles, David R.

    2015-11-01

    Compensational stacking is the tendency for sediment transport systems to fill topographic lows through avulsion. This article quantitatively relates, for the first time, compensational stacking patterns within debris fans to characteristics of their internal stratigraphy and discusses implications to geologic hazard assessment and mitigation. Three exceptionally well-exposed debris fans were selected in Colorado for quantitative stratigraphic analyses. In each fan, the cross-sectional stratigraphy was subdivided into discrete depositional units (debris-flow and stream-flow deposits). The bounding surfaces between the depositional units were used to analyze the compensation index (κcv) of the fans, which is a measure of their compensational or avulsion tendencies. In the measured datasets, κcv ranged from 0.63 to 1.03. Values close to 0.5 represent intermediate levels of compensation, whereas values approaching 1.0 reflect high levels of compensation. The compensational values (κcv) were statistically compared to some physical, observable characteristics of the fans including: (1) debris-flow size, (2) amount of stream-flow deposits, (3) debris-flow composition, and (4) longitudinal position on the fan. These parameters correlated, either positively or negatively, to κcv, supporting their use as proxies for assessing the degree of compensational stacking in settings where large-scale cross-sections of a fan are unavailable. Such empirical results can be used by geologists and engineers for avoidance and mitigation measures of land use on debris fans.

  8. Numerical and experimental investigation on aerodynamic performance of small axial flow fan with hollow blade root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhang; Jin, Yingzi; Huashu, Dou; Yuzhen, Jin

    2013-10-01

    To reduce the influence of adverse flow conditions at the fan hub and improve fan aerodynamic performance, a modification of conventional axial fan blades with numerical and experimental investigation is presented. Hollow blade root is manufactured near the hub. The numerical and experimental results show that hollow blade root has some effect on the static performance. Static pressure of the modified fan is generally the same with that of the datum fan, while, the efficiency curve of the modified fan has a different trend with that of the datum fan. The highest efficiency of the modified fan is 10% greater than that of the datum fan. The orthogonal experimental results of fan noise show that hollow blade root is a feasible method of reducing fan noise, and the maximum value of noise reduction is about 2 dB. The factors affecting the noise reduction of hollow blade root are in the order of importance as follows: hollow blade margin, hollow blade height and hollow blade width. The much smoother pressure distribution of the modified fan than that of the datum fan is the main mechanism of noise reduction of hollow blade root. The research results will provide the proof of the parameter optimization and the structure design for high performance and low noise small axial fans.

  9. Debris-flow hazards on tributary junction fans, Chitral, Hindu Kush Range, northern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. Asif; Haneef, M.; Khan, Anwar S.; Tahirkheli, Tazeem

    2013-01-01

    The Chitral district of northern Pakistan lies in the eastern Hindu Kush Range. The population in this high-relief mountainous terrain is restricted to tributary-junction fans in the Chitral valley. Proximity to steep valley slopes renders these fans prone to hydrogeomorphic hazards, including landslides, floods and debris flows. This paper focuses on debris-flow hazards on tributary-junction fans in Chitral. Using field observations, satellite-image analyses and a preliminary morphometry, the tributary-junction fans in the Chitral valley are classified into (1) discrete and (2) composite. The discrete fans are modern-day active landforms and include debris cones associated with ephemeral gullies, debris fans associated with ephemeral channels and alluvial fans formed by perennial streams. The composite fans are a collage of sediment deposits of widely different ages and formed by diverse alluvial-fan forming processes. These include fans formed predominantly during MIS-2/Holocene interglacial stages superimposed by modern-day alluvial and debris fans. Composite fans are turned into relict fans when entrenched by modern-day perennial streams. These deeply incised channels discharge their sediment load directly into the trunk river without significant spread on fan surface. In comparison, when associated with ephemeral streams, active debris fans develop directly at composite-fan surfaces. Major settlements in Chitral are located on composite fans, as they provide large tracts of leveled land with easy accesses to water from the tributary streams. These fan surfaces are relatively more stable, especially when they are entrenched by perennial streams (e.g., Chitral, Ayun, and Reshun). When associated with ephemeral streams (e.g., Snowghar) or a combination of ephemeral and perennial streams (e.g., Drosh), these fans are subject to frequent debris-flow hazards. Fans associated with ephemeral streams are prone to high-frequency (˜10 years return period) debris-flow

  10. Effect of attack angle on flow characteristic of centrifugal fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Dou, H. S.; Wei, Y. K.; Chen, X. P.; Chen, Y. N.; Cao, W. B.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, numerical simulation is performed for the performance and internal flow of a centrifugal fan with different operating conditions using steady three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the RNG k-e turbulent model. The performance curves, the contours of static pressure, total pressure, radial velocity, relative streamlines and turbulence intensity at different attack angles are obtained. The distributions of static pressure and velocity on suction surface and pressure surface in the same impeller channel are compared for various attack angles. The research shows that the efficiency of the centrifugal fan is the highest when the attack angle is 8 degree. The main reason is that the vortex flow in the impeller is reduced, and the jet-wake pattern is weakened at the impeller outlet. The pressure difference between pressure side and suction side is smooth and the amplitude of the total pressure fluctuation is low along the circumferential direction. These phenomena may cause the loss reduced for the attack angle of about 8 degree.

  11. Flow Measurements and Multiple Pure Tone Noise From a Forward Swept Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, Donald S.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2005-01-01

    A forward-swept fan, designated the Quiet High Speed Fan (QHSF), was tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel to investigate its noise reduction relative to a baseline fan of the same aerodynamic performance. The objective of the Quiet High Speed Fan was a 6-dB reduction in the Effective Perceived Noise Level relative to the baseline fan at the takeoff condition. The intent of the Quiet High Speed Fan design was to provide both a multiple pure tone noise reduction from the forward sweep of the fan rotor and a rotor-stator interaction blade passing tone noise reduction from a leaned stator. The tunnel noise data indicted that the Quiet High Speed Fan was quieter than the baseline fan for a significant portion of the operating line and was 6 dB quieter near the takeoff condition. Although reductions in the multiple pure tones were observed, the vast majority of the EPNdB reduction was a result of the reduction in the blade passing tone and its harmonics. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and shroud unsteady pressure measurement data were obtained upstream of the QHSF and baseline rotors to improve the understanding of the shocks which propagate upstream of the two fans when they are operated at high speeds. The flow phenomena that produce multiple pure tone noise is discussed and compared to measurements of the fan acoustic inlet modes and the far field noise signature of the fan.

  12. Numerical and experimental study on aerodynamic performance of small axial flow fan with splitter blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lifu; Jin, Yingzi; Li, Yi; Jin, Yuzhen; Wang, Yanping; Zhang, Li

    2013-08-01

    To improve the aerodynamic performance of small axial flow fan, in this paper the design of a small axial flow fan with splitter blades is studied. The RNG k-ɛ turbulence model and SIMPLE algorithm were applied to the steady simulation calculation of the flow field, and its result was used as the initial field of the large eddy simulation to calculate the unsteady pressure field. The FW-H noise model was adopted to predict aerodynamic noise in the six monitoring points. Fast Fourier transform algorithm was applied to process the pressure signal. Experiment of noise testing was done to further investigate the aerodynamic noise of fans. And then the results obtained from the numerical simulation and experiment were described and analyzed. The results show that the static characteristics of small axial fan with splitter blades are similar with the prototype fan, and the static characteristics are improved within a certain range of flux. The power spectral density at the six monitoring points of small axial flow fan with splitter blades have decreased to some extent. The experimental results show sound pressure level of new fan has reduced in most frequency bands by comparing with prototype fan. The research results will provide a proof for parameter optimization and noise prediction of small axial flow fans with high performance.

  13. Fan-in-Fuselage Advanced Antitorque System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    EFFECTS IN AXIAL FLOW FANS, Air - craft Engineering, Vol. XXXIII No. 393, November 1961, pp. 314-319 29. Wahl, H. A., et al, DUCTED FAN DESIGN STUDY OF THE...sl/sec) V. = air flow velocity at fan, ft/sec V = outlet (jet) velocity, ft/sec A. = cross-sectiondl area at fan, sq ft A = cross-sectional...loading), of low flow - through velocities, and of a small tip clearance are all highly desirable. Fan power for a given rotor power thus varies

  14. Numerical Simulation of Capillary Flow in Fan-Shaped Asymmetric Interior Corner Under Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong-Qiang, Li; Wen-Hui, Cao; Ling, Liu

    2016-11-01

    Based on fluid mechanics theories, this research focuses on numerical simulation and analysis of capillary flow under microgravity in fan-shaped asymmetric interior corner. We analyze the effect the contact angle has on rising height in a fan-shaped asymmetric interior corner, and get the Concus-Finn condition the calculation of capillary flow needs to satisfy in fan-shaped asymmetric interior corner. Then we study the effect that different parameters of experimental medium and container configuration has on capillary flow in fan-shaped asymmetric interior corner when Concus-Finn condition is fulfilled. The conclusions of this paper has an important role in guiding the analytic solution of flow in a fan-shaped asymmetric interior corner under microgravity. We can also chose the appropriate experimental medium and design a container based on this paper.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Capillary Flow in Fan-Shaped Asymmetric Interior Corner Under Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong-Qiang, Li; Wen-Hui, Cao; Ling, Liu

    2017-02-01

    Based on fluid mechanics theories, this research focuses on numerical simulation and analysis of capillary flow under microgravity in fan-shaped asymmetric interior corner. We analyze the effect the contact angle has on rising height in a fan-shaped asymmetric interior corner, and get the Concus-Finn condition the calculation of capillary flow needs to satisfy in fan-shaped asymmetric interior corner. Then we study the effect that different parameters of experimental medium and container configuration has on capillary flow in fan-shaped asymmetric interior corner when Concus-Finn condition is fulfilled. The conclusions of this paper has an important role in guiding the analytic solution of flow in a fan-shaped asymmetric interior corner under microgravity. We can also chose the appropriate experimental medium and design a container based on this paper.

  16. Investigations on an axial flow fan stage subjected to circumferential inlet flow distortion and swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govardhan, M.; Viswanath, K.

    1997-12-01

    The combined effects of swirl and circumferential inlet flow distortion on the flow field of an axial flow fan stage are reported in this paper. The study involves measurements at the inlet of the rotor and exit of the rotor and stator at design and off design flow conditions. The study indicated that at the design flow condition, swirl had caused deterioration of the performance in addition to that caused by distortion. Pressure rise imparted in the distortion zone is higher than in the free zone. The attenuation of distortion is high in the presence of swirl.

  17. Complex Flow Separation Pattern on Transonic Fan Airfoils Revealed by Flow Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Modern turbofan engines employ a highly loaded fan stage with transonic or low-supersonic velocities in the blade-tip region. The fan blades are often prone to flutter at off-design conditions. Flutter is a highly undesirable and dangerous self-excited mode of blade oscillations that can result in high-cycle fatigue blade failure. The origins of blade flutter are not fully understood yet. The latest view is that the blade oscillations are triggered by high-frequency changes in the extent of the partially separated area on the airfoil suction side. There is a lack of experimental data describing the separated flow characteristics of modern airfoils for transonic fans.

  18. High fidelity phase locked PIV measurements analysing the flow fields surrounding an oscillating piezoelectric fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, Nicholas; Nolan, Kevin; Stafford, Jason; Donnelly, Brian

    2014-07-01

    Piezoelectric fans have been studied extensively and are seen as a promising technology for thermal management due to their ability to provide quiet, reliable cooling with low power consumption. The fluid mechanics of an unconfined piezoelectric fan are complex which is why the majority of the literature to date confines the fan in an attempt to simplify the flow field. This paper investigates the fluid mechanics of an unconfined fan operating in its first vibration frequency mode. The piezoelectric fan used in this study measures 12.7mm × 70mm and resonates at 92.5Hz in air. A custom built experimental facility was developed to capture the fan's flow field using phase locked Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The phase locked PIV results are presented in terms of vorticity and show the formation of a horse shoe vortex. A three dimensional A2 criterion constructed from interpolated PIV measurements was used to identify the vortex core in the vicinity of the fan. This analysis was used to clearly identify the formation of a horse shoe vortex that turns into a hairpin vortex before it breaks up due to a combination of vortex shedding and flow along the fan blade. The results presented in this paper contribute to both the fluid dynamics and heat transfer literature concerning first mode fan oscillation.

  19. Drainage basin morphometry controls on the active depositional area of debris flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihir, Monika; Wasklewicz, Thad; Malamud, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    A majority of the research on understanding the connection between alluvial fans and drainage basins to date has focused on coarse-scale relations between total fan area and drainage basin area. Here we take a new approach where we assess relationships between active fan depositional area and drainage basin morphometry using 52 debris flow fans (32 from the White Mountains and 20 from the Inyo Mountains) on the eastern side of Owens Valley, California, USA. The boundaries for fans, drainage basin and active depositional areas were delineated from 10m digital elevation models and 1 m aerial photographs. We examined the relationships between the normalised active depositional area of the fan (Afad/Af, where Afad is the fan active depositional area and Af the entire fan area) and the following four variables for drainage basin: (i) area (Adb), (ii) total stream length (Ls), (iii) relief (BHH), (iv) roughness (R). We find a statistically significant (r2 > 0.40) inverse power-law relationship between recent sediment contribution to the fan and drainage basin area (Afad/Af = 0.29Adb-0.167) drainage network length (Afad/Af = 0.39Ls-0.161) and basin relief (Afad/Af = 3.90BHH-0.401), and a statistically weak (r2 = 0.22) inverse power law with basin roughness (Afad/Af = 0.32R0.5441). Drainage basin size combined with other morphometric variables may largely determine efficiency in sediment transport and delivery to the fan surface. A large proportion of the total fan area of smaller fans are flooded by debris flow indicating less sediment storage in the drainage basins and greater efficiency in sediment delivery. The findings signify the importance of coarse-scale relationships to both long- and short-term fan evolution.

  20. Large eddy simulation of tip-leakage flow in an axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Keuntae; Choi, Haecheon; Choi, Seokho; Sa, Yongcheol; Kwon, Oh-Kyoung

    2016-11-01

    An axial flow fan with a shroud generates a complicated tip-leakage flow by the interaction of the axial flow with the fan blades and shroud near the blade tips. In this study, large eddy simulation is performed for tip-leakage flow in a forward-swept axial flow fan inside an outdoor unit of an air-conditioner, operating at the design condition of the Reynolds number of 547,000 based on the radius of blade tip and the tip velocity. A dynamic global model is used for a subgrid-scale model, and an immersed boundary method in a non-inertial reference frame is adopted. The present simulation clearly reveals the generation and evolution of tip-leakage vortex near the blade tip by the leakage flow. At the inception of the leakage vortex near the leading edge of the suction-side of the blade tip, the leakage vortex is composed of unsteady multiple vortices containing high-frequency fluctuations. As the leakage vortex develops downstream along a slant line toward the following blade, large and meandering movements of the leakage vortex are observed. Thus low-frequency broad peaks of velocity and pressure occur near the pressure surface. Supported by the KISTI Supercomputing Center (KSC-2016-C3-0027).

  1. Fan1 deficiency results in DNA interstrand cross-link repair defects, enhanced tissue karyomegaly, and organ dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Thongthip, Supawat; Bellani, Marina; Gregg, Siobhan Q.; Sridhar, Sunandini; Conti, Brooke A.; Chen, Yanglu; Seidman, Michael M.; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of FANCD2/FANCI-associated nuclease 1 (FAN1) in humans leads to karyomegalic interstitial nephritis (KIN), a rare hereditary kidney disease characterized by chronic renal fibrosis, tubular degeneration, and characteristic polyploid nuclei in multiple tissues. The mechanism of how FAN1 protects cells is largely unknown but is thought to involve FAN1's function in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair. Here, we describe a Fan1-deficient mouse and show that FAN1 is required for cellular and organismal resistance to ICLs. We show that the ubiquitin-binding zinc finger (UBZ) domain of FAN1, which is needed for interaction with FANCD2, is not required for the initial rapid recruitment of FAN1 to ICLs or for its role in DNA ICL resistance. Epistasis analyses reveal that FAN1 has cross-link repair activities that are independent of the Fanconi anemia proteins and that this activity is redundant with the 5′–3′ exonuclease SNM1A. Karyomegaly becomes prominent in kidneys and livers of Fan1-deficient mice with age, and mice develop liver dysfunction. Treatment of Fan1-deficient mice with ICL-inducing agents results in pronounced thymic and bone marrow hypocellularity and the disappearance of c-kit+ cells. Our results provide insight into the mechanism of FAN1 in ICL repair and demonstrate that the Fan1 mouse model effectively recapitulates the pathological features of human FAN1 deficiency. PMID:26980189

  2. Performance and internal flow of sirocco fan using contra-rotating rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukutomi, J.; Shigemitsu, T.; Yasunobu, T.

    2008-03-01

    A sirocco fan using contra-rotating rotors in which an inner rotor is settled inside the sirocco fan rotor and each rotor rotates in an opposite direction was proposed for the purpose of getting the higher pressure and making the structure of a sirocco fan more compact. If the high discharge pressure is obtained with the adoption of the contra-rotating rotors, it could be used for various purposes. Pressure coefficient of a sirocco fan with contra-rotating rotors is 2.5 times as high as the conventional sirocco fan and the maximum efficiency point of contra-rotating rotors shifts to larger flow rate than a conventional sirocco fan. On the other hand, it was clarified from the flow measurement results that circumferential velocity component at the outlet of the outer rotor of contra-rotating rotors becomes larger than a conventional one. In the present paper, the performance of a conventional sirocco fan and a sirocco fan with contra-rotating rotors are shown and the internal flow field at the outlet of outer rotor of both cases is clarified. Then, the effect of different kind of contra-rotating rotors on the performance and internal flow field is investigated and the rotor design with higher performance would be discussed.

  3. Effects of shaft supporting structure on performance test of axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, R.; Liu, S. L.; Li, M. X.; Zheng, S. Y.

    2016-05-01

    CFD numerical simulation combined with theoretical analysis are used to research and discuss the obstructing effect, caused by the supporting structure of torsion meter and connecting shaft, on the outlet airflow of axial-flow fan in type-C ducted inlet device. The relations between axial flow fan's total pressure efficiency and flow rate are studied when the distance between supporting structure and outlet section is different, which may provide a reference for the proper design of the performance test device.

  4. Flow performance of highly loaded axial fan with bowed rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Liu, X. J.; Yang, A. L.; Dai, R.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a partial bowed rotor blade was proposed for a newly designed high loaded axial fan. The blade was positively bowed 30 degrees from hub to 30 percent spanwise position. Flows of radial blade and bowed blade fans were numerically compared for various operation conditions. Results show that the fan's performance is improved. At the designed condition with flow coefficient of 0.52, the efficiency of the bowed blade fan is increased 1.44% and the static pressure rise is increased 11%. Comparing the flow structures, it can be found that the separated flow in the bowed fan is reduced and confined within 20 percent span, which is less than the 35 percent in the radial fan. It means that the bowed blade generates negative blade force and counteracts partial centrifugal force. It is alleviates the radial movements of boundary layers in fan's hub region. Flow losses due to 3D mixing are reduced in the rotor. Inlet flow to downstream stator is also improved.

  5. Flow Characteristics with Variations of Cut-Off Angle of Multi-Blade Fan for Ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kyung Jun; Park, Jun Geon; Shin, You Hwan; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2010-06-01

    This study investigated on details of flow characteristics of a multi-blade fan for domestic ventilation. Experiments and analysis were carried out to describe on flow pattern with variations of cut-off angle near the scroll-housing throat, which were performed by PIV measurement for the flow field and by total pressure probes. The stagnation point at cut-off region of the fan moves to the exit of the scroll housing as cut-off angle increases. The movement of stagnation point and the variation of throat area of the scroll housing influence to the distribution of velocity magnitude at the exit of the fan. Furthermore, a large distortion of the velocity distribution at the scroll exit causes to increase mixing loss along the flow path. The improvement of the fan design on cut-off is expected through understanding the flow pattern.

  6. Effects of perforation number of blade on aerodynamic performance of dual-rotor small axial flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongjun; Wang, Yanping; Li, Guoqi; Jin, Yingzi; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2015-04-01

    Compared with single rotor small axial flow fans, dual-rotor small axial flow fans is better regarding the static characteristics. But the aerodynamic noise of dual-rotor small axial flow fans is worse than that of single rotor small axial flow fans. In order to improve aerodynamic noise of dual-rotor small axial flow fans, the pre-stage blades with different perforation numbers are designed in this research. The RANS equations and the standard k-ɛ turbulence model as well as the FW-H noise model are used to simulate the flow field within the fan. Then, the aerodynamic performance of the fans with different perforation number is compared and analyzed. The results show that: (1) Compared to the prototype fan, the noise of fans with perforation blades is reduced. Additionally, the noise of the fans decreases with the increase of the number of perforations. (2) The vorticity value in the trailing edge of the pre-stage blades of perforated fans is reduced. It is found that the vorticity value in the trailing edge of the pre-stage blades decreases with the increase of the number of perforations. (3) Compared to the prototype fan, the total pressure rising and efficiency of the fans with perforation blades drop slightly.

  7. Sedimentology and clast fabric of subaerial debris flow facies in a glacially-influenced alluvial fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyles, N.; Kocsis, S.

    1988-09-01

    A large alluvial fan (2 km 2), constructed between 11,000 and 7000 years B.P. at the mouth of Cinquefoil Creek in interior British Columbia, Canada, is identified as "glacially-influenced, debris flow-dominated". The fan was rapidly constructed during and immediately after deglaciation when large volumes of glacial debris were resedimented downslope; fans of this type are widespread in the glaciated portion of the North American Cordillera. Diamict facies, deposited as debris flows, account for 48% of the fan volume, sheetflodd gravels 37%, and other facies 15%. Diamicts show three facies types; crudely-bedded facies containing rafts of soft sediment that are attributed to downslope collapse and mixing of heterogeneous glacial deposits. These occur within the core of the fan. Massive and weakly graded (inverse to normal) diamict facies, derived from the downslope flow of weathered volcanic bedrock, occur within a well-defined bed that can be traced across the entire fan. The occurrence of weakly graded facies as lateral equivalents to massive facies within the same bed, implies the partial development of turbulent, high-velocity "streams" within a viscous debris flow moving over a slope of 6°. Clast fabrics in these facies show weakly-clustered a-axes dipping up and downslope comparable to other debris flows and lahars. The Cinquefoil fan, its internal structure and facies, provides a good "modern" analogue for ancient diamictite sequences deposited in areas of active uplift, rifting and glaciation.

  8. Flooding, flow path selection and growth of alluvial fans and deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerolmack, Douglas; Reitz, Meredith

    2010-05-01

    The surfaces of alluvial fans and river deltas (collectively fans) are often dissected by a small number of channels radiating from the fan apex. On long timescales, channels migrate via avulsion, the process of channel bed deposition and abandonment that often results in catastrophic flooding and loss of life on densely populated fans. What governs the selection of new flow paths, or the ultimate number of active channels, is poorly understood. Here we present results of an experimental noncohesive fan that creates realistic channel patterns by avulsion. The system strongly channelizes in one location until localized shoreline progradation diminishes transport capacity of the channel, resulting in backfilling and subsequent widespread flooding; avulsion is completed when a new channel path is selected. This cycle occurs with a periodicity that is predictable from conservation of mass, and results in fluctuations around an equilibrium slope analogous to sand piles. Selection of a new flow path is inherently stochastic; we observe, however, that previously abandoned channels act as significant attractors for the flow, so that the system tends to oscillate among the same 3-5 channels indefinitely. We demonstrate that a directed random walk model with memory quantitatively reproduces these dynamics and limiting behavior, and is consistent with natural fans. Thus, channel migration behaves as a history-dependent, threshold-driven, stochastic process. Because our experimental fan is built by the recurring avulsion sequence, its shoreline shape is a series of lobes that indicate persistent channel locations. Progradation lengthens lobes, while backfilling results in diffusive widening. These dynamics result in self-similar radial growth of fan lobes, which can be described using a simple geometric model. Together, this work provides a complete description of the statistical spatio-temporal dynamics of fan growth. Experiments also provide another example of realistic

  9. Test of Single-Stage Axial-Flow Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, E Barton

    1942-01-01

    A single-stage axial fan was built and tested in the shop of the propeller-research tunnel of the NACA. The fan comprised a simple 24-blade rotor having a diameter of 21 inches and a solidity of 0.86 and a set of 37 contravanes having a solidity of 1.33. The rotor was driven by a 25-horsepower motor capable of rotating at a speed of 3600 r.p.m. The fan was tested for volume, pressure, and efficiency over a range of delivery pressures and volumes for a wide range of contravane and blade-angle settings. The test results are presented in chart form in terms of nondimensional units in order that similar fans may be accurately designed with a minimum effort. The maximum efficiency (88 percent) was obtained by the fan at a blade angle of 30 degrees and a contravane angle of 70 degrees. An efficiency of 80 percent was obtained by the fan with the contravanes removed.

  10. Parametric System Curves: Correlations Between Fan Pressure Rise and Flow for Large Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max; Wray, Craig

    2010-05-19

    A substantial fraction of HVAC energy use in large commercial buildings is due to fan operation. Fan energy use depends in part on the relationship between system pressure drop and flow through the fan, which is commonly called a "system curve." As a step toward enabling better selections of air-handling system components and analyses of common energy efficiency measures such as duct static pressure reset and duct leakage sealing, this paper shows that a simple four-parameter physical model can be used to define system curves. Our model depends on the square of the fan flow, as is commonly considered. It also includes terms that account for linear-like flow resistances such as filters and coils, and for supply duct leakage when damper positions are fixed or are changed independently of static pressure or fan flow. Only two parameters are needed for systems with variable-position supply dampers (e.g., VAV box dampers modulating to control flow). For these systems, reducing or eliminating supply duct leakage does not change the system curve. The parametric system curve may be most useful when applied to field data. Non-linear techniques could be used to fit the curve to fan pressure rise and flow measurements over a range of operating conditions. During design, when measurements are unavailable, one could use duct design calculation tools instead to determine the coefficients.

  11. Subaqueous ice-contact fans: Depositional systems characterised by highly aggradational supercritical flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Joerg; Winsemann, Jutta

    2015-04-01

    Subaqueous ice-contact fans are deposited by high-energy plane-wall jets from subglacial conduits into standing water bodies. Highly aggradational conditions during flow expansion and deceleration allow for the preservation of bedforms related to supercritical flows, which are commonly considered rare in the depositional record. We present field examples from gravelly and sandy subaqueous ice-contact fan successions, which indicate that deposition by supercritical flows might be considered as a characteristic feature of these depositional systems. The studied successions were deposited in deep ice-dammed lakes, which formed along the margins of the Middle Pleistocene Scandinavian ice sheets across Northern Germany. The gravel-rich subaqueous fan deposits are dominated by large scour-fills (up to 25 m wide and 3 m) deep and deposits of turbulent hyperconcentrated flows, which are partly attributed to supercritical flow conditions (Winsemann et al., 2009). Scours (up to 4.5 m wide and 0.9 m deep) infilled by gravelly backsets are observed above laterally extensive erosional surfaces and are interpreted as deposits of cyclic steps. Laterally discontinuous beds of low-angle cross-stratified gravel are interpreted as antidune deposits. Downflow and up-section the gravel-rich deposits pass into sand-rich successions, which include deposits of chutes-and-pools, breaking antidunes, stationary antidunes and humpback dunes (Lang and Winsemann, 2013). Deposits of chutes-and-pools and breaking antidunes are characterised by scour-fills (up to 4 m wide and 1.2 m deep) comprising backsets or gently dipping sigmoidal foresets. Stationary antidune deposits consist of laterally extensive sinusoidal waveforms with long wavelengths (1-12 m) and low amplitudes (0.1-0.5 m), which formed under quasi-steady flows at the lower limit of the supercritical flow stage and high rates of sedimentation. Humpback dunes are characterised by divergent sigmoidal foresets and are interpreted as

  12. Flow control of a centrifugal fan in a commercial air conditioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jiyu; Bang, Kyeongtae; Choi, Haecheon; Seo, Eung Ryeol; Kang, Yonghun

    2015-11-01

    Air-conditioning fans require a low noise level to provide user comfort and quietness. The aerodynamic noise sources are generated by highly unsteady, turbulent structures near the fan blade. In this study, we investigate the flow characteristics of a centrifugal fan in an air-conditioner indoor unit and suggest control ideas to develop a low noise fan. The experiment is conducted at the operation condition where the Reynolds number is 163000 based on the blade tip velocity and chord length. Intermittent separation occurs at the blade leading edge and thus flow significantly fluctuates there, whereas vortex shedding occurs at the blade trailing edge. Furthermore, the discharge flow observed in the axial plane near the shroud shows low-frequency intermittent behaviors, resulting in high Reynolds stresses. To control these flow structures, we modify the shapes of the blade leading edge and shroud of the centrifugal fan and obtain noise reduction. The flow characteristics of the base and modified fans will be discussed. Supported by 0420-20130051.

  13. Study of Near-Stall Flow Behavior in a Modern Transonic Fan with Composite Sweep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill; Shin, Hyoun-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Detailed flow behavior in a modern transonic fan with a composite sweep is investigated in this paper. Both unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods are applied to investigate the flow field over a wide operating range. The calculated flow fields are compared with the data from an array of high-frequency response pressure transducers embedded in the fan casing. The current study shows that a relatively fine computational grid is required to resolve the flow field adequately and to calculate the pressure rise across the fan correctly. The calculated flow field shows detailed flow structure near the fan rotor tip region. Due to the introduction of composite sweep toward the rotor tip, the flow structure at the rotor tip is much more stable compared to that of the conventional blade design. The passage shock stays very close to the leading edge at the rotor tip even at the throttle limit. On the other hand, the passage shock becomes stronger and detaches earlier from the blade passage at the radius where the blade sweep is in the opposite direction. The interaction between the tip clearance vortex and the passage shock becomes intense as the fan operates toward the stall limit, and tip clearance vortex breakdown occurs at near-stall operation. URANS calculates the time-averaged flow field fairly well. Details of measured RMS static pressure are not calculated with sufficient accuracy with URANS. On the other hand, LES calculates details of the measured unsteady flow features in the current transonic fan with composite sweep fairly well and reveals the flow mechanism behind the measured unsteady flow field.

  14. Effect of Trailing Edge Flow Injection on Fan Noise and Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian; Woodward, Richard P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental investigation using trailing edge blowing for reducing fan rotor/guide vane wake interaction noise was completed in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Data were acquired to measure noise, aerodynamic performance, and flow features for a 22" tip diameter fan representative of modern turbofan technology. The fan was designed to use trailing edge blowing to reduce the fan blade wake momentum deficit. The test objective was to quantify noise reductions, measure impacts on fan aerodynamic performance, and document the flow field using hot-film anemometry. Measurements concentrated on approach, cutback, and takeoff rotational speeds as those are the primary conditions of acoustic interest. Data are presented for a 2% (relative to overall fan flow) trailing edge injection rate and show a 2 dB reduction in Overall Sound Power Level (OAPWL) at all fan test speeds. The reduction in broadband noise is nearly constant and is approximately 1.5 dB up to 20 kHz at all fan speeds. Measurements of tone noise show significant variation, as evidenced by reductions of up to 6 dB in the 2 BPF tone at 6700 rpm.: and increases of nearly 2 dB for the 4 BPF tone at approach speed. Aerodynamic performance measurements show the fan with 2 % injection has an overall efficiency that is comparable to the baseline fan and operates, as intended, with nearly the same pressure ratio and mass flow parameters. Hot-film measurements obtained at the approach operating condition indicate that mean blade wake filling in the tip region was not as significant as expected. This suggests that additional acoustic benefits could be realized if the trailing edge blowing could be modified to provide better filling of the wake momentum deficit. Nevertheless, the hot-film measurements indicate that the trailing edge blowing provided significant reductions in blade wake turbulence. Overall, these results indicate that further work may be required to fully understand the proper

  15. Sediment mass-flow processes on a depositional lobe, outer Mississippi Fan

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, W.C.; Twichell, D.C.; Lee, H.J.; Nelson, C.H.; McArthur, W.G.; Locat, J.; Kenyon, N.H.

    1996-09-01

    As exploration for hydrocarbons moves toward subtler traps, channel-end sand deposits of deep-sea fans and related turbidite systems are among the key targets. SeaMARC 1A sidescan-sonar imagery and cores from the distal reaches of a depositional lobe on the Mississippi Fan show that channelized mass flow as the dominant mechanism for transport of silt and sand during the formation of this part of the fan. Sediments in these flows were rapidly deposited once outside of their confining channels. The depositional lobe is formed of a series of long, narrow sublobes composed of thin-bedded turbidites (normally graded siliciclastic sand and silt, 20 cm thick on average), debris-flow deposits (soft clay clasts up to 5 cm in diameter in a siliciclastic silt matrix, 48 cm thick on average), and background-sedimentation hemipelagic muds. The mass flows most likely originated from slope failure at the head of the Mississippi Canyon or on the outer continental shelf and flowed approximately 500 km to the distal reaches of the fan, with debris flow being the dominant flow type. An analysis that uses the geometry of the confining channels and strength properties of the debris-flow material shows that these thin debris flows could have traveled hundreds of kilometers on extremely small sea-floor slopes at low velocities if the flowing medium behaved as Bingham fluids and were steady-state phenomena.

  16. Debris-flow dominance of alluvial fans masked by runoff reworking and weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haas, Tjalling; Ventra, Dario; Carbonneau, Patrice E.; Kleinhans, Maarten G.

    2014-07-01

    Arid alluvial fan aggradation is highly episodic and fans often comprise active and inactive sectors. Hence the morphology and texture of fan surfaces are partly determined by secondary processes of weathering and erosion in addition to primary processes of aggradation. This introduces considerable uncertainty in the identification of formative processes of terrestrial and Martian fans from aerial and satellite imagery. The objectives of this study are (i) to develop a model to describe the sedimentological and morphological evolution of inactive fan surfaces in arid settings, and (ii) to assess the relative importance of primary processes of aggradation and secondary processes of weathering and reworking for surface morphology and sedimentology and for the stratigraphic record. We studied an alluvial fan characterized by a recently active sector and a long-abandoned, inactive sector along the coast of the hyperarid Atacama Desert. Here, rates of primary geomorphic activity are exceptionally low because of extreme aridity, while weathering rates are relatively high because of the effects of coastal fogs. Long-term processes of fan aggradation and reworking were determined through sedimentological facies analysis of stratigraphic sections. Ground surveys for textural and morphological patterns at the fan surface were integrated with remote-sensing by an Unmanned Airborne Vehicle (UAV). Discharges and sediment-transport capacities were calculated to estimate the efficiency of secondary runoff in reshaping the inactive fan sector. Stratigraphic sections reveal that the fan was dominantly aggraded by debris flows, whereas surface morphology is dominated by debris-flow signatures in the active sector and by weathering and runoff on the inactive sector. On the latter, rapid particle breakdown prevents the formation of a coarse desert pavement. Furthermore, relatively frequent local runoff events erode proximal debris-flow channels on the inactive sector to form local lag

  17. Axial flow fan broad-band noise and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carolus, Thomas; Schneider, Marc; Reese, Hauke

    2007-02-01

    Two prediction methods for broad-band noise of low-pressure axial fans are investigated. Emphasis is put on the interaction noise due to ingested turbulence. The numerical large eddy simulation (LES) is applied to predict the unsteady blade forces due to grid generated highly turbulent inflow; the blade forces are then fed into an analytical two-dimensional acoustic ducted source model. A simple semi-empirical noise prediction model (SEM) is utilized for indicative comparison. Finally, to obtain a database for detailed verification, the turbulence statistics for a variety of different inflow configurations are determined experimentally using hot wire anemometry and a correlation analysis. In the limits of the necessary assumptions the SEM predicts the noise spectra and the overall sound power surprisingly well without any further tuning of parameters; the influence of the fan operating point and the nature of the inflow is obtained. Naturally, the predicted spectra appear unrealistically "smooth", since the empirical input data are averaged and modeled in the frequency domain. By way of contrast the LES yields the fluctuating forces on the blades in the time domain. Details of the source characteristics and their origin are obtained rather clearly. The predicted effects of the ingested turbulence on the fluctuating blade forces and the fan noise compare favorably with experiments. However, the choice of the numerical grid size determines the maximal resolvable frequency and the computational cost. As contrasted with the SEM, the cost for the LES-based method are immense.

  18. Performance potential of air turbo-ramjet employing supersonic through-flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepler, C. E.; Champagne, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the performance potential of a supersonic through-flow fan in an advanced engine designed to power a Mach-5 cruise vehicle. It included a preliminary evaluation of fan performance requirements and the desirability of supersonic versus subsonic combustion, the design and performance of supersonic fans, and the conceptual design of a single-pass air-turbo-rocket/ramjet engine for a Mach 5 cruise vehicle. The study results showed that such an engine could provide high thrust over the entire speed range from sea-level takeoff to Mach 5 cruise, especially over the transonic speed range, and high fuel specific impulse at the Mach 5 cruise condition, with the fan windmilling.

  19. Ducted fan acoustic radiation including the effects of nonuniform mean flow and acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter; Roy, Indranil Danda

    1993-01-01

    Forward and aft acoustic propagation and radiation from a ducted fan is modeled using a finite element discretization of the acoustic field equations. The fan noise source is introduced as equivalent body forces representing distributed blade loading. The flow in and around the nacelle is assumed to be nonuniform, reflecting the effects of forward flight and flow into the inlet. Refraction due to the fan exit jet shear layer is not represented. Acoustic treatment on the inlet and exhaust duct surfaces provides a mechanism for attenuation. In a region enclosing the fan a pressure formulation is used with the assumption of locally uniform flow. Away from the fan a velocity potential formulation is used and the flow is assumed nonuniform but irrotational. A procedure is developed for matching the two regions by making use of local duct modal amplitudes as transition state variables and determining the amplitudes by enforcing natural boundary conditions at the interface between adjacent regions in which pressure and velocity potential are used. Simple models of rotor alone and rotor/exit guide vane generated noise are used to demonstrate the calculation of the radiated acoustic field and to show the effect of acoustic treatment. The model has been used to assess the success of four techniques for acoustic lining optimization in reducing far field noise.

  20. FAN1 acts with FANCI-FANCD2 to promote DNA interstrand cross-link repair.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Ghosal, Gargi; Yuan, Jingsong; Chen, Junjie; Huang, Jun

    2010-08-06

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is caused by mutations in 13 Fanc genes and renders cells hypersensitive to DNA interstrand cross-linking (ICL) agents. A central event in the FA pathway is mono-ubiquitylation of the FANCI-FANCD2 (ID) protein complex. Here, we characterize a previously unrecognized nuclease, Fanconi anemia-associated nuclease 1 (FAN1), that promotes ICL repair in a manner strictly dependent on its ability to accumulate at or near sites of DNA damage and that relies on mono-ubiquitylation of the ID complex. Thus, the mono-ubiquitylated ID complex recruits the downstream repair protein FAN1 and facilitates the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links.

  1. Near Stall Flow Analysis in the Transonic Fan of the RTA Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill

    2010-01-01

    Turbine-based propulsion systems for access to space have been investigated at NASA Glenn Research center. A ground demonstrator engine for validation testing has been developed as a part of the program. The demonstrator, the Revolutionary Turbine Accelerator (RTA-1), is a variable cycle turbofan ramjet designed to transition from an augmented turbofan to a ramjet that produces the thrust required to accelerate the vehicle to Mach 4. The RTA-1 is designed to accommodate a large variation in bypass ratio from sea level static to Mach 4 flight condition. A key component of this engine is a new fan stage that accommodates these large variations in bypass ratio and flow ranges. In the present study, unsteady flow behavior in the fan of the RTA-1 is studied in detail with large eddy simulation (LES) and the numerical results are compared with measured data. During the experimental study of the fan stage, humming sound was detected at 100 % speed near stall operation. The main purpose of the study is to investigate details of the unsteady flow behavior at near stall operation and to identify a possible cause of the hum. The large eddy simulation of the current flow field reproduces main features of the measured flow very well. The LES simulation indicates that non-synchronous flow instability develops as the fan operates toward the stall limit. The FFT analysis of the calculated wall pressure shows that the rotating flow instability has the characteristic frequency that is about 50% of the blade passing frequency.

  2. Investigation of Unsteady Flow Interaction Between an Ultra-Compact Inlet and a Transonic Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill; Rabe, Douglas; Scribben, Angie

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, unsteady flow interaction between an ultra-compact inlet and a transonic fan stage is investigated. Future combat aircraft require ultra-compact inlet ducts as part of an integrated, advanced propulsion system to improve air vehicle capability and effectiveness to meet future mission needs. The main purpose of the study is to advance the current understanding of the flow interaction between two different ultra-compact inlets and a transonic fan for future design applications. Both URANS and LES approaches are used to calculate the unsteady flow field and are compared with the available measured data. The present study indicates that stall inception is mildly affected by the distortion pattern generated by the inlet with the current test set-up. The numerical study indicates that the inlet distortion pattern decays significantly before it reaches the fan face for the current configuration. Numerical results with a shorter distance between the inlet and fan show that counter-rotating vortices near the rotor tip due to the serpentine diffuser affects fan characteristics significantly.

  3. Investigation of flow separation in a transonic-fan linear cascade using visualization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepicovsky, J.

    2008-06-01

    An extensive experimental study into the nature of the separated flows on the blade suction surface of modern transonic fans is described in this paper. The study was a subtask of a larger experimental effort focused on blade flutter excited by flow separation in the blade tip region. The tip sections of airfoils on transonic fan blades are designed for precompression and consequently they differ from sections on the rest of the blade. The blade tip section was modeled by a low aspect ratio blade and therefore most of the blade tested was exposed to the secondary flow effects. The aim of this work was to supply reliable data on flow separation on transonic fan blades for validation of future analytical studies. The experimental study focused on two visualization techniques: surface flow visualization using dye oils and schlieren (and shadowgraph) flow visualization. The following key observations were made during the study. For subsonic inlet flow, the flow on the suction surface of the blade was separated over a large portion of the blade, and the separated area increased with increasing inlet Mach number. For the supersonic inlet flow condition, the flow was attached from the leading edge up to the point where a bow shock from the upper neighboring blade imposed on the blade surface. Downstream, there was a separated flow region in which air flowed in the direction opposite the inlet flow. Finally, past the separated flow region, the flow reattached to the blade surface. For subsonic inlet flow, the low cascade solidity resulted in an increased area of separated flow. For supersonic flow conditions, the low solidity resulted in an improvement in flow over the suction surface.

  4. Investigation of Unsteady Flow Interaction Between an Ultra-Compact Inlet and a Transonic Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill; Rabe, Douglas; Scribben, Angie

    2015-01-01

    In the study presented, unsteady flow interaction between an ultra-compact inlet and a transonic fan stage is investigated. Future combat aircraft engines require ultra-compact inlet ducts as part of an integrated, advanced propulsion system to improve air vehicle capability and effectiveness to meet future mission needs. The main purpose of the current study is to advance the understanding of the flow interaction between a modern ultra-compact inlet and a transonic fan for future design applications. Many experimental/ analytical studies have been reported on the aerodynamics of compact inlets in aircraft engines. On the other hand, very few studies have been reported on the effects of flow distortion from these inlets on the performance of the following fan/compressor stages. The primary goal of the study presented is to investigate how flow interaction between an ultra-compact inlet and a transonic compressor influence the operating margin of the compressor. Both Unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approaches are used to calculate the unsteady flow field, and the numerical results are used to study the flow interaction. The present study indicates that stall inception of the following compressor stage is affected directly based on how the distortion pattern evolves before it interacts with the fan/compressor face. For the present compressor, the stall initiates at the tip section with clean inlet flow and distortion pattern away from the casing itself seems to have limited impacts on the stall inception of the compressor. A counter-rotating swirl, which is generated due to flow separation inside the s-shaped compact duct, generates an increased flow angle near the blade tip. This increased flow angle near the rotor tip due to the secondary flow from the counter-rotating vortices is the primary reason for the reduced compressor stall margin.

  5. Fan noise reduction achieved by removing tip flow irregularities behind the rotor - forward arc test configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Woodward, R. P.; Mackinnon, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The noise source caused by the interaction of the rotor tip flow irregularities (vortices and velocity defects) with the downstream stator vanes was studied. Fan flow was removed behind a 0.508 meter (20 in.) diameter model turbofan through an outer wall slot between the rotor and stator. Noise measurements were made with far-field microphones positioned in an arc about the fan inlet and with a pressure transducer in the duct behind the stator. Little tone noise reduction was observed in the forward arc during flow removal; possibly because the rotor-stator interaction noise did not propagate upstream through the rotor. Noise reductions were maded in the duct behind the stator and the largest decrease occurred with the first increment of flow removal. This result indicates that the rotor tip flow irregularity-stator interaction is as important a noise producing mechanism as the normally considered rotor wake-stator interaction.

  6. Investigation of Axial-flow Fan and Compressor Rotors Designed for Three-dimensional Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahane, A

    1947-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine whether three-dimensional flows may be utilized in axial-flow fan and compressor rotors so that the spanwise load distribution may be varied to obtain high pressure rise. Two rotors, one with approximately uniform and one with solid-body downstream tangential-velocity distributions, were designed and tested at the design blade angle. Radial surveys of total pressure, static pressure, and flow angle were made upstream and downstream of the test rotors through a quantity-coefficient range. Tests of the solid-body rotor were also conducted at a large value of tip clearance. The results indicated that the three-dimensional flows may be utilized with high efficiency and that the three-dimensional theory used in conjunction with two-dimensional cascade data is sufficiently accurate for design purposes. The tests also showed that the tip-clearance losses of rotors highly loaded at the tips are not excessive. The existing three-dimensional theory in simplified for and an illustrative rotor design are presented in appendixes.

  7. Investigation of Flow Separation in a Transonic-fan Linear Cascade Using Visualization Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan; Chima, Rodrick V.; Jett, Thomas A.; Bencic, Timothy J.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    2000-01-01

    An extensive study into the nature of the separated flows on the suction side of modem transonic fan airfoils at high incidence is described in the paper. Suction surface.flow separation is an important flow characteristic that may significantly contribute to stall flutter in transonic fans. Flutter in axial turbomachines is a highly undesirable and dangerous self-excited mode of blade oscillations that can result in high cycle fatigue blade failure. The study basically focused on two visualization techniques: surface flow visualization using dye oils, and schlieren (and shadowgraph) flow visualization. The following key observations were made during the study. For subsonic inlet flow, the flow on the suction side of the blade is separated over a large portion of the blade, and the separated area increases with increasing inlet Mach number. For the supersonic inlet flow condition, the flow is attached from the leading edge up to the point where a bow shock from the upper neighboring blade hits the blade surface. Low cascade solidity, for the subsonic inlet flow, results in an increased area of separated flow. For supersonic flow conditions, a low solidity results in an improvement in flow over the suction surface. Finally, computational results modeling the transonic cascade flowfield illustrate our ability to simulate these flows numerically.

  8. Field investigations of the interaction between debris flows and forest vegetation in two Alpine fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelini, Tamara; Bettella, Francesco; D'Agostino, Vincenzo

    2017-02-01

    A key objective in debris-flow hazard mitigation is the reduction of the potential depositional area in the fan. From this point of view, forested areas are able to provide a protective function hindering the flow motion and promoting the surge deposition. Despite extensive research on Alpine forests and their protective functions, relatively few studies in the literature have quantitatively focused on the relationship between debris-flow depositional features and vegetation. In light of the above, our research investigates how vegetation characteristics in the fan area interact with debris-flow deposition. Field investigations were carried out in two Alpine fans where debris-flow events occurred in the summer of 2012. By recording the characteristics of 1567 involved trees and the associated deposit thicknesses, this paper provides a data set that contributes to the improvement of the knowledge of these interaction processes. The integration of literature findings and the analysis of the collected dataset adds insights into the relationships between tree characteristics and the dynamics of debris flow during the runout path. The main results prove the capacity of the forest of uniformly promoting flow-energy dissipation, presence of high species diversity in debris-flow deposits when comparing disturbed and undisturbed forest stands, tree mortality largely affecting small diameters < 10 cm in the upper/medium part of the cone, and deposit thicknesses depending on the trunk diameter only if the debris-flow regime was collisional. Based on the field results and their analysis, some criteria for the management of protection forests in alluvial fans are suggested.

  9. Application of Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry to Experimental Analysis of Flow through Multiblade Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Gyeong Rae; Kawahashi, Masaaki; Hirahara, Hiroyuki; Kitadume, Michio

    An experimental analysis of the 3D velocity field of flow is very effective for the understanding of the physical significance of complex flow and for the practical design of fluid machinery. Under the currently circumstance, stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) is one of the promising techniques for the experimental analysis. Although the development of algorithms and the feasibility studies of SPIV have been realized, the accumulation of techniques for applications leading to the design of practical fluid machineries or devices is not yet sufficient. To establish practical techniques for the experimental analysis of 3D flow in fluid machinery by SPIV, the detailed 3D analysis of flow using a utility model of multiblade fans used in automobile air-conditioning systems has been carried out. The stereo view camera arrangement and laser-light-sheet illumination for the complex shape of the fan and for the 3D flow through it have been investigated, and the visualization of experimental results for the understanding of the flow structure has also been discussed. The results obtained using the practical techniques applied in this experiment provide knowledge useful in the understanding of flow through the fan and in improving it.

  10. Processes of late Quaternary turbidity current flow and deposition on the Var deep sea fan, northwest Mediterranean sea

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, D. ); Savoye, B. )

    1993-09-01

    Late Quaternary sedimentation patterns on the Var deep-sea fan are known from high-resolution seismic boomer profiles (vertical resolution < 1 m), piston cores, SAR side-scan sonargraphs, and submersible dives. Foram biostratigraphy and radiocarbon dating provide chronologic control that is seismically correlated across the fan. Regional erosional events correspond to the isotopic state 2 and 6 glacial maxima. A widespread surface sand layer was deposited from the 1979 turbidity current, which broke two submarine cables. Numerical modeling constrains its character. A small slide on the upper prodelta developed into an accelerating turbidity current, which eroded sand from the Var canyon. The current was 30 m thick in the upper valley, expanding downflow to >120 m, where it spilled over the eastern Var sedimentary ridge at a velocity of 2.5 ms[sup [minus]1]. Other Holocene turbidity currents (with a 103-yr recurrence interval) were muddier and thicker, but also deposited sand on middle fan-valley levees and are inferred to have had a similar slide-related origin. Late Pleistocene turbidity currents deposited on the high Var sedimentary ridge. The presence of sediment waves and the cross-flow slope inferred from levee asymmetry indicate that some flow were hundreds of meters thick, with velocities of 0.35 ms[sup [minus]1]. Estimated times for deposition of thick levee mud beds are many days or weeks. Late Pleistocene flows therefore are interpreted to result from hyperpycnal flow of glacial outwash in the Var River. Variation in late Pleistocene-Holocene turbidite sedimentation thus is controlled more by changes in sediment supply than by sea level.

  11. Design and evaluation of an aeroacoustic wind tunnel for measurement of axial flow fans.

    PubMed

    Bilka, M; Anthoine, J; Schram, C

    2011-12-01

    An anechoic wind tunnel dedicated to fan self-noise studies has been designed and constructed at the von Karman Institute The multi-chamber, mass flow driven design allows for all fan performance characteristics, aerodynamic quantities (e.g., wake turbulence measurements), and acoustic properties to be assessed in the same facility with the same conditions. The acoustic chamber performance is assessed using the optimum reference method and found to be within the ISO 3745 standards down to 150 Hz for pure tone and broadband source mechanisms. The additional influence of installation effects of an aerodynamic inlet was found to create a scattered sound field only near the source location, while still providing good anechoic results at more distant sound pressure measurement positions. It was found to have inflow properties, span-wise uniformity, and low turbulence intensity, consistent with those desired for fan self-noise studies.

  12. The Role of Flow Diagnostic Techniques in Fan and Open Rotor Noise Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2016-01-01

    A principal source of turbomachinery noise is the interaction of the rotating and stationary blade rows with the perturbations in the airstream through the engine. As such, a lot of research has been devoted to the study of the turbomachinery noise generation mechanisms. This is particularly true of fan and open rotors, both of which are the major contributors to the overall noise output of modern aircraft engines. Much of the research in fan and open rotor noise has been focused on developing theoretical models for predicting their noise characteristics. These models, which run the gamut from the semi-empirical to fully computational ones, are, in one form or another, informed by the description of the unsteady flow-field in which the propulsors (i.e., the fan and open rotors) operate. Not surprisingly, the fidelity of the theoretical models is dependent, to a large extent, on capturing the nuances of the unsteady flowfield that have a direct role in the noise generation process. As such, flow diagnostic techniques have proven to be indispensible in identifying the shortcoming of theoretical models and in helping to improve them. This presentation will provide a few examples of the role of flow diagnostic techniques in assessing the fidelity and robustness of the fan and open rotor noise prediction models.

  13. Corner flow control in high through-flow axial commercial fan/booster using blade 3-D optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fang; Jin, Donghai; Gui, Xingmin

    2012-02-01

    This study is aimed at using blade 3-D optimization to control corner flows in the high through-flow fan/booster of a high bypass ratio commercial turbofan engine. Two kinds of blade 3-D optimization, end-bending and bow, are focused on. On account of the respective operation mode and environment, the approach to 3-D aerodynamic modeling of rotor blades is different from stator vanes. Based on the understanding of the mechanism of the corner flow and the consideration of intensity problem for rotors, this paper uses a variety of blade 3-D optimization approaches, such as loading distribution optimization, perturbation of departure angles and stacking-axis manipulation, which are suitable for rotors and stators respectively. The obtained 3-D blades and vanes can improve the corner flow features by end-bending and bow effects. The results of this study show that flows in corners of the fan/booster, such as the fan hub region, the tip and hub of the vanes of the booster, are very complex and dominated by 3-D effects. The secondary flows there are found to have a strong detrimental effect on the compressor performance. The effects of both end-bending and bow can improve the flow separation in corners, but the specific ways they work and application scope are somewhat different. Redesigning the blades via blade 3-D optimization to control the corner flow has effectively reduced the loss generation and improved the stall margin by a large amount.

  14. Experimental and analytical investigation of fan flow interaction with downstream struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, T. L.; Ng, W. F.; Obrien, W. F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation which was designed to provide insight into the fundamental aspects of fan rotor-downstream strut interaction was undertaken. High response, miniature pressure transducers were embedded in the rotor blades of an experimental fan rig. Five downstream struts were placed at several downstream locations in the discharge flow annulus of the single-stage machine. Significant interaction of the rotor blade surface pressures with the flow disturbance produced by the downstream struts was measured. Several numerical procedures for calculating the quasi-steady rotor response due to downstream flow obstructions were developed. A preliminary comparison of experimental and calculated fluctuating blade pressures on the rotor blades shows general agreement between the experimental and calculated values.

  15. Design, testing and two-dimensional flow modeling of a multiple-disk fan

    SciTech Connect

    Engin, Tahsin; Oezdemir, Mustafa; Cesmeci, Sevki

    2009-11-15

    A multiple-disk Tesla type fan has been designed, tested and analyzed two-dimensionally using the conservation of angular momentum principle. Experimental results showed that such multiple-disk fans exhibited exceptionally low performance characteristics, which could be attributed to the low viscosity, tangential nature of the flow, and large mechanical energy losses at both suction and discharge sections that are comparable to the total input power. By means of theoretical analysis, local and overall shearing stresses on the disk surfaces have been determined based on tangential and radial velocity distributions of the air flow of different volume flow rates at prescribed disk spaces and rotational speeds. Then the total power transmitted by rotating disks to air flow, and the power acquired by the air flow in the gap due to transfer of angular momentum have been obtained by numerically integrating shearing stresses over the disk surfaces. Using the measured shaft and hydraulic powers, these quantities were utilized to evaluate mechanical energy losses associated with the suction and discharge sections of the fan. (author)

  16. Controls on flow width in aggrading alluvial systems and implications for alluvial fan evolution and environmental reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, Andrew; Quine, Timothy; Clarke, Lucy

    2010-05-01

    Alluvial fans are dynamic landforms, the evolution of which is controlled by both external environmental forcing (climate, tectonics and base level change) and internal process-form feedbacks. The latter include changes in flow configuration and width, driven by aggradation and degradation, which may in turn promote changes in sediment transport capacity. Recent numerical modelling indicates that such feedbacks may lead to dramatic and persistent fan entrenchment in the absence of external forcing. However, the parameterisation of flow width within such models is untested to date and is subject to considerable uncertainty. Here we consider this problem and its implications in two ways. (1) We present results from a physical modelling study of flow width dynamics on an aggrading fan in which spatial and temporal patterns of fan inundation are monitored continuously using analysis of digital vertical photography. Observed flow widths are compared with results from a simple theoretical model developed for non-equilibrium (aggradational) conditions. Results demonstrate that the theoretical model is capable of capturing the first-order characteristics of width adjustment over the course of the experiment, and indicate that flow width is a function of fan aggradation rate. This illustrates that models of alluvial flow width derived for equilibrium conditions may have limited utility in non-equilibrium situations, despite their widespread use to date. (2) We then apply this model to simulate post-glacial fan entrenchment in the Avoca Valley, New Zealand. This is carried out by conducting a series of c. 80000 numerical simulations of fan formation, within a Monte Carlo framework, in order to evaluate the potential for reconstructing past environmental conditions by matching simulated and observed fan morphologies. Our results indicate that simulations based on a wide range of model boundary conditions are able to reproduce the observed fan characteristics. Such equifinal

  17. Numerical simulation and analysis of the flow in a two-staged axial fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J. Q.; Dou, H. S.; Jia, H. X.; Chen, X. P.; Wei, Y. K.; Dong, M. W.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, numerical simulation was performed for the internal three-dimensional turbulent flow field in the two-stage axial fan using steady three-dimensional in-compressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the Realizable turbulent model. The numerical simulation results of the steady analysis were combined with the flow characteristics of two- staged axial fan, the influence of the mutual effect between the blade and the vane on the flow of the two inter-stages was analyzed emphatically. This paper studied how the flow field distribution in inter-stage is influenced by the wake interaction and potential flow interaction of mutual effect in the impeller-vane inter-stage and the vane-impeller inter-stage. The results showed that: Relatively, wake interaction has an advantage over potential flow interaction in the impeller-vane inter-stage; potential flow interaction has an advantage over wake interaction in the vane-impeller inter-stage. In other words, distribution of flow field in the two interstages is determined by the rotating component.

  18. Ducted fan inlet/exit and rotor tip flow improvements for vertical lift systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akturk, Ali

    The current research utilized experimental and computational techniques in 5" and 22" diameter ducted fan test systems that have been custom designed and manufactured. Qualitative investigation of flow around the ducted fan was also performed using smoke flow visualizations. Quantitative measurements consisted of 2D and 3D velocity measurements using planar and Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV and SPIV), high resolution total pressure measurements using Kiel total pressure probes and real time six-component force and torque measurements. The computational techniques used in this thesis included a recently developed radial equilibrium based rotor model(REBRM) and a three dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) based CFD model. A radial equilibrium based rotor model (REBRM) developed by the author was effectively integrated into a three-dimensional RANS based computational system. The PIV measurements and computational flow predictions using (REBRM) near the fan inlet plane were in a good agreement at hover and forward flight conditions. The aerodynamic modifications resulting from the fan inlet flow distortions in forward flight regime were clearly captured in 2D PIV results. High resolution total pressure measurements at the downstream of the fan rotor showed that tip leakage, rotor hub separation, and passage flow related total pressure losses were dominant in hover condition. However, the losses were dramatically increased in forward flight because of inlet lip separation and distortion. A novel ducted fan inlet flow conditioning concept named "Double Ducted Fan" (DDF) was developed. The (DDF) concept has a potential to significantly improve the performance and controllability of VTOL UAVs and many other ducted fan based vertical lift systems. The new concept that will significantly reduce the inlet lip separation related performance penalties used a secondary stationary duct system to control "inlet lip separation" occurring especially at

  19. Relationship between surface roughness and age of deposits in debris flow fans, Eastern Owens Valley, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihir, Monika; Wasklewicz, Thad; Liu, Tanzhuo

    2015-04-01

    The episodic nature of debris flows result in deposits of variable ages on the debris flow fan surface. This study maps the variable ages of fan deposits (called geomorphic units here) of four debris flow fans of south-eastern Owens Valley, California, USA from aerial photographs and field surveys. It then assesses the relationships between the age of the deposits, and their surface roughness and particle sizes. The deposits of different ages have different characteristics and are distinguished on the basis of different soil development, varnish accumulation, desert pavement development and surficial topography. The four fans typically have 4 geomorphic units on their surface. Numerical dates of the geomorphic units were obtained with the aid of varnish microlamination dating techniques. High resolution digital elevation data (5 cm planimetric resolution), were generated from a terrestrial laser scanner for each geomorphic unit (16 geomorphic units in total). The elevation data was then used in quantifying surface roughness. Particle sizes were also measured at each geomorphic unit where 50 particles were measured within a rectangular box (1.24 m by 1.00 m). We find that (i) the age of the oldest deposits range from 11,100 to 12,350 years BP (before present), second oldest deposits are around 7300-9500 years BP, third oldest deposits are around 4000 to 6000 years BP and the active deposits are essentially modern to several hundred years old, (ii) the oldest deposits have maximum surface roughness while the youngest deposits have comparatively less surface roughness, (iii) the average particle sizes of the deposits range from 3.15 cm to 22.04 cm with high variability (standard deviation ranging from 2.75 to 10.50) observed in all geomorphic units. Study of relationships between the variables brings out (i) an insignificant relationship between the surface roughness and age of deposits, (ii) an insignificant relationship between particle size variability and age of

  20. Modeling jets in cross flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1994-01-01

    Various approaches to the modeling of jets in cross flow are reviewed. These are grouped into four classes, namely: empirical models, integral models, perturbation models, and numerical models. Empirical models depend largely on the correlation of experimental data and are mostly useful for first-order estimates of global properties such as jet trajectory and velocity and temperature decay rates. Integral models are based on some ordinary-differential form of the conservation laws, but require substantial empirical calibration. They allow more details of the flow field to be obtained; simpler versions have to assume similarity of velocity and temperature profiles, but more sophisticated ones can actually calculate these profiles. Perturbation models require little empirical input, but the need for small parameters to ensure convergent expansions limits their application to either the near-field or the far-field. Therefore, they are mostly useful for the study of flow physics. Numerical models are based on conservation laws in partial-differential form. They require little empirical input and have the widest range of applicability. They also require the most computational resources. Although many qualitative and quantitative features of jets in cross flow have been predicted with numerical models, many issues affecting accuracy such as grid resolution and turbulence model are not completely resolved.

  1. Experimental Analysis of 3D Flow in Scroll Casing of Multi-Blade Fan for Air-Conditioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadume, Michio; Kawahashi, Masaaki; Hirahara, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Tadashi; Yanagawa, Hideki

    The multi-blade fan, which has been widely used as a blower for air-conditioning systems of vehicles, is one of the well-established fluid machinery. However, many factors must be considered in its practical design because the flow generated in the fan is quite complicated with three-dimensionality and unsteadiness. The fundamental fan performance is primarily determined by the impeller of the fan, and is also affected by the scroll casing. However, the theoretical estimation of the effect of the casing on the performance has not been well established. In order to estimate the casing effect on fan performance, detailed three-dimensional (3D) flow analysis in the casing is necessary. Stereoscopic PIV (SPIV) is one of the useful techniques for experimental analysis of 3D flow fields. There are some difficulties in practical application of SPIV for flow analysis in fluid machinery with complicated geometry, but the results obtained provide useful information for understanding the 3D flow field. In this report, experimental investigation of the flow in the scroll casing has been carried out using PIV and SPIV under the premise of downsizing automobile air conditioner fans.

  2. Experimental validation of tonal noise control from subsonic axial fans using flow control obstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Anthony; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice; Gervais, Yves

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents the acoustic performance of a novel approach for the passive adaptive control of tonal noise radiated from subsonic fans. Tonal noise originates from non-uniform flow that causes circumferentially varying blade forces and gives rise to a considerably larger radiated dipolar sound at the blade passage frequency (BPF) and its harmonics compared to the tonal noise generated by a uniform flow. The approach presented in this paper uses obstructions in the flow to destructively interfere with the primary tonal noise arising from various flow conditions. The acoustic radiation of the obstructions is first demonstrated experimentally. Indirect on-axis acoustic measurements are used to validate the analytical prediction of the circumferential spectrum of the blade unsteady lift and related indicators generated by the trapezoidal and sinusoidal obstructions presented in Ref. [A. Gérard, A. Berry, P. Masson, Y. Gervais, Modelling of tonal noise control from subsonic axial fans using flow control obstructions, Journal of Sound and Vibration (2008), this issue, doi: 10.1016/j.jsv.2008.09.027.] and also by cylindrical obstructions used in the literature. The directivity and sound power attenuation are then given in free field for the control of the BPF tone generated by rotor/outlet guide vane (OGV) interaction and the control of an amplified BPF tone generated by the rotor/OGV interaction with an added triangular obstruction between two outlet guide vanes to enhance the primary non-uniform flow. Global control was demonstrated in free field, attenuation up to 8.4 dB of the acoustic power at BPF has been measured. Finally, the aerodynamic performances of the automotive fan used in this study are almost not affected by the presence of the control obstruction.

  3. Flow control in axial fan inlet guide vanes by synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyrus, V.; Trávníček, Z.; Wurst, P.; Kordík, J.

    2013-04-01

    Tested high pressure axial flow fan with hub/tip ratio of 0.70 and external diameter of 600 mm consisted of inlet guide vanes (IGV), rotor and stator blade rows. Fan peripheral velocity was 47 m/s. Air volume flow rate was changed by turning of rear part of the inlet guide vanes. At turning of 20 deg the flow was separated on the IGV profiles. The synthetic jets were introduced through radial holes in machine casing in the location before flow separation origin. Synthetic jet actuator was designed with the use of a speaker by UT AVCR. Its membrane had diameter of 63 mm. Excitation frequency was chosen in the range of 500 Hz - 700 Hz. Synthetic jets favourably influenced separated flow on the vane profiles in the distance of (5 - 12) mm from the casing surface. The reduction of flow separation area caused in the region near the casing the decrease of the profile loss coefficient approximately by 20%.

  4. Climatic controls on debris-flow activity and sediment aggradation: The Del Medio fan, NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savi, Sara; Schildgen, Taylor F.; Tofelde, Stefanie; Wittmann, Hella; Scherler, Dirk; Mey, Jürgen; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-12-01

    In the Central Andes, several studies on alluvial terraces and valley fills have linked sediment aggradation to periods of enhanced sediment supply. However, debate continues over whether tectonic or climatic factors are most important in triggering the enhanced supply. The Del Medio catchment in the Humahuaca Basin (Eastern Cordillera, NW Argentina) is located within a transition zone between subhumid and arid climates and hosts the only active debris-flow fan within this intermontane valley. By combining 10Be analyses of boulder and sediment samples within the Del Medio catchment, with regional morphometric measurements of nearby catchments, we identify the surface processes responsible for aggradation in the Del Medio fan and their likely triggers. We find that the fan surface has been shaped by debris flows and channel avulsions during the last 400 years. Among potential tectonic, climatic, and autogenic factors that might influence deposition, our analyses point to a combination of several favorable factors that drive aggradation. These are in particular the impact of occasional abundant rainfall on steep slopes in rock types prone to failure, located in a region characterized by relatively low rainfall amounts and limited transport capacity. These characteristics are primarily associated with the climatic transition zone between the humid foreland and the arid orogen interior, which creates an imbalance between sediment supply and sediment transfer. The conditions and processes that drive aggradation in the Del Medio catchment today may provide a modern analog for the conditions and processes that drove aggradation in other nearby tributaries in the past.

  5. Relationships between debris fan morphology and flow rheology for wet and dry flows on Earth and Mars: A numerical modeling investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Luke A.; Pelletier, Jon D.

    2013-09-01

    Liquid water may have flowed on the Martian surface in the recent geologic past. Arguments for and against liquid water flows have been made, in part, using interpretations of the morphology of Martian gullies and their associated debris fans. On Earth, sediment transport on steep, debris-flow-dominated hillslopes is often assumed to be a nonlinear function of hillslope gradient. In detail, however, sediment transport on such slopes must also depend on the rheology of the mass movements that drive the majority of transport, both in magnitude and frequency. In this study, we attempt to provide a firmer basis for (1) interpreting flow constituents and/or rheology from debris-fan morphology on Mars and (2) modeling debris-flow-dominated hillslopes on Earth by developing a mass-conservative numerical model that links the rheology of wet and dry granular flows on steep slopes to the morphology of debris fans deposited at their base. Individual flows are routed from initiation points on a slope to stopping points at the base of the hillslope. Model predictions for the shape and average slope of the fans depend on flow rheology. Model results indicate that debris fans associated with dry granular flows may develop average slopes below the kinetic angle of friction. In both the dry and wet cases, the model results suggest that fan morphology depends on the mean properties of the flows involved in fan formation as well as the amount of variation in flow behavior between individual mass movement events. These results provide an improved basis for interpreting the morphology of debris fans on both Earth and Mars.

  6. Natural hazards on alluvial fans: the debris flow and flash flood disaster of December 1999, Vargas state, Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Matthew C.; Wieczorek, Gerald F.; Eaton, L.S.; Torres-Sierra, Heriberto; Sylva, Walter F.

    2001-01-01

    Large populations live on or near alluvial fans in locations such as Los Angeles, California, Salt Lake City, Utah, Denver, Colorado, and lesser known areas such as Sarno, Italy, and Vargas, Venezuela. Debris flows and flash floods occur episodically in these alluvial fan environments, and place many communities at high risk during intense and prolonged rainfall. In December 1999, rainstorms induced thousands of landslides along the Cordillera de la Costa, Vargas, Venezuela. Rainfall accumulation of 293 mm during the first 2 weeks of December was followed by an additional 911 mm of rainfall on December 14 through 16. Debris flows and floods inundated coastal communities resulting in a catastrophic death toll of as many as 30,000 people. Flash floods and debris flows caused severe property destruction on alluvial fans at the mouths of the coastal mountain drainage network. In time scales spanning thousands of years, the alluvial fans along this Caribbean coastline are dynamic zones of high geomorphic activity. Because most of the coastal zone in Vargas consists of steep mountain fronts that rise abruptly from the Caribbean Sea, the alluvial fans provide practically the only flat areas upon which to build. Rebuilding and reoccupation of these areas requires careful determination of hazard zones to avoid future loss of life and property. KEY TERMS: Debris flows, flash floods, alluvial fans, natural hazards, landslides, Venezuela

  7. Air-structure coupling features analysis of mining contra-rotating axial flow fan cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. G.; Sun, W.; Li, F.; Zhang, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between contra-rotating axial flow fan blade and working gas has been studied by means of establishing air-structure coupling control equation and combining Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational solid mechanics (CSM). Based on the single flow channel model, the Finite Volume Method was used to make the field discrete. Additionally, the SIMPLE algorithm, the Standard k-ε model and the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian dynamic grids technology were utilized to get the airflow motion by solving the discrete governing equations. At the same time, the Finite Element Method was used to make the field discrete to solve dynamic response characteristics of blade. Based on weak coupling method, data exchange from the fluid solver and the solid solver was processed on the coupling interface. Then interpolation was used to obtain the coupling characteristics. The results showed that the blade's maximum amplitude was on the tip of the last-stage blade and aerodynamic force signal could reflect the blade working conditions to some extent. By analyzing the flow regime in contra-rotating axial flow fan, it could be found that the vortex core region was mainly in the blade surface, the hub and the blade clearance. In those regions, the turbulence intensity was very high. The last-stage blade's operating life is shorter than that of the pre-stage blade due to the fatigue fracture occurs much more easily on the last-stage blade which bears more stress.

  8. Sediments and processes on a small stream-flow dominated, devonian alluvial fan, Shetland Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Philip A.

    1981-05-01

    The main conglomerate type of a small Devonian alluvial fan in Shetland, northern Britain, is an inverse to normally graded framework-supported gravel. The sedimentological details of these beds and fundamental considerations of the mechanics of movement of highly concentrated flows suggests that neither debris-flow nor grain-flow were responsible for the deposition of these conglomerates. On the contrary, these inverse to normally graded conglomerates were deposited by water as thick gravel sheets with little topographic relief, but broadly analogous to longitudinal bars. They were deposited under high aggradation conditions first on the rising and then on the falling flood. The high concentration of material in transport on the rising and peak flood was responsible for the polymodal and unstratified nature of the conglomerates. As the flood waned, normal grading was developed and a preferred horizontal fabric was produced under low concentrations of sediment. Other conglomerate types, comparatively of lesser importance, were deposited from highly concentrated clast dispersions and are notably richer in matrix and locally possess inverse grading. The hydrological environment was one of flashy discharges of short duration but of high velocity. Flow was dissipated rapidly, perhaps due to extreme water loss. This example from the Devonian of Shetland provides an interesting alternative to the mass-transport dominated fan models currently in vogue.

  9. Laser anemometer measurements in a transonic axial-flow fan rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strazisar, Anthony J.; Wood, Jerry R.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Suder, Kenneth L.

    1989-01-01

    Laser anemometer surveys were made of the 3-D flow field in NASA rotor 67, a low aspect ratio transonic axial-flow fan rotor. The test rotor has a tip relative Mach number of 1.38. The flowfield was surveyed at design speed at near peak efficiency and near stall operating conditions. Data is presented in the form of relative Mach number and relative flow angle distributions on surfaces of revolution at nine spanwise locations evenly spaced from hub to tip. At each spanwise location, data was acquired upstream, within, and downstream of the rotor. Aerodynamic performance measurements and detailed rotor blade and annulus geometry are also presented so that the experimental results can be used as a test case for 3-D turbomachinery flow analysis codes.

  10. Cross Flow Parameter Calculation for Aerodynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, David, Jr. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system and method for determining a cross flow angle for a feature on a structure. A processor unit receives location information identifying a location of the feature on the structure, determines an angle of the feature, identifies flow information for the location, determines a flow angle using the flow information, and determines the cross flow angle for the feature using the flow angle and the angle of the feature. The flow information describes a flow of fluid across the structure. The flow angle comprises an angle of the flow of fluid across the structure for the location of the feature.

  11. The STOL performance of a two-engine, USB powered-lift aircraft with cross-shafted fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, V. C.; Wilson, S. B., III; Zola, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The short takeoff and landing capabilities that characterize the performance of powered-lift aircraft are dependent on engine thrust and are, therefore, severely affected by loss of an engine. This paper shows that the effects of engine loss on the short takeoff and landing performance of powered-lift aircraft can be effectively mitigated by cross-shafting the engine fans in a twin-engine configuration. Engine-out takeoff and landing performances are compared for three powered-lift aircraft configurations: one with four engines, one with two engines, and one with two engines in which the fans are cross-shafted. The results show that the engine-out takeoff and landing performance of the cross-shafted two-engine configuration is significantly better than that of the two-engine configuration without cross-shafting.

  12. Numerical Study of Aeroacoustic Sound on Performance of Bladeless Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Mohammad; Sojoudi, Atta; Hafezisefat, Parinaz

    2017-03-01

    Aeroacoustic performance of fans is essential due to their widespread application. Therefore, the original aim of this paper is to evaluate the generated noise owing to different geometric parameters. In current study, effect of five geometric parameters was investigated on well performance of a Bladeless fan. Airflow through this fan was analyzed simulating a Bladeless fan within a 2 m×2 m×4 m room. Analysis of the flow field inside the fan and evaluating its performance were obtained by solving conservations of mass and momentum equations for aerodynamic investigations and FW-H noise equations for aeroacoustic analysis. In order to design Bladeless fan Eppler 473 airfoil profile was used as the cross section of this fan. Five distinct parameters, namely height of cross section of the fan, outlet angle of the flow relative to the fan axis, thickness of airflow outlet slit, hydraulic diameter and aspect ratio for circular and quadratic cross sections were considered. Validating acoustic code results, we compared numerical solution of FW-H noise equations for NACA0012 with experimental results. FW-H model was selected to predict the noise generated by the Bladeless fan as the numerical results indicated a good agreement with experimental ones for NACA0012. To validate 3-D numerical results, the experimental results of a round jet showed good agreement with those simulation data. In order to indicate the effect of each mentioned parameter on the fan performance, SPL and OASPL diagrams were illustrated.

  13. Investigation of the Flow Physics Driving Stall-Side Flutter in Advanced Forward Swept Fan Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Albert J.; Liu, Jong S.; Panovsky, Josef; Bakhle, Milind A.; Stefko, George; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2003-01-01

    Flutter-free operation of advanced transonic fan designs continues to be a challenging task for the designers of aircraft engines. In order to meet the demands of increased performance and lighter weight, these modern fan designs usually feature low-aspect ratio shroudless rotor blade designs that make the task of achieving adequate flutter margin even more challenging for the aeroelastician. This is especially true for advanced forward swept designs that encompass an entirely new design space compared to previous experience. Fortunately, advances in unsteady computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques over the past decade now provide an analysis capability that can be used to quantitatively assess the aeroelastic characteristics of these next generation fans during the design cycle. For aeroelastic applications, Mississippi State University and NASA Glenn Research Center have developed the CFD code TURBO-AE. This code is a time-accurate three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes unsteady flow solver developed for axial-flow turbomachinery that can model multiple blade rows undergoing harmonic oscillations with arbitrary interblade phase angles, i.e., nodal diameter patterns. Details of the code can be found in Chen et al. (1993, 1994), Bakhle et al. (1997, 1998), and Srivastava et al. (1999). To assess aeroelastic stability, the work-per-cycle from TURBO-AE is converted to the critical damping ratio since this value is more physically meaningful, with both the unsteady normal pressure and viscous shear forces included in the work-per-cycle calculation. If the total damping (aerodynamic plus mechanical) is negative, then the blade is unstable since it extracts energy from the flow field over the vibration cycle. TURBO-AE is an integral part of an aeroelastic design system being developed at Honeywell Engines, Systems & Services for flutter and forced response predictions, with test cases from development rig and engine tests being used to validate its predictive

  14. A computational study of the interaction noise from a small axial-flow fan.

    PubMed

    Lu, H Z; Huang, Lixi; So, R M C; Wang, J

    2007-09-01

    Small axial-flow fans used for computer cooling and many other appliances feature a rotor driven by a downstream motor held by several cylindrical struts. This study focuses on the aerodynamic mechanism of rotor-strut interaction for an isolated fan. The three-dimensional, unsteady flow field is calculated using FLUENT, and the sound radiation predicted by acoustic analogy is compared with measurement data. Striking differences are found between the pressure oscillations in various parts of the structural surfaces during an interaction event. The suction surface of the blade experiences a sudden increase in pressure when the blade trailing edge sweeps past a strut, while the process of pressure decrease on the pressure side of the blade is rather gradual during the interaction. The contribution of the latter towards the total thrust force on the structure is cancelled out significantly by that on the strut. In terms of the acoustic contributions from the rotor and strut, the upstream rotor dominates and this feature differs from the usual rotor-stator interaction acoustics in which the downstream part is responsible for most of the noise. It is therefore argued that the dominant interaction mechanism is potential flow in nature.

  15. Steady and Unsteady Flow Field Measurements Within a NASA 22-Inch Fan Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Krupar, Martin J.; Helland, Stephen M.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate possible sources of fan noise in the flow developed by a 22-in. (55.9 cm) diameter turbofan model. Flow diagnostic data were acquired to identify possible sources of both tone and broadband noise. Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to characterize the tip flows that develop within the rotor blade passages, the wake flow downstream of the rotor, and the shock waves that develop on the blades when operated at transonic relative tip speeds. Single-point hot-wire measurements were made in the rotor wake to determine the frequency content and the length scales of the flow unsteadiness. The results document the changes in the rotor wake flow with both rotor speed and axial distance downstream of the rotor. The data also show the tip flow development within the blade passage, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the following blade. Data also depict the variation of the tip flow with tip clearance. LDV data obtained within the blade passages at high rotor speeds illustrate the passage-to-passage variation of the mean shock position. Spectra computed from the single-point hot-wire measurements illustrate how the energy in the flow oscillations is split between periodic and random components, and how this split varies with both radial and axial position in the rotor wake.

  16. Investigation of flow phenomena in a transonic fan rotor using laser anemometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strazisar, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    Several flow phenomena including flowfield periodicity, rotor shock oscillation, and rotor shock system geometry were investigated in a transonic low aspect ratio fan rotor using laser anemometry. Flow periodicity is found to increase with increasing rotor pressure rise, and to correlate with blade geometry variations. Analysis of time-accurate laser anemometer data indicates that the rotor shock oscillates about its mean location with an amplitude of 3 to 4 percent of rotor chord. The shock surface is nearly two-dimensional for levels of rotor pressure rise at and above the peak efficiency level but becomes more complex for lower levels of pressure rise. Spanwise shock lean generates radial flows due to streamline deflection in the hub-to-shroud streamsurface.

  17. Investigation of flow phenomena in a transonic fan rotor using laser anemometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strazisar, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    Several flow phenomena including flowfield periodicity, rotor shock oscillation, and rotor shock system geometry were investigated in a transonic low aspect ratio fan rotor using laser anemometry. Flow periodicity is found to increase with increasing rotor pressure rise, and to correlate with blade geometry variations. Analysis of time-accurate laser anemometer data indicates that the rotor shock oscillates about its mean location with an amplitude of 3 to 4 percent of rotor chord. The shock surface is nearly two-dimensional or levels of rotor pressure rise at and above the peak efficiency level but becomes more complex for lower levels of pressure rise. Spanwise shock lean generates radial flows due to streamline deflection in the hub-to-shroud streamsurface.

  18. Early to Late Pleistocene history of debris-flow fan evolution in western Death Valley (California) using cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dühnforth, Miriam; Densmore, Alexander L.; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Allen, Philip; Kubik, Peter W.

    2017-03-01

    Debris-flow fans with depositional records over several 105 years may be useful archives for the understanding of fan construction by debris flows and post-depositional surface modification over long timescales. Reading these archives, however, requires that we establish the temporal and spatial pattern of debris-flow activity over time. We used a combination of geomorphic mapping of fan surface characteristics, digital topographic analysis, and cosmogenic radionuclide dating using 10Be and 26Al to study the evolution of the Warm Springs fan on the west side of southern Death Valley, California. The 10Be concentrations yield dates that vary from 989 ± 43 to 595 ± 17 ka on the proximal fan and between 369 ± 13 and 125 ± 5 ka on distal fan surfaces. The interpretation of these results as true depositional ages though is complicated by high inheritance with a minimum of 65 ka measured at the catchment outlet and of at least 125 ka at the distal fan. Results from the 26Al measurements suggest that most sample locations on the fan surfaces underwent simple exposure and were not affected by complex histories of burial and re-exposure. This implies that Warm Springs fan is a relatively stable landform that underwent several 105 years of fan aggradation before fan head incision caused abandonment of the proximal and central fan surfaces and deposition continued on a younger unit at the distal fan. We show that the primary depositional debris-flow morphology is eliminated over a time scale of less than 105 years, which prevents the delineation of individual debris flows as well as the precise reconstruction of lateral shifts in deposition as we find it on younger debris-flow fans. Secondary post-depositional processes control subsequent evolution of surface morphology with the dissection of planar surfaces while smoothing of convex-up interfluves between incised channels continues through time.

  19. Parametric modeling and stagger angle optimization of an axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. X.; Zhang, C. H.; Liu, Y.; Y Zheng, S.

    2013-12-01

    Axial flow fans are widely used in every field of social production. Improving their efficiency is a sustained and urgent demand of domestic industry. The optimization of stagger angle is an important method to improve fan performance. Parametric modeling and calculation process automation are realized in this paper to improve optimization efficiency. Geometric modeling and mesh division are parameterized based on GAMBIT. Parameter setting and flow field calculation are completed in the batch mode of FLUENT. A control program is developed in Visual C++ to dominate the data exchange of mentioned software. It also extracts calculation results for optimization algorithm module (provided by Matlab) to generate directive optimization control parameters, which as feedback are transferred upwards to modeling module. The center line of the blade airfoil, based on CLARK y profile, is constructed by non-constant circulation and triangle discharge method. Stagger angles of six airfoil sections are optimized, to reduce the influence of inlet shock loss as well as gas leak in blade tip clearance and hub resistance at blade root. Finally an optimal solution is obtained, which meets the total pressure requirement under given conditions and improves total pressure efficiency by about 6%.

  20. Performance of a highly loaded two stage axial-flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggeri, R. S.; Benser, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    A two-stage axial-flow fan with a tip speed of 1450 ft/sec (442 m/sec) and an overall pressure ratio of 2.8 was designed, built, and tested. At design speed and pressure ratio, the measured flow matched the design value of 184.2 lbm/sec (83.55kg/sec). The adiabatic efficiency at the design operating point was 85.7 percent. The stall margin at design speed was 10 percent. A first-bending-mode flutter of the second-stage rotor blades was encountered near stall at speeds between 77 and 93 percent of design, and also at high pressure ratios at speeds above 105 percent of design. A 5 deg closed reset of the first-stage stator eliminated second-stage flutter for all but a narrow speed range near 90 percent of design.

  1. Aerodynamic performance of a 1.25-pressure-ratio axial-flow fan stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Steinke, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Aerodynamic design parameters and overall and blade-element performances of a 1.25-pressure-ratio fan stage are reported. Detailed radial surveys were made over the stable operating flow range at rotative speeds from 70 to 120 percent of design speed. At design speed, the measured stage peak efficiency of 0.872 occurred at a weight flow of 34.92 kilograms per second and a pressure ratio of 1.242. Stage stall margin is about 20 percent based on the peak efficiency and stall conditions. The overall peak efficiency for the rotor was 0.911. The overall stage performance showed no significant change when the stators were positioned at 1, 2, or 4 chords downstream of the rotor.

  2. Sound attenuations of axial fan blade tones using flow-driven tunable resonator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorny, Lee James

    Flow-excited, tunable quarter-wavelength resonators can be integrated into the shrouds of ducted subsonic axial fans. This study explores their effectiveness in reducing propagations of tonal noise by means of acoustic wave cancellation. Resonators are a non-intrusive method of generating a secondary sound field near the plane of a rotor. As they can be strategically tuned to reduce radiated noise at the blade passage frequency (BPF) and its harmonics, resonators can be useful for a variety of applications to quiet existing and future turbomachinery. Experiments have demonstrated that a single quarter wave resonator is effective in reducing unidirectional plane wave propagations for long wavelength ducted applications while an array is effective for shorter wavelength or un-ducted facilities where shrouded fans are used. Testing conducted at Center for Acoustics and Vibrations (CAV) at the Pennsylvania State University the Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft und Raumfahrt (DLR) in Berlin, Germany demonstrated that resonator arrays were effective in attenuating shorter wavelength plane-wave and higher order modal propagations of blade tone noise. A chiller fan enclosure, constructed in the CAV laboratory emulated an industrial chiller in its operation. Using this facility, resonators were observed to attenuate blade tone noise from a non-ideal ducted geometry. The approaches used in this study evolved from Helmholtz resonators to conventional quarter wave tubes, to mouth tunable resonators, and finally to back-wall tunable resonators. These developments in tuning allowed for independent control of a resonator's magnitude and phase of the secondary sound field produced by the resonators. It was demonstrated that the use of two tunable resonator chambers oriented axially on either side of the blade region enables a dipole-like secondary sound field to be passively generated and bi-directional attenuations of plane wave noise to be achieved. Tonal attenuations of 28 dB were

  3. GIS-based cell model for simulating debris flow runout on a fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoretti, Carlo; Degetto, Massimo; Boreggio, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    A GIS-based cell model, based on a kinematic approach is proposed to simulate debris flow routing on a fan. The sediment-water mixture is modeled as a monophasic continuum, and the flow pattern is discretized by square cells, 1 m in size, that coincide with the DEM cells. Flow occurs from cells with a higher mixture free surface to those with a lower mixture free surface. A uniform-flow law is used if the elevation of the former cell is higher than that of the latter; otherwise, the flow is simulated using the broad-crested weir law. Erosion and deposition are simulated using an empirical law that is adjusted for a monophasic continuum. The sediment concentration in the routing volume is computed at each time step and controls both erosion and deposition. The cell model is used to simulate a debris flow that occurred on the Rio Lazer (Dolomites, North-Eastern Italian Alps) on November 4th, 1966. Furthermore, the hydrologic and the hydraulic conditions for the initiation of debris flow are simulated, providing the solid-liquid hydrograph of the resulting debris flow. A number of simulations has been carried out with physically reasonable parameters. The results are compared with the extension of the debris-flow deposition area and the map of observed depths of deposited sediments. This comparison shows that the proposed model provides good performance. The analysis of sensitivity carried out by systematically varying the model parameters shows that lower performances are associated with parameter values that are not physically reasonable. The same event is also simulated using a cellular automata model and a finite volume two-dimensional model. The results show that the two models provide a sediment deposition pattern less accurate than that provided by the present cell model.

  4. Investigation of the three-dimensional flow field within a transonic fan rotor: Experiment and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierzga, M. J.; Wood, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the three dimensional flow field through a low aspect ratio, transonic, axial flow fan rotor has been conducted using an advanced laser anemometer (LA) system. Laser velocimeter measurements of the rotor flow field at the design operating speed and over a range of through flow conditions are compared to analytical solutions. The numerical technique used herein yields the solution to the full, three dimensional, unsteady Euler equations using an explicit time marching, finite volume approach. The numerical analysis, when coupled with a simplified boundary layer calculation, generally yields good agreement with the experimental data. The test rotor has an aspect ratio of 1.56, a design total pressure ratio of 1.629 and a tip relative Mach number of 1.38. The high spatial resolution of the LA data matrix (9 radial by 30 axial by 50 blade to blade) permits details of the transonic flow field such as shock location, turning distribution and blade loading levels to be investigated and compared to analytical results.

  5. A prediction model for the vortex shedding noise from the wake of an airfoil or axial flow fan blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Chung, M. K.; Kim, Y.-H.

    1993-06-01

    An analytical model is presented for predicting the vortex shedding noise generated from the wake of axial flow fan blades. The downstream wake of a fan blade is assumed to be dominated by the von Karman vortex street, and the strength and the shedding frequency of the wake vortex are determined from the wake structure model. The fluctuating pressure and lift on the blade surface, which are induced from the vortices in the wake, are analyzed by incorporating the wake model for the von Karman vortex street with thin airfoil theory. The predicted vortex shedding frequency and the overall sound pressure level compare favorably with the measured results for the vortex shedding noise from axial flow fans.

  6. Performance of 1.15-pressure-ratio fan stage at several rotor blade setting angles with reverse flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovich, G.; Moore, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    A 51 cm diameter low pressure ratio fan stage was tested in reverse flow. Survey flow data were taken over the range of rotative speed from 50 percent to 100 percent design speed at several rotor blade setting angles through both flat and feather pitch. Normal flow design values of pressure ratio and weight flow were 1.15 and 29.9 kg/sec with a rotor tip speed of 243.8 m/sec. The maximum thrust in reverse flow was 52.5 percent of design thrust in normal flow.

  7. Controls on fan depositional processes in the schist ranges of the Southern Alps, New Zealand, and implications for debris-flow hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Scally, F. A.; Owens, I. F.; Louis, J.

    2010-10-01

    Sixteen morphometric and vegetation cover variables associated with 32 debris-flow and 28 fluvial fans and their basins in the schist ranges of the Southern Alps of New Zealand are examined. The results show statistically significant differences in the area, length, planimetric shape, relief ratio, Melton's ruggedness ( R), and forest and total vegetation cover between debris-flow and fluvial basins, and in the apex and toe elevations, area, and upper and average axial gradients between debris-flow and fluvial fans. All of these variables except the apex and toe elevations of the fans reflect differences between debris-flow and fluvial processes and environmental controls on them. Discriminant analysis indicates that the relief ratio and Melton's R of the basin and upper and average gradients of the fan axis are able to correctly classify debris-flow and fluvial fans, with almost equally good results obtained by employing only a pair of variables: either basin relief ratio and upper fan gradient or basin Melton's R and basin shape. The lower thresholds at debris-flow sites and upper thresholds at fluvial sites for the relief ratio and Melton's R of the basin and upper and average gradients of the fan are identified, and these as well as the mean values of these variables show significant differences from fans in nearby sedimentary ranges of the Southern Alps with important implications for the assessment of debris-flow hazard on fans. Fan gradient is found to be closely associated with basin size (area and length) at debris-flow sites, but with basin ruggedness (relief ratio) at fluvial sites. Both fan types show a weak association between their size and the size of the contributing basin.

  8. An experimental investigation on the tip leakage noise in axial-flow fans with rotating shroud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, Edward; Cattanei, Andrea; Mazzocut Zecchin, Fabio; Milanese, Gabriele; Parodi, Davide

    2016-08-01

    The tip leakage noise generated by a shrouded rotor of an axial-flow fan has been experimentally studied. The measurements have been taken at high flow rate and at the design point in a hemi-anechoic chamber, at constant rotational speed and during speed ramps. A test plenum designed according to ISO 10302 has been employed to modify the operating conditions and different inlet configurations, ducted and unducted with standard and reduced tip gap, have been considered. The basic features of the inflow have been studied by means of aerodynamic measurements taken upstream of the rotor. To separate the noise generating mechanisms from the acoustic propagation effects, the acoustic response function of the test configuration has been computed employing the spectral decomposition method, and then it has been compared with the velocity-scaled, constant-Strouhal number SPL. In this way, the noise components related to the tip leakage flow have been identified and their connection with geometry have been highlighted. The broadband part of the spectra and the peaks related to the tip leakage flow are affected by the same propagation effects, but show a different dependence on the rotational speed and on the operating point. The upstream geometry affects the radiated noise much more than the performance and even a strong reduction in the tip-gap cannot completely eliminate the related noise.

  9. Measurements of the unsteady flow field within the stator row of a transonic axial-flow fan. 1: Measurement and analysis technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, K. L.; Hathaway, M. D.; Okiishi, T. H.; Strazisar, A. J.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    This two-part paper presents laser anemometer measurements of the unsteady velocity field within the stator row of a transonic axial-flow fan. The objective is to provide additional insight into unsteady blade-row interactions within high speed compressors which affect stage efficiency, energy transfer, and other design considerations. Part 1 describes the measurement and analysis techniques used for resolving the unsteady flow field features. The ensemble-average and variance of the measured velocities are used to identify the rotor wake generated and unresolved unsteadiness, respectively. (Rotor wake generated unsteadiness refers to the unsteadiness generated by the rotor wake velocity deficit and the term unresolved unsteadiness refers to all remaining contributions to unsteadiness such as vortex shedding, turbulence, mass flow fluctuations, etc.). A procedure for calculating auto and cross correlations of the rotor wake generated and unresolved unsteady velocity fluctuations is described. These unsteady-velocity correlations have significance since they also result from a decomposition of the Navier-Stokes equations. This decomposition of the Navier-Stokes equations resulting in the velocity correlations used to describe the unsteady velocity field will also be outlined in this paper.

  10. Measurements of the unsteady flow field within the stator row of a transonic axial-flow fan. I - Measurement and analysis technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, K. L.; Strazisar, A. J.; Adamczyk, J. J.; Hathaway, M. D.; Okiishi, T. H.

    1987-01-01

    This two-part paper presents laser anemometer measurements of the unsteady velocity field within the stator row of a transonic axial-flow fan. The objective is to provide additional insight into unsteady blade-row interactions within highspeed compressors which affect stage efficiency, energy transfer, and other design considerations. Part 1 describes the measurement and analysis techniques used for resolving the unsteady flow field features. The ensemble-average and variance of the measured velocities are used to identify the rotor wake generated and unresolved unsteadiness, respectively. (Rotor wake generated unsteadiness refers to the unsteadiness generated by the rotor wake velocity deficit and the term unresolved unsteadiness refers to all remaining contributions to unsteadiness such as vortex shedding, turbulence, mass flow fluctutions, etc.). A procedure for calculating auto and cross correlations of the rotor wake generated and unresolved unsteady velocity fluctuations is described. These unsteady-velocity correlations have significance since they also result from a decomposition of the Navier-Stokes equations. This decomposition of the Navier-Stokes equations resulting in the velocity correlations used to describe the unsteady velocity field will also be outlined in this paper.

  11. Mt. Chambers Creek alluvial fan - a recorder for Late Quaternary flow regime changes along the eastern Flinders Ranges (South Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Jan-Hendrik; Larsen, Joshua; Cohen, Timothy; Nanson, Gerald

    2010-05-01

    Climate is a primary control on Late Quaternary alluvial fan evolution and past hydrological changes should be sensitively recorded in alluvial fan stratigraphy. The Flinders Ranges (S Australia) are situated between tropical and extra-tropical (e.g. westerlies) elements of the atmospheric circulation. Numerous alluvial fans constitute the transition between the Flinders Ranges and the large salt lake system of Lake Frome to the east. Along the arid eastern margin of the Flinders Ranges, geomorphology and stratigraphy were investigated at Mt. Chambers Creek alluvial fan (31°S). The fan is connected to a ~380 km2 catchment via the Mt. Chambers gorge, which has incised into the uplifted range front. Upstream of the gorge, manifold exposures along valley fills provide evidence for a generally fining-upward sequence of fluvial gravels and (eolian?) silts, which are topped by thick layers of tufa that have subsequently incised. Downstream of the apex, the alluvial fan surface is characterized by relatively low slopes (~0.5° - 1.5°) and a complex pattern of desert pavements, overlain by several inactive feeder channels and/or floodouts. The modern channel drains into an active floodout approximately 13 km downstream of the fan apex, showing that significant quantities of coarse-grained sediment load do not currently reach the baselevel at Lake Frome. Mt. Chambers Creek has incised several meters into the fan body, exposing extensive outcrops of alluvial fan sediments and paleosols. Generally, the fan stratigraphy can be divided into six different units, each of them bounded by laterally continuous and mostly carbonaceous paleosol horizons. The lowermost four units are dominated by matrix- and clast supported gravels, indicating high-energy events such as hyperconcentrated and debris flows. Along the distal fan, the thickness of these units and grain size generally decreases, locally exposing a sequence of well-developed and buried desert pavements. In combination

  12. A new blade element method for calculating the performance of high and intermediate solidity axial flow fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borst, H. V.

    1978-01-01

    A method is presented to design and predict the performance of axial flow rotors operating in a duct. The same method is suitable for the design of ducted fans and open propellers. The unified method is based on the blade element approach and the vortex theory for determining the three dimensional effects, so that two dimensional airfoil data can be used for determining the resultant force on each blade element. Resolution of this force in the thrust and torque planes and integration allows the total performance of the rotor, fan or propeller to be predicted. Three different methods of analysis, one based on a momentum flow theory; another on the vortex theory of propellers; and a third based on the theory of ducted fans, agree and reduce cascade airfoil data to single line as a function of the loading and induced angle of attack at values of constant inflow angle. The theory applies for any solidity from .01 to over 1 and any blade section camber. The effects of the duct and blade number can be determined so that the procedure applies over the entire range from two blade open propellers, to ducted helicopter tail rotors, to axial flow compressors with or without guide vanes, and to wind tunnel drive fans.

  13. Installation effects on the tonal noise generated by axial flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, Edward; Cattanei, Andrea; Mazzocut Zecchin, Fabio

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents the results of experiments on a low-speed axial-flow fan flush mounted on flat panels typically employed in tests on automotive cooling fans. The experiments have been conducted in a hemi-anechoic chamber and were aimed at evaluating the installation effects of the whole test configuration, including chamber floor and size and shape of the mounting panel. The largest panels cause important SPL variations in a narrow, low frequency range. Their effect on the propagation function has been verified by means of parametric BEM computations. A regular wavy trend associated with reflections from the floor is also present. In both cases, the tonal noise is more strongly affected than the broadband one. The analysis is performed by means of an existing spectral decomposition technique and a new one, which allows to consider different noise generating mechanisms and also to separate the emitted tonal and broadband noise from the associated propagation effects. In order to better identify the features of the noise at the blade passing frequency (BPF) harmonics, the phase of the acoustic pressure is also analysed. Measurements are taken during speed ramps, which allow to obtain both constant-Strouhal number SPL data and constant-speed data. The former data set is employed in the new technique, while the latter may be employed in the standard spectral decomposition techniques. Based on both the similarity theory and the analysis of the Green's function of the problem, a theoretical description of the structure of the received SPL spectrum is given. Then, the possibility of discriminating between tonal and broadband noise generating mechanisms is analysed and a theoretical base for the new spectral decomposition technique is provided.

  14. Turbulent crossed fluxes in incompressible flows

    PubMed

    Sancho

    2000-02-01

    We show in the framework of the stochastic calculus the existence of turbulent crossed fluxes in incompressible flows. Physically, these fluxes are related to the dependence of the phenomenological coefficients on the temperature and concentration variables.

  15. Experimental investigation of the transonic flow around the leading edge of an eroded fan airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinner, Joachim; Hergt, Alexander; Willert, Christian

    2014-09-01

    The influence of leading edge modification on the time-averaged and instantaneous flow around a fan airfoil is investigated by particle image velocimetry (PIV), schlieren imaging and high-speed shock shadowgraphs in a transonic cascade windtunnel. In addition to a global characterization of the time-averaged flow using PIV, the instantaneous passage shock position was extracted from single-shot PIV measurements by matching the tracer velocity across the normal shock with an exponential fit. The instantaneous shock positions are assigned to a probability density distribution in order to obtain the average position and the range of fluctuations of the eroded and reference leading edge. The profiles are used to estimate the response time of the particles to the normal shock which was found to be in the sub-microsecond range. Averaged PIV measurements and the probability density of shock position from both geometries are obtained at near stall and choked conditions. In order to extract the frequency range of the shock motion, the shadow of the shock wave was tracked using high-speed shadowgraphy. The paper also provides details on the experimental implementation such as a specifically designed light-sheet probe.

  16. The Astoria Fan: An elongate type fan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C.H.

    1984-01-01

    The Astoria Fan, a modern system, is located on a subducting oceanic crust and fills a north-south-trending trench along the Oregon continental margin. Well-developed channels cross the entire fan length; they display classic inner-fan leveed profiles but evolve into distributaries in the midfan area where the gradient decreases sharply. During periods of low sea level, inner- and middle-fan channels funnel sand to distal depositional sites in the outer-fan area where the sand/shale ratios are highest. This pattern of sand displacement and efficiency of transport appears to be characteristic of elongate fans fed by a major river and submarine canyon. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  17. Cross-flow electrochemical reactor cells, cross-flow reactors, and use of cross-flow reactors for oxidation reactions

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Poeppel, Roger B.; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Udovich, Carl A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention discloses cross-flow electrochemical reactor cells containing oxygen permeable materials which have both electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity, cross-flow reactors, and electrochemical processes using cross-flow reactor cells having oxygen permeable monolithic cores to control and facilitate transport of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas stream to oxidation reactions of organic compounds in another gas stream. These cross-flow electrochemical reactors comprise a hollow ceramic blade positioned across a gas stream flow or a stack of crossed hollow ceramic blades containing a channel or channels for flow of gas streams. Each channel has at least one channel wall disposed between a channel and a portion of an outer surface of the ceramic blade, or a common wall with adjacent blades in a stack comprising a gas-impervious mixed metal oxide material of a perovskite structure having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity. The invention includes reactors comprising first and second zones seprated by gas-impervious mixed metal oxide material material having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity. Prefered gas-impervious materials comprise at least one mixed metal oxide having a perovskite structure or perovskite-like structure. The invention includes, also, oxidation processes controlled by using these electrochemical reactors, and these reactions do not require an external source of electrical potential or any external electric circuit for oxidation to proceed.

  18. PIV measurement of high-Reynolds-number homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in an enclosed flow apparatus with fan agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Zhongwang; Pecenak, Zachary K.; Cao, Lujie; Woodward, Scott H.; Liang, Zach; Meng, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Enclosed flow apparatuses with negligible mean flow are emerging as alternatives to wind tunnels for laboratory studies of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence (HIT) with or without aerosol particles, especially in experimental validation of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). It is desired that these flow apparatuses generate HIT at high Taylor-microscale Reynolds numbers ({{R}λ} ) and enable accurate measurement of turbulence parameters including kinetic energy dissipation rate and thereby {{R}λ} . We have designed an enclosed, fan-driven, highly symmetric truncated-icosahedron ‘soccer ball’ airflow apparatus that enables particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) and other whole-field flow measurement techniques. To minimize gravity effect on inertial particles and improve isotropy, we chose fans instead of synthetic jets as flow actuators. We developed explicit relations between {{R}λ} and physical as well as operational parameters of enclosed HIT chambers. To experimentally characterize turbulence in this near-zero-mean flow chamber, we devised a new two-scale PIV approach utilizing two independent PIV systems to obtain both high resolution and large field of view. Velocity measurement results show that turbulence in the apparatus achieved high homogeneity and isotropy in a large central region (48 mm diameter) of the chamber. From PIV-measured velocity fields, we obtained turbulence dissipation rates and thereby {{R}λ} by using the second-order velocity structure function. A maximum {{R}λ} of 384 was achieved. Furthermore, experiments confirmed that the root mean square (RMS) velocity increases linearly with fan speed, and {{R}λ} increases with the square root of fan speed. Characterizing turbulence in such apparatus paves the way for further investigation of particle dynamics in particle-laden homogeneous and isotropic turbulence.

  19. Sound radiation from a high speed axial flow fan due to the inlet turbulence quadrupole interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Rosenbaum, B. M.; Albers, L. U.

    1974-01-01

    A formula is obtained for the total acoustic power spectra radiated out the front of the fan as a function of frequency. The formula involves the design parameters of the fan as well as the statistical properties of the incident turbulence. Numerical results are calculated for values of the parameters in the range of interest for quiet fans tested at the Lewis Research Center. As in the dipole analysis, when the turbulence correlation lengths become equal to the interblade spacing, the predicted spectra exhibit peaks around the blade passing frequency and its harmonics. There has recently been considerable conjecture about whether the stretching of turbulent eddies as they enter a stationary fan could result in the inlet turbulence being the dominant source of pure tones from nontranslating fans. The results of the current analysis show that, unless the turbulent eddies become quite elongated, this noise source contributes predominantly to the broadband spectrum.

  20. Two-stage fan. 2: Data and performance with redesigned second stage rotor uniform and distorted inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, H. E.; Keenan, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A two-stage fan with a first rotor tip speed of 1450 ft/sec (441.96 m/sec) and no inlet guide vanes was tested with uniform and distorted inlet flows, with a redesigned second rotor having a part span shroud to prevent flutter, with variable-stagger stators set in nominal positions, and without rotor casing treatment. The fan achieved a pressure ratio 2.8 at a corrected flow of 185.4 lbm/sec (84.0 kg/sec), an adiabatic efficiency of 85.0 percent, and a stall margin of 12 percent. The redesigned second rotor did not flutter. Tip radial distortion reduced the stall margin at intermediate speed, but had little effect on stall margin at high or low speeds. Hub radial distortion reduced the stall margin at design speed but increased stall margin at low speed. Circumferential distortion reduced stall pressure ratio and flow to give approximately the same stall lines with uniform inlet flow. Distortions were attenuated by the fan. For Vol. 1, see N74-11421.

  1. Debris flow dominated alluvial fans in the Australian high country indicate that landscape denudation through the Holocene has been dominated by post-bushfire runoff events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marren, Philip; Nyman, Petter; Kermode, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Bushfires play a major role in shaping landscapes across the globe. Whilst the role of fire in shaping and changing vegetation assemblages is relatively well understood, there is still debate about the significance of fire in driving landscape denudation, relative to other processes, such as major rainfall and flood events and questions remain about the frequency of extreme fire events over longer timescales in response to climate forcing. Studies of post-fire landscape impact of recent bushfires in southeast Australia indicate that where storm events occur shortly after a major bushfire, hillslope erosion is enhanced, due to debris flows and erosion of both primary hillslope sediment and sediment stored in hillslope channel networks. In Australia, knowledge of long-term bushfire frequency is largely derived from pollen and micro-charcoal records in lake-sediment archives and is not directly relevant to resolving questions regarding fire impacts on landscape denudation and sediment transfer. We excavated trenches in four alluvial fans at the base of hillslopes in the high country of northeast Victoria, Australia. This area was burnt by bushfires in 1939 and 2003, and regional climate and hydrology are strongly controlled by El Niño. The trenches were up to 3.5m deep, and in most cases intersected underlying floodplain sediment at the base of the trench, indicating that they provide a full record of sedimentation for that sector of the fan. Fan stratigraphy consisted of sub-horizontal (parallel to the fan surface) units 0.3-0.5m thick, with occasional units 1-1.2m thick, and cross-cutting channelized units. Debris flow deposits accounted for 70-80% of the observed sediments, with water-laid gravels and soil units forming the remainder. Most soil layers were burnt, and most (but not all) debris flow units contained charcoal. A typical stratigraphy consisted of 6-8 debris flow units per fan, with four units containing a fire signature or overlying a burnt soil layer

  2. Counter-Rotatable Fan Gas Turbine Engine with Axial Flow Positive Displacement Worm Gas Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A counter-rotatable fan turbine engine includes a counter-rotatable fan section, a worm gas generator, and a low pressure turbine to power the counter-rotatable fan section. The low pressure turbine maybe counter-rotatable or have a single direction of rotation in which case it powers the counter-rotatable fan section through a gearbox. The gas generator has inner and outer bodies having offset inner and outer axes extending through first, second, and third sections of a core assembly. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes and extending radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first, second, and third twist slopes in the first, second, and third sections respectively. A combustor section extends through at least a portion of the second section.

  3. Measurements of the unsteady flow field within the stator row of a transonic axial-flow fan. Part 2: Results and discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Suder, K. L.; Okiishi, T. H.; Strazisar, A. J.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Unsteady velocity field measurements made within the stator row of a transonic axial-flow fan are presented. Measurements were obtained at midspan for two different stator blade rows using a laser anemometer. The first stator row consists of double circular-arc airfoils with a solidity of 1.68. The second features controlled-diffusion airfoils with a solidity of 0.85. Both were tested at design-speed peak efficiency conditions. In addition, the controlled-diffusion stator was also tested at near stall conditions. The procedures developed here are used to identify the rotor wake generated and unresolved unsteadiness from the velocity measurements (rotor wake generated unsteadiness refers to the unsteadiness generated by the rotor wake velocity deficit and unresolved unsteadiness refers to all remaining unsteadiness which contributes to the spread in the distribution of velocities such as vortex shedding, turbulence, etc.). Auto and cross correlations of these unsteady velocity fluctuations are presented to show their relative magnitude and spatial distributions. Amplification and attenuation of both rotor wake generated and unresolved unsteadiness are shown to occur within the stator blade passage.

  4. Measurements of the unsteady flow field within the stator row of a transonic axial-flow fan. II - Results and discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Suder, K. L.; Strazisar, A. J.; Adamczyk, J. J.; Okiishi, T. H.

    1987-01-01

    Unsteady velocity field measurements made within the stator row of a transonic axial-flow fan are presented. Measurements were obtained at midspan for two different stator blade rows using a laser anemometer. The first stator row consists of double circular-arc airfoils with a solidity of 1.68. The second features controlled-diffusion airfoils with a solidity of 0.85. Both were tested at design-speed peak efficiency conditions. In addition, the controlled-diffusion stator was also tested at near stall conditions. The procedures developed here are used to identify the rotor wake generated and unresolved unsteadiness from the velocity measurements (rotor wake generated unsteadiness refers to the unsteadiness generated by the rotor wake velocity deficit and unresolved unsteadiness refers to all remaining unsteadiness which contributes to the spread in the distribution of velocities such as vortex shedding, turbulence, etc.). Auto and cross correlations of these unsteady velocity fluctuations are presented to show their relative magnitude and spatial distributions. Amplification and attenuation of both rotor wake generated and unresolved unsteadiness are shown to occur within the stator blade passage.

  5. Cross flow electrofilter and method

    DOEpatents

    Gidaspow, Dimitri; Lee, Chang H.; Wasan, Darsh T.

    1981-01-01

    A filter for clarifying carbonaceous liquids containing finely divided solid particles of, for instance, unreacted coal, ash and other solids discharged from a coal liquefaction process is presented. The filter includes two passageways separated by a porous filter medium. In one preferred embodiment the filter medium is of tubular shape to form the first passageway and is enclosed within an outer housing to form the second passageway within the annulus. An electrode disposed in the first passageway, for instance along the tube axis, is connected to a source of high voltage for establishing an electric field between the electrode and the filter medium. Slurry feed flows through the first passageway tangentially to the surfaces of the filter medium and the electrode. Particles from the feed slurry are attracted to the electrode within the first passageway to prevent plugging of the porous filter medium while carbonaceous liquid filters into the second passageway for withdrawal. Concentrated slurry is discharged from the first passageway at an end opposite to the feed slurry inlet. Means are also provided for the addition of diluent and a surfactant into the slurry to control relative permittivity and the electrophoretic mobility of the particles.

  6. Design of flood protection for transportation alignments on alluvial fans

    SciTech Connect

    French, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    The method of floodplain delineation on alluvial fans developed for the national flood insurance program is modified to provide estimates of peak flood flows at transportation alignments crossing an alluvial fan. The modified methodology divides the total alignment length into drainage design segments and estimates the peak flows that drainage structures would be required to convey as a function of the length of the drainage design segment, the return period of the event, and the location of the alignment on the alluvial fan. An example of the application of the methodology is provided. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Inlet flow distortion in turbomachinery. I - Comparison of theory and experiment in a transonic fan stage. II - A parameter study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, B. S.; Matwey, M. D.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper, a semi-actuator-disk theory is reviewed that was developed previously for the distorted inflow to a single-stage axial-flow compressor. Flow distortion occurs far upstream; it may be a distortion in stagnation temperature, stagnation pressure, or both. Losses, quasi-steady deviation angles, and reference incidence correlations are included in the analysis, and both subsonic and transonic relative Mach numbers are considered. The theory is compared with measurements made in a transonic fan stage, and a parameter study is carried out to determine the influence of solidity on the attenuation of distortions in stagnation pressure and stagnation temperature.

  8. Analysis of the air flow generated by an air-assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans using a 3D sonic anemometer.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, F Javier; Vidal, Mariano; Boné, Antonio; Malón, Hugo; Aguirre, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The flow of air generated by a new design of air assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans of reversed rotation was analyzed. For this goal, a 3D sonic anemometer has been used (accuracy: 1.5%; measurement range: 0 to 45 m/s). The study was divided into a static test and a dynamic test. During the static test, the air velocity in the working vicinity of the sprayer was measured considering the following machine configurations: (1) one activated fan regulated at three air flows (machine working as a traditional sprayer); (2) two activated fans regulated at three air flows for each fan. In the static test 72 measurement points were considered. The location of the measurement points was as follow: left and right sides of the sprayer; three sections of measurement (A, B and C); three measurement distances from the shaft of the machine (1.5 m, 2.5 m and 3.5 m); and four measurement heights (1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m). The static test results have shown significant differences in the module and the vertical angle of the air velocity vector in function of the regulations of the sprayer. In the dynamic test, the air velocity was measured at 2.5 m from the axis of the sprayer considering four measurement heights (1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m). In this test, the sprayer regulations were: one or two activated fans; one air flow for each fan; forward speed of 2.8 km/h. The use of one fan (back) or two fans (back and front) produced significant differences on the duration of the presence of wind in the measurement point and on the direction of the air velocity vector. The module of the air velocity vector was not affected by the number of activated fans.

  9. Two-stage fan. 3: Data and performance with rotor tip casing treatment, uniform and distorted inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, G. D.; Hodges, T. R.; Keenan, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    A two stage fan with a 1st-stage rotor design tip speed of 1450 ft/sec, a design pressure ratio of 2.8, and corrected flow of 184.2 lbm/sec was tested with axial skewed slots in the casings over the tips of both rotors. The variable stagger stators were set in the nominal positions. Casing treatment improved stall margin by nine percentage points at 70 percent speed but decreased stall margin, efficiency, and flow by small amounts at design speed. Treatment improved first stage performance at low speed only and decreased second stage performance at all operating conditions. Casing treatment did not affect the stall line with tip radially distorted flow but improved stall margin with circumferentially distorted flow. Casing treatment increased the attenuation for both types of inlet flow distortion.

  10. Using Synthetic Aperture Radar data of terrestrial analogs to test for alluvial fan formation mechanisms on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, R. J.; Burr, D. M.

    2017-03-01

    Landforms on Titan include features hypothesized to be alluvial fans. Terrestrial alluvial fans form via two processes: fluid-gravity flows (sheetfloods) and sediment-gravity flows (debris flows). Along the Panamint Mountain Range in Death Valley, California, USA, seven fans formed primarily by debris flows are located adjacent to seven fans formed primarily by sheetfloods. The causal difference between these two groupings stems from their catchment lithologies; the debris flow fan catchments are clay-rich and relatively sand-poor, and the sheetflood fan catchments are clay-poor and sand-rich. On Titan, the low and mid latitudes are dominated by sand seas, demonstrating that sand is available for transport. At high latitudes, these sand seas are absent, suggesting that transportable sand is scarce. Based on the sedimentology of the two Panamint Range fan types, we hypothesize that possible fans at lower latitudes on Titan are formed by sheetfloods, whereas those at higher latitudes formed primarily by debris flows. To test these hypotheses, we measured and analyzed the mean normalized radar cross sections (σ°) and changes in σ° with downfan distance for debris flow and sheetflood fans along the Panamint Range. We then compared the results with the same measurements for possible fans on Titan. We find that, in the Panamint Range, debris flow fans are brighter than sheetflood fans and have greater change in σ° with downfan distance, and that on Titan, low-latitude possible fans are likewise brighter than the fans at high latitudes with greater change in σ° with downfan distance. Consequently, our findings suggest that low-latitude possible fans on Titan are formed primarily by debris flows, whereas high-latitude possible fans on Titan are formed primarily by sheetfloods. Thus, our results do not support our hypotheses. Scenarios to explain these results include: (1) high-latitude possible fans are dominated by radar-dark debris flow deposits, (2) low- and mid

  11. The effects of low-profile vortex generators on flow in a transonic fan-blade cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamerdinger, Peter M.

    1995-03-01

    Two dimensional fully-mixed-out flow conditions were measured downstream of a two-passage transonic fan-blade cascade which had low-profile vortex generators (VG's) attached to the suction surfaces of the blades. The simulation was conducted using a blowdown wind tunnel at a Mach number of 1.4. The objective was to assess the effects of vortex generating devices on the suction surface shock-boundary layer interaction and the resulting losses. Measurements are reported from tests made with older aluminum blading, with and without VG's, and with a nominally similar new set of steel blading, with and without VG's. Differences between the old and new blading were found to be most significant. While shock structures appeared to be similar with VG's attached, dye injection showed that the shock-induced boundary layer separation was greatly suppressed and the downstream flow was much steadier. With VG's, the flow turning was improved by 0.94 degrees, but the flow loss coefficient increased by about 8%. An extension of the study is needed to fully assess the potential of using low-profile VG's in military fan engines.

  12. Coordinated Control of Cross-Flow Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, Benjamin; Brunton, Steven; Polagye, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Cross-flow turbines, also known as vertical-axis turbines, have several advantages over axial-flow turbines for a number of applications including urban wind power, high-density arrays, and marine or fluvial currents. By controlling the angular velocity applied to the turbine as a function of angular blade position, we have demonstrated a 79 percent increase in cross-flow turbine efficiency over constant-velocity control. This strategy uses the downhill simplex method to optimize control parameter profiles during operation of a model turbine in a recirculating water flume. This optimization method is extended to a set of two turbines, where the blade motions and position of the downstream turbine are optimized to beneficially interact with the coherent structures in the wake of the upstream turbine. This control scheme has the potential to enable high-density arrays of cross-flow turbines to operate at cost-effective efficiency. Turbine wake and force measurements are analyzed for insight into the effect of a coordinated control strategy.

  13. Algorithmic localisation of noise sources in the tip region of a low-speed axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Bence; Vad, János

    2017-04-01

    An objective and algorithmised methodology is proposed to analyse beamform data obtained for axial fans. Its application is demonstrated in a case study regarding the tip region of a low-speed cooling fan. First, beamforming is carried out in a co-rotating frame of reference. Then, a distribution of source strength is extracted along the circumference of the rotor at the blade tip radius in each analysed third-octave band. The circumferential distributions are expanded into Fourier series, which allows for filtering out the effects of perturbations, on the basis of an objective criterion. The remaining Fourier components are then considered as base sources to determine the blade-passage-periodic flow mechanisms responsible for the broadband noise. Based on their frequency and angular location, the base sources are grouped together. This is done using the fuzzy c-means clustering method to allow the overlap of the source mechanisms. The number of clusters is determined in a validity analysis. Finally, the obtained clusters are assigned to source mechanisms based on the literature. Thus, turbulent boundary layer - trailing edge interaction noise, tip leakage flow noise, and double leakage flow noise are identified.

  14. Numerical investigation on the self-induced unsteadiness in tip leakage flow of a micro-axial fan rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinxin; Lai, Huanxin

    2015-06-01

    The self-induced unsteadiness in tip leakage flow (TLF) of a micro-axial fan rotor is numerically studied by solvingReynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The micro-axial fan, which is widely used in cooling systems of electronic devices, has a tip clearance of 6% of the axial chord length of the blade. At the design rotation speed, four cases near the peak efficiency point (PEP) with self-induced unsteadiness and four steady cases which have much weaker pressure fluctuations are investigated Using the "interface" separating the incoming main flow and the TLF defined by Du et al. [1], an explanation based on the propagation of the low energy spot and its multi-passing through the high gradient zone of the relativetotal pressure, is proposed to clarify the originating mechanism of the unsteadiness. At the operating points near the PEP, the main flow is weaker than the TLF and the interface moves upstream. The low energy spot which propagates along in the close behind of the interface has opportunity to circulate in the circumferential direction and passes through the sensitive interfaces several times, a slight perturbation therefore may be magnified significantlyand develops into the self-induced unsteadiness. The explanation is demonstrated by numerical results

  15. Monostatic radar cross-section spectra of a rotating-fan array, with tilted plate metal blades, in the PO/PTD approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.-L.; Bor, S.-S.

    1992-12-01

    The monostatic radar cross-section spectra of a rotating-fan array, with tilted blades, are investigated. The high-frequency theoretical treatment of a slowly rotating and electrically large scatterer is based on the quasi-stationary method with the physical optics/physical theory of diffraction (PO/PTD) technique. Only the theta-theta polarization case is considered here, although the psi-psi polarization case can be treated in the same way. The solution is applicable to any observation angles, and, except for the condition of the same rotational velocity, each fan need not have the same number of blades and dimensions or the same spacing. An example, a linear array with two synchronously rotating fans, each with three identical tilted blades, is presented. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results is acceptable.

  16. Estimating debris-flow probability using fan stratigraphy, historic records, and drainage-basin morphology, Interstate 70 highway corridor, central Colorado, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coe, J.A.; Godt, J.W.; Parise, M.; Moscariello, A.; ,

    2003-01-01

    We have used stratigraphic and historic records of debris-flows to estimate mean recurrence intervals of past debris-flow events on 19 fans along the Interstate 70 highway corridor in the Front Range of Colorado. Estimated mean recurrence intervals were used in the Poisson probability model to estimate the probability of future debris-flow events on the fans. Mean recurrence intervals range from 7 to about 2900 years. Annual probabilities range from less than 0.1% to about 13%. A regression analysis of mean recurrence interval data and drainage-basin morphometry yields a regression model that may be suitable to estimate mean recurrence intervals on fans with no stratigraphic or historic records. Additional work is needed to verify this model. ?? 2003 Millpress.

  17. Modeling groundwater-surface water interaction in cross-cutting alluvial fan system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Sager, J. C.; Fogg, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    In the classic interpretation, a deep water table can cause hydraulic 'disconnection' between a river and an underlying aquifer, with the lack of a saturated zone connection between them. Previous research indicates that in such cases heterogeneity may create localized saturated connections between the river and a deep water table. The dynamics of groundwater and surface water interaction under such circumstances has not been adequately investigated. This basin- scale modeling study of the Cosumnes River and American River groundwater systems of the Central Valley of California, which includes both high-resolution (200m×200m×0.5m) modeling of the hydro-facies (~18 million nodes) and variably saturated flow modeling with the parallel computing code ParFlow, investigates how the textual heterogeneity (e.g., connected channels and abundant aquitard facies) affects interplay between the groundwater and surface water, including possible mechanisms for enhancing both stream base flow and recharge through surface spreading. The possible influence of perched aquifers created by low permeability layers on river base flow is also investigated. Optimal locations of floodplain and flooding time frames are being examined. Results of this study will enhance our understanding of the mechanism of water dynamics in the variably saturated zone coupling with heterogeneity. Ultimately, the results will also help restore or better manage the stream base flow and the ecosystem that depends on it.

  18. An experimental study of the effects of an inlet flow conditioner on the noise of a low speed axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoles, J.; Ollerhead, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of inflow condition on the noise generated by a 40kW, 560mm diameter, seven blade ducted fan at speeds up to 5000rpm in an anechoic chamber were measured. A 1.25m diameter hemisperical honeycomb flow conditioner (HFC) which could be fitted with an internal gauze liner was used. Fan entry flow was measured by static and rotating hot-wire anemometers. Noise levels in the first few harmonics of blade passing frequency are very sensitive to inflow condition, but the HFC reduces them to a residual level independent of upstream disturbance levels. Broadband noise is reduced (by a smaller amount) at high blade angles and flow rates. No systematic effect of the gauze liner is detected. Experimental difficulties are caused by unsteadiness in the chamber airflow which causes harmonic level fluctuations with amplitudes of up to 10dB. Although the inlet flow conditioner reduces these fluctuations markedly, long term variations reduce confidence in the data.

  19. Unsteady Flows in a Single-Stage Transonic Axial-Flow Fan Stator Row. Ph.D. Thesis - Iowa State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of the unsteady velocity field within the stator row of a transonic axial-flow fan were acquired using a laser anemometer. Measurements were obtained on axisymmetric surfaces located at 10 and 50 percent span from the shroud, with the fan operating at maximum efficiency at design speed. The ensemble-average and variance of the measured velocities are used to identify rotor-wake-generated (deterministic) unsteadiness and turbulence, respectively. Correlations of both deterministic and turbulent velocity fluctuations provide information on the characteristics of unsteady interactions within the stator row. These correlations are derived from the Navier-Stokes equation in a manner similar to deriving the Reynolds stress terms, whereby various averaging operators are used to average the aperiodic, deterministic, and turbulent velocity fluctuations which are known to be present in multistage turbomachines. The correlations of deterministic and turbulent velocity fluctuations throughout the axial fan stator row are presented. In particular, amplification and attenuation of both types of unsteadiness are shown to occur within the stator blade passage.

  20. Electric Discharge Flow Interaction in Parallel and Cross-Flow Electric Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    was measured by a pitot-static probe (connected to a mercury manometer ) inserted in the exhaust opening of the test section. The probe was removed...fan was employed, blowing in the reverse direction from the normal flow, at an air flow speed too small to be measured by the pitot tube and mercury ... manometer . Results summarized on Figure 21 indicate an increase in power with increased electrode spacing. This is a fundamental improvement over the

  1. Cross-Effects in Microgravity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyalka, Sudarshan K.; Tompson, R. V.; Ivchenko, I. N.; Ghosh, T. K.; Hamoodi, S. A.; Hickey, K. A.; Huang, C. M.; Tebbe, Patrick A.; Gabis, D. H.; Tekasakul, P.; Bentz, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Film growth by chemical/physical vapor deposition is a process of considerable interest in microgravity experiments. The absence of natural convection should allow better control of film growth processes but, in highly non-isothermal ampoules, thermal slip (creep) can become a matter of significant concern. The reported research is a theoretical and experimental investigation of the flow of gas/vapor mixtures under non-continuum conditions. The Boltzmann equation has been solved for a monatomic gas under non-condensing conditions and the various phenomenological coefficients have been computed. Computations for realistic potentials as well as for velocity and creep slip have been completed and the creep slip has been found to be dependent on the type of gas confirming the accuracy of previous variational results. The variational technique has been extended and planar flows calculated via the Burnett solutions. Velocity, diffusion and creep slips have been computed for gas mixtures and previously unknown dependencies of the creep slip on the mixture properties have been observed. Also for gas mixtures, an integral representation of the linearized Boltzmann operator has been developed for use in numerical and variational calculations for all intermolecular force laws. Two, two-bulb capillary systems have been designed, built and tested for the measurements of cross-flows; one of glass for isothermal measurements and one of stainless steel for non-isothermal measurements. Extensive data have been collected for Ar-He and N2-He mixtures at a variety of pressures and mole ratios. Viscosity, velocity slip coefficients and tangential momentum accommodation coefficients have been obtained from measurements with a spinning rotor gauge via a new theory that has been formulated for the spinning rotor gauge in the slip regime. The FIDAP fluid dynamics code has been applied to condensing flows in ampoules in the continuum regime and agreement obtained with the earlier work of

  2. Devolatilization Analysis in a Twin Screw Extruder by using the Flow Analysis Network (FAN) Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyama, Hideki; Takamoto, Seiji; Shintani, Hiroaki; Inoue, Shigeki

    We derived the theoretical formulas for three mechanisms of devolatilization in a twin screw extruder. These are flash, surface refreshment and forced expansion. The method for flash devolatilization is based on the equation of equilibrium concentration which shows that volatiles break off from polymer when they are relieved from high pressure condition. For surface refreshment devolatilization, we applied Latinen's model to allow estimation of polymer behavior in the unfilled screw conveying condition. Forced expansion devolatilization is based on the expansion theory in which foams are generated under reduced pressure and volatiles are diffused on the exposed surface layer after mixing with the injected devolatilization agent. Based on these models, we developed the simulation software of twin-screw extrusion by the FAN method and it allows us to quantitatively estimate volatile concentration and polymer temperature with a high accuracy in the actual multi-vent extrusion process for LDPE + n-hexane.

  3. Why do Cross-Flow Turbines Stall?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnaro, Robert; Strom, Benjamin; Polagye, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Hydrokinetic turbines are prone to instability and stall near their peak operating points under torque control. Understanding the physics of turbine stall may help to mitigate this undesirable occurrence and improve the robustness of torque controllers. A laboratory-scale two-bladed cross-flow turbine operating at a chord-based Reynolds number ~ 3 ×104 is shown to stall at a critical tip-speed ratio. Experiments are conducting bringing the turbine to this critical speed in a recirculating current flume by increasing resistive torque and allowing the rotor to rapidly decelerate while monitoring inflow velocity, torque, and drag. The turbine stalls probabilistically with a distribution generated from hundreds of such events. A machine learning algorithm identifies stall events and indicates the effectiveness of available measurements or combinations of measurements as predictors. Bubble flow visualization and PIV are utilized to observe fluid conditions during stall events including the formation, separation, and advection of leading-edge vortices involved in the stall process.

  4. Unsteady flow at low flow-rate region in a semi-open propeller fan (velocity fluctuation outside of blade tip)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, Norimasa; Kinoue, Yoichi; Jin, Ying-Zi; Liu, Pin; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2011-09-01

    In order to clarify the unsteady flow fields at low flow-rate region with positive gradient on pressure — flow-rate curve, the experimental investigation was carried out at rotor inlet and outside of rotor blade tip without casing in a semi-opened propeller fan using a hot-wire anemometer. A single I-type hot-wire probe was used, and the data obtained were processed by the use of phase-locked averaging, ensemble averaging and FFT analyzing. The flow fields at rotor inlet and outside of rotor blade tip were discussed mainly using the results from distributions of velocity fluctuations and power spectrum density. It was found from these results that there are the two types of different periodical fluctuations and both of those frequencies were not the same of rotor rotating frequency (RRF; 15Hz). One was observed at relatively high flow-rate region at relatively downstream area in measurement and its frequency was approximately 7Hz (47% of RRF). The other was observed at relatively low flow-rate region at relatively upstream area in measurement and its frequency was approximately 10Hz (67% of RRF)". As the velocity fluctuations with the flow fields are rapidly increased by the former fluctuation, it is thought that its fluctuation is the trigger of blade stall.

  5. Sedimentary facies of alluvial fan deposits, Death Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, G.V. )

    1992-01-01

    Fans in Death Valley include both diamicts and bedded gravels. Seven facies may be recognized. The diamicts include: (1) matrix-rich, coarse wackestones; (2) thin, matrix-rich, fine wackestones, that may show grading; (3) matrix-poor, coarse packstones, transitional to wackestones. The bedded facies include: (4) weakly bedded, poorly sorted packstones or grainstones, that show patchy imbrication, and cut-and-fill structures; (5) packed, imbricated cobble lenses, generally interbedded in facies 4; (6) distinctly bedded gravels, that are better bedded, finer and better sorted, and show better imbrication than facies 4, but still do not show clear separation of sand and gravel beds; (7) backfill cross-bedded gravels. Sand beds are not seen in fan deposits. Sand is present in eolian deposits, as plane-laminated, back-eddy deposits in Death Valley Wash, and as laminated or rippled sand in the Amargosa River. The most remarkable features of the fan deposits are the very weak segregation of sand and gravel, and the complete absence of any lower flow-regime structures produced by ripples or dunes. During floods, the slope of fan and even large wash surfaces is steep enough to produce upper flow regimes. There are also very few trends in facies abundance down fans: most fans in Death Valley itself are not strongly dominated by debris flow deposits (diamicts). The facies characteristics of a given fan vary little from proximal to distal regions, but may differ strongly from the facies seen in adjacent fans. Ancient deposits that show clear segregation of gravel from cross-bedded sand beds, or strong proximal to distal facies transitions, must have been deposited in environments quite different from Death Valley.

  6. Thrust and mass flow characteristics of four 36 inch diameter tip turbine fan thrust vectoring systems in and out of ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esker, D. W.; Roddiger, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The calibration tests carried out on the propulsion system components of a 70 percent scale, powered model of a NASA 3-fan V/STOL aircraft configuration are described. The three X3/6B/T58 turbotip fan units used in the large scale powered model were tested on an isolated basis over a range of ground heights from H/D of 1.02 to infinity. A higher pressure ratio LF336/J85 fan unit was tested over a range of ground heights from 1.55 to infinity. The results of the test program demonstrated that: (1) the thrust and mass flow performance of the X376B/T58 nose lift unit is essentially constant for H/D variations down to 1.55; at H/D 1.02 back pressurization of the fan exit occurs and is accompanied by an increase in thrust of five percent; (2) a change in nose fan exit hub shape from flat plate to hemispherical produces no significant difference in louvered lift nozzle performance for height variations from H/D = 1.02 to infinity; (3) operation of the nose lift nozzle at the higher fan pressure ratio generated by the LF336/J85 fan system causes no significant change in ground proximity performance down to an H/D of 1.55, the lowest height tested with this unit; and (4) the performance of the left and right X376B/T58 lift/cruise units in the vertical lift mode remains unchanged, within plus or minus two percent for the range of ground heights from H/D = 1.02 to infinity.

  7. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE). Aerodynamic and aeromechanical performance of a 50.8 cm (20 inch) diameter 1.34 PR variable pitch fan with core flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, R. G.; Mcfalls, R. A.; Beacher, B. F.

    1977-01-01

    The fan aerodynamic and aeromechanical performance tests of the quiet clean short haul experimental engine under the wing fan and inlet with a simulated core flow are described. Overall forward mode fan performance is presented at each rotor pitch angle setting with conventional flow pressure ratio efficiency fan maps, distinguishing the performance characteristics of the fan bypass and fan core regions. Effects of off design bypass ratio, hybrid inlet geometry, and tip radial inlet distortion on fan performance are determined. The nonaxisymmetric bypass OGV and pylon configuration is assessed relative to both total pressure loss and induced circumferential flow distortion. Reverse mode performance, obtained by resetting the rotor blades through both the stall pitch and flat pitch directions, is discussed in terms of the conventional flow pressure ratio relationship and its implications upon achievable reverse thrust. Core performance in reverse mode operation is presented in terms of overall recovery levels and radial profiles existing at the simulated core inlet plane. Observations of the starting phenomena associated with the initiation of stable rotor flow during acceleration in the reverse mode are briefly discussed. Aeromechanical response characteristics of the fan blades are presented as a separate appendix, along with a description of the vehicle instrumentation and method of data reduction.

  8. Large Alluvial Fans on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Howard, Alan D.

    2004-01-01

    Several dozen distinct alluvial fans, 10 to greater than 40 km long downslope are observed exclusively in highlands craters. Within a search region between 0 deg. and 30 deg. S, alluvial fan-containing craters were only found between 18 and 29 S, and they all occur at around plus or minus 1 km of the MOLA-defined Martian datum. Within the study area they are not randomly distributed but instead form three distinct clusters. Fans typically descend greater than 1 km from where they disgorge from their alcoves. Longitudinal profiles show that their surfaces are very slightly concave with a mean slope of 2 degrees. Many fans exhibit very long, narrow low-relief ridges radially oriented down-slope, often branching at their distal ends, suggestive of distributaries. Morphometric data for 31 fans was derived from MOLA data and compared with terrestrial fans with high-relief source areas, terrestrial low gradient alluvial ramps in inactive tectonic settings, and older Martian alluvial ramps along crater floors. The Martian alluvial fans generally fall on the same trends as the terrestrial alluvial fans, whereas the gentler Martian crater floor ramps are similar in gradient to the low relief terrestrial alluvial surfaces. For a given fan gradient, Martian alluvial fans generally have greater source basin relief than terrestrial fans in active tectonic settings. This suggests that the terrestrial source basins either yield coarser debris or have higher sediment concentrations than their Martian counterpoints. Martian fans and Basin and Range fans have steeper gradients than the older Martian alluvial ramps and terrestrial low relief alluvial surfaces, which is consistent with a supply of coarse sediment. Martian fans are relatively large and of low gradient, similar to terrestrial fluvial fans rather than debris flow fans. However, gravity scaling uncertainties make the flow regime forming Martian fans uncertain. Martian fans, at least those in Holden crater, apparently

  9. Cross-flow Ultrafiltration Scaling Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M

    2006-04-10

    One legacy of the nuclear age is radioactive waste and it must be stabilized to be stored in a safe manner. An important part of the stabilization process is the separation of radioactive solids from the liquid wastes by cross-flow ultrafiltration. The performance of this technology with the wastes to be treated was unknown and, therefore, had to be obtained. However, before beginning a filter study the question of experimental scale had to be addressed. Of course, carrying out experiments using full-size equipment is always ideal, but rarely practical when dealing with plant size processes. Flow loops that will handle millions of liters of slurries, which are either highly caustic or acidic, with flow rates of 10,000 lpm make full-scale tests prohibitively expensive. Moreover, when the slurries happen to be radioactive such work is also very dangerous. All of these considerations lend themselves to investigations at smaller scales and in many situations can be treated with computational analyses. Unfortunately, as scale is reduced it becomes harder to provide prototypic results and the two and three phase multi-component mixtures challenge accurate computational results. To obtain accurate and representative filter results the use of two scales were chosen: (1) Small-scale--would allow the testing with actual radioactive waste samples and compare results with simulated wastes that were not radioactive. For this scale the feed tank held 6 liters of waste and it had a single cross-flow filter tube 0.61 m long. (2) Pilot-scale--would be restricted to use simulated non-radioactive wastes. At this larger scale the feed tank held 120 liters of waste and the filter unit was prototypic to the planned plant facility in pore size (0.1 micron), length (2.29 m), diameter (0.0127 m inside and 0.0159 m outside diameter), and being multi-tubed. The small-scale apparatus is convenient, easy to use, and can test both radioactive and non-radioactive wastes; therefore, there is a

  10. Highly Inclined Jets in Cross Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, I. M.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2003-01-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of flow field generated by pitched and yawed jets discharging from a flat plate into a cross-flow are presented. The circular jet was pitched at alpha = 20deg and 45deg and yawed between Beta = 0deg and 90deg in increments of 15deg. The measurements were performed with two ×-wires providing all three components of velocity and turbulent stresses. These data were obtained at downstream locations of x = 3, 5, 10 and 20, where the distance x, normalized by the jet diameter, is measured from the center of the orifice. Data for all configurations were acquired at a momentum-flux ratio J = 8. Additionally, for selected angles and locations, surveys were conducted for J = 1.5, 4, and 20. As expected, the jet penetration is found to be higher at larger alpha. With increasing beta the jet spreads more. The rate of reduction of peak streamwise vorticity, ? max, with the downstream distance is significantly less at higher Beta but is found to be practically independent of alpha. Thus, at the farthest measurement station x = 20, ?xmax is about five times larger for Beta = 75deg compared to the levels at Beta = 0deg. Streamwise velocity within the jet-vortex structure is found to depend on the parameter J. At J = 1.5 and 4, 'wake-like' velocity profiles are observed. In comparison, a 'jet-like' overshoot is present at higher J. Distributions of turbulent stresses for various cases are documented. Peak normal stresses are found to occur within the core of the streamwise vortices. With yaw, at lower values of J, high turbulence is also observed in the boundary layer underneath the jet-vortex structure

  11. Fan Noise Reduction: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2001-01-01

    Fan noise reduction technologies developed as part of the engine noise reduction element of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program are reviewed. Developments in low-noise fan stage design, swept and leaned outlet guide vanes, active noise control, fan flow management, and scarfed inlet are discussed. In each case, a description of the method is presented and, where available, representative results and general conclusions are discussed. The review concludes with a summary of the accomplishments of the AST-sponsored fan noise reduction research and a few thoughts on future work.

  12. The Effect of Cross Flow on Slat Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper continues the computational examination (AIAA Journal, Vol. 45, No. 9, 2007, pp. 2174-2186) of the unsteady flow within the slat cove region of a multi-element high-lift airfoil configuration. Two simulations have been performed to examine the effect of cross flow on the near-field fluctuations and far-field acoustics. The cross flow was imposed by changing the free-stream velocity vector and modifying the Reynolds number. The cross flow does appear to alter the dynamics in the cove region, but the impact on the noise seems to be more dependent on the flow conditions. However, separating out the true effects of the cross flow from those of the Mach and Reynolds number would require additional calculations to isolate those effects.

  13. Cross flow characteristics in a three fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, J. H.; Euh, D. J.; Park, C. K.; Youn, Y. J.; Kwon, T. S.

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the reactor thermal margin of APR+, reactor core flow distribution including both axial and lateral directional hydraulic resistances of fuel assemblies should be known. 3-Ch cross flow test facility has been constructed with three full-size fuel assemblies to investigate the cross flow characteristics. Performance tests have been performed. The axial and lateral directional hydraulic resistances of fuel assemblies have been measured. The test results have been compared to the CFD calculation. (authors)

  14. Alluvial fan facies in Death Valley: Contrasts with fluvial gravels and implications for the interpretation of ancient fan'' gravels

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, G.V. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Sedimentary environments in Death Valley belong to three major groups: fans, washes, and playas. Fans in Death Valley include both diamicts and bedded gravels. Seven facies may be recognized. The diamicts include: (1) matrix-rich, coarse wackestones; (2) thin, matrix-rich, fine wackestones, that may show grading; (3) matrix-poor, coarse packstones, transitional to wackestones. The bedded facies include: (4) weakly bedded, poorly sorted packstones or grainstones, that show patchy imbrication, and cut-and-fill structures; (5) packed, imbricated cobble lenses, generally interbedded in facies 4; (6) distinctly bedded gravels, that are better bedded, finer and better sorted, and show better imbrication than facies 4, but still do not show clear separation of sand and gravel beds; (7) backfill cross-bedded gravels. Sand beds are not seen in fan deposits. Sand is present in eolian deposits of the playa, as plane-laminated, back-eddy deposits in Death Valley Wash, and as laminated or rippled sand in the Amargosa River, which drains into the south end of Death Valley. The most remarkable features of the fan and wash deposits are the very weak segregation of sand and gravel, and the absence of any lower flow-regime structures produced by ripples or dunes. During floods, the slope of fan and wash surfaces is steep enough to produce upper regime flows. Most fans in Death Valley itself are not strongly dominated by debris flow deposits (diamicts). Within a fan, facies vary little from proximal to distal regions, but may differ strongly from facies seen in adjacent fans.

  15. The entrainment, pressure and flow process of a jet fan modeled in a square section wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Mutama, K.R.; Hall, A.E.

    1995-12-31

    Jet fan (ductless fan) ventilation in underground mines and tunnels is a subject requiring further attention. At present there are no accepted procedures or guidelines for this type of ventilation. The main reason has been the absence of sufficient general data, which has hampered the development of rules. There is great potential for using jet fans in terms of both effectiveness and economics because they eliminate the need for ventilation tubing. In the present studies a procedure is described and results are presented from a jet fan modeled in a square section wind tunnel. The major purpose of the studies was to provide fundamental data on jet fan performance after it was realized that previous work had been limited and too site specific. The jet fan position in relation to the tunnel walls was varied in order to study the influence of confining walls on entrainment rates and the resulting aerodynamics. A clearer understanding of the fundamental principles of jet fan applications was obtained.

  16. Effects of four inlet and outlet tip-annulus-area blockage configurations on the performance of an axial-flow fan rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, W. M.; Hager, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    An axial-flow fan rotor was tested with four configurations of tip-annulus-area blockage to speeds as high as 0.8 of design speed. The rotor performance with the four blockage configurations is compared with the unblocked rotor performance and with blockage configurations previously investigated. The blockage configurations enable the rotor to operate in a stable condition, to much lower flows than the unblocked rotor, with no evidence of rotating stall. The blockage configurations were effective in reducing rotor torque and weight flow but were accompanied by reductions in pressure ratio and efficiency.

  17. Flow in tubes of non-circular cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadir, Raushan Ara

    Laminar, viscous, incompressible flow in tubes of noncircular cross sections is investigated. The specific aims of the investigation are (1) to look at the problems of both developing flow and fully developed flow, (2) to consider noncircular cross sections in a more systematic manner than has been done in the past, and (3) to develop a relatively simple finite element technique for producing accurate numerical solutions of flow in tubes of fairly arbitrary cross sections. Fully developed flow in tubes is governed by a Poisson type equation for the mainstream velocity. Both analytical and numerical solutions are considered. The cross sections studied include elliptic and rectangular cross sections of different aspect ratios, some triangular cross sections, and a series of crescent-shaped cross sections. The physical characteristics of the flow are examined in a systematic manner in order to determine how these characteristics are affected by certain geometrical features of the cross section. Solutions fall into three basic categories depending on the shape of the cross section. In the first category, which includes circular and elliptic cross sections, solutions are possible in closed form. In the second, including rectangular and some triangular cross sections, solutions are in the form of infinite series. In the third, including cross sections of more complicated or irregular shapes, only numerical solutions are possible. Results of calculations of velocity profiles, flow rate, pumping power, and friction factor are presented in a way which can be useful for engineering applications. In numerical studies of both developing and fully developed flow finite element techniques are used. Results are obtained for tubes of rectangular and elliptic cross sections of different aspect ratios, for tubes of crescent-shaped cross sections, and a tube whose cross section is an oval of Cassini. For fully developed flow, results are compared with the corresponding exact

  18. Effects of flow maldistribution on the thermal performance of cross-flow micro heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonino, C.; Savino, S.

    2016-09-01

    The combined effect of viscosity- and geometry-induced flow maldistribution on the thermal performance of cross-flow micro heat exchangers is investigated with reference to two microchannel cross-sectional geometries, three solid materials, three mass flow rates and three flow nonuniformity models. A FEM procedure, specifically developed for the analysis of the heat transfer between incompressible fluids in cross-flow micro heat exchangers, is used for the numerical simulations. The computed results indicate that flow maldistribution has limited effects on microchannel bulk temperatures, at least for the considered range of operating conditions.

  19. Two interacting cylinders in cross flow.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Mahbub; Meyer, J P

    2011-11-01

    Cylindrical structures in a group are frequently seen on land and in the ocean. Mutual flow interaction between the structures makes the wake very excited or tranquil depending on the spacing between the structures. The excited wake-enhancing forces in some cases cause a catastrophic failure of the structures. This paper presents results of an experimental investigation of Strouhal number (St), time-mean, and fluctuating forces on, and flow structures around, two identical circular cylinders at stagger angle α = 0°-180° and gap-spacing ratio T/D=0.1-5, where T is the gap width between the cylinders, and D is the diameter of a cylinder. While forces were measured using a load cell, St was from spectral analysis of fluctuating pressures measured on the side surfaces of the cylinders. A flow visualization test was conducted to observe flow structures around the cylinders. Based on forces, St, and flow structures, 19 distinct flow categories in the ranges of α and T/D investigated are observed, including one quadristable flow, three kinds of tristable flows, and four kinds of bistable flows. The quadristable, tristable, and bistable flows ensue from instabilities of the gap flow, shear layers, vortices, separation bubbles, and wakes, engendering a strong jump or drop in forces and St of the cylinders. The two cylinders interact with each other in six different mechanisms, namely interaction between boundary layer and cylinder, shear layer or wake and cylinder, shear layer and shear layer, vortex and cylinder, vortex and shear layer, and vortex and vortex. While the interaction between vortex and cylinder results in a very high fluctuating drag, that between vortex and shear layer results in a high fluctuating lift. On the other hand, the interaction between shear layer or wake and cylinder weakens mean and fluctuating forces and flow unsteadiness. A mutual discussion of forces, St, and flow structures is presented in this paper.

  20. Inlet flow distortion in turbomachinery - Comparison of theory and experiment in a transonic fan stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, B. S.; Matwey, M. D.

    1983-01-01

    Consideration is given to both velocity and temperature circumferential inlet distortions at upstream infinity (Seidel et al., 1980). The blade rows here are modeled as semiactuator disks, and losses and quasi-steady deviation angle correlations are included in the analysis. The governing equations are linearized, and the perturbations in stagnation pressure and stagnation temperature at upstream infinity are represented as Fourier series. The flow in the rotor is modeled as inviscid, one-dimensional, unsteady, and compressible. the flow is steady elsewhere. The deviation angles for the rotor and stator are taken to be functions of the relative inlet angle and Mach number, and use is made of the correlations contained in Johnson and Bullock (1965). It is assumed that the losses in relative stagnation pressure in the rotor and stator occur across the trailing edge. Boundary conditions applied at the various stations furnish the equations that make it possible to solve for the several quantities introduced in the linearization of the governing equations.

  1. Shape optimization of multi-chamber cross-flow mufflers by SA optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Min-Chie; Chang, Ying-Chun

    2008-05-01

    It is essential when searching for an efficient acoustical mechanism to have an optimally shaped muffler designed specially for the constrained space found in today's plants. Because the research work of optimally shaped straight silencers in conjunction with multi-chamber cross-flow perforated ducts is rarely addressed, this paper will not only analyze the sound transmission loss (STL) of three kinds of cross-flow perforated mufflers but also will analyze the optimal design shape within a limited space. In this paper, the four-pole system matrix used in evaluating acoustic performance is derived by using the decoupled numerical method. Moreover, a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, a robust scheme in searching for the global optimum by imitating the softening process of metal, has been adopted during shape optimization. To reassure SA's correctness, the STL's maximization of three kinds of muffles with respect to one-tone and dual-tone noise is exemplified. Furthermore, the optimization of mufflers with respect to an octave-band fan noise by the simulated algorithm has been introduced and fully discussed. Before the SA operation can be carried out, an accuracy check of the mathematical model with respect to cross-flow perforated mufflers has to be performed by Munjal's analytical data and experimental data. The optimal result in eliminating broadband noise reveals that the cross-flow perforated muffler with more chambers is far superior at noise reduction than a muffler with fewer chambers. Consequently, the approach used for the optimal design of noise elimination proposed in this study is certainly easy and efficient.

  2. Parametric study on performance of cross-flow turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, C.B.; Seshadri, V.; Singh, S.N.

    1995-04-01

    In the present experimental study, the effect of blade number, nozzle entry arc, and head on the performance characteristics of a cross-flow turbine have been investigated. It has been observed that the efficiency of the turbine increases with increase in blade number, nozzle entry arc, and head. The present investigation has also shown that there is an optimum number of blades for a given nozzle entry arc beyond which the performance of the cross-flow turbine deteriorates. It has also been shown that cross-flow turbines at higher heads do not behave as pure impulse turbines.

  3. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 6; Theoretical Analysis for Coupling of Active Noise Control Actuator Ring Sources to an Annular Duct with Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an analytical model for the coupling of active noise control (ANC) piston-type actuators that are mounted flush to the inner and outer walls of an annular duct to the modes in the duct generated by the actuator motion. The analysis will be used to couple the ANC actuators to the modal analysis propagation computer program for the annular duct, to predict the effects of active suppression of fan-generated engine noise sources. This combined program will then be available to assist in the design or evaluation of ANC systems in fan engine annular exhaust ducts. An analysis has been developed to predict the modes generated in an annular duct due to the coupling of flush-mounted ring actuators on the inner and outer walls of the duct. The analysis has been combined with a previous analysis for the coupling of modes to a cylindrical duct in a FORTRAN computer program to perform the computations. The method includes the effects of uniform mean flow in the duct. The program can be used for design or evaluation purposes for active noise control hardware for turbofan engines. Predictions for some sample cases modeled after the geometry of the NASA Lewis ANC Fan indicate very efficient coupling in both the inlet and exhaust ducts for the m = 6 spinning mode at frequencies where only a single radial mode is cut-on. Radial mode content in higher order cut-off modes at the source plane and the required actuator displacement amplitude to achieve 110 dB SPL levels in the desired mode were predicted. Equivalent cases with and without flow were examined for the cylindrical and annular geometry, and little difference was found for a duct flow Mach number of 0.1. The actuator ring coupling program will be adapted as a subroutine to the cylindrical duct modal analysis and the exhaust duct modal analysis. This will allow the fan source to be defined in terms of characteristic modes at the fan source plane and predict the propagation to the

  4. Investigation of the unsteady pressure distribution on the blades of an axial flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, R. E.; Franke, G. F.

    1978-01-01

    The unsteady response of a stator blade caused by the interaction of the stator with the wakes of an upstream rotor was investigated. Unsteady pressure distributions were measured using a blade instrumented with a series miniature pressure transducers. The influence of several geometrical and flow parameters - rotor/stator spacing, stator solidity and stator incidence angle - were studied to determine the unsteady response of the stator to these parameters. A major influence on the stator unsteady response is due to the stator solidity. At high solidities the blade-to-blade interference has a larger contribution. While the range of rotor/stator spacings investigated had a minor influence, the effect of stator incidence angle is significant. The data indicate the existence of an optimum positive incidence which minimizes the unsteady response.

  5. Energy efficient engine: fan test hardware detailed design report

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1980-10-01

    A single stage fan and quarter stage booster were designed for the energy efficient engine. The fan has an inlet radius ratio of 0.342 and a specific flow rate of 208.9 Kg/S sq m (42.8 lbm/sec sq ft). The fan rotor has 32 medium aspect ratio (2.597) titanium blades with a partspan shroud at 55% blade height. The design corrected fan tip speed is 411.5 M/S (1350 ft/sec). The quarter stage island splits the total fan flow with approximately 22% of the flow being supercharged by the quarter stage rotor. The fan bypass ratio is 6.8. The core flow total pressure ratio is 1.67 and the fan bypass pressure ratio is 1.65. The design details of the fan and booster blading, and the fan frame and static structure for the fan configuration are presented.

  6. Energy efficient engine: Fan test hardware detailed design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    A single stage fan and quarter stage booster were designed for the energy efficient engine. The fan has an inlet radius ratio of 0.342 and a specific flow rate of 208.9 Kg/S sq m (42.8 lbm/sec sq ft). The fan rotor has 32 medium aspect ratio (2.597) titanium blades with a partspan shroud at 55% blade height. The design corrected fan tip speed is 411.5 M/S (1350 ft/sec). The quarter stage island splits the total fan flow with approximately 22% of the flow being supercharged by the quarter stage rotor. The fan bypass ratio is 6.8. The core flow total pressure ratio is 1.67 and the fan bypass pressure ratio is 1.65. The design details of the fan and booster blading, and the fan frame and static structure for the fan configuration are presented.

  7. Quiet High-Speed Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieber, Lysbeth; Repp, Russ; Weir, Donald S.

    1996-01-01

    A calibration of the acoustic and aerodynamic prediction methods was performed and a baseline fan definition was established and evaluated to support the quiet high speed fan program. A computational fluid dynamic analysis of the NASA QF-12 Fan rotor, using the DAWES flow simulation program was performed to demonstrate and verify the causes of the relatively poor aerodynamic performance observed during the fan test. In addition, the rotor flowfield characteristics were qualitatively compared to the acoustic measurements to identify the key acoustic characteristics of the flow. The V072 turbofan source noise prediction code was used to generate noise predictions for the TFE731-60 fan at three operating conditions and compared to experimental data. V072 results were also used in the Acoustic Radiation Code to generate far field noise for the TFE731-60 nacelle at three speed points for the blade passage tone. A full 3-D viscous flow simulation of the current production TFE731-60 fan rotor was performed with the DAWES flow analysis program. The DAWES analysis was used to estimate the onset of multiple pure tone noise, based on predictions of inlet shock position as a function of the rotor tip speed. Finally, the TFE731-60 fan rotor wake structure predicted by the DAWES program was used to define a redesigned stator with the leading edge configured to minimize the acoustic effects of rotor wake / stator interaction, without appreciably degrading performance.

  8. Investigation of Performance Improvements Including Application of Inlet Guide Vanes to a Cross-flow Fan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    configurations while a butterfly valve in the exhaust duct was used for throttling studies. Figure 18 shows the horizontal inlet configuration...vertical thrust in a single seat VTOL aircraft, researchers at both the Naval Postgraduate School and Syracuse University have urged further

  9. Development of a Cross-Flow Fan Rotor for Vertical Take-Off and Landing Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    motor used to power the CFF was the Scorpion HK-5035–410KV. This electric motor had a 6-mm output shaft and was rated to operate at temperatures of...power of 7,000 watts for 18 5 seconds and a peak current of 145 amperes for 5 seconds [5]. Scorpion Power System LTD included a controller assembly...with the Scorpion HK-5035–410KV motor which was used to control the speed of the motor. This assembly was mounted in the custom built speed control

  10. Development of a Cross-Flow Fan Powered Quad-Rotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    and Batteries: Various motors were tried and the ones that were sufficiently powerful were the Scorpion Power System HKIII-4035–560KV motors. The...most recent motors tested that were not powerful enough were the Scorpion Power System HKIII-4025–330KV motors. The batteries chosen were Thunder Power...Innovations, “NAZA-M,” DJI, [Online]. Available: http://www.dji.com/product/naza-m/spec. [Accessed 12 May 2015]. [18] Scoprion Power System LTD, “ Scorpion

  11. Thrust Augmentation Study of Cross-Flow Fan for Vertical Take-Off and Landing Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    generator.......................................................66 Figure 53. Location of “ Scorpion ESC Programmer v1.2...66 Figure 54. Opened “ Scorpion ESC Programmer v1.2” application ..................................67 Figure 55. Location of COM port...DC Power Supply • 1x WaveTek Pulse Generator • 1x Thermostat • 1x Giant Weighing Scale • 1x Laptop installed with “ Scorpion ECS Programmer v1.2

  12. Advanced Noise Control Fan Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Noise Control Fan at the NASA Glenn Research Center is used to experimentally analyze fan generated acoustics. In order to determine how a proposed noise reduction concept affects fan performance, flow measurements can be used to compute mass flow. Since tedious flow mapping is required to obtain an accurate mass flow, an equation was developed to correlate the mass flow to inlet lip wall static pressure measurements. Once this correlation is obtained, the mass flow for future configurations can be obtained from the nonintrusive wall static pressures. Once the mass flow is known, the thrust and fan performance can be evaluated. This correlation enables fan acoustics and performance to be obtained simultaneously without disturbing the flow.

  13. Study on an undershot cross-flow water turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Yasuyuki; Inagaki, Terumi; Li, Yanrong; Omiya, Ryota; Fukutomi, Junichiro

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to develop a water turbine suitable for ultra-low heads in open channels, with the end goal being the effective utilization of unutilized hydroelectric energy in agricultural water channels. We performed tests by applying a cross-flow runner to an open channel as an undershot water turbine while attempting to simplify the structure and eliminate the casing. We experimentally investigated the flow fields and performance of water turbines in states where the flow rate was constant for the undershot cross-flow water turbine mentioned above. In addition, we compared existing undershot water turbines with our undershot cross-flow water turbine after attaching a bottom plate to the runner. From the results, we were able to clarify the following. Although the effective head for cross-flow runners with no bottom plate was lower than those found in existing runners equipped with a bottom plate, the power output is greater in the high rotational speed range because of the high turbine efficiency. Also, the runner with no bottom plate differed from runners that had a bottom plate in that no water was being wound up by the blades or retained between the blades, and the former received twice the flow due to the flow-through effect. As a result, the turbine efficiency was greater for runners with no bottom plate in the full rotational speed range compared with that found in runners that had a bottom plate.

  14. Flood hazard assessment on alluvial fans: an examination of the methodology

    SciTech Connect

    French, R.H.

    1984-08-01

    The report presents the results of a critical examination of assumptions and methodology recommended by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to assess flood hazard on alluvial fans. The conculsions reached are as follows. First, the assumption that a flow on an alluvial fan has an equal probability of crossing any point on a given contour seems to be a very conservative assumption. Second, given the data from the Nevada Test Site, it would appear that the assumption that fans have critical to supercritical slopes is acceptable. Third, the present methods of estimating channel width and depth on alluvial fans seem to be invalid. Fourth, the specific flood hazard evaluation procedures recommended by FEMA are not valid in some cases because they are based on the assumption that sufficient records exist to do a standard peak flow analysis. Fifth, the validity of the implied assumption that debris flows present no risk can only be assessed after a location on a fan relative to the intersection point has been established. It is concluded that the current methods of flood hazard assessment on alluvial fans are not adequate given the current and projected economic value of structures and development on alluvial fans in the southwestern United States. 55 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  15. Radar Cross-Sectional Spectra of Rotating Multiple Skew-Plated Metal Fan Blades by Physical Optics/Physical Theory of Diffraction, Equivalent Currents Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bor, Sheau-Shong; Yang, Tai-Lin; Yang, Shui-Yuan

    1992-05-01

    The monostatic radar cross-sectional spectra of rotating multiple skew-plated metal fan blades are investigated. The theoretical treatment of such a slowly rotating and electrically large scatterer is based on the quasi-stationary method together with physical optics/physical theory of diffraction (PO/PTD) equivalent current techniques. Only the θθ polarization case is considered here, but the \\psi\\psi polarization case can be treated in the same way. This solution is applicable to any observation angle, and is represented by such a general form as one which enables us to treat a similar scatterer with multiple blades and with different skew angles. Three rotating skew-plated blades are taken as an example, and the agreements between the theoretical and experimental results are satisfactory.

  16. Turbulent combustion flow through variable cross section channel

    SciTech Connect

    Rogov, B.V.; Sokolova, I.A.

    1999-07-01

    The object of this study is to develop a new evolutionary numerical method for solving direct task of Laval nozzle, which provides non-iterative calculations of chemical reacting turbulent flows with detailed kinetic chemistry. The numerical scheme of fourth order along the normal coordinate and second order along the streamwise one is derived for calculation of difference-differential equations of the second order and the first order. Marching method provides the possibility of computing field flow in subsonic section of nozzle and near an expansion. Critical mass consumption is calculated with controlled accuracy. After critical cross section of nozzle a combined marching method with global iterations over axial pressure (only) makes it possible to overcome ill posedness of mixed supersonic flow and calculate the whole flow field near and after critical cross section. Numerical results are demonstrated on turbulent burning hydrogen-oxygen flow through Laval nozzle with curvature of wall K{sub w} = 0.5.

  17. Highly Loaded Fan by Using Tandem Cascade Rotor Blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Suga, Shinya; Matsuoka, Akinori

    For axial flow compressors and fans in the aircraft engines higher pressure ratio is required in order to attain the high thrust engines. In this study, the fan with the tandem cascades was introduced to increase the fan pressure ratio. The use of tandem cascades in the fan allows savings in length and weight and therefore a compact fan could be built. The design of fan with tandem cascades and the fan testing were carried out to develop the high pressure ratio fan for the Air Turbo Ramjet (ATR) propulsion system. The ATR is a combined cycle engine which performs like a turbojet engine at subsonic speeds and a ramjet at supersonic speeds. In particular, high fan pressure ratio contributes to increase the engine thrust during subsonic flight at which the engine does not make use of ram effect. The results of the fan testing indicate that the pressure ratio of 2.2 is achieved in single stage fan.

  18. Crossing Borders Virtual and Real: A Transnational Internet-Based Community of Spaghetti Western Fans Finally Meet Each Other Face to Face on the Wild Plains of Almeria, Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broughton, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Since the rise of the Internet, the act of border crossing has become a pursuit that must necessarily be conceptualized in both real and virtual terms. By using theories connected to virtual communities, new technologies, fan cultures and tourism, this paper seeks to show that the culturally productive activities of a transnational virtual…

  19. Performance of a 1.15-pressure-ratio axial-flow fan stage with a blade tip solidity of 0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, W. M.; Steinke, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The overall and blade-element performance of a low-solidity, low-pressure-ratio, low-tip-speed fan stage is presented over the stable operating range at rotative speeds from 90 to 120 percent of design speed. At design speed a stage peak efficiency of 0.836 was obtained at a weight flow of 30.27 kilograms per second and a pressure ratio of 1.111. The pressure ratio was less than design pressure ratio, and the design energy input into the rotor was not achieved. A mismatch of the rotor and stator blade elements resulted due to the lower than design pressure ratio of the rotor.

  20. Storm-reworked shallow-marine fans in the Middle Triassic Baise area, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiahao; Xie, Xinong; Pang, Xiong; Liu, Baojun

    2017-03-01

    Shallow-marine fans have been analyzed for sedimentary characteristics and genetic mechanisms far less commonly than deep-marine fans. Based on outcrop observations, this study reveals that large-scale submarine fans in the Middle Triassic Baise area, south China, consisted of a braided channel-levee facies complex in the inner fans; sinuous channel-levee facies complex, overbank facies and crevasse splay facies in the medial fans; and sand sheet facies in the outer fans, which present different lithology assemblages and depositional successions. The lithofacies of dominant massive sandstone, secondary graded sandstone and laminated sandstone from bottom to top is similar to the Bouma sequence, indicative of gravity flow processes. However, the laminated sandstones mostly bear sedimentary structures of gutter casts, wave-generated ripple marks, hummocky cross-bedding, wave-generated cross-bedding and ripple bedding, and were thus attributed to frequent storm reworking processes. Moreover, discontinuous deposition recorded by abrupt sediment grain-size changes, distinct interfaces and divergent paleocurrent orientations occurred between the laminated sandstones and the underlying massive (or graded) sandstones. Accordingly, storm reworking processes together with abundant fossils of Daonella, Ammonite and Crinoidea indicate a shallow-marine paleo-environment. As a whole, this study provides a good example of large-scale shallow-marine fans and laminated sandstones resulted from storm reworking.

  1. Effects of a kind of non-smooth blade on the unsteady flow field at the exit of an axial fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongwei, Ma; Jibo, Guo

    2008-03-01

    An experimental investigation of effects of a kind of streamwise-grooved blade on the unsteady flow field at an exit of an axial-flow fan was performed. The flow field at 25% chord downstream from the trailing edge at hub was measured using a fast-response five-hole pressure probe at different mass-flow conditions. The unsteady flow of the grooved blades was compared with that of the smooth blades. The measurement results indicate that: (1) the grooved blades restrain the velocity fluctuation and the pressure fluctuation by modulating the blade boundary layers, which contributes to the flow loss reduction in the hub region and in the rotor wake region at the design condition; (2) the stream-wise grooves play an important role in restraining the radial migration in the blade boundary layer and abating the tip flow mixing, which contributes to the flow loss reduction in the tip region at the design condition; (3) at the near stall condition, the grooved surface can not reduce the flow loss, even in-crease the loss nearby when the separation happens in the blade boundary layer.

  2. Experimental study of cross-flow wet electrostatic precipitator.

    PubMed

    Ali, M; Pasic, H; Alam, K; Tiji, S A N; Mannella, N; Silva, T; Liu, T

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports development and testing of a novel cross-flow wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP), recently patented at Ohio University, that utilizes vertical columns of permeable material in the form of polypropylene ropes placed in a cross-flow configuration within a flue gas stream. The cross-flow design has large surface area, which provides scrubbing action; therefore, it has the potential for removing multiple pollutants, including particulates, gases, vapors, and mists. In this new method, the ropes are kept wet by the liquid (water) introduced from the top of the cells running downward on the ropes by capillary action, making the permeable materials act as the ground electrode for capturing particles from the flue gas. Preliminary testing has shown an efficiency of well above 80% using two cells and three sets of discharge electrodes. Since the material of construction is primarily corrosion-resistant polymeric material, both weight and cost reductions are expected from this new design.

  3. Formation of scalloped cross-bedding without unsteady flows.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Scalloped cross-bedding formed by fluctuating flow superficially resembles that formed by superimposed or intersecting bedforms, but, as illustrated in three-dimensional computer plots, the two kinds of structures commonly can be distinguished by directional properties of the bedding. Scallops deposited by alongslope-migrating, superimposed bedforms have cross-bed and bounding-surface dip patterns that lack bilateral symmetry and have cross-bed dips that are asymmetrically distributed relative to bounding-surface dips. Scallops with dip patterns that are bilaterally symmetrically distributed relative to the bounding-surface dips can be produced either by fluctuating flow or by downslope or upslope migration of superimposed bedforms. An example of nearshore-marine scalloped cross-bedding of Pleistocene age was examined in detail in a coastal terrace of Monterey Bay, California. -from Author

  4. Fan/Ram Duct Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-10-01

    turbofan engine shutoff scheme, the ram duct flow conditions, and the Ian duct shutoff vane area transi- tion schedule. This loss will be...airflow. The performance of the turbofan is neglected until the main engine burner is ignited. At that time it is assumed that the turbo - fan...B. Transient Operation . . .. TRANSIENT TRANSITION TEST CASES A. Turbofan to Ramjet B. Ramjet to Turbo fan CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

  5. Cross-flow electrofilter and method

    DOEpatents

    Gidaspow, Dimitri; Lee, Chang H.; Wasan, Darsh T.

    1980-01-01

    A filter for clarifying carbonaceous liquids containing finely divided solid particles of, for instance, unreacted coal, ash and other solids discharged from a coal liquefaction process is presented. The filter includes two passageways separated by a porous filter medium. In one preferred embodiment the filter medium is of tubular shape to form the first passageway and is enclosed within an outer housing to form the second passageway within the annulus. An electrode disposed in the first passageway, for instance along the tube axis, is connected to a source of high voltage for establishing an electric field between the electrode and the filter medium. Slurry feed flows through the first passageway tangentially to the surfaces of the filter medium and the electrode. Particles from the feed slurry are attracted to the electrode within the first passageway to prevent plugging of the porous filter medium while carbonaceous liquid filters into the second passageway for withdrawal. Concentrated slurry is discharged from the first passageway at an end opposite to the feed slurry inlet. Means are also provided for the addition of diluent and a surfactant into the slurry to control relative permittivity and the electrophoretic mobility of the particles.

  6. A crossed hot-wire technique for complex turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Bradshaw, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a crossed hot-wire technique for the measurement of all components of mean velocity, Reynolds stresses, and triple products in a complex turbulent flow. The accuracy of various assumptions usually implicit in the use of crossed hot-wire anemometers is examined. It is shown that significant errors can result in flow with gradients in mean velocity or Reynolds stress, but that a first-order correction for these errors can be made using available data. It is also shown how corrections can be made for high turbulence levels using available data.

  7. Simulation and experiment research of aerodynamic performance of small axial fans with struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wei; Lin, Peifeng; Zhang, Li; Jin, Yingzi; Wang, Yanping; Kim, Heuy Dong; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2016-06-01

    Interaction between rotor and struts has great effect on the performance of small axial fan systems. The small axial fan systems are selected as the studied objects in this paper, and four square struts are downstream of the rotor. The cross section of the struts is changed to the cylindrical shapes for the investigation: one is in the same hydraulic diameter as the square struts and another one is in the same cross section as the square struts. Influence of the shape of the struts on the static pressure characteristics, the internal flow and the sound emission of the small axial fans are studied. Standard K-ɛ turbulence model and SIMPLE algorithm are applied in the calculation of the steady fluid field, and the curves of the pressure rising against the flow rate are obtained, which demonstrates that the simulation results are in nice consistence with the experimental data. The steady calculation results are set as the initial field in the unsteady calculation. Large eddy simulation and PISO algorithm are used in the transient calculation, and the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings model is introduced to predict the sound level at the eight monitoring points. The research results show that: the static pressure coefficients of the fan with cylindrical struts increase by about 25% compared to the fan with square struts, and the efficiencies increase by about 28.6%. The research provides a theoretical guide for shape optimization and noise reduction of small axial fan with struts.

  8. Method and apparatus for affecting a recirculation zone in a cross flow

    DOEpatents

    Bathina, Mahesh [Andhra Pradesh, IN; Singh, Ramanand [Uttar Pradesh, IN

    2012-07-17

    Disclosed is a cross flow apparatus including a surface and at least one outlet located at the surface. The cross flow apparatus further includes at least one guide at the surface configured to direct an intersecting flow flowing across the surface and increase a velocity of a cross flow being expelled from the at least one outlet downstream from the at least one outlet.

  9. Two-Stage Centrifugal Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Converse, David

    2011-01-01

    Fan designs are often constrained by envelope, rotational speed, weight, and power. Aerodynamic performance and motor electrical performance are heavily influenced by rotational speed. The fan used in this work is at a practical limit for rotational speed due to motor performance characteristics, and there is no more space available in the packaging for a larger fan. The pressure rise requirements keep growing. The way to ordinarily accommodate a higher DP is to spin faster or grow the fan rotor diameter. The invention is to put two radially oriented stages on a single disk. Flow enters the first stage from the center; energy is imparted to the flow in the first stage blades, the flow is redirected some amount opposite to the direction of rotation in the fixed stators, and more energy is imparted to the flow in the second- stage blades. Without increasing either rotational speed or disk diameter, it is believed that as much as 50 percent more DP can be achieved with this design than with an ordinary, single-stage centrifugal design. This invention is useful primarily for fans having relatively low flow rates with relatively high pressure rise requirements.

  10. Noise generated by quiet engine fans. 3: Fan C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montegan, F. J.; Schaefer, J. W.; Schmiedlin, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    A family of fans designed with low noise features was acoustically evaluated, and noise results are documented for a 1.6-pressure-ratio, 472-m/sec (155-ft/sec) tip speed fan. The fan is described and some aerodynamic operating data are given. Far field noise around the fan was measured over a range of operating conditions for a variety of configurations having different arrangements of sound absorbing material in the flow ducts. Complete results of 1.3 octave band analysis of the data are presented in tabular form. Included also are acoustic power spectra and sideline perceived noise levels. Representative 1/3 octave band data are presented graphically, and sample graphs of continuous narrow band spectra are also provided.

  11. Tricritical spiral vortex instability in cross-slot flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haward, Simon J.; Poole, Robert J.; Alves, Manuel A.; Oliveira, Paulo J.; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Shen, Amy Q.

    2016-03-01

    We examine fluid flow through cross-slot devices with various depth to width ratios α . At low Reynolds number, Re, flow is symmetric and a sharp boundary exists between the two incoming fluid streams. Above an α -dependent critical value, R ec(α ) , a steady symmetry-breaking bifurcation occurs and a spiral vortex structure develops. Order parameters characterizing the instability grow according to a sixth-order Landau potential, and show a progression from second- to first-order transitions as α increases beyond a tricritical value of α ≈0.55 . Flow simulations indicate the instability is driven by vortex stretching at the stagnation point.

  12. Tricritical spiral vortex instability in cross-slot flow.

    PubMed

    Haward, Simon J; Poole, Robert J; Alves, Manuel A; Oliveira, Paulo J; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Shen, Amy Q

    2016-03-01

    We examine fluid flow through cross-slot devices with various depth to width ratios α. At low Reynolds number, Re, flow is symmetric and a sharp boundary exists between the two incoming fluid streams. Above an α-dependent critical value, Re(c)(α), a steady symmetry-breaking bifurcation occurs and a spiral vortex structure develops. Order parameters characterizing the instability grow according to a sixth-order Landau potential, and show a progression from second- to first-order transitions as α increases beyond a tricritical value of α ≈ 0.55. Flow simulations indicate the instability is driven by vortex stretching at the stagnation point.

  13. Aerodynamic performance of axial-flow fan stage operated at nine inlet guide vane angles. [to be used on vertical lift aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Reid, L.

    1979-01-01

    The overall performance of a fan stage with nine inlet guide vane angle settings is presented. These data were obtained over the stable flow range at speeds from 60 to 120 percent of design for vane setting angles from -25 to 42.5 degrees. At design speed and design inlet guide vane angle, the stage has a peak efficiency of 0.892 at a pressure ratio of 1.322 and a flow of 25.31 kg/s. The stall margin based on peak efficiency and stall was 20 percent. Based on an operating line passing through the peak efficiency point at the design setting angle, the useful operating range of the stage at design speed is limited by stall at the positive setting angles and by choke at the negative angles. At design the calculated static thrust along the operating line varied from 68 to 114 percent of that obtained at design setting angle.

  14. Hydraulic processes on alluvial fans

    SciTech Connect

    French, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Alluvial fans are among the most prominent landscape features in the American Southwest and throughout the semi-arid and arid regions of the world. The importance of developing a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the hydraulic processes which formed, and which continue to modify, these features derives from their rapid and significant development over the past four decades. As unplanned urban sprawl moved from valley floors onto alluvial fans, the serious damage incurred from infrequent flow events has dramatically increased. This book presents a discussion of our current and rapidly expanding knowledge of hydraulic processes on alluvial fans. It addresses the subject from a multidisciplinary viewpoint, acquainting the reader with geological principles pertinent to the analysis of hydraulic processes on alluvial fans.

  15. Three-dimensional flow visualization of shock wave using double-pulsed holographic interferometry. II - Flow visualization for three-dimensional shock structures in rotating aeroengine fan blade rows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasu, Shohachi; Tamaki, Teiichi; Nagano, Susumu; Kashiwagi, Takao

    1990-09-01

    The growing demand for more fuel-efficient aero gas turbine engines has led to the need for a detailed understanding of the aerodynamic behavior of components. The optical technique of holography has recently achieved importance as a means of providing the experimental data necessary for the development and validation of relevant design calculation methods. This paper describes the double-pulsed holographic flow visualization technique which has been developed at IHI and provides information on 3-dimensional shock structures of the transonic flow region between the blades and shock/casing wall boundary layer interaction in rotating aeroengine fan at various rotor speeds and throttling conditions.

  16. Field, Laboratory and Imaging spectroscopic Analysis of Landslide, Debris Flow and Flood Hazards in Lacustrine, Aeolian and Alluvial Fan Deposits Surrounding the Salton Sea, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, B. E.; Hooper, D. M.; Mars, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution satellite imagery, field spectral measurements using a portable ASD spectrometer, and 2013 hyperspectral AVIRIS imagery were used to evaluate the age of the Martinez Mountain Landslide (MML) near the Salton Sea, in order to determine the relative ages of adjacent alluvial fan surfaces and the potential for additional landslides, debris flows, and floods. The Salton Sea (SS) occupies a pluvial lake basin, with ancient shorelines ranging from 81 meters to 113 meters above the modern lake level. The highest shoreline overlaps the toe of the 0.24 - 0.38 km3 MML deposit derived from hydrothermally altered granites exposed near the summit of Martinez Mountain. The MML was originally believed to be of early Holocene age. However, AVIRIS mineral maps show abundant desert varnish on the top and toe of the landslide. Desert varnish can provide a means of relative dating of alluvial fan (AF) or landslide surfaces, as it accumulates at determinable rates over time. Based on the 1) highest levels of desert varnish accumulation mapped within the basin, 2) abundant evaporite playa minerals on top of the toe of the landslide, and 3) the highest shoreline of the ancestral lake overtopping the toe of the landslide with gastropod and bivalve shells, we conclude that the MML predates the oldest alluvial fan terraces and lake sediments exposed in the Coachella and Imperial valleys and must be older than early Holocene (i.e. Late Pleistocene?). Thus, the MML landslide has the potential to be used as a spectral endmember for desert varnish thickness and thus proxy for age discrimination of active AF washes versus desert pavements. Given the older age of the MML landslide and low water levels in the modern SS, the risk from future rockslides of this size and related seiches is rather low. However, catastrophic floods and debris flows do occur along the most active AF channels; and the aftermath of such flows can be identified spectrally by montmorillonite crusts forming in

  17. Alluvial fans and their natural distinction from rivers based on morphology, hydraulic processes, sedimentary processes, and facies assemblages

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, T.C. ); McPherson, J.G. )

    1994-07-01

    Contrary to common contemporary usage, alluvial fans are a naturally unique phenomenon readily distinguishable from other sedimentary environments, including gravel-bed rivers, on the basis of morphology, hydraulic processes, sedimentologic processes, and facies assemblages. The piedmont setting of alluvial fans where the feeder channel of an upland drainage basin intersects the mountain front assures that catastrophic fluid gravity flows and sediment gravity flows, including sheetfloods, rock falls, rock slides, rock avalanches, and debris flows, are major constructional processes, regardless of climate. The unconfinement of these flows at the mountain front gives rise to the high-sloping, semiconical form that typifies fans. The plano-convex cross-profile geometry inherent in this form is the inverse of the toughlike cross-sectional form of river systems, and precludes the development of floodplains that characterize rivers. The relatively high slope of alluvial fans creates unique hydraulic conditions where passing fluid gravity flows attain high capacity, high competency, and upper flow regime, resulting in sheetfloods that deposit low-angle antidune or surface-parallel planar-stratified sequences. These waterlaid facies contrast with the typically lower-flow-regime thick-bedded, cross-bedded, and lenticular channel facies, and associated floodplain sequences, of rivers. The unconfinement of flows on fans causes a swift decrease in velocity, competency, and capacity as they attenuate, inducing rapid deposition that leads to the angular, poorly sorted textures and short radii typical of fans. This condition is markedly different than for rivers, where sediment gravity flows are rare and water flows remain confined by channel walls or spill into floodplains, and increase in depth downstream.

  18. Active Control of Fan Noise in Ducts Using Magnetic Bearings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of magnetic bearings. An axial flow fan creates tonal noise related to its rotational rate. Additional noise exists due to harmonics of this frequency...magnetic bearings. An axial flow fan creates tonal noise related to its rotational rate. Additional noise exists due to harmonics of this frequency as well...systems typically have fans that will move air from the heating or cooling system to any desired space. Fan noise is characterized first by tonal

  19. Low Noise Research Fan Stage Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, David E.; Neubert, Robert J.; Malmborg, Eric W.; Philbrick, Daniel H.; Spear, David A.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the design of a Low Noise ADP Research Fan stage. The fan is a variable pitch design which is designed at the cruise pitch condition. Relative to the cruise setting, the blade is closed at takeoff and opened for reverse thrust operation. The fan stage is a split flow design with fan exit guide vanes and core stators. This fan stage design was combined with a nacelle and engine core duct to form a powered fan/nacelle, subscale model. This model is intended for use in aerodynamic performance, acoustic and structural testing in a wind tunnel. The model has a 22-inch outer fan diameter and a hub-to-top ratio of 0.426 which permits the use of existing NASA fan and cowl force balance designs and rig drive system. The design parameters were selected to permit valid acoustic and aerodynamic comparisons with the PW 17-inch rig previously tested under NASA contract. The fan stage design is described in detail. The results of the design axisymmetric analysis at aerodynamic design condition are included. The structural analysis of the fan rotor and attachment is described including the material selections and stress analysis. The blade and attachment are predicted to have adequate low cycle fatigue life, and an acceptable operating range without resonant stress or flutter. The stage was acoustically designed with airfoil counts in the fan exit guide vane and core stator to minimize noise. A fan-FEGV tone analysis developed separately under NASA contract was used to determine these airfoil counts. The fan stage design was matched to a nacelle design to form a fan/nacelle model for wind tunnel testing. The nacelle design was developed under a separate NASA contract. The nacelle was designed with an axisymmetric inlet, cowl and nozzle for convenience in testing and fabrication. Aerodynamic analysis of the nacelle confirmed the required performance at various aircraft operating conditions.

  20. Dating of debris flow fan complexes from Lantau Island, Hong Kong, China: The potential relationship between landslide activity and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, R. J.; Parry, S.; Millis, S. W.; Wang, N.; Rieser, U.; DeWitt, R.

    2015-11-01

    Five debris flow fan complexes bordering the coastal foothills of western Lantau Island, Hong Kong, have been the subject of a stratigraphic and dating study to explore the potential relationship between past periods of climate change and landslide activity. Luminescence (OSL) ages from the fan complexes, supported by a few calibrated radiocarbon (14C) ages on duplicate samples, suggest six main periods of accumulation: 28,000-20,000 ka, 14,500-10,500 ka, 5800-5000 ka, 4370-4230 ka, 3560-3320 ka, and 1350-1050 ka. The younger periods (< 10,000 ka) appear to be dominated by relatively thin (0.5-1.5 m) units deposited mainly by debris flood events whereas the older periods are dominated by thicker (1.0-3.5 m) units deposited by debris flow events. We hypothesise that immediately prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, i.e., 21,000 ka), the climate was cool and dry. Upland areas were probably devoid of vegetation, providing favourable conditions for sediment production in source areas. These debris-laden source areas are likely to have been mobilised during periodic rainstorm activity, rapidly channelised over relatively short drainage courses, and then deposited as thick, sediment-rich, debris flow deposits along the coastal foothills. During the early to middle Holocene, the climate was warmer and more humid. Pluvial conditions dominated; forests occupied the upland source areas, leading to possibly reduced sediment yields, more frequent flash floods and deposition dominated by debris floods. Compared with recent studies on the weathering and erosion history of the Pearl River Delta, our landslide age data are indicative of a potential link between increased landslide activity and intensification of the East Asian monsoon during the early to middle Holocene.

  1. A method to assess fluvial fan channel networks, with a preliminary application to fans in coastal British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard, Thomas Hugh; Hogan, Dan L.; Wilford, David J.; Roberts, Brian

    2010-03-01

    The channel network on a fluvial fan distributes sediment across the fan surface and determines fan development. We present a method to characterize fan channel networks (FCNs) so that the effect of controls (e.g., sediment supply) on the FCN can be evaluated. We then do a preliminary test of the method using three fans in coastal British Columbia. The method uses a set of three measures: 1) the spatial extent of hydrogeomorphic activity, measured as the percentage of the contemporary fan surface area occupied by active channels; 2) the topologic structure, using node counts to measure channel network complexity; and 3) a sediment budget to indicate the proportion of sediment that is stored on the fan, loosely characterized by comparing the second-largest clast size of sediment at the fan apex or intersection point with the second-largest clast at the toe of the fan. These measures were applied to two fan deltas and one partial fan delta in northern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, using channel surveys conducted in 2006 and 2007. All three fans are located within 30 km of each other, have similar climatic, physiographic, and vegetation settings, and have natural channel networks. Each fan has perennial channel flow at the fan apex. Watershed areas range from 19.5 to 35.6 km 2, and contemporary fan areas range from 0.2 to 0.7 km 2. The Melton Relative Relief ratio ranges from 0.24 to 0.30 and none of the fans show evidence of debris floods or debris flows. In addition to testing the efficacy of the FCN measures, we use these fans to explore the question of whether fans in similar geomorphic settings and with similar controls develop similar FCNs. Results show the fans have between 4.7-8.5 % of the contemporary fan surface occupied by the active channel network. Topologic node counts indicate that the two fan deltas have a similar level of channel complexity, with 42-54 nodes in total. The partial fan delta channel network is approximately half as complex, with

  2. Nonlinear dynamics of tube arrays in cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Cai, Y.; Zhu, S.

    1994-04-01

    Fluidelastic instability of loosely supported tube arrays was studied analytically and experimentally. This is one of the important practical problems of autonomous fluid-structure systems with many interesting motions. Both fluid-damping and fluid-stiffness controlled instabilities were investigated. Depending on the system parameter, the dynamic response of the tubes includes periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic motions. The analytical model is based on the unsteady flow theory, which can predict the nonlinear dynamics of tube arrays in cross flow. For fluid-damping controlled instability, analytical results and experimental data agree reasonably well. This study was applied to heat exchangers.

  3. Ambient wind energy harvesting using cross-flow fluttering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuguang; Yuan, Jianping; Lipson, Hod

    2011-01-01

    In this experimental study, we propose and test a bioinspired piezo-leaf architecture which converts wind energy into electrical energy by wind-induced fluttering motion. While conventional fluttering devices are arranged in parallel with the flow direction, here we explore a dangling cross-flow stalk arrangement. This architecture amplifies the vibration by an order of magnitude, making it appropriate for low-cost organic piezomaterials. We fabricated prototypes using flexible piezoelectric materials as stalks and polymer film as leaves. A series of experiments demonstrated a peak output power of approximately 600 μ W and maximum power density of approximately 2 mW/cm3 from a single leaf.

  4. Vertical, Bubbly, Cross-Flow Characteristics over Tube Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaki, C.; Cheong, K. H.; Monji, H.; Matsui, G.

    2005-12-01

    Two-phase flow over tube bundles is commonly observed in shell and tube-type heat exchangers. However, only limited amount of data concerning flow pattern and void fraction exists due to the flow complexity and the difficulties in measurement. The detailed flow structure in tube bundles needs to be understood for reliable and effective design. Therefore, the objective of this study was to clarify the two-phase structure of cross-flow in tube bundles by PIV. Experiments were conducted using two types of models, namely in-line and staggered arrays with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.5. Each test section contains 20 rows of five 15 mm O.D. tubes in each row. The experiment’s data were obtained under very low void fraction (α<0.02). Liquid and gas velocity data in the whole flow field were measured successfully by optical filtering and image processing. The structures of bubbly flow in the two different configurations of tube bundles were described in terms of the velocity vector field, turbulence intensity and void fraction.

  5. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, David A.; Bacchi, David P.; Connors, Timothy F.; Collins, III, Edwin L.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously horn have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken.

  6. Effect of inner guide on performances of cross flow turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokubu, K.; Yamasaki, K.; Honda, H.; Kanemoto, T.

    2012-11-01

    To get the sustainable society, the hydropower with not only the large but also the mini/micro capacity has been paid attention to the power generation. The cross-flow turbines can work efficiently at the comparatively low head and/or low discharge in the onshore and the offshore, and the runner and the casing profiles have been optimizing. In this paper, the turbine composed of the optimal profiles has prepared to provide for the mini/micro hydropower, and the performances have been investigated at the low head. The hydraulic efficiency is maximal at the normal guide vane opening and deteriorates at the lower and the higher discharge than the normal discharge. Such deteriorations are brought from the unacceptable flow conditions crossing in the runner, that is, the flow direction does not meet the setting angle of the blade at the inner radius. To improve dramatically the performances, the inner guide, which guards the shaft from the water jet and adjusts the flow direction, was installed in the runner.

  7. Investigation of non-symmetric jets in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fan-Ming

    1987-05-01

    Non-symmetric jets in crossflow were studied with various jet geometries, jet orientations, jet characteristics, and jet to crossflow velocity ratios. Four different cross-section geometry jets were studied and compared with a circular jet with identical jet port cross-sectional area. Standard dye and laser induced fluorescent flow visualization techniques were used to identify the existence of various vortices in the flow field. Among the many forms of secondary vortices produced, three major vortex systems were identified: main jet vortices, wake vortices, and spinoff vortices. A reconstruction of the asymmetric flow field based on observations and its evolution and relationships with established symmetric jets in the crossflow were made. The large scale rolled-up vortex structure which was found at low jet to crossflow velocity ratio is very similar to the hair-pin vortex structure. This observation provides a potential research tool on the study of the structure of turbulent boundary layers. Unsteady jets created by pulsation of the jet flow at low pulsation frequencies give the increase of the depth of penetration. However, the introducing of swirl into jets by passive methods reduces the depth of penetration.

  8. Flow instability in a curved duct of rectangular cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belaidi, A.; Johnson, M. W.; Humphrey, J. A. C.

    1992-12-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out in a curved duct of rectangular cross section in order to study the development of flow instability in such geometries. Hot wire anemometry was used to obtain detailed measurements of velocity on the symmetry plane of the duct for different curvature ratios. As the duct Dean number is increased, a centrifugal instability develops and the Dean vortices are seen to oscillate along the inner wall. To understand the contribution of these vortices to the laminar-turbulent transition, time histories and spectra of the flow were taken on the symmetry plane of the duct for different Reynolds numbers. These data reveal a time-periodic motion along the inner wall where the secondary flows originating from the side wall boundary layers collide. The bend angle where this instability develops depends on the Reynolds number while the frequency of the instability depends on the curvature ratio of the bend.

  9. Design Guidelines for Quiet Fans and Pumps for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, John S.; Magliozzi, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    This document presents guidelines for the design of quiet fans and pumps of the class used on space vehicles. A simple procedure is presented for the prediction of fan noise over the meaningful frequency spectrum. A section also presents general design criteria for axial flow fans, squirrel cage fans, centrifugal fans, and centrifugal pumps. The basis for this report is an experimental program conducted by Hamilton Standard under NASA Contract NAS 9-12457. The derivations of the noise predicting methods used in this document are explained in Hamilton Standard Report SVHSER 6183, "Fan and Pump Noise Control," dated May 1973 (6).

  10. Regional and local risk assessments of alluvial fans by combination of historical and geomorphological data on debris flows, the most damaging natural hazard in the Aosta Valley Region (NW-Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardino, Marco; Ratto, Sara; Alberto, Walter; Armand, Marco; Cignetti, Martina; Palomba, Mauro; Navillod, Evelyne

    2010-05-01

    The Aosta Valley (NW-Italy) is a small alpine Region (area = 3262 km2) where alluvial fans occupy large sectors of the main valley bottom and also of the tributary valleys; most towns and villages lie in these sectors which are frequently affected by different geomorphological processes, including debris flows. For a best environmental hazard assessment and management of alluvial fans, a research project has been carried out with a particular attention to debris flows, responsible for causing major damages to human activities and infrastructures. A debris flows inventory on a regional scale has been created, combining historical data (1900 to present), technical maps and geomorphological analysis on the alluvial fans areas. A complex methodology for data collection and analysis has been organized in two different stages. As a first step, aerial photointerpretation and Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) analysis were conducted over the Aosta Valley Region to obtain a complete fans inventory and to identify the most affected sectors by debris flows. As a second step, data on debris flow events occurred in the Region has been collected from different sources, such as bibliographic and historical data, municipality hazard maps for land planning restriction and drainage basin technical studies. For each inventored debris flow, aerial photointerpretations have been performed to validate geomorphological and historical data, mostly collected during major regional flood events. Finally, the selected debris flow events has been formally organized in a GIS to perform spatial and statistical analysis. Application of the methodology to the complete Aosta Valley Region dataset involved the overcoming of some difficulties, such as: 1) correct identification of repeated events from different sources, 2) exact recognition of small phenomena by photointerpretation and 3) problems related to the rapid landforms obliteration. The preliminary results of the research activity are outlined

  11. Fan Acoustic Issues in the NASA Space Flight Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher S.; Goodman, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Emphasis needs to be placed on choosing quiet fans compatible with systems design and specifications that control spec levels: a) Sound power; b) Choose quiet fan or plan to quiet it, early in program; c) Plan early verification that fan source allocations are met. Airborne noise: a) System design should function/play together with fans used (flow passages, restrictions, bends, expansions & contractions, and acoustics) vs. fan speed understood (nominal, worst case, & unplanned variances); b) Fan inlets treated, as required; c) Fan Outlets treated, as required; d) Ducted system inlets are outlets designed for acoustic compliance compatibility & designed so some late required modifications can be made without significant impacts. Structure Borne Noise: a) Structure borne noise dealt with as part of fan package or installation; b) Duct attachments and lines isolated. Case Radiated Noise: - Treatment added as much as possible to fan package (see example).

  12. Development of an implantable oxygenator with cross-flow pump.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Yuichi; Funakubo, Akio; Fukunaga, Kazuyoshi; Taga, Ichiro; Higami, Tetsuya; Kawamura, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Yasuhiro

    2006-01-01

    Thrombogenicity, a problem with long-term artificial lungs, is caused by blood-biomaterial interactions and is made worse by nonuniform flow, which also causes decreased gas exchange. To overcome these obstacles, we changed the inlet and added a uniform flow pump to our previous oxygenator design. Conventional membrane oxygenators have a (1/2)-inch port for the inlet of blood. These port structures make it difficult for the blood to flow uniformly in the oxygenator. In addition, the complex blood flow patterns that occur in the oxygenator, including turbulence and stagnation, lead to thrombogenicity. A cross-flow pump (CFP) can result in uniform blood flow to the inlet side of an oxygenator. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of an integrated oxygenator with a fiber bundle porosity of 0.6 and a membrane surface area of 1.3 m2. The inlet part of the oxygenator is improved and better fits the outlet of the CFP. Each of the three models of the improved oxygenator has a different inlet taper angle. The computational fluid dynamics analysis showed that, compared with the original design, uniform flow of the integrated oxygenator improved by 88.8% at the hollow fiber membrane. With the integrated oxygenator, O2 transfer increased by an average of 20.8%, and CO2 transfer increased by an average of 35.5%. The results of our experiments suggest that the CFP, which produces a wide, uniform flow to the oxygenator, is effective in attaining high gas exchange performance.

  13. A database on flood and debris-flow processes in alluvial fans: a preliminary analysis aimed at evaluation of the damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennari, Carmela; Santangelo, Nicoletta; Santo, Antonio; Parise, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Debris-flow and flood events cause yearly wide damages to buildings and infrastructures, and produce many casualties and fatalities. These processes are very common in Italy, affecting mainly torrential stream basins with different geological and morphological settings: in the Alpine mountain areas they are quite well analysed, whilst much less attention is generally paid in contexts such as those of the Apennines mostly due to the minor frequency of the events. Nevertheless, debris-flows and flood processes occur along many alluvial fans, have greatly contributed to their building up, and are therefore worth to be studied. Along many areas of the Southern Apennines, coalescent alluvial fans are a widespread geomorphic unit, typically located at the foot of steep slopes. In most cases these areas correspond to the more highly urbanised sectors, generally considered to be safer than the bottom valley, as concerns the direct effects from flooding. During intense storms, villages and towns built on alluvial fans may be affected by flooding and/or debris flow processes originated in the above catchment, and rapidly transferred downslope due to the steep slopes and the torrential character of the streams. This creates a very high hazard to the population and is at the origin of the severe and recurrent damage to urban settlements. Starting from the above considerations, we compiled a catalogue of flood and debris-flow events occurred in Campania Region, southern Italy, by consulting very different information sources: national and local newspapers and journals, regional historical archives, scientific literature, internet blogs. More than 350 events, occurred in Campania from 1700 to present, were collected. Information on time of occurrence and location are available for each event, with different level of accuracy, that is typically lower going back to the oldest events for which only the year or the month of occurrence of the event was identified; nevertheless, for

  14. Vibration effect on cross-flow and co-flow focusing mechanism for droplet generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, Alinaghi; Dalton, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Microbubbles are widely used in many industries such as water treatment, drug coating, and ultrasonic contrast agents. Cross-flow focusing and co-flow focusing are considered basic mechanisms used for microbubble generation. Typically, to achieve micron-sized droplets requires structure dimensions in the same order of magnitude of the desired droplet sizes. In this paper we report a method of applying an external vibration to a cross-flow and co-flow focusing structure, which allows for smaller droplets to be generated. The junction dimension was 700×400 μm, and the channel width was 800 μm. The two assumed fluids are selected in a way that the Capillary number is high (Ca>10) to make use of necking effect occurred in the downstream. Linear vibration was exerted on the microchannel structure in the direction of central flow. A 2D structure was simulated using finite element software, and the numerical approach was then verified by comparing the experimental data of a typical cross-flow focusing structure taken from our previous study with the corresponding simulation assuming the same parameters. The results show that although the droplet generation regime depends on flow ratio (Qa/Qw) and vibration parameter (ampl×freq), Capillary number also has a significant effect on the regime. Briefly, applying a low-cost linear vibration to the conventional flow focusing structures can be used as an accurate controlling technique for increasing the chance of droplet generation. In fact, vibration motion can change the flow regime and breakup mechanism. It can also change the breakup point at which the droplets are formed.

  15. Unsteady Simulation of an ASME Venturi Flow in a Cross Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, Jeremy; Rahai, Hamid

    2010-11-01

    Unsteady numerical simulations of an ASME venturi flow into a cross flow were performed. The velocity ratios between the venturi flow and the free stream were 25, 50, and 75%. Two cases of the venturi with and without a tube extension have been investigated. The tube extension length was approximately 4D (here D is the inner diameter of the venturi's outlet), connecting the venturi to the bottom surface of the numerical wind tunnel. A finite volume approach with the Wilcox K-φ turbulence model were used. Results that include contours of the mean velocity, velocity vector, turbulent kinetic energy, pressure and vortices within the venturi as well as downstream in the interaction region indicate that when the venturi is flushed with the surface, there is evidence of flow separation within the venturi, near the outlet. However, when the tube extension was added, the pressure recovery was sustained and flow separation within the venturi was not present and the characteristics of the flow in the interaction region were similar to the corresponding characteristics of a pipe jet in a cross flow.

  16. Directional scales of heterogeneity in alluvial fan aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Neton, M.J.; Dorsch, J.; Young, S.C.; Olson, C.D. . Dept. of Geological Sciences Tennessee Valley Authority Engineering Lab., Norris, TN )

    1992-01-01

    Abrupt lateral and vertical permeability changes of up to 12 orders of magnitude are common in alluvial fan aquifers due to depositional heterogeneity. This abrupt heterogeneity is problematic, particularly in construction of a continuous hydraulic conductivity field from point measurements. Site characterization is improved through use of a scale-and-directionally-related model of fan heterogeneities. A directional classification of alluvial fan aquifer heterogeneities is proposed. The three directional scales of heterogeneity in alluvial fan aquifers are: (1) within-fan, (2) between-fan (strike-parallel), and (3) cross-fan (strike-perpendicular). Within-fan heterogeneity ranges from very small-scale intergrain relationships which control the nature of pores, to larger scale permeability trends between fan apex and toe, and includes abrupt lateral and vertical facies relationships. Between-fan heterogeneities are of a larger-scale and include differences between adjacent (non)coalescent fans along a basin-margin fault due primarily to changes in lithology between adjacent upland source basins. These differences produce different (a) grain and pore fluid compositions, (b) lithologic facies and proportions, and (c) down-fan fining trends, between adjacent fans. Cross-fan heterogeneities extend from source to basin. Fan deposits are in abrupt contact upgradient with low permeability, basin-margin source rock. Downgradient, fan deposits are in gradational to abrupt contact with time-equivalent, generally lower permeability deposits of lake, desert, longitudinal braided and meandering river, volcanic, and shallow marine environments. Throughout basin history these environments may abruptly cover the fan with low permeability horizons.

  17. Geophysical Investigation of Subsurface Characteristics of Icy Debris Fans with Ground Penetrating Radar in the Wrangell Mountains, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. D.; Jacob, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    Authors Tracey Smith^1, Rob Jacob^1, Jeffrey Trop^1, Keith Williams^2 and Craig Kochel^1 Bucknell University, Geology and Environmental Geoscience Department, Lewisburg, PA UNAVCO, 6350 Nautilus Dr., Boulder, CO 80301 Icy debris fans have recently been described as deglaciation features on Earth and similar features have been observed on Mars, however, the subsurface characteristics remain unknown. We used ground penetrating radar (GPR) to non-invasively investigate the subsurface characteristics of icy debris fans near McCarthy, Alaska, USA. The three fans investigated in Alaska are the East, West, and Middle fans which are between the Nabesna ice cap and the McCarthy Glacier. Icy debris fans in general are a largely unexplored suite of paraglacial landforms and processes in alpine regions. Recent field studies focused on direct observations and depositional processes. The results showed that each fan's composition is primarily influenced by the type and frequency of mass wasting processes that supply the fan. Photographic studies show that the East fan receives far more ice and snow avalanches whereas the Middle and West fan receive fewer mass wasting events but more clastic debris is deposited on the Middle and West fan from rock falls and icy debris flows. GPR profiles and WARR surveys consisting of both, common mid-point (CMP), and common shot-point (CSP) surveys investigated the subsurface geometry of the fans and the McCarthy Glacier.All GPR surveys were collected in 2013 with 100MHz bi-static antennas. Four axial profiles and three cross-fan profiles were done on the West and Middle fans as well as the McCarthy Glacier in order to investigate the relationship between the three features. Terrestrial laser surveying of the surface and real-time kinematic GPS provided the surface elevation used to correct the GPR data for topographic changes. GPR profiles yielded reflectors that were continuous for 10+ m and hyperbolic reflections in the subsurface. The WARR

  18. Geophysical Investigation of Subsurface Characteristics of Icy Debris Fans with Ground Penetrating Radar in the Wrangell Mountains, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L. F.; Pun, W.; Milkereit, B.

    2011-12-01

    Authors Tracey Smith^1, Rob Jacob^1, Jeffrey Trop^1, Keith Williams^2 and Craig Kochel^1 Bucknell University, Geology and Environmental Geoscience Department, Lewisburg, PA UNAVCO, 6350 Nautilus Dr., Boulder, CO 80301 Icy debris fans have recently been described as deglaciation features on Earth and similar features have been observed on Mars, however, the subsurface characteristics remain unknown. We used ground penetrating radar (GPR) to non-invasively investigate the subsurface characteristics of icy debris fans near McCarthy, Alaska, USA. The three fans investigated in Alaska are the East, West, and Middle fans which are between the Nabesna ice cap and the McCarthy Glacier. Icy debris fans in general are a largely unexplored suite of paraglacial landforms and processes in alpine regions. Recent field studies focused on direct observations and depositional processes. The results showed that each fan's composition is primarily influenced by the type and frequency of mass wasting processes that supply the fan. Photographic studies show that the East fan receives far more ice and snow avalanches whereas the Middle and West fan receive fewer mass wasting events but more clastic debris is deposited on the Middle and West fan from rock falls and icy debris flows. GPR profiles and WARR surveys consisting of both, common mid-point (CMP), and common shot-point (CSP) surveys investigated the subsurface geometry of the fans and the McCarthy Glacier.All GPR surveys were collected in 2013 with 100MHz bi-static antennas. Four axial profiles and three cross-fan profiles were done on the West and Middle fans as well as the McCarthy Glacier in order to investigate the relationship between the three features. Terrestrial laser surveying of the surface and real-time kinematic GPS provided the surface elevation used to correct the GPR data for topographic changes. GPR profiles yielded reflectors that were continuous for 10+ m and hyperbolic reflections in the subsurface. The WARR

  19. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.

    1984-05-14

    Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  20. Cross Flow Effects on Glaze Ice Roughness Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2004-01-01

    The present study examines the impact of large-scale cross flow on the creation of ice roughness elements on the leading edge of a swept wing under glaze icing conditions. A three-dimensional triple-deck structure is developed to describe the local interaction of a 3 D air boundary layer with ice sheets and liquid films. A linear stability analysis is presented here. It is found that, as the sweep angle increases, the local icing instabilities enhance and the most linearly unstable modes are strictly three dimensional.

  1. Analysis of multiple jets in a cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaac, K. M.; Schetz, J. A.

    1982-12-01

    The analysis of Campbell and Schetz (1973) is extended to the study of multiple jets in a cross flow, where the interaction of two jets is taken into account by a modification of the drag coefficient that is sensed by each jet. Results show that the rear jet trajectory is significantly modified by the presence of the front one even when the jets are spaced far apart. The analysis is applicable to such phenomena as the exhaust of chimney stack smoke into a wind and the lift jets of a V/STOL aircraft during takeoff or landing in strong winds.

  2. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals in response to said first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  3. Optimized cross-slot flow geometry for microfluidic extensional rheometry.

    PubMed

    Haward, Simon J; Oliveira, Mónica S N; Alves, Manuel A; McKinley, Gareth H

    2012-09-21

    A precision-machined cross-slot flow geometry with a shape that has been optimized by numerical simulation of the fluid kinematics is fabricated and used to measure the extensional viscosity of a dilute polymer solution. Full-field birefringence microscopy is used to monitor the evolution and growth of macromolecular anisotropy along the stagnation point streamline, and we observe the formation of a strong and uniform birefringent strand when the dimensionless flow strength exceeds a critical Weissenberg number Wi(crit) ≈ 0.5. Birefringence and bulk pressure drop measurements provide self-consistent estimates of the planar extensional viscosity of the fluid over a wide range of deformation rates (26 s(-1) ≤ ε ≤ 435 s(-1)) and are also in close agreement with numerical simulations performed by using a finitely extensible nonlinear elastic dumbbell model.

  4. Recovery Act - Refinement of Cross Flow Turbine Airfoils

    SciTech Connect

    McEntee, Jarlath

    2013-08-30

    Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC (ORPC) is a global leader in hydrokinetic technology and project development. ORPC develops hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of oceans and rivers to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC’s technology consists of a family of modular hydrokinetic power systems: the TidGen® Power System, for use at shallow to medium-depth tidal sites; the RivGen™ Power System, for use at river and estuary sites; and the OCGen® Power System, presently under development, for use at deep tidal and offshore ocean current sites. These power systems convert kinetic energy in moving water into clean, renewable, grid-compatible electric power. The core technology component for all ORPC power systems is its patented turbine generator unit (TGU). The TGU uses proprietary advanced design cross flow (ADCF) turbines to drive an underwater permanent magnet generator mounted at the TGU’s center. It is a gearless, direct-drive system that has the potential for high reliability, requires no lubricants and releases no toxins that could contaminate the surrounding water. The hydrokinetic industry shows tremendous promise as a means of helping reduce the U.S.’s use of fossil fuels and dependence on foreign oil. To exploit this market opportunity, cross-flow hydrokinetic devices need to advance beyond the pre-commercial state and more systematic data about the structure and function of cross-flow hydrokinetic devices is required. This DOE STTR project, “Recovery Act - Refinement of Cross Flow Turbine Airfoils,” refined the cross-flow turbine design process to improve efficiency and performance and developed turbine manufacturing processes appropriate for volume production. The project proposed (1) to overcome the lack of data by extensively studying the properties of cross flow turbines, a particularly competitive design approach for extracting hydrokinetic energy and (2) to help ORPC mature its pre

  5. Tectonically controlled fan delta and submarine fan sedimentation of late Miocene age, southern Temblor Range, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T; Thomson, Alan

    1989-01-01

    The Santa Margarita Formation in the southern Temblor Range, composed of conglomerate and subordinate sandstone, evolved as a large complex of fan deltas and submarine fans in late Miocene time. An 80 to 90-m.y.-old granitic basement of the Salinian block and an accompanying 23.5-m.y.-old volcanic field now located in the northern Gabilan Range and the Pinnacles area, respectively, were the primary source terranes. In general, the fan deltas crop out along the west side of the southern Temblor Range, whereas the proximal parts of the submarine fans crop out along the east side of the range. The fan deltas consist of subaerial topset beds and low-angle basinward-dipping subaqueous foreset beds. Strata interpreted to be topset beds are composed largely of conglomerate with thick to very thick horizontal beds and matrix-supported clasts. Most of the thick to very thick conglomerate beds are internally massive and disorganized. Strata interpreted as foreset beds are composed of thick-bedded, large-scale, low-angle, cross-stratified conglomerate and sandstone units which commonly are internally massive. Abundant molluskan macrofossils such as Ostrea and Pecten are present in the subaqueous foreset beds; many have been displaced downslope from their original site of deposition. Conglomerate- and sandstone-filled submarine canyons, through which coarse-grained detritus was transported to the adjacent submarine fans, locally have cut into the foreset beds of the fan deltas. These submarine canyon deposits are generally better stratified than adjacent foreset-bed deposits, and they consist of thick horizontal beds, internally massive or normally graded, arranged in fining- and thinning-upward sequences. Isolated and composite conglomerate- and sandstone-filled channels, which crop out on the east flank of the southern Temblor Range, are interpreted as proximal submarine-fan channel deposits. These channel-form conglomerate and sandstone deposits are characterized by thick

  6. Measurements of the flow and thermal characteristics of turbulet jets in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, S. A.

    An experimental investigation of the flow, turbulence, and thermal characteristics of heated, cooled, and isothermal turbulent jets in cross flow is reported. The experiments were carried out in a water channel facility of the recirculation type. Hot or cold water was injected verically upward from a circular pipe located near the channel bottom to the cross-flowing stream in the channel. Hot and cold-film anemometers along with appropriate linearizers, bridges, filters, and probes were used. A new signal analysis method was developed for resolving the complex three-dimensional structure of the mean turbulent flow field resulting from the interaction between the free stream and the jet. A rotatable probe technique was used to measure the size components for the Reynolds stress tensor in isothermal flows of any turbulence intensity. New experssions that correct for the temperature contamination of the velocity signals in nonisothermal flows were developed for both the linearized and unlinearized anemometer responses. Mean velocity and turbulence intensity data were obtained for the isothermal jet at jet-to-free stream velocity ratios of 2, 4, and 6 both in and outside the jet plane of symmetry.

  7. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, A.V.

    1983-10-12

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  8. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.

    1985-01-01

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  9. Thermal/chemical stability of ceramic cross flow filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Bahovchin, D.M.; Lippert, T.E.; Tressler, R.E.; McNerney, K.B.

    1992-01-01

    Westinghouse has undertaken a two phase program to determine possible long-term, high temperature influence that advanced coal-based power system environments may have on the stability of the ceramic cross flow filter elements. During the past year, we have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100[degrees]C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. The alumina/mullite cross flow liter material that has consistently been used throughout the flow-through gas phase alkali testing segment of this program, consists of mullite rods or needles that are embedded within an amorphous phase which contains corundum (Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) and anorthite (CaAl[sub 2]Si[sub 2]O[sub 8]). Due to the rapid cooling rate that was used to produce the alumina/mullite filter disc material from high fire, the matrix consists of 59.6 wt% mullite, 30.5 wt% amorphous, 5.1 wt% anorthite, and 4.8 wt% alumina. The relatively low, as-fabricated, hot strength of this material (841[plus minus]259 psi at 870[degrees]C) is a direct result of the high amorphous content which softens at temperatures of 870[degrees]C. Load versus deflection curves as a function of temperature indicate that this material is relatively brittle up to temperatures of 600[degrees]C. Both a loss of strength, as well as plastic deformation of the matrix occurs at [approximately]700[degrees]C. If cross flow filters are manufactured from an alumina/mullite matrix that contains an [approximately]30.5 wt% amorphous content, we suspect that the plastic nature of the glass phase could potentially serve as a substrate for fines collection during initial filter operation at 700[degrees]C. Similarly the plastic nature could potentially cause deformation of the liter under load.

  10. Thermal/chemical stability of ceramic cross flow filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Bahovchin, D.M.; Lippert, T.E.; Tressler, R.E.; McNerney, K.B.

    1992-11-01

    Westinghouse has undertaken a two phase program to determine possible long-term, high temperature influence that advanced coal-based power system environments may have on the stability of the ceramic cross flow filter elements. During the past year, we have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100{degrees}C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. The alumina/mullite cross flow liter material that has consistently been used throughout the flow-through gas phase alkali testing segment of this program, consists of mullite rods or needles that are embedded within an amorphous phase which contains corundum (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and anorthite (CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}). Due to the rapid cooling rate that was used to produce the alumina/mullite filter disc material from high fire, the matrix consists of 59.6 wt% mullite, 30.5 wt% amorphous, 5.1 wt% anorthite, and 4.8 wt% alumina. The relatively low, as-fabricated, hot strength of this material (841{plus_minus}259 psi at 870{degrees}C) is a direct result of the high amorphous content which softens at temperatures of 870{degrees}C. Load versus deflection curves as a function of temperature indicate that this material is relatively brittle up to temperatures of 600{degrees}C. Both a loss of strength, as well as plastic deformation of the matrix occurs at {approximately}700{degrees}C. If cross flow filters are manufactured from an alumina/mullite matrix that contains an {approximately}30.5 wt% amorphous content, we suspect that the plastic nature of the glass phase could potentially serve as a substrate for fines collection during initial filter operation at 700{degrees}C. Similarly the plastic nature could potentially cause deformation of the liter under load.

  11. Transverse jet injection into a supersonic turbulent cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Z. A.; Thornber, B.; Drikakis, D.

    2011-04-01

    Jet injection into a supersonic cross-flow is a challenging fluid dynamics problem in the field of aerospace engineering which has applications as part of a rocket thrust vector control system for noise control in cavities and fuel injection in scramjet combustion chambers. Several experimental and theoretical/numerical works have been conducted to explore this flow; however, there is a dearth of literature detailing the instantaneous flow which is vital to improve the efficiency of the mixing of fluids. In this paper, a sonic jet in a Mach 1.6 free-stream is studied using a finite volume Godunov type implicit large eddy simulations technique, which employs fifth-order accurate MUSCL (Monotone Upstream-centered Schemes for Conservation Laws) scheme with modified variable extrapolation and a three-stage second-order strong-stability-preserving Runge-Kutta scheme for temporal advancement. A digital filter based turbulent inflow data generation method is implemented in order to capture the physics of the supersonic turbulent boundary layer. This paper details the averaged and instantaneous flow features including vortex structures downstream of the jet injection, along with the jet penetration, jet mixing, pressure distributions, turbulent kinetic energy, and Reynolds stresses in the downstream flow. It demonstrates that Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities in the upper jet shear layer are primarily responsible for mixing of the two fluids. The results are compared to experimental data and recently performed classical large eddy simulations (LES) with the same initial conditions in order to demonstrate the accuracy of the numerical methods and utility of the inflow generation method. Results here show equivalent accuracy for 1/45th of the computational resources used in the classical LES study.

  12. Quiet High Speed Fan II (QHSF II): Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kontos, Karen; Weir, Don; Ross, Dave

    2012-01-01

    This report details the aerodynamic, mechanical, structural design and fabrication of a Honey Engines Quiet High Speed Fan II (lower hub/tip ratio and higher specific flow than the Baseline I fan). This fan/nacelle system incorporates features such as advanced forward sweep and an advanced integrated fan/fan exit guide vane design that provides for the following characteristics: (1) Reduced noise at supersonic tip speeds, in comparison to current state-of-the-art fan technology; (2) Improved aeroelastic stability within the anticipated operating envelope; and (3) Aerodynamic performance consistent with current state-of-the-art fan technology. This fan was fabricated by Honeywell and tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Ft Low Speed Wind Tunnel for aerodynamic, aeromechanical, and acoustic performance.

  13. Hydrodynamic radius determination with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation using decaying cross-flows. Part II. Experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Emma; Håkansson, Andreas; Janiak, John; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2012-08-31

    In this study we investigate the effect of programmed cross-flows on the error in the hydrodynamic radii (r(h)) determination with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF). Three different standard polystyrene particles (nominal radii of 30 and 40 and 50 nm) are fractionated with exponentially and linearly decaying cross-flows with different decay rates. Hydrodynamic radii are calculated according to retention theory including steric effects. Rapid decay is expected to give rise to systematic deviations in r(h) determination. The error in r(h) was found to be small when decay rates with half-lives longer than 6 min were used, whereas steeper decays could give rise to errors as high as 16% of the particle size. The error is often explained in terms of secondary relaxation. However, comparisons show that experimental errors are significantly larger than what would be expected due to secondary relaxation, suggesting that other factors also have to be considered in order to fully understand deviations for rapidly decaying cross-flow.

  14. Cross-flow versus counter-current flow packed-bed scrubbers: a mathematical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fthenakis, V.M.

    1996-02-01

    Little is known about the mass transfer properties of packing media exposed to a crossflow of gas and liquid, whereas there is abundant information related to counter-current scrubbers. This paper presents a theoretical analysis of mass transfer and hydrodynamics in cross- flow packed bed scrubbers and compares those with information available for counter current towers, so that the first can be evaluated and/or designed based on data derived for the second. Mathematical models of mass transfer in cross-flow and counter- current packed bed scrubbers are presented. From those, one can predict the removal effectiveness of a crossflow scrubber from the number of transfer units (NTU) calculated for a similar counterflow operation; alternatively, when the removal effectiveness in counterflow is known, one can predict the corresponding NTU in crossflow.

  15. Experimental Alluvial Fan Modeling Related to Large Alluvial Fans on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraal, E. R.; van Dijk, M.; Postma, G.

    2006-12-01

    A population of large alluvial fans has been discovered on Mars. They emanate from crater rims and deposit into crater basins. The build up of such alluvial fans requires a sustained source of flowing surface water. However, the amount of water may vary and that variation can be recorded in variations in fan surface morphology and slope. About half of the alluvial fans on Mars preserve a surface fluvial record (e.g.stream patterns, meanders, cut banks) and the majority have slopes measurable at Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) resolution. We are conducting experimental modeling of alluvial fan formation using the Eurotank at Utrecht University to understand the relative importance of sediment discharge and pre-existing basin slopes on alluvial fan morphology. The Eurotank Flume Facility contains a flume 5 by 8 meters. The water discharge, sediment discharge, basin structure, and particle size can all be varied. We conduct two experiments simultaneously; the resulting fans are deposited on two 2.5 by 5 meter prepared surfaces with constant slopes of ~0.035 and ~0.045, respectively. Sediment and water discharge are held constant. Results are recorded as a combination of surface images (from video recording of fluvial processes) and digital terrain models (DTM) at a resolution of ~80 microns from photogrammetry (stereo pairs) of the entire fan apron surface. The DTM and photographic results will be integrated with data from previous experiments of fan formation over lower sloping surfaces and the combined experiments will be compared to the Martian fan population. We will compare the experimental formation of surface fluvial features similar to those observed on Mars (e.g. stream patterns) with the goal of ascertaining the amount of fluid (i.e. debris flow vs. fluvial) required to form the Martian alluvial fans. Though we are currently focusing on Martian large alluvial fans, we anticipate that there will be broad applications to many of the fans discovered on Mars

  16. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Rotor Alone Aerodynamic Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Jeracki, Robert J.; Woodward, Richard P.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of an isolated fan or rotor alone model was measured in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9- by 15- Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel as part of the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test conducted at NASA Glenn. The Source Diagnostic Test was conducted to identify the noise sources within a wind tunnel scale model of a turbofan engine and quantify their contribution to the overall system noise level. The fan was part of a 1/5th scale model representation of the bypass stage of a current technology turbofan engine. For the rotor alone testing, the fan and nacelle, including the inlet, external cowl, and fixed area fan exit nozzle, were modeled in the test hardware; the internal outlet guide vanes located behind the fan were removed. Without the outlet guide vanes, the velocity at the nozzle exit changes significantly, thereby affecting the fan performance. As part of the investigation, variations in the fan nozzle area were tested in order to match as closely as possible the rotor alone performance with the fan performance obtained with the outlet guide vanes installed. The fan operating performance was determined using fixed pressure/temperature combination rakes and the corrected weight flow. The performance results indicate that a suitable nozzle exit was achieved to be able to closely match the rotor alone and fan/outlet guide vane configuration performance on the sea level operating line. A small shift in the slope of the sea level operating line was measured, which resulted in a slightly higher rotor alone fan pressure ratio at take-off conditions, matched fan performance at cutback conditions, and a slightly lower rotor alone fan pressure ratio at approach conditions. However, the small differences in fan performance at all fan conditions were considered too small to affect the fan acoustic performance.

  17. Multiscale Simulations of ALD in Cross Flow Reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Libera, Joseph A.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2014-08-13

    In this study, we have developed a multiscale simulation code that allows us to study the impact of surface chemistry on the coating of large area substrates with high surface area/high aspect-ratio features. Our code, based on open-source libraries, takes advantage of the ALD surface chemistry to achieve an extremely efficient two-way coupling between reactor and feature length scales, and it can provide simulated quartz crystal microbalance and mass spectrometry data at any point of the reactor. By combining experimental surface characterization with simple analysis of growth profiles in a tubular cross flow reactor, we are able to extract amore » minimal set of reactions to effectively model the surface chemistry, including the presence of spurious CVD, to evaluate the impact of surface chemistry on the coating of large, high surface area substrates.« less

  18. Multiscale Simulations of ALD in Cross Flow Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Libera, Joseph A.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2014-08-13

    In this study, we have developed a multiscale simulation code that allows us to study the impact of surface chemistry on the coating of large area substrates with high surface area/high aspect-ratio features. Our code, based on open-source libraries, takes advantage of the ALD surface chemistry to achieve an extremely efficient two-way coupling between reactor and feature length scales, and it can provide simulated quartz crystal microbalance and mass spectrometry data at any point of the reactor. By combining experimental surface characterization with simple analysis of growth profiles in a tubular cross flow reactor, we are able to extract a minimal set of reactions to effectively model the surface chemistry, including the presence of spurious CVD, to evaluate the impact of surface chemistry on the coating of large, high surface area substrates.

  19. Pitched and Yawed Circular Jets in Cross-Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Reddy, D. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of flow field generated by pitched and yawed jets discharging from a flat plate into a cross-flow are presented. The circular jet was pitched at alpha = 20 degrees and 45 degrees and yawed between beta = 0 degrees and 90 degrees in increments of 15 degrees. The measurements were performed with two X-wires providing all three components of velocity and turbulence intensity. These data were obtained at downstream locations of x = 3, 5, 10 and 20, where the distance x normalized by the jet diameter, is measured from the center of the orifice. Data for all configurations were acquired at a momentum-flux ratio J = 8. Additionally, for selected angles and locations, surveys were conducted for J = 1.5, 4, and 20. As expected, the jet penetration is found to be higher at larger alpha. With increasing beta the jet spreads more. The rate of reduction of peak streamwise vorticity, with the downstream distance is significantly lessened at higher alpha but is found to be practically independent of alpha. Thus, at the farthest measurement station x = 20, omega(sub xmax) is about five times larger for beta = 0 degrees compared to the levels at beta = 0 degrees. Streamwise velocity within the jet-vortex structure is found to depend on the parameter J. At J = 1.5 and 4, 'wake-like' velocity profiles are observed. In comparison, a 'jet-like' overshoot is present at higher J.

  20. Isothermal and Reactive Turbulent Jets in Cross-Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Bush, Scott; Ibrahim, Irene

    2004-11-01

    Jets in cross flow have numerous applications including vertical/short takeoff/landing (V/STOL) aircraft, cooling jets for gas turbine blades and combustion air supply inlets in gas turbine engine. The properties exhibited by these jets are dictated by complex three dimensional turbulence structures which form due to the interaction of the jet with the freestream. The isothermal tests are conducted in a wind tunnel measuring the characteristics of air jets injected perpendicular into an otherwise undisturbed air stream. Different nozzle exit geometries of the air jets were tested including circular, triangular and elongated configurations. Jets are injected in single and paired combinations with other jets to measure the effect of mutual interaction on the parameters mentioned. Quantitative velocity fields are obtained using PIV. The data obtained allows the extraction of flow parameters such as jet structure, penetration and mixing. The reacting tests include separate and combined jets of fuel/air mixture utilized to explore the stabilization of combustion at various operating conditions. Different geometrical configurations of transverse jets are tested to determine the shape and combination of jets that will optimize the jets ability to successfully stabilize a flame.

  1. Fan noise prediction assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bent, Paul H.

    1995-01-01

    This report is an evaluation of two techniques for predicting the fan noise radiation from engine nacelles. The first is a relatively computational intensive finite element technique. The code is named ARC, an abbreviation of Acoustic Radiation Code, and was developed by Eversman. This is actually a suite of software that first generates a grid around the nacelle, then solves for the potential flowfield, and finally solves the acoustic radiation problem. The second approach is an analytical technique requiring minimal computational effort. This is termed the cutoff ratio technique and was developed by Rice. Details of the duct geometry, such as the hub-to-tip ratio and Mach number of the flow in the duct, and modal content of the duct noise are required for proper prediction.

  2. Flow interactions of finite-span synthetic jets and a cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Joseph D.

    The interaction of a finite-span synthetic jet with a cross-flow over a swept-back finite wing was studied experimentally at a Reynolds number of 100,000 and at multiple angles of attack. The focus of the work was to explore the interaction of finite span synthetic jets with a locally attached or separated flow field in the vicinity of the synthetic jet orifice. The effect of blowing ratio and aspect ratio of the jet orifice was discussed in detail. As was shown in previous work for an unswept finite configuration, the time-averaged velocity field exhibits secondary streamwise flow structures that evolve due to the finite span of the synthetic jet orifice. Furthermore, these structures depend upon actuation level of the jet, as well as orifice geometry. Phase-averaged measurements over the swept-back finite configuration showed that in the presence of sweep the flow becomes highly three-dimensional almost immediately downstream of the synthetic jet orifice. It was demonstrated that the baseline flow field that develops over a swept-back configuration (dependent on angle of attack), which is characterized by spanwise and streamwise vorticity components, is responsible for the immediate breakdown of the coherent structures that are introduced by the synthetic jet orifice, and for the formation of the secondary flow structures that were seen in the time-averaged flow field. Furthermore, the effect of jet placement along the span of the wing was studied. A finite-span synthetic jet was placed near the tip of a finite sweptback wing. The focus of that part of the work was to explore the interaction of the synthetic jet with a spatially non-uniform velocity field (due to the presence of a tip vortex), especially the formation and advection of flow structures in the vicinity of the synthetic jet. As was shown, the time-averaged velocity field exhibited streamwise flow structures downstream of the jet. The tip vortex was found to influence the development of the flow

  3. Fan Database and Web-tool for Choosing Quieter Spaceflight Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher S.; Burnside, Nathan J.

    2007-01-01

    One critical aspect of designing spaceflight hardware is the selection of fans to provide the necessary cooling. And with efforts to minimize cost and the tendancy to be conservative with the amount of cooling provided, it is easy to choose an overpowered fan. One impact of this is that the fan uses more energy than is necessary. But, the more significant impact is that the hardware produces much more acoustic noise than if an optimal fan was chosen. Choosing the right fan for a specific hardware application is no simple task. It requires knowledge of cooling requirements and various fan performance characteristics as well as knowledge of the aerodynamic losses of the hardware in which the fan is to be installed. Knowledge of the acoustic emissions of each fan as a function of operating condition is also required in order to choose a quieter fan for a given design point. The purpose of this paper is to describe a database and design-tool that have been developed to aid spaceflight hardware developers in choosing a fan for their application that is based on aerodynamic performance and reduced acoustic emissions as well. This web-based-tool provides a limited amount of fan-data, provides a method for selecting a fan based on its projected operating point, and also provides a method for comparing and contrasting aerodynamic performance and acoustic data from different fans. Drill-down techniques are used to display details of the spectral noise characteristics of the fan at specific operation conditions. The fan aerodynamic and acoustic data were acquired at Ames Research Center in the Experimental Aero-Physics Branch's Anechoic Chamber. Acoustic data were acquired according to ANSI Standard S12.11-1987, "Method for the Measurement of Noise Emitted by Small Air-Moving Devices." One significant improvement made to this technique included automation that allows for a significant increase in flow-rate resolution. The web-tool was developed at Johnson Space Center and is

  4. Fan Noise Prediction: Status and Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    1997-01-01

    The prediction of fan noise is an important part to the prediction of overall turbofan engine noise. Advances in computers and better understanding of the flow physics have allowed researchers to compute sound generation from first principles and rely less on empirical correlations. While progress has been made, there are still many aspects of the problem that need to be explored. This paper presents some recent advances in fan noise prediction and suggests areas that still need further development. Fan noise predictions that support the recommendations are taken from existing publications.

  5. Supersonic fan engines for military aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franciscus, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    Engine performance and mission studies were performed for turbofan engines with supersonic through-flow fans. A Mach 2.4 CTOL aircraft was used in the study. Two missions were considered: a long range penetrator mission and a long range intercept mission. The supersonic fan engine is compared with an augmented mixed flow turbofan in terms of mission radius for a fixed takeoff gross weight of 75,000 lbm. The mission radius of aircraft powered by supersonic fan engines could be 15 percent longer than aircraft powered with conventional turbofan engines at moderate thrust to gross weight ratios. The climb and acceleration performance of the supersonic fan engines is better than that of the conventional turbofan engines.

  6. Static test of a fan-powered chin nozzle for V/STOl applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salemann, V.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of a "chin" nozzle which diverts flow in a downward direction immediately downstream of a fan typical of designs suitable for V/STOL A applications was evaluated. Back pressure distortion to the fan and fan discharge pressure distortion were also measured. Results show that the distortion is significant at the closest spacing between the fan exit and cascade entrance tested, and that the chin nozzle performance deteriorates with increased flow diversion to the chin nozzle. Color oil flow visualization on video tape and still photos were also obtained. Tests were conducted behind a 12" model fan in the NASA-Lewis fan calibration facility.

  7. The Advanced Noise Control Fan Baseline Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, Joseph; Loew, Raymond A.; Lauer, Joel T.; Stuliff, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center s (NASA Glenn) Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) was developed in the early 1990s to provide a convenient test bed to measure and understand fan-generated acoustics, duct propagation, and radiation to the farfield. As part of a complete upgrade, current baseline and acoustic measurements were documented. Extensive in-duct, farfield acoustic, and flow field measurements are reported. This is a follow-on paper to documenting the operating description of the ANCF.

  8. Loki--A Lava Lake in Rarefied Circumplanetary Cross Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Andrew C.; Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.; Trafton, Laurence M.; Moore, Chris H.

    2011-05-01

    The interaction between Io's largest hot spot, Loki, and Io's circumplanetary winds is simulated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Our three-dimensional simulation models the rarefied pressure-driven boundary layer flow over a ``hot'' disk in the presence of a weak gravitational field. The pressure gradient which forces winds away from the subsolar point toward the nightside is caused by the variation in insolation over the surface. The rarefaction varies strongly with time of day due to the exponential dependence of the vapor pressure on the surrounding surface frost temperature (KnHS~1×10-4 to 0.5 where KnHS = λ/R, λ is the mean free path, and R is Loki's effective radius). The spread of heat from the hot spot, the equilibration of pressure over the hot spot, and separation of the boundary layer are examined. The spread of heat away from the hot spot is approximately controlled by δ = tRADU/R (tRAD is the radiation time scale and U is the mean wind speed). For cross flow speed considered here, δ~0.5 and therefore the gas warmed by the hot spot cools by e-1~0.5R downstream of the hot spot edge. For the cases without plasma heating, the boundary layer flow separates near the hot spot because the spot creates a significant adverse pressure gradient. Despite the near surface pressure over the hot spot being lower than over surrounding regions, the increased scale height due to the 332 K surface temperature results in higher pressures above the hot spot than the surrounding sublimation atmosphere at high altitudes (>10 km). When plasma heating from above is included the atmosphere is significantly inflated leading to a higher pressure gradient at all altitudes and therefore higher flow speeds. The elevated pressure at high altitudes also decreases the relative size of the adverse pressure gradient created by the hot spot; therefore the boundary layer remains attached. The pressure over the hot spot does not equilibrate with the surrounding

  9. Experiments on confined turbulent jets in cross flow. [longitudinal and transverse distributions of velocity and temperature for jet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamotani, Y.; Greber, I.

    1974-01-01

    Results are reported of experiments on the effects of an opposite wall on the characteristics of turbulent jets injected into a cross flow, for unheated and heated jets. Longitudinal and transverse distributions of velocity and temperature are presented for single and multiple circular jets, and trajectories are presented for two-dimensional jets. The opposite wall has relatively little effect on a single jet unless the ratio of jet to cross flow momentum flux is large enough for the jet to impinge on the opposite wall. For a row of jets aligned perpendicularly to the cross flow, the opposite wall exerts progressively larger influence as the spacing between jets decreases. Much of the effect of jet and wall proximity can be understood by considering the interaction of the vortex flow which is the major feature of the structure of a single jet in a cross flow. Smoke photographs are shown to elucidate some of the interaction patterns.

  10. The Effect of Body Geometry on the Flow Noise of Cylinders in Cross Flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEachern, James F.

    This is an experimental thesis that examines the effects of body geometry on the flow noise of cylindrical inertial pressure gradient hydrophones in cross flow. Flow noise is characterized as a fluctuating force on the surface of the body. Variable geometry inertial hydrophones have been fabricated, calibrated and towed in water in an acoustically quiet facility. Flow noise expressed as equivalent sound pressure level is presented for a blunt ended cylinder with a length to diameter ratio of 0.5. The results of the acoustic tow testing show some agreement with existing models for noise generated by pressure fluctuations in the turbulent boundary layer. The fluctuating force is measured at Reynolds numbers from 4 cdot 10^3 to 1.8 cdot 10^4 on cylindrical bodies with length to diameter ratios ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 and end cap shapes ranging from flat to hemispherical. Results are expressed in terms of dimensionless spectra. The experimental results show that increased end cap radius and body aspect ratio can attenuate the fluctuating force level.

  11. TBCC Fan Stage Operability and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth L.

    2007-01-01

    NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program is investigating turbine-based propulsion systems for access to space because it provides the potential for aircraft-like, space-launch operations that may significantly reduce launch costs and improve safety. Studies performed under NASA s NGLT and the NASP High Speed Propulsion Assessment (HiSPA) program indicated a variable cycle turbofan/ramjet was the best configuration to satisfy access-to-space mission requirements because this configuration maximizes the engine thrust-to-weight ratio while minimizing frontal area. To this end, NASA and GE teamed to design a Mach 4 variable cycle turbofan/ramjet engine for access to space. To enable the wide operating range of a Mach 4+ variable cycle turbofan ramjet required the development of a unique fan stage design capable of multi-point operation to accommodate variations in bypass ratio (10X), fan speed (7X), inlet mass flow (3.5X), inlet pressure (8X), and inlet temperature (3X). The primary goal of the fan stage was to provide a high pressure ratio level with good efficiency at takeoff through the mid range of engine operation, while avoiding stall and losses at the higher flight Mach numbers, without the use of variable inlet guide vanes. Overall fan performance and operability therefore requires major consideration, as competing goals at different operating points and aeromechanical issues become major drivers in the design. To mitigate risk of meeting the unique design requirements for the fan stage, NASA and GE teamed to design and build a 57% engine scaled fan stage to be tested in NASA s transonic compressor facility. The objectives of this test are to assess the aerodynamic and aero mechanic performance and operability characteristics of the fan stage over the entire range of engine operation including: 1) sea level static take-off, 2) transition over large swings in fan bypass ratio, 3) transition from turbofan to ramjet, and 4) fan windmilling operation at high Mach

  12. Discrete-frequency and broadband noise radiation from diesel engine cooling fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geon-Seok

    theory to predict the discrete-frequency noise at the blade passing frequency (BPF) and harmonics. The unsteady lift was predicted by considering transverse and longitudinal velocity fluctuations. The influences due to an upstream finger guard were also investigated. The radiated sound power spectra that were measured for the fan are shown to be in excellent agreement with those predicted. The agreement between prediction and measurement is only fair at the fundamental BPF tone. Further experimental investigations revealed that the interaction noise between the fan blades and a shroud surrounding the fan might be the dominant source for the radiation at the first harmonic. The space-time correlation functions of the inflow velocity fluctuations were measured and utilized in stochastic lifting surface theory to calculate the unsteady blade lift and resulting broadband fan noise. The integral length scale of the inlet flow was found to be much smaller than the blade-to-blade separate distance of the fan. Therefore, contributions from blade-to-blade correlations of the various elements on different blades were found to be negligible and hence ignored; only the correlations between the strip elements on a given blade were considered. The cross-correlations measured between elements separated by more than the integral length scale were also found to be negligibly small. The predicted broadband sound power spectra agree well with those measured for frequencies greater than 400 Hz. There are deviations between the predictions and measurements at lower frequencies. These are likely due to fan blade stall, and possibly, anomalies in the noise measurement environment. In order to reduce the sound radiation at the blade rate tones, the baseline fan was replaced with a skewed fan. The backward skew angle of 30° was found to effectively reduce the 2nd and higher harmonics of the blade rate tone. The interaction of the shroud opening and the blade tips dominates the sound level at

  13. Analysis of the cross flow in a radial inflow turbine scroll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Abdallah, S.; Tabakoff, W.

    1977-01-01

    Equations of motion were derived, and a computational procedure is presented, for determining the nonviscous flow characteristics in the cross-sectional planes of a curved channel due to continuous mass discharge or mass addition. An analysis was applied to the radial inflow turbine scroll to study the effects of scroll geometry and the through flow velocity profile on the flow behavior. The computed flow velocity component in the scroll cross-sectional plane, together with the through flow velocity profile which can be determined in a separate analysis, provide a complete description of the three dimensional flow in the scroll.

  14. Integration of Twenty-Bladed Cross-Flow Fan into Vertical Take-Off and Landing Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    45 APPENDIX B. SCORPION MOTOR SPECIFICATIONS.....................................49 APPENDIX C. ANALYTICAL DATA...17 Figure 16. Scorpion Motors 4025, 4035, and 5035, respectively. From [17]. ..................18 Figure 17. Thunder Power RC lithium...Digital balance used for thrust measurement...................................................20 Figure 21. Scorpion motor potentiometer

  15. Illustration of cross flow of polystyrene melts through a coathanger die

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöppner, V.; Henke, B.

    2015-05-01

    To design an optimal coathanger die with a uniform flow rate distribution and low pressure drop, it is essential to understand the flow conditions in the die. This is important because the quality of the product is influenced by the flow velocity and the flow rate distribution. In extrusion dies, cross flows also occur in addition to the main flow, which flow perpendicular to the main flow. This results in pressure gradients in the extrusion direction, which have an influence on flow distribution and pressure drop in the die. In recent decades, quantitative representation and analysis of physical flow processes have made considerable progress in predicting the weather, developing drive technologies and designing aircraft using simulation methods and lab trials. Using the flow-line method, the flow is analyzed in flat film extrusion dies with a rectangular cross-section, in particular cross flows. The simplest method to visualize the flow is based on the measurement of obstacle orientation in the flow field by adding individual particles. A near-surface flow field can be visualized by using wool or textile yarns. By sticking thin, frayed at the ends of strands of wool surface that is to be examined cross flows, near-wall profiles of the flow and vortex and separation regions can be visualized. A further possibility is to add glass fibers and analyze the fiber orientation by microscopy and x-ray analysis. In this paper the influence of process parameters (e.g. melt temperatures and throughput) on cross flow and fiber orientation is described.

  16. Active fans and grizzly bears: Reducing risks for wilderness campers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakals, M. E.; Wilford, D. J.; Wellwood, D. W.; MacDougall, S. A.

    2010-03-01

    Active geomorphic fans experience debris flows, debris floods and/or floods (hydrogeomorphic processes) that can be hazards to humans. Grizzly bears ( Ursus arctos) can also be a hazard to humans. This paper presents the results of a cross-disciplinary study that analyzed both hydrogeomorphic and grizzly bear hazards to wilderness campers on geomorphic fans along a popular hiking trail in Kluane National Park and Reserve in southwestern Yukon Territory, Canada. Based on the results, a method is proposed to reduce the risks to campers associated with camping on fans. The method includes both landscape and site scales and is based on easily understood and readily available information regarding weather, vegetation, stream bank conditions, and bear ecology and behaviour. Educating wilderness campers and providing a method of decision-making to reduce risk supports Parks Canada's public safety program; a program based on the principle of user self-sufficiency. Reducing grizzly bear-human conflicts complements the efforts of Parks Canada to ensure a healthy grizzly bear population.

  17. Recent results about fan noise: Its generation, radiation and suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiler, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    Fan noise including its generation, radiation characteristics, and suppression by acoustic treatment is studied. In fan noise generation, results from engine and fan experiments, using inflow control measures to suppress noise sources related to inflow distortion and turbulence, are described. The suppression of sources related to inflow allows the experiments to focus on the fan or engine internal sources. Some of the experiments incorporated pressure sensors on the fan blades to sample the flow disturbances encountered by the blades. From these data some inferences can be drawn about the origins of the disturbances. Also, hot wire measurements of a fan rotor wake field are presented and related to the fan's noise signature. The radiation and the suppression of fan noise are dependent on the acoustic modes generated by the fan. Fan noise suppression and radiation is described by relating these phenomena to the mode cutoff ratio parameter. In addition to its utility in acoustic treatment design and performance prediction, cutoff ratio was useful in developing a simple description of the radiation pattern for broadband fan noise. Some of the findings using the cutoff ratio parameter are presented.

  18. Submarine fans in a sequence stratigraphic framework

    SciTech Connect

    Posamentier, H.W.; Erskine, R.D.; Mitchum, R.M.; Vail, P.R.

    1987-05-01

    Submarine fans are fan- or cone-shaped turbiditic deposits formed in upper bathyal or deeper water depths. Within a sequence stratigraphic framework, these basin-floor turbidites can occur during lowstand-fan or lowstand-wedge systems tract time. During lowstand fan time, streams are rejuvenated and depocenters shift from the coastal plain to the upper slope, causing retrogradational slope failure and canyon formation. The sediment delivered here bypasses the canyon and continues down the slope as a succession of gravity flows and is deposited as fan-shaped turbiditic deposits at the base of the slope. Seismic and outcrop evidence suggest that these sand-prone deposits are abruptly introduced into the basin and are generally characterized by subtle external mounding and internal bidirectionally down lapping seismic reflections where seismically resolvable. Deep-water sediment deposited during this interval has no coeval shelf equivalent. During lowstand wedge time, streams cease down cutting and valleys which have been freshly incised begin to fill. Because coarse sediment will preferentially be deposited within these incised valleys, the sand-to-mud ratio delivered to the upper slope will be decreased and, consequently, there is an inherent difference between submarine fans deposited at this time and those deposited during lowstand fan time. Deposition during lowstand wedge time is characterized seismically by slope front fill or wedge-shaped geometries down lapping the earlier submarine fan (i.e., deposited during lowstand fan time). These shale-prone deposits are largely comprised of thinner-bedded turbidites as well as the occasional leveed channel.

  19. Flow topologies and turbulence scales in a jet-in-cross-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oefelein, Joseph C.; Ruiz, Anthony M.; Lacaze, Guilhem

    2015-04-03

    This study presents a detailed analysis of the flow topologies and turbulence scales in the jet-in-cross-flow experiment of [Su and Mungal JFM 2004]. The analysis is performed using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique with a highly resolved grid and time-step and well controlled boundary conditions. This enables quantitative agreement with the first and second moments of turbulence statistics measured in the experiment. LES is used to perform the analysis since experimental measurements of time-resolved 3D fields are still in their infancy and because sampling periods are generally limited with direct numerical simulation. A major focal point is the comprehensive characterization of the turbulence scales and their evolution. Time-resolved probes are used with long sampling periods to obtain maps of the integral scales, Taylor microscales, and turbulent kinetic energy spectra. Scalar-fluctuation scales are also quantified. In the near-field, coherent structures are clearly identified, both in physical and spectral space. Along the jet centerline, turbulence scales grow according to a classical one-third power law. However, the derived maps of turbulence scales reveal strong inhomogeneities in the flow. From the modeling perspective, these insights are useful to design optimized grids and improve numerical predictions in similar configurations.

  20. Flow topologies and turbulence scales in a jet-in-cross-flow

    DOE PAGES

    Oefelein, Joseph C.; Ruiz, Anthony M.; Lacaze, Guilhem

    2015-04-03

    This study presents a detailed analysis of the flow topologies and turbulence scales in the jet-in-cross-flow experiment of [Su and Mungal JFM 2004]. The analysis is performed using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique with a highly resolved grid and time-step and well controlled boundary conditions. This enables quantitative agreement with the first and second moments of turbulence statistics measured in the experiment. LES is used to perform the analysis since experimental measurements of time-resolved 3D fields are still in their infancy and because sampling periods are generally limited with direct numerical simulation. A major focal point is the comprehensivemore » characterization of the turbulence scales and their evolution. Time-resolved probes are used with long sampling periods to obtain maps of the integral scales, Taylor microscales, and turbulent kinetic energy spectra. Scalar-fluctuation scales are also quantified. In the near-field, coherent structures are clearly identified, both in physical and spectral space. Along the jet centerline, turbulence scales grow according to a classical one-third power law. However, the derived maps of turbulence scales reveal strong inhomogeneities in the flow. From the modeling perspective, these insights are useful to design optimized grids and improve numerical predictions in similar configurations.« less

  1. V/STOL model fan stage rig design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatham, J. G.; Creason, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    A model single-stage fan with variable inlet guide vanes (VIGV) was designed to demonstrate efficient point operation while providing flow and pressure ratio modulation capability required for a V/STOL propulsion system. The fan stage incorporates a split-flap VIGV with an independently actuated ID flap to permit independent modulation of fan and core engine airstreams, a flow splitter integrally designed into the blade and vanes to completely segregate fan and core airstreams in order to maximize core stream supercharging for V/STOL operation, and an EGV with a variable leading edge fan flap for rig performance optimization. The stage was designed for a maximum flow size of 37.4 kg/s (82.3 lb/s) for compatibility with LeRC test facility requirements. Design values at maximum flow for blade tip velocity and stage pressure ratio are 472 m/s (1550 ft/s) and 1.68, respectively.

  2. Characterisation and modelling of washover fans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly, Chantal; Sallenger, Asbury H.

    2007-01-01

    Pre- and post-storm topography and aerial photography, collected in regions where new washover fans were formed, were studied to determine the extent of morphologic, vegetative and anthropogenic control on washover shape and extent. When overwash is funnelled through a gap in a dune ridge and then spreads laterally on the back barrier, decelerating and depositing sediment, it forms washover fans. Fans were shown to primarily occur at pre-existing gaps in the foredune. During overwash, these gaps, or overwash throats, widened and deepened. The shape and extent of the fan was shown to depend on not only the pre-storm topography, but also the existence of beach tracks, roads and other anthropogenic influences and vegetation. The cross-shore overwash profile change model by Larson et al. and Donnelly et al. was modified to include pre-storm throat widths and a lateral spreading angle estimated from the pre-storm topography as inputs and tested using cross-shore profiles through the fan centres. These new inputs make the model more generalised, such that the calibrated model is applicable to a wider range of cross-shore profiles.

  3. Industrial Turbine Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Westinghouse Corp. & R &D Center's development of blades of an advanced controllable-pitch axial fan used in electrical power generation was aided by four computer programs supplied by COSMIC. Programs helped determine sensitivity of large industrial turbines and fans to particular matter such as dust and ash which can cause erosion. Programs also helped substantially reduce developmental costs.

  4. Experimental investigation and CFD analysis on cross flow in the core of PMR200

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeong -Hun; Yoon, Su -Jong; Cho, Hyoung -Kyu; Jae, Moosung; Park, Goon -Cherl

    2015-04-16

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the major Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concepts, which consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of nuclear gradegraphite. However, the shape of the graphite blocks could be easily changed by neutron damage duringthe reactor operation and the shape change can create gaps between the blocks inducing the bypass flow.In the VHTR core, two types of gaps, a vertical gap and a horizontal gap which are called bypass gap and cross gap, respectively, can be formed. The cross gap complicates the flow field in the reactor core by connecting the coolant channel to the bypass gap and it could lead to a loss of effective coolant flow in the fuel blocks. Thus, a cross flow experimental facility was constructed to investigate the cross flow phenomena in the core of the VHTR and a series of experiments were carried out under varying flow rates and gap sizes. The results of the experiments were compared with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis results in order to verify its prediction capability for the cross flow phenomena. Fairly good agreement was seen between experimental results and CFD predictions and the local characteristics of the cross flow was discussed in detail. Based on the calculation results, pressure loss coefficient across the cross gap was evaluated, which is necessary for the thermo-fluid analysis of the VHTR core using a lumped parameter code.

  5. Experimental investigation and CFD analysis on cross flow in the core of PMR200

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jeong -Hun; Yoon, Su -Jong; Cho, Hyoung -Kyu; ...

    2015-04-16

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the major Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concepts, which consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of nuclear gradegraphite. However, the shape of the graphite blocks could be easily changed by neutron damage duringthe reactor operation and the shape change can create gaps between the blocks inducing the bypass flow.In the VHTR core, two types of gaps, a vertical gap and a horizontal gap which are called bypass gap and cross gap, respectively, can be formed. The cross gap complicates the flow field in the reactor core by connectingmore » the coolant channel to the bypass gap and it could lead to a loss of effective coolant flow in the fuel blocks. Thus, a cross flow experimental facility was constructed to investigate the cross flow phenomena in the core of the VHTR and a series of experiments were carried out under varying flow rates and gap sizes. The results of the experiments were compared with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis results in order to verify its prediction capability for the cross flow phenomena. Fairly good agreement was seen between experimental results and CFD predictions and the local characteristics of the cross flow was discussed in detail. Based on the calculation results, pressure loss coefficient across the cross gap was evaluated, which is necessary for the thermo-fluid analysis of the VHTR core using a lumped parameter code.« less

  6. Seabed morphology and sedimentary processes on high-gradient trough mouth fans offshore Troms, northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydningen, Tom Arne; Laberg, Jan Sverre; Kolstad, Vidar

    2015-10-01

    Trough mouth fans (TMF) situated at the mouths of formerly glaciated cross-shelf troughs are important paleoclimatic archives. Whereas the sedimentary processes of large, low-gradient TMFs have received considerable interest, little attention has been paid to the other end member of this landform class, i.e. TMFs with higher slope gradients. Detailed swath-bathymetric data and seismic profiles from the continental margin offshore Troms, northern Norway cover three high-gradient TMFs (the Andfjorden, Malangsdjupet and Rebbenesdjupet TMFs; slope gradients generally between 1° and 15°), as well as inter-fan areas, which include two submarine canyons (the Andøya and Senja Canyon) and the Malangsgrunnen inter-fan slope. The present-day morphologies of the Andfjorden and Malangsdjupet TMFs have evolved from sediment transport and distribution through gully-channel complexes. The Andfjorden TMF has later been affected by a large submarine landslide that remobilized much of these complexes. The Rebbenesdjupet TMF is dominated by a number of small and relatively shallow slide scars, which are inferred to be related to small-scale sediment failure of glaciomarine and/or contouritic sediments. The canyons cut into the adjacent TMFs, and turbidity currents originating on the fans widened and deepened the canyons during downslope flow. The Malangsgrunnen shelf break and inter-fan slope acted as a funnel for turbidity currents originating on the upper slope, forming a dendritic pattern of gullies. A conceptual model for the high-gradient TMFs on the Troms margin has been compiled. The main sediment input onto the TMFs has occurred during peak glacials when the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet reached the shelf edge. The overall convex fan form and progradational seismic facies show that these glacigenic deposits were repeatedly distributed onto the fan. On the Andfjorden and Malangsdjupet TMFs, gully-channel complexes occur within such deposits. It is thus inferred that the steep

  7. Controls on alluvial fan long-profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stock, J.D.; Schmidt, K.M.; Miller, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Water and debris flows exiting confined valleys have a tendency to deposit sediment on steep fans. On alluvial fans where water transport of gravel predominates, channel slopes tend to decrease downfan from ???0.10-0.04 to ???0.01 across wide ranges of climate and tectonism. Some have argued that this pattern reflects grain-size fining downfan such that higher threshold slopes are required just to entrain coarser particles in the waters of the upper fan, whereas lower slopes are required to entrain finer grains downfan (threshold hypothesis). An older hypothesis is that slope is adjusted to transport the supplied sediment load, which decreases downfan as deposition occurs (transport hypothesis). We have begun to test these hypotheses for alluvial fan long-profiles using detailed hydraulic and particle-size data in sediment transport models. On four alluvial fans in the western U.S., we find that channel hydraulic radiiare largely 0.5-0.9 m at fan heads, decreasing to 0.1-0.2 m at distal margins. We find that median gravel diameter does not change systematically along the upper 60%-80% of active fan channels as slope declines, so downstream gravel fining cannot explain most of the observed channel slope reduction. However, as slope declines, channel-bed sand cover increases systematically downfan from areal fractions of <20% above fan heads to distal fan values in excess of 70%. As a result, entrainment thresholds for bed material might decrease systematically downfan, leading to lower slopes. However, current models of this effect alone tend to underpredict downfan slope changes. This is likely due to off-channel gravel deposition. Calculations that match observed fan long-profiles require an exponential decline in gravel transport rate, so that on some fans approximately half of the load must be deposited off channel every -0.20-1.4 km downfan. This leads us to hypothesize that some alluvial fan long-proffies are statements about the rate of overbank deposition of

  8. Measurements of the flow and turbulence characteristics of round jets in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, S. A.; Pletcher, R. H.

    1986-05-01

    Measurements of the velocity and turbulence characteristics of a round turbulent jet in cross flow are reported. The experiments were conducted in a water channel, 8.53 m long, 0.61 m wide, and 1.067 m deep, of the recirculation type. Water was injected vertically upward from a circular pipe located near the channel bottom to simulate the turbulent jet. Normal and 45 deg-slanted fiber-film probes along with appropriate anemometers and bridges were operated in the constant temperature mode to measure mean velocities, turbulence intensities, Reynolds stresses, structural parameters, correlation coefficients, and the turbulent kinetic energy. The measurements were carried out in the jet and its wake both in and outside the jet plane of symmetry.

  9. Detailed flow and force measurements in a rotated triangular tube bundle subjected to two-phase cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettigrew, M. J.; Zhang, C.; Mureithi, N. W.; Pamfil, D.

    2005-05-01

    Two-phase cross-flow exists in many shell-and-tube heat exchangers. A detailed knowledge of the characteristics of two-phase cross-flow in tube bundles is required to understand and formulate flow-induced vibration parameters such as damping, fluidelastic instability, and random excitation due to turbulence. An experimental program was undertaken with a rotated-triangular array of cylinders subjected to air/water flow to simulate two-phase mixtures. The array is made of relatively large diameter cylinders (38 mm) to allow for detailed two-phase flow measurements between cylinders. Fiber-optic probes were developed to measure local void fraction. Local flow velocities and bubble diameters or characteristic lengths of the two-phase mixture are obtained by using double probes. Both the dynamic lift and drag forces were measured with a strain gauge instrumented cylinder.

  10. Single- and Two-Phase Diversion Cross-Flows Between Triangle Tight Lattice Rod Bundle Subchannels - Data on Flow Resistance and Interfacial Friction Coefficients for the Cross-Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsuya Higuchi; Akimaro Kawahara; Michio Sadatomi; Hiroyuki Kudo

    2006-07-01

    Single- and two-phase diversion cross-flows arising from the pressure difference between tight lattice subchannels are our concern in this study. In order to obtain a correlation of the diversion cross-flow, we conducted adiabatic experiments using a vertical multiple-channel with two subchannels simplifying the triangle tight lattice rod bundle for air-water flows at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. In the experiments, data were obtained on the axial variations in the pressure difference between the subchannels, the ratio of flow rate in one subchannel to the whole channel, the void fraction in each subchannel for slug-churn and annular flows in two-phase flow case. These data were analyzed by use of a lateral momentum equation based on a two-fluid model to determine both the cross-flow resistance coefficient between liquid phase and channel wall and the gas-liquid interfacial friction coefficient. The resulting coefficients have been correlated in a way similar to that developed for square lattice subchannel case by Kano et al. (2002); the cross-flow resistance coefficient data can be well correlated with a ratio of the lateral velocity due to the cross-flow to the axial one irrespective of single- and two-phase flows; the interfacial friction coefficient data were well correlated with a Reynolds number, which is based on the relative velocity between gas and liquid cross-flows as the characteristic velocity. (authors)

  11. Cross-flow vortex structure and transition measurements using multi-element hot films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, Naval K.; Mangalam, Siva M.; Maddalon, Dal V.; Collier, Fayette S., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment on a 45-degree swept wing was conducted to study three-dimensional boundary-layer characteristics using surface-mounted, micro-thin, multi-element hot-film sensors. Cross-flow vortex structure and boundary-layer transition were measured from the simultaneously acquired signals of the hot films. Spanwise variation of the root-mean-square (RMS) hot-film signal show a local minima and maxima. The distance between two minima corresponds to the stationary cross-flow vortex wavelength and agrees with naphthalene flow-visualization results. The chordwise and spanwise variation of amplified traveling (nonstationary) cross-flow disturbance characteristics were measured as Reynolds number was varied. The frequency of the most amplified cross-flow disturbances agrees with linear stability theory.

  12. Experimental quiet engine program aerodynamic performance of fan A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, R. G.; Parker, D. E.; Dunbar, L. W.

    1971-01-01

    The aerodynamic component test results are presented of fan A, one of two high-bypass-ratio, 1160 feet per second single-stage fans, which was designed and tested as part of the NASA Experimental Quiet Engine Program. This fan was designed to deliver a bypass pressure ratio of 1.50 with an adiabatic efficiency of 86.5% at a total fan flow of 950 lb/sec. It was tested with and without inlet flow distortion. A bypass total-pressure ratio of 1.52 and an adiabatic efficiency of 88.3% at a total fan flow of 962 lb/sec were actually achieved. An operating margin of 12.4% was demonstrated at design speed.

  13. Debris Flow Initiation and Fan Reworking in the Green River Canyons of the Eastern Uinta Mountains: The Limited Role of Wildfire and the Significance of Low-Magnitude Floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, I. J.; Schmidt, J. C.; Pederson, J. L.; Martin, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    The primary determinant on channel organization of the Green River in the canyons of the eastern Uinta Mountains is the occurrence and frequency of debris flows in tributary watersheds. The frequency of these debris flows appears to be related to climatic factors, not factors related to wildfire. Debris flows in the eastern Uinta Mountains occur by a process known as the firehose effect, wherein overland flow generated on bedrock slopes cascades down steep cliffs and saturates and impacts colluvium stored in bedrock hollows. The colluvium fails, initiating debris flows that travel downslope to the Green River. The dry climate and high-strength bedrock cause hillslopes to be weathering-limited, prohibiting the formation of extensive regolith and vegetative cover. This reduces the degree vegetation regulates geomorphic processes and, in turn, causes wildfire to have little influence on debris flow initiation; slight increases in watershed runoff do not appear to alter the likelihood of this process occurring. A secondary determinant on channel organization in debris fan-dominated canyons are the magnitude of mainstem discharges and the degree to which they rework debris flow deposits; in this case flows are regulated by Flaming Gorge Dam. Substantial reworking of debris flow deposits can be accomplished by mainstem floods with discharges greater than 75%\\ of the pre-dam two year flood, whereas floods with magnitudes less than 40%\\ of the pre-dam 2-year flood do little reworking.

  14. Calculation of linearized supersonic flow over slender cones of arbitrary cross section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascitti, V. R.

    1972-01-01

    Supersonic linearized conical-flow theory is used to determine the flow over slender pointed cones having horizontal and vertical planes of symmetry. The geometry of the cone cross sections and surface velocities are expanded in Fourier series. The symmetry condition permits the uncoupling of lifting and nonlifting solutions. The present method reduces to Ward's theory for flow over a cone of elliptic cross section. Results are also presented for other shapes. Results by this method diverge for cross-sectional shapes where the maximum thickness is large compared with the minimum thickness. However, even for these slender-body shapes, lower order solutions are good approximations to the complete solution.

  15. Design, fabrication and acoustic tests of a 36 inch (0.914 meter) statorless turbotip fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. G.; Stempert, D. L.; Uhl, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    The LF336/E is a 36 inch (0.914 meter) diameter fan designed to operate in a rotor-alone configuration. Design features required for modification of the existing LF336/A rotor-stator fan into the LF336/E statorless fan configuration are discussed. Tests of the statorless fan identified an aerodynamic performance deficiency due to inaccurate accounting of the fan exit swirl during the aerodynamic design. This performance deficiency, related to fan exit static pressure levels, produced about a 20 percent thrust loss. A study was then conducted for further evaluation of the fan exit flow fields typical of statorless fan systems. This study showed that through proper selection of fan design variables such as pressure ratio, radius ratio, and swirl distributions, performance of a statorless fan configuration could be improved with levels of thrust approaching the conventional rotor-stator fan system. Acoustic measurements were taken for the statorless fan system at both GE and NASA, and when compared to other lift fan systems, showed noise levels comparable to the quietest lift fan configuration which included rotor-stator spacing and acoustic treatment. The statorless fan system was also used to determine effects of rotor leading edge serrations on noise generations. A cascade test program identified the serration geometry based on minimum pressure losses, wake turbulence levels and noise generations.

  16. A Fan Design that Meets the NASA Aeronautics Noise Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James; Tweedt, Daniel; Jeracki, Robert; Envia, Edmaine; Bartos, Karen; Slater, John

    2003-01-01

    A fan concept was previously identified that would meet the NASA aeronautics goal of a 20 EPNdB reduction in aircraft noise. This was a 2-stage fan with a pressure ratio of 1.15 and a 460 ft/sec tip speed. The 2 stages were identical so that, with the proper synchrophasing, noise from one stage could be used to cancel noise from the other stage. This paper documents the aerodynamic design of the 2-stage fan concept in a 22-in. diameter size for testing in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-ft wind tunnel. A set of rotor and stator coordinates are listed in the report. Stress and flutter analyses were done on these blades and showed that the design was structurally viable. A noise prediction code, using the blade coordinates and fan flows, indicated that the 2-stage fan would meet the goal of a 20 dB reduction in fan noise.

  17. An analysis of pressure driven cross-flow through a long slot connecting two parallel channels

    SciTech Connect

    Shadday, M.A. Jr.

    1992-12-31

    Cross-flow between two parallel channels that were connected by a long narrow slot has been measured. The data was presented primarily in terms of transverse resistance coefficients. This data has been analyzed with momentum balances applied to both the axial and transverse components of the slot flow. The importance of wall friction to the slot flow and the necessity of calculating the axial component of the slot flow is demonstrated.

  18. Sedimentation model of gravel-dominated alluvial piedmont fan, Ganga Plain, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, U. K.

    2009-03-01

    The Piedmont Zone of the Indo-Gangetic Plain contains numerous, laterally coalescing small alluvial fans. The Latest Pleistocene-Holocene 30 km long Gaula Fan can be divided into gravelly proximal fan (0-14 km down-stream), gravel-sand rich mid fan (14-22 km) and sand-mud dominated distal fan (22-30 km). The fan succession is composed of two fan expansion cycles A and B. Separated by an undulatory erosional contact of regional extent, cycle A is characterized by river borne clast-supported gravelly deposits, and the overlying fan expansion cycle B by matrix-supported gravely debris flows. The main process behind fan development has been lateral migration of channels over the fan surface probably due to rapid sedimentation caused by increased sediment supply, and the fluctuating water budget in response to changing climate. The water laid expansion cycle A represents a humid phase. The debris flow deposits of expansion cycle B suggest a dry phase. Approximately between 8 and 3 Ka, cycle B also indicates a phase of tectonic instability in the Siwalik Hills forming the mountain front. The tectonic activity caused incision of rivers into the fan surface, and in turn resulted in reduced fan-building activity. At present the fan surface is accreting by sheet flow processes.

  19. Averaged indicators of secondary flow in repeated acoustic Doppler current profiler crossings of bends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinehart, R.L.; Burau, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Cross-stream velocity was measured in a large river bend at high spatial resolution over three separate survey episodes. A suite of methods for resolving cross-stream velocity distributions was tested on data collected using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) in the sand-bedded Sacramento River, California. The bend was surveyed with repeated ADCP crossings at eight cross sections during a rising limb of high discharge in February 2004 and twice on recession in March 2004. By translating and interpolating repeated ADCP crossings to planar grids, velocity ensembles at similar positions along irregular boat paths could be averaged. The averaging minimized turbulent fluctuations in streamwise velocities over 1 m/s, enabling the resolution of weaker cross-stream velocities (???15-30 cm/s). Secondary-flow influence on suspended sediment was inferred from a lateral region of acoustic backscatter intensity aligned with outward flow over the point bar. A near-bed decrease in backscatter intensity across the pool corresponded with inward cross-stream flow. These suspension indicators were used to orient averaged velocity grids for unambiguously defining the cross-stream velocity magnitudes. Additional field investigations could test whether the correlation between cross-stream velocity and backscatter intensity patterns results from helical recirculation of suspended sediment to the inside of the bend. These river measurements, consistent with classic and recent laboratory studies, show that ADCP surveys can provide refined views of secondary flow and sediment movement in large rivers.

  20. Advanced Low-Noise Research Fan Stage Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubert, Robert; Bock, Larry; Malmborg, Eric; Owen-Peer, William

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the design of the Advanced Low-Noise Research Fan stage. The fan is a variable pitch design, which is designed at the cruise pitch condition. Relative to the cruise setting, the blade is closed at takeoff and opened for reverse thrust operation. The fan stage is a split flow design with fan exit guide vanes (FEGVs) and core stators. The fan stage design is combined with a nacelle and engine core duct to form a powered fan/nacelle subscale model. This model is intended for use in combined aerodynamic, acoustic, and structural testing in a wind tunnel. The fan has an outer diameter of 22 in. and a hub-to-tip of 0.426 in., which allows the use of existing NASA fan and cowl force balance and rig drive systems. The design parameters were selected to permit valid acoustic and aerodynamic comparisons with the Pratt & Whitney (P&W) 17- and 22-in. rigs previously tested under NASA contract. The fan stage design is described in detail. The results of the design axisymmetric and Navier-Stokes aerodynamic analysis are presented at the critical design conditions. The structural analysis of the fan rotor and attachment is included. The blade and attachment are predicted to have adequate low-cycle fatigue life and an acceptable operating range without resonant stress or flutter. The stage was acoustically designed with airfoil counts in the FEGV and core stator to minimize noise. A fan/FEGV tone analysis developed separately under NASA contract was used to determine the optimum airfoil counts. The fan stage was matched to the existing nacelle, designed under the previous P&W low-noise contract, to form a fan/nacelle model for wind tunnel testing. It is an axisymmetric nacelle for convenience in testing and analysis. Previous testing confirmed that the nacelle performed as required at various aircraft operating conditions.

  1. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: A CROSS-FLOW PERVAPORATION SYSTEM FOR REMOVAL OF VOCS FROM CONTAMINATED WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation is a process for removing volatile organic compounds (VOC) from contaminated water. The performance of the cross-flow pervaporation system increases with temperature, with an equipment limitation of 35 degrees Celsius. Permeable membranes that preferentially adsor...

  2. Computer program for the analysis of the cross flow in a radial inflow turbine scroll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Abdallah, S.; Tabakoff, W.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program was used to solve the governing of the potential flow in the cross sectional planes of a radial inflow turbine scroll. A list of the main program, the subroutines, and typical output example are included.

  3. Dilution jets in accelerated cross flows. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipshitz, A.; Greber, I.

    1984-01-01

    Results of flow visualization experiments and measurements of the temperature field produced by a single jet and a row of dilution jets issued into a reverse flow combustor are presented. The flow in such combustors is typified by transverse and longitudinal acceleration during the passage through its bending section. The flow visualization experiments are designed to examine the separate effects of longitudinal and transverse acceleration on the jet trajectory and spreading rate. A model describing a dense single jet in a lighter accelerating cross flow is developed. The model is based on integral conservation equations, including the pressure terms appropriate to accelerating flows. It uses a modified entrainment correlation obtained from previous experiments of a jet in a cross stream. The flow visualization results are compared with the model calculations in terms of trajectories and spreading rates. Each experiment is typified by a set of three parameters: momentum ratio, density ratio and the densimetric Froude number.

  4. Hydrodynamic radius determination with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation using decaying cross-flows. Part I. A theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Andreas; Magnusson, Emma; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2012-08-31

    Direct determination of hydrodynamic radius from retention time is an advantage of the field-flow fractionation techniques. However, this is not always completely straight forward since non-idealities exist and assumptions have been made in deriving the retention equations. In this study we investigate the effect on accuracy from two factors: (1) level of sophistication of the equations used to determine channel height from a calibration experiment and (2) the influence of secondary relaxation on the accuracy of hydrodynamic radius determination. A new improved technique for estimating the channel height from calibration experiments is suggested. It is concluded that severe systematic error can arise if the most common channel height equations are used and an alternative more rigorous approach is described. For secondary relaxation it is concluded that this effect increases with the cross-flow decay rate. The secondary relaxation effect is quantified for different conditions. This is part one of two. In the second part the determination of hydrodynamic radius are evaluated experimentally under similar conditions.

  5. Acoustic Measurements of an Uninstalled Spacecraft Cabin Ventilation Fan Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle; Brown, Clifford A.; Shook, Tony D.; Winkel, James; Kolacz, John S.; Podboy, Devin M.; Loew, Raymond A.; Mirecki, Julius H.

    2012-01-01

    Sound pressure measurements were recorded for a prototype of a spacecraft cabin ventilation fan in a test in the NASA Glenn Acoustical Testing Laboratory. The axial fan is approximately 0.089 m (3.50 in.) in diameter and 0.223 m (9.00 in.) long and has nine rotor blades and eleven stator vanes. At design point of 12,000 rpm, the fan was predicted to produce a flow rate of 0.709 cu m/s (150 cfm) and a total pressure rise of 925 Pa (3.72 in. of water) at 12,000 rpm. While the fan was designed to be part of a ducted atmospheric revitalization system, no attempt was made to throttle the flow or simulate the installed configuration during this test. The fan was operated at six speeds from 6,000 to 13,500 rpm. A 13-microphone traversing array was used to collect sound pressure measurements along two horizontal planes parallel to the flow direction, two vertical planes upstream of the fan inlet and two vertical planes downstream of the fan exhaust. Measurements indicate that sound at blade passing frequency harmonics contribute significantly to the overall audible noise produced by the fan at free delivery conditions.

  6. Experimental alluvial fans: Advances in understanding of fan dynamics and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Lucy E.

    2015-09-01

    Alluvial fans are depositional systems that develop because of a disparity between the upstream and downstream sediment transport capacity of a system, usually at the base of mountain fronts as rivers emerge from the constrained mountain area onto the plain. They are dynamic landforms that are prone to abrupt changes on a geomorphological (decades to centuries) time scale, while also being long-term deposition features that preserve sedimentary strata and are sensitive indictors of environmental change. The complexity of interactions between catchment characteristics, climate, tectonics, internal system feedbacks, and environmental processes on field alluvial fans means that it is difficult to isolate individual variables in a field setting; therefore, the controlled conditions afforded by experimental models has provided a novel technique to overcome some of these complexities. The use of experimental models of alluvial fans has a long history and these have been implemented over a range of different research areas utilising various experimental designs. Using this technique, important advances have been made in determining the primary factors influencing fan slope, understanding of avulsion dynamics, identifying autogenic processes driving change on fan systems independent of any change in external conditions, and the mechanics of flow and flood risk on alluvial fans, to name a few. However, experiments cannot be carried out in isolation. Thus, combining the findings from experimental alluvial fans with field research and numerical modelling is important and, likewise, using these techniques to inform experimental design. If this can be achieved, there is potential for future experimental developments to explore key alluvial fan issues such as stratigraphic preservation potential and simulating extra terrestrial fan systems.

  7. Thermal/chemical degradation of ceramic cross-flow filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lane, J.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1989-11-01

    This report summarizes the 14-month, Phase 1 effort conducted by Westinghouse on the Thermal/Chemical Degradation of Ceramic Cross-Flow Filter Materials program. In Phase 1 expected filter process conditions were identified for a fixed-bed, fluid-bed, and entrained-bed gasification, direct coal fired turbine, and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system. Ceramic cross-flow filter materials were also selected, procured, and subjected to chemical and physical characterization. The stability of each of the ceramic cross-flow materials was assessed in terms of potential reactions or phase change as a result of process temperature, and effluent gas compositions containing alkali and fines. In addition chemical and physical characterization was conducted on cross-flow filters that were exposed to the METC fluid-bed gasifier and the New York University pressurized fluidized-bed combustor. Long-term high temperature degradation mechanisms were proposed for each ceramic cross-flow material at process operating conditions. An experimental bench-scale test program is recommended to be conducted in Phase 2, generating data that support the proposed cross-flow filter material thermal/chemical degradation mechanisms. Papers on the individual subtasks have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  8. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  9. Experimental quiet engine program aerodynamic performance of Fan C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, R. G.; Parker, D. E.; Dunbar, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    This report presents the aerodynamic component test results of Fan C, a high-bypass-ratio, low-aerodynamic-loading, 1550 feet per second (472.4 m/sec), single-stage fan, which was designed and tested as part of the NASA Experimental Quiet Engine Program. The fan was designed to deliver a bypass pressure ratio of 1.60 with an adiabatic efficiency of 84.2 percent at a total fan flow of 915 lb/sec (415.0 kg/sec). It was tested with and without inlet distortion. A bypass total-pressure ratio of 1.61 and an adiabatic efficiency of 83.9 percent at a total fan flow of 921 lb/sec (417.8 kg/sec) were actually achieved. An operating margin in excess of 14.6 percent was demonstrated at design speed.

  10. A cantilevered flexible cylinder in cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jessica; Smits, Alexander; Stone, Howard

    2011-11-01

    Biological fluid-structure interactions of high aspect ratio bluff bodies are commonplace: flow around tall plants; flow through arrays of sensory vibrissae, antennae, and hairs. In this study, we seek insight to this class of problems by generalizing the flow configuration to uniform flow past a flexible cantilevered cylinder. Experiments were conducted for ReD = 100-500. Cylinders deflected with the flow and demonstrated multimodal oscillations in both the streamwise and transverse directions. Oscillation frequencies were correlated with vortex shedding frequencies, but low oscillation frequencies (sub-1 Hz), which were not apparently vortex- induced, were also present. Two ReD regimes were noted in which the vortex shedding frequency remained relatively constant with ReD , while the two regimes were separated by an intermediate transition region. This feature results in an apparently linear relationship between St and ReD in each regime. Hydrogen bubble visualization showed strong three-dimensionality in the wake, as well as a diversity of wake structures varying with ReD . NSF-GRFP

  11. CFD simulations of the flow control performance applied for inlet of low drag high-bypass turbofan engine at cross flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursakov, I. A.; Kazhan, E. V.; Lysenkov, A. V.; Savelyev, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Paper describes the optimization procedure for low cruise drag inlet of high-bypass ratio turbofan engine (HBRE). The critical cross-flow velocity when the flow separation on the lee side of the inlet channel occurs is determined. The effciency of different flow control devices used to improve the flow parameters at inlet section cross flow regime is analyzed. Boundary layer suction, bypass slot and vortex generators are considered. It is shown that flow control devices enlarge the stability range of inlet performance at cross flow regimes.

  12. Dynamics of the ion flow in a discharge with crossed E and H fields

    SciTech Connect

    Movsesyants, Yu. B. Tyuryukanov, P. M.

    2011-12-15

    The experimental and theoretical results of the investigation of an ion flow in a low-pressure discharge in crossed E and H fields are presented. It is shown that two quasi-stationary current states can be realized in a transonic collisionless flow of ions in a cold plasma.

  13. Numerical simulation for fan broadband noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Takaaki; Yamasaki, Nobuhiko; Ooishi, Tsutomu

    2011-03-01

    In order to elucidate the broadband noise of fan, the numerical simulation of fan operating at two different rotational speeds is carried out using the three-dimensional unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations. The computed results are compared to experiment to estimate its accuracy and are found to show good agreement with experiment. A method is proposed to evaluate the turbulent kinetic energy in the framework of the Spalart-Allmaras one equation turbulence model. From the calculation results, the turbulent kinetic energy is visualized as the turbulence of the flow which leads to generate the broadband noise, and its noise sources are identified.

  14. Morphometry of Alluvial Fans in a Polar Desert (Svalbard, Norway): Implications for Interpreting Martian Fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauber, E.; Preusker, F.; Trauthan, F.; Reiss, D.; Zanetti, M.; Jaumann, R.; Hiesinger, H.

    2009-04-01

    channels, many of which display well-developed lateral levees, and debris tongues. Boulder-sized (>1 m) rocks are present, but rare. Where a vertical section of the fan can be observed (typically at the toe, where braided rivers cut the fans), it appears poorly sorted. Following the reasoning of, e.g., [8,9], we conclude that the fans in our study area are dominated by debris flows. However, fluvial processes might also have been involved, and the complex interplay between fluvial incision and debris flows on alluvial fans is well known also from fans in different climatic environments [e.g., 10]. Topographic profiles along 55 fans were measured in HRSC-AX DEM. Fan length ranges between 80 m and about 800 m, with heights between 9 and 140 m (from apex to toe). The profiles of the Svalbard fans can be approximated very well with a power law function. Overall gradients vary between 0.11 and 0.43, with a peak at 0.18-0.2. Several measures have been suggested to quantify the concavity of river and fan profiles [e.g., 1, 11]. We use a simple method, which was suggested by Langbein [12] and is still widely used [e.g., 9, 13,14]. The Langbein-concavity of the fan profiles shows a continous range between 0 and 0.53. The topography of Martian fan-like features [2,3] is studied on the basis of DEM derived from HRSC stereo data [15,16], with a grid spacing of 50-100 m. An example of a profile along a Martian fan in Holden crater exhibits a Langbein-concavity of 0.194 and a gradient of 0.069. While the concavity falls in the range observed on Svalbard, the gradient is less. Another major difference is the fan dimension, with the fan in Holden Crater being much larger. We also produced a HRSC DEM of Mojave Crater on Mars, which displays a number of fans with dimensions similar to those on Svalbard [3], and discuss the relationship between local slopes and fans in Mojave Crater. Alluvial fans form by one or a combination of the following mechanisms: avulsing channelized rivers, sheet

  15. Rhone deep-sea fan: morphostructure and growth pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Droz, L.; Bellaiche, G.

    1985-03-01

    A detailed bathymetric survey of the Rhone deep-sea fan and its feeder canyon using Sea-Beam, reveals morphologic features such as very tight meanders of the canyon and channel courses, cutoff meanders, and downslope narrowing of the inner channel floor. Striking similarities exist between these deep-sea features and some continental landforms, especially in alluvial plain areas or desert environments. Sea-Beam also reveals evidence of huge slump scars affecting the slope and fan. The superficial structure of the Rhone Fan results from the stacking of numerous lenticular acoustic units displaying specific seismic characters in which the authors recognized channel and levee facies. Except in the upper fan area, these units have not been constant; they have generally migrated, owing to shifting of the channel throughout fan evolution. Construction of the fan probably began as early as the early Pliocene and continued to the close of the Wurmian (late Wisconsinian). The fan's growth pattern could be associated with climatic fluctuations. The principal sedimentary mechanism responsible for the growth of the fan appears to be turbidity currents, but mass gravity flows have also been an important factor in building the fan by occasionally blocking the main channel and forcing it to migrate.

  16. CFD Models of a Serpentine Inlet, Fan, and Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Arend, D. J.; Castner, R. S.; Slater, J. W.; Truax, P. P.

    2010-01-01

    Several computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes were used to analyze the Versatile Integrated Inlet Propulsion Aerodynamics Rig (VIIPAR) located at NASA Glenn Research Center. The rig consists of a serpentine inlet, a rake assembly, inlet guide vanes, a 12-in. diameter tip-turbine driven fan stage, exit rakes or probes, and an exhaust nozzle with a translating centerbody. The analyses were done to develop computational capabilities for modeling inlet/fan interaction and to help interpret experimental data. Three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) calculations of the fan stage were used to predict the operating line of the stage, the effects of leakage from the turbine stream, and the effects of inlet guide vane (IGV) setting angle. Coupled axisymmetric calculations of a bellmouth, fan, and nozzle were used to develop techniques for coupling codes together and to investigate possible effects of the nozzle on the fan. RANS calculations of the serpentine inlet were coupled to Euler calculations of the fan to investigate the complete inlet/fan system. Computed wall static pressures along the inlet centerline agreed reasonably well with experimental data but computed total pressures at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP) showed significant differences from the data. Inlet distortion was shown to reduce the fan corrected flow and pressure ratio, and was not completely eliminated by passage through the fan

  17. 30 CFR 57.4504 - Fan installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4504 Fan installations. (a) Fan houses, fan bulkheads... of combustible materials, except installed wiring, ground and track support, headframes, and...

  18. 30 CFR 57.4504 - Fan installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4504 Fan installations. (a) Fan houses, fan bulkheads... of combustible materials, except installed wiring, ground and track support, headframes, and...

  19. 30 CFR 57.4504 - Fan installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4504 Fan installations. (a) Fan houses, fan bulkheads... of combustible materials, except installed wiring, ground and track support, headframes, and...

  20. 30 CFR 57.4504 - Fan installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4504 Fan installations. (a) Fan houses, fan bulkheads... of combustible materials, except installed wiring, ground and track support, headframes, and...

  1. 30 CFR 57.4504 - Fan installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4504 Fan installations. (a) Fan houses, fan bulkheads... of combustible materials, except installed wiring, ground and track support, headframes, and...

  2. Scheduling and Separating Departures Crossing Arrival Flows in Shared Airspace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalley, Eric; Parke, Bonny K.; Lee, Paul; Omar, Faisal; Lee, Hwasoo; Beinert, Nancy; Kraut, Joshua M.; Palmer, Everett

    2013-01-01

    Flight efficiency and reduction of flight delays are among the primary goals of NextGen. In this paper, we propose a concept of shared airspace where departures fly across arrival flows, provided gaps are available in these flows. We have explored solutions to separate departures temporally from arrival traffic and pre-arranged procedures to support controllers' decisions. We conducted a Human-in-the-Loop simulation and assessed the efficiency and safety of 96 departures from the San Jose airport (SJC) climbing across the arrival airspace of the Oakland and San Francisco arrival flows. In our simulation, the SJC tower had a tool to schedule departures to fly across predicted gaps in the arrival flow. When departures were mistimed and separation could not be ensured, a safe but less efficient route was provided to the departures to fly under the arrival flows. A coordination using a point-out procedure allowed the arrival controller to control the SJC departures right after takeoff. We manipulated the accuracy of departure time (accurate vs. inaccurate) as well as which sector took control of the departures after takeoff (departure vs. arrival sector) in a 2x2 full factorial plan. Results show that coordination time decreased and climb efficiency increased when the arrival sector controlled the aircraft right after takeoff. Also, climb efficiency increased when the departure times were more accurate. Coordination was shown to be a critical component of tactical operations in shared airspace. Although workload, coordination, and safety were judged by controllers as acceptable in the simulation, it appears that in the field, controllers would need improved tools and coordination procedures to support this procedure.

  3. Smart Fan Modules And System

    DOEpatents

    Cipolla, Thomas M.; Kaufman, Richard I.; Mok, Lawrence S.

    2003-07-15

    A fan module including: two or more individual fans, each fan having an air movement means and a motor engaged with the air movement means for accelerating air entering each of the two or more individual fans; a temperature sensor for sensing a temperature associated with the two or more fans and for outputting a first signal corresponding to the temperature; rotational speed sensor for outputting a second signal corresponding to a rotational speed of each of the two or more fans; and a processor for receiving the first and second signals and controlling the two or more individual fans based on the first and second signals. A fan module including: two or more individual fans, each fan having an air movement means and a motor engaged with the air movement means for accelerating air entering each of the two or more individual fans; a temperature sensor for sensing a temperature associated with the two or more fans and for outputting a first signal corresponding to the temperature; rotational speed sensor for outputting a second signal corresponding to a rotational speed of each of the two or more fans; and a processor for receiving the first and second signals and controlling the two or more individual fans based on the first and second signals.

  4. Nonstationary flow in a channel with variable cross section under conditions of periodic pulsed energy supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2007-04-01

    The effect of a periodic pulsed supply of energy, equal to that of hydrogen combustion in air, on the structure of a supersonic flow in a channel of variable cross section modeling a ramjet tract has been studied. The flow has been numerically simulated based on two-dimensional gasdynamic equations. Various flow regimes are obtained depending on the configuration of energy supply zones and the excess air ratio in the channel.

  5. Traffic flow of a roundabout crossing with an open boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ke-Zhao; Tan, Hui-Li; Kong, Ling-Jiang; Liu, Mu-Ren

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a cellular automaton traffic flow model with an open boundary condition to describe the traffic flow at a roundabout crossing with an inner roundabout lane and an outer roundabout lane. The simulation results show that the boundary condition, bottlenecks and the self-organization affect the traffic flow at the roundabout crossing. Because of the effect of bottlenecks, jams easily appear on the inner roundabout lane. To improve the capacity of the roundabout system, proper values of the enter probability α and the out probability β can be chosen.

  6. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of a Spacecraft Cabin Ventilation Fan Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    Quieter working environments for astronauts are needed if future long-duration space exploration missions are to be safe and productive. Ventilation and payload cooling fans are known to be dominant sources of noise, with the International Space Station being a good case in point. To address this issue cost effectively, early attention to fan design, selection, and installation has been recommended, leading to an effort by NASA to examine the potential for small-fan noise reduction by improving fan aerodynamic design. As a preliminary part of that effort, the aerodynamics of a cabin ventilation fan designed by Hamilton Sundstrand has been simulated using computational fluid dynamics codes, and the computed solutions analyzed to quantify various aspects of the fan aerodynamics and performance. Four simulations were performed at the design rotational speed: two at the design flow rate and two at off-design flow rates. Following a brief discussion of the computational codes, various aerodynamic- and performance-related quantities derived from the computed flow fields are presented along with relevant flow field details. The results show that the computed fan performance is in generally good agreement with stated design goals.

  7. The calibration and operation of a constant-temperature crossed-wire probe in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernando, E. M.; Donovan, J. F.; Smits, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    The calibration and operation of a constant-temperature crossed-wire probe in supersonic flow is considered. Crossed-wire probes offer considerable advantages over single, inclined wires: the kinematic shear stress can be derived from a single point measurement; the rms quantities can be derived from the same measurement, and the instantaneous quantities can be obtained as a continuous function of time. However, using a crossed-wire probe in supersonic flow is subject to the following practical difficulties: the problem of flow interference, where the shock waves from one wire and its supports interfere with the flow over the other wire; the necessity for high frequency response to resolve the spectral content, and the sensitivity of the results to small changes in the calibration constants. In the present contribution, each of these problems is addressed. Practical solutions are suggested, and some encouraging results are presented.

  8. Global aerodynamic instability of twin cylinders in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md. Mahbub; Meyer, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    This paper comprises an in-depth physical discussion of the flow-induced vibration of two circular cylinders in view of the time-mean lift force on stationary cylinders and interaction mechanisms. The gap-spacing ratio T/D is varied from 0.1 to 5 and the attack angle α from 0° to 180° where T is the gap width between the cylinders and D is the diameter of a cylinder. Mechanisms of interaction between two cylinders are discussed based on time-mean lift, fluctuating lift, flow structures and flow-induced responses. The whole regime is classified into seven interaction regimes, i.e., no interaction regime; boundary layer and cylinder interaction regime; shear-layer/wake and cylinder interaction regime; shear-layer and shear-layer interaction regime; vortex and cylinder interaction regime; vortex and shear-layer interaction regime; and vortex and vortex interaction regime. Though a single non-interfering circular cylinder does not correspond to a galloping following quasi-steady galloping theory, two circular cylinders experience violent galloping vibration due to shear-layer/wake and cylinder interaction as well as boundary layer and cylinder interaction. A larger magnitude of fluctuating lift communicates to a larger amplitude vortex excitation.

  9. Cellular automata (CA) simulation of the interaction of vehicle flows and pedestrian crossings on urban low-grade uncontrolled roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Wang, Yan

    2015-08-01

    This paper discusses the interaction of vehicle flows and pedestrian crossings on uncontrolled low-grade roads or branch roads without separating barriers in cities where pedestrians may cross randomly from any location on both sides of the road. The rules governing pedestrian street crossings are analyzed, and a cellular automata (CA) model to simulate the interaction of vehicle flows and pedestrian crossings is proposed. The influence of the interaction of vehicle flows and pedestrian crossings on the volume and travel time of the vehicle flow and the average wait time for pedestrians to cross is investigated through simulations. The main results of the simulation are as follows: (1) The vehicle flow volume decreases because of interruption from pedestrian crossings, but a small number of pedestrian crossings do not cause a significant delay to vehicles. (2) If there are many pedestrian crossings, slow vehicles will have little chance to accelerate, causing travel time to increase and the vehicle flow volume to decrease. (3) The average wait time for pedestrians to cross generally decreases with a decrease in vehicle flow volume and also decreases with an increase in the number of pedestrian crossings. (4) Temporal and spatial characteristics of vehicle flows and pedestrian flows and some interesting phenomena such as "crossing belt" and "vehicle belt" are found through the simulations.

  10. 9. DETAIL OF THE FAN HOUSE INTERIOR, SHOWING FAN OPENINGS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF THE FAN HOUSE INTERIOR, SHOWING FAN OPENINGS. - Tower Hill No. 2 Mine, Approximately 0.47 mile Southwest of intersection of Stone Church Road & Township Route 561, Hibbs, Fayette County, PA

  11. On the Nonlinear Evolution of a Stationary Cross-Flow Vortex in a Fully Three-Dimensional Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear stability of a fully three-dimensional boundary layer flow in an incompressible fluid and derive an equation governing the nonlinear development of a stationary cross-flow vortex. The amplitude equation is a novel integro-differential equation which has spatial derivatives of the amplitude occurring in the kernal function. It is shown that the evolution of the cross-flow vortex is strongly coupled to the properties of an unsteady wall layer which is in fact driven by an unknown slip velocity, proportional to the amplitude of the cross-flow vortex. The work is extended to obtain the corresponding equation for rotating disk flow. A number of special cases are examined and the numerical solution for one of cases, and further analysis, demonstrates the existence of finite-distance as well as focussing type singularities. The numerical solutions also indicate the presence of a new type of nonlinear wave solution for a certain set of parameter values.

  12. Leading edge embedded fan airfoil concept -- A new powered high lift technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Nhan Huu

    A new powered-lift airfoil concept called Leading Edge Embedded Fan (LEEF) is proposed for Extremely Short Take-Off and Landing (ESTOL) and Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) applications. The LEEF airfoil concept is a powered-lift airfoil concept capable of generating thrust and very high lift-coefficient at extreme angles-of attack (AoA). It is designed to activate only at the take-off and landing phases, similar to conventional flaps or slats, allowing the aircraft to operate efficiently at cruise in its conventional configuration. The LEEF concept consists of placing a crossflow fan (CFF) along the leading-edge (LE) of the wing, and the housing is designed to alter the airfoil shape between take-off/landing and cruise configurations with ease. The unique rectangular cross section of the crossflow fan allows for its ease of integration into a conventional subsonic wing. This technology is developed for ESTOL aircraft applications and is most effectively applied to General Aviation (GA) aircraft. Another potential area of application for LEEF is tiltrotor aircraft. Unlike existing powered high-lift systems, the LEEF airfoil uses a local high-pressure air source from cross-flow fans, does not require ducting, and is able to be deployed using distributed electric power systems throughout the wing. In addition to distributed lift augmentation, the LEEF system can provide additional thrust during takeoff and landing operation to supplement the primary cruise propulsion system. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of a conventional airfoil/wing using the NACA 63-3-418 section, commonly used in GA, and a LEEF airfoil/wing embedded into the same airfoil section were carried out to evaluate the advantages of and the costs associated with implementing the LEEF concept. Computational results show that significant lift and augmented thrust are available during LEEF operation while requiring only moderate fan power

  13. Development of a Fan for Future Space Suit Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul. Heather L.; Converse, David; Dionne, Steven; Moser, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    NASA's next generation space suit system will place new demands on the fan used to circulate breathing gas through the ventilation loop of the portable life support system. Long duration missions with frequent extravehicular activities (EVAs), the requirement for significant increases in reliability and durability, and a mission profile that imposes strict limits on weight, volume and power create the basis for a set of requirements that demand more performance than is available from existing fan designs. This paper describes the development of a new fan to meet these needs. A centrifugal fan was designed with a normal operating speed of approximately 39,400 rpm to meet the ventilation flow requirements while also meeting the aggressive minimal packaging, weight and power requirements. The prototype fan also operates at 56,000 rpm to satisfy a second operating condition associated with a single fan providing ventilation flow to two spacesuits connected in series. This fan incorporates a novel nonmetallic "can" to keep the oxygen flow separate from the motor electronics, thus eliminating ignition potential. The nonmetallic can enables a small package size and low power consumption. To keep cost and schedule within project bounds a commercial motor controller was used. The fan design has been detailed and implemented using materials and approaches selected to address anticipated mission needs. Test data is presented to show how this fan performs relative to anticipated ventilation requirements for the EVA portable life support system. Additionally, data is presented to show tolerance to anticipated environmental factors such as acoustics, shock, and vibration. Recommendations for forward work to progress the technology readiness level and prepare the fan for the next EVA space suit system are also discussed.

  14. Prototype Morphing Fan Nozzle Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun; Song, Gang-Bing

    2004-01-01

    Ongoing research in NASA Glenn Research Center's Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch to develop smart materials technologies for aeropropulsion structural components has resulted in the design of the prototype morphing fan nozzle shown in the photograph. This prototype exploits the potential of smart materials to significantly improve the performance of existing aircraft engines by introducing new inherent capabilities for shape control, vibration damping, noise reduction, health monitoring, and flow manipulation. The novel design employs two different smart materials, a shape-memory alloy and magnetorheological fluids, to reduce the nozzle area by up to 30 percent. The prototype of the variable-area fan nozzle implements an overlapping spring leaf assembly to simplify the initial design and to provide ease of structural control. A single bundle of shape memory alloy wire actuators is used to reduce the nozzle geometry. The nozzle is subsequently held in the reduced-area configuration by using magnetorheological fluid brakes. This prototype uses the inherent advantages of shape memory alloys in providing large induced strains and of magnetorheological fluids in generating large resistive forces. In addition, the spring leaf design also functions as a return spring, once the magnetorheological fluid brakes are released, to help force the shape memory alloy wires to return to their original position. A computerized real-time control system uses the derivative-gain and proportional-gain algorithms to operate the system. This design represents a novel approach to the active control of high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Researchers have estimated that such engines will reduce thrust specific fuel consumption by 9 percent over that of fixed-geometry fan nozzles. This research was conducted under a cooperative agreement (NCC3-839) at the University of Akron.

  15. Cross flow induced vibrations in staggered arrays of cylindrical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Marn, J.

    1991-12-31

    Flow induced vibrations cause by instability is the subject of this investigation. The bulk of the work performed is theoretical in nature, the comparison with some of existing experimental data is given for each of four models described. First model encompasses the effects of prescribed motion on the cylinder. Such circumstances occur in the case of vortex shedding initiated instability. The reduced velocity within the cylinder array is low and there is no coupling between the adjacent cylinders. Second model assumes certain form of vibration and corresponding behavior of the perturbed velocity field in temporal and one of spatial coordinates thus transforming partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations and takes into account the motion of the neighboring cylinder. This corresponds to fluid elastic controlled instabilities. The resulting equations are solved analytically. The model is used for better understanding of the equations of cylinder motion as well as for quick estimates of threshold of instability. Third model relaxes an assumption about the form of vibration in spatial direction and uses the vorticity formulation of equation of fluid motion to account for fluid-solid interaction. This model analysis is of two phase (air-water mixture) flow. The void fraction distribution is found to be the single most decisive factor to determine the onset of instability for such a domain. In conclusion, two distinct mechanism were found to be responsible for flow induced vibration caused instabilities, (1) outside source controlled periodic excitation (such as vortex shedding) -- described by the first model and (2) fluid elastic forces -- described by second, third and fourth models. For the values of reduced velocity below 0.7 first model is proposed, for the values above 0.7, the rest.

  16. Crossing turbulent boundaries: interfacial flux in environmental flows.

    PubMed

    Grant, Stanley B; Marusic, Ivan

    2011-09-01

    Advances in the visualization and prediction of turbulence are shedding new light on mass transfer in the turbulent boundary layer. These discoveries have important implications for many topics in environmental science and engineering, from the transport of earth-warming CO2 across the sea-air interface, to nutrient processing and sediment erosion in rivers, lakes, and the ocean, to pollutant removal in water and wastewater treatment systems. In this article we outline current understanding of turbulent boundary layer flows, with particular focus on coherent turbulence and its impact on mass transport across the sediment-water interface in marine and freshwater systems.

  17. Nonlinear stability of non-stationary cross-flow vortices in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1995-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of long wavelength non-stationary cross-flow vortices in a compressible boundary layer is investigated and the work extends that of Gajjar (1994) to flows involving multiple critical layers. The basic flow profile considered in this paper is that appropriate for a fully three-dimensional boundary layer with O(1) Mach number and with wall heating or cooling. The governing equations for the evolution of the cross-flow vortex are obtained and some special cases are discussed. One special case includes linear theory where exact analytic expressions for the growth rate of the vortices are obtained. Another special case is a generalization of the Bassom & Gajjar (1988) results for neutral waves to compressible flows. The viscous correction to the growth rate is derived and it is shown how the unsteady nonlinear critical layer structure merges with that for a Haberman type of viscous critical layer.

  18. Flight effects on noise by the JT8D engine with inverted primary/fan flow as measured in the NASA-Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strout, F. G.

    1978-01-01

    A JT8D-17R engine with inverted primary and fan flows was tested under static conditions as well as in the NASA Ames 40 by 80 Foot Wind Tunnel to determine static and flight noise characteristics, and flow profile of a large scale engine. Test and analysis techniques developed by a previous model and JT8D engine test program were used to determine the in-flight noise. The engine with inverted flow was tested with a conical nozzle and with a plug nozzle, 20 lobe nozzle, and an acoustic shield. Wind tunnel results show that forward velocity causes significant reduction in peak PNL suppression relative to uninverted flow. The loss of EPNL suppression is relatively modest. The in-flight peak PNL suppression of the inverter with conical nozzle was 2.5 PNdb relative to a static value of 5.5 PNdb. The corresponding EPNL suppression was 4.0 EPNdb for flight and 5.0 EPNdb for static operation. The highest in-flight EPNL suppression was 7.5 EPNdb obtained by the inverter with 20 lobe nozzle and acoustic shield. When compared with the JT8D engine with internal mixer, the inverted flow configuration provides more EPNL suppression under both static and flight conditions.

  19. Design and Initial Development of Monolithic Cross-Flow Ceramic Hot-Gas Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Barra, C.; Limaye, S.; Stinton, D.P.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1999-06-06

    Advanced, coal-fueled, power generation systems utilizing pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies are currently being developed for high-efficiency, low emissions, and low-cost power generation. In spite of the advantages of these promising technologies, the severe operating environment often leads to material degradation and loss of performance in the barrier filters used for particle entrapment. To address this problem, LoTEC Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are jointly designing and developing a monolithic cross-flow ceramic hot-gas filter. The filter concept involves a truly monolithic cross-flow design that is resistant to delamination, can be easily fabricated, and offers flexibility of geometry and material make-up. During Phase I of the program, a thermo-mechanical analysis was performed to determine how a cross-flow filter would respond both thermally and mechanically to a series of thermal and mechanical loads. The cross-flow filter mold was designed accordingly, and the materials selection was narrowed down to Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24} (CS-50) and 2Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-3SiO{sub 2} (mullite). A fabrication process was developed using gelcasting technology and monolithic cross-flow filters were fabricated. The program focuses on obtaining optimum filter permeability and testing the corrosion resistance of the candidate materials.

  20. A circular cylinder undergoing large-amplitude transverse oscillations in a slow uniform cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, K. M.; Liu, P.

    2013-05-01

    This study explores the vortex patterns formed by a circular cylinder undergoing lateral cylinder oscillations with large amplitudes and in the presence of a slow uniform cross flow. It is an extension of our previous study (Lam et al., 2010b) in which formation of the 2S, 2P and P+S vortex modes were discussed from the viewpoint of interaction of a uniform cross-flow with the vortex street patterns of a cylinder oscillating in an otherwise quiescent fluid at Keulegan-Carpenter numbers up to KC=8.9. The present paper reports three additional experimental sets in which the amplitudes of cylinder oscillations have even larger values, at A/D>2.5, and lie beyond the vortex mode map usually quoted from Williamson and Roshko (1988). It is found that the slow uniform cross-flow at λ/D≈3 and Reynolds number based on cross-flow velocity at 232 acts to convect the corresponding vortex patterns in the absence of cross-flow downstream across the line of cylinder oscillation. Vortex-vortex interaction and vortex-cylinder interaction are observed to affect the subsequent development of vortices. The P+S vortex mode is found to occur up to KC=16. At KC between 16 and 24, a new vortex mode is observed in which only one vortex pair can be convected downstream every cylinder oscillation cycle. Another new vortex mode with two vortex pairs and two stationary vortices are found at KC>24.

  1. Dynamic analysis of pedestrian crossing behaviors on traffic flow at unsignalized mid-block crosswalks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; He, Jing; Luo, Zhiyong; Yang, Wunian; Zhang, Xiping

    2015-05-01

    It is important to study the effects of pedestrian crossing behaviors on traffic flow for solving the urban traffic jam problem. Based on the Nagel-Schreckenberg (NaSch) traffic cellular automata (TCA) model, a new one-dimensional TCA model is proposed considering the uncertainty conflict behaviors between pedestrians and vehicles at unsignalized mid-block crosswalks and defining the parallel updating rules of motion states of pedestrians and vehicles. The traffic flow is simulated for different vehicle densities and behavior trigger probabilities. The fundamental diagrams show that no matter what the values of vehicle braking probability, pedestrian acceleration crossing probability, pedestrian backing probability and pedestrian generation probability, the system flow shows the "increasing-saturating-decreasing" trend with the increase of vehicle density; when the vehicle braking probability is lower, it is easy to cause an emergency brake of vehicle and result in great fluctuation of saturated flow; the saturated flow decreases slightly with the increase of the pedestrian acceleration crossing probability; when the pedestrian backing probability lies between 0.4 and 0.6, the saturated flow is unstable, which shows the hesitant behavior of pedestrians when making the decision of backing; the maximum flow is sensitive to the pedestrian generation probability and rapidly decreases with increasing the pedestrian generation probability, the maximum flow is approximately equal to zero when the probability is more than 0.5. The simulations prove that the influence of frequent crossing behavior upon vehicle flow is immense; the vehicle flow decreases and gets into serious congestion state rapidly with the increase of the pedestrian generation probability.

  2. A Preliminary Axial Fan Design Method with the Considerat ion of Performance and Noise Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chan; Kil, Hyun Gwon

    2010-06-01

    Presented in this paper are a fan's aero-acoustic performance method and its computation procedure which combines aerodynamic flow field data, performances and noise levels of fan. The internal flow field and the performance of fan are analyzed by the through-flow modeling, inviscid pitch-averaged quasi-3D flow analysis combined with flow deviation and pressure loss distribution models. Based on the predicted internal flow field dada by the trough-flow modeling, fan noise is predicted by two models for the discrete frequency noise due to rotating steady aerodynamic thrust and blade interaction and for the broadband noise due to turbulent boundary layer and wake vortex shedding. The present predictions of the flow distribution, the performance and the noise level of fan are well agreed with actual test results.

  3. Prediction of ducted fan performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, M. R.; Spangler, S. B.

    1972-01-01

    Computer program to predict performance of ducted fan combination at specified advance ratio and angle of attack is described. Parameters affecting performance of ducted fan are presented. Information obtained from computer program is explained for various conditions considered.

  4. Performance characterization of a cross-flow hydrokinetic turbine in sheared inflow

    SciTech Connect

    Forbush, Dominic; Polagye, Brian; Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Donegan, James; McEntee, Jarlath

    2016-12-01

    A method for constructing a non-dimensional performance curve for a cross-flow hydrokinetic turbine in sheared flow is developed for a natural river site. The river flow characteristics are quasi-steady, with negligible vertical shear, persistent lateral shear, and synoptic changes dominated by long time scales (days to weeks). Performance curves developed from inflow velocities measured at individual points (randomly sampled) yield inconclusive turbine performance characteristics because of the spatial variation in mean flow. Performance curves using temporally- and spatially-averaged inflow velocities are more conclusive. The implications of sheared inflow are considered in terms of resource assessment and turbine control.

  5. Reactive control of subsonic axial fan noise in a duct.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Choy, Y S; Huang, L; Cheng, L

    2014-10-01

    Suppressing the ducted fan noise at low frequencies without varying the flow capacity is still a technical challenge. This study examines a conceived device consisting of two tensioned membranes backed with cavities housing the axial fan for suppression of the sound radiation from the axial fan directly. The noise suppression is achieved by destructive interference between the sound fields from the axial fan of a dipole nature and sound radiation from the membrane via vibroacoustics coupling. A two-dimensional model with the flow effect is presented which allows the performance of the device to be explored analytically. The air flow influences the symmetrical behavior and excites the odd in vacuo mode response of the membrane due to kinematic coupling. Such an asymmetrical effect can be compromised with off-center alignment of the axial fan. Tension plays an important role to sustain the performance to revoke the deformation of the membrane during the axial fan operation. With the design of four appropriately tensioned membranes covered by a cylindrical cavity, the first and second blade passage frequencies of the axial fan can be reduced by at least 20 dB. The satisfactory agreement between experiment and theory demonstrates that its feasibility is practical.

  6. Analytical investigation of fan tone noise due to ingested atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganz, U. W.

    1980-01-01

    The atmospheric turbulence involved in the fan noise generation is evaluated with an existing model for the atmospheric turbulence and an extended version of an existing model concerned with the effects of a flow contraction on convected turbulence. Fan tone noise due to ingested atmospheric turbulence is evaluated with existing fan noise models. The results indicate that the difference in fan narrowband noise due to atmospheric turbulence between static and flight landing approach conditions is in the order of 30 dB. It is concluded that fan noise due to atmospheric turbulence is insignificant in flight conditions for the fans used in the current high bypass ratio engines. The difference in fan narrowband noise between the two conditions is primarily due to the low intensity of the turbulence involved in fan noise generation in flight conditions. Fan noise due to atmospheric turbulence in static conditions should be reduced below the flight fan broadband noise levels which is best achieved with a reduction in the intensity of the fan inflow turbulence. Such a reduction can be obtained with the use of an inflow control device, low wind velocities, small surface roughness in the test stand environment, and large engine axis height above the ground. Peak sound power levels for fan tone noise due to ingested turbulence occur for transverse integral scales in the order of 25% of the rotor blade spacing in the fan tip region.

  7. Does Kutta lift exist on a vortex ring in a uniform cross flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, T. T.; Lua, K. B.; Thet, K.

    2008-05-01

    Past works [Y. K. Chang and A. D. Vakili, Phys. Fluids 7, 1583 (1995); R. Sau and K. Mahesh, AIAA Paper No. 2007-1316] show that a vortex ring ejected normal to a cross flow tilts and deforms as it propagates downstream, and they attribute this phenomenon to the Kutta lift or Magnus effect. Here, we show through a controlled experiment that there is no physical evidence of the existence of a Kutta lift when a fully developed vortex ring is exposed to a uniform cross flow. The observed phenomenon could be attributed to the modification of vorticity distribution of the vortex core due to the combined effect of the cross flow itself and the entrainment of boundary layer material during the formation of vortex ring.

  8. Cross-Flow Ultrafiltration with a Shear-Thinning Organic Based Slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.

    2001-01-10

    The Department of Energy is sponsoring the River Protection Project, which includes the design of a facility to stabilize liquid radioactive waste that is stored at the Hanford Site. Because of its experience with radioactive waste stabilization, the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company was contracted to develop and test parts of the waste treatment process. One part of the process is the separation of highly radioactive solids from the liquid wastes by precipitation and cross-flow filtration. A cross-flow filter was tested with simulated wastes made to represent typical waste chemical and physical characteristics. This paper discusses the results of cross-flow filter operation in a pilot-scale facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids SRTC.

  9. Regenerative Blower for EVA Suit Ventilation Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Paul, Heather L.

    2010-01-01

    Portable life support systems in future space suits will include a ventilation subsystem driven by a dedicated fan. This ventilation fan must meet challenging requirements for pressure rise, flow rate, efficiency, size, safety, and reliability. This paper describes research and development that showed the feasibility of a regenerative blower that is uniquely suited to meet these requirements. We proved feasibility through component tests, blower tests, and design analysis. Based on the requirements for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) ventilation fan, we designed the critical elements of the blower. We measured the effects of key design parameters on blower performance using separate effects tests, and used the results of these tests to design a regenerative blower that will meet the ventilation fan requirements. We assembled a proof-of-concept blower and measured its performance at sub-atmospheric pressures that simulate a PLSS ventilation loop environment. Head/flow performance and maximum efficiency point data were used to specify the design and operating conditions for the ventilation fan. We identified materials for the blower that will enhance safety for operation in a lunar environment, and produced a solid model that illustrates the final design. The proof-of-concept blower produced the flow rate and pressure rise needed for the CSSE ventilation subsystem while running at 5400 rpm, consuming only 9 W of electric power using a non-optimized, commercial motor and controller and inefficient bearings. Scaling the test results to a complete design shows that a lightweight, compact, reliable, and low power regenerative blower can meet the performance requirements for future space suit life support systems.

  10. Regenerative Blower for EVA Suit Ventilation Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather; Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Portable life support systems in future space suits will include a ventilation subsystem driven by a dedicated fan. This ventilation fan must meet challenging requirements for pressure rise, flow rate, efficiency, size, safety, and reliability. This paper describes research and development that showed the feasibility of a regenerative blower that is uniquely suited to meet these requirements. We proved feasibility through component tests, blower tests, and design analysis. Based on the requirements for the Constellation Space Suit ventilation fan, we designed the critical elements of the blower. We measured the effects of key design parameters on blower performance using separate effects tests, and used the results of these tests to design a regenerative blower that will meet the ventilation fan requirements. We assembled a proof-of-concept blower and measured its performance at low pressures that simulate a PLSS environment. We obtained head/flow performance curves over a range of operating speeds, identified the maximum efficiency point for the blower, and used these results to specify the design and operating conditions for the ventilation fan. We designed a compact motor that can drive the blower under all anticipated operating requirements and operate with high efficiency during normal operation. We identified materials for the blower that will enhance safety for operation in a lunar environment. We produced a solid model that illustrates the final design. The proof-of-concept blower produced the flow rate and pressure rise needed for the CSSS ventilation subsystem while running at 5400 rpm and consuming only 9 W of electric power and using a non-optimized, commercial motor and controller and inefficient bearings. Scaling the test results to a complete design shows that a lightweight, compact, reliable, and low power blower can meet the performance requirements for future PLSSs.

  11. Boeing 18-Inch Fan Rig Broadband Noise Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganz, Ulrich W.; Joppa, Paul D.; Patten, Timothy J.; Scharpf, Daniel F.

    1998-01-01

    The purposes of the subject test were to identify and quantify the mechanisms by which fan broadband noise is produced, and to assess the validity of such theoretical models of those mechanisms as may be available. The test was conducted with the Boeing 18-inch fan rig in the Boeing Low-Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF). The rig was designed to be particularly clean and geometrically simple to facilitate theoretical modeling and to minimize sources of interfering noise. The inlet is cylindrical and is equipped with a boundary layer suction system. The fan is typical of modern high-by-pass ratio designs but is capable of operating with or without fan exit guide vanes (stators), and there is only a single flow stream. Fan loading and tip clearance are adjustable. Instrumentation included measurements of fan performance, the unsteady flow field incident on the fan and stators, and far-field and in-duct acoustic fields. The acoustic results were manipulated to estimate the noise generated by different sources. Significant fan broadband noise was found to come from the rotor self-noise as measured with clean inflow and no boundary layer. The rotor tip clearance affected rotor self-noise somewhat. The interaction of the rotor with inlet boundary layer turbulence is also a significant source, and is strongly affected by rotor tip clearance. High level noise can be generated by a high-order nonuniform rotating at a fraction of the fan speed, at least when tip clearance and loading are both large. Stator-generated noise is the loudest of the significant sources, by a small margin, at least on this rig. Stator noise is significantly affected by propagation through the fan.

  12. Characterizing subsurface hydraulic heterogeneity of alluvial fan using riverstage fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Li; Yeh, Tian-Chyi Jim; Wen, Jet-Chau; Huang, Shao-Yang; Zha, Yuanyuan; Tsai, Jui-Pin; Hao, Yonghong; Liang, Yue

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the ability of riverstage tomography to estimate 2-D spatial distribution of hydraulic diffusivity (D) of Zhuoshui River alluvial fan, Taiwan, using groundwater level data from 65 wells and stream stage data from 5 gauging stations. In order to accomplish this objective, wavelet analysis is first conducted to investigate the temporal characteristics of groundwater level, precipitation, and stream stage. The results of the analysis show that variations of groundwater level and stream stage are highly correlated over seasonal and annual periods while that between precipitation is less significant. Subsequently, spatial cross-correlation between seasonal variations of groundwater level and riverstage data is analyzed. It is found that the correlation contour map reflects the pattern of sediment distribution of the fan. This finding is further substantiated by the cross-correlation analysis using both noisy and noise-free groundwater and riverstage data of a synthetic aquifer, where aquifer heterogeneity is known exactly. The ability of riverstage tomography is then tested with these synthetic data sets to estimate D distribution. Finally, the riverstage tomography is applied to the alluvial fan. The results of the application reveal that the apex and southeast of the alluvial fan are regions with relatively high D and the D values gradually decrease toward the shoreline of the fan. In addition, D at northern alluvial fan is slightly larger than that at southern. These findings are consistent with the geologic evolution of this alluvial fan.

  13. Investigation of rarefied gas flow in microchannels of non-uniform cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemadri, Vadiraj; Varade, Vijay V.; Agrawal, Amit; Bhandarkar, U. V.

    2016-02-01

    Study of rarefied gas flow in converging and diverging cross sections is crucial to the development of micro-nozzles and micro-thrusters. In other practical cases too, a microchannel may not always be straight and may include diverging and converging sections in the flow path. In this context, isothermal rarefied gas flow in microchannels of longitudinally varying cross section is studied experimentally in this work. The primary objective is to investigate the existence of Knudsen minimum in microchannels of varying cross sections. The effect of geometrical cross section and fluid properties on the Knudsen minimum are also investigated by performing experiments on three divergence angles (4°, 8°, and 12°) and three different gases (argon, nitrogen, and oxygen) to prove the robustness of the result. The Knudsen minimum, which is one of the characteristic features of rarefied flows, is experimentally observed for the first time in a microchannel of varying cross section. The position of the Knudsen minimum (at Kn ≈ 1) is seen to depend only weakly on the divergence angle and fluid properties.

  14. Thin-film flow in helically wound shallow channels of arbitrary cross-sectional shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, D. J.; Stokes, Y. M.; Green, J. E. F.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the steady, gravity-driven flow of a thin film of viscous fluid down a helically wound shallow channel of arbitrary cross-sectional shape with arbitrary torsion and curvature. This extends our previous work [D. J. Arnold et al., "Thin-film flow in helically-wound rectangular channels of arbitrary torsion and curvature," J. Fluid Mech. 764, 76-94 (2015)] on channels of rectangular cross section. The Navier-Stokes equations are expressed in a novel, non-orthogonal coordinate system fitted to the channel bottom. By assuming that the channel depth is small compared to its width and that the fluid depth in the vertical direction is also small compared to its typical horizontal extent, we are able to solve for the velocity components and pressure analytically. Using these results, a differential equation for the free surface shape is obtained, which must in general be solved numerically. Motivated by the aim of understanding flows in static spiral particle separators used in mineral processing, we investigate the effect of cross-sectional shape on the secondary flow in the channel cross section. We show that the competition between gravity and inertia in non-rectangular channels is qualitatively similar to that in rectangular channels, but that the cross-sectional shape has a strong influence on the breakup of the secondary flow into multiple clockwise-rotating cells. This may be triggered by small changes to the channel geometry, such as one or more bumps in the channel bottom that are small relative to the fluid depth. In contrast to the secondary flow which is quite sensitive to small bumps in the channel bottom, the free-surface profile is relatively insensitive to these. The sensitivity of the flow to the channel geometry may have important implications for the design of efficient spiral particle separators.

  15. The CA model for traffic-flow at the grade roundabout crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rui-Xiong; Bai, Ke-Zhao; Liu, Mu-Ren

    2006-07-01

    The cellular automaton model is suggested to describe the traffic-flow at the grade roundabout crossing. After the simulation with computer, the fundamental properties of this model have been revealed. Analysing this kind of road structure, this paper transforms the grade roundabout crossing with inner-roundabout-lane and outer-roundabout-lane into a configuration with many bottlenecks. Because of the self-organization, the traffic flow remains unblocked under a certain vehicle density. Some results of the simulation are close to the actual design parameter.

  16. Thermal design of multi-fluid mixed-mixed cross-flow heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roetzel, W.; Luo, X.

    2010-11-01

    A fast analytical calculation method is developed for the thermal design and rating of multi-fluid mixed-mixed cross-flow heat exchangers. Temperature dependent heat capacities and heat transfer coefficients can iteratively be taken into account. They are determined at one or two special reference temperatures. Examples are given for the application of the method to the rating of special multi-fluid multi-pass shell-and-tube heat exchangers and multi-fluid cross-flow plate-fin heat exchangers. The accuracy of the method is tested against numerical calculations with good results.

  17. Analysis of the injection of a heated turbulent jet into a cross flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Schetz, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The development of a theoretical model is investigated of the incompressible jet injection process. The discharge of a turbulent jet into a cross flow was mathematically modeled by using an integral method which accounts for natural fluid mechanisms such as turbulence, entrainment, buoyancy, and heat transfer. The analytical results are supported by experimental data and demonstrate the usefulness of the theory for estimating the trajectory and flow properties of the jet for a variety of injection conditions. The capability of predicting jet flow properties, as well as two- and three-dimensional jet paths, was enhanced by obtaining the jet cross-sectional area during the solution of the conservation equations. Realistic estimates of temperature in the jet fluid were acquired by accounting for heat losses in the jet flow due to forced convection and to entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet.

  18. Fan rotor blades of turbofan engines

    SciTech Connect

    Zipps, R.H.; Rynaski, C.H.; Fulton, G.B.

    1986-11-11

    This patent describes a fan blade of the type extending outwardly from a rotor disk across the annular flowpath for working medium gases in the fan section of a turbofan engine, including: an airfoil section having an arcuate cross section contour at the inner wall of the working medium flowpath; and a root section having an upstream end and a downstream end wherein the root section is formed to an arcuate contour which approximates the arcuate contour of the airfoil cross section at the inner wall of the working medium flowpath projected onto the root section, and wherein the root section is convergently tapered from the downstream end toward the upstream end of the blade.

  19. A fan tale, modern and ancient fans - A comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.J. ); Thor, D.R. ); Cherven, V.B.

    1991-02-01

    The Quaternary Conception fan of the Santa Barbara basin and the Upper Cretaceous Lathrop fan of the northern San Joaquin basin tell an interesting tale. Both fans show a well defined sequence stratigraphy of alternating low-stand, sand-rich units that alternate with thin high-stand silt units that drape and in-fill the surface topography of the previous sand-cycle. Isopachs made from detailed well log correlations (Lathrop) and seismic reflection data tied to borings (Conception) show that the fans are composed of a series of offset-stacked, elongate fan lobes. These lobes are similar in size. A major difference in the development of the two fans is the timing of tectonism. Concomitant tectonism uplifted the Conception fan lobes and resulted in localized erosion of high-stand silts beds and sand-on-sand lobe contacts. Tectonism and Lathrop occurred after fan deposition and provided the trapping structure-the Lathrop anticlinal fold. Following are some lessons to be learned from these and other fans the authors have studied: (1) Quaternary or modern' fans and ancient fans are similar. (2) Elongate sand-rich fan lobes separated by highstand silt units are typical of fans. (3) In addition to well-known techniques (seismic stratigraphy and detailed well log correlations), original reservoir pressures may be used to differentiate sequences and lobes (e.g., Lathrop). (4) Tectonism and erosion along the margin may limit traps to the uppermost lobe sequence (e.g., Conception). (5) An offset-stacked elongate fan lobe model is a valuable exploration and production tool.

  20. In-vessel fluid flow measurements using thermocouples cross-correlation.

    SciTech Connect

    NguyenLe, Q.

    1998-05-08

    Fluid flow rate in high temperature and pressure vessels can be difficult to measure due to the associated harsh environment, inaccessible locations and pressure boundary integrity concerns. However, by using quick response miniature thermocouples to measure the naturally occurring temperature variations within the flow, the fluid velocity can be inferred from the transit time analysis. This flow measurement technique has other advantages such as the flow profile is not significantly disturbed, no additional flow restrictions introduced and the system fiction factor is not increased. Furthermore, since the measured flow rate is generally unaffected by the global system dynamics, such as heat increases or losses, as well as changes in the flow regimes, the location of the thermocouple pairs is extremely flexible. Due to the mentioned advantages, the thermocouple cross-correlation flow measurement method has been developed for use at the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA). Currently, thermocouple cross-correlation technique is used to measure the Reactor Pressure Vessel downcomer fluid velocity and the suppression pool in-vessel natural circulation velocity.

  1. Bubble Formation from Wall Orifice in Liquid Cross-Flow Under Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Kamotani, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Two-phase flows present a wide variety of applications for spacecraft thermal control systems design. Bubble formation and detachment is an integral part of the two phase flow science. The objective of the present work is to experimentally investigate the effects of liquid cross-flow velocity, gas flow rate, and orifice diameter on bubble formation in a wall-bubble injection configuration. Data were taken mainly under reduced gravity conditions but some data were taken in normal gravity for comparison. The reduced gravity experiment was conducted aboard the NASA DC-9 Reduced Gravity Aircraft. The results show that the process of bubble formation and detachment depends on gravity, the orifice diameter, the gas flow rate, and the liquid cross-flow velocity. The data are analyzed based on a force balance, and two different detachment mechanisms are identified. When the gas momentum is large, the bubble detaches from the injection orifice as the gas momentum overcomes the attaching effects of liquid drag and inertia. The surface tension force is much reduced because a large part of the bubble pinning edge at the orifice is lost as the bubble axis is tilted by the liquid flow. When the gas momentum is small, the force balance in the liquid flow direction is important, and the bubble detaches when the bubble axis inclination exceeds a certain angle.

  2. Aerodynamic Performance Measurements for a Forward Swept Low Noise Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian

    2006-01-01

    One source of noise in high tip speed turbofan engines, caused by shocks, is called multiple pure tone noise (MPT's). A new fan, called the Quiet High Speed Fan (QHSF), showed reduced noise over the part speed operating range, which includes MPT's. The QHSF showed improved performance in most respects relative to a baseline fan; however, a partspeed instability discovered during testing reduced the operating range below acceptable limits. The measured QHSF adiabatic efficiency on the fixed nozzle acoustic operating line was 85.1 percent and the baseline fan 82.9 percent, a 2.2 percent improvement. The operating line pressure rise at design point rotational speed and mass flow was 1.764 and 1.755 for the QHSF and baseline fan, respectively. Weight flow at design point speed was 98.28 lbm/sec for the QHSF and 97.97 lbm/sec for the baseline fan. The operability margin for the QHSF approached 0 percent at the 75 percent speed operating condition. The baseline fan maintained sufficient margin throughout the operating range as expected. Based on the stage aerodynamic measurements, this concept shows promise for improved performance over current technology if the operability limitations can be solved.

  3. Three dimensional turbulent boundary layer development on a fan rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Hah, C.; Govindan, T. R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper is concerned with an experimental study undertaken to measure the boundary layer growth on a fan rotor blade. The measurements were carried out using a miniature 'X' configuration hot wire probe at various chordwise and radial locations on both surfaces of the blade. The streamwise and radial velocity profiles as well as the corresponding intensity components are interpreted and correlated. The validity of conventional velocity profiles such as the 'law of the wall' for the streamwise profile and the hodograph plot for the cross flow profile are examined. The measured values of boundary-layer gross properties are compared with the predictions based on a momentum-integral technique.

  4. Performance of transonic fan stage with weight flow per unit annulus area of 198 kilograms per second per square meter (40.6(lb/sec)/sq ft)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovich, G.; Moore, R. D.; Urasek, D. C.

    1973-01-01

    The overall and blade-element performance are presented for an air compressor stage designed to study the effect of weight flow per unit annulus area on efficiency and flow range. At the design speed of 424.8 m/sec the peak efficiency of 0.81 occurred at the design weight flow and a total pressure ratio of 1.56. Design pressure ratio and weight flow were 1.57 and 29.5 kg/sec (65.0 lb/sec), respectively. Stall margin at design speed was 19 percent based on the weight flow and pressure ratio at peak efficiency and at stall.

  5. Development of a fan model for the CONTAIN code

    SciTech Connect

    Pevey, R.E.

    1987-01-08

    A fan model has been added to the CONTAIN code with a minimum of disruption of the standard CONTAIN calculation sequence. The user is required to supply a simple pressure vs. flow rate curve for each fan in his model configuration. Inclusion of the fan model required modification to two CONTAIN subroutines, IFLOW and EXEQNX. The two modified routines and the resulting executable module are located on the LANL mass storage system as /560007/iflow, /560007/exeqnx, and /560007/cont01, respectively. The model has been initially validated using a very simple sample problem and is ready for a more complete workout using the SRP reactor models from the RSRD probabilistic risk analysis.

  6. Baleen Hydrodynamics and Morphology of Cross-Flow Filtration in Balaenid Whale Suspension Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Werth, Alexander J.; Potvin, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The traditional view of mysticete feeding involves static baleen directly sieving particles from seawater using a simple, dead-end flow-through filtration mechanism. Flow tank experiments on bowhead (Balaena mysticetus) baleen indicate the long-standing model of dead-end filtration, at least in balaenid (bowhead and right) whales, is not merely simplistic but wrong. To recreate continuous intraoral flow, sections of baleen were tested in a flume through which water and buoyant particles circulated with variable flow velocity. Kinematic sequences were analyzed to investigate movement and capture of particles by baleen plates and fringes. Results indicate that very few particles flow directly through the baleen rack; instead much water flows anteroposteriorly along the interior (lingual) side of the rack, allowing items to be carried posteriorly and accumulate at the posterior of the mouth where they might readily be swallowed. Since water flows mainly parallel to rather than directly through the filter, the cross-flow mechanism significantly reduces entrapment and tangling of minute items in baleen fringes, obviating the need to clean the filter. The absence of copepods or other prey found trapped in the baleen of necropsied right and bowhead whales supports this hypothesis. Reduced through-baleen flow was observed with and without boundaries modeling the tongue and lips, indicating that baleen itself is the main if not sole agent of crossflow. Preliminary investigation of baleen from balaenopterid whales that use intermittent filter feeding suggests that although the biomechanics and hydrodynamics of oral flow differ, cross-flow filtration may occur to some degree in all mysticetes. PMID:26918630

  7. Baleen Hydrodynamics and Morphology of Cross-Flow Filtration in Balaenid Whale Suspension Feeding.

    PubMed

    Werth, Alexander J; Potvin, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The traditional view of mysticete feeding involves static baleen directly sieving particles from seawater using a simple, dead-end flow-through filtration mechanism. Flow tank experiments on bowhead (Balaena mysticetus) baleen indicate the long-standing model of dead-end filtration, at least in balaenid (bowhead and right) whales, is not merely simplistic but wrong. To recreate continuous intraoral flow, sections of baleen were tested in a flume through which water and buoyant particles circulated with variable flow velocity. Kinematic sequences were analyzed to investigate movement and capture of particles by baleen plates and fringes. Results indicate that very few particles flow directly through the baleen rack; instead much water flows anteroposteriorly along the interior (lingual) side of the rack, allowing items to be carried posteriorly and accumulate at the posterior of the mouth where they might readily be swallowed. Since water flows mainly parallel to rather than directly through the filter, the cross-flow mechanism significantly reduces entrapment and tangling of minute items in baleen fringes, obviating the need to clean the filter. The absence of copepods or other prey found trapped in the baleen of necropsied right and bowhead whales supports this hypothesis. Reduced through-baleen flow was observed with and without boundaries modeling the tongue and lips, indicating that baleen itself is the main if not sole agent of crossflow. Preliminary investigation of baleen from balaenopterid whales that use intermittent filter feeding suggests that although the biomechanics and hydrodynamics of oral flow differ, cross-flow filtration may occur to some degree in all mysticetes.

  8. Comparison of modern Mississippi fan with selected ancient fans

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, G.; Moiola, R.J.; McPherson, J.G.; O'Connell, S.

    1988-09-01

    A comparison of the modern passive-margin Mississippi fan (DSDP Leg 96) with selected ancient active-margin fans reveals major differences in turbidite facies associations and seismic characteristics of the lower fan area. The lower Mississippi fan is composed of channel (facies B and F) and nonchannel sequences (facies C. and D), whereas lower fan areas of ancient active-margin fans are characterized by nonchannelized, thickening-upward depositional lobes (facies C and D) with sheetlike geometry. An absence of depositional lobes in the lower Mississippi fan is also suggested by a lack of mounded seismic reflections. Continuous and parallel seismic reflections of the lower Mississippi fan may represent sheet sands, but not those of true depositional lobes. In mature passive-margin fans, long, sinuous channels develop as a consequence of low gradients and the transport of sediment with a relatively low sand/mud ratio, and these channels develop lenticular sand bodies. In contrast, channels in active-margin fans are short and commonly braided as a result of high gradients and the transport of sediment with a relatively high sand/mud ratio. Braided channels characteristically develop sheetlike sand bodies.

  9. Vortex shedding and galloping of open semi-circular and parabolic cylinders in cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, D. S.; Veljkovic, I.

    2005-11-01

    An experimental wind-tunnel study was undertaken to investigate the flow-induced vibration behaviour of open semi-circular and parabolic cylinders in cross-flow. The motivation for the research was to investigate the cause of the fatigue failures of a number of parabolic section rotary mixing blades in a large mixing vessel. Results are presented for force coefficients as a function of angle of incidence of the flow, Strouhal number and amplitude response. It is shown that the parabolic cylinder is subject to large amplitude vortex shedding resonance and, when the elastic axis is sufficiently downstream of the section's centre of gravity, galloping instability.

  10. On the trajectory scaling of tandem twin jets in cross-flow in close proximity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    New, T. H.; Zang, B.

    2015-11-01

    An experimental study has been conducted on tandem twin jets in cross-flow (JICF) in close proximity to investigate the relationships between their trajectories, separation distances and velocity ratios. Results show that the front and rear jets, each with initially distinct jet trajectory, merge into a single trajectory shortly after they exhaust into the cross-flow. Furthermore, the merged tandem JICF attains deeper cross-flow penetration than that of a single JICF at the same velocity ratio. The front jet is also observed to provide `shielding' for the rear jet such that the latter penetrates relatively deeper into the cross-flow, which corroborates observations made by earlier studies. In particular, the present study demonstrates that it is possible to collapse the tandem JICF merged trajectories by ` rD'-scaling, where A and B coefficients show slight reductions and increments, respectively, with increasing separation distance. Collapsing the merged trajectories by using single JICF A and B coefficients leads to the notion of effective velocity ratio for tandem JICF, which enable the authors to propose a modification in the ` rD'-scaling law for tandem JICF. Lastly, the modified ` rD'-scaling law is applied to trajectory data from an earlier tandem JICF study, and its validity is demonstrated by the resulting good collapse.

  11. Mixing characteristics of pulsed air-assist liquid jet into an internal subsonic cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Inchul; Kang, Youngsu; Koo, Jaye

    2010-04-01

    Penetration depth, spray dispersion angle, droplet sizes in breakup processes and atomization processes are very important parameters in combustor of air-breathing engine. These processes will enhance air/fuel mixing inside the combustor. Experimental results from the pulsed air-assist liquid jet injected into a cross-flow are investigated. And experiments were conducted to a range of cross-flow velocities from 42˜136 m/s. Air is injected with 0˜300kPa, with air-assist pulsation frequency of 0˜20Hz. Pulsation frequency was modulated by solenoid valve. Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer(PDPA) was utilized to quantitatively measuring droplet characteristics. High-speed CCD camera was used to obtain injected spray structure. Pulsed air-assist liquid jet will offer rapid mixing and good liquid jet penetration. Air-assist makes a very fine droplet which generated mist-like spray. Pulsed air-assist liquid jet will introduce additional supplementary turbulent mixing and control of penetration depth into a cross-flow field. The results show that pulsation frequency has an effect on penetration, transverse velocities and droplet sizes. The experimental data generated in these studies are used for a development of active control strategies to optimize the liquid jet penetration in subsonic cross-flow conditions and predict combustion low frequency instability.

  12. Generation of two-dimensional vortices in a cross-flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samaniego, Jean-Michel

    1993-01-01

    The present report is concerned with an experimental study on the generation of plane two-dimensional vortices in a cross-flow. The purpose of this work is to address the problem of the feasibility of a two-dimensional experiment of flame-vortex interactions.

  13. Depositional facies and Hohokam settlement patterns of Holocene alluvial fans, N. Tucson Basin, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Field, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of depositional facies on eight Holocene alluvial fans of varying dimensions is used to evaluate prehistoric Hohokam agricultural settlement patterns. Two facies are recognized: channel gravelly sand facies and overbank silty sand facies. No debris flow deposits occur. The channel facies is characterized by relatively well sorted stratified sands and gravels with common heavy mineral laminations. Overbank facies deposits are massive and very poorly sorted due to heavy bioturbation. Lithostratigraphic profiles from backhoe trenches and sediment size analysis document headward migration of depositional facies which results in fining upward sequences. Each sequence is a channel fan lobe with an underlying coarse grained channel sand which fines to overbank silty sands. Lateral and vertical variations in facies distributions show that depositional processes are affected by drainage basin area (fan size) and distance from fan head. Gravelly channel sands dominate at the headward portions of the fan and are more pervasive on large fans; overbank silty sands are ubiquitous at fan toes and approach closer to the fan head of smaller alluvial fans. When depositional facies are considered as records of water flow over an alluvial surface, the farming potential of each fan can be analyzed. Depositional models of alluvial fan sedimentation provide the basis for understanding Hohokam settlement patterns on active alluvial surfaces.

  14. Low Frequency Noise Contamination in Fan Model Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2008-01-01

    Aircraft engine noise research and development depends on the ability to study and predict the noise created by each engine component in isolation. The presence of a downstream pylon for a model fan test, however, may result in noise contamination through pylon interactions with the free stream and model exhaust airflows. Additionally, there is the problem of separating the fan and jet noise components generated by the model fan. A methodology was therefore developed to improve the data quality for the 9 15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center that identifies three noise sources: fan noise, jet noise, and rig noise. The jet noise and rig noise were then measured by mounting a scale model of the 9 15 LSWT model fan installation in a jet rig to simulate everything except the rotating machinery and in duct components of fan noise. The data showed that the spectra measured in the LSWT has a strong rig noise component at frequencies as high as 3 kHz depending on the fan and airflow fan exit velocity. The jet noise was determined to be significantly lower than the rig noise (i.e., noise generated by flow interaction with the downstream support pylon). A mathematical model for the rig noise was then developed using a multi-dimensional least squares fit to the rig noise data. This allows the rig noise to be subtracted or removed, depending on the amplitude of the rig noise relative to the fan noise, at any given frequency, observer angle, or nozzle pressure ratio. The impact of isolating the fan noise with this method on spectra, overall power level (OAPWL), and Effective Perceived Noise Level (EPNL) is studied.

  15. Effect of real-time information upon traffic flows on crossing roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Minoru; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Yokoya, Yasushi; Ishibashi, Yoshihiro

    2009-04-01

    The effect of real-time information on the traffic flows of the crossing roads is studied by simulations based on a cellular automaton model. At the intersection, drivers have to enter a road of a shorter trip-time, by making a turn if necessary, as indicated on the information board. Dynamics of the traffic are expressed as a return map in the density-flow space. The traffic flow is classified into six phases, as a function of the car density. It is found that such a behavior of drivers induces too much concentration of cars on one road and, as a result, causes oscillation of the flow and the density of cars on both roads. The oscillation usually results in a reduced total flow, except for the cases of high car density.

  16. Reducing cross-sectional data using a genetic algorithm method and effects on cross-section geometry and steady-flow profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of reduced cross-sectional data points on steady-flow profiles were also determined. Thirty-five cross sections of the original steady-flow model of the Kootenai River were used. These two methods were tested for all cross sections with each cross section resolution reduced to 10, 20 and 30 data points, that is, six tests were completed for each of the thirty-five cross sections. Generally, differences from the original water-surface elevation were smaller as the number of data points in reduced cross sections increased, but this was not always the case, especially in the braided reach. Differences were smaller for reduced cross sections developed by the genetic algorithm method than the standard algorithm method.

  17. Cellular automata model for urban road traffic flow considering pedestrian crossing street

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Han-Tao; Yang, Shuo; Chen, Xiao-Xu

    2016-11-01

    In order to analyze the effect of pedestrians' crossing street on vehicle flows, we investigated traffic characteristics of vehicles and pedestrians. Based on that, rules of lane changing, acceleration, deceleration, randomization and update are modified. Then we established two urban two-lane cellular automata models of traffic flow, one of which is about sections with non-signalized crosswalk and the other is on uncontrolled sections with pedestrians crossing street at random. MATLAB is used for numerical simulation of the different traffic conditions; meanwhile space-time diagram and relational graphs of traffic flow parameters are generated and then comparatively analyzed. Simulation results indicate that when vehicle density is lower than around 25 vehs/(km lane), pedestrians have modest impact on traffic flow, whereas when vehicle density is higher than about 60 vehs/(km lane), traffic speed and volume will decrease significantly especially on sections with non-signal-controlled crosswalk. The results illustrate that the proposed models reconstruct the traffic flow's characteristic with the situation where there are pedestrians crossing and can provide some practical reference for urban traffic management.

  18. A Fan-tastic Alternative to Bulbs: Learning Circuits with Fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekey, Robert; Edwards, Andrea; McCullough, Roy; Reitz, William; Mitchell, Brandon

    2017-01-01

    The incandescent bulb has been a useful tool for teaching basic electrical circuits, as brightness is related to the current or power flowing through a bulb. This has led to the development of qualitative pedagogical treatments for examining resistive combinations in simple circuits using bulbs and batteries, which were first introduced by James Evans and thoroughly expanded upon by McDermott and others. This paper argues that replacing bulbs with small computer fans leads to similar, if not greater, insight of experimental results that can be qualitatively observed using a variety of senses. The magnitude of current through a fan is related to the frequency of the rotating fan blades, which can be seen, heard, and felt by the students. Experiments using incandescent bulbs only utilize vision, which is not ideal as the human eyes' perception of brightness is skewed because the response to light intensity is logarithmic rather than linear.

  19. Cross-Diffusion Systems with Excluded-Volume Effects and Asymptotic Gradient Flow Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruna, Maria; Burger, Martin; Ranetbauer, Helene; Wolfram, Marie-Therese

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we discuss the analysis of a cross-diffusion PDE system for a mixture of hard spheres, which was derived in Bruna and Chapman (J Chem Phys 137:204116-1-204116-16, 2012a) from a stochastic system of interacting Brownian particles using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The resulting cross-diffusion system is valid in the limit of small volume fraction of particles. While the system has a gradient flow structure in the symmetric case of all particles having the same size and diffusivity, this is not valid in general. We discuss local stability and global existence for the symmetric case using the gradient flow structure and entropy variable techniques. For the general case, we introduce the concept of an asymptotic gradient flow structure and show how it can be used to study the behavior close to equilibrium. Finally, we illustrate the behavior of the model with various numerical simulations.

  20. 40 CFR 1066.105 - Ambient controls and vehicle cooling fans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment, Measurement Instruments, Fuel, and... cooling fan have a minimum opening of 0.2 m2 and a minimum width of 0.8 m. (i) Verify the air flow... accuracy of ±2% of the measured air flow speed. (ii) For fans with rectangular outlets, divide the...

  1. High loading, low speed fan study, 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, M. J.; Burdsall, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A low speed, low noise, single stage fan was designed and tested. Design pressure ratio was 1.5 at a rotor tip speed of 1000 ft/sec. No inlet guide vane was used, the rotor stator was spaced and the number of rotor and stator airfoils was selected for low noise. Tests were conducted with uniform and distorted inlet flows. Stall margin of the initial design was too low for practical application. Airfoil slots and boundary layer and endwall devices did not improve stall margin sufficiently. A redesigned stator with reduced loadings increased stall margin, giving a fan efficiency of 0.883, 15% stall margin, and a 1.474 pressure radio at a specific flow of 41.7 lb/sec sq ft. Casing treatment over rotor tips improved stall margin with distorted inlet flow; vortex generators did not. Blade passing frequency noise increased with rotor relative Mach number. No supersonic fan noise was measured below 105% of design speed. Slotting airfoils, casing treatments, and a reduction of the ratio (number-stators/number-rotors) from (2n + 16) to (2n + 2) had no significant effects on noise.

  2. A Numerical Method for Computing the Transonic Fan Duct Flow over a Centerbody into an Exterior Free Stream - Program Tea-343,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-24

    to Boundaries 8. Application of the Prescribed Inlet Flow Condition 27 to the Difference Equation 9. Application of the Boundary Conditions for the 30...formula for the hyperbolic case analogous to Eq. (46) for the outside stream may easily be written down. 8. Application of the Prescribed Inlet Flow Condition to

  3. Peclet number analysis of cross-flow in porous gas diffusion layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC).

    PubMed

    Suresh, P V; Jayanti, Sreenivas

    2016-10-01

    Adoption of hydrogen economy by means of using hydrogen fuel cells is one possible solution for energy crisis and climate change issues. Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell, which is an important type of fuel cells, suffers from the problem of water management. Cross-flow is induced in some flow field designs to enhance the water removal. The presence of cross-flow in the serpentine and interdigitated flow fields makes them more effective in proper distribution of the reactants on the reaction layer and evacuation of water from the reaction layer than diffusion-based conventional parallel flow fields. However, too much of cross-flow leads to flow maldistribution in the channels, higher pressure drop, and membrane dehydration. In this study, an attempt has been made to quantify the amount of cross-flow required for effective distribution of reactants and removal of water in the gas diffusion layer. Unit cells containing two adjacent channels with gas diffusion layer (GDL) and catalyst layer at the bottom have been considered for the parallel, interdigitated, and serpentine flow patterns. Computational fluid dynamics-based simulations are carried out to study the reactant transport in under-the-rib area with cross-flow in the GDL. A new criterion based on the Peclet number is presented as a quantitative measure of cross-flow in the GDL. The study shows that a cross-flow Peclet number of the order of 2 is required for effective removal of water from the GDL. Estimates show that this much of cross-flow is not usually produced in the U-bends of Serpentine flow fields, making these areas prone to flooding.

  4. Oscillating flow and heat transfer in a channel with sudden cross section change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Hashim, Waqar

    1993-01-01

    We have computationally examined oscillating flow (zero mean) between two parallel plates with a sudden change in cross section. The flow was assumed to be laminar incompressible with the inflow velocity uniform over the channel cross section but varying sinusoidally with time. The cases studied cover wide ranges of Re(sub max) (from 187.5 to 2000), Va (from 1 to 10.66), the expansion ratio (1:2 and 1:4) and A(sub r) (2 and 4). Also, three different geometric cases were discussed: (1) asymmetric expansion/contraction; (2) symmetric expansion/contraction; and (3) symmetric blunt body. For these oscillating flow conditions, the fluid undergoes sudden expansion in one-half of the cycle and sudden contraction inthe other half. The instantaneous friction factor, for some ranges of Re(sub max) and Va, deviated substantially from the steady-state friction factor for the same flow parameters. A region has been identified below which the flow is laminar quasi-steady. A videotape showing computer simulations of the oscillating flow demonstrates the usefulness of the current analyses in providing information on the transient hydraulic phenomena.

  5. A critical evaluation of various methods for the analysis of flow-solid interaction in a nest of thin cylinders subjected to cross flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1987-01-01

    Various experimental, analytical, and numerical analysis methods for flow-solid interaction of a nest of cylinders subjected to cross flows are reviewed. A nest of cylinders subjected to cross flows can be found in numerous engineering applications including the Space Shuttle Maine Engine-Main Injector Assembly (SSME-MIA) and nuclear reactor heat exchangers. Despite its extreme importance in engineering applications, understanding of the flow-solid interaction process is quite limited and design of the tube banks are mostly dependent on experiments and/or experimental correlation equations. For future development of major numerical analysis methods for the flow-solid interaction of a nest of cylinders subjected to cross flow, various turbulence models, nonlinear structural dynamics, and existing laminar flow-solid interaction analysis methods are included.

  6. Cross-flow turbines: progress report on physical and numerical model studies at large laboratory scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, Martin; Bachant, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Cross-flow turbines show potential in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) applications. A research focus is on accurately predicting device performance and wake evolution to improve turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction. Experiments were carried with large laboratory-scale cross-flow turbines D O (1 m) using a turbine test bed in a large cross-section tow tank, designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. Several turbines of varying solidity were employed, including the UNH Reference Vertical Axis Turbine (RVAT) and a 1:6 scale model of the DOE-Sandia Reference Model 2 (RM2) turbine. To improve parameterization in array simulations, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier-Stokes models. Results are presented for the simulation of performance and wake dynamics of cross-flow turbines and compared with experiments and body-fitted mesh, blade-resolving CFD. Supported by NSF-CBET Grant 1150797, Sandia National Laboratories.

  7. COOLING FAN AND SYSTEM PERFORMANCE AND EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Dupree

    2005-07-31

    Upcoming emissions regulations (Tiers 3, 4a and 4b) are imposing significantly higher heat loads on the cooling system than lesser regulated machines. This work was a suite of tasks aimed at reducing the parasitic losses of the cooling system, or improving the design process through six distinct tasks: 1. Develop an axial fan that will provide more airflow, with less input power and less noise. The initial plan was to use Genetic Algorithms to do an automated fan design, incorporating forward sweep for low noise. First and second generation concepts could not meet either performance or sound goals. An experienced turbomachinery designer, using a specialized CFD analysis program has taken over the design and has been able to demonstrate a 5% flow improvement (vs 10% goal) and 10% efficiency improvement (vs 10% goal) using blade twist only. 2. Fan shroud developments, using an 'aeroshroud' concept developed at Michigan State University. Performance testing at Michigan State University showed the design is capable of meeting the goal of a 10% increase in flow, but over a very narrow operating range of fan performance. The goal of 10% increase in fan efficiency was not met. Fan noise was reduced from 0 to 2dB, vs. a goal of 5dB at constant airflow. The narrow range of fan operating conditions affected by the aeroshroud makes this concept unattractive for further development at this time 3. Improved axial fan system modeling is needed to accommodate the numbers of cooling systems to be redesigned to meet lower emissions requirements. A CFD fan system modeling guide has been completed and transferred to design engineers. Current, uncontrolled modeling practices produce flow estimates in some cases within 5% of measured values, and in some cases within 25% of measured values. The techniques in the modeling guide reduced variability to the goal of + 5% for the case under study. 4. Demonstrate the performance and design versatility of a high performance fan. A 'swept blade

  8. Rapid delineation of alluvial fans using IfSAR-derived DEM for selected provinces in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Iris Jill; Aquino, Dakila; Norini, Gianluca; Narod Eco, Rodrigo; Mahar Lagmay, Alfredo

    2015-04-01

    Alluvial fans are fan-shaped geomorphic features formed when sediments from a watershed are transported and deposited downstream via tributaries flowing out from the sudden break of a slope. Hazards usually associated with alluvial fans are flooding and debris flows. In this study, we used an Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar-derived digital elevation model of Pangasinan and Nueva Ecija Provinces in the Philippines to identify and delineate alluvial fans. Primary parameters considered include the geomorphic characteristics of the catchment area, stream network and slopes ranging from 0.11 to 8 degrees. Using this method, 12 alluvial fans were identified in Pangasinan and 16 in Nueva Ecija with areas ranging from 0.35 to 80 sq. km. The largest fan identified is the Mangatarem-Aguilar fan in Pangaisnan with a total area of 80.87 sq km while the Gabaldon fan in Nueva Ecija with total area of 48.11 sq km. We observed from the results that some alluvial fans have multiple feeder streams, and others have overlapping lateral extents with adjacent fans. These overlapping fans are called bajadas. In addition, the general location of fans and their apices in the two provinces appear to coincide with segments of the Philippines Fault System. There are about people 1.4 million living within these alluvial fans. Mapping and characterizing and identifying their associated hazards is crucial in the disaster preparedness efforts of the exposed population.

  9. An Experimental Study of Fan Inflow Distortion Tone Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle

    2010-01-01

    The tone noise generated when a fan ingests circumferentially distorted flow was studied by an experiment conducted with the Advanced Noise Control Fan at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The inflow was distorted by inserting cylindrical rods radially into the duct. The rods were arranged in circumferentially irregular patterns in three of the five configurations tested. Rods were held in place using a mounting ring with 30 equally spaced holes placed at an axial location one rotor chordlength upstream of the fan. Acoustic pressure was measured in the inlet and exhaust duct of the fan using the Rotating Rake fan tone measurement system. Sound power levels, calculated from the measured data, were plotted as a function of circumferential mode. An analytic description of the unsteady pressure distribution at the interaction plane between the stationary rods and the fan rotor is presented in a form suitable for representing the circumferentially irregularly placed rods. Terms in the analytical description for sound power were proven to be useful in determining the dominant circumferential modes measured in the experiment and the differences in mode power level between the configurations tested. Insight gained through this work will be useful in the development of tools to compute fan inflow distortion tone noise.

  10. Numerical Simulations of a Reacting Sonic Jet in a Supersonic Cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attal, Nitesh; Ramaprabhu, Praveen

    2014-11-01

    Interaction of a jet with a background cross-flow is a situation common to many engineering systems, including combustors in SCRAMJETS, gas turbines etc. Such an interaction enhances fuel-air mixing through the distortion of coherent structures into counter-rotating vortex pairs that are tilted, stretched and then sundered by the velocity gradient in the cross-flow, eventually leading to turbulent mixing. The ignition process and flame characteristics depend sensitively on the extent and efficiency of this turbulent mixing process. We describe results from detailed 3D numerical simulations of a sonic circular jet of diameter (D = 0.5 cm) issuing a mixture of H2 (Fuel) diluted with 50% N2 at 300 K into a turbulent, Mach 2 cross-flow of air at 1200 K. The simulations were performed in a computational domain of 20 × 16 × 16 jet diameters using the compressible flow code FLASH, with modifications to handle detailed (H2-O2) chemistry and temperature-dependent material properties. We discuss the role of shock driven mixing, ignition and flame anchoring on the combustion efficiency of the system.

  11. Performance of transonic fan stage with weight flow per unit annulus area of 178 kilograms per second per square meter (6.5(lb/sec)/(sq ft))

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Urasek, D. C.; Kovich, G.

    1973-01-01

    The overall and blade-element performances are presented over the stable flow operating range from 50 to 100 percent of design speed. Stage peak efficiency of 0.834 was obtained at a weight flow of 26.4 kg/sec (58.3 lb/sec) and a pressure ratio of 1.581. The stall margin for the stage was 7.5 percent based on weight flow and pressure ratio at stall and peak efficiency conditions. The rotor minimum losses were approximately equal to design except in the blade vibration damper region. Stator minimum losses were less than design except in the tip and damper regions.

  12. Scale-adaptive simulation of a hot jet in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, B. M.; Menter, F. R.; Hansen, T.; Esteve, M.-J.

    2011-12-01

    The simulation of a hot jet in cross flow is of crucial interest for the aircraft industry as it directly impacts aircraft safety and global performance. Due to the highly transient and turbulent character of this flow, simulation strategies are necessary that resolve at least a part of the turbulence spectrum. The high Reynolds numbers for realistic aircraft applications do not permit the use of pure Large Eddy Simulations as the spatial and temporal resolution requirements for wall bounded flows are prohibitive in an industrial design process. For this reason, the hybrid approach of the Scale-Adaptive Simulation is employed, which retains attached boundary layers in well-established RANS regime and allows the resolution of turbulent fluctuations in areas with sufficient flow instabilities and grid refinement. To evaluate the influence of the underlying numerical grid, three meshing strategies are investigated and the results are validated against experimental data.

  13. Critical review of the trailing edge condition in steady and unsteady flow. Blade flutter in compressors and fans: Numerical simulation of the aerodynamic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radwan, S. F.; Rockwell, D. O.; Johnson, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Existing interpretations of the trailing edge condition, addressing both theoretical and experimental works in steady, as well as unsteady flows are critically reviewed. The work of Kutta and Joukowski on the trailing edge condition in steady flow is reviewed. It is shown that for most practical airfoils and blades (as in the case of most turbomachine blades), this condition is violated due to rounded trailing edges and high frequency effects, the flow dynamics in the trailing edge region being dominated by viscous forces; therefore, any meaningful modelling must include viscous effects. The question of to what extent the trailing edge condition affects acoustic radiation from the edge is raised; it is found that violation of the trailing edge condition leads to significant sound diffraction at the tailing edge, which is related to the problem of noise generation. Finally, various trailing edge conditions in unsteady flow are discussed, with emphasis on high reduced frequencies.

  14. Fan and pump noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misoda, J.; Magliozzi, B.

    1973-01-01

    The development is described of improved, low noise level fan and pump concepts for the space shuttle. In addition, a set of noise design criteria for small fans and pumps was derived. The concepts and criteria were created by obtaining Apollo hardware test data to correlate and modify existing noise estimating procedures. A set of space shuttle selection criteria was used to determine preliminary fan and pump concepts. These concepts were tested and modified to obtain noise sources and characteristics which yield the design criteria and quiet, efficient space shuttle fan and pump concepts.

  15. Fan Cart: The Next Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamore, Brian

    2016-10-01

    For years the fan cart has provided physics students with an excellent resource for exploring fundamental mechanics concepts such as acceleration, Newton's laws, impulse, momentum, work-energy, and energy conversions. The Physics Teacher has even seen some excellent do-it-yourself (DIY) fan carts and activities. If you are interested in developing the `E' portion of your and your students' STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) skills, one way to accomplish this is to revisit the DIY fan cart. In this article I share a design of a new edition of the DIY fan cart and some ideas for incorporating the engineering design process into your high school curriculum.

  16. Cross-flow turbines: physical and numerical model studies towards improved array simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2015-12-01

    Cross-flow, or vertical-axis turbines, show potential in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices towards improving turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference for axial-flow turbines, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction for cross-flow turbines. Numerical simulations are generally better suited to explore the turbine array design parameter space, as physical model studies of large arrays at large model scale would be expensive. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries, the turbines' interaction with the energy resource needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Most models in use today, e.g. actuator disk, are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. Experiments were carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed in a large cross-section tow tank, designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. To improve parameterization in array simulations, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier--Stokes models. The ALM predicts turbine loading with the blade element method combined with sub-models for dynamic stall and flow curvature. The open-source software is written as an extension library for the OpenFOAM CFD package, which allows the ALM body force to be applied to their standard RANS and LES solvers. Turbine forcing is also applied to volume of fluid (VOF) models, e.g., for predicting free surface effects on submerged MHK devices. An

  17. Performance of transonic fan stage with weight flow per unit annulus area of 208 kilograms per second per square meter (42.6 (lb/sec)/sq ft)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urasek, D. C.; Kovich, G.; Moore, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Performance was obtained for a 50-cm-diameter compressor designed for a high weight flow per unit annulus area of 208 (kg/sec)/sq m. Peak efficiency values of 0.83 and 0.79 were obtained for the rotor and stage, respectively. The stall margin for the stage was 23 percent, based on equivalent weight flow and total-pressure ratio at peak efficiency and stall.

  18. Experimental and numerical analyses of finned cross flow heat exchangers efficiency under non-uniform gas inlet flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bury, Tomasz; Składzień, Jan; Widziewicz, Katarzyna

    2010-10-01

    The work deals with experimental and numerical thermodynamic analyses of cross-flow finned tube heat exchangers of the gas-liquid type. The aim of the work is to determine an impact of the gas non-uniform inlet on the heat exchangers performance. The measurements have been carried out on a special testing rig and own numerical code has been used for numerical simulations. Analysis of the experimental and numerical results has shown that the range of the non-uniform air inlet to the considered heat exchangers may be significant and it can significantly affect the heat exchanger efficiency.

  19. Influence of cross-flow on nonlinear Tollmien-Schlichting/vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. A. R.; Smith, F. T.

    1994-01-01

    The transition of an incompressible three-dimensional boundary layer with strong cross-flow is considered theoretically and computationally in the context of vortex/wave interactions. Specifically the work centers on two lower-branch Tollmien-Schlichting waves which mutually interact nonlinearly to induce a longitudinal vortex flow. The vortex motion in turn gives rise to significant wave modulation via wall-shear forcing. The characteristic Reynolds number is large and, as a consequence, the waves' and the vortex motion are governed primarily by triple deck theory. The nonlinear interaction is captured by a viscous partial-differential system for the vortex coupled with a pair of amplitude equations for each wave pressure. Following analysis and computation over a wide range of parameters, three distinct responses are found to emerge in the nonlinear behavior of the flow solution downstream: an algebraic finite-distance singularity, far-downstream saturation or far-downstream wave decay leaving pure vortex flow. These depend on the input conditions, the wave angles and the size of the cross flow.

  20. PIV measurement of the vertical cross-flow structure over tube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaki, C.; Cheong, K. H.; Monji, H.; Matsui, G.

    Shell and tube heat exchangers are among the most commonly used types of heat exchangers. Shell-side cross-flow in tube bundles has received considerable attention and has been investigated extensively. However, the microscopic flow structure including velocity distribution, wake, and turbulent structure in the tube bundles needs to be determined for more effective designs. Therefore, in this study, in order to clarify the detailed structure of cross-flow in tube bundles with particle image velocimetry (PIV), experiments were conducted using two types of model; in-line and staggered bundles with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.5, containing 20 rows of five 15 mm O.D. tubes in each row. The velocity data in the whole flow field were measured successfully by adjusting the refractive index of the working fluid to that of the tube material. The flow features were characterized in different tube bundles with regards to the velocity vector field, vortex structure, and turbulent intensity.

  1. A Numerical Simulation of a Normal Sonic Jet into a Hypersonic Cross-Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffries, Damon K.; Krishnamurthy, Ramesh; Chandra, Suresh

    1997-01-01

    This study involves numerical modeling of a normal sonic jet injection into a hypersonic cross-flow. The numerical code used for simulation is GASP (General Aerodynamic Simulation Program.) First the numerical predictions are compared with well established solutions for compressible laminar flow. Then comparisons are made with non-injection test case measurements of surface pressure distributions. Good agreement with the measurements is observed. Currently comparisons are underway with the injection case. All the experimental data were generated at the Southampton University Light Piston Isentropic Compression Tube.

  2. Dynamics of traffic flows on crossing roads induced by real-time information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Minoru; Ishibashi, Yoshihiro; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2013-02-01

    Traffic flows on crossing roads with an information board installed at the intersection have been simulated by a cellular automaton model. In the model, drivers have to enter the road with a shorter trip-time indicated on the information board, by making a turn at the intersection if necessary. The movement of drivers induces various traffic states, which are classified into six phases as a function of the car density. The dynamics of the traffic is expressed as the return map in the density-flow space, and analyzed on the basis of the car configuration on the roads.

  3. PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CROSS-FLOW FILTRATION FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.; Nash, C.; Poirier, M.

    2011-01-12

    In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, the DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing cross-flow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was included in those studies, with a focus on start-up techniques, filter cake development, the application of filter aids (cake forming solid precoats), and body feeds (flux enhancing polymers). This paper discusses the progress of those filter studies. Cross-flow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate slurries. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self-cleaning through the action of wall shear stress created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self-cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduce permeability. Unfortunately, low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Savannah River Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the cross-flow filter axial flowrate, limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, limited by space and increasing the required pump load. SRNL set up both dead-end and cross-flow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, filter cleaning, and several different types of filter aids and body feeds. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed

  4. Field of Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Subimage #1 Figure 1 Subimage #2 Figure 2 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Anaglyph Figure 3 Subimage #3 Figure 4

    At the very beginning of spring in the southern hemisphere on Mars the ground is covered with a seasonal layer of carbon dioxide ice. In this image there are two lanes of undisturbed ice bordered by two lanes peppered with fans of dark dust.

    When we zoom in to the subimage (figure 1), the fans are seen to be pointed in the same direction, dust carried along by the prevailing wind. The fans seem to emanate from spider-like features.

    The second subimage (figure 2) zooms in to full HiRISE resolution to reveal the nature of the 'spiders.' The arms are channels carved in the surface, blanketed by the seasonal carbon dioxide ice. The seasonal ice, warmed from below, evaporates and the gas is carried along the channels. Wherever a weak spot is found the gas vents to the top of the seasonal ice, carrying along dust from below.

    The anaglyph (figure 3) of this spider shows that these channels are deep, deepening and widening as they converge. Spiders like this are often draped over the local topography and often channels get larger as they go uphill. This is consistent with a gas eroding the channels.

    A different channel morphology is apparent in the lanes not showing fans. In these regions the channels are dense, more like lace, and are not radially organized. The third subimage (figure 4) shows an example of 'lace.'

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_002532_0935 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 09-Feb-2007. The complete image is centered at -86.4 degrees latitude, 99.1 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 276.1 km (172.6 miles). At this distance the image scale is

  5. Dark Spots and Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    As winter turns to spring at the south polar ice cap of Mars, the rising sun reveals dark spots and fans emerging from the cold polar night. Using visual images (left) and temperature data (right) from the Thermal Emission Imaging system on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter, scientists have built a new model for the origin of the dark markings. Scientists propose the markings come from dark sand and dust strewn by high-speed jets of carbon-dioxide gas. These erupt from under a layer of carbon-dioxide ice that forms each Martian winter.

  6. Influence of Shock Wave on the Flutter Behavior of Fan Blades Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Rakesh; Bakhle, Milind A.; Stefko, George L.

    2003-01-01

    Modern fan designs have blades with forward sweep; a lean, thin cross section; and a wide chord to improve performance and reduce noise. These geometric features coupled with the presence of a shock wave can lead to flutter instability. Flutter is a self-excited dynamic instability arising because of fluid-structure interaction, which causes the energy from the surrounding fluid to be extracted by the vibrating structure. An in-flight occurrence of flutter could be catastrophic and is a significant design issue for rotor blades in gas turbines. Understanding the flutter behavior and the influence of flow features on flutter will lead to a better and safer design. An aeroelastic analysis code, TURBO, has been developed and validated for flutter calculations at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The code has been used to understand the occurrence of flutter in a forward-swept fan design. The forward-swept fan, which consists of 22 inserted blades, encountered flutter during wind tunnel tests at part speed conditions.

  7. Harmonic Balance Computations of Fan Aeroelastic Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    2010-01-01

    A harmonic balance (HB) aeroelastic analysis, which has been recently developed, was used to determine the aeroelastic stability (flutter) characteristics of an experimental fan. To assess the numerical accuracy of this HB aeroelastic analysis, a time-domain aeroelastic analysis was also used to determine the aeroelastic stability characteristics of the same fan. Both of these three-dimensional analysis codes model the unsteady flowfield due to blade vibrations using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. In the HB analysis, the unsteady flow equations are converted to a HB form and solved using a pseudo-time marching method. In the time-domain analysis, the unsteady flow equations are solved using an implicit time-marching approach. Steady and unsteady computations for two vibration modes were carried out at two rotational speeds: 100 percent (design) and 70 percent (part-speed). The steady and unsteady results obtained from the two analysis methods compare well, thus verifying the recently developed HB aeroelastic analysis. Based on the results, the experimental fan was found to have no aeroelastic instability (flutter) at the conditions examined in this study.

  8. Labyrinth seal testing for lift fan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobek, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    An abradable buffered labyrinth seal for the control of turbine gas path leakage in a tip-turbine driven lift fan was designed, tested, and analyzed. The seal configuration was not designed to operate in any specific location but was sized to be evaluated in an existing test rig. The final sealing diameter selected was 28 inches. Results of testing indicate that the flow equations predicted seal air flows consistent with measured values. Excellent sealing characteristics of the abradable coating on the stator land were demonstrated when a substantial seal penetration of .030 inch into the land surface was encountered without appreciable wear on the labyrinth knife edges.

  9. Highstand shelf fans: The role of buoyancy reversal in the deposition of a new type of shelf sand body

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steel, Elisabeth; Simms, Alexander R.; Warrick, Jonathan; Yokoyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Although sea-level highstands are typically associated with sediment-starved continental shelves, high sea level does not hinder major river floods. Turbidity currents generated by plunging of sediment-laden rivers at the fluvial-marine interface, known as hyperpycnal flows, allow for cross-shelf transport of suspended sand beyond the coastline. Hyperpycnal flows in southern California have deposited six subaqueous fans on the shelf of the northern Santa Barbara Channel in the Holocene. Using eight cores and nine grab samples, we describe the deposits, age, and stratigraphic architecture of two fans in the Santa Barbara Channel. Fan lobes have up to 3 m of relief and are composed of multiple hyperpycnite beds ∼5 cm to 40 cm thick. Deposit architecture and geometry suggest the hyperpycnal flows became positively buoyant and lifted off the seabed, resulting in well-sorted, structureless, elongate sand lobes. Contrary to conventional sequence stratigraphic models, the presence of these features on the continental shelf suggests that active-margin shelves may locally develop high-quality reservoir sand bodies during sea-level highstands, and that such shelves need not be solely the site of sediment bypass. These deposits may provide a Quaternary analogue to many well-sorted sand bodies in the rock record that are interpreted as turbidites but lack typical Bouma-type features.

  10. Cross-flow deep fat frying and its effect on fry quality distribution and mobility.

    PubMed

    van Koerten, K N; Schutyser, M A I; Somsen, D; Boom, R M

    2016-04-01

    Conventional industrial frying systems are not optimised towards homogeneous product quality, which is partly related to poor oil distribution across the packed bed of fries. In this study we investigate an alternative frying system with an oil cross-flow from bottom to top through a packed bed of fries. Fluidization of rectangular fries during frying was characterised with a modified Ergun equation. Mixing was visualized by using two coloured layers of fries and quantified in terms of mixing entropy. Smaller fries mixed quickly during frying, while longer fries exhibited much less mixing, which was attributed to the higher minimum fluidization velocity and slower dehydration for longer fries. The cross-flow velocity was found an important parameter for the homogeneity of the moisture content of fries. Increased oil velocities positively affected moisture distribution due to a higher oil refresh rate. However, inducing fluidization caused the moisture distribution to become unpredictable due to bed instabilities.

  11. Architecture of a modern transient slope fan (Villafranca fan, Gioia basin-Southeastern Tyrrhenian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamberi, Fabiano; Rovere, Marzia

    2011-05-01

    The high resolution of geophysical data applied to the study of the modern seafloor provides excellent details on the architecture of deep-water fans. Numerous researches have addressed the study of modern ponded and terminal deep-water fans. In contrast, thorough studies of present-day examples of transient slope fans, i.e. those fans that are connected to a deeper depositional area, are not available. Multibeam bathymetry and CHIRP profiles have been used in the study of the Villafranca transient slope fan located in the northeastern Sicilian margin. Hanging above the 300-m high erosional flank of the Stromboli axial valley, perpendicular to the fan elongation, it represents a particular kind of transient fan. The fan is composed of a leveed channel followed downslope by a depositional lobe. The relief of the eastern levee above the channel axis changes due to longitudinal variations in the rate of sediment overbanking; despite the low sinuosity of the channel, an increased rate of overbank flow is observed in the outside of the channel bends. Downslope from a knickpoint, an increase in levee relief is the result of the entrenchment of the central tract of the channel. The erosional deepening of the channel followed the failure of a mass-transport deposit (MTD) that lowered the distal slope portion, also causing a step along the channel course. The MTD is characterized by an extensional headwall domain and by a slightly deformed main body that has suffered very restricted downslope movement. It was caused by the gliding of the levee wedge as a consequence of its undermining, due to the excavation of the Stromboli valley in the distal slope. Retrogressive sediment failures are widespread in the eastern levee; they form high mobility MTDs such as a debris flow that spread in the eastern portion of the depositional lobe. The Villafranca depositional lobe has an internal architecture that largely differs from that of classic fan models. Straight, approximately 500-m

  12. Performance Study of a Ducted Fan System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrego, Anita I.; Bulaga, Robert W.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An experimental investigation was completed in the NASA Ames 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel with the objective of determining the performance characteristics of a ducted fan. The model was an annular duct with a 38-in diameter, 10-in chord, and a 5-bladed fixed-pitch fan. Model variations included duct angle of attack, exit vane flap length, flap deflection angle, and duct chord length. Duct performance data were obtained for axial and forward flight test conditions. Axial flow test data showed figure of merit decreases with increasing advance ratio. Forward flight data showed an increasing propulsive force with decreasing duct angle of attack. Exit vane flap deflection angle and flap chord length were shown to be an effective way of providing side force. Extending the duct chord did not effect the duct performance.

  13. Physical and Numerical Model Studies of Cross-flow Turbines Towards Accurate Parameterization in Array Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2014-12-01

    Cross-flow turbines, often referred to as vertical-axis turbines, show potential for success in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications, ranging from small- to utility-scale installations in tidal/ocean currents and offshore wind. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices to the optimization of turbine arrays. It would be expensive and time-consuming to conduct physical model studies of large arrays at large model scales (to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers), and hence numerical techniques are generally better suited to explore the array design parameter space. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries (e.g., grid resolution into the viscous sublayer on turbine blades), the turbines' interaction with the energy resource (water current or wind) needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Models used today--a common model is the actuator disk concept--are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. This wake structure has been shown to create "constructive" interference in some cases, improving turbine performance in array configurations, in contrast with axial-flow, or horizontal axis devices. Towards a more accurate parameterization of cross-flow turbines, an extensive experimental study was carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed with wake measurement capability in a large cross-section tow tank. The experimental results were then "interpolated" using high-fidelity Navier--Stokes simulations, to gain insight into the turbine's near-wake. The study was designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. The end product of

  14. Enhancement of microfluidic particle separation using cross-flow filters with hydrodynamic focusing

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yun-Yen; Huang, Chen-Kang

    2016-01-01

    A microfluidic chip is proposed to separate microparticles using cross-flow filtration enhanced with hydrodynamic focusing. By exploiting a buffer flow from the side, the microparticles in the sample flow are pushed on one side of the microchannels, lining up to pass through the filters. Meanwhile a larger pressure gradient in the filters is obtained to enhance separation efficiency. Compared with the traditional cross-flow filtration, our proposed mechanism has the buffer flow to create a moving virtual boundary for the sample flow to actively push all the particles to reach the filters for separation. It further allows higher flow rates. The device only requires soft lithograph fabrication to create microchannels and a novel pressurized bonding technique to make high-aspect-ratio filtration structures. A mixture of polystyrene microparticles with 2.7 μm and 10.6 μm diameters are successfully separated. 96.2 ± 2.8% of the large particle are recovered with a purity of 97.9 ± 0.5%, while 97.5 ± 0.4% of the small particle are depleted with a purity of 99.2 ± 0.4% at a sample throughput of 10 μl/min. The experiment is also conducted to show the feasibility of this mechanism to separate biological cells with the sample solutions of spiked PC3 cells in whole blood. By virtue of its high separation efficiency, our device offers a label-free separation technique and potential integration with other components, thereby serving as a promising tool for continuous cell filtration and analysis applications. PMID:26858812

  15. Enhancement of microfluidic particle separation using cross-flow filters with hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yun-Yen; Huang, Chen-Kang; Lu, Yen-Wen

    2016-01-01

    A microfluidic chip is proposed to separate microparticles using cross-flow filtration enhanced with hydrodynamic focusing. By exploiting a buffer flow from the side, the microparticles in the sample flow are pushed on one side of the microchannels, lining up to pass through the filters. Meanwhile a larger pressure gradient in the filters is obtained to enhance separation efficiency. Compared with the traditional cross-flow filtration, our proposed mechanism has the buffer flow to create a moving virtual boundary for the sample flow to actively push all the particles to reach the filters for separation. It further allows higher flow rates. The device only requires soft lithograph fabrication to create microchannels and a novel pressurized bonding technique to make high-aspect-ratio filtration structures. A mixture of polystyrene microparticles with 2.7 μm and 10.6 μm diameters are successfully separated. 96.2 ± 2.8% of the large particle are recovered with a purity of 97.9 ± 0.5%, while 97.5 ± 0.4% of the small particle are depleted with a purity of 99.2 ± 0.4% at a sample throughput of 10 μl/min. The experiment is also conducted to show the feasibility of this mechanism to separate biological cells with the sample solutions of spiked PC3 cells in whole blood. By virtue of its high separation efficiency, our device offers a label-free separation technique and potential integration with other components, thereby serving as a promising tool for continuous cell filtration and analysis applications.

  16. Air-bubbling, hollow-fiber reactor with cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration.

    PubMed

    Nishii, K; Sode, K; Karube, I

    1990-05-01

    Continuous asymmetric reduction of dyhydrooxoisophorone (DOIP) to 4-hydroxy-2,2,6-trimethylcyclo-hexanone (4-HTMCH) was achieved by a thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus NK86-0151. Three reactors were used: an air-bubbling hollow-fiber reactor with cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration, an air-lift reactor, and a CSTR with PAA immobilized cells. The maximum cell concentration of 11.1 g dry wt L(-1) was obtained in an air-bubbling hollow-fiber reactor, while in the other reactors the cell densities were between 3.5 and 4.1 g dry wt L(-1) The optimum bleed ratio was 0.1 at the dilution rate 0.3 h(-1) in the hollow-fiber reactor. The highest viable cell concentration was maintained in the dilution range of 0.4-0.7 h(-1) by a combination of proper cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration. The maximum volumetric productivity of 4-HTMCH reached 826 mg L(-1) h(-1) at the dilution rate 0.54 h(-1). This value was 4 and 2 times higher than those in the air-lift reactor and CSTR, respectively. The increasing viable cell concentration increased the volumetric productivity of 4-HTMCH. A cell free product solution was continuously obtained by cross-flow filtration.

  17. The Far Field Structure of a Jet in Cross-Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanitis, Nicolas; Dawson, James

    2014-11-01

    Stereoscopic PIV measurements were performed in the far field of a cross-flow jet. Measurements were taken in a water channel in the spanwise-wall normal plane (y-z) containing the Counter-Rotating vortex pair (CVP). The jet's Reynolds number was Rejet = 2 ×104 and had an exit diameter of dj = 4 mm. Measurements were taken for a jet to cross-flow velocity ratio of Vr = 10 at three downstream positions of x /dj = 30 , 55 , 85 and for a Vr = 15 , 20 at x /dj = 85 . Two point spatial correlations hint at the presence of arch shaped structures titled in the streamwise x-direction on the windward side of the CVP as well as straight vortex tubes extending into the wake. The arched shaped structure is compounded by PDFs of the location of streamwise vorticity peaks (vortex tubes) in the instantaneous field indicating the presence of a vortex structure aligned in the spanwise direction. This information together with the use of High Speed Stereoscopic PIV and Taylor's Hypothesis, which allowed for the extraction of 3D structures, led to the development of an eddy model comprised of hairpin, roller and wake structures to predict turbulence statistics of a jet in cross-flow.

  18. Optimal hydraulic design of earth dam cross section using saturated-unsaturated seepage flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.-Q.; Unami, K.; Kawachi, T.

    An optimal hydraulic design problem regarding an earth dam cross section is formulated as an inverse problem for the steady model of saturated-unsaturated seepage flows in porous media. In the problem formulation, the choice of soil material to be used in each point of the dam cross sectional domain is considered as the control variable to be identified. The performance index used to evaluate the appropriateness of the design is defined as the sum of two square integral norms, which represent reducing the saturated zone and minimizing material costs. It is also shown that the first norm bounds the total seepage discharge through the earth dam. Since the governing variational boundary value problem as well as the adjoint problem is well-posed, a deterministic approach is taken. A numerical scheme including pseudo-unsteady terms is developed to calculate the optimal solution in an ideal earth dam cross section to be designed utilizing two different types of soil material. The results show that an inclined clay core of less hydraulic conductivity should be located on the upstream side of the cross section. The unsaturated zone turns out to play an important role in the flow field and the optimal design.

  19. Numerical investigation of the bowed stator effects in a transonic fan at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Enliang; Zhao, Shengfeng; Gong, Jianbo; Lu, Xingen; Zhu, Junqiang

    2017-02-01

    The performance of fan stage in a small turbofan engines is significantly affected at high-altitude low Reynolds number. In order to examine the effect of low Reynolds number on the fan stage, 3D numerical simulation method was employed to analyse the performance variations and the underlying flow structure in the fan stage. For the sake of decreasing the influence of low Reynolds number, the different bowed stator airfoils were redesigned and the effect of the modified design was evaluated.

  20. Fan Cart: The Next Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamore, Brian

    2016-01-01

    For years the fan cart has provided physics students with an excellent resource for exploring fundamental mechanics concepts such as acceleration, Newton's laws, impulse, momentum, work-energy, and energy conversions. "The Physics Teacher" has even seen some excellent do-it-yourself (DIY) fan carts and activities. If you are interested…

  1. Design study and performance analysis of a high-speed multistage variable-geometry fan for a variable cycle engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Parker, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A design technology study was performed to identify a high speed, multistage, variable geometry fan configuration capable of achieving wide flow modulation with near optimum efficiency at the important operating condition. A parametric screening study of the front and rear block fans was conducted in which the influence of major fan design features on weight and efficiency was determined. Key design parameters were varied systematically to determine the fan configuration most suited for a double bypass, variable cycle engine. Two and three stage fans were considered for the front block. A single stage, core driven fan was studied for the rear block. Variable geometry concepts were evaluated to provide near optimum off design performance. A detailed aerodynamic design and a preliminary mechanical design were carried out for the selected fan configuration. Performance predictions were made for the front and rear block fans.

  2. Low-flow hydraulic conductivity tests at wells that cross the water table.

    PubMed

    Aragon-Jose, Alejandra T; Robbins, Gary A

    2011-01-01

    Wells with screens and sand packs that cross the water table represent a challenging problem for determining hydraulic conductivity by slug testing due to sand pack drainage and resaturation. Sand pack drainage results in a multisegmented recovery curve. One must then subjectively pick a portion of the curve to analyze. Sand pack drainage also results in a change in the effective radius of the well which requires a guess at the porosity or specific yield in analyzing the test. In the study of Robbins et al. (2009), a method was introduced to obtain hydraulic conductivity in monitoring wells using the steady-state drawdown and flow rate obtained during low-flow sampling. The method was tested in this study in wells whose screens cross the water table and shown to avoid sand pack drainage problems that complicate analyzing slug tests. In applying the method to low-flow sampling, only a single pair of steady-state flow rate and drawdown are needed; hence, to derive meaningful results, an accurate determination of these parameters is required.

  3. Influence of cross-flow on the entrainment of bending plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedland, Graham; Mastin, Larry; Steven, Solovitz; Cal, Raul

    2016-11-01

    Volcanic eruption columns inject high concentrations of ash into the atmosphere. Some of this ash is carried downwind forming ash clouds in the atmosphere that are hazardous for private and commercial aviation. Current models rely on inputs such as plume height, duration, eruption rate, and meteorological wind fields. Eruption rate is estimated from plume height using relations that depend on the rate of air entrainment into the plume, which is not well quantified. A wind tunnel experiment has been designed to investigate these models by injecting a vertical air jet into a cross-flow. The ratio of the cross-flow and jet velocities is varied to simulate a weak plume, and flow response is measured using particle image velocimetry. The plumes are characterized and profile data is examined to measure the growth of weak plumes and the entrainment velocity along its trajectory. This allows for the study of the flow field, mean, and second order moments, and obtain information to improve models of volcanic ash concentrations in the atmosphere.

  4. Kinetics of gravity-driven slug flow in partially wettable capillaries of varying cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissan, Alon; Wang, Qiuling; Wallach, Rony

    2016-11-01

    A mathematical model for slug (finite liquid volume) motion in not-fully-wettable capillary tubes with sinusoidally varying cross-sectional areas was developed. The model, based on the Navier-Stokes equation, accounts for the full viscous terms due to nonuniform geometry, the inertial term, the slug's front and rear meniscus hysteresis effect, and dependence of contact angle on flow velocity (dynamic contact angle). The model includes a velocity-dependent film that is left behind the advancing slug, reducing its mass. The model was successfully verified experimentally by recording slug movement in uniform and sinusoidal capillary tubes with a gray-scale high-speed camera. Simulation showed that tube nonuniformity has a substantial effect on slug flow pattern: in a uniform tube it is monotonic and depends mainly on the slug's momentary mass/length; an undulating tube radius results in nonmonotonic flow characteristics. The static nonzero contact angle varies locally in nonuniform tubes owing to the additional effect of wall slope. Moreover, the nonuniform cross-sectional area induces slug acceleration, deceleration, blockage, and metastable-equilibrium locations. Increasing contact angle further amplifies the geometry effect on slug propagation. The developed model provides a modified means of emulating slug flow in differently wettable porous media for intermittent inlet water supply (e.g., raindrops on the soil surface).

  5. Investigation of Blade Angle of an Open Cross-Flow Runner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Yusuke; Iio, Shouichiro; Veerapun, Salisa; Uchiyama, Tomomi

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a nano-hydraulic turbine utilizing drop structure in irrigation channels or industrial waterways. This study was focused on an open-type cross-flow turbine without any attached equipment for cost reduction and easy maintenance. In this study, the authors used an artificial indoor waterfall as lab model. Test runner which is a simple structure of 20 circular arc-shaped blades sandwiched by two circular plates was used The optimum inlet blade angle and the relationship between the power performance and the flow rate approaching theoretically and experimentally were investigated. As a result, the optimum inlet blade angle due to the flow rate was changed. Additionally, allocation rate of power output in 1st stage and 2nd stage is changed by the blade inlet angle.

  6. Experimental study on corrugated cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Minsung; Baik, Young-Jin; Park, Seong-Ryong; Ra, Ho-Sang; Lim, Hyug

    2010-11-15

    Experimental study on cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers (PHEs) was performed. The two prototype PHEs were manufactured in a stack of single-wave plates and double-wave plates in parallel. Cooling air flows through the PHEs in a crosswise direction against internal cooling water. The heat exchanger aims to substitute open-loop cooling towers with closed-loop water circulation, which guarantees cleanliness and compactness. In this study, the prototype PHEs were tested in a laboratory scale experiments. From the tests, double-wave PHE shows approximately 50% enhanced heat transfer performance compared to single-wave PHE. However, double-wave PHE costs 30% additional pressure drop. For commercialization, a wide channel design for air flow would be essential for reliable performance. (author)

  7. CF6 fan performance improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, R. F.; Reemsnyder, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    A significant portion of the NASA-sponsored Performance Improvement Program for the CF6 engine was the development of an improved fan concept. This involved aerodynamic redesign of the CF6 fan blade to increase fan efficiency while retaining the mechanical integrity, operability, and acoustic characteristics of the existing blade. A further improvement in performance was obtained by adding a fan case stiffener ring to decouple blade-case vibrational characteristics, permitting a significant reduction in running tip clearance. Engine testing was performed to establish the performance, mechanical and acoustic properties of the new design relative to the current fan, and to establish power management characteristics for the CF6-50C2/E2 engine. A significant improvement in cruise power SFC of 1.8 percent was demonstrated in Sea Level testing projected to altitude flight conditions.

  8. Gravity deposits in deep sea fans and on Continental Slopes, Black Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, M.K.; Konyukhov, A.I.

    1988-08-01

    The Danube fan has a classical structure. It is clearly expressed in the bottom relief and traced by reflection profiles for more than 200 km. The fan body is levee valley, which splits in a mid-fan area into numerous meandering distributaries. The fan consists of gravity and hemipelagic deposits. These are mainly turbidites of various compositions. Channels are filled with grain-flow deposits (sand), debris-flow deposits (sandy clay with shells), and slides from valley walls (mud, sapropelic mud). Levees in upper and mid-fan areas are formed by specific turbidite sequences: mudstone crumbs in the base, thinly laminated silt and clays in the middle, blue mud on the top. Hemipelagic sediments increase noticeably on outer slopes of the levees. In the Pleistocene sequences these are mud; in the Holocene, sapropelic mud and coccolith-diatom ooze. Distal turbidites are widespread in the lower fan areas. In the base of each cycle is a thin sand-silt layer with unclear graded bedding; the upper part is represented by mud. Reflection profiles demonstrate an ancient fan system with buried channels and levees. Configurations of these bodies are very similar to those of the modern fans. The sedimentary lens on the sea floor opposite the mouths of submarine canyons of the Rioni, Inguri, Kodori, Supsa, and Chorokh Rivers was formed by overlapped modern and ancient fans. The Inguri and Rioni produced a practically single submarine fan, the largest in this area. It is rather well expressed morphologically and traced by reflection profiles for more than 100 km. In its lower part it overlays a number of small fans. The Rioni-Inguri fan is smaller than the Danube, but the whole system of overlapped fans occupies an area of about 17,000 km/sup 2/, being more than 3 km thick. The composition and structure of sediments in this deep-sea system change sharply, depending on the geomorphological position.

  9. A coordinated flowing afterglow and crossed beam study of electron attachment to CCl3Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanel, P.; Smith, D.; Matejcik, S.; Kiendler, A.; Mark, T. D.

    1997-11-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to CCl3Br has been studied using a flowing afterglow/Langmuir probe (FALP) and a crossed beam technique. In the FALP experiment the overall attachment rate coefficients and the branching ratio into the Cl- and the Br- product channels, R = Cl-/(Cl- + Br-), were measured as a function of the gas temperature, Tg, in the range of 300-540K and the electron temperatures, Te, from Tg to 4000K indicating that R approached the statistical value of 0.75 at the highest Tg. At Tg = 540K both Cl2-1 and ClBr- molecular ions were observed at about the 2% level. An apparent activation energy of 55 meV for the overall attachment reaction was derived using a model developed previously to describe the dependence of dissociative electron attachment rates on Tg and Te. The crossed beam experiment provided relative attachment cross-sections for the production of Cl- and Br- as a function of electron energy, E, from near zero up to ~2 eV at several Tg within the range 311-423 K. The absolute cross-sections at Tg = 311K were obtained from the FALP value using a calibration procedure. At low E the overall attachment cross-section varies as E-1 in accordance with s-wave capture theory. In accordance with the FALP data R increases from 0.2 at low E and the lowest Tg to the statistical value of 0.75 at high E and high Tg. A peak observed in the cross-section at an E of about 0.7 eV is tentatively attributed to p-wave electron attachment. The rapid decrease of this peak cross-section with Tg is ascribed to autodetachment.

  10. A sedimentary model for early Palaeozoic fluvial fans, Alderney Sandstone Formation (Channel Islands, UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ielpi, Alessandro; Ghinassi, Massimiliano

    2016-08-01

    Fluvial fans in the rock record are inferred based on critical criteria such as: downstream grain-size fining; evidence for drainage fractionation along bifurcating channels; increasing fluvial-aeolian interaction in the basinward direction; and radial palaeoflow dispersion. Since pre-vegetation fluvial rocks often lack heterolithic alluvium and channelisation at the outcrop scale, the recognition of pre-Silurian fluvial fans has, so far, not been straightforward. This research proposes a sedimentary model for the Alderney Sandstone Formation of Channel Islands (UK), so far considered as a fine record of early Palaeozoic axial-fluvial sedimentation. Here, outcrop-based and remote-sensing analysis of the formation's type-section reveal the interaction of fluvial and aeolian processes, expressed by the alternation of: compound fluvial bars enclosing macroform surfaces, related to phases of perennial discharge; fluvial sandsheets containing antidunal forms and soft-sediment deformations, related to seasonal (i.e. flashy) discharge; and aeolian bedforms overlying thin stream-flow deposits. An up-section increase in aeolian deposits is accompanied by the shrinking of fluvial bars and minor-channel cuts, suggesting that drainage was fractioned along smaller channels terminating into marginal aeolian environments. Together with a propensity towards more dispersed values of fluvial cross-set thickness up-section (again due to discharge fractionation along intermittently active channels), these features depict an aeolian-influenced fluvial fan. This work discusses a set of criteria for the identification of fluvial fans in pre-vegetation environments. In doing so, it also explores possible parallels to modern environments, and underscores the potential of integrated outcrop and remotely sensed observations on ancient fluvial rocks and modern sedimentary realms.

  11. Characterization of Composite Fan Case Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvoracek, Charlene M.

    2004-01-01

    The majority of commercial turbine engines that power today s aircraft use a large fan driven by the engine core to generate thrust which dramatically increases the engine s efficiency. However, if one of these fan blades fails during flight, it becomes high energy shrapnel, potentially impacting the engine or puncturing the aircraft itself and thus risking the lives of passengers. To solve this problem, the fan case must be capable of containing a fan blade should it break off during flight. Currently, all commercial fan cases are made of either just a thick metal barrier or a thinner metal wall surrounded by Kevlar-an ultra strong fiber that elastically catches the blade. My summer 2004 project was to characterize the resins for a composite fan case that will be lighter and more efficient than the current metal. The composite fan case is created by braiding carbon fibers and injecting a polymer resin into the braid. The resin holds the fibers together, so at first using the strongest polymer appears to logically lead to the strongest fan case. Unfortunately, the stronger polymers are too viscous when melted. This makes the manufacturing process more difficult because the polymer does not flow as freely through the braid, and the final product is less dense. With all of this in mind, it is important to remember that the strength of the polymer is still imperative; the case must still contain blades with high impact energy. The research identified which polymer had the right balance of properties, including ease of fabrication, toughness, and ability to transfer the load to the carbon fibers. Resin deformation was studied to better understand the composite response during high speed impact. My role in this research was the testing of polymers using dynamic mechanical analysis and tensile, compression, and torsion testing. Dynamic mechanical analysis examines the response of materials under cyclic loading. Two techniques were used for dynamic mechanical analysis

  12. Timing and nature of alluvial fan development along the Chajnantor Plateau, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesta, Jason M.; Ward, Dylan J.

    2016-11-01

    Alluvial systems in the Atacama Desert provide a unique opportunity to elucidate the sedimentary response to climate variability, particularly changes in precipitation, in hyperarid environments. Alluvial fans along the eastern margin of the Salar de Atacama, adjacent to the Chajnantor Plateau in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, provide an archive of climate-modulated sediment transfer and erosion at an extreme of Earth's climate. Three regional alluvial fan surfaces (Qf1 [oldest] to Qf3 [youngest]) were mapped along the western flank of the Chajnantor Plateau. The alluvial fans were examined with geomorphic and terrestrial cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating methods to define the timing of alluvial fan formation and to determine the role of climatic processes on fan development in a hyperarid environment. Alluvial fans in the study area are comprised of hyperconcentrated flow and boulder-rich debris flow deposits that reflect deposition transitioning between cohesive and noncohesive regimes. Alluvial fan surfaces yield exposure ages that range from 49.6 ± 4.4 to 194 ± 12 ka, while debris flow boulders yield exposure ages ranging from 12.4 ± 2.1 to 229 ± 53 ka. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages indicate that abandonment of alluvial fan surfaces Qf1, Qf2, and Qf3 date to 175 ± 22.6 ka (MIS 6), 134.5 ± 9.18 ka (MIS 6), and 20.07 ± 6.26 ka (MIS 2), respectively. A 36Cl concentration-depth profile through alluvial fan Qf1 suggests a simple depositional history with minimal nuclide inheritance implying relatively rapid aggradation (6 m in ca. 25 kyr) followed by surface abandonment ca. 180-200 ka. Our data support a strong climatic control on alluvial fan evolution in the region, and we propose that the alluvial fans along the margins of the Salar de Atacama form according to the humid model of fan formation.

  13. Rapid Calculations of Three-Dimensional Inlet/Fan Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    2007-01-01

    Two computational fluid dynamics codes have been merged to permit rapid calculations of inlet/fan interaction. Inlets are modeled using the WIND-US Navier-Stokes code. Fans are modeled using a new three-dimensional Euler code called CSTALL that solves the flow through the entire compression system but models blade rows using body forces for turning and loss. The body force model is described and it is shown how unknown terms in the model can be estimated from other Navier-Stokes solutions of the blade rows run separately. The inlet and fan calculations are run simultaneously and are coupled at an interface plane using a third code called SYNCEX that is described briefly. Results are shown for an axisymmetric nacelle at high angle of attack modeled both as an isolated inlet and coupled to a single stage fan. The isolated inlet calculations are unrealistic after the flow separates but the coupled codes can model large regions of separated flow extending from the lower lip of the nacelle into the fan rotor.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Cross-Flow Axis Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines, Including Effects of Waves and Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2011-12-01

    A new test bed for Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines at the Center for Ocean Renewable Energy at the University of New Hampshire (UNH-CORE) was used to evaluate the performance of different cross-flow axis hydrokinetic turbines, and investigate the effects of waves and turbulence on these devices. The test bed was designed and built to operate in the UNH tow and wave tank, which has a cross section of 3.67m (width) x 2.44m (depth). In the present configuration, tow speeds of up to 3 m/s can be achieved for smaller turbine models, and up to 1.5 m/s for large turbine models with low gear ratio. It features a flap style wave maker at one end that is capable of producing waves with 1-5 s periods up to 0.4 m wave height. Turbine thrust (drag) and mechanical power output (torque, angular velocity) were measured at tow speeds of 0.6-1.5 m/s for two cross-flow axis MHK turbines: a Gorlov Helical Turbine (GHT) and a Lucid spherical turbine (LST). Both were provided by Lucid Energy Technologies, LLP, and have frontal areas of 1.3 (GHT) and 1.0 (LST) square meters, respectively. GHT performance was also measured in progressive waves of various periods, grid turbulence, and in the wake of a cylinder, installed upstream at various cross-stream locations. Overall, the GHT performs with higher power and thrust (drag) coefficients than the LST. A 2nd law efficiency, or kinetic exergy efficiency, was defined to calculate what fraction of the kinetic energy removed from the flow is converted to usable shaft work by each turbine. The exergy efficiency varies with tip speed ratio but approaches 90% for the optimum operating conditions for each turbine. The fraction of kinetic energy removed from the fluid that is not converted to shaft work is redistributed into turbulent kinetic energy in the wake. Quantifying the kinetic energy flowing out of the turbine is important for modeling of environmental transport processes and for predicting performance when turbines are used in arrays

  15. Experimental Investigation of the Discharge Coefficient and Impingement Heat Transfer Characteristics of a Single Jet in Cross Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Brian

    This experimentation investigates the local heat transfer characteristics of an impinging jet with the effects of cross flow. The jet is formed by a single round hole with a diameter of 0.25 inches, sharp edges and a length to diameter ratio of 4. For one combination of impingement plate spacing and cross flow to jet flow mass velocity ratio, detailed photographs of a sheet of liquid crystal were taken. These photographs were then used to create a Nusselt number contour plot. Observations are made regarding the comparison of the Nusselt number contour plots with and without cross flow. Comparisons are also made to data in open literature citing the degradation of the average Nusselt number with cross flow to that without cross flow. While the main focus of this study was the heat transfer of an impinging jet, a large amount of discharge coefficient data was also gathered for a single, sharp edged, round hole in the presence of cross flow. It compared very well to other investigator's data and a correlation relating the discharge coefficient to the mass velocity ratio is reported.

  16. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-06-27

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  17. Dynamic bowtie for fan-beam CT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fenglin; Wang, Ge; Cong, Wenxiang; Hsieh, Scott S; Pelc, Norbert J

    2013-01-01

    A bowtie is a filter used to shape an x-ray beam and equalize its flux reaching different detector channels. For development of spectral CT with energy discriminating photon-counting (EDPC) detectors, here we propose and evaluate a dynamic bowtie for performance optimization based on a patient model or a scout scan. With a mechanical rotation of a dynamic bowtie and an adaptive adjustment of an x-ray source flux, an x-ray beam intensity profile can be modulated. First, a mathematical model for dynamic bowtie filtering is established for an elliptical section in fan-beam geometry, and the contour of the optimal bowtie is derived. Then, numerical simulation is performed to compare the performance of the dynamic bowtie in the cases of an ideal phantom and a realistic cross-section relative to the counterparts without any bowtie and with a fixed bowtie respectively. Our dynamic bowtie can equalize the expected numbers of photons in the case of an ideal phantom. In practical cases, our dynamic bowtie can effectively reduce the dynamic range of detected signals inside the field of view. Although our design is optimized for an elliptical phantom, the resultant dynamic bowtie can be applied to a real fan-beam scan if the underlying cross-section can be approximated as an ellipse. Furthermore, our design methodology can be applied to specify an optimized dynamic bowtie for any cross-section of a patient, preferably using rapid prototyping technology.

  18. Vadose zone flow model parameterisation using cross-borehole radar and resistivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binley, Andrew; Cassiani, Giorgio; Middleton, Roy; Winship, Peter

    2002-10-01

    Cross-borehole geoelectrical imaging, in particular electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and transmission radar tomography, can provide high-resolution images of hydrogeological structures and, in some cases, detailed assessment of dynamic processes in the subsurface environment. Through appropriate petrophysical relationships, these tools offer data suitable for parameterising and constraining models of groundwater flow. This is demonstrated using cross-borehole radar and resistivity measurements collected during a controlled vadose zone tracer test, performed at a field site in the UK Sherwood Sandstone. Both methods show clearly the vertical migration of the tracer over a 200 h monitoring period. By comparing first and second spatial moments of changes in moisture content predicted from a numerical simulation of vadose zone flow with equivalent statistics from two- and three-dimensional ERT and cross-borehole radar profiles the effective hydraulic conductivity is estimated to be approximately 0.4 m/d. Such a value is comparable to field estimates from borehole hydraulic tests carried out in the saturated zone at the field site and provides valuable information that may be utilised to parameterise pollutant transport models of the site.

  19. Vadose Zone Flow Model Parameterisation Using Cross-Borehole Radar and Resistivity Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binley, A.; Cassiani, G.; Middleton, R.; Winship, P.

    2001-12-01

    Cross-borehole geoelectrical imaging, in particular electrical resistivity tomography and transmission radar tomography, can provide high resolution images of hydrogeological structures and, in some cases, detailed assessment of dynamic processes in the subsurface environment. Through appropriate petrophysical relationships, these tools offer data suitable for parameterizing and constraining models of groundwater flow. This is demonstrated using cross-borehole radar and resistivity measurements collected during a controlled vadose zone tracer test, performed at a field site in the UK Sherwood Sandstone. Both methods show clearly the vertical migration of the tracer over a 200 hour monitoring period. By comparing first and second spatial moments of changes in moisture content predicted from a numerical simulation of vadose zone flow with equivalent statistics from 2- and 3-D electrical resistivity tomography and cross-borehole radar profiles the effective hydraulic conductivity is estimated to be approximately 0.4 m d-1. Such a value is comparable to field estimates from borehole hydraulic tests carried out in the saturated zone at the field site and provides valuable information that may be utilized to parameterise pollutant transport models of the site.

  20. Experimental evaluation of sound produced by two cylinders in a cross flow in various configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilka, Michael; Kerrian, Peter; Morris, Scott

    2012-11-01

    Cylinders in a cross flow is a canonical test case that is considered representative of industrial fluid flow problems, such as heat exchangers and aircraft landing gear. The general configurations are cylinders in tandem, parallel or staggered, which lead to several interesting flow phenomena such as wake cavity/wake interaction effects (tandem), symmetric/asymmetric wake behavior (parallel) or wake interaction/coanda effects (staggered), depending on relative location of the cylinders. In many cases, it is important to not only understand the flow interaction between the cylinders but also the acoustic consequence of such configurations. However, information on the acoustical behavior based on these configurations is relatively small compared to that of the steady aerodynamic and flow interaction behavior. The present work investigates the acoustic spectral properties of these configurations in order to characterize the sound produced by cylinder proximity and wake effects. The spectra are measured using an acoustic beam-forming technique to identify the sources and remove spurious content from the spectra.

  1. The Effect of Vortex Generators on a Jet in a Cross-Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Foss, J. K.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of vortex generators in the form of tabs on the penetration and spreading of a jet in a cross-flow has been studied experimentally. It is found that the tab has very little effect when placed on the leeward side, i.e., on the downstream edge of the jet nozzle relative to the free-stream flow. A study of the static pressure distribution reveals significantly lower pressures on the leeward side. Thus, when placed on that side the tab does not produce a "pressure hill" of sufficient magnitude that is the primary source of streamwise vorticity in the flow field over the tab. This qualitatively explains the ineffectiveness. In comparison, there is a significant effect on the flow field when the tab is placed on the windward side, The sense of vorticity generated by the tab in the latter configuration is opposite to that of the bound vortex pair that otherwise characterizes the flow. Thus, the strength of the bound vortex pair is diminished and the jet penetration is reduced.

  2. Constraints of nonresponding flows based on cross layers in the networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi-Chao; Xiao, Yang; Wang, Dong

    2016-02-01

    In the active queue management (AQM) scheme, core routers cannot manage and constrain user datagram protocol (UDP) data flows by the sliding window control mechanism in the transport layer due to the nonresponsive nature of such traffic flows. However, the UDP traffics occupy a large part of the network service nowadays which brings a great challenge to the stability of the more and more complex networks. To solve the uncontrollable problem, this paper proposes a cross layers random early detection (CLRED) scheme, which can control the nonresponding UDP-like flows rate effectively when congestion occurs in the access point (AP). The CLRED makes use of the MAC frame acknowledgement (ACK) transmitting congestion information to the sources nodes and utilizes the back-off windows of the MAC layer throttling data rate. Consequently, the UDP-like flows data rate can be restrained timely by the sources nodes in order to alleviate congestion in the complex networks. The proposed CLRED can constrain the nonresponsive flows availably and make the communication expedite, so that the network can sustain stable. The simulation results of network simulator-2 (NS2) verify the proposed CLRED scheme.

  3. Broadband Liner Optimization for the Source Diagnostic Test Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    The broadband component of fan noise has grown in relevance with the utilization of increased bypass ratio and advanced fan designs. Thus, while the attenuation of fan tones remains paramount, the ability to simultaneously reduce broadband fan noise levels has become more appealing. This paper describes a broadband acoustic liner optimization study for the scale model Source Diagnostic Test fan. Specifically, in-duct attenuation predictions with a statistical fan source model are used to obtain optimum impedance spectra over a number of flow conditions for three liner locations in the bypass duct. The predicted optimum impedance information is then used with acoustic liner modeling tools to design liners aimed at producing impedance spectra that most closely match the predicted optimum values. Design selection is based on an acceptance criterion that provides the ability to apply increased weighting to specific frequencies and/or operating conditions. Typical tonal liner designs targeting single frequencies at one operating condition are first produced to provide baseline performance information. These are followed by multiple broadband design approaches culminating in a broadband liner targeting the full range of frequencies and operating conditions. The broadband liner is found to satisfy the optimum impedance objectives much better than the tonal liner designs. In addition, the broadband liner is found to provide better attenuation than the tonal designs over the full range of frequencies and operating conditions considered. Thus, the current study successfully establishes a process for the initial design and evaluation of novel broadband liner concepts for complex engine configurations.

  4. Mechanisms of Flame Stabilization and Blowout in a Reacting Turbulent Hydrogen Jet in Cross-Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kolla, H.; Grout, R. W.; Gruber, A.; Chen, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    The mechanisms contributing to flame stabilization and blowout in a nitrogen-diluted hydrogen transverse jet in a turbulent boundary layer cross-flow (JICF) are investigated using three-dimensional direct numerical simulation (DNS) with detailed chemistry. Non-reacting JICF DNS were performed to understand the relative magnitude and physical location of low velocity regions on the leeward side of the fuel jet where a flame can potentially anchor. As the injection angle is reduced from 90{sup o} to 70{sup o}, the low velocity region was found to diminish significantly, both in terms of physical extent and magnitude, and hence, its ability to provide favorable conditions for flame anchoring and stabilization are greatly reduced. In the reacting JICF DNS a stable flame is observed for 90{sup o} injection angle and, on average, the flame root is in the vicinity of low velocity magnitude and stoichiometric mixture. When the injection angle is smoothly transitioned to 75{sup o} a transient flame blowout is observed. Ensemble averaged quantities on the flame base reveal two phases of the blowout characterized by a kinematic imbalance between flame propagation speed and flow normal velocity. In the first phase dominant flow structures repeatedly draw the flame base closer to the jet centerline resulting in richer-than-stoichiometric mixtures and high velocity magnitudes. In the second phase, in spite of low velocity magnitudes and a return to stoichiometry, due to jet bending and flame alignment normal to the cross-flow, the flow velocity normal to the flame base increases dramatically perpetuating the blowout.

  5. Taylor-Couette flow control by amplitude variation of the inner cylinder cross-section oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oualli, Hamid; Mekadem, Mahmoud; Lebbi, Mohamed; Bouabdallah, Ahcene

    2015-07-01

    The hydrodynamic stability of a viscous fluid flow evolving in an annular space between a rotating inner cylinder with a periodically variable radius and an outer fixed cylinder is considered. The basic flow is axis-symmetric with two counter-rotating vortices each wavelength along the whole filled system length. The numerical simulations are implemented on the commercial Fluent software package, a finite-volume CFD code. It is aimed to make investigation of the early flow transition with assessment of the flow response to radial pulsatile motion superimposed to the inner cylinder cross-section as an extension of a previous developed work in Oualli et al. [H. Oualli, A. Lalaoua, S. Hanchi, A. Bouabdallah, Eur. Phys. J. Appl. Phys. 61, 11102 (2013)] where a comparative controlling strategy is applied to the outer cylinder. The same basic system is considered with similar calculating parameters and procedure. In Oualli et al. [H. Oualli, A. Lalaoua, S. Hanchi, A. Bouabdallah, Eur. Phys. J. Appl. Phys. 61, 11102 (2013)], it is concluded that for the actuated outer cylinder and relatively to the non-controlled case, the critical Taylor number, Tac1, characterizing the first instability onset illustrated by the piled Taylor vortices along the gap, increases substantially to reach a growing rate of 70% when the deforming amplitude is ɛ = 15%. Interestingly, when this controlling strategy is applied to the inner cylinder cross-section with a slight modification of the actuating law, this tendency completely inverts and the critical Taylor number decreases sharply from Tac1 = 41.33 to Tac1 = 17.66 for ɛ = 5%, corresponding to a reduction rate of 57%. Fundamentally, this result is interesting and can be interpreted by prematurely triggering instabilities resulting in rapid development of flow turbulence. Practically, important applicative aspects can be met in several industry areas where substantial intensification of transport phenomena (mass, momentum and heat) is

  6. Numerical Investigation of Cross Flow Phenomena in a Tight-Lattice Rod Bundle Using Advanced Interface Tracking Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weizhong; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ose, Yasuo; Ohnuki, Akira; Akimoto, Hajime; Hotta, Akitoshi; Fujimura, Ken

    In relation to the design of an innovative FLexible-fuel-cycle Water Reactor (FLWR), investigation of thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles of the FLWR is being carried out at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The FLWR core adopts a tight triangular lattice arrangement with about 1 mm gap clearance between adjacent fuel rods. In view of importance of accurate prediction of cross flow between subchannels in the evaluation of the boiling transition (BT) in the FLWR core, this study presents a statistical evaluation of numerical simulation results obtained by a detailed two-phase flow simulation code, TPFIT, which employs an advanced interface tracking method. In order to clarify mechanisms of cross flow in such tight lattice rod bundles, the TPFIT is applied to simulate water-steam two-phase flow in two modeled subchannels. Attention is focused on instantaneous fluctuation characteristics of cross flow. With the calculation of correlation coefficients between differential pressure and gas/liquid mixing coefficients, time scales of cross flow are evaluated, and effects of mixing section length, flow pattern and gap spacing on correlation coefficients are investigated. Differences in mechanism between gas and liquid cross flows are pointed out.

  7. Reduction of Jet Penetration in a Cross-Flow by Using Tabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1998-01-01

    A tab placed suitably on a nozzle that produces a jet in a cross-flow can reduce the penetration of the jet. This effect, achieved when the tab is placed on the windward side of the nozzle relative to the cross flow, may be of interest in film cooling applications. Wind tunnel experiments are carried out, in the momentum ratio (J) range of 10-90, to investigate the tab geometry that would maximize this effect. The preliminary results show that a 'delta tab' having a base width approximately fifty percent of the nozzle diameter may be considered optimum. With a given tab size, the effect is more pronounced at higher J. Reduction in jet penetration by as much as 40% is observed. Comparable reduction in jet penetration is also obtained when a triangular shaped tab is placed flush with the tunnel wall or with its apex tilted down into the jet nozzle (the 'delta tab' being the configuration in which the apex is tilted up). However, the delta tab involves the least flow blockage and pressure loss. Relative to the baseline case, the lateral spreading of the jet is found to be more with the delta tab but less with other orientations of the tab.

  8. Heat transfer in oscillating flows with sudden change in cross section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Hashim, Waqar; Tew, Roy C.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Oscillating fluid flow (zero mean) with heat transfer, between two parallel plates with a sudden change in cross section, was examined computationally. The flow was assumed to be laminar and incompressible with inflow velocity uniform over the channel cross section but varying sinusoidally with time. Over 30 different cases were examined; these cases cover wide ranges of Re sub max (187.5 to 30000), Va (1 to 350), expansion ratio (1:2, 1:4, 1:8, and 1:12) and A sub r (0.68 to 4). Three different geometric cases were considered (asymmetric expansion and/or contraction, symmetric expansion/contraction, and symmetric blunt body). The heat transfer cases were based on constant wall temperature at higher (heating) or lower (cooling) value than the inflow fluid temperature. As a result of the oscillating flow, the fluid undergoes sudden expansion in one half of the cycle and sudden contraction in the other half. One heating case is examined in detail, and conclusions are drawn from all the cases (documented in detail elsewhere). Instantaneous friction factors and heat transfer coefficients, for some ranges of Re sub max and Va, deviated substantially from those predicted with steady state correlations.

  9. Bacteriological evaluation of a laminar cross-flow tunnel for surgery under operational conditions.

    PubMed

    van der Waaij, D; Heidt, P J; Hendriks, W D

    1974-04-01

    A transportable surgery cross-flow unit has been tested under ;operational conditions'. By the use of artificial aerosols and a volunteer surgical team, or dummies, it was found that, at an air velocity of 0.45 m./sec., a detectable transfer to above the table occurred only when quite highly concentrated aerosols (of more than 10(3.6) bacteria/m.(3) of air or more) existed underneath the table. The short disappearance time under these conditions and the quite stable flow pattern above the table found when a surgical team was working, standing along both sides of the table, make it unlikely that an aerosol of detectable concentration can develop during surgery, at this site. The chance that particles, liberated from the heads of the surgical team, settle on the table, was found to be strongly reduced when a cross-flow tunnel operated at an air velocity of 0.45 m./sec. The transfer from outside the unit to the inside was prevented by closing the upper part of the open front side.

  10. Bacteriological evaluation of a laminar cross-flow tunnel for surgery under operational conditions

    PubMed Central

    van der Waaij, D.; Heidt, P. J.; Hendriks, W. D. H.

    1974-01-01

    A transportable surgery cross-flow unit has been tested under `operational conditions'. By the use of artificial aerosols and a volunteer surgical team, or dummies, it was found that, at an air velocity of 0·45 m./sec., a detectable transfer to above the table occurred only when quite highly concentrated aerosols (of more than 103·6 bacteria/m.3 of air or more) existed underneath the table. The short disappearance time under these conditions and the quite stable flow pattern above the table found when a surgical team was working, standing along both sides of the table, make it unlikely that an aerosol of detectable concentration can develop during surgery, at this site. The chance that particles, liberated from the heads of the surgical team, settle on the table, was found to be strongly reduced when a cross-flow tunnel operated at an air velocity of 0·45 m./sec. The transfer from outside the unit to the inside was prevented by closing the upper part of the open front side. PMID:4274415

  11. Effects of a fluctuating sheared flow on cross phase in passive-scalar turbulent diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leconte, M.; Beyer, P.; Benkadda, S.; Garbet, X.

    2006-11-01

    Transport barriers are key elements concerning energy and particle confinement in fusion devices. They play a fundamental role in the L →H transition observed in most tokamaks' edges. It has been shown that a shear in the E ×B velocity could trigger and sustain such a barrier. The E ×B velocity shear model has proven to be of great interest in the study of the formation and characteristics of transport barriers. Here we address a particular case of flow shear stabilization, namely the effect of a shear flow on the diffusion of a passive scalar. A shear flow reduces the radial flux (radial transport) Γ of a passive scalar field (we consider the pressure field) via the reduction of the turbulence energy √⟨p2⟩ and/or via the reduction of the cross phase cosδ between the fluctuations of the pressure and velocity fields. We compare our results with those of different analytical models for passive-scalar advection or diffusion [Terry et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 185001 (2001); Kim and Diamond, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 075001 (2003)]. However, these studies yielded contradictory results. The purpose of this study is to shed light on this particular issue using numerical simulations to clarify the role of the reduction of the amplitude of turbulence and cross phase in regulating the radial transport.

  12. The supersonic fan engine: An advanced concept in supersonic cruise propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franciscus, L. C.

    1981-01-01

    Engine performance and mission studies were carried out for turbofan engines equipped with supersonic through-flow fans. The mission was for a commercial supersonic transport with a Mach 2.32 capability. The advantages of the supersonic fan engines are discussed in terms of mission range comparisons with other engine types. The effects of fan efficiency, inlet losses, and engine weight on engine performance and mission range are shown. The range of a supersonic transport with supersonic fan engines could be 10 to 20 percent better than with other types having the same technology core.

  13. Two-dimensional model of a slow-mode expansion fan at Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, P. H.; Hill, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    A 2D model for the standing slow-mode expansion fan that is expected to exist downstream of the Jovian moon Io is developed. The leading edge of the expansion fan makes an angle of 45 deg with the upstream magnetic field direction, and the fan width is about 114 deg. The plasma flow returns to its upstream direction by way of a slow-mode shock behind Io where the MHD parameters return asymptotically to their upstream conditions. The magnetic field perturbation within the fan is much smaller than that associated with the Alfven wing, which lies farther upstream.

  14. Large Well-Exposed Alluvial Fans in Deep Late-Noachian Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.

    2004-01-01

    Large, fresh-appearing alluvial fans (typically greater than 10 km long) have been identified during a systematic search of 100 m/pixel low-sun daylight THEMIS IR imaging in deep late-Noachian or early-Hesperian craters. Our study of these fans was augmented with MOLA-derived topography and high-resolution MOC and THEMIS VIS images where available. The influence of alluvial fan deposition on the topography of crater floors has been recognized in previous topographic studies. Recent Mars Odyssey-era studies have also identified and described in detail a fluvial delta or fan of approximately the same age as the alluvial fans of this study. Our results, at the time of this writing, indicate that these fans are only found in less than 5% of all craters greater than or equal to 70 kilometers in diameter within a large study region. In every case the fan-containing craters were restricted to a latitude belt between 20 degrees S and 30 degrees S. All of which had significant topographic relief and appeared morphologically younger than typical mid-Noachian craters in the size range. However, large fans were not found in the most pristine (and presumably youngest) craters in this size range. Most Martian fans have morphologies consistent with terrestrial debris-flow-dominated fans.

  15. Jet mixing into a heated cross flow in a cylindrical duct: Influence of geometry and flow variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatch, M. S.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    To examine the mixing characteristics of jets in an axi-symmetric can geometry, temperature measurements were obtained downstream of a row of cold jets injected into a heated cross stream. Parametric, non-reacting experiments were conducted to determine the influence of geometry and flow variations on mixing patterns in a cylindrical configuration. Results show that jet to mainstream momentum flux ratio and orifice geometry significantly impact the mixing characteristics of jets in a can geometry. For a fixed number of orifices, the coupling between momentum flux ratio and injector determines (1) the degree of jet penetration at the injection plane, and (2) the extent of circumferential mixing downstream of the injection plane. The results also show that, at a fixed momentum flux ratio, jet penetration decreases with (1) an increase in slanted slot aspect ratio, and (2) an increase in the angle of the slots with respect to the mainstream direction.

  16. Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control

    SciTech Connect

    Benedek, K. , Inc., Cambridge, MA ); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. )

    1991-08-01

    This report describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

  17. ZENON ENVIRONMENTAL, INC.; CROSS-FLOW PERVAPORATION TECHNOLOGY; INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT (EPA/540/R-95/511)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of the Zenon cross-flow pervaporation technology was conducted under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program in February 1995 to determine the removal efficiency of trichloroethylene (TCE) from groundwaters at the Naval Air Station North Isla...

  18. Extensional flow of hyaluronic acid solutions in an optimized microfluidic cross-slot device.

    PubMed

    Haward, S J; Jaishankar, A; Oliveira, M S N; Alves, M A; McKinley, G H

    2013-07-01

    We utilize a recently developed microfluidic device, the Optimized Shape Cross-slot Extensional Rheometer (OSCER), to study the elongational flow behavior and rheological properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) solutions representative of the synovial fluid (SF) found in the knee joint. The OSCER geometry is a stagnation point device that imposes a planar extensional flow with a homogenous extension rate over a significant length of the inlet and outlet channel axes. Due to the compressive nature of the flow generated along the inlet channels, and the planar elongational flow along the outlet channels, the flow field in the OSCER device can also be considered as representative of the flow field that arises between compressing articular cartilage layers of the knee joints during running or jumping movements. Full-field birefringence microscopy measurements demonstrate a high degree of localized macromolecular orientation along streamlines passing close to the stagnation point of the OSCER device, while micro-particle image velocimetry is used to quantify the flow kinematics. The stress-optical rule is used to assess the local extensional viscosity in the elongating fluid elements as a function of the measured deformation rate. The large limiting values of the dimensionless Trouton ratio, Tr ∼ O(50), demonstrate that these fluids are highly extensional-thickening, providing a clear mechanism for the load-dampening properties of SF. The results also indicate the potential for utilizing the OSCER in screening of physiological SF samples, which will lead to improved understanding of, and therapies for, disease progression in arthritis sufferers.

  19. Transient performance of fan engine with water ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, S. N. B.

    1991-01-01

    In a continuing investigation on effects of rain-water ingestion into bypass fan engines, it is shown that the performance of axial-flow compressors and fans is fundamentally time-dependent during ingestion of water. A code named WINCOF-I has been developed for establishing the performance of axial-flow turbomachinery operating with air-water vapor-water droplet-water film mixture, Illustrative examples of predictions and effects are provided for the case of the air-compression system of a generic bypass fan engine. Utilizing performance maps so-generated, the effects of water ingestion into the generic engine have been determined under test cell conditions simulating ingestion, flight operation (altitude and flight Mach number), and power-demand setting.

  20. Mechanism of Suppression and Extinguishment of Communication Cable Fire by Ultra Fine Water Mist in Cross-Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-14

    of Communication Cable Fire by Ultra Fine Water Mist in Cross-Flow Chuka C. Ndubizu,* Ramagopal Ananth, Damian Rouson , and Frederick W. Williams NRL...Ultra Fine Water Mist in Cross-Flow April 14, 2006 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. RAMAGOPAL ANANTH DAMIAN ROUSON FREDERICK W... WILLIAMS Navy Technology Center for Safety and Survivability Chemistry Division CHUKA C. NDUBIZU Geo-Centers, Inc. Arlington, VA i REPORT

  1. New observations of sinuous channels on the Amazon Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    High-sinuosity submarine fan channels on the Amazon Fan were first observed using long-range (GLORIA) side-scan sonar in 1982 and mapped in greater detail using multibeam sonar in 1984. These data have provided important insights into the nature and evolution of submarine channel systems. Subsequent studies on the Amazon Fan have focused on avulsion patterns, sedimentation patterns, fan growth and the climate record contained in fan sediments, and there has been relatively little additional work on the details of sinuous channel morphology. Channels on the Amazon Fan have been imaged by multibeam sonar on several occasions since 1984 during focused studies, regional mapping and ship transit. These multibeam data are being compiled and studied to better characterize these iconic channels. One observation of particular interest is that, on the Amazon Fan, channel-wall slumps appear to be more common than previously thought. Drilling of a cut-off meander during ODP Leg 155 on the Amazon Fan showed the presence of slumped material deeper in the channel suggesting that failure of the channel wall was in part responsible for the abandonment and filling of that meander loop. The failure also apparently created a sandy debris flow with clasts of fine-grained levee material transported in a sandy matrix. This sandy debris flow may have been able to flow along the channel and deposit at the seaward end where similar sediments can be found. Disturbed zones now visible on the inner walls of channels at several other places along the channels suggest that these kinds of inner-wall slumps may play important roles in channel evolution and fan growth. Channel-blocking slumps can isolate channel loops which can then fill with sandy sediments, and avulsions are likely if this kind of slump fills the channel. The failure of channel walls can also lead to new channel segments that tend to straighten the channel. Dramatic changes to the shape of the channel can likely lead to large and

  2. Experimental Investigation on Design Enhancement of Axial Fan Using Fixed Guide Vane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munisamy, K. M.; Govindasamy, R.; Thangaraju, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    Airflow passes through the rotating blade in an axial flow fan will experience a helical flow pattern. This swirling effect leads the system to experience swirl energy losses or pressure drop yet reducing the total efficiency of the fan system. A robust tool to encounter this air spin past the blade is by introducing guide vane to the system. Owing to its importance, a new approach in designing outlet guide vane design for a commercial usage 1250mm diameter axial fan with a 30° pitch angle impeller has been introduced in this paper. A single line metal of proper curvature guide vane design technique has been adopted for this study. By choosing fan total efficiency as a target variable to be improved, the total and static pressure on the design point were set to be constraints. Therefore, the guide vane design was done based on the improvement target on the static pressure in system. The research shows that, with the improvement in static pressure by 29.63% through guide vane installation, the total fan efficiency is increased by 5.12%, thus reduces the fan power by 5.32%. Good agreement were found, that when the fan total efficiency increases, the power consumption of the fan is reduced. Therefore, this new approach of guide vane design can be applied to improve axial fan performance.

  3. Semi-analytical model of cross-borehole flow experiments for fractured medium characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubinet, D.; Irving, J.; Day-Lewis, F. D.

    2014-12-01

    The study of fractured rocks is extremely important in a wide variety of research fields where the fractures and faults can represent either rapid access to some resource of interest or potential pathways for the migration of contaminants in the subsurface. Identification of their presence and determination of their properties are critical and challenging tasks that have led to numerous fracture characterization methods. Among these methods, cross-borehole flowmeter analysis aims to evaluate fracture connections and hydraulic properties from vertical-flow-velocity measurements conducted in one or more observation boreholes under forced hydraulic conditions. Previous studies have demonstrated that analysis of these data can provide important information on fracture connectivity, transmissivity, and storativity. Estimating these properties requires the development of analytical and/or numerical modeling tools that are well adapted to the complexity of the problem. Quantitative analysis of cross-borehole flowmeter experiments, in particular, requires modeling formulations that: (i) can be adapted to a variety of fracture and experimental configurations; (ii) can take into account interactions between the boreholes because their radii of influence may overlap; and (iii) can be readily cast into an inversion framework that allows for not only the estimation of fracture hydraulic properties, but also an assessment of estimation error. To this end, we present a new semi-analytical formulation for cross-borehole flow in fractured media that links transient vertical-flow velocities measured in one or a series of observation wells during hydraulic forcing to the transmissivity and storativity of the fractures intersected by these wells. Our model addresses the above needs and provides a flexible and computationally efficient semi-analytical framework having strong potential for future adaptation to more complex configurations. The proposed modeling approach is demonstrated

  4. A cross-disciplinary understanding of incipient motion for effective environmental flow setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neverman, Andrew; Fuller, Ian; Death, Russell; Procter, Jon; Singh, Ranvir

    2016-04-01

    Environmental flow setting as a tool for maintaining ecological health in rivers has been a focus of debate for many years. Environmental flow setting often involves the establishment of base flow levels below impoundment structures as well as setting flushing flows in order to control excess periphyton accrual and sedimentation. The role of bedload transport and substrate stability is recognised as an integral part of effectively managing benthic communities, but environmental flow regulations often do not focus on managing sediment processes. Environmental flows which fail to scour periphyton have been attributed to increased biomass accumulation through increasing nutrient supply to periphyton mats. It may therefore be more effective to establish environmental flow models based on incipient motion thresholds. The aim of these models would be to establish target near-bed velocities as opposed to discharges. Establishment of such models requires an accurate understanding of the threshold conditions for incipient motion. Despite decades of incipient motion studies scientists are unable to consistently and accurately predict bedload transport in natural channels. Incipient motion results from a complex set of geomorphic, hydrologic, and ecological interactions operating over a range of spatial and temporal scales. Direct measurement of these processes can be difficult and time consuming, and has been restricted by a lack of suitable high spatio-temporal resolution methods in the past. This paper presents a cross-disciplinary approach to the study of incipient motion to develop effective environmental flow targets. Recent developments in remote sensing and 3D point cloud analysis are used to characterise substrate surfaces. Groundwater head pressures are measured during floods to examine changes in threshold velocities under different seepage conditions. The onset of bedload transport is recorded using impact plate sensors to relate transport initiation to near

  5. 14 CFR 29.908 - Cooling fans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cooling fans. 29.908 Section 29.908... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.908 Cooling fans. For cooling fans that are a part of a powerplant installation the following apply: (a) Category A. For cooling fans...

  6. 14 CFR 29.908 - Cooling fans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cooling fans. 29.908 Section 29.908... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.908 Cooling fans. For cooling fans that are a part of a powerplant installation the following apply: (a) Category A. For cooling fans...

  7. 14 CFR 29.908 - Cooling fans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cooling fans. 29.908 Section 29.908... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.908 Cooling fans. For cooling fans that are a part of a powerplant installation the following apply: (a) Category A. For cooling fans...

  8. 14 CFR 29.908 - Cooling fans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooling fans. 29.908 Section 29.908... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.908 Cooling fans. For cooling fans that are a part of a powerplant installation the following apply: (a) Category A. For cooling fans...

  9. 14 CFR 29.908 - Cooling fans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cooling fans. 29.908 Section 29.908... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.908 Cooling fans. For cooling fans that are a part of a powerplant installation the following apply: (a) Category A. For cooling fans...

  10. Site technology capsule: Zenon Environmental, Inc. cross-flow pervaporation system

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This capsule contains information on the cross-flow pervaporation technology developed by ZENON Environmental, INC., (ZENON). The technology is designed to remove volatile organic compounds (VOC) from aqueous media. In early 1995, a full-scale Zenon system was evaluated at a former disposal area on Navel Air Station North Island (NASNI) in Coronado, California. Groundwater at the site is contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE) and other organic compounds. Results of the demonstration are summarized in the Performance Data section of this capsule. Results from a 1993 pilot-scale SITE demonstration of the technology in Burlington, Ontario, Canada, are also summarized in the Performance Data section.

  11. Final Report: Pilot-scale Cross-flow Filtration Test - Envelope A + Entrained Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.

    2000-06-27

    This report discusses the results of the operation of a cross-flow filter in a pilot-scale experimental facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company.This filter technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by BNFL, Inc. This plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

  12. Experimental study of cross flow mixing in cylindrical and rectangular ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liscinsky, D. S.; Vranos, A.; Lohmann, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation of non-reacting cross flow jet injection and mixing in cylindrical and rectangular ducts has been conducted with application to a low emissions combustor. Quantitative measurement of injectant concentration distributions perpendicular to the duct axis were obtained by planar digital imaging of the Mie-scattered light from an aerosol seed mixed with the injectant. The flowfield unmixedness was evaluated using (1) a mixing parameter derived from the ratio of the jet concentration fluctuations to the fully mixed concentration, and (2) probability density functions of the concentration distributions. Mixing rate was measured for 45 degree slant slot and round orifice injectors.

  13. Computational analysis of magnetohydrodynamic Casson and Maxwell flows over a stretching sheet with cross diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, G.; Sandeep, N.; Ali, M. E.

    This paper reports the magnetohydrodynamic chemically reacting Casson and Maxwell fluids past a stretching sheet with cross diffusion, non-uniform heat source/sink, thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects. Numerical results are obtained by employing the R-K based shooting method. Effects of pertinent parameters on flow, thermal and concentration fields are discussed with graphical illustrations. We presented the tabular results to discuss the nature of the skin friction coefficient, reduced Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. Dual nature is observed in the solution of Casson and Maxwell fluids. It is also observed a significant increase in heat and mass transfer rate of Maxwell fluid when compared with the Casson fluid.

  14. Methods and systems for Raman and optical cross-interrogation in flow-through silicon membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Letant, Sonia E.

    2014-09-09

    Cross-interrogating photonic detection systems and methods are shown. A flow through photonic crystal membrane with a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate is provided with pores which are distributed along multiple regions. The pores of one region have walls to which a first type of target specific anchor can be attached, while pores of another region have walls to which a second type of target specific anchor can be attached. An optical arrangement out-of-plane to the SERS substrate is also provided for enhanced sensitivity and identification of target organisms.

  15. Continuous Processing of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients Suspensions via Dynamic Cross-Flow Filtration.

    PubMed

    Gursch, Johannes; Hohl, Roland; Toschkoff, Gregor; Dujmovic, Diana; Brozio, Jörg; Krumme, Markus; Rasenack, Norbert; Khinast, Johannes

    2015-10-01

    Over the last years, continuous manufacturing has created significant interest in the pharmaceutical industry. Continuous filtration at low flow rates and high solid loadings poses, however, a significant challenge. A commercially available, continuously operating, dynamic cross-flow filtration device (CFF) is tested and characterized. It is shown that the CFF is a highly suitable technology for continuous filtration. For all tested model active pharmaceutical ingredients, a material-specific strictly linear relationship between feed and permeate rate is identified. Moreover, for each tested substance, a constant concentration factor is reached. A one-parameter model based on a linear equation is suitable to fully describe the CFF filtration performance. This rather unexpected finding and the concentration polarization layer buildup is analyzed and a basic model to describe the observed filtration behavior is developed.

  16. Penetration Characteristics of Air, Carbon Dioxide and Helium Transverse Sonic Jets in Mach 5 Cross Flow

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Erinc; Kontis, Konstantinos; Saravanan, Selvaraj

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation of sonic air, CO2 and Helium transverse jets in Mach 5 cross flow was carried out over a flat plate. The jet to freestream momentum flux ratio, J, was kept the same for all gases. The unsteady flow topology was examined using high speed schlieren visualisation and PIV. Schlieren visualisation provided information regarding oscillating jet shear layer structures and bow shock, Mach disc and barrel shocks. Two-component PIV measurements at the centreline, provided information regarding jet penetration trajectories. Barrel shocks and Mach disc forming the jet boundary were visualised/quantified also jet penetration boundaries were determined. Even though J is kept the same for all gases, the penetration patterns were found to be remarkably different both at the nearfield and the farfield. Air and CO2 jet resulted similar nearfield and farfield penetration pattern whereas Helium jet spread minimal in the nearfield. PMID:25494348

  17. Freezing transition in a four-directional traffic model for facing and crossing pedestrian flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi; Komada, Kazuhito

    2010-04-01

    We study the traffic behavior in the facing and crossing traffic of pedestrians numerically and analytically. There are four kinds of walkers, those moving to east, to west, to north, and to south. We present the mean-field approximation (MFA) model for the four-directional traffic. The model is described in terms of four nonlinear difference equations. The excluded-volume effect and directionality are taken into account. The fundamental diagrams (current-density diagrams) are derived. When pedestrian density is higher than a critical value, the dynamical phase transition occurs from the free flow to the frozen (stopping) state. The critical density is derived by using the linear stability analysis. The velocity and current (flow) at the steady state are derived analytically. The analytical result is consistent with that obtained by the numerical simulation.

  18. An experimental study of the flow field surrounding a subsonic jet in a cross flow. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Robert Foster

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the flow interaction of a 5.08 cm (2.00 in.) diameter round subsonic jet exhausting perpendicularly to a flat plate in a subsonic cross flow was conducted in the NASA Ames 7x1O ft. Wind Tunnel Number One. Flat plate surface pressures were measured at 400 locations in a 30.48 cm (12.0 in.) concentric circular array surrounding the jet exit. Results from these measurements are provided in tabular and graphical form for jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios ranging from 4 to 12, and for jet exit Mach numbers ranging from 0.50 to 0.93. Laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) three component velocity measurements were made in selected regions in the developed jet plume and near the flat plate surface, at a jet Mach number of 0.50 and jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios of 6 and 8. The results of both pressure and LDV measurements are compared with the results of previous experiments. In addition, pictures of the jet plume shape at jet velocity ratios ranging from 4 to 12 were obtained using schleiren photography. The LDV measurements are consistent with previous work, but more extensive measurements will be necessary to provide a detailed picture of the flow field. The surface pressure results compare closely with previous work and provide a useful characterization of jet induced surface pressures. The results demonstrate the primary influence of jet velocity ratio and the secondary influence of jet Mach number in determining such surface pressures.

  19. Incidence loss for fan turbine rotor blade in two-dimensional cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, J. F.; Moffitt, T. P.; Stabe, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of incidence angle on the aerodynamic performance of a fan turbine rotor blade was investigated experimentally in a two dimensional cascade. The test covered a range of incidence angles from -15 deg to 10 deg and exit ideal critical velocity ratios from 0.75 to 0.95. The principal measurements were blade-surface static pressures and cross-channel survey of exit total pressure, static pressure, and flow angle. Flow adjacent to surfaces was examined using a visualization technique. The results of the investigation include blade-surface velocity distribution and overall kinetic energy loss coefficients for the incidence angles and exit velocity ratios tested. The measured losses are compared with those from a reference core turbine rotor blade and also with two common analytical methods of predicting incidence loss.

  20. Optimization of Orifice Geometry for Cross-Flow Mixing in a Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, J. T.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    Mixing of gaseous jets in a cross-flow has significant applications in engineering, one example of which is the dilution zone of a gas turbine combustor. Despite years of study, the design of the jet injection in combustors is largely based on practical experience. The emergence of NO(x) regulations for stationary gas turbines and the anticipation of aero-engine regulations requires an improved understanding of jet mixing as new combustor concepts are introduced. For example, the success of the staged combustor to reduce the emission of NO(x) is almost entirely dependent upon the rapid and complete dilution of the rich zone products within the mixing section. It is these mixing challenges to which the present study is directed. A series of experiments was undertaken to delineate the optimal mixer orifice geometry. A cross-flow to core-flow momentum-flux ratio of 40 and a mass flow ratio of 2.5 were selected as representative of a conventional design. An experimental test matrix was designed around three variables: the number of orifices, the orifice length-to- width ratio, and the orifice angle. A regression analysis was performed on the data to arrive at an interpolating equation that predicted the mixing performance of orifice geometry combinations within the range of the test matrix parameters. Results indicate that the best mixing orifice geometry tested involves eight orifices with a long-to-short side aspect ratio of 3.5 at a twenty-three degree inclination from the center-line of the mixing section.

  1. Optimization of Orifice Geometry for Cross-Flow Mixing in a Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sowa, W. A.; Kroll, J. T.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Mixing of gaseous jets in a cross-flow has significant applications in engineering, one example of which is the dilution zone of a gas turbine combustor. Despite years of study, the design of jet injection in combustors is largely based on practical experience. A series of experiments was undertaken to delineate the optimal mixer orifice geometry. A cross-flow to core-flow momentum-flux ratio of 40 and a mass flow ratio of 2.5 were selected as representative of an advanced design. An experimental test matrix was designed around three variables: the number of orifices, the orifice aspect ratio (long-to-short dimension), and the orifice angle. A regression analysis was performed on the data to arrive at an interpolating equation that predicted the mixing performance of orifice geometry combinations within the range of the test matrix parameters. Results indicate that mixture uniformity is a non-linear function of the number of orifices, the orifice aspect ratio, and the orifice angle. Optimum mixing occurs when the asymptotic mean jet trajectories are in the range of 0.35 less than r/R less than 0.5 (where r = 0 is at the mixer wall) at z/R = 1.0. At the optimum number of orifices, the difference between shallow-angled slots with large aspect ratios and round holes is minimal and either approach will lead to good mixing performance. At the optimum number of orifices, it appears possible to have two local optimums where one corresponds to an aspect ratio of 1.0 and the other to a high aspect ratio.

  2. Blown Away: The Shedding and Oscillation of Sessile Drops by Cross Flowing Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew James Barnabas

    For drops sessile on a solid surface, cross flowing air can drive drop oscillation or shedding, based on the balance and interaction of aerodynamic drag force (based on drop size/shape and air speed) and adhesion/capillary forces (based on surface tension and drop size/shape). Better understanding of the above has applications to, e.g., fuel cell flooding, airfoil icing, and visibility in rain. To understand the basic physics, experiments studying individual sessile drops in a low speed wind tunnel were performed in this thesis. Analysis of high speed video gave time resolved profiles and airspeed for shedding. Testing 0.5 mul to 100 mul drops of water and hexadecane on poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS) yielded a master curve describing critical airspeed for shedding for water drops on all surface tested. This curve predicts behavior for new surfaces, and explains experimental results published previously. It also indicates that the higher contact angle leads to easier shedding due to decreased adhesion and increased drag. Developing a novel floating element differential drag sensor gave the first measurements of the microNewton drag force experienced by drops. Forces magnitude is comparable to gravitational shedding from a tilted plate and to simplified models for drop adhesion, with deviations that suggest effects due to the air flow. Fluid properties are seen to have little effect on drag versus airspeed, and decreased adhesion is seen to be more important than increased drag for easing shedding. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number increases slightly with liquid-solid contact angle, and with drop volume. Results suggest that the drop experiences increased drag compared to similarly shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillations aeroelasticly coupling into the otherwise laminar flow. The bulk and surface oscillations of sessile drops in cross flow was also studied, using a full profile analysis

  3. Axisymmetric electrostatic magnetohydrodynamic oscillations in tokamaks with general cross-sections and toroidal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Guo, Wenfeng

    2016-06-01

    The frequency spectrum and mode structure of axisymmetric electrostatic oscillations [the zonal flow (ZF), sound waves (SW), geodesic acoustic modes (GAM), and electrostatic mean flows (EMF)] in tokamaks with general cross-sections and toroidal flows are studied analytically using the electrostatic approximation for magnetohydrodynamic modes. These modes constitute the "electrostatic continua." Starting from the energy principle for a tokamak plasma with toroidal rotation, we showed that these modes are completely stable. The ZF, the SW, and the EMF could all be viewed as special cases of the general GAM. The Euler equations for the general GAM are obtained and are solved analytically for both the low and high range of Mach numbers. The solution consists of the usual countable infinite set of eigen-modes with discrete eigen-frequencies, and two modes with lower frequencies. The countable infinite set is identified with the regular GAM. The lower frequency mode, which is also divergence free as the plasma rotation tends to zero, is identified as the ZF. The other lower (zero) frequency mode is a pure geodesic E×B flow and not divergence free is identified as the EMF. The frequency of the EMF is shown to be exactly 0 independent of plasma cross-section or its flow Mach number. We also show that in general, sound waves with no geodesic components are (almost) completely lost in tokamaks with a general cross-sectional shape. The exception is the special case of strict up-down symmetry. In this case, half of the GAMs would have no geodesic displacements. They are identified as the SW. Present day tokamaks, although not strictly up-down symmetric, usually are only slightly up-down asymmetric. They are expected to share the property with the up-down symmetric tokamak in that half of the GAMs would be more sound wave-like, i.e., have much weaker coupling to the geodesic components than the other half of non-sound-wave-like modes with stronger coupling to the geodesic

  4. Flow-induced oscillations of a prism with triangular cross-section placed in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Daniel; Seyed-Aghazadeh, Banafsheh; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2015-11-01

    Flow-induced oscillations of a prism with a triangular cross-section was studied experimentally. The cylinder had one-degree-of-freedom to oscillate in the crossflow direction. The response of the cylinder in terms of the amplitudes of oscillations as well as the flow forces were studied at varying angles of attack in the range of α = 0° -60° and a reduced velocity range of U* =4-22. Depending on the angle of attack and the reduced velocity, the cylinder experienced either VIV or galloping. For small angles of attack of α<30°, the cylinder did not oscillate while for larger angles of α = 30° and 35°, the cylinder underwent VIV in a range of reduced velocities (U* =7-14.5) and galloping at higher reduced velocities (U* =19.5-22). The conducted dye flow visualization as well as the measured flow forces confirmed the existence of lock-in as well as galloping-type response. For larger angles of attack of α>35°, the amplitude of oscillations increased monotonically with increasing reduced velocity and the cylinder underwent galloping. Several different vortex shedding patterns were observed in the wake of the cylinder at different angles of attack and flow velocities. New, high-frequency shedding patterns with their corresponding high harmonic shedding frequencies in the flow force FFTs were observed in the regions where galloping occurred. This work is partially supported by the NSF-sponsored IGERT: Offshore Wind Energy Engineering, Environmental Science, and Policy (Grant Number 1068864).

  5. Groundwater Budget Analysis of Cross Formational Flow: Hueco Bolson (Texas and Chihuahua)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, W. R.

    2005-12-01

    Groundwater from the Hueco Bolson supplies the majority of municipal water in El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, the largest international border community in the world. For over 100 years, water managers and researchers have been developing an understanding of Hueco Bolson groundwater occurrence and movement, and the interaction between surface water and groundwater. Since 2001, isotopic studies of groundwater chemistry on both sides of the border have provided valuable insights into the occurrence of groundwater and its historic movement. Numerical groundwater flow models of the area have been developed and used since the 1970s. The results of the most recent model were used to develop a detailed analysis of the groundwater inflows, outflows and storage change of the entire area and subregions of the model domain from 1903 to 2002. These detailed groundwater budgets were used to quantify temporal and spatial flow changes that resulted from groundwater pumping: induced inflow of surface water, decreased natural outflows, and storage declines. In addition, the detailed groundwater budgets were used to quantify the changes in cross formational flow between the Rio Grande Alluvium and the Hueco Bolson, as well as the changes in vertical flow within the Hueco Bolson. The groundwater budget results are consistent with the results of the isotopic analyses, providing a much needed confirmation of the overall conceptual model of the numerical model. In addition, the groundwater budgets have provided information that has been useful in further interpreting the results of the isotopic analyses.

  6. Scaling Law for Cross-stream Diffusion in Microchannels under Combined Electroosmotic and Pressure Driven Flow.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongjun; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the cross-stream diffusion of an analyte in a rectangular microchannel under combined electroosmotic flow (EOF) and pressure driven flow to investigate the heterogeneous transport behavior and spatially-dependent diffusion scaling law. An analytical model capable of accurately describing 3D steady-state convection-diffusion in microchannels with arbitrary aspect ratios is developed based on the assumption of the thin Electric Double Layer (EDL). The model is verified against high-fidelity numerical simulation in terms of flow velocity and analyte concentration profiles with excellent agreement (<0.5% relative error). An extensive parametric analysis is then undertaken to interrogate the effect of the combined flow velocity field on the transport behavior in both the positive pressure gradient (PPG) and negative pressure gradient (NPG) cases. For the first time, the evolution from the spindle-shaped concentration profile in the PPG case, via the stripe-shaped profile (pure EOF), and finally to the butterfly-shaped profile in the PPG case is obtained using the analytical model along with a quantitative depiction of the spatially-dependent diffusion layer thickness and scaling law across a wide range of the parameter space.

  7. Integral fan/water separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Centrifugal force created by rotating fan wheel separates moisture from gas. Lightweight portable unit can be worn with pressurized suit, where it will remove moisture that accumulates from breathing and perspiration.

  8. Central Fan Integrated Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-12

    This information sheet describes one example of a ventilation system design, a central fan integrated supply (CFIS) system, a mechanical ventilation and pollutant source control to ensure that there is reasonable indoor air quality inside the house.

  9. Fan Noise Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.

    1994-01-01

    Results of recent NASA research to reduce aircraft turbofan noise are described. As the bypass ratio of a turbofan engine increases from five to as much as 20, the dominant source of engine noise is the fan. A primary mechanism of tone noise generation is the rotor blade wakes interacting with downstream stator vanes. Methods of analyzing rotor stator tone noise generation are described and sample results are given. The role of an acoustic modal description is emphasized. Wind tunnel tests of model fans and nacelles are described including a novel rotating microphone technique for modal measurement. Sample far field results are given showing the effects of inlet length, and modal measurements are shown which point to a new generation mechanism. Concepts for active fan noise control at the source are addressed. Implications of the research which have general relevance to fan noise generation and control are discussed.

  10. Fan noise research at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneweg, John F.

    Results of recent NASA research to reduce aircraft turbofan noise are described. As the bypass ratio of a turbofan engine increases from 5 to as much as 20, the dominant source of engine noise is the fan. A primary mechanism of tone noise generation is the rotor blade wakes interacting with downstream stator vanes. Methods of analyzing rotor-stator tone noise generation are described and sample results are given. The role of an acoustic modal description is emphasized. Wind tunnel tests of model fans and nacelles are described including a novel rotating microphone technique for modal measurement. Sample far field results are given showing the effects of inlet length, and modal measurements are shown which point to a new generation mechanism. Concepts for active fan noise control at the source are addressed. Implications of the research which have general relevance to fan noise generation and control are discussed.

  11. PFP supply fan motor starters

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, R.D.

    1995-05-31

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is currently stabilizing about 25 kg of Pu sludge; upon completion of this task, PFP will be maintained in a safe standby condition to await decision from the PFP NEPA review. It can take about 10 years to initiate and complete terminal cleanout after this; the facility will then be decommissioned and decontaminated. The 234-5Z ventilation system must continue to operate until terminal cleanout. Part of the ventilation system is the seismic fan shutdown system which shuts down the ventilation supply fans in case of strong earthquake. This document presents criteria for installing solid state, reduced voltage motor starters and isolation contactors for the 8 main ventilation supply fans. The isolation contactors will shutdown the supply fans in event of earthquake.

  12. Cross-correlation of instantaneous phase increments in pressure-flow fluctuations: Applications to cerebral autoregulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Hu, Kun; Stanley, H. Eugene; Novak, Vera; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2006-03-01

    We investigate the relationship between the blood flow velocities (BFV) in the middle cerebral arteries and beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) recorded from a finger in healthy and post-stroke subjects during the quasisteady state after perturbation for four different physiologic conditions: supine rest, head-up tilt, hyperventilation, and CO2 rebreathing in upright position. To evaluate whether instantaneous BP changes in the steady state are coupled with instantaneous changes in the BFV, we compare dynamical patterns in the instantaneous phases of these signals, obtained from the Hilbert transform, as a function of time. We find that in post-stroke subjects the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV exhibit well-pronounced patterns that remain stable in time for all four physiologic conditions, while in healthy subjects these patterns are different, less pronounced, and more variable. We propose an approach based on the cross-correlation of the instantaneous phase increments to quantify the coupling between BP and BFV signals. We find that the maximum correlation strength is different for the two groups and for the different conditions. For healthy subjects the amplitude of the cross-correlation between the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV is small and attenuates within 3-5 heartbeats. In contrast, for post-stroke subjects, this amplitude is significantly larger and cross-correlations persist up to 20 heartbeats. Further, we show that the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV are cross-correlated even within a single heartbeat cycle. We compare the results of our approach with three complementary methods: direct BP-BFV cross-correlation, transfer function analysis, and phase synchronization analysis. Our findings provide insight into the mechanism of cerebral vascular control in healthy subjects, suggesting that this control mechanism may involve rapid adjustments (within a heartbeat) of the cerebral vessels, so that BFV remains steady in

  13. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2006-09-30

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (a) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, which will be (b) evaluated at ''in-service'' loads at service temperatures and environments. In this 12th quarter of performance, program activities are concluded for Task 2 and continuing for Tasks 3, 4 and

  14. A Variable Speed Fan Dynamometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Karl D

    1920-01-01

    Fan brakes used as absorption dynamometers in testing internal combustion engines have the disadvantage that a given fan will run only at one speed when the engine is delivering full power. In order to be able to vary the speed at which a given power will be absorbed, English manufacturers have for some time been using a cylindrical housing around the fan with one or two variable openings in the periphery. Here, results are given of tests conducted to determine how great a range of speed can be obtained from such a device. The tests show that a power ratio of five to 1 can be obtained, the power ratio being defined as the ratio of the power absorbed by the fan at a given speed with the outlet open to the power absorbed at the same speed with the second outlet closed. Data show that improvements in the design of the fan brake can make the speed ratio approach but not exceed a value of two to one. Also given here are a brief outline of previous work on fan brakes, a description of the experimental apparatus and methods used in the tests, and a more detailed statement of test results.

  15. Measurement of airflow and pressure characteristics of a fan built in a car ventilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, Jan; Poláček, Filip; Fojtlín, Miloš; Fišer, Jan; Jícha, Miroslav

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a set of operating points of a fan built in ventilation system of our test car. These operating points are given by the fan pressure characteristics and are defined by a pressure drop of the HVAC system (air ducts and vents) and volumetric flow rate of ventilation air. To cover a wide range of pressure drops situations, four cases of vent flaps setup were examined: (1) all vents opened, (2) only central vents closed (3) only central vents opened and (4) all vents closed. To cover a different volumetric flows, the each case was measured at least for four different speeds of fan defined by the fan voltage. It was observed that the pressure difference of the fan is proportional to the fan voltage and strongly depends on the throttling of the air distribution system by the settings of the vents flaps. In case of our test car we identified correlations between volumetric flow rate of ventilation air, fan pressure difference and fan voltage. These correlations will facilitate and reduce time costs of the following experiments with this test car.

  16. A scale-down cross-flow filtration technology for biopharmaceuticals and the associated theory.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuyin; Kiefer, Hans; Zhou, Dansheng; Guan, Yue Hugh; Wang, Shili; Wang, Hua; Lu, Ying; Zhuang, Yingping

    2016-03-10

    Use of microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) in cross-flow mode has been intensifying in downstream processing for expensive biopharmaceuticals. A scale-down cross-flow module with ring channel was constructed for reducing costs and increasing throughput. Commensurate with its validation, a new scale down (or scale up) theoretical framework has been further developed to 3 operational parities: (1) ratio of initial sample volume to membrane area, (2) shear force adjacent to membrane surface, and (3) initial permeate flux. By keeping identical initial physicochemical properties, we show that these 3 operational parities are equivalent to 2 further time-dependent theoretical parities for flux and transmission respectively. Importantly, transmission sensitively reflects membrane conditions for partially transmissible molecules or particles. Computational fluid dynamics simulation was conducted to confirm nearly identical shear forces for the mini and its reference filters. Permeate fluxes in suspension containing Escherichia coli phage T7, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) or other proteins, and transmission (with phage T7) were measured. For application demonstration, diafiltration and concentration modes were applied to the MAb, and separation mode to a mixture of bovine serum albumin and lysozyme. In conclusion, the developed scale-down filter has been shown to behave identically or similarly to its reference filter.

  17. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal Kad

    2007-09-30

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program were to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined was iterative and intended to systematically (i) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, to be (ii) evaluated at 'in-service' loads at service temperatures and environments. Our report outlines the significant hoop creep enhancements possible via secondary cross-rolling and/or flow-forming operations. Each of the

  18. Study of a new airfoil used in reversible axial fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Chaojun; Wei, Baosuo; Gu, Chuangang

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of the reverse ventilation of axial flow are analyzed. An s shaped airfoil with a double circular arc was tested in a wind tunnel. The experimental results showed that the characteristics of this new airfoil in reverse ventilation are the same as those in normal ventilation, and that this airfoil is better than the existing airfoils used on reversible axial fans.

  19. The supersonic fan engine - An advanced concept in supersonic cruise propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franciscus, L. C.

    1981-01-01

    Engine performance and mission studies were conducted for a novel turbofan engine concept incorporating a supersonic through-flow fan, and comparisons were made with two supersonic transport (SST) engine concepts of equivalent thrust and technological sophistication. It was found that in the case of an SST with a cruise speed of Mach 2.32, the through-flow fan engine may yield ranges 10 to 20% greater than the two alternatives considered. The engine has a conventional core, with the supersonic fan being driven by a concentric low-pressure turbine that is uncoupled with the single, high pressure turbine/compressor core spool. Among the topics discussed are the methods of analysis employed and perturbation studies concerning supersonic fan adiabatic efficiency, fan discharge characteristics and propulsion system weight.

  20. Performance Evaluation, Emulation, and Control of Cross-Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnaro, Robert J.

    Cross-flow hydrokinetic turbines are a promising option for effectively harvesting energy from fast-flowing streams or currents. This work describes the dynamics of such turbines, analyzes techniques used to scale turbine properties for prototyping, determines and demonstrates the limits of stability for cross-flow rotors, and discusses means and objectives of turbine control. Novel control strategies are under development to utilize low-speed operation (slower than at maximum power point) as a means of shedding power under rated conditions. However, operation in this regime may be unstable. An experiment designed to characterize the stability of a laboratory-scale cross-flow turbine operating near a critically low speed yields evidence that system stall (complete loss of ability to rotate) occurs due, in part, to interactions with turbulent decreases in flow speed. The turbine is capable of maintaining 'stable' operation at critical speed for short duration (typically less than 10 s), as described by exponential decay. The presence of accelerated 'bypass' flow around the rotor and decelerated 'induction' region directly upstream of the rotor, both predicted by linear momentum theory, are observed and quantified with particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements conducted upstream of the turbine. Additionally, general agreement is seen between PIV inflow measurements and those obtained by an advection-corrected acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) further upstream. Performance of a turbine at small (prototype) geometric scale may be prone to undesirable effects due to operation at low Reynolds number and in the presence of high channel blockage. Therefore, testing at larger scale, in open water is desirable. A cross-flow hydrokinetic turbine with a projected area (product of blade span and rotor diameter) of 0.7 m2 is evaluated in open-water tow trials at three inflow speeds ranging from 1.0 m/s to 2.1 m/s. Measurements of the inflow velocity, the rotor mechanical

  1. Measurements of the cross-sectional distributions of spherical particles suspended in rectangular channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanishi, Takahiro; Yabu, Takuya; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Itano, Tomoaki; Sugihara-Seki, Masako

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the inertial migration of neutrally buoyant spherical particles using millimeter-sized rectangular channels of various aspect ratios (AR = 1 - 4.2), in the range of Reynolds numbers (Re) from 100 to 2000. The Reynolds number was defined as UH/ ν, where U is the maximum flow velocity, H is the length of the shorter face of the channel cross-section, and ν is the kinematic viscosity. Dilute suspensions of polystyrene particles of diameter d = 300 - 650 μm were used. For the size ratio d / H = 0 . 1 - 0.25, the observation of particle positions at downstream cross-sections revealed that the particles were aligned in a straight or curved line nearly parallel to the longer face of the channel cross-section and their probability density function showed a sharp peak at a certain distance from the channel centerline. These focusing positions of particles were found to depend on Re, d / H and AR. They approached the channel centerline with increasing Re. As AR increased for constant Re and constant d / H , focusing positions moved closer to the channel centerline, and reached asymptotic positions for AR>2.

  2. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-02-28

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  3. Alluvial-fan and lacustrine fan-delta sedimentation in west-central California during the Middle Tertiary transition from subduction to transform tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.B. . Dept. of Geological Science); Stanley, R.G. )

    1992-01-01

    The Plush Ranch (PR) Formation was deposited in one of several sedimentary basins in west-central California. The PR consists of more than 1,800 m of nonmarine sedimentary rocks and interbedded basaltic volcanic rocks that together record a complicated history of synsedimentary faulting, volcanism, and deposition in alluvial-fan, fan-delta, and lacustrine depositional settings. The sedimentological analysis indicates that both the northern and southern margins of the PR basin apparently were controlled ENE-trending normal faults, but that the two margins are characterized from each other by distinctive depositional facies, provenance, and sediment transport directions. The northern basin margin is recorded by sandstone-dominated braidplain deposits, with interbedded lenses of boulder-rich breccia derived by landsliding from a nearby granitic provenance. The southern basin margin is represented by matrix- and clast-supported boulder- to pebble-conglomerate with interbedded trough-crossbedded sandstones; these represent debris-flow and stream-flow alluvial-fan deposits. The alluvial-fan deposits grade northward into lacustrine fan-delta facies and provide an excellent detailed record of interfingering between alluvial-fan and lacustrine fan-delta deposits on a bed-by-bed scale. Basalt are interbedded with turbidite sandstones and evaporite/carbonate-rich intervals, but not with alluvial-fan deposits. The analysis of the sedimentary record of the PR Formation permits documentation of detailed facies relations that are useful in understanding alluvial-fan and fan-delta transitions in fault-bounded lacustrine basins. In addition, results support the conclusion of earlier workers that the Big Pine fault was a down-to-the-north, normal-slip fault along the southern margin of the PR basin during late Oligocene-early Miocene time, and then became a predominantly left-slip fault during the Quaternary.

  4. Damping and fluidelastic instability in two-phase cross-flow heat exchanger tube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Joaquin E.

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate damping and fluidelastic instability in tube arrays subjected to two-phase cross-flow. The purpose of this research was to improve our understanding of these phenomena and how they are affected by void fraction and flow regime. The model tube bundle had 10 cantilevered tubes in a parallel-triangular configuration, with a pitch ratio of 1.49. The two-phase flow loop used in this research utilized Refrigerant 11 as the working fluid, which better models steam-water than air-water mixtures in terms of vapour-liquid mass ratio as well as permitting phase changes due to pressure fluctuations. The void fraction was measured using a gamma densitometer, introducing an improvement over the Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) in terms of void fraction, density and velocity predictions. Three different damping measurement methodologies were implemented and compared in order to obtain a more reliable damping estimate. The methods were the traditionally used half-power bandwidth, the logarithmic decrement and an exponential fitting to the tube decay response. The decay trace was obtained by "plucking" the monitored tube from outside the test section using a novel technique, in which a pair of electromagnets changed their polarity at the natural frequency of the tube to produce resonance. The experiments showed that the half-power bandwidth produces higher damping values than the other two methods. The primary difference between the methods is caused by tube frequency shifting, triggered by fluctuations in the added mass and coupling between the tubes, which depend on void fraction and flow regime. The exponential fitting proved to be the more consistent and reliable approach to estimating damping. In order to examine the relationship between the damping ratio and mass flux, the former was plotted as a function of void fraction and pitch mass flux in an iso-contour plot. The results showed that damping is not independent of mass

  5. An Isolated Circular Synthetic Jet in Cross-Flow at Low Momentum-Flux Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.; Zaman, Khairul B. M. Q.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2005-01-01

    A joint experimental and computational investigation was carried out for a round synthetic jet issuing normal to a turbulent boundary layer at a momentum-flux ratio of one. Distributions of velocity and turbulence intensity were measured by hot-wire anemometry. Numerical results were obtained using unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) computations. Time and phase-averaged flow properties were compared on the cross sectional plane at x/D = 0.53, 5 and 10 as well as on the axial plane of symmetry. Overall, the numerical results agreed well with the experimental data. CFD predicted a somewhat larger velocity deficit in regions of low-momentum fluid pulled up from the boundary layer. Phase- averaged velocity contours at the plane of symmetry indicated good match between experiments and CFD regarding the size and the position of the periodic flow structure. However, some differences occurred in details such as the shape and inclination of the low-speed flow structure.

  6. Active Control of Jets in Cross-Flow for Film Cooling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.

    2003-01-01

    Jets in cross-flow have applications in film cooling of gas turbine vanes, blades and combustor liners. Their cooling effectiveness depends on the extent to which the cool jet-fluid adheres to the cooled component surface. Lift-off of the cooling jet flow or other mechanisms promoting mixing, cause loss of cooling effectiveness as they allow the hot "free-stream" fluid to come in contact with the component surface. The premise of this project is that cooling effectiveness can be improved by actively controlling (e.9. forcing, pulsing) the jet flow. Active control can be applied to prevent/delay lift-off and suppress mixing. Furthermore, an actively controlled film-cooling system coupled with appropriate sensory input (e.g. temperature or heat flux) can adapt to spatial and temporal variations of the hot-gas path. Thus, it is conceivable that the efficiency of film-cooling systems can be improved, resulting in coolant fluid economy. It is envisioned that Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) will play a role in the realization of such systems. As a first step, a feasibility study will be conducted to evaluate the concept, identify actuation and sensory elements and develop a control strategy. Part of this study will be the design of a proof-of-concept experiment and collection of necessary data.

  7. Interactions of a finite span synthetic jet with a cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Chia Min; van Buren, Tyler; Whalen, Edward; Amitay, Michael; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Team; Boeing Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    A synthetic jet is a zero-net-mass-flux flow control actuator that produces alternating ejection and suction of fluid momentum across an orifice. It has been used in numerous applications as an active flow control device to improve aerodynamic performance. Though their aerodynamic performance effects are well known, this present study seeks to understand the fluid dynamic effects of synthetic jets. Specifically, the work investigates the interactions of a finite span synthetic jet with a zero-pressure-gradient laminar boundary layer. This study was performed in a small-scale subsonic wind tunnel with an adjustable test section upper wall that was used to generate a zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. Several finite span rectangular orifices were chosen for this study. Time and phase-averaged Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) measurements were acquired at multiple planes upstream and downstream of the synthetic jet orifice to explore the interaction of the synthetic jet with the cross flow. The effects of the orifice aspect ratio (12, 18, and 24) and blowing ratio (0.5, 1, and 1.5) were investigated. The unsteady vortical structures observed in the near field and the steady structures in the far field are discussed.

  8. On the use of the periodicity condition in cross-flow tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beladjine, Boumedienne; Aounallah, Mohammed; Belkadi, Mustapha; Aadjlout, Lahouari; Imine, Omar

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements and numerical predictions of turbulent cross-flow through an in-line 7×7 bundle configuration with a constant transverse and longitudinal pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.44. The experiments are conducted to measure the pressure around tubes, using DPS differential pressure scanner with air flow, in square channel at a Reynolds number of 35000 based on the gap velocity and the tube diameter. The commercial ANSYS FLUENT is used to solve the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The primary aim of the present study is to search for a turbulent model that could serve as an engineering design tool at a relatively low computational cost. The performances of the Spalart-Allmaras, the RNG k-ɛ, the Shear Stress Transport k-ω and the second moment closure RSM models are evaluated by comparing their simulation results against experimental data. The second objective is to verify the validity of the periodicity assumption taken account in the most previous numerical works by considering the filled bundle geometry. The CFD results show that the Spalart-Allmaras model on the fine mesh are comparable to the experiments while the periodicity statement did not produce consistently the flow behavior in the 7×7 tube bundle configuration.

  9. Relationship of flow and cross-sectional area to frictional stress in airway models of asthma.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, R; Singh, V; Tattersfield, A E; Sharma, S D; Kar, S; Gupta, A B

    1999-08-01

    Frictional stress from air flowing through narrowed airways may damage the airway mucosa and thereby increase airway inflammation and airway obstruction. To investigate the levels of frictional stress that might occur in the airway, we measured the frictional stress in three physical airway models (model 1: normal state; models 2 and 3: narrowed states with cross-sectional area half and one-fourth of model 1, respectively) at tracheal expiratory flow rates of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 L/sec. Frictional stress measured at stations in the trachea (A), two each in the left (B and C) and right (D and E) major bronchi, and one in the right secondary bronchus (F) indicated that at higher flow rates, high values of the frictional stress seen in model 3 (highest value being 139.2 N/m2 at 8 L/sec at station) could well damage the airway wall, especially during episodes of cough, and particularly when the mucosa is inflamed and friable as it is in asthmatic patients. Conversely, control of cough may have anti-inflammatory benefits in asthmatic patients.

  10. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of a 1215 ft/sec Tip Speed Transonic Fan System Model for Acoustic Methods Assessment and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Aerodynamic simulations of a 1215 ft/sec tip speed transonic fan system were performed at five different operating points on the fan operating line, in order to provide detailed internal flow field information for use with fan acoustic prediction methods presently being developed, assessed and validated. The fan system is a sub-scale, low-noise research fan/nacelle model that has undergone extensive experimental testing in the 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Details of the fan geometry, the computational fluid dynamics methods, the computational grids, and various computational parameters relevant to the numerical simulations are discussed. Flow field results for three of the five operating points simulated are presented in order to provide a representative look at the computed solutions. Each of the five fan aerodynamic simulations involved the entire fan system, which for this model did not include a split flow path with core and bypass ducts. As a result, it was only necessary to adjust fan rotational speed in order to set the fan operating point, leading to operating points that lie on a fan operating line and making mass flow rate a fully dependent parameter. The resulting mass flow rates are in good agreement with measurement values. Computed blade row flow fields at all fan operating points are, in general, aerodynamically healthy. Rotor blade and fan exit guide vane flow characteristics are good, including incidence and deviation angles, chordwise static pressure distributions, blade surface boundary layers, secondary flow structures, and blade wakes. Examination of the flow fields at all operating conditions reveals no excessive boundary layer separations or related secondary-flow problems.

  11. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Vane Unsteady Pressure Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the nature of fan outlet guide vane pressure fluctuations and their link to rotor-stator interaction noise, time histories of vane fluctuating pressures were digitally acquired as part of the Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test. Vane unsteady pressures were measured at seven fan tip speeds for both a radial and a swept vane configuration. Using time-domain averaging and spectral analysis, the blade passing frequency (BPF) harmonic and broadband contents of the vane pressures were individually analyzed. Significant Sound Pressure Level (SPL) reductions were observed for the swept vane relative to the radial vane for the BPF harmonics of vane pressure, but vane broadband reductions due to sweep turned out to be much smaller especially on an average basis. Cross-correlation analysis was used to establish the level of spatial coherence of broadband pressures between different locations on the vane and integral length scales of pressure fluctuations were estimated from these correlations. Two main results of this work are: (1) the average broadband level on the vane (in dB) increases linearly with the fan tip speed for both the radial and swept vanes, and (2) the broadband pressure distribution on the vane is nearly homogeneous and its integral length scale is a monotonically decreasing function of fan tip speed.

  12. Altitude performance of a low-noise-technology fan in a turbofan engine with and without a sound suppressing nacelle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, T. J.; Grey, R. E.; Abdelwahah, M.

    1976-01-01

    Test variables were inlet Reynolds number index (0.2 to 0.5), flight Mach number (0.2 to 0.8), and flow distortion (tip radial and combined circumferential - tip radial patterns). Results are limited to fan bypass and overall engine performance. There were no discernible effects of Reynolds number on fan performance. Increasing flight Mach number shifted the fan operating line such that pressure ratio decreased and airflow increased. Inlet flow distortion lowered stall margin. For a Reynolds number index of 0.2 and flight Mach number of 0.54, the sound suppressing nacelle lowered fan efficiency three points and increased specific fuel consumption about 10 percent.

  13. Surface processes on a mud-dominated Mars analogue alluvial fan, Atacama Desert, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobley, D. E.; Howard, A. D.; Morgan, A. M.; Matsubara, Y.; Moore, J. M.; Parsons, R.; Williams, R. M.; Burr, D. M.; Hayes, A. G.; Dietrich, W.

    2012-12-01

    We characterize surface processes on highly unusual terrestrial alluvial fans, which we interpret as a strong analogue for large fans on Mars. The Mars fans date to post-Noachian periods when the martian climate was dominated by cold, hyperarid conditions. Some of the martian fans are differentially eroded to leave their distributary channels in positive relief. This inversion, along with the lack of boulders visible on most fan surfaces, reveals that the dominant grain size of the fans is fine enough for the overbank deposits to be stripped by wind. Degradation, image resolution, and lack of ground truthing all act to obscure the nature of the past flow processes. The fans in the Pampa de Tamarugal of the Atacama Desert of northern Chile are excellent potential Mars analogues for a number of reasons: 1. Hyperaridity, with ~2 mm/y rainfall over the fans themselves, resulting in 2. very little vegetation, 3. no fluvial erosion on the fans themselves, and 4. wind-driven erosion of the fan surfaces; 5. equivalent fan scale (tens of km); 6. similar fan gradient (low); 7. low channel branching density; 8. runoff fed from adjacent, much steeper terrain receiving more precipitation (~500 km2 drainages receiving 0.1-1 m/y precipitation in the High Andes, crater walls and interpreted orographic effects on Mars). Both the modern channels and the preserved stratigraphy are dominated by debris flow-like sheetflow mud deposits. Channels are leveed by concrete-like mass-supported deposits of granules and sand suspended in a silt and clay matrix, often overtopping the channel margins and forming up to 150 m wide levees and km-length sheet flows. This leveeing strongly constrains the aggrading channel, which is typically dominated by better sorted and imbricated fluvial deposits. We infer that the wetter tail of mudlfows sorts the deposits, keeping the central channel unblocked by mud. Relatively few channels are active at any time, but aggradation triggers occasional avulsions

  14. Nusselt numbers of laminar, oscillating flows in stacks and regenerators with pores of arbitrary cross-sectional geometry.

    PubMed

    Brady, John F

    2013-04-01

    Though widely used in steady-flow heat transfer applications, the Nusselt number-a dimensionless heat transfer coefficient-has not been studied as thoroughly in oscillating flows and is therefore not generally used in thermoacoustic applications. This paper presents expressions for the Nusselt numbers of laminar oscillating flows within the pores of stacks and regenerators, derived from thermoacoustic theory developed by Rott and Swift. These expressions are based on bulk (velocity-weighted, cross-sectionally averaged) temperature, rather than the cross-sectionally averaged temperature. Results are shown for parallel plates, circular pores, rectangular pores, and within the boundary layer limit. It is shown that bulk temperature does not become infinite during an acoustic cycle and that the Nusselt number is a complex constant at all times. In addition, steady-flow Nusselt numbers are recovered when velocity and temperature profiles are like those in steady flows.

  15. Effect of momentum dependent interactions and nucleonic cross-section on directed flow (v{sub 1})

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Anupriya; Vinayak, Karan Singh; Kumar, Suneel

    2013-07-15

    The descriptive analysis for the effect of momentum dependent interactions and nucleonic cross-section (isospin dependent and isospin-independent) on the neutron–proton directed flow (v{sub 1}), within the framework of the isospin dependent quantum molecular dynamics model is presented. Our study shows that, the directed flow of both neutrons and protons is affected by the momentum dependence of nuclear equation of state and the isospin dependence of nucleon–nucleon cross-section. A soft momentum dependent (SM) equation of state is found to be more compatible with the experimental data. -- Highlights: •Role of rapidity cut on transverse flow has been explored. •p{sub t} differential flow for protons and neutrons has been studied. •Role of MDI on directed flow has been studied.

  16. Measurement and analysis of radiated sound from a low speed fan with a large tip gap.

    PubMed

    Bilka, M J; Anthoine, J; Schram, C

    2014-05-01

    The wake flow field and radiated sound from a low speed axial fan is studied experimentally. The fan geometry uses controlled diffusion blades and is designed with a low aspect ratio (0.9). The fan is installed with a large tip gap, approximately 10% of the blade span. The radiated sound field is analyzed using a known trailing edge noise formulation. First, the model is compared to an experiment of a single airfoil in a wind tunnel to assess the predictive capabilities. Second, measurements of the fan are made at two different blade loading conditions. Hot wire measurements are made in the near wake of the fan to assess the extent of the tip leakage flow for each condition. The radiated sound fields are compared with the trailing edge noise theory. Use is made of the wake measurements as an input to a surface pressure model. When the fan is operated with the optimal blade loading, the influence of the tip leakage flow is found to be of secondary acoustic impact. When the fan is operated at a high loading condition for the blades, a more significant leakage flow develops and is found to be responsible for the dominant radiated sound.

  17. Cross-correlation based time delay estimation for turbulent flow velocity measurements: Statistical considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, Balazs; Bencze, Attila; Zoletnik, Sandor; Veres, Gabor; Por, Gabor

    2011-12-15

    Time delay estimation methods (TDE) are well-known techniques to investigate poloidal flows in hot magnetized plasmas through the propagation properties of turbulent structures in the medium. One of these methods is based on the estimation of the time lag at which the cross-correlation function (CCF) estimation reaches its maximum value. The uncertainty of the peak location refers to the smallest determinable flow velocity modulation, and therefore the standard deviation of the time delay imposes important limitation to the measurements. In this article, the relative standard deviation of the CCF estimation and the standard deviation of its peak location are calculated analytically using a simple model of turbulent signals. This model assumes independent (non interacting) overlapping events (coherent structures) with randomly distributed spatio-temporal origins moving with background flow. The result of our calculations is the derivation of a general formula for the CCF variance, which is valid not exclusively in the high event density limit, but also for arbitrary event densities. Our formula reproduces the well known expression for high event densities previously published in the literature. In this paper we also present a derivation of the variance of time delay estimation that turns out to be inversely proportional to the applied time window. The derived formulas were tested in real plasma measurements. The calculations are an extension of the earlier work of Bencze and Zoletnik [Phys. Plasmas 12, 052323 (2005)] where the autocorrelation-width technique was developed. Additionally, we show that velocities calculated by a TDE method possess a broadband noise which originates from this variance, its power spectral density cannot be decreased by worsening the time resolution and can be coherent with noises of other velocity measurements where the same turbulent structures are used. This noise should not be confused with the impact of zero mean frequency zonal flow

  18. Flow structures and red blood cell dynamics in arteriole of dilated or constricted cross section.

    PubMed

    Gambaruto, Alberto M

    2016-07-26

    Vessel with 'circular' or 'star-shaped' cross sections are studied, representing respectively dilated or constricted cases where endothelial cells smoothly line or bulge into the lumen. Computational haemodynamics simulations are carried out on idealised periodic arteriole-sized vessels, with red blood cell 'tube' hematocrit value=24%. A further simulation of a single red blood cell serves for comparison purposes. The bulk motion of the red blood cells reproduces well-known effects, including the presence of a cell-free layer and the apparent shear-thinning non-Newtonian rheology. The velocity flow field is analysed in a Lagrangian reference frame, relative to any given red blood cell, hence removing the bulk coaxial motion and highlighting instead the complex secondary flow patterns. An aggregate formation becomes apparent, continuously rearranging and dynamic, brought about by the inter-cellular fluid mechanics interactions and the deformability properties of the cells. The secondary flow field induces a vacillating radial migration of the red blood cells. At different radial locations, the red blood cells express different residence times, orientation and shape. The shear stresses exerted by the flow on the vessel wall are influenced by the motion of red blood cells, despite the presence of the cell-free layer. Spatial (and temporal) variations of wall shear stress patters are observed, especially for the 'circular' vessel. The 'star-shaped' vessel bears considerable stress at the protruding endothelial cell crests, where the stress vectors are coaxially aligned. The bulging endothelial cells hence regularise the transmission of stresses on the vessel wall.

  19. Flow structure caused by a local cross-sectional area increase and curvature in a sharp river bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, B.; Hoitink, A. J. F.; Labeur, R. J.

    2015-09-01

    Horizontal flow recirculation is often observed in sharp river bends, causing a complex three-dimensional flow structure with large implications for the morphological and planimetric development of meanders. Several field observations in small-scale systems show that sharp bends are often found in association with a strong increase in cross-sectional area, the deposition of outer bank benches, and reattachment bars near the inner bank. Recent studies show that these bends can also occur in large-scale systems. In this study, we present field measurements of a sharp bend in the Mahakam River, East Kalimantan, Indonesia. The cross-sectional area increases by a factor of 3 compared with the reach-averaged cross-sectional area. Along a river reach of about 150 km, cross-sectional area correlates strongly with curvature. The field measurements are analyzed together with the results from numerical simulation with a three-dimensional finite element model, which yields a comprehensive view of the intricate flow structure. In turn, the model is used to validate a new equation that captures the water surface topography dependence on cross-sectional area variation and curvature. The results show the importance of the increase in cross-sectional area in the development of horizontal recirculation. Vertical acceleration of the flow into the scour causes the pressure to deviate from a hydrostatic pressure distribution. Strong downflow (up to 12 cm s-1) advects longitudinal momentum toward the bed, causing the flow to concentrate in the lower part of the cross section. This increases the velocity magnitude throughout the cross section, which is expected to maintain the large scour depth found in several bends along the Mahakam River.

  20. Flow structure caused by a local cross-sectional area increase and curvature in sharp river bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, B.

    2015-12-01

    Horizontal flow recirculation is often observed in sharp river bends, causing a complex three-dimensional flow structure with large implications for the morphological and planimetric development of meanders. Several field observations in small scale systems show that sharp bends are often found in association with a strong increase in cross-sectional area, the deposition of outer bank benches and reattachment bars near the inner bank. Recent studies show that these bends can also occur in large scale systems. In this study, we present field measurements of a sharp bend in the Mahakam River, East Kalimantan, Indonesia. The cross-sectional area increases by a factor of three compared with the reach averaged cross-sectional area. Along a river reach of about 150 km, cross-sectional area correlates strongly with curvature. The field measurements are analyzed together with the results from numerical simulation with a 3D finite element model, which yields a comprehensive view of the intricate flow structure. In turn, the model is used to validate a new equation that captures the water surface topography dependence on cross-sectional area variation and curvature. The results show the importance of the increase in cross-sectional area in the development of horizontal recirculation. Vertical acceleration of the flow into the scour causes the pressure to deviate from a hydrostatic pressure distribution. Strong downflow (up to 12 cm/s) advects longitudinal momentum towards the bed, causing the flow to concentrate in the lower part of the cross-section. This increases the velocity magnitude throughout the cross-section, which is expected to maintain the large scour depth found in several bends along the Mahakam River.